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Sample records for alh84001 carbonate globules

  1. Modern terrestrial analogues for the carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Kazmierczak, Józef; Kempe, Stephan

    2003-04-01

    Modern carbonate globules, located in cracks of submerged volcanic rocks and in calcareous pinnacles in alkaline (sodic) Lake Van, Turkey, appear to be analogues for the approximately 3.9 billion-year-old carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH84001. These terrestrial globules have similar diameters and are chemically and mineralogically zoned. Furthermore, they display surface and etching structures similar to those described from ALH84001, which were interpreted as fossilized microbial forms. These terrestrial carbonates formed at low temperatures where Ca-rich groundwaters enter the lake. Chemical, mineralogical, microbiological, and biomolecular methods were used in an attempt to decipher the process responsible for the genesis of these structures. Although the exact mode of formation of Lake Van carbonates remains an enigma, their similarity to the Martian globules indicates that the ALH84001 carbonates may have formed in similar setting on ancient Mars. PMID:12712250

  2. Olivine and Carbonate Globules in ALH84001: A Terrestrial Analog, and Implications for Water on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.

    2005-01-01

    Carbonate globules in ALH84001 are associated with small olivine grains an unexpected finding because the olivines equilibrated at high T while the carbonate is chemically zoned and unequilibrated. A possible explanation comes from a terrestrial analog on Spitsbergen (Norway), where some carbonate globules grew in cavities left by aqueous dissolution of olivine. For ALH84001, the same process may have acted, with larger olivines dissolved out and smaller ones shielded inside orthopyroxene. Carbonate would have been deposited in holes where the olivine had been. Later shocks crushed remaining void space, and mobilized feldspathic glass around the carbonates.

  3. Thermal Decomposition of Siderite-Pyrite Assemblages: Implications for Sulfide Mineralogy in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 Carbonate Globules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Morris, R. V.

    2004-03-01

    Closed system heating experiments of siderite-pyrite mixtures produce magnetite-pyrrhotite associations similar to those reported for black rims of the carbonate globules in ALH84001 Martian meteorite. These results support an inorganic formation process for magnetite and pyrrhotite in ALH84001.

  4. X-ray microprobe measurements of the chemical compositions of ALH84001 carbonate globules

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, G.J.; Sutton, S.R.; Keller, L.P.

    2004-01-28

    We measured minor element contents of carbonate from ALH84001 and report trends in tbe Ca, V, Mn and Sr in carbonate and the associated magnetite bands. McKay et al. suggested that carbonate globules in the ALH84001 meteorite from Mars contained evidence consistent with the development of bacterial life early in the history of Mars. This result provoked an extensive study of the ALH84001 meteorite. More recently Thomas-Keprta et al. have published a study showing that the magnetite associated with carbonate rims are of the size and shape produced by terrestrial bacteria. This paper has revived interest in ALH84001. The typical ALH84001 carbonate globule consists of four regions: a core of Fe-rich carbonate, a thin magnetite-rich band, a rim of Mn-rich carbonate, and another thin magnetite-rich band. Trace element analysis of each of these phases may allow us to address several important questions about these carbonates: (1) The origin of the magnetite-rich bands in the ALH84001 carbonate globules. If the magnetites are derived from the underlying carbonate through thermal decomposition (as proposed by Golden et al.), then we expect to see 'inherited' trace elements in these magnetite bands. (2) The origin of the rim carbonate, by determining whether the carbonate in the core has the same trace elements as the rim carbonates. (3) The age of the rim carbonate. Borg et al. dated the formation of the rim carbonate using the Rb/Sr chronometer. Borg et al. performed their measurements on an aliquot of what they called a high-Rb, low-Sr carbonate separate from the rim. We previously measured the trace element contents of chips from core and rim carbonates from an ALH84001 carbonate globule using an X-Ray Microprobe on Beamline X26A at the National Synchrotron Light Source. These measurements showed the rim carbonate had a very low Rb content, with Sr>>Rb, inconsistent with the {approx}5 ppm Rb reported by Borg et al. in the sample they dated by the Rb/Sr chronometer. The

  5. Elongated prismatic magnetite crystals in ALH84001 carbonate globules: potential Martian magnetofossils.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Keprta, K L; Bazylinski, D A; Kirschvink, J L; Clemett, S J; McKay, D S; Wentworth, S J; Vali, H; Gibson, E K; Romanek, C S

    2000-12-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we have analyzed magnetite (Fe3O4) crystals acid-extracted from carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH84001. We studied 594 magnetites from ALH84001 and grouped them into three populations on the basis of morphology: 389 were irregularly shaped, 164 were elongated prisms, and 41 were whisker-like. As a possible terrestrial analog for the ALH84001 elongated prisms, we compared these magnetites with those produced by the terrestrial magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1. By TEM again, we examined 206 magnetites recovered from strain MV-1 cells. Natural (Darwinian) selection in terrestrial magnetotactic bacteria appears to have resulted in the formation of intracellular magnetite crystals having the physical and chemical properties that optimize their magnetic moment. In this study, we describe six properties of magnetite produced by biologically controlled mechanisms (e.g., magnetotactic bacteria), properties that, collectively, are not observed in any known population of inorganic magnetites. These criteria can be used to distinguish one of the modes of origin for magnetites from samples with complex or unknown histories. Of the ALH84001 magnetites that we have examined, the elongated prismatic magnetite particles (similar to 27% of the total) are indistinguishable from the MV-1 magnetites in five of these six characteristics observed for biogenically controlled mineralization of magnetite crystals. PMID:11543573

  6. Carbonate Globules from Spitsbergen, Norway: Terrestrial Analogs of the Carbonates in Martian Meteorite ALH84001?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De, Subarnarek; Bunch, Ted; Treiman, Allan H.; Amundsen, Hans E. F.; Blake, David F.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Pleistocene volcanic centers in NW Spitsbergen, Norway host one of the world's richest occurrences of mantle xenoliths. The xenoliths comprise varieties of spinel lherzolites and pyroxenites. Some of these xenoliths (and their host basalts) contain 10-100 micrometer globules of ankedtic-magnesitic carbonates (AMC). In composition, mineralogy and petrology the AMC globules from Spitsbergen are strikingly similar to the carbonate globules in ALH84001. The AMC globules occur within interstitial quenched glass and as fracture fillings, although we have not seen replacement fabrics analogous to carbonate rosettes replacing glass in ALH84001. Siderite/ankerite forms the core of these concentrically zoned globules while rims are predominantly magnesite. Clay minerals can occasionally be found within and around the globules. Aside from the clay minerals, the principal mineralogical difference between the AMCs and the ALH84001 carbonate rosettes is the presence of concentrated zones of nanophase magnetite in the rosettes, notably absent in the AMCs. However, carbonate globules containing nanophase magnetite have been produced inorganically by hydrothermal precipitation of carbonates and subsequent heating. We heated Spitsbergen AMC at 585 C in a reducing atmosphere to determine whether magnetite could be produced. Optical micrographs of the heated Spitsbergen AMC show dark concentric zones within the AMC. High resolution SEM images of those areas reveal 150-200 nm euhedral crystals that exhibit various morphologies including octahedra and elongated prisms. EDS analyses of areas where the crystals occur contain Fe, O, and minor Si, and P. However, the probe integrates over volumes of material, which also include the surrounding matrix. We have begun TEM observations of both the heated and unheated Spitsbergen AMC to characterize the microstructures of the carbonates, establish the presence/absence of magnetite and determine the relationship of the clay minerals to the

  7. Hydrothermal origin for carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH84001: a terrestrial analogue from Spitsbergen (Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Amundsen, Hans E. F.; Blake, David F.; Bunch, Ted

    2002-12-01

    Carbonate minerals in the ancient Martian meteorite ALH84001 are the only known solid phases that bear witness to the processing of volatile and biologically critical compounds (CO 2, H 2O) on early Mars. Similar carbonates have been found in xenoliths and their host basalts from Quaternary volcanic centers in northern Spitsbergen (Norway). These carbonates were deposited by hot (i.e., hydrothermal) waters associated with the volcanic activity. By analogy with the Spitsbergen carbonates, the ALH84001 carbonates were probably also deposited by hot water. Hydrothermal activity was probably common and widespread on Early Mars, which featured abundant basaltic rocks, water as ice or liquid, and heat from volcanos and asteroid impacts. On Earth, descendants of the earliest life forms still prefer hydrothermal environments, which are now shown to have been present on early Mars.

  8. Magnetite and Carbonate Textures in ALH84001: Experimental Insights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koziol, Andrea M.

    2001-01-01

    Synthetic siderite and synthetic siderite-magnesite carbonates were equilibrated with hematite, magnetite, and CO2 at elevated pressure and temperature. Comparisons are made to textures seen in the carbonate globules in ALH84001. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Siderite globules associated with fossil microbiota from cretaceous cavity and fracture fillings in Southern Belgium: second known terrestrial analog for the carbonate in Martian meteorite ALH84001?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baele, Jean-Marc

    2003-02-01

    Recently discovered siderite globules from Upper Cretaceous cavity and fracture fillings in southern Belgium are described and interpreted with emphasis on the still unsolved problem of the carbonates in meteorite ALH84001, which enclose controversal evidence for ancient Martian life. The most interesting aspects of the carbonates described here are 1) their close association with fossil microbiota, 2) their environment, which is 100% sedimentary, subaerial and not hydrothermal and 3) their morphologies, some of which being similar to those in ALH84001. Although the question of the direct biological influence is not critical in this case, the biogenicity for the minerals will be discussed as a strong possibility and is not only inferred from the simple spatial (and temporal) association of the carbonates and the fossil microbiota. Morphological, textural and chemical data will be presented and interpreted as variations in fluid chemistry related to environmental changes. Although they may appear different from those in Martian meteorite and Spitzbergen xenoliths, the Cretaceous globules originated in subsurface environment which left evident traces of life in the form of fossil microbial/fungal mats. They are thus considered as an opportunity to investigate biosignatures in future research using the wide range of available techniques.

  10. High Calcium (~80mol%) Late Stage Carbonate in ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildea, K. J.; Holland, G.; Lyon, I. C.; Chatzitheodoridis, E.; Burgess, R.

    2006-03-01

    Brief petrological, chemical and textural description of previously undescribed high Ca late stage carbonate in Martian meteorite ALH84001. This carbonate surrounds Mg rich carbonates and rosette fragments.

  11. Variable Carbon Isotopes in ALH84001 Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niles, P. B.; Leshin, L. A.; Guan, Y.

    2002-12-01

    The Martian meteorite ALH84001 contains a small amount of carbonate that was deposited from aqueous fluids on the Martian surface approximately 3.9 Ga.. McKay et al. (1996) proposed evidence for the existence of life preserved within the carbonate grains. In order to determine the nature of the ancient Martian aqueous system we have combined previously collected oxygen isotopic data with new carbon isotopic measurements performed on the Cameca 6f ion microprobe at Arizona State University. Isotopic measurements were made at high mass resolution with a spot size of 10 microns. The measured carbon isotopic values range from 29.2‰ to 64.5‰ (PDB) with an average uncertainty of +/-1.6‰ (1σ ). These data agree very well with previous acid dissolution and stepped combustion experiments which range from a δ13C of +32‰ to +41‰ . As observed with the oxygen isotopic data, the carbon isotopic composition is correlated with the chemical composition of the carbonates. This allows us to establish that the earliest (Ca-rich) carbonates had the lightest carbon isotopic composition while the latest forming (Mg-rich) carbonates had the heaviest carbon isotopic composition. The large range of carbon isotopic compositions measured in this study cannot be explained by previously proposed models. Temperature change or a Rayleigh distillation process caused by progressive carbonate precipitation are insufficient to create the observed carbon isotopic compositions. Furthermore, processes such as evaporation or photosynthesis will not produce large carbon isotopic variations due to rapid isotopic equilibration with the atmosphere. We propose two possible models for the formation of the ALH84001 carbonates consistent with the isotopic data collected thus far. Carbonates could have formed from an evolving system where the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of the carbonates reflects a mixing between magmatic hydrothermal fluids and fluids in equilibrium with an isotopically

  12. Kinetic model of carbonate dissolution in Martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, R. E.; Humayun, M.

    2003-09-01

    The magnetites and sulfides located in the rims of carbonate globules in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 have been claimed as evidence of past life on Mars. Here, we consider the possibility that the rims were formed by dissolution and reprecipitation of the primary carbonate by the action of water. To estimate the rate of these solution-precipitation reactions, a kinetic model of magnesite-siderite carbonate dissolution was applied and used to examine the physicochemical conditions under which these rims might have formed. The results indicate that the formation of the rims could have taken place in < 50 yr of exposure to small amounts of aqueous fluids at ambient temperatures. Plausible conditions pertaining to reactions under a hypothetical ancient Martian atmosphere (1 bar CO 2), the modern Martian atmosphere (8 mbar CO 2), and the present terrestrial atmosphere (0.35 mbar CO 2) were explored to constrain the site of the process. The results indicated that such reactions likely occurred under the latter two conditions. The possibility of Antarctic weathering must be entertained, which, if correct, would imply that the plausibly biogenic minerals (single-domain magnetite of characteristic morphology and sulfide) reported from the rims may be the products of terrestrial microbial activity. This model is discussed in terms of the available isotope data and found to be compatible with the formation of ALH84001 rims. Particularly, anticorrelated variations of radiocarbon with δ 13C indicate that carbonate in ALH84001 was affected by solution-precipitation reactions immediately after its initial fall (˜13,000 yr ago) and then again during its recent exposure prior to collection.

  13. Modeling the Chemical Composition of the Fluid that Formed the ALH84001 Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niles, P. B.; Leshin, L.

    2005-12-01

    The character of aqueous systems on Mars can provide us with important information regarding the history of water and the possibilities for the presence of life on Mars. Evidence of these aqueous systems has been preserved in carbonates found in the martian meteorite ALH84001 whose crystallization age of 4.5 Ga indicates that it has experienced almost all of Mars' history. In addition, the 3.9 Ga age of the carbonates places their formation at a critical time that has been argued to have been `warm and wet' by many studies. The carbonates in the ALH84001 meteorite provide the best opportunity, among all of the martian meteorites, to understand the details of an ancient aqueous system on Mars. Their unique chemical, isotopic and mineralogical composition provides the opportunity to make conclusive statements about the geological conditions in which they formed including the temperature, association with the atmosphere, chemistry of the fluids, and the presence or absence of life. This study uses an empirical model to understand the attributes of the formation fluid based on the unique chemical compositions of the carbonates. This requires the assumption that the ALH84001 carbonate globules formed from a single fluid whose chemical composition changed due to the precipitation of carbonates more calcium rich than the overall fluid composition. The model consists of a simple stepwise stoichiometric calculation of the precipitation of the ALH84001 carbonates from a hypothetical solution. From extensive measurements of the chemical composition of the globules and their abundance in the rock, one can calculate the total amount of magnesium, calcium, and iron removed from the formation fluid as the carbonates precipitated. The unique zoned nature of the ALH84001 carbonates provides a real constraint on the possible fluid compositions consistent with their precipitation. Our results indicate that the fluid that formed the ALH84001 carbonates had an Mg/Ca ratio that was

  14. Focused Ion Beam Microscopy of ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; McKay, David S.; Vali, Hojatollah; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Romanek, Christopher S.

    2005-01-01

    Our aim is to understand the mechanism(s) of formation of carbonate assemblages in ALH84001. A prerequisite is that a detailed characterization of the chemical and physical properties of the carbonate be established. We present here analyses by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of carbonate thin sections produced by both focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning and ultramicrotomy. Our results suggest that the formation of ALH84001 carbonate assemblages were produced by considerably more complex process(es) than simple aqueous precipitation followed by partial thermal decomposition as proposed by other investigators [e.g., 1-3].

  15. Leachates formed carbonates in ALH84001 and on early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melwani Daswani, M.; Grady, M. M.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Wright, I. P.

    2013-09-01

    Evidence abounds for liquid water existing on Mars prior to the late heavy bombardment (LHB) ~3.9 Ga ago and physicochemically interacting with rocks to form distinct geomorphological landforms and mineralogical alteration products (e.g. [3, 4, 8, 14]). ALH84001, the oldest (~4.5-4.1 Ga [11, 13]) known martian meteorite, contains secondary carbonate minerals formed on Mars ~3.9-4.0 Ga ago [5], roughly contemporaneous to the LHB. Recent isotopic evidence supports their formation at low temperature (~18 °C [9]) and also by fluids derived from aqueous weathering in the Noachian/Phyllosian, due to the elevated 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the carbonates and bulk rock of ALH84001 [1].

  16. Statistical Analyses Comparing Prismatic Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Globules with those from the Terrestrial Magnetotactic Bacteria Strain MV-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; McKay, David S.; Wentworth, Susan J.; Vali, H.; Gibson, Everett K.

    2000-01-01

    Here we use rigorous mathematical modeling to compare ALH84001 prismatic magnetites with those produced by terrestrial magnetotactic bacteria, MV-1. We find that this subset of the Martian magnetites appears to be statistically indistinguishable from those of MV-1.

  17. Paleomagnetic evidence of a low-temperature origin of carbonate in the Martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Kirschvink, J L; Maine, A T; Vali, H

    1997-03-14

    Indirect evidence for life on Mars has been reported from the study of meteorite ALH84001. The formation temperature of the carbonates is controversial; some estimates suggest 20 degrees to 80 degrees C, whereas others exceed 650 degrees C. Paleomagnetism can be used to distinguish between these possibilities because heating can remagnetize ferrimagnetic minerals. Study of two adjacent pyroxene grains from the crushed zone of ALH84001 shows that each possesses a stable natural remanent magnetization (NRM), implying that Mars had a substantial magnetic field when the grains cooled. However, NRM directions from these particles differ, implying that the meteorite has not been heated significantly since the formation of the internal crushed zone about 4 billion years ago. The carbonate globules postdate this brecciation, and thus formed at low temperatures. PMID:9054354

  18. Paleomagnetic evidence of a low-temperature origin of carbonate in the Martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Kirschvink, J L; Maine, A T; Vali, H

    1997-03-14

    Indirect evidence for life on Mars has been reported from the study of meteorite ALH84001. The formation temperature of the carbonates is controversial; some estimates suggest 20 degrees to 80 degrees C, whereas others exceed 650 degrees C. Paleomagnetism can be used to distinguish between these possibilities because heating can remagnetize ferrimagnetic minerals. Study of two adjacent pyroxene grains from the crushed zone of ALH84001 shows that each possesses a stable natural remanent magnetization (NRM), implying that Mars had a substantial magnetic field when the grains cooled. However, NRM directions from these particles differ, implying that the meteorite has not been heated significantly since the formation of the internal crushed zone about 4 billion years ago. The carbonate globules postdate this brecciation, and thus formed at low temperatures.

  19. Petrological evidence for shock melting of carbonates in the martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Scott, E R; Yamaguchi, A; Krot, A N

    1997-05-22

    The meteorite ALH84001--a shocked igneous rock of probable martian origin-contains chemically and isotopically heterogeneous carbonate globules, associated with which are organic and inorganic structures that have been interpreted as possible fossil remains of ancient martian biota. A critical assumption underlying this suggestion is that the carbonates formed from low-temperature fluids penetrating the cracks and voids of the host rock. Here we report petrological studies of ALH84001 which investigate the effects of shock on the various mineralogical components of the rock. We find that carbonate, plagioclase and silica were melted and partly redistributed by the same shock event responsible for the intense local crushing of pyroxene in the meteorite. Texture and compositional data show that, during the period of shock decompression, monomineralic melts were injected into pyroxene fractures that were subsequently cooled and resealed within seconds. Our results therefore suggest that the carbonates in ALH84001 could not have formed at low temperatures, but instead crystallized from shock-melted material; this conclusion weakens significantly the arguments that these carbonates could host the fossilized remnants of biogenic activity. PMID:9163421

  20. Oxygen isotopic constraints on the genesis of carbonates from Martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leshin, Laurie A.; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Harvey, Ralph P.

    1997-03-01

    With a crystallization age of 4.5 Ga, ALH84001 is unique among the Martian meteorites. It is also the only Martian meteorite that contains an appreciable amount of carbonate, and significantly, this carbonate occurs without associated secondary hydrated minerals. Moreover, McKay et al. (1996) have suggested that ALH84001 contains evidence of past Martian life in the form of nanofossils, biogenic minerals, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The presence of carbonate in ALH84001 is especially significant. The early Martian environment is thought to have been more hospitable to life than todays cold, dry climate. In order to better assess the true delta-O-18 values, as well as the isotopic diversity and complexity of the ALH84001 carbonates, direct measurements of the oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of individual carbonate phases are needed. Here we report in situ analyses of delta-O-18 values in carbonates from two polished thin sections of ALH84001.

  1. The Origin of Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks believed to have formed approx 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of magnetite and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships between the carbonate disks, their associated magnetites and the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. Comparison of these results with experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates conducted under a range of heating scenarios suggests that the magnetite nanocrystals in the ALH84001 carbonate disks are not the products of thermal decomposition.

  2. The age of the carbonates in martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Borg, L E; Connelly, J N; Nyquist, L E; Shih, C Y; Wiesmann, H; Reese, Y

    1999-10-01

    The age of secondary carbonate mineralization in the martian meteorite ALH84001 was determined to be 3.90 +/- 0.04 billion years by rubidium-strontium (Rb-Sr) dating and 4.04 +/- 0.10 billion years by lead-lead (Pb-Pb) dating. The Rb-Sr and Pb-Pb isochrons are defined by leachates of a mixture of high-graded carbonate (visually estimated as approximately 5 percent), whitlockite (trace), and orthopyroxene (approximately 95 percent). The carbonate formation age is contemporaneous with a period in martian history when the surface is thought to have had flowing water, but also was undergoing heavy bombardment by meteorites. Therefore, this age does not distinguish between aqueous and impact origins for the carbonates. PMID:10506566

  3. The age of the carbonates in martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borg, L. E.; Connelly, J. N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C. Y.; Wiesmann, H.; Reese, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The age of secondary carbonate mineralization in the martian meteorite ALH84001 was determined to be 3.90 +/- 0.04 billion years by rubidium-strontium (Rb-Sr) dating and 4.04 +/- 0.10 billion years by lead-lead (Pb-Pb) dating. The Rb-Sr and Pb-Pb isochrons are defined by leachates of a mixture of high-graded carbonate (visually estimated as approximately 5 percent), whitlockite (trace), and orthopyroxene (approximately 95 percent). The carbonate formation age is contemporaneous with a period in martian history when the surface is thought to have had flowing water, but also was undergoing heavy bombardment by meteorites. Therefore, this age does not distinguish between aqueous and impact origins for the carbonates.

  4. Formation of "Chemically Pure" Magnetite from Mg-Fe-Carbonates Implications for the Exclusively Inorganic Origin of Magnetite and Sulfides in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Morris, R. V.; Trieman, A. H.; McKay, G. A.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetite and sulfides in the black rims of carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH84001 have been studied extensively because of the claim by McKay et al. that they are biogenic in origin. However, exclusively inorganic (abiotic) processes are able to account for the occurrence of carbonate-sulfide-magnetite assemblages in the meteorite. We have previously precipitated chemically zoned and sulfide-bearing carbonate globules analogous to those in ALH84001 (at less than or equal to 150 C) from multiple fluxes of variable-composition Ca-Mg-Fe-CO2-S-H2O solutions. Brief heating of precipitated globules to approx. 470 C produced magnetite and pyrrhotite within the globules by thermal decomposition of siderite and pyrite, respectively. We have also shown that morphology of magnetite formed by inorganic thermal decomposition of Fe-rich carbonate is similar to the morphology of so-called biogenic magnetite in the carbonate globules of ALH84001. Magnetite crystals in the rims of carbonate globules in ALH84001 are chemically pure [Note: "Chemically pure" is defined here as magnetite with Mg at levels comparable or lower than Mg detected by [8] in ALH84001 magnetite]. A debate continues on whether or not chemically pure magnetite can form by the thermal decomposition of mixed Mg-Fe-carbonates that have formed under abiotic conditions. Thomas-Keprta et al. argue that it is not possible to form Mg-free magnetite from Mg-Fe-carbonate based on thermodynamic data. We previously suggested that chemically pure magnetite could form by the thermal decomposition of relatively pure siderite in the outer rims of the globules. Mg-Fe-carbonates may also thermally decompose under conditions conducive for formation of chemically pure magnetite. In this paper we show through laboratory experiments that chemically pure magnetite can form by an inorganic process from mixed Mg-Fe-carbonates.

  5. Submicron magnetite grains and carbon compounds in Martian meteorite ALH84001: inorganic, abiotic formation by shock and thermal metamorphism.

    PubMed

    Treiman, Allan H

    2003-01-01

    Purported biogenic features of the ALH84001 Martian meteorite (the carbonate globules, their submicron magnetite grains, and organic matter) have reasonable inorganic origins, and a comprehensive hypothesis is offered here. The carbonate globules were deposited from hydrothermal water, without biological mediation. Thereafter, ALH84001 was affected by an impact shock event, which raised its temperature nearly instantaneously to 500-700K, and induced iron-rich carbonate in the globules to decompose to magnetite and other minerals. The rapidity of the temperature increase caused magnetite grains to nucleate in abundance; hence individual crystals were very small. Nucleation and growth of magnetite crystals were fastest along edges and faces of the precursor carbonate grains, forcing the magnetite grains to be platy or elongated, including the "truncated hexa-octahedra" shape. ALH84001 had formed at some depth within Mars where the lithostatic pressure was significantly above that of Mars' surface. Also, because the rock was at depth, the impact heat dissipated slowly. During this interval, magnetite crystals approached chemical equilibria with surrounding minerals and gas. Their composition, nearly pure Fe(3)O(4), reflects those of equilibria; elements that substitute into magnetite are either absent from iron-rich carbonate (e.g., Ti, Al, Cr), or partitioned into other minerals during magnetite formation (Mg, Mn). Many microstructural imperfections in the magnetite grains would have annealed out as the rock cooled. In this post-shock thermal regime, carbon-bearing gas from the decomposition of iron carbonates reacted with water in the rock (or from its surroundings) to produce organic matter via Fischer-Tropschlike reactions. Formation of such organic compounds like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons would have been catalyzed by the magnetite (formation of graphite, the thermochemically stable phase, would be kinetically hindered). PMID:14577885

  6. Submicron Magnetite Grains and Carbon Compounds in Martian Meteorite ALH84001: Inorganic, Abiotic Formation by Shock and Thermal Metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    2003-06-01

    Purported biogenic features of the ALH84001 Martian meteorite (the carbonate globules, their submicron magnetite grains, and organic matter) have reasonable inorganic origins, and a comprehensive hypothesis is offered here. The carbonate globules were deposited from hydrothermal water, without biological mediation. Thereafter, ALH84001 was affected by an impact shock event, which raised its temperature nearly instantaneously to 500-700K, and induced iron-rich carbonate in the globules to decompose to magnetite and other minerals. The rapidity of the temperature increase caused magnetite grains to nucleate in abundance; hence individual crystals were very small. Nucleation and growth of magnetite crystals were fastest along edges and faces of the precursor carbonate grains, forcing the magnetite grains to be platy or elongated, including the "truncated hexa-octahedra" shape. ALH84001 had formed at some depth within Mars where the lithostatic pressure was significantly above that of Mars' surface. Also, because the rock was at depth, the impact heat dissipated slowly. During this interval, magnetite crystals approached chemical equilibria with surrounding minerals and gas. Their composition, nearly pure Fe3O4, reflects those of equilibria; elements that substitute into magnetite are either absent from iron-rich carbonate (e.g., Ti, Al, Cr), or partitioned into other minerals during magnetite formation (Mg, Mn). Many microstructural imperfections in the magnetite grains would have annealed out as the rock cooled. In this post-shock thermal regime, carbon-bearing gas from the decomposition of iron carbonates reacted with water in the rock (or from its surroundings) to produce organic matter via Fischer-Tropschlike reactions. Formation of such organic compounds like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons would have been catalyzed by the magnetite (formation of graphite, the thermochemically stable phase, would be kinetically hindered).

  7. Submicron magnetite grains and carbon compounds in Martian meteorite ALH84001: inorganic, abiotic formation by shock and thermal metamorphism.

    PubMed

    Treiman, Allan H

    2003-01-01

    Purported biogenic features of the ALH84001 Martian meteorite (the carbonate globules, their submicron magnetite grains, and organic matter) have reasonable inorganic origins, and a comprehensive hypothesis is offered here. The carbonate globules were deposited from hydrothermal water, without biological mediation. Thereafter, ALH84001 was affected by an impact shock event, which raised its temperature nearly instantaneously to 500-700K, and induced iron-rich carbonate in the globules to decompose to magnetite and other minerals. The rapidity of the temperature increase caused magnetite grains to nucleate in abundance; hence individual crystals were very small. Nucleation and growth of magnetite crystals were fastest along edges and faces of the precursor carbonate grains, forcing the magnetite grains to be platy or elongated, including the "truncated hexa-octahedra" shape. ALH84001 had formed at some depth within Mars where the lithostatic pressure was significantly above that of Mars' surface. Also, because the rock was at depth, the impact heat dissipated slowly. During this interval, magnetite crystals approached chemical equilibria with surrounding minerals and gas. Their composition, nearly pure Fe(3)O(4), reflects those of equilibria; elements that substitute into magnetite are either absent from iron-rich carbonate (e.g., Ti, Al, Cr), or partitioned into other minerals during magnetite formation (Mg, Mn). Many microstructural imperfections in the magnetite grains would have annealed out as the rock cooled. In this post-shock thermal regime, carbon-bearing gas from the decomposition of iron carbonates reacted with water in the rock (or from its surroundings) to produce organic matter via Fischer-Tropschlike reactions. Formation of such organic compounds like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons would have been catalyzed by the magnetite (formation of graphite, the thermochemically stable phase, would be kinetically hindered).

  8. The temperature of formation of carbonate in Martian meteorite ALH84001: constraints from cation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hutcheon, I D; Kent, A; Phinney, D L; Ryerson, F J

    1999-08-13

    An important test of the hypothesis that Martian meteorite ALH84001 contains fossil remnants of an ancient Martian biota is the thermal history of the carbonate rosettes associated with the proposed biomarkers. If carbonates formed at temperatures over {approximately} 110 C (the limit for terrestrial life), it is unlikely that these minerals are associated with a terrestrial-like biota.

  9. Evaluation of the formation environment of the carbonates in Martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niles, Paul Breckenridge

    The carbonates in martian meteorite ALH84001 preserve a record of aqueous processes on Mars at 3.9 Ga, and have been suggested to contain signatures of ancient martian life. The conditions of the carbonate formation environment are critical for understanding possible evidence for life on Mars, the history of water on Mars, and the evolution of the martian atmosphere. However, the formation environment of the ALH84001 carbonates continues to be controversial. New isotopic analyses of the ALH84001 carbonates, laboratory experiments, and geochemical modeling performed in this study provide quantitative constraints on the formation environment of the ALH84001 carbonates. Microscale carbon isotope analyses of ALH84001 carbonates reveal variable d 13 C values ranging from +27[per thousand] to +64[per thousand] that are correlated with carbonate chemical compositions. Isotopic analyses of synthetic hydrothermal carbonates with chemical compositions similar to the ALH84001 carbonates do not show similar isotope compositions, correlations, or trends. Combined with earlier oxygen isotope analyses, these data are inconsistent with formation of the carbonates in previously proposed environments, and indicate that the carbonates formed in a short period of time (hours or days) from a low temperature, dynamic aqueous system. A combination of empirical and equilibrium thermodynamic modeling reveals that the precipitating fluids were Mg- and CO 2 -rich, and probably formed through low temperature (<100°C) leaching of rocks with similar compositions to ALH84001. Prior to precipitating the carbonates, the fluids must have had an Mg/Ca ratio greater than ~4 and an Fe/Ca ratio greater than ~1. Three new hypotheses are proposed that involve low temperature (<100°C), dynamic aqueous processes: the carbonates formed (1) in a sublacustrine spring environment during the mixing of two fluids derived from separate chemical and isotopic reservoirs; (2) from high pH fluids that were exposed

  10. Origin of carbonate-magnetite-sulfide assemblages in Martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Scott, E R

    1999-02-25

    A review of the mineralogical, isotopic, and chemical properties of the carbonates and associated submicrometer iron oxides and sulfides in Martian meteorite ALH84001 provides minimal evidence for microbial activity. Some magnetites resemble those formed by magnetotactic microorganisms but cubic crystals <50 nm in size and elongated grains <25 nm long are too small to be single-domain magnets and are probably abiogenic. Magnetites with shapes that are clearly unique to magnetotactic bacteria appear to be absent in ALH84001. Magnetosomes have not been reported in plutonic rocks and are unlikely to have been transported in fluids through fractures and uniformly deposited where abiogenic magnetite was forming epitaxially on carbonate. Submicrometer sulfides and magnetites probably formed during shock heating. Carbonates have correlated variations in Ca, Mg, and 18O/16O, magnetite-rich rims, and they appear to be embedded in pyroxene and plagiociase glass. Carbonates with these features have not been identified in carbonaceous chondrites and terrestrial rocks, suggesting that the ALH84001 carbonates have a unique origin. Carbonates and hydrated minerals in ALH84001, like secondary phases in other Martian meteorites, have O and H isotopic ratios favoring formation from fluids that exchanged with the Martian atmosphere. I propose that carbonates originally formed in ALH84001 from aqueous fluids and were subsequently shock heated and vaporized. The original carbonates were probably dolomite-magnesite-siderite assemblages that formed in pores at interstitial sites with minor sulfate, chloride, and phyllosilicates. These phases, like many other volatile-rich phases in Martian meteorites, may have formed as evaporate deposits from intermittent floods. PMID:11542931

  11. Reassessment of the "Life on Mars" Hypothesis: Origin of Carbonate-Magnetite Assemblages in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.; Wentworth, S. J.; Fei Corporation

    2007-07-01

    We present here the most detailed and comprehensive TEM analyses of the ALH84001 carbonate disks yet obtained. The results indicate that the disks show a subtle complexity that is incompatible with current "simple purely inorganic processes."

  12. Petrography and bulk chemistry of Martian orthopyroxenite ALH84001: implications for the origin of secondary carbonates.

    PubMed

    Gleason, J D; Kring, D A; Hill, D H; Boynton, W V

    1997-08-01

    New petrologic and bulk geochemical data for the SNC-related (Martian) meteorite ALH84001 suggest a relatively simple igneous history overprinted by complex shock and hydrothermal processes. ALH84001 is an igneous orthopyroxene cumulate containing penetrative shock deformation textures and a few percent secondary extraterrestrial carbonates. Rare earth element (REE) patterns for several splits of the meteorite reveal substantial heterogeneity in REE abundances and significant fractionation of the REEs between crushed and uncrushed domains within the meteorite. Complex zoning in carbonates indicates nonequilibrium processes were involved in their formation, suggesting that CO2-rich fluids of variable composition infiltrated the rock while on Mars. We interpret petrographic textures to be consistent with an inorganic origin for the carbonate involving dissolution-replacement reactions between CO2-charged fluids and feldspathic glass in the meteorite. Carbonate formation clearly postdated processes that last redistributed the REE in the meteorite. PMID:11540477

  13. Coordinated In Situ Nanosims Analyses of H-C-O Isotopes in ALH 84001 Carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, T.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Wang, J.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    The surface geology and geomorphology of Mars indicate that it was once warm enough to maintain a large body of liquid water on its surface, though such a warm environment might have been transient. This study reports the hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen isotope compositions of the ancient atmosphere/hydrosphere of Mars based on in situ ion microprobe analyses of approximately 4 Ga-old carbonates in Allan Hills (ALH) 84001. The ALH 84001 carbonates are the most promising targets because they are thought to have formed from fluid that was closely associated with the Noachian atmosphere. While there are a number of carbon and oxygen isotope studies of the ALH 84001 carbonates, in situ hydrogen isotope analyses of these carbonates are limited and were reported more than a decade ago. Well-documented coordinated in situ analyses of carbon, oxygen and hydrogen isotopes provide an internally consistent dataset that can be used to constrain the nature of the Noachian atmosphere/hydrosphere and may eventually shed light on the hypothesis of ancient watery Mars.

  14. Microdistributions of Rb and Sr in ALH84001 carbonates: Chronological implications for secondary alteration on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Wadhwa, M.; Sutton, S.R.; Flynn, G.J.

    2005-04-22

    Concentrations of Rb and Sr were analyzed on the micron-scale in various compositional zones of the ALH84001 carbonates. Implications of the measured Rb/Sr ratios for the chronology of these carbonates are discussed. ALH84001 is unique among the Martian meteorites in that it has an ancient crystallization age of {approx}4.5 Ga defined by Sm-Nd isotope systematics. Another aspect that differentiates this Martian meteorite from the others is the presence of Ca-Fe-Mg carbonates (modal abundance {approx}1%) that are thought to have been precipitated during alteration in a near-surface environment. Precise age dating of these carbonates is important since it could provide constraints on the timing of surficial secondary alteration processes on Mars. However, this has been a challenging problem owing to the relatively small abundance of the carbonates in ALH84001 and because these carbonates are difficult to separate from the other minerals in the rock by physical and chemical means. Previous investigations have attempted to separate the carbonates by leaching of carbonate-rich mineral fractions. The single 'bulk carbonate' fraction analyzed by Wadhwa and Lugmair was characterized by a low {sup 87}Rb/{sup 86}Sr ratio of {approx}0.05, the lowest of any mineral in ALH84001, and the corresponding Rb-Sr age estimate ({approx}1.39 Ga) was dependent on the assumption of isotopic equilibrium between the carbonates and plagioclase. As pointed out by Borg et al., such an assumption may not be assured and, therefore, they obtained multiple carbonate-rich leachates with a range of {sup 87}Rb/{sup 86}Sr ratios (0.12-2.62) from which they estimated an age of {approx}3.9 Ga. Although these authors performed painstaking chemical characterization to determine contributions in the leachates from minerals such as phosphates and silicates, it is nevertheless difficult to positively rule out contributions from other as yet unidentified phases. Therefore, the goal of the present

  15. Petrologic evidence for low-temperature, possibly flood evaporitic origin of carbonates in the ALH84001 meteorite.

    PubMed

    Warren, P H

    1998-07-25

    High-temperature models for origin of the carbonates in Martian meteorite ALH84001 are implausible. The impact metasomatism model, invoking reaction between CO2 rich fluid and the host orthopyroxenite, requires conversion of olivine into orthopyroxene, yet olivine in ALH84001 shows no depletion in carbonate-rich areas; or else conversion of orthopyroxene into silica, which should have yielded a higher silica/carbonate ratio. The impact melt model implies that the fracture-linked carbonates, as products of melt injection, should appear as continuous planar veins, but in many areas they do not. Both vapor deposition and impact melting seem inconsistent with the zoned poikilotopic texture of many large carbonates. The popular hydrothermal model is inconsistent with the virtual absence of secondary hydrated silicates in ALH84001. Prior brecciation should have facilitated alteration. Hydrothermal fluids would be warm, and rate of hydration of mafic silicates obeys an Arrhenius law, at least up to approximately 100 degrees C. Most important, hydrothermal episodes tend to last for many years. Many areas of the ancient Martian crust show evidence for massive flooding. I propose that the carbonates formed as evaporite deposits from floodwaters that percolated through the fractures of ALH84001, but only briefly, as evaporation and groundwater flow caused the water table to quickly recede beneath the level of this rock during the later stages of the flood episode. The setting might have been a layer of megaregolith beneath a surface catchment of pooled floodwater, analogous to a playa lake. Carbonate precipitation would occur in response to evaporative concentration of the water. To explain the scarcity of sulfates in ALH84001, the water table must be assumed to recede quickly relative to the rate of evaporation. During the period when ALH84001 was above the water table, evaporation would have slowed, as the evaporation front passed beneath the surface of the debris layer

  16. The Hydrological Cycle on Mars as Inferred from the Multi O-isotopic Composition of Carbonates in ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, R.; Niles, P. B.; Chong, K.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    Carbonate minerals provide valuable record of the atmosphere in which they are formed. This work utilizes C and O triple isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals found in ALH84001 to explore the interaction between atmosphere-hydrosphere and lithosphere. The origin of carbonates found in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 (<1%) is heavily debated with low temperature aqueous precipitation, biogenic production, evaporative processes, high temperature reactions, and impact induced melting and reprecipitation are all candidate processes. These carbonates are heterogeneous chemically (Mg, Ca and Fe-Mn rich) and isotopically (δ13CPDB = +27 to 46 %; δ18OVSMOW = +9.5 to 20.6%) on micrometer scales. Our stepped phosphoric acid dissolution experiments released CO2 from multiple phases of Martian carbonate in the rock (12h acid digestion at 25o C for Ca rich phase and 3h acid digestion at 150oC for Mg rich phase). Both Ca and Mg rich phases showed 0.7% excess 17O (Δ17O = δ17O - 0.52δ18O) in contrast to terrestrial carbonate minerals formed by surficial weathering of the meteorite with no oxygen isotopic anomaly Δ17O ≈ 0 (one hour acid digestion at 25o C). The newly identified Ca-rich carbonate phase is 18O enriched (δ18O = +25%) in contrast to all of the other Ca-rich carbonates previously described. It also contains excess 17O (Δ17O = 0.7%) indicating incorporation of oxygen from an atmospheric source of Martian origin. These oxygen isotope characteristics differentiate this phase from the more commonly described carbonate globules or rosettes and suggest formation from separate aqueous event. This is confirmed by the carbon isotope composition of this new carbonate phase (δ13C= +20%) which differs from the other Martian carbonates in the meteorite and from terrestrial sources. This difference may be an evidence of the long term evolution of carbon isotopes in the atmosphere of Mars. The discovery of highly enriched (O isotopes) Ca-rich phase of Martian

  17. Microscale carbon isotope variability in ALH84001 carbonates and a discussion of possible formation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niles, P. B.; Leshin, L. A.; Guan, Y.

    2005-06-01

    The carbonates in martian meteorite ALH84001 preserve a record of aqueous processes on Mars at 3.9 Ga, and have been suggested to contain signatures of ancient martian life. The conditions of the carbonate formation environment are critical for understanding possible evidence for life on Mars, the history of water on Mars, and the evolution of the martian atmosphere. Despite numerous studies of petrographic relationships, microscale oxygen isotope compositions, microscale chemical compositions, and other minerals associated with the carbonates, formation models remain relatively unconstrained. Microscale carbon isotope analyses of ALH84001 carbonates reveal variable δ 13C values ranging from +27 to +64 ‰. The isotopic compositions are correlated with chemical composition and extent of crystallization such that the Mg-poor, early-formed carbonates are relatively 13C depleted and the Mg-rich, later forming carbonates, are 13C enriched. These data are inconsistent with many of the previously proposed environments for carbonate formation, and a new set of hypotheses are proposed. Specifically, two new models that account for the data involve low temperature (<100°C) aqueous processes: (1) the carbonates formed during mixing of two fluids derived from separate chemical and isotopic reservoirs; or (2) the carbonates formed from high pH fluids that are exposed to a CO 2-rich atmosphere and precipitate carbonate, similar to high pH springs on Earth.

  18. New Insights into the Origin of Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keptra, Katie L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth S. J.; Mckay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks believed to have formed approx.3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose ori gins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of magnetite and carbonate may be unrelated: that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships between the carbonate disks, their associated magnetites and the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded [1]. Comparison of these results with experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates conducted under a range of heating scenarios suggests that the magnetite nanocrystals in the ALH84001 carbonate disks are not the products of thermal decomposition.

  19. Carbonate formation events in ALH 84001 trace the evolution of the Martian atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Robina; Niles, Paul B.; Chong, Kenneth; Corrigan, Catherine M.; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Carbonate minerals provide critical information for defining atmosphere–hydrosphere interactions. Carbonate minerals in the Martian meteorite ALH 84001 have been dated to ∼3.9 Ga, and both C and O-triple isotopes can be used to decipher the planet’s climate history. Here we report Δ17O, δ18O, and δ13C data of ALH 84001 of at least two varieties of carbonates, using a stepped acid dissolution technique paired with ion microprobe analyses to specifically target carbonates from distinct formation events and constrain the Martian atmosphere–hydrosphere–geosphere interactions and surficial aqueous alterations. These results indicate the presence of a Ca-rich carbonate phase enriched in 18O that formed sometime after the primary aqueous event at 3.9 Ga. The phases showed excess 17O (0.7‰) that captured the atmosphere–regolith chemical reservoir transfer, as well as CO2, O3, and H2O isotopic interactions at the time of formation of each specific carbonate. The carbon isotopes preserved in the Ca-rich carbonate phase indicate that the Noachian atmosphere of Mars was substantially depleted in 13C compared with the modern atmosphere. PMID:25535348

  20. The Carbonates in ALH 84001 Record the Evolution of the Martian Atmosphere Through Multiple Formation Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaheen, R.; Niles, P. B.; Corrgan, C.

    2012-01-01

    Current Martian conditions restrict the presence of liquid water due to low temperatures (approx 210K), a thin atmosphere (approx 7mb), and intense UV radiation. However, past conditions on Mars may have been different with the possibility that the ancient Martian climate was warm and wet with a dense CO2 atmosphere. The cycling of carbon on Mars through atmospheric CO2 and carbonate minerals is critical for deciphering its climate history. In particular stable isotopes contained in carbonates can provide information of their origin and formation environment as well as possibly hinting at the composition of global reservoirs such as atmospheric CO2. Martian meteorite ALH 84001 contains widely studied carbonate rosettes that have been dated to approx. 3.9 Ga and have been used to interpret climatic conditions present at that time. However, there is mount-ing evidence for multiple episodes of carbonate formation in ALH 84001 with potentially distinct isotopic compositions. This study seeks to tease out these different carbonate assemblages using stepped phosphoric acid dissolution and analysis of carbon and triple oxygen stable isotopes. In addition, we report SIMS analyses of the delta O-18 several petrographically unusual carbonate phases in the meteorite.

  1. Carbonate formation events in ALH 84001 trace the evolution of the Martian atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Robina; Niles, Paul B; Chong, Kenneth; Corrigan, Catherine M; Thiemens, Mark H

    2015-01-13

    Carbonate minerals provide critical information for defining atmosphere-hydrosphere interactions. Carbonate minerals in the Martian meteorite ALH 84001 have been dated to ∼ 3.9 Ga, and both C and O-triple isotopes can be used to decipher the planet's climate history. Here we report Δ(17)O, δ(18)O, and δ(13)C data of ALH 84001 of at least two varieties of carbonates, using a stepped acid dissolution technique paired with ion microprobe analyses to specifically target carbonates from distinct formation events and constrain the Martian atmosphere-hydrosphere-geosphere interactions and surficial aqueous alterations. These results indicate the presence of a Ca-rich carbonate phase enriched in (18)O that formed sometime after the primary aqueous event at 3.9 Ga. The phases showed excess (17)O (0.7‰) that captured the atmosphere-regolith chemical reservoir transfer, as well as CO2, O3, and H2O isotopic interactions at the time of formation of each specific carbonate. The carbon isotopes preserved in the Ca-rich carbonate phase indicate that the Noachian atmosphere of Mars was substantially depleted in (13)C compared with the modern atmosphere. PMID:25535348

  2. New insights into the origin of magnetite crystals in ALH84001 carbonate disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.

    2009-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks which are believed to have precipitated approximately 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these Fe3O4 are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of Fe3O4 and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. We focus this discussion on the composition of ALH84001 magnetites and then compare these observations with those from experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios.

  3. Origin of Magnetite Crystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K.L.; Clemett, S.J.; McKay, D.S.; Gibson, E. K.; Wentworth, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks which are believed to have precipitated approx.3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these Fe3O4 are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of Fe3O4 and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded [1]. We focus this discussion on the composition of ALH84001 magnetites and then compare these observations with those from our thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios.

  4. Carbonates in ALH 84001: Part of the Story of Water on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrigan, C. M.

    2004-07-01

    Carbonate-rich regions in ALH 84001 are complicated. There are familiar forms of carbonate as well as fascinating textural forms previously unreported including carbonate rosettes, planiform "slab" carbonates, distinct "post-slab" magnesium carbonates (magnesite), and carbonates interstitial to feldspathic glass and orthopyroxene. Slab carbonates reveal portions of the carbonate growth sequence not seen in the rosettes and suggest that initial nucleating compositions were rich in calcium. They formed in two major stages. The first stage involved growth of the rosettes and slab carbonates. This step was controlled by the rate of crystal nucleation, how fast the ingredients were delivered to the growing crystals, and how much fluid was available. Cosmochemists call this type of growth "kinetically controlled." Next, an alteration event formed the magnesite-siderite (iron carbonate) layers on the exterior surfaces of the carbonate. Post-slab magnesite, intimately associated with silica glass, is compositionally similar to the magnesite in these secondary exterior layers, but represents a later generation of carbonate growth. Formation of feldspathic glasses had little or no thermal effect on carbonates, as indicated by the lack of thermal decomposition or any compositional changes associated with glass/carbonate contacts. The carbonates tell an important story about water in the ancient crust of Mars. The presence of numerous, distinct generations of carbonate formation and relatively clear fracture chronology within carbonate further suggest that interactions between ALH 84001 and the crustal fluids of Mars were discontinuous and occurred only a few times over its 4.5 Ga history. The reactivation and remobilization of fluids (causing events such as formation of magnesite-siderite-magnesite layers and precipitation of post-slab magnesite) and the fracturing within the rock were almost certainly driven by impacts. The evidence for punctuated, impact-driven interaction

  5. ALH84001: The Key to Unlocking Secrets About Mars-15 Years and Counting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K.; McKay, D. S.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    From the December 27, 1984 discovery of ALH84001, and its subsequent identification as a sample of Mars in 1993, mystery and debate has surrounded the meteorite [1]. With the realization that the ALH84001 sample was a orthopyroxenite and one of the oldest SNC meteorites (approx.4.09 Ga) [2] available to study, important and critical information about the Martian hydrosphere and atmosphere along with the early history and evolution of the planet could be obtained by studying the unique carbonate globules (approx.3.9 Ga) in the sample [3]. The initial work showed the carbonate globules were deposited within fractures and cracks in the host-orthopyroxene by low-temperature aqueous fluids [4]. Ideas that the carbonates were formed at temperatures [5] approaching 800 C were ruled out by later experiments [6]. The 1996 announcement by McKay et al. [7] that ALH84001 contained features which could be interpreted as having a biogenic origin generated considerable excitement and criticism. The NASA Administrator Dan Golden said the 1996 ALH84001 announcement saved NASAs Mars planetary exploration program and injected $6 billion dollars over five years into the scientific research and analysis efforts [8]. All of the original four lines of evidence for possible biogenic features within ALH84001 offered by McKay et al. have withstood the test of time. Criticism has been directed at the interpretation of the 1996 analytical data. Research has expanded to other SNC meteorites. Despite the numerous attacks on the ideas, the debate continues after 15 years. The 2009 paper by Thomas-Keprta et al. [9] on the origins of a suite of magnetites within the ALH84001 has offered strong arguments that some of the magnetites can only be formed by biogenic processes and not from thermal decomposition or shock events which happened to the meteorite. NASA s Astrobiology Institute was formed from the foundation laid by the ALH84001 hypothesis of finding life beyond the Earth. The strong

  6. Covariant C and O Isotope Trends in Some Terrestrial Carbonates and ALH 84001: Possible Linkage Through Similar Formation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Kathryn E.; Niles, Paul B.; Socki, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Carbonate minerals found on the surface of Mars and in martian meteorites indicate that liquid water has played a significant role in the planet's history. These findings have raised questions regarding the history of the martian hydrosphere and atmosphere as well as the possibility of life. Sunset Crater, Arizona is a dry environment with relatively high evaporation and brief periods of precipitation. This environment resembles Mars and may make Sunset Crater a good analog to martian carbonates. In this study we sought to identify discrete micro-scale isotopic variation within the carbonate crusts in Sunset Crater to see if they resembled the micro-scale isotope variation found in ALH 84001 carbonates. Sunset Crater carbonate formation may be used as a martian analog and ultimately provide insight into carbonate formation in ALH 84001.

  7. Martian carbonates in ALH 84001: Textural, elemental, and stable isotopic compositional evidence on their formation. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanek, C. S.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Socki, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Martian orthopyroxenite ALH 84001 is unusual compared to other martian meteorites in its abundance of Mg-Fe-Ca carbonites. Becasue textural evidence indicates that these carbonates are undoubtedly of martian origin, we have undertaken stable isotopic studies to elucidate their origin by evaluating whether they represent primordial martian C that was outgassing from the mantle of Mars, or volatile additions to the ALH 84001 protolith that equilibrated with the martian atmosphere. If precipitation occurred in a closed system then the isotopic results are compatible with the observed chemical zonation. A unique temperature of formation can be calculated using the difference in C-13 and O-18 between the Fe and Mg carbonates, assuming that precipitation occurred at a constant temperature. Precipitation of approximately one-half of the CO2 reservoir at 320 C can account for the observed values, with the original CO2 reservoir having a delta C-13 of approximately 45% and delta O-18 of approximately 22%. If carbonate precipitated in equilibrium with a large isotopically homogeneous CO2 reservoir (open system), isotopic differences must be attributed to a change in temperature of at least several hundreds of degrees. This temperature change is compatible with a calculated range of temperatures based on carbonate geothermometry. Clearly, carbonate in ALH 84001 is in delta O-18 disequilibrium with orthopyroxene groundmass. Most likely, the carbonate precipitated from a fluid that equilibrated with the martian atmosphere. The deposits or fluids in equilibrium with these deposits were remobilized in the crust producing the carbonate in ALH 84001. This observation establishes a link for the first time between the atmospheric and lithospheric C and O pools that reside on Mars.

  8. A possible high-temperature origin for the carbonates in the martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Harvey, R P; McSween, H Y

    1996-07-01

    The meteorite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001, commonly accepted to be of martian origin, is unique among known martian meteorites in containing abundant, zoned, pre-terrestrial carbonate minerals. Previous studies of the oxygen isotope compositions of these minerals have suggested that they precipitated from a low-temperature (0-80 degrees C) aqueous fluid in the martian crust--perhaps in a near-surface hydrothermal system. Here we report analyses of the major-element compositions of the carbonates, which provide an independent constraint on the composition and temperature of the fluid from which they formed. We argue that the most likely explanation for the observed compositions, and for the absence of co-existing hydrons minerals, is that the carbonates were formed by reactions between hot (> 650 degrees C), CO2-rich fluids and the ultramatic host rock during an impact event. Impact processes on the martian surface can produce both the hot, CO2-rich fluid (by volatilization of surface carbonates or other CO2 sources) and--by brecciation--the condults through which it flowed. Impact metasomatism is also consistent with the observed oxygen isotope disequillbrium, sequence of mineral formation, and carbonate mineral zoning, reflecting carbonate formation during rapid cooling from high temperatures rather than prolonged exposure to low-temperature fluids. PMID:8657303

  9. A possible high-temperature origin for the carbonates in the martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Harvey, R P; McSween, H Y

    1996-07-01

    The meteorite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001, commonly accepted to be of martian origin, is unique among known martian meteorites in containing abundant, zoned, pre-terrestrial carbonate minerals. Previous studies of the oxygen isotope compositions of these minerals have suggested that they precipitated from a low-temperature (0-80 degrees C) aqueous fluid in the martian crust--perhaps in a near-surface hydrothermal system. Here we report analyses of the major-element compositions of the carbonates, which provide an independent constraint on the composition and temperature of the fluid from which they formed. We argue that the most likely explanation for the observed compositions, and for the absence of co-existing hydrons minerals, is that the carbonates were formed by reactions between hot (> 650 degrees C), CO2-rich fluids and the ultramatic host rock during an impact event. Impact processes on the martian surface can produce both the hot, CO2-rich fluid (by volatilization of surface carbonates or other CO2 sources) and--by brecciation--the condults through which it flowed. Impact metasomatism is also consistent with the observed oxygen isotope disequillbrium, sequence of mineral formation, and carbonate mineral zoning, reflecting carbonate formation during rapid cooling from high temperatures rather than prolonged exposure to low-temperature fluids.

  10. Carbon- and Sulfur-bearing Minerals in the Martian Meteorite ALH 84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanek, C. S.; Thomas, K. L.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; McKay, D. S.; Socki, R. A.

    1995-09-01

    Unusual carbonate minerals in ALH 84001 [1] provide insights into surficial processes that may have occurred on Mars, but despite detailed geochemical studies [2-4] carbonate petrogenesis has yet to be fully-characterized. High-resolution TEM and SEM analyses were performed on C- and S-bearing mineral grains to better constrain the nature and timing of carbonate mineralization events. Morphological elements: C- and S-bearing minerals in ALH 84001 commonly occur as spheroidal aggregates or fine-grained vug-filling structures. Spheroids are either orange or black, ~150 micrometers (+/- 50 micrometers) in diameter and highly-flattened (10-30 micrometers thick). Orange spheroids have limpid amber-colored cores and white to translucent mantles which are sometimes bound by thin black rims (< 10 micrometers). When viewed under cathodoluminescence, cores are non-luminescent while mantles luminesce a uniform bright-orange color. Black spheroids are less frequently observed; while they are similar in dimension to the orange spheroids they are chemically more heterogeneous. Black irregular aggregates fill residual pore-space between mineral grains. These structures are comprised of extremely fine-grained (< 2 micrometers) material that occasionally forms lenticular stringers up to 50 micrometers in length. Chemistry and Mineralogy: Small grains (30 micrometers dia.) were removed from C- and S-bearing aggregates, microtomed (~100 nm thick) and examined by TEM for imaging, electron diffraction, and elemental analysis. The orange spheroids have cores composed of Fe-Mg-Ca carbonate, with the centers having the highest concentration of Fe (45 mol%) and Ca (15 mol%). The concentration of Mg increases outward to almost pure MgCO3. TEM results support previous analyses of carbonate chemistry [1-4] and clearly indicate that a wide range of Mg-Fe-Ca solid solution exists in carbonate at a scale of ~10 nm. White mantles of the orange spheroids are composed of nearly pure MgCO3 (<5 mol

  11. Nanophase Magnetite and Pyrrhotite in ALH84001 Martian Meteorite: Evidence for an Abiotic Origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Lauer, H. V., Jr. III; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.

    2006-01-01

    The nanophase magnetite crystals in the black rims of pancake-shaped carbonate globules of the Martian meteorite ALH84001 have been studied extensively because of the claim by McKay et al.that they are biogenic in origin. A subpopulation of these magnetite crystals are reported to conform to a unique elongated shape called "truncated hexa-octahedral" or "THO" by Thomas-Keprta et al. They claim these THO magnetite crystals can only be produced by living bacteria thus forming a biomarker in the meteorite. In contrast, thermal decomposition of Fe-rich carbonate has been suggested as an alternate hypothesis for the elongated magnetite formation in ALH84001 carbonates. The experimental and observational evidence for the inorganic formation of nanophase magnetite and pyrrhotite in ALH84001 by decomposition of Fe-rich carbonate in the presence of pyrite are provided.

  12. Sulfide isotopic compositions in shergottites and ALH84001, and possible implications for life on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, J.P.; McSween, H.Y. Jr.; Riciputi, L.R.

    1997-10-01

    The shergottite and ALH84001 meteorites hold keys for understanding geologic and possibly biologic processes on Mars. Recently, it has been proposed that carbonates in ALH84001, and the Fe-sulfides they contain, are products of extraterrestrial biogenic activity. Here we report ion microprobe analyses of sulfides in shergottites and ALH84001. The sulfur isotope ratios of igneous pyrrhotites in shergottites (mean {delta}{sup 34}S{sub CDT}: Shergotty = -0.4{per_thousand}, Zagami = +2.7{per_thousand}, EETA79001A = 1.9{per_thousand}, EETA79001B = -1.7{per_thousand}, LEW88516 = -1.9{per_thousand}, QUE94201 = +0.8{per_thousand}) are similar to those of terrestrial ocean-floor basalts, suggesting that the sulfur isotopic composition of the Martian mantle may be similar to that of the mantle of the Earth. The sulfur isotopic systematics of ALH84001 sulfides are distinct from the shergottites. Measured sulfur isotope ratios of eight pyrite grains ({delta}{sup 34}S{sub CDT} = +2.0 to +7.3{per_thousand}) in crushed zones confirm previously reported analyses of isotopically heavy sulfides and are indistinguishable from an Fe-sulfide zone within a carbonate globule ({delta}{sup 34}S{sub CDT} = +6.0{per_thousand}). Analyses of synthesized, fine-grained mixtures of sulfide, carbonate, and magnetite indicate than the measured sulfur isotope ratio is independent of the presence of carbonate and magnetite in the sputtered volume, confirming the accuracy of the analysis of the fine-grained sulfide in the carbonate globule. Terrestrial biogenic sulfate reduction typically results in light isotopic enrichments. The similarity of {delta}{sup 34}S values of the sulfides in ALH84001 imply that the Fe-sulfide zones within ALH84001 carbonates are probably not the result of bacterial reduction of sulfate. 38 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. A Petrographic History of Martian Meteorite ALH84001: Two Shocks and an Ancient Age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1995-01-01

    ALH84001 is an igneous meteorite, an orthopyroxenite of martian origin. It contains petrographic evidence of two shock metamorphic events, separated by thermal and chemical events. The evidence for two shock events suggests that ALH84001 is ancient and perhaps a sample of the martian highlands. From petrography and mineral chemistry, the history of ALH84001 must include: crystallization from magma, a first shock (impact) metamorphism, thermal metamorphism, low-temperature chemical alteration, and a second shock (impact) metamorphism. Originally, ALH84001 was igneous, an orthopyroxene-chromite cumulate. In the first shock event, the igneous rock was cut by melt-breccia or cataclastic veinlets, now bands of equigranular fine-grained pyroxene and other minerals (crush zones). Intact fragments of the cumulate were fractured and strained (now converted to polygonized zones). The subsequent thermal metamorphism (possibly related to the first shock) annealed the melt-breccia or cataclastic veinlets to their present granoblastic texture and permitted chemical homogenization of all mineral species present. The temperature of metamorphism was at least 875 C, based on mineral thermometers. Next, Mg-Fe-Ca carbonates and pyrite replaced plagioclase in both clasts and granular bands, producing ellipsoidal carbonate globules with sub-micron scale compositional stratigraphy, repeated identically in all globules, The second shock event produced microfault offsets of carbonate stratigraphy and other mineral contacts, radial fractures around chromite and maskelynite, and strain birefringence in pyroxene. Maskelynite could not have been preserved from the first shock event, because it would have crystallized back to plagioclase. The martian source area for ALH84001 must permit this complex, multiple impact history. Very few craters on young igneous surfaces are on or near earlier impact features. It is more likely that ALH84001 was ejected from an old igneous unit (Hesperian or

  14. Origin of magnetite crystals in Martian meteorite ALH84001 carbonate disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie; Clemett, Simon; McKay, David; Gibson, Everett; Wentworth, Susan

    The Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks. These carbonate disks are believed to have precipitated 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch on Mars during which both the oldest extant Martian surfaces were formed, and perhaps the earliest global oceans. In-timately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate [1,2]. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate [3,4]. Alternatively, the origins of magnetite and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. For example, the magnetites might have already been present in the aqueous fluids from which the carbonates were believed to have been deposited. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterization of the compositional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. Extensive use of focused ion beam milling techniques has been utilized for sample preparation. We then compared our ob-servations with those from experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios. We conclude that the vast majority of the nanocrystal magnetites present in the carbonate disks could not have formed by any of the currently proposed thermal decomposition scenarios. Instead, we find there is considerable evidence in support of an alternative allochthonous origin for the magnetite unrelated to any shock or thermal processing of the carbonates [5]. [1] McKay et al. (1996) Science 273, 924-930. [2] Thomas-Keprta et al. (2001) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 98, 2164

  15. Evidence for exclusively inorganic formation of magnetite in Martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Brearley, A. J.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Treiman, A. H.; Zolensky, M. E.; Schwandt, C. S.; Lofgren, G. E.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetite crystals produced by terrestrial magnetotactic bacterium MV-1 are elongated on a [111] crystallographic axis, in a so-called truncated hexa-Octahedral shape. This morphology has been proposed to constitute a biomarker (i.e., formed only in biogenic processes). A subpopulation of magnetite crystals associated with carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH84001 is reported to have this morphology, and the observation has been taken as evidence for biological activity on Mars. In this study, we present evidence for the exclusively inorganic origin of [111]-elongated magnetite crystals in ALH84001. We report three-dimensional(3-D) morphologies for approx.1000 magnetite crystals extracted from: (1) thermal decomposition products of Fe-rich carbonate produced by inorganic hydrothermal precipitation in laboratory experiments; (2) carbonate globules in Martian meteoriteeALH84001; and (3) cells of magnetotactic bacterial strain MV-1. The 3-D morphologies were derived by fitting 3-D shape models to two-dimensional bright-field transmission-electron microscope (TEAM) images obtained at a series of viewing angles. The view down the {110} axes closest to the [111] elongation axis of magnetite crystals ([111]x{110) not equal to 0) provides a 2-D projection that uniquely discriminates among the three [111]-elongated magnetite morphologies found in these samples: [111]-elongated truncated hexaoctahedron ([111]-THO), [111]-elongated cubo-octahedron ([111]-ECO), and [111]-elongated simple octahedron ([111]-ESO). All [111] -elongated morphologies are present in the three types of sample, but in different proportions. In the ALH84001 Martian meteorite and in our inorganic laboratory products, the most common [111]-elongated magnetite crystal morphology is [111]-ECO. In contrast, the most common morphology for magnetotactic bacterial strain MV-1 is [111]-THO. These results show that: (1) the morphology of [111]-elongated magnetite crystals associated with the carbonate

  16. Morphological Evidence for an Exclusively Inorganic Origin for Magnetite in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Brearley, A. J.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Treiman, A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Schwandt, C. S.; Lofgren, G. E.; McKay, G. A.

    2003-01-01

    The origin of magnetite crystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 is the focus of a debate about the possibility of past (and present) life on Mars. McKay et al. originally suggested that some of the magnetite crystals associated with carbonate globules in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 are biogenic in ori-gin, because they are single magnetic domain, free of crystalline defects, chemically pure, and coexist with other metastable phases in apparent disequilibrium. Thomas-Keprta et al. reported that a subpopulation of magnetite crystals (approx. 25%) associated with carbonate globules in ALH84001 and magnetite crystals produced by magnetotactic bacterial strain MV-1 have similar morphologies with crystal elongation along the [111] crystallographic axis that they describe as "truncated hexa-octahedral" ([111-THO]) magnetite. Along with several other properties, the [111]-THO morphology has been proposed to constitute a biomarker (i.e., formed only in biogenic processes), so that the presence of [111]-THO magnetite in ALH84001 may be evidence for past life on Mars.

  17. Low-temperature carbonate concretions in the Martian meteorite ALH84001: evidence from stable isotopes and mineralogy.

    PubMed

    Valley, J W; Eiler, J M; Graham, C M; Gibson, E K; Romanek, C S; Stolper, E M

    1997-03-14

    The martian meteorite ALH84001 contains small, disk-shaped concretions of carbonate with concentric chemical and mineralogical zonation. Oxygen isotope compositions of these concretions, measured by ion microprobe, range from delta18O = +9.5 to +20.5 per thousand. Most of the core of one concretion is homogeneous (16.7 +/- 1.2 per thousand) and over 5 per thousand higher in delta18O than a second concretion. Orthopyroxene that hosts the secondary carbonates is isotopically homogeneous (delta18O = 4.6 +/- 1.2 per thousand). Secondary SiO2 has delta18O = 20.4 per thousand. Carbon isotope ratios measured from the core of one concretion average delta13C = 46 +/- 8 per thousand, consistent with formation on Mars. The isotopic variations and mineral compositions offer no evidence for high temperature (>650 degrees C) carbonate precipitation and suggest non-equilibrium processes at low temperatures (< approximately 300 degrees C). PMID:9054355

  18. Low-temperature carbonate concretions in the Martian meteorite ALH84001: evidence from stable isotopes and mineralogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valley, J. W.; Eiler, J. M.; Graham, C. M.; Gibson, E. K.; Romanek, C. S.; Stolper, E. M.

    1997-01-01

    The martian meteorite ALH84001 contains small, disk-shaped concretions of carbonate with concentric chemical and mineralogical zonation. Oxygen isotope compositions of these concretions, measured by ion microprobe, range from delta18O = +9.5 to +20.5 per thousand. Most of the core of one concretion is homogeneous (16.7 +/- 1.2 per thousand) and over 5 per thousand higher in delta18O than a second concretion. Orthopyroxene that hosts the secondary carbonates is isotopically homogeneous (delta18O = 4.6 +/- 1.2 per thousand). Secondary SiO2 has delta18O = 20.4 per thousand. Carbon isotope ratios measured from the core of one concretion average delta13C = 46 +/- 8 per thousand, consistent with formation on Mars. The isotopic variations and mineral compositions offer no evidence for high temperature (>650 degrees C) carbonate precipitation and suggest non-equilibrium processes at low temperatures (< approximately 300 degrees C).

  19. Truncated Hexa-Octahedral Magnetite Crystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001: Evidence of Biogenic Activity on Early Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K.; Clemett, S. J.; Schwartz, C.; McIntosh, J. R.; Bazylinski, D. A.; Kirschvink, J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.; Vali, H.; Romanek, C. S.

    2004-01-01

    The landmark paper by McKay et al. [1] cited four lines of evidence associated with the Martian meteorite ALH84001 to support the hypothesis that life existed on Mars approximately 4 Ga ago. Now, more than five years later, attention has focused on the ALH84001 magnetite grains embedded within carbonate globules in the ALH84001 meteorite. We have suggested that up to approx.25% of the ALH84001 magnetite crystals are products of biological activity [e.g., 2]. The remaining magnetites lack sufficient characteristics to constrain their origin. The papers of Thomas Keprta et al. were criticized arguing that the three dimensional structure of ALH84001 magnetite crystals can only be unambiguously determined using electron tomographic techniques. Clemett et al. [3] confirmed that magnetites produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-I display a truncated hexa-octahedral geometry using electron tomography and validated the use of the multi-tilt classical transmission microscopy technique used by [2]. Recently the geometry of the purported martian biogenic magnetites was shown be identical to that for MV-1 magnetites using electron tomography [6].

  20. ALH84001: The Key to Unlocking Secrets About Mars-15 Years and Counting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K.

    2011-01-01

    From the December 27, 1984 discovery of ALH84001, and its subsequent identification as a sample of Mars in 1993, mystery and debate has surrounded the meteorite. With the realization that the ALH84001 sample was a orthopyroxenite and one of the oldest SNC meteorites (4.09 Ga) available to study, important and critical information about the Martian hydrosphere and atmosphere along with the early history and evolution of the planet could be obtained by studying the unique carbonate globules (3.9 Ga) in the sample. The initial work showed the carbonate globules were deposited within fractures and cracks in the host-orthopyroxene by low-temperature aqueous fluids. Ideas that the carbonates were formed at temperatures approaching 800oC were ruled out by later experiments. The 1996 announcement by McKay et al. that ALH84001 contained features which could be interpreted as having a biogenic origin generated considerable excitement and criticism. The NASA Administrator Dan Golden said the 1996 ALH84001 announcement saved NASA s Mars planetary exploration program and injected $6 billion dollars over five years into the scientific research and analysis efforts. All of the original four lines of evidence for possible biogenic features within ALH84001 offered by McKay et al. have withstood the test of time. Criticism has been directed at the interpretation of the 1996 analytical data. Research has expanded to other SNC meteorites. Despite the numerous attacks on the ideas, the debate continues after 15 years. The 2009 paper by Thomas-Keprta et al. on the origins of a suite of magnetites within the ALH84001 has offered strong arguments that some of the magnetites can only be formed by biogenic processes and not from thermal decomposition or shock events which happened to the meteorite. NASA s Astrobiology Institute was formed from the foundation laid by the ALH84001 hypothesis of finding life beyond the Earth. The strong astrobiology outreach programs have expanded because of

  1. Stable Isotope Enrichment of Carbonate from the Martian Meteorite ALH84001: Test of a Hypothesis at Wright Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socki, R. A.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Romanek, C. S.

    1995-09-01

    We report here the stable isotope composition of carbonate measured from a suite of desert soils from the Dry Valleys of Antarctica [1] to determine the 13C enrichments attributed to cryogenic freezing in terrestrial environments. These data are then used to gauge whether cryogenic freezing is a viable aqueous process that can produce extreme 13C enrichments observed in Martian carbonates (e.g., ALH 84001 [2]). Analyses of ALH 84001 have shown that the delta^(13)C of carbonate is the most-positive yet recorded for an SNC meteorite (ca. 42 per mil)[2]. The source of carbon is thought to be Martian atmospheric CO2, which has been recycled through an aqueous medium into the solid phase. The delta^(13)C of the carbonate is consistent with a precipitation temperature below ~300 degrees C [3], assuming the delta^(13)C of Martian CO2 lies somewhere between 26 and 46 per mil [4, 5]. An equilibrium temperature of formation near 0 degrees C is difficult to reconcile if the atmospheric source of carbon is <26 per mil, despite the fact that equilbrium isotope enrichments are large at this temperature (12-14 per mil) [6-8]. Low delta^(13)C for atmospheric CO2 is only compatible with high delta^(13)C for carbonate when non-equilibrium processes are the primary mechanism of isotopic fractionation. An inorganic surficial process known to enrich carbonate by >15 per mil over ambient atmospheric CO2 is cryogenic freezing [9]. Carbonate-bearing soils from Wright Valley, Antarctica were studied as a terrestrial analog to the carbonates in ALH 84001 to characterize isotopic "fingerprints" associated with cryogenic freezing. delta^(13)C and delta^(18)O carbonate values from Prospect Mesa Soil Pit range from +0.89 per mil to -20.46 per mil (PDB) within the "permanently frozen zone" (below 0.4 m), and +4.20 per mil to -11.87 per mil at the surface. The most enriched 13C and 18O tend to occur at the surface where seasonal variations in temperature or precipitation have imposed cyclical

  2. Stable Isotope Enrichment of Carbonate from the Martian Meteorite ALH84001: Test of a Hypothesis at Wright Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socki, R. A.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Romanek, C. S.

    1995-09-01

    We report here the stable isotope composition of carbonate measured from a suite of desert soils from the Dry Valleys of Antarctica [1] to determine the 13C enrichments attributed to cryogenic freezing in terrestrial environments. These data are then used to gauge whether cryogenic freezing is a viable aqueous process that can produce extreme 13C enrichments observed in Martian carbonates (e.g., ALH 84001 [2]). Analyses of ALH 84001 have shown that the delta^(13)C of carbonate is the most-positive yet recorded for an SNC meteorite (ca. 42 per mil)[2]. The source of carbon is thought to be Martian atmospheric CO2, which has been recycled through an aqueous medium into the solid phase. The delta^(13)C of the carbonate is consistent with a precipitation temperature below ~300 degrees C [3], assuming the delta^(13)C of Martian CO2 lies somewhere between 26 and 46 per mil [4, 5]. An equilibrium temperature of formation near 0 degrees C is difficult to reconcile if the atmospheric source of carbon is <26 per mil, despite the fact that equilbrium isotope enrichments are large at this temperature (12-14 per mil) [6-8]. Low delta^(13)C for atmospheric CO2 is only compatible with high delta^(13)C for carbonate when non-equilibrium processes are the primary mechanism of isotopic fractionation. An inorganic surficial process known to enrich carbonate by >15 per mil over ambient atmospheric CO2 is cryogenic freezing [9]. Carbonate-bearing soils from Wright Valley, Antarctica were studied as a terrestrial analog to the carbonates in ALH 84001 to characterize isotopic "fingerprints" associated with cryogenic freezing. delta^(13)C and delta^(18)O carbonate values from Prospect Mesa Soil Pit range from +0.89 per mil to -20.46 per mil (PDB) within the "permanently frozen zone" (below 0.4 m), and +4.20 per mil to -11.87 per mil at the surface. The most enriched 13C and 18O tend to occur at the surface where seasonal variations in temperature or precipitation have imposed cyclical

  3. Low-temperature carbonate concretions in the martian meteorite ALH84001: Evidence from stable isotopes and mineralogy

    SciTech Connect

    Valley, J.W.; Eiler, J.M.; Stolper, E.M.

    1997-03-14

    The martian meteorite ALH84001 contains small, disk-shaped concentrations of carbonate with concentric chemical and mineralogical zonation. Oxygen isotope compositions of these concretions, measured by ion microprobe, range from {delta}{sup 18}O = +9.5 to +20.5{per_thousand}. Most of the core of one concretion is homogeneous (16.7 {+-} 1.2{per_thousand}) and over 5{per_thousand} higher in ({delta}{sup 18}O = 4.6 {+-} 1.2{per_thousand}). Secondary SiO{sub 2} has {delta}{sup 18}O = 20.4{per_thousand}. Carbon isotope ratios measured from the core of one concretion average {delta}{sup 13}C = 46 {+-} 8{per_thousand}, consistent with formation on Mars. The isotopic variations and mineral compositions offer no evidence for high temperature (>650{degrees}C) carbonate precipitation and suggest non-equilibrium processes at low temperatures (<{approximately} 300{degrees}C). 44 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Originof magnetite in martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, E.; Fuller, M.

    2003-04-01

    The magnetization of ALH84001 is predominantly carried by single domain magnetite, which is found in association with carbonate. The magnetite is found in topotactic relationship with the carbonate in regions of iron rich carbonate, whereas in magnesium richer areas periclase is found. The magnetite formed from the carbonate by thermal decomposition of siderite at elevated temperature in a major impact event at about 4.0 Gyr. Chromite is also present in large amounts, but it is predominantly paramagnetic at room temperature with a Neel point close to 100^oK. Carbonate with associated magnetite is also found in the martian meteorite Nakhla. Experiments and theory show that siderite is a major product of percolation and evaporation of brines generated under pressures of more than 0.1bar of carbon dioxide. This is the preferred explanation for the carbonate in nakhla, as well as in ALH84001. Thermal decomposition of siderite may result from deep burial, magmatic heat sources, or as in the case of ALH84001, impact heating.

  5. Formation of Carbonate Minerals in Martian Meteorite ALH 84001 from Cool Water Near the Surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2011-12-01

    Carbonate minerals in the Allan Hills 84001 meteorite are important because they ought to contain information about the chemistry and temperature of the water they formed in. They are also an important part of testing the idea that the meteorite contains evidence of past life on Mars. Hypotheses for the origin of the carbonates are impressively varied. A key test of the ideas is to determine the temperature at which the carbonates formed. Estimates up to now range from a bit below freezing to 700 oC, too big a range to test anything! To address the problem Itay Halevy, Woodward Fischer, and John Eiler (Caltech) used an approach that involves "clumped" isotope thermometry, which makes comparisons among different isotopic compositions of extracted CO2. This allowed the investigators to use the isotopic abundances of both carbon and oxygen. The results indicate that the carbonates formed at 18 ± 4 oC from a shallow subsurface (upper few meters to tens of meters) pool of water that was gradually evaporating. The wet episode did not last long, leading Halevy and his colleagues to conclude that the environment may have been too transient for life to have emerged here from scratch. On the other hand, if life already existed on the Martian surface this wet near-surface environment would have provided a happy home. An impact blasted the Martian home of ALH 84001, causing a transient heating event, perhaps disturbing the isotopic record...or perhaps not because the event was so short. In any case, the clumped isotope thermometry approach seems to have given a good measurement of the temperature at which the carbonate minerals formed.

  6. Search for past life on Mars: possible relic biogenic activity in martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    McKay, D S; Gibson, E K; Thomas-Keprta, K L; Vali, H; Romanek, C S; Clemett, S J; Chillier, X D; Maechling, C R; Zare, R N

    1996-08-16

    Fresh fracture surfaces of the martian meteorite ALH84001 contain abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These fresh fracture surfaces also display carbonate globules. Contamination studies suggest that the PAHs are indigenous to the meteorite. High-resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopy study of surface textures and internal structures of selected carbonate globules show that the globules contain fine-grained, secondary phases of single-domain magnetite and Fe-sulfides. The carbonate globules are similar in texture and size to some terrestrial bacterially induced carbonate precipitates. Although inorganic formation is possible, formation of the globules by biogenic processes could explain many of the observed features, including the PAHs. The PAHs, the carbonate globules, and their associated secondary mineral phases and textures could thus be fossil remains of a past martian biota. PMID:8688069

  7. Search for Past Life on Mars: Possible Relict Biogenic Activity in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David S.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Vali, Hojatollah; Romanek, Christopher S.; Clemett, Simon J.; Chillier, Xavier D. F.; Maechling, Claude R.; Zare, Richard N.

    1996-01-01

    Fresh fracture surfaces of the martian meteorite ALH84001 contain abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These fresh fracture surfaces also display carbonate globules. Contamination studies suggest the PAHs are indigenous to the meteorite. High resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopy study of surface textures and internal structures of selected carbonate globules show that the globules contain fine-grained, secondary phases of single-domain magnetite and Fe-monosulfides. The carbonate globules are similar in texture and size to some terrestrial bacterially induced carbonate precipitates. Although inorganic formation is possible, formation of the globules by biogenic processes could explain many of the observed features including the PAHs. The PAHs, the carbonate globules, and their associated secondary mineral phases and textures could thus be fossil remains of a past martian biota.

  8. Search for past life on Mars: possible relic biogenic activity in martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    McKay, D S; Gibson, E K; Thomas-Keprta, K L; Vali, H; Romanek, C S; Clemett, S J; Chillier, X D; Maechling, C R; Zare, R N

    1996-08-16

    Fresh fracture surfaces of the martian meteorite ALH84001 contain abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These fresh fracture surfaces also display carbonate globules. Contamination studies suggest that the PAHs are indigenous to the meteorite. High-resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopy study of surface textures and internal structures of selected carbonate globules show that the globules contain fine-grained, secondary phases of single-domain magnetite and Fe-sulfides. The carbonate globules are similar in texture and size to some terrestrial bacterially induced carbonate precipitates. Although inorganic formation is possible, formation of the globules by biogenic processes could explain many of the observed features, including the PAHs. The PAHs, the carbonate globules, and their associated secondary mineral phases and textures could thus be fossil remains of a past martian biota.

  9. Thermal Decomposition of an Impure (Roxbury) Siderite: Relevance to the Presence of Chemically Pure Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, D.S.; Gibson, E.K.; Thomas-Keprta, K.L.; Clemett, S.J.; Wentworth, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    The question of the origin of nanophase magnetite in Martian meteorite ALH84001 has been widely debated for nearly a decade. Golden et al. have reported producing nearly chemically pure magnetite from thermal decomposition of chemically impure siderite [(Fe, Mg, Mn)CO3]. This claim is significant for three reasons: first, it has been argued that chemically pure magnetite present in the carbonate disks in Martian meteorite ALH84001 could have formed by the thermal decomposition of the impure carbonate matrix in which they are embedded; second, the chemical purity of magnetite has been previously used to identify biogenic magnetite; and, third, previous studies of thermal decomposition of impure (Mg,Ca,Mn)-siderites, which have been investigated under a wide variety of conditions by numerous researchers, invariably yields a mixed metal oxide phase as the product and not chemically pure magnetite. The explanation for this observation is that these siderites all possess the same crystallographic structure (Calcite; R3c) so solid solutions between these carbonates are readily formed and can be viewed on an atomic scale as two chemically different but structurally similar lattices.

  10. Magnetic tests for magnetosome chains in Martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Benjamin P; Kim, Soon Sam; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Kopp, Robert E; Sankaran, Mohan; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Komeili, Arash

    2004-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy studies have been used to argue that magnetite crystals in carbonate from Martian meteorite ALH84001 have a composition and morphology indistinguishable from that of magnetotactic bacteria. It has even been claimed from scanning electron microscopy imaging that some ALH84001 magnetite crystals are aligned in chains. Alignment of magnetosomes in chains is perhaps the most distinctive of the six crystallographic properties thought to be collectively unique to magnetofossils. Here we use three rock magnetic techniques, low-temperature cycling, the Moskowitz test, and ferromagnetic resonance, to sense the bulk composition and crystallography of millions of ALH84001 magnetite crystals. The magnetic data demonstrate that although the magnetite is unusually pure and fine-grained in a manner similar to terrestrial magnetofossils, most or all of the crystals are not arranged in chains. PMID:15155900

  11. Magnetic tests for magnetosome chains in Martian meteorite ALH84001

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Kim, Soon Sam; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Kopp, Robert E.; Sankaran, Mohan; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Komeili, Arash

    2004-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy studies have been used to argue that magnetite crystals in carbonate from Martian meteorite ALH84001 have a composition and morphology indistinguishable from that of magnetotactic bacteria. It has even been claimed from scanning electron microscopy imaging that some ALH84001 magnetite crystals are aligned in chains. Alignment of magnetosomes in chains is perhaps the most distinctive of the six crystallographic properties thought to be collectively unique to magnetofossils. Here we use three rock magnetic techniques, low-temperature cycling, the Moskowitz test, and ferromagnetic resonance, to sense the bulk composition and crystallography of millions of ALH84001 magnetite crystals. The magnetic data demonstrate that although the magnetite is unusually pure and fine-grained in a manner similar to terrestrial magnetofossils, most or all of the crystals are not arranged in chains. PMID:15155900

  12. Magnetic tests for magnetosome chains in Martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Kim, Soon Sam; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Kopp, Robert E.; Sankaran, Mohan; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Komeili, Arash

    2004-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy studies have been used to argue that magnetite crystals in carbonate from Martian meteorite ALH84001have a composition and morphology indistinguishable from that of magnetotactic bacteria. It has even been claimed from scanning electron microscopy imaging that some ALH84001magnetite crystals are aligned in chains. Alignment of magnetosomes in chains is perhaps the most distinctive of the six crystallographic properties thought to be collectively unique to magnetofossils. Here we use three rock magnetic techniques, low-temperature cycling, the Moskowitz test, and ferromagnetic resonance, to sense the bulk composition and crystallography of millions of ALH84001magnetite crystals. The magnetic data demonstrate that although the magnetite is unusually pure and fine-grained in a manner similar to terrestrial magnetofossils, most or all of the crystals are not arranged in chains.

  13. Covariant C and O Isotope Trends in Arctic Carbonate Crusts and ALH 84001: Potential Biomarker or Indicator of Cryogenic Formation Environment?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.; Blake, Weston; Leveille, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This work seeks to use the chemical, isotopic, and mineralogical characteristics of secondary carbonate minerals produced during brief aqueous events to identify the conditions of the aqueous environment in which they formed. Liquid water near the surface of Mars is subject to either rapid freezing and/or evaporation. These processes are also active on Earth, and produce secondary minerals that have complex chemical, mineralogical, and isotopic textures and compositions that can include covariant relationships between Delta C-13 (sub VPDB) and delta O-18 (sub VSMOW). The extremely well studied four billion year old carbonates preserved in martian meteorite ALH 84001 also show covariant delta C-13 and delta O-18 compositions, but these variations are manifested on a micro-scale in a single thin section while the variation observed so far in terrestrial carbonates is seen between different hand samples.

  14. Paleomagnetic record of Martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antretter, Maria; Fuller, Mike; Scott, Edward; Jackson, Mike; Moskowitz, Bruce; Solheid, Peter

    2003-06-01

    The natural remanent magnetization (NRM) of the Martian meteorite ALH84001 is predominantly carried by fine magnetite, which is found in association with carbonate. The magnetite is in epitaxial and topotactic relation with the carbonate and formed from the carbonate in the major impact event at 4.0 Ga. The NRM will therefore record this field. The local preferential crystallographic and shape alignment of the magnetite defines local easy directions of magnetization may account for the observed inhomogeneity of the NRM on a microscopic scale. Normalizing the intensity of the NRM by the saturation isothermal remanence (IRMs) then gives an estimate for the 4.0 Ga Martian field one order smaller than the present geomagnetic field. Such a field is unlikely to be strong enough to generate the high-intensity Martian magnetic anomalies. ALH 84001 in its pristine state as an orthopyroxenite is not a plausible source rock for the Martian anomalies because its magnetite was not formed until the 4.0 Ga event.

  15. Magnetic Tests For Magnetosome Chains In Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, B. P.; Kim, S.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Sankaran, M.; Kobayashi, A.; Komeili, A.

    2003-12-01

    Transmission electron microscopy studies have been used to argue that magnetites in carbonates from Martian meteorite ALH84001 have a composition and morphology indistinguishable from that of magnetotactic bacteria and their magnetofossils (1). It has even been claimed from scanning electron microscopy imaging that some ALH84001 magnetites are aligned in chains (2). If true, this would provide dramatic support for the magnetofossil hypothesis because alignment in chains is perhaps the most distinctive of the six crystallographic properties thought to be collectively unique to magnetosomes. The leading alternative hypothesis is that the ALH84001 magnetites are the inorganic products of shock-heating of the carbonates (3, 4). Here we use three rock magnetic techniques-low-temperature cycling, the Moskowitz test (5), and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR)-to demonstrate that most or all of the magnetites in ALH84001 are unusually pure and fine-grained but are not arranged in magnetosome chains. 1. K. L. Thomas-Keprta et al., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 64, 4049-4081 (2000). 2. I. E. Friedmann, J. Wierzchos, C. Ascaso, M. Winklhofer, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 2176-2181 (2001). 3. D. C. Golden et al., Am. Mineral. 83, 370-375 (2001). 4. D. J. Barber, E. R. D. Scott, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99, 6556-6561 (2002). 5. B. M. Moskowitz, R. B. Frankel, D. A. Bazylinski, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 120, 283-300 (1993).

  16. Truncated hexa-octahedral magnetite crystals in ALH84001: presumptive biosignatures.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Keprta, K L; Clemett, S J; Bazylinski, D A; Kirschvink, J L; McKay, D S; Wentworth, S J; Vali, H; Gibson, E K; McKay, M F; Romanek, C S

    2001-02-27

    McKay et al. [(1996) Science 273, 924-930] suggested that carbonate globules in the meteorite ALH84001 contained the fossil remains of Martian microbes. We have characterized a subpopulation of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) crystals present in abundance within the Fe-rich rims of these carbonate globules. We find these Martian magnetites to be both chemically and physically identical to terrestrial, biogenically precipitated, intracellular magnetites produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1. Specifically, both magnetite populations are single-domain and chemically pure, and exhibit a unique crystal habit we describe as truncated hexa-octahedral. There are no known reports of inorganic processes to explain the observation of truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites in a terrestrial sample. In bacteria strain MV-1 their presence is therefore likely a product of Natural Selection. Unless there is an unknown and unexplained inorganic process on Mars that is conspicuously absent on the Earth and forms truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites, we suggest that these magnetite crystals in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 were likely produced by a biogenic process. As such, these crystals are interpreted as Martian magnetofossils and constitute evidence of the oldest life yet found. PMID:11226210

  17. Truncated hexa-octahedral magnetite crystals in ALH84001: Presumptive biosignatures

    PubMed Central

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; McKay, David S.; Wentworth, Susan J.; Vali, Hojatollah; Gibson, Everett K.; McKay, Mary Fae; Romanek, Christopher S.

    2001-01-01

    McKay et al. [(1996) Science 273, 924–930] suggested that carbonate globules in the meteorite ALH84001 contained the fossil remains of Martian microbes. We have characterized a subpopulation of magnetite (Fe3O4) crystals present in abundance within the Fe-rich rims of these carbonate globules. We find these Martian magnetites to be both chemically and physically identical to terrestrial, biogenically precipitated, intracellular magnetites produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1. Specifically, both magnetite populations are single-domain and chemically pure, and exhibit a unique crystal habit we describe as truncated hexa-octahedral. There are no known reports of inorganic processes to explain the observation of truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites in a terrestrial sample. In bacteria strain MV-1 their presence is therefore likely a product of Natural Selection. Unless there is an unknown and unexplained inorganic process on Mars that is conspicuously absent on the Earth and forms truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites, we suggest that these magnetite crystals in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 were likely produced by a biogenic process. As such, these crystals are interpreted as Martian magnetofossils and constitute evidence of the oldest life yet found. PMID:11226210

  18. Truncated hexa-octahedral magnetite crystals in ALH84001: presumptive biosignatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Bazylinski, D. A.; Kirschvink, J. L.; McKay, D. S.; Wentworth, S. J.; Vali, H.; Gibson, E. K. Jr; McKay, M. F.; Romanek, C. S.

    2001-01-01

    McKay et al. [(1996) Science 273, 924-930] suggested that carbonate globules in the meteorite ALH84001 contained the fossil remains of Martian microbes. We have characterized a subpopulation of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) crystals present in abundance within the Fe-rich rims of these carbonate globules. We find these Martian magnetites to be both chemically and physically identical to terrestrial, biogenically precipitated, intracellular magnetites produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1. Specifically, both magnetite populations are single-domain and chemically pure, and exhibit a unique crystal habit we describe as truncated hexa-octahedral. There are no known reports of inorganic processes to explain the observation of truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites in a terrestrial sample. In bacteria strain MV-1 their presence is therefore likely a product of Natural Selection. Unless there is an unknown and unexplained inorganic process on Mars that is conspicuously absent on the Earth and forms truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites, we suggest that these magnetite crystals in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 were likely produced by a biogenic process. As such, these crystals are interpreted as Martian magnetofossils and constitute evidence of the oldest life yet found.

  19. Biomimetic Properties of Minerals and the Search for Life in the Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Jan; Young, David; Peng, Hsin-Hsin; Wu, Cheng-Yeu; Young, John D.

    2012-05-01

    The existence of extraterrestrial life was heralded by controversial claims made in 1996 that the Martian meteorite ALH84001 harbored relics of ancient microorganisms. We review here the accumulated evidence for and against past extraterrestrial life in this Martian meteorite. The main pro-life arguments—the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, magnetite crystals, carbonate globules, and structures resembling terrestrial life-forms known as nanobacteria—can be deemed ambiguous at best. Although these criteria are compatible with living processes, each one of them can be explained by nonliving chemical processes. By undergoing amorphous-to-crystalline transformations and binding to multiple substrates, including other ions and simple organic compounds, minerals—especially those containing carbonate—have been shown to display biomimetic properties, producing forms that resemble bacteria. This simple and down-to-earth explanation can account fully for the existence of mineral entities resembling putative nano- and microorganisms that have been described not only in the ALH84001 meteorite but also in the human body.

  20. Cryogenic Origin for Mars Analog Carbonates in the Bockfjord Volcanic Complex Svalbard (Norway)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, H. E. F.; Benning, L.; Blake, D. F.; Fogel, M.; Ming, D.; Skidmore, M.; Steele, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Sverrefjell and Sigurdfjell eruptive centers in the Bockfjord Volcanic Complex (BVC) on Svalbard (Norway) formed by subglacial eruptions ca. 1 Ma ago. These eruptive centers carry ubiquitous magnesian carbonate deposits including dolomitemagnesite globules similar to those in the Martian meteorite ALH84001. Carbonates in mantle xenoliths are dominated by ALH84001 type carbonate globules that formed during quenching of CO2-rich mantle fluids. Lava hosted carbonates include ALH84001 type carbonate globules occurring throughout lava vesicles and microfractures and massive carbonate deposits associated with vertical volcanic vents. Massive carbonates include < or equal 5 cm thick magnesite deposits protruding downwards into clear blue ice within volcanic vents and carbonate cemented lava breccias associated with volcanic vents. Carbonate cements comprise layered deposits of calcite, dolomite, huntite, magnesite and aragonite associated with ALH84001 type carbonate globules lining lava vesicles. Combined Mossbauer, XRD and VNIR data show that breccia carbonate cements at Sverrefjell are analog to Comanche carbonates at Gusev crater.

  1. Geochemical evidence for mixing of three components in martian orthopyroxenite ALH 84001. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Lindstrom, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    ALH 84001, a ferroan martian orthopyroxenite, originally consisted of three petrographically defined components: a cumulus assemblage of orthopyroxene + chromite, a trapped melt assemblage of orthopyroxene(?) + chromite + maskelynite + apatite + augite +/- pyrite, and a metasomatic assemblage of carbonate +/- pyrite. We present the results of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) study of five bulk samples of ALH 84001, combined with Scanning Ion Mass Spectrometer (SIMS) data on the orthopyroxene, in order to attempt to set limits on the geochemical characteristics of the latter two components, and therefore on the petrogenesis of ALH 84001. The INAA data support the petrographic observations, suggesting that there are at least three components in ALH 84001. We will assume that each of the three geochemically required components can be equated with one of the petrographically observed components. Both trapped melt and metasomatic components in ALH 84001 have higher Na than orthopyroxene based on compositions of maskelynite, apatite, and carbonate. For the metasomatic component, we will assume its Na content is that of carbonate, while for a trapped melt component, we will use a typical Na content inferred for martian meteorite parent melts, approximately 1 wt% Na2O. Under these assumptions, we can set limits on the Light Rare Earth Elements/Heavy Rare Earth Elements (LREE/HREE) ratios of the components, and use this information to compare the petrogenesis of ALH 84001 with other martian meteorites. The above calculations assume that the bulk samples are representative of different portions of ALH 84001. We will also evaluate the possible heterogeneous distribution of mineral phases in the bulk samples as the cause of compositional heterogeneity in our samples.

  2. A search for endogenous amino acids in martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Bada, J L; Glavin, D P; McDonald, G D; Becker, L

    1998-01-16

    Trace amounts of glycine, serine, and alanine were detected in the carbonate component of the martian meteorite ALH84001 by high-performance liquid chromatography. The detected amino acids were not uniformly distributed in the carbonate component and ranged in concentration from 0.1 to 7 parts per million. Although the detected alanine consists primarily of the L enantiomer, low concentrations (<0.1 parts per million) of endogenous D-alanine may be present in the ALH84001 carbonates. The amino acids present in this sample of ALH84001 appear to be terrestrial in origin and similar to those in Allan Hills ice, although the possibility cannot be ruled out that minute amounts of some amino acids such as D-alanine are preserved in the meteorite. PMID:9430583

  3. A search for endogenous amino acids in martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bada, J. L.; Glavin, D. P.; McDonald, G. D.; Becker, L.

    1998-01-01

    Trace amounts of glycine, serine, and alanine were detected in the carbonate component of the martian meteorite ALH84001 by high-performance liquid chromatography. The detected amino acids were not uniformly distributed in the carbonate component and ranged in concentration from 0.1 to 7 parts per million. Although the detected alanine consists primarily of the L enantiomer, low concentrations (<0.1 parts per million) of endogenous D-alanine may be present in the ALH84001 carbonates. The amino acids present in this sample of ALH84001 appear to be terrestrial in origin and similar to those in Allan Hills ice, although the possibility cannot be ruled out that minute amounts of some amino acids such as D-alanine are preserved in the meteorite.

  4. The origin of organic matter in the Martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Becker, L; Popp, B; Rust, T; Bada, J L

    1999-03-30

    Stable carbon isotope measurements of the organic matter associated with the carbonate globules and the bulk matrix material in the ALH84001 Martian meteorite indicate that two distinct sources are present in the sample. The delta 13C values for the organic matter associated with the carbonate globules averaged -26% and is attributed to terrestrial contamination. In contrast, the delta 13C values for the organic matter associated with the bulk matrix material yielded a value of -15%. The only common sources of carbon on the Earth that yield similar delta 13C values, other then some diagenetically altered marine carbonates, are C4 plants. A delta 13C value of -15%, on the other hand, is consistent with a kerogen-like component, the most ubiquitous form of organic matter found in carbonaceous chondrites such as the Murchison meteorite. Examination of the carbonate globules and bulk matrix material using laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) indicates the presence of a high molecular weight organic component which appears to be extraterrestrial in origin, possibly derived from the exogenous delivery, of meteoritic or cometary debris to the surface of Mars. PMID:11542930

  5. The origin of organic matter in the Martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Becker, L; Popp, B; Rust, T; Bada, J L

    1999-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope measurements of the organic matter associated with the carbonate globules and the bulk matrix material in the ALH84001 Martian meteorite indicate that two distinct sources are present in the sample. The delta 13C values for the organic matter associated with the carbonate globules averaged -26% and is attributed to terrestrial contamination. In contrast, the delta 13C values for the organic matter associated with the bulk matrix material yielded a value of -15%. The only common carbon sources on the Earth that yield similar delta 13C values, other then some diagenetically altered marine carbonates, are C4 plants. A delta 13C value of -15%, on the other hand, is consistent with a kerogen-like component, the most ubiquitous form of organic matter found in carbonaceous chondrites such as the Murchison meteorite. Examination of the carbonate globules and bulk matrix material using laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) indicates the presence of a high molecular weight organic component which appears to be extraterrestrial in origin, possibly derived from the exogenous delivery of meteoritic or cometary debris to the surface of Mars. PMID:11543335

  6. Mars Life? - Orange-colored Carbonate Mineral Globules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This photograph shows orange-colored carbonate mineral globules found in a meteorite, called ALH84001, believed to have once been a part of Mars. These carbonate minerals in the meteorite are believed to have been formed on Mars more than 3.6 billion years ago. Their structure and chemistry suggest that they may have been formed with the assistance of primitive, bacteria-like living organisms. A two-year investigation by a NASA research team found organic molecules, mineral features characteristic of biological activity and possible microscopic fossils inside of carbonate minerals such as these in the meteorite.

  7. Structural and morphological anomalies in magnetosomes: possible biogenic origin for magnetite in ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A P; Barry, J C; Webb, R I

    2001-01-01

    We report biogenic magnetite whiskers, with axial ratios of 6 : 1, elongated in the [1 1 1], [1 1 2] and [1 0 0] directions, resembling the magnetite whiskers detected in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 by Bradley et al., and interpreted by those authors as evidence of vapour-phase (abiogenic) growth. Magnetosomal whiskers with extended defects consistent with screw dislocations and magnetosomes resembling flattened twinned platelets, as well as other twinning phenomena and other structural defects, are also reported here. Magnetosomes with teardrop-shaped, cuboidal, irregular and jagged structures similar to those detected in ALH84001 by McKay et al., coprecipitation of magnetite possibly with amorphous calcium carbonate, coprecipitation of magnetite possibly with amorphous silica, the incorporation of titanium in volutin inclusions and disoriented arrays of magnetosomes are also described. These observations demonstrate that the structures of the magnetite particles in ALH84001, their spatial arrangement and coprecipitation with carbonates and proximity to silicates are consistent with being biogenic. Electron-beam-induced flash-melting of magnetosomes produced numerous screw dislocations in the [1 1 1], [1 0 0], and [1 1 0] lattice planes and induced fusion of platelets. From this, the lack of screw dislocations reported in the magnetite particles in ALH84001 (McKay et al., and Bradley et al.) indicates that they have a low-temperature origin. PMID:11136443

  8. ALH84001, a cumulate orthopyroxenite member of the Martian meteorite clan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.

    1994-01-01

    ALH84001, originally classified as a diogenite, is a coarse-grained, cataclastic, orthopyroxenite meteorite related to the martian (SNC) meteorites. The orthopyroxene is relatively uniform in composition, with a mean composition of Wo3.3En69.4Fs27.3. Minor phases are euhedral to subhedral chromite and interstitial maskelynite, An31.1Ab63.2Or5.7, with accessory augite, Wo42.2En45.1Fs12.7, apatite, pyrite and carbonates, Cc11.5Mg58.0Sd29.4Rd1.1. The pyroxenes and chromites in ALH84001 are similar in composition to these phases in EETA79001 lithology a megacrysts but are more homogeneous. Maskelynite is similar in composition to feldspars in the nakhlites and Chassigny. Two generations of carbonates are present, early (pre-shock) strongly zoned carbonates and late (post-shock) carbonates. The high Ca content of both types of carbonates indicates that they were formed at moderately high temperature, possibly approximately 700 C. ALH84001 has a slightly LREE-depleted pattern with La 0.67x and Lu 1.85x CI abundances and with a negative Eu anomaly (Eu/Sm 0.56x CI). The uniform pyroxene composition is unusual for martian meteorites, and suggests that ALH84001 cooled more slowly than did the shergottites, nakhlites of Chassigny. The nearly monomineralic composition, coarse-grain size, homogeneous orthopyroxene and chromite compositions, the interstitial maskelynite and apatite, and the REE pattern suggest that ALH84001 is a cumulate orthopyroxenite containing minor trapped, intercumulus material.

  9. Isotope Geochemistry of Possible Terrestrial Analogue for Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied the microdomain oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions by SIMS of complex carbonate rosettes from spinel therzolite xenoliths, hosted by nepheline basanite, from the island of Spitsbergen (Norway). The Quaternary volcanic rocks containing the xenoliths erupted into a high Arctic environment and through relatively thick continental crust containing carbonate rocks. We have attempted to constrain the sources of the carbonates in these rocks by combined O-18/O-16 and C-13/C-12 ratio measurements in 25 micron diameter spots of the carbonate and compare them to previous work based primarily on trace-element distributions. The origin of these carbonates can be interpreted in terms of either contamination by carbonate country rock during ascent of the xenoliths in the host basalt, or more probably by hydrothermal processes after emplacement. The isotopic composition of these carbonates from a combined delta.18O(sub SMOW) and delta.13C(sub PDB) standpoint precludes a primary origin of these minerals from the mantle. Here a description is given of the analysis procedure, standardization of the carbonates, major element compositions of the carbonates measured by electron microprobe, and their correlated C and O isotope compositions as measured by ion microprobe. Since these carbonate rosettes may represent a terrestrial analogue to the carbonate "globules" found in the martian meteorite ALH84001 interpretations for the origin of the features found in the Spitsbergen may be of interest in constraining the origin of these carbonate minerals on Mars.

  10. Experimental Shock Decomposition of Siderite and the Origin of Magnetite in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Mary Sue

    2007-01-01

    Shock recovery experiments to determine whether magnetite could be produced by the decomposition of iron-carbonate were initiated. Naturally occurring siderite was first characterized by electron microprobe (EMP), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mossbauer spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility measurements to be sure that the starting material did not contain detectable magnetite. Samples were shocked in tungsten-alloy holders (W=90%, Ni=6%, Cu=4%) to further insure that any iron phases in the shock products were contributed by the siderite rather than the sample holder. Each sample was shocked to a specific pressure between 30 to 49 GPa. Previously reported results of TEM analyses on 49 GPa experiments indicated the presence of nano-phase spinel-structured iron oxide. Transformation of siderite to magnetite as characterized by TEM was found in the 49 GPa shock experiment. Compositions of most magnetites are greater than 50% Fe sup(+2) in the octahedral site of the inverse spinel structure. Magnetites produced in shock experiments display the same range of single-domain, superparamagnetic sizes (approx. 50 100 nm), compositions (100% magnetite to 80% magnetite-20% magnesioferrite), and morphologies (equant, elongated, euhedral to subhedral) as magnetites synthesized by Golden et al. (2001) or magnetites grown naturally by MV1 magnetotactic bacteria, and as the magnetites in Martian meteorite ALH84001. Fritz et al. (2005) previously concluded that ALH84001 experienced approx. 32 GPa pressure and a resultant thermal pulse of approx. 100 - 110 C. However, ALH84001 contains evidence of local temperature excursions high enough to 1 melt feldspar, pyroxene, and a silica-rich phase. This 49 GPa experiment demonstrates that magnetite can be produced by the shock decomposition of siderite as a result of local heating to greater than 470 C. Therefore, magnetite in the rims of carbonates in Martian meteorite ALH84001 could be a product of shock devolatilization of

  11. Spectral analysis of ALH 84001, a meteorite from Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, J.; Pieters, C.; Mustard, J.; Pratt, S.; Hiroi, T.

    1994-07-01

    ALH 84001 has recently been reclassified as a meteorite from Mars (SNC) and contains more than 90% orthopyroxene with minor chromite and accessory phases of augite, maskelynite, and carbonate. This meteorite represents a new class of igneous material from Mars. We have measured reflectance spectra of ALH 84001 as a chip as a powder, dry sieved to less than 125 microns to compare with previous spectral analyses of SNCs and remote observations of Mars. Spectra of the chip and powder in the visible-to-near-infrared region are shown. These spectra are composites of data measured with the RELAB bidirectional spectrometer from 0.3 to 2.55 microns and a Nicolet FTIR for longer wavelengths. As expected, the spectra of the chip have negative slopes and are significantly darker than the spectrum of the particulate sample, which has a positive slope. The strong absorptions near 1 micron and 2 microns are characteristic of low-Ca pyroxene and have band rninima of 0.925 microns and 1.930 microns. The strong absorption near 3 microns is characteristic of water. There is a distinct flattening in the spectrum between 1.0 and 1.5 microns indicating the presence of an additional absorption. This is interpreted to be the result of Fe(2+) in the M1 site of low-Ca pyroxene. Mid-infrared spectra showing the Christiansen feature and the reststrahlen bands are shown for spectra of the powder and of three different locations on the chip. These spectra exhibit several features in this range, some of which are associated with a specific region on the chip. Each of the spectra includes a doublet reststrahlen peak near 1100/cm, and peaks near 880 and 500/cm, which are typical for low-Ca pyroxenes. Weaker features at 940-1000/cm, 600-750/cm, and 530-560/cm are present in spectra from some locations on the chip, but not others, implying compositional and textural variation.

  12. A mild, near-surface aqueous environment on Noachian Mars preserved in ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halevy, I.; Fischer, W. W.; Eiler, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Despite widespread evidence for liquid water at the surface of Mars during parts of the Noachian epoch, the temperature of early aqueous environments has been impossible to establish, raising questions of whether Mars' surface was ever warmer than today. This has hindered insight into aqueous alteration processes, which, on the basis of orbital spectroscopy, appear to have been prevalent on Noachian Mars. It is important to understand such processes, as they link the observed secondary mineral assemblages to interactions between primary igneous silicates and the surface environment (atmosphere-hydrosphere). We have addressed this problem by determining the precipitation temperatures of secondary carbonate minerals preserved in the oldest known sample of Mars' crust-the meteorite Allan Hills 84001 (ALH84001). Using carbonate 'clumped' isotope thermometry we have found that the carbonates in ALH84001, which are 3.9-4.0 billion years old, formed at a temperature of ~18±4°C. With temperature known, we used the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of the carbonates, as constrained by both our measurements and previous acid digestion and ion microprobe studies, to develop a model for their formation process and environment. The observed isotopic variation is best explained by carbonate precipitation out of a gradually evaporating, shallow subsurface aqueous solution (e.g. a regolith aquifer) at near-constant temperatures. Furthermore, on the basis of the isotopic composition of the earliest precipitated carbonates in ALH84001, the volatiles from which they formed (H2O and CO2) came not from depth, but from the early Martian surface. The occurrence of carbonates in other SNC meteorites and as a minor component of Martian dust implies that environments analogous to the one we studied may have been important in generating some of the observed secondary mineral assemblages by interaction between Mars' igneous crust and its atmosphere-hydrosphere.

  13. Origins of magnetite nanocrystals in Martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.; Wentworth, S. J.

    2009-11-01

    The Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks. These carbonate disks are believed to have precipitated 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch on Mars during which both the oldest extant Martian surfaces were formed, and perhaps the earliest global oceans. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe 3O 4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of magnetite and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. For example, the magnetites might have already been present in the aqueous fluids from which the carbonates were believed to have been deposited. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterization of the compositional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. Extensive use of focused ion beam milling techniques has been utilized for sample preparation. We then compared our observations with those from experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios. We conclude that the vast majority of the nanocrystal magnetites present in the carbonate disks could not have formed by any of the currently proposed thermal decomposition scenarios. Instead, we find there is considerable evidence in support of an alternative allochthonous origin for the magnetite unrelated to any shock or thermal processing of the carbonates.

  14. Origins of Magnetite Nanocrystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Mckay, David S.; Gibson, Everett K.; Wentworth, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    The Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks. These carbonate disks are believed to have precipitated 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch on Mars during which both the oldest extant Martian surfaces were formed, and perhaps the earliest global oceans. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of mag- netite and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. For example, the magnetites might have already been present in the aqueous fluids from which the carbonates were believed to have been deposited. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compo- sitional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. Extensive use of focused ion beam milling techniques has been utilized for sample preparation. We then compared our observations with those from experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios. We conclude that the vast majority of the nanocrystal magnetites present in the car- bonate disks could not have formed by any of the currently proposed thermal decomposition scenarios. Instead, we find there is considerable evidence in support of an alternative allochthonous origin for the magnetite unrelated to any shock or thermal processing of the carbonates.

  15. Determination of the Three-Dimensional Morphology of ALH84001 and Biogenic MV-1 Magnetite: Comparison of Results from Electron Tomography and Classical Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Schwartz, Cindy; Morphew, Mary; McIntosh, J. Richard; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Vali, Hojatollah

    2004-01-01

    Dated at approximately 3.9 billion years of age, carbonate disks, found within fractures of the host rock of Martian meteorite ALH84001, have been interpreted as secondary minerals that formed at low temperature in an aqueous medium. Heterogeneously distributed within these disks are magnetite nanocrystals that are of Martian origin. Approximately one quarter of these magnetites have morphological and chemical similarities to magnetite particles produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1, which are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats on Earth. Moreover, these types of magnetite particles are not known or expected to be produced by abiotic means either through geological processes or synthetically in the laboratory. The remaining three quarters of the ALH84001 magnetites are likely products of multiple processes including, but not limited to, precipitation from a hydrothermal fluid, thermal decomposition of the carbonate matrix in which they are embedded, and extracellular formation by dissimilatory Fe-reducing bacteria. We have proposed that the origins of magnetites in ALH84001 can be best explained as the products of multiple processes, one of which is biological. Recently the three-dimensional (3-D) external morphology of the purported biogenic fraction of the ALH84001 magnetites has been the subject of considerable debate. We report here the 3-D geometry of biogenic magnetite crystals extracted from MV-1 and of those extracted from ALH84001 carbonate disks using a combination of high resolution classical and tomographic transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We focus on answering the following questions: (1) which technique provides adequate information to deduce the 3-D external crystal morphology?; and, (2) what is the precise 3-D geometry of the ALH84001 and MV-1 magnetites?

  16. Did an Impact Make the Mysterious Microscopic Magnetite Crystals in ALH 84001?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2007-10-01

    Fervent debate swirls around microscopic crystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) in Martian meteorite ALH 84001. Some investigators suggest that the crystals are evidence of past life on Mars, citing magnetite crystals of similar chemical compositions and sizes made by magnetotactic bacteria on Earth. Others cite assorted experiments and observations to argue that the important little crystals formed entirely by non-biological processes, hence say nothing about life on Mars. One of those processes is the decomposition of iron carbonate (the mineral siderite), which occurs in ALH 84001. Researchers argue that heating this mineral causes it to decompose into magnetite and CO2 gas. Experiments showing this were done by heating siderite and observing that it decomposed and formed magnetite, but nobody had shock-heated siderite to see if magnetite crystals formed. (Shock is a rapid, strong rise and fall in pressure. It happens under many circumstances, including meteorite impacts.) The lack of shock experiments has been solved by Mary Sue Bell (University of Houston and Jacobs Engineering). She experimentally shocked samples of siderite at the Experimental Impact Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center. She shows that magnetite crystals of the right size and composition formed when samples were shocked to 49 GPa (about 500,000 times the pressure at the Earth's surface). This is more evidence for a non-biological origin for the magnetite crystals in ALH 84001 and is consistent with what we know about the impact history of the rock. There seems to be growing evidence against a biological origin, but don't expect these results to completely settle the debate!

  17. Record of fluid-rock interactions on Mars from the meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Romanek, C S; Grady, M M; Wright, I P; Mittlefehldt, D W; Socki, R A; Pillinger, C T; Gibson, E K

    1994-12-15

    Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 is the most recently recognized member of a suite of meteorites--the SNCs--that almost certainly originated on Mars. Several factors distinguish ALH84001 from the other SNC meteorites. Preliminary studies suggest that it may be older than other martian meteorites. Moreover, it contains abundant, zoned domains of calcium-iron-magnesium carbonate that are indigenous to the sample and thus may hold important clues regarding near-surface processes on Mars and the evolution of the martian atmosphere. We report here analyses of the carbon and oxygen stable-isotope compositions of the carbonates that place constraints on their formation conditions. Our results imply the presence of at least two chemically distinct carbonates--one Ca,Fe-rich, the other Mg-rich--that are enriched in 13C relative to terrestrial carbonates (delta 13C approximately +41/1000), consistent with martian atmospheric CO2 as the carbon source. The oxygen isotope compositions of the carbonates indicate that they precipitated from a low-temperature fluid in the martian crust. Combined with textural and bulk geochemical considerations, the isotope data suggest that carbonate deposition took place in an open-system environment in which the ambient temperature fluctuated. PMID:7990956

  18. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Martian (SNC) Meteorite ALH 84001: Hydrocarbons from Mars, Terrestrial Contaminants, or Both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Romanek, C. S.; Macheling, C. R.; Gibson, E. K.; McKay, D. S.; Score, R.; Zare, R. N.

    1995-09-01

    Previous work has shown that pre-terrestrial polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) exist in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and certain meteorites [1-3]. We previously reported the first observation of PAHs in the newest member of the SNC group, Allan Hills 84001 [4] and determined that particular types of organic compounds are indigenous to ALH 84001 because they are associated with certain mineralogical features [4]. We also analyzed two diogenites from Antarctica: one showed no evidence for aromatic hydrocarbons while the other contained PAHs with the same major peaks as those in ALH 84001[4]. PAHs in the diogenite meteorite are not associated with mineral features on the analyzed surface and the most abundant PAHs in the diogenite are lower by a factor of 3 than those in ALH 84001. Furthermore, ALH 84001 contains a number of minor PAHs not found in the diogenite or typical terrestrial soils [4]. In this study we are analyzing a more complete group of Antarctic and non-Antarctic meteorites, including SNCs, to determine: (1) PAHs abundance and diversity in Antarctic meteorites and (2) the contribution of PAHs in SNCs from martian and, possibly, terrestrial sources. ALH 84001 is an unusual orthopyroxenite which contains abundant carbonate spheroids which are ~100-200 micrometers in diameter and range in composition from magnesite to ferroan magnesite [5-7]. These spheroids are not the result of terrestrial contamination: oxygen isotopic compositions indicate that the carbonates probably precipitated from a low-temperature fluid within the martian crust [5] and carbon isotopic abundances are consistent with martian atmospheric CO2 as the carbon source [5]. PAHs may coexist with other low-temperature carbon-bearing phases in a subsurface martian environment. Samples: We are analyzing freshly-fractured meteorite samples, or chips, which have been extracted from the internal regions of the following meteorites: ALH 84001 (crush and uncrush zones), EETA79001

  19. Formation of "Chemically Pure" Magnetite from Mg-Fe-Carbontes: Implications for Exclusively Inorganic Origin of Magnetite and Sulfides in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Morris, R. V.; Treiman, A. H.; McKay, G. A.

    2006-03-01

    Pure (Mg-free) magnetite was synthesized by heating Mg-Fe-carbonate at 350°C in the presence of pyrite in an evacuated sealed glass tube. The Mg-free magnetite in the black rims of ALH84001 may have formed by a similar inorganic abiotic process from Mg-Fe-carbonates.

  20. Search for Unique Organic Biomarkers in ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zare, Richard N.

    1999-01-01

    Four goals were outlined for this project. These were: [1] to reproduce the measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) in ALH84001 with both a higher spatial resolution and sensitivity than has been previously reported; [2] to extend such measurements to include other members of the Martian SNC (Shergotties, Nahklites, and Chassigny) meteorite clan, in particular the Antarctic Martian meteorite EETA79001; [3] to address issues of potential organic contamination, because at present very little is known about the effect of terrestrial weathering in the Antarctic environment as it pertains to perturbing an indigenous organic distribution within a meteoritic matrix; and [4] to diversify the range of organic compounds studied to include species that can serve as unique biological markers - "molecular fossils" - derived from once living organisms. In order to achieve this, three specific goals were outlined for the funding period 06/01/97 to 02/28/98. They were: [1] to investigate the effects of terrestrial weathering and organic contamination of meteoritic samples collected from Antarctica; [2] to reproduce and extend upon the measurements of PAHs in ALH84001 with the aim of establishing or refuting the indigeneity of these species; and [3] to extend the analysis of organic compounds in ALH84001 and EETA79001 to address compounds that are considered to be more biologically relevant than PAHS. All three were successfully accomplished, as detailed in the previous performance report. In brief, however, the results achieved were to establish that the PAHs found in ALH84001 were indigenous and not due to contamination, and to determine that a novel and sensitive technique in meteoritic work, capillary zone electrophoresis (CE), could indeed detect amino acids, a potential class of biomarker.

  1. LU-HF Age and Isotope Systematics of ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, M.; Lapen, T. J.; Brandon, A. D.; Beard, B. L.; Shafer, J. T.; Peslier, A. H.

    2009-01-01

    Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 is an orthopyroxenite that is unique among the Martian meteorites in having the oldest inferred crystallization age (approx..4.5 to 4.0 Gyr) [e.g., 1-6 and references therein 7]. Its ancient origin makes this stone a critical constraint on early history of Mars, in particular the evolution of different planetary crust and mantle reservoirs. However, because there is significant variability in reported crystallization ages, determination of initial isotope compositions is imprecise making assessment of planetary reservoirs difficult. Here we report a new Lu-Hf mineral isochron age, initial Hf-176/Hf-177 isotope composition, and inferred Martian mantle source compositions for ALH84001 that place constraints on longlived source reservoirs for the enriched shergottite suite of Martian meteorites including Shergotty, Zagami, NWA4468, NWA856, RBT04262, LAR06319, and Los Angeles. Sm-Nd isotope analyses are under way for the same mineral aliquots analyzed for Lu-Hf. The Lu-Hf system was utilized because Lu and Hf are both lithophile and refractory and are not easily redistributed during short-lived thermal pulses associated with shock metamorphism. Moreover, chromite has relatively modest Hf concentrations with very low Lu/Hf ratios [9] yielding tight constraints on initial Hf-176/Hf-177 isotope compositions

  2. Magnetite whiskers and platelets in the ALH84001 Martian meteorite: evidence of vapor phase growth.

    PubMed

    Bradley, J P; Harvey, R P; McSween, H Y

    1996-01-01

    Nanometer-sized magnetite crystals associated with carbonates in fracture zones within Martian meteorite ALH84001 have been examined using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Some of the crystals exhibit distinctive morphologies: filamentary rods and ribbon, and platelets. The rods and ribbons are elongated along the crystallographic [100] and [111] directions. Some of the rods contain microstructural defects indicating that they grew by spiral growth about screw dislocations. Platelets are flattened along the [100] and [110] directions. These unique morphologies and microstructures constrain the growth conditions of magnetite. The whiskers and platelets most likely formed in the temperature range 500-800 degrees C by direct condensation from a vapor or precipitation from a supercritical fluid, and their properties are inconsistent with a biogenic origin. PMID:11541129

  3. Magnetite whiskers and platelets in the ALH84001 Martian meteorite: evidence of vapor phase growth.

    PubMed

    Bradley, J P; Harvey, R P; McSween, H Y

    1996-01-01

    Nanometer-sized magnetite crystals associated with carbonates in fracture zones within Martian meteorite ALH84001 have been examined using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Some of the crystals exhibit distinctive morphologies: filamentary rods and ribbon, and platelets. The rods and ribbons are elongated along the crystallographic [100] and [111] directions. Some of the rods contain microstructural defects indicating that they grew by spiral growth about screw dislocations. Platelets are flattened along the [100] and [110] directions. These unique morphologies and microstructures constrain the growth conditions of magnetite. The whiskers and platelets most likely formed in the temperature range 500-800 degrees C by direct condensation from a vapor or precipitation from a supercritical fluid, and their properties are inconsistent with a biogenic origin.

  4. Evidence for the extraterrestrial origin of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Clemett, S J; Dulay, M T; Gillette, J S; Chillier, X D; Mahajan, T B; Zare, R N

    1998-01-01

    Possible sources of terrestrial contamination are considered for the observation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the Martian meteorite ALH84001. Contamination is concluded to be negligible. PMID:9809015

  5. Geochemistry of the Martian meteorite ALH84001, revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrat, Jean-Alix; Bollinger, Claire

    2010-04-01

    Major and trace element abundances were determined on powders prepared from four distinct chips from Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 to constrain the bulk rock composition, and to assess the trace element abundances of orthopyroxenes and phosphates. Our new determinations were used to evaluate the composition of the parental melt of this stone. An unrealistic light rare earth element (REE)-enriched parental melt is calculated from the composition of the orthopyroxene and relevant equilibrium partition coefficients. The involvement of a small amount of trapped melt and subsolidus reequilibrations between orthopyroxene and the interstitial phases can account for this discrepancy. A parental melt that displays a trace element pattern (REE, Zr, and Hf) that closely resembles enriched shergottites such as Zagami or Los Angeles is calculated if these effects are taken into account. These results suggest that some shergottitic melts were already erupted on Mars during the Noachian.

  6. Pre-4.0 billion year weathering on Mars constrained by Rb-Sr geochronology on meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Brian L.; Ludois, James M.; Lapen, Thomas J.; Johnson, Clark M.

    2013-01-01

    The timing and nature of aqueous alteration of meteorite ALH84001 has important implications for the history of water on early Mars, the evolution of the Martian atmosphere, and the potential for early Mars habitability. Rubidium-Sr isotope analyses of mineral separates from igneous-textured and carbonate-rich aliquots of Martian meteorite ALH84001 constrain the age of alteration and the source of fluids. The carbonate-rich aliquot defines a precise Rb-Sr isochron between maskelynite, orthopyroxene, and chromite of 3952±22 Ma, and this is interpreted to represent a shock resetting event that was broadly coeval with carbonate precipitation. Carbonate, bulk rock, and multi-mineral separates all have high 87Sr/86Sr ratios that can only have been produced by alteration via a fluid derived through interaction with high Rb/Sr phyllosilicates that were produced prior to 3950 Ma. These data confirm that the source of Sr in the fluids was previously altered crustal rock, consistent with fluids that underwent low-temperature water-rock interaction (Eiler et al., 2002; Halvey et al., 2011). These results therefore provide evidence for wet, clay-rich conditions on the surface of Mars prior to ˜4.2 Ga.

  7. Hydrogeological Interpretation of Candidate Origin Sites for Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, V. C.

    1996-09-01

    Barlow (this meeting) has identified two potential source craters for the martian meteorite ALH84001. The craters are at 11.7(deg) S, 243.3(deg) W (Mare Tyrrhenum site) and 14.0(deg) S, 343.5(deg) W (Sinus Sabaeus site). As noted by Barlow, both craters lie in the heavily cratered terrain (HCT) and are adjacent to fluvial valleys. Here I explore the fluvial history of these areas based upon the surrounding valley morphology. The most prominent valley network at the Sabaeus site is Evros Vallis. This wide, flat-floored valley is approximately 600 km long with an average width of 2.5 km and a depth of 220 m. The eroded volume of the entire Evros network is approximately 6x 10(11) m(3) . This is typical for networks located in the heavily cratered terrain (e.g. Warrego and Parana Valles). Evros is also an isolated valley system. No similar networks are found in the surrounding terrain. Thus it is unlikely that Evros formed as a result of widespread rainfall. A localized water source, such as discharge of a hydrothermal system or localized melting of snowfall, seems more consistent. Previous modeling has demonstrated that only hydrothermal systems associated with high permeability sub-surfaces can discharge sufficient water to form a valley network. The bulk of the discharge from such systems is consequently low temperature, slightly heated water. Precipitation of calcium carbonate by low temperature fluids is consistent with most interpretations of the geochemistry of ALH84001. Available imagery at the Tyrrhenum site is of lesser quality. While eroded units of the HCT are nearby, there are no comparable well developed valley networks at this site. Erosion is instead manifested predominantly as gullies on slopes. This style of erosion suggests that water was not present at this site for the length of time as at the more integrated Sabaeus site. The superposition of fluidized ejecta blankets suggests however that ground water or ground ice was still present at this

  8. Spectral analysis of ALH 84001, a meteorite from Mars. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J.; Pieters, C.; Mustard, J.; Pratt, S.; Hiroi, T.

    1994-01-01

    ALH 84001 has recently been reclassified as a meteorite from Mars (SNC) and contains more than 90% orthopyroxene with minor chromite and accessory phases of augite, maskelynite, and carbonate. This meteorite represents a new class of igneous material from Mars. We have measured reflectance spectra of ALH 84001 as a chip as a powder, dry sieved to less than 125 microns to compare with previous spectral analyses of SNCs and remote observations of Mars. Spectra of the chip and powder in the visible-to-near-infrared region are shown. These spectra are composites of data measured with the RELAB bidirectional spectrometer from 0.3 to 2.55 microns and a Nicolet FTIR for longer wavelengths. As expected, the spectra of the chip have negative slopes and are significantly darker than the spectrum of the particulate sample, which has a positive slope. The strong absorptions near 1 micron and 2 microns are characteristic of low-Ca pyroxene and have band rninima of 0.925 microns and 1.930 microns. The strong absorption near 3 microns is characteristic of water. There is a distinct flattening in the spectrum between 1.0 and 1.5 microns indicating the presence of an additional absorption. This is interpreted to be the result of Fe(2+) in the M1 site of low-Ca pyroxene. Mid-infrared spectra showing the Christiansen feature and the reststrahlen bands are shown for spectra of the powder and of three different locations on the chip. These spectra exhibit several features in this range, some of which are associated with a specific region on the chip. Each of the spectra includes a doublet reststrahlen peak near 1100/cm, and peaks near 880 and 500/cm, which are typical for low-Ca pyroxenes. Weaker features at 940-1000/cm, 600-750/cm, and 530-560/cm are present in spectra from some locations on the chip, but not others, implying compositional and textural variation.

  9. High-temperature Mars-to-Earth transfer of meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Kyoungwon; Reiners, Peter W.

    2007-08-01

    Martian meteorites provide crucial insights into Martian evolution and interplanetary mass transfer, including the potential for exogenesis. ALH84001 is the oldest Martian meteorite discovered so far, and has been used to derive important conclusions about Martian surface temperatures and very low-temperature Mars-to-Earth transfer. To better constrain the thermal evolution and shock metamorphic history of ALH84001, we applied (U-Th)/He thermochronometry to single grains of phosphate (merrillite) from ALH84001. The (U-Th)/He ages of individual phosphate grains in ALH84001 range from 60 Ma to 1.8 Ga, with a weighted mean of ~830 Ma. This broad age distribution reflects multiple diffusion domains, and requires a relatively high-temperature resetting event younger than ˜ 60 Ma. These new data are combined with the published whole-rock (maskelynite as a main Ar reservoir) 40Ar/ 39Ar age spectra which show 5-8% fractional loss of radiogenic 40Ar since 4.0 Ga. He diffusion in both terrestrial and extraterrestrial apatite has a significantly higher activation energy (138 ˜ 184 kJ/mol) than Ar diffusion in maskelynite (75 kJ/mol), leading to an important "kinetic crossover" in fractional loss contours for these systems. Taken together, the phosphate (U-Th)/He and whole-rock 40Ar/ 39Ar ages require both very low surface temperatures on Mars, and one or more short-lived, high-temperature, shock events after 4.0 Ga. We suggest that the last shock event occurred with ejection of ALH84001 from Mars, and reached a peak temperature of approximately 400 °C. These results undermine the proposed low-temperature ejection hypothesis for ALH84001, but support long-lived extremely cold Martian surface temperatures.

  10. Low-Temperature Thermal History of Martian Meteorite ALH84001 from (U-Th)/He Thermochronometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K.; Reiners, P. W.

    2005-03-01

    Single grain (U-Th)/He ages from ALH84001 are interpreted either by (1) a single intense (maximum temperature of ~430 ºC) shock event at 15 Ma, or (2) stronger shock at sometime between (0.3-0.7) Ga and 15 Ma, followed by a minor shock at 15 Ma.

  11. [Pros and cons for Martian life: scientific debate on ALH84001].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, M

    1997-03-01

    Scientific debate related to possible martian life is summarized in this article. Even there is no firm conclusion yet to convince the existence of life on Mars, intensive studies on the meteorite ALH84001 have invoked many valuable findings. PMID:11540351

  12. A Hypothesis for the Abiotic and Non-Martian Origins of Putative Signs of Ancient Martian Life in ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    2001-01-01

    Putative evidence of martian life in ALH84001 can be explained by abiotic and non-martian processes consistent with the meteorite's geological history. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. High-Temperature Mars-to-Earth Transfer of Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K.; Reiners, P. W.

    2006-12-01

    Mars is thought to have experienced intense volcanism, impact cratering and fluvial resurfacing during its first ~1.5 Byr, followed by a less-energetic, colder period. Rare meteoritic samples of the Martian crust provide some of the only direct evidence by which to test and develop models of the paleoenvironmental evolution of the planet, its potential habitability by life, and the process of interplanetary mass transport. Thermal histories of Martian meteorites provide crucial evidence bearing not only on long-term, ambient near-surface conditions on Mars, but also on whether meteoroids can be ejected from their large parent bodies without significant heating, a favorable condition for exogenesis (including panspermia) hypotheses. One of the best samples to address these issues is Martian meteorite ALH84001, because it has the oldest crystallization age of ~4.5 Ga, is thought to have resided near the surface since ~4.0 Ga, and has been suggested to have experienced no significant heating during or after its ejection from Mars at 15 Ma. To better constrain the thermal evolution and shock metamorphic history of ALH84001, we applied (U-Th)/He thermochronometry to single grains of merrillite and chlorapatite from ALH84001. The (U-Th)/He ages of individual phosphate grains in ALH84001 range from 60 Ma to 1.8 Ga, with a weighted mean of ~830 Ma. This broad age distribution reflects multiple diffusion domains, and requires a relatively high-temperature resetting event younger than ~60 Ma. These new data are combined with the published whole-rock (maskelynite as a main Ar reservoir) 40Ar/39Ar age spectra which show 5-8 % fractional loss of 40Ar since 4.0 Ga. He diffusion in both terrestrial and extraterrestrial apatite has a significantly higher activation energy (138 ~ 184 kJ/mol) than Ar diffusion in maskelynite (75 kJ/mol), leading to an important "kinetic crossover" in fractional loss contours for these systems. Taken together, the phosphate (U-Th)/He and maskelynite

  14. Atomic force microscopy imaging of fragments from the Martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Steele, A; Goddard, D; Beech, I B; Tapper, R C; Stapleton, D; Smith, J R

    1998-01-01

    A combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) techniques, as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods has been used to study fragments of the Martian meteorite ALH84001. Images of the same areas on the meteorite were obtained prior to and following gold/palladium coating by mapping the surface of the fragment using ESEM coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Viewing of the fragments demonstrated the presence of structures, previously described as nanofossils by McKay et al. (Search for past life on Mars--possible relic biogenic activity in martian meteorite ALH84001. Science, 1996, pp. 924-930) of NASA who used SEM imaging of gold-coated meteorite samples. Careful imaging of the fragments revealed that the observed structures were not an artefact introduced by the coating procedure. PMID:11541278

  15. Atomic force microscopy imaging of fragments from the Martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Steele, A; Goddard, D; Beech, I B; Tapper, R C; Stapleton, D; Smith, J R

    1998-01-01

    A combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) techniques, as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods has been used to study fragments of the Martian meteorite ALH84001. Images of the same areas on the meteorite were obtained prior to and following gold/palladium coating by mapping the surface of the fragment using ESEM coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Viewing of the fragments demonstrated the presence of structures, previously described as nanofossils by McKay et al. (Search for past life on Mars--possible relic biogenic activity in martian meteorite ALH84001. Science, 1996, pp. 924-930) of NASA who used SEM imaging of gold-coated meteorite samples. Careful imaging of the fragments revealed that the observed structures were not an artefact introduced by the coating procedure.

  16. Atomic force microscopy imaging of fragments from the Martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, A.; Goddard, D.; Beech, I. B.; Tapper, R. C.; Stapleton, D.; Smith, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    A combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) techniques, as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods has been used to study fragments of the Martian meteorite ALH84001. Images of the same areas on the meteorite were obtained prior to and following gold/palladium coating by mapping the surface of the fragment using ESEM coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Viewing of the fragments demonstrated the presence of structures, previously described as nanofossils by McKay et al. (Search for past life on Mars--possible relic biogenic activity in martian meteorite ALH84001. Science, 1996, pp. 924-930) of NASA who used SEM imaging of gold-coated meteorite samples. Careful imaging of the fragments revealed that the observed structures were not an artefact introduced by the coating procedure.

  17. Ar-Ar chronology of the Martian meteorite ALH84001: evidence for the timing of the early bombardment of Mars.

    PubMed

    Turner, G; Knott, S F; Ash, R D; Gilmour, J D

    1997-09-01

    ALH84001, a cataclastic cumulate orthopyroxenite meteorite from Mars, has been dated by Ar-Ar stepped heating and laser probe methods. Both methods give ages close to 3,900 Ma. The age calculated is dependent on assumptions made about 39Ar recoil effects and on whether significant quantities of 40Ar from the Martian atmosphere are trapped in the meteorite. If, as suggested by xenon and nitrogen isotope studies, Martian atmospheric argon is present, then it must reside predominantly in the K-rich phase maskelynite. Independently determined 129Xe abundances in the maskelynite can be used to place limits on the concentration of the atmospheric 40Ar. These indicate a reduction of around 80 Ma to ages calculated on the assumption that no Martian atmosphere is present. After this correction, the nominal ages obtained are: 3940 +/- 50, 3870 +/- 80, and 3970 +/- 100 Ma. by stepped heating, and 3900 +/- 90 Ma by laser probe (1 sigma statistical errors), giving a weighted mean value of 3,920 Ma. Ambiguities in the interpretation of 39Ar recoil effects and in the contribution of Martian atmospheric 40Ar lead to uncertainties in the Ar-Ar age which are difficult to quantify, but we suggest that the true value lies somewhere between 4,050 and 3,800 Ma. This age probably dates a period of annealing of the meteorite subsequent to the shock event which gave it its cataclastic texture. The experiments provide the first evidence of an event occurring on Mars coincident with the time of the late heavy bombardment of the Moon and may reflect a similar period of bombardment in the Southern Highlands of Mars. Whether the age determined bears any relationship to the time of carbonate deposition in ALH84001 is not known. Such a link depends on whether the temperature associated with the metasomatic activity was sufficient to cause argon loss from the maskelynite and/or whether the metasomatism and metamorphism were linked in time through a common heat source. PMID:11541217

  18. Bacterial mineralization patterns in basaltic aquifers: implications for possible life in martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Keprta, K L; McKay, D S; Wentworth, S J; Stevens, T O; Taunton, A E; Allen, C C; Coleman, A; Gibson, E K; Romanek, C S

    1998-11-01

    To explore the formation and preservation of biogenic features in igneous rocks, we have examined the organisms in experimental basaltic microcosms using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Four types of microorganisms were recognized on the basis of size, morphology, and chemical composition. Some of the organisms mineralized rapidly, whereas others show no evidence of mineralization. Many mineralized cells are hollow and do not contain evidence of microstructure. Filaments, either attached or no longer attached to organisms, are common. Unattached filaments are mineralized and are most likely bacterial appendages (e.g., prosthecae). Features similar in size and morphology to unattached, mineralized filaments are recognized in martian meteorite ALH84001.

  19. Bacterial mineralization patterns in basaltic aquifers: Implications for possible life in Martian meteorite ALH84001

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas-Keprta, K.L.; Wentworth, S.J.; Allen, C.C.; McKay, D.S.; Gibson, E.K. Jr.; Stevens, T.O.; Taunton, A.E.; Coleman, A.; Romanek, C.S.

    1998-11-01

    To explore the formation and preservation of biogenic features in igneous rocks, the authors have examined the organisms in experimental basaltic microcosms using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Four types of microorganisms were recognized on the basis of size, morphology, and chemical composition. Some of the organisms mineralized rapidly, whereas others show no evidence of mineralization. Many mineralized cells are hollow and do not contain evidence of microstructure. Filaments, either attached or no longer attached to organisms, are common. Unattached filaments are mineralized and are most likely bacterial appendages (e.g., prosthecae). Features similar in size and morphology to unattached, mineralized filaments are recognized in martial meteorite ALH84001.

  20. A low temperature transfer of ALH84001 from Mars to Earth.

    PubMed

    Weiss, B P; Kirschvink, J L; Baudenbacher, F J; Vali, H; Peters, N T; Macdonald, F A; Wikswo, J P

    2000-10-27

    The ejection of material from Mars is thought to be caused by large impacts that would heat much of the ejecta to high temperatures. Images of the magnetic field of martian meteorite ALH84001 reveal a spatially heterogeneous pattern of magnetization associated with fractures and rock fragments. Heating the meteorite to 40 degrees C reduces the intensity of some magnetic features, indicating that the interior of the rock has not been above this temperature since before its ejection from the surface of Mars. Because this temperature cannot sterilize most bacteria or eukarya, these data support the hypothesis that meteorites could transfer life between planets in the solar system. PMID:11052940

  1. A low temperature transfer of ALH84001 from Mars to Earth.

    PubMed

    Weiss, B P; Kirschvink, J L; Baudenbacher, F J; Vali, H; Peters, N T; Macdonald, F A; Wikswo, J P

    2000-10-27

    The ejection of material from Mars is thought to be caused by large impacts that would heat much of the ejecta to high temperatures. Images of the magnetic field of martian meteorite ALH84001 reveal a spatially heterogeneous pattern of magnetization associated with fractures and rock fragments. Heating the meteorite to 40 degrees C reduces the intensity of some magnetic features, indicating that the interior of the rock has not been above this temperature since before its ejection from the surface of Mars. Because this temperature cannot sterilize most bacteria or eukarya, these data support the hypothesis that meteorites could transfer life between planets in the solar system.

  2. Bacterial mineralization patterns in basaltic aquifers: implications for possible life in martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; McKay, D. S.; Wentworth, S. J.; Stevens, T. O.; Taunton, A. E.; Allen, C. C.; Coleman, A.; Gibson, E. K. Jr; Romanek, C. S.

    1998-01-01

    To explore the formation and preservation of biogenic features in igneous rocks, we have examined the organisms in experimental basaltic microcosms using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Four types of microorganisms were recognized on the basis of size, morphology, and chemical composition. Some of the organisms mineralized rapidly, whereas others show no evidence of mineralization. Many mineralized cells are hollow and do not contain evidence of microstructure. Filaments, either attached or no longer attached to organisms, are common. Unattached filaments are mineralized and are most likely bacterial appendages (e.g., prosthecae). Features similar in size and morphology to unattached, mineralized filaments are recognized in martian meteorite ALH84001.

  3. Bacterial mineralization patterns in basaltic aquifers: implications for possible life in martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Keprta, K L; McKay, D S; Wentworth, S J; Stevens, T O; Taunton, A E; Allen, C C; Coleman, A; Gibson, E K; Romanek, C S

    1998-11-01

    To explore the formation and preservation of biogenic features in igneous rocks, we have examined the organisms in experimental basaltic microcosms using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Four types of microorganisms were recognized on the basis of size, morphology, and chemical composition. Some of the organisms mineralized rapidly, whereas others show no evidence of mineralization. Many mineralized cells are hollow and do not contain evidence of microstructure. Filaments, either attached or no longer attached to organisms, are common. Unattached filaments are mineralized and are most likely bacterial appendages (e.g., prosthecae). Features similar in size and morphology to unattached, mineralized filaments are recognized in martian meteorite ALH84001. PMID:11541429

  4. Chains of magnetite crystals in the meteorite ALH84001: evidence of biological origin.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, E I; Wierzchos, J; Ascaso, C; Winklhofer, M

    2001-02-27

    The presence of magnetite crystal chains, considered missing evidence for the biological origin of magnetite in ALH84001 [Thomas-Keprta, K. L., Bazylinski, D. A., Kirschvink, J. L., Clemett, S. J., McKay, D. S., Wentworth, S. J., Vali, H., Gibson, E. K., Jr., & Romanek, C. S. (2000) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 64, 4049-4081], is demonstrated by high-power stereo backscattered scanning electron microscopy. Five characteristics of such chains (uniform crystal size and shape within chains, gaps between crystals, orientation of elongated crystals along the chain axis, flexibility of chains, and a halo that is a possible remnant of a membrane around chains), observed or inferred to be present in magnetotactic bacteria but incompatible with a nonbiological origin, are shown to be present. Although it is unlikely that magnetotactic bacteria were ever alive in ALH84001, decomposed remains of such organisms could have been deposited in cracks in the rock while it was still on the surface on Mars. PMID:11226212

  5. Chains of magnetite crystals in the meteorite ALH84001: Evidence of biological origin

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, E. Imre; Wierzchos, Jacek; Ascaso, Carmen; Winklhofer, Michael

    2001-01-01

    The presence of magnetite crystal chains, considered missing evidence for the biological origin of magnetite in ALH84001 [Thomas-Keprta, K. L., Bazylinski, D. A., Kirschvink, J. L., Clemett, S. J., McKay, D. S., Wentworth, S. J., Vali, H., Gibson, E. K., Jr., & Romanek, C. S. (2000) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 64, 4049–4081], is demonstrated by high-power stereo backscattered scanning electron microscopy. Five characteristics of such chains (uniform crystal size and shape within chains, gaps between crystals, orientation of elongated crystals along the chain axis, flexibility of chains, and a halo that is a possible remnant of a membrane around chains), observed or inferred to be present in magnetotactic bacteria but incompatible with a nonbiological origin, are shown to be present. Although it is unlikely that magnetotactic bacteria were ever alive in ALH84001, decomposed remains of such organisms could have been deposited in cracks in the rock while it was still on the surface on Mars. PMID:11226212

  6. Magnetite Formation from Thermal Decomposition of Siderite: Implications for Inorganic Magnetite Formation in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, RIchard V.

    2002-01-01

    A biogenic mechanism for formation of a subpopulation magnetite in Martian meteorite ALH84001 has been suggested [McKay et al., 1996; Thomas-Keprta, et al., 2000]. We are developing experimental evidence for an alternating working hypothesis, that the subpopulation was produced inorganically by the thermal decomposition of siderite [Golden et al., 2000].

  7. Constraints on the Thermal History of Martian Meteorites ALH84001 and MIL03346 by Single Crystal XRD, Electron Microprobe and Mössbauer Analyses of Ortho- and Clinopyroxene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domeneghetti, M. C.; Fioretti, A. M.; Cámara, F.; Carraro, A.; McCammon, C.; Tazzoli, V.

    2007-07-01

    Constraints on the thermal history of meteorites can be established by estimating the Fe2+-Mg order degree in their pyroxene using single-crystal XRD. We present here the data obtained on martian meteorites ALH84001 and MIL03346.

  8. Micro-Spectroscopy as a Tool for Detecting Micron-Scale Mineral Variations Across a Rock Surface: An Example Using a Thin Section of Martian Meteorite ALH 84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, J. B.; Bishop, J. L.

    2003-03-01

    Visible and near-infrared spectra of a portion of martian meteorite ALH84001 were acquired using a high resolution imaging microscope to investigate imaging spectroscopy for mineral detection at small scales.

  9. A Younger Age for ALH84001 and Its Geochemical Link to Shergottite Sources in Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapen, T. J.; Righter, M.; Brandon, A. D.; Debaille, V.; Beard, B. L.; Shafer, J. T.; Peslier, A. H.

    2010-04-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 (ALH) is the oldest known igneous rock from Mars and has been used to constrain its early history. Lutetium-hafnium (Lu-Hf) isotope data for ALH indicate an igneous age of 4.091 ± 0.030 billion years, nearly coeval with an interval of heavy bombardment and cessation of the martian core dynamo and magnetic field. The calculated Lu/Hf and Sm/Nd (samarium/neodymium) ratios of the ALH parental magma source indicate that it must have undergone extensive igneous processing associated with the crystallization of a deep magma ocean. This same mantle source region also produced the shergottite magmas (dated 150 to 570 million years ago), possibly indicating uniform igneous processes in Mars for nearly 4 billion years.

  10. A younger age for ALH84001 and its geochemical link to shergottite sources in Mars.

    PubMed

    Lapen, T J; Righter, M; Brandon, A D; Debaille, V; Beard, B L; Shafer, J T; Peslier, A H

    2010-04-16

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 (ALH) is the oldest known igneous rock from Mars and has been used to constrain its early history. Lutetium-hafnium (Lu-Hf) isotope data for ALH indicate an igneous age of 4.091 +/- 0.030 billion years, nearly coeval with an interval of heavy bombardment and cessation of the martian core dynamo and magnetic field. The calculated Lu/Hf and Sm/Nd (samarium/neodymium) ratios of the ALH parental magma source indicate that it must have undergone extensive igneous processing associated with the crystallization of a deep magma ocean. This same mantle source region also produced the shergottite magmas (dated 150 to 570 million years ago), possibly indicating uniform igneous processes in Mars for nearly 4 billion years. PMID:20395507

  11. A younger age for ALH84001 and its geochemical link to shergottite sources in Mars.

    PubMed

    Lapen, T J; Righter, M; Brandon, A D; Debaille, V; Beard, B L; Shafer, J T; Peslier, A H

    2010-04-16

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 (ALH) is the oldest known igneous rock from Mars and has been used to constrain its early history. Lutetium-hafnium (Lu-Hf) isotope data for ALH indicate an igneous age of 4.091 +/- 0.030 billion years, nearly coeval with an interval of heavy bombardment and cessation of the martian core dynamo and magnetic field. The calculated Lu/Hf and Sm/Nd (samarium/neodymium) ratios of the ALH parental magma source indicate that it must have undergone extensive igneous processing associated with the crystallization of a deep magma ocean. This same mantle source region also produced the shergottite magmas (dated 150 to 570 million years ago), possibly indicating uniform igneous processes in Mars for nearly 4 billion years.

  12. Three-Dimensional Morphological Analysis of ALH84001 Magnetite Using Electron Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Shimmin, Joel; Morphew, Mary; McIntosh, J. Richard; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Vali, Hojatollah

    2003-01-01

    We report here the crystal morphologies of MV-1 and ALH84001 magnetites as calculated by back-projection using electron tomography. In the present study, we used a 300 keV TEM with a field emission gun (Tecnai F-30 from FEI Inc.), equipped with a 2048 x 2048 pixel CCD camera from Gatan Inc. to image magnetite crystals over tilt ranges of approx. +/- 72 deg in 2 deg tilt intervals. The images were aligned for back-projection, either manually, or through the use of fiducial 5 nm Au spheres affixed to the specimen prior to microscopy. Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions were computed using weighted back-projection of the tilted views. The tomograms were viewed and analyzed as a series of slices 1.0 nm thick, taken parallel to the specimen-supporting grid, using the IMOD software package. The shape of each magnetite crystal was determined by defining the external contour of a given magnetite in each slice and assembling a stack of these contours in 3-D. To aid in visualization, the stacked contour array was reduced to an optimal mesh by Delaunay triangulation. The surface normal to each of the triangles in the mesh was calculated and the triangle faces colored according to the orientation of that surface normal relative to the principal crystallographic axis of magnetite. Green surfaces correspond to {111} orientations, blue surfaces to {100} orientations, and red surfaces to {110} orientations. Triangles whose surface normal did not correspond to one of the principal axes were colored gray. Within the experimental and numerical uncertainties of the deconvolution, the tomographic reconstruction of both MV-1 and ALH84001 magnetites are equivalent and correspond to a truncated hexa-octahedral morphology.

  13. Study of a possible magnetite biosignature in Martian meteorite ALH84001: Implications for the biological toxicology of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie Louise

    "Why do we have such a longstanding fascination with Mars? Very simply put, it's about life. The search for life elsewhere in our Solar System has been a major driver for exploring Mars, pretty much since we began seriously looking at that planet."1 The major objective of this work is to describe signs of possible life, that is biosignatures, in rocks from Mars if indeed they are present. Biosignatures are specific identifiable properties that result from living things; they may be implanted in the environment and may persist even if the living thing is no longer present. Over 100 mineral biosignatures have been discussed in the literature; however, only one, magnetite, is addressed by this study. Magnetite is found in many rock types on earth and in meteorites. Previous studies of terrestrial magnetite have used few properties, such as size and chemical composition, to determine one of the modes of origins for magnetite (e.g., biogenic, inorganic). This study has established a rigorous set of six criteria for the identification of intracellularly precipitated biogenic magnetite. These criteria have been applied to a subpopulation of magnetites embedded within carbonates in Martian meteorite ALH84001. These magnetites are found to be chemically and physically indistinguishable from those produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1, hence, they were likely formed by biogenic processes on ancient Mars. These criteria may be also used to distinguish origins for magnetites from terrestrial samples with complex or unknown histories. The presence of purported past life on early Mars suggests that, if life once began it may still exist today, possibly in oases in the Martian subsurface. Future manned missions should consider potential hazards of an extant biological environment(s) on Mars. 1 Quote attributed to Jack Farmer of Arizona State University in discussing NASA's program of Mars Exploration (see "Deciphering Mars: Follow the Water," Astrobiology Magazine Sept

  14. FTIR Analysis of Water in Pyroxene and Plagioclase in ALH 84001 and Nakhlites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, A. H.; Cintala, M. J.; Montes, R.; Cardenas, F.

    2016-01-01

    with crustal reservoirs or hydrothermal fluids. Here, nominally anhydrous minerals (pyroxene, olivine, plagioclase, or maskelynite) in orthopyroxenite ALH 84001 and selected nakhlites are analyzed for water and major elements, in order to determine 1) whether they contain any water; 2) if they do, what controls its distribution (crystallization, degassing, hydrothermal or impact processes); and 3) if any of these measurements can be used to infer the water contents of the parent magma and their mantle sources. A shock-reverberation experiment was also performed on terrestrial orthopyroxenes (opx) to simulate the heavily shocked conditions of ALH 84001 (> 31 GPa [17]).

  15. A Single Grain U-Pb and Pb-Pb Dating and D/H Ratios of the Phosphate Mineral in ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, M.; Ota, Y.; Takahata, N.; Sano, Y.; Sugiura, N.

    2012-12-01

    There are many studies that determine U-Pb and Pb-Pb ages of phosphates in Martian meteorites. Phosphate minerals such as an apatite (Ca5(PO4)3[OH, F, Cl]) and a whitlockite (Ca9 [Mg, Fe2+] (PO4)6 PO3OH) contain water in the form of OH, which provides us hydrogen isotopic information. The goal of this study is to obtain a crystallization age and hydrogen isotopic distributions of each grain and to relate them to the surface evolution of Mars. ALH84001 is known to be about 4 billion years old [1]. Its carbonates and maskelynite showed high D/H ratios with large deviations, which indicates large fractionation at early Mars surface [2]. Due to small grain sizes and limited spatial resolutions of measurements, previous studies used several grains for one age or one series of isotopic distributions. Here we determined single grain ages and D/H ratios using NanoSIMS with a high spatial resolution. A thin section of ALH84001 was polished and carbon-coated. The section was then observed by SEM-EDS to locate phosphate minerals. A large phosphate grain (>100μm) was found and analyzed by NanoSIMS. A ~10nA O- primary ion beam (with spot diameter of ~20μm) was used for U-Pb and Pb-Pb measurements and a ~1nA (spot diameter of <10μm) was for D/H ratio measurements. An apatite from a Prairie Lake circular complex, PRAP, with a known age (1156 Ma; [3]) was used as a standard for U-Pb. The D/H ratio and the water content of an apatite from Morocco were measured by conventional methods to use as a D/H standard. 238U-206Pb isochron, 207Pb-206Pb isochron, and total U-Pb isochron age, a regression line in 3-D space (238U/206Pb-207Pb/206Pb-204Pb/206Pb) showed a consistent age ~4 Ga. The ages obtained in this study were also consistent with previous U-Pb dating within experimental errors. D/H ratios in the same grain showed high values and a considerable deviation, which seems to be due to mixing of terrestrial water. References: [1] Terada K. et al. 2003 Meteoritics & Planet. Sci. 38

  16. Ion microprobe measurements of 18O/ 16O ratios of phosphate minerals in the Martian meteorites ALH84001 and Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, James P.; Blake, Ruth E.; Coath, Christopher D.

    2003-06-01

    Oxygen isotope ratios of merrillite and chlorapatite in the Martian meteorites ALH84001 and Los Angeles have been measured by ion microprobe in multicollector mode. δ 18O values of phosphate minerals measured in situ range from ˜3 to 6‰, and are similar to Martian meteorite whole-rock values, as well as the δ 18O of igneous phosphate on Earth. These results suggest that the primary, abiotic, igneous phosphate reservoir on Mars is similar in oxygen isotopic composition to the basaltic phosphate reservoir on Earth. This is an important first step in the characterization of Martian phosphate reservoirs for the use of δ 18O of phosphate minerals as a biomarker for life on Mars. Cumulative textural, major-element, and isotopic evidence presented here suggest a primary, igneous origin for the phosphates in Los Angeles and ALH84001; textural and chemical evidence suggests that phosphates in ALH84001 were subsequently shock-melted in a later event.

  17. Implications of noble gases in a recently recognized Martian meteorite (ALH84001) for the degassing history of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, T. D.

    1994-01-01

    For terrestrial planets, atmospheric compositions are not static, but evolve with time, in part due to degassing of the interior. Unfortunately, the evolution is slow enough that it is usually not observable on human timescales, or even on the timescales of rocks that preserve samples of Earth's ancient atmosphere. Preliminary results on a recently recognized Martian meteorite, ALH84001, indicate that it is a very old rock, and has a relatively high noble gas content suggestive of atmospheric incorporation, but with an isotopic composition slightly inconsistent with currently known Martian reservoirs. Hence, this rock may provide a sample of ancient Martian atmosphere, which can be used to test models of volatile evolution (in particular, degassing) on Mars. ALH84001 is a cumulate orthopyroxenite. Although originally classified as a diogenite, its oxygen isotopes, and several chemical and petrographic features, strong suggest that it is, like the SNC meteorites, Martian. A Sm-Nd crystallization age of 4.5 Ga has been reported. The meteorite is rich in noble gases, compared to most SNC's. In many respects the noble gases are typical of SNC meteorites. However, there are some subtle differences. In particular, the Xe isotopes in SNC meteorites can be explained as a mixture of Martian atmospheric Xe (as represented by glass in EETA 79001), the Xe in the dunite Chassigny (usually assumed to be representative of the Martian interior, and with lower (129)Xe/(132)Xe, (134)Xe/(132)Xe and (136)Xe/(132)Xe ratios), and later additions from known processes like fission, spallation and terrestrial contamination. The isotopic composition of ALH84001 is inconsistent (at greater than 2-3 sigma) with any mixture of those components. Even if no accumulation of fission Xe during the age of the rock is assumed, there is too little (136)Xe and (134)Xe for the amount of (129)Xe measured.

  18. The search for terrestrial nanobacteria as possible analogs for purported Martian nanofossils in the Martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Stevens, Todd O.; Golden, D. C.; Allen, Carlton C.; Gibson, E. K.

    1997-03-01

    Basalts from the Columbia River (CRB) are studied in order to examine the igneous rock types similar to the main lithology of ALH84001. High resolution SEM and TEM are used to examine Columbia River surfaces for microorganisms in situ and those extracted from the basalt surface. Philips XL 40 field emission gun SEM microscope observations show the presence of small, nanometer-scale coccoid (spheroidal) bacteria on DC-06 and DB-11. It is suggested that these forms may be nanobacteria or appendages of bacteria from CRB samples. Another possibility is that they may be dwarf bacteria.

  19. Micro-Spectroscopy as a Tool for Detecting Micron-Scale Mineral Variations Across a Rock Surface: An Example Using a Thin Section of Martian Meteorite ALH 84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, J. Brad; Bishop, Janice L.

    2003-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy is a powerful tool for mineral detection across broad spatial regions. A prototype micro-imaging spectrometer at NASA Ames is tested in this study on a scale of tens to hundreds of microns across rock surfaces. Initial measurements were performed in the visible spectral region on a thin section of martian meteorite ALH 84001.

  20. Carbonate and Magnetite Parageneses as Monitors of Carbon Dioxide and Oxygen Fugacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koziol, Andrea M.

    2000-01-01

    The stable coexistence of siderite with other key minerals, such as graphite or magnetite, is only possible under certain restrictive conditions of CO2 and O2 fugacity. Carbonate parageneses in Mars meteorite ALH 84001 are analyzed.

  1. Organic Carbon Exists in Mars Meteorites: Where is it on the Martian Surface?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, D. S.; Clemett, S. J.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Wentworth, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    The search for organic carbon on Mars has been a major challenge. The first attempt was the Viking GC-MS in situ experiment which gave inconclusive results at two sites oil. After the discovery that the SNC meteorites were from Mars, reported C isotopic compositional information which suggested a reduced C component present in the Martian meteorites reported the presence of reduced C components (i.e., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) associated with the carbonate globules in ALH84001. Jull et al. noted in Nakhla there was acid insoluble C component present with more than 75% of its C lacking any C-14, which is modern-day terrestrial carbon. This C fraction was believed to be either indigenous martian or ancient meteoritic carbon. Fisk et al. have shown textural evidence along with C-enriched areas within fractures in Nakhla and ALH84001. Westall et al. have shown the presence of a large irregular fragment of organic material completely embedded within a chip of ALH84001. Interior samples from the Naklnla SNC made available by the British Museum of Natural History, were analyzed. Petrographic examination of Nakhla showed evidence of fractures (approx.0.5 microns wide) filled with dark brown to black dendritic material with characteristics similar to those observed by. Iddingsite is also present along fractures in olivine. Fracture filling and dendritic material was examined by SEM-EDX, TEM-EDX, Focused Electron Beam microscopy, Laser Raman Spectroscopy, Nano-SIMS Ion Micro-probe, and Stepped-Combustion Static Mass Spectrometry. Observations from the first three techniques are discussed.

  2. Reduced Martian Carbon: Evidence from Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K.; McKay, David S.; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, SImon J.; Pillinger, COlin T.; Wright, Ian P.; Verchovsky, A. P.

    2010-01-01

    Identification of indigenous reduced carbon species on Mars has been a challenge since the first hypotheses about life on Mars were proposed. Ranging from the early astronomical measurements to analyses of samples from the Martian surface in the form of Martian meteorites. The first direct attempt to analyze the carbon species on the surface was in 1976 with the Viking GC-MS in-situ experiment which gave inconclusive results at two sites on Mars [1]. With the recognition in 1983 that samples of the Martian surface were already present on Earth in the form of Martian meteorites by Bogard and Johnson [2] new opportunities became available for direct study of Mars's samples in te rlraesbtrioalratories. Carbon isotopic compositional information suggested a reduced carbon component was present in the Martian meteorites [3-5]. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons associated with carbonate globules in ALH84001 were later identified [6,7]. Jull et al [8] noted that an insoluble component was present within Nakhla and more than 75% of its C lacked any 14C, which is modern-day carbon contaminant. This carbon fraction was believed to be either indigenous (i..e. Martian) or ancient meteoritic carbon phase. Within the fractures of Nakhla and ALH84001, Fisk et al [9,10] identified reduced carbon-enriched areas. Gibson et al. [11] using a combination of NanoSIMS, Focused Electron microscopy, Laser Raman Spectroscopy and Stepped-Combustion Static Mass Spectrometry analyses the presence of possible indigenous reduced carbon components within the 1.3 Ga old Nakhla.

  3. Carbonate Cements from the Sverrefjell and Sigurdfjell Volcanoes, Svalbard Norway: Analogs for Martian Carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, D. F.; Treiman, A. H.; Morris, R.; Bish, D.; Amundsen, H.E.F.; Steele, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Sverrefjell and Sigurdfjell volcanic complexes erupted at 1Ma on Svalbard, Norway. Sverrefjell is a cone of cinders, pillow lavas and dikes; Sigurdfjell is elongate in outcrop and may represent a fissure eruption [1]. The lavas of both volcanos were volatile rich. The volcanos erupted under ice and were subsequently dissected by glaciation (glacial eratics are present on most of Sverrefjell, even on its summit). Eruption beneath an ice sheet is inferred, based on the presence of pillow lavas from near sea level to 1000 m above sea level. Sverrefjell contains the largest fraction of ultramafic xenoliths of any volcanic complex in the world, in places accounting for as much as 50% of the volume of the outcrop. The Sverrefjell and Sigurdfell volcanos contain carbonate cements of several varieties: (1) Amundsen [2] reported Mg-Fe-rich carbonate in sub-mm globules in basalts and ultramafic xenoliths from the volcanos. These globules are the best terrestrial analogs to the carbonate globules in the Mars meteorite ALH84001 [3]. (2) Thick (1-3 cm) coatings of carbonate cement drape the walls of vertical volcanic pipes or conduits on the flanks and near the present summit of Sverrefjell. Similar occurrences are found on Sigurdfjell. (3) Breccia-filled pipes or vents occur on Sverrefjell and Siggurdfjell in which the breccia fragments are cemented by carbonate. The fragments themselves commonly contain carbonate globules similar to those found in the basalts and ultramafic xenoliths.

  4. Bulk and stable isotopic compositions of carbonate minerals in Martian meteorite Allan Hills 84001: no proof of high formation temperature.

    PubMed

    Treiman, A H; Romanek, C S

    1998-07-01

    Understanding the origin of carbonate minerals in the Martian meteorite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 is crucial to evaluating the hypothesis that they contain traces of ancient Martian life. Using arguments based on chemical equilibria among carbonates and fluids, an origin at >650 degrees C (inimical to life) has been proposed. However, the bulk and stable isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals are open to multiple interpretations and so lend no particular support to a high-temperature origin. Other methods (possibly less direct) will have to be used to determine the formation temperature of the carbonates in ALH84001. PMID:11543073

  5. Bulk and Stable Isotopic Compositions of Carbonate Minerals in Martian Meteorite Allan Hills 84001: No Proof of High Formation Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Romanek, Christopher S.

    1998-01-01

    Understanding the origin of carbonate minerals in the Martian meteorite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 is crucial to evaluating the hypothesis that they contain traces of ancient Martian life. Using arguments based on chemical equilibria among carbonates and fluids, an origin at greater than 650 C (inimical to life) has been proposed. However, the bulk and stable isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals are open to multiple interpretations and so lend no particular support to a high-temperature origin. Other methods (possibly less direct) will have to be used to determine the formation temperature of the carbonates in ALH 84001.

  6. Analysis of Arctic Carbonates Profiles by Raman Spectroscopy using Exomars Raman Laser Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansano, A.; López, G.; Medina, J.; Rull, F.

    2011-10-01

    This work details the analysis performed by Raman spectroscopy on carbonate samples from the Svalbard Islands (Norway) in the Arctic. This place is considered a potential Martian analog because the carbonate formation show close similarities with the formation in ALH84001 meteorite. The results obtained illustrate the performances of the Raman instrument included in the Exomars (ESA) mission.

  7. Discovery of Carbonate-Rich Outcrops in the Gusev Crater Columbia Hills by the MER Rover Spirit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Richard V.; Ruff, Steven W.; Gellert, Ralf; Ming, Douglas W.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Clark, Benton C.; Golden, Dadi C.; Siebach, Kirsten L.; Klingelhoefer, Goestar; Schroeder, Christian; Fleischer, Iris; Yen, Albert S.; Squyres, Steven W.

    2010-01-01

    The chemical composition, global abundance, distribution, and formation pathways of carbonates are central to understanding aqueous processes, climate, and habitability of early Mars. The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit analyzed a series of olivine-rich outcrops while descending from the summit region of Husband Hill into the Inner Basin of the Columbia Hills of Gusev Crater to the eastern edge of the El Dorado ripple field in late 2005. Reanalysis of Spirit s mineralogical data from the Moessbauer Spectrometer (MB) and the Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) and chemical data from the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) in 2010, coupled with new laboratory data for carbonate-bearing samples, lead to identification of carbonate in one of the outcrops (Comanche) [Morris, R.V., et al., Science, 329, 421-424]. The carbonate is rich in magnesium and iron (Mc62Sd25Cc11Rh2, assuming all Ca and Mn is associated with the carbonate) and is a major component of the Comanche outcrops (16 to 34 wt.%). The mineralogical, chemical, and abundance data are constrained in multiple, mutually consistent ways by the MER analyses. For example, a low-Ca carbonate is required by the MB and APXS data and is consistent with Mini-TES data. Three spectral features attributable to fundamental infrared vibrational modes of low-Ca carbonate are present in the Mini-TES spectra of Comanche outcrops. The average composition of Comanche carbonate approximates the average composition of the carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH 84001. Analogy with ALH 84001, terrestrial, and synthetic carbonate globules suggests that Comanche carbonate precipitated from aqueous solutions under hydrothermal conditions at near neutral pH in association with volcanic activity during the Noachian era. Comanche outcrop morphology suggests they are remnants of a larger carbonate-bearing formation that evolved in ultramafic rock and then preferentially eroded by a combination of aeolian

  8. Discovery of Carbonate-Rich Outcrops in the Gusev Crater Columbia Hills by the MER Rover Spirit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, R. V.; Ruff, S. W.; Gellert, R.; Ming, D. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; Clark, B. C.; Golden, D. C.; Siebach, K. L.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Schroeder, C.; Fleischer, I.; Yen, A. S.; Squyres, S. W.

    2010-12-01

    The chemical composition, global abundance, distribution, and formation pathways of carbonates are central to understanding aqueous processes, climate, and habitability of early Mars. The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit analyzed a series of olivine-rich outcrops while descending from the summit region of Husband Hill into the Inner Basin of the Columbia Hills of Gusev Crater to the eastern edge of the El Dorado ripple field in late 2005. Reanalysis of Spirit’s mineralogical data from the Moessbauer Spectrometer (MB) and the Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) and chemical data from the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) in 2010, coupled with new laboratory data for carbonate-bearing samples, lead to identification of carbonate in one of the outcrops (Comanche) [Morris, R.V., et al., Science, 329, 421-424]. The carbonate is rich in magnesium and iron (Mc62Sd25Cc11Rh2, assuming all Ca and Mn is associated with the carbonate) and is a major component of the Comanche outcrops (16 to 34 wt.%). The mineralogical, chemical, and abundance data are constrained in multiple, mutually consistent ways by the MER analyses. For example, a low-Ca carbonate is required by the MB and APXS data and is consistent with Mini-TES data. Three spectral features attributable to fundamental infrared vibrational modes of low-Ca carbonate are present in the Mini-TES spectra of Comanche outcrops. The average composition of Comanche carbonate approximates the average composition of the carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH 84001. Analogy with ALH 84001, terrestrial, and synthetic carbonate globules suggests that Comanche carbonate precipitated from aqueous solutions under hydrothermal conditions at near neutral pH in association with volcanic activity during the Noachian era. Comanche outcrop morphology suggests they are remnants of a larger carbonate-bearing formation that evolved in ultramafic rock and then preferentially eroded by a combination of aeolian

  9. Characterization of Spitsbergen Disks by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Le, L.; Ross, K.; McKay, David S.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    'Carbonate disks' found in the fractures and pores spaces of peridotite xenoliths and basalts from the island of Spitsbergen in the Norwegian Svalbard archipelago have been suggested to be "The best (and best documented) terrestrial analogs for the [Martian meteorite] ALH84001 carbonate globules ..." Previous studies have indicated that Spitsbergen carbonates show broadly comparable internal layering and mineral compositions to ALH84001 carbonate-magnetite disks. We report here for the first time, the detailed mineral characterization of Spitsbergen carbonates and their spatial relationship to the host mineral assemblages in the xenolith, using high resolution TEM (as used previously for ALH84001 carbonate disks). These studies were conducted in concert with complementary Raman and SEM analysis of the same samples. Our results indicate that there are significant chemical and physical differences between the disks in Spitsbergen and the carbonates present in ALH84001.

  10. Air stable iron/iron carbide magnetic nanoparticles embedded in amorphous carbon globules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhanala, Hari Krishna; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2015-06-01

    We have synthesized Fe/Fe3C magnetic nanoparticles embedded in an amorphous carbon globule by pyrolysing of benzene, ferrocene and hydroboric acid. The diameter of the globules is ˜ 1 µm and that of Fe/Fe3C magnetic nanoparticles is ˜ 40 nm. The globules exhibit ferromagnetic like behavior and the magnetization as well as the coercivity is found to increases with decreasing temperature.

  11. The role of vaterite and aragonite in the formation of pseudo-biogenic carbonate structures: implications for Martian exobiology.

    PubMed

    Vecht, A; Ireland, T G

    2000-08-01

    A simple synthesis of various forms of calcium carbonate with spherical and 'floral' morphologies is reported. Vaterite formation occurs at approximately 25 degrees C, aragonite at approximately 70 degrees C and calcite at about approximately 80 degrees C. These are produced when CO2 is reacted with an aqueous solution of calcium chloride in the presence of ammonia. These conditions may have existed at the surface of Mars in the past, leading us to conclude that such mineral formations may be common there. Although the initial phases are modified over time with changing temperature and pressure conditions, they still influence the final morphology of the carbonates observed. A comparison of these structures with those found in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 suggests, but does not confirm, a non-biogenic origin for the ALH84001 carbonates. PMID:11543352

  12. The role of vaterite and aragonite in the formation of pseudo-biogenic carbonate structures: implications for Martian exobiology.

    PubMed

    Vecht, A; Ireland, T G

    2000-08-01

    A simple synthesis of various forms of calcium carbonate with spherical and 'floral' morphologies is reported. Vaterite formation occurs at approximately 25 degrees C, aragonite at approximately 70 degrees C and calcite at about approximately 80 degrees C. These are produced when CO2 is reacted with an aqueous solution of calcium chloride in the presence of ammonia. These conditions may have existed at the surface of Mars in the past, leading us to conclude that such mineral formations may be common there. Although the initial phases are modified over time with changing temperature and pressure conditions, they still influence the final morphology of the carbonates observed. A comparison of these structures with those found in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 suggests, but does not confirm, a non-biogenic origin for the ALH84001 carbonates.

  13. A Terrestrial Analogue from Spitsbergen (Svalbard, Norway) for the Comanche Carbonate at Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Richard V.; Blake, D. F.; Bish, D.; Ming, Douglas W.; Agresti, D. G.; Treiman, A. H.; Steele, A.; Amundsen, H. E. F.

    2011-01-01

    Carbonate occurs at the Comanche outcrops in Gusev Crater on the basis of analyses made by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit [1]. Taken together, mineralogical data from Spirit's Moessbauer (MB) and Mini-TES spectrometer and chemical data from the APXS spectrometer show that Comanche carbonate has an Mg-Fe-rich bulk chemical composition, is present at high concentrations, and is distributed throughout the outcrop and not just at the MB and APXS analysis location. The granular outcrop texture and the observation that it appears to be resistant to weathering compared with surrounding material [1] imply that the carbonate may be present as a cement. A hydrothermal origin for the Comanche carbonate was inferred by analogy with laboratory experiments and with a carbonate occurrence within the Bockfjord volcanic complex on the island Spitsbergen (Svalbard, Norway) [1]. The laboratory carbonates, synthesized by precipitation from hydrothermal solutions, have (MB) parameters and average bulk chemical compositions that are characteristic of Comanche carbonate. The connection to Comanche carbonate is only through chemical data for certain occurrences of Spitsbergen carbonates. In fact, the common average bulk chemical composition for these Spitsbergen carbonates, the synthetic carbonates, the Comanche carbonate, and also the carbonate globules found in martian meteorite ALH84001 is a chemical constraint consistent with a hydrothermal formation process for all the carbonates [e.g., 1-3]. We develop here a link between MB data for the Comanche carbonate from MER and MB data for certain Spitsbergen carbonate occurrences from laboratory measurements. We also obtained visible and near- IR spectra on Spitsbergen carbonates for comparison with martian carbonate detections made on the basis of CRISM spectral data, e.g., in Nili Fossae [4].

  14. Field Characterization of the Mineralogy and Organic Chemistry of Carbonates from the 2010 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition by Evolved Gas Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Ten Kate, I. L.; Stern, J. C.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Blake, D. F.; Morris, R. V.; Steele, A.; Amundson, H. E. F.

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition (AMASE) investigated two geologic settings using methodologies and techniques being developed or considered for future Mars missions, such as the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), ExoMars, and Mars Sample Return. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) [1] instrument suite, which will be on MSL, consists of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a gas chromatograph (GC), and a tunable laser mass spectrometer (TLS); all will be applied to analyze gases created by pyrolysis of samples. During AMASE, a Hiden Evolved Gas Analysis-Mass Spectrometer (EGA-MS) system represented the EGA-MS capability of SAM. Another MSL instrument, CheMin, will use x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to perform quantitative mineralogical characterization of samples [e.g., 2]. Field-portable versions of CheMin were used during AMASE. AMASE 2010 focused on two sites that represented biotic and abiotic analogs. The abiotic site was the basaltic Sigurdfjell vent complex, which contains Mars-analog carbonate cements including carbonate globules which are excellent analogs for the globules in the ALH84001 martian meteorite [e.g., 3, 4]. The biotic site was the Knorringfjell fossil methane seep, which featured carbonates precipitated in a methane-supported chemosynthetic community [5]. This contribution focuses on EGA-MS analyses of samples from each site, with mineralogy comparisons to CheMin team results. The results give insight into organic content and organic-mineral associations, as well as some constraints on the minerals present.

  15. Mineral Biomarkers in Martian Meteorite Allan Hills 84001?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Bazylinski, D. A.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Golden, D. C.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Romanek, C. S.

    1998-01-01

    The occurrence of fine-grained magnetite in the Fe-rich rims surrounding carbonate globules in the martian meteorite ALH84001, originally described in , have been proposed as fossil remains of primitive martian organisms. Here we report observations on size and shape distributions of magnetites from ALH84001 and compare them to biogenic and inorganic magnetite crystals of terrestrial origin. While some magnetite morphology is not unequivocally diagnostic for its biogenicity, such as cubodial forms of magnetite, which are common in inorganically formed magnetites, other morphologies of magnetite (parallel-epiped or elongated prismatic and arrowhead forms) are more likely signatures of biogenic activity. Some ALH 84001 magnetite particles described below have unique morphology and length-to-width ratios that are indistinguishable from a variety of terrestrial biogenic magnetite and distinct from all known inorganic forms of magnetite.

  16. Sublimation: A Mechanism for the Enrichment of Organics in Antarctic Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Luann; McDonald, Gene D.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Bunch, Theodore E.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Recent analyses of the carbonate globules present in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 have detected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at the ppm level. The distribution of PAHs observed in ALH84001 was interpreted as being inconsistent with a terrestrial origin and were claimed to be indigenous to the meteorite, perhaps derived from an ancient Martian biota. However, Becker et al., have examined PAHs in the Martian meteorite EETA79001, in several Antarctic carbonaceous chondrites and Antarctic Allan Hills Ice and detected many of the same PAHs found in ALH84001. The reported presence of L-amino acids of apparent terrestrial origin in the EETA79001 druse material, suggests that this meteorite is contaminated with terrestrial/extraterrestrial organics probably derived from Antarctic ice meltwater that had percolated through the meteorite. The detection of PAHs and L-amino acids in these Martian meteorites suggests that despite storage in the Antarctic ice, selective changes of certain chemical and mineralogical phases has occurred.

  17. Possible Evidence for Life in ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David; Gibson, Everett; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie

    1999-01-01

    Since our original paper in Science in August 1996, considerable new data has appeared from laboratories throughout the world, and our own team has had a chance to examine the sample in greater detail. The following summary touches on our original data and interpretation, and points out new data from us and from other groups, and the resulting changes and refinements in interpretations which we have made during the past three years. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Possible Evidence for Life in ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie

    1999-01-01

    Since our original paper Science in August 1996, considerable new data has appeared from laboratories throughout the world, and our own team has had a chance to examine the sample in greater detail. The following summary touches on our original data and interpretation, and points out new data from us and from other groups, and the resulting changes and refinements in interpretations which we have made during the past three years.

  19. Rare Potassium-Bearing Mica in Allan Hills 84001: Additional Constraints on Carbonate Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brearley, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    There have been presented several intriguing observations suggesting evidence of fossil life in martian orthopyroxenite ALH 84001. These exciting and controversial observations have stimulated extensive debate over the origin and history of ALH 84001, but many issues still remain unresolved. Among the most important is the question of the temperature at which the carbonates, which host the putative microfossils, formed. Oxygen- isotopic data, while showing that the carbonates are generally out of isotopic equilibria with the host rock, cannot constrain their temperature of formation. Both low- and high-temperature scenarios are plausible depending on whether carbonate growth occurred in an open or closed system. Petrographic arguments have generally been used to support a high-temperature origin but these appear to be suspect because they assume equilibrium between carbonate compositions that are not in contact. Some observations appear to be consistent with shock mobilization and growth from immiscible silicate-carbonate melts at high temperatures. Proponents of a low-temperature origin for the carbonates are hampered by the fact that there is currently no evidence of hydrous phases that would indicate low temperatures and the presence of a hydrous fluid during the formation of the carbonates. However, the absence of hydrous phases does not rule out carbonate formation at low temperatures, because the carbonate forming fluids may have been extremely CO2 rich, such that hydrous phases would not have been stabilized. In this study, I have carried out additional Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of ALH-84001 and have found evidence of very rare phyllosilicates, which appear to be convincingly of pre-terrestrial origin. At present these observations are limited to one occurrence: further studies are in progress to determine if the phyllosilicates are more widespread.

  20. Effect of Carbonic Anhydrase II in Molten Globule State on Physical Properties of Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine Liposome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Hiroko; Tanaka, Michiko; Imai, Kenichiro; Sonoyama, Masashi; Mitaku, Shigeki

    2001-05-01

    Ultrasonic relaxation measurement was employed for confirmation of the interaction between dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membrane and a soluble protein, carbonic anhydrase II (CA II). The enhancement of the fluctuation of DMPC membrane structure was observed in the presence of CA II under acidic condition, pH 3.6-4, indicating the interaction between DMPC and CA II@. The pyrene fluorescence spectrum of CA II solution clearly showed that this protein adopted an unfolding intermediate called the molten globule state under the low pH condition, in which CA II interacted with DMPC@. However, CA II in the molten globule state did not cause membrane lysis in contrast to the high lytic activity of α-lactalbumin on DMPC liposomes.

  1. Modeling Chemical and Isotopic Variations in Lab Formed Hydrothermal Carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, P. B.; Leshin, L. A.; Golden, D. C.; Socki, R. A.; Guan, Y.; Ming, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    Chemical and mineralogical data (e.g. [1]) from Mars suggest that the history of liquid water on the planet was more sporadic in nature than long-lived. The non-equilibrium chemical and isotopic compositions of the carbonates preserved in the martian meteorite ALH84001 are direct evidence of ancient secondary minerals that have not undergone significant diagenesis or stabilization processes typical of long-lived aqueous systems on Earth. Thus secondary minerals and sediments on Mars may primarily record the characteristics of the aqueous environment in which they formed without being significantly overprinted by subsequent diagenetic processes during burial.

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Antarctic Martian meteorites, carbonaceous chondrites, and polar ice.

    PubMed

    Becker, L; Glavin, D P; Bada, J L

    1997-01-01

    Recent analyses of the carbonate globules present in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 have detected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at the ppm level (McKay et al., 1996). The distribution of PAHs observed in ALH84001 was interpreted as being inconsistent with a terrestrial origin and were claimed to be indigenous to the meteorite, perhaps derived from an ancient martian biota. We have examined PAHs in the Antarctic shergottite EETA79001, which is also considered to be from Mars, as well as several Antarctic carbonaceous chondrites. We have found that many of the same PAHs detected in the ALH84001 carbonate globules are present in Antarctic carbonaceous chondrites and in both the matrix and carbonate (druse) component of EETA79001. We also investigated PAHs in polar ice and found that carbonate is an effective scavenger of PAHs in ice meltwater. Moreover, the distribution of PAHs in the carbonate extract of Antarctic Allan Hills ice is remarkably similar to that found in both EETA79001 and ALH84001. The reported presence of L-amino acids of apparent terrestrial origin in the EETA79001 druse material (McDonald and Bada, 1995) suggests that this meteorite is contaminated with terrestrial organics probably derived from Antarctic ice meltwater that had percolated through the meteorite. Our data suggests that the PAHs observed in both ALH84001 and EETA79001 are derived from either the exogenous delivery of organics to Mars or extraterrestrial and terrestrial PAHs present in the ice meltwater or, more likely, from a mixture of these sources. It would appear that PAHs are not useful biomarkers in the search for extinct or extant life on Mars. PMID:11541466

  3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Antarctic Martian meteorites, carbonaceous chondrites, and polar ice.

    PubMed

    Becker, L; Glavin, D P; Bada, J L

    1997-01-01

    Recent analyses of the carbonate globules present in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 have detected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at the ppm level (McKay et al., 1996). The distribution of PAHs observed in ALH84001 was interpreted as being inconsistent with a terrestrial origin and were claimed to be indigenous to the meteorite, perhaps derived from an ancient martian biota. We have examined PAHs in the Antarctic shergottite EETA79001, which is also considered to be from Mars, as well as several Antarctic carbonaceous chondrites. We have found that many of the same PAHs detected in the ALH84001 carbonate globules are present in Antarctic carbonaceous chondrites and in both the matrix and carbonate (druse) component of EETA79001. We also investigated PAHs in polar ice and found that carbonate is an effective scavenger of PAHs in ice meltwater. Moreover, the distribution of PAHs in the carbonate extract of Antarctic Allan Hills ice is remarkably similar to that found in both EETA79001 and ALH84001. The reported presence of L-amino acids of apparent terrestrial origin in the EETA79001 druse material (McDonald and Bada, 1995) suggests that this meteorite is contaminated with terrestrial organics probably derived from Antarctic ice meltwater that had percolated through the meteorite. Our data suggests that the PAHs observed in both ALH84001 and EETA79001 are derived from either the exogenous delivery of organics to Mars or extraterrestrial and terrestrial PAHs present in the ice meltwater or, more likely, from a mixture of these sources. It would appear that PAHs are not useful biomarkers in the search for extinct or extant life on Mars.

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Antarctic Martian meteorites, carbonaceous chondrites, and polar ice

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, L. |; Glavin, D.P.; Bada, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Recent analyses of the carbonate globules present in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 have detected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at the ppm level. The distribution of PAHs observed in ALH84001 was interpreted as being inconsistent with a terrestrial origin and were claimed to be indigenous to the meteorite, perhaps derived from an ancient martian biota. We have examined PAHs in the Antarctic shergottite EETA79001, which is also considered to be from Mars, as well as several Antarctic carbonaceous chondrites. We have found that many of the same PAHs detected in the ALH84001 carbonate globules are present in Antarctic carbonaceous chondrites and in both the matrix and carbonate (druse) component of EETA79001. We also investigated PAHs in polar ice and found that carbonate is an effective scavenger of PAHs in ice meltwater. Moreover, the distribution of PAHs in the carbonate extract of Antarctic Allan Hills ice is remarkably similar to that found in both EETA79001 and ALH84001. The reported presence of L-amino acids of apparent terrestrial origin in the EETA79001 druse material suggests that this meteorite is contaminated with terrestrial organics probably derived from Antarctic ice meltwater that had percolated through the meteorite. Our data suggests that the PAHs observed in both ALH84001 and EETA79001 are derived from either the exogenous delivery of organics to Mars or extraterrestrial and terrestrial PAHs present in the ice meltwater or, more likely, from a mixture of these sources. It would appear that PAHs are not useful biomarkers in the search for extinct or extant life on Mars. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Analysis of Siderite Thermal Decomposition by Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, M. S.; Lin, I.-C.; McKay, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    Characterization of carbonate devolitilization has important implications for atmospheric interactions and climatic effects related to large meteorite impacts in platform sediments. On a smaller scale, meteorites contain carbonates which have witnessed shock metamorphic events and may record pressure/temperature histories of impact(s). ALH84001 meteorite contains zoned Ca-Mg-Fe-carbonates which formed on Mars. Magnetite crystals are found in the rims and cores of these carbonates and some are associated with void spaces leading to the suggestion by Brearley et al. that the crystals were produced by thermal decomposition of the carbonate at high temperature, possibly by incipient shock melting or devolitilization. Golden et al. recently synthesized spherical Mg-Fe-Ca-carbonates from solution under mild hydrothermal conditions that have similar carbonate compositional zoning to those of ALH84001. They have shown experimental evidence that the carbonate-sulfide-magnetite assemblage in ALH84001 can result from a multistep inorganic process involving heating possibly due to shock events. Experimental shock studies on calcium carbonate prove its stability to approx. 60 GPa, well in excess of the approx. 45 GPa peak pressures indicated by other shock features in ALH84001. In addition, Raman spectroscopy of carbonate globules in ALH84001 indicates no presence of CaO and MgO. Such oxide phases should be found associated with the magnetites in voids if these magnetites are high temperature shock products, the voids resulting from devolitilization of CO2 from calcium or magnesium carbonate. However, if the starting material was siderite (FeCO3), thermal breakdown of the ALH84001 carbonate at 470 C would produce iron oxide + CO2. As no documentation of shock effects in siderite exists, we have begun shock experiments to determine whether or not magnetite is produced by the decomposition of siderite within the < 45GPa pressure window and by the resultant thermal pulse to approx

  6. Organic Carbon Exists in Mars Meteorites: where is it on the Martian Surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, David; Clemett, Simon; Gibson, Everett; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie; Wentworth, Susan

    The search for organic carbon on Mars has been a major challenge. The first attempt was the Viking GC-MS in situ experiment which gave inconclusive results at two sites on Mars [1]. After the discovery that the SNC meteorites were from Mars [2], [3-5] reported C isotopic compositional information which suggested a reduced C component present in the Martian meteorites. [6 7] reported the presence of reduced C components (i.e., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) associated with the carbonate globules in ALH84001. Jull et al. [8] noted in Nakhla there was an acid insoluble C component present with more than 75% of its C lacking any 14 C, which is modern-day terrestrial carbon. This C fraction was believed to be either indigenous martian or ancient meteoritic carbon. Fisk et al. [9, 10] have shown textural evidence along with C-enriched areas within fractures in Nakhla and ALH84001. Westall et al. [11] have shown the presence of a large irregular fragment of organic material completely embedded within a chip of ALH84001. Interior samples from the Nakhla SNC made available by the British Museum of Natural His-tory, were analyzed. Petrographic examination [12] of Nakhla showed evidence of fractures ( 0.5 m wide) filled with dark brown to black dendritic material with characteristics similar to those observed by [10]. Iddingsite is also present along fractures in olivine. Fracture filling and dendritic material was examined by SEM-EDX, TEM-EDX, Focused Electron Beam mi-croscopy, Laser Raman Spectroscopy, Nano-SIMS Ion Micro-probe, and Stepped-Combustion Static Mass Spectrometry. Observations from the first three techniques are discussed in [12 and 13]. Nano-SIMS Ion Microprobe studies of the C-bearing fractures, containing the optically dark dendritic material, show direct correlation between C- and CN- abundances. Ion abun-dances for epoxy are distinct from those of the dendritic material[12] . Laser Raman Spectrometry was utilized to examine the optically dark dendritic

  7. Organic Carbon Exists in Mars Meteorites: where is it on the Martian Surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, David; Clemett, Simon; Gibson, Everett; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie; Wentworth, Susan

    The search for organic carbon on Mars has been a major challenge. The first attempt was the Viking GC-MS in situ experiment which gave inconclusive results at two sites on Mars [1]. After the discovery that the SNC meteorites were from Mars [2], [3-5] reported C isotopic compositional information which suggested a reduced C component present in the Martian meteorites. [6 7] reported the presence of reduced C components (i.e., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) associated with the carbonate globules in ALH84001. Jull et al. [8] noted in Nakhla there was an acid insoluble C component present with more than 75% of its C lacking any 14 C, which is modern-day terrestrial carbon. This C fraction was believed to be either indigenous martian or ancient meteoritic carbon. Fisk et al. [9, 10] have shown textural evidence along with C-enriched areas within fractures in Nakhla and ALH84001. Westall et al. [11] have shown the presence of a large irregular fragment of organic material completely embedded within a chip of ALH84001. Interior samples from the Nakhla SNC made available by the British Museum of Natural His-tory, were analyzed. Petrographic examination [12] of Nakhla showed evidence of fractures ( 0.5 m wide) filled with dark brown to black dendritic material with characteristics similar to those observed by [10]. Iddingsite is also present along fractures in olivine. Fracture filling and dendritic material was examined by SEM-EDX, TEM-EDX, Focused Electron Beam mi-croscopy, Laser Raman Spectroscopy, Nano-SIMS Ion Micro-probe, and Stepped-Combustion Static Mass Spectrometry. Observations from the first three techniques are discussed in [12 and 13]. Nano-SIMS Ion Microprobe studies of the C-bearing fractures, containing the optically dark dendritic material, show direct correlation between C- and CN- abundances. Ion abun-dances for epoxy are distinct from those of the dendritic material[12] . Laser Raman Spectrometry was utilized to examine the optically dark dendritic

  8. Contribution of Organic Material to the Stable Isotope Composition of Some Terrestrial Carbonates as Analogs for Martian Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Bissada, K. K.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the isotopic geochemistry of terrestrial carbonate formation is essential to understanding the evolution of the Martian atmosphere, hydrosphere, and potential biosphere. Carbonate minerals, in particular, are important secondary minerals for interpreting past aqueous environments, as illustrated by the carbonates present in ALH84001 [1]. Models for the history of Mars suggest that the planet was warmer, wetter, and possessed a greater atmospheric pressure within the first billion years as compared to present conditions [2],[3],[4], and likely had an active hydrologic cycle. Morse and Marion [5] point out that associated with this hydrologic cycle would be the active chemical weathering of silicate minerals and thus consumption of atmospheric CO2 and deposition of carbonate and silica. It is during this warmer and wetter period of Martian history that surface and/or near-surface conditions would be most favorable for harboring possible microbiological life. Carbonates within ALH84001 offer evidence that fluids were present at 3.9 Gy on Mars [6]. A more through understanding of the effects of aqueous weathering and the potential contribution of organic compounds on the isotopic composition of Martian carbonate minerals can be gained by studying some terrestrial occurrences of carbonate rocks.

  9. Carbonate- and silicate-rich globules in the kimberlitic rocks of northwestern Tarim large igneous province, NW China: Evidence for carbonated mantle source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhiguo; Zhang, Zhaochong; Santosh, M.; Hou, Tong; Zhang, Dongyang

    2014-12-01

    We report carbonate- and silicate-rich globules and andradite from the Wajilitage kimberlitic rocks in the northwestern Tarim large igneous province, NW China. The carbonate-rich globules vary in size from 1 to 3 mm, and most have ellipsoidal or round shape, and are composed of nearly pure calcite. The silicate-rich globules are elliptical to round in shape and are typically larger than the carbonate-rich globules ranging from 2 to several centimeters in diameter. They are characterized by clear reaction rims and contain several silicate minerals such as garnet, diopside and phlogopite. The silicate-rich globules, reported here for the first time, are suggested to be related to the origin of andradite within the kimberlitic rocks. Our results show that calcite in the carbonate-rich globules has a high XCa (>0.97) and is characterized by extremely high concentrations of the total rare earth elements (up to 1500 ppm), enrichment in Sr (8521-10,645 ppm) and LREE, and remarkable depletion in Nd, Ta, Zr, Hf and Ti. The calcite in the silicate-rich globules is geochemically similar to those in the carbonate-rich globules except the lower trace element contents. Garnet is dominantly andradite (And59.56-92.32Grs5.67-36.03Pyr0.36-4.61Spe0-0.33) and is enriched in light rare earth elements (LREEs) and relatively depleted in Rb, Ba, Th, Pb, Sr, Zr and Hf. Phlogopite in the silicate-rich globules has a high Mg# ranging from 0.93 to 0.97. The composition of the diopside is Wo45.82-51.39En39.81-49.09Fs0.88-0.95 with a high Mg# ranging from 0.88 to 0.95. Diopside in the silicate-rich globules has low total rare earth element (REE) contents (14-31 ppm) and shows middle REE- (Eu to Gd), slight light REE- and heavy REE-enrichment with elevated Zr, Hf and Sr contents and a negative Nb anomaly in the normalized diagram. The matrix of the kimberlitic rocks are silica undersaturated (27.92-29.31 wt.% SiO2) with low Al2O3 (4.51-5.15 wt.%) and high CaO (17.29-17.77 wt.%) contents. The

  10. Carbonates in the Martian meteorite Allan Hills 84001 formed at 18 ± 4 °C in a near-surface aqueous environment

    PubMed Central

    Halevy, Itay; Fischer, Woodward W.; Eiler, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite evidence for liquid water at the surface of Mars during the Noachian epoch, the temperature of early aqueous environments has been impossible to establish, raising questions of whether the surface of Mars was ever warmer than today. We address this problem by determining the precipitation temperature of secondary carbonate minerals preserved in the oldest known sample of Mars’ crust—the approximately 4.1 billion-year-old meteorite Allan Hills 84001 (ALH84001). The formation environment of these carbonates, which are constrained to be slightly younger than the crystallization age of the rock (i.e., 3.9 to 4.0 billion years), has been poorly understood, hindering insight into the hydrologic and carbon cycles of earliest Mars. Using “clumped” isotope thermometry we find that the carbonates in ALH84001 precipitated at a temperature of approximately 18 °C, with water and carbon dioxide derived from the ancient Martian atmosphere. Furthermore, covarying carbonate carbon and oxygen isotope ratios are constrained to have formed at constant, low temperatures, pointing to deposition from a gradually evaporating, subsurface water body—likely a shallow aquifer (meters to tens of meters below the surface). Despite the mild temperatures, the apparently ephemeral nature of water in this environment leaves open the question of its habitability. PMID:21969543

  11. Carbonates in the Martian meteorite Allan Hills 84001 formed at 18 +/- 4 degrees C in a near-surface aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Halevy, Itay; Fischer, Woodward W; Eiler, John M

    2011-10-11

    Despite evidence for liquid water at the surface of Mars during the Noachian epoch, the temperature of early aqueous environments has been impossible to establish, raising questions of whether the surface of Mars was ever warmer than today. We address this problem by determining the precipitation temperature of secondary carbonate minerals preserved in the oldest known sample of Mars' crust--the approximately 4.1 billion-year-old meteorite Allan Hills 84001 (ALH84001). The formation environment of these carbonates, which are constrained to be slightly younger than the crystallization age of the rock (i.e., 3.9 to 4.0 billion years), has been poorly understood, hindering insight into the hydrologic and carbon cycles of earliest Mars. Using "clumped" isotope thermometry we find that the carbonates in ALH84001 precipitated at a temperature of approximately 18 °C, with water and carbon dioxide derived from the ancient Martian atmosphere. Furthermore, covarying carbonate carbon and oxygen isotope ratios are constrained to have formed at constant, low temperatures, pointing to deposition from a gradually evaporating, subsurface water body--likely a shallow aquifer (meters to tens of meters below the surface). Despite the mild temperatures, the apparently ephemeral nature of water in this environment leaves open the question of its habitability. PMID:21969543

  12. Carbonates in the Martian meteorite Allan Hills 84001 formed at 18 +/- 4 degrees C in a near-surface aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Halevy, Itay; Fischer, Woodward W; Eiler, John M

    2011-10-11

    Despite evidence for liquid water at the surface of Mars during the Noachian epoch, the temperature of early aqueous environments has been impossible to establish, raising questions of whether the surface of Mars was ever warmer than today. We address this problem by determining the precipitation temperature of secondary carbonate minerals preserved in the oldest known sample of Mars' crust--the approximately 4.1 billion-year-old meteorite Allan Hills 84001 (ALH84001). The formation environment of these carbonates, which are constrained to be slightly younger than the crystallization age of the rock (i.e., 3.9 to 4.0 billion years), has been poorly understood, hindering insight into the hydrologic and carbon cycles of earliest Mars. Using "clumped" isotope thermometry we find that the carbonates in ALH84001 precipitated at a temperature of approximately 18 °C, with water and carbon dioxide derived from the ancient Martian atmosphere. Furthermore, covarying carbonate carbon and oxygen isotope ratios are constrained to have formed at constant, low temperatures, pointing to deposition from a gradually evaporating, subsurface water body--likely a shallow aquifer (meters to tens of meters below the surface). Despite the mild temperatures, the apparently ephemeral nature of water in this environment leaves open the question of its habitability.

  13. My favorite Martians: NASA uncovers evidence of ancient life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Dasch, P; Kross, J

    1996-01-01

    The possibility of life on Mars is explored through the recently found meteorite ALH84001. Thought to have left Mars 16 million years ago, the meteorite was found on an Antarctic ice shelf in 1984. Carbonate globules were found containing microfossils and unusual mineral compounds. NASA researchers believe they have found single-celled fossils resembling nanobacteria fossils found on Earth, but caution that much more research is required.

  14. My favorite Martians: NASA uncovers evidence of ancient life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Dasch, P; Kross, J

    1996-01-01

    The possibility of life on Mars is explored through the recently found meteorite ALH84001. Thought to have left Mars 16 million years ago, the meteorite was found on an Antarctic ice shelf in 1984. Carbonate globules were found containing microfossils and unusual mineral compounds. NASA researchers believe they have found single-celled fossils resembling nanobacteria fossils found on Earth, but caution that much more research is required. PMID:11539593

  15. Nature of Reduced Carbon in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; McKay, D. S.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; White, L. M.

    2012-01-01

    Martian meteorites provide important information on the nature of reduced carbon components present on Mars throughout its history. The first in situ analyses for carbon on the surface of Mars by the Viking landers yielded disappointing results. With the recognition of Martian meteorites on Earth, investigations have shown carbon-bearing phases exist on Mars. Studies have yielded presence of reduced carbon, carbonates and inferred graphitic carbon phases. Samples ranging in age from the first approximately 4 Ga of Mars history [e.g. ALH84001] to nakhlites with a crystallization age of 1.3 Ga [e.g. Nakhla] with aqueous alteration processes occurring 0.5-0.7 Ga after crystallizaton. Shergottites demonstrate formation ages around 165-500 Ma with younger aqueous alterations events. Only a limited number of the Martian meteorites do not show evidence of significance terrestrial alterations. Selected areas within ALH84001, Nakhla, Yamato 000593 and possibly Tissint are suitable for study of their indigenous reduced carbon bearing phases. Nakhla possesses discrete, well-defined carbonaceous phases present within iddingsite alteration zones. Based upon both isotopic measurements and analysis of Nakhla's organic phases the presence of pre-terrestrial organics is now recognized. The reduced carbon-bearing phases appear to have been deposited during preterrestrial aqueous alteration events that produced clays. In addition, the microcrystalline layers of Nakhla's iddingsite have discrete units of salt crystals suggestive of evaporation processes. While we can only speculate on the origin of these unique carbonaceous structures, we note that the significance of such observations is that it may allow us to understand the role of Martian carbon as seen in the Martian meteorites with obvious implications for astrobiology and the pre-biotic evolution of Mars. In any case, our observations strongly suggest that reduced organic carbon exists as micrometer- size, discrete structures

  16. Thackeray's Globules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Strangely glowing, floating dark clouds are silhouetted against nearby bright stars in a busy star-forming region viewed by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

    The image showing dense, opaque dust clouds - known as globules - in the star-forming region IC 2944 is available online at http://heritage.stsci.edu or http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/01 or http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . It was taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    Little is known about the origin and nature of these globules in IC 2944, which were first found by astronomer A.D. Thackeray in 1950. Globules are generally associated with large hydrogen-emitting star-formation regions, which give off the glowing light of hydrogen gas.

    The largest globule in this image consists of two separate clouds that gently overlap along our line of sight. Each cloud is nearly 1.4 light-years along its longest dimension. Collectively, they contain enough material to equal more than 15 times the mass of our Sun. The surrounding hydrogen-rich region, IC 2944, is filled with gas and dust illuminated and heated by a loose cluster of stars that are much hotter and more massive than our Sun. IC 2944 is relatively close by, only 5,900 light-years away in the constellation Centaurus.

    Using the remarkable resolution of Hubble, astronomers can for the first time study the intricate structure of these globules. They appear to be heavily fractured, as if major forces were tearing them apart. When radio astronomers observed the faint hiss of molecules within the globules, they realized that the globules are actually in constant, churning motion, moving supersonically among each other. This may be caused by powerful ultraviolet radiation from the luminous, massive stars, which heat up hydrogen gas in the region. The gas expands and streams against the globules, leading to their destruction. Despite their serene appearance

  17. The history of Allan Hills 84001 revised: multiple shock events.

    PubMed

    Treiman, A H

    1998-07-01

    The geologic history of Martian meteorite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 is more complex than previously recognized, with evidence for four or five crater-forming impacts onto Mars. This history of repeated deformation and shock metamorphism appears to weaken some arguments that have been offered for and against the hypothesis of ancient Martian life in ALH 84001. Allan Hills 84001 formed originally from basaltic magma. Its first impact event (I1) is inferred from the deformation (D1) that produced the granular-textured bands ("crush zones") that transect the original igneous fabric. Deformation D1 is characterized by intense shear and may represent excavation or rebound flow of rock beneath a large impact crater. An intense thermal metamorphism followed D1 and may be related to it. The next impact (I2) produced fractures, (Fr2) in which carbonate "pancakes" were deposited and produced feldspathic glass from some of the igneous feldspars and silica. After I2, carbonate pancakes and globules were deposited in Fr2 fractures and replaced feldspathic glass and possibly crystalline silicates. Next, feldspars, feldspathic glass, and possibly some carbonates were mobilized and melted in the third impact (I3). Microfaulting, intense fracturing, and shear are also associated with I3. In the fourth impact (I4), the rock was fractured and deformed without significant heating, which permitted remnant magnetization directions to vary across fracture surfaces. Finally, ALH 84001 was ejected from Mars in event I5, which could be identical to I4. This history of multiple impacts is consistent with the photogeology of the Martian highlands and may help resolve some apparent contradictions among recent results on ALH 84001. For example, the submicron rounded magnetite grains in the carbonate globules could be contemporaneous with carbonate deposition, whereas the elongate magnetite grains, epitaxial on carbonates, could be ascribed to vapor-phase deposition during I3. PMID:11543074

  18. Life on Mars, Where do we stand after seven years of investigations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, E.

    2003-04-01

    The question "Is there life on Mars?" is one of the most challenging questions for the scientific community to answer. Until documented samples are returned to Earth from Mars by space probes, the only samples available for study are twenty-six undocumented, randomly selected Martian samples delivered to Earth. Martian meteorites offer a unique opportunity to study near-surface samples from Mars. Martian meteorites of widely differing ages (ALH84001 - crystallization age of 4.5 Gy. with 3.9 Gy. old carbonates; Nakhla D crystallization age of 1.3 Gy. and clays of possibly 600-700 Ma. years age; and Shergotty D 165 Ma. crystallization age) contain evidence of water produced alteration products (hydrates, clays, sulfates, carbonates, halites, etc.). ALH84001 and Nakhla has been shown to contain indigenous reduced carbon compounds with isotopic compositions which are not products of terrestrial contaminants. Unique magnetite biomarkers are found within the ALH84001 low-temperature carbonate globules and display six unique properties of magnetites produced by the reference MV-1 magnetosome bacteria. Recently, the three-dimensional morphologies of the magnetites from both MV-1 magnetosome bacteria and the "biogenic" population of magnetites within the carbonates of ALH84001 have been show to be crystallographically equivalent. The determination that the properties of both MV-1 and ALH84001 magnetites are essentially identical provides further support for our interpretation that these Martian magnetites were produced by similar biogenic processes on Mars. To date, all of the models presented utilizing thermal decomposition of iron-rich carbonates to produce magnetites within ALH84001's carbonates fail to produce the unique properties of the biogenic magnetites. In addition, morphological structures are present within the three Martian meteorites which are identical to fossilized bacteria. Despite more than seven years of extensive research by the scientific community, the

  19. Reshaping the folding energy landscape by chloride salt: impact on molten-globule formation and aggregation behavior of carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Borén, Kristina; Grankvist, Hannah; Hammarström, Per; Carlsson, Uno

    2004-05-21

    During chemical denaturation different intermediate states are populated or suppressed due to the nature of the denaturant used. Chemical denaturation by guanidine-HCl (GuHCl) of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) leads to a three-state unfolding process (Cm,NI=1.0 and Cm,IU=1.9 M GuHCl) with formation of an equilibrium molten-globule intermediate that is stable at moderate concentrations of the denaturant (1-2 M) with a maximum at 1.5 M GuHCl. On the contrary, urea denaturation gives rise to an apparent two-state unfolding transition (Cm=4.4 M urea). However, 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS) binding and decreased refolding capacity revealed the presence of the molten globule in the middle of the unfolding transition zone, although to a lesser extent than in GuHCl. Cross-linking studies showed the formation of moderate oligomer sized (300 kDa) and large soluble aggregates (>1000 kDa). Inclusion of 1.5 M NaCl to the urea denaturant to mimic the ionic character of GuHCl leads to a three-state unfolding behavior (Cm,NI=3.0 and Cm,IU=6.4 M urea) with a significantly stabilized molten-globule intermediate by the chloride salt. Comparisons between NaCl and LiCl of the impact on the stability of the various states of HCA II in urea showed that the effects followed what could be expected from the Hofmeister series, where Li+ is a chaotropic ion leading to decreased stability of the native state. Salt addition to the completely urea unfolded HCA II also led to an aggregation prone unfolded state, that has not been observed before for carbonic anhydrase. Refolding from this state only provided low recoveries of native enzyme.

  20. Negative δ 18O values in Allan Hills 84001 carbonate: Possible evidence for water precipitation on mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, G.; Saxton, J. M.; Lyon, I. C.; Turner, G.

    2005-03-01

    The Martian meteorite ALH84001 contains ˜1% by weight of carbonate formed by secondary processes on the Martian surface or in the shallow subsurface. The major form of this carbonate is chemically and isotopically zoned rosettes which have been well documented elsewhere. This study concentrates upon carbonate regions ˜200 μm across which possess previously unobserved magnesium rich inner cores, interpreted here as rosette fragments, surrounded by a later stage cement containing rare Ca-rich carbonates (up to Ca 81Mg 07Fe 04Mn 07) intimately associated with feldspar. High spatial resolution ion probe analyses of Ca-rich carbonate surrounding rosette fragments have δ 18O V-SMOW values as low as -10 ‰. These values are not compatible with deposition from a global Martian atmosphere invoked to explain ALH84001 rosettes. The range of δ 18O values are also incompatible with a fluid that has equilibrated with the Martian crust at high temperature or from remobilisation of carbonate of rosette isotopic composition. At Martian atmospheric temperatures, the small CO 2(gas)-CO 2(ice) fractionation makes meteoric CO 2 an unlikely source for -10 ‰ carbonates. In contrast, closed system Rayleigh fractionation of H 2O can generate δ 18O H2O -30 ‰, as observed at high latitudes on Earth. We suggest that atmospheric transport and precipitation of H 2O in a similar fashion to that on Earth provides a source of suitably 18O depleted water for generation of carbonate with δ 18O V-SMOW = -10 ‰.

  1. The Possibility of Past Life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, E. K.; McKay, D. S.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Vali, H.; Romanek, C. S.; Clemett, S.; Chiller, X.; Maechling, C.; Zare, R. N.

    1996-09-01

    An igneous Mars meteorite, ALH84001, of unknown geologic context, was penetrated by fluids along fractures and pore spaces, which then became the sites of secondary mineral formation. Freshly broken fracture surfaces display carbonate globules with associated abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Studies by others have shown that the igneous material crystalized 4.5 Ga, and that the carbonate globules formed 3.6 Ga. ALH84001 was removed from the martian surface 16 My ago by an impact and arrived on Antarctica 13,000 years ago. It appears to be essentially free of terrestrial weathering. The PAHs are present at concentrations ~ 10(3) to 10(5) times higher than are found in the surrounding terrestrial ice, and contamination studies indicate that the observed organic material is indigenous to the meteorite. The carbonate globules are rimmed by fine-grained, secondary phases of single-domain magnetite and iron sulfides, that could have resulted from oxidation and reduction reactions known to be important in terrestrial microbial systems. SEM and TEM images of the carbonate globules show features resembling terrestrial microorganisms, terrestrial biogenic carbonate structures, or microfossils. Although there are alternative explanations for each of the above phenomena taken individually, when they are considered collectively, particularly in view of their spatial association, we conclude that they may be evidence for primitive life on early Mars.

  2. Ion Microprobe Measurements of Carbon Isotopes in Martian Phosphates: Insights into the Martian Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goreva, J. S.; Leshin, L. A.; Guan, Y.

    2003-03-01

    In-situ measurements of C in the phosphates from meteorites Los Angeles, Zagami, QUE94201 and ALH84001 predict isotopically light martian magmatic C, heavier than previous estimates yet significantly lighter than the terrestrial value.

  3. Rubidium-Strontium Formation Age of Allan Hills 84001 Carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borg, L. E.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Weismann, H.; Reese, Y.; Connelly, J. N.

    1998-01-01

    Our preferred age for the formation of carbonates in the martian meteorite ALH 84001 is 3.90 plus or minus 0.04 Ga for Lambda (Rubidium 87) equals 0.01402 Ga (exp -1), or 3.85 plus or minus 0.04 Ga for Lambda (Rubidium 87) = 0.0142 Ga(exponent -1). This age is determined by a three-point Rb-Sr isochron defined by leachates of high-graded carbonate-rich material. Major cation and especially phosphorous analyses of the leachates permit contributions from igneous whitlockite to be recognized for low-acidity leachates, and the corresponding data are omitted from the isochron. Data for the two highest acidity leachates plot close to the preferred isochron, but are omitted because we believe they contain contributions leached from the pyroxene substrate on which most of the carbonates are found. Nevertheless, the isochron age for all five highest-acidity leachates is 3.94 plus or minus 0.04 Ga, and is within error of the age obtained for the more restricted data set. All leachates used to define the isochron have major cation compositions that are singular to those obtained by microprobe analyses of the carbonate rosettes and are consistent with progressive digestion of the carbonates according to their composition. The age thus obtained for the carbonates is about 600 m.y. younger than the crystalization age of ALH 84001 determined by Sm-Nd analyses but is within error limits of the age of impact metamorphism inferred from the Rb-Sr and Ar-Ar systematics of silicates. which yield ages of 3.85 plus or minus 0.05 Ga and 4.05- 3.80 Ga to 4.3-3.8 Ga, respectively. Similarities between the carbonate crystallization age and the age of impact metamorphism as determined by Ar-Ar and Rb-Sr suggest that the carbonate formation is impact-related. Nevertheless, both high and low- temperature scenarios for the origin of the carbonates are possible.

  4. Detection of carbonates in dust shells around evolved stars.

    PubMed

    Kemper, F; Jäger, C; Waters, L B F M; Henning, Th; Molster, F J; Barlow, M J; Lim, T; de Koter, A

    2002-01-17

    Carbonates on large Solar System bodies like Earth and Mars (the latter represented by the meteorite ALH84001) form through the weathering of silicates in a watery (CO3)2- solution. The presence of carbonates in interplanetary dust particles and asteroids (again, represented by meteorites) is not completely understood, but has been attributed to aqueous alteration on a large parent body, which was subsequently shattered into smaller pieces. Despite efforts, the presence of carbonates outside the Solar System has hitherto not been established. Here we report the discovery of the carbonates calcite and dolomite in the dust shells of evolved stars, where the conditions are too primitive for the formation of large parent bodies with liquid water. These carbonates, therefore, are not formed by aqueous alteration, but perhaps through processes on the surfaces of dust or ice grains or gas phase condensation. The presence of carbonates which did not form by aqueous alteration suggests that some of the carbonates found in Solar System bodies no longer provide direct evidence that liquid water was present on large parent bodies early in the history of the Solar System. PMID:11797000

  5. The provenance and formation of reduced carbon phases on Mars from the study of Martian meteorites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, A.; McCubbin, F. M.; Fries, M.

    2015-12-01

    Organic carbon compounds are essential building blocks of terrestrial life, so the occurrence and origin (biotic or abiotic) of organic compounds on Mars is of great significance. Indeed, the question of Martian organic matter is among the highest priority targets for robotic spacecraft missions in the next decade includ- ing the Mars Science Laboratory and Mars 2020. Sev- eral Martian meteorites contain organic carbon (i.e., macromolecular reduced carbon-rich material, not nec- essarily related to biota), but there is little agreement on its origins. Initial hypotheses for the origin of this organic carbon included: terrestrial contamination; chondritic meteoritic input; thermal decomposition of Martian carbonate minerals; direct precipitation from cooling aqueous fluids; and the remains of ancient Martian biota. We report on results from the analysis of 14 martian meteorites and show the distribution of organic phases throughout the samples analyzed. We will present formation scearios for each of the types of organic matter discovered. These studies when combined show 4 possible pools of reduced carbon on Mars. 1) impact generated graphite in the Tissint meteorite, 2) secondary hydrothermal generated graphite in ALH 84001, 3) primary igneous reduced carbon in 12 Martian meteorites associated with spinel inclusions in olivine and pyroxene 4) and potentially primary hydrothermally formed organic carbon / nitrogen containing organic species in the maskelynite phases of the Tissint meteorite. These studies show that Mars has produced reduced carbon / organic carbon via several mechanisms and reveal that the building blocks of life, if not life itself, are present on Mars.

  6. Carbonate Globules in Columbia River Basalt The Search for Life in Terrestrial Subsurface Environments as Possible Martian Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, V.; McKay, D. S.; Wentworth, S. J.; ThomasKeprta, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    Basalts from the Columbia River (CRB) Plateau contain minor amounts of carbonates of unknown origins. We have examined the petrology and chemistry of the CRB carbonates to elucidate the modes of formation. This study is directly relevant to meteorites and future samples returned from Mars. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Detection of oxygen isotopic anomaly in terrestrial atmospheric carbonates and its implications to Mars

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, R.; Abramian, A.; Horn, J.; Dominguez, G.; Sullivan, R.; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    The debate of life on Mars centers around the source of the globular, micrometer-sized mineral carbonates in the ALH84001 meteorite; consequently, the identification of Martian processes that form carbonates is critical. This paper reports a previously undescribed carbonate formation process that occurs on Earth and, likely, on Mars. We identified micrometer-sized carbonates in terrestrial aerosols that possess excess 17O (0.4–3.9‰). The unique O-isotopic composition mechanistically describes the atmospheric heterogeneous chemical reaction on aerosol surfaces. Concomitant laboratory experiments define the transfer of ozone isotopic anomaly to carbonates via hydrogen peroxide formation when O3 reacts with surface adsorbed water. This previously unidentified chemical reaction scenario provides an explanation for production of the isotopically anomalous carbonates found in the SNC (shergottites, nakhlaites, chassignites) Martian meteorites and terrestrial atmospheric carbonates. The anomalous hydrogen peroxide formed on the aerosol surfaces may transfer its O-isotopic signature to the water reservoir, thus producing mass independently fractionated secondary mineral evaporites. The formation of peroxide via heterogeneous chemistry on aerosol surfaces also reveals a previously undescribed oxidative process of utility in understanding ozone and oxygen chemistry, both on Mars and Earth. PMID:21059939

  8. Isotope Variations in Terrestrial Carbonates and Thermal Springs as Biomarkers: Analogs for Martian Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Bissada, K. K.

    2006-01-01

    Stable isotope measurements of carbonate minerals contained within ALH84001 [1] suggest that fluids were present at 3.9 Gy on Mars [2, 3, 4, 5]. Both oxygen and carbon isotopes provide independent means of deciphering paleoenvironmental conditions at the time of carbonate mineral precipitation. In terrestrial carbonate rocks oxygen isotopes not only indicate the paleotemperature of the precipitating fluid, but also provide clues to environmental conditions that affected the fluid chemistry. Carbon isotopes, on the other hand, can indicate the presence or absence of organic compounds during precipitation (i.e. biogenically vs. thermogenically-generated methane), thus serving as a potential biomarker. We have undertaken a study of micro scale stable isotope variations measured in some terrestrial carbonates and the influence of organic compounds associated with the formation of these carbonates. Preliminary results indicate that isotope variations occur within narrow and discrete intervals, providing clues to paleoenvironmental conditions that include both biological and non-biological activity. These results carry implications for deciphering Martian isotope data and therefore potential biological prospecting on the planet Mars. Recently, Fourier Transform Spectrometer observations have detected methane occurring in the Martian atmosphere [6] that could be attributed to a possible biogenic source. Indeed, Mars Express has detected the presence of methane in the Martian atmosphere [7], with evidence indicating that methane abundances are greatest above those basins with high water concentrations.

  9. Detection of oxygen isotopic anomaly in terrestrial atmospheric carbonates and its implications to Mars.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, R; Abramian, A; Horn, J; Dominguez, G; Sullivan, R; Thiemens, Mark H

    2010-11-23

    The debate of life on Mars centers around the source of the globular, micrometer-sized mineral carbonates in the ALH84001 meteorite; consequently, the identification of Martian processes that form carbonates is critical. This paper reports a previously undescribed carbonate formation process that occurs on Earth and, likely, on Mars. We identified micrometer-sized carbonates in terrestrial aerosols that possess excess (17)O (0.4-3.9‰). The unique O-isotopic composition mechanistically describes the atmospheric heterogeneous chemical reaction on aerosol surfaces. Concomitant laboratory experiments define the transfer of ozone isotopic anomaly to carbonates via hydrogen peroxide formation when O(3) reacts with surface adsorbed water. This previously unidentified chemical reaction scenario provides an explanation for production of the isotopically anomalous carbonates found in the SNC (shergottites, nakhlaites, chassignites) Martian meteorites and terrestrial atmospheric carbonates. The anomalous hydrogen peroxide formed on the aerosol surfaces may transfer its O-isotopic signature to the water reservoir, thus producing mass independently fractionated secondary mineral evaporites. The formation of peroxide via heterogeneous chemistry on aerosol surfaces also reveals a previously undescribed oxidative process of utility in understanding ozone and oxygen chemistry, both on Mars and Earth. PMID:21059939

  10. Detection of oxygen isotopic anomaly in terrestrial atmospheric carbonates and its implications to Mars.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, R; Abramian, A; Horn, J; Dominguez, G; Sullivan, R; Thiemens, Mark H

    2010-11-23

    The debate of life on Mars centers around the source of the globular, micrometer-sized mineral carbonates in the ALH84001 meteorite; consequently, the identification of Martian processes that form carbonates is critical. This paper reports a previously undescribed carbonate formation process that occurs on Earth and, likely, on Mars. We identified micrometer-sized carbonates in terrestrial aerosols that possess excess (17)O (0.4-3.9‰). The unique O-isotopic composition mechanistically describes the atmospheric heterogeneous chemical reaction on aerosol surfaces. Concomitant laboratory experiments define the transfer of ozone isotopic anomaly to carbonates via hydrogen peroxide formation when O(3) reacts with surface adsorbed water. This previously unidentified chemical reaction scenario provides an explanation for production of the isotopically anomalous carbonates found in the SNC (shergottites, nakhlaites, chassignites) Martian meteorites and terrestrial atmospheric carbonates. The anomalous hydrogen peroxide formed on the aerosol surfaces may transfer its O-isotopic signature to the water reservoir, thus producing mass independently fractionated secondary mineral evaporites. The formation of peroxide via heterogeneous chemistry on aerosol surfaces also reveals a previously undescribed oxidative process of utility in understanding ozone and oxygen chemistry, both on Mars and Earth.

  11. Microbial extremophiles in evolutionary aspect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2007-09-01

    The microflora of the cryosphere of planet Earth provides the best analogs for life forms that might be found in the permafrost or polar ice caps of Mars, near the surface of the cometary nuclei, or in the liquid water beneath the ice crusts of icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn. For astrobiology the focus on the study alkaliphilic microorganisms was enhanced by the findings of abundant carbonates and carbonate globules rimmed with possibly biogenic magnetites in association with the putative microfossils in the ALH84001 meteorite. Although the ALH84001 "nanofossils" were too small and simple to be unambiguously recognized as biogenic, they stimulated Astrobiology research and studies of microbial extremophiles and biomarkers in ancient rocks and meteorites. Recent studies of CI and CM carbonaceous meteorites have resulted in the detection of the well-preserved mineralized remains of coccoidal and filamentous microorganisms in cyanobacterial mats. Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis has shown anomalous biogenic element ratios clearly indicating they are not recent biological contaminants. This paper reviews microbial extremophiles in context of their significance to Astrobiology and the evolution of life. Extremophilic microorganisms on Earth are models for life that might endure high radiation environments in the ice near the surface of comets or on the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn and in the seafloor deep beneath the icy crusts of Europa and Enceladus.

  12. Microbial Extremophiles in Evolutionary Aspect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    The microflora of the cryosphere of planet Earth provides the best analogs for life forms that might be found in the permafrost or polar ice caps of Mars, near the surface of the cometary nuclei, or in the liquid water beneath the ice crusts of icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn. For astrobiology the focus on the study alkaliphilic microorganisms was enhanced by the findings of abundant carbonates and carbonate globules rimmed with possibly biogenic magnetites in association with the putative microfossils in the ALH84001 meteorite. Although the ALH84001 "nanofossils" were to small and simple to be unambiguously recognized as biogenic, they stimulated Astrobiology research and studies of microbial extremophiles and biomarkers in ancient rocks and meteorites. Recent studies of CI and CM carbonaceous meteorites have resulted in the detection of the well-preserved mineralized remains of coccoidal and" filamentous microorganisms in cyanobacterial mats. Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis has shown anomalous biogenic element ratios clearly indicating they are not recent biological contaminants. This paper reviews microbial extremophiles in context of their significance to Astrobiology and the evolution of life. Extremophilic microorganisms on Earth are models for life that might endure high radiation environments in the ice near the surface of comets or on the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn and in the seafloor deep beneath the icy crusts of Europa and Enceladus.

  13. Radial systems of dark globules

    SciTech Connect

    Gyul'budagyn, A.L.

    1986-03-01

    The author gives examples of radial systems consisting of dark globules and ''elephant trunks''. Besides already known systems, which contain hot stars at their center, data are given on three radial systems of a new kind, at the center of which there are stars of spectral types later than B. Data are given on 32 globules of radial systems of the association Cep OB2. On the basis of the observational data, it is concluded that at least some of the isolated Bok globules derive from elephant trunks and dark globules forming radial systems around hot stars. It is also suggested that the two molecular clouds situated near the Rosette nebula and possessing velocities differing by ca 20 km/sec from the velocity of the nebula could have been ejected in opposite directions from the center of the nebula. One of these clouds consists of dark globules forming the radial system of the Rosette nebula.

  14. Formation of magnetite and iron-rich carbonates by thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.; Liu, S.; Roh, Y.; Cole, D.; Phelps, T.; Vali, H.; Kirschvink, J.L.; Onsttot, T.; McKay, D.

    1997-06-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study the formation of iron minerals by a thermophilic (45 to 75 C) fermentative iron-reducing bacterial culture (TOR39) obtained from the deep subsurface. Using amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide as an electron acceptor and glucose as an electron donor, TOR39 produced magnetite and iron-rich carbonates at conditions consistent, on a thermodynamic basis, with Eh ({minus}200 mV to {minus}415 mV) and pH (6.2 to 7.7) values determined for these experiments. Analyses of the precipitating solid phases by X-ray diffraction showed that the starting amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide was nearly completely converted to magnetite and Fe-rich carbonate after 20 days of incubation. Increasing bicarbonate concentration in the chemical milieu resulted in increased proportions of siderite relative to magnetite and the addition of MgCl{sub 2} caused the formation of magnesium-rich carbonate in addition to siderite. The results suggest that the TOR39 bacterial culture may have the capacity to form magnetite and iron-rich carbonates in a variety of geochemical conditions. These results may have significant implications for studying the past biogenic activities in the Martian meteorite ALH84001.

  15. Chains of Magnetite Crystals in the Meteorite ALH84001: Evidence of Biological Origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, E. I.; Wierzchos, J.; Ascaso, C.; Winklhofer, M.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of magnetite crystal chains, missing evidence for their biological origin, as well as five morphological characteristics incompatible with a nonbiological origin are demonstrated by high-power stereo backscattered scanning electron microscopy. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Searching for traces of life associated with carbonates in martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepot, K.; Kearsley, A. T.; Chater, R. J.; McPhail, D. J.

    Martian meteorites provide an obvious starting point for the search for evidence of life on Mars. Peculiar structures shown by electron microscopy of fragments from the Antarctic meteorite ALH84001 have been reported to demonstrate shapes and a size distribution similar to those of cultured terrestrial nanobacteria. However, the association of these putative fossil forms with bacteria is only morphological, and no traces of undisputed biological organic matter have yet been demonstrated in close association with these structures. Similar, and larger, apparent microbial fossils have been found within samples of the Martian basaltic shergottite meteorite Los Angeles 001 (LA 001). Here they are associated with calcium carbonate deposition, known from isotopic studies to be terrestrial in origin, and also with silica-bearing globular encrustations, reminiscent of biofilm. This association is typical of bacterially-mediated mineral precipitation, which may occur directly on bacterial cells or on their surroundings. We have used analytical electron microscopy to locate and document possible bacterial shapes in LA 001, prior to Focussed Ion Beam cross-sectioning and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry of the internal sections revealed. We intend to compare the morphology and composition of internal structures to those of bacteria preserved in terrestrial carbonate stromatolites, siliceous sinters and abiotic precipitates, in order to determine whether major element compositional variation, isotopic and trace element partitioning can be used to reliably fingerprint bacterial activity as responsible for the meteoritic structures.

  17. Anomalous Diffusion in Fractal Globules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamm, M. V.; Nazarov, L. I.; Gavrilov, A. A.; Chertovich, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    The fractal globule state is a popular model for describing chromatin packing in eukaryotic nuclei. Here we provide a scaling theory and dissipative particle dynamics computer simulation for the thermal motion of monomers in the fractal globule state. Simulations starting from different entanglement-free initial states show good convergence which provides evidence supporting the existence of a unique metastable fractal globule state. We show monomer motion in this state to be subdiffusive described by ⟨X2(t )⟩˜tαF with αF close to 0.4. This result is in good agreement with existing experimental data on the chromatin dynamics, which makes an additional argument in support of the fractal globule model of chromatin packing.

  18. Anomalous diffusion in fractal globules.

    PubMed

    Tamm, M V; Nazarov, L I; Gavrilov, A A; Chertovich, A V

    2015-05-01

    The fractal globule state is a popular model for describing chromatin packing in eukaryotic nuclei. Here we provide a scaling theory and dissipative particle dynamics computer simulation for the thermal motion of monomers in the fractal globule state. Simulations starting from different entanglement-free initial states show good convergence which provides evidence supporting the existence of a unique metastable fractal globule state. We show monomer motion in this state to be subdiffusive described by ⟨X(2)(t)⟩∼t(αF) with αF close to 0.4. This result is in good agreement with existing experimental data on the chromatin dynamics, which makes an additional argument in support of the fractal globule model of chromatin packing. PMID:25978267

  19. Anomalous diffusion in fractal globules.

    PubMed

    Tamm, M V; Nazarov, L I; Gavrilov, A A; Chertovich, A V

    2015-05-01

    The fractal globule state is a popular model for describing chromatin packing in eukaryotic nuclei. Here we provide a scaling theory and dissipative particle dynamics computer simulation for the thermal motion of monomers in the fractal globule state. Simulations starting from different entanglement-free initial states show good convergence which provides evidence supporting the existence of a unique metastable fractal globule state. We show monomer motion in this state to be subdiffusive described by ⟨X(2)(t)⟩∼t(αF) with αF close to 0.4. This result is in good agreement with existing experimental data on the chromatin dynamics, which makes an additional argument in support of the fractal globule model of chromatin packing.

  20. Discovery of Biological Structures in the Tissint Mars Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, J.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.; Wallis, Daryl; Miyake, Nori; Wallis, Max; Di Gregorio, Barry; Mufti, Shirwan Al

    2012-03-01

    Preliminary SEM/EDAX studies of the Tissint meteorite shows projections of interior spherical globules rich in C and O. Such concentrations of carbonaceous material in a matrix of mineral grains poses a mystery if biological processes are excluded. They are consistent with remnants of biological structures, thus supporting earlier similar claims for the Mars meteorite ALH84001..

  1. Interstellar organic globules in meteorites and comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messenger, Scott; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Keller, Lindsay

    Organic matter in primitive meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) is often enriched in D/H and 15N/14N relative to terrestrial values [1-3] due to preservation of interstellar cold molecular cloud material [1]. Some meteorites and IDPs contain micrometer-size inclusions with extreme H and N isotopic anomalies [2-4], possibly due to preserved primordial organic grains. In the Tagish Lake meteorite the main carriers of these anomalies are sub-micrometer, hollow organic globules [5]. Similar objects have been observed in extracts of other chondritic meteorites, but little is known about their N and H isotopic compositions [6-8]. We have measured the H, C, and N isotopic compositions of organic globules in the Bells CM2 carbonaceous chondrite meteorite, NASA Stardust (comet Wild-2) mission samples, and in ‘cometary' IDPs. High-resolution TEM imaging and EELS show that the globules consist of structurally amorphous carbon lacking long range order or development of graphite-like domains. In almost all cases the organic globules have strong enrichments in D/H and 15N/14N. These isotopic anomalies likely resulted from low temperature ( 10 K) chemical reactions in a cold molecular cloud or at the outer regions of the protosolar nebula. These results show that microscopic organic grains were widespread constituents of the protoplanetary disk. Microscopic organic globules may thus have been a common form of prebiotic organic matter delivered to the early Earth by comets and meteorites. References: [1] Messenger S. and Walker R.M. in Astrophysical Implications of the Laboratory Study of Presolar Materials (1997), p.545. [2] Messenger S. (2000) Nature 404, 968. [3] Busemann H. et al. (2006), Science 312, 727. [4] Floss C. et al. (2004) Science 303, 1355. [5] Nakamura-Messenger K. et al. (2006) Science, 314, 1439. [6] Claus G. and Nagy B., (1961) Nature 192, 594 [7] Aoki T., Akai J., Makino K. (2003) Int Symp.Evol. of Solar System Materials 5 [8] Garvie L

  2. Thackeray's Globules in IC 2944

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Strangely glowing dark clouds float serenely in this remarkable and beautiful image taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. These dense, opaque dust clouds - known as 'globules' - are silhouetted against nearby bright stars in the busy star-forming region, IC 2944. These globules were first found in IC 2944 by astronomer A.D. Thackeray in 1950. Although globules like these have been known since Dutch-American astronomer Bart Bok first drew attention to such objects in 1947, little is still known about their origin and nature, except that they are generally associated with areas of star formation, called 'HII regions' due to the presence of hydrogen gas. The largest of the globules in this image is actually two separate clouds that gently overlap along our line of sight. Each cloud is nearly 1.4 light-years (50 arcseconds) along its longest dimension, and collectively, they contain enough material to equal over 15 solar masses. IC 2944, the surrounding HII region, is filled with gas and dust that is illuminated and heated by a loose cluster of O-type stars. These stars are much hotter and much more massive than our Sun. IC 2944 is relatively close by, located only 5900 light-years (1800 parsecs) away in the constellation Centaurus. Thanks to the remarkable resolution offered by the Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers can for the first time study the intricate structure of these globules. The globules appear to be heavily fractured, as if major forces were tearing them apart. When radio astronomers observed the faint hiss of molecules within the globules, they realized that the globules are actually in constant, churning motion, moving supersonically among each other. This may be caused by the powerful ultraviolet radiation from the luminous, massive stars, which also heat up the gas in the HII region, causing it to expand and stream against the globules, leading to their destruction. Despite their serene appearance, the globules may actually be likened to clumps

  3. Cation diffusion in calcite: determining closure temperatures and the thermal history for the Allan Hills 84001 meteorite.

    PubMed

    Fisler, D K; Cygan, R T

    1998-07-01

    The presence of zoned Fe, Mg, Ca, and Mn in the carbonate phases associated with the cracks and inclusions of the Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 meteorite provides evidence for constraining the thermal history of the meteorite. Using self- and tracer-diffusion coefficients obtained from laboratory experiments on natural calcite, cooling rates are calculated for various temperatures and diffusion distances to assist in the evaluation of the compositional zoning associated with the carbonate phases in ALH 84001. The closure temperature model provides the average temperature below which compositional zoning will be preserved for a given cooling rate, that is, the temperature at which diffusion will be ineffective in homogenizing the phase. The validity of various theories for the formation of the carbonate globules may be examined, therefore, in view of the diffusion-limited kinetic constraints. Experiments using a thin film-mineral diffusion couple and ion microprobe for depth profiling analysis were performed for the temperature range of 550-800 degrees C to determine self- and tracer-diffusion coefficients for Ca and Mg and in calcite. The resulting activation energies for Ca (Ea(Ca) = 271 +/- 80 kJ/mol) and for Mg (Ea(Mg) = 284 +/- 74 kJ/mol) were used then to calculate a series of cooling rate, grain size, and closure temperature curves. The data indicate, for example, that by the diffusion of Mg in calcite, a 10 micrometers compositional zone would be completely homogenized at a temperature of 300 degrees C for cooling rates <100 K/Ma. These data provide no constraint on formation models that propose a low-temperature fluid precipitation mechanism; however, they indicate that the carbonate globules were not exposed to a high-temperature environment for long time scales following formation. PMID:11543076

  4. Cation diffusion in calcite: determining closure temperatures and the thermal history for the Allan Hills 84001 meteorite.

    PubMed

    Fisler, D K; Cygan, R T

    1998-07-01

    The presence of zoned Fe, Mg, Ca, and Mn in the carbonate phases associated with the cracks and inclusions of the Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 meteorite provides evidence for constraining the thermal history of the meteorite. Using self- and tracer-diffusion coefficients obtained from laboratory experiments on natural calcite, cooling rates are calculated for various temperatures and diffusion distances to assist in the evaluation of the compositional zoning associated with the carbonate phases in ALH 84001. The closure temperature model provides the average temperature below which compositional zoning will be preserved for a given cooling rate, that is, the temperature at which diffusion will be ineffective in homogenizing the phase. The validity of various theories for the formation of the carbonate globules may be examined, therefore, in view of the diffusion-limited kinetic constraints. Experiments using a thin film-mineral diffusion couple and ion microprobe for depth profiling analysis were performed for the temperature range of 550-800 degrees C to determine self- and tracer-diffusion coefficients for Ca and Mg and in calcite. The resulting activation energies for Ca (Ea(Ca) = 271 +/- 80 kJ/mol) and for Mg (Ea(Mg) = 284 +/- 74 kJ/mol) were used then to calculate a series of cooling rate, grain size, and closure temperature curves. The data indicate, for example, that by the diffusion of Mg in calcite, a 10 micrometers compositional zone would be completely homogenized at a temperature of 300 degrees C for cooling rates <100 K/Ma. These data provide no constraint on formation models that propose a low-temperature fluid precipitation mechanism; however, they indicate that the carbonate globules were not exposed to a high-temperature environment for long time scales following formation.

  5. Experimental Shock Decomposition of Siderite to Magnetite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, M. S.; Golden, D. C.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2005-01-01

    The debate about fossil life on Mars includes the origin of magnetites of specific sizes and habits in the siderite-rich portions of the carbonate spheres in ALH 84001 [1,2]. Specifically [2] were able to demonstrate that inorganic synthesis of these compositionally zoned spheres from aqueous solutions of variable ion-concentrations is possible. They further demonstrated the formation of magnetite from siderite upon heating at 550 C under a Mars-like CO2-rich atmosphere according to 3FeCO3 = Fe3O4 + 2CO2 + CO [3] and they postulated that the carbonates in ALH 84001 were heated to these temperatures by some shock event. The average shock pressure for ALH 84001, substantially based on the refractive index of diaplectic feldspar glasses [3,4,5] is some 35-40 GPa and associated temperatures are some 300-400 C [4]. However, some of the feldspar is melted [5], requiring local deviations from this average as high as 45-50 GPa. Indeed, [5] observes the carbonates in ALH 84001 to be melted locally, requiring pressures in excess of 60 GPa and temperatures > 600 C. Combining these shock studies with the above inorganic synthesis of zoned carbonates it seems possible to produce the ALH 84001 magnetites by the shock-induced decomposition of siderite.

  6. Isotopic evidence for a terrestrial source of organic compounds found in martian meteorites Allan Hills 84001 and Elephant Moraine 79001.

    PubMed

    Jull, A J; Courtney, C; Jeffrey, D A; Beck, J W

    1998-01-16

    Stepped-heating experiments on martian meteorites Allan Hills 84001 (ALH84001) and Elephant Moraine 79001 (EETA79001) revealed low-temperature (200 to 430 degrees Celsius) fractions with a carbon isotopic composition delta13C between -22 and -33 per mil and a carbon-14 content that is 40 to 60 percent of that of modern terrestrial carbon, consistent with a terrestrial origin for most of the organic material. Intermediate-temperature (400 to 600 degrees Celsius) carbonate-rich fractions of ALH84001 have delta13C of +32 to +40 per mil with a low carbon-14 content, consistent with an extraterrestrial origin, whereas some of the carbonate fraction of EETA79001 is terrestrial. In addition, ALH84001 contains a small preterrestrial carbon component of unknown origin that combusts at intermediate temperatures. This component is likely a residual acid-insoluble carbonate or a more refractory organic phase. PMID:9430584

  7. Partial phase diagram of aqueous bovine carbonic anhydrase: analyses of the pressure-dependent temperatures of the low- to physiological-temperature nondenaturational conformational change and of unfolding to the molten globule state.

    PubMed

    McNevin, Stacey L; Nguyen, Duong T; Britt, B Mark

    2008-10-01

    At 1.0 atm pressure and in 150 mM sodium phosphate (pH=7.0), bovine carbonic anhydrase undergoes a nondenaturational conformational change at 30.3 degrees C and an unfolding transition from the physiological conformer to the molten globule state at 67.4 degrees C. The pressure dependences of the temperatures of these transitions have been studied under reversible conditions for the purpose of understanding DeltaH degrees, DeltaS degrees, and DeltaV for each conformational change. Temperatures for the low-temperature to physiological-temperature conformational change TL-->P are obtained from physiologically relevant conditions using slow-scan-rate differential scanning calorimetry. Temperatures for the physiological-temperature conformation to molten globule state conversion TP-->MG are obtained from differential scanning calorimetry measurements of the apparent transition temperature in the presence of guanidine hydrochloride extrapolated to zero molar denaturant. The use of slow-scan-rate differential scanning calorimetry permits the calculation of the activation volume for the conversion of the low-temperature conformer to the physiological-temperature conformer DeltaVL-->P. At 1.0 atm pressure, the transition from the low-temperature conformer to the physiological-temperature conformer involves a volume change DeltaVL-->P=15+/-2 L/mole, which contrasts with the partial unfolding of the physiological-temperature conformer to the molten globule state (DeltaVP-->MG=26+/-9 L/mole). The activation volume for this process DeltaVL-->P=51+/-9 L/mole and is consistent with a prior thermodynamic analysis that suggests the conformational transition from the low-temperature conformation to the physiological-temperature conformation possesses a substantial unfolding quality. These results provide further evidence the structure of the enzyme obtained from crystals grown below 30 degrees C should not be regarded as the physiological structure (the normal bovine body

  8. Geochemistry of Carbonates on Mars: Implications for Climate History and Nature of Aqueous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niles, Paul B.; Catling, David C.; Berger, Gilles; Chassefière, Eric; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Michalski, Joseph R.; Morris, Richard; Ruff, Steven W.; Sutter, Brad

    2013-01-01

    Ongoing research on martian meteorites and a new set of observations of carbonate minerals provided by an unprecedented series of robotic missions to Mars in the past 15 years help define new constraints on the history of martian climate with important crosscutting themes including: the CO2 budget of Mars, the role of Mg-, Fe-rich fluids on Mars, and the interplay between carbonate formation and acidity. Carbonate minerals have now been identified in a wide range of localities on Mars as well as in several martian meteorites. The martian meteorites contain carbonates in low abundances (<1 vol.%) and with a wide range of chemistries. Carbonates have also been identified by remote sensing instruments on orbiting spacecraft in several surface locations as well as in low concentrations (2-5 wt.%) in the martian dust. The Spirit rover also identified an outcrop with 16 to 34 wt.% carbonate material in the Columbia Hills of Gusev Crater that strongly resembled the composition of carbonate found in martian meteorite ALH 84001. Finally, the Phoenix lander identified concentrations of 3-6 wt.% carbonate in the soils of the northern plains. The carbonates discovered to date do not clearly indicate the past presence of a dense Noachian atmosphere, but instead suggest localized hydrothermal aqueous environments with limited water availability that existed primarily in the early to mid-Noachian followed by low levels of carbonate formation from thin films of transient water from the late Noachian to the present. The prevalence of carbonate along with evidence for active carbonate precipitation suggests that a global acidic chemistry is unlikely and a more complex relationship between acidity and carbonate formation is present.

  9. The challenge of remote exploration for extraterrestrial fossil life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Paul H.; Taunton, Anne E.

    1997-07-01

    The discovery of possible fossils of nanobacteria in a meteorite from Mars is both an exciting development and a considerably challenge for future work. The meteorite bearing the possible fossils, ALH84001, has been on Earth for over ten thousand years, and thus the possibility that the `fossils' are terrestrial contamination must be considered. We suggest that the only way to fully resolve the issue of possible martian life is to study directly- sampled pieces of Mars, either using in situ instrumentation or via sample return. The small size of the possible fossils, and their relatively low abundance in bulk rock samples make in situ analysis difficult and indirect. We suggest that addressing the issue of ancient life on Mars will require sample return, probably assisted by in situ screening by landers/rovers. Our study of ALH84001 confirms the observation of McKay et al. of the existence of `fossils' in ALH84001, and we find that they are highly abundant on all the carbonate nodules we examined. Examination of lunar meteorites and two other martian meteorites, with terrestrial and laboratory histories very similar to that of ALH84001, shows that nano-`fossils' are absent, suggesting that the features in ALH84001 are probably not terrestrial contamination.

  10. Biomarkers in Carbonate Thermal Springs: Implications for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Kivett, S. J.; McKay, D. S.

    1998-01-01

    Evidence of possible relict biogenic activity has been reported in carbonate inclusions within martian meteorite ALH 84001. The initial evidence included ovoid and elongated forms 50 - 500 nanometers in length, morphologically similar to but significantly smaller than many terrestrial microbes. More recently, thin structures resembling the remains of organic biofilms have been reported in the same meteorite. Carbonates have also been discussed in the context of Mars sample return missions. Thermal spring deposits have often been cited as prime locations for exobiological exploration. By analogy to Earth, specialized microbes may have existed in the heated, mineralized waters, and precipitates of carbonate and/or silica from these waters may have trapped and preserved evidence of life. Since the geological interactions that produce thermal springs can be recognized in orbital imagery, directed searches for microfossils in such deposits are deemed possible. We are engaged in a study of the signatures produced by contemporary biogenic activity (biomarkers) in carbonate thermal springs. We are examining the microbes that live in such environments and the preservation of microbial forms, biofilms, and petrographic fabrics indicative of life in thermal spring mineral deposits. This work is part of a much more extensive study to refine the appropriate tools, techniques, and approaches to seek evidence of life in a range of planetary samples. A deeper understanding of biological signatures will prepare us for the detailed search for life on Mars and eventually on other planets. Overall. the study of biomarkers in rocks and soils will provide insight into the evolution of life because such signatures are a record of how life interacts with its environment, how it adapts to changing conditions, and how life can influence geology and climate.

  11. Olivine in Martian Meteorite Allan Hills 84001: Evidence for a High-Temperature Origin and Implications for Signs of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Leshin, L. A.; Adcock, C. T.

    1999-01-01

    Olivine from Martian meteorite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 occurs as clusters within orthopyroxene adjacent to fractures containing disrupted carbonate globules and feldspathic shock glass. The inclusions are irregular in shape and range in size from approx. 40 microns to submicrometer. Some of the inclusions are elongate and boudinage-like. The olivine grains are in sharp contact with the enclosing orthopyroxene and often contain small inclusions of chromite The olivine exhibits a very limited range of composition from Fo(sub 65) to Fo(sub 66) (n = 25). The delta(sup 18)O values of the olivine and orthopyroxene analyzed by ion microprobe range from +4.3 to +5.3% and are indistinguishable from each other within analytical uncertainty. The mineral chemistries, O-isotopic data, and textural relationships indicate that the olivine inclusions were produced at a temperature greater than 800 C. It is unlikely that the olivines formed during the same event that gave rise to the carbonates in ALH 84001, which have more elevated and variable delta(sup 18)O values, and were probably formed from fluids that were not in isotopic equilibrium with the orthopyroxene or olivine The reactions most likely instrumental in the formation of olivine could be either the dehydration of hydrous silicates that formed during carbonate precipitation or the reduction of orthopyroxene and spinel If the olivine was formed by either reaction during a postcarbonate beating event, the implications are profound with regards to the interpretations of McKay et al. Due to the low diffusion rates in carbonates, this rapid, high-temperature event would have resulted in the preservation of the fine-scale carbonate zoning' while partially devolatilizing select carbonate compositions on a submicrometer scale. This may have resulted in the formation of the minute magnetite grains that McKay et al attributed to biogenic activity.

  12. Observation and Analysis of In Situ Carbonaceous Matter in Naklha. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Clemett, S. J.; Thomas-Kerpta, K. L.; McKay, D. S.; Wentworth, S. J.; Robert, F.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.; Rice, T.; VanLeer, B.

    2006-01-01

    The search for indigenous carbon components on Mars has been a challenge. The first attempt was the Viking GC-MS in situ experiment which gave inconclusive results at two sites on Mars [1]. After the discovery that the SNC meteorites were from Mars [2], [3-5] reported C isotopic compositional information which suggested a reduced C component present in the martian meteorites. [6 & 7] reported the presence of reduced C components (i.e., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) associated with the carbonate globules in ALH84001. Jull et al. [8] noted in Nakhla there was an acid insoluble C component present with more than 75% of its C lacking any C-14, which is modern-day carbon. This C fraction was believed to be either indigenous martian or ancient meteoritic carbon. Fisk et al. [9, 10] have shown textural evidence along with C-enriched areas within fractures in Nakhla and ALH84001. To further understand the nature of possible indigenous reduced C components, we have carried out a variety of measurements on martian meteorites. For this presentation we will discuss only the Nakhla results. Interior samples from the Nakhla SNC meteorite, recently made available by the British Museum of Natural History, were analyzed. Petrographic examination [11, McKay et al., this volume] of Nakhla showed evidence of fractures (approx.0.5 micron wide) filled with dark brown to black dendritic material [Fig. 1] with characteristics similar to those observed by [10]. Iddingsite is also present along fractures in olivine. Fracture filling and dendritic material was examined by SEM-EDX, TEM-EDX, Focused Electron Beam microscopy, Laser Raman Spectroscopy, Nano-SIMS Ion Micro-probe, and Stepped-Combustion Static Mass Spectrometry.

  13. Presolar Organic Globules in Astromaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Clemett, S. J.

    2012-01-01

    Presolar grains were identified in meteorite residues 20 years ago based on their exotic isotopic compositions [1]. Their study has provide new insights into stellar evolution and the first view of the original building blocks of the solar system. Organic matter in meteorites and IDPs is highly enriched in D/H and N-15/N-14 at micron scales, possibly due to presolar organic grains [2-4]. These anomalies are ascribed to the partial preservation of presolar cold molecular cloud material. Identifying the carriers of these anomalies and elucidating their physical and chemical properties may give new views of interstellar chemistry and better understanding of the original components of the protosolar disk. However, identifying the carriers has been hampered by their small size and the inability to chemically isolate them. Thanks to major advances in nano-scale analytical techniques and advanced sample preparation, we were able to show that in the Tagish Lake meteorite, the principle carriers of these isotopic anomalies are sub-microns, hollow organic globules [5]. The organic globules likely formed by photochemical processing of organic ices in a cold molecular cloud or the outermost regions of the protosolar disk [5]. Organic globules with similar physical, chemical, and isotopic properties are also recently found from Bells CM2 carbonaceous chondrite, in IDPs [6] and in the comet Wild-2 samples returned by Stardust [7]. These results support the view that microscopic organic grains were widespread constituents of the protoplanetary disk. Their exotic isotopic compositions trace their origins to the outermost portions of the protosolar disk or a presolar cold molecular cloud.

  14. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The presentations in this session are: 1. A Prototype Life Detection Chip 2. The Geology of Atlantis Basin, Mars, and Its Astrobiological Interest 3. Collecting Bacteria Together with Aerosols in the Martian Atmosphere by the FOELDIX Experimental Instrument Developed with a Nutrient Detector Pattern: Model Measurements of Effectivity 4. 2D and 3D X-ray Imaging of Microorganisms in Meteorites Using Complexity Analysis to Distinguish Field Images of Stromatoloids from Surrounding Rock Matrix in 3.45 Ga Strelley Pool Chert, Western Australia 4. Characterization of Two Isolates from Andean Lakes in Bolivia Short Time Scale Evolution of Microbiolites in Rapidly Receding Altiplanic Lakes: Learning How to Recognize Changing Signatures of Life 5. The Effect of Salts on Electrospray Ionization of Amino Acids in the Negative Mode 6. Determination of Aromatic Ring Number Using Multi-Channel Deep UV Native Fluorescence 7. Microbial D/H Fractionation in Extraterrestrial Materials: Application to Micrometeorites and Mars 8. Carbon Isotope Characteristics of Spring-fed Iron-precipitating Microbial Mats 9. Amino Acid Survival Under Ambient Martian Surface UV Lighting Extraction of Organic Molecules from Terrestrial Material: Quantitative Yields from Heat and Water Extractions 10. Laboratory Detection and Analysis of Organic Compounds in Rocks Using HPLC and XRD Methods 11. Thermal Decomposition of Siderite-Pyrite Assemblages: Implications for Sulfide Mineralogy in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 Carbonate Globules 12. Determination of the Three-Dimensional Morphology of ALH84001 and Biogenic MV-1 Magnetite: Comparison of Results from Electron Tomography and Classical Transmission Electron Microscopy 13. On the Possibility of a Crypto-Biotic Crust on Mars Based on Northern and Southern Ringed Polar Dune Spots 14. Comparative Planetology of the Terrestrial Inner Planets: Implications for Astrobiology 15. A Possible Europa Exobiology 16. A Possible Biogeochemical Model for Titan

  15. Workshop on the Issue Martian Meteorites: Where do we Stand and Where are we Going?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The presentations in this workshop discuss the composition of Martian meteorites. Many of the talks were on a specific meteorite, i.e., Allan Hills 84001 (ALH84001). The discovery earlier of carbonates in ALH84001 lead some researchers to suggest that there was evidence of martian life. Other possible explanations for this phenomena are given. Other papers discuss methods to sterilize martian samples, the existence of water on Mars, the facilities of the Meteorite Processing Laboratory at Johnson Space Center, comparative analyses of geologic processes and the gathering of meteorites.

  16. A nitrogen and argon stable isotope study of Allan Hills 84001: implications for the evolution of the Martian atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Grady, M M; Wright, I P; Pillinger, C T

    1998-07-01

    The abundances and isotopic compositions of N and Ar have been measured by stepped combustion of the Allan Hills 84001 (ALH 84001) Martian orthopyroxenite. Material described as shocked is N-poor ([N] approximately 0.34 ppm; delta 15N approximately +23%); although during stepped combustion, 15N-enriched N (delta 15N approximately +143%) is released in a narrow temperature interval between 700 degrees C and 800 degrees C (along with 13C-enriched C (delta 13C approximately +19%) and 40Ar). Cosmogenic species are found to be negligible at this temperature; thus, the isotopically heavy component is identified, in part, as Martian atmospheric gas trapped relatively recently in the history of ALH84001. The N and Ar data show that ALH84001 contains species from the Martian lithosphere, a component interpreted as ancient trapped atmosphere (in addition to the modern atmospheric species), and excess 40Ar from K decay. Deconvolution of radiogenic 40Ar from other Ar components, on the basis of end-member 36Ar/14N and 40Ar/36Ar ratios, has enabled calculation of a K-Ar age for ALH 84001 as 3.5-4.6 Ga, depending on assumed K abundance. If the component believed to be Martian palaeoatmosphere was introduced to ALH 84001 at the time the K-Ar age was set, then the composition of the atmosphere at this time is constrained to: delta 15N > or = +200%, 40Ar/36Ar < or = 3000 and 36Ar/14N > or = 17 x 10(-5). In terms of the petrogenetic history of the meteorite, ALH 84001 crystallised soon after differentiation of the planet, may have been shocked and thermally metamorphosed in an early period of bombardment, and then subjected to a second event. This later process did not reset the K-Ar system but perhaps was responsible for introducing (recent) atmospheric gases into ALH 84001; and it might mark the time at which ALH 84001 suffered fluid alteration resulting in the formation of the plagioclase and carbonate mineral assemblages. PMID:11543078

  17. [Meteoritics and mineralogy on possible ancient Martian life].

    PubMed

    Tsuchiyama, A

    1996-12-01

    Possible relic biogenic activity in martian meteorite ALH84001 was proposed by McKay et al. (Science, 273, 924-930, 1996). This ancient meteorite of 4.5 billion years old contains abundant carbonates as secondary minerals precipitated from a fluid on the martian surface. They showed the following lines of evidence for the ancient life; (1) unique mineral compositions and biominerals, (2) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in association with the carbonates, and (3) unique structures and morphologies typical of nanobacteria or microfossils. This review is divided into two parts; one is on the martian meteorites in general and ALH84001, which has many features unlike other martian meteorites, and the other is on mineralogical (biomineralogical) and geochemical features of the carbonates and microfossil-like structures. There is little doubt that ALH84001 is from Mars as well as eleven other SNC meteorites. However, the mineralogical and biomineralogical evidence for martian bacteria given by McKay et al. (1996) is controversial, and could be formed by non-biogenic processes. Thus, further study of ALH84001 and other martian meteorites is required. We also need to consider the future Mars mission especially sample return mission.

  18. [Meteoritics and mineralogy on possible ancient Martian life].

    PubMed

    Tsuchiyama, A

    1996-12-01

    Possible relic biogenic activity in martian meteorite ALH84001 was proposed by McKay et al. (Science, 273, 924-930, 1996). This ancient meteorite of 4.5 billion years old contains abundant carbonates as secondary minerals precipitated from a fluid on the martian surface. They showed the following lines of evidence for the ancient life; (1) unique mineral compositions and biominerals, (2) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in association with the carbonates, and (3) unique structures and morphologies typical of nanobacteria or microfossils. This review is divided into two parts; one is on the martian meteorites in general and ALH84001, which has many features unlike other martian meteorites, and the other is on mineralogical (biomineralogical) and geochemical features of the carbonates and microfossil-like structures. There is little doubt that ALH84001 is from Mars as well as eleven other SNC meteorites. However, the mineralogical and biomineralogical evidence for martian bacteria given by McKay et al. (1996) is controversial, and could be formed by non-biogenic processes. Thus, further study of ALH84001 and other martian meteorites is required. We also need to consider the future Mars mission especially sample return mission. PMID:11540347

  19. Photometric distances to nine dark globules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheswar, G.; Bhatt, H. C.

    2006-07-01

    Distances to nine dark globules are determined by a method using optical (VRI) and near-infrared (near-IR) (JHK) photometry of stars projected towards the field containing the globules. In this method, we compute intrinsic colour indices of stars projected towards the direction of the globule by dereddening the observed colour indices using various trial values of extinction AV and a standard extinction law. These computed intrinsic colour indices for each star are then compared with the intrinsic colour indices of normal main-sequence stars and a spectral type is assigned to the star for which the computed colour indices best match with the standard intrinsic colour indices. Distances (d) to the stars are determined using the AV and absolute magnitude (MV) corresponding to the spectral types thus obtained. A distance versus extinction plot is made and the distance at which AV undergoes a sharp rise is taken to be the distance to the globule. All the clouds studied in this work are in the distance range 160-400pc. The estimated distances to dark globules LDN 544, LDN 549, LDN 567, LDN 543, LDN 1113, LDN 1031, LDN 1225, LDN 1252 and LDN 1257 are 180 +/- 35, 200 +/- 40, 180 +/- 35, 160 +/- 30, 350 +/- 70, 200 +/- 40, 400 +/- 80, 250 +/- 50 and 250 +/- 50pc, respectively. Using the distances determined, we have estimated the masses of the globules and the far-IR luminosity of the IRAS sources associated with them. The mass of the clouds studied are in the range 10-200Msolar.

  20. High-Resolution Multiple Sulfur Isotope Studies of Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojzsis, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    Sensitive, high resolution measurements of S-32, S-31, and S-34 in individual pyrite grains in martian meteorite ALH84001 by an in situ ion microprobe multi-collection technique reveal mass-independent anomalies in Delta.S-33 (Delta.S-33 = delta.S-33 - 0.516delta.S-34) in addition to the lowest 634S found in an extraterrestrial material. Low delta.S-34 values in two pyrite grains intimately associated with carbonate in ALH84001 can be explained by the sensitivity of sulfur to fractionations in the geologic environment. Anomalies in Delta.S-33 recorded in ALH84001 pyrites probably formed by gas-phase reactions in the early martian atmosphere (>4 Ga). The discovery of clearly resolvable Delta-S33 anomalies in 2 of 12 ALH84001 pyrites analyzed in their petrographic context in thin section, is considered strong evidence for crust-atmosphere exchange and the global cycling of volatile sulfur species on early Mars. These results corroborate previous measurements by Farquhar and co-workers who used a different technique that measures that bulk Delta.S-33 values of martian meteorites. These independent techniques, and their results, suggest that sulfur affected by mass-independent fractionation is common on Mars.

  1. About iron globules formed at cooling of iron-contained plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulina, N. V.; Gromyko, A. I.; Bondarenko, G. V.; Marachevsky, A. V.; Chekanova, L. A.; Prokof'ev, D. E.; Churilov, G. N.

    2006-12-01

    This paper is devoted to the investigation of iron globules that are formed during cooling of the iron-carbon-helium plasma and as a result of destruction of a natural ball lightning. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, and ferromagnetic resonance investigations were carried out. The magnetization values of the samplers were determined.

  2. Organic Globules in the Tagish Lake Meteorite: Remnants of the Protosolar Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay P.; Clemett, Simon J.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2006-12-01

    Coordinated transmission electron microscopy and isotopic measurements of organic globules in the Tagish Lake meteorite shows that they have elevated ratios of nitrogen-15 to nitrogen-14 (1.2 to 2 times terrestrial) and of deuterium to hydrogen (2.5 to 9 times terrestrial). These isotopic anomalies are indicative of mass fractionation during chemical reactions at extremely low temperatures (10 to 20 kelvin), characteristic of cold molecular clouds and the outer protosolar disk. The globules probably originated as organic ice coatings on preexisting grains that were photochemically processed into refractory organic matter. The globules resemble cometary carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen (CHON) particles, suggesting that such grains were important constituents of the solar system starting materials.

  3. Organic globules in the Tagish Lake meteorite: remnants of the protosolar disk.

    PubMed

    Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay P; Clemett, Simon J; Zolensky, Michael E

    2006-12-01

    Coordinated transmission electron microscopy and isotopic measurements of organic globules in the Tagish Lake meteorite shows that they have elevated ratios of nitrogen-15 to nitrogen-14 (1.2 to 2 times terrestrial) and of deuterium to hydrogen (2.5 to 9 times terrestrial). These isotopic anomalies are indicative of mass fractionation during chemical reactions at extremely low temperatures (10 to 20 kelvin), characteristic of cold molecular clouds and the outer protosolar disk. The globules probably originated as organic ice coatings on preexisting grains that were photochemically processed into refractory organic matter. The globules resemble cometary carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen (CHON) particles, suggesting that such grains were important constituents of the solar system starting materials.

  4. ORIGIN OF ORGANIC GLOBULES IN METEORITES: LABORATORY SIMULATION USING AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Midori; Kimura, Yuki

    2009-10-01

    Analogs of organic hollow globules, which have been found in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites and interplanetary dust particles, were synthesized in our laboratory from benzene and anthracene using plasma. Our results suggest that organic globules could be made from aromatic rings in circumstellar envelopes around evolved stars. The hollow interior could be formed by coagulation of vacancies, formed by electronic excitation and/or knock-out of carbon atoms following irradiation by plasma particles such as protons and He{sup +} ions. This experimental result suggests that organic globules are possibly the final products in the evolution of carbonaceous matter from acetylene and benzene to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ejecta gas from evolved stars.

  5. Dark Globule in IC 1396 (IRAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger view of inset

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope image of a glowing stellar nursery provides a spectacular contrast to the opaque cloud seen in visible light (inset). The Elephant's Trunk Nebula is an elongated dark globule within the emission nebula IC 1396 in the constellation of Cepheus. Located at a distance of 2,450 light-years, the globule is a condensation of dense gas that is barely surviving the strong ionizing radiation from a nearby massive star. The globule is being compressed by the surrounding ionized gas. The dark globule is seen in silhouette at visible-light wavelengths, backlit by the illumination of a bright star located to the left of the field of view.

    The Spitzer Space Telescope pierces through the obscuration to reveal the birth of new protostars, or embryonic stars, and previously unseen young stars. The infrared image was obtained by Spitzer's infrared array camera. The image is a four-color composite of invisible light, showing emissions from wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8.0 microns (red). The filamentary appearance of the globule results from the sculpting effects of competing physical processes. The winds from a massive star, located to the left of the image, produce a dense circular rim comprising the 'head' of the globule and a swept-back tail of gas.

    A pair of young stars (LkHa 349 and LkHa 349c) that formed from the dense gas has cleared a spherical cavity within the globule head. While one of these stars is significantly fainter than the other in the visible-light image, they are of comparable brightness in the infrared Spitzer image. This implies the presence of a thick and dusty disc around LkHa 349c. Such circumstellar discs are the precursors of planetary systems. They are much thicker in the early stages of stellar formation when the placental planet-forming material (gas and dust) is still

  6. Carbonates in Martian Meteorites - A Reappraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, M. M.; Wright, I. P.; Douglas, C.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1995-09-01

    The occurrence of carbonates in martian meteorites was first established after acid dissolution and stepped combustion analyses of whole-rock Nakhla [1]. The release of CO2 after a 24 hr. reaction with 100% H3PO4 at 25 degrees C was taken to imply that the carbonate mineral present was calcite, a proposal subsequently confirmed by petrographic examination [2]. The isotopic composition of the carbon comprising the calcite was enriched in 13C (isotopically heavy) with delta^(l3)C ~ +12 per mil. An extended period of acid attack, also at 25 degrees C, released small quantities of even more 13C-enriched CO2 (delta^(13)C ~ +49 per mil), but the isotopic data were considered uncertain, and thus little significance was attached to the result, beyond the suggestion that some carbonate was perhaps dolomite or iron-bearing. Now, however, following the analysis of Fe-Mg-rich carbonates in ALH 84001 [3-5], it is apparent that previously-reported data might underestimate the abundance and delta^(13)C of carbonates in SNCs [6], and that a much higher proportion might occur as siderite or dolomite end-members. Iron- and magnesium-rich carbonates are only partially attacked at 25 degrees C, even after extended exposure to H3PO4 [7]. Given that the delta^(13)C of carbonates in SNCs has been used to deduce both environmental conditions on Mars [4, 6], and the evolution of the martian atmosphere [8], it is desirable that correct delta^(l3)c values are known. We have undertaken a reappraisal of the chemical and isotopic composition of carbonates in martian meteorites, by a programme of high resolution stepped combustion analyses and high temperature (75 degrees C) acid dissolution . Carbonates in most martian meteorites are extremely fine-grained. and therefore not easv to identify by traditional optical microscopic methods; it is not possible to determine readily the mineralogical composition of the grains. Comparison of combustion data from SNCs with that from pure materials allows

  7. Evidence for Ancient Martian Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Three SNC meteorites ranging in age from 4.5 Ga. to 1.3 Ga. to 165 m.y. contain features suggestive, of past biogenic activity on Mars. Because we do not know what past martian life looks like or its physical or chemical properties, the only tools or criteria which the scientific community have to evaluate evidence of past life is to use evidence for early life on earth. There are features within ALH8400 I's carbonate globules and the pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration phases of Nakhla and Shergotty which have been interpreted as possible evidence for past life on early Mars. Eight criteria have been established for the recognition of past life within terrestrial geologic samples. They are: (a) geologic context; (b) sample's age and stratigraphic location (c) cellular morphology; (d) colonies; (e) biominerals; (f) stable isotope patterns unique to biology; (g) organic biomarkers; (h) indigenous features to the sample. For general acceptance of past life, essentially most or all of these criteria must be met. Studies have shown conclusively that the reduced carbon components in ALH84001 and Nakhla are indigenous to the meteorites and are not terrestrial contaminants Based on carbon isotopic compositions and mineralogical morphologies, there is no question or disagreement that the carbonate globules or embedded magnetites in ALH84001 and the pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration products in Nakhla and Shergotty were formed on Mars. Possible microfossil structures and some reduced carbon components in the carbonates and pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration products are, therefore, almost certainly indigenous, but other possible evidence for life (e.g. amino acids) may be a result of terrestrial contamination Our hypothesis of possible early life on Mars was presented in August 1996. Today, we believe it stands stronger than when originally presented. To date, no fatal strikes have been made to any of our original four lines of evidence. While details of the hypothesis are

  8. Interactions between milk fat globules and green tea catechins.

    PubMed

    Rashidinejad, Ali; Birch, E John; Everett, David W

    2016-05-15

    The determination of putative chemical interactions between the milk fat globule membrane and green tea catechins provided useful information about the role of milk fat globules (MFGs) in high-fat dairy systems, such as cheese, and containing bioactive compounds, such as tea catechins. Catechins from green tea (125-1,000 ppm), including (+)-catechin, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, and green tea extract were added to washed MFGs to examine possible interactions. The addition of catechins gave a significant change in the size and ζ-potential of MFGs. The recovery of different catechins from the milk fat globule suspensions was found to vary, suggesting selective association with the milk fat globule membranes. The interactions were further investigated using transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy. It is suggested that catechins are localised in association with milk fat globule membrane domains as they contain both hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties with potential points of molecular interaction. PMID:26775981

  9. Interactions between milk fat globules and green tea catechins.

    PubMed

    Rashidinejad, Ali; Birch, E John; Everett, David W

    2016-05-15

    The determination of putative chemical interactions between the milk fat globule membrane and green tea catechins provided useful information about the role of milk fat globules (MFGs) in high-fat dairy systems, such as cheese, and containing bioactive compounds, such as tea catechins. Catechins from green tea (125-1,000 ppm), including (+)-catechin, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, and green tea extract were added to washed MFGs to examine possible interactions. The addition of catechins gave a significant change in the size and ζ-potential of MFGs. The recovery of different catechins from the milk fat globule suspensions was found to vary, suggesting selective association with the milk fat globule membranes. The interactions were further investigated using transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy. It is suggested that catechins are localised in association with milk fat globule membrane domains as they contain both hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties with potential points of molecular interaction.

  10. Milk Fat Globule structure & function; nanosciece comes to milk production

    PubMed Central

    Argov, Nurit; Lemay, Danielle G; German, J Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The biological process of fat globule assembly and secretion produces highly complex globule compositions and structures with many properties now recognized to be the direct result of these structures. During homogenization, fat globules are broken down and subsequently structures and surfaces different than the native state are formed. This process alters the milk fat globule unique macrostructure and the effects associated to their structure would be expected to be lost. In the present overview, the need for continued research of the fundamental aspects of the mechanism involved in milk fat globules synthesis secretion and size distribution, as well as establishing ways to regulate those processes are highlighted. Ultimately these insights will guide food technology to developing a new generation of structure based functional foods and as highlighted in this overview, dairy functional products should be the pioneering commodity. PMID:24363495

  11. Fractal Globules: A New Approach to Artificial Molecular Machines

    PubMed Central

    Avetisov, Vladik A.; Ivanov, Viktor A.; Meshkov, Dmitry A.; Nechaev, Sergei K.

    2014-01-01

    The over-damped relaxation of elastic networks constructed by contact maps of hierarchically folded fractal (crumpled) polymer globules was investigated in detail. It was found that the relaxation dynamics of an anisotropic fractal globule is very similar to the behavior of biological molecular machines like motor proteins. When it is perturbed, the system quickly relaxes to a low-dimensional manifold, M, with a large basin of attraction and then slowly approaches equilibrium, not escaping M. Taking these properties into account, it is suggested that fractal globules, even those made by synthetic polymers, are artificial molecular machines that can transform perturbations into directed quasimechanical motion along a defined path. PMID:25418305

  12. Fractal globules: a new approach to artificial molecular machines.

    PubMed

    Avetisov, Vladik A; Ivanov, Viktor A; Meshkov, Dmitry A; Nechaev, Sergei K

    2014-11-18

    The over-damped relaxation of elastic networks constructed by contact maps of hierarchically folded fractal (crumpled) polymer globules was investigated in detail. It was found that the relaxation dynamics of an anisotropic fractal globule is very similar to the behavior of biological molecular machines like motor proteins. When it is perturbed, the system quickly relaxes to a low-dimensional manifold, M, with a large basin of attraction and then slowly approaches equilibrium, not escaping M. Taking these properties into account, it is suggested that fractal globules, even those made by synthetic polymers, are artificial molecular machines that can transform perturbations into directed quasimechanical motion along a defined path. PMID:25418305

  13. Fractal globules: a new approach to artificial molecular machines.

    PubMed

    Avetisov, Vladik A; Ivanov, Viktor A; Meshkov, Dmitry A; Nechaev, Sergei K

    2014-11-18

    The over-damped relaxation of elastic networks constructed by contact maps of hierarchically folded fractal (crumpled) polymer globules was investigated in detail. It was found that the relaxation dynamics of an anisotropic fractal globule is very similar to the behavior of biological molecular machines like motor proteins. When it is perturbed, the system quickly relaxes to a low-dimensional manifold, M, with a large basin of attraction and then slowly approaches equilibrium, not escaping M. Taking these properties into account, it is suggested that fractal globules, even those made by synthetic polymers, are artificial molecular machines that can transform perturbations into directed quasimechanical motion along a defined path.

  14. Lipid-protein globules of avian egg yolk. Isolation and properties of globules stable in concentrated sodium chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Vadehra, D V; Bain, J M; Burley, R W

    1977-09-15

    A new type of globular particle, the 'insoluble yolk globule', was isolated from the egg yolk of three avian species (hen, duck, and emu) by centrifugation or gel-filtration chromatography. These globules are stable in NaCl and urea solutions at concentrations that dissolve or disrupt other constituents of yolk, The isolated globules are about 1% of the dry yolk of hen's and duck's eggs but about 8% emu's-egg yolk. Most of these globules are less than 2 micrometer in diameter. Electron micrographs of sections show a preponderance of globules in the range 0.125-0.25 micrometer, each with a thick shell surrounding a feature-less anterior. Globules with the same appearance were seen in sections of unfractionated yolk. Two kinds of larger particles were also observed: (i) particles with a distinct outer membrane and a vesiculated interior; (ii) featureless spheres, possibly of lipid. The insoluble yolk globules comprise protein (8-11% by dry wt.), phospholipid (31-35% total lipid), triacylglycerols (49-53%), cholesterol (8%) and cholesteryl esters (2-3%); the variations being among species. The phospholipid is accessible to phospholipase C. The isolated protein is heterogeneous and resembles the apoprotein from the yolk low-density lipoprotein.

  15. Magnetosomal matrix: ultrafine structure may template biomineralization of magnetosomes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A P; Barry, J C

    2004-02-01

    The organic matrix surrounding bullet-shaped, cubo-octahedral, D-shaped, irregular arrowhead-shaped, and truncated hexa-octahedral magnetosomes was analysed in a variety of uncultured magnetotactic bacteria. The matrix was examined using low- (80 kV) and intermediate- (400 kV) voltage TEM. It encapsulated magnetosomes in dehydrated cells, ultraviolet-B-irradiated dehydrated cells and stained resin-embedded fixed cells, so the apparent structure of the matrix does not appear to be an artefact of specimen preparation. High-resolution images revealed lattice fringes in the matrix surrounding magnetite and greigite magnetosomes that were aligned with lattice fringes in the encapsulated magnetosomes. In all except one case, the lattice fringes had widths equal to or twice the width of the corresponding lattice fringes in the magnetosomes. The lattice fringes in the matrix were aligned with the [311], [220], [331], [111] and [391] related lattice planes of magnetite and the [222] lattice plane of greigite. An unidentified material, possibly an iron hydroxide, was detected in two immature magnetosomes containing magnetite. The unidentified phase had a structure similar to that of the matrix as it contained [311], [220] and [111] lattice fringes, which indicates that the matrix acts as a template for the spatially controlled biomineralization of the unidentified phase, which itself transforms into magnetite. The unidentified phase was thus called pre-magnetite. The presence of the magnetosomal matrix explains all of the five properties of the biosignature of the magnetosomal chain proposed previously by Friedmann et al. and supports their claim that some of the magnetite particles in the carbonate globules in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 are biogenic. Two new morphologies of magnetite magnetosomes are also reported here (i.e. tooth-shaped and hexa-octahedral magnetosomes). Tooth-shaped magnetite magnetosomes elongated in the [110] direction are reported, and are distinct

  16. Organic Globules in Carbonaceous Chondrites: An Experimental Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, C.-C.; ten Kate, I. L.; Plümper, O.; King, H. E.; Geisler, T.; Lenting, C.; Tielens, X.

    2016-08-01

    PAHs have been considered as material composing organic globules in CCs. In order to test the PAH precursor hypothesis, we conducted hydrothermal as well as melting experiments with two different types of PAHs.

  17. Molten globules, entropy-driven conformational change and protein folding.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Robert L; Rose, George D

    2013-02-01

    The exquisite side chain close-packing in the protein core and at binding interfaces has prompted a conviction that packing selectivity is the primary mechanism for molecular recognition in folding and/or binding reactions. Contrary to this view, molten globule proteins can adopt native topology and bind targets tightly and specifically in the absence of side chain close-packing. The molten globule is a highly dynamic form with native-like secondary structure and a loose protein core that admits solvent. The related (but still controversial) dry molten globule is an expanded form of the native protein with largely intact topology but a tighter protein core that excludes solvent. Neither form retains side chain close-packing, and therefore both structure and function must result from other factors, assuming that the reality of the dry molten globule is accepted. This simplifying realization calls for a re-evaluation of established models. PMID:23237704

  18. No `nanofossils' in martian meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, J. P.; Harvey, R. P.; McSween, H. Y.; Gibson, Everett; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie; Vali, H.

    1997-12-01

    Elongated, segmented forms found on fracture surfaces within the martian meteorite ALH84001 have been proposed to be martian `nanofossils', even though they appear too small to be fossilized bacteria. We have examined similar forms and find that the majority are (non-biological) lamellar growth steps on pyroxene and carbonate crystals. Their segmented surface microstructures are laboratory artefacts resulting from the deposition of conductive heavy-metal coatings.

  19. Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron (FEGSEM) and Transmission Electron (TEM) Microscopy of Phyllosilicates in Martian Meteorites ALH84001, Nakhla, and Shergotty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Gibson, Everett K.

    2000-01-01

    Here we document the occurrence of phyllosilicates and alteration phases in three martian meteorites, suggest formation conditions required for phyllosilicate formation and speculate on the extent of fluid:rock interactions during the past history of Mars.

  20. Sulfur isotopic systematics in alteration assemblages in martian meteorite Allan Hills 84001

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, C.K.; Layne, G.D.; Papike, J.J.; Spilde, M.N.

    1996-08-01

    ALH84001 is a coarse-grained, clastic orthopyroxenite meteorite related to the SNC meteorite group (shergottites, nakhlites, Chassigny). Superimposed upon the orthopyroxene-dominant igneous mineral assemblage is a hydrothermal signature. This hydrothermal overprint consists of carbonate assemblages occurring in spheroidal aggregates and fine-grained carbonate-sulfide vug-filling. The sulfide in this assemblage has been identified as pyrite, an unusual sulfide in meteorites. Previously, Burgess et al. (1989) reported a bulk {delta} {sup 34}S for a SNC group meteorite (Shergotty) of -0.5 {+-} 1.5%. Here, we report the first martian {delta} {sup 34}S values from individual sulfide grains. Using newly developed ion microprobe techniques, we were able to determine {delta} {sup 34}S of the pyrite in ALH84001 with a 1 {alpha} precision of better than {+-}0.5%. The {delta} {sup 34}S values for the pyrite range from +4.8 to +7.8%. Within the stated uncertainties, the pyrite from ALH84001 exhibits a real variability in {delta} {sup 34}S in this alteration assemblage. In addition, these sulfides are demonstrably enriched in {sup 34}S relative to Canon Diablo troilite and sulfides from most other meteorites. This signature implies that the planetary body represented by ALH 84001 experienced processes capable of fractionating sulphur isotopes and that hydrothermal conditions changed during pyrite precipitation (T, pH, fluid composition, etc.). These new data are not consistent with the pyrite recording either biogenic activity or atmospheric fractionation of sulphur through nonthermal escape mechanisms or oxidation processes. This study also demonstrates the usefulness of ion microprobe measurements of sulphur isotopes in constraining conditions on other planetary bodies.

  1. Sulfur isotopic systematics in alteration assemblages in martian meteorite Allan Hills 84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Layne, G. D.; Papike, J. J.; Spilde, M. N.

    1996-08-01

    ALH84001 is a coarse-grained, clastic orthopyroxenite meteorite related to the SNC meteorite group ( shergottites, nakhlites, Chassigny). Superimposed upon the orthopyroxene-dominant igneous mineral assemblage is a hydrothermal signature. This hydrothermal overprint consists of carbonate assemblages occurring in spheroidal aggregates and fine-grained carbonate-sulfide vug-filling. The sulfide in this assemblage has been identified as pyrite, an unusual sulfide in meteorites. Previously, Burgess et al. (1989) reported a bulk δ 34S for a SNC group meteorite (Shergotty) of -0.5 ± 1.5‰. Here, we report the first martian δ 34S values from individual sulfide grains. Using newly developed ion microprobe techniques, we were able to determine δ 34S of the pyrite in ALH84001 with a 1 a precision of better than ±0.5‰. The δ 34S values for the pyrite range from +4.8 to +7.8‰. Within the stated uncertainties, the pyrite from ALH84001 exhibits a real variability in δ 34S in this alteration assemblage. In addition, these sulfides are demonstrably enriched in 34S relative to Canon Diablo troilite and sulfides from most other meteorites. This signature implies that the planetary body represented by ALH84001 experienced processes capable of fractionating sulphur isotopes and that hydrothermal conditions changed during pyrite precipitation (T, pH, fluid composition, etc.). The fractionated signature of the sulphur in the pyrite is most likely attributed to either conditions of pyrite precipitation (low temperature, reduced (low fo 2) and moderately alkaline (pH > 8) environment) or enrichment of fluids in 34S by surface processes (weathering or impact processes) prior to precipitation. These new data are not consistent with the pyrite recording either biogenic activity or atmospheric fractionation of sulphur through nonthermal escape mechanisms or oxidation processes. This study also demonstrates the usefulness of ion microprobe measurements of sulphur isotopes in

  2. On the origins of polarization holes in Bok globules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, R.; Wolf, S.; Reissl, S.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Polarimetric observations of Bok globules frequently show a decrease in the degree of polarization towards their central dense regions (polarization holes). This behaviour is usually explained with increased disalignment owing to high density and temperature, or insufficient angular resolution of a possibly complex magnetic field structure. Aims: We investigate whether a significant decrease in polarized emission of dense regions in Bok globules is possible under certain physical conditions. For instance, we evaluate the impact of optical depth effects and various properties of the dust phase. Methods: We use radiative transfer modelling to calculate the temperature structure of an analytical Bok globule model and simulate the polarized thermal emission of elongated dust grains. For the alignment of the dust grains, we consider a magnetic field and include radiative torque and internal alignment. Results: Besides the usual explanations, selected conditions of the temperature and density distribution, the dust phase and the magnetic field are also able to significantly decrease the polarized emission of dense regions in Bok globules. Taking submm/mm grains and typical column densities of existing Bok globules into consideration, the optical depth is high enough to decrease the degree of polarization by up to ΔP ~ 10%. If limited to the densest regions, dust grain growth to submm/mm size and accumulated graphite grains decrease the degree of polarization by up to ΔP ~ 10% and ΔP ~ 5%, respectively. However, the effect of the graphite grains occurs only if they do not align with the magnetic field.

  3. Star formation in the globules of the Trifid Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernicharo, Jose; Lefloch, Bertrand; Garcia Lopez, Ramon; Esteban, Cesar

    We present optical and millimeter (continuum and molecular) observations of a cometary globule in the Trifid nebula showing clear signs of star formation activity. The globule is associated with a long jet finishing in a large bow shock. The HH jet can be seen in all the popular pictures of the Trifid. It has remained unrevealed although it has been in front of our eyes since the first high sensitivity photographic pictures of the Trifid. The jet emanates from the head of a cometary globule submitted to the strong UV field of the ionizing star of the Trifid. The continuum emission at 230 GHz follows the globule's head contour and consists of extended and weak emission plus a strong point source from where the jet seems to arise. High resolution spectroscopy in the SII line at 6730 A indicates that the jet is practically in the plane of the sky. The dust emission arises from a clump of ~= 5 M_\\odot. The molecular observations cover a larger surface and indicate a total mass for the globule of 30-50 M_\\odot.

  4. ISO Observations of Starless Bok Globules: Usually No Embedded Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemens, D.; Byrne, A.; Yun, J.; Kane, B.

    1996-01-01

    We have used ISOCAM to search the cores of a sample of small Bok globules previously classified to be mostly starless based on analysis of IRAS data. The ISO observations at 6.75microns (LW2 filter) and 14.5microns (LW3 filter) were sufficiently deep to enable detection of any low-mass hydrogen burning star or young stellar object (YSO) embedded in these globules. Of the 20 Bok globules observed by ISOCAM to date, we have reduced the data for 14. Of these, 13 show no evidence for faint red (S(sub v)(LW3) greater than S(sub v)(LW2)) stars missed by IRAS. One (CB68) does show the first mid-infrared detection of the very cool IRAS source toward this cloud, and may be a Class I or 0 YSO. We conclude, based on these new ISO observations, that Bok globules which have no IRAS sources are in general bona fide starless molecular clouds.

  5. Proteome profile and biological activity of caprine, bovine and human milk fat globules.

    PubMed

    Spertino, Stefano; Cipriani, Valentina; De Angelis, Chiara; Giuffrida, Maria Gabriella; Marsano, Francesco; Cavaletto, Maria

    2012-04-01

    Upon combining bidimensional electrophoresis with monodimensional separation, a more comprehensive analysis of the milk fat globule membrane has been obtained. The proteomic profile of caprine milk fat globules revealed the presence of butyrophilin, lactadherin and perilipin as the major proteins, they were also associated to bovine and human milk fat globule membranes. Xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase has been detected only in monodimensional gels. Biological activity of milk fat globules has been evaluated in Caco2-cells, as a representative model of the intestinal barrier. The increase of cell viability was indicative of a potential nutraceutical role for the whole milk fat globule, suggesting a possible employment in milk formula preparation.

  6. Facilitated diffusion of proteins through crumpled fractal DNA globules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smrek, Jan; Grosberg, Alexander Y.

    2015-07-01

    We explore how the specific fractal globule conformation, found for the chromatin fiber of higher eukaryotes and topologically constrained dense polymers, affects the facilitated diffusion of proteins in this environment. Using scaling arguments and supporting Monte Carlo simulations, we relate DNA looping probability distribution, fractal dimension, and protein nonspecific affinity for the DNA to the effective diffusion parameters of the proteins. We explicitly consider correlations between subsequent readsorption events of the proteins, and we find that facilitated diffusion is faster for the crumpled globule conformation with high intersegmental surface dimension than in the case of dense fractal conformations with smooth surfaces. As a byproduct, we obtain an expression for the macroscopic conductivity of a hypothetic material consisting of conducting fractal nanowires immersed in a weakly conducting medium.

  7. Facilitated diffusion of proteins through crumpled fractal DNA globules.

    PubMed

    Smrek, Jan; Grosberg, Alexander Y

    2015-07-01

    We explore how the specific fractal globule conformation, found for the chromatin fiber of higher eukaryotes and topologically constrained dense polymers, affects the facilitated diffusion of proteins in this environment. Using scaling arguments and supporting Monte Carlo simulations, we relate DNA looping probability distribution, fractal dimension, and protein nonspecific affinity for the DNA to the effective diffusion parameters of the proteins. We explicitly consider correlations between subsequent readsorption events of the proteins, and we find that facilitated diffusion is faster for the crumpled globule conformation with high intersegmental surface dimension than in the case of dense fractal conformations with smooth surfaces. As a byproduct, we obtain an expression for the macroscopic conductivity of a hypothetic material consisting of conducting fractal nanowires immersed in a weakly conducting medium.

  8. Martian paleomagnetism with the SQUID microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Benjamin Paul

    Rocks should preserve natural remanent magnetizations with stable directional and intensity information at levels ˜1000 times below that of the noise level on today's best moment magnetometers. The superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) Microscope is a new, high-resolution magnetometer that can now detect such weak signals. It maps the magnetic fields above samples with a spatial resolution of <100 mum and a moment sensitivity of <10 -15 Am2. It therefore provides data with a resolution directly comparable with that of other common petrographic techniques. This thesis describes applications of SQUID microscopy to a variety of problems in the planetary sciences. A SQUID microscope paleomagnetic conglomerate test demonstrates that ALH84001 has been cooler than ˜40°C since before its ejection from the surface of Mars at 15 Ma. Because this temperature cannot sterilize most bacteria or eukarya, these data support the hypothesis that meteorites could transfer life between planets in the solar system. These and other data on panspermia demand a re-evaluation of the long-held assumption that terrestrial life evolved in isolation on Earth. Subsequent magnetic and textural studies of the meteorite show that 4 Ga ALH84001 carbonates containing magnetite and pyrrhotite carry a stable natural remanent magnetization. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology demonstrates that this magnetization originated at 3.9--4.1 Ga on Mars. This magnetization is the oldest known for a planetary rock, and its strong intensity suggests that Mars had generated a geodynamo at or before 4 Ga. The intensity of the field that magnetized ALH84001 was roughly within an order of magnitude of that at the surface of the present-day Earth, sufficient for magnetotaxis by the bacteria whose magnetofossils have been reported in ALH84001 and possibly for the production of the strong crustal anomalies. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology calculations also provide an explanation for why ALH84001 contains a sample of

  9. Is the Molten Globule a Third Phase of Proteins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Vijay S.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    1998-02-01

    The equilibrium properties of proteins are studied by Monte Carlo simulation of two simplified models of protein-like heteropolymers. These models emphasize the polymeric entropy of the fluctuating polypeptide chain. Our calculations suggest a generic phase diagram that contains a thermodynamically distinct ``molten globule'' state in addition to a rigid native state and a nontrivial unfolded state. The roles of side-chain packing and loop entropy are discussed.

  10. Ionization front interactions and the formation of globules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, P. W. J. L.

    1981-10-01

    It is assumed that an H II region has evolved inside a molecular cloud. The interactions that result from the expanding shell of compressed molecular gas reaching the edge of the cloud are calculated, and the instability of the ionization front to the formation of globules is investigated. The rarefaction wave which is reflected from the contact discontinuity as the leading shock passes through the edge of the cloud accelerates the ionization front, and since conditions at the front satisfy Capriotti's criterion for instability, the shell breaks up. The size of the fragment so created is determined by the thickness of the compressed shell. If the shell phase of H II region evolution has proceeded significantly, then globules of up to a fraction of a solar mass may be formed in an H II region caused by a star with an ionizing luminosity of 10 to the 49th photons/sec in a molecular cloud of density 1000/cu cm. These globules may survive the ionizing flux from the star, and will be driven from the cloud by the rocket effect.

  11. PIG (partially ionized globule) anatomy - Density and temperature structure of the bright-rimmed globule IC 1396E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serabyn, E.; Guesten, R.; Mundy, L.

    1993-01-01

    The density and temperature structure of the bright-rimmed cometary globule IC 1396E is estimated, and the possibility that recent internal star formation was triggered by the ionization front in its southern surface is assessed. On the basis of NH3 data, gas temperatures in the globule are found to increase outward from the center, from a minimum of 17 K in its tail to a maximum of 26 K on the surface most directly facing the stars ionizing IC 1396. On the basis of a microturbulent radiative transfer code to model the radial dependence of the CS line intensities, and also the intensities of the optically thin 2-1 and 5-4 lines toward the cloud center, a radial density dependence of r exp -1.55 to r exp -1.75 is found.

  12. 2009 Arctic Mars Analogue Svalbard Expedition (AMASE) Evolved Gas Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; McAdam, A.; Eigenbrode, J.; Steele, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Arctic Mars Analogue Svalbard Expedition (AMASE) continued its multi-year campaign in August 2009 to study selected sedimentary and igneous environments in this geological diverse archipelago using a variety of measurement techniques and protocols that are candidates for future Mars missions. The X-ray diffraction mineralogical and evolved gas analysis (EGA) employed during the AMASE-2009 campaign closely mimicked similar experiments that are planned for the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). Field instruments similar to those under development for the ESA ExoMars or other rover missions provided imaging, spectroscopic, and subsurface sounding data. A variety of microbiology and field life detection techniques rounded out the AMASE-2009 analytical tools. The evolved gas mass spectrometer utilized on AMASE-2009 was designed to model elements of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite of instruments on MSL. Powdered rock samples were heated from ambient to 1000 C in a helium stream and evolved gases continuously analyzed by a mass spectrometer. A continued focus of AMASE-2009 was analysis of carbonates from the Spitsbergen Sverrefjell volcano [1]. The similarity of macromolecular carbon (MMC) associated with magnetite in carbonate globules found in an ice cave in Sverrefjell to those studied in the Mars meteorite ALH84001 has been a motivation for their intensive study. The MMC associated with these carbonates appears to have been formed abiotically [2] following the eruption of the Sverrefjell volcano into glacial ice. The AMASE-2008 EGA studies of microsampled carbonate layers are described and the ability and limitations of these in situ tools to distinguish biomarkers. [1] H. Amundsen, Nature 327, 692-695 (1987). [2] A. Steele et al., Meteoritics and Planetary Science 42, 1549-1566 (2007) Acknowledgement: Support of this work is from the NASA ASTEP program with A. Steele AMASE PI and H. Amundsen Expedition lead.

  13. The formation of elephant-trunk globules in the Rosette nebula: CO observations

    SciTech Connect

    Schneps, M.H.; Ho, P.T.P.; Barrett, A.H.

    1980-08-15

    The prominent elephant-trunk globules in the northwest quadrant of the Rosette nebula have been observed in the microwave lines of CO and /sup 13/CO (J=1..-->..0). The CO emission closely follows the optical outline of the obscuring material and leaves little doubt that the emission is associated with the globules. The physical characteristics derived are typical of those observed in other dust globules which are not necessarily associated with H II regions.

  14. In situ observation of D-rich carbonaceous globules embedded in NWA 801 CR2 chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiguchi, Minako; Kobayashi, Sachio; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2013-12-01

    Eighty-five D-rich carbonaceous particles were identified in the matrix of the NWA 801 CR2 chondrite using isotope microscopy. The occurrence of 67 D-rich carbonaceous particles was characterized using secondary electron microscopy combined with X-ray elemental mapping. The close association of H and C, and D-enrichment suggests that the D-rich carbonaceous particles correspond to organic matter. The D-rich organic particles were scattered ubiquitously throughout the matrix at a concentration of approximately 660 ppm. The morphology of the D-rich carbonaceous particles is globular up to about 1 μm in diameter and is classified into four types: ring globules, round globules, irregular-shaped globules, and globule aggregates. The ring globules are ring-shaped organic matter containing silicate and/or oxide, with or without a void in the center. This is the first report of silicate and oxide grains surrounded by D-rich organic matter. The globule aggregates are composed of several D-rich organic globules mixed with silicates. Morphology of ring globules is very similar to core-mantle grain produced in the molecular cloud or in the outer solar nebula inferring by astronomy, suggesting that the organic globules have formed by UV photolysis in the ice mantle. Silicates or oxides attached to D-rich organic globules are the first observation among chondrites so far and may be unique nature of CR2 chondrites. The hydrogen isotopic compositions of the ring globules, round globules, irregular-shaped globules, and globule aggregates are δD = 3000-4800, 2900-8100, 2700-11,000, and 2500-11,000‰, respectively. Variations of D/H ratio of these organic globules seemed to be attributed to variations of D/H ratio of the organic radicals or differences of content of the D-rich organic radicals. There are no significant differences in the hydrogen isotopic compositions among the four types of D-rich carbonaceous matter. The D-enrichments suggest that these organic globules have

  15. Isolation of a novel oil globule protein from the green alga Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Peled, Ehud; Leu, Stefan; Zarka, Aliza; Weiss, Meira; Pick, Uri; Khozin-Goldberg, Inna; Boussiba, Sammy

    2011-09-01

    Cytoplasmic oil globules of Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyceae) were isolated and analyzed for pigments, lipids and proteins. Astaxanthin appeared to be the only pigment deposited in the globules. Triacyglycerols were the main lipids (more than 90% of total fatty acids) in both the cell-free extract and in the oil globules. Lipid profile analysis of the oil globules showed that relative to the cell-free extract, they were enriched with extraplastidial lipids. A fatty acids profile revealed that the major fatty acids in the isolated globules were oleic acid (18:1) and linoleic acid (18:2). Protein extracts from the globules revealed seven enriched protein bands, all of which were possible globule-associated proteins. A major 33-kDa globule protein was partially sequenced by MS/MS analysis, and degenerate DNA primers were prepared and utilized to clone its encoding gene from cDNA extracted from cells grown in a nitrogen depleted medium under high light. The sequence of this 275-amino acid protein, termed the Haematococcus Oil Globule Protein (HOGP), revealed partial homology with a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii oil globule protein and with undefined proteins from other green algae. The HOGP transcript was barely detectable in vegetative cells, but its level increased by more than 100 fold within 12 h of exposure to nitrogen depletion/high light conditions, which induced oil accumulation. HOGP is the first oil-globule-associated protein to be identified in H. pluvialis, and it is a member of a novel gene family that may be unique to green microalgae. PMID:21732215

  16. Proteomics of the milk fat globule membrane from Camelus dromedarius.

    PubMed

    Saadaoui, Besma; Henry, Céline; Khorchani, Touhami; Mars, Mohamed; Martin, Patrice; Cebo, Christelle

    2013-04-01

    Camel milk has been widely characterized with regards to casein and whey proteins. However, in camelids, almost nothing is known about the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM), the membrane surrounding fat globules in milk. The purpose of this study was thus to identify MFGM proteins from Camelus dromedarius milk. Major MFGM proteins (namely, fatty acid synthase, xanthine oxidase, butyrophilin, lactadherin, and adipophilin) already evidenced in cow milk were identified in camel milk using MS. In addition, a 1D-LC-MS/MS approach led us to identify 322 functional groups of proteins associated with the camel MFGM. Dromedary MFGM proteins were then classified into functional categories using DAVID (the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery) bioinformatics resources. More than 50% of MFGM proteins from camel milk were found to be integral membrane proteins (mostly belonging to the plasma membrane), or proteins associated to the membrane. Enriched GO terms associated with MFGM proteins from camel milk were protein transport (p-value = 1.73 × 10(-14)), translation (p-value = 1.08 × 10(-11)), lipid biosynthetic process (p-value = 6.72 × 10(-10)), hexose metabolic process (p-value = 1.89 × 10(-04)), and actin cytoskeleton organization (p-value = 2.72 × 10(-04)). These findings will help to contribute to a better characterization of camel milk. Identified MFGM proteins from camel milk may also provide new insight into lipid droplet formation in the mammary epithelial cell.

  17. Electrochemical evidence on the molten globule conformation of cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Pineda, T; Sevilla, J M; Román, A J; Blázquez, M

    1997-12-01

    To explore a new approach for characterizing the molten globule conformation, cyclic voltammetric studies of salt induced transitions at acidic pH of cyt c have been carried out. The use of modified electrodes has made the observation of direct electrochemistry in native cyt c possible. However, most of these electrodes do not show reversible responses at acidic pH, due to the fact that, for this system, a deprotonated electrode surface is needed. In these studies, we have used a 6-mercaptopurine and cysteine-modified gold electrodes which are effective for direct rapid electron transfer to cyt c, even in acid solutions. The change in the absorption bands of cyt c are used to monitor the conformational states and, hence, to compare the voltammetric results. Under the experimental conditions where the A state of cyt c is obtained, a reversible voltammetric signal is observed. The midpoint peak potentials are found to be very close to the formal potential of native cyt c. Results are discussed in terms of a cooperative two-state transition between the acid unfolded and the globular acidic states of cyt c. This finding establishes, for the first time, the similarity of both the native and the molten globule-like conformations in terms of its redox properties. PMID:9434113

  18. Electrochemical evidence on the molten globule conformation of cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Pineda, T; Sevilla, J M; Román, A J; Blázquez, M

    1997-12-01

    To explore a new approach for characterizing the molten globule conformation, cyclic voltammetric studies of salt induced transitions at acidic pH of cyt c have been carried out. The use of modified electrodes has made the observation of direct electrochemistry in native cyt c possible. However, most of these electrodes do not show reversible responses at acidic pH, due to the fact that, for this system, a deprotonated electrode surface is needed. In these studies, we have used a 6-mercaptopurine and cysteine-modified gold electrodes which are effective for direct rapid electron transfer to cyt c, even in acid solutions. The change in the absorption bands of cyt c are used to monitor the conformational states and, hence, to compare the voltammetric results. Under the experimental conditions where the A state of cyt c is obtained, a reversible voltammetric signal is observed. The midpoint peak potentials are found to be very close to the formal potential of native cyt c. Results are discussed in terms of a cooperative two-state transition between the acid unfolded and the globular acidic states of cyt c. This finding establishes, for the first time, the similarity of both the native and the molten globule-like conformations in terms of its redox properties.

  19. Electrophoresis of small particles and fluid globules in weak electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baygents, J. C.; Saville, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    An examination is conducted of the influence of partial ionization on the electrophoresis of small particles and fluid globules, with a view to the nature of conditions under which dissociation-association (D-A) alters electrokinetics. It is found that, since D-A processes are important in cases where double-layer polarization and relaxation would otherwise prevail, the predicted effect on electrophoretic mobility is greatest for the drops and bubbles whose surfaces are fluid and convection within the interface is significant. While the computation scheme used applies only to situations where forcing-field magnitude is small, the results obtained indicate that D-A processes involving ionogenic solutes may be significant in apolar liquids where electrokinetic phenomena are driven by strong forcing fields.

  20. Crystallization of a designed peptide from a molten globule ensemble.

    PubMed

    Betz; Raleigh; DeGrado; Lovejoy; Anderson; Ogihara; Eisenberg

    1995-01-01

    Backgound. The design of amino acid sequences that adopt a desired three-dimensional fold has been of keen interest over the past decade. However, the design of proteins that adopt unique conformations is still a considerable problem. Until very recently, all of the designed proteins that have been extensively characterized possess the hallmarks of the molten globular state. Molten globular intermediates have been observed in both equilibrium and kinetic protein folding/stability studies, and understanding the forces that determine compact non-native states is critical for a comprehensive understanding of proteins. This paper describes the solution and early solid state characterization of peptides that form molten globular ensembles. Results. Crystals diffracting to 3.5Å resolution have been grown of a 16-residue peptide (alpha1A) designed to form a tetramer of alpha-helices. In addition, a closely related peptide, alpha1, has previously been shown to yield crystals that diffract to 1.2Å resolution. The solution properties of these two peptides were examined to determine whether their well defined crystalline conformations were retained in solution. On the basis of an examination of their NMR spectra, sedimentation equilibria, thermal unfolding, and ANS binding, it is concluded that the peptides form alpha-helical aggregates with properties similar to those of the molten globule state. Thus, for these peptides, the process of crystallization bears many similarities to models of protein folding. Upon dissolution, the peptides rapidly assume compact molten globular states similar to the molten globule like intermediates that are formed at short times after refolding is initiated. Following a rate-determining nucleation step, the peptides crystallize into a single or a small number of conformations in a process that mimics the formation of native structure in proteins. PMID:9162140

  1. Major proteins of the goat milk fat globule membrane.

    PubMed

    Cebo, C; Caillat, H; Bouvier, F; Martin, P

    2010-03-01

    Fat is present in milk as droplets of triglycerides surrounded by a complex membrane derived from the mammary epithelial cell called milk fat globule membrane (MFGM). Although numerous studies have been published on human or bovine MFGM proteins, to date few studies exist on MFGM proteins from goat milk. The objective of this study was thus to investigate the protein composition of the goat MFGM. Milk fat globule membrane proteins from goat milk were separated by 6% and 10% sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE and were Coomassie or periodic acid-Schiff stained. Most of MFGM proteins [mucin-1, fatty acid synthase, xanthine oxidase, butyrophilin, lactadherin (MFG EGF-8, MFG-E8), and adipophilin] already described in cow milk were identified in goat milk using peptide mass fingerprinting. In addition, lectin staining provided a preliminary characterization of carbohydrate structures occurring on MFGM proteins from goat milk depending on alpha(S1)-casein genotype and lactation stage. We provide here first evidence of the presence of O-glycans on fatty acid synthase and xanthine oxidase from goat milk. A prominent difference between the cow and the goat species was demonstrated for lactadherin. Indeed, whereas 2 polypeptide chains were easily identified by peptide mass fingerprinting matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight analysis within bovine MFGM proteins, lactadherin from goat milk consisted of a single polypeptide chain. Another striking observation was the presence of caseins associated with MFGM preparations from goat milk, whereas virtually no caseins were found in MFGM extracts from bovine milk. Taken together, these observations strongly support the existence of a singular secretion mode previously hypothesized in the goat.

  2. Hyperinsulinemic clamp modulates milk fat globule lipid composition in goats.

    PubMed

    Argov-Argaman, N; Mbogori, T; Sabastian, C; Shamay, A; Mabjeesh, S J

    2012-10-01

    We determined the effect of insulin on milk fatty acid (FA) and lipid composition in goats. Four dairy goats, 150 d in milk, were subjected to hyperinsulinemic clamp (treatment) or saline (control) infusion for 4d in a crossover design study. Composition and concentration of plasma and milk FA, triglycerides, phospholipids, sphingolipids, and cholesterol were determined. Mammary gland biopsies were taken at the end of each experimental period and lipogenic gene expression was determined. Plasma insulin was elevated 3.5-fold, whereas plasma glucose remained constant during the treatment period. Feed intake decreased by 26% and fat yield decreased by 17% relative to controls. No change in nonesterified FA concentration was found between controls and treatment. Compared with controls, insulin decreased yield of long-chain saturated FA by 14%. Milk concentration of long-chain FA was reduced by 3%, whereas that of medium-chain FA increased by 5% during the treatment compared with controls. Hyperinsulinemic clamps increased the yields of milk phospholipids by 9% and cholesterol by 16%, whereas it only tended to decrease triglyceride yields (by 11%). Hyperinsulinemic treatment resulted in compositional changes in the milk fat globule membrane, as reflected by 15 and 9% decreases in phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine concentrations, respectively. Lipogenic gene expression of acyl coenzyme A carboxylase, stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase, and FA synthase did not change, whereas lipoprotein lipase gene expression tended toward an increase in the treatment period compared with controls. Hyperinsulinemic clamps reduce the availability of long-chain FA, which are considered to originate from the diet and adipose lipolysis for milk lipid synthesis by the mammary gland of goats. Under these conditions, long-chain FA might be preferentially channeled to phospholipid rather than triglyceride synthesis, hence increasing phospholipid yields. Mechanisms determining FA

  3. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVI, Part 19

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Patera? 24) Mars Polar Cap Edges Tracked over 3 Full Mars Years; 25) Elemental Abundance in Presolar SiC: Comparing Grains Separated by Acid Residue and Gently Separation Procedures; 26) First Results from the Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) Experiment on the Huygens Entry Probe of Titan; 27) Minor Element Behavior of Pallasite Olivine: Understanding Pallasite Thermal History and Chronology; 28) Canonical Anorthite in a Grosnaja Forsterite-bearing CAI; 29) Experimental Evidence for Condensation of 'Astrophysical' Carbonate; 30) Distribution and Classification of Multiple Coronae on Venus; 31) Recognition of Rayed Craters on Mars in THEMIS Thermal Infrared Imagery: Implications for Martian Meteorite Source Regions; 32) Geochemical Modeling of Evaporites on Mars: Insight from Meridiani Planum; 33) Hadean Crustal Processes Revealed from Oxygen Isotopes and U-Th-Pb Depth Profiling of Pre-4.0 Ga Detrital Zircons from Western Australia; 34) On Modeling the Seepage of Water into the Martian Subsurface; 35) Martial Gullies and Groundwater: A Series of Unfortunate Exceptions; 36) Olivine and Carbonate Globules in ALH84001: A Terrestrial Analog, and Implications for Water on Mars; 37) A Reevaluation of Mass Movements Within the Valles Marineris Region of Mars Using MOLA and MOC Data; 38) Evidence of Hydrated 109P/Swift-Tuttle Meteoroids from Meteor Spectroscopy; 39) Cr-54 Anomalies in the Solar System: Their Extent and Origin; 40) Reevaluation of the Mn-53-Cr-53 Systematic in the Basaltic Achondrites; 41) Effective Liquid Metal-Silicate Mixing Upon Shock by Power-Law Droplet Size Scaling in Richtmyer-Meshkov Like Perturbations; 42) Post-Impact Deformation of Impact Craters: Towards a Better Understanding Through the Study of Mjolnir Crater; 43) Cutting Silica Aerogel for Particle Extraction; 44) Liquid Hydrocarbons on Titan's Surface? How Cassini ISS Observations Fit into the Story (So Far); and 45) Mesoscale Simulations of Polar Circulations: Late Spring to Late Summe

  4. Effect of coil-globule transition on the single-chain crystallization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mao-Xiang

    2013-05-30

    The folding process of a single chain including coil-globule transition and crystallization has been investigated through dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. The results based upon ensemble averaging illustrated three distinct states: coil, molten globule, and globule states. Furthermore, the crystallization process from these collapsed states demonstrated various characteristics and it also verified the thermodynamic partitions. The isothermal crystallization in the three states showed the folding rates, and the final crystallite morphologies strongly depended on the collapsed states. Especially, the onset temperature of crystallization in the intermediate molten globule state demonstrated the strongest sensitivity to the solvent qualities in the three different states. Moreover, the crystallization in this intermediate state illustrated a two-step folding mechanism with the prior dense core serving as a precursor to induce the subsequent crystallization. Our observations would help in understanding the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transition of a single macromolecule. Possible relations to the protein folding were also discussed. PMID:23646890

  5. Formation of Metal and Silicate Globules in Gujba: A New Bencubbin-like Meteorite Fall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.; Kallemeyn, Gregory W.; Wasson, John T.; Clayton, Robert N.; Mayeda, Toshiko; Grady, Monica; Verchovsky, Alexander B.; Eugster, Otto; Lorenzetti, Silvio

    2006-01-01

    Gujba is a coarse-grained meteorite fall composed of 41 vol% large kamacite globules, 20 vol% large light-colored silicate globules with cryptocrystalline, barred pyroxene and barred olivine textures, 39 vol% dark-colored, silicate-rich matrix, and rare refractory inclusions. Gujba resembles Bencubbin and Weatherford in texture, oxygen-isotopic composition and in having high bulk delta N-15 values (approximately +685%0). The He-3 cosmic-ray exposure age of Gujba (26 +/- 7 Ma) is essentially identical to that of Bencubbin, suggesting that they were both reduced to meter-size fragments in the same parent-body collision. The Gujba metal globules exhibit metal-troilite quench textures and vary in their abundances of troilite and volatile siderophile elements. We suggest that the metal globules formed as liquid droplets either via condensation in an impact-generated vapor plume or by evaporation of preexisting metal particles in a plume. The lower the abundance of volatile elements in the metal globules, the higher the globule quench temperature. We infer that the large silicate globules also formed from completely molten droplets; their low volatile-element abundances indicate that they also formed at high temperatures, probably by processes analogous to those that formed the metal globules. The coarse-grained Bencubbin-Weatherford-Gujba meteorites may represent a depositional component from the vapor cloud enriched in coarse and dense particles. A second class of Bencubbin-like meteorites (represented by Hammadah a1 Hamra 237 and QUE 94411) may be a finer fraction derived from the same vapor cloud

  6. Discovery of a Hot Corino in the Bok Globule B335

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Muneaki; Sakai, Nami; Oya, Yoko; López-Sepulcre, Ana; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Lefloch, Bertrand; Caux, Emmanuel; Vastel, Charlotte; Kahane, Claudine; Sakai, Takeshi; Hirota, Tomoya; Aikawa, Yuri; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    We report the first evidence of a hot corino in a Bok globule. This is based on ALMA observations in the 1.2 mm band toward the low-mass Class 0 protostar IRAS 19347+0727 in B335. Saturated complex organic molecules (COMs), CH3CHO, HCOOCH3, and NH2CHO, are detected in a compact region within a few 10 au around the protostar. Additionally, CH3OCH3, C2H5OH, C2H5CN, and CH3COCH3 are tentatively detected. Carbon-chain related molecules, CCH and c-C3H2, are also found in this source, whose distributions are extended over a scale of a few 100 au. On the other hand, sulfur-bearing molecules CS, SO, and SO2 have both compact and extended components. Fractional abundances of the COMs relative to H2 are found to be comparable to those in known hot corino sources. Though the COMs lines are as broad as 5–8 km s‑1, they do not show obvious rotation motion in the present observation. Thus, the COMs mainly exist in a structure whose distribution is much smaller than the synthesized beam (0.″58 × 0.″52).

  7. The endoplasmic reticulum and casein-containing vesicles contribute to milk fat globule membrane.

    PubMed

    Honvo-Houéto, Edith; Henry, Céline; Chat, Sophie; Layani, Sarah; Truchet, Sandrine

    2016-10-01

    During lactation, mammary epithelial cells secrete huge amounts of milk from their apical side. The current view is that caseins are secreted by exocytosis, whereas milk fat globules are released by budding, enwrapped by the plasma membrane. Owing to the number and large size of milk fat globules, the membrane surface needed for their release might exceed that of the apical plasma membrane. A large-scale proteomics analysis of both cytoplasmic lipid droplets and secreted milk fat globule membranes was used to decipher the cellular origins of the milk fat globule membrane. Surprisingly, differential analysis of protein profiles of these two organelles strongly suggest that, in addition to the plasma membrane, the endoplasmic reticulum and the secretory vesicles contribute to the milk fat globule membrane. Analysis of membrane-associated and raft microdomain proteins reinforces this possibility and also points to a role for lipid rafts in milk product secretion. Our results provide evidence for a significant contribution of the endoplasmic reticulum to the milk fat globule membrane and a role for SNAREs in membrane dynamics during milk secretion. These novel aspects point to a more complex model for milk secretion than currently envisioned.

  8. Isolated milk fat globules as substrate for lipoprotein lipase: study of factors relevant to spontaneous lipolysis in milk

    SciTech Connect

    Sundheim, G.; Bengtsson-Olivecrona, G.

    1987-03-01

    Fat globules isolated from normal and from spontaneous milk samples were compared as substrates for purified lipoprotein lipase. Only slight differences were observed. Fat globules isolated from fresh warm milk were almost resistant to lipolysis. This included globules from milk prone to spontaneous lipolysis. Cooling made the globules accessible to rapid lipolysis even if they were from normal milk. Rewarming the fat globules did not reverse the process. Maximum rate of lipolysis (after rewarming) required fat globules be stored at 10/sup 0/C or below for 5 to 10 h. Lipolysis at 4/sup 0/C usually started after a lag time of 3 to 5 h, but with fat globules from spontaneous milk the lag time was shorter. Fat globules isolated from cold milk were a poor substrate at 4/sup 0/C but were lipolyzed when warmed. When /sup 125/I-labeled lipase was added to fresh warm milk, some of the lipase bound to the milk fat globules but it caused little lipolysis. Binding increased after cooling, as did lipolysis. Both binding of lipase and lipolysis were impeded by the presence of skim milk. Another way to make fat globules isolated from fresh warm milk susceptible to lipolysis was to treat them with chemicals known to remove proteins.

  9. Visualization of Microbial Biomarkers by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wainwright, Norman R.; Allen, Carlton C.; Child, Alice

    2001-01-01

    We are developing tools to link the biochemical structure of selected biomarkers with putative biogenic structures observed in mineralized samples. The detection of evidence of life on Mars and other planets will rely on methods that can discriminate compounds formed exclusively by living organisms. While biogenic compounds, such as amino acids and nucleotides have been discovered in extraterrestrial sources, such as meteorites and comets, their formation can be explained by abiotic means. The formation of cellular structures, or more elaborate organic molecules, such as complex lipids, proteins or nucleic acids, however, is strongly correlated to the presence of even the most primitive life processes. Recent evidence lends support to the hypothesis that life may have once existed on Mars. Carbonate globules and ppm concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been described in ALH84001, a meteorite originating from Mars ejecta captured by Earth over 13,000 years ago. The localized high concentration of PAHs that follow an increasing gradient from the intact fusion crust towards the interior corresponds to microgram quantities of hydrocarbon. Even though ALH84001 and other similar meteorites have withstood the forces capable of ejecting rock through Mars' escape velocity, upon entering Earth's atmosphere, their core temperatures are likely not to have been raised significantly, as evidenced by the survival of remanent magnetic signatures. Ideal biomarkers of ancient or modern biological life would include molecules that are (or were) pervasive and highly resistant to degradation. Also, requisite methods of detection should be simple, extremely sensitive and broadly inclusive (NASA SP-530). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan or pseudopeptidoglycan and beta-glucan are microbial cell wall components which together cover the entire microbial spectrum of eubacteria, archea and fungi. They are all remarkably resistant to thermal degradation

  10. Astrobiological Significance of Microbial Extremophiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    The microflora of the cryosphere of planet Earth provides the best analogs for life forms that might be found in the permafrost or polar ice caps of Mars, near the surface of the cometary nuclei, or in the liquid water beneath and the ice crusts of icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn. The importance of study alkaliphilic microorganisms for astrobiology was enhanced by the findings of abundant carbonates and carbonate globules rimmed with possibly biogenic magnetites in association with the putative microfossils in the ALH84001 meteorite. Although the ALH84001 "nanofossils" were to small and simple to be unambiguously recognized as biogenic, they stimulated Astrobiology research and studies of microbial extremophiles and biomarkers in ancient rocks and meteorites. Recent studies of CI and CM carbonaceous meteorites have resulted in the detection of the well-preserved mineralized remains of coccoidal and filamentous microorganisms in cyanobacterial mats. Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis has shown anomalous biogenic element ratios clearly indicating they are not recent biological contaminants. This paper reviews microbial extremophiles in context of their significance to Astrobiology. The study of halophilic microorganisms was started from work with saline soils and lakes, and one of the record of good growth for Haloferax mediterranei was shown at 30 percent NaC1. Although alkali-tolerant nitrifying bacteria had previously been reported, the first described alkaliphilic microorganism was the bacterium Streptococcus faecalis. Halophilic and alkaliphilic forms are relevant to conditions that might be found in closed impact basins and craters on Mars filled with evaporite deposits. The first obligately acidophilic bacterium described was Acidithiobacillus ferrooxydans (formally Thiobacillus ferrooxidans). Later thermophilic lithotrophic acidophiles were found, and the hyperacidophilic moderately thermophilic species of the genus Picrophilus were found to grow at negative p

  11. An abiotic origin for hydrocarbons in the Allan Hills 84001 martian meteorite through cooling of magmatic and impact-generated gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, E. L.

    2000-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations of metastable equilibria were used to evaluate the potential for abiotic synthesis of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the martian meteorite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001. The calculations show that PAHs and normal alkanes could form metastably from CO, CO2, and H2 below approximately 250-300 degrees C during rapid cooling of trapped magmatic or impact-generated gases. Depending on temperature, bulk composition, and oxidation-reduction conditions, PAHs and normal alkanes can form simultaneously or separately. Moreover, PAHs can form at lower H/C ratios, higher CO/CO2 ratios, and higher temperatures than normal alkanes. Dry conditions with H/C ratios less than approximately 0.01-0.001 together with high CO/CO2 ratios also favor the formation of unalkylated PAHs. The observed abundance of PAHs, their low alkylation, and a variable but high aromatic to aliphatic ratio in ALH 84001 all correspond to low H/C and high CO/CO2 ratios in magmatic and impact gases and can be used to deduce spatial variations of these ratios. Some hydrocarbons could have been formed from trapped magmatic gases, especially if the cooling was fast enough to prevent reequilibration. We propose that subsequent impact heating(s) in ALH 84001 could have led to dissociation of ferrous carbonates to yield fine-grain magnetite, formation of a CO-rich local gas phase, reduction of water vapor to H2, reequilibration of the trapped magmatic gases, aromatization of hydrocarbons formed previously, and overprinting of the synthesis from magmatic gases, if any. Rapid cooling and high-temperature quenching of CO-, H2-rich impact gases could have led to magnetite-catalyzed hydrocarbon synthesis.

  12. Redefining the dry molten globule state of proteins.

    PubMed

    Neumaier, Sabine; Kiefhaber, Thomas

    2014-06-26

    Dynamics and function of proteins are governed by the structural and energetic properties of the different states they adopt and the barriers separating them. In earlier work, native-state triplet-triplet energy transfer (TTET) on the villin headpiece subdomain (HP35) revealed an equilibrium between a locked native state and an unlocked native state, which are structurally similar but have different dynamic properties. The locked state is restricted to low amplitude motions, whereas the unlocked state shows increased conformational flexibility and undergoes local unfolding reactions. This classified the unlocked state as a dry molten globule (DMG), which was proposed to represent an expanded native state with loosened side-chain interactions and a solvent-shielded core. To test whether the unlocked state of HP35 is actually expanded compared to the locked state, we performed high-pressure TTET measurements. Increasing pressure shifts the equilibrium from the locked toward the unlocked state, with a small negative reaction volume for unlocking (ΔV(0)=-1.6±0.5cm(3)/mol). Therefore, rather than being expanded, the unlocked state represents an alternatively packed, compact state, demonstrating that native proteins can exist in several compact folded states, an observation with implications for protein function. The transition state for unlocking/locking, in contrast, has a largely increased volume relative to the locked and unlocked state, with respective activation volumes of 7.1±0.4cm(3)/mol and 8.7±0.9cm(3)/mol, indicating an expansion of the protein during the locking/unlocking transition. The presented results demonstrate the existence of both compact, low-energy and expanded, high-energy DMGs, prompting a broader definition of this state. PMID:24792909

  13. The numerical analysis of the rotational theory for the formation of lunar globules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J.; Bastin, J.; Stewart, K.

    1982-01-01

    The morphology of lunar globules is studied through the application of a numerical analysis of their rotation in space during cooling. It is assumed that molten rock is shot from the surface of the moon, solidifies in space above the moon and then falls back to the surface. The rotational theory studied makes the following assumptions: the volume of the molten rock does not change during cooling; the angular momentum is conserved; there are no internal motions because of the high viscosity of the molten rock, i.e., in equilibrium the globule is rotating as a rigid body; finally, the kinetic reaction of the globule to the forces is fast relative to the rate of cooling, i.e., the globule reaches equilibrium at constant energy. These assumptions are subjected to numerical analysis yielding good agreement between the actual globule shapes and the numerical results, but leaving some doubt as to the validity of the rotational theory due to the failure to establish the existence of true local minima and an incomplete understanding of the thermokentics.

  14. A novel infant milk formula concept: Mimicking the human milk fat globule structure.

    PubMed

    Gallier, Sophie; Vocking, Karin; Post, Jan Andries; Van De Heijning, Bert; Acton, Dennis; Van Der Beek, Eline M; Van Baalen, Ton

    2015-12-01

    Human milk (HM) provides all nutrients to support an optimal growth and development of the neonate. The composition and structure of HM lipids, the most important energy provider, have an impact on the digestion, uptake and metabolism of lipids. In HM, the lipids are present in the form of dispersed fat globules: large fat droplets enveloped by a phospholipid membrane. Currently, infant milk formula (Control IMF) contains small fat droplets primarily coated by proteins. Recently, a novel IMF concept (Concept IMF) was developed with a different lipid architecture, Nuturis(®), comprising large fat droplets with a phospholipid coating. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), with appropriate fluorescent probes, and transmission electron microscopy were used to determine and compare the interfacial composition and structure of HM fat globules, Concept IMF fat droplets and Control IMF fat droplets. The presence of a trilayer-structured HM fat globule membrane, composed of phospholipids, proteins, glycoproteins and cholesterol, was confirmed; in addition exosome-like vesicles are observed within cytoplasmic crescents. The Control IMF fat droplets had a thick protein-only interface. The Concept IMF fat droplets showed a very thin interface composed of a mixture of phospholipids, proteins and cholesterol. Furthermore, the Concept IMF contained fragments of milk fat globule membrane, which has been suggested to have potential biological functions in infants. By mimicking more closely the structure and composition of HM fat globules, this novel IMF concept with Nuturis(®) may have metabolic and digestive properties that are more similar to HM compared to Control IMF.

  15. Formation of domain-swapped oligomer of cytochrome C from its molten globule state oligomer.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Megha Subhash; Parui, Partha Pratim; Kamikubo, Hironari; Yamanaka, Masaru; Nagao, Satoshi; Komori, Hirofumi; Kataoka, Mikio; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Hirota, Shun

    2014-07-22

    Many proteins, including cytochrome c (cyt c), have been shown to form domain-swapped oligomers, but the factors governing the oligomerization process remain unrevealed. We obtained oligomers of cyt c by refolding cyt c from its acid molten globule state to neutral pH state under high protein and ion concentrations. The amount of oligomeric cyt c obtained depended on the nature of the anion (chaotropic or kosmotropic) in the solution: ClO4(-) (oligomers, 11% ± 2% (heme unit)), SCN(-) (10% ± 2%), I(-) (6% ± 2%), NO3(-) (3% ± 1%), Br(-) (2% ± 1%), Cl(-) (2% ± 1%), and SO4(2-) (3% ± 1%) for refolding of 2 mM cyt c (anion concentration 125 mM). Dimeric cyt c obtained by refolding from the molten globule state exhibited a domain-swapped structure, in which the C-terminal α-helices were exchanged between protomers. According to small-angle X-ray scattering measurements, approximately 25% of the cyt c molecules were dimerized in the molten globule state containing 125 mM ClO4(-). These results indicate that a certain amount of molten globule state oligomers of cyt c convert to domain-swapped oligomers during refolding and that the intermolecular interactions necessary for domain swapping are present in the molten globule state. PMID:24981551

  16. Signatures in magnetites formed by (Ca,Mg,Fe)CO3 thermal decomposition: Terrestrial and extraterrestrial implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Lauer, Howard V.; Romanek, Christopher S.

    2012-06-01

    It has never been demonstrated whether magnetite synthesized through the heat-dependent decomposition of carbonate precursors retains the chemical and structural features of the carbonates. In this study, synthetic (Ca,Mg,Fe)CO3 was thermally decomposed by heating from 25 to 700 °C under 1 atm CO2, and by in situ exposure under vacuum to the electron beam of a transmission electron microscope. In both cases, the decomposition of the carbonate was topotactic and resulted in porous pseudomorphs composed of oriented aggregates of magnetite nanocrystals. Both calcium and magnesium were incorporated into nanophase magnetite, forming (Ca,Mg)-magnetites and (Ca,Mg)-ferrites when these elements were present in the parent material, thus preserving the chemical signature of the precursor. These results show that magnetites synthesized in this way acquire a chemical and structural inheritance from their carbonate precursor that indicates how they were produced. These results are not only important in the determination of the origin of chemically-impure, oriented nanophase magnetite crystals in general, but they also provide important insights into the origin of the large, euhedral, chemically-pure, [111]-elongated magnetites found within Ca-, Mg- and Fe-rich carbonates of the Martian meteorite ALH84001. Based on our experimental results, the chemically-pure magnetites within ALH84001 cannot be genetically related to the Ca-, Mg- and Fe-rich carbonate matrix within which they are embedded, and an alternative explanation for their occurrence is warranted.

  17. Goat α(s1)-casein genotype affects milk fat globule physicochemical properties and the composition of the milk fat globule membrane.

    PubMed

    Cebo, C; Lopez, C; Henry, C; Beauvallet, C; Ménard, O; Bevilacqua, C; Bouvier, F; Caillat, H; Martin, P

    2012-11-01

    Milk fat secretion is a complex process that initiates in the endoplasmic reticulum of the mammary epithelial cell by the budding of lipid droplets. Lipid droplets are finally released as fat globules in milk enveloped by the apical plasma membrane of the mammary epithelial cell. The milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) thus comprises membrane-specific proteins and polar lipids (glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids) surrounding a core of neutral lipids (mainly triacylglycerols and cholesterol esters). We have recently described major proteins of the MFGM in the goat and we have highlighted prominent differences between goats and bovine species, especially regarding lactadherin, a major MFGM protein. Here, we show that, in the goat species, the well-documented genetic polymorphism at the α(s1)-casein (CSN1S1) locus affects both structure and composition of milk fat globules. We first evidenced that both milk fat globule size and ζ-potential are related to the α(s1)-casein genotype. At midlactation, goats displaying strong genotypes for α(s1)-casein (A/A goats) produce larger fat globules than goats with a null genotype at the CSN1S1 locus (O/O goats). A linear relationship (R(2)=0.75) between fat content (g/kg) in the milk and diameter of fat globules (μm) was established. Moreover, we found significant differences with regard to MFGM composition (including both polar lipids and MFGM proteins) from goats with extreme genotype at the CSN1S1 locus. At midlactation, the amount of polar lipids is significantly higher in the MFGM from goats with null genotypes for α(s1)-casein (O/O goats; 5.97±0.11mg/g of fat; mean ± standard deviation) than in the MFGM from goats with strong genotypes for α(s1)-casein (A/A goats; 3.96±0.12mg/g of fat; mean ± standard deviation). Two MFGM-associated proteins, namely lactadherin and stomatin, are also significantly upregulated in the MFGM from goats with null genotype for α(s1)-casein at early lactation. Our findings are

  18. Individual subunits of bacterial luciferase are molten globules and interact with molecular chaperones.

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, G C; Beckers, C J; Baase, W A; Dahlquist, F W

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the assembly of a large heterodimeric protein, bacterial luciferase, by mixing purified subunits expressed separately in bacteria. The individual subunits alpha and beta contain much (66% and 50%, respectively) of the alpha-helix content of the native heterodimer as measured by circular dichroism, yet the alpha subunit lacks observable tertiary structure as measured by NMR. These results are consistent with the alpha subunit existing in a molten globule or collapsed form prior to assembly. The molecular chaperone GroEL binds reversibly to both subunits prior to assembly. Since these observations were obtained under physiological conditions, we propose that the molten globule exists as a stable form during folding or assembly in the cell. Either the molten globule form of the subunits is an authentic folding intermediate or it is in rapid equilibrium with one. GroEL may function by facilitating assembly through stabilization of these incompletely folded subunits. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7902573

  19. [Milk fat globules, as determinants of the nutritional and biological value of goat milk].

    PubMed

    Skidan, I N; Gulyaev, A E; Kaznacheev, K S

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes the most complete information on such fundamentally important quality parameters of goat milk as the cellular composition of somatic cells and the structure of cytoplasmic debris in milk. It also focuses on the characterization of an essential component of the energetic value and nutritional content of milk--milk fat globules and milk fat globule membranes. The survey also clarifies some of the terms and meanings of physiological processes associated with the formation of the milk of various ruminants and breast milk. PMID:26841561

  20. Dark Cloud and Globule Distribution for Galactic Longitudes 230 to 360 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feitzinger, J. V.; Stuewe, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A catalogue of dark nebulae and globules was compiled from a study of the ESO-B and SRC-J sky atlas for galactic longitudes 230 deg 1 360 deg. This catalogue closes the great southern gap open since the work of Lynds (1962). Listed were 489 dark nebulae and 311 globules. The catalogue contains positions, sizes, opacities, and the van den Bergh classification on the filamentary morphology of dark clouds. Statistics are presented concerning the northern and southern distributions and sizes of the nebulae.

  1. Coil–globule transition of a polymer involved in excluded-volume interactions with macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Odagiri, Kenta; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-10-07

    Polymers adopt extended coil and compact globule states according to the balance between entropy and interaction energies. The transition of a polymer between an extended coil state and compact globule state can be induced by changing thermodynamic force such as temperature to alter the energy/entropy balance. Previously, this transition was theoretically studied by taking into account the excluded-volume interaction between monomers of a polymer chain using the partition function. For binary mixtures of a long polymer and short polymers, the coil-globule transition can be induced by changing the concentration of the shorter polymers. Here, we investigate the transition caused by short polymers by generalizing the partition function of the long polymer to include the excluded-volume effect of short polymers. The coil-globule transition is studied as a function of the concentration of mixed polymers by systematically varying Flory’s χ-parameters. We show that the transition is caused by the interplay between the excluded-volume interaction and the dispersion state of short polymers in the solvent. We also reveal that the same results can be obtained by combining the mixing entropy and elastic energy if the volume of a long polymer is properly defined.

  2. Na-Fe-Phosphate Globules in Impact Metal-Troilite Associations of Chelyabinsk Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharygin, V. V.; Karmanov, N. S.; Podgornykh, N. M.

    2016-08-01

    Multi- and monophase phosphate globules have been found in the impact metal-troilite aggregates of the Chelyabinsk chondrite. Their phase composition varies and they contain galileiite, sarcopside, graftonite and Na-Fe-phosphate Na2(Fe,Mn)5(PO4)4.

  3. Enzymic characteristics of fat globule membranes from bovine colostrum and bovine milk

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Fat globule membranes have been isolated from bovine colostrum and bovine milk by the dispersion of the fat in sucrose solutions at 4 degrees C and fractionation by centrifugation through discontinuous sucrose gradients. The morphology and enzymic characteristics of the separated fractions were examined. Fractions comprising a large proportion of the total extracted membrane were thus obtained having high levels of the Golgi marker enzymes UDP-galactose N- acetylglucosamine beta-4-galactosyltransferase and thiamine pyrophosphatase. A membrane-derived form of the galactosyltransferase has been solubilized from fat and purified to homogeneity. This enzyme is larger in molecular weight than previously studied soluble galactosyltransferases, but resembles in size the galactosyltransferase of lactating mammary Golgi membranes. In contrast, when fat globule membranes were prepared by traditional procedures, which involved washing the fat at higher temperatures, before extraction, galactosyltransferase was not present in the membranes, having been released into supernatant fractions, When the enzyme released by this procedure was partially purified and examined by gel filtration, it was found to be of a degraded form resembling in size the soluble galactosyltransferase of milk. The release is therefore attributed to the action of proteolytic enzymes. Our observations contrast with previous biochemical studies which suggested that Golgi membranes do not contribute to the milk fat globule membrane. They are, however, consistent with electron microscope studies of the fat secretion process, which indicate that secretory vesicle membranes, derived from the Golgi apparatus, may provide a large proportion of the fat globule membrane. PMID:402369

  4. Polymer globule with fractal properties caused by intramolecular nanostructuring and spatial constrains.

    PubMed

    Glagoleva, Anna A; Vasilevskaya, Valentina V; Khokhlov, Alexei R

    2016-06-21

    By means of computer simulation, we studied macromolecules composed of N dumbbell amphiphilic monomer units with attractive pendant groups. In poor solvents, these macromolecules form spherical globules that are dense in the case of short chains (the gyration radius RG∼N(1/3)), or hollow inside and obey the RG∼N(1/2) law when the macromolecules are sufficiently long. Due to the specific intramolecular nanostructuring, the vesicle-like globules of long amphiphilic macromolecules posses some properties of fractal globules, by which they (i) could demonstrate the same scaling statistics for the entire macromolecule and for short subchains with m monomer units and (ii) possess a specific territorial structure. Within a narrow slit, the globule loses its inner cavity, takes a disk-like shape and scales as N(1/2) for much shorter macromolecules. However, the field of end-to-end distance r(m) ∼m(1/2) dependence for subchains becomes visibly smaller. The results obtained were compared with the homopolymer case. PMID:27198966

  5. Developmental changes in the milk fat globule membrane proteome during the transition from colostrum to milk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shotgun Proteomics, using amine-reactive isobaric tags (iTRAQ) was used to quantify protein changes in milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) that were isolated from day 1 colostrum and compared to MFGM from day 7 milk. Eight Holstein cows were randomly assigned to 2 groups of 4 cow sample pools for a s...

  6. Developmental changes in milk fat globule membrane proteome expression during the transition from colostrum to milk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shotgun Proteomics, using amine-reactive isobaric tags (iTRAQ) was used to quantify protein changes in milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) that were isolated from day 1 colostrum and compared to MFGM from day 7 milk. Eight Holstein cows were randomly assigned to 2 groups of 4 cow sample pools for a s...

  7. Topological switching between an alpha-beta parallel protein and a remarkably helical molten globule.

    PubMed

    Nabuurs, Sanne M; Westphal, Adrie H; aan den Toorn, Marije; Lindhoud, Simon; van Mierlo, Carlo P M

    2009-06-17

    Partially folded protein species transiently exist during folding of most proteins. Often these species are molten globules, which may be on- or off-pathway to native protein. Molten globules have a substantial amount of secondary structure but lack virtually all the tertiary side-chain packing characteristic of natively folded proteins. These ensembles of interconverting conformers are prone to aggregation and potentially play a role in numerous devastating pathologies, and thus attract considerable attention. The molten globule that is observed during folding of apoflavodoxin from Azotobacter vinelandii is off-pathway, as it has to unfold before native protein can be formed. Here we report that this species can be trapped under nativelike conditions by substituting amino acid residue F44 by Y44, allowing spectroscopic characterization of its conformation. Whereas native apoflavodoxin contains a parallel beta-sheet surrounded by alpha-helices (i.e., the flavodoxin-like or alpha-beta parallel topology), it is shown that the molten globule has a totally different topology: it is helical and contains no beta-sheet. The presence of this remarkably nonnative species shows that single polypeptide sequences can code for distinct folds that swap upon changing conditions. Topological switching between unrelated protein structures is likely a general phenomenon in the protein structure universe.

  8. Effect of galactose on acid induced molten globule state of Soybean Agglutinin: Biophysical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Parvez; Naseem, Farha; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2015-11-01

    In the present study the formation of molten globule-like unfolding intermediate Soybean Agglutinin (SBA) in acidic pH range has been established with the help of acrylamide quenching, intrinsic fluorescence, ANS fluorescence measurement, far UV CD and dynamic light scattering measurement. A marked increase in ANS fluorescence was observed at pH 2.2. Ksv of acrylamide quenching was found to be higher at pH 2.2 than that of native SBA at pH 7. Far UV CD spectra of pH induced state suggest that SBA shows significant retention of secondary structure closure to native. Hydrodynamic radius of SBA at pH 2.2 was found be more as compared to native state and also in other pH induced states. Further we checked the effect of galactose on the molten globule state of SBA. This study suggests that SBA exist as molten globule at pH 2.2 and this study will help in acid induced molten globule state of other proteins.

  9. Aqueous Chemical Modeling of Sedimentation on Early Mars with Application to Surface-Atmosphere Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catling, David C.

    2004-01-01

    This project was to investigate models for aqueous sedimentation on early Mars from fluid evaporation. Results focused on three specific areas: (1) First, a fluid evaporation model incorporating iron minerals was developed to compute the evaporation of a likely solution on early Mars derived from the weathering of mafic rock. (2) Second, the fluid evaporation model was applied to salts within Martian meteorites, specifically salts in the nakhlites and ALH84001. Evaporation models were found to be consistent with the mineralogy of salt assemblages-anhydrite, gypsum, Fe-Mg-Ca carbonates, halite, clays-- and the concentric chemical fractionation of Ca-to Mg-rich carbonate rosettes in ALH84001. We made progress in further developing our models of fluid concentration by contributing to updating the FREZCHEM model. (3) Third, theoretical investigation was done to determine the thermodynamics and kinetics involved in the formation of gray, crystalline hematite. This mineral, of probable ancient aqueous origin, has been observed in several areas on the surface of Mars by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer on Mars Global Surveyor. The "Opportunity" Mars Exploration Rover has also detected gray hematite at its landing site in Meridiani Planum. We investigated how gray hematite can be formed via atmospheric oxidation, aqueous precipitation and subsequent diagenesis, or hydrothermal processes. We also studied the geomorphology of the Aram Chaos hematite region using Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images.

  10. Illuminating the off-pathway nature of the molten globule folding intermediate of an α-β parallel protein.

    PubMed

    Lindhoud, Simon; Westphal, Adrie H; Borst, Jan Willem; van Mierlo, Carlo P M

    2012-01-01

    Partially folded protein species transiently form during folding of most proteins. Often, these species are molten globules, which may be on- or off-pathway to the native state. Molten globules are ensembles of interconverting protein conformers that have a substantial amount of secondary structure, but lack virtually all tertiary side-chain packing characteristics of natively folded proteins. Due to solvent-exposed hydrophobic groups, molten globules are prone to aggregation, which can have detrimental effects on organisms. The molten globule observed during folding of the 179-residue apoflavodoxin from Azotobacter vinelandii is off-pathway, as it has to unfold before native protein can form. Here, we study folding of apoflavodoxin and characterize its molten globule using fluorescence spectroscopy and Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). Apoflavodoxin is site-specifically labeled with fluorescent donor and acceptor dyes, utilizing dye-inaccessibility of Cys69 in cofactor-bound protein. Donor (i.e., Alexa Fluor 488) is covalently attached to Cys69 in all apoflavodoxin variants used. Acceptor (i.e., Alexa Fluor 568) is coupled to Cys1, Cys131 and Cys178, respectively. Our FRET data show that apoflavodoxin's molten globule forms in a non-cooperative manner and that its N-terminal 69 residues fold last. In addition, striking conformational differences between molten globule and native protein are revealed, because the inter-label distances sampled in the 111-residue C-terminal segment of the molten globule are shorter than observed for native apoflavodoxin. Thus, FRET sheds light on the off-pathway nature of the molten globule during folding of an α-β parallel protein. PMID:23029219

  11. A Short, Critical Evaluation of Proposed Signs of Ancient Martian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, Allan

    Unambiguous identification of fossil traces of life (terrestrial or extraterrestrial) can be difficult or impossible. For instance, many shapes in the 0.1 - 10 micron size range can form biologically or abiotically. Published images of such shapes in ALH84001 have been Rorschach tests of our preconceptions: biologists tend to see biological influences; inorganic chemists or petrolgists see abiotic processes. Similarly, many complex carbon compounds can also form from biologic or abiotic precursors; some see degraded biological matter, other see organic syntheses. In this light, W. Schopf's checklist of characteristics for microfossils has not provided an answer to whether there are traces of ancient martian life in ALH84001; members of D. McKay's research group claim to have satisfied all these criteria, yet few biologists or meteoriticists have been convinced. The job of the exobiologist has been complicated greatly by recent recognition of life in nearly all low-T environments on Earth. If all our terrestrial systems are influenced by biology, how can we recognize a sterile system?

  12. Immunocytochemical Evidence for Golgi Vesicle Involvement in Milk Fat Globule Secretion.

    PubMed

    Wooding, F B Peter; Sargeant, Timothy J

    2015-12-01

    The exact mechanism of secretion of the milk fat globule (MFG) from the mammary secretory cell is still controversial. We have previously suggested close involvement of Golgi vesicles in this process. This paper provides direct immunocytochemical evidence that butyrophilin is present in the Golgi stack and vesicles in ovine and caprine mammary glands. We suggest that it is the butyrophilin in the Golgi vesicle membrane that forms the specific association with the adipophilin on the lipid surface in the cytoplasm. Exocytosis of the associated Golgi vesicle will then initiate the process of MFG secretion. Further exocytosis of associated Golgi vesicles will continue and complete the process. Areas of the plasmalemma that have butyrophilin delivered by previous non-lipid associated Golgi exocytoses may also contribute to the process of forming the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM). PMID:26374828

  13. Comparative proteomics of milk fat globule membrane in different species reveals variations in lactation and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Xinyu; Zhang, Weiqing; Liu, Lu; Pang, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Shuwen; Lv, Jiaping

    2016-04-01

    In present study, 312, 554, 175 and 143 proteins were identified and quantified by label-free quantitative proteomics in human, cow, goat and yak milk fat globule membrane (MFGM), respectively. Fifty proteins involved in vesicle mediate transport and milk fat globule secretion were conserved among species. Moreover, proteins involved in lipid synthesis and secretion (xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase, stomatin and CD36), showed different expression pattern and the host defense proteins exhibited various profiles within species. Notably, the content and activity of lipid catabolic enzymes were significantly higher in human MFGM, which could be indicative of the superior fat utilization in breast fed infants. Our findings unraveled the significant differences in protein composition of human milk and conventionally used substitutes of it. The in-depth study of lipid metabolic enzymes in human MFGM will probably contribute to the improvement of the fat utilization through modulation of lipid catabolic enzymes in infant formula.

  14. Optical Coherence Tomography Findings in Anterior Chamber Ointment Globule after Phacoemulsification

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M.; Haddad, Randa S.; Salti, Haytham I.; Habbal, Zuhair

    2015-01-01

    We present 2 cases of anterior chamber ointment with evidence of progressive endothelial cell loss. In both cases, an anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) was similar to an OCT of a tobramycin-dexamethasone ointment placed on a pen tip. An anterior segment OCT also demonstrated the direct contact of the globule with the corneal endothelium. A gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis documented the similarity to tobramycin-dexamethasone ointment in 1 case. Anterior segment OCT can help in confirming the diagnosis. Corneal endothelial injury is a continuous process, and its clinical manifestation is related to the size of the globule, the initial endothelium count, and the duration of ointment contact, which is related to supine positioning. It is advisable to avoid ointments in the immediate postoperative period, especially in corneal wounds larger than 3 mm. PMID:26955351

  15. Comparative proteomics of milk fat globule membrane in different species reveals variations in lactation and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Xinyu; Zhang, Weiqing; Liu, Lu; Pang, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Shuwen; Lv, Jiaping

    2016-04-01

    In present study, 312, 554, 175 and 143 proteins were identified and quantified by label-free quantitative proteomics in human, cow, goat and yak milk fat globule membrane (MFGM), respectively. Fifty proteins involved in vesicle mediate transport and milk fat globule secretion were conserved among species. Moreover, proteins involved in lipid synthesis and secretion (xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase, stomatin and CD36), showed different expression pattern and the host defense proteins exhibited various profiles within species. Notably, the content and activity of lipid catabolic enzymes were significantly higher in human MFGM, which could be indicative of the superior fat utilization in breast fed infants. Our findings unraveled the significant differences in protein composition of human milk and conventionally used substitutes of it. The in-depth study of lipid metabolic enzymes in human MFGM will probably contribute to the improvement of the fat utilization through modulation of lipid catabolic enzymes in infant formula. PMID:26593540

  16. A protective effect of milk fat globule EGF factor VIII (MFG-E8) on the spontaneous fusion of milk fat globules in breast milk.

    PubMed

    Yasueda, Takehiko; Oshima, Kenzi; Nakatani, Hajime; Tabuchi, Kanji; Nadano, Daita; Matsuda, Tsukasa

    2015-07-01

    Lipid droplets synthesized in mammary epithelial cells are secreted into breast milk by the budding-off mechanism. The milk lipids, termed mik fat globules (MFGs), are surrounded with the cell plasma membrane and contain various membrane proteins, including milk fat globule epidermal growth factor (EGF)-factor VIII (MFG-E8), on their surface. We report here that the MFGs in the milk of MFG-E8-deficient mice fused each other and turned into abnormally large size of lipid droplets within ∼48 h after being secreted into mammary alveolar lumen in situ or being incubated at 37°C in vitro. This biophysical degeneration of MFGs in the MFG-E8-deficient milk was efficiently rescued in vitro by adding the milk serum of wild-type mice, isolated MFG-E8 or annexin V. Moreover, addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (30 mM) also protected the MFG fusion remarkably in vitro. In addition, bovine MFGs also fused each other when isolated from milk serum, and the fusion was inhibited by adding isolated MFG-E8 or mouse milk serum, but not the milk serum of MFG-E8-deficient mice. MFG-E8 in breast milk may mask the phosphatidylserine exposed on the surface of MFGs with time after secretion and thereby suppress the membrane fusion among MFGs resulting in the enlargement of MFGs in the breast milk. PMID:25661589

  17. A Spitzer Survey of an Isolated Globule: DC314.8-5.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Sachindev S.; Whittet, D. C. B.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J.; Horne, D.; Mayeur, P. A.

    2011-05-01

    DC314.8-5.1 is an isolated globule in the constellation of Circinus in the southern hemisphere. A 10.53 V-magnitude B9 star is illuminating a reflection nebula in the eastern part of this cloud. We surveyed this cloud using data from Spitzer IRS, IRAC and MIPS instruments. The main goals of our survey are to use mid-IR photometry along with 2MASS data to determine if this globule is a site of active star formation and to use IR spectroscopy to detect PAHs and investigate the energetics in the cloud. Here we describe preliminary results from the investigation of PAH emissions in DC314.8-5.1. Inspection of the IRAC 8 micron image shows widespread structured PAH emission towards this cloud. We have high resolution IRS spectra of HD130079 and low resolution IRS maps of the reflection nebula. In the spectral data we detect all the major PAH emissions in the 5 20 micron region. We find that the emission in the 12 14 micron region is quenched compared to the 11.3 micron feature suggesting most of the PAHs have solo hydrogen bonds. Spatial variation of PAH emissions seems to be identical as we move from the illuminating source, HD130079, towards the interior of the cloud except in the south-southwest region, where we see a slight enhancement. This enhancement is probably due to the skin effect (i.e., an excess due to viewing angle). We will analyze the ratios of various PAH features to i) put this globule in a global context with respect to the energetics of the region, and ii) determine the ionization state of the carrier molecules to investigate the interaction of PAHs with soft UV radiation. Combining results from the spectroscopic program with the stellar census data will provide new insight into the physical and evolutionary state of this isolated globule.

  18. Spitzer Observations of a 24 μm Shadow: Bok Globule CB 190

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, Amelia M.; Bieging, John H.; Rieke, George H.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Balog, Zoltan; Gordon, Karl D.; Green, Elizabeth M.; Keene, Jocelyn; Kelly, Brandon C.; Rubin, Mark; Werner, Michael W.

    2007-08-01

    We present Spitzer observations of the dark globule CB 190 (LDN 771). We observe a roughly circular 24 μm shadow with a 70" radius. The extinction profile of this shadow matches the profile derived from 2MASS photometry at the outer edges of the globule and reaches a maximum of ~32 visual magnitudes at the center. The corresponding mass of CB 190 is ~10 Msolar. Our 12CO and 13CO J=2-1 data over a 10'×10' region centered on the shadow show a temperature ~10 K. The thermal continuum indicates a similar temperature for the dust. The molecular data also show evidence of freezeout onto dust grains. We estimate a distance to CB 190 of 400 pc using the spectroscopic parallax of a star associated with the globule. Bonnor-Ebert fits to the density profile, in conjunction with this distance, yield ξmax=7.2, indicating that CB 190 may be unstable. The high temperature (56 K) of the best-fit Bonnor-Ebert model is in contradiction with the CO and thermal continuum data, leading to the conclusion that the thermal pressure is not enough to prevent free-fall collapse. We also find that the turbulence in the cloud is inadequate to support it. However, the cloud may be supported by the magnetic field, if this field is at the average level for dark globules. Since the magnetic field will eventually leak out through ambipolar diffusion, it is likely that CB 190 is collapsing or in a late precollapse stage. This work is based in part on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under NASA contract 1407.

  19. Coil-globule transition of poly(methyl methacrylate) in isoamyl acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Tomohide

    1997-09-01

    The coil-globule transition was studied by static light scattering measurements on poly(methyl methacrylate) with the molecular weight Mw×10-6=2.35 and 4.4 in isoamyl acetate. Since the phase separation of the dilute solution occurred very slowly, the measurements could be made in the broad temperature range from near the Θ temperature 61 °C to 0 °C 30 min after a quench of the solution. The observed expansion factor α2 for the radius of gyration was represented as a function only of τM1/2 and showed a constant value at large -τM1/2 with τ being 1-Θ/T. A quantitative comparison between a recent theory for a contracted coil and the data of α2 revealed the coil-globule crossover phenomena. The behavior of plot of 1/α3 versus -τM1/2 was distinctly different in the three ranges, i.e., coil range, globule range, and range of a constant α. The plot of the observed second virial coefficient A2 against temperature yielded a minimum as predicted from a theory of A2 below the Θ temperature.

  20. Coil-globule transition of poly(methyl methacrylate) in isoamyl acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, M.; Nakagawa, T.

    1997-09-01

    The coil-globule transition was studied by static light scattering measurements on poly(methyl methacrylate) with the molecular weight M{sub w}{times}10{sup {minus}6}=2.35 and 4.4 in isoamyl acetate. Since the phase separation of the dilute solution occurred very slowly, the measurements could be made in the broad temperature range from near the {Theta} temperature 61{degree}C to 0{degree}C 30 min after a quench of the solution. The observed expansion factor {alpha}{sup 2} for the radius of gyration was represented as a function only of {tau}M{sup 1/2} and showed a constant value at large {minus}{tau}M{sup 1/2} with {tau} being 1{minus}{Theta}/T. A quantitative comparison between a recent theory for a contracted coil and the data of {alpha}{sup 2} revealed the coil-globule crossover phenomena. The behavior of plot of 1/{alpha}{sup 3} versus {minus}{tau}M{sup 1/2} was distinctly different in the three ranges, i.e., coil range, globule range, and range of a constant {alpha}. The plot of the observed second virial coefficient A{sub 2} against temperature yielded a minimum as predicted from a theory of A{sub 2} below the {Theta} temperature. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. [Lipid Composition of Different Breeds of Milk Fat Globules by Confocal Raman Microscopy].

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Wang, Zi-wei; Song, Jun-hong; Pang, Rui-peng; Ren, Fa-zheng

    2016-01-01

    Different breeds of cows affect the form of fat exist in dairy products and the final functionality, which depended mainly on the composition of the milk fat globules(MFG). However, the relationship between the composition and breeds has not been illuminated. In our study, differences in the lipid content and fatty acid composition of native bovine, buffalo and yak MFG were investigated by confocal Raman spectroscopy. The research offers the possibility of acquisition and analysis of the Raman signal without disruption of the structure of fat globule. The results showed that yak MFG had a higher ratio of band intensities at 2 885/2 850 cm(-1), indicating yak MFG tend to have a triglyceride core in a fluid state with a milk fat globule membrane in a crystalline state. The buffalo and yak MFG had a higher level of unsaturation compared to bovine MFG, shown by a higher ratio of band intensities at 1 655/1 744 cm(-1). The results indicate that small MFG of buffalo is more unsaturated than yak, while the large MFG of buffalo is less unsaturated than the yak. Thus, selective use of cream with yak MFG would allow a harder and more costly churning process but lead to a softer butter. Buffalo milk which contains larger MFG is more suitable for cream and MFG membrane separation. PMID:27228754

  2. Spitzer and HHT Observations of Bok Globule B335: Isolated Star Formation Efficiency and Cloud Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, Amelia M.; Rubin, Mark; Werner, Michael W.; Rieke, George H.; Bieging, John H.; Keene, Jocelyn; Kang, Miju; Shirley, Yancy L.; Su, K. Y. L.; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Wilner, David J.

    2008-11-01

    We present infrared and millimeter observations of Barnard 335, the prototypical isolated Bok globule with an embedded protostar. Using Spitzer data we measure the source luminosity accurately; we also constrain the density profile of the innermost globule material near the protostar using the observation of an 8.0 μm shadow. Heinrich Hertz Telescope (HHT) observations of 12CO 2-1 confirm the detection of a flattened molecular core with diameter ~10,000 AU and the same orientation as the circumstellar disk (~100 to 200 AU in diameter). This structure is probably the same as that generating the 8.0 μm shadow and is expected from theoretical simulations of collapsing embedded protostars. We estimate the mass of the protostar to be only ~5% of the mass of the parent globule. This work is based in part on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under NASA contract 1407.

  3. Pillars and globules at the edges of H ii regions. Confronting Herschel observations and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblin, P.; Minier, V.; Schneider, N.; Audit, E.; Hill, T.; Didelon, P.; Peretto, N.; Arzoumanian, D.; Motte, F.; Zavagno, A.; Bontemps, S.; Anderson, L. D.; André, Ph.; Bernard, J. P.; Csengeri, T.; Di Francesco, J.; Elia, D.; Hennemann, M.; Könyves, V.; Marston, A. P.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Roussel, H.; Sousbie, T.; Spinoglio, L.; White, G. J.; Williams, J.

    2013-12-01

    Context. Herschel far-infrared imaging observations have revealed the density structure of the interface between H ii regions and molecular clouds in great detail. In particular, pillars and globules are present in many high-mass star-forming regions, such as the Eagle nebula (M 16) and the Rosette molecular cloud, and understanding their origin will help characterize triggered star formation. Aims: The formation mechanisms of these structures are still being debated. The initial morphology of the molecular cloud and its turbulent state are key parameters since they generate deformations and curvatures of the shell during the expansion of the H ii region. Recent numerical simulations have shown how pillars can arise from the collapse of the shell in on itself and how globules can be formed from the interplay of the turbulent molecular cloud and the ionization from massive stars. The goal here is to test this scenario through recent observations of two massive star-forming regions, M 16 and the Rosette molecular cloud. Methods: First, the column density structure of the interface between molecular clouds and associated H ii regions was characterized using column density maps obtained from far-infrared imaging of the Herschel HOBYS key programme. Then, the DisPerSe algorithm was used on these maps to detect the compressed layers around the ionized gas and pillars in different evolutionary states. Column density profiles were constructed. Finally, their velocity structure was investigated using CO data, and all observational signatures were tested against some distinct diagnostics established from simulations. Results: The column density profiles have revealed the importance of compression at the edge of the ionized gas. The velocity properties of the structures, i.e. pillars and globules, are very close to what we predict from the numerical simulations. We have identified a good candidate of a nascent pillar in the Rosette molecular cloud that presents the velocity

  4. Hexafluoroacetone hydrate as a structure modifier in proteins: characterization of a molten globule state of hen egg-white lysozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjya, S.; Balaram, P.

    1997-01-01

    A molten globule-like state of hen egg-white lysozyme has been characterized in 25% aqueous hexafluoroacetone hydrate (HFA) by CD, fluorescence, NMR, and H/D exchange experiments. The far UV CD spectra of lysozyme in 25% HFA supports retention of native-like secondary structure while the loss of near UV CD bands are indicative of the overall collapse of the tertiary structure. The intermediate state in 25% HFA exhibits an enhanced affinity towards the hydrophobic dye, ANS, and a native-like tryptophan fluorescence quenching. 1-D NMR spectra indicates loss of native-like tertiary fold as evident from the absence of ring current-shifted 1H resonances. CD, fluorescence, and NMR suggest that the transition from the native state to a molten globule state in 25% HFA is a cooperative process. A second structural transition from this compact molten globule-like state to an "open" helical state is observed at higher concentrations of HFA (> or = 50%). This transition is characterized by a dramatic loss of ANS binding with a concomitant increase in far UV CD bands. The thermal unfolding of the molten globule state in 25% HFA is sharply cooperative, indicating a predominant role of side-chain-side-chain interactions in the stability of the partially folded state. H/D exchange experiments yield higher protection factors for many of the backbone amide protons from the four alpha-helices along with the C-terminal 3(10) helix, whereas little or no protection is observed for most of the amide protons from the triple-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet domain. This equilibrium molten globule-like state of lysozyme in 25% HFA is remarkably similar to the molten globule state observed for alpha-lactalbumin and also with the molten globule state transiently observed in the kinetic refolding experiments of hen lysozyme. These results suggest that HFA may prove generally useful as a structure modifier in proteins. PMID:9144778

  5. Coil–globule transition in the denatured state of a small protein

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Eilon; Haran, Gilad

    2006-01-01

    Upon transfer from strongly denaturing to native conditions, proteins undergo a collapse that either precedes folding or occurs simultaneously with it. This collapse is similar to the well known coil–globule transition of polymers. Here we employ single-molecule fluorescence methods to fully characterize the equilibrium coil–globule transition in the denatured state of the IgG-binding domain of protein L. By using FRET measurements on freely diffusing individual molecules, we determine the radius of gyration of the protein, which shows a gradual expansion as the concentration of the denaturant, guanidinium hydrochloride, is increased all the way up to 7 M. This expansion is observed also in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements of the hydrodynamic radius of the protein. We analyze the radius of gyration measurements using the theory of the coil–globule transition of Sanchez [Sanchez, I. C. (1979) Macromolecules 12, 980–988], which balances the excluded volume entropy of the chain with the average interresidue interaction energy. In particular, we calculate the solvation energy of the denatured protein, a property that is not readily accessible in other experiments. The dependence of this energy on denaturant concentration is nonlinear, contrasting with the common linear extrapolation method used to describe denaturation energy. Interestingly, a fit to the binding model of chemical denaturation suggests a single denaturant binding site per protein residue. The size of the denatured protein under native conditions can be extrapolated from the data as well, showing that the fully collapsed state of protein is only ≈10% larger than the folded state. PMID:16857738

  6. A Spitzer Survey of an Isolated Globule: DC314.8-5.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, S. S.; Whittet, D. C. B.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J.; Horne, D.; Mayeur, P. A.

    2011-05-01

    DC314.8-5.1 is an isolated globule in the constellation of Circinus in the Southern Hemisphere. A 10th magnitude B9 star is illuminating a reflection nebula in the eastern part of this cloud. Using this fortuitous association Whittet (2007) found the distance, mean number density of hydrogen and mass to be 342 /pm 50 pc, > 9 × 10^3 cm-3 and 30 ˜ 100 solar masses, respectively. We surveyed this cloud using data from Spitzer's IRS, IRAC and MIPS instruments. The main goals of our survey are to use mid-IR photometry along with 2MASS data to determine if this globule is a site of active star formation and to use IR spectroscopy to detect PAHs and investigate the energetics in the cloud. Results from the analysis of these data will lead to a better understanding of the interaction of dense molecular gas and dust in isolated cloud cores with a well defined soft UV radiation fields. In this poster we describe some preliminary results from the investigation of PAH emissions in DC314.8-5.1. Inspection of the IRAC 8 μm image shows widespread structured PAH emission toward this cloud. We have high resolution IRS spectra of HD130079 and low resolution IRS maps of the reflection nebula. In the spectral data we detect all the major PAH emissions in the 5 ˜ 20 μm region. We find that the emission in the 12 to 14 μm region is quenched compared to the 11.3 μm feature suggesting that most of the PAHs posses solo hydrogen bonds. Spatial variation of PAH emissions seems to be identical as we move from the illuminating source, HD130079, towards the interior of the cloud except in the south-southwest region, where we see a slight enhancement. This enhancement is probably due to the skin effect (i.e., in this direction we are viewing the edge of the cloud leading to an excess of PAH emission along the line of sight.) At present, we are analyzing the ratios of various PAH features to i) put this globule in a global context with respect to the energetics of the region, and ii

  7. Triggered star-formation in the bright rimmed globule IC1396A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Nimesh A.; Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Goldsmith, Paul

    2015-01-01

    IC1396 is a well known HII region and molecular cloud complex surrounding the Trumpler 37 cluster of OB stars in the Cepheus OB2 association. The dense, elephant trunk shaped globules in this region typically show bright rims facing the central exciting O6 star HD~206267. This region, at a distance of 870 pc, is an excellent astrophysical laboratory for studying the feedback effects of massive stars on neighboring molecular clouds. Triggered star formation occurs when dense cores (which would otherwise remain stable) are compressed and made unstable by the sustained energy input from the OB association. Observationally it remains challenging to prove whether the onset of star-formation in such globules is triggered or spontaneous.Using the Submillimeter Array (SMA), we observed IC1396 globule A (Pottasch 1958 nomenclature), targeting four newly discovered protostars from recent Herschel PACS observations. Here we present 230 GHz molecular line (CO, 13CO, C18O, N2D+ and H2CO) and continuum results for the source IC1396A-PACS-1 (Sicilia-Aguilar et al. 2014). This is a Class 0 source very close to the edge of the ionization front and Herschel observations show this to be a most promisingcase of triggered star-formation. The SMA 230 GHz continuum source has a flux density of 280 mJy. We estimate a dust mass of about 0.1 Msun in this source which appears very compact in our 5" beam. CO, 13CO and C18O emission is largely resolved out by the interferometer and will require combined imaging with single-dish observations. (We have a parallel ongoing study being carried out with the IRAM 30m telescope). SMA N2D+ emission peaks on the continuum sourceand is partially resolved. H2CO emission appears to avoid the peak of continuum and N2D+, suggesting depletion. Both the morphology and kinematics in H2CO emission are indicative of internal disturbance, away from the PDR region into the globule.

  8. Morphology of globules and cenospheres in heavy fuel oil burner experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kwack, E.Y.; Shakkottai, P.; Massier, P.F.; Back, L.H. )

    1992-04-01

    Number 6 fuel oil was heated, sprayed, and burned in an enclosure using a small commercial oil burner. Samples of residues that emerged from the flame were collected at various locations outside the flame and observed by a scanning electron microscope. Porous cenospheres, larger globules (of size 80 {mu}m to 200 {mu}m) that resemble soap bubbles formed from the very viscous liquid residue, and unburned oil drops were the types of particle collected. This paper reports on the qualitative relationships of the morphology of these particles to the temperature history to which they were subjected were made.

  9. The dynamics of the biological membrane surrounding the buffalo milk fat globule investigated as a function of temperature.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hanh T H; Madec, Marie-Noëlle; Ong, Lydia; Kentish, Sandra E; Gras, Sally L; Lopez, Christelle

    2016-08-01

    The biological membrane surrounding fat globules in milk (the MFGM) is poorly understood, despite its importance in digestion and in determining the properties of fat globules. In this study, in situ structural investigations of buffalo MFGM were performed as a function of temperature (4-60°C), using confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that temperature and rate of temperature change affected the lipid domains formed in the MFGM with the lateral segregation (i) of high Tm lipids and cholesterol in a Lo phase for both TTm and (ii) of high Tm lipids in a gel phase for Tglobules during processing and digestion.

  10. Stability of milk fat globule membrane proteins toward human enzymatic gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Le, T T; Van de Wiele, T; Do, T N H; Debyser, G; Struijs, K; Devreese, B; Dewettinck, K; Van Camp, J

    2012-05-01

    The milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) fraction refers to the thin film of polar lipids and membrane proteins that surrounds fat globules in milk. It is its unique biochemical composition that renders MFGM with some beneficial biological activities, such as anti-adhesive effects toward pathogens. However, a prerequisite for the putative bioactivity of MFGM is its stability during gastrointestinal digestion. We, therefore, subjected MFGM material, isolated from raw milk, to an in vitro enzymatic gastrointestinal digestion. Sodium dodecyl sulfate PAGE, in combination with 2 staining methods, Coomassie Blue and periodic acid Schiff staining, was used to evaluate polypeptide patterns of the digest, whereas mass spectrometry was used to confirm the presence of specific MFGM proteins. Generally, it was observed that glycoproteins showed higher resistance to endogenous proteases compared with non-glycosylated proteins. Mucin 1 displayed the highest resistance to digestion and a considerable part of this protein was still detected at its original molecular weight after gastric and small intestine digestion. Cluster of differentiation 36 was also quite resistant to pepsin. A significant part of periodic acid Schiff 6/7 survived the gastric digestion, provided that the lipid moiety was not removed from the MFGM material. Overall, MFGM glycoproteins are generally more resistant to gastrointestinal digestion than serum milk proteins and the presence of lipids, besides glycosylation, may protect MFGM glycoproteins from gastrointestinal digestion. This gastrointestinal stability makes MFGM glycoproteins amenable to further studies in which their putative health-promoting effects can be explored.

  11. N-15-Rich Organic Globules in a Cluster IDP and the Bells CM2 Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2008-01-01

    Organic matter in primitive meteorites and chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs) is commonly enriched in D/H and 15N/14N relative to terrestrial values [1-3]. These anomalies are ascribed to the partial preservation of presolar cold molecular cloud material [1]. Some meteorites and IDPs contain m-size inclusions with extreme H and N isotopic anomalies [2-4], possibly due to preserved pristine primordial organic grains. We recently showed that the in the Tagish Lake meteorite, the principle carriers of these anomalies are sub- m, hollow organic globules [5]. The globules likely formed by photochemical processing of organic ices in a cold molecular cloud or the outermost regions of the protosolar disk [5]. We proposed that similar materials should be common among primitive meteorites, IDPs, and comets. Similar objects have been observed in organic extracts of carbonaceous chondrites [6-8], however their N and H isotopic compositions are generally unknown. Bulk H and N isotopic compositions may indicate which meteorites best preserve interstellar organic compounds. Thus, we selected the Bells CM2 carbonaceous chondrites for study based on its large bulk 15N (+335 %) and D (+990 %) [9].

  12. Existence of molten globule state in homocysteine-induced protein covalent modifications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Tarun; Sharma, Gurumayum Suraj; Singh, Laishram Rajendrakumar

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteine thiolactone is a toxic metabolite produced from homocysteine by amino-acyl t-RNA synthetase in error editing reaction. The basic cause of toxicity of homocysteine thiolactone is believed to be due to the adduct formation with lysine residues (known as protein N-homocysteinylation) leading to protein aggregation and loss of enzyme function. There was no data available until now that showed the effect of homocysteine thiolactone on the native state structural changes that led to aggregate formation. In the present study we have investigated the time dependent structural changes due to homocysteine thiolactone induced modifications on three different proteins having different physico-chemical properties (cytochrome-c, lysozyme and alpha lactalbumin). We discovered that N-homocysteinylation leads to the formation of molten globule state--an important protein folding intermediate in the protein folding pathway. We also found that the formation of the molten globule state might be responsible for the appearance of aggregate formation. The study indicates the importance of protein folding intermediate state in eliciting the homocysteine thiolactone toxicity. PMID:25405350

  13. Data from proteomic characterization and comparison of mammalian milk fat globule proteomes by iTRAQ analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongxin; Zheng, Nan; Zhao, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yangdong; Han, Rongwei; Ma, Lu; Zhao, Shengguo; Li, Songli; Guo, Tongjun; Wang, Jiaqi

    2015-06-01

    Milk fat globules memebrane (MFGM)-enriched proteomes from Holstein, Jersey, yak, buffalo, goat, camel, horse, and human were extracted and identified by an iTRAQ quantification proteomic approach. Proteomes data were analyzed by bioinformatic and multivariate statistical analysis and used to present the characteristic traits of the MFGM proteins among the studied mammals. The data of this study are also related to the research article "Proteomic characterization and comparison of mammalian milk fat globule proteomes by iTRAQ analysis" in the Journal of Proteomics [1]. PMID:26217709

  14. Effects of pressure on the structure of metmyoglobin: molecular dynamics predictions for pressure unfolding through a molten globule intermediate.

    PubMed Central

    Floriano, W. B.; Nascimento, M. A.; Domont, G. B.; Goddard, W. A.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the pathway for pressure unfolding of metmyoglobin using molecular dynamics (MD) for a range of pressures (0.1 MPa to 1.2 GPa) and a temperature of 300 K. We find that the unfolding of metmyoglobin proceeds via a two-step mechanism native --> molten globule intermediate --> unfolded, where the molten globule forms at 700 MPa. The simulation describes qualitatively the experimental behavior of metmyoglobin under pressure. We find that unfolding of the alpha-helices follows the sequence of migrating hydrogen bonds (i,i + 4) --> (i,i + 2). PMID:9827996

  15. Evidence for a Noachian-Aged Ephemeral Lake in Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, S. W.; Niles, P. B.; Alfano, F.; Clarke, A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Gusev crater was selected as the landing site for the Spirit rover because of the likelihood that it contained an ancient lake. Although outcrops rich in Mg-Fe carbonate dubbed Comanche were discovered in the Noachian-aged Columbia Hills, they were inferred to result from volcanic hydrothermal activity. Spirit encountered other mineral and chemical indicators of aqueous activity, but none was recognized as definitive evidence for a former lake in part because none was associated with obvious lacustrine sedimentary deposits. However, water discharge into Martian crater basins like Gusev may have been episodic, producing only small amounts of sediment and shallow ephemeral lakes. Evaporative precipitation from such water bodies has been suggested as a way of producing the Mg- and Fe-rich carbonates found in ALH84001 and carbonates and salts in some nakhlites a hypothesis we examine for the Comanche carbonate.

  16. Comparative proteomics of milk fat globule membrane in goat colostrum and mature milk.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Liu, Lu; Pang, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Shuwen; Jia, Zhenhu; Ma, Changlu; Zhao, Lili; Lv, Jiaping

    2016-10-15

    As an important nutrient source in large area of world, the composition and nutritional value of goat milk are not well deliberated. Detailed annotation of protein composition is essential to address the physiological and nutritional value of goat milk. In the present study, 423 colostrum and mature goat milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) proteins were identified. The abundance of 189 proteins was significantly different between colostrums and mature milk MFGM. The acute phase proteins were higher in colostrums MFGM than those in mature milk MFGM which protected newborns at the beginning of life. Proteins related to synthesis and secretion were conserved through lactation to ensure the milk production. Of note, long term depression (LTD) proteins were observed in colostrum and mature milk MFGM. Milk LTD proteins could be potential biomarkers for diagnosis of lactation related depressive syndromes and should be taken into considerations of their effects on newborns. PMID:27173528

  17. Jeans analysis of Bok globules in {\\varvec{f(R)}} gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainio, Jaakko; Vilja, Iiro

    2016-10-01

    We examine the effects of f( R) gravity on Jeans analysis of collapsing dust clouds. We provide a method for testing modified gravity models by their effects on star formation as the presence of f(R) gravity is found to modify the limit for collapse. In this analysis we add perturbations to a de Sitter background. As the standard Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian is modified, new types of dynamics emerge. Depending on the characteristics of a chosen f( R) model, the appearance of new limits is possible. The physicality of these limits is further examined. We find the asymptotic Jeans masses for f( R) theories compared to standard Jeans mass. Through this ratio, the effects of the f( R) modified Jeans mass for viable theories are examined in molecular clouds. Bok globules have a mass range comparable to Jeans masses in question and are therefore used for comparing different f( R) models. Viable theories are found to assist in star formation.

  18. Role of milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor 8 in osteoimmunology.

    PubMed

    Sinningen, Kathrin; Thiele, Sylvia; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Rauner, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor 8 (MFG-E8) is a glycoprotein that is abundantly expressed in various tissues and has a pivotal role in the phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells. However, MFG-E8 has also gained significant attention because of its wide range of functions in autoimmunity, inflammation and tissue homeostasis. More recently, MFG-E8 has been identified as a critical regulator of bone homeostasis, being expressed in both, osteoblasts and osteoclasts. In addition, it was shown that MFG-E8 fulfils an active role in modulating inflammatory processes, suggesting an anti-inflammatory role of MFG-E8 and proposing it as a novel therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases. This concise review focusses on the expression and regulation of MFG-E8 in the context of inflammatory bone diseases, highlights its role in the pathophysiology of osteoimmune diseases and discusses the therapeutic potential of MFG-E8. PMID:27579162

  19. Composition and microstructure of colostrum and mature bovine milk fat globule membrane.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaoqiang; Guo, Zheng; Jin, Qingzhe; Huang, Jianhua; Cheong, Lingzhi; Xu, Xuebing; Wang, Xingguo

    2015-10-15

    The microstructures of colostrum and mature bovine milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) were investigated using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) at different temperatures, and the relationships between microstructure variations and the chemical compositions of the MFGM were also examined. Using a fluorophore-labeled phospholipid probe, we found that non-fluorescent domains on the MFGM were positively correlated with the amount of sphingomyelin at both room (20 °C) and physiological (37 °C) temperatures. However, at the storage temperature (4 °C), there were more non-fluorescent domains on the MFGM. These results indicate that the heterogeneities in the MFGM are most likely to be the result of the lateral segregation of sphingomyelin at the room and physiological temperatures, and at the storage temperature, phospholipids with saturated fatty acids affect the formation of these domains. PMID:25952880

  20. Short communication: Milk fat globule membrane as a potential delivery system for liposoluble nutrients.

    PubMed

    Bezelgues, J-B; Morgan, F; Palomo, G; Crosset-Perrotin, L; Ducret, P

    2009-06-01

    A soft physical process was used to extract and purified bovine milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) fractions on a pilot scale. Oil-in-water emulsions enriched with alpha-tocopherol and lycopene were then prepared and stabilized with the extracted MFGM fraction and conventional milk protein concentrates (i.e., whey proteins, caseinate). A protocol of in vitro digestion was set up to evaluate the bioaccessibility of the tocopherol and lycopene in the different emulsions. Bioaccessibility was defined as the capacity of liposoluble compounds to be transferred into mixed micelles formed during the digestion process. Results showed that the accumulation of the tocopherol and lycopene into mixed micelles in MFGM-stabilized emulsions was around 2-fold greater than in emulsions stabilized with conventional milk proteins. This result confirms the potential use of MFGM-enriched ingredients as delivery systems of liposoluble nutrients in food formulations. PMID:19447983

  1. Kinetics of coil-globule transition of poly(methyl methacrylate) in isoamyl acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Tomohide

    1999-02-01

    The kinetics of coil-globule transition was studied by static light scattering measurements on poly(methyl methacrylate) with the molecular weight Mw×10-6=8.4 and 12.2 in isoamyl acetate. Since the phase separation of the solution occurred very slowly, the mean-square radius of gyration of the polymer could be determined for a long time after quench to far below the θ-temperature 61 °C. The expansion factor α2 observed 30 min after quench to below the coil-globule crossover point, deviated largely from theoretical predictions, and was found to be a transient one. Chain collapse processes were measured in the time range from 30 min to a few thousand min after the quenches to 30 °C and 45 °C for Mw=12.2×106 and to 30 °C for Mw=8.4×106. The expansion factor in each process approached a constant value αeq2 in the time range. The collapse process was expressed as a function of time t(min) by α2=α∞2+{b/(t+c)}p, where b, c, p, and α∞2 were constant, independent of time. In all the three processes the constants had values near p˜0.5, b˜0.4, c˜0.6, and α∞2 was slightly smaller than αeq2. The constant c was introduced to satisfy the initial condition of α2=1 at t=0. This behavior of α2(t) and a comparison with kinetic theories of chain collapse concluded that the chain collapse occurred in a single stage process without formation of chain knots.

  2. The protein and lipid composition of the membrane of milk fat globules depends on their size.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Argov-Argaman, Nurit; Anggrek, Jeni; Boeren, Sjef; van Hooijdonk, Toon; Vervoort, Jacques; Hettinga, Kasper Arthur

    2016-06-01

    In bovine milk, fat globules (MFG) have a heterogeneous size distribution with diameters ranging from 0.1 to 15 µm. Although efforts have been made to explain differences in lipid composition, little is known about the protein composition of MFG membranes (MFGM) in different sizes of MFG. In this study, protein and lipid analyses were combined to study MFG formation and secretion. Two different sized MFG fractions (7.6±0.9 µm and 3.3±1.2 µm) were obtained by centrifugation. The protein composition of MFGM in the large and small MFG fractions was compared using mass-spectrometry-based proteomics techniques. The lipid composition and fatty acid composition of MFG was determined using HPLC-evaporative light-scattering detector and gas chromatography, respectively. Two frequently studied proteins in lipid droplet biogenesis, perilipin-2 and TIP47, were increased in the large and small MFG fractions, respectively. In the large MFG fraction, besides perilipin-2, cytoplasmic vesicle proteins (heat shock proteins, 14-3-3 proteins, and Rabs), microfilaments and intermediate filament-related proteins (actin and vimentin), host defense proteins (cathelicidins), and phosphatidylinositol were higher in concentration. On the other hand, cholesterol synthesis enzymes [lanosterol synthase and sterol-4-α-carboxylate 3-dehydrogenase (decarboxylating)], cholesterol, unsaturated fatty acids, and phosphatidylethanolamine were, besides TIP47, higher in concentration in the small MFG fraction. These results suggest that vesicle proteins, microfilaments and intermediate filaments, cholesterol, and specific phospholipids play an important role in lipid droplet growth, secretion, or both. The observations from this study clearly demonstrated the difference in protein and lipid composition between small and large MFG fractions. Studying the role of these components in more detail in future experiments may lead to a better understanding of fat globule formation and secretion.

  3. Capturing molten globule state of α-lactalbumin through constant pH molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Nicholus; Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2013-03-01

    The recently developed methods of constant pH molecular dynamics directly captures the correlation between protonation and conformation to probe protein structure, function, and dynamics. In this work, we investigate the effect of pH on the conformational properties of the protein human α-lactalbumin. Constant pH simulations at both acidic and alkaline medium indicate the formation of the molten globule state, which is in accordance with the previous experimental observations (especially, in acidic medium). The size of the protein measured by its radius of gyration (RG) exhibits a marked increase in both acidic and alkaline medium, which matches with the corresponding experimentally observed value of RG found in the molten globule. The probability of native contacts is also considerably reduced at acidic and basic pH as compared to that of native structure crystallized at neutral pH. The mean fractal dimension D2 of the protein records a sharp increase in basic medium as compared to those in neutral and acidic solutions implying a significant pH induced conformational change. The mean square fluctuations of all residues of the entire protein are found to increase by several folds in both acidic and basic medium, which may be correlated with the normalized solvent accessibility of the residues indicating role of solvent accessible surface area on protein internal dynamics. The helices comprising the α-domain of the protein are moderately preserved in the acidic and alkaline pH. However, the β-sheet structures present in the β-domain are completely disrupted in both acidic as well as basic pH.

  4. Differential role of molten globule and protein folding in distinguishing unique features of botulinum neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Kukreja, Roshan V; Cai, Shuowei; Singh, Bal R

    2014-06-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are proteins of great interest not only because of their extreme toxicity but also paradoxically for their therapeutic applications. All the known serotypes (A-G) have varying degrees of longevity and potency inside the neuronal cell. Differential chemical modifications such as phosphorylation and ubiquitination have been suggested as possible mechanisms for their longevity, but the molecular basis of the longevity remains unclear. Since the endopeptidase domain (light chain; LC) of toxin apparently survives inside the neuronal cells for months, it is important to examine the structural features of this domain to understand its resistance to intracellular degradation. Published crystal structures (both botulinum neurotoxins and endopeptidase domain) have not provided adequate explanation for the intracellular longevity of the domain. Structural features obtained from spectroscopic analysis of LCA and LCB were similar, and a PRIME (PReImminent Molten Globule Enzyme) conformation appears to be responsible for their optimal enzymatic activity at 37°C. LCE, on the other hand, was although optimally active at 37°C, but its active conformation differed from the PRIME conformation of LCA and LCB. This study establishes and confirms our earlier finding that an optimally active conformation of these proteins in the form of PRIME exists for the most poisonous poison, botulinum neurotoxin. There are substantial variations in the structural and functional characteristics of these active molten globule related structures among the three BoNT endopeptidases examined. These differential conformations of LCs are important in understanding the fundamental structural features of proteins, and their possible connection to intracellular longevity could provide significant clues for devising new countermeasures and effective therapeutics. PMID:24568862

  5. A Seventh Criterion for the Identification of Bacterial Magnetofossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, J. L.

    2001-05-01

    The controversy surrounding the presence of ancient bacterial life on Mars is at present focused on the existence of bacterial magnetofossils in the ALH84001 meteorite. Thomas-Keprta et al. (GCA 64:4049-4081, 2000) and Friedmann et al. (PNAS 98:2176-2181, 2001) have used six fingerprints of natural selection on the morphology and organization of bacterial magnetites as a guide for evaluating a biological origin of the fine-grained magnetite in the rims of the ALH84001 carbonate blebs. These six factors include unusual crystal morphology, elongation along the magnetically-easy \\{111\\} axis, high chemical purity, defect-free crystal lattice, a narrow size and shape distribution corresponding to the single-domain stability field, and the alignment of similarly-sized and shaped particles in linear chains. All six of these features can be viewed as maximizing in the net magnetic moment and magnetic stability of the bacterial cells, increasing the biological efficiency of magnetotaxis. All six of these are present in a well-defined sub-population of the Martian magnetites, whereas the closest inorganic analog found to date meets at most 3. Thomas-Keprta et al. (PNAS 98: 2164-2169, 2001) report yet another distinctive feature common to both Martian magnetites and bacterial strain MV-1, which is a hexa-octahedral morphology truncated at the long ends by a series of [100] and [111] faces. The net effect of these truncations is to remove all right-angle edges from the ends of these elongate magnetosomes, rounding them out. This general feature is in fact very common among the magnetosomes present in populations of living magnetotactic bacteria, and leads to the question of why this type of rounding would be supported by natural selection. I suspect that the answer might lie in the detailed magnetization pattern of elongate magnetic particiles. Recent numerical calculations of the magnetization patterns of rectangular magnetite crystals reveals the tendency for them to

  6. The effect of milk processing on the microstructure of the milk fat globule and rennet induced gel observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ong, L; Dagastine, R R; Kentish, S E; Gras, S L

    2010-04-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was successfully used to observe the effect of milk processing on the size and the morphology of the milk fat globule in raw milk, raw ultrafiltered milk, and standardized and pasteurized milk prepared for cheese manufacture (cheese-milk) and commercial pasteurized and homogenized milk. Fat globule size distributions for the milk preparations were analyzed using both image analysis and light scattering and both measurements produced similar data trends. Changes to the native milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) were tracked using a MFGM specific fluorescent stain that allowed MFGM proteins and adsorbed proteins to be differentiated on the fat globule surface. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis confirmed the identity of native MFGM proteins isolated from the surface of fat globules within raw, UF retentate, and cheese-milk preparations, whereas only casein was detected on the surface of fat globules in homogenized milk. The microstructure, porosity, and gel strength of the rennet induced gel made from raw milk and cheese-milk was also found to be comparable and significantly different to that made from homogenized milk. Our results highlight the potential use of CLSM as a tool to observe the structural details of the fat globule and associated membrane close to its native environment.

  7. Evidence for life in a martian meteorite?

    PubMed

    McSween, H Y

    1997-07-01

    The controversial hypothesis that the ALH84001 meteorite contains relics of ancient martian life has spurred new findings, but the question has not yet been resolved. Organic matter probably results, at least in part, from terrestrial contamination by Antarctic ice meltwater. The origin of nanophase magnetites and sulfides, suggested, on the basis of their sizes and morphologies, to be biogenic remains contested, as does the formation temperature of the carbonates that contain all of the cited evidence for life. The reported nonfossils may be magnetite whiskers and platelets, probably grown from a vapor. New observations, such as the possible presence of biofilms and shock metamorphic effects in the carbonates, have not yet been evaluated. Regardless of the ultimate conclusion, this controversy continues to help define strategies and sharpen tools that will be required for a Mars exploration program focused on the search for life. PMID:11541665

  8. Isotope ratios of H, C, and O in CO2 and H2O of the martian atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Webster, Chris R; Mahaffy, Paul R; Flesch, Gregory J; Niles, Paul B; Jones, John H; Leshin, Laurie A; Atreya, Sushil K; Stern, Jennifer C; Christensen, Lance E; Owen, Tobias; Franz, Heather; Pepin, Robert O; Steele, Andrew; Achilles, Cherie; Agard, Christophe; Alves Verdasca, José Alexandre; Anderson, Robert; Anderson, Ryan; Archer, Doug; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Arvidson, Ray; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Aubrey, Andrew; Baker, Burt; Baker, Michael; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Baratoux, David; Baroukh, Julien; Barraclough, Bruce; Bean, Keri; Beegle, Luther; Behar, Alberto; Bell, James; Bender, Steve; Benna, Mehdi; Bentz, Jennifer; Berger, Gilles; Berger, Jeff; Berman, Daniel; Bish, David; Blake, David F; Blanco Avalos, Juan J; Blaney, Diana; Blank, Jen; Blau, Hannah; Bleacher, Lora; Boehm, Eckart; Botta, Oliver; Böttcher, Stephan; Boucher, Thomas; Bower, Hannah; Boyd, Nick; Boynton, Bill; Breves, Elly; Bridges, John; Bridges, Nathan; Brinckerhoff, William; Brinza, David; Bristow, Thomas; Brunet, Claude; Brunner, Anna; Brunner, Will; Buch, Arnaud; Bullock, Mark; Burmeister, Sönke; Cabane, Michel; Calef, Fred; Cameron, James; Campbell, John; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Caride Rodríguez, Javier; Carmosino, Marco; Carrasco Blázquez, Isaías; Charpentier, Antoine; Chipera, Steve; Choi, David; Clark, Benton; Clegg, Sam; Cleghorn, Timothy; Cloutis, Ed; Cody, George; Coll, Patrice; Conrad, Pamela; Coscia, David; Cousin, Agnès; Cremers, David; Crisp, Joy; Cros, Alain; Cucinotta, Frank; d'Uston, Claude; Davis, Scott; Day, Mackenzie; de la Torre Juarez, Manuel; DeFlores, Lauren; DeLapp, Dorothea; DeMarines, Julia; DesMarais, David; Dietrich, William; Dingler, Robert; Donny, Christophe; Downs, Bob; Drake, Darrell; Dromart, Gilles; Dupont, Audrey; Duston, Brian; Dworkin, Jason; Dyar, M Darby; Edgar, Lauren; Edgett, Kenneth; Edwards, Christopher; Edwards, Laurence; Ehlmann, Bethany; Ehresmann, Bent; Eigenbrode, Jen; Elliott, Beverley; Elliott, Harvey; Ewing, Ryan; Fabre, Cécile; Fairén, Alberto; Farley, Ken; Farmer, Jack; Fassett, Caleb; Favot, Laurent; Fay, Donald; Fedosov, Fedor; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Fisk, Marty; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Floyd, Melissa; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Forni, Olivier; Fraeman, Abby; Francis, Raymond; François, Pascaline; Freissinet, Caroline; French, Katherine Louise; Frydenvang, Jens; Gaboriaud, Alain; Gailhanou, Marc; Garvin, James; Gasnault, Olivier; Geffroy, Claude; Gellert, Ralf; Genzer, Maria; Glavin, Daniel; Godber, Austin; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter; Golovin, Dmitry; Gómez Gómez, Felipe; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Gondet, Brigitte; Gordon, Suzanne; Gorevan, Stephen; Grant, John; Griffes, Jennifer; Grinspoon, David; Grotzinger, John; Guillemot, Philippe; Guo, Jingnan; Gupta, Sanjeev; Guzewich, Scott; Haberle, Robert; Halleaux, Douglas; Hallet, Bernard; Hamilton, Vicky; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Harpold, Daniel; Harri, Ari-Matti; Harshman, Karl; Hassler, Donald; Haukka, Harri; Hayes, Alex; Herkenhoff, Ken; Herrera, Paul; Hettrich, Sebastian; Heydari, Ezat; Hipkin, Victoria; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Hudgins, Judy; Huntress, Wesley; Hurowitz, Joel; Hviid, Stubbe; Iagnemma, Karl; Indyk, Steve; Israël, Guy; Jackson, Ryan; Jacob, Samantha; Jakosky, Bruce; Jensen, Elsa; Jensen, Jaqueline Kløvgaard; Johnson, Jeffrey; Johnson, Micah; Johnstone, Steve; Jones, Andrea; Joseph, Jonathan; Jun, Insoo; Kah, Linda; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kahre, Melinda; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kasprzak, Wayne; Kauhanen, Janne; Keely, Leslie; Kemppinen, Osku; Keymeulen, Didier; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kinch, Kjartan; King, Penny; Kirkland, Laurel; Kocurek, Gary; Koefoed, Asmus; Köhler, Jan; Kortmann, Onno; Kozyrev, Alexander; Krezoski, Jill; Krysak, Daniel; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Lacour, Jean Luc; Lafaille, Vivian; Langevin, Yves; Lanza, Nina; Lasue, Jeremie; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Lee, Ella Mae; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Lees, David; Lefavor, Matthew; Lemmon, Mark; Lepinette Malvitte, Alain; Léveillé, Richard; Lewin-Carpintier, Éric; Lewis, Kevin; Li, Shuai; Lipkaman, Leslie; Little, Cynthia; Litvak, Maxim; Lorigny, Eric; Lugmair, Guenter; Lundberg, Angela; Lyness, Eric; Madsen, Morten; Maki, Justin; Malakhov, Alexey; Malespin, Charles; Malin, Michael; Mangold, Nicolas; Manhes, Gérard; Manning, Heidi; Marchand, Geneviève; Marín Jiménez, Mercedes; Martín García, César; Martin, Dave; Martin, Mildred; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Martín-Soler, Javier; Martín-Torres, F Javier; Mauchien, Patrick; Maurice, Sylvestre; McAdam, Amy; McCartney, Elaina; McConnochie, Timothy; McCullough, Emily; McEwan, Ian; McKay, Christopher; McLennan, Scott; McNair, Sean; Melikechi, Noureddine; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Meyer, Michael; Mezzacappa, Alissa; Miller, Hayden; Miller, Kristen; Milliken, Ralph; Ming, Douglas; Minitti, Michelle; Mischna, Michael; Mitrofanov, Igor; Moersch, Jeff; Mokrousov, Maxim; Molina Jurado, Antonio; Moores, John; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Morookian, John Michael; Morris, Richard; Morrison, Shaunna; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Muller, Jan-Peter; Muñoz Caro, Guillermo; Nachon, Marion; Navarro López, Sara; Navarro-González, Rafael; Nealson, Kenneth; Nefian, Ara; Nelson, Tony; Newcombe, Megan; Newman, Claire; Newsom, Horton; Nikiforov, Sergey; Nixon, Brian; Noe Dobrea, Eldar; Nolan, Thomas; Oehler, Dorothy; Ollila, Ann; Olson, Timothy; de Pablo Hernández, Miguel Ángel; Paillet, Alexis; Pallier, Etienne; Palucis, Marisa; Parker, Timothy; Parot, Yann; Patel, Kiran; Paton, Mark; Paulsen, Gale; Pavlov, Alex; Pavri, Betina; Peinado-González, Verónica; Peret, Laurent; Perez, Rene; Perrett, Glynis; Peterson, Joe; Pilorget, Cedric; Pinet, Patrick; Pla-García, Jorge; Plante, Ianik; Poitrasson, Franck; Polkko, Jouni; Popa, Radu; Posiolova, Liliya; Posner, Arik; Pradler, Irina; Prats, Benito; Prokhorov, Vasily; Purdy, Sharon Wilson; Raaen, Eric; Radziemski, Leon; Rafkin, Scot; Ramos, Miguel; Rampe, Elizabeth; Raulin, François; Ravine, Michael; Reitz, Günther; Rennó, Nilton; Rice, Melissa; Richardson, Mark; Robert, François; Robertson, Kevin; Rodriguez Manfredi, José Antonio; Romeral-Planelló, Julio J; Rowland, Scott; Rubin, David; Saccoccio, Muriel; Salamon, Andrew; Sandoval, Jennifer; Sanin, Anton; Sans Fuentes, Sara Alejandra; Saper, Lee; Sarrazin, Philippe; Sautter, Violaine; Savijärvi, Hannu; Schieber, Juergen; Schmidt, Mariek; Schmidt, Walter; Scholes, Daniel; Schoppers, Marcel; Schröder, Susanne; Schwenzer, Susanne; Sebastian Martinez, Eduardo; Sengstacken, Aaron; Shterts, Ruslan; Siebach, Kirsten; Siili, Tero; Simmonds, Jeff; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Slavney, Susie; Sletten, Ronald; Smith, Michael; Sobrón Sánchez, Pablo; Spanovich, Nicole; Spray, John; Squyres, Steven; Stack, Katie; Stalport, Fabien; Stein, Thomas; Stewart, Noel; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Stoiber, Kevin; Stolper, Ed; Sucharski, Bob; Sullivan, Rob; Summons, Roger; Sumner, Dawn; Sun, Vivian; Supulver, Kimberley; Sutter, Brad; Szopa, Cyril; Tan, Florence; Tate, Christopher; Teinturier, Samuel; ten Kate, Inge; Thomas, Peter; Thompson, Lucy; Tokar, Robert; Toplis, Mike; Torres Redondo, Josefina; Trainer, Melissa; Treiman, Allan; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; VanBommel, Scott; Vaniman, David; Varenikov, Alexey; Vasavada, Ashwin; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Vicenzi, Edward; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Voytek, Mary; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Ward, Jennifer; Weigle, Eddie; Wellington, Danika; Westall, Frances; Wiens, Roger Craig; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Williams, Amy; Williams, Joshua; Williams, Rebecca; Williams, Richard B; Wilson, Mike; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Wolff, Mike; Wong, Mike; Wray, James; Wu, Megan; Yana, Charles; Yen, Albert; Yingst, Aileen; Zeitlin, Cary; Zimdar, Robert; Zorzano Mier, María-Paz

    2013-07-19

    Stable isotope ratios of H, C, and O are powerful indicators of a wide variety of planetary geophysical processes, and for Mars they reveal the record of loss of its atmosphere and subsequent interactions with its surface such as carbonate formation. We report in situ measurements of the isotopic ratios of D/H and (18)O/(16)O in water and (13)C/(12)C, (18)O/(16)O, (17)O/(16)O, and (13)C(18)O/(12)C(16)O in carbon dioxide, made in the martian atmosphere at Gale Crater from the Curiosity rover using the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM)'s tunable laser spectrometer (TLS). Comparison between our measurements in the modern atmosphere and those of martian meteorites such as ALH 84001 implies that the martian reservoirs of CO2 and H2O were largely established ~4 billion years ago, but that atmospheric loss or surface interaction may be still ongoing. PMID:23869013

  9. Isotope ratios of H, C, and O in CO2 and H2O of the martian atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Webster, Chris R; Mahaffy, Paul R; Flesch, Gregory J; Niles, Paul B; Jones, John H; Leshin, Laurie A; Atreya, Sushil K; Stern, Jennifer C; Christensen, Lance E; Owen, Tobias; Franz, Heather; Pepin, Robert O; Steele, Andrew; Achilles, Cherie; Agard, Christophe; Alves Verdasca, José Alexandre; Anderson, Robert; Anderson, Ryan; Archer, Doug; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Arvidson, Ray; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Aubrey, Andrew; Baker, Burt; Baker, Michael; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Baratoux, David; Baroukh, Julien; Barraclough, Bruce; Bean, Keri; Beegle, Luther; Behar, Alberto; Bell, James; Bender, Steve; Benna, Mehdi; Bentz, Jennifer; Berger, Gilles; Berger, Jeff; Berman, Daniel; Bish, David; Blake, David F; Blanco Avalos, Juan J; Blaney, Diana; Blank, Jen; Blau, Hannah; Bleacher, Lora; Boehm, Eckart; Botta, Oliver; Böttcher, Stephan; Boucher, Thomas; Bower, Hannah; Boyd, Nick; Boynton, Bill; Breves, Elly; Bridges, John; Bridges, Nathan; Brinckerhoff, William; Brinza, David; Bristow, Thomas; Brunet, Claude; Brunner, Anna; Brunner, Will; Buch, Arnaud; Bullock, Mark; Burmeister, Sönke; Cabane, Michel; Calef, Fred; Cameron, James; Campbell, John; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Caride Rodríguez, Javier; Carmosino, Marco; Carrasco Blázquez, Isaías; Charpentier, Antoine; Chipera, Steve; Choi, David; Clark, Benton; Clegg, Sam; Cleghorn, Timothy; Cloutis, Ed; Cody, George; Coll, Patrice; Conrad, Pamela; Coscia, David; Cousin, Agnès; Cremers, David; Crisp, Joy; Cros, Alain; Cucinotta, Frank; d'Uston, Claude; Davis, Scott; Day, Mackenzie; de la Torre Juarez, Manuel; DeFlores, Lauren; DeLapp, Dorothea; DeMarines, Julia; DesMarais, David; Dietrich, William; Dingler, Robert; Donny, Christophe; Downs, Bob; Drake, Darrell; Dromart, Gilles; Dupont, Audrey; Duston, Brian; Dworkin, Jason; Dyar, M Darby; Edgar, Lauren; Edgett, Kenneth; Edwards, Christopher; Edwards, Laurence; Ehlmann, Bethany; Ehresmann, Bent; Eigenbrode, Jen; Elliott, Beverley; Elliott, Harvey; Ewing, Ryan; Fabre, Cécile; Fairén, Alberto; Farley, Ken; Farmer, Jack; Fassett, Caleb; Favot, Laurent; Fay, Donald; Fedosov, Fedor; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Fisk, Marty; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Floyd, Melissa; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Forni, Olivier; Fraeman, Abby; Francis, Raymond; François, Pascaline; Freissinet, Caroline; French, Katherine Louise; Frydenvang, Jens; Gaboriaud, Alain; Gailhanou, Marc; Garvin, James; Gasnault, Olivier; Geffroy, Claude; Gellert, Ralf; Genzer, Maria; Glavin, Daniel; Godber, Austin; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter; Golovin, Dmitry; Gómez Gómez, Felipe; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Gondet, Brigitte; Gordon, Suzanne; Gorevan, Stephen; Grant, John; Griffes, Jennifer; Grinspoon, David; Grotzinger, John; Guillemot, Philippe; Guo, Jingnan; Gupta, Sanjeev; Guzewich, Scott; Haberle, Robert; Halleaux, Douglas; Hallet, Bernard; Hamilton, Vicky; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Harpold, Daniel; Harri, Ari-Matti; Harshman, Karl; Hassler, Donald; Haukka, Harri; Hayes, Alex; Herkenhoff, Ken; Herrera, Paul; Hettrich, Sebastian; Heydari, Ezat; Hipkin, Victoria; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Hudgins, Judy; Huntress, Wesley; Hurowitz, Joel; Hviid, Stubbe; Iagnemma, Karl; Indyk, Steve; Israël, Guy; Jackson, Ryan; Jacob, Samantha; Jakosky, Bruce; Jensen, Elsa; Jensen, Jaqueline Kløvgaard; Johnson, Jeffrey; Johnson, Micah; Johnstone, Steve; Jones, Andrea; Joseph, Jonathan; Jun, Insoo; Kah, Linda; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kahre, Melinda; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kasprzak, Wayne; Kauhanen, Janne; Keely, Leslie; Kemppinen, Osku; Keymeulen, Didier; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kinch, Kjartan; King, Penny; Kirkland, Laurel; Kocurek, Gary; Koefoed, Asmus; Köhler, Jan; Kortmann, Onno; Kozyrev, Alexander; Krezoski, Jill; Krysak, Daniel; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Lacour, Jean Luc; Lafaille, Vivian; Langevin, Yves; Lanza, Nina; Lasue, Jeremie; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Lee, Ella Mae; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Lees, David; Lefavor, Matthew; Lemmon, Mark; Lepinette Malvitte, Alain; Léveillé, Richard; Lewin-Carpintier, Éric; Lewis, Kevin; Li, Shuai; Lipkaman, Leslie; Little, Cynthia; Litvak, Maxim; Lorigny, Eric; Lugmair, Guenter; Lundberg, Angela; Lyness, Eric; Madsen, Morten; Maki, Justin; Malakhov, Alexey; Malespin, Charles; Malin, Michael; Mangold, Nicolas; Manhes, Gérard; Manning, Heidi; Marchand, Geneviève; Marín Jiménez, Mercedes; Martín García, César; Martin, Dave; Martin, Mildred; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Martín-Soler, Javier; Martín-Torres, F Javier; Mauchien, Patrick; Maurice, Sylvestre; McAdam, Amy; McCartney, Elaina; McConnochie, Timothy; McCullough, Emily; McEwan, Ian; McKay, Christopher; McLennan, Scott; McNair, Sean; Melikechi, Noureddine; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Meyer, Michael; Mezzacappa, Alissa; Miller, Hayden; Miller, Kristen; Milliken, Ralph; Ming, Douglas; Minitti, Michelle; Mischna, Michael; Mitrofanov, Igor; Moersch, Jeff; Mokrousov, Maxim; Molina Jurado, Antonio; Moores, John; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Morookian, John Michael; Morris, Richard; Morrison, Shaunna; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Muller, Jan-Peter; Muñoz Caro, Guillermo; Nachon, Marion; Navarro López, Sara; Navarro-González, Rafael; Nealson, Kenneth; Nefian, Ara; Nelson, Tony; Newcombe, Megan; Newman, Claire; Newsom, Horton; Nikiforov, Sergey; Nixon, Brian; Noe Dobrea, Eldar; Nolan, Thomas; Oehler, Dorothy; Ollila, Ann; Olson, Timothy; de Pablo Hernández, Miguel Ángel; Paillet, Alexis; Pallier, Etienne; Palucis, Marisa; Parker, Timothy; Parot, Yann; Patel, Kiran; Paton, Mark; Paulsen, Gale; Pavlov, Alex; Pavri, Betina; Peinado-González, Verónica; Peret, Laurent; Perez, Rene; Perrett, Glynis; Peterson, Joe; Pilorget, Cedric; Pinet, Patrick; Pla-García, Jorge; Plante, Ianik; Poitrasson, Franck; Polkko, Jouni; Popa, Radu; Posiolova, Liliya; Posner, Arik; Pradler, Irina; Prats, Benito; Prokhorov, Vasily; Purdy, Sharon Wilson; Raaen, Eric; Radziemski, Leon; Rafkin, Scot; Ramos, Miguel; Rampe, Elizabeth; Raulin, François; Ravine, Michael; Reitz, Günther; Rennó, Nilton; Rice, Melissa; Richardson, Mark; Robert, François; Robertson, Kevin; Rodriguez Manfredi, José Antonio; Romeral-Planelló, Julio J; Rowland, Scott; Rubin, David; Saccoccio, Muriel; Salamon, Andrew; Sandoval, Jennifer; Sanin, Anton; Sans Fuentes, Sara Alejandra; Saper, Lee; Sarrazin, Philippe; Sautter, Violaine; Savijärvi, Hannu; Schieber, Juergen; Schmidt, Mariek; Schmidt, Walter; Scholes, Daniel; Schoppers, Marcel; Schröder, Susanne; Schwenzer, Susanne; Sebastian Martinez, Eduardo; Sengstacken, Aaron; Shterts, Ruslan; Siebach, Kirsten; Siili, Tero; Simmonds, Jeff; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Slavney, Susie; Sletten, Ronald; Smith, Michael; Sobrón Sánchez, Pablo; Spanovich, Nicole; Spray, John; Squyres, Steven; Stack, Katie; Stalport, Fabien; Stein, Thomas; Stewart, Noel; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Stoiber, Kevin; Stolper, Ed; Sucharski, Bob; Sullivan, Rob; Summons, Roger; Sumner, Dawn; Sun, Vivian; Supulver, Kimberley; Sutter, Brad; Szopa, Cyril; Tan, Florence; Tate, Christopher; Teinturier, Samuel; ten Kate, Inge; Thomas, Peter; Thompson, Lucy; Tokar, Robert; Toplis, Mike; Torres Redondo, Josefina; Trainer, Melissa; Treiman, Allan; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; VanBommel, Scott; Vaniman, David; Varenikov, Alexey; Vasavada, Ashwin; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Vicenzi, Edward; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Voytek, Mary; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Ward, Jennifer; Weigle, Eddie; Wellington, Danika; Westall, Frances; Wiens, Roger Craig; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Williams, Amy; Williams, Joshua; Williams, Rebecca; Williams, Richard B; Wilson, Mike; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Wolff, Mike; Wong, Mike; Wray, James; Wu, Megan; Yana, Charles; Yen, Albert; Yingst, Aileen; Zeitlin, Cary; Zimdar, Robert; Zorzano Mier, María-Paz

    2013-07-19

    Stable isotope ratios of H, C, and O are powerful indicators of a wide variety of planetary geophysical processes, and for Mars they reveal the record of loss of its atmosphere and subsequent interactions with its surface such as carbonate formation. We report in situ measurements of the isotopic ratios of D/H and (18)O/(16)O in water and (13)C/(12)C, (18)O/(16)O, (17)O/(16)O, and (13)C(18)O/(12)C(16)O in carbon dioxide, made in the martian atmosphere at Gale Crater from the Curiosity rover using the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM)'s tunable laser spectrometer (TLS). Comparison between our measurements in the modern atmosphere and those of martian meteorites such as ALH 84001 implies that the martian reservoirs of CO2 and H2O were largely established ~4 billion years ago, but that atmospheric loss or surface interaction may be still ongoing.

  10. Globules and pillars in Cygnus X. I. Herschel far-infrared imaging of the Cygnus OB2 environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Blazere, A.; André, Ph.; Anderson, L. D.; Arzoumanian, D.; Comerón, F.; Didelon, P.; Di Francesco, J.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Guarcello, M. G.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Könyves, V.; Marston, A.; Minier, V.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Röllig, M.; Roy, A.; Spinoglio, L.; Tremblin, P.; White, G. J.; Wright, N. J.

    2016-06-01

    The radiative feedback of massive stars on molecular clouds creates pillars, globules and other features at the interface between the H II region and molecular cloud. Optical and near-infrared observations from the ground as well as with the Hubble or Spitzer satellites have revealed numerous examples of such cloud structures. We present here Herschel far-infrared observations between 70 μm and 500 μm of the immediate environment of the rich Cygnus OB2 association, performed within the Herschel imaging survey of OB Young Stellar objects (HOBYS) program. All of the observed irradiated structures were detected based on their appearance at 70 μm, and have been classified as pillars, globules, evaporating gasous globules (EGGs), proplyd-like objects, and condensations. From the 70 μm and 160 μm flux maps, we derive the local far-ultraviolet (FUV) field on the photon dominated surfaces. In parallel, we use a census of the O-stars to estimate the overall FUV-field, that is 103-104 G0 (Habing field) close to the central OB cluster (within 10 pc) and decreases down to a few tens G0, in a distance of 50 pc. From a spectral energy distribution (SED) fit to the four longest Herschel wavelengths, we determine column density and temperature maps and derive masses, volume densities and surface densities for these structures. We find that the morphological classification corresponds to distinct physical properties. Pillars and globules are massive (~500 M⊙) and large (equivalent radius r ~ 0.6 pc) structures, corresponding to what is defined as "clumps" for molecular clouds. EGGs and proplyd-likeobjects are smaller (r ~ 0.1 and 0.2 pc) and less massive (~10 and ~30 M⊙). Cloud condensations are small (~0.1 pc), have an average mass of 35 M⊙, are dense (~6 × 104 cm-3), and can thus be described as molecular cloud "cores". All pillars and globules are oriented toward the Cyg OB2 association center and have the longest estimated photoevaporation lifetimes, a few million

  11. Formation of meteorite hydrocarbons from thermal decomposition of siderite (FeCO 3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollom, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of siderite has been proposed as a source of magnetite in martian meteorites. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the possibility that this process might also result in abiotic synthesis of organic compounds. Siderite decomposition in the presence of water vapor at 300°C generated a variety of organic products dominated by alkylated and hydroxylated aromatic compounds. The results suggest that formation of magnetite by thermal decomposition of siderite on the precursor rock of the martian meteorite ALH84001 would have been accompanied by formation of organic compounds and may represent a source of extraterrestrial organic matter in the meteorite and on Mars. The results also suggest that thermal decomposition of siderite during metamorphism could account for some of the reduced carbon observed in metasedimentary rocks from the early Earth.

  12. Scanning Electron Microscopy Investigation of a Sample Depth Profile Through the Martian Meteorite Nakhla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toporski, Jan; Steele, Andrew; Westall, Frances; McKay, David S.

    2000-01-01

    The ongoing scientific debate as to whether or not the Martian meteorite ALH84001 contained evidence of possible biogenic activities showed the need to establish consistent methods to ascertain the origin of such evidence. To distinguish between terrestrial organic material/microbial contaminants and possible indigenous microbiota within meteorites is therefore crucial. With this in mind a depth profile consisting of four samples from a new sample allocation of Martian meteorite Nakhla was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. SEM imaging of freshly broken fractured chips revealed structures strongly recent terrestrial microorganisms, in some cases showing evidence of active growth. This conclusion was supported by EDX analysis, which showed the presence of carbon associated with these structures, we concluded that these structures represent recent terrestrial contaminants rather than structures indigenous to the meteorite. Page

  13. Peering Through a Martian Veil: ALHA84001 Sm-Nd Age Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, Laurence E.; Shih, Chi-Yu

    2013-01-01

    The ancient Martian orthopyroxenite ALH84001experienced a complex history of impact and aqueous alteration events. Here we summarize Sm-147-Nd-143 and Sm-146-Nd-142 analyses performed at JSC. Further, using REE data, we model the REE abundance pattern of the basaltic magma parental to ALH84001 cumulus orthopyroxene. We find the Sm-146-Nd-142 isotopic data to be consistent with isotopic evolution in material having the modeled Sm/Nd ratio from a time very close to the planet's formation to igneous crystallization of ALH84001 as inferred from the Sm-Nd studies.

  14. In vivo digestion of bovine milk fat globules: effect of processing and interfacial structural changes. II. Upper digestive tract digestion.

    PubMed

    Gallier, Sophie; Zhu, Xiang Q; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Ye, Aiqian; Moughan, Paul J; Singh, Harjinder

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this research was to study the effect of milk processing on the in vivo upper digestive tract digestion of milk fat globules. Fasted rats were serially gavaged over a 5h period with cream from raw, pasteurised, or pasteurised and homogenised milk. Only a few intact dietary proteins and peptides were present in the small intestinal digesta. Significantly (P<0.05) more longer chain (C≥10) fatty acids were present in the digesta of rats gavaged with raw (448 mg g(-1) digesta dry matter (DDM)) and homogenised creams (528 mg g(-1) DDM), as compared to pasteurised and homogenised cream (249 mg g(-1) DDM). Microscopy techniques were used to investigate the structural changes during digestion. Liquid-crystalline lamellar phases surrounding the fat globules, fatty acid soap crystals and lipid-mucin interactions were evident in all small intestinal digesta. Overall, the pasteurised and homogenised cream appeared to be digested to a greater extent. PMID:23871080

  15. The unfolding enthalpy of the pH 4 molten globule of apomyoglobin measured by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Jamin, M.; Antalik, M.; Loh, S. N.; Bolen, D. W.; Baldwin, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    The unfolding enthalpy of the pH 4 molten globule from sperm whale apomyoglobin has been measured by isothermal titration calorimetry, using titration to acid pH. The unfolding enthalpy is close to zero at 20 degrees C, in contrast both to the positive values expected for peptide helices and the negative values reported for holomyoglobin and native apomyoglobin. At 20 degrees C, the hydrophobic interaction should make only a small contribution to the unfolding enthalpy according to the liquid hydrocarbon model. Our result indicates that some factor present in the unfolding enthalpies of native proteins makes the unfolding enthalpy of the pH 4 molten globule less positive than expected from data for peptide helices. PMID:10933499

  16. Redox proteomics of fat globules unveils broad protein lactosylation and compositional changes in milk samples subjected to various technological procedures.

    PubMed

    Arena, Simona; Renzone, Giovanni; Novi, Gianfranco; Scaloni, Andrea

    2011-10-19

    The Maillard reaction between lactose and proteins occurs during thermal treatment of milk and lactosylated β-lactoglobulin, α-lactalbumin and caseins have widely been used to monitor the quality of dairy products. We recently demonstrated that a number of other whey milk proteins essential for nutrient delivery, defense against bacteria/virus and cellular proliferation become lactosylated during milk processing. The extent of their modification is associated with the harshness of product manufacturing. Since fat globule proteins are also highly important for the health-beneficial properties of milk, an evaluation of their lactosylation is crucial for a complete understanding of aliment nutritional characteristics. This is more important when milk is the unique dietary source, as in the infant diet. To this purpose, a sequential proteomic procedure involving an optimized milk fat globule (MFG) preparation/electrophoretic resolution, shot-gun analysis of gel portions for protein identification, selective trapping of lactosylated peptides by phenylboronate chromatography and their analysis by nanoLC-ESI-electron transfer dissociation (ETD) tandem MS was used for systematic characterization of fat globule proteins in milk samples subjected to various manufacturing procedures. Significant MFG protein compositional changes were observed between samples, highlighting the progressive adsorption of caseins and whey proteins on the fat globule surface as result of the technological process used. A significant lactosylation of MFG proteins was observed in ultra-high temperature sterilized and powdered for infant nutrition milk preparations, which well paralleled with the harshness of thermal treatment. Globally, this study allowed the identification of novel 157 non-redundant modification sites and 35 MFG proteins never reported so far as being lactosylated, in addition to the 153 ones ascertained here as present on other 21 MFG-adsorbed proteins whose nature was already

  17. Detection of Bacterial Magnetofossils with Ferromagnetic Resonance and Rock Magnetic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, J. L.; Kim, S.; Weiss, B.

    2001-12-01

    Intracellular biomineralization of magnetite is a biochemical process used by members of the Bacteria, Protist, and Animal kingdoms, and the fossil remains of this process on Earth (termed magnetofossils) have been documented in sediments as old as the ~2 Byr Gunflint Chert. Magnetofossils 4 Byr old have also been reported from carbonates in the Martian meteorite ALH84001; if this interpretation is correct, they represent the oldest evidence for life yet found. Past techniques for identification of bacterial magnetofossils have relied on the use of particle extraction and high-resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM). Because these techniques are time-consuming and fairly complex, they are not appropriate for screening large volumes of sediments on Earth and could not be used remotely on a Martian lander. For this reason, we have been testing a variety of ferromagnetic resonance and low-temperature rock magnetic techniques to determine if they are capable of identifying correctly rock samples known to contain abundant magnetofossils. An instrument capable of making such a determination, if deployed on the Martian surface, could be extraordinarily valuable for selecting samples for return to Earth. Several features of the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra have signatures only displayed by pure samples of magnetite from the magnetotactic bacteria, and from samples known to contain abundant magnetofossils. These unique features apparently arise from the elongated shape and narrow size distribution of the single-domain magnetite produced by these bacteria. Preliminary results from ALH84001 carbonates also have these features. We are also currently obtaining FMR spectra and low-temperature rock magnetic data on samples of Archean and Early Proterozoic sediments from Australia to search for older evidence of intracellular magnetite biomineralization on Earth.

  18. Evidence for close side-chain packing in an early protein folding intermediate previously assumed to be a molten globule

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Laura E.; Connell, Katelyn B.; Marqusee, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The molten globule, a conformational ensemble with significant secondary structure but only loosely packed tertiary structure, has been suggested to be a ubiquitous intermediate in protein folding. However, it is difficult to assess the tertiary packing of transiently populated species to evaluate this hypothesis. Escherichia coli RNase H is known to populate an intermediate before the rate-limiting barrier to folding that has long been thought to be a molten globule. We investigated this hypothesis by making mimics of the intermediate that are the ground-state conformation at equilibrium, using two approaches: a truncation to generate a fragment mimic of the intermediate, and selective destabilization of the native state using point mutations. Spectroscopic characterization and the response of the mimics to further mutation are consistent with studies on the transient kinetic intermediate, indicating that they model the early intermediate. Both mimics fold cooperatively and exhibit NMR spectra indicative of a closely packed conformation, in contrast to the hypothesis of molten tertiary packing. This result is important for understanding the nature of the subsequent rate-limiting barrier to folding and has implications for the assumption that many other proteins populate molten globule folding intermediates. PMID:25258414

  19. Effects of arginine on rabbit muscle creatine kinase and salt-induced molten globule-like state.

    PubMed

    Ou, Wen-bin; Wang, Ri-Sheng; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Hai-Meng

    2003-11-01

    The arginine (Arg)-induced unfolding and the salt-induced folding of creatine kinase (CK) have been studied by measuring enzyme activity, fluorescence emission spectra, native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The results showed that Arg caused inactivation and unfolding of CK, but there was no aggregation during CK denaturation. The kinetics of CK unfolding followed a one-phase process. At higher concentrations of Arg (>160 mM), the CK dimers were fully dissociated, the alkali characteristic of Arg mainly led to the dissociation of dimers, but not denaturation effect of Arg's guanidine groups on CK. The inactivation of CK occurred before noticeable conformational changes of the whole molecules. KCl induced monomeric and dimeric molten globule-like states of CK denatured by Arg. These results suggest that as a protein denaturant, the effect of Arg on CK differed from that of guanidine and alkali, its denaturation for protein contains the double effects, which acts not only as guanidine hydrochloride but also as alkali. The active sites of CK have more flexibility than the whole enzyme conformation. Monomeric and dimeric molten globule-like states of CK were formed by the salt inducing in 160 and 500 mM Arg H(2)O solutions, respectively. The molten globule-like states indicate that monomeric and dimeric intermediates exist during CK folding. Furthermore, these results also proved the orderly folding model of CK.

  20. Les transfusions de globules rouges chez le nouveau-né : Des directives révisées

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    En général, depuis dix ans, les professionnels de la santé qui soignent des nouveau-nés à haut risque dans des unités de soins intensifs néonatals sont plus restrictifs dans leur utilisation de transfusions de globules rouges. Le présent énoncé est conçu pour ceux qui soignent des nouveau-nés à haut risque (des prématurés aux nouveau-nés d’un mois). Il vise à fournir des directives pour réduire l’incidence d’anémie chez les nourrissons prématurés et à terme, à repérer des stratégies pour réduire le besoin de transfusions de globules rouges et à limiter l’exposition à des donneurs au sein de cette population. Des recommandations portant sur les transfusions de globules rouges sont incluses.

  1. Evidence for close side-chain packing in an early protein folding intermediate previously assumed to be a molten globule.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Laura E; Connell, Katelyn B; Marqusee, Susan

    2014-10-14

    The molten globule, a conformational ensemble with significant secondary structure but only loosely packed tertiary structure, has been suggested to be a ubiquitous intermediate in protein folding. However, it is difficult to assess the tertiary packing of transiently populated species to evaluate this hypothesis. Escherichia coli RNase H is known to populate an intermediate before the rate-limiting barrier to folding that has long been thought to be a molten globule. We investigated this hypothesis by making mimics of the intermediate that are the ground-state conformation at equilibrium, using two approaches: a truncation to generate a fragment mimic of the intermediate, and selective destabilization of the native state using point mutations. Spectroscopic characterization and the response of the mimics to further mutation are consistent with studies on the transient kinetic intermediate, indicating that they model the early intermediate. Both mimics fold cooperatively and exhibit NMR spectra indicative of a closely packed conformation, in contrast to the hypothesis of molten tertiary packing. This result is important for understanding the nature of the subsequent rate-limiting barrier to folding and has implications for the assumption that many other proteins populate molten globule folding intermediates. PMID:25258414

  2. Identification of Escherichia coli F4ac-binding proteins in porcine milk fat globule membrane

    PubMed Central

    Novakovic, Predrag; Huang, Yanyun Y.; Lockerbie, Betty; Shahriar, Farshid; Kelly, John; Gordon, John R.; Middleton, Dorothy M.; Loewen, Matthew E.; Kidney, Beverly A.; Simko, Elemir

    2015-01-01

    F4ac-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) must attach to the intestinal mucosa to cause diarrhea in piglets. Prevention of bacterial attachment to the intestinal mucosa is the most effective defense against ETEC-induced diarrhea. Porcine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) were shown to be able to inhibit attachment of ETEC to the intestinal brush border; however, the specific components of porcine MFGM that inhibited attachment of ETEC to enterocytes were not identified. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to identify F4ac-binding MFGM proteins by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography. The proteome of porcine MFGM was characterized and the following F4ac-binding proteins were detected by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography: lactadherin, butyrophilin, adipophilin, acyl-CoA synthetase 3, and fatty acid-binding protein 3. The biological function of these proteins was not investigated but it is possible that their interaction with F4ac fimbria interferes with bacterial attachment and colonization. PMID:25852227

  3. Identification of Escherichia coli F4ac-binding proteins in porcine milk fat globule membrane.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, Predrag; Huang, Yanyun Y; Lockerbie, Betty; Shahriar, Farshid; Kelly, John; Gordon, John R; Middleton, Dorothy M; Loewen, Matthew E; Kidney, Beverly A; Simko, Elemir

    2015-04-01

    F4ac-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) must attach to the intestinal mucosa to cause diarrhea in piglets. Prevention of bacterial attachment to the intestinal mucosa is the most effective defense against ETEC-induced diarrhea. Porcine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) were shown to be able to inhibit attachment of ETEC to the intestinal brush border; however, the specific components of porcine MFGM that inhibited attachment of ETEC to enterocytes were not identified. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to identify F4ac-binding MFGM proteins by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography. The proteome of porcine MFGM was characterized and the following F4ac-binding proteins were detected by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography: lactadherin, butyrophilin, adipophilin, acyl-CoA synthetase 3, and fatty acid-binding protein 3. The biological function of these proteins was not investigated but it is possible that their interaction with F4ac fimbria interferes with bacterial attachment and colonization.

  4. Characterization of the stable, acid-induced, molten globule-like state of staphylococcal nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Fink, A. L.; Calciano, L. J.; Goto, Y.; Nishimura, M.; Swedberg, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    Titration of a salt-free solution of native staphylococcal nuclease by HCl leads to an unfolding transition in the vicinity of pH 4, as determined by near- and far-UV circular dichroism. At pH 2-3, the protein is substantially unfolded. The addition of further HCl results in a second transition, this one to a more structured species (the A state) with the properties of an expanded molten globule, namely substantial secondary structure, little or no tertiary structure, relatively compact size as determined by hydrodynamic radius, and the ability to bind the hydrophobic dye 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonic acid. The addition of anions, in the form of neutral salts, to the acid-unfolded state at pH 2 also causes a transition leading to the A state. Fourier transform infrared analysis of the amide I band was used to compare the amount and type of secondary structure in the native and A states. A significant decrease in alpha-helix structure, with a corresponding increase in beta or extended structure, was observed in the A state, compared to the native state. A model to account for such compact denatured states is proposed. PMID:8358298

  5. A model of the molten globule state from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed Central

    Daggett, V; Levitt, M

    1992-01-01

    It is generally accepted that a protein's primary sequence determines its three-dimensional structure. It has proved difficult, however, to obtain detailed structural information about the actual protein folding process and intermediate states. We present the results of molecular dynamics simulations of the unfolding of reduced bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. The resulting partially "denatured" state was compact but expanded relative to the native state (11-25%); the expansion was not caused by an influx of water molecules. The structures were mobile, with overall secondary structure contents comparable to those of the native protein. The protein experienced relatively local unfolding, with the largest changes in the structure occurring in the loop regions. A hydrophobic core was maintained although packing of the side chains was compromised. The properties displayed in the simulation are consistent with unfolding to a molten globule state. Our simulations provide an in-depth view of this state and details of water-protein interactions that cannot yet be obtained experimentally. Images PMID:1594623

  6. Metabolism of milk fat globule membrane components by nonstarter lactic acid bacteria isolated from cheese.

    PubMed

    Moe, K M; Porcellato, D; Skeie, S

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how components present in the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) may be used for growth and survival by cheese-ripening lactobacilli. This was achieved by analyzing metabolites produced during incubation on appropriate media. The lactobacilli investigated were able to utilize components from the MFGM throughout a 24-d incubation period. We observed an apparent connection between the higher proteolytic activity of Lactobacillus paracasei INF448 and its ability to grow in the MFGM media after depletion of readily available sugars. All the studied strains produced large amounts of acetate when grown on an acylated aminosugar, presumably from deacetylation of the monosaccharides. Growth of Lb. plantarum INF15D on D-galactose resulted in a metabolic shift, expressed as different fates of the produced pyruvate, compared with growth on the other monosaccharides. For Lb. plantarum INF15D, the presence of D-galactose also seemed to initiate degradation of some amino acids known to take part in energy production, specifically Arg and Tyr.

  7. Identification of Escherichia coli F4ac-binding proteins in porcine milk fat globule membrane.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, Predrag; Huang, Yanyun Y; Lockerbie, Betty; Shahriar, Farshid; Kelly, John; Gordon, John R; Middleton, Dorothy M; Loewen, Matthew E; Kidney, Beverly A; Simko, Elemir

    2015-04-01

    F4ac-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) must attach to the intestinal mucosa to cause diarrhea in piglets. Prevention of bacterial attachment to the intestinal mucosa is the most effective defense against ETEC-induced diarrhea. Porcine milk fat globule membranes (MFGM) were shown to be able to inhibit attachment of ETEC to the intestinal brush border; however, the specific components of porcine MFGM that inhibited attachment of ETEC to enterocytes were not identified. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to identify F4ac-binding MFGM proteins by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography. The proteome of porcine MFGM was characterized and the following F4ac-binding proteins were detected by overlay Western blot and affinity chromatography: lactadherin, butyrophilin, adipophilin, acyl-CoA synthetase 3, and fatty acid-binding protein 3. The biological function of these proteins was not investigated but it is possible that their interaction with F4ac fimbria interferes with bacterial attachment and colonization. PMID:25852227

  8. Guanidine hydrochloride-induced alkali molten globule model of horse ferrocytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rishu; Kaur, Sandeep; Kumar, Rajesh

    2013-02-01

    This article compares structural, kinetic and thermodynamic properties of previously unknown guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl)-induced alkali molten globule (MG) state of horse 'ferrocytochrome c' (ferrocyt c) with the known NaCl-induced alkali-MG state of ferrocyt c. It is well known that Cl(-) arising from GdnHCl refolds and stabilizes the acid-denatured protein to MG state. We demonstrate that the GdnH(+) arising from GdnHCl (≤0.2 M) also transforms the base-denatured CO-liganded ferrocyt c (carbonmonoxycyt c) to MG state by making the electrostatic interactions to the negative charges of the protein. Structural and molecular properties extracted from the basic spectroscopic (circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence, FTIR and NMR) experiments suggest that the GdnH(+)- and Na(+)-induced MG states of base-denatured carbonmonoxycyt c are molecular compact states containing native-like secondary structures and disordered tertiary structures. Kinetic experiments involving the measurement of the CO association to the alkaline ferrocyt c in the presence of different GdnHCl and NaCl concentrations indicate that the Na(+)-induced MG state is more constrained relative to that of GdnH(+)-induced MG state. Analyses of thermal (near UV-CD) denaturation curves of the base-denatured protein in the presence of different GdnHCl and NaCl concentration also indicate that the Na(+)-induced MG state is thermally more stable than the GdnH(+)-induced MG state.

  9. The alkali molten globule state of ferrocytochrome c: extraordinary stability, persistent structure, and constrained overall dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rao, D Krishna; Kumar, Rajesh; Yadaiah, M; Bhuyan, Abani K

    2006-03-14

    This paper describes the structural and dynamic properties of a hitherto uncovered alkali molten globule (MG) state of horse "ferrocytochrome c" (ferrocyt c). Several experimental difficulties mainly because of heme autoxidation and extraordinary stability of ferrocyt c have been overcome by working with the carbonmonoxide-bound molecule under extremely basic condition (pH 13) in a strictly anaerobic atmosphere. Structural and molecular properties extracted from basic spectroscopic experiments suggest that cations drive the base-denatured CO-liganded protein to the MG state. The stability of this state is approximately 5.2 kcal mol(-)(1), and the guanidinium-induced unfolding transition is sharp (m(g) approximately 2.3 kcal mol(-)(1) M(-)(1)), suggesting contents of rigid tertiary structure. Strategic experiments involving the measurement of the CO association rate to the base-denatured protein and intrachain diffusion rates measured by laser photolysis of CO indicate a substantially restricted overall motion and stiffness of the polypeptide chain in the MG state. Possible placement of the state in the folding coordinate of ferrocyt c is discussed.

  10. ARE LARGE, COMETARY-SHAPED PROPLYDS REALLY (FREE-FLOATING) EVAPORATING GAS GLOBULES?

    SciTech Connect

    Sahai, R.; Guesten, R.; Morris, M. R.

    2012-12-20

    We report the detection of strong and compact molecular line emission (in the CO J = 3-2, 4-3, 6-5, 7-6, {sup 13}CO J = 3-2, HCN, and HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 transitions) from a cometary-shaped object (Carina-frEGG1) in the Carina star-forming region (SFR) previously classified as a photoevaporating protoplanetary disk (proplyd). We derive a molecular mass of 0.35 M{sub Sun} for Carina-frEGG1, which shows that it is not a proplyd, but belongs to a class of free-floating evaporating gas globules (frEGGs) recently found in the Cygnus SFR by Sahai et al. Archival adaptive optics near-IR (Ks) images show a central hourglass-shaped nebula. The derived source luminosity (about 8-18 L{sub Sun }), the hourglass morphology, and the presence of collimated jets seen in Hubble Space Telescope images imply the presence of a jet-driving, young, low-mass star deeply embedded in the dust inside Carina-frEGG1. Our results suggest that the true nature of many or most such cometary-shaped objects seen in massive SFRs and previously labeled as proplyds has been misunderstood, and that these are really frEGGs.

  11. Rise of the Helix from a Collapsed Globule during the Folding of Monellin.

    PubMed

    Goluguri, Rama Reddy; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2015-09-01

    Early kinetic intermediates observed during the folding of many proteins are invariably compact and appear to possess some secondary structure. Consequently, it has been difficult to understand whether compaction drives secondary structure formation or secondary structure formation facilitates compaction during folding. In this study of the folding of single-chain monellin, it is shown that a kinetic molten globule (MG) is populated at 2 ms of folding. Far-UV circular dichroism (CD) measurements show that the kinetic MG is devoid of any helical structure even under the most stabilizing folding conditions. Multisite fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements show that the kinetic MG is compact with different segments having contracted to different extents. It is shown that the sequence segment that goes on to form the sole helix in the native protein is fully collapsed in the kinetic MG. This segment expands to accommodate the helix as the kinetic MG folds further to the native state, while other segments of the protein contract. Helix formation starting from the kinetic MG is shown to occur in multiple kinetic steps, whether measured by far-UV CD or by FRET. PMID:26258844

  12. Gradual Folding of an Off-Pathway Molten Globule Detected at the Single-Molecule Level.

    PubMed

    Lindhoud, Simon; Pirchi, Menahem; Westphal, Adrie H; Haran, Gilad; van Mierlo, Carlo P M

    2015-09-25

    Molten globules (MGs) are compact, partially folded intermediates that are transiently present during folding of many proteins. These intermediates reside on or off the folding pathway to native protein. Conformational evolution during folding of off-pathway MGs is largely unexplored. Here, we characterize the denaturant-dependent structure of apoflavodoxin's off-pathway MG. Using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET), we follow conversion of unfolded species into MG down to denaturant concentrations that favor formation of native protein. Under strongly denaturing conditions, fluorescence resonance energy transfer histograms show a single peak, arising from unfolded protein. The smFRET efficiency distribution shifts to higher value upon decreasing denaturant concentration because the MG folds. Strikingly, upon approaching native conditions, the fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency of the MG rises above that of native protein. Thus, smFRET exposes the misfolded nature of apoflavodoxin's off-pathway MG. We show that conversion of unfolded into MG protein is a gradual, second-order-like process that simultaneously involves separate regions within the polypeptide. PMID:26163276

  13. Comparative proteomics of milk fat globule membrane proteins from transgenic cloned cattle.

    PubMed

    Sui, Shunchao; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Jianwu; Zhang, Ran; Guo, Chengdong; Yu, Tian; Li, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The use of transgenic livestock is providing new methods for obtaining pharmaceutically useful proteins. However, the protein expression profiles of the transgenic animals, including expression of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) proteins, have not been well characterized. In this study, we compared the MFGM protein expression profile of the colostrum and mature milk from three lines of transgenic cloned (TC) cattle, i.e., expressing recombinant human α-lactalbumin (TC-LA), lactoferrin (TC-LF) or lysozyme (TC-LZ) in the mammary gland, with those from cloned non-transgenic (C) and conventionally bred normal animals (N). We identified 1, 225 proteins in milk MFGM, 166 of which were specifically expressed only in the TC-LA group, 265 only in the TC-LF group, and 184 only in the TC-LZ group. There were 43 proteins expressed only in the transgenic cloned animals, but the concentrations of these proteins were below the detection limit of silver staining. Functional analysis also showed that the 43 proteins had no obvious influence on the bovine mammary gland. Quantitative comparison revealed that MFGM proteins were up- or down-regulated more than twofold in the TC and C groups compared to N group: 126 in colostrum and 77 in mature milk of the TC-LA group; 157 in colostrum and 222 in mature milk of the TC-LF group; 49 in colostrum and 98 in mature milk of the TC-LZ group; 98 in colostrum and 132 in mature milk in the C group. These up- and down-regulated proteins in the transgenic animals were not associated with a particular biological function or pathway, which appears that expression of certain exogenous proteins has no general deleterious effects on the cattle mammary gland.

  14. SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY AND SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF BOK GLOBULE CB 17: A CANDIDATE FIRST HYDROSTATIC CORE?

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xuepeng; Arce, Hector G.; Dunham, Michael M.; Zhang Qizhou; Bourke, Tyler L.; Launhardt, Ralf; Schmalzl, Markus; Henning, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    We present high angular resolution Submillimeter Array (SMA) and Spitzer observations toward the Bok globule CB 17. SMA 1.3 mm dust continuum images reveal within CB 17 two sources with an angular separation of {approx}21'' ({approx}5250 AU at a distance of {approx}250 pc). The northwestern continuum source, referred to as CB 17 IRS, dominates the infrared emission in the Spitzer images, drives a bipolar outflow extending in the northwest-southeast direction, and is classified as a low-luminosity Class 0/I transition object (L{sub bol} {approx} 0.5 L{sub Sun }). The southeastern continuum source, referred to as CB 17 MMS, has faint dust continuum emission in the SMA 1.3 mm observations ({approx}6{sigma} detection; {approx}3.8 mJy), but is not detected in the deep Spitzer infrared images at wavelengths from 3.6 to 70 {mu}m. Its bolometric luminosity and temperature, estimated from its spectral energy distribution, are {<=}0.04 L{sub Sun} and {<=}16 K, respectively. The SMA CO (2-1) observations suggest that CB 17 MMS may drive a low-velocity molecular outflow ({approx}2.5 km s{sup -1}), extending in the east-west direction. Comparisons with prestellar cores and Class 0 protostars suggest that CB 17 MMS is more evolved than prestellar cores but less evolved than Class 0 protostars. The observed characteristics of CB 17 MMS are consistent with the theoretical predictions from radiative/magnetohydrodynamical simulations of a first hydrostatic core, but there is also the possibility that CB 17 MMS is an extremely low luminosity protostar deeply embedded in an edge-on circumstellar disk. Further observations are needed to study the properties of CB 17 MMS and to address more precisely its evolutionary stage.

  15. Shocked and Scorched - Free-Floating Evaporating Gas Globules and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Morris, Mark R.; Claussen, Mark J.

    2014-07-01

    Massive stars have a strong feedback effect on their environment, via their winds, UV radiation, and ultimately, supernova blast waves, all of which can alter the likelihood for the formation of stars in nearby clouds and limit the accretion process of nearby protostars. Free-floating Evaporating Gaseous Globules, or frEGGs, are a newly recognized class of stellar nurseries embedded within the giant HII regions found in massive star-formation region (MSFRs). We recently discovered the prototype frEGG in the Cygnus MSFR with HST. Further investigation using the Spitzer and Herschel archives have revealed a much larger number (>50) in Cygnus and other MSFRs. Our molecular-line observations of these show the presence of dense clouds with total masses of cool molecular gas exceeding 0.5 to a few Msun associated with these objects, thereby disproving the initial hypothesis based on their morphology that these have an origin similar to the proplyds (cometary-shaped photoevaporating protoplanetary disks) found in Orion. We report the results of our molecular-line studies and detailed high-resolution optical (with HST) or near-IR (with AO at the Keck Observatory) imaging of a few frEGGs in Cygnus, Carina and the W5 MSFRs. The images show the presence of young stars with associated outflow cavities and/or jets in the heads of the tadpole-shaped frEGGs. These results support our hypothesis that frEGGs are density concentrations originating in giant molecular clouds, that, when subject to the compression by the strong winds and ionization from massive stars in these MSFRs, become active star-forming cores. In summary, by virtue of their distinct, isolated morphologies, frEGGs offer us a clean probe of triggered star formation on small scales in the vicinity of massive stars.

  16. Milk fat globule E-8 and interleukin 17 in systemic lupus erythematosus: partners in crime?

    PubMed Central

    Elgengehy, Fatema; Niazy, Marwa; Ghoneim, Shada

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-factorial, autoimmune disease with a wide array of manifestations. The pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-17 has been implicated in the inflammatory response and tissue damage in SLE; however, its correlation with disease activity is still questionable. Meanwhile, efficient clearance of apoptotic cells is required for immune tolerance. An abnormally low or high level of milk fat globule (MFG-E8) can result in impaired apoptotic cell clearance and the subsequent autoimmune response. In this study, we endeavoured to compare the levels of MFG-E8 and IL-17 in SLE patients and healthy controls and to reveal the alleged association of these levels with SLE disease activity. Material and methods Serum samples from 57 SLE patients and 30 healthy control subjects were examined for quantitation of MFG-E8 and IL-17 levels using ELISA. Systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity was calculated using the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). Clinical manifestations and laboratory findings of the patients were also recorded. Results We report that serum MFG-E8 levels were significantly elevated in the sera of SLE patients compared to healthy controls (p-value = 0.019). Likewise, IL-17 levels were higher in SLE patients (p-value < 0.001). A positive correlation was revealed between MFG-E8 level and proteinuria. Surprisingly, there was a poor correlation between disease activity and the levels of either IL-17 or MFG-E8. Conclusions Although serum MFG-E8 and IL-17 levels were higher in SLE patients than in normal controls, our results indicate that they cannot accurately reflect the disease activity. Meanwhile, further studies are needed to assess MFG-E8 and IL-17 as potential therapeutic targets in SLE patients. PMID:27407263

  17. Study of magnetic field geometry and extinction in Bok globule CB130

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, A.; Das, H. S.

    2016-09-01

    We trace the peripheral magnetic field structure of Bok globule CB130 by estimating the linear polarization of its field stars in the R band. The magnetic field orientation sampled by these stars, aligned on average among themselves, and the polarization produced within the cloud has a different direction from that of Galactic plane with an offset of 53°. The offset between minor axis and the mean magnetic field of CB130 is found to be 80°. The estimated strength of the magnetic field in the plane-of-the-sky is ˜116±19 μG. We constructed the visual extinction map using the Near Infrared Color Excess (NICE) method to see the dust distribution around CB130. Contours of Herschel (Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA) SPIRE 500 μm dust continuum emission map of this cloud is over-plotted on the visual extinction map, which shows that the regions having higher optical extinction correspond to higher densities of dust. Three distinct high dust density cores (named as C1, C2, and C3) are identified in the extinction map. It is observed that the cores C1 and C3 are located close to two previously known cores CB130-1 and CB130-2, respectively. Estimates of visual extinction of some moderately obscured stars of CB130 are made utilizing near-infrared photometry. It is observed that there is a feeble dependence of polarization on extinction, and the polarization efficiency (defined as p/AV) of the dust grains decreases with the increase in extinction.

  18. Shocked and Scorched: Free-Floating Evaporating Gas Globules and Star Formation in Cygnus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Claussen, M. J.; Morris, M. R.

    2012-05-01

    We report molecular line observations of a new class of Free-floating Evaporating Gas Globules with tadpole shapes (i.e., FrEGGs), recently discovered in the Cygnus star-forming region. We serendipitously found two of these in an HST imaging survey, including one of the most prominent members of this class (IRAS20324+4057: the Tadpole). Our molecular-line observations, carried out with the Arizona Radio Observatory's mm-wave telescopes, include on-the-fly maps in the CO and 13CO J=2-1 lines as well as pointed observations in the J=3-2 line of the high-density tracers HCO+ and N2H+. These data show the presence of dense molecular cores with total masses of cold molecular gas exceeding one to a few Msun in almost all FrEGGs. Our radio continuum imaging of 3 FrEGGs, as well as Halpha images from the IPHAS survey reveal bright photo-ionized peripheries around these objects. We infer that FrEGGs are dense, star-forming molecular cores that originated in the Cygnus cloud and are now being photoevaporated by the ultraviolet radiation field of the Cyg OB2 cluster, and shaped by the ram pressure of strong wind sources. The extended tails in some of the largest objects show wiggles likely resulting from Kelvin-Helmoltz instabilities. We find evidence for non-thermal radio emission in the Tadpole, with the radio emission peaking strongly along the shock/ionization front at its head, possibly as a result of a compressed magnetic layer in this front that is interacting with cosmic rays associated with the Cyg OB2 association.

  19. A molten globule intermediate of the von Willebrand factor A1 domain firmly tethers platelets under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Alexander; Madde, Pranathi; Blancas-Mejia, Luis M; Auton, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    Clinical mutations in patients diagnosed with Type 2A von Willebrand disease (VWD) have been identified that break the single disulfide bond linking N- and C-termini in the vWF A1 domain. We have modeled the effect of these mutations on the disulfide-bonded structure of A1 by reducing and carboxy-amidating these cysteines. Solution biophysical studies show that loss of this disulfide bond induces a molten globule conformational state lacking global tertiary structure but retaining residual secondary structure. The conformational dependence of platelet adhesion to these native and molten globule states of A1 is quantitatively compared using real-time high-speed video microscopy analysis of platelet translocation dynamics under shear flow in a parallel plate microfluidic flow chamber. While normal platelets translocating on surface-captured native A1 domain retain the catch-bond character of pause times that increase as a function of shear rate at low shear and decrease as a function of shear rate at high shear, platelets that interact with A1 lacking the disulfide bond remain stably attached and do not translocate. Based on these findings, we propose that the shear stress-sensitive regulation of the A1-GPIb interaction is due to folding the tertiary structure of this domain. Removal of the tertiary structure by disrupting the disulfide bond destroys this regulatory mechanism resulting in high-strength interactions between platelets and vWF A1 that are dependent only on residual secondary structure elements present in the molten globule conformation. PMID:24265179

  20. Secretion of three enzymes for fatty acid synthesis into mouse milk in association with fat globules, and rapid decrease of the secreted enzymes by treatment with rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Hitomi; Uchida, Kana; Okajima, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Nadano, Daita

    2011-04-01

    The mammary epithelium produces numerous lipid droplets during lactation and secretes them in plasma membrane-enclosed vesicles known as milk fat globules. The biogenesis of such fat globules is considered to provide a model for clarifying the mechanisms of lipogenesis in mammals. In the present study, we identified acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase, ATP citrate lyase, and fatty acid synthase in mouse milk. Fractionation of milk showed that these three enzymes were located predominantly in milk fat globules. The three enzymes were resistant to trypsin digestion without Triton X-100, indicating that they were not located on the outer surface of the globules and thus associated with the precursors of the globules before secretion. When a low dose of rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), was injected into lactating mice, the levels of the three enzymes in milk were decreased within 3h after injection. Since the protein levels of the three enzymes in tissues were not obviously altered by this short-term treatment, known transcriptional control by mTOR signaling was unlikely to account for this decrease in their levels in milk. Our findings suggest a new, putatively mTOR-dependent localization of the three enzymes for de novo lipogenesis. PMID:21281598

  1. Mars as the Parent Body for the CI Carbonaceous Chondrites: Confirmation of Early Mars Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, J. E.

    2003-07-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that CI Carbonaceaous Chondrites belong in the Mars meteorite family. They thus represent samples, like ALH84001, of the Noachian surface environment, and are rich in organic matter, suggesting a living environment.

  2. The Microbiological Contamination of Meteorites: A Null Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, A.; Toporski, J. K. W.; Westall, F. W.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Gibson, E. K.; Avci, R.; Whitby, C.; McKay, D. S.; Griffin, C.

    2000-01-01

    Using 4 different techniques we have studied 9 meteorites including the Martian meteorites ALH84001 and Nakhla for terrestrial contamination in all 9 we have found evidence of terrestrial microorganisms.

  3. Characterization of molten globule PopB in absence and presence of its chaperone PcrH.

    PubMed

    Dey, Supratim; Basu, Abhishek; Datta, Saumen

    2012-06-01

    The TTSS encoding "translocator operon" of Pseudomonas aeruginosa consists of a major translocator protein PopB, minor translocator protein PopD and their cognate chaperone PcrH. Far-UV CD spectra and secondary structure prediction servers predict an α-helical model for PopB, PcrH and PopB-PcrH complex. PopB itself forms a single species of higher order oligomer (15 mer) as seen from AUC, but in complex with PcrH, both monomeric (1:1) and oligomeric form exist. PopB has large solvent-exposed hydrophobic patches and exists as an unordered molten globule in its native state, but on forming complex with PcrH it gets transformed into an ordered molten globule. Tryptophan fluorescence spectrum indicates that PopB interacts with the first TPR region of dimeric PcrH to form a stable PopB-PcrH complex that has a partial rigid structure with a large hydrodynamic radius and few tertiary contacts. The pH-dependent studies of PopB, PcrH and complex by ANS fluorescence, urea induced unfolding and thermal denaturation experiments prove that PcrH not only provides structural support to the ordered molten globule PopB in complex but also undergoes conformational change to assist PopB to pass through the needle complex of TTSS and form pores in the host cell membrane. ITC experiments show a strong affinity (K(d) ~ 0.37 μM) of PopB for PcrH at pH 7.8, which reduces to ~0.68 μM at pH 5.8. PcrH also loses its rigid tertiary structure at pH 5 and attains a molten globule conformation. This indicates that the decrease in pH releases PopB molecules and thus triggers the TTSS activation mechanism for the formation of a functional translocon. PMID:22585368

  4. Magnetism and the putative early Martian life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochette, P.

    2001-08-01

    A short critical review is provided on three questions linking magnetism and the putative early Mars life. Was there a large internal Martian magnetic field, during which period, and is it a requisite for life? What is the origin of the paleomagnetic signal of Martian meteorites, including ALH84001? What is the present credibility of the case for fossil bacterial magnetite grains in ALH84001?

  5. Mechanistic Insight into the Reactivation of BCAII Enzyme from Denatured and Molten Globule States by Eukaryotic Ribosomes and Domain V rRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Biprashekhar; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-01

    In all life forms, decoding of messenger-RNA into polypeptide chain is accomplished by the ribosome. Several protein chaperones are known to bind at the exit of ribosomal tunnel to ensure proper folding of the nascent chain by inhibiting their premature folding in the densely crowded environment of the cell. However, accumulating evidence suggests that ribosome may play a chaperone role in protein folding events in vitro. Ribosome-mediated folding of denatured proteins by prokaryotic ribosomes has been studied extensively. The RNA-assisted chaperone activity of the prokaryotic ribosome has been attributed to the domain V, a span of 23S rRNA at the intersubunit side of the large subunit encompassing the Peptidyl Transferase Centre. Evidently, this functional property of ribosome is unrelated to the nascent chain protein folding at the exit of the ribosomal tunnel. Here, we seek to scrutinize whether this unique function is conserved in a primitive kinetoplastid group of eukaryotic species Leishmania donovani where the ribosome structure possesses distinct additional features and appears markedly different compared to other higher eukaryotic ribosomes. Bovine Carbonic Anhydrase II (BCAII) enzyme was considered as the model protein. Our results manifest that domain V of the large subunit rRNA of Leishmania ribosomes preserves chaperone activity suggesting that ribosome-mediated protein folding is, indeed, a conserved phenomenon. Further, we aimed to investigate the mechanism underpinning the ribosome-assisted protein reactivation process. Interestingly, the surface plasmon resonance binding analyses exhibit that rRNA guides productive folding by directly interacting with molten globule-like states of the protein. In contrast, native protein shows no notable affinity to the rRNA. Thus, our study not only confirms conserved, RNA-mediated chaperoning role of ribosome but also provides crucial insight into the mechanism of the process. PMID:27099964

  6. Mechanistic Insight into the Reactivation of BCAII Enzyme from Denatured and Molten Globule States by Eukaryotic Ribosomes and Domain V rRNAs.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Biprashekhar; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-01

    In all life forms, decoding of messenger-RNA into polypeptide chain is accomplished by the ribosome. Several protein chaperones are known to bind at the exit of ribosomal tunnel to ensure proper folding of the nascent chain by inhibiting their premature folding in the densely crowded environment of the cell. However, accumulating evidence suggests that ribosome may play a chaperone role in protein folding events in vitro. Ribosome-mediated folding of denatured proteins by prokaryotic ribosomes has been studied extensively. The RNA-assisted chaperone activity of the prokaryotic ribosome has been attributed to the domain V, a span of 23S rRNA at the intersubunit side of the large subunit encompassing the Peptidyl Transferase Centre. Evidently, this functional property of ribosome is unrelated to the nascent chain protein folding at the exit of the ribosomal tunnel. Here, we seek to scrutinize whether this unique function is conserved in a primitive kinetoplastid group of eukaryotic species Leishmania donovani where the ribosome structure possesses distinct additional features and appears markedly different compared to other higher eukaryotic ribosomes. Bovine Carbonic Anhydrase II (BCAII) enzyme was considered as the model protein. Our results manifest that domain V of the large subunit rRNA of Leishmania ribosomes preserves chaperone activity suggesting that ribosome-mediated protein folding is, indeed, a conserved phenomenon. Further, we aimed to investigate the mechanism underpinning the ribosome-assisted protein reactivation process. Interestingly, the surface plasmon resonance binding analyses exhibit that rRNA guides productive folding by directly interacting with molten globule-like states of the protein. In contrast, native protein shows no notable affinity to the rRNA. Thus, our study not only confirms conserved, RNA-mediated chaperoning role of ribosome but also provides crucial insight into the mechanism of the process. PMID:27099964

  7. Mechanistic Insight into the Reactivation of BCAII Enzyme from Denatured and Molten Globule States by Eukaryotic Ribosomes and Domain V rRNAs.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Biprashekhar; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-01

    In all life forms, decoding of messenger-RNA into polypeptide chain is accomplished by the ribosome. Several protein chaperones are known to bind at the exit of ribosomal tunnel to ensure proper folding of the nascent chain by inhibiting their premature folding in the densely crowded environment of the cell. However, accumulating evidence suggests that ribosome may play a chaperone role in protein folding events in vitro. Ribosome-mediated folding of denatured proteins by prokaryotic ribosomes has been studied extensively. The RNA-assisted chaperone activity of the prokaryotic ribosome has been attributed to the domain V, a span of 23S rRNA at the intersubunit side of the large subunit encompassing the Peptidyl Transferase Centre. Evidently, this functional property of ribosome is unrelated to the nascent chain protein folding at the exit of the ribosomal tunnel. Here, we seek to scrutinize whether this unique function is conserved in a primitive kinetoplastid group of eukaryotic species Leishmania donovani where the ribosome structure possesses distinct additional features and appears markedly different compared to other higher eukaryotic ribosomes. Bovine Carbonic Anhydrase II (BCAII) enzyme was considered as the model protein. Our results manifest that domain V of the large subunit rRNA of Leishmania ribosomes preserves chaperone activity suggesting that ribosome-mediated protein folding is, indeed, a conserved phenomenon. Further, we aimed to investigate the mechanism underpinning the ribosome-assisted protein reactivation process. Interestingly, the surface plasmon resonance binding analyses exhibit that rRNA guides productive folding by directly interacting with molten globule-like states of the protein. In contrast, native protein shows no notable affinity to the rRNA. Thus, our study not only confirms conserved, RNA-mediated chaperoning role of ribosome but also provides crucial insight into the mechanism of the process.

  8. Observation of persistent α-helical content and discrete types of backbone disorder during a molten globule to ordered peptide transition via deep-UV resonance Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Mia C.; Mutter, Andrew; Koder, Ronald L.; JiJi, Renee D.; Cooley, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    The molten globule state can aide in the folding of a protein to a functional structure and is loosely defined as an increase in structural disorder with conservation of the ensemble secondary structure content. Simultaneous observation of persistent secondary structure content with increased disorder has remained experimentally problematic. As a consequence, modeling how the molten globule state remains stable and how it facilitates proper folding remains difficult due to a lack of amenable spectroscopic techniques to characterize this class of partially unfolded proteins. Previously, deep-UV resonance Raman (dUVRR) spectroscopy has proven useful in the resolution of global and local structural fluctuations in the secondary structure of proteins. In this work, dUVRR was employed to study the molten globule to ordered transition of a model four-helix bundle protein, HP7. Both the average ensemble secondary structure and types of local disorder were monitored, without perturbation of the solvent, pH, or temperature. The molten globule to ordered transition is induced by stepwise coordination of two heme molecules. Persistent dUVRR spectral features in the amide III region at 1295–1301 and 1335–1338 cm−1 confirm previous observations that HP7 remains predominantly helical in the molten globule versus the fully ordered state. Additionally, these spectra represent the first demonstration of conserved helical content in a molten globule protein. With successive heme binding significant losses are observed in the spectral intensity of the amide III3 and S regions (1230–1260 and 1390 cm−1, respectively), which are known to be sensitive to local disorder. These observations indicate that there is a decrease in the structural populations able to explore various extended conformations, with successive heme binding events. DUVRR spectra indicate that the first heme coordination between two helical segments diminishes exploration of more elongated backbone structural

  9. Nucleotide-free kinesin motor domains reversibly convert to an inactive conformation with characteristics of a molten globule.

    PubMed

    Hackney, David D; McGoff, Marshall S

    2016-10-15

    Nucleotide-free kinesin motor domains from several kinesin families convert reversibly to a refractory conformation that cannot rapidly rebind ADP. In the absence of glycerol, the refractory conformation of Drosophila kinesin motor domains is favored by 50-fold with conversion of the active to the refractory species at ∼0.052 s(-1) and reactivating in the presence of ADP at ∼0.001 s(-1). This reactivation by ADP is due to conformational selection rather than induced fit because ADP is not bound to the refractory species at concentrations of ADP that are sufficient to saturate the rate of reactivation. Glycerol stabilizes the active conformation by reducing the rate of inactivation, while having little effect on the reactivation rate. Circular dichroism indicates a large conformational change occurs on formation of the refractory species. The refractory conformation binds ANS (8-anilino-1-napthalenesulfonic acid) with a large increase in fluorescence, indicating that it has molten globule character. High ANS binding is also observed with the refractory forms of Eg5 (a kinesin-5) and Ncd (a kinesin-14), indicating that a refractory conformation with molten globule characteristics may be a common feature of nucleotide-free kinesin motor domains.

  10. A lattice model Monte Carlo study of coil-to-globule and other conformational transitions of polymer, amphiphile, and solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Deirdre E.; Kuznetsov, Yuri A.; Timoshenko, Edward G.; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2000-05-01

    A model of polymer-amphiphile-solvent systems on a cubic lattice is used to investigate the phase diagram of such systems. The polymer is treated within the canonical ensemble (T,V,N) and the amphiphile and solvent are treated within the grand canonical ensemble (T,V,μ). Using a range of Monte Carlo moves the phase diagram of polymer-amphiphile-solvent mixtures, as a function of solvent quality (parametrized by χ) and relative chemical potential, μ, is studied for the dilute polymer limit. The effect of increasing the polymer chain length, N, on the critical aggregation concentration (CAC), and the type of polymer-amphiphile complex formed above the CAC are also examined. For some parameters, it is found that the polymer and amphiphile form a polymer-micelle complex at low amphiphile concentrations, and that the polymer coil-to-globule transition point increases with increasing amphiphile concentration. The resulting collapsed globule has a solvent core and is surrounded by a layer of amphiphile. These results are in good qualitative agreement with experimental results for the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM)/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) system. At higher amphiphile concentrations, the polymer and amphiphile form several layered structures depending on the strength of the three-body amphiphilic interactions, l. Finally, the effect of the polymer chain length, N, and the strength of the three-body amphiphilic interactions, l, on the stability of the polymer-amphiphile structures is investigated.

  11. A molten globule-like intermediate state detected in the thermal transition of cytochrome c under low salt concentration.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shigeyoshi; Baba, Takayuki; Kidokoro, Shun-Ichi

    2007-04-01

    To understand the stabilization mechanism of the transient intermediate state in protein folding, it is very important to understand the structure and stability of the molten globule state under a native condition, in which the native state exists stably. The thermal transitions of horse cytochrome c were thermodynamically evaluated by highly precise differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at pH 3.8-5.0. The heat capacity functions were analyzed using double deconvolution and the nonlinear least-squares method. An intermediate (I) state is clearly confirmed in the thermal native (N)-to-denatured (D) transition of horse cytochrome c. The mole fraction of the intermediate state shows the largest value, 0.4, at nearly 70 degrees C at pH 4.1. This intermediate state was also detected by the circular dichroism (CD) method and was found to have the properties of the molten globule-like structure by three-state analysis of the CD data. The Gibbs free-energy change between N and I, DeltaG(NI), and that between N and D, DeltaG(ND), were evaluated to be 9-22 kJ mol(-1) and 41-45 kJ mol(-1), respectively at 15( ) degrees C and pH 4.1.

  12. Microsecond Rearrangements of Hydrophobic Clusters in an Initially Collapsed Globule Prime Structure Formation during the Folding of a Small Protein.

    PubMed

    Goluguri, Rama Reddy; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2016-07-31

    Determining how polypeptide chain collapse initiates structure formation during protein folding is a long standing goal. It has been challenging to characterize experimentally the dynamics of the polypeptide chain, which lead to the formation of a compact kinetic molten globule (MG) in about a millisecond. In this study, the sub-millisecond events that occur early during the folding of monellin from the guanidine hydrochloride-unfolded state have been characterized using multiple fluorescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes. The kinetic MG is shown to form in a noncooperative manner from the unfolded (U) state as a result of at least three different processes happening during the first millisecond of folding. Initial chain compaction completes within the first 37μs, and further compaction occurs only after structure formation commences at a few milliseconds of folding. The transient nonnative and native-like hydrophobic clusters with side chains of certain residues buried form during the initial chain collapse and the nonnative clusters quickly disassemble. Subsequently, partial chain desolvation occurs, leading to the formation of a kinetic MG. The initial chain compaction and subsequent chain rearrangement appear to be barrierless processes. The two structural rearrangements within the collapsed globule appear to prime the protein for the actual folding transition. PMID:27370109

  13. The Pb isotopic evolution of the Martian mantle constrained by initial Pb in Martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, J. J.; Nemchin, A. A.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Snape, J. F.; Bland, P.; Benedix, G. K.

    2015-12-01

    The Pb isotopic compositions of maskelynite and pyroxene grains were measured in ALH84001 and three enriched shergottites (Zagami, Roberts Massif 04262, and Larkman Nunatuk 12011) by secondary ion mass spectrometry. A maskelynite-pyroxene isochron for ALH84001 defines a crystallization age of 4089 ± 73 Ma (2σ). The initial Pb isotopic composition of each meteorite was measured in multiple maskelynite grains. ALH84001 has the least radiogenic initial Pb isotopic composition of any Martian meteorite measured to date (i.e., 206Pb/204Pb = 10.07 ± 0.17, 2σ). Assuming an age of reservoir formation for ALH84001 and the enriched shergottites of 4513 Ma, a two-stage Pb isotopic model has been constructed. This model links ALH84001 and the enriched shergottites by their similar μ value (238U/204Pb) of 4.1-4.6 from 4.51 Ga to 4.1 Ga and 0.17 Ga, respectively. The model employed here is dependent on a chondritic μ value (~1.2) from 4567 to 4513 Ma, which implies that core segregation had little to no effect on the μ value(s) of the Martian mantle. The proposed Pb isotopic model here can be used to calculate ages that are in agreement with Rb-Sr, Lu-Hf, and Sm-Nd ages previously determined in the meteorites and confirm the young (~170 Ma) ages of the enriched shergottites and ancient, >4 Ga, age of ALH84001.

  14. Sulphide globules and their impact on sulphur degassing budget: the case of Grímsvötn volcano, Iceland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadi, Baptiste; Carn, Simon; Sigmarsson, Olgeir

    2014-05-01

    Volcanic eruptions are known to contribute sulphur to the atmosphere. Two different methods allow estimation of sulphur mass loading: remote satellite measurements and the petrologic method. Sulphur emission at subduction-related volcanoes is often underestimated by the latter method relative to the former whereas a fair agreement is found for hot spot-related volcanoes. The Grímsvötn 2011 eruption allows further comparison between these two methods. Grímsvötn is a basaltic subglacial volcano located under the Vatnajökull ice cap, above the Iceland mantle plume and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The May 2011 eruption lasted one week and took place inside the composite caldera of the volcano. During the first 24 hours, the column reached a height of more than 20 km and bulk of the magma was emitted. The basaltic tephra has quartz-normative tholeiite composition with 1-5% plagioclase, clinopyroxene, olivine, FeTi-oxide crystals and, noteworthy, sulphide globules present in the groundmass glass. Sulphur concentrations of twenty eight melt inclusions (MIs) were measured in plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine crystals extracted from the tephra produced during the most explosive phase. The difference between the mean sulphur content of both MIs and groundmass glass multiplied by the magma mass erupted, yields 0.73 ± 0.18 Tg of liberated sulphur. This is four times the estimated sulphur degassing by satellite measurements (0.19 ± 0.06 Tg). The contributions of different sulphur sinks were quantified. The geothermal system harvests approximately 0.037 Tg (5%), which are liberated during jökulhlaups. Sulphur adhering to the volcanic ash is approximately 0.12 Tg (15%). Added to the satellite measurements of sulphur entering the stratosphere, half of the S estimated by the petrologic method is still missing. Sulphur immiscibility forming sulphur globules in the magma chambers appears the most probable explanation for the missing 50% of sulphur. Due to elevated density of

  15. Bovine milk proteome: Quantitative changes in normal milk exosomes, milk fat globule membranes and whey proteomes resulting from Staphylococcus aureus mastitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of milk protein composition/expression in healthy cows and cows with mastitis will provide information important for the dairy food industry, mammary biology and immune function in the mammary gland. To facilitate maximum protein discovery, milk was fractioned into whey, milk fat globule ...

  16. [Interconnection between architecture of protein globule and disposition of conformational conservative oligopeptides in proteins from one protein family].

    PubMed

    Batianovskiĭ, A V; Filatov, I V; Namiot, V A; Esipova, N G; Volotovskiĭ, I D

    2012-01-01

    It was shown that selective interactions between helical segments of macromolecules can realize in globular proteins in the segments characterized by the same periodicities of charge distribution i.e. between conformationally conservative oligopeptides. It was found that in the macromolecules of alpha-helical proteins conformationally conservative oligopeptides are disposed at a distance being characteristic of direct interactions. For representatives of many structural families of alpha-type proteins specific disposition of conformationally conservative segments is observed. This disposition is inherent to a particular structural family. Disposition of conformationally conservative segments is not related to homology of the amino acid sequence but reflects peculiarities of native 3D-architectures of protein globules.

  17. Expression, purification, and characterization of recombinant human and murine milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor-factor 8.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Erick R; Ciferri, Claudio; Phung, Wilson; Sandoval, Wendy; Matsumoto, Marissa L

    2016-08-01

    Milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor-factor 8 (MFG-E8), as its name suggests, is a major glycoprotein component of milk fat globules secreted by the mammary epithelium. Although its role in milk fat production is unclear, MFG-E8 has been shown to act as a bridge linking apoptotic cells to phagocytes for removal of these dying cells. MFG-E8 is capable of bridging these two very different cell types via interactions through both its epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain(s) and its lectin-type C domains. The EGF-like domain interacts with αVβ3 and αVβ5 integrins on the surface of phagocytes, whereas the C domains bind phosphatidylserine found on the surface of apoptotic cells. In an attempt to purify full-length, recombinant MFG-E8 expressed in either insect cells or CHO cells, we find that it is highly aggregated. Systematic truncation of the domain architecture of MFG-E8 indicates that the C domains are mainly responsible for the aggregation propensity. Addition of Triton X-100 to the conditioned cell culture media allowed partial recovery of non-aggregated, full-length MFG-E8. A more comprehensive detergent screen identified CHAPS as a stabilizer of MFG-E8 and allowed purification of a significant portion of non-aggregated, full-length protein. The CHAPS-stabilized recombinant MFG-E8 retained its natural ability to bind both αVβ3 and αVβ5 integrins and phosphatidylserine suggesting that it is properly folded and active. Herein we describe an efficient purification method for production of non-aggregated, full-length MFG-E8.

  18. Trifluoroethanol stabilizes the molten globule state and induces non-amyloidic turbidity in stem bromelain near its isoelectric point.

    PubMed

    Dave, Sandeep; Mahajan, Sahil; Chandra, Vemika; Gupta, Pawan

    2011-11-01

    Stem bromelain (SBM) is a therapeutic protein that has been studied for alkaline denaturation in the intestines, the principal site of its absorption. In this study, we investigated fluorinated alcohol 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE)-induced conformational changes in the specific/pre-molten globule (SMG) state of SBM observed at pH 10 by spectroscopic methods. Far-UV circular dichroism (CD) spectra showed that the protein retained its native-like secondary structure at TFE concentrations of up to 30% with a pronounced minimum at 222 nm, characteristic of a helix. However, addition of slightly higher TFE concentrations (≥40%) resulted in an ∼2.5-fold induction of this helical feature and a time-dependent increase in non-amyloidic turbidity as evidenced by turbidometric, Congo red-binding, and Thioflavin T (ThT)-binding studies. Near-UV CD spectra suggested a gradual but significant loss of tertiary structure at 10-30% TFE. Tryptophan studies showed blue-shifted fluorescence, although the number of accessible tryptophans remained the same up to 30% TFE. The SMG showed enhanced binding of the fluorescent probe 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonic acid (ANS) up to 30% TFE, beyond which binding plateaued. Thermal and guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) transition studies in the near-UV range indicated a single cooperative transition for the SMG state in the presence of 30% TFE, similar to that observed for native SBM at pH 7.0 (although with different T(m)s), unlike the SMG state. TFE (30%) appeared to induce native-like stability to the original SMG. These observations suggest a transformation of the SMG to a characteristic molten globule (MG) conformation at 30% TFE, possibly due to TFE-induced rearrangement of hydrophobic interactions at the protein's isoelectric point.

  19. Expression, purification, and characterization of recombinant human and murine milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor-factor 8.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Erick R; Ciferri, Claudio; Phung, Wilson; Sandoval, Wendy; Matsumoto, Marissa L

    2016-08-01

    Milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor-factor 8 (MFG-E8), as its name suggests, is a major glycoprotein component of milk fat globules secreted by the mammary epithelium. Although its role in milk fat production is unclear, MFG-E8 has been shown to act as a bridge linking apoptotic cells to phagocytes for removal of these dying cells. MFG-E8 is capable of bridging these two very different cell types via interactions through both its epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain(s) and its lectin-type C domains. The EGF-like domain interacts with αVβ3 and αVβ5 integrins on the surface of phagocytes, whereas the C domains bind phosphatidylserine found on the surface of apoptotic cells. In an attempt to purify full-length, recombinant MFG-E8 expressed in either insect cells or CHO cells, we find that it is highly aggregated. Systematic truncation of the domain architecture of MFG-E8 indicates that the C domains are mainly responsible for the aggregation propensity. Addition of Triton X-100 to the conditioned cell culture media allowed partial recovery of non-aggregated, full-length MFG-E8. A more comprehensive detergent screen identified CHAPS as a stabilizer of MFG-E8 and allowed purification of a significant portion of non-aggregated, full-length protein. The CHAPS-stabilized recombinant MFG-E8 retained its natural ability to bind both αVβ3 and αVβ5 integrins and phosphatidylserine suggesting that it is properly folded and active. Herein we describe an efficient purification method for production of non-aggregated, full-length MFG-E8. PMID:27102803

  20. 1-Anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS) is not a desirable probe for determining the molten globule state of chymopapain.

    PubMed

    Qadeer, Atiyatul; Rabbani, Gulam; Zaidi, Nida; Ahmad, Ejaz; Khan, Javed M; Khan, Rizwan H

    2012-01-01

    The molten globule (MG) state of proteins is widely detected through binding with 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulphonate (ANS), a fluorescent dye. This strategy is based upon the assumption that when in molten globule state, the exposed hydrophobic clusters of protein are readily bound by the nonpolar anilino-naphthalene moiety of ANS molecules which then produce brilliant fluorescence. In this work, we explored the acid-induced unfolding pathway of chymopapain, a cysteine proteases from Carica papaya, by monitoring the conformational changes over a pH range 1.0-7.4 by circular dichroism, intrinsic fluorescence, ANS binding, acrylamide quenching, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The spectroscopic measurements showed that although maximum ANS fluorescence intensity was observed at pH 1.0, however protein exhibited ∼80% loss of secondary structure which does not comply with the characteristics of a typical MG-state. In contrast at pH 1.5, chymopapain retains substantial amount of secondary structure, disrupted side chain interactions, increased hydrodynamic radii and nearly 30-fold increase in ANS fluorescence with respect to the native state, indicating that MG-state exists at pH 1.5 and not at pH 1.0. ITC measurements revealed that ANS molecules bound to chymopapain via hydrophobic interaction were more at pH 1.5 than at pH 1.0. However, a large number of ANS molecules were also involved in electrostatic interaction with protein at pH 1.0 which, together with hydrophobically interacted molecules, may be responsible for maximum ANS fluorescence. We conclude that maximum ANS-fluorescence alone may not be the criteria for determining the MG of chymopapain. Hence a comprehensive structural analysis of the intermediate is essentially required. PMID:23209794

  1. Physical properties and formation of MCLD 126.6+24.5 : a dense cometary shape globule at high-Galactic latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristorcelli, Isabelle; Rivera-Ingraham, Alana; Juvela, Mika; Falgarone, Edith; Pelkonen, Veli-Matti; Pagani, Laurent; Ysard, Nathalie; Montier, Ludovic; Montillaud, Julien; Marshall, Douglas; Bernard, Jean-Philippe

    2015-08-01

    The high-latitude molecular clouds are mostly gravitationally unbound and an interesting question to be investigated is how dense cores can form in such tenuous, diffuse environment, and what is their ability to form stars. Are these dense cores forming from random fluctuations in a turbulent medium, or is their formation triggered by external mechanisms ?We present here a detailed analysis of the dense high-latitude clump MCLD 126.6+24.5 observed with PACS and SPIRE as part of the Herschel Key-Program ‘Galactic Cold Cores’, a follow-up of Planck detections. The clump lies in a tenuous high-latitude cloud, located at the border of the Polaris Flare, a large molecular cirrus cloud in the direction of the north celestial pole, at an estimated distance of 150 pc. Its cometary globule shape appears similar to what is usually found in globules in active star formation regions, although this nebula is far from any such region.The column density distribution derived from the Herschel data shows a very sharp edge and narrow transition between the diffuse medium and the molecular part of the cloud. This remarkable feature could be the signature of a shocked-compression flow from its southern side, likely associated with the North Celestial Pole HI loop. Cold cores are found embedded inside the globule, with temperatures down to 10K. We also analyse the properties of its 2 main filaments (including a pillar-like structure). We present their main characteristics, both in terms of dust and gas physical properties, combining the Herschel data with IRAM maps of 13CO and C18O. We compare the overall properties of the globule and its structure with predictions from MHD simulations in order to investigate the origin of this intriguing cometary shape globule found in high-galactic latitude diffuse environment.

  2. 13C-Depleted carbon microparticles in >3700-Ma sea-floor sedimentary rocks from west greenland

    PubMed

    Rosing

    1999-01-29

    Turbiditic and pelagic sedimentary rocks from the Isua supracrustal belt in west Greenland [more than 3700 million years ago (Ma)] contain reduced carbon that is likely biogenic. The carbon is present as 2- to 5-micrometer graphite globules and has an isotopic composition of delta13C that is about -19 per mil (Pee Dee belemnite standard). These data and the mode of occurrence indicate that the reduced carbon represents biogenic detritus, which was perhaps derived from planktonic organisms.

  3. Circularly permuted dihydrofolate reductase possesses all the properties of the molten globule state, but can resume functional tertiary structure by interaction with its ligands.

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, V. N.; Kutyshenko, V. P.; Protasova NYu; Rogov, V. V.; Vassilenko, K. S.; Gudkov, A. T.

    1996-01-01

    It is obvious that functional activity of a protein molecule is closely related to its structure. On the other hand, the understanding of structure-function relationship still remains one of the intriguing problems of molecular biology. There is widespread belief that mutagenesis presents a real way to solve this problem. Following this assumption, we have investigated the effect of circular permutation in dihydrofolate reductase from E. coli on protein structure and functioning. It has been shown that in the absence of ligands two circularly permuted variants of dihydrofolate reductase possess all the properties of the molten globule state. However, after addition of ligands they gain the native-like structural properties and specific activity. This means that the in vitro folding of permuted dihydrofolate reductase is terminated at the stage of the molten globule formation. Interaction of permuted protein with ligands leads to the structural adjustment and formation of active protein molecules. PMID:8880908

  4. A statistical theory of coil-to-globule-to-coil transition of a polymer chain in a mixture of good solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budkov, Yu. A.; Kolesnikov, A. L.; Kalikin, N. N.; Kiselev, M. G.

    2016-05-01

    We present an off-lattice statistical model of a single polymer chain in mixed-solvent media. Taking into account the polymer conformational entropy, renormalization of solvent composition near the polymer backbone, the universal intermolecular excluded-volume and van der Waals interactions within the self-consistent field theory, the reentrant coil-to-globule-to-coil transition (co-nonsolvency) has been described in this paper. For convenience we split the system volume in two parts: the volume occupied by the polymer chain and the volume of bulk solution. Considering the equilibrium between two sub-volumes, the polymer solvation free energy as a function of radius of gyration and co-solvent mole fraction within internal polymer volume has been obtained. Minimizing the free energy of solvation with respect to its arguments, we show two qulitatively different regimes of co-nonsolvency. Namely, at sufficiently high temperature the reentrant coil-to-globule-to-coil transition proceeds smoothly. On the contrary, when the temperature drops below a certain threshold value a coil-globule transition occurs in the regime of first-order phase transition, i.e., discontinuous changes of the radius of gyration and the local co-solvent mole fraction near the polymer backbone. We show that, when the collapse of the polymer chain takes place, the entropy and enthalpy contributions to the solvation free energy of the globule strongly grow. From the first principles of statistical thermodynamics we confirm earlier speculations based on the MD simulations results that the co-nonsolvency is the essentially enthalpic-entropic effect and is caused by enthalpy-entropy compensation. We show that the temperature dependences of the solution heat capacity change due to the solvation of the polymer chain are in qualitative agreement with the differential scanning calorimetry data for PNIPAM in aqueous methanol.

  5. Equilibrium titrations of acid-induced unfolding-refolding and salt-induced molten globule of cytochrome c by FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aichun; Lam, Troy

    2005-04-01

    Despite extensive investigations on the acid-unfolded and acid/salt-induced molten globule(-like) states of cytochrome c using variety of techniques, structural features of the acid-unfolded state in terms of residual secondary structures and the structural transition between the acid-unfolded and acid/salt-refolded states have not been fully characterized beyond the circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. It is unusual that secondary structure(s) of the unfolded state leading to the molten globule state, an important protein folding intermediate, as determined by CD was not fully corroborated by independent experimental method(s). In this study, we carried out an equilibrium titration of acid-induced unfolding and subsequent acid- and salt-induced refolding of cytochrome c using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The spectral profiles of the equilibrium titration reveal new structural details about the acid-unfolded state and the structural transition associated with the acid/salt-refolded molten globule(-like) states of cytochrome c.

  6. Rod-to-Globule Transition of pDNA/PEG-Poly(l-Lysine) Polyplex Micelles Induced by a Collapsed Balance Between DNA Rigidity and PEG Crowdedness.

    PubMed

    Tockary, Theofilus A; Osada, Kensuke; Motoda, Yusuke; Hiki, Shigehiro; Chen, Qixian; Takeda, Kaori M; Dirisala, Anjaneyulu; Osawa, Shigehito; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2016-03-01

    The role of poly(ethylene-glycol) (PEG) in rod-shaped polyplex micelle structures, having a characteristic core of folded plasmid DNA (pDNA) and a shell of tethered PEG chains, is investigated using PEG-detachable polyplex micelles. Rod shapes undergo change to compacted globule shapes by removal of PEG from polyplex micelles prepared from block copolymer with acid-labile linkage between PEG and poly(l-lysine) (PLys) through exposure to acidic milieu. This structural change supports the previous investigation on the rod shapes that PEG shell prevents the DNA structure from being globule shaped as the most favored structure in minimizing surface area. Noteworthy, despite the PEG is continuously depleted, the structural change does not occur in gradual shortening manner but the rod shapes keep their length unchanged and abruptly transform into globule shapes. Analysis of PEG density reveals the transition occurred when tethered PEG of rod shapes has decreased to a critical crowdedness, i.e., discontacted with neighboring PEG, which eventually illuminates another contribution, rigidity of DNA packaged as bundle in the rod shapes, in addition to the steric repulsion of PEG, in sustaining rod shapes. This investigation affirms significant role of PEG and also DNA rigidity as bundle in the formation of rod-shaped structures enduring the quest of compaction of charge-neutralized DNA in the polyplex micelles.

  7. Characterization of sub-nanosecond dynamics of the molten globule state of α-lactalbumin using quasielastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarek, Mounir; Neumann, Dan A.; Tobias, Douglas J.

    2003-08-01

    The dynamics of α-lactalbumin in the native and molten globule states in solution was investigated using quasielastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. We generated 2 nanosecond molecular dynamics trajectories at 300 K of α-lactalbumin solvated in a water box in the native state, and a putative member of the ensemble of conformations of the molten globule state generated by simulation at high temperature. Overall the agreement between the measured and calculated dynamical structure factors is good. Preliminary analysis of the simulated dynamics of the molten globule state revealed a strong heterogeneity of motions along the protein backbone, with larger amplitudes in the regions of the protein that unfold, mainly the β-sheet region. The results presented here demonstrate the utility of using a combination of neutron scattering measurements and molecular dynamics simulations to characterize and quantify, in a sequence-specific fashion, the differences in dynamics between the native and partially folded states of proteins on the time scale (˜100 ps) and length scale (a few to tens of Å) probed by current neutron spectrometers.

  8. Sub-Micrometer-Scale Mapping of Magnetite Crystals and Sulfur Globules in Magnetotactic Bacteria Using Confocal Raman Micro-Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Stephan H. K.; Gigler, Alexander M.; Hanzlik, Marianne; Winklhofer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The ferrimagnetic mineral magnetite is biomineralized by magnetotactic microorganisms and a diverse range of animals. Here we demonstrate that confocal Raman microscopy can be used to visualize chains of magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria, even though magnetite is a poor Raman scatterer and in bacteria occurs in typical grain sizes of only 35–120 nm, well below the diffraction-limited optical resolution. When using long integration times together with low laser power (<0.25 mW) to prevent laser induced damage of magnetite, we can identify and map magnetite by its characteristic Raman spectrum (303, 535, 665 ) against a large autofluorescence background in our natural magnetotactic bacteria samples. While greigite (cubic ; Raman lines of 253 and 351 ) is often found in the Deltaproteobacteria class, it is not present in our samples. In intracellular sulfur globules of Candidatus Magnetobacterium bavaricum (Nitrospirae), we identified the sole presence of cyclo-octasulfur (: 151, 219, 467 ), using green (532 nm), red (638 nm) and near-infrared excitation (785 nm). The Raman-spectra of phosphorous-rich intracellular accumulations point to orthophosphate in magnetic vibrios and to polyphosphate in magnetic cocci. Under green excitation, the cell envelopes are dominated by the resonant Raman lines of the heme cofactor of the b or c-type cytochrome, which can be used as a strong marker for label-free live-cell imaging of bacterial cytoplasmic membranes, as well as an indicator for the redox state. PMID:25233081

  9. Stat3 controls cell death during mammary gland involution by regulating uptake of milk fat globules and lysosomal membrane permeabilization

    PubMed Central

    Resemann, Henrike K.; Ramos-Montoya, Antonio; Skepper, Jeremy; Watson, Christine J.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that Stat3 regulates lysosomal mediated-programmed cell death (LM-PCD) during mouse mammary gland involution in vivo. However, the mechanism that controls the release of lysosomal cathepsins to initiate cell death in this context has not been elucidated. We show here that Stat3 regulates the formation of large lysosomal vacuoles that contain triglyceride. Furthermore, we demonstrate that milk fat globules (MFGs) are toxic to epithelial cells and that, when applied to purified lysosomes, the MFG hydrolysate oleic acid potently induces lysosomal leakiness. Additionally, uptake of secreted MFGs coated in butyrophilin 1A1 is diminished in Stat3 ablated mammary glands while loss of the phagocytosis bridging molecule MFG-E8 results in reduced leakage of cathepsins in vivo. We propose that Stat3 regulates LM-PCD in mouse mammary gland by switching cellular function from secretion to uptake of MFGs. Thereafter, perturbation of lysosomal vesicle membranes by high levels of free fatty acids results in controlled leakage of cathepsins culminating in cell death. PMID:25283994

  10. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on conformational changes of canine milk lysozyme between the native, molten globule, and unfolded states.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Demura, Makoto; Nitta, Katsutoshi

    2004-11-01

    The effect of pressure on the unfolding of the native (N) and molten globule (MG) state of canine milk lysozyme (CML) was examined using ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy at pH 4.5 and 2.0, respectively. It appeared that the thermally induced unfolding was promoted by the increase of pressure from atmospheric to 100 MPa, which indicates that both the N and MG states of CML unfolded with the decrease of the partial molar volume change (DeltaV). The volume changes needed for unfolding were estimated from the free energy change vs. pressure plots, and these volume changes became less negative from 20 to 60 degrees C. The DeltaV values at 25 degrees C were obtained for the N-MG (-46 cm3/mol) and MG-unfolded-state (U) transition (-40 cm3/mol). With regards to the MG-U transition, this value is contrastive to that of bovine alpha-lactalbumin (BLA) (0.9 cm3/mol), which is homologous to CML. Previous studies revealed that the MG state of CML was significantly more stable, and closer to the N state in structure, than that of BLA. In contrast to the swollen hydrophobic core of the MG state of BLA, our results suggest that the MG state of CML possesses a tightly packed hydrophobic core into which water molecules cannot penetrate. PMID:15488764

  11. The presence of HLA-DR antigens on lactating human breast epithelium and milk fat globule membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, R A; Ormerod, M G; Greaves, M F

    1980-01-01

    HLA-DR antigens have been demonstrated on the secretory epithelia of lactating breast using rabbit anti-p28,33 ('Ia-like') and mouse monoclonal anti-HLA-DR 'framework'. Normal non-lactating breast, benign or malignant tumours, epithelial cells from normal breast or isolated from milk and a presumptive breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7) were all HLA-DR-negative. HLA-DR, HLA (ABC 'framework') and beta 2-microglobulin determinants were also demonstrated on the surface of milk fat globules (MFG) which were unreactive with monoclonal antibodies to thymus cells or leucocytes. A monoclonal antibody detecting allelic HLA-DR determinants (HLA-DRw 1,2,6) was positive on 40% of MFG samples tested, positive reactions being concordant, when tested, with blood B lymphocytes. Antisera raised against MFG membranes also contain anti-HLA-DR activity. Whether the breast epithelial cells synthesize HLA-DR molecules or acquire these passively from mononuclear cells which infiltrate during lactation is not yet resolved. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7002399

  12. Formations of Bacteria-like Textures by dynamic reactions in Meteorite and Syntheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Y.

    2009-05-01

    1. Introduction Spherule texture can be formed in dynamic reaction during meteoritic impact in air. However, there are no reports on nano-bacteria-like (i.e. spherule-chained) textures with iron (and Nickel) oxides (with chlorine) in composition and micro-texture with 100nm order [1] in meteorite and synthetic experiment. The purpose of the present study is to elucidate spherule-chained texture with micro-texture of 100nm in order found in the Kuga iron meteorite, Iwakuni, Yamaguchi, Japan, and its first artificial synthesis in laboratory. 2. Two textures in the Kuga meteorite: The Kuga iron meteorite found in Kuga, Iwakuni, Yamaguchi, Japan reveals spherule-chained texture with Fe, Ni-rich composition with 10μm in size, where each spherule contained "long micro-texture in 100nm in size"[1,2]. The complex texture of flow and chained shapes can be found only in the fusion crust of the meteorite formed by quenched and random processes with vapor-melting process in air of the Earth. The FE-ASEM with EDX analyses by an in-situ observation indicate that the matrix of the spherule-chained texture with Fe, Ni, O-rich (with minor Cl) composition is carbon-rich composition formed by impact reactions in air. 3. Comparison with Martian meteorite Remnant of life in ocean can be found by mineralized fossil, which can be found in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 as bacteria-like chained texture of magnetite in composition (in 100nm order) around carbonate spherules [3]. Similarity of bacteria-like texture of the ALH84001 compared with the Kuga meteorites in this study are composition of Fe-rich, C-bearing, and chained texture of small size replaced by Fe and O-rich composition in air. Major difference of these textures is no carbonates minerals in the Kuga meteorite at dynamic reaction in air [1, 2, 3]. 4. First synthesis of bacteria- like akaganeite: A bacteria-like texture with Fe oxides (with minor chlorine as akaganeite-like compositions) is synthesized by chlorine and water

  13. Milk fat globule membrane isolated from buttermilk or whey cream and their lipid components inhibit infectivity of rotavirus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fuller, K L; Kuhlenschmidt, T B; Kuhlenschmidt, M S; Jiménez-Flores, R; Donovan, S M

    2013-06-01

    Milk fat is encapsulated in a milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) that contains bioactive glycoproteins and glycolipids. The MFGM inhibits infectivity of rotavirus (RV), activity that has been attributed to its glycoprotein and carbohydrate components. However, previous studies of proteins and oligosaccharides in the MGFM have not accounted for all the bioactivity associated with the complete MFGM. The lipid fraction of the MFGM accounts for half of its composition by weight, and we postulate that this fraction should be tested by itself to determine if it plays a role in antiviral activity. Herein, the anti-RV activity of an organic extract of MFGM was tested. Natural and whey buttermilk powders containing bovine MFGM enriched in polar lipids were prepared by microfiltration and supercritical fluid extraction treatment to reduce the triglyceride content of the powders. Lipid fractions were then extracted from the MFGM using both single- and dual-phase extraction methods. Whole MFGM and organic extracts were screened in MA-104 cells for anti-infective activity against a neuraminidase-sensitive rotavirus using a focus-forming unit assay. Dose-dependent inhibition was observed for whole buttermilk and cheese whey MFGM against the rotavirus. In general, buttermilk MFGM exhibited greater RV percentage inhibition than cheese whey MFGM. Organic-soluble anti-RV compounds were identified in bovine MFGM. The most active fraction, isolated by dual-phase extraction and iatrobead chromatography, was free of proteins and highly nonpolar. Further separation of this fraction in a less polar solvent (30:1 chloroform:methanol) resolved at least 5 lipid-containing compounds, which likely contribute to the anti-RV activity associated with bovine MFGM. In summary, lipid components associated with MFGM appear to contribute in large part to the anti-RV activity associated with the bovine MFGM.

  14. Force-induced globule-coil transition in laminin binding protein and its role for viral-cell membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, Boris N; Benedetti, Fabrizio; Mikhaylov, Andrey G; Korneev, Denis V; Sekatskii, Sergey K; Karakouz, Tanya; Belavin, Pavel A; Netesova, Nina A; Protopopova, Elena V; Konovalova, Svetlana N; Dietler, Giovanni; Loktev, Valery B

    2014-12-01

    The specific interactions of the pairs laminin binding protein (LBP)-purified tick-borne encephalitis viral surface protein E and certain recombinant fragments of this protein, as well as West Nile viral surface protein E and certain recombinant fragments of that protein, are studied by combined methods of single-molecule dynamic force spectroscopy (SMDFS), enzyme immunoassay and optical surface waves-based biosensor measurements. The experiments were performed at neutral pH (7.4) and acid pH (5.3) conditions. The data obtained confirm the role of LBP as a cell receptor for two typical viral species of the Flavivirus genus. A comparison of these data with similar data obtained for another cell receptor of this family, namely human αVβ3 integrin, reveals that both these receptors are very important. Studying the specific interaction between the cell receptors in question and specially prepared monoclonal antibodies against them, we could show that both interaction sites involved in the process of virus-cell interaction remain intact at pH 5.3. At the same time, for these acid conditions characteristic for an endosome during flavivirus-cell membrane fusion, SMDFS data reveal the existence of a force-induced (effective already for forces as small as 30-70 pN) sharp globule-coil transition for LBP and LBP-fragments of protein E complexes. We argue that this conformational transformation, being an analog of abrupt first-order phase transition and having similarity with the famous Rayleigh hydrodynamic instability, might be indispensable for the flavivirus-cell membrane fusion process. PMID:25319621

  15. Milk fat globule glycoproteins in human milk and in gastric aspirates of mother's milk-fed preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Peterson, J A; Hamosh, M; Scallan, C D; Ceriani, R L; Henderson, T R; Mehta, N R; Armand, M; Hamosh, P

    1998-10-01

    Human milk fat globule (HMFG) glycoproteins can prevent infections by microorganisms in breast-fed infants; the MUC-1 mucin inhibits binding of S-fimbriated Escherichia coli to buccal mucosa, and lactadherin may prevent symptomatic rotavirus infections. In this study, the survival of these HMFG glycoproteins in the stomach of human milk-fed preterm infants (gestational age = 27.5 +/- 0.4 wk) was assessed, and levels in their mothers' milk determined, using specific RIAs. Butyrophilin, a major component of HMFG membrane that has no demonstrated antimicrobial activity, was studied for comparison. The levels of mucin, lactadherin, and butyrophilin in 41 milk samples of 20 mothers were 729 +/- 75, 93 +/- 10, and 41 +/- 3 microg/mL, respectively. Mucin and lactadherin were significantly higher in early milk samples (<15 d postpartum) than in later milk samples (15-90 d postpartum), whereas butyrophilin showed no such difference. Significant amounts of mucin and lactadherin were found in almost all gastric aspirates of human milk-fed infants, even 4 h after feeding (mucin, 270 +/- 30 microg/mL; lactadherin, 23.2 +/- 4.4 microg/mL), whereas butyrophilin was rapidly degraded in the majority of aspirates. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the immunoreactive mucin, lactadherin, and butyrophilin in the milk-fed gastric aspirates had the expected native molecular weights. Mucin and lactadherin survived at all gastric pH values, whereas butyrophilin was found only at pH > 4. Neither lactadherin nor butyrophilin were detected in gastric aspirates of formula-fed infants (gestational age = 27.8 +/- 0.5 wk), whereas the very low level of mucin (9.1 +/- 1.1 microg/mL) in this group is presumably cross-reacting gastric mucin. These results demonstrate that two HMFG glycoproteins implicated in prevention of infection, MUC-1 mucin and lactadherin, survive and maintain their integrity in the stomachs of human milk-fed preterm infants.

  16. MUC-1 expression in pleomorphic adenomas using two human milk fat globule protein membrane antibodies (HMFG-1 and HMFG-2)

    PubMed Central

    PONCE-BRAVO, Santa; LEDESMA-MONTES, Constantino; GARCÉS-ORTÍZ, Maricela

    2015-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma (PA) is the most common salivary gland tumor and its microscopic features and histogenesis are a matter of debate. Human milk fat globule protein membrane (HMFG) monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) comprise a set of antibodies against the mucin 1 (MUC-1) protein detected in several salivary gland tumors. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the immunoexpression of the PA neoplastic cells to MUC-1 protein using HMFG-1 and HMFG-2 MoAbs, contrasting these results with those from normal salivary gland tissue. Material and Methods Immunohistochemical detection of MUC-1 protein using HMFG-1 and HMFG-2 MoAbs was made in 5 mm thick, paraffin embedded slides, and the avidin-biotin method was used. Results Positivity to HMFG-1 and HMFG-2 MoAbs was found in ductal, squamous metaplastic and neoplastic myoepithelial cells, keratin pearls and intraductal mucous material. Two kinds of myoepithelial cells were identified: classic myoepithelial cells around ducts were negative to both MoAbs, and modified myoepithelial cells were positive to both MoAbs. This last cellular group of the analyzed tumors showed similar MUC-1 immunoexpression to ductal epithelial cells using both HMFG antibodies. Intraductal mucous secretion was also HMFG-1 and HMFG-2 positive. Conclusions Our results showed there are two kinds of myoepithelial cells in PA. The first cellular group is represented by the different kinds of neoplastic myoepithelial cells and is HMFG-positive. The second one is HMFG-negative and represented by the neoplastic myoepithelial cells located around the ducts. PMID:26221920

  17. Acid-induced molten globule state of a prion protein: crucial role of Strand 1-Helix 1-Strand 2 segment.

    PubMed

    Honda, Ryo P; Yamaguchi, Kei-ichi; Kuwata, Kazuo

    2014-10-31

    The conversion of a cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to its pathogenic isoform (PrP(Sc)) is a critical event in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. Pathogenic conversion is usually associated with the oligomerization process; therefore, the conformational characteristics of the pre-oligomer state may provide insights into the conversion process. Previous studies indicate that PrP(C) is prone to oligomer formation at low pH, but the conformation of the pre-oligomer state remains unknown. In this study, we systematically analyzed the acid-induced conformational changes of PrP(C) and discovered a unique acid-induced molten globule state at pH 2.0 termed the "A-state." We characterized the structure of the A-state using far/near-UV CD, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate fluorescence, size exclusion chromatography, and NMR. Deuterium exchange experiments with NMR detection revealed its first unique structure ever reported thus far; i.e. the Strand 1-Helix 1-Strand 2 segment at the N terminus was preferentially unfolded, whereas the Helix 2-Helix 3 segment at the C terminus remained marginally stable. This conformational change could be triggered by the protonation of Asp(144), Asp(147), and Glu(196), followed by disruption of key salt bridges in PrP(C). Moreover, the initial population of the A-state at low pH (pH 2.0-5.0) was well correlated with the rate of the β-rich oligomer formation, suggesting that the A-state is the pre-oligomer state. Thus, the specific conformation of the A-state would provide crucial insights into the mechanisms of oligomerization and further pathogenic conversion as well as facilitating the design of novel medical chaperones for treating prion diseases. PMID:25217639

  18. The Effect of pH on Globular State of Lipase-3646; an Appropriate Model for Molten Globule Investigations.

    PubMed

    Golaki, Bahram Pooreydy; Aminzadeh, Saeed; Karkhane, Ali Asghar; Yakhchali, Bagher; Farrokh, Parisa; Jazii, Ferdous Rastgar; Nadimifar, Mohammadsadegh

    2015-08-01

    Secondary structure content of proteins in molten globule state is relatively constant while the quantity of tertiary structures clearly declines due to alterations in side-chain packing. In the present study, we analyze the MG state of lipase-3646 for the first time. We introduce lipase-3646 as an appropriate model for investigating the properties and behavior of a protein in MG state as well as folding pathway. Applying fluorescence spectroscopy we measured both intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence of lipase-3646 in a pH range from 1.0 to 12.0. It was found that at pH 3.0 the protein acquires a MG state. Applying far-UV circular dichroism (CD), our analysis on the secondary structure of lipase-3646 revealed a slight change in the MG state intermediate (pH 3.0) compared to the native state (pH 8.5), which this amount of change is common for MG. Measurements in near-UV CD also showed a significant change in the enzyme conformation at pH 3.0 in comparison with the pH 8.5 wherein the protein acquires its native structure. Quenching the fluorescence by applying acrylamide, the amount 23 and 35 M(-1) were measured at pHs 8.5 and 3.0 respectively for stern-volmer constant (KSV). An increase in the enzyme molecular volume in the MG state was confirmed by gel filtration chromatography. PMID:26239273

  19. The molten globule of β(2)-microglobulin accumulated at pH 4 and its role in protein folding.

    PubMed

    Mukaiyama, Atsushi; Nakamura, Takashi; Makabe, Koki; Maki, Kosuke; Goto, Yuji; Kuwajima, Kunihiro

    2013-01-23

    The acid transition of β(2)-microglobulin (β2m) was studied by tryptophan fluorescence, peptide circular dichroism, and NMR spectroscopy. The protein exhibits a three-state transition with an equilibrium intermediate accumulated at pH4 (25°C). The pH4 intermediate has typical characteristics of the molten globule (MG) state; it showed a native-like secondary structure without specific side-chain tertiary structure, and the hydrodynamic radius determined by pulse field gradient NMR was only 20% larger than that of the native state. The accumulation of the pH4 intermediate is very analogous to the behavior of apomyoglobin, for which the pH4 MG has been well characterized, although β2m, a β-protein, is structurally very different from α-helical apomyoglobin. NMR pH titration of histidine residues of β2m has also indicated that His84 has an abnormally low pK(a) value in the native state. From the pH dependence of the unfolding transition, the protonations of this histidine and 10 weakly abnormal carboxylates triggered the transition from the native to the MG state. This behavior is again analogous to that of apomyoglobin, suggesting a common mechanism of production of the pH4 MG. In contrast to the folding of apomyoglobin, in which the MG was equivalent to the burst-phase kinetic folding intermediate, the burst-phase refolding intermediate of β2m, detected by stopped-flow circular dichroism, was significantly more structured than the pH4 intermediate. It is proposed that the folding of β2m from its acid-denatured state takes place in the following order: denatured state→MG→burst-phase intermediate→native state. PMID:23154171

  20. The Geologic History of Mars: An Astrobiology Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K.; Westall, Frances; McKay, David S.; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie; Socki, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    Fourteen SNC meteorites contain information which must be incorporated with recent spaceflight data for developing Mars' geologic history. SNCs have crystallization ages of 4500 to 160 m.y. Tle oldest meteorite ALH84001 contains information on the Noachian period of Mars' history. There are no meteorites from the Hesperian period and the remaining 13 meteorites fall into two age groups within the Amazonian: The nakhlites around 1300 m.y. and the shergottites between 800-160 m.y. Oxygen isotopic analysis of Martian samples shows two distinct O2 reservoirs throughout Martian history indicating late additions of volatiles and a lack of plate tectonics prior to 3.9 Gy. Evidence for percolation of aqueous brines through impact-produced fractures in the rocky surface is contained in the 3.9 Gy-old ALH84001 carbonate deposits. These carbonates precipitated at approx. 100 C. At this time life had already evolved on Earth. Early Mars could have hosted life similar to the bacteria that inhabited early Earth. Potential microorganisms could have been transported into fractures by carbonate-bearing waters and their remains could have become incorporated into the precipitated carbonate. Since Mars had a weak magnetic field at this time, it can be hypothesized that some of the Martian microorganisms may have been similar to terrestrial magnetotactic bacteria. Over geologic time episodic cratering, and tectonic events have occurred on Mars along with the periodic release of subsurface waters which may have produced clays within SNC meteorites. The geochemical data contained within SNC meteorites complements previous observational data and the recent Mars Global Surveyor data to provide a geological and environmental history which spans almost the entire lifespan on Mars. One of the outstanding features of this model is the possible creation of an early (about 4 Gy) volatile reservoir distinct from the outgassed Mars volatiles, and the persistence of this reservoir throughout most

  1. What we have learned about Mars from SNC meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    lithosphere, but it is in isotopic equilibrium with the atmosphere and has been since 1.3 Ga. The isotopically heavy atmosphere/hydrosphere composition deduced from these rocks reflects a loss process more severe than current atmospheric evolution models, and the occurence of carbonates in SNC meteorites suggest that they, rather than scapolite or hydrous carbonates, are the major crustal sink for CO2. Weathering products in SNC meteorites support the idea of limited alteration of the lithosphere by small volumes of saline, CO2-bearing water. Atmospheric composition and evolution are further constrained by noble gases in these meteorites, although Xe and Kr isotopes suggest different origins for the atmosphere. Planetary ejection of these rocks has promoted an advance in the understanding of impact physics, which has been accomplished by a model involving spallation during large cratering events. Ejection of all the SNC meteorites (except ALH84001) in one or two events may provide a plausible solution to most constraints imposed by chronology, geochemistry, and cosmic ray exposure, although problems remain with this scenario; ALH84001 may represent older martian crust sampled during a separate impact.

  2. Magnetotactic bacteria on Earth and on Mars.

    PubMed

    McKay, Christopher P; Friedmann, E Imre; Frankel, Richard B; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2003-01-01

    Continued interest in the possibility of evidence for life in the ALH84001 Martian meteorite has focused on the magnetite crystals. This review is structured around three related questions: is the magnetite in ALH84001 of biological or non-biological origin, or a mixture of both? does magnetite on Earth provide insight to the plausibility of biogenic magnetite on Mars? could magnetotaxis have developed on Mars? There are credible arguments for both the biological and non-biological origin of the magnetite in ALH84001, and we suggest that more studies of ALH84001, extensive laboratory simulations of non-biological magnetite formation, as well as further studies of magnetotactic bacteria on Earth will be required to further address this question. Magnetite grains produced by bacteria could provide one of the few inorganic traces of past bacterial life on Mars that could be recovered from surface soils and sediments. If there was biogenic magnetite on Mars in sufficient abundance to leave fossil remains in the volcanic rocks of ALH84001, then it is likely that better-preserved magnetite will be found in sedimentary deposits on Mars. Deposits in ancient lakebeds could contain well-preserved chains of magnetite clearly indicating a biogenic origin.

  3. Magnetotactic bacteria on Earth and on Mars.

    PubMed

    McKay, Christopher P; Friedmann, E Imre; Frankel, Richard B; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2003-01-01

    Continued interest in the possibility of evidence for life in the ALH84001 Martian meteorite has focused on the magnetite crystals. This review is structured around three related questions: is the magnetite in ALH84001 of biological or non-biological origin, or a mixture of both? does magnetite on Earth provide insight to the plausibility of biogenic magnetite on Mars? could magnetotaxis have developed on Mars? There are credible arguments for both the biological and non-biological origin of the magnetite in ALH84001, and we suggest that more studies of ALH84001, extensive laboratory simulations of non-biological magnetite formation, as well as further studies of magnetotactic bacteria on Earth will be required to further address this question. Magnetite grains produced by bacteria could provide one of the few inorganic traces of past bacterial life on Mars that could be recovered from surface soils and sediments. If there was biogenic magnetite on Mars in sufficient abundance to leave fossil remains in the volcanic rocks of ALH84001, then it is likely that better-preserved magnetite will be found in sedimentary deposits on Mars. Deposits in ancient lakebeds could contain well-preserved chains of magnetite clearly indicating a biogenic origin. PMID:14577877

  4. Magnetotactic bacteria on Earth and on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher P.; Friedmann, E. Imre; Frankel, Richard B.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.

    2003-01-01

    Continued interest in the possibility of evidence for life in the ALH84001 Martian meteorite has focused on the magnetite crystals. This review is structured around three related questions: is the magnetite in ALH84001 of biological or non-biological origin, or a mixture of both? does magnetite on Earth provide insight to the plausibility of biogenic magnetite on Mars? could magnetotaxis have developed on Mars? There are credible arguments for both the biological and non-biological origin of the magnetite in ALH84001, and we suggest that more studies of ALH84001, extensive laboratory simulations of non-biological magnetite formation, as well as further studies of magnetotactic bacteria on Earth will be required to further address this question. Magnetite grains produced by bacteria could provide one of the few inorganic traces of past bacterial life on Mars that could be recovered from surface soils and sediments. If there was biogenic magnetite on Mars in sufficient abundance to leave fossil remains in the volcanic rocks of ALH84001, then it is likely that better-preserved magnetite will be found in sedimentary deposits on Mars. Deposits in ancient lakebeds could contain well-preserved chains of magnetite clearly indicating a biogenic origin.

  5. Magnetotactic Bacteria on Earth and on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Christopher P.; Friedmann, E. Imre; Frankel, Richard B.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.

    2003-06-01

    Continued interest in the possibility of evidence for life in the ALH84001 Martian meteorite has focused on the magnetite crystals. This review is structured around three related questions: Is the magnetite in ALH84001 of biological or non-biological origin, or a mixture of both? Does magnetite on Earth provide insight to the plausibility of biogenic magnetite on Mars? Could magnetotaxis have developed on Mars? There are credible arguments for both the biological and non-biological origin of the magnetite in ALH84001, and we suggest that more studies of ALH84001, extensive laboratory simulations of non-biological magnetite formation, as well as further studies of magnetotactic bacteria on Earth will be required to further address this question. Magnetite grains produced by bacteria could provide one of the few inorganic traces of past bacterial life on Mars that could be recovered from surface soils and sediments. If there was biogenic magnetite on Mars in sufficient abundance to leave fossil remains in the volcanic rocks of ALH84001, then it is likely that better-preserved magnetite will be found in sedimentary deposits on Mars. Deposits in ancient lakebeds could contain well-preserved chains of magnetite clearly indicating a biogenic origin.

  6. Mineralization of Bacteria in Terrestrial Basaltic Rocks: Comparison With Possible Biogenic Features in Martian Meteorite Allan Hills 84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; McKay, D. S.; Wentworth, S. J.; Stevens, T. O.; Taunton, A. E.; Allen, C. C.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Romanek, C. S.

    1998-01-01

    The identification of biogenic features altered by diagenesis or mineralization is important in determining whether specific features in terrestrial rocks and in meteorites may have a biogenic origin. Unfortunately, few studies have addressed the formation of biogenic features in igneous rocks, which may be important to these phenomena, including the controversy over possible biogenic features in basaltic martian meteorite ALH84001. To explore the presence of biogenic features in igneous rocks, we examined microcosms growing in basaltic small-scale experimental growth chambers or microcosms. Microbial communities were harvested from aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt (CRB) group and grown in a microcosm containing unweathered basalt chips and groundwater (technique described in. These microcosms simulated natural growth conditions in the deep subsurface of the CRB, which should be a good terrestrial analog for any putative martian subsurface ecosystem that may have once included ALH84001. Here we present new size measurements and photomicrographs comparing the putative martian fossils to biogenic material in the CRB microcosms. The range of size and shapes of the biogenic features on the CRB microcosm chips overlaps with and is similar to those on ALH84001 chips. Although this present work does not provide evidence for the biogenicity of ALH84001 features, we believe that, based on criteria of size, shape, and general morphology, a biogenic interpretation for the ALH84001 features remains plausible.

  7. Biochemical and histological characterization of antigens preferentially expressed on the surface and cytoplasm of breast carcinoma cells identified by monoclonal antibodies against the human milk fat globule.

    PubMed

    Peterson, J A; Zava, D T; Duwe, A K; Blank, E W; Battifora, H; Ceriani, R L

    1990-06-01

    The preparation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the human milk fat globule membrane with preferential binding to breast carcinoma cells is described. Using BALB/c mouse myeloma cells; inter-specific, intra-strain, and inter-strain hybridomas were isolated that identified three different components of the human milk fat globule of approximately 46,000, and 70,000 daltons and a mucin-like glycoprotein complex (NPGP) ranging from 400,000 to over a million daltons, respectively. Three MAbs (BrE1, BrE2, BrE3) identified the latter component which consists of at least three different size molecules for which the aforementioned MAb's have different binding specificities. MAbs, BrE2 and BrE3, bound to normal breast epithelial cells but to a lesser extent than to tumors and only at the apical surface facing the lumen, while they bound breast carcinomas strongly, and often in the cytoplasm as well as on the surface. Higher concentrations of BrE3 were required to stain normal breast compared to breast tumors. BrE1 also stained breast carcinomas both on the surface and cytoplasmically but did not stain normal breast tissue. The MAb, Mc13, as well as the previously reported MAb McR2, both against the 70,000 dalton component, did not significantly stain either normal or cancerous breast tissue in histological sections but did bind significantly to cultured breast epithelial cells and to the milk fat globule membrane. The MAbs, Mc8 and Mc3, reported previously to be against the 46,000 dalton component, stained histologically only malignant breast tissue but only weakly; however, they bound strongly to intact breast carcinoma cells and breast cell membrane preparations with a radioimmunobinding assay. These MAbs should be useful in characterizing the surface of breast epithelial cells, studying surface alterations in malignancy, and possibly in breast cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  8. Vibrational coherence from van der Waals modes in the native and molten-globule states of ZnII-substituted cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Dillman, Kevin L; Beck, Warren F

    2011-07-01

    The low-frequency vibrational coherence from Zn(II)-substituted cytochrome c (ZnCytc) was characterized at room temperature in the native and acid/high-salt molten-globule states using femtosecond pump-probe, dynamic-absorption spectroscopy and impulsive excitation of the Soret absorption band. The pump-probe signals observed from the native state contain two types of modulation components in the vibrational coherence. The first type is a set of slowly damped (damping time γ > 1.5 ps) components with frequencies of 10, 30, 70, and 120 cm(-1) that are assigned to out-of-plane vibrations of the porphyrin macrocycle following similar assignments in other porphyrin systems. A similar set of components is observed in the pump-probe signal from the molten-globule state, but the signal is much less strongly modulated. The second type is a strong, very rapidly damped (γ < 150 fs) 79 cm(-1) modulation component that is assigned to van der Waals interactions between the porphyrin and nonpolar groups in its first solvation shell from the surrounding protein structure; the line shape and intensity of this component are comparable to those observed previously for bacteriochlorophyll a and Zn(II)meso-tetrakis(N-methylpyridyl)porphyrin in solution. This component is almost completely absent from the signal from the molten-globule state. The results suggest that the van der Waals modes obtain intensity enhancement in the vibrational coherence because the attacking groups are displaced by the change of extent and/or change in shape of the π-electron density that accompanies the π → π* optical transition of the Zn(II) porphyrin. In the molten-globule state of ZnCytc, owing to the expanded hydrophobic core and to the loss of order for the groups that attack the π-electron density of the Zn(II) porphyrin, the van der Waals modes are rendered effectively inactive. These results support an assignment of the broad low-frequency background in the spectrum of the vibrational

  9. Fossilized microorganisms associated with zeolite-carbonate interfaces in sub-seafloor hydrothermal environments.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, M; Lindblom, S; Broman, C; Holm, N G

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we describe carbon-rich filamentous structures observed in association with the zeolite mineral phillipsite from sub-seafloor samples drilled and collected during the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 197 at the Emperor Seamounts. The filamentous structures are approximately 5 microm thick and approximately 100-200 microm in length. They are found attached to phillipsite surfaces in veins and entombed in vein-filling carbonates. The carbon content of the filaments ranges between approximately 10 wt% C and 55 wt% C. They further bind to propidium iodide (PI), which is a dye that binds to damaged cell membranes and remnants of DNA. Carbon-rich globular microstructures, 1-2 microm in diameter, are also found associated with the phillipsite surfaces as well as within wedge-shaped cavities in phillipsite assemblages. The globules have a carbon content that range between approximately 5 wt% C and 55 wt% C and they bind to PI. Ordinary globular iron oxides found throughout the samples differ in that they contain no carbon and do not bind to the dye PI. The carbon-rich globules are mostly concentrated to a film-like structure that is attached to the phillipsite surfaces. This film has a carbon content that ranges between approximately 25 wt% C and 75 wt% C and partially binds to PI. EDS analyses show that the carbon in all structures described are not associated with calcium and therefore not bound in carbonates. The carbon content and the binding to PI may indicate that the filamentous structures could represent fossilized filamentous microorganisms, the globules could represent fossilized microbial cells and the film-like structures could represent a microbially produced biofilm. Our results extend the knowledge of possible habitable niches for a deep biosphere in sub-seafloor environments and suggests, as phillipsite is one of the most common zeolite mineral in volcanic rocks of the oceanic crust, that it could be a common feature in the oceanic crust

  10. Heterogeneity of equilibrium molten globule state of cytochrome c induced by weak salt denaturants under physiological condition.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Hamidur; Alam Khan, Md Khurshid; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Islam, Asimul; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Ahmad, Faizan

    2015-01-01

    While many proteins are recognized to undergo folding via intermediate(s), the heterogeneity of equilibrium folding intermediate(s) along the folding pathway is less understood. In our present study, FTIR spectroscopy, far- and near-UV circular dichroism (CD), ANS and tryptophan fluorescence, near IR absorbance spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were used to study the structural and thermodynamic characteristics of the native (N), denatured (D) and intermediate state (X) of goat cytochorme c (cyt-c) induced by weak salt denaturants (LiBr, LiCl and LiClO4) at pH 6.0 and 25°C. The LiBr-induced denaturation of cyt-c measured by Soret absorption (Δε400) and CD ([θ]409), is a three-step process, N ↔ X ↔ D. It is observed that the X state obtained along the denaturation pathway of cyt-c possesses common structural and thermodynamic characteristics of the molten globule (MG) state. The MG state of cyt-c induced by LiBr is compared for its structural and thermodynamic parameters with those found in other solvent conditions such as LiCl, LiClO4 and acidic pH. Our observations suggest: (1) that the LiBr-induced MG state of cyt-c retains the native Met80-Fe(III) axial bond and Trp59-propionate interactions; (2) that LiBr-induced MG state of cyt-c is more compact retaining the hydrophobic interactions in comparison to the MG states induced by LiCl, LiClO4 and 0.5 M NaCl at pH 2.0; and (3) that there exists heterogeneity of equilibrium intermediates along the unfolding pathway of cyt-c as highly ordered (X1), classical (X2) and disordered (X3), i.e., D ↔ X3 ↔ X2 ↔ X1 ↔ N.

  11. Heterogeneity of Equilibrium Molten Globule State of Cytochrome c Induced by Weak Salt Denaturants under Physiological Condition

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Hamidur; Alam Khan, Md. Khurshid; Hassan, Md. Imtaiyaz; Islam, Asimul; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Ahmad, Faizan

    2015-01-01

    While many proteins are recognized to undergo folding via intermediate(s), the heterogeneity of equilibrium folding intermediate(s) along the folding pathway is less understood. In our present study, FTIR spectroscopy, far- and near-UV circular dichroism (CD), ANS and tryptophan fluorescence, near IR absorbance spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were used to study the structural and thermodynamic characteristics of the native (N), denatured (D) and intermediate state (X) of goat cytochorme c (cyt-c) induced by weak salt denaturants (LiBr, LiCl and LiClO4) at pH 6.0 and 25°C. The LiBr-induced denaturation of cyt-c measured by Soret absorption (Δε400) and CD ([θ]409), is a three-step process, N ↔ X ↔ D. It is observed that the X state obtained along the denaturation pathway of cyt-c possesses common structural and thermodynamic characteristics of the molten globule (MG) state. The MG state of cyt-c induced by LiBr is compared for its structural and thermodynamic parameters with those found in other solvent conditions such as LiCl, LiClO4 and acidic pH. Our observations suggest: (1) that the LiBr-induced MG state of cyt-c retains the native Met80-Fe(III) axial bond and Trp59-propionate interactions; (2) that LiBr-induced MG state of cyt-c is more compact retaining the hydrophobic interactions in comparison to the MG states induced by LiCl, LiClO4 and 0.5 M NaCl at pH 2.0; and (3) that there exists heterogeneity of equilibrium intermediates along the unfolding pathway of cyt-c as highly ordered (X1), classical (X2) and disordered (X3), i.e., D ↔ X3 ↔ X2 ↔ X1 ↔ N. PMID:25849212

  12. Heterogeneity of equilibrium molten globule state of cytochrome c induced by weak salt denaturants under physiological condition.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Hamidur; Alam Khan, Md Khurshid; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Islam, Asimul; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Ahmad, Faizan

    2015-01-01

    While many proteins are recognized to undergo folding via intermediate(s), the heterogeneity of equilibrium folding intermediate(s) along the folding pathway is less understood. In our present study, FTIR spectroscopy, far- and near-UV circular dichroism (CD), ANS and tryptophan fluorescence, near IR absorbance spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were used to study the structural and thermodynamic characteristics of the native (N), denatured (D) and intermediate state (X) of goat cytochorme c (cyt-c) induced by weak salt denaturants (LiBr, LiCl and LiClO4) at pH 6.0 and 25°C. The LiBr-induced denaturation of cyt-c measured by Soret absorption (Δε400) and CD ([θ]409), is a three-step process, N ↔ X ↔ D. It is observed that the X state obtained along the denaturation pathway of cyt-c possesses common structural and thermodynamic characteristics of the molten globule (MG) state. The MG state of cyt-c induced by LiBr is compared for its structural and thermodynamic parameters with those found in other solvent conditions such as LiCl, LiClO4 and acidic pH. Our observations suggest: (1) that the LiBr-induced MG state of cyt-c retains the native Met80-Fe(III) axial bond and Trp59-propionate interactions; (2) that LiBr-induced MG state of cyt-c is more compact retaining the hydrophobic interactions in comparison to the MG states induced by LiCl, LiClO4 and 0.5 M NaCl at pH 2.0; and (3) that there exists heterogeneity of equilibrium intermediates along the unfolding pathway of cyt-c as highly ordered (X1), classical (X2) and disordered (X3), i.e., D ↔ X3 ↔ X2 ↔ X1 ↔ N. PMID:25849212

  13. Microstructure and properties of pure iron/copper composite cladding layers on carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Long; Huang, Yong-xian; Lü, Shi-xiong; Huang, Ti-fang; Lü, Zong-liang

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, pure iron/copper composite metal cladding was deposited onto carbon steel by tungsten inert gas welding. The study focused on interfacial morphological, microstructural, and mechanical analyses of the composite cladding layers. Iron liquid-solid-phase zones were formed at copper/steel and iron interfaces because of the melting of the steel substrate and iron. Iron concentrated in the copper cladding layer was observed to exhibit belt, globule, and dendrite morphologies. The appearance of iron-rich globules indicated the occurrence of liquid phase separation (LPS) prior to solidification, and iron-rich dendrites crystallized without the occurrence of LPS. The maximum microhardness of the iron/steel interface was lower than that of the copper/steel interface because of the diffusion of elemental carbon. All samples fractured in the cladding layers. Because of a relatively lower strength of the copper layer, a short plateau region appeared when shear movement was from copper to iron.

  14. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS IN SUPPORT OF CARBON DIOXIDE-LIMESTONE SEQUESTRATION IN THE OCEAN

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Golomb; Eugene Barry; David Ryan; Carl Lawton; Peter Swett; John Hannon; Huishan Duan

    2004-09-01

    In the second half of the second contractual year the construction of the High Pressure Flow Reactor (HPFR) was completed, tested, and satisfactory results have been obtained. The major component of the HPFR is a Kenics-type static mixer in which two fluids are thoroughly mixed. In our case the two fluids are liquid or supercritical CO{sub 2} and a slurry of pulverized limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) in pure or artificial seawater. The outflow from the static mixer is an emulsion consisting of CO{sub 2} droplets coated with a sheath of CaCO{sub 3} particles dispersed in water. The coated CO{sub 2} droplets are called globules, and the emulsion is called globulsion. By adjusting the proportions of the two fluids, carbon dioxide and water, the length and pressure drop across the static mixer, globules with a fairly uniform distribution of diameters can be obtained. By using different particle sizes of CaCO{sub 3}, globules can be obtained that are lighter or heavier than water, thus floating or sinking in a water column. The globulsion ensuing from the static mixer flows into a high pressure cell with windows, where the properties of the globules can be observed, such as their diameter and settling velocity. Using the Stokes' equation, the specific gravity of the globules can be determined. Also, a second generation High Pressure Batch Reactor (HPBR) was constructed. This reactor allows better mixing of the ingredients, more accurate temperature and pressure control, better illumination and video camera observations. In this reactor we established that CO{sub 2}-in-water globulsions can be formed stabilized by other particles than pulverized limestone. So far, we used flyash obtained from a local coal-fired power plant, and a pulverized magnesium silicate mineral, lizardite, Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}, obtained from DOE's Albany Research Laboratory. In the reporting period we conducted joint experiments in NETL's high pressure water tunnel facility. Thanks to the

  15. Functional Role of Milk Fat Globule-Epidermal Growth Factor VIII in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses and Inflammatory/Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation involves a series of complex biological processes mediated by innate immunity for host defense against pathogen infection. Chronic inflammation is considered to be one of the major causes of serious diseases, including a number of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases, cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and neurological diseases. Milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor 8 (MFG-E8) is a secreted protein found in vertebrates and was initially discovered as a critical component of the milk fat globule. Previously, a number of studies have reported that MFG-E8 contributes to various biological functions including the phagocytic removal of damaged and apoptotic cells from tissues, the induction of VEGF-mediated neovascularization, the maintenance of intestinal epithelial homeostasis, and the promotion of mucosal healing. Recently, emerging studies have reported that MFG-E8 plays a role in inflammatory responses and inflammatory/autoimmune diseases. This review describes the characteristics of MFG-E8-mediated signaling pathways, summarizes recent findings supporting the roles of MFG-E8 in inflammatory responses and inflammatory/autoimmune diseases, and discusses MFG-E8 targeting as a potential therapeutic strategy for the development of anti-inflammatory/autoimmune disease drugs. PMID:27429513

  16. Characterization of pre-molten globule state of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c and its deletants at pH 6.0 and 25 °C.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Anzarul; Ubaid-Ullah, Shah; Zaidi, Sobia; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Islam, Asimul; Batra, Janendra K; Ahmad, Faizan

    2015-01-01

    To understand the role of five extra N-terminal residues, we prepared wild type (WT) yeast iso-1-cytochrome c (y-cyt-c) and its deletants by subsequently deleting these residues. Denaturation of all these proteins induced by LiCl was followed by observing changes in molar absorption coefficient at 405 nm (Δɛ405), the mean residue ellipticity at 222 nm ([θ]222), and the difference mean residue ellipticity at 409 nm (Δ[θ]409) near physiological pH and temperature (pH 6.0 and 25 °C). It was observed that in each case LiCl induces biphasic transition, N (native) state ↔ X (intermediate) state ↔ D (denatured) state. The intermediate (X) was characterized by the far-UV, near-UV and Soret circular dichroism, ANS (8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid) binding and dynamic light scattering measurements. These measurements led us to conclude that X state of each protein has structural characteristics of PMG (pre-molten globule) state. Thermodynamic stability of all proteins was also determined. It was observed that the N-terminal extension stabilizes the native WT protein but it has no effect on the stability of PMG state. Another state was observed for each protein, in the presence of 0.33 M Na2SO4 at pH 2.1, which when characterized showed all structural characteristics of MG (molten globule) state. PMID:25450045

  17. Non-equilibrium effects evidenced by vibrational spectra during the coil-to-globule transition in poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) subjected to an ultrafast heating-cooling cycle.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sanket A; Kamath, Ganesh; Suthar, Kamlesh J; Mancini, Derrick C; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S

    2014-03-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with finite element calculations are used to explore the conformational dynamics of a thermo-sensitive oligomer, namely poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM), subjected to an ultra-fast heating-cooling cycle. Finite element (FE) calculations were used to predict the temperature profile resulting from laser-induced heating of the polymer-aqueous system. The heating rate (∼0.6 K ps(-1)) deduced from FE calculations was used to heat an aqueous solution of PNIPAM consisting of 30 monomeric units (30-mer) from 285 K to 315 K. Non-equilibrium effects arising from the ultra-fast heating-cooling cycle results in a hysteresis during the coil-to-globule transition. The corresponding atomic scale conformations were characterized by monitoring the changes in the vibrational spectra, which provided a reliable metric to study the coil-to-globule transition in PNIPAM and vice-versa across the LCST. The vibrational spectra of bonds involving atoms from the oligomer backbone and the various side-groups (amide I, amide II, and the isopropyl group of PNIPAM) of the oligomers were analyzed to study the conformational changes in the oligomer corresponding to the observed hysteresis. The differences in the vibrational spectra calculated at various temperatures during heating and cooling cycles were used to understand the coil-to-globule and globule-to-coil transitions in the PNIPAM oligomer and identify the changes in the relative interactions between various atoms in the backbone and in the side groups of the oligomer with water. The shifts in the computed vibrational spectral peaks and the changes in the intensity of peaks for the different regions of PNIPAM, seen across the LCST during the heating cycle, are in good agreement with previous experimental studies. The changes in the radius of gyration (Rg) and vibrational spectra for amide I and amide II regions of PNIPAM suggest a clear coil-to-globule transition at ∼301 K during the

  18. A study of xenon isotopes in a martian meteorite using the RELAX ultrasensitive mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Whitby, J A; Gilmour, J D; Turner, G

    1997-01-15

    The Refrigerator Enhanced Analyser for Xenon (RELAX), an ultrasensitive resonance ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer, has been used with a laser microprobe to investigate the isotopic composition of xenon trapped in the martian meteorite ALH84001. The laser microprobe has a spatial resolution of the order of 100{mu}m thus allowing the in situ analysis of individual mineral grains in a polished section when combined with ultrasensitive, low blank sample analysis. We present results showing that the mineral orthopyroxene in ALH84001 contains a trapped xenon component consistent with a martian origin. Additionally, a cosmic ray exposure age of 15Ma for ALH84001 is obtained from spallation derived xenon trapped within an apatite grain.

  19. Amino Acids in the Antarctic Martian Meteorite MIL03346

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Aubrey, A.; Dworkin, J. P.; Botta, O.; Bada, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    The report by McKay et al. that the Martian meteorite ALH84001 contains evidence for life on Mars remains controversial. Of central importance is whether ALH84001 and other Antarctic Martian meteorites contain endogenous organic compounds. In any investigation of organic compounds possibly derived from Mars it is important to focus on compounds that play an essential role in biochemistry as we know it and that have properties such as chirality which can be used to distinguish between biotic versus abiotic origins. Amino acids are one of the few compounds that fulfill these requirements. Previous analyses of the Antarctic Martian meteorites ALH84001 and EETA79001 have shown that these meteorites contain low levels of terrestrial amino acid contamination derived from Antarctic ice meltwater. Here we report preliminary amino acid investigations of a third Antarctic Martian meteorite MIL03346 which was discovered in Antarctica during the 2003-04 ANSMET season. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract

  20. Life from Mars? The story and its implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Score, R.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Jakosky, B.; Yarus, M.

    1997-02-01

    After the announcement on 7 August 1996 by NASA officials that traces of fossil microbes have been detected in meteorite ALH84001, a symposium was held on 29 August 1996, at Boulder, Colorado, where scholars from a range of disciplines discussed the evidence for life on Mars and its implications. This special issue presents articles based on several of the talks given at that symposium. These papers include: 1. The thrill of the search - finding ALH84001 (R. Score). 2. Uncovering Martians hidden among us - the source of ALH84001 (D. W. Mittlefehldt). 3. Laying out the evidence - the case for life on Mars (B. Jakosky). 4. Is the case persuasive? A skeptical view (M. Yarus).

  1. Extinct Life on Mars: Looking for Traces of Viruses Instead of Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksanfomality, Leonid

    The finds in the ALH 84001 meteorite were reported as a sign of traces and fossils of ancient Martian primitive life. Despite many experiments, the issue has not been settled. A study of geochemical data suggests that simple inorganic processes sometimes offer a more plausible explanation of the suspicious structures found in the ALH 84001 meteorite that had been discussed by many authors. A photo of certain micro structures got in the paper of N. Yushkin (Fig. 1) proves the point. (Figure: The inorganic structures in granites.) It is known that viruses possess an ability to survive under very severe external conditions. The Martian biogenic activity (if any) could leave its virus' sign. Thus it could make a sense to look for viruses or even DNA traces both in the body of the ALH 84001 meteorite and on Mars in future space missions instead of traces of the extinct bacteria.

  2. Independent of their localization in protein the hydrophobic amino acid residues have no effect on the molten globule state of apomyoglobin and the disulfide bond on the surface of apomyoglobin stabilizes this intermediate state.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Tatiana N; Majorina, Maria A; Larina, Daria S; Kashparov, Ivan A; Samatova, Ekaterina N; Glukhov, Anatoly S; Melnik, Bogdan S

    2014-01-01

    At present it is unclear which interactions in proteins reveal the presence of intermediate states, their stability and formation rate. In this study, we have investigated the effect of substitutions of hydrophobic amino acid residues in the hydrophobic core of protein and on its surface on a molten globule type intermediate state of apomyoglobin. It has been found that independent of their localization in protein, substitutions of hydrophobic amino acid residues do not affect the stability of the molten globule state of apomyoglobin. It has been shown also that introduction of a disulfide bond on the protein surface can stabilize the molten globule state. However in the case of apomyoglobin, stabilization of the intermediate state leads to relative destabilization of the native state of apomyoglobin. The result obtained allows us not only to conclude which mutations can have an effect on the intermediate state of the molten globule type, but also explains why the introduction of a disulfide bond (which seems to "strengthen" the protein) can result in destabilization of the protein native state of apomyoglobin. PMID:24892675

  3. Primary ductal adenocarcinoma of the lacrimal gland, associated with abundant intracytoplasmic lumens containing some eosinophilic hyaline globules: cytological, histological and ultrastructural findings.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyueng-Whan; Park, Hyung Kyu; Kim, Wook Youn; Kim, Wan-Seop; Lim, So Dug; Han, Hye Seung; Hwang, Tae Sook

    2014-10-01

    A primary ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) of the lacrimal gland is a rare distinct subtype of an epithelial tumor arising in the lacrimal gland. PDA is the counterpart of salivary duct carcinoma (SDC) resembling an invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast. In our case, PDA revealed histopathological and immunohistochemical results corresponding to SDC. Interestingly, the tumor cells showed intracytoplasmic vacuoles containing dense eosinophilic hyaline globules at light microscopy. Ultrastructurally, the tumor cells exhibited microvilli-lined intracytoplasmic lumen containing homogenous electron-dense secretory products. A previous study demonstrated that numerous intracytoplasmic lumens of tumor cells are favored breast malignant tumor, similar to the histopathology of PDA, rather than benign lesion. This characteristic finding may be meaningful to diagnose high grade epithelial tumors including PDA.

  4. Ferromagnetic resonance and low-temperature magnetic tests for biogenic magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Sam Kim, Soon; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Kopp, Robert E.; Sankaran, Mohan; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Komeili, Arash

    2004-07-01

    Magnetite is both a common inorganic rock-forming mineral and a biogenic product formed by a diversity of organisms. Magnetotactic bacteria produce intracellular magnetites of high purity and crystallinity (magnetosomes) arranged in linear chains of crystals. Magnetosomes and their fossils (magnetofossils) have been identified using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in sediments dating back to ˜510-570 Ma, and possibly in 4 Ga carbonates in Martian meteorite ALH84001. We present the results from two rock magnetic analyses—the low-temperature Moskowitz test and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR)—applied to dozens of samples of magnetite and other materials. The magnetites in these samples are of diverse composition, size, shape, and origin: biologically induced (extracellular), biologically controlled (magnetosomes and chiton teeth), magnetofossil, synthetic, and natural inorganic. We confirm that the Moskowitz test is a distinctive indicator for magnetotactic bacteria and provide the first direct experimental evidence that this is accomplished via sensitivity to the magnetosome chain structure. We also demonstrate that the FMR spectra of four different strains of magnetotactic bacteria and a magnetofossil-bearing carbonate have a form distinct from all other samples measured in this study. We suggest that this signature also results from the magnetosomes' unique arrangement in chains. Because FMR can rapidly identify samples with large fractions of intact, isolated magnetosome chains, it could be a powerful tool for identifying magnetofossils in sediments.

  5. Evidence for Past Life on Early Mars: How the Evidence Stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Everett K.; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; McKay, David S.; Romanek, Christopher; Wentworth, Susan J.

    2004-06-01

    Martian Meteorite ALH84001 contains four unusual features which have been interpreted as possible signatures of relic biogenic activity. After six years of intense study by the world's scientific community, the current status of the biogenic hypothesis is reviewed and shown to still be valid. Furthermore additional features have been observed in two younger Martian meteorites. The strongest argument for possible evidence of biogenic activity within the ALH84001 meteorite is the presence of truncated hexa-octahedral magnetite crystals which are only known on Earth to be the products of biology.

  6. Hydrolysis of bovine and caprine milk fat globules by lipoprotein lipase. Effects of heparin and skim milk on lipase distribution and on lipolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sundheim, G.; Bengtsson-Olivecrona, G.

    1987-12-01

    Heparin can dissociate lipoprotein lipase from casein micelles, and addition of heparin enhances lipolysis in bovine but not in caprine milk. Heparin shortened the lag-time for binding of lipoprotein lipase to milk fat globules and for lipolysis. Heparin counteracted the inhibitory effects of skim milk on binding of lipase and on lipolysis. Heparin stimulated lipolysis in all bovine milk samples when added before cooling and in spontaneously lipolytic milk samples also when added after cooling. Heparin enhanced lipolysis of isolated milk fat globules. Hence, its effect is not solely due to dissociation of lipoprotein lipase from the casein micelles. Cooling of goat milk caused more marked changes in the distribution of lipase than cooling of bovine milk; the fraction of added /sup 125/I-labeled lipase that bound to cream increased from about 8 to 60%. In addition, caprine skim milk caused less inhibition of lipolysis than bovine skim milk. These observations provide an explanation for the high degree of cold storage lipolysis in goat milk. Heparin had only small effects on the distribution of lipoprotein lipase in caprine milk, which explains why heparin has so little effect on lipolysis in caprine milk. The distribution of /sup 35/S-labeled heparin in bovine milk was studied. In warm milk less than 10% bound to the cream fraction, but when milk was cooled, binding of heparin to cream increased to 45%. These results suggest that there exists in the skim fraction a relatively small amount of a heparin-binding protein, which on cooling of milk adsorbs to the milk fat, or suggests that cooling induces a conformational change in a membrane protein such that its affinity for heparin increases.

  7. Cooling causes changes in the distribution of lipoprotein lipase and milk fat globule membrane proteins between the skim milk and cream phase.

    PubMed

    Dickow, J A; Larsen, L B; Hammershøj, M; Wiking, L

    2011-02-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity and free fatty acid levels were studied in freshly milked, uncooled milk from individual Danish Holstein or Jersey cows, or after storage for up to 24h at either a cooling temperature (4°C) or at the milking temperature (31°C). Upon cooling for up to 24h, LPL activity increased in the cream phase, whereas the activity in the skim milk was steady, as observed for Jersey cows, or increased, as seen for the Holsteins. Storage at 31°C decreased the LPL activity in both the cream phase and the skim milk phase. The increase in free fatty acid levels was found to depend on LPL activity, incubation temperature, substrate availability, and incubation time. Furthermore, the migration of milk proteins between the skim milk phase and the cream phase upon cooling of milk from Jersey cows or from Danish Holstein cows was studied using proteomic methods involving 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Proteins associated with the milk fat globules were isolated from all milk fractions and analyzed. Major changes in the distributions of proteins between the skim milk phase and the cream phase were observed after cooling at 4°C for 4h, where a total of 29 proteins between the 2 breeds was found to change their association with the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) significantly. Among these, the MFGM proteins adipophilin, fatty acid-binding protein, and lactadherin, as well as the non-MFGM proteins β-casein, lactoferrin, and heat shock protein-71, were identified. Adipophilin, lactadherin, and lactoferrin were quantitatively more associated with the MFGM upon cold storage at 4°C, whereas β-casein, fatty acid-binding protein, and heat shock protein-71 were found to be less associated with the MFGM upon cold storage.

  8. Cholesterol Decreases the Size and the Mechanical Resistance to Rupture of Sphingomyelin Rich Domains, in Lipid Bilayers Studied as a Model of the Milk Fat Globule Membrane.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Appala Venkata Ramana; Guyomarc'h, Fanny; Lopez, Christelle

    2016-07-01

    Sphingomyelin-rich microdomains have been observed in the biological membrane surrounding milk fat globules (MFGM). The role played by cholesterol in these domains and in the physical properties and functions of the MFGM remains poorly understood. The objective of this work was therefore to investigate the phase state, topography, and mechanical properties of MFGM polar lipid bilayers as a function of cholesterol concentration, by combining X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy imaging, and force spectroscopy. At room temperature, i.e. below the phase transition temperature of the MFGM polar lipids, the bilayers showed the formation of sphingomyelin-rich domains in the solid ordered (so) phase that protruded about 1 nm above the liquid disordered (ld) phase. These so phase domains have a higher mechanical resistance to rupture than the ld phase (30 nN versus 15 nN). Addition of cholesterol in the MFGM polar lipid bilayers (i) induced the formation of liquid ordered (lo) phase for up to 27 mol % in the bilayers, (ii) decreased the height difference between the thicker ordered domains and the surrounding ld phase, (iii) promoted the formation of small sized domains, and (iv) decreased the mechanical resistance to rupture of the sphingomyelin-rich domains down to ∼5 nN. The biological and functional relevance of the lo phase cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich domains in the membrane surrounding fat globules in milk remains to be elucidated. This study brought new insight about the functional role of cholesterol in milk polar lipid ingredients, which can be used in the preparation of food emulsions, e.g. infant milk formulas. PMID:27300157

  9. Bacteria in the Tatahouine meteorite: nanometric-scale life in rocks.

    PubMed

    Gillet, P h; Barrat, J A; Heulin, T h; Achouak, W; Lesourd, M; Guyot, F; Benzerara, K

    2000-02-15

    We present a study of the textural signature of terrestrial weathering and related biological activity in the Tatahouine meteorite. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy images obtained on the weathered samples of the Tatahouine meteorite and surrounding soil show two types of bacteria-like forms lying on mineral surfaces: (1) rod-shaped forms (RSF) about 70-80 nm wide and ranging from 100 nm to 600 nm in length; (2) ovoid forms (OVF) with diameters between 70 and 300 nm. They look like single cells surrounded by a cell wall. Only Na, K, C, O and N with traces of P and S are observed in the bulk of these objects. The chemical analyses and electron diffraction patterns confirm that the RSF and OVF cannot be magnetite or other iron oxides, iron hydroxides, silicates or carbonates. The sizes of the RSF and OVF are below those commonly observed for bacteria but are very similar to some bacteria-like forms described in the Martian meteorite ALH84001. All the previous observations strongly suggest that they are bacteria or their remnants. This conclusion is further supported by microbiological experiments in which pleomorphic bacteria with morphology similar to the OVF and RSF objects are obtained from biological culture of the soil surrounding the meteorite pieces. The present results show that bacteriomorphs of diameter less than 100 nm may in fact represent real bacteria or their remnants. PMID:11543579

  10. Mars Atmospheric Composition, Isotope Ratios and Seasonal Variations: Overview and Updates of the SAM Measurements at Gale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We will summarize the in situ measurements of atmospheric composition and the isotopic ratios of D/H in water, C-13/C-12, O-18/O-16, O-17 / O-16, and C-13 O-18 / C-12 O-16 in carbon dioxide, and Ar-38 / Ar-36, Kr-x / Kr-84, and N-15 / N-14 made in the martian atmosphere at Gale Crater from the Curiosity Rover using the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM)'s Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS) and Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS). With data over 700 sols since the Curiosity landing, we will discuss evidence and implications for changes on seasonal and other timescales. We will also present results for continued methane and methane enrichment experiments over this time period. Comparison between our measurements in the modern atmosphere and those of martian meteorites like ALH 84001 implies that the martian reservoirs of CO2 and H2O were largely established approximately 4 billion years ago, but that atmospheric loss or surface interaction may be still ongoing.

  11. Nanobacteria from blood: the smallest culturable autonomously replicating agent on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajander, E. Olavi; Kuronen, Ilpo; Akerman, Kari K.; Pelttari, Alpo; Ciftcioglu, Neva

    1997-07-01

    Nanobacteria are the first mineral forming bacteria isolated from blood and blood products. They are coccoid cell-walled organisms with a size of 0.08 - 0.5 micrometers in EM, occure in clusters, produce a biofilm containing carbonate or hydroxyl apatite, and are highly resistant to heat, gamma-irradiation and antibiotics. Their growth rate is about one hundredth that of ordinary bacteria and they divide via several mechanisms. Taq polymerase was able to use their nontraditional nucleic acid as a template. 16S rRNA gene sequence results positioned them into the alpha-2 subgroup of Proteobacteria. Nanobacteria are smallest cell-walled bacteria since they can pass through 0.07 micrometers pores. In low-serum cultures, they form even smaller elementary particles or tubular units. How can blood be infected with such slow growing, heat and radio-resistant bacteria? The answer may lie in their phylogeny: alpha-2 subgroup has organisms from soil exposed to radiation and heat, that can penetrate into eukaryotic cells. Nanobacteria grow so slowly that they require a niche `cleaned' with heat, radiation or immunodefence. For survival they cloak themselves in apatite, a normal constituent of mammalian body. This may link nanobacteria to nannobacteria discovered from sedimentary rocks by Dr. Folk. Both have similar size, size variation, clustering and mineral deposits. They may resemble the probable ancient bacterial fossils in the Martian meteorite ALH84001.

  12. Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsions for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, David; Golomb, Dan; Shi, Guang; Shih, Cherry; Lewczuk, Rob; Miksch, Joshua; Manmode, Rahul; Mulagapati, Srihariraju; Malepati, Chetankurmar

    2011-09-30

    This project involves the use of an innovative new invention Particle Stabilized Emulsions (PSEs) of Carbon Dioxide-in-Water and Water-in-Carbon Dioxide for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. The EOR emulsion would be injected into a semi-depleted oil reservoir such as Dover 33 in Otsego County, Michigan. It is expected that the emulsion would dislocate the stranded heavy crude oil from the rock granule surfaces, reduce its viscosity, and increase its mobility. The advancing emulsion front should provide viscosity control which drives the reduced-viscosity oil toward the production wells. The make-up of the emulsion would be subsequently changed so it interacts with the surrounding rock minerals in order to enhance mineralization, thereby providing permanent sequestration of the injected CO{sub 2}. In Phase 1 of the project, the following tasks were accomplished: 1. Perform laboratory scale (mL/min) refinements on existing procedures for producing liquid carbon dioxide-in-water (C/W) and water-in-liquid carbon dioxide (W/C) emulsion stabilized by hydrophilic and hydrophobic fine particles, respectively, using a Kenics-type static mixer. 2. Design and cost evaluate scaled up (gal/min) C/W and W/C emulsification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 at the Otsego County semi-depleted oil field. 3. Design the modifications necessary to the present CO{sub 2} flooding system at Otsego County for emulsion injection. 4. Design monitoring and verification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 for measuring potential leakage of CO{sub 2} after emulsion injection. 5. Design production protocol to assess enhanced oil recovery with emulsion injection compared to present recovery with neat CO{sub 2} flooding. 6. Obtain Federal and State permits for emulsion injection. Initial research focused on creating particle stabilized emulsions with the smallest possible globule size so that the emulsion can penetrate even low-permeability crude

  13. Interaction of insulin with methyl tert-butyl ether promotes molten globule-like state and production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Valipour, Masoumeh; Maghami, Parvaneh; Habibi-Rezaei, Mehran; Sadeghpour, Mostafa; Khademian, Mohamad Ali; Mosavi, Khadijeh; Sheibani, Nader; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2015-09-01

    Interaction of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) with proteins is a new look at its potential adverse biological effects. When MTBE is released to the environment it enters the blood stream through inhalation, and could affect the properties of various proteins. Here we investigated the interaction of MTBE with insulin and its effect on insulin structural changes. Our results showed that insulin formed a molten globule (MG)-like structure in the presence of 8 μM MTBE under physiological pH. The insulin structural changes were studied using spectroscopy methods, viscosity calculation, dynamic light scattering and differential scanning calorimetry. To delineate the mechanisms involved in MTBE-protein interactions, the formation of reactive oxygen specious (ROS) and formation of protein aggregates were measured. The chemiluminscence experiments revealed an increase in ROS production in the presence of MTBE especially in the MG-like state. These results were further confirmed by the aggregation tests, which indicated more aggregation of insulin at 40 μM MTBE compared with 8 μM. Thus, the formation of initial aggregates and exposure of the hydrophobic patches upon formation of the MG-like state in the presence of MTBE drives protein oxidation and ROS generation.

  14. [The globule diameter and various electron and conformational properties of the flavoprotein fragment of mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase studied by fluorescence spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Sukharev, V I; Vekshin, N L

    2000-10-01

    The globule dimensions and some electron and conformational properties of the flavoprotein (peripheral) fragment of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase were determined by the time-resolved, phase-modulating, and polarization fluorescence spectroscopies, as well as correlated confocal microscopy. The rotational and the diffusion (translocation) diameters of the protein fragment were shown to be no less than 44 A and approximately 72 A, respectively. The diameter of protomitochondrial particles from the bovine heart, which were used for the isolation of the fraction of peripheral fragments, was no less than 2300 A. The fluorescence from tryptophan and flavin fluorophores in the fragment is strongly quenched by iron of the iron-sulfur clusters, which suggests that a strong electron-vibrational interaction of iron with Trp residues and flavin takes place. An overlapping of the electron clouds of iron-sulfur clusters, Trp residues, and flavin is likely to facilitate the electron transfer through the protein. The heat inactivation of the enzyme was accompanied by neither its substantial conformational changes, nor a considerable release of iron ions from the clusters located near the Trp residues.

  15. Purification and characterization of novel whey glycoprotein WGP-88 which binds to a monoclonal antibody to PAS-4 glycoprotein in the bovine milk fat globule membrane.

    PubMed

    Hwangbo, S; Azuma, N; Kurisaki, J; Kanno, C

    1997-09-01

    A monoclonal antibody to the PAS-4 glycoprotein (78 kDa) of the bovine milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) specifically recognized PAS-4, and was named KAS4. A component recognized by KAS4 was found in whey protein, this being a glycoprotein of 88 kDa by SDS-PAGE and named WGP-88. WGP-88 was purified and characterized in comparison with PAS-4. WGP-88 had apparent pI values of 6.45 and 6.39, while those of PAS-4 were 7.39 and 7.35. Neuraminidase digestion shifted the pI values of WGP-88 to 6.57 and of PAS-4 to 7.52. WGP-88 was rich in polar amino residues (44.9 mol%), while PAS-4 was abundant in nonpolar amino acid residues (48.7 mol%). WGP-88 contained 17.1% of carbohydrate and PAS-4 had 7.2%. The results of reductive hydrolysis, N-glycanase digestion, and a lectin blot analysis suggested that N- and O-linked sugar chains were contained in both glycoproteins. WGP-88 and PAS-4 had a different N-terminal amino acid sequence. WGP-88 and PAS-4 respectively inhibited competitively the binding of KAS4 to PAS-4 and WGP-88. Our studies revealed WGP-88 recognized by KAS4 mAb to be a novel whey protein and to have different biochemical properties from those of PAS-4.

  16. The Pathogenic Mutation T182A Converts the Prion Protein into a Molten Globule-like Conformation Whose Misfolding to Oligomers but Not to Fibrils Is Drastically Accelerated.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jogender; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2016-01-26

    Delineation of the effects of pathogenic mutations linked with familial prion diseases on the structure and misfolding of prion protein (PrP) will be useful in understanding the molecular mechanism of PrP misfolding. Here, it has been shown that the pathogenic mutation T182A causes a drastic reduction in the apparent cooperativity and enthalpy of unfolding of the mouse prion protein (moPrP) under misfolding-prone conditions by converting the protein into a molten globule (MG)-like conformation. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange studies in conjunction with mass spectrometry indicate that the T182A mutation disrupts the core of the protein, thereby increasing overall structural dynamics. T182A moPrP is shown to misfold to oligomers very much faster than does wild-type (wt) moPrP but to misfold to fibrils at a rate similar to that of wt moPrP. This observation suggests that oligomers are unlikely to play a productive role in the direct pathway of aggregation from monomer to fibrils. The observation that fully folded T182A moPrP has a MG-like structure, and that it misfolds to oligomers much faster than does wt moPrP, suggests that a MG-like intermediate, whose structure resembles that of fully folded T182A moPrP, might be populated early on the pathway of misfolding of wt moPrP to oligomers. PMID:26713717

  17. Quantitative proteomic analysis of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) proteins in human and bovine colostrum and mature milk samples through iTRAQ labeling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Cong, Min; Peng, Xiuming; Wu, Junrui; Wu, Rina; Liu, Biao; Ye, Wenhui; Yue, Xiqing

    2016-05-18

    Milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) proteins have many functions. To explore the different proteomics of human and bovine MFGM, MFGM proteins were separated from human and bovine colostrum and mature milk, and analyzed by the iTRAQ proteomic approach. A total of 411 proteins were recognized and quantified. Among these, 232 kinds of differentially expressed proteins were identified. These differentially expressed proteins were analyzed based on multivariate analysis, gene ontology (GO) annotation and KEGG pathway. Biological processes involved were response to stimulus, localization, establishment of localization, and the immune system process. Cellular components engaged were the extracellular space, extracellular region parts, cell fractions, and vesicles. Molecular functions touched upon were protein binding, nucleotide binding, and enzyme inhibitor activity. The KEGG pathway analysis showed several pathways, including regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, neurotrophin signaling pathway, leukocyte transendothelial migration, tight junction, complement and coagulation cascades, vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathway, and adherens junction. These results enhance our understanding of different proteomes of human and bovine MFGM across different lactation phases, which could provide important information and potential directions for the infant milk powder and functional food industries. PMID:27159491

  18. Evidence for Dry Molten Globule-Like Domains in the pH-Induced Equilibrium Folding Intermediate of a Multidomain Protein.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Nirbhik; Mishra, Prajna; Jha, Santosh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The role of van der Waals (vdW) packing interactions compared to the hydrophobic effect in stabilizing the functional structure of proteins is poorly understood. Here we show, using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, dynamic fluorescence quenching, red-edge excitation shift, and near- and far-UV circular dichroism, that the pH-induced structural perturbation of a multidomain protein leads to the formation of a state in which two out of the three domains have characteristics of dry molten globules, that is, the domains are expanded compared to the native protein with disrupted packing interactions but have dry cores. We quantitatively estimate the energetic contribution of vdW interactions and show that they play an important role in the stability of the native state and cooperativity of its structural transition, in addition to the hydrophobic effect. Our results also indicate that during the pH-induced unfolding, side-chain unlocking and hydrophobic solvation occur in two distinct steps and not in a concerted manner, as commonly believed. PMID:26700266

  19. Molten globule-like partially folded state of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase at low pH induced by 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoroisopropanol.

    PubMed

    Abd Halim, Adyani Azizah; Zaroog, Mohammed Suleiman; Kadir, Habsah Abdul; Tayyab, Saad

    2014-01-01

    Effect of 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) on acid-denatured Bacillus licheniformis α -amylase (BLA) at pH 2.0 was investigated by far-UV CD, intrinsic fluorescence, and ANS fluorescence measurements. Addition of increasing HFIP concentrations led to an increase in the mean residue ellipticity at 222 nm (MRE 222 nm) up to 1.5 M HFIP concentration beyond which it sloped off. A small increase in the intrinsic fluorescence and a marked increase in the ANS fluorescence were also observed up to 0.4 M HFIP concentration, both of which decreased thereafter. Far- and near-UV CD spectra of the HFIP-induced state observed at 0.4 M HFIP showed significant retention of the secondary structures closer to native BLA but a disordered tertiary structure. Increase in the ANS fluorescence intensity was also observed with the HFIP-induced state, suggesting exposure of the hydrophobic clusters to the solvent. Furthermore, thermal denaturation of HFIP-induced state showed a non-cooperative transition. Taken together, all these results suggested that HFIP-induced state of BLA represented a molten globule-like state at pH 2.0. PMID:24977228

  20. Magnetite biomineralization and ancient life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Frankel, R B; Buseck, P R

    2000-04-01

    Certain chemical and mineral features of the Martian meteorite ALH84001 were reported in 1996 to be probable evidence of ancient life on Mars. In spite of new observations and interpretations, the question of ancient life on Mars remains unresolved. Putative biogenic, nanometer magnetite has now become a leading focus in the debate. PMID:10742183

  1. Magnetite biomineralization and ancient life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Frankel, R B; Buseck, P R

    2000-04-01

    Certain chemical and mineral features of the Martian meteorite ALH84001 were reported in 1996 to be probable evidence of ancient life on Mars. In spite of new observations and interpretations, the question of ancient life on Mars remains unresolved. Putative biogenic, nanometer magnetite has now become a leading focus in the debate.

  2. The temperature-dependent physical state of polar lipids and their miscibility impact the topography and mechanical properties of bilayer models of the milk fat globule membrane.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Appala Venkata Ramana; Guyomarc'h, Fanny; Lopez, Christelle

    2016-09-01

    The polar lipid assembly and biophysical properties of the biological membrane enveloping the milk fat globules (the MFGM) are yet poorly known, especially in connection with the temperature history that milk can experience after its secretion. However, bioactive mechanisms depend on biological structure, which itself highly depend on temperature. The objectives of this study were to investigate polar lipid packing in hydrated bilayers, models of the MFGM, and to follow at intermolecular level temperature-induced changes in the range 60-6°C, using the combination of differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and force spectroscopy. MFGM polar lipids, especially sphingomyelin, contain long chain saturated fatty acids with high phase transition temperatures. On cooling, the liquid disordered ld to solid ordered so (gel) phase transition of MFGM polar lipids started at about 40°C, leading to phase separation and formation of so phase domains protruding by about 1nm from the ld phase. Indentation measurements using AFM revealed that the resistance of the so phase domains to rupture was significantly higher than that of the ld phase and that it increased for both the domain and fluid phases with decreasing temperature. However, packing and stability of the bilayers were adversely affected by fast cooling to 6°C or by cooling-rewarming cycle. This study showed that MFGM polar lipid bilayers are dynamic systems. Heterogeneity in the structure and mechanical properties of the membrane was induced by temperature-dependent so/ld phase immiscibility of the lipid components. This could have consequences on the MFGM technological and biological functions (e.g. immunity and milk lipid digestion). PMID:27349732

  3. Preservation of protein globules and peptidoglycan in the mineralized cell wall of nitrate-reducing, iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria: a cryo-electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Miot, J; Maclellan, K; Benzerara, K; Boisset, N

    2011-11-01

    Iron-oxidizing bacteria are important actors of the geochemical cycle of iron in modern environments and may have played a key role all over Earth's history. However, in order to better assess that role on the modern and the past Earth, there is a need for better understanding the mechanisms of bacterial iron oxidation and for defining potential biosignatures to be looked for in the geologic record. In this study, we investigated experimentally and at the nanometre scale the mineralization of iron-oxidizing bacteria with a combination of synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). We show that the use of cryo-TEM instead of conventional microscopy provides detailed information of the successive iron biomineralization stages in anaerobic nitrate-reducing iron-oxidizing bacteria. These results suggest the existence of preferential Fe-binding and Fe-oxidizing sites on the outer face of the plasma membrane leading to the nucleation and growth of Fe minerals within the periplasm of these cells that eventually become completely encrusted. In contrast, the septa of dividing cells remain nonmineralized. In addition, the use of cryo-TEM offers a detailed view of the exceptional preservation of protein globules and the peptidoglycan within the Fe-mineralized cell walls of these bacteria. These organic molecules and ultrastructural details might be protected from further degradation by entrapment in the mineral matrix down to the nanometre scale. This is discussed in the light of previous studies on the properties of Fe-organic interactions and more generally on the fossilization of mineral-organic assemblies.

  4. Milk fat globule membrane coating of large lipid droplets in the diet of young mice prevents body fat accumulation in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Baars, Annemarie; Oosting, Annemarie; Engels, Eefje; Kegler, Diane; Kodde, Andrea; Schipper, Lidewij; Verkade, Henkjan J; van der Beek, Eline M

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated protective effects of breast-feeding on childhood obesity. Differences between human milk and infant milk formula (IMF) in dietary lipid structure may contribute to this effect. In our mouse model, feeding a diet containing large lipid droplets coated with phospholipids (PL) (Nuturis®; PL of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) fraction origin) in early life protected against excessive body fat accumulation following a diet challenge in adult life. We now set out to determine the relevance of increased droplet size and/or MFGM lipid droplet coating to the observed anti-obesogenic effects in adult life. From day 16 to 42, male mouse pups were exposed to diets with small (S) or large (L) lipid droplets (0·3 v. 2·9 µm average mode diameter, respectively), either without MFGM or with MFGM coating around the lipid droplet, resulting in four groups: S (control diet), L, Scoating and Lcoating (Nuturis® IMF diet). Mice were subsequently challenged with a Western-style diet until dissection at postnatal day 98. A non-challenged group served as reference (REF). We repeatedly determined body composition between postnatal day 42 and 98. At day 98 plasma and gene expression measurements were performed. Only the Nuturis® IMF diet (Lcoating) in early life containing MFGM-coated large lipid droplets reduced body fat mass to a level comparable with the REF group. These data support the notion that the structural aspects of lipids in human milk, for example, both lipid droplet size as well as the MFGM coating, may contribute to its reported protective effect against obesity in later life. PMID:27040581

  5. Polarization of prostate cancer-associated macrophages is induced by milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8)-mediated efferocytosis.

    PubMed

    Soki, Fabiana N; Koh, Amy J; Jones, Jacqueline D; Kim, Yeo Won; Dai, Jinlu; Keller, Evan T; Pienta, Kenneth J; Atabai, Kamran; Roca, Hernan; McCauley, Laurie K

    2014-08-29

    Tumor cells secrete factors that modulate macrophage activation and polarization into M2 type tumor-associated macrophages, which promote tumor growth, progression, and metastasis. The mechanisms that mediate this polarization are not clear. Macrophages are phagocytic cells that participate in the clearance of apoptotic cells, a process known as efferocytosis. Milk fat globule- EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8) is a bridge protein that facilitates efferocytosis and is associated with suppression of proinflammatory responses. This study investigated the hypothesis that MFG-E8-mediated efferocytosis promotes M2 polarization. Tissue and serum exosomes from prostate cancer patients presented higher levels of MFG-E8 compared with controls, a novel finding in human prostate cancer. Coculture of macrophages with apoptotic cancer cells increased efferocytosis, elevated MFG-E8 protein expression levels, and induced macrophage polarization into an alternatively activated M2 phenotype. Administration of antibody against MFG-E8 significantly attenuated the increase in M2 polarization. Inhibition of STAT3 phosphorylation using the inhibitor Stattic decreased efferocytosis and M2 macrophage polarization in vitro, with a correlating increase in SOCS3 protein expression. Moreover, MFG-E8 knockdown tumor cells cultured with wild-type or MFG-E8-deficient macrophages resulted in increased SOCS3 expression with decreased STAT3 activation. This suggests that SOCS3 and phospho-STAT3 act in an inversely dependent manner when stimulated by MFG-E8 and efferocytosis. These results uncover a unique role of efferocytosis via MFG-E8 as a mechanism for macrophage polarization into tumor-promoting M2 cells.

  6. Milk fat globule membrane coating of large lipid droplets in the diet of young mice prevents body fat accumulation in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Baars, Annemarie; Oosting, Annemarie; Engels, Eefje; Kegler, Diane; Kodde, Andrea; Schipper, Lidewij; Verkade, Henkjan J; van der Beek, Eline M

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated protective effects of breast-feeding on childhood obesity. Differences between human milk and infant milk formula (IMF) in dietary lipid structure may contribute to this effect. In our mouse model, feeding a diet containing large lipid droplets coated with phospholipids (PL) (Nuturis®; PL of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) fraction origin) in early life protected against excessive body fat accumulation following a diet challenge in adult life. We now set out to determine the relevance of increased droplet size and/or MFGM lipid droplet coating to the observed anti-obesogenic effects in adult life. From day 16 to 42, male mouse pups were exposed to diets with small (S) or large (L) lipid droplets (0·3 v. 2·9 µm average mode diameter, respectively), either without MFGM or with MFGM coating around the lipid droplet, resulting in four groups: S (control diet), L, Scoating and Lcoating (Nuturis® IMF diet). Mice were subsequently challenged with a Western-style diet until dissection at postnatal day 98. A non-challenged group served as reference (REF). We repeatedly determined body composition between postnatal day 42 and 98. At day 98 plasma and gene expression measurements were performed. Only the Nuturis® IMF diet (Lcoating) in early life containing MFGM-coated large lipid droplets reduced body fat mass to a level comparable with the REF group. These data support the notion that the structural aspects of lipids in human milk, for example, both lipid droplet size as well as the MFGM coating, may contribute to its reported protective effect against obesity in later life.

  7. Role of ionic liquid on the conformational dynamics in the native, molten globule, and unfolded states of cytochrome c: a fluorescence correlation spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Sen Mojumdar, Supratik; Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Chattoraj, Shyamtanu; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2012-10-11

    The role of a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL, [pmim][Br]) on the size and conformational dynamics of a protein, horse heart cytochrome c (Cyt C) in its native, molten globule (MG-I and II), and unfolded states is studied using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). For this purpose, the protein was covalently labeled by a fluorescent dye, Alexa Fluor 488. It is observed that the addition of the RTIL leads to an increase in the hydrodynamic radius (r(H)) of the protein, Cyt C in the native or MG-I state. In contrast, the addition of RTIL causes a decrease in the size (hydrodynamic radius, r(H)) of Cyt C unfolded by GdnHCl or MG-II state. The decrease in size indicates the formation of a relatively compact structure. We detected two types of conformational relaxation of the protein. The shorter relaxation time component (~3-5.5 μs) corresponds to the protein folding or intrachain contact formation, while the relatively longer time component (~63-122 μs) may be assigned to the motion of the protein side chains or concerted chain dynamics. The burst integrated fluorescence lifetime histograms indicate that the increase in size of the protein is accompanied by an increase in the contribution of the shorter component (~0.3-0.4 ns) with a concomitant decrease of the contribution of the longer component (~2.8-3.6 ns). An opposite trend is observed during the decrease in size of the protein. PMID:22989328

  8. Nanoanalytical Electron Microscopy Reveals a Sequential Mineralization Process Involving Carbonate-Containing Amorphous Precursors.

    PubMed

    Nitiputri, Kharissa; Ramasse, Quentin M; Autefage, Hélène; McGilvery, Catriona M; Boonrungsiman, Suwimon; Evans, Nicholas D; Stevens, Molly M; Porter, Alexandra E

    2016-07-26

    A direct observation and an in-depth characterization of the steps by which bone mineral nucleates and grows in the extracellular matrix during the earliest stages of maturation, using relevant biomineralization models as they grow into mature bone mineral, is an important research goal. To better understand the process of bone mineralization in the extracellular matrix, we used nanoanalytical electron microscopy techniques to examine an in vitro model of bone formation. This study demonstrates the presence of three dominant CaP structures in the mineralizing osteoblast cultures: <80 nm dense granules with a low calcium to phosphate ratio (Ca/P) and crystalline domains; calcium phosphate needles emanating from a focus: "needle-like globules" (100-300 nm in diameter) and mature mineral, both with statistically higher Ca/P compared to that of the dense granules. Many of the submicron granules and globules were interspersed around fibrillar structures containing nitrogen, which are most likely the signature of the organic phase. With high spatial resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) mapping, spatially resolved maps were acquired showing the distribution of carbonate within each mineral structure. The carbonate was located in the middle of the granules, which suggested the nucleation of the younger mineral starts with a carbonate-containing precursor and that this precursor may act as seed for growth into larger, submicron-sized, needle-like globules of hydroxyapatite with a different stoichiometry. Application of analytical electron microscopy has important implications in deciphering both how normal bone forms and in understanding pathological mineralization. PMID:27383526

  9. Microstructure, elastic and inelastic properties of partially graphitized biomorphic carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, T. S.; Kardashev, B. K.; Smirnov, B. I.; Gutierrez-Pardo, A.; Ramirez-Rico, J.; Martinez-Fernandez, J.

    2015-03-01

    The microstructural characteristics and amplitude dependences of the Young's modulus E and internal friction (logarithmic decrement δ) of biocarbon matrices prepared by beech wood carbonization at temperatures T carb = 850-1600°C in the presence of a nickel-containing catalyst have been studied. Using X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, it has been shown that the use of a nickel catalyst during carbonization results in a partial graphitization of biocarbons at T carb ≥ 1000°C: the graphite phase is formed as 50- to 100-nm globules at T carb = 1000°C and as 0.5- to 3.0-μm globules at T carb = 1600°C. It has been found that the measured dependences E( T carb) and δ( T carb) contain three characteristic ranges of variations in the Young's modulus and logarithmic decrement with a change in the carbonization temperature: E increases and δ decreases in the ranges T carb < 1000°C and T carb > 1300°C; in the range 1000 < T carb < 1300°C, E sharply decreases and δ increases. The observed behavior of E( T carb) and δ( T carb) for biocarbons carbonized in the presence of nickel correlates with the evolution of their microstructure. The largest values of E are obtained for samples with T carb = 1000 and 1600°C. However, the samples with T carb = 1600°C exhibit a higher susceptibility to microplasticity due to the presence of a globular graphite phase that is significantly larger in size and total volume.

  10. Isotope geochemistry of caliche developed on basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauth, L. Paul; Brilli, Mauro; Klonowski, Stan

    2003-01-01

    Enormous variations in oxygen and carbon isotopes occur in caliche developed on < 3 Ma basalts in 3 volcanic fields in Arizona, significantly extending the range of δ 18O and δ 13C observed in terrestrial caliche. Within each volcanic field, δ 18O is broadly co-variant with δ 13C and increases as δ 13C increases. The most 18O and 13C enriched samples are for subaerial calcite developed on pinnacles, knobs, and flow lobes that protrude above tephra and soil. The most 18O and 13C depleted samples are for pedogenic carbonate developed in soil atmospheres. The pedogenic caliche has δ 18O fixed by normal precipitation in local meteoric waters at ambient temperatures and has low δ 13C characteristic of microbial soil CO 2. Subaerial caliche has formed from 18O-rich evapoconcentrated meteoric waters that dried out on surfaces after local rains. The associated 13C enrichment is due either to removal of 12C by photosynthesizers in the evaporating drops or to kinetic isotope effects associated with evaporation. Caliche on basalt lava flows thus initially forms with the isotopic signature of evaporation and is subsequently over-layered during burial by calcite carrying the isotopic signature of the soil environment. The large change in carbon isotope composition in subsequent soil calcite defines an isotopic biosignature that should have developed in martian examples if Mars had a "warm, wet" early period and photosynthesizing microbes were present in the early soils. The approach can be similarly applied to terrestrial Precambrian paleocaliche in the search for the earliest record of life on land. Large variations reported for δ 18O of carbonate in Martian meteorite ALH84001 do not necessarily require high temperatures, playa lakes, or flood runoff if the carbonate is an example of altered martian caliche.

  11. Entrainment in solution of an oscillating NADH oxidase activity from the bovine milk fat globule membrane with a temperature-compensated period length suggestive of an ultradian time-keeping (clock) function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James; Lawler, Juliana; Wang, Sui; Keenan, Thomas W.; Morre, Dorothy M.

    2002-01-01

    Entrainment in solution of an oscillating activity with a temperature compensated period of 24 min is described for a NADH oxidase (NOX) activity of the bovine milk fat globule membrane, a derivative of the mammary epithelial cell plasma membrane. The period of 24 min remained unchanged at 17 degrees C, 27 degrees C and 37 degrees C whereas the amplitude approximately doubled with each 10 degree C rise in temperature (Q(10)congruent with 2). The periodicity was observed with both intact milk fat globule membranes and with detergent-solubilized membranes, demonstrating that the oscillations did not require an association with membranes. The periodicity was not the result of instrument variation or of chemical interactions among reactants in solution. Preparations with different periodicities entrained (autosynchronized) when mixed. Upon mixing, the preparations exhibited two oscillatory patterns but eventually a single pattern representing the mean of the farthest separated maxima of the two preparations analyzed separately emerged. The cell surface NOX protein is the first reported example of an entrainable biochemical entity with a temperature-compensated periodicity potentially capable of functioning as an ultradian or circadian clock driver.

  12. Cathodoluminescence : an imaging technique for the search of extraterrestrial life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramboz, C.; Rubert, Y.; Bost, N.; Westall, F.; Lerouge, C.

    2012-04-01

    Solids irradiated by a 10-20 keV electron beam emit ligth in the UV-visible range, which is called cathodoluminescence (CL). CL imagery is a powerful tool for visualizing minerals and their internal structures (lattice defects, zoning). For example, terrestrial calcite, either of sedimentary or biogenic origin, often display a bright orange CL, as a result of the incorporation of trace Mn2+ in its lattice. Aragonite can also be discriminated from calcite by its green CL. Carbonates are a major target for the search of life on Mars, and CL imagery could contribute to reveal carbonates in situ. Thomas et al. [1] have validated the concept of an electron lamp to make CL imagery of a rock surface placed in a martian CO2 atmosphere. We present 2 examples of terrestrial bacterial microstructures that are revealed by CL. (1) In Sinemurian sediments from the Montmiral borehole (Valence Basin, France), banded wavy calcite in contact with pyrite represents fossilized biofilms of sulfato-reducing bacteria, as confirmed by the sulfur isotopic composition of pyrite ~+36 %0 PDB. (2) At l'Ile Crémieux, north of the Valence basin, a dense filamentous microbial/fungal community with a bright orange CL signature is embedded in vuggy calcite from a tectonic vein. The mat is anchored 1-2 mm deep in the oolitic veinwall and emerges at right angle in the 'open' fracture space. Finally, carbonate vesicles and exhalite crusts from the Svalbard basalt in Groendland, with orange CL, are shown as analogues to carbonates from the martian ALH84001 igneous meteorite. [1]Thomas et al. (2009) in A. Gucsik (Ed.) "Cathodoluminescence and Its Application in the Planetary Sciences"

  13. Early Mars: A Warm Wet Niche for Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K.; McKay, David S.; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.

    2010-01-01

    Exploration of Mars has begun to unveil the history of the planet. Combinations of remote sensing, in situ compositional measurements and photographic observations have shown Mars had a dynamic and active geologic evolution. Mars geologic evolution had conditions that were suitable for supporting life. A habitable planet must have water, carbon and energy sources along with a dynamic geologic past. Mars meets all of these requirements. The first 600 Ma of Martian history were ripe for life to develop because of the abundance of: (i) Water-as shown by carved canyons and oceans or lakes with the early presence of near surface water shown by precipitated carbonates in ALH84001, well-dated at approx.3.9 Ga, (ii) Energy from the original accretional processes, a molten core which generated a strong magnetic field leaving a permanent record in the early crust, active volcanism continuing throughout Martian history, and continuing impact processes, (iii) Carbon, water and a likely thicker atmosphere from extensive volcanic outgassing (i.e. H2O, CO2, CH4, CO, O2, N2, H2S, SO2, etc.) and (iv) crustal tectonics as revealed by faulting and possible plate movement reflected by the magnetic patterns in the crust [1]. The question arises: "Why would life not develop from these favorable conditions on Mars in its first 600 Ma?" During this period, environmental near-surface conditions on Mars were more favorable to life than at any later time. Standing bodies of water, precipitation and flowing surface water, and possibly abundant hydrothermal energy would favor the formation of early life. (Even if life developed elsewhere on Earth, Venus, or on other bodies-it was transported to Mars where surface conditions were suitable for life to evolve)

  14. Conditions on Early Mars Might Have Fostered Rapid and Early Development of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K.; McKay, David S.; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Wentworth, Susan J.

    2007-01-01

    The exploration of Mars during the past decades has begun to unveil the history of the planet. The combinations of remote sensing, in situ geochemical compositional measurements and photographic observations from both above and on the surface have shown Mars to have a dynamic and active geologic evolution. Mars geologic evolution clearly had conditions that were suitable for supporting life. For a planet to be able to be habitable, it must have water, carbon sources, energy sources and a dynamic geologic past. Mars meets all of these requirements. The first 600 My of Martian history were ripe for life to develop because of the abundance of (i) Water-carved canyons and oceans or lakes with the early presence of near surface water shown by precipitated carbonates in ALH84001 well-dated at approx.3.9 Gy., (ii) Energy from the original accretional processes, a molten core which generated a strong magnetic field leaving a permanent record in the early crust, early active volcanism continuing throughout Martian history, and, and continuing impact processes, (iii) Carbon and water from possibly extensive volcanic outgassing (i.e. H2O, CO2, CH4, CO, O2, N2, H2S, SO2, etc.) and (iv) some crustal tectonics as revealed by faulting and possible plate movement reflected by the magnetic pattern in the crust. The question arises: "Why would life not evolve from these favorable conditions on early Mars in its first 600 My?" During this period, it seems likely that environmental near-surface conditions on Mars were more favorable to life than at any later time. Standing bodies of water, precipitation and flowing surface water, and possibly abundant hydrothermal energy would all favor the formation of early life. Even if life developed elsewhere (on Earth, Venus, or on other solar systems) and was transported to Mars, the surface conditions were likely very hospitable for that introduced life to multiply and evolve.

  15. Carbonate-silicate liquid immiscibility in the mantle propels kimberlite magma ascent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenetsky, Vadim S.; Yaxley, Gregory M.

    2015-06-01

    Kimberlite is a rare volcanic rock renowned as the major host of diamonds and originated at the base of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Although kimberlite magmas are dense in crystals and deeply-derived rock fragments, they ascend to the surface extremely rapidly, enabling diamonds to survive. The unique physical properties of kimberlite magmas depend on the specific compositions of their parental melts that, in absence of historical eruptions and due to pervasive alteration of kimberlite rocks, remain highly debatable. We explain exceptionally rapid ascent of kimberlite magma from mantle depths by combining empirical data on the essentially carbonatite composition of the kimberlite primary melts and experimental evidence on interaction of the carbonate liquids with mantle minerals. Our experimental study shows that orthopyroxene is completely dissolved in a Na2CO3 melt at 2.0-5.0 GPa and 1000-1200 °C. The dissolution of orthopyroxene results in homogeneous silicate-carbonate melt at 5.0 GPa and 1200 °C, and is followed by unmixing of carbonate and carbonated silicate melts and formation of stable magmatic emulsion at lower pressures and temperatures. The dispersed silicate melt has a significant capacity for storing a carbonate component in the deep mantle (13 wt% CO2 at 2.0 GPa). We envisage that this component reaches saturation and is gradually released as CO2 bubbles, as the silicate melt globules are transported upwards through the lithosphere by the carbonatite magma. The globules of unmixed, CO2-rich silicate melt are continuously produced upon further reaction between the natrocarbonatite melt and mantle peridotite. On decompression the dispersed silicate melt phase ensures a continuous supply of CO2 bubbles that decrease density and increase buoyancy and promote rapid ascent of the magmatic emulsion.

  16. Beagle 2: The Next Exobiology Mission to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Pillinger, Colin T.; Wright, Ian P.; Morse, Andy; Stewart, Jenny; Morgan, G.; Praine, Ian; Leigh, Dennis; Sims, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    Beagle 2 is a 60 kg probe (with a 30 kg lander) developed in the United Kingdom for inclusion on the European Space Agency's 2003 Mars Express. Beagle 2 will deliver to the Martian surface a payload which consists of a high percentage of science instruments to landed spacecraft mass. Beagle 2 will be launched in June, 2003 with Mars Express on a Soyuz-Fregat rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Beagle 2 will land on Mars on December 26, 2003 in the Isidis Planitia basin (approximately 10 degrees N and 275 degrees W), a large sedimentary basin that overlies the boundary between ancient highlands and northern plains. Isidis Planitia, the third largest basin on Mars, which is possibly filled with sediment deposited at the bottom of long-standing lakes or seas, offers an ideal environment for preserving traces of life. Beagle 2 was developed to search for organic material and other volatiles on and below the surface of Mars in addition to the study of the inorganic chemistry and mineralogy. Beagle 2 will utilize a mechanical mole and grinder to obtain samples from below the surface, under rocks and inside rocks. A pair of stereo cameras will image the landing site along with a microscope for examination of surface and rock samples. Analyses will include both rock and soil samples at various wavelengths, X-ray spectrometer and Mossbauer spectrometer as well as a search for organics and other light element species (e.g. carbonates and water) and measurement of their isotopic compositions. Beagle 2 has as its focus the goal of establishing whether evidence for life existed in the past on Mars at the Isidis Planitia site or at least establishing if the conditions were ever suitable. Carbonates and organic components were first recognized as existing on Mars when they were found in the Martian meteorite Nakhla. Romanek et al showed the carbonates in ALH84001 were formed at low temperatures. McKay et al noted possible evidence of early life on Mars within the

  17. A review of meteorite evidence for the timing of magmatism and of surface or near-surface liquid water on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, Lars; Drake, Michael J.

    2005-09-01

    There is widespread photogeological evidence for ubiquitous water flowing on the surface of Mars. However, the age of surface and near-surface water cannot be deduced with high precision from photogeology. While there is clear evidence for old and young fluvial features in the photogeologic record, the uncertainty in the absolute calibration of the Martian crater flux results in uncertainties of +/-1.5 Gyr in the middle period of Martian geologic history. Aqueous alteration of primary igneous minerals produces secondary minerals in Martian meteorites. Here we use the ages of secondary alteration minerals in Martian meteorites to obtain absolute ages when liquid water was at or near the surface of Mars. Aqueous alteration events in Martian meteorites occurred at 3929 +/- 37 Ma (carbonates in ALH84001), 633 +/- 23 Ma (iddingsite in nakhlites), and 0-170 Ma (salts in shergottites). Furthermore, these events appear to be of short duration, suggesting episodic rather than continuous aqueous alteration of the meteorites. The Martian meteorites appear to be contaminated by Martian surface Pb characterized by a 207Pb/206Pb ratio near 1. Lead of this composition could be produced by water-based alteration on the Martian surface. The high 129Xe/132Xe ratio in the Martian atmosphere compared to Martian meteorites indicates fractionation of I from Xe within ~100 Myr after nucleosynthesis of 129I. Such fractionation is difficult to achieve through magmatic processes. However, water very efficiently fractionates I from Xe, raising the intriguing possibility that Mars had a liquid water ocean within its first 100 Myr.1.

  18. Mars Atmospheric Composition, Isotope Ratios and Seasonal Variations: Overview and Updates of the SAM Measurements at Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, C. R.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Franz, H.; Trainer, M. G.; Wong, M. H.; Mischna, M. A.; Flesch, G.; Farley, K. A.; Owen, T. C.; Niles, P. B.; Jones, J. H.; Christensen, L. E.; Martín-Torres, J.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    We will summarize the in situ measurements of atmospheric composition and the isotopic ratios of D/H in water, 13C/12C, 18O/16O, 17O/16O, and 13C18O/12C16O in carbon dioxide, 38Ar/36Ar, xKr/84Kr, and 15N/14N made in the martian atmosphere at Gale Crater from the Curiosity Rover using the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM)'s Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS) and Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS). With data over 700 sols since the Curiosity landing, we will discuss evidence and implications for changes on seasonal and other timescales. We will also present results for continued methane and methane enrichment experiments over this time period. Comparison between our measurements in the modern atmosphere and those of martian meteorites like ALH 84001 implies that the martian reservoirs of CO2 and H2O were largely established ~4 billion years ago, but that atmospheric loss or surface interaction may be still ongoing. References:[1] Mahaffy P. R. et al., Science, 341, 263-266, 2013, doi:10.1126/science.1237966. [2] Webster C. R. et al. (2013), Science, 341, 260-263, doi:10.1126/science.1237961. [3] Wong, M. H. et al. (2013), Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1002/2013GL057840. [4] Atreya S. K. et al (2013), Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 1-5, doi:10.1002/2013GL057763. The research described here was supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  19. Amorphous Ca-phosphate precursors for Ca-carbonate biominerals mediated by Chromohalobacter marismortui.

    PubMed

    Rivadeneyra, María Angustias; Martín-Algarra, Agustín; Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Sánchez-Navas, Antonio; Martín-Ramos, José Daniel

    2010-07-01

    Although diverse microbial metabolisms are known to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals, the mechanisms involved in the bacterial mediation, in particular nucleation, are still debated. The study of aragonite precipitation by Chromohalobacter marismortui during the early stages (3-7 days) of culture experiments, and its relation to bacterial metabolic pathways, shows that: (1) carbonate nucleation occurs after precipitation of an amorphous Ca phosphate precursor phase on bacterial cell surfaces and/or embedded in bacterial films; (2) precipitation of this precursor phase results from local high concentrations of PO(4)(3-) and Ca(2+) binding around bacterial cell envelopes; and (3) crystalline nanoparticles, a few hundred nanometres in diametre, form after dissolution of precursor phosphate globules, and later aggregate, allowing the accretion of aragonite bioliths.

  20. Microfossils, biominerals, and chemical biomarkers in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Rozanov, Alexei Y.

    2003-01-01

    The discovery of biominerals, chemical biomarkers and evidence of microfossils in the Mars meteorite (ALH84001) stimulated research into biomarkers, microbial extremophiles and provided impetus to the newly emerging fields of Astrobiology and Bacterial Paleontology. The debate following the ALH84001 results has highlighted the importance of developing methodologies for recognition of mineral and elemental bioindicators, chemical biomarkers and microfossils in terrestrial rocks and meteorites prior to sample return missions to comets, asteroids, and Mars. Comparative studies of living and fossil micro-organisms and biomarkers are vital to developing expertise needed to recognize indigenous biosignatures and recent contaminants. This paper reviews elemental and mineral bioindicators, chemical biomarkers and keropgen in terrestrial rocks and meteorites. Electron Microscopy images of hyperthermophilic nanobacteria, sulfur and sulfate reducing bacteria, and mineralized microfossils and kerogen found in-situ in carbonaceous meteorite rock matrix are presented.

  1. Micro-scale experimental investigation of the effect of flow rate on trapping in sandstone and carbonate rock samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khishvand, Mahdi; Akbarabadi, Morteza; Piri, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of a pore-scale experimental study of residual trapping in consolidated sandstone and carbonate rock samples under confining stress. We investigate how the changes in wetting phase flow rate impacts pore-scale distribution of fluids during imbibition in natural, water-wet porous media. We systematically study pore-scale trapping of the nonwetting phase as well as size and distribution of its disconnected globules. Seven sets of drainage-imbibition experiments were performed with brine and oil as the wetting and nonwetting phases, respectively. We utilized a two-phase miniature core-flooding apparatus integrated with an X-ray microtomography system to examine pore-scale fluid distributions in small Bentheimer sandstone (D = 4.9 mm and L = 13 mm) and Gambier limestone (D = 4.4 mm and L = 75 mm) core samples. The results show that with increase in capillary number, the residual oil saturation at the end of the imbibition reduces from 0.46 to 0.20 in Bemtheimer sandstone and from 0.46 to 0.28 in Gambier limestone. We use pore-scale displacement mechanisms, in-situ wettability characteristics, and pore size distribution information to explain the observed capillary desaturation trends. The reduction was believed to be caused by alteration of the order in which pore-scale displacements took place during imbibition. Furthermore, increase in capillary number produced significantly different pore-scale fluid distributions during imbibition. We explored the pore fluid occupancies and studied size and distribution of the trapped oil clusters during different imbibition experiments. The results clearly show that as the capillary number increases, imbibition produces smaller trapped oil globules. In other words, the volume of individual trapped oil globules decreased at higher brine flow rates. Finally, we observed that the pore space in the limestone sample was considerably altered through matrix dissolution at extremely high brine flow rates. This

  2. Carbon-carbon cylinder block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight cylinder block composed of carbon-carbon is disclosed. The use of carbon-carbon over conventional materials, such as cast iron or aluminum, reduces the weight of the cylinder block and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocating engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance can be small, especially when the carbon-carbon cylinder block is used in conjunction with a carbon-carbon piston. Use of the carbon-carbon cylinder block has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  3. Paleointensity of the Martian field from SQUID Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, B. P.; Fong, L. E.; Lima, E. A.; Baudenbacher, F. J.; Vali, H.

    2005-12-01

    Crustal magnetic anomalies in the southern Martian hemisphere have intensities an order of magnitude larger than typical crustal anomalies on Earth. Two possible explanations for this difference are that compared to the present-day Earth, Mars has either (i) larger amounts of crustal ferromagnetic minerals or (ii) the crust was magnetized by a larger paleofield. ALH84001, the only pre-Amazonian Martian meteorite, possesses a stable magnetization dating to 4 Ga or earlier. Previous paleomagnetic studies with SQUID moment magnetometers on bulk ALH84001 grains have estimated that the paleointensity of the field which magnetized the meteorite was between 0.1-1 times that of the Earth's present field. However, these estimates may be lower limits on the true paleointensity because the orientation of the magnetization in ALH84001 is spatially heterogeneous on the submillimeter scale. This complication could have profound implications for hypothesis (ii) above. Here we first demonstrate that superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopy can recover the same magnetization intensity and direction of a well characterized modern-day terrestrial basalt as that measured with a 2G Enterprises SQUID moment magnetometer. A SQUID microscope paleointensity analysis of this basalt gives the expected present day field intensity of a few tens of microtesla. We further show that our new high resolution SQUID microscopy study of ALH84001, which has mapped its heterogeneous magnetization with the highest resolution yet (0.1 mm), favors the upper range of previous paleointensity estimates for the 4 Ga Martian paleofield (e.g., within a factor of several of that of the present-day Earth). However, this field, were it dynamo in origin, is still too weak to easily explain the intensity of the Martian magnetic anomalies.

  4. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    ScienceCinema

    Jeffrey Long

    2016-07-12

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  5. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Long

    2010-07-12

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  6. Carbonate precipitation under bulk acidic conditions as a potential biosignature for searching life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Remolar, David C.; Preston, Louisa J.; Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Huang, L.; Southam, Gordon; Banerjee, Neil R.; Osinski, Gordon R.; Flemming, Roberta; Gómez-Ortíz, David; Prieto Ballesteros, Olga; Rodríguez, Nuria; Amils, Ricardo; Darby Dyar, M.

    2012-10-01

    Recent observations of carbonate minerals in ancient Martian rocks have been interpreted as evidence for the former presence of circumneutral solutions optimal for carbonate precipitation. Sampling from surface and subsurface regions of the low-pH system of Río Tinto has shown, unexpectedly, that carbonates can form under diverse macroscopic physicochemical conditions ranging from very low to neutral pH (1.5-7.0). A multi-technique approach demonstrates that carbonate minerals are closely associated with microbial activity. Carbonates occur in the form of micron-size carbonate precipitates under bacterial biofilms, mineralization of subsurface colonies, and possible biogenic microstructures including globules, platelets and dumbbell morphologies. We propose that carbonate precipitation in the low-pH environment of Río Tinto is a process enabled by microbially-mediated neutralization driven by the reduction of ferric iron coupled to the oxidation of biomolecules in microbially-maintained circumneutral oases, where the local pH (at the scale of cells or cell colonies) can be much different than in the macroscopic environment. Acidic conditions were likely predominant in vast regions of Mars over the last four billion years of planetary evolution. Ancient Martian microbial life inhabiting low-pH environments could have precipitated carbonates similar to those observed at Río Tinto. Preservation of carbonates at Río Tinto over geologically significant timescales suggests that similarly-formed carbonate minerals could also be preserved on Mars. Such carbonates could soon be observed by the Mars Science Laboratory, and by future missions to the red planet.

  7. Mars as the parent body of the CI carbonaceous chondrites and implications for Mars biological and climatic history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, John E.

    1997-07-01

    The hypothesis that CI meteorites have an origin on Mars is presented along with supporting data and implications. A Martian origin for the CI will support Martian biogenesis and effect assessments of Martian histories, suggesting Mars and Earth evolved in parallel in both biologic and geologic realms for a long period. The CI containing a Martian pattern of oxygen isotopes and mineralogy indicative of deposition by liquid water. The CI contain no evidence of hypervelocity impact, but contain space-exposed olivine grains and are thus regolith material, indicating their formation under a planetary atmosphere. They contain organic matter similar to that found in Martian meteorites, ALH84001 and EETA79001. A scenario of formation of CI meteorites as being water altered late planetary accretion material is proposed. The 4.5 Gyr age of the CI, matching ALH84001, and their high concentration of organic matter, including possible fossil bacteria, strongly supports the hypothesis of early Martian biogenesis. With CI plus ALH84001 being old, and the SNCs being young, the Martian crustal age dichotomy is now well reflected in Martian meteorite ages. This suggests Mars has a strongly bimodal pattern of crustal ages, either very old or very young with liquid water moving on the planets surface until late in the planets history.

  8. Carbon-carbon piston development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, Mark P.

    1994-01-01

    A new piston concept, made of carbon-carbon refractory-composite material, has been developed that overcomes a number of the shortcomings of aluminum pistons. Carbon-carbon material, developed in the early 1960's, is lighter in weight than aluminum, has higher strength and stiffness than aluminum and maintains these properties at temperatures over 2500 F. In addition, carbon-carbon material has a low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent resistance to thermal shock. An effort, called the Advanced Carbon-Carbon Piston Program was started in 1986 to develop and test carbon-carbon pistons for use in spark ignition engines. The carbon-carbon pistons were designed to be replacements for existing aluminum pistons, using standard piston pin assemblies and using standard rings. Carbon-carbon pistons can potentially enable engines to be more reliable, more efficient and have greater power output. By utilizing the unique characteristics of carbon-carbon material a piston can: (1) have greater resistance to structural damage caused by overheating, lean air-fuel mixture conditions and detonation; (2) be designed to be lighter than an aluminum piston thus, reducing the reciprocating mass of an engine, and (3) be operated in a higher combustion temperature environment without failure.

  9. Addition of a dairy fraction rich in milk fat globule membrane to a high-saturated fat meal reduces the postprandial insulinaemic and inflammatory response in overweight and obese adults.

    PubMed

    Demmer, Elieke; Van Loan, Marta D; Rivera, Nancy; Rogers, Tara S; Gertz, Erik R; German, J Bruce; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; Zivkovic, Angela M

    2016-01-01

    Meals high in SFA, particularly palmitate, are associated with postprandial inflammation and insulin resistance. Milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) has anti-inflammatory properties that may attenuate the negative effects of SFA-rich meals. Our objective was to examine the postprandial metabolic and inflammatory response to a high-fat meal composed of palm oil (PO) compared with PO with an added dairy fraction rich in MFGM (PO+MFGM) in overweight and obese men and women (n 36) in a randomised, double-blinded, cross-over trial. Participants consumed two isoenergetic high-fat meals composed of a smoothie enriched with PO with v. without a cream-derived complex milk lipid fraction ( dairy fraction rich in MFGM) separated by a washout of 1-2 weeks. Serum cytokines, adhesion molecules, cortisol and markers of inflammation were measured at fasting, and at 1, 3 and 6 h postprandially. Glucose, insulin and lipid profiles were analysed in plasma. Consumption of the PO + MFGM v. PO meal resulted in lower total cholesterol (P = 0·021), LDL-cholesterol (P = 0·046), soluble intracellular adhesion molecule (P = 0·005) and insulin (P = 0·005) incremental AUC, and increased IL-10 (P = 0·013). Individuals with high baseline C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations (≥3 mg/l, n 17) had higher (P = 0·030) insulin at 1 h after the PO meal than individuals with CRP concentrations <3 mg/l (n 19). The addition of MFGM attenuated this difference between CRP groups. The addition of a dairy fraction rich in MFGM attenuated the negative effects of a high-SFA meal by reducing postprandial cholesterol, inflammatory markers and insulin response in overweight and obese individuals, particularly in those with elevated CRP. PMID:27313850

  10. Myeloid-Epithelial-Reproductive Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and Milk Fat Globule Epidermal Growth Factor 8 Coordinately Improve Remodeling After Myocardial Infarction via Local Delivery of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Howangyin, Kiave-Yune; Zlatanova, Ivana; Pinto, Cristina; Ngkelo, Anta; Cochain, Clément; Rouanet, Marie; Vilar, José; Lemitre, Mathilde; Stockmann, Christian; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Mallat, Ziad

    2016-01-01

    Background— In infarcted heart, improper clearance of dying cells by activated neighboring phagocytes may precipitate the transition to heart failure. We analyzed the coordinated role of 2 major mediators of efferocytosis, the myeloid-epithelial-reproductive protein tyrosine kinase (Mertk) and the milk fat globule epidermal growth factor (Mfge8), in directing cardiac remodeling by skewing the inflammatory response after myocardial infarction. Methods and Results— We generated double-deficient mice for Mertk and Mfge8 (Mertk−/−/Mfge8−/−) and challenged them with acute coronary ligature. Compared with wild-type, Mertk-deficient (Mertk−/−), or Mfge8-deficient (Mfge8−/−) animals, Mertk−/−/Mfge8−/− mice displayed greater alteration in cardiac function and remodeling. Mertk and Mfge8 were expressed mainly by cardiac Ly6CHigh and Low monocytes and macrophages. In parallel, Mertk−/−/Mfge8−/− bone marrow chimeras manifested increased accumulation of apoptotic cells, enhanced fibrotic area, and larger infarct size, as well as reduced angiogenesis. We found that the abrogation of efferocytosis affected neither the ability of circulating monocytes to infiltrate cardiac tissue nor the number of resident Ly6CHigh and Ly6CHow monocytes/macrophages populating the infarcted milieu. In contrast, combined Mertk and Mfge8 deficiency in Ly6CHigh/Ly6CLow monocytes/macrophages either obtained from in vitro differentiation of bone marrow cells or isolated from infarcted hearts altered their capacity of efferocytosis and subsequently blunted vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) release. Using LysMCre+/VEGFAfl/fl mice, we further identified an important role for myeloid-derived VEGFA in improving cardiac function and angiogenesis. Conclusions— After myocardial infarction, Mertk- and Mfge8-expressing monocyte/macrophages synergistically engage the clearance of injured cardiomyocytes, favoring the secretion of VEGFA to locally repair the

  11. Calcium Carbonate

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  12. Carbon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konov, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    The properties of new carbon materials (single-crystal and polycrystalline CVD diamond films and wafers, single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene) and the prospects of their use as optical elements and devices are discussed.

  13. Carbon-Carbon Piston Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Schwind, Francis A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved structure for carbon-carbon composite piston architectures consists of replacing the knitted fiber, three-dimensional piston preform architecture described in U.S. Pat. No. 4.909,133 (Taylor et al.) with a two-dimensional lay-up or molding of carbon fiber fabric or tape. Initially. the carbon fabric or tape layers are prepregged with carbonaceous organic resins and/or pitches and are laid up or molded about a mandrel. to form a carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part shaped like a "U" channel, a "T"-bar. or a combination of the two. The molded carbon-fiber reinforced organic-matrix composite part is then pyrolized in an inert atmosphere, to convert the organic matrix materials to carbon. At this point, cylindrical piston blanks are cored from the "U" channel, "T"-bar, or combination part. These blanks are then densified by reimpregnation with resins or pitches which are subsequently carbonized. Densification is also be accomplished by direct infiltration with carbon by vapor deposition processes. Once the desired density has been achieved, the piston billets are machined to final piston dimensions; coated with oxidation sealants; and/or coated with a catalyst. When compared to conventional steel or aluminum-alloy pistons, the use of carbon-carbon composite pistons reduces the overall weight of the engine; allows for operation at higher temperatures without a loss of strength; allows for quieter operation; reduces the heat loss; and reduces the level of hydrocarbon emissions.

  14. Reproducing Experiment in the Shock-Induced Removal of CO2 From the Atmosphere on the Early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, K.; Isobe, H.

    2005-12-01

    The evolution of the Mars is one of the most important problems on the environmental issues of terrestrial planets. The early Martian atmosphere was formed by degassing and it consisted thick CO2. Most of the CO2 must have been removed from the early Martian atmosphere in order to change to the present thin atmosphere. Heavy bombardment of planetesimals had been one of the important high energy processes on the primitive Mars. In this study, we experiment to reproduce the reaction between the early Martian atmosphere and the minerals in the high temperature condition caused by the shock-induced heating and discuss its effect of CO2 removal from the atmosphere. Reaction experiments were carried out with CO2 or CO2- H2O fluid at the pressure of 100MPa or 50MPa. A range of the temperature is 200-650°C and run durat