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Sample records for alh84001 preserves evidence

  1. Nanophase Magnetite and Pyrrhotite in ALH84001 Martian Meteorite: Evidence for an Abiotic Origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Lauer, H. V., Jr. III; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.

    2006-01-01

    The nanophase magnetite crystals in the black rims of pancake-shaped carbonate globules of the Martian meteorite ALH84001 have been studied extensively because of the claim by McKay et al.that they are biogenic in origin. A subpopulation of these magnetite crystals are reported to conform to a unique elongated shape called "truncated hexa-octahedral" or "THO" by Thomas-Keprta et al. They claim these THO magnetite crystals can only be produced by living bacteria thus forming a biomarker in the meteorite. In contrast, thermal decomposition of Fe-rich carbonate has been suggested as an alternate hypothesis for the elongated magnetite formation in ALH84001 carbonates. The experimental and observational evidence for the inorganic formation of nanophase magnetite and pyrrhotite in ALH84001 by decomposition of Fe-rich carbonate in the presence of pyrite are provided.

  2. Morphological Evidence for an Exclusively Inorganic Origin for Magnetite in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Brearley, A. J.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Treiman, A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Schwandt, C. S.; Lofgren, G. E.; McKay, G. A.

    2003-01-01

    The origin of magnetite crystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 is the focus of a debate about the possibility of past (and present) life on Mars. McKay et al. originally suggested that some of the magnetite crystals associated with carbonate globules in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 are biogenic in ori-gin, because they are single magnetic domain, free of crystalline defects, chemically pure, and coexist with other metastable phases in apparent disequilibrium. Thomas-Keprta et al. reported that a subpopulation of magnetite crystals (approx. 25%) associated with carbonate globules in ALH84001 and magnetite crystals produced by magnetotactic bacterial strain MV-1 have similar morphologies with crystal elongation along the [111] crystallographic axis that they describe as "truncated hexa-octahedral" ([111-THO]) magnetite. Along with several other properties, the [111]-THO morphology has been proposed to constitute a biomarker (i.e., formed only in biogenic processes), so that the presence of [111]-THO magnetite in ALH84001 may be evidence for past life on Mars.

  3. Evidence for exclusively inorganic formation of magnetite in Martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Brearley, A. J.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Treiman, A. H.; Zolensky, M. E.; Schwandt, C. S.; Lofgren, G. E.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetite crystals produced by terrestrial magnetotactic bacterium MV-1 are elongated on a [111] crystallographic axis, in a so-called truncated hexa-Octahedral shape. This morphology has been proposed to constitute a biomarker (i.e., formed only in biogenic processes). A subpopulation of magnetite crystals associated with carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH84001 is reported to have this morphology, and the observation has been taken as evidence for biological activity on Mars. In this study, we present evidence for the exclusively inorganic origin of [111]-elongated magnetite crystals in ALH84001. We report three-dimensional(3-D) morphologies for approx.1000 magnetite crystals extracted from: (1) thermal decomposition products of Fe-rich carbonate produced by inorganic hydrothermal precipitation in laboratory experiments; (2) carbonate globules in Martian meteoriteeALH84001; and (3) cells of magnetotactic bacterial strain MV-1. The 3-D morphologies were derived by fitting 3-D shape models to two-dimensional bright-field transmission-electron microscope (TEAM) images obtained at a series of viewing angles. The view down the {110} axes closest to the [111] elongation axis of magnetite crystals ([111]x{110) not equal to 0) provides a 2-D projection that uniquely discriminates among the three [111]-elongated magnetite morphologies found in these samples: [111]-elongated truncated hexaoctahedron ([111]-THO), [111]-elongated cubo-octahedron ([111]-ECO), and [111]-elongated simple octahedron ([111]-ESO). All [111] -elongated morphologies are present in the three types of sample, but in different proportions. In the ALH84001 Martian meteorite and in our inorganic laboratory products, the most common [111]-elongated magnetite crystal morphology is [111]-ECO. In contrast, the most common morphology for magnetotactic bacterial strain MV-1 is [111]-THO. These results show that: (1) the morphology of [111]-elongated magnetite crystals associated with the carbonate

  4. Chains of magnetite crystals in the meteorite ALH84001: evidence of biological origin.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, E I; Wierzchos, J; Ascaso, C; Winklhofer, M

    2001-02-27

    The presence of magnetite crystal chains, considered missing evidence for the biological origin of magnetite in ALH84001 [Thomas-Keprta, K. L., Bazylinski, D. A., Kirschvink, J. L., Clemett, S. J., McKay, D. S., Wentworth, S. J., Vali, H., Gibson, E. K., Jr., & Romanek, C. S. (2000) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 64, 4049-4081], is demonstrated by high-power stereo backscattered scanning electron microscopy. Five characteristics of such chains (uniform crystal size and shape within chains, gaps between crystals, orientation of elongated crystals along the chain axis, flexibility of chains, and a halo that is a possible remnant of a membrane around chains), observed or inferred to be present in magnetotactic bacteria but incompatible with a nonbiological origin, are shown to be present. Although it is unlikely that magnetotactic bacteria were ever alive in ALH84001, decomposed remains of such organisms could have been deposited in cracks in the rock while it was still on the surface on Mars.

  5. Petrologic evidence for low-temperature, possibly flood evaporitic origin of carbonates in the ALH84001 meteorite.

    PubMed

    Warren, P H

    1998-07-25

    High-temperature models for origin of the carbonates in Martian meteorite ALH84001 are implausible. The impact metasomatism model, invoking reaction between CO2 rich fluid and the host orthopyroxenite, requires conversion of olivine into orthopyroxene, yet olivine in ALH84001 shows no depletion in carbonate-rich areas; or else conversion of orthopyroxene into silica, which should have yielded a higher silica/carbonate ratio. The impact melt model implies that the fracture-linked carbonates, as products of melt injection, should appear as continuous planar veins, but in many areas they do not. Both vapor deposition and impact melting seem inconsistent with the zoned poikilotopic texture of many large carbonates. The popular hydrothermal model is inconsistent with the virtual absence of secondary hydrated silicates in ALH84001. Prior brecciation should have facilitated alteration. Hydrothermal fluids would be warm, and rate of hydration of mafic silicates obeys an Arrhenius law, at least up to approximately 100 degrees C. Most important, hydrothermal episodes tend to last for many years. Many areas of the ancient Martian crust show evidence for massive flooding. I propose that the carbonates formed as evaporite deposits from floodwaters that percolated through the fractures of ALH84001, but only briefly, as evaporation and groundwater flow caused the water table to quickly recede beneath the level of this rock during the later stages of the flood episode. The setting might have been a layer of megaregolith beneath a surface catchment of pooled floodwater, analogous to a playa lake. Carbonate precipitation would occur in response to evaporative concentration of the water. To explain the scarcity of sulfates in ALH84001, the water table must be assumed to recede quickly relative to the rate of evaporation. During the period when ALH84001 was above the water table, evaporation would have slowed, as the evaporation front passed beneath the surface of the debris layer

  6. Truncated Hexa-Octahedral Magnetite Crystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001: Evidence of Biogenic Activity on Early Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K.; Clemett, S. J.; Schwartz, C.; McIntosh, J. R.; Bazylinski, D. A.; Kirschvink, J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.; Vali, H.; Romanek, C. S.

    2004-01-01

    The landmark paper by McKay et al. [1] cited four lines of evidence associated with the Martian meteorite ALH84001 to support the hypothesis that life existed on Mars approximately 4 Ga ago. Now, more than five years later, attention has focused on the ALH84001 magnetite grains embedded within carbonate globules in the ALH84001 meteorite. We have suggested that up to approx.25% of the ALH84001 magnetite crystals are products of biological activity [e.g., 2]. The remaining magnetites lack sufficient characteristics to constrain their origin. The papers of Thomas Keprta et al. were criticized arguing that the three dimensional structure of ALH84001 magnetite crystals can only be unambiguously determined using electron tomographic techniques. Clemett et al. [3] confirmed that magnetites produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-I display a truncated hexa-octahedral geometry using electron tomography and validated the use of the multi-tilt classical transmission microscopy technique used by [2]. Recently the geometry of the purported martian biogenic magnetites was shown be identical to that for MV-1 magnetites using electron tomography [6].

  7. Geochemical evidence for mixing of three components in martian orthopyroxenite ALH 84001. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Lindstrom, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    ALH 84001, a ferroan martian orthopyroxenite, originally consisted of three petrographically defined components: a cumulus assemblage of orthopyroxene + chromite, a trapped melt assemblage of orthopyroxene(?) + chromite + maskelynite + apatite + augite +/- pyrite, and a metasomatic assemblage of carbonate +/- pyrite. We present the results of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) study of five bulk samples of ALH 84001, combined with Scanning Ion Mass Spectrometer (SIMS) data on the orthopyroxene, in order to attempt to set limits on the geochemical characteristics of the latter two components, and therefore on the petrogenesis of ALH 84001. The INAA data support the petrographic observations, suggesting that there are at least three components in ALH 84001. We will assume that each of the three geochemically required components can be equated with one of the petrographically observed components. Both trapped melt and metasomatic components in ALH 84001 have higher Na than orthopyroxene based on compositions of maskelynite, apatite, and carbonate. For the metasomatic component, we will assume its Na content is that of carbonate, while for a trapped melt component, we will use a typical Na content inferred for martian meteorite parent melts, approximately 1 wt% Na2O. Under these assumptions, we can set limits on the Light Rare Earth Elements/Heavy Rare Earth Elements (LREE/HREE) ratios of the components, and use this information to compare the petrogenesis of ALH 84001 with other martian meteorites. The above calculations assume that the bulk samples are representative of different portions of ALH 84001. We will also evaluate the possible heterogeneous distribution of mineral phases in the bulk samples as the cause of compositional heterogeneity in our samples.

  8. Biomarkers in ALH84001???

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allen H.

    1999-01-01

    D. McKay and colleagues suggested that four sets of features in ALH84001 were biomarkers, signs of an ancient martian biota that once inhabited the meteorite. Subsequent work has not validated their hypothesis; each suggested biomarker has been found to be ambiguous or immaterial. Nor has their hypothesis been disproved. Rather, it is now one of many hypotheses about the alteration of ALH84001. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Hosts of hydrogen in ALH 84001: Evidence for hydrous martian salts in the oldest martian meteorite?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiler, John M.; Kitchen, Nami; Leshin, Lauri; Strausberg, Melissa

    2002-03-01

    The Martian meteorite, ALH84001, contains D-rich hydrogen of plausible Martian origin (Leshin et al. 1996). The phase identity of the host(s) of this hydrogen are not well known and could include organic matter (McKay et al., 1996), phlogopite (Brearley 2000), glass (Mittlefehldt 1994) and/or other, unidentified components of this rock. Previous ion microprobe studies indicate that much of the hydrogen in ALH84001 as texturally associated with concretions of nominally anhydrous carbonates, glass and oxides (Boctor et al., 1998; Sugiura and Hoshino, 2000). We examined the physical and chemical properties of the host(s) of this hydrogen by stepped pyrolysis of variously pre-treated sub-samples. A continuous-flow method of water reduction and mass spectrometry (Eiler and Kitchen 2001) was used to permit detailed study of the small amounts of this hydrogen-poor sample available for study. We find that the host(s) of D-rich hydrogen released from ALH84001 at relatively low temperatures (~500 deg C) is soluble in orthophosphoric and dilute hydrochloric acids and undergoes near-complete isotopic exchange with water within hours at temperatures of 200 to 300 deg C. These characteristics are most consistent with the carrier phase(s) being a hydrous salt (e.g., carbonate, sulfate or halide); the thermal stability of this material is inconsistent with many examples of such minerals (e.g., gypsum) and instead suggests one or more relatively refractory hydrous carbonates (e.g., hydromagnesite). Hydrous salts (particularly hydrous carbonates) are common on the earth only in evaporite, sabkha, and hydrocryogenic-weathering environments; we suggest that much (if not all) of the 'Martian' hydrogen in ALH84001 was introduced in analogous environments on or near the martian surface rather than through biological activity or hydrothermal alteration of silicates in the crust.

  10. First evidence for infiltration metasomatism in a martian meteorite, ALH 84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhwa, M.; Crozaz, G.

    1994-07-01

    ALH 84001, originally classified as a diogenite, was recently recognized by Mittlefehldt as a new member of the clan of martian meteorites. It is a coarse-grained orthopyroxenite with same O isotopic composition as the nakhlites. Most of this meteorite consists of orthopyroxene grains; it also contains maskelynite, chromite, and accessory minerals including apatite, augite, pyrite, and Mg-Ca-Mn-Fe carbonates. With the ion microprobe, we measured the concentrations of Rare Earth Elements (REEs) and other selected minor and trace elements in individual grains of orthopyroxene, maskelynite, and apatite. Although in all SNCs phosphate is the mineral with the highest REE concentrations, it is not the major REE carrier in ALH 84001. Using the most appropriate partition coefficients for these minerals in SNCs, we estimated the compositions of the metals that may have been in equilibrium with the 'average' orthopyroxene, the apatite, and the maskelynite. The orthopyroxene equilibrium melt is slightly LREE depleted, whereas the apatite and maskelynite equilibrium melts have higher REE concentrations and are strikingly LREE enriched. We tried unsuccessfully to derive the apatite and maskelynite melts from the orthopyroxene melt by fractional crystallization. We therefore suggest that an infiltrating fluid enriched in LREE is responsible for the formation of the apatite and maskelynite that occur as interstitial grains in ALH 84001. The similarity of REE patterns for the parent melts of ALH 84001, Shergotty, and Zagami seems to indicate that the new SNC meteorite is more closely related to these two shergottites than to any of the other meteorites thought to have come from Mars.

  11. A Petrographic History of Martian Meteorite ALH84001: Two Shocks and an Ancient Age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1995-01-01

    ALH84001 is an igneous meteorite, an orthopyroxenite of martian origin. It contains petrographic evidence of two shock metamorphic events, separated by thermal and chemical events. The evidence for two shock events suggests that ALH84001 is ancient and perhaps a sample of the martian highlands. From petrography and mineral chemistry, the history of ALH84001 must include: crystallization from magma, a first shock (impact) metamorphism, thermal metamorphism, low-temperature chemical alteration, and a second shock (impact) metamorphism. Originally, ALH84001 was igneous, an orthopyroxene-chromite cumulate. In the first shock event, the igneous rock was cut by melt-breccia or cataclastic veinlets, now bands of equigranular fine-grained pyroxene and other minerals (crush zones). Intact fragments of the cumulate were fractured and strained (now converted to polygonized zones). The subsequent thermal metamorphism (possibly related to the first shock) annealed the melt-breccia or cataclastic veinlets to their present granoblastic texture and permitted chemical homogenization of all mineral species present. The temperature of metamorphism was at least 875 C, based on mineral thermometers. Next, Mg-Fe-Ca carbonates and pyrite replaced plagioclase in both clasts and granular bands, producing ellipsoidal carbonate globules with sub-micron scale compositional stratigraphy, repeated identically in all globules, The second shock event produced microfault offsets of carbonate stratigraphy and other mineral contacts, radial fractures around chromite and maskelynite, and strain birefringence in pyroxene. Maskelynite could not have been preserved from the first shock event, because it would have crystallized back to plagioclase. The martian source area for ALH84001 must permit this complex, multiple impact history. Very few craters on young igneous surfaces are on or near earlier impact features. It is more likely that ALH84001 was ejected from an old igneous unit (Hesperian or

  12. The Origin of Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks believed to have formed approx 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of magnetite and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships between the carbonate disks, their associated magnetites and the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. Comparison of these results with experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates conducted under a range of heating scenarios suggests that the magnetite nanocrystals in the ALH84001 carbonate disks are not the products of thermal decomposition.

  13. Bacterial mineralization patterns in basaltic aquifers: implications for possible life in martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; McKay, D. S.; Wentworth, S. J.; Stevens, T. O.; Taunton, A. E.; Allen, C. C.; Coleman, A.; Gibson, E. K. Jr; Romanek, C. S.

    1998-01-01

    To explore the formation and preservation of biogenic features in igneous rocks, we have examined the organisms in experimental basaltic microcosms using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Four types of microorganisms were recognized on the basis of size, morphology, and chemical composition. Some of the organisms mineralized rapidly, whereas others show no evidence of mineralization. Many mineralized cells are hollow and do not contain evidence of microstructure. Filaments, either attached or no longer attached to organisms, are common. Unattached filaments are mineralized and are most likely bacterial appendages (e.g., prosthecae). Features similar in size and morphology to unattached, mineralized filaments are recognized in martian meteorite ALH84001.

  14. Bacterial mineralization patterns in basaltic aquifers: Implications for possible life in Martian meteorite ALH84001

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas-Keprta, K.L.; Wentworth, S.J.; Allen, C.C.; McKay, D.S.; Gibson, E.K. Jr.; Stevens, T.O.; Taunton, A.E.; Coleman, A.; Romanek, C.S.

    1998-11-01

    To explore the formation and preservation of biogenic features in igneous rocks, the authors have examined the organisms in experimental basaltic microcosms using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Four types of microorganisms were recognized on the basis of size, morphology, and chemical composition. Some of the organisms mineralized rapidly, whereas others show no evidence of mineralization. Many mineralized cells are hollow and do not contain evidence of microstructure. Filaments, either attached or no longer attached to organisms, are common. Unattached filaments are mineralized and are most likely bacterial appendages (e.g., prosthecae). Features similar in size and morphology to unattached, mineralized filaments are recognized in martial meteorite ALH84001.

  15. ALH84001: The Key to Unlocking Secrets About Mars-15 Years and Counting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K.; McKay, D. S.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    From the December 27, 1984 discovery of ALH84001, and its subsequent identification as a sample of Mars in 1993, mystery and debate has surrounded the meteorite [1]. With the realization that the ALH84001 sample was a orthopyroxenite and one of the oldest SNC meteorites (approx.4.09 Ga) [2] available to study, important and critical information about the Martian hydrosphere and atmosphere along with the early history and evolution of the planet could be obtained by studying the unique carbonate globules (approx.3.9 Ga) in the sample [3]. The initial work showed the carbonate globules were deposited within fractures and cracks in the host-orthopyroxene by low-temperature aqueous fluids [4]. Ideas that the carbonates were formed at temperatures [5] approaching 800 C were ruled out by later experiments [6]. The 1996 announcement by McKay et al. [7] that ALH84001 contained features which could be interpreted as having a biogenic origin generated considerable excitement and criticism. The NASA Administrator Dan Golden said the 1996 ALH84001 announcement saved NASAs Mars planetary exploration program and injected $6 billion dollars over five years into the scientific research and analysis efforts [8]. All of the original four lines of evidence for possible biogenic features within ALH84001 offered by McKay et al. have withstood the test of time. Criticism has been directed at the interpretation of the 1996 analytical data. Research has expanded to other SNC meteorites. Despite the numerous attacks on the ideas, the debate continues after 15 years. The 2009 paper by Thomas-Keprta et al. [9] on the origins of a suite of magnetites within the ALH84001 has offered strong arguments that some of the magnetites can only be formed by biogenic processes and not from thermal decomposition or shock events which happened to the meteorite. NASA s Astrobiology Institute was formed from the foundation laid by the ALH84001 hypothesis of finding life beyond the Earth. The strong

  16. Carbon and nitrogen in ALH 84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, M. M.; Wright, I. P.; Douglas, C.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1994-07-01

    Reclassification of ALH 84001 as an orthopyroxenite related to SNCs brings the total number of martian meteorites to 10. Preliminary descriptions of ALH 84001 and the more detailed analysis that followed highlighted the presence of abundant Fe, Mg-carbonates distributed heterogeneously throughout the specimen. Previous studies of SNCs identified four discrete carbon-bearing components: materials that combusted at temperatures usually associated with organics, carbonates, magmatic carbon, and trapped martian atmospheric carbon dioxide. The isotopic compositions of these species are distinctive, and have been used to constrain the operation of martian surficial processes. Given the relatively high carbonate abundance in ALH 84001, detailed isotopic analyses of the specimen will undoubtedly provide further information on the formation mechanisms of these minerals. Nitrogen analysis could identify the presence of any N-bearing salts and trapped atmospheric species. This abstract reports the first results from analysis of carbon in ALH 84001. A high-resolution stepped combustion of 5.099 mg of powdered ALH 84001 was performed. The most outstanding feature of the analysis was the release of almost 50% of the total C across a narrow temperature range from 450-525 C, with (delta)C-13 is approximately +40%. The enrichment C-13 in carbonates from ALH 84001 indicates beyond any doubt that these salts are truly indigenous to the meteorite, rather than an Antarctic weathering product. Wright et al. defined a linear relationship between yield and C isotopic composition of carbonate in SNCs; the datum from ALH 84001 extends this association. For the carbonate to be formed by interaction of martian atmospheric CO2 with regolith material, reaction would need to have occurred at temperatures around 100 C. Such a high temperature is unlikely on the martian surface, and therefore the carbonates more probably formed in a hydrothermal environment.

  17. A Hypothesis for the Abiotic and Non-Martian Origins of Putative Signs of Ancient Martian Life in ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    2001-01-01

    Putative evidence of martian life in ALH84001 can be explained by abiotic and non-martian processes consistent with the meteorite's geological history. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. New Insights into the Origin of Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keptra, Katie L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth S. J.; Mckay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks believed to have formed approx.3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose ori gins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of magnetite and carbonate may be unrelated: that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships between the carbonate disks, their associated magnetites and the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded [1]. Comparison of these results with experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates conducted under a range of heating scenarios suggests that the magnetite nanocrystals in the ALH84001 carbonate disks are not the products of thermal decomposition.

  19. Origin of Magnetite Crystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K.L.; Clemett, S.J.; McKay, D.S.; Gibson, E. K.; Wentworth, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks which are believed to have precipitated approx.3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these Fe3O4 are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of Fe3O4 and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded [1]. We focus this discussion on the composition of ALH84001 magnetites and then compare these observations with those from our thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios.

  20. New insights into the origin of magnetite crystals in ALH84001 carbonate disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.

    2009-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks which are believed to have precipitated approximately 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these Fe3O4 are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of Fe3O4 and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. We focus this discussion on the composition of ALH84001 magnetites and then compare these observations with those from experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios.

  1. A search for endogenous amino acids in martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bada, J. L.; Glavin, D. P.; McDonald, G. D.; Becker, L.

    1998-01-01

    Trace amounts of glycine, serine, and alanine were detected in the carbonate component of the martian meteorite ALH84001 by high-performance liquid chromatography. The detected amino acids were not uniformly distributed in the carbonate component and ranged in concentration from 0.1 to 7 parts per million. Although the detected alanine consists primarily of the L enantiomer, low concentrations (<0.1 parts per million) of endogenous D-alanine may be present in the ALH84001 carbonates. The amino acids present in this sample of ALH84001 appear to be terrestrial in origin and similar to those in Allan Hills ice, although the possibility cannot be ruled out that minute amounts of some amino acids such as D-alanine are preserved in the meteorite.

  2. Origins of Magnetite Nanocrystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Mckay, David S.; Gibson, Everett K.; Wentworth, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    The Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks. These carbonate disks are believed to have precipitated 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch on Mars during which both the oldest extant Martian surfaces were formed, and perhaps the earliest global oceans. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of mag- netite and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. For example, the magnetites might have already been present in the aqueous fluids from which the carbonates were believed to have been deposited. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compo- sitional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. Extensive use of focused ion beam milling techniques has been utilized for sample preparation. We then compared our observations with those from experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios. We conclude that the vast majority of the nanocrystal magnetites present in the car- bonate disks could not have formed by any of the currently proposed thermal decomposition scenarios. Instead, we find there is considerable evidence in support of an alternative allochthonous origin for the magnetite unrelated to any shock or thermal processing of the carbonates.

  3. ALH84001: The Key to Unlocking Secrets About Mars-15 Years and Counting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K.

    2011-01-01

    From the December 27, 1984 discovery of ALH84001, and its subsequent identification as a sample of Mars in 1993, mystery and debate has surrounded the meteorite. With the realization that the ALH84001 sample was a orthopyroxenite and one of the oldest SNC meteorites (4.09 Ga) available to study, important and critical information about the Martian hydrosphere and atmosphere along with the early history and evolution of the planet could be obtained by studying the unique carbonate globules (3.9 Ga) in the sample. The initial work showed the carbonate globules were deposited within fractures and cracks in the host-orthopyroxene by low-temperature aqueous fluids. Ideas that the carbonates were formed at temperatures approaching 800oC were ruled out by later experiments. The 1996 announcement by McKay et al. that ALH84001 contained features which could be interpreted as having a biogenic origin generated considerable excitement and criticism. The NASA Administrator Dan Golden said the 1996 ALH84001 announcement saved NASA s Mars planetary exploration program and injected $6 billion dollars over five years into the scientific research and analysis efforts. All of the original four lines of evidence for possible biogenic features within ALH84001 offered by McKay et al. have withstood the test of time. Criticism has been directed at the interpretation of the 1996 analytical data. Research has expanded to other SNC meteorites. Despite the numerous attacks on the ideas, the debate continues after 15 years. The 2009 paper by Thomas-Keprta et al. on the origins of a suite of magnetites within the ALH84001 has offered strong arguments that some of the magnetites can only be formed by biogenic processes and not from thermal decomposition or shock events which happened to the meteorite. NASA s Astrobiology Institute was formed from the foundation laid by the ALH84001 hypothesis of finding life beyond the Earth. The strong astrobiology outreach programs have expanded because of

  4. X-ray microprobe measurements of the chemical compositions of ALH84001 carbonate globules

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, G.J.; Sutton, S.R.; Keller, L.P.

    2004-01-28

    We measured minor element contents of carbonate from ALH84001 and report trends in tbe Ca, V, Mn and Sr in carbonate and the associated magnetite bands. McKay et al. suggested that carbonate globules in the ALH84001 meteorite from Mars contained evidence consistent with the development of bacterial life early in the history of Mars. This result provoked an extensive study of the ALH84001 meteorite. More recently Thomas-Keprta et al. have published a study showing that the magnetite associated with carbonate rims are of the size and shape produced by terrestrial bacteria. This paper has revived interest in ALH84001. The typical ALH84001 carbonate globule consists of four regions: a core of Fe-rich carbonate, a thin magnetite-rich band, a rim of Mn-rich carbonate, and another thin magnetite-rich band. Trace element analysis of each of these phases may allow us to address several important questions about these carbonates: (1) The origin of the magnetite-rich bands in the ALH84001 carbonate globules. If the magnetites are derived from the underlying carbonate through thermal decomposition (as proposed by Golden et al.), then we expect to see 'inherited' trace elements in these magnetite bands. (2) The origin of the rim carbonate, by determining whether the carbonate in the core has the same trace elements as the rim carbonates. (3) The age of the rim carbonate. Borg et al. dated the formation of the rim carbonate using the Rb/Sr chronometer. Borg et al. performed their measurements on an aliquot of what they called a high-Rb, low-Sr carbonate separate from the rim. We previously measured the trace element contents of chips from core and rim carbonates from an ALH84001 carbonate globule using an X-Ray Microprobe on Beamline X26A at the National Synchrotron Light Source. These measurements showed the rim carbonate had a very low Rb content, with Sr>>Rb, inconsistent with the {approx}5 ppm Rb reported by Borg et al. in the sample they dated by the Rb/Sr chronometer. The

  5. Origin of carbonate-magnetite-sulfide assemblages in Martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Edward R. D.

    1999-02-01

    A review of the mineralogical, isotopic, and chemical properties of the carbonates and associated submicrometer iron oxides and sulfides in Martian meteorite ALH84001 provides minimal evidence for microbial activity. Some magnetites resemble those formed by magnetotactic microorganisms but cubic crystals <50 nm in size and elongated grains <25 nm long are too small to be single-domain magnets and are probably abiogenic. Magnetites with shapes that are clearly unique to magnetotactic bacteria appear to be absent in ALH84001. Magnetosomes have not been reported in plutonic rocks and are unlikely to have been transported in fluids through fractures and uniformly deposited where abiogenic magnetite was forming epitaxially on carbonate. Submicrometer sulfides and magnetites probably formed during shock heating. Carbonates have correlated variations in Ca, Mg, and 18O/16O, magnetite-rich rims, and they appear to be embedded in pyroxene and plagioclase glass. Carbonates with these features have not been identified in carbonaceous chondrites and terrestrial rocks, suggesting that the ALH84001 carbonates have a unique origin. Carbonates and hydrated minerals in ALH84001, like secondary phases in other Martian meteorites, have O and H isotopic ratios favoring formation from fluids that exchanged with the Martian atmosphere. I propose that carbonates originally formed in ALH84001 from aqueous fluids and were subsequently shock heated and vaporized. The original carbonates were probably dolomite-magnesite-siderite assemblages that formed in pores at interstitial sites with minor sulfate, chloride, and phyllosilicates. These phases, like many other volatile-rich phases in Martian meteorites, may have formed as evaporite deposits from intermittent floods.

  6. Microbial Alteration of Maskelynite: Implications for ALH 84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanCleave, K. A.; Robbins, L. L.; Bell, M. S.

    2000-01-01

    To assess the origin of Fe and Mg-enriched carbonates associated with maskelynite in ALH 84001, we are conducting experiments involving the microbial alteration of feldspathic glass and any microbially-induced precipitation which results during this process.

  7. Experimental Shock Decomposition of Siderite and the Origin of Magnetite in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Mary Sue

    2007-01-01

    Shock recovery experiments to determine whether magnetite could be produced by the decomposition of iron-carbonate were initiated. Naturally occurring siderite was first characterized by electron microprobe (EMP), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mossbauer spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility measurements to be sure that the starting material did not contain detectable magnetite. Samples were shocked in tungsten-alloy holders (W=90%, Ni=6%, Cu=4%) to further insure that any iron phases in the shock products were contributed by the siderite rather than the sample holder. Each sample was shocked to a specific pressure between 30 to 49 GPa. Previously reported results of TEM analyses on 49 GPa experiments indicated the presence of nano-phase spinel-structured iron oxide. Transformation of siderite to magnetite as characterized by TEM was found in the 49 GPa shock experiment. Compositions of most magnetites are greater than 50% Fe sup(+2) in the octahedral site of the inverse spinel structure. Magnetites produced in shock experiments display the same range of single-domain, superparamagnetic sizes (approx. 50 100 nm), compositions (100% magnetite to 80% magnetite-20% magnesioferrite), and morphologies (equant, elongated, euhedral to subhedral) as magnetites synthesized by Golden et al. (2001) or magnetites grown naturally by MV1 magnetotactic bacteria, and as the magnetites in Martian meteorite ALH84001. Fritz et al. (2005) previously concluded that ALH84001 experienced approx. 32 GPa pressure and a resultant thermal pulse of approx. 100 - 110 C. However, ALH84001 contains evidence of local temperature excursions high enough to 1 melt feldspar, pyroxene, and a silica-rich phase. This 49 GPa experiment demonstrates that magnetite can be produced by the shock decomposition of siderite as a result of local heating to greater than 470 C. Therefore, magnetite in the rims of carbonates in Martian meteorite ALH84001 could be a product of shock devolatilization of

  8. Hydrothermal Origin for Carbonate Globules in ALH84001 by Analogy with Similar Carbonates from Spitsbergen (Norway)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.; Amundsen, H. E. F.; Blake, D. F.; Bunch, T.

    2002-01-01

    Basalts and xenoliths from Spitsbergen (Norway) contain carbonate globules nearly identical to those in ALH84001. The Spitsbergen globules formed from hydrothermal waters by analogy, so did those in ALH84001. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. The Hydrological Cycle on Mars as Inferred from the Multi O-isotopic Composition of Carbonates in ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, R.; Niles, P. B.; Chong, K.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    Carbonate minerals provide valuable record of the atmosphere in which they are formed. This work utilizes C and O triple isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals found in ALH84001 to explore the interaction between atmosphere-hydrosphere and lithosphere. The origin of carbonates found in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 (<1%) is heavily debated with low temperature aqueous precipitation, biogenic production, evaporative processes, high temperature reactions, and impact induced melting and reprecipitation are all candidate processes. These carbonates are heterogeneous chemically (Mg, Ca and Fe-Mn rich) and isotopically (δ13CPDB = +27 to 46 %; δ18OVSMOW = +9.5 to 20.6%) on micrometer scales. Our stepped phosphoric acid dissolution experiments released CO2 from multiple phases of Martian carbonate in the rock (12h acid digestion at 25o C for Ca rich phase and 3h acid digestion at 150oC for Mg rich phase). Both Ca and Mg rich phases showed 0.7% excess 17O (Δ17O = δ17O - 0.52δ18O) in contrast to terrestrial carbonate minerals formed by surficial weathering of the meteorite with no oxygen isotopic anomaly Δ17O ≈ 0 (one hour acid digestion at 25o C). The newly identified Ca-rich carbonate phase is 18O enriched (δ18O = +25%) in contrast to all of the other Ca-rich carbonates previously described. It also contains excess 17O (Δ17O = 0.7%) indicating incorporation of oxygen from an atmospheric source of Martian origin. These oxygen isotope characteristics differentiate this phase from the more commonly described carbonate globules or rosettes and suggest formation from separate aqueous event. This is confirmed by the carbon isotope composition of this new carbonate phase (δ13C= +20%) which differs from the other Martian carbonates in the meteorite and from terrestrial sources. This difference may be an evidence of the long term evolution of carbon isotopes in the atmosphere of Mars. The discovery of highly enriched (O isotopes) Ca-rich phase of Martian

  10. High Resolution Chemical Study of ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, Pamela G.; Douglas, Susanne; Kuhlman, Kimberly R.

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the chemistry of a sample of the SNC meteorite ALH84001 using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) with an energy dispersive chemical analytical detector and a focused ion beam secondary ion mass spectrometer (FIB-SIMS). Here we present the chemical data, both spectra and images, from two techniques that do not require sample preparation with a conductive coating, thus eliminating the possibility of preparation-induced textural artifacts. The FIB-SIMS instrument includes a column optimized for SEM with a quadrupole type mass spectrometer. Its spatial and spectral resolution are 20 nm and 0.4 AMU, respectively. The spatial resolution of the ESEM for chemical analysis is about 100 nm. Limits of detection for both instruments are mass dependent. Both the ESEM and the FIB-SIMS instrument revealed contrasting surficial features; crumbled, weathered appearance of the matrix in some regions as well as a rather ubiquitous presence of euhedral halite crystals, often associated with cracks or holes in the surface of the rock. Other halogen elements present in the vicinity of the NaCl crystals include K and Br. In this report, elemental inventories are shown as mass spectra and as X-ray maps.

  11. Magnetic tests for magnetosome chains in Martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Benjamin P; Kim, Soon Sam; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Kopp, Robert E; Sankaran, Mohan; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Komeili, Arash

    2004-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy studies have been used to argue that magnetite crystals in carbonate from Martian meteorite ALH84001 have a composition and morphology indistinguishable from that of magnetotactic bacteria. It has even been claimed from scanning electron microscopy imaging that some ALH84001 magnetite crystals are aligned in chains. Alignment of magnetosomes in chains is perhaps the most distinctive of the six crystallographic properties thought to be collectively unique to magnetofossils. Here we use three rock magnetic techniques, low-temperature cycling, the Moskowitz test, and ferromagnetic resonance, to sense the bulk composition and crystallography of millions of ALH84001 magnetite crystals. The magnetic data demonstrate that although the magnetite is unusually pure and fine-grained in a manner similar to terrestrial magnetofossils, most or all of the crystals are not arranged in chains.

  12. Magnetofossils in Terrestrial Samples and Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ThomasKeptra, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    2001-01-01

    Here we compare magnetite crystals produced by terrestrial magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1 with a subpopulation of magnetites from ALH84001. We find both to be chemically and physically identical-specifically, both are single-domain, chemically pure, and exhibit an unusual crystal habit we describe as truncated hexa-octahedral. On Earth such truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites are only known to be produced by magnetotactic bacteria. We suggest that the observation of truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites in ALH84001 are both consistent with, and in the absence of terrestrial inorganic analogs, likely formed by biogenic processes. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Focused Ion Beam Microscopy of ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; McKay, David S.; Vali, Hojatollah; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Romanek, Christopher S.

    2005-01-01

    Our aim is to understand the mechanism(s) of formation of carbonate assemblages in ALH84001. A prerequisite is that a detailed characterization of the chemical and physical properties of the carbonate be established. We present here analyses by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of carbonate thin sections produced by both focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning and ultramicrotomy. Our results suggest that the formation of ALH84001 carbonate assemblages were produced by considerably more complex process(es) than simple aqueous precipitation followed by partial thermal decomposition as proposed by other investigators [e.g., 1-3].

  14. Exposure histories of ALH 84001 and ALHA 77005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Finkel, R. C.

    1994-07-01

    From cosmogenic nuclide studies of SNC meteorites exposure histories, ejection conditions from the hypothesized martian parent body, and genetic relationships between SNC meteorites were determined. Previous studies show ablation to have been very low in at least three shergottites, ALHA 77005, Shergotty, and EETA 79001. This suggests that the atmospheric entry velocity and/or entry angle of shergottites must have been much lower than of ordinary chondrites. We report the results of cosmogenic radionuclides in the newly classified SNC meteorite ALH 84001 and additional studies of ALHA 77005. Be-10 (half-life = 1.5 m.y.) and Cl-36 (0.30 m.y.) results are presented for these two meteorites along with previous measurements of the shergottite LEW 88516. Aluminum-26 (0.71 m.y.) measurements are in progress. We received two chips on opposite sides of ALH 84001. Two subsamples, at depths of 0.5-3.5 mm and 7-9 mm, from fusion crust were separated from ALH 84001,97. The C-14 terrestrial age is 6.5 +/- 1.3 k.y. The noble gas exposure age is reported to be 14 +/- 2 m.y. The Be-10 and Cl-36 concentrations in three subsamples are nearly constant. A reasonable interpretation is that there are no SCR (solar cosmic ray) effects at these sample depths. The Be-10 production rate is estimated to be 21-24 atom/min-kg based on recovered size and over 3 cm of ablation depth. The Be-10 concentration indicates that ALH 84001 was exposed to cosmic rays 4-7 m.y. in a 4 pi geometry. The Be-10 exposure age is significantly shorter than noble gas exposure age. Three of the subsamples of ALHA 77005 measured for cosmogenic radionuclides are aliquots from the noble gas study. Chemical analysis and Al-26 measurements for these three subsamples are in progress.

  15. Search for Unique Organic Biomarkers in ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zare, Richard N.

    1999-01-01

    Four goals were outlined for this project. These were: [1] to reproduce the measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) in ALH84001 with both a higher spatial resolution and sensitivity than has been previously reported; [2] to extend such measurements to include other members of the Martian SNC (Shergotties, Nahklites, and Chassigny) meteorite clan, in particular the Antarctic Martian meteorite EETA79001; [3] to address issues of potential organic contamination, because at present very little is known about the effect of terrestrial weathering in the Antarctic environment as it pertains to perturbing an indigenous organic distribution within a meteoritic matrix; and [4] to diversify the range of organic compounds studied to include species that can serve as unique biological markers - "molecular fossils" - derived from once living organisms. In order to achieve this, three specific goals were outlined for the funding period 06/01/97 to 02/28/98. They were: [1] to investigate the effects of terrestrial weathering and organic contamination of meteoritic samples collected from Antarctica; [2] to reproduce and extend upon the measurements of PAHs in ALH84001 with the aim of establishing or refuting the indigeneity of these species; and [3] to extend the analysis of organic compounds in ALH84001 and EETA79001 to address compounds that are considered to be more biologically relevant than PAHS. All three were successfully accomplished, as detailed in the previous performance report. In brief, however, the results achieved were to establish that the PAHs found in ALH84001 were indigenous and not due to contamination, and to determine that a novel and sensitive technique in meteoritic work, capillary zone electrophoresis (CE), could indeed detect amino acids, a potential class of biomarker.

  16. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Martian (SNC) Meteorite ALH 84001: Hydrocarbons from Mars, Terrestrial Contaminants, or Both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Romanek, C. S.; Macheling, C. R.; Gibson, E. K.; McKay, D. S.; Score, R.; Zare, R. N.

    1995-09-01

    Previous work has shown that pre-terrestrial polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) exist in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and certain meteorites [1-3]. We previously reported the first observation of PAHs in the newest member of the SNC group, Allan Hills 84001 [4] and determined that particular types of organic compounds are indigenous to ALH 84001 because they are associated with certain mineralogical features [4]. We also analyzed two diogenites from Antarctica: one showed no evidence for aromatic hydrocarbons while the other contained PAHs with the same major peaks as those in ALH 84001[4]. PAHs in the diogenite meteorite are not associated with mineral features on the analyzed surface and the most abundant PAHs in the diogenite are lower by a factor of 3 than those in ALH 84001. Furthermore, ALH 84001 contains a number of minor PAHs not found in the diogenite or typical terrestrial soils [4]. In this study we are analyzing a more complete group of Antarctic and non-Antarctic meteorites, including SNCs, to determine: (1) PAHs abundance and diversity in Antarctic meteorites and (2) the contribution of PAHs in SNCs from martian and, possibly, terrestrial sources. ALH 84001 is an unusual orthopyroxenite which contains abundant carbonate spheroids which are ~100-200 micrometers in diameter and range in composition from magnesite to ferroan magnesite [5-7]. These spheroids are not the result of terrestrial contamination: oxygen isotopic compositions indicate that the carbonates probably precipitated from a low-temperature fluid within the martian crust [5] and carbon isotopic abundances are consistent with martian atmospheric CO2 as the carbon source [5]. PAHs may coexist with other low-temperature carbon-bearing phases in a subsurface martian environment. Samples: We are analyzing freshly-fractured meteorite samples, or chips, which have been extracted from the internal regions of the following meteorites: ALH 84001 (crush and uncrush zones), EETA79001

  17. Carbonate formation events in ALH 84001 trace the evolution of the Martian atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Robina; Niles, Paul B; Chong, Kenneth; Corrigan, Catherine M; Thiemens, Mark H

    2015-01-13

    Carbonate minerals provide critical information for defining atmosphere-hydrosphere interactions. Carbonate minerals in the Martian meteorite ALH 84001 have been dated to ∼ 3.9 Ga, and both C and O-triple isotopes can be used to decipher the planet's climate history. Here we report Δ(17)O, δ(18)O, and δ(13)C data of ALH 84001 of at least two varieties of carbonates, using a stepped acid dissolution technique paired with ion microprobe analyses to specifically target carbonates from distinct formation events and constrain the Martian atmosphere-hydrosphere-geosphere interactions and surficial aqueous alterations. These results indicate the presence of a Ca-rich carbonate phase enriched in (18)O that formed sometime after the primary aqueous event at 3.9 Ga. The phases showed excess (17)O (0.7‰) that captured the atmosphere-regolith chemical reservoir transfer, as well as CO2, O3, and H2O isotopic interactions at the time of formation of each specific carbonate. The carbon isotopes preserved in the Ca-rich carbonate phase indicate that the Noachian atmosphere of Mars was substantially depleted in (13)C compared with the modern atmosphere.

  18. Possible Evidence for Life in ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie

    1999-01-01

    Since our original paper Science in August 1996, considerable new data has appeared from laboratories throughout the world, and our own team has had a chance to examine the sample in greater detail. The following summary touches on our original data and interpretation, and points out new data from us and from other groups, and the resulting changes and refinements in interpretations which we have made during the past three years.

  19. The Carbonates in ALH 84001 Record the Evolution of the Martian Atmosphere Through Multiple Formation Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaheen, R.; Niles, P. B.; Corrgan, C.

    2012-01-01

    Current Martian conditions restrict the presence of liquid water due to low temperatures (approx 210K), a thin atmosphere (approx 7mb), and intense UV radiation. However, past conditions on Mars may have been different with the possibility that the ancient Martian climate was warm and wet with a dense CO2 atmosphere. The cycling of carbon on Mars through atmospheric CO2 and carbonate minerals is critical for deciphering its climate history. In particular stable isotopes contained in carbonates can provide information of their origin and formation environment as well as possibly hinting at the composition of global reservoirs such as atmospheric CO2. Martian meteorite ALH 84001 contains widely studied carbonate rosettes that have been dated to approx. 3.9 Ga and have been used to interpret climatic conditions present at that time. However, there is mount-ing evidence for multiple episodes of carbonate formation in ALH 84001 with potentially distinct isotopic compositions. This study seeks to tease out these different carbonate assemblages using stepped phosphoric acid dissolution and analysis of carbon and triple oxygen stable isotopes. In addition, we report SIMS analyses of the delta O-18 several petrographically unusual carbonate phases in the meteorite.

  20. Truncated hexa-octahedral magnetite crystals in ALH84001: presumptive biosignatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Bazylinski, D. A.; Kirschvink, J. L.; McKay, D. S.; Wentworth, S. J.; Vali, H.; Gibson, E. K. Jr; McKay, M. F.; Romanek, C. S.

    2001-01-01

    McKay et al. [(1996) Science 273, 924-930] suggested that carbonate globules in the meteorite ALH84001 contained the fossil remains of Martian microbes. We have characterized a subpopulation of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) crystals present in abundance within the Fe-rich rims of these carbonate globules. We find these Martian magnetites to be both chemically and physically identical to terrestrial, biogenically precipitated, intracellular magnetites produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1. Specifically, both magnetite populations are single-domain and chemically pure, and exhibit a unique crystal habit we describe as truncated hexa-octahedral. There are no known reports of inorganic processes to explain the observation of truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites in a terrestrial sample. In bacteria strain MV-1 their presence is therefore likely a product of Natural Selection. Unless there is an unknown and unexplained inorganic process on Mars that is conspicuously absent on the Earth and forms truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites, we suggest that these magnetite crystals in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 were likely produced by a biogenic process. As such, these crystals are interpreted as Martian magnetofossils and constitute evidence of the oldest life yet found.

  1. Truncated hexa-octahedral magnetite crystals in ALH84001: presumptive biosignatures.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Keprta, K L; Clemett, S J; Bazylinski, D A; Kirschvink, J L; McKay, D S; Wentworth, S J; Vali, H; Gibson, E K; McKay, M F; Romanek, C S

    2001-02-27

    McKay et al. [(1996) Science 273, 924-930] suggested that carbonate globules in the meteorite ALH84001 contained the fossil remains of Martian microbes. We have characterized a subpopulation of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) crystals present in abundance within the Fe-rich rims of these carbonate globules. We find these Martian magnetites to be both chemically and physically identical to terrestrial, biogenically precipitated, intracellular magnetites produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1. Specifically, both magnetite populations are single-domain and chemically pure, and exhibit a unique crystal habit we describe as truncated hexa-octahedral. There are no known reports of inorganic processes to explain the observation of truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites in a terrestrial sample. In bacteria strain MV-1 their presence is therefore likely a product of Natural Selection. Unless there is an unknown and unexplained inorganic process on Mars that is conspicuously absent on the Earth and forms truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites, we suggest that these magnetite crystals in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 were likely produced by a biogenic process. As such, these crystals are interpreted as Martian magnetofossils and constitute evidence of the oldest life yet found.

  2. Cryogenic Calcite: A Morphologic and Isotopic Analog to the ALH84001 Carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, P. B.; Leshin, L. A.; Socki, R. A.; Guan, Y.; Ming, D. W.; Gibson, E. K.

    2004-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 carbonates preserve large and variable microscale isotopic compositions, which in some way reflect their formation environment. These measurements show large variations (>20%) in the carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of the carbonates on a 10-20 micron scale that are correlated with chemical composition. However, the utilization of these data sets for interpreting the formation conditions of the carbonates is complex due to lack of suitable terrestrial analogs and the difficulty of modeling under non-equilibrium conditions. Thus, the mechanisms and processes are largely unknown that create and preserve large microscale isotopic variations in carbonate minerals. Experimental tests of the possible environments and mechanisms that lead to large microscale isotopic variations can help address these concerns. One possible mechanism for creating large carbon isotopic variations in carbonates involves the freezing of water. Carbonates precipitate during extensive CO2 degassing that occurs during the freezing process as the fluid s decreasing volume drives CO2 out. This rapid CO2 degassing results in a kinetic isotopic fractionation where the CO2 gas has a much lighter isotopic composition causing an enrichment of 13C in the remaining dissolved bicarbonate. This study seeks to determine the suitability of cryogenically formed carbonates as analogs to ALH84001 carbonates. Specifically, our objective is to determine how accurately models using equilibrium fractionation factors approximate the isotopic compositions of cryogenically precipitated carbonates. This includes determining the accuracy of applying equilibrium fractionation factors during a kinetic process, and determining how isotopic variations in the fluid are preserved in microscale variations in the precipitated carbonates.

  3. Isotopic Constraints on the Genesis of Carbonates in Martian Meteorite ALH 84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leshin, Laurie A.

    1999-01-01

    Oxygen isotopic analyses in approximately 20 micrometer spots in a chemically diverse suite of carbonates from ALH 84001 show highly variable delta(exp 18)O values from +5.4 to +25.3%. The isotopic data are correlated with the major element composition of the carbonate. The earliest forming (Ca-rich) carbonates have the lowest delta(exp 18)O values and the late-forming Mg-rich carbonates have the highest delta(exp 18)O values. Two models that can explain the isotopic variation were investigated. The carbonates could have formed in a water-rich environment at relatively low, but highly variable temperatures. In this open-system case the lower limit to the temperature variation is approximately 125 C, with fluctuations of over 250 C possible within the constraints of the model, depending on fluid composition. Alternatively the data can be explained by a closed-system model in which carbonates precipitated from a limited amount of a CO2-rich fluid. This scenario can reproduce the range of isotopic values observed, even at relatively high temperatures (greater than 500 C). Thus, the oxygen isotopic compositions do not provide unequivocal evidence for formation of the carbonates at low temperature. Neither of these scenarios is consistent with a biological origin of the carbonates and their associated features. Olivine from ALH 84001 occurs as clusters within orthopyroxene adjacent to fractures containing disrupted carbonate globules and feldspathic shock glass. The inclusions are irregular in shape and range in size from approximately 40 micrometers to submicrometer. The olivine exhibits a limited range of chemical composition from Fo(sub 65) to Fo(sub 66). We measured delta(exp 18)O values of the olivine to be +5.1 +/- 1.4%, indistinguishable within uncertainty from the host orthopyroxene. The data suggest that the olivine formed at high temperature (greater than 800 C), and is probably unrelated to carbonate formation. Instead the olivine probably formed by

  4. Carbonates in ALH 84001: Part of the Story of Water on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrigan, C. M.

    2004-07-01

    Carbonate-rich regions in ALH 84001 are complicated. There are familiar forms of carbonate as well as fascinating textural forms previously unreported including carbonate rosettes, planiform "slab" carbonates, distinct "post-slab" magnesium carbonates (magnesite), and carbonates interstitial to feldspathic glass and orthopyroxene. Slab carbonates reveal portions of the carbonate growth sequence not seen in the rosettes and suggest that initial nucleating compositions were rich in calcium. They formed in two major stages. The first stage involved growth of the rosettes and slab carbonates. This step was controlled by the rate of crystal nucleation, how fast the ingredients were delivered to the growing crystals, and how much fluid was available. Cosmochemists call this type of growth "kinetically controlled." Next, an alteration event formed the magnesite-siderite (iron carbonate) layers on the exterior surfaces of the carbonate. Post-slab magnesite, intimately associated with silica glass, is compositionally similar to the magnesite in these secondary exterior layers, but represents a later generation of carbonate growth. Formation of feldspathic glasses had little or no thermal effect on carbonates, as indicated by the lack of thermal decomposition or any compositional changes associated with glass/carbonate contacts. The carbonates tell an important story about water in the ancient crust of Mars. The presence of numerous, distinct generations of carbonate formation and relatively clear fracture chronology within carbonate further suggest that interactions between ALH 84001 and the crustal fluids of Mars were discontinuous and occurred only a few times over its 4.5 Ga history. The reactivation and remobilization of fluids (causing events such as formation of magnesite-siderite-magnesite layers and precipitation of post-slab magnesite) and the fracturing within the rock were almost certainly driven by impacts. The evidence for punctuated, impact-driven interaction

  5. LU-HF Age and Isotope Systematics of ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, M.; Lapen, T. J.; Brandon, A. D.; Beard, B. L.; Shafer, J. T.; Peslier, A. H.

    2009-01-01

    Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 is an orthopyroxenite that is unique among the Martian meteorites in having the oldest inferred crystallization age (approx..4.5 to 4.0 Gyr) [e.g., 1-6 and references therein 7]. Its ancient origin makes this stone a critical constraint on early history of Mars, in particular the evolution of different planetary crust and mantle reservoirs. However, because there is significant variability in reported crystallization ages, determination of initial isotope compositions is imprecise making assessment of planetary reservoirs difficult. Here we report a new Lu-Hf mineral isochron age, initial Hf-176/Hf-177 isotope composition, and inferred Martian mantle source compositions for ALH84001 that place constraints on longlived source reservoirs for the enriched shergottite suite of Martian meteorites including Shergotty, Zagami, NWA4468, NWA856, RBT04262, LAR06319, and Los Angeles. Sm-Nd isotope analyses are under way for the same mineral aliquots analyzed for Lu-Hf. The Lu-Hf system was utilized because Lu and Hf are both lithophile and refractory and are not easily redistributed during short-lived thermal pulses associated with shock metamorphism. Moreover, chromite has relatively modest Hf concentrations with very low Lu/Hf ratios [9] yielding tight constraints on initial Hf-176/Hf-177 isotope compositions

  6. Truncated Hexa-Octahedral Magnetites: Biosignatures in Terrestrial Samples and Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; McKay, David S.; Wentworth, Susan J.; Vali, H.; Gibson, Everett K.

    2001-01-01

    We suggest that the observation of truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites in ALH84001 are both consistent with, and in the absence of terrestrial inorganic analogs, likely formed by biogenic processes. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. The age of the carbonates in martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borg, L. E.; Connelly, J. N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C. Y.; Wiesmann, H.; Reese, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The age of secondary carbonate mineralization in the martian meteorite ALH84001 was determined to be 3.90 +/- 0.04 billion years by rubidium-strontium (Rb-Sr) dating and 4.04 +/- 0.10 billion years by lead-lead (Pb-Pb) dating. The Rb-Sr and Pb-Pb isochrons are defined by leachates of a mixture of high-graded carbonate (visually estimated as approximately 5 percent), whitlockite (trace), and orthopyroxene (approximately 95 percent). The carbonate formation age is contemporaneous with a period in martian history when the surface is thought to have had flowing water, but also was undergoing heavy bombardment by meteorites. Therefore, this age does not distinguish between aqueous and impact origins for the carbonates.

  8. FTIR Analysis of Water in Pyroxene and Plagioclase in ALH 84001 and Nakhlites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, A. H.; Cintala, M. J.; Montes, R.; Cardenas, F.

    2016-01-01

    with crustal reservoirs or hydrothermal fluids. Here, nominally anhydrous minerals (pyroxene, olivine, plagioclase, or maskelynite) in orthopyroxenite ALH 84001 and selected nakhlites are analyzed for water and major elements, in order to determine 1) whether they contain any water; 2) if they do, what controls its distribution (crystallization, degassing, hydrothermal or impact processes); and 3) if any of these measurements can be used to infer the water contents of the parent magma and their mantle sources. A shock-reverberation experiment was also performed on terrestrial orthopyroxenes (opx) to simulate the heavily shocked conditions of ALH 84001 (> 31 GPa [17]).

  9. Modern terrestrial analogues for the carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Kazmierczak, Józef; Kempe, Stephan

    2003-04-01

    Modern carbonate globules, located in cracks of submerged volcanic rocks and in calcareous pinnacles in alkaline (sodic) Lake Van, Turkey, appear to be analogues for the approximately 3.9 billion-year-old carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH84001. These terrestrial globules have similar diameters and are chemically and mineralogically zoned. Furthermore, they display surface and etching structures similar to those described from ALH84001, which were interpreted as fossilized microbial forms. These terrestrial carbonates formed at low temperatures where Ca-rich groundwaters enter the lake. Chemical, mineralogical, microbiological, and biomolecular methods were used in an attempt to decipher the process responsible for the genesis of these structures. Although the exact mode of formation of Lake Van carbonates remains an enigma, their similarity to the Martian globules indicates that the ALH84001 carbonates may have formed in similar setting on ancient Mars.

  10. Sulfide isotopic compositions in shergottites and ALH84001, and possible implications for life on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, J.P.; McSween, H.Y. Jr.; Riciputi, L.R.

    1997-10-01

    The shergottite and ALH84001 meteorites hold keys for understanding geologic and possibly biologic processes on Mars. Recently, it has been proposed that carbonates in ALH84001, and the Fe-sulfides they contain, are products of extraterrestrial biogenic activity. Here we report ion microprobe analyses of sulfides in shergottites and ALH84001. The sulfur isotope ratios of igneous pyrrhotites in shergottites (mean {delta}{sup 34}S{sub CDT}: Shergotty = -0.4{per_thousand}, Zagami = +2.7{per_thousand}, EETA79001A = 1.9{per_thousand}, EETA79001B = -1.7{per_thousand}, LEW88516 = -1.9{per_thousand}, QUE94201 = +0.8{per_thousand}) are similar to those of terrestrial ocean-floor basalts, suggesting that the sulfur isotopic composition of the Martian mantle may be similar to that of the mantle of the Earth. The sulfur isotopic systematics of ALH84001 sulfides are distinct from the shergottites. Measured sulfur isotope ratios of eight pyrite grains ({delta}{sup 34}S{sub CDT} = +2.0 to +7.3{per_thousand}) in crushed zones confirm previously reported analyses of isotopically heavy sulfides and are indistinguishable from an Fe-sulfide zone within a carbonate globule ({delta}{sup 34}S{sub CDT} = +6.0{per_thousand}). Analyses of synthesized, fine-grained mixtures of sulfide, carbonate, and magnetite indicate than the measured sulfur isotope ratio is independent of the presence of carbonate and magnetite in the sputtered volume, confirming the accuracy of the analysis of the fine-grained sulfide in the carbonate globule. Terrestrial biogenic sulfate reduction typically results in light isotopic enrichments. The similarity of {delta}{sup 34}S values of the sulfides in ALH84001 imply that the Fe-sulfide zones within ALH84001 carbonates are probably not the result of bacterial reduction of sulfate. 38 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Olivine and Carbonate Globules in ALH84001: A Terrestrial Analog, and Implications for Water on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.

    2005-01-01

    Carbonate globules in ALH84001 are associated with small olivine grains an unexpected finding because the olivines equilibrated at high T while the carbonate is chemically zoned and unequilibrated. A possible explanation comes from a terrestrial analog on Spitsbergen (Norway), where some carbonate globules grew in cavities left by aqueous dissolution of olivine. For ALH84001, the same process may have acted, with larger olivines dissolved out and smaller ones shielded inside orthopyroxene. Carbonate would have been deposited in holes where the olivine had been. Later shocks crushed remaining void space, and mobilized feldspathic glass around the carbonates.

  12. Oxygen Isotopic Constraints on the Genesis of Carbonates from Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leshin, Laurie A.; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Carpenter, Paul K.; Harvey, Ralph P.

    1998-01-01

    Ion microprobe oxygen isotopic measurements of a chemically diverse suite of carbonates from Martian meteorite ALH84001 are reported. The delta(sup 18)O values are highly variable, ranging from +5.4 to + 25.3%, and are correlated with major element compositions of the carbonate. The earliest forming (Ca-rich) carbonates have the lowest delta(sup 18)O values and the late-forming (Mg-rich) carbonates have the highest delta(sup 18)O values. Two models are presented which can explain the isotopic variations. The carbonates could have formed in a water rich environment at relatively low, but highly variable temperatures. In this open-system case the lower limit to the temperature variation is approx. 125 C, with fluctuations of over 250 C possible within the constraints of the model. Alternatively, the data can be explained by a closed-system model in which the carbonates precipitated from a limited amount of CO2-rich fluid. This scenario can reproduce the isotopic variations observed at a range of temperatures, including relatively high temperatures (less than 500 C). Thus the oxygen isotopic compositions do not provide unequivocal evidence for formation of the carbonates at low temperature. Although more information is needed in order to distinguish between the models, neither of the implied environments is consistent with biological activity. Thus, we suggest that features associated with the carbonates which have been interpreted to be the result of biological activity were most probably formed by inorganic processes.

  13. The temperature of formation of carbonate in Martian meteorite ALH84001: constraints from cation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hutcheon, I D; Kent, A; Phinney, D L; Ryerson, F J

    1999-08-13

    An important test of the hypothesis that Martian meteorite ALH84001 contains fossil remnants of an ancient Martian biota is the thermal history of the carbonate rosettes associated with the proposed biomarkers. If carbonates formed at temperatures over {approximately} 110 C (the limit for terrestrial life), it is unlikely that these minerals are associated with a terrestrial-like biota.

  14. ALH84001, a cumulate orthopyroxenite member of the Martian meteorite clan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.

    1994-01-01

    ALH84001, originally classified as a diogenite, is a coarse-grained, cataclastic, orthopyroxenite meteorite related to the martian (SNC) meteorites. The orthopyroxene is relatively uniform in composition, with a mean composition of Wo3.3En69.4Fs27.3. Minor phases are euhedral to subhedral chromite and interstitial maskelynite, An31.1Ab63.2Or5.7, with accessory augite, Wo42.2En45.1Fs12.7, apatite, pyrite and carbonates, Cc11.5Mg58.0Sd29.4Rd1.1. The pyroxenes and chromites in ALH84001 are similar in composition to these phases in EETA79001 lithology a megacrysts but are more homogeneous. Maskelynite is similar in composition to feldspars in the nakhlites and Chassigny. Two generations of carbonates are present, early (pre-shock) strongly zoned carbonates and late (post-shock) carbonates. The high Ca content of both types of carbonates indicates that they were formed at moderately high temperature, possibly approximately 700 C. ALH84001 has a slightly LREE-depleted pattern with La 0.67x and Lu 1.85x CI abundances and with a negative Eu anomaly (Eu/Sm 0.56x CI). The uniform pyroxene composition is unusual for martian meteorites, and suggests that ALH84001 cooled more slowly than did the shergottites, nakhlites of Chassigny. The nearly monomineralic composition, coarse-grain size, homogeneous orthopyroxene and chromite compositions, the interstitial maskelynite and apatite, and the REE pattern suggest that ALH84001 is a cumulate orthopyroxenite containing minor trapped, intercumulus material.

  15. Hydrothermal Origin for Carbonate Globules in Martian Meteorite ALH84001: A Terrestrial Analogue from Spitsbergen (Norway)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Amundsen, Hans E. F.; Blake, David F.; Bunch, Ted

    2002-01-01

    Carbonate minerals in the ancient Martian meteorite ALH84001 are the only known solid phases that bear witness to the processing of volatile and biologically critical compounds (CO2, H2O) on early Mars. Similar carbonates have been found in xenoliths and their host basalts from Quaternary volcanic centers in northern Spitsbergen (Norway). These carbonates were deposited by hot (i.e., hydrothermal) waters associated with the volcanic activity. By analogy with the Spitsbergen carbonates, the ALH84001 carbonates were probably also deposited by hot water. Hydrothermal activity was probably common and widespread on Early Mars, which featured abundant basaltic rocks, water as ice or liquid, and heat from volcanos and asteroid impacts. On Earth, descendants of the earliest life forms still prefer hydrothermal environments, which are now shown to have been present on early Mars.

  16. Atomic force microscopy imaging of fragments from the Martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Steele, A; Goddard, D; Beech, I B; Tapper, R C; Stapleton, D; Smith, J R

    1998-01-01

    A combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) techniques, as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods has been used to study fragments of the Martian meteorite ALH84001. Images of the same areas on the meteorite were obtained prior to and following gold/palladium coating by mapping the surface of the fragment using ESEM coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Viewing of the fragments demonstrated the presence of structures, previously described as nanofossils by McKay et al. (Search for past life on Mars--possible relic biogenic activity in martian meteorite ALH84001. Science, 1996, pp. 924-930) of NASA who used SEM imaging of gold-coated meteorite samples. Careful imaging of the fragments revealed that the observed structures were not an artefact introduced by the coating procedure.

  17. Atomic force microscopy imaging of fragments from the Martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, A.; Goddard, D.; Beech, I. B.; Tapper, R. C.; Stapleton, D.; Smith, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    A combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) techniques, as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods has been used to study fragments of the Martian meteorite ALH84001. Images of the same areas on the meteorite were obtained prior to and following gold/palladium coating by mapping the surface of the fragment using ESEM coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. Viewing of the fragments demonstrated the presence of structures, previously described as nanofossils by McKay et al. (Search for past life on Mars--possible relic biogenic activity in martian meteorite ALH84001. Science, 1996, pp. 924-930) of NASA who used SEM imaging of gold-coated meteorite samples. Careful imaging of the fragments revealed that the observed structures were not an artefact introduced by the coating procedure.

  18. Coordinated In Situ Nanosims Analyses of H-C-O Isotopes in ALH 84001 Carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, T.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Wang, J.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    The surface geology and geomorphology of Mars indicate that it was once warm enough to maintain a large body of liquid water on its surface, though such a warm environment might have been transient. This study reports the hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen isotope compositions of the ancient atmosphere/hydrosphere of Mars based on in situ ion microprobe analyses of approximately 4 Ga-old carbonates in Allan Hills (ALH) 84001. The ALH 84001 carbonates are the most promising targets because they are thought to have formed from fluid that was closely associated with the Noachian atmosphere. While there are a number of carbon and oxygen isotope studies of the ALH 84001 carbonates, in situ hydrogen isotope analyses of these carbonates are limited and were reported more than a decade ago. Well-documented coordinated in situ analyses of carbon, oxygen and hydrogen isotopes provide an internally consistent dataset that can be used to constrain the nature of the Noachian atmosphere/hydrosphere and may eventually shed light on the hypothesis of ancient watery Mars.

  19. Microdistributions of Rb and Sr in ALH84001 carbonates: Chronological implications for secondary alteration on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Wadhwa, M.; Sutton, S.R.; Flynn, G.J.

    2005-04-22

    Concentrations of Rb and Sr were analyzed on the micron-scale in various compositional zones of the ALH84001 carbonates. Implications of the measured Rb/Sr ratios for the chronology of these carbonates are discussed. ALH84001 is unique among the Martian meteorites in that it has an ancient crystallization age of {approx}4.5 Ga defined by Sm-Nd isotope systematics. Another aspect that differentiates this Martian meteorite from the others is the presence of Ca-Fe-Mg carbonates (modal abundance {approx}1%) that are thought to have been precipitated during alteration in a near-surface environment. Precise age dating of these carbonates is important since it could provide constraints on the timing of surficial secondary alteration processes on Mars. However, this has been a challenging problem owing to the relatively small abundance of the carbonates in ALH84001 and because these carbonates are difficult to separate from the other minerals in the rock by physical and chemical means. Previous investigations have attempted to separate the carbonates by leaching of carbonate-rich mineral fractions. The single 'bulk carbonate' fraction analyzed by Wadhwa and Lugmair was characterized by a low {sup 87}Rb/{sup 86}Sr ratio of {approx}0.05, the lowest of any mineral in ALH84001, and the corresponding Rb-Sr age estimate ({approx}1.39 Ga) was dependent on the assumption of isotopic equilibrium between the carbonates and plagioclase. As pointed out by Borg et al., such an assumption may not be assured and, therefore, they obtained multiple carbonate-rich leachates with a range of {sup 87}Rb/{sup 86}Sr ratios (0.12-2.62) from which they estimated an age of {approx}3.9 Ga. Although these authors performed painstaking chemical characterization to determine contributions in the leachates from minerals such as phosphates and silicates, it is nevertheless difficult to positively rule out contributions from other as yet unidentified phases. Therefore, the goal of the present

  20. Carbonate Globules from Spitsbergen, Norway: Terrestrial Analogs of the Carbonates in Martian Meteorite ALH84001?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De, Subarnarek; Bunch, Ted; Treiman, Allan H.; Amundsen, Hans E. F.; Blake, David F.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Pleistocene volcanic centers in NW Spitsbergen, Norway host one of the world's richest occurrences of mantle xenoliths. The xenoliths comprise varieties of spinel lherzolites and pyroxenites. Some of these xenoliths (and their host basalts) contain 10-100 micrometer globules of ankedtic-magnesitic carbonates (AMC). In composition, mineralogy and petrology the AMC globules from Spitsbergen are strikingly similar to the carbonate globules in ALH84001. The AMC globules occur within interstitial quenched glass and as fracture fillings, although we have not seen replacement fabrics analogous to carbonate rosettes replacing glass in ALH84001. Siderite/ankerite forms the core of these concentrically zoned globules while rims are predominantly magnesite. Clay minerals can occasionally be found within and around the globules. Aside from the clay minerals, the principal mineralogical difference between the AMCs and the ALH84001 carbonate rosettes is the presence of concentrated zones of nanophase magnetite in the rosettes, notably absent in the AMCs. However, carbonate globules containing nanophase magnetite have been produced inorganically by hydrothermal precipitation of carbonates and subsequent heating. We heated Spitsbergen AMC at 585 C in a reducing atmosphere to determine whether magnetite could be produced. Optical micrographs of the heated Spitsbergen AMC show dark concentric zones within the AMC. High resolution SEM images of those areas reveal 150-200 nm euhedral crystals that exhibit various morphologies including octahedra and elongated prisms. EDS analyses of areas where the crystals occur contain Fe, O, and minor Si, and P. However, the probe integrates over volumes of material, which also include the surrounding matrix. We have begun TEM observations of both the heated and unheated Spitsbergen AMC to characterize the microstructures of the carbonates, establish the presence/absence of magnetite and determine the relationship of the clay minerals to the

  1. Covariant C and O Isotope Trends in Arctic Carbonate Crusts and ALH 84001: Potential Biomarker or Indicator of Cryogenic Formation Environment?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.; Blake, Weston; Leveille, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This work seeks to use the chemical, isotopic, and mineralogical characteristics of secondary carbonate minerals produced during brief aqueous events to identify the conditions of the aqueous environment in which they formed. Liquid water near the surface of Mars is subject to either rapid freezing and/or evaporation. These processes are also active on Earth, and produce secondary minerals that have complex chemical, mineralogical, and isotopic textures and compositions that can include covariant relationships between Delta C-13 (sub VPDB) and delta O-18 (sub VSMOW). The extremely well studied four billion year old carbonates preserved in martian meteorite ALH 84001 also show covariant delta C-13 and delta O-18 compositions, but these variations are manifested on a micro-scale in a single thin section while the variation observed so far in terrestrial carbonates is seen between different hand samples.

  2. Statistical Analyses Comparing Prismatic Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Globules with those from the Terrestrial Magnetotactic Bacteria Strain MV-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; McKay, David S.; Wentworth, Susan J.; Vali, H.; Gibson, Everett K.

    2000-01-01

    Here we use rigorous mathematical modeling to compare ALH84001 prismatic magnetites with those produced by terrestrial magnetotactic bacteria, MV-1. We find that this subset of the Martian magnetites appears to be statistically indistinguishable from those of MV-1.

  3. Search for Past Life on Mars: Possible Relict Biogenic Activity in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David S.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Vali, Hojatollah; Romanek, Christopher S.; Clemett, Simon J.; Chillier, Xavier D. F.; Maechling, Claude R.; Zare, Richard N.

    1996-01-01

    Fresh fracture surfaces of the martian meteorite ALH84001 contain abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These fresh fracture surfaces also display carbonate globules. Contamination studies suggest the PAHs are indigenous to the meteorite. High resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopy study of surface textures and internal structures of selected carbonate globules show that the globules contain fine-grained, secondary phases of single-domain magnetite and Fe-monosulfides. The carbonate globules are similar in texture and size to some terrestrial bacterially induced carbonate precipitates. Although inorganic formation is possible, formation of the globules by biogenic processes could explain many of the observed features including the PAHs. The PAHs, the carbonate globules, and their associated secondary mineral phases and textures could thus be fossil remains of a past martian biota.

  4. A younger age for ALH84001 and its geochemical link to shergottite sources in Mars.

    PubMed

    Lapen, T J; Righter, M; Brandon, A D; Debaille, V; Beard, B L; Shafer, J T; Peslier, A H

    2010-04-16

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 (ALH) is the oldest known igneous rock from Mars and has been used to constrain its early history. Lutetium-hafnium (Lu-Hf) isotope data for ALH indicate an igneous age of 4.091 +/- 0.030 billion years, nearly coeval with an interval of heavy bombardment and cessation of the martian core dynamo and magnetic field. The calculated Lu/Hf and Sm/Nd (samarium/neodymium) ratios of the ALH parental magma source indicate that it must have undergone extensive igneous processing associated with the crystallization of a deep magma ocean. This same mantle source region also produced the shergottite magmas (dated 150 to 570 million years ago), possibly indicating uniform igneous processes in Mars for nearly 4 billion years.

  5. Three-Dimensional Morphological Analysis of ALH84001 Magnetite Using Electron Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Shimmin, Joel; Morphew, Mary; McIntosh, J. Richard; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Vali, Hojatollah

    2003-01-01

    We report here the crystal morphologies of MV-1 and ALH84001 magnetites as calculated by back-projection using electron tomography. In the present study, we used a 300 keV TEM with a field emission gun (Tecnai F-30 from FEI Inc.), equipped with a 2048 x 2048 pixel CCD camera from Gatan Inc. to image magnetite crystals over tilt ranges of approx. +/- 72 deg in 2 deg tilt intervals. The images were aligned for back-projection, either manually, or through the use of fiducial 5 nm Au spheres affixed to the specimen prior to microscopy. Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions were computed using weighted back-projection of the tilted views. The tomograms were viewed and analyzed as a series of slices 1.0 nm thick, taken parallel to the specimen-supporting grid, using the IMOD software package. The shape of each magnetite crystal was determined by defining the external contour of a given magnetite in each slice and assembling a stack of these contours in 3-D. To aid in visualization, the stacked contour array was reduced to an optimal mesh by Delaunay triangulation. The surface normal to each of the triangles in the mesh was calculated and the triangle faces colored according to the orientation of that surface normal relative to the principal crystallographic axis of magnetite. Green surfaces correspond to {111} orientations, blue surfaces to {100} orientations, and red surfaces to {110} orientations. Triangles whose surface normal did not correspond to one of the principal axes were colored gray. Within the experimental and numerical uncertainties of the deconvolution, the tomographic reconstruction of both MV-1 and ALH84001 magnetites are equivalent and correspond to a truncated hexa-octahedral morphology.

  6. Formation of Carbonate Minerals in Martian Meteorite ALH 84001 from Cool Water Near the Surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2011-12-01

    Carbonate minerals in the Allan Hills 84001 meteorite are important because they ought to contain information about the chemistry and temperature of the water they formed in. They are also an important part of testing the idea that the meteorite contains evidence of past life on Mars. Hypotheses for the origin of the carbonates are impressively varied. A key test of the ideas is to determine the temperature at which the carbonates formed. Estimates up to now range from a bit below freezing to 700 oC, too big a range to test anything! To address the problem Itay Halevy, Woodward Fischer, and John Eiler (Caltech) used an approach that involves "clumped" isotope thermometry, which makes comparisons among different isotopic compositions of extracted CO2. This allowed the investigators to use the isotopic abundances of both carbon and oxygen. The results indicate that the carbonates formed at 18 ± 4 oC from a shallow subsurface (upper few meters to tens of meters) pool of water that was gradually evaporating. The wet episode did not last long, leading Halevy and his colleagues to conclude that the environment may have been too transient for life to have emerged here from scratch. On the other hand, if life already existed on the Martian surface this wet near-surface environment would have provided a happy home. An impact blasted the Martian home of ALH 84001, causing a transient heating event, perhaps disturbing the isotopic record...or perhaps not because the event was so short. In any case, the clumped isotope thermometry approach seems to have given a good measurement of the temperature at which the carbonate minerals formed.

  7. Covariant C and O Isotope Trends in Some Terrestrial Carbonates and ALH 84001: Possible Linkage Through Similar Formation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Kathryn E.; Niles, Paul B.; Socki, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Carbonate minerals found on the surface of Mars and in martian meteorites indicate that liquid water has played a significant role in the planet's history. These findings have raised questions regarding the history of the martian hydrosphere and atmosphere as well as the possibility of life. Sunset Crater, Arizona is a dry environment with relatively high evaporation and brief periods of precipitation. This environment resembles Mars and may make Sunset Crater a good analog to martian carbonates. In this study we sought to identify discrete micro-scale isotopic variation within the carbonate crusts in Sunset Crater to see if they resembled the micro-scale isotope variation found in ALH 84001 carbonates. Sunset Crater carbonate formation may be used as a martian analog and ultimately provide insight into carbonate formation in ALH 84001.

  8. Siderophile Trace Elements in ALH 84001 and Other Achondrites: A Temporal Increase of Oxygen Fugacity in the Martian Mantle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, P. H.; Kallemeyn, G. W.

    1995-09-01

    We have employed neutron activation, including radiochemical NAA, to investigate SNC/martian meteorites ALH 77005, ALH 84001 and LEW 88516, along with 15 eucrites. Our data for 10 manifestly monomict eucrites confirm previous indications [e.g., 1] that compositionally pristine eucrites are generally extremely siderophile-poor, although for several of the most extremely siderophile-depleted eucrites we find slight enhancements in Re/Os (Figure). Our RNAA data are the first for highly siderophile elements in polymict eucrites, and show a broad similarity with lunar polymict breccias. In general, our data (e.g., Ga/Al = 4.3x10^-4) confirm SNC affinity [2] for ALH84001. However, siderophile concentrations are, by SNC standards, extraordinarily low: Ni = 5.8 micrograms/g and (in pg/g) Au = 9.4, Ir = 80, Os = 10.2, and Re = 1.66+/-0.25(1-s); Ge (1080 ng/g) is typical for SNCs. Like terrestrial basalts [1], other SNCs have relatively constant Re, ranging from 28 (Lafayette [3]) to 102 pg/g (ALH 77005) among seven analyzed meteorites of various types, in which Os ranges from <2.3 to 4400 pg/g. A plot of Os vs. Re/Os (Figure) shows that ALH 84001 has 23x lower Re than expected for a young SNC of similar Os content. On Earth, Re generally behaves as a mildly incompatible element, whereas Os behaves as a strongly compatible element. A plausible explanation for this divergence [1] is that Re is more prone to enter higher oxidation states, such as Re^4+, which would tend to behave like W^4+. This model is consistent with the Os-like behavior of Re in the highly reduced lunar and eucritic environments, and Birck and Allegre [1] interpret the typically intermediate Re contents of SNCs as suggestive of origin from a mantle source region at intermediate fO(sub)2 (they also considered, but rejected, an implausible "contamination" model). Extended to ALH 84001, this model implies that the mantle source was at a substantially (roughly 1.7 log(sub)10 units) lower fO2 than the analogous

  9. Hydrogeological Interpretation of Candidate Origin Sites for Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.; McKay, Chris; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Barlow (this meeting) has identified two potential source craters for the martian meteorite ALH84001. The craters are at 11.7 deg S, 243.3 deg W (Mare Tyrrhenum site) and 14.0 deg S, 343.5 deg W (Sinus Sabaeus site). As noted by Barlow, both craters lie in the heavily cratered terrain (HCT) and are adjacent to fluvial valleys, Here I explore the fluvial history of these areas based upon the surrounding valley morphology. The most prominent valley network at the Sabaeus site is Evros Vallis. This wide, flat-floored valley is approximately 600 km long with an average width of 2.5 km and a depth of 220 m. The eroded volume of the entire Evros network is approximately 6 x 10(exp 11) cc. This is typical for networks located in the heavily cratered terrain (e.g. Warrego and Parana Valles). Evros is also an isolated valley system. No similar networks are found in the surrounding terrain. Thus it is unlikely that Evros formed as a result of widespread rainfall. A localized water source, such as discharge of a hydrothermal system or localized melting of snowfall, seems more consistent Previous modeling has demonstrated that only hydrothermal systems associated with high permeability subsurfaces can discharge sufficient water to form a valley network. The bulk of the discharge from such systems is consequently low temperature, slightly heated water Precipitation of calcium carbonate by low temperature fluids is consistent with most interpretations of the geochemistry of ALH84001. Available imagery at the Tyrrhenum site is of lesser quality. While eroded units of the HCT are nearby, there are no comparable well developed valley networks at this site. Erosion is instead manifested predominantly as gullies on slopes. This style of erosion suggests that water was not present at this site for the length of time as at the more integrated Sabaeus site. The superposition of fluidized ejecta blankets suggests however that ground water or ground ice was still present at this locality

  10. Carbon- and Sulfur-bearing Minerals in the Martian Meteorite ALH 84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanek, C. S.; Thomas, K. L.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; McKay, D. S.; Socki, R. A.

    1995-09-01

    Unusual carbonate minerals in ALH 84001 [1] provide insights into surficial processes that may have occurred on Mars, but despite detailed geochemical studies [2-4] carbonate petrogenesis has yet to be fully-characterized. High-resolution TEM and SEM analyses were performed on C- and S-bearing mineral grains to better constrain the nature and timing of carbonate mineralization events. Morphological elements: C- and S-bearing minerals in ALH 84001 commonly occur as spheroidal aggregates or fine-grained vug-filling structures. Spheroids are either orange or black, ~150 micrometers (+/- 50 micrometers) in diameter and highly-flattened (10-30 micrometers thick). Orange spheroids have limpid amber-colored cores and white to translucent mantles which are sometimes bound by thin black rims (< 10 micrometers). When viewed under cathodoluminescence, cores are non-luminescent while mantles luminesce a uniform bright-orange color. Black spheroids are less frequently observed; while they are similar in dimension to the orange spheroids they are chemically more heterogeneous. Black irregular aggregates fill residual pore-space between mineral grains. These structures are comprised of extremely fine-grained (< 2 micrometers) material that occasionally forms lenticular stringers up to 50 micrometers in length. Chemistry and Mineralogy: Small grains (30 micrometers dia.) were removed from C- and S-bearing aggregates, microtomed (~100 nm thick) and examined by TEM for imaging, electron diffraction, and elemental analysis. The orange spheroids have cores composed of Fe-Mg-Ca carbonate, with the centers having the highest concentration of Fe (45 mol%) and Ca (15 mol%). The concentration of Mg increases outward to almost pure MgCO3. TEM results support previous analyses of carbonate chemistry [1-4] and clearly indicate that a wide range of Mg-Fe-Ca solid solution exists in carbonate at a scale of ~10 nm. White mantles of the orange spheroids are composed of nearly pure MgCO3 (<5 mol

  11. The origin of organic matter in the Martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Becker, L; Popp, B; Rust, T; Bada, J L

    1999-03-30

    Stable carbon isotope measurements of the organic matter associated with the carbonate globules and the bulk matrix material in the ALH84001 Martian meteorite indicate that two distinct sources are present in the sample. The delta 13C values for the organic matter associated with the carbonate globules averaged -26% and is attributed to terrestrial contamination. In contrast, the delta 13C values for the organic matter associated with the bulk matrix material yielded a value of -15%. The only common sources of carbon on the Earth that yield similar delta 13C values, other then some diagenetically altered marine carbonates, are C4 plants. A delta 13C value of -15%, on the other hand, is consistent with a kerogen-like component, the most ubiquitous form of organic matter found in carbonaceous chondrites such as the Murchison meteorite. Examination of the carbonate globules and bulk matrix material using laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) indicates the presence of a high molecular weight organic component which appears to be extraterrestrial in origin, possibly derived from the exogenous delivery, of meteoritic or cometary debris to the surface of Mars.

  12. Isotope Geochemistry of Possible Terrestrial Analogue for Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied the microdomain oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions by SIMS of complex carbonate rosettes from spinel therzolite xenoliths, hosted by nepheline basanite, from the island of Spitsbergen (Norway). The Quaternary volcanic rocks containing the xenoliths erupted into a high Arctic environment and through relatively thick continental crust containing carbonate rocks. We have attempted to constrain the sources of the carbonates in these rocks by combined O-18/O-16 and C-13/C-12 ratio measurements in 25 micron diameter spots of the carbonate and compare them to previous work based primarily on trace-element distributions. The origin of these carbonates can be interpreted in terms of either contamination by carbonate country rock during ascent of the xenoliths in the host basalt, or more probably by hydrothermal processes after emplacement. The isotopic composition of these carbonates from a combined delta.18O(sub SMOW) and delta.13C(sub PDB) standpoint precludes a primary origin of these minerals from the mantle. Here a description is given of the analysis procedure, standardization of the carbonates, major element compositions of the carbonates measured by electron microprobe, and their correlated C and O isotope compositions as measured by ion microprobe. Since these carbonate rosettes may represent a terrestrial analogue to the carbonate "globules" found in the martian meteorite ALH84001 interpretations for the origin of the features found in the Spitsbergen may be of interest in constraining the origin of these carbonate minerals on Mars.

  13. Trapped Ar isotopes in meteorite ALH 84001 indicate Mars did not have a thick ancient atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, William S.; Shuster, David L.; Renne, Paul R.; Weiss, Benjamin P.

    2012-09-01

    Water is not currently stable in liquid form on the martian surface due to the present mean atmospheric pressure of ∼7 mbar and mean global temperature of ∼220 K. However, geomorphic features and hydrated mineral assemblages suggest that Mars’ climate was once warmer and liquid water flowed on the surface. These observations may indicate a substantially more massive atmosphere in the past, but there have been few observational constraints on paleoatmospheric pressures. Here we show how the 40Ar/36Ar ratios of trapped gases within martian meteorite ALH 84001 constrain paleoatmospheric pressure on Mars during the Noachian era [∼4.56-3.8 billion years (Ga)]. Our model indicates that atmospheric pressures did not exceed ∼1.5 bar during the first 400 million years (Ma) of the Noachian era, and were <400 mbar by 4.16 Ga. Such pressures of CO2 are only sufficient to stabilize liquid water on Mars’ surface at low latitudes during seasonally warm periods. Other greenhouse gases like SO2 and water vapor may have played an important role in intermittently stabilizing liquid water at higher latitudes following major volcanic eruptions or impact events.

  14. Determination of the Three-Dimensional Morphology of ALH84001 and Biogenic MV-1 Magnetite: Comparison of Results from Electron Tomography and Classical Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Schwartz, Cindy; Morphew, Mary; McIntosh, J. Richard; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Vali, Hojatollah

    2004-01-01

    Dated at approximately 3.9 billion years of age, carbonate disks, found within fractures of the host rock of Martian meteorite ALH84001, have been interpreted as secondary minerals that formed at low temperature in an aqueous medium. Heterogeneously distributed within these disks are magnetite nanocrystals that are of Martian origin. Approximately one quarter of these magnetites have morphological and chemical similarities to magnetite particles produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1, which are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats on Earth. Moreover, these types of magnetite particles are not known or expected to be produced by abiotic means either through geological processes or synthetically in the laboratory. The remaining three quarters of the ALH84001 magnetites are likely products of multiple processes including, but not limited to, precipitation from a hydrothermal fluid, thermal decomposition of the carbonate matrix in which they are embedded, and extracellular formation by dissimilatory Fe-reducing bacteria. We have proposed that the origins of magnetites in ALH84001 can be best explained as the products of multiple processes, one of which is biological. Recently the three-dimensional (3-D) external morphology of the purported biogenic fraction of the ALH84001 magnetites has been the subject of considerable debate. We report here the 3-D geometry of biogenic magnetite crystals extracted from MV-1 and of those extracted from ALH84001 carbonate disks using a combination of high resolution classical and tomographic transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We focus on answering the following questions: (1) which technique provides adequate information to deduce the 3-D external crystal morphology?; and, (2) what is the precise 3-D geometry of the ALH84001 and MV-1 magnetites?

  15. Submicron magnetite grains and carbon compounds in Martian meteorite ALH84001: inorganic, abiotic formation by shock and thermal metamorphism.

    PubMed

    Treiman, Allan H

    2003-01-01

    Purported biogenic features of the ALH84001 Martian meteorite (the carbonate globules, their submicron magnetite grains, and organic matter) have reasonable inorganic origins, and a comprehensive hypothesis is offered here. The carbonate globules were deposited from hydrothermal water, without biological mediation. Thereafter, ALH84001 was affected by an impact shock event, which raised its temperature nearly instantaneously to 500-700K, and induced iron-rich carbonate in the globules to decompose to magnetite and other minerals. The rapidity of the temperature increase caused magnetite grains to nucleate in abundance; hence individual crystals were very small. Nucleation and growth of magnetite crystals were fastest along edges and faces of the precursor carbonate grains, forcing the magnetite grains to be platy or elongated, including the "truncated hexa-octahedra" shape. ALH84001 had formed at some depth within Mars where the lithostatic pressure was significantly above that of Mars' surface. Also, because the rock was at depth, the impact heat dissipated slowly. During this interval, magnetite crystals approached chemical equilibria with surrounding minerals and gas. Their composition, nearly pure Fe(3)O(4), reflects those of equilibria; elements that substitute into magnetite are either absent from iron-rich carbonate (e.g., Ti, Al, Cr), or partitioned into other minerals during magnetite formation (Mg, Mn). Many microstructural imperfections in the magnetite grains would have annealed out as the rock cooled. In this post-shock thermal regime, carbon-bearing gas from the decomposition of iron carbonates reacted with water in the rock (or from its surroundings) to produce organic matter via Fischer-Tropschlike reactions. Formation of such organic compounds like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons would have been catalyzed by the magnetite (formation of graphite, the thermochemically stable phase, would be kinetically hindered).

  16. Micro-Spectroscopy as a Tool for Detecting Micron-Scale Mineral Variations Across a Rock Surface: An Example Using a Thin Section of Martian Meteorite ALH 84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, J. Brad; Bishop, Janice L.

    2003-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy is a powerful tool for mineral detection across broad spatial regions. A prototype micro-imaging spectrometer at NASA Ames is tested in this study on a scale of tens to hundreds of microns across rock surfaces. Initial measurements were performed in the visible spectral region on a thin section of martian meteorite ALH 84001.

  17. Alteration minerals, fluids, and gases on early Mars: Predictions from 1-D flow geochemical modeling of mineral assemblages in meteorite ALH 84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melwani Daswani, Mohit; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Reed, Mark H.; Wright, Ian P.; Grady, Monica M.

    2016-11-01

    Clay minerals, although ubiquitous on the ancient terrains of Mars, have not been observed in Martian meteorite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001, which is an orthopyroxenite sample of the early Martian crust with a secondary carbonate assemblage. We used a low-temperature (20 °C) one-dimensional (1-D) transport thermochemical model to investigate the possible aqueous alteration processes that produced the carbonate assemblage of ALH 84001 while avoiding the coprecipitation of clay minerals. We found that the carbonate in ALH 84001 could have been produced in a process, whereby a low-temperature ( 20 °C) fluid, initially equilibrated with the early Martian atmosphere, moved through surficial clay mineral and silica-rich layers, percolated through the parent rock of the meteorite, and precipitated carbonates (thereby decreasing the partial pressure of CO2) as it evaporated. This finding requires that before encountering the unweathered orthopyroxenite host of ALH 84001, the fluid permeated rock that became weathered during the process. We were able to predict the composition of the clay minerals formed during weathering, which included the dioctahedral smectite nontronite, kaolinite, and chlorite, all of which have been previously detected on Mars. We also calculated host rock replacement in local equilibrium conditions by the hydrated silicate talc, which is typically considered to be a higher temperature hydrothermal phase on Earth, but may have been a common constituent in the formation of Martian soils through pervasive aqueous alteration. Finally, goethite and magnetite were also found to precipitate in the secondary alteration assemblage, the latter associated with the generation of H2. Apparently, despite the limited water-rock interaction that must have led to the formation of the carbonates 3.9 Ga ago, in the vicinity of the ALH 84001 source rocks, clay formation would have been widespread.

  18. Formation of "Chemically Pure" Magnetite from Mg-Fe-Carbonates Implications for the Exclusively Inorganic Origin of Magnetite and Sulfides in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Morris, R. V.; Trieman, A. H.; McKay, G. A.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetite and sulfides in the black rims of carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH84001 have been studied extensively because of the claim by McKay et al. that they are biogenic in origin. However, exclusively inorganic (abiotic) processes are able to account for the occurrence of carbonate-sulfide-magnetite assemblages in the meteorite. We have previously precipitated chemically zoned and sulfide-bearing carbonate globules analogous to those in ALH84001 (at less than or equal to 150 C) from multiple fluxes of variable-composition Ca-Mg-Fe-CO2-S-H2O solutions. Brief heating of precipitated globules to approx. 470 C produced magnetite and pyrrhotite within the globules by thermal decomposition of siderite and pyrite, respectively. We have also shown that morphology of magnetite formed by inorganic thermal decomposition of Fe-rich carbonate is similar to the morphology of so-called biogenic magnetite in the carbonate globules of ALH84001. Magnetite crystals in the rims of carbonate globules in ALH84001 are chemically pure [Note: "Chemically pure" is defined here as magnetite with Mg at levels comparable or lower than Mg detected by [8] in ALH84001 magnetite]. A debate continues on whether or not chemically pure magnetite can form by the thermal decomposition of mixed Mg-Fe-carbonates that have formed under abiotic conditions. Thomas-Keprta et al. argue that it is not possible to form Mg-free magnetite from Mg-Fe-carbonate based on thermodynamic data. We previously suggested that chemically pure magnetite could form by the thermal decomposition of relatively pure siderite in the outer rims of the globules. Mg-Fe-carbonates may also thermally decompose under conditions conducive for formation of chemically pure magnetite. In this paper we show through laboratory experiments that chemically pure magnetite can form by an inorganic process from mixed Mg-Fe-carbonates.

  19. Study of a possible magnetite biosignature in Martian meteorite ALH84001: Implications for the biological toxicology of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie Louise

    "Why do we have such a longstanding fascination with Mars? Very simply put, it's about life. The search for life elsewhere in our Solar System has been a major driver for exploring Mars, pretty much since we began seriously looking at that planet."1 The major objective of this work is to describe signs of possible life, that is biosignatures, in rocks from Mars if indeed they are present. Biosignatures are specific identifiable properties that result from living things; they may be implanted in the environment and may persist even if the living thing is no longer present. Over 100 mineral biosignatures have been discussed in the literature; however, only one, magnetite, is addressed by this study. Magnetite is found in many rock types on earth and in meteorites. Previous studies of terrestrial magnetite have used few properties, such as size and chemical composition, to determine one of the modes of origins for magnetite (e.g., biogenic, inorganic). This study has established a rigorous set of six criteria for the identification of intracellularly precipitated biogenic magnetite. These criteria have been applied to a subpopulation of magnetites embedded within carbonates in Martian meteorite ALH84001. These magnetites are found to be chemically and physically indistinguishable from those produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1, hence, they were likely formed by biogenic processes on ancient Mars. These criteria may be also used to distinguish origins for magnetites from terrestrial samples with complex or unknown histories. The presence of purported past life on early Mars suggests that, if life once began it may still exist today, possibly in oases in the Martian subsurface. Future manned missions should consider potential hazards of an extant biological environment(s) on Mars. 1 Quote attributed to Jack Farmer of Arizona State University in discussing NASA's program of Mars Exploration (see "Deciphering Mars: Follow the Water," Astrobiology Magazine Sept

  20. Thermal Decomposition of an Impure (Roxbury) Siderite: Relevance to the Presence of Chemically Pure Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, D.S.; Gibson, E.K.; Thomas-Keprta, K.L.; Clemett, S.J.; Wentworth, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    The question of the origin of nanophase magnetite in Martian meteorite ALH84001 has been widely debated for nearly a decade. Golden et al. have reported producing nearly chemically pure magnetite from thermal decomposition of chemically impure siderite [(Fe, Mg, Mn)CO3]. This claim is significant for three reasons: first, it has been argued that chemically pure magnetite present in the carbonate disks in Martian meteorite ALH84001 could have formed by the thermal decomposition of the impure carbonate matrix in which they are embedded; second, the chemical purity of magnetite has been previously used to identify biogenic magnetite; and, third, previous studies of thermal decomposition of impure (Mg,Ca,Mn)-siderites, which have been investigated under a wide variety of conditions by numerous researchers, invariably yields a mixed metal oxide phase as the product and not chemically pure magnetite. The explanation for this observation is that these siderites all possess the same crystallographic structure (Calcite; R3c) so solid solutions between these carbonates are readily formed and can be viewed on an atomic scale as two chemically different but structurally similar lattices.

  1. Magnetotactic bacteria on Earth and on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher P.; Friedmann, E. Imre; Frankel, Richard B.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.

    2003-01-01

    Continued interest in the possibility of evidence for life in the ALH84001 Martian meteorite has focused on the magnetite crystals. This review is structured around three related questions: is the magnetite in ALH84001 of biological or non-biological origin, or a mixture of both? does magnetite on Earth provide insight to the plausibility of biogenic magnetite on Mars? could magnetotaxis have developed on Mars? There are credible arguments for both the biological and non-biological origin of the magnetite in ALH84001, and we suggest that more studies of ALH84001, extensive laboratory simulations of non-biological magnetite formation, as well as further studies of magnetotactic bacteria on Earth will be required to further address this question. Magnetite grains produced by bacteria could provide one of the few inorganic traces of past bacterial life on Mars that could be recovered from surface soils and sediments. If there was biogenic magnetite on Mars in sufficient abundance to leave fossil remains in the volcanic rocks of ALH84001, then it is likely that better-preserved magnetite will be found in sedimentary deposits on Mars. Deposits in ancient lakebeds could contain well-preserved chains of magnetite clearly indicating a biogenic origin.

  2. Magnetotactic bacteria on Earth and on Mars.

    PubMed

    McKay, Christopher P; Friedmann, E Imre; Frankel, Richard B; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2003-01-01

    Continued interest in the possibility of evidence for life in the ALH84001 Martian meteorite has focused on the magnetite crystals. This review is structured around three related questions: is the magnetite in ALH84001 of biological or non-biological origin, or a mixture of both? does magnetite on Earth provide insight to the plausibility of biogenic magnetite on Mars? could magnetotaxis have developed on Mars? There are credible arguments for both the biological and non-biological origin of the magnetite in ALH84001, and we suggest that more studies of ALH84001, extensive laboratory simulations of non-biological magnetite formation, as well as further studies of magnetotactic bacteria on Earth will be required to further address this question. Magnetite grains produced by bacteria could provide one of the few inorganic traces of past bacterial life on Mars that could be recovered from surface soils and sediments. If there was biogenic magnetite on Mars in sufficient abundance to leave fossil remains in the volcanic rocks of ALH84001, then it is likely that better-preserved magnetite will be found in sedimentary deposits on Mars. Deposits in ancient lakebeds could contain well-preserved chains of magnetite clearly indicating a biogenic origin.

  3. Evidence for life in a martian meteorite?

    PubMed

    McSween, H Y

    1997-07-01

    The controversial hypothesis that the ALH84001 meteorite contains relics of ancient martian life has spurred new findings, but the question has not yet been resolved. Organic matter probably results, at least in part, from terrestrial contamination by Antarctic ice meltwater. The origin of nanophase magnetites and sulfides, suggested, on the basis of their sizes and morphologies, to be biogenic remains contested, as does the formation temperature of the carbonates that contain all of the cited evidence for life. The reported nonfossils may be magnetite whiskers and platelets, probably grown from a vapor. New observations, such as the possible presence of biofilms and shock metamorphic effects in the carbonates, have not yet been evaluated. Regardless of the ultimate conclusion, this controversy continues to help define strategies and sharpen tools that will be required for a Mars exploration program focused on the search for life.

  4. Evidence for a Noachian-Aged Ephemeral Lake in Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, S. W.; Niles, P. B.; Alfano, F.; Clarke, A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Gusev crater was selected as the landing site for the Spirit rover because of the likelihood that it contained an ancient lake. Although outcrops rich in Mg-Fe carbonate dubbed Comanche were discovered in the Noachian-aged Columbia Hills, they were inferred to result from volcanic hydrothermal activity. Spirit encountered other mineral and chemical indicators of aqueous activity, but none was recognized as definitive evidence for a former lake in part because none was associated with obvious lacustrine sedimentary deposits. However, water discharge into Martian crater basins like Gusev may have been episodic, producing only small amounts of sediment and shallow ephemeral lakes. Evaporative precipitation from such water bodies has been suggested as a way of producing the Mg- and Fe-rich carbonates found in ALH84001 and carbonates and salts in some nakhlites a hypothesis we examine for the Comanche carbonate.

  5. Olivine in Martian Meteorite Allan Hills 84001: Evidence for a High-Temperature Origin and Implications for Signs of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Leshin, L. A.; Adcock, C. T.

    1999-01-01

    Olivine from Martian meteorite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 occurs as clusters within orthopyroxene adjacent to fractures containing disrupted carbonate globules and feldspathic shock glass. The inclusions are irregular in shape and range in size from approx. 40 microns to submicrometer. Some of the inclusions are elongate and boudinage-like. The olivine grains are in sharp contact with the enclosing orthopyroxene and often contain small inclusions of chromite The olivine exhibits a very limited range of composition from Fo(sub 65) to Fo(sub 66) (n = 25). The delta(sup 18)O values of the olivine and orthopyroxene analyzed by ion microprobe range from +4.3 to +5.3% and are indistinguishable from each other within analytical uncertainty. The mineral chemistries, O-isotopic data, and textural relationships indicate that the olivine inclusions were produced at a temperature greater than 800 C. It is unlikely that the olivines formed during the same event that gave rise to the carbonates in ALH 84001, which have more elevated and variable delta(sup 18)O values, and were probably formed from fluids that were not in isotopic equilibrium with the orthopyroxene or olivine The reactions most likely instrumental in the formation of olivine could be either the dehydration of hydrous silicates that formed during carbonate precipitation or the reduction of orthopyroxene and spinel If the olivine was formed by either reaction during a postcarbonate beating event, the implications are profound with regards to the interpretations of McKay et al. Due to the low diffusion rates in carbonates, this rapid, high-temperature event would have resulted in the preservation of the fine-scale carbonate zoning' while partially devolatilizing select carbonate compositions on a submicrometer scale. This may have resulted in the formation of the minute magnetite grains that McKay et al attributed to biogenic activity.

  6. 15 CFR 270.330 - Moving and preserving evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Moving and preserving evidence. 270... an Investigation; and Protection of Information Preservation of Evidence § 270.330 Moving and preserving evidence. (a) A Team and NIST will take all necessary steps in moving and preserving...

  7. 15 CFR 270.330 - Moving and preserving evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Moving and preserving evidence. 270... an Investigation; and Protection of Information Preservation of Evidence § 270.330 Moving and preserving evidence. (a) A Team and NIST will take all necessary steps in moving and preserving...

  8. 15 CFR 270.330 - Moving and preserving evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Moving and preserving evidence. 270... an Investigation; and Protection of Information Preservation of Evidence § 270.330 Moving and preserving evidence. (a) A Team and NIST will take all necessary steps in moving and preserving...

  9. 15 CFR 270.330 - Moving and preserving evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Moving and preserving evidence. 270... an Investigation; and Protection of Information Preservation of Evidence § 270.330 Moving and preserving evidence. (a) A Team and NIST will take all necessary steps in moving and preserving...

  10. 15 CFR 270.330 - Moving and preserving evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Moving and preserving evidence. 270... an Investigation; and Protection of Information Preservation of Evidence § 270.330 Moving and preserving evidence. (a) A Team and NIST will take all necessary steps in moving and preserving...

  11. 10 CFR 1015.504 - Preservation of evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preservation of evidence. 1015.504 Section 1015.504 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COLLECTION OF CLAIMS OWED THE UNITED STATES Referrals to the Department of Justice § 1015.504 Preservation of evidence. DOE will take care to preserve all files...

  12. The Microbiological Contamination of Meteorites: A Null Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, A.; Toporski, J. K. W.; Westall, F. W.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Gibson, E. K.; Avci, R.; Whitby, C.; McKay, D. S.; Griffin, C.

    2000-01-01

    Using 4 different techniques we have studied 9 meteorites including the Martian meteorites ALH84001 and Nakhla for terrestrial contamination in all 9 we have found evidence of terrestrial microorganisms.

  13. Chemical and Isotopic Study of Lab-formed Carbonates Under Cryogenic and Hydrothermal Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, P. B.; Leshin, L. A.; Socki, R. A.; Guan, Y.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Gibson, E. K.

    2004-01-01

    Aqueous environments on early Mars were probably relatively short-lived and localized, as evidenced by the lack of abundant secondary minerals detected by the TES instrument. In order to better understand the aqueous history of early Mars we need to be able to interpret the evidence preserved in secondary minerals formed during these aqueous events. Carbonate minerals, in particular, are important secondary minerals for interpreting past aqueous environments as illustrated by the carbonates preserved in ALH84001. Carbonates formed in short-lived, dynamic aqueous events often preserve kinetic rather than equilibrium chemical and isotopic processes, and predicting the behavior of such systems is facilitated by empirical data.

  14. 32 CFR 516.24 - Preservation of evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Preservation of evidence. 516.24 Section 516.24 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS LITIGATION Reporting Legal Proceedings to HQDA § 516.24 Preservation of...

  15. Modeling Chemical and Isotopic Variations in Lab Formed Hydrothermal Carbonates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, P. B.; Leshin, L. A.; Golden, D. C.; Socki, R. A.; Guan, Y.; Ming, D. W.

    2005-01-01

    Chemical and mineralogical data (e.g. [1]) from Mars suggest that the history of liquid water on the planet was more sporadic in nature than long-lived. The non-equilibrium chemical and isotopic compositions of the carbonates preserved in the martian meteorite ALH84001 are direct evidence of ancient secondary minerals that have not undergone significant diagenesis or stabilization processes typical of long-lived aqueous systems on Earth. Thus secondary minerals and sediments on Mars may primarily record the characteristics of the aqueous environment in which they formed without being significantly overprinted by subsequent diagenetic processes during burial.

  16. Evidence for a Second Generation of Magnesite in Martian Meteorite Allan Hills 84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, C. M.; Harvey, R. P.

    2003-01-01

    Single-stage formation mechanisms for carbonate and other secondary minerals in ALH84001 are rapidly being revised to include multiple stages of carbonate growth and later thermal and mechanical events including alteration. In an effort to confirm some of these more complex histories we have been studying carbonate-bearing regions within this meteorite. Magnesitic carbonates found in contact with unique 'slab' carbonates in two thin sections of ALH84001 show indications of being of a later generation. The results of our observations help clarify the origins of the carbonate and related minerals in ALH84001, and how these minerals can be used to understand the history of interactions between the martian crust and its volatile inventory.

  17. Evidence for Microfossils in Ancient Rocks and Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Rozanov, A. Y.; Zhmur, S. I.; Gorlenko, V. M.

    1998-01-01

    The McKay et all. detection of chemical biomarkers and possible microfossils in an ancient meteorite from Mars (ALH84001) stimulated research in several areas of importance to the newly emerging field of Astrobiology. Their report resulted in a search for additional evidence of microfossils in ancient terrestrial rocks and meteorites. These studies of ancient rocks and meteorites were conducted independently (and later collaboratively) in the United States and Russia using the SEM, Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM), and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). We have encountered in-situ in freshly broken carbonaceous chondrites a large number of complex microstructures that appear to be lithified microbial forms. The meteoritic microstructures have characteristics similar to the lithified remains of filamentous cyanobacteria and bacterial microfossils we have found in ancient phosphorites, ancient graphites and oil shales. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Link microprobe analysis shows the possible microfossils have a distribution of chemical elements characteristic of the meteorite rock matrix, although many exhibit a superimposed carbon enhancement. We have concluded that the mineralized bodies encountered embedded in the rock matrix of freshly fractured meteoritic surfaces can not be dismissed as recent surface contaminants. Many of the forms found in-situ in the Murchison, Efremovka, and Orgueil carbonaceous meteorites are strikingly similar to microfossils of coccoid bacteria, cyanobacteria and fungi such as we have found in the Cambrian phosphorites of Khubsugul, Mongolia and high carbon Phanerozoic and Precambrian rocks of the Siberian and Russian Platforms.

  18. Analyses at High Spatial Resolution of Organic Molecules in Extraterrestrial Samples: Two-Step Laser Mass Spectrometry: Search for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Antarctic Meteorite and Micrometeorite Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zare, Richard N.

    1998-01-01

    Perhaps the best way to summarize the past three-year grant period is to cite the publications and present a brief synopsis of each: 1. "Indigenous Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Molecules in Circumstellar Graphite Grains." Bulk C-12/C-13 isotope ratios observed in some graphite grains extracted from primitive meteorites point strongly to a circumstellar origin. By applying our technique of microprobe two-step laser desorption laser ionization mass spectrometry ((mu)L(sup 2)MS) to individual circumstellar graphite grains we have measured the C-12/C-13 isotope ratio of various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) found in these grains. 2. "Deuterium Enrichments in Cluster IDPS," Large enrichments in the D/H isotope ratios in IDPs likely arise from the preservation of presolar molecules. 3. "Evidence for thermalization of surface-disorder molecules at heating rates of 10(exp 8) K/s". A careful study of the ((mu)L(sup 2)MS) of aniline-d(sub 7) from a single-crystal surface (0001) of sapphire (al2O3) shows that all measured properties are consistent with a thermal mechanism for desorption. 4. "Search for past life on Mars; possible relic biogenic activity in Martian meteorite ALH 84001. The authors examined the Martian meteorite ALH 84001 and found several lines of evidence compatible with existence of past primitive (single-cell) life on early Mars. 5. "Microprobe two-step laser mass spectrometry as an analytical tool for meteorite samples". THis paper presents a comprehensive review of (mu)L(sup 2)MS and how this technique can be applied to meteoritic samples. 6. "Indigenous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in circumstellar graphite grains from primitive meteorites". The C-12/C-13 isotope ratios were measured for PAHs in a total of 89 spherical graphite grains. 7. "Observation of indigenous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in "Giant" carbonaceous antarctic micrometeorites." The (mu)L(sup 2)MS method was used to establish the nature and distribution of PAHs in

  19. Evidence for shock heating and constraints on Martian surface temperatures revealed by 40Ar/ 39Ar thermochronometry of Martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, William S.; Shuster, David L.; Renne, Paul R.; Weiss, Benjamin P.

    2010-12-01

    The thermal histories of Martian meteorite are important for the interpretation of petrologic, geochemical, geochronological, and paleomagnetic constraints that they provide on the evolution of Mars. In this paper, we quantify 40Ar/ 39Ar ages and Ar diffusion kinetics of Martian meteorites Allan Hills (ALH) 84001, Nakhla, and Miller Range (MIL) 03346. We constrain the thermal history of each meteorite and discuss the resulting implications for their petrology, paleomagnetism, and geochronology. Maskelynite in ALH 84001 yields a 40Ar/ 39Ar isochron age of 4163 ± 35 Ma, which is indistinguishable from recent Pb-Pb ( Bouvier et al., 2009a) and Lu-Hf ages ( Lapen et al., 2010). The high precision of this result arises from clear resolution of a reproducible trapped 40Ar/ 36Ar component in maskelynite in ALH 84001 ( 40Ar/ 36Ar = 632 ± 90). The maskelynite 40Ar/ 39Ar age predates the Late Heavy Bombardment and likely represents the time at which the original natural remanent magnetization (NRM) component observed in ALH 84001 was acquired. Nakhla and MIL 03346 yield 40Ar/ 39Ar isochron ages of 1332 ± 24 and 1339 ± 8 Ma, respectively, which we interpret to date crystallization. Multi-phase, multi-domain diffusion models constrained by the observed Ar diffusion kinetics and 40Ar/ 39Ar age spectra suggest that localized regions within both ALH 84001 and Nakhla were intensely heated for brief durations during shock events at 1158 ± 110 and 913 ± 9 Ma, respectively. These ages may date the marginal melting of pyroxene in each rock, mobilization of carbonates and maskelynite in ALH 84001, and NRM overprints observed in ALH 84001. The inferred peak temperatures of the shock heating events (>1400 °C) are sufficient to mobilize Ar, Sr, and Pb in constituent minerals, which may explain some of the dispersion observed in 40Ar/ 39Ar, Rb-Sr, and U-Th-Pb data toward ages younger than ˜4.1 Ga. The data also place conservative upper bounds on the long-duration residence

  20. Preservation of dental evidence following exposure to high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hill, Anthony J; Lain, Russell; Hewson, Ian

    2011-02-25

    The success of the Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) process relies upon sufficient post-mortem data being recovered to allow for a meaningful comparison with ante-mortem records of the missing person. Human bodies subjected to prolonged high temperatures, as experienced during the Black Saturday bushfires in Victoria, are often reduced to fragile skeletal elements. The dental structures, however, are the most durable tissues of the body and often survive these prolonged high temperatures. Without protecting the fragile remains at the scene and during transportation to the mortuary, disruption of the skeletal and dental elements may occur. This disruption will result in difficulties in obtaining post-mortem evidence and lead to problems during the reconciliation (formal identification) phase of the investigation. In the two case reports presented to illustrate these problems, there was significant loss and degradation of dental structures at the scene and during transportation to the mortuary. In the first case described, where no protection was afforded to the remains, total loss of all anatomical dental structures occurred. In the second case, where protection of the structures was undertaken, vital dental evidence was preserved. As a result of the experience in this particular DVI incident, where remains were exposed to prolonged high temperature and physical damage, new protocols have been formulated. Adherence to these protocols will maximise the recovery and preservation of dental evidence at the scene and during transportation to the mortuary.

  1. 28 CFR 28.22 - The requirement to preserve biological evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The requirement to preserve biological evidence. 28.22 Section 28.22 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DNA IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM Preservation of Biological Evidence § 28.22 The requirement to preserve biological evidence. (a)...

  2. 28 CFR 28.22 - The requirement to preserve biological evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false The requirement to preserve biological evidence. 28.22 Section 28.22 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DNA IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM Preservation of Biological Evidence § 28.22 The requirement to preserve biological evidence. (a)...

  3. 28 CFR 28.22 - The requirement to preserve biological evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false The requirement to preserve biological evidence. 28.22 Section 28.22 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DNA IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM Preservation of Biological Evidence § 28.22 The requirement to preserve biological evidence. (a)...

  4. 28 CFR 28.22 - The requirement to preserve biological evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false The requirement to preserve biological evidence. 28.22 Section 28.22 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DNA IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM Preservation of Biological Evidence § 28.22 The requirement to preserve biological evidence. (a)...

  5. 28 CFR 28.22 - The requirement to preserve biological evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false The requirement to preserve biological evidence. 28.22 Section 28.22 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DNA IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM Preservation of Biological Evidence § 28.22 The requirement to preserve biological evidence. (a)...

  6. Carbonates in the Martian meteorite Allan Hills 84001 formed at 18 ± 4 °C in a near-surface aqueous environment

    PubMed Central

    Halevy, Itay; Fischer, Woodward W.; Eiler, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite evidence for liquid water at the surface of Mars during the Noachian epoch, the temperature of early aqueous environments has been impossible to establish, raising questions of whether the surface of Mars was ever warmer than today. We address this problem by determining the precipitation temperature of secondary carbonate minerals preserved in the oldest known sample of Mars’ crust—the approximately 4.1 billion-year-old meteorite Allan Hills 84001 (ALH84001). The formation environment of these carbonates, which are constrained to be slightly younger than the crystallization age of the rock (i.e., 3.9 to 4.0 billion years), has been poorly understood, hindering insight into the hydrologic and carbon cycles of earliest Mars. Using “clumped” isotope thermometry we find that the carbonates in ALH84001 precipitated at a temperature of approximately 18 °C, with water and carbon dioxide derived from the ancient Martian atmosphere. Furthermore, covarying carbonate carbon and oxygen isotope ratios are constrained to have formed at constant, low temperatures, pointing to deposition from a gradually evaporating, subsurface water body—likely a shallow aquifer (meters to tens of meters below the surface). Despite the mild temperatures, the apparently ephemeral nature of water in this environment leaves open the question of its habitability. PMID:21969543

  7. Mineralization of Bacteria in Terrestrial Basaltic Rocks: Comparison With Possible Biogenic Features in Martian Meteorite Allan Hills 84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; McKay, D. S.; Wentworth, S. J.; Stevens, T. O.; Taunton, A. E.; Allen, C. C.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Romanek, C. S.

    1998-01-01

    The identification of biogenic features altered by diagenesis or mineralization is important in determining whether specific features in terrestrial rocks and in meteorites may have a biogenic origin. Unfortunately, few studies have addressed the formation of biogenic features in igneous rocks, which may be important to these phenomena, including the controversy over possible biogenic features in basaltic martian meteorite ALH84001. To explore the presence of biogenic features in igneous rocks, we examined microcosms growing in basaltic small-scale experimental growth chambers or microcosms. Microbial communities were harvested from aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt (CRB) group and grown in a microcosm containing unweathered basalt chips and groundwater (technique described in. These microcosms simulated natural growth conditions in the deep subsurface of the CRB, which should be a good terrestrial analog for any putative martian subsurface ecosystem that may have once included ALH84001. Here we present new size measurements and photomicrographs comparing the putative martian fossils to biogenic material in the CRB microcosms. The range of size and shapes of the biogenic features on the CRB microcosm chips overlaps with and is similar to those on ALH84001 chips. Although this present work does not provide evidence for the biogenicity of ALH84001 features, we believe that, based on criteria of size, shape, and general morphology, a biogenic interpretation for the ALH84001 features remains plausible.

  8. Amino Acids in the Antarctic Martian Meteorite MIL03346

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Aubrey, A.; Dworkin, J. P.; Botta, O.; Bada, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    The report by McKay et al. that the Martian meteorite ALH84001 contains evidence for life on Mars remains controversial. Of central importance is whether ALH84001 and other Antarctic Martian meteorites contain endogenous organic compounds. In any investigation of organic compounds possibly derived from Mars it is important to focus on compounds that play an essential role in biochemistry as we know it and that have properties such as chirality which can be used to distinguish between biotic versus abiotic origins. Amino acids are one of the few compounds that fulfill these requirements. Previous analyses of the Antarctic Martian meteorites ALH84001 and EETA79001 have shown that these meteorites contain low levels of terrestrial amino acid contamination derived from Antarctic ice meltwater. Here we report preliminary amino acid investigations of a third Antarctic Martian meteorite MIL03346 which was discovered in Antarctica during the 2003-04 ANSMET season. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract

  9. Workshop on the Issue Martian Meteorites: Where do we Stand and Where are we Going?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The presentations in this workshop discuss the composition of Martian meteorites. Many of the talks were on a specific meteorite, i.e., Allan Hills 84001 (ALH84001). The discovery earlier of carbonates in ALH84001 lead some researchers to suggest that there was evidence of martian life. Other possible explanations for this phenomena are given. Other papers discuss methods to sterilize martian samples, the existence of water on Mars, the facilities of the Meteorite Processing Laboratory at Johnson Space Center, comparative analyses of geologic processes and the gathering of meteorites.

  10. Evidence from Hydrogen Isotopes in Meteorites for a Subsurface Hydrogen Reservoir on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usui, Tomohiro; Alexander, Conel M. O'D.; Wang, Jianhua; Simon, Justin I.; Jones, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The surface geology and geomorphology of Mars indicates that it was once warm enough to maintain a large body of liquid water on its surface, though such a warm environment might have been transient. The transition to the present cold and dry Mars is closely linked to the history of surface water, yet the evolution of surficial water is poorly constrained. We have conducted in situ hydrogen isotope (D/H) analyses of quenched and impact glasses in three Martian meteorites (Yamato 980459, EETA79001, LAR 06319) by Cameca ims-6f at Digital Terrain Models (DTM) following the methods of [1]. The hydrogen isotope analyses provide evidence for the existence of a distinct but ubiquitous water/ice reservoir (D/H = 2-3 times Earth's ocean water: Standard Mean Ocean Water (SMOW)) that lasted from at least the time when the meteorites crystallized (173-472 Ma) to the time they were ejected by impacts (0.7-3.3 Ma), but possibly much longer [2]. The origin of this reservoir appears to predate the current Martian atmospheric water (D/H equals approximately 5-6 times SMOW) and is unlikely to be a simple mixture of atmospheric and primordial water retained in the Martian mantle (D/H is approximately equal to SMOW [1]). Given the fact that this intermediate-D/H reservoir (2-3 times SMOW) is observed in a diverse range of Martian materials with different ages (e.g., SNC (Shergottites, Nakhlites, Chassignites) meteorites, including shergottites such as ALH 84001; and Curiosity surface data [3]), we conclude that this intermediate-D/H reservoir is likely a global surficial feature that has remained relatively intact over geologic time. We propose that this reservoir represents either hydrated crust and/or ground ice interbedded within sediments. Our results corroborate the hypothesis that a buried cryosphere accounts for a large part of the initial water budget of Mars.

  11. 14 CFR 249.31 - Preservation and inspection of evidence of compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Truth-in-Lending Act § 249.31 Preservation and inspection of evidence of compliance. Air carriers and... provisions of Title I (Truth in Lending) and Title V (General Provisions) of the Consumer Credit...

  12. Magnetite biomineralization and ancient life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Frankel, R B; Buseck, P R

    2000-04-01

    Certain chemical and mineral features of the Martian meteorite ALH84001 were reported in 1996 to be probable evidence of ancient life on Mars. In spite of new observations and interpretations, the question of ancient life on Mars remains unresolved. Putative biogenic, nanometer magnetite has now become a leading focus in the debate.

  13. Preserving residual renal function in dialysis patients: an update on evidence to assist clinical decision making

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jens Dam; Peters, Christian Daugaard; Jespersen, Bente

    2011-01-01

    It has been documented that preservation of residual renal function in dialysis patients improves quality of life as well as survival. Clinical trials on strategies to preserve residual renal function are clearly lacking. While waiting for more results from clinical trials, patients will benefit from clinicians being aware of available knowledge. The aim of this review was to offer an update on current evidence assisting doctors in clinical practice. PMID:25949486

  14. High-Resolution Multiple Sulfur Isotope Studies of Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojzsis, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    Sensitive, high resolution measurements of S-32, S-31, and S-34 in individual pyrite grains in martian meteorite ALH84001 by an in situ ion microprobe multi-collection technique reveal mass-independent anomalies in Delta.S-33 (Delta.S-33 = delta.S-33 - 0.516delta.S-34) in addition to the lowest 634S found in an extraterrestrial material. Low delta.S-34 values in two pyrite grains intimately associated with carbonate in ALH84001 can be explained by the sensitivity of sulfur to fractionations in the geologic environment. Anomalies in Delta.S-33 recorded in ALH84001 pyrites probably formed by gas-phase reactions in the early martian atmosphere (>4 Ga). The discovery of clearly resolvable Delta-S33 anomalies in 2 of 12 ALH84001 pyrites analyzed in their petrographic context in thin section, is considered strong evidence for crust-atmosphere exchange and the global cycling of volatile sulfur species on early Mars. These results corroborate previous measurements by Farquhar and co-workers who used a different technique that measures that bulk Delta.S-33 values of martian meteorites. These independent techniques, and their results, suggest that sulfur affected by mass-independent fractionation is common on Mars.

  15. Analysis of Siderite Thermal Decomposition by Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, M. S.; Lin, I.-C.; McKay, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    Characterization of carbonate devolitilization has important implications for atmospheric interactions and climatic effects related to large meteorite impacts in platform sediments. On a smaller scale, meteorites contain carbonates which have witnessed shock metamorphic events and may record pressure/temperature histories of impact(s). ALH84001 meteorite contains zoned Ca-Mg-Fe-carbonates which formed on Mars. Magnetite crystals are found in the rims and cores of these carbonates and some are associated with void spaces leading to the suggestion by Brearley et al. that the crystals were produced by thermal decomposition of the carbonate at high temperature, possibly by incipient shock melting or devolitilization. Golden et al. recently synthesized spherical Mg-Fe-Ca-carbonates from solution under mild hydrothermal conditions that have similar carbonate compositional zoning to those of ALH84001. They have shown experimental evidence that the carbonate-sulfide-magnetite assemblage in ALH84001 can result from a multistep inorganic process involving heating possibly due to shock events. Experimental shock studies on calcium carbonate prove its stability to approx. 60 GPa, well in excess of the approx. 45 GPa peak pressures indicated by other shock features in ALH84001. In addition, Raman spectroscopy of carbonate globules in ALH84001 indicates no presence of CaO and MgO. Such oxide phases should be found associated with the magnetites in voids if these magnetites are high temperature shock products, the voids resulting from devolitilization of CO2 from calcium or magnesium carbonate. However, if the starting material was siderite (FeCO3), thermal breakdown of the ALH84001 carbonate at 470 C would produce iron oxide + CO2. As no documentation of shock effects in siderite exists, we have begun shock experiments to determine whether or not magnetite is produced by the decomposition of siderite within the < 45GPa pressure window and by the resultant thermal pulse to approx

  16. Are the evidences of forensic entomology preserved in ethanol suitable for SEM studies?

    PubMed

    López-Esclapez, Raquel; García, María-Dolores; Arnaldos, María-Isabel; Presa, Juan José; Ubero-Pascal, Nicolás

    2014-07-01

    In forensic practice, the use of arthropod evidences to estimate the postmortem interval is a very good approach when the elapsed time from death is long, but it requires the correct identification of the specimens. This is a crucial step, not always easy to achieve, in particular when dealing with immature specimens. In this case, scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) can be useful, but the techniques used to preserve specimens in forensic practice are usually different from those used to prepare specimens for SEM studies. To determine whether forensic evidences preserving techniques are also compatible with SEM analysis, we have compared specimens of all the immature stages of Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830 (Diptera, Calliphoridae) preserved in 70% ethanol, with others prepared with aldehydic fixative techniques that are more appropriate for SEM studies. At the same time, two drying techniques have also been compared with both fixative techniques, the critical point drying and air-drying following with hexamethyldisilizane treatment (HMDS). Our results indicate that there are not basis against recommending the use of ethanol to preserve forensic entomological evidences and that both drying methods appear to offer good results for second and third instar larvae, although HMDS behaves better with eggs and pupae.

  17. Preservation and analysis of footprint evidence within the archaeological record: examples from Valsequillo and Cuatrocienegas, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, M.; Huddart, D.; Gonzalez, S.

    2008-05-01

    Human footprints provide a direct record of human occupation and can be used to make a range of biometric inferences about the individuals which left them. In this paper we describe the application of three-dimensional optical laser scanning in the preservation and analysis both human and animal footprints. Optical laser scanning provides a digital elevation model of a print or surface with a vertical accuracy typically less than + 0.01 mm. Not only does this provide a procedure for recording fragile footprint evidence but allows digital measurements to be made. It is also possible to use the techniques developed for rapid proto-typing to recreate the print as solid models for visualisation. The role of optical laser scanning in the preservation of footprint evidence is explored with specific reference to the controversial footprints of the Valsequillo Basin in Central Mexico which may provide some of the earliest evidence of human colonization of the Americas. More importantly, digital footprint scans provide a basis for the numerical analysis of footprints allowing the tools of geometric morphometrics to be applied. These tools have been widely developed in the fields of biology and physical anthropology and used to explore the anatomical significance of shape. One key question that can be addressed using this approach is to develop a statistical approach to the objective recognition of a human footprint thereby helping to verify their interpretation and archaeological significance. Using footprint data from sites across the World a statistical model for the recognition of human footprints is presented and used to evaluate the controversial footprint site of Valsequillo, (Puebla State) preserved in volcanic ash and those in the Cuatrocienegas Basin, (Coahuila State) preserved in travertine.

  18. Identification, Collection, and Preservation of Veterinary Forensic Evidence: On Scene and During the Postmortem Examination.

    PubMed

    Touroo, R; Fitch, A

    2016-09-01

    Although it is the obligation of the veterinary forensic pathologist to be competent in identifying, collecting, and preserving evidence from the body, it is also necessary for them to understand the relevance of conditions on the crime scene. The body is just one piece of the puzzle that needs to be considered when determining the cause of death. The information required for a complete postmortem analysis should also include details of the animal's environment and items of evidence present on the crime scene. These factors will assist the veterinary forensic pathologist in the interpretation of necropsy findings. Therefore, the veterinary forensic pathologist needs to have a basic understanding of how the crime scene is processed, as well as the role of the forensic veterinarian on scene. In addition, the veterinary forensic pathologist must remain unbiased, necessitating an understanding of evidence maintenance and authentication.

  19. Evidence-Based Strategies for Preserving Mobility for Elderly and Aging Manual Wheelchair Users

    PubMed Central

    Requejo, Philip S.; Furumasu, Jan; Mulroy, Sara J.

    2015-01-01

    Elderly and aging manual wheelchair (MWC) users have increased risk for accelerated loss of function and mobility that greatly limits independence and affects quality of life. This review paper addresses important issues for preserving function and mobility for elderly and aging individuals who use a MWC by presenting the current available evidence and recommendations. These include recommendations for maximizing function, by decreasing pain, improving the ability to self-propel, and prolonging mobility and endurance through ergonomics, individualized wheelchair selection and configuration, and adaptations for increasing the capacity to handle the daily mobility demands through training, strengthening, and exercise. Each recommendation is supported by current research in each relevant area. PMID:26366040

  20. Evidence of preserved collagen in an Early Jurassic sauropodomorph dinosaur revealed by synchrotron FTIR microspectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yao-Chang; Chiang, Cheng-Cheng; Huang, Pei-Yu; Chung, Chao-Yu; Huang, Timothy D.; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chen, Ching-Iue; Chang, Rong-Seng; Liao, Cheng-Hao; Reisz, Robert R.

    2017-01-01

    Fossilized organic remains are important sources of information because they provide a unique form of biological and evolutionary information, and have the long-term potential for genomic explorations. Here we report evidence of protein preservation in a terrestrial vertebrate found inside the vascular canals of a rib of a 195-million-year-old sauropodomorph dinosaur, where blood vessels and nerves would normally have been present in the living organism. The in situ synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectra exhibit the characteristic infrared absorption bands for amide A and B, amide I, II and III of collagen. Aggregated haematite particles (α-Fe2O3) about 6∼8 μm in diameter are also identified inside the vascular canals using confocal Raman microscopy, where the organic remains were preserved. We propose that these particles likely had a crucial role in the preservation of the proteins, and may be remnants partially contributed from haemoglobin and other iron-rich proteins from the original blood. PMID:28140389

  1. Digit-only sauropod pes trackways from China – evidence of swimming or a preservational phenomenon?

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lida; Li, Daqing; Falkingham, Peter L.; Lockley, Martin G.; Benton, Michael J.; Klein, Hendrik; Zhang, Jianping; Ran, Hao; Persons, W. Scott; Dai, Hui

    2016-01-01

    For more than 70 years unusual sauropod trackways have played a pivotal role in debates about the swimming ability of sauropods. Most claims that sauropods could swim have been based on manus-only or manus-dominated trackways. However none of these incomplete trackways has been entirely convincing, and most have proved to be taphonomic artifacts, either undertracks or the result of differential depth of penetration of manus and pes tracks, but otherwise showed the typical pattern of normal walking trackways. Here we report an assemblage of unusual sauropod tracks from the Lower Cretaceous Hekou Group of Gansu Province, northern China, characterized by the preservation of only the pes claw traces, that we interpret as having been left by walking, not buoyant or swimming, individuals. They are interpreted as the result of animals moving on a soft mud-silt substrate, projecting their claws deeply to register their traces on an underlying sand layer where they gained more grip during progression. Other sauropod walking trackways on the same surface with both pes and manus traces preserved, were probably left earlier on relatively firm substrates that predated the deposition of soft mud and silt . Presently, there is no convincing evidence of swimming sauropods from their trackways, which is not to say that sauropods did not swim at all. PMID:26888058

  2. A uniquely preserved Ediacaran fossil with direct evidence for a quilted bodyplan.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shuhai; Shen, Bing; Zhou, Chuanming; Xie, Guwei; Yuan, Xunlai

    2005-07-19

    Ediacara fossils are among the oldest known macroscopic and complex life forms. Their bodyplan, ecology, and phylogenetic affinities have been controversial. On the basis of taphonomic observations, Seilacher [Seilacher, A. (1989) Lethaia 22, 229-239] proposed that the core elements of the Ediacara biota, the vendobionts, were constructed with serially or fractally arranged quilts or tube-like units. However, anatomy of quilt walls has been rarely reported, because most Ediacara fossils are preserved as casts and molds in siliciclastic rocks with inadequate morphological resolution. Here, we report an Ediacara form, uniquely preserved in situ and in three dimensions with its organic walls cast by early diagenetic calcite, from bituminous limestone of the 551- to 542-mega-annum Dengying Formation of South China. Despite diagenetic tampering, serial sections show that the Dengying form consists of biserially arranged, tube-like quilts, each with two vertical side walls, a floor, a roof, and an open distal end. Three-dimensional morphological complexity of the Dengying form excludes a microbial interpretation but is broadly consistent with vendobionts. Unlike classic frondose vendobionts sensu Seilacher, however, the Dengying form probably lacked a smooth margin and had distally open quilts. It probably lived procumbently at or near the water-sediment interface and shows evidence for substrate utilization. Despite its uncertain phylogeny, ontogeny, and functional biology, the Dengying form adds to Ediacaran biodiversity, places key constraints on the ecology and extinction of Ediacara organisms, and points to the need to explore an alternative taphonomic window for Ediacara biology.

  3. Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron (FEGSEM) and Transmission Electron (TEM) Microscopy of Phyllosilicates in Martian Meteorites ALH84001, Nakhla, and Shergotty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Gibson, Everett K.

    2000-01-01

    Here we document the occurrence of phyllosilicates and alteration phases in three martian meteorites, suggest formation conditions required for phyllosilicate formation and speculate on the extent of fluid:rock interactions during the past history of Mars.

  4. Embryology of Early Jurassic dinosaur from China with evidence of preserved organic remains.

    PubMed

    Reisz, Robert R; Huang, Timothy D; Roberts, Eric M; Peng, ShinRung; Sullivan, Corwin; Stein, Koen; LeBlanc, Aaron R H; Shieh, DarBin; Chang, RongSeng; Chiang, ChengCheng; Yang, Chuanwei; Zhong, Shiming

    2013-04-11

    Fossil dinosaur embryos are surprisingly rare, being almost entirely restricted to Upper Cretaceous strata that record the late stages of non-avian dinosaur evolution. Notable exceptions are the oldest known embryos from the Early Jurassic South African sauropodomorph Massospondylus and Late Jurassic embryos of a theropod from Portugal. The fact that dinosaur embryos are rare and typically enclosed in eggshells limits their availability for tissue and cellular level investigations of development. Consequently, little is known about growth patterns in dinosaur embryos, even though post-hatching ontogeny has been studied in several taxa. Here we report the discovery of an embryonic dinosaur bone bed from the Lower Jurassic of China, the oldest such occurrence in the fossil record. The embryos are similar in geological age to those of Massospondylus and are also assignable to a sauropodomorph dinosaur, probably Lufengosaurus. The preservation of numerous disarticulated skeletal elements and eggshells in this monotaxic bone bed, representing different stages of incubation and therefore derived from different nests, provides opportunities for new investigations of dinosaur embryology in a clade noted for gigantism. For example, comparisons among embryonic femora of different sizes and developmental stages reveal a consistently rapid rate of growth throughout development, possibly indicating that short incubation times were characteristic of sauropodomorphs. In addition, asymmetric radial growth of the femoral shaft and rapid expansion of the fourth trochanter suggest that embryonic muscle activation played an important role in the pre-hatching ontogeny of these dinosaurs. This discovery also provides the oldest evidence of in situ preservation of complex organic remains in a terrestrial vertebrate.

  5. A uniquely preserved Ediacaran fossil with direct evidence for a quilted bodyplan

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shuhai; Shen, Bing; Zhou, Chuanming; Xie, Guwei; Yuan, Xunlai

    2005-01-01

    Ediacara fossils are among the oldest known macroscopic and complex life forms. Their bodyplan, ecology, and phylogenetic affinities have been controversial. On the basis of taphonomic observations, Seilacher [Seilacher, A. (1989) Lethaia 22, 229–239] proposed that the core elements of the Ediacara biota, the vendobionts, were constructed with serially or fractally arranged quilts or tube-like units. However, anatomy of quilt walls has been rarely reported, because most Ediacara fossils are preserved as casts and molds in siliciclastic rocks with inadequate morphological resolution. Here, we report an Ediacara form, uniquely preserved in situ and in three dimensions with its organic walls cast by early diagenetic calcite, from bituminous limestone of the 551- to 542-mega-annum Dengying Formation of South China. Despite diagenetic tampering, serial sections show that the Dengying form consists of biserially arranged, tube-like quilts, each with two vertical side walls, a floor, a roof, and an open distal end. Three-dimensional morphological complexity of the Dengying form excludes a microbial interpretation but is broadly consistent with vendobionts. Unlike classic frondose vendobionts sensu Seilacher, however, the Dengying form probably lacked a smooth margin and had distally open quilts. It probably lived procumbently at or near the water–sediment interface and shows evidence for substrate utilization. Despite its uncertain phylogeny, ontogeny, and functional biology, the Dengying form adds to Ediacaran biodiversity, places key constraints on the ecology and extinction of Ediacara organisms, and points to the need to explore an alternative taphonomic window for Ediacara biology. PMID:16014417

  6. Large Devices of Industrial Culture: the Preservation of their Historical Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller-Kempas, Ruth

    Development of material science and engineering technology is present in devices of the last 150 years. How can the historical evidence of their construction and use, the transfer of technological stages of development be preserved as a special quality in cultural tradition? The conservation of technical artefacts as a cultural heritage of western civilisation has developed scientific methods of conservation so as to respect their authenticity as materialised references of the past. During the last fifteen years these methods have been evaluated in the unique training program for this specialisation of conservation discipline at the HTW Berlin, University for Applied Sciences. They are enough standardised now to be applied without hesitation on objects being kept indoor in a museum or private collection. It is much more difficult to keep devices outside or, as is the case in Observatory - at climates changing between inside aud outside situations. The paper will show a few examples of how to develop concepts for conservation and how it is teclinically possible to preserve the very important original surfaces of the objects, their authentic materiality. As soon as the objects are kept as part of cultural history or history of science they change their function and can not be kept in the same manner as before. They give evidence of their materiality. The archaeometry of modern times is a new and expanding branch of historic research. Moreover the surface of a historic device is the point of contact between passed times and the presence for the general public as much as for the scientists. It will be demonstrated how large the loss of historic information and thus of cultural value of objects can be by renovation instead of considerate conservation. Some examples of careful conservation work carried out on big objects other than an observatory are presented. The paper will then summarise the possibilities and difficulties of doing such work on large devices still in

  7. The role of Victorian emergency nurses in the collection and preservation of forensic evidence: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    McGillivray, Bree

    2005-04-01

    Emergency Departments (ED) are providing care for increasing numbers of patients who present as a result of criminal or interpersonal violence and patients may be victims, suspects or perpetrators. As a result, the role of emergency nurses in the recognition, collection and preservation of forensic evidence is increasing. There is little published literature about the role and responsibilities of emergency nurses regarding the collection and preservation of evidence in the state of Victoria and this is complicated by a lack of department and organisation policy and the need for more specific educational preparation of emergency nurses in this area. While it is well accepted that the primary focus of nursing care will always be the physical and emotional care of the patient, the increasing importance of the role of emergency nurses in the recognition and collection of forensic evidence in Victoria is now being recognized and the need for education of emergency nurses in this area understood. This paper reviews the literature related to the recognition, collection and preservation, of forensic materials in EDs by emergency nurses in the state of Victoria and discusses the role of emergency nurses in Victoria in caring for patients who present as victims of violence and in whom the collection and preservation of forensic evidence is required.

  8. Preservation of eccentric strength in older adults: Evidence, mechanisms and implications for training and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Roig, Marc; Macintyre, Donna L; Eng, Janice J; Narici, Marco V; Maganaris, Constantinos N; Reid, W Darlene

    2010-06-01

    Overall reductions in muscle strength typically accompany the aging process. However, older adults show a relatively preserved capacity of producing eccentric strength. The preservation of eccentric strength in older adults is a well-established phenomenon, occurring indiscriminately across different muscle groups, independent of age-related architectural changes in muscle structure and velocity of movement. The mechanisms for the preservation of eccentric strength appear to be mechanical and cellular in origin and include both passive and active elements regulating muscle stiffness. The age-related accumulation of non-contractile material in the muscle-tendon unit increases passive stiffness, which might offer mechanical advantage during eccentric contractions. In addition, the preserved muscle tension and increased instantaneous stiffness of old muscle fibers during stretch increase active stiffness, which might enhance eccentric strength. The fact that the preservation of eccentric strength is present in people with chronic conditions when compared to age-matched healthy controls indicates that the aging process per se does not exclusively mediate the preservation of eccentric strength. Physical inactivity, which is common in elderly and people with chronic conditions, is a potential factor regulating the preservation of eccentric strength. When compared to concentric strength, the magnitude of preservation of eccentric strength in older adults ranges from 2% to 48% with a mean value of 21.6% from all studies. This functional reserve of eccentric strength might be clinically relevant, especially to initiate resistance training and rehabilitation programs in individuals with low levels of strength.

  9. Preservation of eccentric strength in older adults: Evidence, mechanisms and implications for training and rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Roig, Marc; MacIntyre, Donna L.; Eng, Janice J.; Narici, Marco V.; Maganaris, Constantinos N.; Reid, W. Darlene

    2012-01-01

    Overall reductions in muscle strength typically accompany the aging process. However, older adults show a relatively preserved capacity of producing eccentric strength. The preservation of eccentric strength in older adults is a well-established phenomenon, occurring indiscriminately across different muscle groups, independent of age-related architectural changes in muscle structure and velocity of movement. The mechanisms for the preservation of eccentric strength appear to be mechanical and cellular in origin and include both passive and active elements regulating muscle stiffness. The age-related accumulation of non-contractile material in the muscle-tendon unit increases passive stiffness, which might offer mechanical advantage during eccentric contractions. In addition, the preserved muscle tension and increased instantaneous stiffness of old muscle fibers during stretch increase active stiffness, which might enhance eccentric strength. The fact that the preservation of eccentric strength is present in people with chronic conditions when compared to age-matched healthy controls indicates that the aging process per se does not exclusively mediate the preservation of eccentric strength. Physical inactivity, which is common in elderly and people with chronic conditions, is a potential factor regulating the preservation of eccentric strength. When compared to concentric strength, the magnitude of the preservation of eccentric strength in older adults ranges from 2% to 48% with a mean value from all studies of 21.6%. This functional reserve of eccentric strength might be clinically relevant, especially to initiate resistance training and rehabilitation programs in individuals with low levels of strength. PMID:20303404

  10. The History of Allan Hills 84001 Revised: Multiple Shock Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1998-01-01

    The geologic history of Martian meteorite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 is more complex than previously recognized, with evidence for four or five crater-forming impacts onto Mars. This history of repeated deformation and shock metamorphism appears to weaken some arguments that have been offered for and against the hypothesis of ancient Martian life in ALH 84001. Allan Hills 84001 formed originally from basaltic magma. Its first impact event (I1) is inferred from the deformation (D1) that produced the granular-textured bands ("crush zones") that transect the original igneous fabric. Deformation D1 is characterized by intense shear and may represent excavation or rebound flow of rock beneath a large impact crater. An intense thermal metamorphism followed D1 and may be related to it. The next impact (I2) produced fractures, (Fr2) in which carbonate "pancakes" were deposited and produced feldspathic glass from some of the igneous feldspars and silica. After I2, carbonate pancakes and globules were deposited in Fr2 fractures and replaced feldspathic glass and possibly crystalline silicates. Next, feldspars, feldspathic glass, and possibly some carbonates were mobilized and melted in the third impact (I3). Microfaulting, intense fracturing, and shear are also associated with 13. In the fourth impact (I4), the rock was fractured and deformed without significant heating, which permitted remnant magnetization directions to vary across fracture surfaces. Finally, ALH 84001 was ejected from Mars in event I5, which could be identical to I4. This history of multiple impacts is consistent with the photogeology of the Martian highlands and may help resolve some apparent contradictions among recent results on ALH 84001. For example, the submicron rounded magnetite grains in the carbonate globules could be contemporaneous with carbonate deposition, whereas the elongate magnetite grains, epitaxial on carbonates, could be ascribed to vapor-phase deposition during I3.

  11. Chemical, experimental, and morphological evidence for diagenetically altered melanin in exceptionally preserved fossils.

    PubMed

    Colleary, Caitlin; Dolocan, Andrei; Gardner, James; Singh, Suresh; Wuttke, Michael; Rabenstein, Renate; Habersetzer, Jörg; Schaal, Stephan; Feseha, Mulugeta; Clemens, Matthew; Jacobs, Bonnie F; Currano, Ellen D; Jacobs, Louis L; Sylvestersen, Rene Lyng; Gabbott, Sarah E; Vinther, Jakob

    2015-10-13

    In living organisms, color patterns, behavior, and ecology are closely linked. Thus, detection of fossil pigments may permit inferences about important aspects of ancient animal ecology and evolution. Melanin-bearing melanosomes were suggested to preserve as organic residues in exceptionally preserved fossils, retaining distinct morphology that is associated with aspects of original color patterns. Nevertheless, these oblong and spherical structures have also been identified as fossilized bacteria. To date, chemical studies have not directly considered the effects of diagenesis on melanin preservation, and how this may influence its identification. Here we use time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry to identify and chemically characterize melanin in a diverse sample of previously unstudied extant and fossil taxa, including fossils with notably different diagenetic histories and geologic ages. We document signatures consistent with melanin preservation in fossils ranging from feathers, to mammals, to amphibians. Using principal component analyses, we characterize putative mixtures of eumelanin and phaeomelanin in both fossil and extant samples. Surprisingly, both extant and fossil amphibians generally exhibit melanosomes with a mixed eumelanin/phaeomelanin composition rather than pure eumelanin, as assumed previously. We argue that experimental maturation of modern melanin samples replicates diagenetic chemical alteration of melanin observed in fossils. This refutes the hypothesis that such fossil microbodies could be bacteria, and demonstrates that melanin is widely responsible for the organic soft tissue outlines in vertebrates found at exceptional fossil localities, thus allowing for the reconstruction of certain aspects of original pigment patterns.

  12. Chemical, experimental, and morphological evidence for diagenetically altered melanin in exceptionally preserved fossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colleary, Caitlin; Dolocan, Andrei; Gardner, James; Singh, Suresh; Wuttke, Michael; Rabenstein, Renate; Habersetzer, Jörg; Schaal, Stephan; Feseha, Mulugeta; Clemens, Matthew; Jacobs, Bonnie F.; Currano, Ellen D.; Jacobs, Louis L.; Lyng Sylvestersen, Rene; Gabbott, Sarah E.; Vinther, Jakob

    2015-10-01

    In living organisms, color patterns, behavior, and ecology are closely linked. Thus, detection of fossil pigments may permit inferences about important aspects of ancient animal ecology and evolution. Melanin-bearing melanosomes were suggested to preserve as organic residues in exceptionally preserved fossils, retaining distinct morphology that is associated with aspects of original color patterns. Nevertheless, these oblong and spherical structures have also been identified as fossilized bacteria. To date, chemical studies have not directly considered the effects of diagenesis on melanin preservation, and how this may influence its identification. Here we use time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry to identify and chemically characterize melanin in a diverse sample of previously unstudied extant and fossil taxa, including fossils with notably different diagenetic histories and geologic ages. We document signatures consistent with melanin preservation in fossils ranging from feathers, to mammals, to amphibians. Using principal component analyses, we characterize putative mixtures of eumelanin and phaeomelanin in both fossil and extant samples. Surprisingly, both extant and fossil amphibians generally exhibit melanosomes with a mixed eumelanin/phaeomelanin composition rather than pure eumelanin, as assumed previously. We argue that experimental maturation of modern melanin samples replicates diagenetic chemical alteration of melanin observed in fossils. This refutes the hypothesis that such fossil microbodies could be bacteria, and demonstrates that melanin is widely responsible for the organic soft tissue outlines in vertebrates found at exceptional fossil localities, thus allowing for the reconstruction of certain aspects of original pigment patterns.

  13. Chemical, experimental, and morphological evidence for diagenetically altered melanin in exceptionally preserved fossils

    PubMed Central

    Colleary, Caitlin; Dolocan, Andrei; Gardner, James; Singh, Suresh; Wuttke, Michael; Rabenstein, Renate; Habersetzer, Jörg; Schaal, Stephan; Feseha, Mulugeta; Clemens, Matthew; Jacobs, Bonnie F.; Currano, Ellen D.; Jacobs, Louis L.; Sylvestersen, Rene Lyng; Gabbott, Sarah E.; Vinther, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    In living organisms, color patterns, behavior, and ecology are closely linked. Thus, detection of fossil pigments may permit inferences about important aspects of ancient animal ecology and evolution. Melanin-bearing melanosomes were suggested to preserve as organic residues in exceptionally preserved fossils, retaining distinct morphology that is associated with aspects of original color patterns. Nevertheless, these oblong and spherical structures have also been identified as fossilized bacteria. To date, chemical studies have not directly considered the effects of diagenesis on melanin preservation, and how this may influence its identification. Here we use time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry to identify and chemically characterize melanin in a diverse sample of previously unstudied extant and fossil taxa, including fossils with notably different diagenetic histories and geologic ages. We document signatures consistent with melanin preservation in fossils ranging from feathers, to mammals, to amphibians. Using principal component analyses, we characterize putative mixtures of eumelanin and phaeomelanin in both fossil and extant samples. Surprisingly, both extant and fossil amphibians generally exhibit melanosomes with a mixed eumelanin/phaeomelanin composition rather than pure eumelanin, as assumed previously. We argue that experimental maturation of modern melanin samples replicates diagenetic chemical alteration of melanin observed in fossils. This refutes the hypothesis that such fossil microbodies could be bacteria, and demonstrates that melanin is widely responsible for the organic soft tissue outlines in vertebrates found at exceptional fossil localities, thus allowing for the reconstruction of certain aspects of original pigment patterns. PMID:26417094

  14. Morphological and Geochemical Evidence of Eumelanin Preservation in the Feathers of the Early Cretaceous Bird, Gansus yumenensis

    PubMed Central

    Barden, Holly E.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Li, Daqing; Manning, Phillip L.; Edwards, Nicholas P.; van Dongen, Bart E.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown evidence for the preservation of colour in fossilized soft tissues by imaging melanosomes, melanin pigment containing organelles. This study combines geochemical analyses with morphological observations to investigate the preservation of melanosomes and melanin within feathers of the Early Cretaceous bird, Gansus yumenensis. Scanning electron microscopy reveals structures concordant with those previously identified as eumelanosomes within visually dark areas of the feathers but not in lighter areas or sedimentary matrices. Fourier transform infrared analyses show different spectra for the feathers and their matrices; melanic functional groups appear in the feather including carboxylic acid and ketone groups that are not seen in the matrix. When mapped, the carboxylic acid group absorption faithfully replicates the visually dark areas of the feathers. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy of one specimen demonstrates the presence of organic signals but proved too insensitive to resolve melanin. Pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry shows a similar distribution of aliphatic material within both feathers that are different from those of their respective matrices. In combination, these techniques strongly suggest that not only do the feathers contain endogenous organic material, but that both geochemical and morphological evidence supports the preservation of original eumelanic pigment residue. PMID:22022404

  15. Evidence-Based Recommendations for Fertility Preservation Options for Inclusion in Treatment Protocols for Pediatric and Adolescent Patients Diagnosed With Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fernbach, Alison; Lockart, Barbara; Armus, Cheryl L; Bashore, Lisa M; Levine, Jennifer; Kroon, Leah; Sylvain, Genevieve; Rodgers, Cheryl

    2014-07-01

    As survival rates improve for pediatric cancers, increased attention has been paid to late effects of cancer therapy, in particular, infertility. Fertility preservation options are available for pre- and postpubertal cancer patients; however, many providers lack knowledge regarding options. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive synthesis of current evidence and recommendations regarding fertility preservation options for children, adolescents, and young adults undergoing cancer treatment. A systematic search was performed to identify fertility preservation evidence. Fifty-three studies and 4 clinical guidelines were used for the review. Final recommendations consisted of 2 strong and 1 weak recommendation for both female and male fertility preservation options. The treatment team should be knowledgeable about fertility preservation so that they can educate patients and families about available fertility preservation options. It is important to consider and discuss all available fertility options with patients at the time of diagnosis.

  16. Relative category-specific preservation in semantic dementia? Evidence from 35 cases.

    PubMed

    Merck, Catherine; Jonin, Pierre-Yves; Vichard, Hélène; Boursiquot, Sandrine Le Moal; Leblay, Virginie; Belliard, Serge

    2013-03-01

    Category-specific deficits have rarely been reported in semantic dementia (SD). To our knowledge, only four previous studies have documented category-specific deficits, and these have focused on the living versus non-living things contrast rather than on more fine-grained semantic categories. This study aimed to determine whether a category-specific effect could be highlighted by a semantic sorting task administered to 35 SD patients once at baseline and again after 2 years and to 10 Alzheimer's disease patients (AD). We found a relative preservation of fruit and vegetables only in SD. This relative preservation of fruit and vegetables could be considered with regard to the importance of color knowledge in their discrimination. Indeed, color knowledge retrieval is known to depend on the left posterior fusiform gyrus which is relatively spared in SD. Finally, according to predictions of semantic memory models, our findings best fitted the Devlin and Gonnerman's computational account.

  17. The use of full spectrum digital photography for evidence collection and preservation in cases involving forensic odontology.

    PubMed

    Wright, Franklin D; Golden, Gregory S

    2010-09-10

    Photography often represents the best method to collect and preserve evidence in forensic cases. This is especially true in forensic odontology with cases involving dental identification, human abuse and, perhaps most significantly, bitemark cases. Basic visible light photography is adequate in most dental identification cases; however, full spectrum digital photography is best utilized to collect all available evidence in cases of human abuse and bitemarks. This paper will discuss the types of photographic evidence that should be collected with various forensic odontological cases and the specific techniques utilized in full spectrum forensic digital photography. The use of full spectrum photography captures the forensic injuries using special techniques recording the injuries in each of the four resultant events that occur when light strikes skin.

  18. The forensiX evidence collection tube and its impact on DNA preservation and recovery.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Alex M; Holzinger, Ralf; Berner, Florian; Krebs, Walter; Hostettler, Bernhard; Lardi, Elges; Hertli, Christian; Quartermaine, Roy; Stamm, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Biological samples are vulnerable to degradation from the time they are collected until they are analysed at the laboratory. Biological contaminants, such as bacteria, fungi, and enzymes, as well as environmental factors, such as sunlight, heat, and humidity, can increase the rate of DNA degradation. Currently, DNA samples are normally dried or frozen to limit their degradation prior to their arrival at the laboratory. In this study, the effect of the sample drying rate on DNA preservation was investigated, as well as a comparison between drying and freezing methods. The drying performances of two commercially available DNA collection tools (swab and drying tube) with different drying rates were evaluated. The swabs were used to collect human saliva, placed into the drying tubes, and stored in a controlled environment at 25°C and 60% relative humidity, or frozen at -20°C, for 2 weeks. Swabs that were stored in fast sample drying tubes yielded 95% recoverable DNA, whereas swabs stored in tubes with slower sample drying rates yielded only 12% recoverable DNA; saliva stored in a microtube at -20°C was used as a control. Thus, DNA sampling tools that offer rapid drying can significantly improve the preservation of DNA collected on a swab, increasing the quantity of DNA available for subsequent analysis.

  19. The biology and clinical evidence of microfracture in hip preservation surgery.

    PubMed

    Green, Chadwick John; Beck, Aswin; Wood, David; Zheng, Ming H

    2016-07-01

    The use of microfracture in hip arthroscopy is increasing dramatically. However, recent reports raise concerns not only about the lack of evidence to support the clinical use of microfracture, but also about the potential harm caused by violation of the subchondral bone plate. The biology and pathology of the microfracture technique were described based on observations in translational models and the clinical evidence for hip microfracture was reviewed systematically. The clinical outcomes in patients undergoing microfracture were the same as those not undergoing microfracture. However, the overall clinical evidence quality is poor in hips. This review identified only one study with Level III evidence, while most studies were Level IV. There were no randomized trials available for review. Repair tissue is primarily of fibrocartilaginous nature. Reconstitution of the subchondral bone is often incomplete and associated with poor quality repair tissue and faster degeneration. Subchondral bone cyst formation is associated with microfracture, likely secondary to subchondral bone plate disruption and a combination of pressurized synovial fluid and inflammatory mediators moving from the joint into the bone. There is a lack of clinical efficacy evidence for patients undergoing microfracture. There is evidence of bone cyst formation following microfracture in animal studies, which may accelerate joint degeneration. Bone cyst formation following microfracture has not been studied adequately in humans.

  20. Late Jurassic ocean anoxic event: evidence from voluminous sulphide deposition and preservation in the Panthalassa

    PubMed Central

    Nozaki, Tatsuo; Kato, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Katsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    The historically productive copper-bearing Besshi-type sulphide deposits in the Japanese accretionary complex were formed as volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits on the deep-sea floor of the Panthalassa Ocean. Here we report that eleven typical Besshi-type deposits yielded Re-Os isochron ages around 150 Ma (148.4 ± 1.4 Ma from the composite isochron) in Late Jurassic time. This date coincides with the lowest marine 87Sr/86Sr ratio and highest atmospheric CO2 concentration of the past 300 million years. We infer that intense mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal and volcanic activity in the Late Jurassic produced huge sulphide deposits and large emissions of CO2 gas, leading to global warming and a stratified Panthalassa Ocean with anoxic deep seas that favored preservation of sulphides in the pelagic environment. The emergence of ocean anoxia triggered by seafloor volcanism is also consistent with a positive δ13C excursion and widespread deposition of petroleum source rocks and black shales. PMID:23712471

  1. A bizarre Jurassic maniraptoran theropod with preserved evidence of membranous wings.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xing; Zheng, Xiaoting; Sullivan, Corwin; Wang, Xiaoli; Xing, Lida; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xiaomei; O'Connor, Jingmai K; Zhang, Fucheng; Pan, Yanhong

    2015-05-07

    The wings of birds and their closest theropod relatives share a uniform fundamental architecture, with pinnate flight feathers as the key component. Here we report a new scansoriopterygid theropod, Yi qi gen. et sp. nov., based on a new specimen from the Middle-Upper Jurassic period Tiaojishan Formation of Hebei Province, China. Yi is nested phylogenetically among winged theropods but has large stiff filamentous feathers of an unusual type on both the forelimb and hindlimb. However, the filamentous feathers of Yi resemble pinnate feathers in bearing morphologically diverse melanosomes. Most surprisingly, Yi has a long rod-like bone extending from each wrist, and patches of membranous tissue preserved between the rod-like bones and the manual digits. Analogous features are unknown in any dinosaur but occur in various flying and gliding tetrapods, suggesting the intriguing possibility that Yi had membranous aerodynamic surfaces totally different from the archetypal feathered wings of birds and their closest relatives. Documentation of the unique forelimbs of Yi greatly increases the morphological disparity known to exist among dinosaurs, and highlights the extraordinary breadth and richness of the evolutionary experimentation that took place close to the origin of birds.

  2. Late Jurassic ocean anoxic event: evidence from voluminous sulphide deposition and preservation in the Panthalassa.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Tatsuo; Kato, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Katsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    The historically productive copper-bearing Besshi-type sulphide deposits in the Japanese accretionary complex were formed as volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits on the deep-sea floor of the Panthalassa Ocean. Here we report that eleven typical Besshi-type deposits yielded Re-Os isochron ages around 150 Ma (148.4 ± 1.4 Ma from the composite isochron) in Late Jurassic time. This date coincides with the lowest marine (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratio and highest atmospheric CO2 concentration of the past 300 million years. We infer that intense mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal and volcanic activity in the Late Jurassic produced huge sulphide deposits and large emissions of CO2 gas, leading to global warming and a stratified Panthalassa Ocean with anoxic deep seas that favored preservation of sulphides in the pelagic environment. The emergence of ocean anoxia triggered by seafloor volcanism is also consistent with a positive δ(13)C excursion and widespread deposition of petroleum source rocks and black shales.

  3. Preserved implicit mentalizing in schizophrenia despite poor explicit performance: evidence from eye tracking

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Paul; Smith, Pauline; Passerieux, Christine; Ramus, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia has been characterized by an impaired mentalizing. It has been suggested that distinguishing implicit from explicit processes is crucial in social cognition, and only the latter might be affected in schizophrenia. Two other questions remain open: (1) Is schizophrenia characterized by an hypo- or hyper attribution of intentions? (2) Is it characterized by a deficit in the attribution of intention or of contingency? To test these three questions, spontaneous mentalizing was tested in 29 individuals with schizophrenia and 29 control subjects using the Frith-Happé animations, while eye movements were recorded. Explicit mentalizing was measured from participants’ verbal descriptions and was contrasted with implicit mentalizing measured through eye tracking. As a group, patients made less accurate and less intentional descriptions of the goal-directed and theory of mind animations. No group differences were found in the attribution of contingency. Eye tracking results revealed that patients and controls showed a similar modulation of eye movements in response to the mental states displayed in the Frith-Happé animations. To conclude, in this paradigm, participants with schizophrenia showed a dissociation between explicit and implicit mentalizing, with a decrease in the explicit attribution of intentions, whereas their eye movements suggested a preserved implicit perception of intentions. PMID:27703225

  4. X-ray evidence for capillary pressure driven flow in preserved core from The Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, B.P.; Roberts, J.J.; Schneberk, D.J.

    1997-03-01

    Improved understanding of fluid storage and transport mechanisms relevant to The Geysers reservoir is fundamental to efficient and economic long term production of steam. X-ray computed tomographs of core from research borehole SB-15D made within 72 hours of drilling show characteristic x-ray attenuation profiles that can only be explained by imbibition of drilling fluid at reservoir conditions. The shape of the profile is highly diagnostic. Early time scans, when interpreted taking into account independent measurements of pore size distribution, permeabilities and capillary pressures for the rock matrix sampled by SB-15D, are consistent with strong capillary suctions for the recovered rocks. This indirect indication of imbibition under reservoir conditions, along with detailed analysis of x-ray attenuation in recovered core, suggests that water content was low in much of the preserved core. These measurements are part of a series of laboratory experiments monitored by x-ray methods intended to evaluate movement of various fluids to determine the relative importance capillarity, Darcy flow and vapor phase diffusion.

  5. Martian Chlorobenzene Identified by Curiosity in Yellowknife Bay: Evidence for the Preservation of Organics in a Mudstone on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D.; Freissinet, C.; Mahaffy, P.; Miller, K.; Eigenbrode, J.; Summons, R.; Martin, M.; Franz, H.; Steele, A.; Archer, D.; Atreya, S.; Brickerhoff, W.; Conrad, P.; DesMarais, D.; Dworkin, J.; Malespin, C.; McAdam, A.; Ming, D.; Pavlov, A.; Stern, J.; Brunner, A.; Buch, A.; Grotzinger, J.; Kashyap, S.; Squyres, S.

    2015-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the Curiosity rover is designed to determine the inventory of organic and inorganic volatiles thermally evolved from solid samples using a combination of evolved gas analysis (EGA), gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS), and tunable laser spectroscopy. The first sample analyzed by SAM at the Rocknest (RN) aeolian deposit revealed chlorohydrocarbons derived primarily from reactions between a martian oxychlorine phase (e.g. perchlorate) and terrestrial carbon from N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) vapor present in the SAM instrument background. No conclusive evidence for martian chlorohydrocarbons in the RN sand was found. After RN, Curiosity traveled to Yellowknife Bay and drilled two holes separated by 2.75 m designated John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB). Analyses of JK and CB by both SAM and the CheMin x-ray diffraction instrument revealed a mudstone (called Sheepbed) consisting of approx.20 wt% smectite clays, which on Earth are known to aid the concentration and preservation of organic matter. Last year at LPSC we reported elevated abundances of chlorobenzene (CBZ) and a more diverse suite of chlorinated hydrocarbons including dichloroalkanes in CB compared to RN, suggesting that martian or meteoritic organic compounds may be preserved in the mudstone. Here we present SAM data from additional analyses of the CB sample and of Confidence Hills (CH), another drill sample collected at the base of Mt. Sharp. This new SAM data along with supporting laboratory analog experiments indicate that most of the chlorobenzene detected in CB is derived from martian organic matter preserved in the mudstone.

  6. Laetoli Footprints Preserve Earliest Direct Evidence of Human-Like Bipedal Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Raichlen, David A.; Gordon, Adam D.; Harcourt-Smith, William E. H.; Foster, Adam D.; Haas, Wm. Randall

    2010-01-01

    Background Debates over the evolution of hominin bipedalism, a defining human characteristic, revolve around whether early bipeds walked more like humans, with energetically efficient extended hind limbs, or more like apes with flexed hind limbs. The 3.6 million year old hominin footprints at Laetoli, Tanzania represent the earliest direct evidence of hominin bipedalism. Determining the kinematics of Laetoli hominins will allow us to understand whether selection acted to decrease energy costs of bipedalism by 3.6 Ma. Methodology/Principal Findings Using an experimental design, we show that the Laetoli hominins walked with weight transfer most similar to the economical extended limb bipedalism of humans. Humans walked through a sand trackway using both extended limb bipedalism, and more flexed limb bipedalism. Footprint morphology from extended limb trials matches weight distribution patterns found in the Laetoli footprints. Conclusions These results provide us with the earliest direct evidence of kinematically human-like bipedalism currently known, and show that extended limb bipedalism evolved long before the appearance of the genus Homo. Since extended-limb bipedalism is more energetically economical than ape-like bipedalism, energy expenditure was likely an important selection pressure on hominin bipeds by 3.6 Ma. PMID:20339543

  7. Evidence for the preservation of technogenic tritiated organic compounds in an estuarine sedimentary environment.

    PubMed

    Croudace, Ian W; Warwick, Phillip E; Morris, Jenny E

    2012-06-05

    The macrotidal Severn Estuary (southwestern UK) has received a broad range of industrial discharges since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. A more recent anthropogenic input to the estuary has been technogenic tritium (specifically organically bound tritium, OBT). This was derived from a specialized industrial laboratory producing custom radiolabeled compounds for life science research and diagnostic testing from 1980 until 2008. While it was generally acknowledged that the radiological impact of the tritium discharges into the Estuary was small, public concern motivated the company and regulatory agencies to commission several research studies from 1998 to 2005 to better understand their environmental impact. This study examined OBT interaction with estuarine sediment by acquiring a broad range of geochemical and sedimentological data from a suite of sediment cores collected from the northern side of the Estuary. Two important observations are that the OBT compounds are strongly bound to the clay/silt fraction of sediment and that the down-core OBT profiles in intertidal and subtidal sediments are broadly similar to the discharge record. Geochemical and chronometric methods (Cu, Pb and Zn elemental profiles, (210)Pb, (137)Cs) provide important corroboration of the OBT record. A key additional piece of evidence that firmly authenticated the established chronology was the discovery of a previously unreported sedimentary marker layer that was generated by a major storm surge that occurred on December 13, 1981. Although this study has provided clear evidence of systematic accumulation of OBT in sedimentary sinks of the region, an estimation of its depositional inventory shows it represents only a small fraction of the total discharge. This modest retention in the principal sedimentary sinks of the Severn Estuary system reflects the particular dynamics of this highly macrotidal sediment starved estuary.

  8. Evidence Supporting the Existence of a Distinct Obese Phenotype of Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    PubMed

    Obokata, Masaru; Reddy, Yogesh N V; Pislaru, Sorin V; Melenovsky, Vojtech; Borlaug, Barry A

    2017-04-05

    Background -Heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is a heterogeneous syndrome. Phenotyping patients into pathophysiologically homogenous groups may enable better targeting of treatment. Obesity is common in HFpEF and has many cardiovascular effects, suggesting it may be a viable candidate for phenotyping. We compared cardiovascular structure, function, and reserve capacity in subjects with obese HFpEF, non-obese HFpEF, and controls. Methods -Subjects with obese HFpEF (BMI≥35kg/m(2), n=99), non-obese HFpEF (BMI<30kg/m(2), n=96), and non-obese controls free of HF (n=71) underwent detailed clinical assessment, echocardiography and invasive hemodynamic exercise testing. Results -Compared to both non-obese HFpEF and controls, subjects with obese HFpEF displayed increased plasma volume (3907 [3563,4333] vs. 2772 [2555,3133] and 2680 [2380,3006] ml, p<0.0001), more concentric left ventricular remodeling, greater right ventricular dilatation (base 34±7 vs. 31±6 and 30±6 mm, p=0.0005; length 66±7 vs. 61±7 and 61±7 mm, p<0.0001), more right ventricular dysfunction, increased epicardial fat thickness (10±2 vs. 7±2 and 6±2 mm, p<0.0001), and greater total epicardial heart volume (945 [831,1105] vs. 797 [643,979] and 632 [517,768] ml, p<0.0001), despite lower NT-proBNP levels. Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was correlated with body mass and plasma volume in obese HFpEF (r=0.22 and 0.27, both p<0.05), but not in non-obese HFpEF (p≥0.3). The increase in heart volumes in obese HFpEF was associated with greater pericardial restraint and heightened ventricular interdependence, reflected by increased ratio of right to left heart filling pressures (0.64±0.17 vs. 0.56±0.19 and 0.53±0.20, p=0.0004), higher pulmonary venous pressure relative to left ventricular transmural pressure, and greater left ventricular eccentricity index (1.10±0.19 vs 0.99±0.06 and 0.97±0.12, p<0.0001). Interdependence was enhanced as pulmonary artery pressure load

  9. Evidence of North Africa's green revolution preserved in sedimentary organic matter deposited in three coastal lagoons.

    PubMed

    Oczkowski, Autumn J; Flower, Roger J; Thompson, Julian R; Ayache, Fethi; Ahmed, Mahmoud H; Ramdani, Mohamed; Turner, Simon

    2011-07-01

    Because of longer residence times and limited mixing in coastal lagoons, the impacts of anthropogenic nutrient loading to lagoon food webs are often more pronounced than in other coastal ecosystems. For these reasons, many lagoons also provide an excellent environment for the deposition and accumulation of organic matter (OM). Sediment cores were retrieved from three North African lagoons to provide records of recent environmental changes. We measured percentage nitrogen (%N), nitrogen stable isotope values (delta15N), and percentage organic matter (%OM), and we used radiometric dating techniques (210Pb, 137Cs) to examine the evidence for the intensification of upstream agricultural practices in sediment cores from Lake Manzala (Egypt), Ghar El Melh Lagoon (Tunisia), and Lagune de Nador (Morocco). With the exception of one core collected near a sewage outfall, sediments from Lake Manzala clearly reflected the impact of agricultural intensification following completion of the Aswan High Dam and delta barrages in the mid-1960s to early 1970s. Both %N and %OM more than doubled in three Manzala sediment cores, and delta15N values declined from 5 per thousand to < 1 per thousand. These changes reflect the increasing use of synthetic fertilizers (delta15N approximately 0 per thousand) from the 1960s to the present. Sediments from Ghar El Melh show a similar trend, with %N more than tripling, %OM increasing by 50%, and delta15N declining from 6 per thousand to 2 per thousand since 1965. These changes are consistent with the increasing use of water from a nearby river for crop irrigation and agricultural fertilizer use. Lagune de Nador receives relatively little agricultural drainage water, and core data did not show the same trends as Manzala and Ghar El Melh. Overall, the sediment core data from these systems reflect environmental shifts in the quantity, quality, and isotope signature of the deposited organic matter and confirm the concerns of local scientists and

  10. The Luoping biota: exceptional preservation, and new evidence on the Triassic recovery from end-Permian mass extinction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shi-xue; Zhang, Qi-yue; Chen, Zhong-Qiang; Zhou, Chang-yong; Lü, Tao; Xie, Tao; Wen, Wen; Huang, Jin-yuan; Benton, Michael J

    2011-08-07

    The timing and nature of biotic recovery from the devastating end-Permian mass extinction (252 Ma) are much debated. New studies in South China suggest that complex marine ecosystems did not become re-established until the middle-late Anisian (Middle Triassic), much later than had been proposed by some. The recently discovered exceptionally preserved Luoping biota from the Anisian Stage of the Middle Triassic, Yunnan Province and southwest China shows this final stage of community assembly on the continental shelf. The fossil assemblage is a mixture of marine animals, including abundant lightly sclerotized arthropods, associated with fishes, marine reptiles, bivalves, gastropods, belemnoids, ammonoids, echinoderms, brachiopods, conodonts and foraminifers, as well as plants and rare arthropods from nearby land. In some ways, the Luoping biota rebuilt the framework of the pre-extinction latest Permian marine ecosystem, but it differed too in profound ways. New trophic levels were introduced, most notably among top predators in the form of the diverse marine reptiles that had no evident analogues in the Late Permian. The Luoping biota is one of the most diverse Triassic marine fossil Lagerstätten in the world, providing a new and early window on recovery and radiation of Triassic marine ecosystems some 10 Myr after the end-Permian mass extinction.

  11. The Luoping biota: exceptional preservation, and new evidence on the Triassic recovery from end-Permian mass extinction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shi-xue; Zhang, Qi-yue; Chen, Zhong-Qiang; Zhou, Chang-yong; Lü, Tao; Xie, Tao; Wen, Wen; Huang, Jin-yuan; Benton, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    The timing and nature of biotic recovery from the devastating end-Permian mass extinction (252 Ma) are much debated. New studies in South China suggest that complex marine ecosystems did not become re-established until the middle–late Anisian (Middle Triassic), much later than had been proposed by some. The recently discovered exceptionally preserved Luoping biota from the Anisian Stage of the Middle Triassic, Yunnan Province and southwest China shows this final stage of community assembly on the continental shelf. The fossil assemblage is a mixture of marine animals, including abundant lightly sclerotized arthropods, associated with fishes, marine reptiles, bivalves, gastropods, belemnoids, ammonoids, echinoderms, brachiopods, conodonts and foraminifers, as well as plants and rare arthropods from nearby land. In some ways, the Luoping biota rebuilt the framework of the pre-extinction latest Permian marine ecosystem, but it differed too in profound ways. New trophic levels were introduced, most notably among top predators in the form of the diverse marine reptiles that had no evident analogues in the Late Permian. The Luoping biota is one of the most diverse Triassic marine fossil Lagerstätten in the world, providing a new and early window on recovery and radiation of Triassic marine ecosystems some 10 Myr after the end-Permian mass extinction. PMID:21183583

  12. Rare Potassium-Bearing Mica in Allan Hills 84001: Additional Constraints on Carbonate Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brearley, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    There have been presented several intriguing observations suggesting evidence of fossil life in martian orthopyroxenite ALH 84001. These exciting and controversial observations have stimulated extensive debate over the origin and history of ALH 84001, but many issues still remain unresolved. Among the most important is the question of the temperature at which the carbonates, which host the putative microfossils, formed. Oxygen- isotopic data, while showing that the carbonates are generally out of isotopic equilibria with the host rock, cannot constrain their temperature of formation. Both low- and high-temperature scenarios are plausible depending on whether carbonate growth occurred in an open or closed system. Petrographic arguments have generally been used to support a high-temperature origin but these appear to be suspect because they assume equilibrium between carbonate compositions that are not in contact. Some observations appear to be consistent with shock mobilization and growth from immiscible silicate-carbonate melts at high temperatures. Proponents of a low-temperature origin for the carbonates are hampered by the fact that there is currently no evidence of hydrous phases that would indicate low temperatures and the presence of a hydrous fluid during the formation of the carbonates. However, the absence of hydrous phases does not rule out carbonate formation at low temperatures, because the carbonate forming fluids may have been extremely CO2 rich, such that hydrous phases would not have been stabilized. In this study, I have carried out additional Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of ALH-84001 and have found evidence of very rare phyllosilicates, which appear to be convincingly of pre-terrestrial origin. At present these observations are limited to one occurrence: further studies are in progress to determine if the phyllosilicates are more widespread.

  13. Organic Carbon Exists in Mars Meteorites: Where is it on the Martian Surface?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, D. S.; Clemett, S. J.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Wentworth, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    The search for organic carbon on Mars has been a major challenge. The first attempt was the Viking GC-MS in situ experiment which gave inconclusive results at two sites oil. After the discovery that the SNC meteorites were from Mars, reported C isotopic compositional information which suggested a reduced C component present in the Martian meteorites reported the presence of reduced C components (i.e., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) associated with the carbonate globules in ALH84001. Jull et al. noted in Nakhla there was acid insoluble C component present with more than 75% of its C lacking any C-14, which is modern-day terrestrial carbon. This C fraction was believed to be either indigenous martian or ancient meteoritic carbon. Fisk et al. have shown textural evidence along with C-enriched areas within fractures in Nakhla and ALH84001. Westall et al. have shown the presence of a large irregular fragment of organic material completely embedded within a chip of ALH84001. Interior samples from the Naklnla SNC made available by the British Museum of Natural History, were analyzed. Petrographic examination of Nakhla showed evidence of fractures (approx.0.5 microns wide) filled with dark brown to black dendritic material with characteristics similar to those observed by. Iddingsite is also present along fractures in olivine. Fracture filling and dendritic material was examined by SEM-EDX, TEM-EDX, Focused Electron Beam microscopy, Laser Raman Spectroscopy, Nano-SIMS Ion Micro-probe, and Stepped-Combustion Static Mass Spectrometry. Observations from the first three techniques are discussed.

  14. Direct evidence for organic carbon preservation as clay-organic nanocomposites in a Devonian black shale; from deposition to diagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Martin John; Löhr, Stefan Carlos; Fraser, Samuel Alex; Baruch, Elizabeth Teresa

    2014-02-01

    The burial of marine sourced organic carbon (OC) in continental margin sediments is most commonly linked to oceanographic regulation of bottom-water oxygenation (anoxia) and/or biological productivity. Here we show an additional influence in the Devonian Woodford Shale, in which OC occurs as nanometer intercalations with specific phyllosilicate minerals (mixed-layer illite/smectite) that we term organo-mineral nanocomposites. High resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) images provide direct evidence of this nano-scale relationship. While discrete micron-scale organic particles, such as Tasmanites algal cysts, are present in some lamina, a strong relation between total organic carbon (TOC) and mineral surface area (MSA) over a range of 15% TOC indicate that the dominant association of organic carbon is with mineral surfaces and not as discrete pelagic grains, consistent with HRTEM images of nanocomposites. Where periods of oxygenation are indicated by bioturbation, this relationship is modified by a shift to lower OC loading on mineral surfaces and reduced MSA variability likely resulting from biological mixing and homogenization of the sediment, oxidative burn down of OC and/or stripping of OC from minerals in animal guts. The TOC-MSA relationship extends across a range of burial depths and thermal maturities into the oil window and persists through partial illitization. Where illitization occurs, the loss of mineral surface area associated with the collapse of smectite interlayer space results in a systematic increase in TOC:MSA and reorganization of organic carbon and clays into nano-scale aggregates. While the Woodford Shale is representative of black shale deposits commonly thought to record heightened marine productivity and/or anoxia, our results point to the importance of high surface area clay minerals for OC enrichment. Given that the vast majority of these clay minerals are formed in soils before being transported to continental margin

  15. Mars Life? - Microscopic Tube-like Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This high-resolution scanning electron microscope image shows an unusual tube-like structural form that is less than 1/100th the width of a human hair in size found in meteorite ALH84001, a meteorite believed to be of Martian origin. Although this structure is not part of the research published in the Aug. 16 issue of the journal Science, it is located in a similar carbonate glob in the meteorite. This structure will be the subject of future investigations that could confirm whether or not it is fossil evidence of primitive life on Mars 3.6 billion years ago.

  16. A Younger Age for the Oldest Martian Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2010-05-01

    The Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 Martian meteorite is famous for containing fiercely-disputed evidence for fossil life. Equally important to many cosmochemists, the meteorite also contains important information about the construction of the Martian crust by magmas derived from the interior, and the subsequent modification of those igneous rocks by large impacts and circulating water. A surprising feature of ALH 84001 has been its extremely ancient age, 4.50 billion years, as determined by samarium-neodymium (Sm-Nd) and rubidium-strontium (Rb-Sr) isotopic dating. If correct, the ancient age implies that the magma in which ALH 84001 formed intruded the primordial crust, perhaps forming in a deep ocean of magma that surrounded Mars during its initial differentiation into metallic core, rocky mantle, and primary crust. New age determinations by Thomas Lapen (University of Houston) and colleagues there and at the Johnson Space Center, the Lunar and Planetary Institute, the University of Wisconsin, and the University of Brussels, Belgium, indicate that the rock crystallized in a magma 4.091 billion years ago. They used lutetium-hafnium (Lu-Hf) isotopes in determining the new age. This isotopic system has the advantage of not being affected as readily by impact heating and water alteration as are Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr. The new age is consistent with igneous activity throughout Martian history and with a period of heavy bombardment between 4.2 and 4.1 billion years as inferred from the ages of large impact basins on Mars.

  17. Molecular evidence for a microbial role in ooid formation and preservation of molecular biosignatures in ancient oolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, G.; O'Reilly, S. S.; Winter, A.; Newman, S. A.; Pruss, S. B.; Bosak, T.; Klepac-Ceraj, V.; McDermott, F. P.; Summons, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    Ooids are concentrically laminated carbonate grains, occurring in a limited number of modern shallow marine and lacustrine settings. Oolitic sedimentary rocks (oolite) are common in the geological record, particularly in the Precambrian, and subsequent to some mass extinction events. Despite their significance, controversy remains about processes that form and shape ooids. Abiotic models typically favour carbonate precipitation in suspension in supersaturated, agitated water while biotic models emphasise microbial benthic contribution to ooid carbonate precipitation in relatively low turbulence waters. While various interpretations of ooids in the geological record have been made, the ongoing formation debate, together with post-depositional diagenesis, hinders our ability to interpret and utilize ooids to reconstruct Earth's past environments and biodiversity. Recently, Neoproterozoic oolitic carbonates have been shown to preserve C-isotopic records of environmental change and carbon cycle anomalies. This prompts the question whether molecular organic biosignatures can be found in well-preserved oolite. Here, lipid biomarker analysis and Illumina sequencing of modern ooids at Pigeon Cay, the Bahamas, revealed colonization of ooids by biofim-producing α-proteobacteria and diatoms, sulfate-reducing bacteria, anoxygenic phototrophs, as well as some cyanobacteria, in calm waters adjacent to the surf zone. These were comparable to communities associated with microbially-cemented grapestones. Relict lipids bound within ooid carbonate were also dominated by bacterial fatty acids, hydroxy acids and hopanoids. This indicates that a common, bacteria-dominated, microbial community is directly involved in carbonate precipitation of ooids and grapestones, likely by autotrophic metabolism and organomineralization of biofilms. Analysis of oolites as old as Jurassic in age revealed the preservation of hydrocarbons, as well as appreciable amounts of fatty acids, and emphasises

  18. Biomarkers in Carbonate Thermal Springs: Implications for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Kivett, S. J.; McKay, D. S.

    1998-01-01

    Evidence of possible relict biogenic activity has been reported in carbonate inclusions within martian meteorite ALH 84001. The initial evidence included ovoid and elongated forms 50 - 500 nanometers in length, morphologically similar to but significantly smaller than many terrestrial microbes. More recently, thin structures resembling the remains of organic biofilms have been reported in the same meteorite. Carbonates have also been discussed in the context of Mars sample return missions. Thermal spring deposits have often been cited as prime locations for exobiological exploration. By analogy to Earth, specialized microbes may have existed in the heated, mineralized waters, and precipitates of carbonate and/or silica from these waters may have trapped and preserved evidence of life. Since the geological interactions that produce thermal springs can be recognized in orbital imagery, directed searches for microfossils in such deposits are deemed possible. We are engaged in a study of the signatures produced by contemporary biogenic activity (biomarkers) in carbonate thermal springs. We are examining the microbes that live in such environments and the preservation of microbial forms, biofilms, and petrographic fabrics indicative of life in thermal spring mineral deposits. This work is part of a much more extensive study to refine the appropriate tools, techniques, and approaches to seek evidence of life in a range of planetary samples. A deeper understanding of biological signatures will prepare us for the detailed search for life on Mars and eventually on other planets. Overall. the study of biomarkers in rocks and soils will provide insight into the evolution of life because such signatures are a record of how life interacts with its environment, how it adapts to changing conditions, and how life can influence geology and climate.

  19. Highly depleted isotopic compositions evident in Iapetus and Rheic Ocean basalts: implications for crustal generation and preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, J. Brendan; Waldron, John W. F.; Schofield, David I.; Barry, Tiffany L.; Band, Adrian R.

    2014-07-01

    Subduction of both the Iapetus and Rheic oceans began relatively soon after their opening. Vestiges of both the Iapetan and Rheic oceanic lithospheres are preserved as supra-subduction ophiolites and related mafic complexes in the Appalachian-Caledonian and Variscan orogens. However, available Sm-Nd isotopic data indicate that the mantle source of these complexes was highly depleted as a result of an earlier history of magmatism that occurred prior to initiation of the Iapetus and Rheic oceans. We propose two alternative models for this feature: either the highly depleted mantle was preserved in a long-lived oceanic plateau within the Paleopacific realm or the source for the basalt crust was been recycled from a previously depleted mantle and was brought to an ocean spreading centre during return flow, without significant re-enrichment en-route. Data from present-day oceans suggest that such return flow was more likely to have occurred in the Paleopacific than in new mid-ocean ridges produced in the opening of the Iapetus and Rheic oceans. Variation in crustal density produced by Fe partitioning rendered the lithosphere derived from previously depleted mantle more buoyant than the surrounding asthenosphere, facilitating its preservation. The buoyant oceanic lithosphere was captured from the adjacent Paleopacific, in a manner analogous to the Mesozoic-Cenozoic "capture" in the Atlantic realm of the Caribbean plate. This mechanism of "plate capture" may explain the premature closing of the oceans, and the distribution of collisional events and peri-Gondwanan terranes in the Appalachian-Caledonian and Variscan orogens.

  20. The inverse microconglomerate test: Further evidence for the preservation of Hadean magnetizations in metasediments of the Jack Hills, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottrell, Rory D.; Tarduno, John A.; Bono, Richard K.; Dare, Matthew S.; Mitra, Gautam

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a new paleomagnetic test, applicable to metamorphosed terrains, that assesses the recording fidelity of a metasediment. Magnetic mineral carriers with unblocking temperatures lower than the peak metamorphic temperature should record a common remagnetization direction, whereas those with higher unblocking temperatures should be randomly distributed if a primary magnetization has been preserved on a sedimentary grain scale. We call this an inverse microconglomerate test. Application to metasediments of the Jack Hills (JH), Western Australia, reveals that the chrome mica fuchsite records a well-grouped secondary magnetization at unblocking temperatures between ˜270 and 340°C, in contrast to the random distribution of in situ directions held by zircons isolated at unblocking temperatures >550°C. This positive test further supports JH zircons as hosts of primary Hadean magnetizations. More generally, the new test can aid in understanding the timing of peak metamorphism and deformation in complex terrains.

  1. Microbial Extremophiles in Evolutionary Aspect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    The microflora of the cryosphere of planet Earth provides the best analogs for life forms that might be found in the permafrost or polar ice caps of Mars, near the surface of the cometary nuclei, or in the liquid water beneath the ice crusts of icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn. For astrobiology the focus on the study alkaliphilic microorganisms was enhanced by the findings of abundant carbonates and carbonate globules rimmed with possibly biogenic magnetites in association with the putative microfossils in the ALH84001 meteorite. Although the ALH84001 "nanofossils" were to small and simple to be unambiguously recognized as biogenic, they stimulated Astrobiology research and studies of microbial extremophiles and biomarkers in ancient rocks and meteorites. Recent studies of CI and CM carbonaceous meteorites have resulted in the detection of the well-preserved mineralized remains of coccoidal and" filamentous microorganisms in cyanobacterial mats. Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis has shown anomalous biogenic element ratios clearly indicating they are not recent biological contaminants. This paper reviews microbial extremophiles in context of their significance to Astrobiology and the evolution of life. Extremophilic microorganisms on Earth are models for life that might endure high radiation environments in the ice near the surface of comets or on the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn and in the seafloor deep beneath the icy crusts of Europa and Enceladus.

  2. A Late Cretaceous diversification of Asian oviraptorid dinosaurs: evidence from a new species preserved in an unusual posture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Junchang; Chen, Rongjun; Brusatte, Stephen L.; Zhu, Yangxiao; Shen, Caizhi

    2016-11-01

    Oviraptorosaurs are a bizarre group of bird-like theropod dinosaurs, the derived forms of which have shortened, toothless skulls, and which diverged from close relatives by developing peculiar feeding adaptations. Although once among the most mysterious of dinosaurs, oviraptorosaurs are becoming better understood with the discovery of many new fossils in Asia and North America. The Ganzhou area of southern China is emerging as a hotspot of oviraptorosaur discoveries, as over the past half decade five new monotypic genera have been found in the latest Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) deposits of this region. We here report a sixth diagnostic oviraptorosaur from Ganzhou, Tongtianlong limosus gen. et sp. nov., represented by a remarkably well-preserved specimen in an unusual splayed-limb and raised-head posture. Tongtianlong is a derived oviraptorid oviraptorosaur, differentiated from other species by its unique dome-like skull roof, highly convex premaxilla, and other features of the skull. The large number of oviraptorosaurs from Ganzhou, which often differ in cranial morphologies related to feeding, document an evolutionary radiation of these dinosaurs during the very latest Cretaceous of Asia, which helped establish one of the last diverse dinosaur faunas before the end-Cretaceous extinction.

  3. A Late Cretaceous diversification of Asian oviraptorid dinosaurs: evidence from a new species preserved in an unusual posture

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Junchang; Chen, Rongjun; Brusatte, Stephen L.; Zhu, Yangxiao; Shen, Caizhi

    2016-01-01

    Oviraptorosaurs are a bizarre group of bird-like theropod dinosaurs, the derived forms of which have shortened, toothless skulls, and which diverged from close relatives by developing peculiar feeding adaptations. Although once among the most mysterious of dinosaurs, oviraptorosaurs are becoming better understood with the discovery of many new fossils in Asia and North America. The Ganzhou area of southern China is emerging as a hotspot of oviraptorosaur discoveries, as over the past half decade five new monotypic genera have been found in the latest Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) deposits of this region. We here report a sixth diagnostic oviraptorosaur from Ganzhou, Tongtianlong limosus gen. et sp. nov., represented by a remarkably well-preserved specimen in an unusual splayed-limb and raised-head posture. Tongtianlong is a derived oviraptorid oviraptorosaur, differentiated from other species by its unique dome-like skull roof, highly convex premaxilla, and other features of the skull. The large number of oviraptorosaurs from Ganzhou, which often differ in cranial morphologies related to feeding, document an evolutionary radiation of these dinosaurs during the very latest Cretaceous of Asia, which helped establish one of the last diverse dinosaur faunas before the end-Cretaceous extinction. PMID:27831542

  4. Is phonological-lexical representation preserved in moderate stage Alzheimer disease? Evidence from the efficacy of Korean syllabic cues.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji Hye; Na, Duk L; Chin, Juhee; Ahn, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Byung Hwa; Suh, Mee Kyung; Kim, Geon Ha; Kim, Hyanghee

    2010-01-01

    Patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) usually experience naming difficulty due to storage and access problems in phonological-lexical representation. Investigating naming response patterns followed by cueing may help us to understand the underlying mechanism of naming deficits in AD. A total of 221 patients with mild cognitive impairment and AD [Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) 0.5, 1, 2] were included as subjects. Sixty items of the Korean version of the Boston Naming Test were given, and upon failure, semantic/syllabic cues were verbally presented. From the results, even in the CDR 2 group, which is considered to be a moderate stage of AD, syllabic cues significantly facilitated correct responses. Our findings are in contrast with previous studies conducted with English-speaking patients, which reported that phonological-lexical representation may have been disrupted in the moderate stage of AD, and that none of the cues facilitated correct word retrieval. The difference may be ascribed to the fact that direct access to the phonological-lexical representation via syllabic cues was possible in the confrontation naming task performed by the Korean patients. It can be concluded that phonological-lexical representation in moderate stage Korean AD might be partially preserved because syllabic cues in AD patients were effective in facilitating target words.

  5. New Evidences for Preserved Segmentation of the Alpine-Tethyan Domain in the Iberia-Africa Plate Boundary Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, M.; Torne, M.; Verges, J.; Buffett, G. G.

    2015-12-01

    Based on gravity analysis and previous integrated studies combining potential fields and seismic data, we demonstrate that the Iberia-Africa plate boundary region is characterized by several tectonically inverted transtensional domains inherited from the Jurassic. Gravity data, when filtered for short wavelengths, show conspicuous positive Bouguer anomalies associated with the Gorringe Bank, the Guadalquivir Bank and the Ronda/Beni-Bousera peridotitic massifs. Gravity modelling combined with seismic and geological data shows that the filtered Bouguer anomalies are compatible with relatively high-density and shallow-buried bodies, which correspond to partly serpentinized peridotitic slices with similar densities and geometries as those proved for the Gorringe Bank. The study indicates that the Alpine convergence between Africa and Iberia since Late Cretaceous times reactivated these transtensional domains, which were less deformed westwards and thus preserved their segmentation. The interpretation of these Bouguer anomalies and their distribution substantiates the double-polarity subduction model proposed for the region, and agrees with the present-day seismically diffuse character of the Iberia-Africa plate boundary.

  6. Hive-stored pollen of honey bees: many lines of evidence are consistent with pollen preservation, not nutrient conversion

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kirk E; Carroll, Mark J; Sheehan, Tim; Mott, Brendon M; Maes, Patrick; Corby-Harris, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Honey bee hives are filled with stored pollen, honey, plant resins and wax, all antimicrobial to differing degrees. Stored pollen is the nutritionally rich currency used for colony growth and consists of 40–50% simple sugars. Many studies speculate that prior to consumption by bees, stored pollen undergoes long-term nutrient conversion, becoming more nutritious ‘bee bread’ as microbes predigest the pollen. We quantified both structural and functional aspects associated with this hypothesis using behavioural assays, bacterial plate counts, microscopy and 454 amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene from both newly collected and hive-stored pollen. We found that bees preferentially consume fresh pollen stored for <3 days. Newly collected pollen contained few bacteria, values which decreased significantly as pollen were stored >96 h. The estimated microbe to pollen grain surface area ratio was 1:1 000 000 indicating a negligible effect of microbial metabolism on hive-stored pollen. Consistent with these findings, hive-stored pollen grains did not appear compromised according to microscopy. Based on year round 454 amplicon sequencing, bacterial communities of newly collected and hive-stored pollen did not differ, indicating the lack of an emergent microbial community co-evolved to digest stored pollen. In accord with previous culturing and 16S cloning, acid resistant and osmotolerant bacteria like Lactobacillus kunkeei were found in greatest abundance in stored pollen, consistent with the harsh character of this microenvironment. We conclude that stored pollen is not evolved for microbially mediated nutrient conversion, but is a preservative environment due primarily to added honey, nectar, bee secretions and properties of pollen itself. PMID:25319366

  7. Tectonic influences on the preservation of marine terraces: Old and new evidence from Santa Catalina Island, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schumann, R. Randall; Minor, Scott A.; Muhs, Daniel R.; Groves, Lindsey T.; McGeehin, John P.

    2012-01-01

    The California Channel Islands contain some of the best geologic records of past climate and sea-level changes, recorded in uplifted, fossil-bearing marine terrace deposits. Among the eight California Channel Islands and the nearby Palos Verdes Hills, only Santa Catalina Island does not exhibit prominent emergent marine terraces, though the same terrace-forming processes that acted on the other Channel Islands must also have occurred on Santa Catalina. We re-evaluated previous researchers' field evidence and examined new topographic, bathymetric, and stream-profile data in order to find possible explanations for the lack of obvious marine terrace landforms or deposits on the island today. The most likely explanation is associated with the island's unresolved tectonic history, with evidence for both recent uplift and subsidence being offered by different researchers. Bathymetric and seismic reflection data indicate the presence of submerged terrace-like landforms from a few meters below present sea level to depths far exceeding that of the lowest glacial lowstand, suggesting that the Catalina Island block may have subsided, submerging marine terraces that would have formed in the late Quaternary. Similar submerged marine terrace landforms exist offshore of all of the other California Channel Islands, including some at anomalously great depths, but late Quaternary uplift is well documented on those islands. Therefore, such submarine features must be more thoroughly investigated and adequately explained before they can be accepted as definitive evidence of subsidence. Nevertheless, the striking similarity of the terrace-like features around Santa Catalina Island to those surrounding the other, uplifting, Channel Islands prompted us to investigate other lines of evidence of tectonic activity, such as stream profile data. Recent uplift is suggested by disequilibrium stream profiles on the western side of the island, including nickpoints and profile convexities. Rapid

  8. Geologic Map of the Meskhent Tessera Quadrangle (V-3), Venus: Evidence for Early Formation and Preservation of Regional Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, M. A.; Head, James W.

    2008-01-01

    The area of the Meskhent Tessera quadrangle (V-3, 50-75degN, 60-120degE, Fig. 1) corresponds to a transition zone from the uplands of Ishtar Terra to the west to the lowlands of Atalanta Planitia to the east. The topographic configuration, gravity signature, and presence of large tesserae in Ishtar Terra are consistent with extensive areas of thickened crust and tectonically stabilized lithosphere representing ancient and now extinct regimes of mantle convection. The gravity and topographic characteristics of Atalanta Planitia have been cited as evidence for large-scale mantle downwelling. Thus, the region of Meskhent Tessera quadrangle represents an important sample for the study of the regional history of long-wavelength topography (highlands, midlands, and lowlands), interaction between the downwelling and areas of thickened crust/lithosphere, formation of associated tectonic features, and emplacement of volcanic plains.

  9. Contribution of Organic Material to the Stable Isotope Composition of Some Terrestrial Carbonates as Analogs for Martian Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Bissada, K. K.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the isotopic geochemistry of terrestrial carbonate formation is essential to understanding the evolution of the Martian atmosphere, hydrosphere, and potential biosphere. Carbonate minerals, in particular, are important secondary minerals for interpreting past aqueous environments, as illustrated by the carbonates present in ALH84001 [1]. Models for the history of Mars suggest that the planet was warmer, wetter, and possessed a greater atmospheric pressure within the first billion years as compared to present conditions [2],[3],[4], and likely had an active hydrologic cycle. Morse and Marion [5] point out that associated with this hydrologic cycle would be the active chemical weathering of silicate minerals and thus consumption of atmospheric CO2 and deposition of carbonate and silica. It is during this warmer and wetter period of Martian history that surface and/or near-surface conditions would be most favorable for harboring possible microbiological life. Carbonates within ALH84001 offer evidence that fluids were present at 3.9 Gy on Mars [6]. A more through understanding of the effects of aqueous weathering and the potential contribution of organic compounds on the isotopic composition of Martian carbonate minerals can be gained by studying some terrestrial occurrences of carbonate rocks.

  10. Alteration of Rock Fragments from Columbia River Basalt Microcosms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentworth, Susan J.; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Velbel, Michael A.; McKay, David S.; Stevens, Todd O.

    1999-01-01

    During an earlier study, microorganisms were grown microcosms consisting of sterilized chips of Columbia River Basalt (CRB) and natural CRB ground water with its natural microflora; environmental conditions simulated a deep subsurface, anaerobic, dark environment. Subsequent scanning and transmission electron microscope (SEM and TEM) studies revealed the presence of several types of bacteria and biofilm, some of which were mineralized. Some of these biological features are very similar to possible biogenic features found in two meteorites from Mars, ALH84001 (found in Antarctica) and Nakhla (observed to fall in Egypt). Both ALH84001 and Nakhla contain traces of low-temperature aqueous alteration of silicates, oxides, and sulfides. The goals of this study are to use high-resolution field-emission SEM (FE-SEM) to examine the CRB samples for evidence of alteration features similar to those in the martian meteorites, to determine the extent of alteration during the CRB microcosm experiments, and to determine whether effects of biological activity can be distinguished from inorganic effects.

  11. Preservation Microfilming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sajor, Ladd Z.

    1972-01-01

    Microfilming preserves the library's holdings while creating space for new acquisitions without the need for new library construction and physical expansion. In addition, microfilming protects rare originals from excessive handling, preserves material with permanent research value and makes possible economic demand" reprinting via positive…

  12. Detrital magnetite and chromite in Jack Hills quartzite cobbles: Further evidence for the preservation of primary magnetizations and new insights into sediment provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dare, Matthew S.; Tarduno, John A.; Bono, Richard K.; Cottrell, Rory D.; Beard, James S.; Kodama, Kenneth P.

    2016-10-01

    The magnetization of zircons from sedimentary rocks of the Jack Hills (Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia) provide evidence for a Hadean to Paleoarchean geodynamo, 4.0 to 4.2 billion years old. These magnetizations pass a microconglomerate test, attesting to the fidelity of Jack Hills zircons as recorders of these most ancient magnetic signals. The lack of pervasive remagnetization of the Jack Hills is also documented through a positive conglomerate test conducted on cobble-sized clasts. A key element of the latter test is the preservation of a high unblocking temperature magnetization that can survive peak metamorphic temperatures. Rock magnetic studies suggest the mineral carrier is magnetite. Herein, we investigate the magnetic mineral carriers in cobble samples through scanning electron microscope and microprobe analyses, conduct an inter-laboratory paleomagnetic study to evaluate sensitivities required to evaluate the weak magnetizations carried by the Jack Hills sediments, and assess provenance information constrained by the opaque minerals. These data confirm magnetite as a detrital phase and the presence of high unblocking temperature magnetizations, further supporting the posit that the Jack Hills sediments can preserve primary magnetic signatures. We note that some of these magnetizations are near the measurement resolution of standard cryogenic magnetometers and thus exacting laboratory procedures are required to uncover these signals. In addition to magnetite, the cobbles contain an assemblage of Mg poor Cr-Fe chromites, Ni-sulfides and pyrrhotite that suggest a source in a layered intrusion different from the granitoid source of the zircons. Any Hadean rock fragment in these sediments, if present, remains elusive.

  13. Habitability and preservation from source to sink: Evidence for habitable surface environments in soils on early Mars and their possible contribution to fluvial deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horgan, B. H. N.

    2014-12-01

    One of the most widespread habitable environments on Earth lurks just under our feet. Soils, which are created by precipitation-induced chemical weathering of rocks and sediments, provide abundant geochemical sources of energy for microbes, and form even under water-limited or snow-dominated climates. The mineralogy of soils is directly related to climatic and environmental conditions. Typical neutral, well-drained soils are dominated by phyllosilicates produced through hydrolysis by carbonic acid, but the additional presence of sulfates, oxides, reduced iron, and carbonates can indicate other conditions, including variations in water saturation, redox state, and pH. The high clay content of soils enhances preservation, and reducing soils, like those formed in wetlands, can preserve high concentrations of organics in the form of coal precursors. On Mars, deposits with mineralogies consistent with paleosols are observed in several locations, but are best exemplified by clay-bearing deposits on the plateau surrounding Mawrth Vallis. Widespread smectites at Mawrth are consistent with regional paleosols formed under a temperate climate, and detections of leached Al-rich minerals, acid sulfates, and reduced iron-bearing phases are consistent with localized modification of these soils by fluctuating ground water tables. Together, this suggests a wetlands-like surface environment with diverse chemical gradients providing many energy pathways for life and locally high preservation potential. While sites like Mawrth could be excellent targets for organics and biosignatures on Mars, one limitation of such dispersed sites is that finding high concentrations of organics can be challenging. An alternative would be to utilize deltas and other fluvial deposits as a geological filter. Deltas concentrate the often organic-rich clay size fraction of detrital sediments in well-defined locations. On Earth, the majority of deltaic organics and clays are sourced from soils upstream, and

  14. Preservation Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Reagan W.

    2004-01-01

    The long-term preservation of digital entities requires mechanisms to manage the authenticity of massive data collections that are written to archival storage systems. Preservation environments impose authenticity constraints and manage the evolution of the storage system technology by building infrastructure independent solutions. This seeming paradox, the need for large archives, while avoiding dependence upon vendor specific solutions, is resolved through use of data grid technology. Data grids provide the storage repository abstractions that make it possible to migrate collections between vendor specific products, while ensuring the authenticity of the archived data. Data grids provide the software infrastructure that interfaces vendor-specific storage archives to preservation environments.

  15. Urine Preservative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M. (Inventor); Nillen, Jeannie (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is CPG, a combination of a chlorhexidine salt (such as chlorhexidine digluconate, chlorhexidine diacetate, or chlorhexidine dichloride) and n-propyl gallate that can be used at ambient temperatures as a urine preservative.

  16. Aging and decision making under uncertainty: behavioral and neural evidence for the preservation of decision making in the absence of learning in old age.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, S M Hadi; Rostami, Maryam; Yomogida, Yukihito; Takahashi, Makoto; Tsukiura, Takashi; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2010-10-01

    Decision making under uncertainty is an essential component of everyday life. Recent psychological studies suggest that older adults, despite age-related neurological decline, can make advantageous decisions when information about the contingencies of the outcomes is available. In this study, a two-choice prediction paradigm has been used, in conjunction with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), to investigate the effects of normal aging on neural substrates underlying uncertain decision making in the absence of learning that have not been addressed in previous neuroimaging studies. Neuroimaging results showed that both the healthy older and young adults recruited a network of brain regions comprising the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, bilateral inferior parietal lobule, medial frontal cortex, and right lateral orbitofrontal cortex during the prediction task. As was hypothesized, the performance of older adults in the prediction task was not impaired compared to young adults. Although no significant age-related increases in brain activity have been found, we observed an age-related decrease in activity in the right inferior parietal lobule. We speculate that the observed age-related decrease in parietal activity could be explained by age-related differences in decision making behavior revealed by questionnaire results and maximizing scores. Together, this study demonstrates behavioral and neural evidence for the preservation of decision making in older adults when information about the contingencies of the outcome is available.

  17. Beagle 2: The Next Exobiology Mission to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Pillinger, Colin T.; Wright, Ian P.; Morse, Andy; Stewart, Jenny; Morgan, G.; Praine, Ian; Leigh, Dennis; Sims, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    Beagle 2 is a 60 kg probe (with a 30 kg lander) developed in the United Kingdom for inclusion on the European Space Agency's 2003 Mars Express. Beagle 2 will deliver to the Martian surface a payload which consists of a high percentage of science instruments to landed spacecraft mass. Beagle 2 will be launched in June, 2003 with Mars Express on a Soyuz-Fregat rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Beagle 2 will land on Mars on December 26, 2003 in the Isidis Planitia basin (approximately 10 degrees N and 275 degrees W), a large sedimentary basin that overlies the boundary between ancient highlands and northern plains. Isidis Planitia, the third largest basin on Mars, which is possibly filled with sediment deposited at the bottom of long-standing lakes or seas, offers an ideal environment for preserving traces of life. Beagle 2 was developed to search for organic material and other volatiles on and below the surface of Mars in addition to the study of the inorganic chemistry and mineralogy. Beagle 2 will utilize a mechanical mole and grinder to obtain samples from below the surface, under rocks and inside rocks. A pair of stereo cameras will image the landing site along with a microscope for examination of surface and rock samples. Analyses will include both rock and soil samples at various wavelengths, X-ray spectrometer and Mossbauer spectrometer as well as a search for organics and other light element species (e.g. carbonates and water) and measurement of their isotopic compositions. Beagle 2 has as its focus the goal of establishing whether evidence for life existed in the past on Mars at the Isidis Planitia site or at least establishing if the conditions were ever suitable. Carbonates and organic components were first recognized as existing on Mars when they were found in the Martian meteorite Nakhla. Romanek et al showed the carbonates in ALH84001 were formed at low temperatures. McKay et al noted possible evidence of early life on Mars within the

  18. Digitizing Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of digital imaging technology focuses on its potential use for preservation of library materials. Topics addressed include converting microfilm to digital; the high cost of conversion from paper or microfilm; quality; indexing; database management issues; incompatibility among imaging systems; longevity; cooperative pilot projects; and…

  19. Preservation Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noriega, Chon A.

    2005-01-01

    One must undertake multi-institutional efforts that include universities, archives, museums, libraries and community-based arts organizations and the artists to preserve Latino art history. Arts infrastructure can be strengthened by various Chicano Studies Research Center projects that are concerned with archive building and scholarship, and with…

  20. Neighborhood Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benin, Shirley

    1984-01-01

    Because of concern about the preservation of the historic character of Stamford (Connecticut), children in a pilot program at an elementary school learned about neighborhood history, sketched houses, researched houses which had been torn down and drew and constructed replicas of them, and learned about renovation and period interior design. (IS)

  1. Preliminary Interpretations of Atmospheric Stable Isotopes and Argon from Mars Science Laboratory (SAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.; Niles, P. B.; Webster, C. R.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Flesch, G. J.; Christensen, L. E.; Leshin, L. A.; Franz, H.; Wong, M.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Manning, H.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Owen, T.; Pepin, B.; Stern, J. C.; Trainer, M.; Schwenzer, S. P.

    2013-01-01

    Given the broad agreement between C, H, and O isotopic ratios in the modern atmosphere and the ALH 84001 meteorite, it is possible that these reservoirs were established after early atmospheric loss prior to 4 Ga. The preservation of these signals over this long period of history can be explained in several slightly different ways: 1) C, O, and H have remained static in the atmosphere and have not exchanged with the surface over the past 4 Ga; 2) C, O, and H in the atmosphere have potentially varied widely over history but have been continually buffered by larger reservoirs in the crust which have remained unchanged over the past 4 Ga. This second possibility allows for potentially large variations in atmospheric pressure to occur as CO2 is recycled back into the atmosphere from crustal reservoirs or degassed from the mantle.

  2. Scanning Electron Microscopy Investigation of a Sample Depth Profile Through the Martian Meteorite Nakhla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toporski, Jan; Steele, Andrew; Westall, Frances; McKay, David S.

    2000-01-01

    The ongoing scientific debate as to whether or not the Martian meteorite ALH84001 contained evidence of possible biogenic activities showed the need to establish consistent methods to ascertain the origin of such evidence. To distinguish between terrestrial organic material/microbial contaminants and possible indigenous microbiota within meteorites is therefore crucial. With this in mind a depth profile consisting of four samples from a new sample allocation of Martian meteorite Nakhla was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. SEM imaging of freshly broken fractured chips revealed structures strongly recent terrestrial microorganisms, in some cases showing evidence of active growth. This conclusion was supported by EDX analysis, which showed the presence of carbon associated with these structures, we concluded that these structures represent recent terrestrial contaminants rather than structures indigenous to the meteorite. Page

  3. Peering Through a Martian Veil: ALHA84001 Sm-Nd Age Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, Laurence E.; Shih, Chi-Yu

    2013-01-01

    The ancient Martian orthopyroxenite ALH84001experienced a complex history of impact and aqueous alteration events. Here we summarize Sm-147-Nd-143 and Sm-146-Nd-142 analyses performed at JSC. Further, using REE data, we model the REE abundance pattern of the basaltic magma parental to ALH84001 cumulus orthopyroxene. We find the Sm-146-Nd-142 isotopic data to be consistent with isotopic evolution in material having the modeled Sm/Nd ratio from a time very close to the planet's formation to igneous crystallization of ALH84001 as inferred from the Sm-Nd studies.

  4. Identification of carbonate-rich outcrops on Mars by the Spirit rover.

    PubMed

    Morris, Richard V; Ruff, Steven W; Gellert, Ralf; Ming, Douglas W; Arvidson, Raymond E; Clark, Benton C; Golden, D C; Siebach, Kirsten; Klingelhöfer, Göstar; Schröder, Christian; Fleischer, Iris; Yen, Albert S; Squyres, Steven W

    2010-07-23

    Decades of speculation about a warmer, wetter Mars climate in the planet's first billion years postulate a denser CO2-rich atmosphere than at present. Such an atmosphere should have led to the formation of outcrops rich in carbonate minerals, for which evidence has been sparse. Using the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, we have now identified outcrops rich in magnesium-iron carbonate (16 to 34 weight percent) in the Columbia Hills of Gusev crater. Its composition approximates the average composition of the carbonate globules in martian meteorite ALH 84001. The Gusev carbonate probably precipitated from carbonate-bearing solutions under hydrothermal conditions at near-neutral pH in association with volcanic activity during the Noachian era.

  5. Geochemical evidence for enhanced preservation of organic matter in the oxygen minimum zone of the continental margin of northern California during the Late Pleistocene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, Walter E.; Gardner, James V.; Anderson, Roger Y.

    1994-01-01

    The present upper water mass of the northeastern Pacific Ocean off California has a well-developed oxygen minimum zone between 600 and 1200 m wherein concentrations of dissolved oxygen are less than 0.5 mL/L. Even at such low concentrations of dissolved oxygen, benthic burrowing organisms are abundant enough to thoroughly bioturbate the surface and near-surface sediments. These macro organisms, together with micro organisms, also consume large quantities of organic carbon produced by large seasonal stocks of plankton in the overlying surface waters, which are supported by high concentrations of nutrients within the California Current upwelling system. In contrast to modern conditions of bioturbation, laminated sediments are preserved in upper Pleistocene sections of cores collected on the continental slope at water depths within the present oxygen minimum zone from at least as far north as the California-Oregon border and as far south as Point Conception. Comparison of sediment components in the laminae with those delivered to sediment traps as pelagic marine “snow” demonstrates that the dark-light lamination couplets are indeed annual (varves). These upper Pleistocene varved sediments contain more abundant lipid-rich “sapropelic” (type II) organic matter than the overlying bioturbated, oxidized Holocene sediments. The baseline of stable carbon isotopic composition of the organic matter in these slope cores does not change with time, indicating that the higher concentrations of type II organic matter in the varved sediments represent better preservation of organic matter rather than any change in the source of organic matter.

  6. Observation and Analysis of In Situ Carbonaceous Matter in Naklha. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Clemett, S. J.; Thomas-Kerpta, K. L.; McKay, D. S.; Wentworth, S. J.; Robert, F.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.; Rice, T.; VanLeer, B.

    2006-01-01

    The search for indigenous carbon components on Mars has been a challenge. The first attempt was the Viking GC-MS in situ experiment which gave inconclusive results at two sites on Mars [1]. After the discovery that the SNC meteorites were from Mars [2], [3-5] reported C isotopic compositional information which suggested a reduced C component present in the martian meteorites. [6 & 7] reported the presence of reduced C components (i.e., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) associated with the carbonate globules in ALH84001. Jull et al. [8] noted in Nakhla there was an acid insoluble C component present with more than 75% of its C lacking any C-14, which is modern-day carbon. This C fraction was believed to be either indigenous martian or ancient meteoritic carbon. Fisk et al. [9, 10] have shown textural evidence along with C-enriched areas within fractures in Nakhla and ALH84001. To further understand the nature of possible indigenous reduced C components, we have carried out a variety of measurements on martian meteorites. For this presentation we will discuss only the Nakhla results. Interior samples from the Nakhla SNC meteorite, recently made available by the British Museum of Natural History, were analyzed. Petrographic examination [11, McKay et al., this volume] of Nakhla showed evidence of fractures (approx.0.5 micron wide) filled with dark brown to black dendritic material [Fig. 1] with characteristics similar to those observed by [10]. Iddingsite is also present along fractures in olivine. Fracture filling and dendritic material was examined by SEM-EDX, TEM-EDX, Focused Electron Beam microscopy, Laser Raman Spectroscopy, Nano-SIMS Ion Micro-probe, and Stepped-Combustion Static Mass Spectrometry.

  7. Preserved fine-tuning of face perception and memory: evidence from the own-race bias in high- and low-performing older adults

    PubMed Central

    Komes, Jessica; Schweinberger, Stefan R.; Wiese, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Previous research suggests specific deficits in face perception and memory in older adults, which could reflect a dedifferentiation in the context of a general broadening of cognitive architecture with advanced age. Such dedifferentiation could manifest in a less specialized face processing system. A promising tool to investigate the fine-tuning of face processing in older age is the own-race bias (ORB), a phenomenon reflecting more accurate memory for own-relative to other-race faces, which is related to an expertise-based specialization of early perceptual stages. To investigate whether poor face memory in older age is accompanied by reduced expertise-based specialization of face processing, we assessed event-related brain potential correlates of the ORB in high- vs. low-performing older adults (mean age = 69 years; N = 24 per group). Intriguingly, both older groups demonstrated an equivalent pattern of a behavioral ORB, and a parallel increase in N170 for other-race faces, reflecting less efficient early perceptual processing for this face category. Group differences only emerged independent of face ethnicity: whereas low-performers exhibited a right-lateralized N170, high-performers showed a more bilateral response. This finding may suggest a compensatory mechanism counteracting age-related decline in face perception enabling more efficient encoding into memory in high performers. Overall, our results demonstrate that even a less efficient face processing system in older adults can exhibit preserved expertise-related specialization toward own-race faces. PMID:24772080

  8. Preservation of perceptual integration improves temporal stability of bimanual coordination in the elderly: an evidence of age-related brain plasticity.

    PubMed

    Blais, Mélody; Martin, Elodie; Albaret, Jean-Michel; Tallet, Jessica

    2014-12-15

    Despite the apparent age-related decline in perceptual-motor performance, recent studies suggest that the elderly people can improve their reaction time when relevant sensory information are available. However, little is known about which sensory information may improve motor behaviour itself. Using a synchronization task, the present study investigates how visual and/or auditory stimulations could increase accuracy and stability of three bimanual coordination modes produced by elderly and young adults. Neurophysiological activations are recorded with ElectroEncephaloGraphy (EEG) to explore neural mechanisms underlying behavioural effects. Results reveal that the elderly stabilize all coordination modes when auditory or audio-visual stimulations are available, compared to visual stimulation alone. This suggests that auditory stimulations are sufficient to improve temporal stability of rhythmic coordination, even more in the elderly. This behavioural effect is primarily associated with increased attentional and sensorimotor-related neural activations in the elderly but similar perceptual-related activations in elderly and young adults. This suggests that, despite a degradation of attentional and sensorimotor neural processes, perceptual integration of auditory stimulations is preserved in the elderly. These results suggest that perceptual-related brain plasticity is, at least partially, conserved in normal aging.

  9. Nature of Reduced Carbon in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; McKay, D. S.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; White, L. M.

    2012-01-01

    Martian meteorites provide important information on the nature of reduced carbon components present on Mars throughout its history. The first in situ analyses for carbon on the surface of Mars by the Viking landers yielded disappointing results. With the recognition of Martian meteorites on Earth, investigations have shown carbon-bearing phases exist on Mars. Studies have yielded presence of reduced carbon, carbonates and inferred graphitic carbon phases. Samples ranging in age from the first approximately 4 Ga of Mars history [e.g. ALH84001] to nakhlites with a crystallization age of 1.3 Ga [e.g. Nakhla] with aqueous alteration processes occurring 0.5-0.7 Ga after crystallizaton. Shergottites demonstrate formation ages around 165-500 Ma with younger aqueous alterations events. Only a limited number of the Martian meteorites do not show evidence of significance terrestrial alterations. Selected areas within ALH84001, Nakhla, Yamato 000593 and possibly Tissint are suitable for study of their indigenous reduced carbon bearing phases. Nakhla possesses discrete, well-defined carbonaceous phases present within iddingsite alteration zones. Based upon both isotopic measurements and analysis of Nakhla's organic phases the presence of pre-terrestrial organics is now recognized. The reduced carbon-bearing phases appear to have been deposited during preterrestrial aqueous alteration events that produced clays. In addition, the microcrystalline layers of Nakhla's iddingsite have discrete units of salt crystals suggestive of evaporation processes. While we can only speculate on the origin of these unique carbonaceous structures, we note that the significance of such observations is that it may allow us to understand the role of Martian carbon as seen in the Martian meteorites with obvious implications for astrobiology and the pre-biotic evolution of Mars. In any case, our observations strongly suggest that reduced organic carbon exists as micrometer- size, discrete structures

  10. Cryogenic Origin for Mars Analog Carbonates in the Bockfjord Volcanic Complex Svalbard (Norway)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, H. E. F.; Benning, L.; Blake, D. F.; Fogel, M.; Ming, D.; Skidmore, M.; Steele, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Sverrefjell and Sigurdfjell eruptive centers in the Bockfjord Volcanic Complex (BVC) on Svalbard (Norway) formed by subglacial eruptions ca. 1 Ma ago. These eruptive centers carry ubiquitous magnesian carbonate deposits including dolomitemagnesite globules similar to those in the Martian meteorite ALH84001. Carbonates in mantle xenoliths are dominated by ALH84001 type carbonate globules that formed during quenching of CO2-rich mantle fluids. Lava hosted carbonates include ALH84001 type carbonate globules occurring throughout lava vesicles and microfractures and massive carbonate deposits associated with vertical volcanic vents. Massive carbonates include < or equal 5 cm thick magnesite deposits protruding downwards into clear blue ice within volcanic vents and carbonate cemented lava breccias associated with volcanic vents. Carbonate cements comprise layered deposits of calcite, dolomite, huntite, magnesite and aragonite associated with ALH84001 type carbonate globules lining lava vesicles. Combined Mossbauer, XRD and VNIR data show that breccia carbonate cements at Sverrefjell are analog to Comanche carbonates at Gusev crater.

  11. Characterization of Spitsbergen Disks by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Le, L.; Ross, K.; McKay, David S.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    'Carbonate disks' found in the fractures and pores spaces of peridotite xenoliths and basalts from the island of Spitsbergen in the Norwegian Svalbard archipelago have been suggested to be "The best (and best documented) terrestrial analogs for the [Martian meteorite] ALH84001 carbonate globules ..." Previous studies have indicated that Spitsbergen carbonates show broadly comparable internal layering and mineral compositions to ALH84001 carbonate-magnetite disks. We report here for the first time, the detailed mineral characterization of Spitsbergen carbonates and their spatial relationship to the host mineral assemblages in the xenolith, using high resolution TEM (as used previously for ALH84001 carbonate disks). These studies were conducted in concert with complementary Raman and SEM analysis of the same samples. Our results indicate that there are significant chemical and physical differences between the disks in Spitsbergen and the carbonates present in ALH84001.

  12. Rapid On-Line Control to Reaching Is Preserved in Children With Congenital Spastic Hemiplegia: Evidence From Double-Step Reaching Performance.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Christian; Fuelscher, Ian; Enticott, Peter G; Reid, Susan M; Williams, Jacqueline

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the integrity of on-line control of reaching in congenital spastic hemiplegia in light of disparate evidence. Twelve children with and without spastic hemiplegia (11-17 years old) completed a double-step reaching task requiring them to reach and touch a target that remained stationary for most trials (viz nonjump trial) but unexpectedly displaced laterally at movement onset for a minority of trials (20%: known as jump trials). Although children with spastic hemiplegia were generally slower than age-matched controls, they could account for target perturbation at age-appropriate levels shown by a lack of interaction effect on movement time and nonsignificant group difference for time to reach trajectory correction on jump trials. Our data suggest that at a group level, on-line control of reaching may be age-appropriate in spastic hemiplegia. However, our data also highlight the need to experimentally acknowledge the considerable heterogeneity of the spastic hemiplegia population when investigating motor cognition.

  13. Metaconglomerate preserves evidence for kimberlite, diamondiferous root and medium grade terrane of a pre-2.7 Ga Southern Superior protocraton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylova, M. G.; Afanasiev, V. P.; Bruce, L. F.; Thurston, P. C.; Ryder, J.

    2011-12-01

    We studied heavy minerals extracted from a diamondiferous metaconglomerate that formed 2697-2701 Ma in a successor basin within the Michipicoten Greenstone Belt (MGB) of the Wawa-Abitibi Terrane (Southern Superior Craton). The conglomerate is metamorphosed in the greenschist facies and contains mainly locally derived igneous mafic to felsic detritus, but also very minor components of medium grade metamorphic minerals, diamonds and paragenetic diamond indicator minerals. Comparison of the size distribution, resorbtion and N aggregation of diamonds in nearby Wawa lamprophyres and the metaconglomerate diamonds confirms that the latter were not derived from the proximal lamprophyric source. The heavy minerals in the metaconglomerate include diopside, olivine, corundum, chromite, almandine, pyrope with kelyphitic rims, picroilmenite, amphibole and anorthite. Low abundances of the heavy minerals (several grains per 4-70 tons of the metaconglomerate) are, in part, explained by their complete or partial replacement by the greenschist mineral assemblage. Detrital almandine and amphibole are inferred to originate in amphibolite facies rocks. Cr-diopside, olivine, chromite and anorthite were sourced from mafic-ultramafic anorthosite- and chromitite-bearing layered complexes mapped in the MGB. The presence of pyrope with more than 6 wt.% Cr 2O 3 suggests derivation from a cratonic root. Picroilmenite has compositions typical of kimberlite and unlike that of ultramafic lamprophyres and other unconventional diamondiferous volcanics. The Wawa metaconglomerate, therefore, should be considered analogous to the Witwatersrand successor basin conglomerate in recording indirect evidence for Archean kimberlites. The tight localization of the diamondiferous conglomerate in time and space was controlled by a quick (~ 3 Ma) erosion of the source kimberlite body. The location of the kimberlite-bearing > 2.7 Ga Superior protocraton was inferred from the provenance of the metaconglomerate

  14. Formax Preserved Birds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, Philip

    1978-01-01

    A quick, simple method for preserving bird specimens using borax and a formalin solution is described. Procedures for injecting and mounting the specimens are given along with certain restrictions on preserving specimens. (MA)

  15. What Is Fertility Preservation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer.net/navigating-cancer-care/dating-sex-and-reproduction/fertility-concerns-and-preservation-men [top] ASCO. (2016). ... cancer.net/navigating-cancer-care/dating-sex-and-reproduction/fertility-concerns-and-preservation-women [top] National Cancer ...

  16. Preservation and Judgment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Peggy

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the need for the preservation of both print and non-print library materials. Issues raised include problems of photocopying; deciding what to discard and weed out of collections; special considerations for children's books; jobs for preservation librarians; and the need for good judgment in making preservation decisions. (LRW)

  17. Organizing Preservation Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloonan, Michele

    This resource guide considers issues in the staffing and organization of preservation activities. It provides guidance in implementing a systematic preservation program and evaluates the structures of various types of preservation programs. The following articles complement the discussion of program models and implementation: (1)…

  18. Iron-rich encrustation on the footwall of the Gánt bauxite (Vértes Hills, Hungary)—evidence for preservation of organic matter under exceptional conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germán-Heins, Judit

    1994-12-01

    Investigation of the iron-rich encrustation under the Gánt bauxite in the Vértes Hills (Hungary) provides good evidence for preservation of organic matter. The organic matter probably was trapped during rapid redeposition of bauxitic material by episodic mudflow/debris flow onto a karstic surface, triggered by synsedimentary tectonism associated with Early to Middle Eocene strike-slip motions. According to the morphogenetic study of hematite pseudomorphs after pyrite in the crust, the cathodoluminescence study of the cement of the underlying dolostone and the crust, the high negative values of δ13C and δ18O of the cement, and the chemical analysis of trace element composition of the crust, the bauxite and the dolostone bedrock show pyrite precipitation in a meteoric phreatic, organic-rich environment at the contact of the bauxite and the underlying dolostone. This environment was probably created as a result of the slow rise of the water table preceding the Middle Eocene transgression. Sulphur, needed for the formation of the pyrite, may have been supplied by the organic matter, which may have been concentrated at the bottom of the deposit as tropical vegetation trapped underneath the mudflow, or by introduction of marine pore water during transgression.

  19. Remembering preservation in hippocampal amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Ian A.; Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2017-01-01

    The lesion-deficit model dominates neuropsychology. This is unsurprising given powerful demonstrations that focal brain lesions can affect specific aspects of cognition. Nowhere is this more evident than in patients with bilateral hippocampal damage. In the last sixty years the amnesia and other impairments exhibited by these patients have helped to delineate the functions of the hippocampus and shape the field of memory. We do not question the value of this approach. However, less prominent are the cognitive processes that remain intact following hippocampal lesions. Here, we collate the piecemeal reports of preservation of function following focal bilateral hippocampal damage, highlighting a wealth of information often veiled by the field’s focus on deficits. We consider how a systematic understanding of what is preserved as well as what is lost could add an important layer of precision to models of memory and the hippocampus. PMID:26361051

  20. Modes of fossil preservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schopf, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The processes of geologic preservation are important for understanding the organisms represented by fossils. Some fossil differences are due to basic differences in organization of animals and plants, but the interpretation of fossils has also tended to be influenced by modes of preservation. Four modes of preservation generally can be distinguished: (1) Cellular permineralization ("petrifaction") preserves anatomical detail, and, occasionally, even cytologic structures. (2) Coalified compression, best illustrated by structures from coal but characteristic of many plant fossils in shale, preserves anatomical details in distorted form and produces surface replicas (impressions) on enclosing matrix. (3) Authigenic preservation replicates surface form or outline (molds and casts) prior to distortion by compression and, depending on cementation and timing, may intergrade with fossils that have been subject to compression. (4) Duripartic (hard part) preservation is characteristic of fossil skeletal remains, predominantly animal. Molds, pseudomorphs, or casts may form as bulk replacements following dissolution of the original fossil material, usually by leaching. Classification of the kinds of preservation in fossils will aid in identifying the processes responsible for modifying the fossil remains of both animals and plants. ?? 1975.

  1. Grafts for Ridge Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Jamjoom, Amal; Cohen, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar ridge bone resorption is a biologic phenomenon that occurs following tooth extraction and cannot be prevented. This paper reviews the vertical and horizontal ridge dimensional changes that are associated with tooth extraction. It also provides an overview of the advantages of ridge preservation as well as grafting materials. A Medline search among English language papers was performed in March 2015 using alveolar ridge preservation, ridge augmentation, and various graft types as search terms. Additional papers were considered following the preliminary review of the initial search that were relevant to alveolar ridge preservation. The literature suggests that ridge preservation methods and augmentation techniques are available to minimize and restore available bone. Numerous grafting materials, such as autografts, allografts, xenografts, and alloplasts, currently are used for ridge preservation. Other materials, such as growth factors, also can be used to enhance biologic outcome. PMID:26262646

  2. Tifft Farm Nature Preserve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Thomas B.; Gannon, David J.

    1980-01-01

    Described are the creation, development, activities, and programs of Tifft Farm, a 264-acre nature preserve and environmental education center in Buffalo, New York, constructed on a sanitary landfill. (BT)

  3. Shape Preserving Spline Interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A rational spline solution to the problem of shape preserving interpolation is discussed. The rational spline is represented in terms of first derivative values at the knots and provides an alternative to the spline-under-tension. The idea of making the shape control parameters dependent on the first derivative unknowns is then explored. The monotonic or convex shape of the interpolation data can then be preserved automatically through the solution of the resulting non-linear consistency equations of the spline.

  4. Food Preservation beyond the Season.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanes, Phyllis

    1992-01-01

    Examines how current scientific knowledge of food preservation emerged from traditions handed down through the generations. Discusses various methods of preservation, their history, and current application. (LZ)

  5. A History Worth Preserving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Cynthia

    2008-04-01

    The Manhattan Project transformed the course of American and world history, science, politics and society. If we can read about this in books and watch History Channel documentaries, why do we need to preserve some of the properties of this enormous undertaking? The presentation, ``A History Worth Preserving,'' will address why some of the physical properties need to be preserved and which ones we are struggling to maintain for future generations. The story of this effort begins in 1997 as the Department of Energy was posed to demolish the last remaining Manhattan Project properties at the Los Alamos laboratory. Located deep behind security fences, the ``V Site's'' asbestos-shingled wooden buildings looked like humble garages with over-sized wooden doors. The ``V Site'' properties were almost lost twice, first to bulldozers and then the Cerro Grande fire of 2000. Now, visitors can stand inside the building where J. Robert Oppenheimer and his crew once worked and imagine the Trinity ``gadget'' hanging from its hoist shortly before it ushered in the Atomic Age on July 16, 1945. As Richard Rhodes has commented, we preserve what we value of the physical past because it specifically embodies our social past. But many challenge whether the Manhattan Project properties ought to be preserved. Rather than recognize the Manhattan Project as a great achievement worthy of commemoration, some see it as a regrettable event, producing an instrument to take man's inhumanity to man to extremes. While these divergent views will no doubt persist, the significance of the Manhattan Project in producing the world's first atomic bombs is irrefutable. Preserving some of its tangible remains is essential so that future generations can understand what the undertaking entailed from its humble wooden sheds to enormous first-of-a-kind industrial plants with 125,000 people working in secret and living in frontier-like communities. With continuing pressure for their demolition, what progress has

  6. An Experimental Study in the Preservation of Poetry Shape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Susan H.; Lashbrook, William B.

    1980-01-01

    Study determines whether the preservation of poetry shape by an oral interpreter enhances the listener's mental perception and comprehension of selected poetry. Evidence supports the hypothesis that receivers could identify, comprehend, and appreciate the oral interpretation of poetry which stressed the preservation of its shape. (JMF)

  7. Preservation: Issues and Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Paul N., Ed.; Pilette, Roberta, Ed.

    A reference guide from leading experts in the field, this book covers the repair, maintenance, and preservation of library or archive collections, providing a definitive and authoritative analysis of how to plan for and ensure the long-term health of an institution's collection in this digital age. Chapters include: (1) "Defining the Library…

  8. Paints and Preservatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Larry E.; Miller, Larry E.

    The publication contains an outline for use by agriculture teachers in developing a teaching plan for a unit on paints and preservatives. The topics included are (1) recognizing, solving, and preventing paint problems and (2) operating and using power spray painting equipment. Items presented for each topic are: the situation, (intended to inform…

  9. Preserving the Seminar Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, David; Evans, Jocelyn; Levy, Meyer

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a new approach to online graduate education. With hopes of recruiting a larger cohort in order to preserve a graduate program struggling with low enrollment, we began offering a limited number of seats to students who would attend class in real time but from remote locations, using a videoconferencing platform. Unlike…

  10. Experimental Shock Decomposition of Siderite to Magnetite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, M. S.; Golden, D. C.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2005-01-01

    The debate about fossil life on Mars includes the origin of magnetites of specific sizes and habits in the siderite-rich portions of the carbonate spheres in ALH 84001 [1,2]. Specifically [2] were able to demonstrate that inorganic synthesis of these compositionally zoned spheres from aqueous solutions of variable ion-concentrations is possible. They further demonstrated the formation of magnetite from siderite upon heating at 550 C under a Mars-like CO2-rich atmosphere according to 3FeCO3 = Fe3O4 + 2CO2 + CO [3] and they postulated that the carbonates in ALH 84001 were heated to these temperatures by some shock event. The average shock pressure for ALH 84001, substantially based on the refractive index of diaplectic feldspar glasses [3,4,5] is some 35-40 GPa and associated temperatures are some 300-400 C [4]. However, some of the feldspar is melted [5], requiring local deviations from this average as high as 45-50 GPa. Indeed, [5] observes the carbonates in ALH 84001 to be melted locally, requiring pressures in excess of 60 GPa and temperatures > 600 C. Combining these shock studies with the above inorganic synthesis of zoned carbonates it seems possible to produce the ALH 84001 magnetites by the shock-induced decomposition of siderite.

  11. Blood Preservation Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    stordge. Since dihydroxyacetone ( DHA ) seems a very promising additive for 2,3-DPG preservation, basic studies of metabolism of DHA were carried out. These...Washington,D.C. pp. 285-297. 16. Beutler, E. and Guinto, E. 1972. The metabolism of dihydroxyacetone ( DHA ) by human erythrocytes. Clinical Research...CPD with various additives such as ascorbic acid and dihydroxyacetone , and BAGPM mixing exerted a 2,3-DPG- sparing effect. The studies of the effect of

  12. Memoir of fertility preservation.

    PubMed

    Gosden, Roger G

    2013-01-01

    Fertility preservation has been practiced for at least 50 years using semen banking, pelvic surgery, and radiation shields, but in the past 20 years it has emerged as a rapidly growing subspecialty of reproductive medicine. A dramatic rise in survivorship of young cancer patients and the widespread postponement of family building to the later years of the female reproductive lifespan have been major driving forces. Throughout the history of fertility preservation, low temperature banking has played a pivotal role, first for gametes and later for embryos and immature germ cells, while ovarian transplantation recently began to contribute and spermatogonial stem cell transfer holds future promise for men and prepubertal boys. But there are significant risks with some diseases from reimplanting residual disease, which hopefully can be eliminated by new methods for purging the tissue and germ cell culture. Since all technologies are interim, cryopreservation as a mainstay in this field will likely be swept aside eventually by a stream of progress aimed at managing fertility preservation in vivo.

  13. Current Concepts in Hip Preservation Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Kelly L.; Cook, P. Christopher; Geisler, Paul R.; Yen, Yi-Meng; Giordano, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Successful treatment of nonarthritic hip pain in young athletic individuals remains a challenge. A growing fund of clinical knowledge has paralleled technical innovations that have enabled hip preservation surgeons to address a multitude of structural variations of the proximal femur and acetabulum and concomitant intra-articular joint pathology. Often, a combination of open and arthroscopic techniques are necessary to treat more complex pathomorphologies. Peri- and postoperative recovery after such procedures can pose a substantial challenge to the patient, and a dedicated, thoughtful approach may reduce setbacks, limit morbidity, and help optimize functional outcomes. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed and CINAHL databases were searched to identify relevant scientific and review articles through December 2014 using the search terms hip preservation, labrum, surgical dislocation, femoroacetabular impingement, postoperative rehabilitation, peri-acetabular osteotomy, and rotational osteotomy. Reference lists of included articles were reviewed to locate additional references of interest. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Hip preservation procedures and appropriate rehabilitation have allowed individuals to return to a physically active lifestyle. Conclusion: Effective postoperative rehabilitation must consider modifications and precautions specific to the particular surgical techniques used. Proper postoperative rehabilitation after hip preservation surgery may help optimize functional recovery and maximize clinical success and patient satisfaction. PMID:26733593

  14. Preserving the Manhattan Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Cynthia

    2014-03-01

    When future generations look back on the 20th century, few events will rival the harnessing of nuclear energy as a turning point in world history, science and society. Yet, the Department of Energy has not always embraced its Manhattan Project origins. The presentation will focus on the progress made over the last 20 years to preserve the properties and first-hand accounts that for decades have been threatened with demolition and indifference. Since the mid-1950s, most remaining Manhattan Project properties at the Los Alamos National Laboratory had been abandoned. Among them was a cluster of wooden buildings called the ``V Site.'' This is where scientists assembled the ``Gadget,'' the world's first atomic device tested on July 16, 1945. Regardless of its significance, the ``V Site'' buildings like all the rest were slated for demolition. The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) toured the properties in November 1998. Most could not believe that the world's first atomic bomb was designed in such humble structures. The properties were declared to be ``monumental in their lack of monumentality.'' A Save America's Treasures grant for 700,000 was awarded to restore the properties. To raise the required matching funds, I left the Federal government and soon founded the Atomic Heritage Foundation. The presentation will trace the progress made over the last decade to generate interest and support nationwide to preserve the Manhattan Project heritage. Saving both the physical properties and first-hand accounts of the men and women have been a priority. Perhaps our most significant achievement may be legislation now under consideration by Congress to create a Manhattan Project National Historical Park. Seventy years later, the Manhattan Project is finally getting the recognition it deserves.

  15. Preserving Perishables (Dormavac)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A new commercial product that can preserve perishable commodities for weeks without freezing, so that they can be shipped fresh without the cost of air freight, has been developed by Grumman Corporation, Bethpage, Long Island, New York. The development benefited from the company's experience in developing the environmental control system for the Lunar Module, which delivered Apollo astronauts to the surface of the moon. Called Dormavac, the system provides a commodity-preserving environment within an aluminum container that can be transported by truck, rail or ship. Dormavac creates a cold-but above freezing-environment with high relative humidity and very low air pressure. The saturated air minimizes commodity weight loss and the air is automatically changed several times an hour to flush away odors and harmful gases released by the commodities. According to company literature, Dormavac significantly extends the transportation life of perishables. For example, pork has a normal cold storage life of about seven days, beef two weeks and tomatoes three weeks; with Dormavac, pork remains fresh for three weeks, beef more than six weeks and tomatoes seven weeks or more. Dormavac is manufactured and marketed by Grumman Allied Industries, Woodbury, New York. In developing the system, Grumman Allied drew upon the technological resources of another company subsidiary, Grumman Aerospace. Engineers who had earlier worked on Lunar Module environmental control brought their know-how and experience to the Dormavac development.

  16. Sagan Lecture: Exploring Mars Broadens the Biogeosciences Into the Realm of Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Des Marais, D. J.

    2006-12-01

    The exploration of Mars will enhance the biogeosciences by deepening our understanding of life, planetary environments, and their long-term evolution. Following a decline in geologic activity on Mars, potentially habitable environments have retreated from near-surface locales in the ancient crust to the deep subsurface today. Geologic activity on Earth has largely obliterated its earliest record of environments and life. Thus we don't know whether life required 700 years or 700 million years to begin. Studies of the meteorite ALH84001 revealed that the Martian crust has probably preserved, at the nm scale, a 4.4 billion year record of near- surface environments and processes. Coordinated studies of Earth and Mars might therefore capture a broader history of life in the inner solar system. To determine how life can begin is to understand how planetary and biological processes interact at the most fundamental level. Exploring another inhabited planet should help to discriminate between universal characteristics of life versus features that represent "merely" local solutions to surviving Earth's unique environmental history. An extant subsurface Martian biosphere would provide another dramatically different example. The search for life begins with a search for environments that might have supported it. A habitable environment provides sources of energy for metabolism, chemical building blocks for cells, and conditions that can sustain liquid water. Mars exploration must therefore "follow the water, follow the energy, and follow the carbon and other nutrients." Missions have made a solid start. For example, the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) found evidence of ancient habitable environments in late Noachian-early Hesperian rocks. Opportunity found evidence of sulfate-rich playa lakes and persistent saline groundwater that could have sustained certain acidophilic Earthly microorganisms. Spirit documented several types of volcanic rocks that been pervasively altered and

  17. The Geologic History of Mars: An Astrobiology Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K.; Westall, Frances; McKay, David S.; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie; Socki, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    Fourteen SNC meteorites contain information which must be incorporated with recent spaceflight data for developing Mars' geologic history. SNCs have crystallization ages of 4500 to 160 m.y. Tle oldest meteorite ALH84001 contains information on the Noachian period of Mars' history. There are no meteorites from the Hesperian period and the remaining 13 meteorites fall into two age groups within the Amazonian: The nakhlites around 1300 m.y. and the shergottites between 800-160 m.y. Oxygen isotopic analysis of Martian samples shows two distinct O2 reservoirs throughout Martian history indicating late additions of volatiles and a lack of plate tectonics prior to 3.9 Gy. Evidence for percolation of aqueous brines through impact-produced fractures in the rocky surface is contained in the 3.9 Gy-old ALH84001 carbonate deposits. These carbonates precipitated at approx. 100 C. At this time life had already evolved on Earth. Early Mars could have hosted life similar to the bacteria that inhabited early Earth. Potential microorganisms could have been transported into fractures by carbonate-bearing waters and their remains could have become incorporated into the precipitated carbonate. Since Mars had a weak magnetic field at this time, it can be hypothesized that some of the Martian microorganisms may have been similar to terrestrial magnetotactic bacteria. Over geologic time episodic cratering, and tectonic events have occurred on Mars along with the periodic release of subsurface waters which may have produced clays within SNC meteorites. The geochemical data contained within SNC meteorites complements previous observational data and the recent Mars Global Surveyor data to provide a geological and environmental history which spans almost the entire lifespan on Mars. One of the outstanding features of this model is the possible creation of an early (about 4 Gy) volatile reservoir distinct from the outgassed Mars volatiles, and the persistence of this reservoir throughout most

  18. Preserving reptiles for research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gotte, Steve W.; Jacobs, Jeremy F.; Zug, George R.; Dodd, C. Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    What are voucher specimens and why do we collect them? Voucher specimens are animals and/or their parts that are deposited in a research museum to document the occurrence of a taxon at a specific location in space and time (Pleijel et al., 2008; Reynolds and McDiarmid, 2012). For field biologists, vouchers are the repeatable element of a field study as they allow other biologists, now and in the future, to confirm the identity of species that were studied. The scientific importance of a voucher specimen or series of specimens is that other people are afforded the opportunity to examine the entire animal and confirm or correct identifications. A photographic record is somewhat useful for recording the occurrence of a species, but such records can be insufficient for reliable confirmation of specific identity. Even if a photo shows diagnostic characters of currently recognized taxa, it may not show characters that separate taxa that may be described in the future. Substantial cryptic biodiversity is being found in even relatively well-known herpetofaunas (Crawford et al., 2010), and specimens allow researchers to retroactively evaluate the true diversity in a study as understanding of taxonomy evolves. They enable biologists to study the systematic relationships of populations by quantifying variation in different traits. Specimens are also a source of biological data such as behaviour, ecology, epidemiology, and reproduction through examination of their anatomy, reproductive and digestive tracts, and parasites (Suarez and Tsutsui, 2004). Preserving reptiles as vouchers is not difficult, although doing it properly requires care, effort, and time. Poorly preserved vouchers can invalidate the results and conclusions of your study because of the inability to confirm the identity of your study animals. Good science requires repeatability of observations, and the absence of vouchers or poorly preserved ones prevents such confirmation. Due to space restrictions, we are

  19. Mineral Biomarkers in Martian Meteorite Allan Hills 84001?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Bazylinski, D. A.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Golden, D. C.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Romanek, C. S.

    1998-01-01

    The occurrence of fine-grained magnetite in the Fe-rich rims surrounding carbonate globules in the martian meteorite ALH84001, originally described in , have been proposed as fossil remains of primitive martian organisms. Here we report observations on size and shape distributions of magnetites from ALH84001 and compare them to biogenic and inorganic magnetite crystals of terrestrial origin. While some magnetite morphology is not unequivocally diagnostic for its biogenicity, such as cubodial forms of magnetite, which are common in inorganically formed magnetites, other morphologies of magnetite (parallel-epiped or elongated prismatic and arrowhead forms) are more likely signatures of biogenic activity. Some ALH 84001 magnetite particles described below have unique morphology and length-to-width ratios that are indistinguishable from a variety of terrestrial biogenic magnetite and distinct from all known inorganic forms of magnetite.

  20. Sublimation: A Mechanism for the Enrichment of Organics in Antarctic Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Luann; McDonald, Gene D.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Bunch, Theodore E.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Recent analyses of the carbonate globules present in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 have detected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at the ppm level. The distribution of PAHs observed in ALH84001 was interpreted as being inconsistent with a terrestrial origin and were claimed to be indigenous to the meteorite, perhaps derived from an ancient Martian biota. However, Becker et al., have examined PAHs in the Martian meteorite EETA79001, in several Antarctic carbonaceous chondrites and Antarctic Allan Hills Ice and detected many of the same PAHs found in ALH84001. The reported presence of L-amino acids of apparent terrestrial origin in the EETA79001 druse material, suggests that this meteorite is contaminated with terrestrial/extraterrestrial organics probably derived from Antarctic ice meltwater that had percolated through the meteorite. The detection of PAHs and L-amino acids in these Martian meteorites suggests that despite storage in the Antarctic ice, selective changes of certain chemical and mineralogical phases has occurred.

  1. Plant cytoplasm preserved by lightning.

    PubMed

    Wang, X

    2004-10-01

    Usually only an organism with hard parts may be preserved in the fossil record. Cytoplasm, which is a physiologically active part of a plant, is rarely seen in the fossil record. Two Cretaceous plant fossils older than 100 million years with exceptional preservation of cytoplasm are reported here. Some cytoplasm is well preserved with subcellular details while other cytoplasm is highly hydrolyzed in the cortex of the same fossil even though both of preservations may be less than 2 microm away. The unique preservation pattern, sharp contrast of preservation in adjacent cells and the exceptional preservation of cytoplasm in the cortex suggest that lightning should play an important role in the preservation of cytoplasm and that cytoplasmic membranes may be more stable than the cell contents. Interpreting the preservation needs knowledge scattering in several formerly unrelated fields of science, including geophysics, botany, biophysics, cytology and microwave fixation technology. This new interpretation of fossilization will shed new light on preservation of cytoplasm and promote cytoplasm fossils from a position of rarity to a position of common research objects available for biological research. The importance of the identification of cytoplasm in fossil lies not in itself but in how much it influences the future research in paleobotany.

  2. Antarctic science preserve polluted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simarski, Lynn Teo

    Geophysicists are alarmed at the electromagnetic pollution of a research site in the Antarctic specifically set aside to study the ionosphere and magnetosphere. A private New Zealand communications company called Telecom recently constructed a satellite ground station within the boundaries of this Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), protected since the mid-1970s. The placement of a commercial facility within this site sets an ominous precedent not only for the sanctity of other SSSIs, but also for Specially Protected Areas—preserves not even open to scientific research, such as certain penguin rookeries.The roughly rectangular, one-by-one-half mile site, located at Arrival Heights not far from McMurdo Station, is one of a number of areas protected under the Antarctic treaty for designated scientific activities. Many sites are set aside for geological or biological research, but this is the only one specifically for physical science.

  3. Format-Preserving Encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellare, Mihir; Ristenpart, Thomas; Rogaway, Phillip; Stegers, Till

    Format-preserving encryption (FPE) encrypts a plaintext of some specified format into a ciphertext of identical format—for example, encrypting a valid credit-card number into a valid credit-card number. The problem has been known for some time, but it has lacked a fully general and rigorous treatment. We provide one, starting off by formally defining FPE and security goals for it. We investigate the natural approach for achieving FPE on complex domains, the “rank-then-encipher” approach, and explore what it can and cannot do. We describe two flavors of unbalanced Feistel networks that can be used for achieving FPE, and we prove new security results for each. We revisit the cycle-walking approach for enciphering on a non-sparse subset of an encipherable domain, showing that the timing information that may be divulged by cycle walking is not a damaging thing to leak.

  4. Mechanism for Burgess Shale-type preservation

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Robert R.; Hammarlund, Emma U.; Hou, Xianguang; Qi, Changshi; Gabbott, Sarah E.; Zhao, Yuanlong; Peng, Jin; Canfield, Donald E.

    2012-01-01

    Exceptionally preserved fossil biotas of the Burgess Shale and a handful of other similar Cambrian deposits provide rare but critical insights into the early diversification of animals. The extraordinary preservation of labile tissues in these geographically widespread but temporally restricted soft-bodied fossil assemblages has remained enigmatic since Walcott’s initial discovery in 1909. Here, we demonstrate the mechanism of Burgess Shale-type preservation using sedimentologic and geochemical data from the Chengjiang, Burgess Shale, and five other principal Burgess Shale-type deposits. Sulfur isotope evidence from sedimentary pyrites reveals that the exquisite fossilization of organic remains as carbonaceous compressions resulted from early inhibition of microbial activity in the sediments by means of oxidant deprivation. Low sulfate concentrations in the global ocean and low-oxygen bottom water conditions at the sites of deposition resulted in reduced oxidant availability. Subsequently, rapid entombment of fossils in fine-grained sediments and early sealing of sediments by pervasive carbonate cements at bed tops restricted oxidant flux into the sediments. A permeability barrier, provided by bed-capping cements that were emplaced at the seafloor, is a feature that is shared among Burgess Shale-type deposits, and resulted from the unusually high alkalinity of Cambrian oceans. Thus, Burgess Shale-type preservation of soft-bodied fossil assemblages worldwide was promoted by unique aspects of early Paleozoic seawater chemistry that strongly impacted sediment diagenesis, providing a fundamentally unique record of the immediate aftermath of the “Cambrian explosion.” PMID:22392974

  5. Mechanism for Burgess Shale-type preservation.

    PubMed

    Gaines, Robert R; Hammarlund, Emma U; Hou, Xianguang; Qi, Changshi; Gabbott, Sarah E; Zhao, Yuanlong; Peng, Jin; Canfield, Donald E

    2012-04-03

    Exceptionally preserved fossil biotas of the Burgess Shale and a handful of other similar Cambrian deposits provide rare but critical insights into the early diversification of animals. The extraordinary preservation of labile tissues in these geographically widespread but temporally restricted soft-bodied fossil assemblages has remained enigmatic since Walcott's initial discovery in 1909. Here, we demonstrate the mechanism of Burgess Shale-type preservation using sedimentologic and geochemical data from the Chengjiang, Burgess Shale, and five other principal Burgess Shale-type deposits. Sulfur isotope evidence from sedimentary pyrites reveals that the exquisite fossilization of organic remains as carbonaceous compressions resulted from early inhibition of microbial activity in the sediments by means of oxidant deprivation. Low sulfate concentrations in the global ocean and low-oxygen bottom water conditions at the sites of deposition resulted in reduced oxidant availability. Subsequently, rapid entombment of fossils in fine-grained sediments and early sealing of sediments by pervasive carbonate cements at bed tops restricted oxidant flux into the sediments. A permeability barrier, provided by bed-capping cements that were emplaced at the seafloor, is a feature that is shared among Burgess Shale-type deposits, and resulted from the unusually high alkalinity of Cambrian oceans. Thus, Burgess Shale-type preservation of soft-bodied fossil assemblages worldwide was promoted by unique aspects of early Paleozoic seawater chemistry that strongly impacted sediment diagenesis, providing a fundamentally unique record of the immediate aftermath of the "Cambrian explosion."

  6. Current Concepts in Hip Preservation Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Kelly L.; Cook, P. Christopher; Yen, Yi-Meng; Giordano, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Context: An evolution in conceptual understanding, coupled with technical innovations, has enabled hip preservation surgeons to address complex pathomorphologies about the hip joint to reduce pain, optimize function, and potentially increase the longevity of the native hip joint. Technical aspects of hip preservation surgeries are diverse and range from isolated arthroscopic or open procedures to hybrid procedures that combine the advantages of arthroscopy with open surgical dislocation, pelvic and/or proximal femoral osteotomy, and biologic treatments for cartilage restoration. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed and CINAHL databases were searched to identify relevant scientific and review articles from January 1920 to January 2015 using the search terms hip preservation, labrum, surgical dislocation, femoroacetabular impingement, peri-acetabular osteotomy, and rotational osteotomy. Reference lists of included articles were reviewed to locate additional references of interest. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Thoughtful individualized surgical procedures are available to optimize the femoroacetabular joint in the presence of hip dysfunction. Conclusion: A comprehensive understanding of the relationship between femoral and pelvic orientation, morphology, and the development of intra-articular abnormalities is necessary to formulate a patient-specific approach to treatment with potential for a successful long-term result. PMID:26502445

  7. Honoring Our Hospital's History: A Preservation and Digitization Initiative.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Kerry; Bass, Jordan; Maloney, Toby

    2016-01-01

    There is limited literature on hospital archives projects. Hospitals understandably have a strong focus on patient care, but there is still a critical need to keep institutional archives. Among their many uses, institutional archives preserve corporate memory, provide evidence of interactions with community, and assist in contemporary decision making. This column describes a university-hospital partnership to undertake a one-year project to preserve, detail, and digitize ten boxes, or approximately 3.8 meters, of materials dating from 1980 to 2006. This project serves as a model for other hospital or health care facilities wanting to preserve and more actively engage with their archival collections.

  8. Irradiation preservation of seafood: Literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Molton, P.M.

    1987-10-01

    The application of gamma-irradiation for extending the shelf life of seafood has been of interest for many years. This report reviews a number of studies on seafood irradiation conducted over the past several years. Topics covered include seafood irradiation techniques and dosages, species applicability and differences, the effects of packaging on seafood preservation, and changes in organoleptic acceptability as a result of irradiation. Particular attention is given to radiation effects (likely and unlikely) of concern to the public. These include the potential for generation of toxic chemical products, botulinum toxin production, and other health concerns. No scientifically defensible evidence of any kind was found for any harmful effect of irradiation of seafoods at the doses being considered (less than 300 krad), and all indications are that irradiation is an acceptable and needed additional tool for seafood preservation. 49 refs., 14 figs., 14 tabs.

  9. Bulk and Stable Isotopic Compositions of Carbonate Minerals in Martian Meteorite Allan Hills 84001: No Proof of High Formation Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Romanek, Christopher S.

    1998-01-01

    Understanding the origin of carbonate minerals in the Martian meteorite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 is crucial to evaluating the hypothesis that they contain traces of ancient Martian life. Using arguments based on chemical equilibria among carbonates and fluids, an origin at greater than 650 C (inimical to life) has been proposed. However, the bulk and stable isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals are open to multiple interpretations and so lend no particular support to a high-temperature origin. Other methods (possibly less direct) will have to be used to determine the formation temperature of the carbonates in ALH 84001.

  10. Dry Mars: Parched Rocks and Fallen Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    2001-01-01

    While "following the water" to find life on Mars, it is easy to overlook evidence that Mars is harshly dry, and to neglect ideas that do not invoke water. Direct evidence for a dry Mars comes from the ALH 84001 meteorite, which has seen little or no liquid water during its last 3.9 billion years on Mars. Its aridity is difficult to reconcile with a Mars of abundant near-surface surface water or with episodes of warm wet climate. Alternative scenarios are also possible, even likely, for the martian gullies and debris flows that have been cited as evidence of liquid water. It is reasonable that the gullies flows are the remnants of massive dust avalanches, comparable to large climax snow avalanches seen on Earth. Mars' surface is now desiccated, and at least part of it has been equally desiccated for the past 3.9 billion years. With this background, and the wealth of atmospheric, imaging, and chemical data available from Mars, one must be very cautious in evaluating claims for liquid water recently at or near Mars' surface. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Building Preservation Knowledge in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Ingrid

    The project to translate into Portuguese and disseminate preservation knowledge was part of a broader partnership between the Council on Library and Information Resources, which incorporates the former Commission on Preservation and Access, and a consortium of Brazilian archival, library, and museum institutions. The partnership was intended to…

  12. Collections Security: The Preservation Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patkus, Beth L.

    1998-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the basic elements of library security and preservation programs as a background for an exploration of security/preservation issues, problems, and policies. Discusses environmental control, disaster preparedness, fire protection, storage and handling, and controlling access to collections. (AEF)

  13. Preservation Methods for Digital Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajendran, L.; Venkatesan, M.; Kanthimathi, S.

    2005-01-01

    Going digital is the way to minimize handling of damaged materials, but the imaging process is demanding and must be done with oversight by preservation staff and with a high enough level of quality to ensure the reusability of the archival electronic file for as long as possible. This paper focuses on the scope and needs of digital preservation,…

  14. Entanglement preservation by continuous distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Mundarain, D.; Orszag, M.

    2009-05-15

    We study the two-qubit entanglement preservation for a system in the presence of independent thermal baths. We use a combination of filtering operations and distillation protocols as a series of frequent measurements on the system. It is shown that a small fraction of the total amount of available copies of the system preserves or even improves its initial entanglement during the evolution.

  15. Preservation of Liquid Biological Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi (Inventor); Nimmagudda, Ramalingeshwara R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of preserving a liquid biological sample, comprising the step of: contacting said liquid biological sample with a preservative comprising, sodium benzoate in an amount of at least about 0.15% of the sample (weight/volume) and citric acid in an amount of at least about 0.025% of the sample (weight/volume).

  16. User Experience and Heritage Preservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orfield, Steven J.; Chapman, J. Wesley; Davis, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    In considering the heritage preservation of higher education campus buildings, much of the attention gravitates toward issues of selection, cost, accuracy, and value, but the model for most preservation projects does not have a clear method of achieving the best solutions for meeting these targets. Instead, it simply relies on the design team and…

  17. Historic Preservation in Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilfoil, Joanne K.

    2004-01-01

    The Blue Grass Trust in Lexington, Kentucky sponsors the annual visual art contest for historic preservation, one of the many events they sponsor as part of the celebrations planned for Historic Preservation Month each May. When the announcement concerning the Blue Grass Trust visual art competition is released, area high school art teachers…

  18. Preserving Dignity in Later Life.

    PubMed

    São José, José Manuel

    2016-09-01

    This article examines how elders who receive social care in the community experience loss of dignity and how they preserve their dignity. Qualitative research revealed that loss of dignity is a major concern for these elders and that they preserve their dignity differently, ranging from actively engaging with life to detaching themselves from life. We conclude that, in later life, preserving dignity while receiving social care differs from preserving dignity in the context of health care, especially health care provided in institutional settings. Furthermore, preserving dignity in later life, while receiving social care, is a complex process, depending not only on performing activities and individual action and responsibility, but also on other actions, some of them involving a certain inactivity/passivity, and interactions with others, especially caregivers. This article offers some insights to developing better policies and care practices for promoting dignity in the context of community-based social care.

  19. Contact dermatitis caused by preservatives.

    PubMed

    Yim, Elizabeth; Baquerizo Nole, Katherine L; Tosti, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Preservatives are biocidal chemicals added to food, cosmetics, and industrial products to prevent the growth of microorganisms. They are usually nontoxic and inexpensive and have a long shelf life. Unfortunately, they commonly cause contact dermatitis. This article reviews the most important classes of preservatives physicians are most likely to encounter in their daily practice, specifically isothiazolinones, formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasers, iodopropynyl butylcarbamate, methyldibromoglutaronitrile, and parabens. For each preservative mentioned, the prevalence of sensitization, clinical presentation of contact dermatitis, patch testing concentrations, cross reactions, and related legislation will be discussed. Mandatory labeling of preservatives is required in some countries, but not required in others. Until policies are made, physicians and patients must be proactive in identifying potential sensitizers and removing their use. We hope that this article will serve as a guide for policy makers in creating legislation and future regulations on the use and concentration of certain preservatives in cosmetics and industrial products.

  20. Possible and False Biomarkers from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Max P.

    2004-01-01

    The Search for life in the Solar System is one of NASA's main goals for the coming decade. We may never observe alien life directly; we or our robotic craft may always be removed from it by many years, or meters of crust. If we do find evidence of Life elsewhere in the Solar System it will probably be in form of chemical biomarkers, quintessentially biological molecules that indicate the presence of micro-organisms. What molecules would be truly indicative of alien life? Chlorophyll fragments, which are often used by geochemists are probably far too specific. Simpler molecules, such as fatty acids, amino acids and nucleo-bases might seem to be biomarkers, but they can form non-biotically in space. Alkyl substituted aromatics in ALH 84001 have been invoked as biomarkers, but they are not strong evidence in and of themselves. Understanding the range of nonbiological organic molecules which could act as false biomarkers in space is a prerequisite for any reasonable search for true biomarkers on other worlds. When simple organics arrive at the surface of a body like Europa, either from below or from space, how long do they survive and what do they make? How can we distinguish these from real biomarkers? In this talk I will present some ideas about what might be useful qualities to consider in a potential biomarker, and will ask for advice from the attendant geochemists.

  1. [Food preservation through combined processes].

    PubMed

    Sala Trepat, F J

    1995-03-01

    Food preservation by combined processes is based on the combination of two or more existing preservation methods with the objective of developing milder preservation procedures. Currently two combined processes (CP) deserve a special attention, the preservation of food by high pressures (HP) and the preservation of food with the combined use of heat and ultrasounds under pressure (Mano-Thermo-Sonication). In the preservation by HP, the food, at room temperature or at very mild temperature, is held during relatively long periods under very high pressures (100-1000 MPa) to inactivate its enzymes and/or microorganisms. This procedure has proved to be effective to inactivate vegetative cells but much less effective to inactivate most enzymes and bacterial spores. Several kinds of food preserved by this method have already been launched into the market. In Mano-Thermo-Sonication (MTS Process) microorganisms and enzymes are inactivated by a combined heat/ultrasounds treatment under pressure. By this method, the lethality of heat treatments at the same temperature is highly increased. Therefore, the intensity of heat treatments can be drastically reduced. Heat resistance of spores is reduced by a factor of 1/10 and that of enzymes and vegetative cells is reduced by a factor of 1/50 approximately. The applicability of this procedure is currently being investigated.

  2. Effects of wood preservative leachates from docks

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, P.H.; Van Dolah, R.F.; Bobo, M.Y.; Mathews, T.D.

    1994-12-31

    Recent evidence indicates that the wood preservative commonly used in dock pilings (chromated copper arsenate or CCA) is highly toxic to several estuarine organisms in laboratory experiments. Increasing demand for residential docks prompted a field study intended to complement these earlier laboratory investigations. Objectives of the study were to: (1) examine concentrations of Cu, Cr, and As in sediments and oysters from intertidal locations in several creeks with and without high densities of docks; (2) examine the bioaccumulation of wood preservative leachates by laboratory-reared oysters transferred to field sites near and distant from newly constructed docks; and (3) investigate the acute toxicity of wood preservative leachates for several species of estuarine fishes and invertebrates exposed to these compounds in the field. Preliminary results indicate that sediment concentrations of all three metals were well below ER-L levels reported by Long and Morgan at all but one dock site. In an ancillary study, 24h LC{sub 50} bioassays were performed using rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis) which were exposed to pore water from sediments in creeks with and without docks. Toxicities of bulk sediments from the same sites were examined using Microtox which measures decreases in bioluminescence of marine bacteria (Photobacterium phosphoreum) as a function of sediment concentration. Neither the rotifer nor the Microtox bioassays showed any significant differences in toxicity between creeks with and without docks.

  3. Preservation versus non-preservation of mitral valve apparatus during mitral valve replacement: a meta-analysis of 3835 patients

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Michel Pompeu Barros de Oliveira; Ferraz, Paulo Ernando; Escobar, Rodrigo Renda; Martins, Wendell Santos; de Araújo e Sá, Frederico Browne Correia; Lustosa, Pablo César; Vasconcelos, Frederico Pires; Lima, Ricardo Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Resection of the chordopapillary apparatus during mitral valve replacement has been associated with a negative impact on survival. Mitral valve replacement with the preservation of the mitral valve apparatus has been associated with better outcomes, but surgeons remain refractory to its use. To determine if there is any real difference in preservation vs non-preservation of mitral valve apparatus during mitral valve replacement in terms of outcomes, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL/CCTR, SciELO, LILACS, Google Scholar and reference lists of relevant articles to search for clinical studies that compared outcomes (30-day mortality, postoperative low cardiac output syndrome or 5-year mortality) between preservation vs non-preservation during mitral valve replacement from 1966 to 2011. The principal summary measures were odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence interval and P-values (that will be considered statistically significant when <0.05). The ORs were combined across studies using a weighted DerSimonian–Laird random-effects model. The meta-analysis was completed using the software Comprehensive Meta-Analysis version 2 (Biostat Inc., Englewood, NJ, USA). Twenty studies (3 randomized and 17 non-randomized) were identified and included a total of 3835 patients (1918 for mitral valve replacement preservation and 1917 for mitral valve replacement non-preservation). There was significant difference between mitral valve replacement preservation and mitral valve replacement non-preservation groups in the risk of 30-day mortality (OR 0.418, P <0.001), postoperative low cardiac output syndrome (OR 0.299, P <0.001) or 5-year mortality (OR 0.380, P <0.001). No publication bias or important heterogeneity of effects on any outcome was observed. In conclusion, we found evidence that argues in favour of the preservation of mitral valve apparatus during mitral valve replacement. PMID:23027596

  4. Pylorus-Preserving Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seung-Young; Yang, Han-Kwang

    2016-01-01

    Pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (PPG) is a function-preserving surgery for the treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC), aiming to decrease the complication rate and improve postoperative quality of life. According to the Japanese gastric cancer treatment guidelines, PPG can be performed for cT1N0M0 gastric cancer located in the middle-third of the stomach, at least 4.0 cm away from the pylorus. Although the length of the antral cuff gradually increased, from 1.5 cm during the initial use of the procedure to 3.0 cm currently, its optimal length still remains unclear. Standard procedures for the preservation of pyloric function, infra-pyloric vessels, and hepatic branch of the vagus nerve, make PPG technically more difficult and raise concerns about incomplete lymph node dissection. The short- and long-term oncological and survival outcomes of PPG were comparable to those for distal gastrectomy, but with several advantages such as a lower incidence of dumping syndrome, bile reflux, and gallstone formation, and improved nutritional status. Gastric stasis, a typical complication of PPG, can be effectively treated by balloon dilatation and stent insertion. Robot-assisted pylorus-preserving gastrectomy is feasible for EGC in the middle-third of the stomach in terms of the short-term clinical outcome. However, any benefits over laparoscopy-assisted PPG (LAPPG) from the patient's perspective have not yet been proven. An ongoing Korean multicenter randomized controlled trial (KLASS-04), which compares LAPPG and laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for EGC in the middle-third of the stomach, may provide more clear evidence about the advantages and oncologic safety of PPG. PMID:27433390

  5. Preserving the heritage of discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weart, Spencer

    2002-01-01

    In the 40 years since its creation, the Niels Bohr Library has become the world center for preserving the historical record of modern physics and allied fields, and for helping people show this record to the public

  6. Cultural Preservation Program for Alaska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbaran, Francisco Ramon

    2011-01-01

    In this technical report, an innovative cultural preservation program for implementation in Athabascan villages is presented. The parameters for success in implementing such a project is discussed based on a workshop with Athabascan elders.

  7. NONCONVEX REGULARIZATION FOR SHAPE PRESERVATION

    SciTech Connect

    CHARTRAND, RICK

    2007-01-16

    The authors show that using a nonconvex penalty term to regularize image reconstruction can substantially improve the preservation of object shapes. The commonly-used total-variation regularization, {integral}|{del}u|, penalizes the length of the object edges. They show that {integral}|{del}u|{sup p}, 0 < p < 1, only penalizes edges of dimension at least 2-p, and thus finite-length edges not at all. We give numerical examples showing the resulting improvement in shape preservation.

  8. Preservation of Liquid Biological Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi (Inventor); Nimmagudda, Ramalingeshwara (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention related to the preservation of a liquid biological sample. The biological sample is exposed to a preservative containing at least about 0.15 g of sodium benzoate and at least about 0.025 g of citric acid per 100 ml of sample. The biological sample may be collected in a vessel or an absorbent mass. The biological sample may also be exposed to a substrate and/or a vehicle.

  9. Ferromagnetic resonance and low-temperature magnetic tests for biogenic magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Sam Kim, Soon; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Kopp, Robert E.; Sankaran, Mohan; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Komeili, Arash

    2004-07-01

    Magnetite is both a common inorganic rock-forming mineral and a biogenic product formed by a diversity of organisms. Magnetotactic bacteria produce intracellular magnetites of high purity and crystallinity (magnetosomes) arranged in linear chains of crystals. Magnetosomes and their fossils (magnetofossils) have been identified using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in sediments dating back to ˜510-570 Ma, and possibly in 4 Ga carbonates in Martian meteorite ALH84001. We present the results from two rock magnetic analyses—the low-temperature Moskowitz test and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR)—applied to dozens of samples of magnetite and other materials. The magnetites in these samples are of diverse composition, size, shape, and origin: biologically induced (extracellular), biologically controlled (magnetosomes and chiton teeth), magnetofossil, synthetic, and natural inorganic. We confirm that the Moskowitz test is a distinctive indicator for magnetotactic bacteria and provide the first direct experimental evidence that this is accomplished via sensitivity to the magnetosome chain structure. We also demonstrate that the FMR spectra of four different strains of magnetotactic bacteria and a magnetofossil-bearing carbonate have a form distinct from all other samples measured in this study. We suggest that this signature also results from the magnetosomes' unique arrangement in chains. Because FMR can rapidly identify samples with large fractions of intact, isolated magnetosome chains, it could be a powerful tool for identifying magnetofossils in sediments.

  10. Isotope Variations in Terrestrial Carbonates and Thermal Springs as Biomarkers: Analogs for Martian Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Bissada, K. K.

    2006-01-01

    Stable isotope measurements of carbonate minerals contained within ALH84001 [1] suggest that fluids were present at 3.9 Gy on Mars [2, 3, 4, 5]. Both oxygen and carbon isotopes provide independent means of deciphering paleoenvironmental conditions at the time of carbonate mineral precipitation. In terrestrial carbonate rocks oxygen isotopes not only indicate the paleotemperature of the precipitating fluid, but also provide clues to environmental conditions that affected the fluid chemistry. Carbon isotopes, on the other hand, can indicate the presence or absence of organic compounds during precipitation (i.e. biogenically vs. thermogenically-generated methane), thus serving as a potential biomarker. We have undertaken a study of micro scale stable isotope variations measured in some terrestrial carbonates and the influence of organic compounds associated with the formation of these carbonates. Preliminary results indicate that isotope variations occur within narrow and discrete intervals, providing clues to paleoenvironmental conditions that include both biological and non-biological activity. These results carry implications for deciphering Martian isotope data and therefore potential biological prospecting on the planet Mars. Recently, Fourier Transform Spectrometer observations have detected methane occurring in the Martian atmosphere [6] that could be attributed to a possible biogenic source. Indeed, Mars Express has detected the presence of methane in the Martian atmosphere [7], with evidence indicating that methane abundances are greatest above those basins with high water concentrations.

  11. Mars Atmospheric Composition, Isotope Ratios and Seasonal Variations: Overview and Updates of the SAM Measurements at Gale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We will summarize the in situ measurements of atmospheric composition and the isotopic ratios of D/H in water, C-13/C-12, O-18/O-16, O-17 / O-16, and C-13 O-18 / C-12 O-16 in carbon dioxide, and Ar-38 / Ar-36, Kr-x / Kr-84, and N-15 / N-14 made in the martian atmosphere at Gale Crater from the Curiosity Rover using the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM)'s Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS) and Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS). With data over 700 sols since the Curiosity landing, we will discuss evidence and implications for changes on seasonal and other timescales. We will also present results for continued methane and methane enrichment experiments over this time period. Comparison between our measurements in the modern atmosphere and those of martian meteorites like ALH 84001 implies that the martian reservoirs of CO2 and H2O were largely established approximately 4 billion years ago, but that atmospheric loss or surface interaction may be still ongoing.

  12. Post-cremation taphonomy and artifact preservation.

    PubMed

    Warren, Michael W; Schultz, John J

    2002-05-01

    Contemporary commercial cremation is a reductive taphonomic process that represents one of the most extreme examples of postmortem human alteration of bone. The thorough reduction and fragmentation of cremated human remains often leaves little biological evidence of diagnostic value. Instead, non-osseous artifacts often provide the best evidence of the origin of the cremated remains, the identity of the decedent, and commingling of the remains of more than one individual. Once human remains have been cremated they are most commonly placed into a processor and reduced into small fragments and fine ash suitable for inurnment or scattering. The type of processor determines the size and utility of the particulates and artifacts available for analysis. The newest type of processors have changed the manner and degree of postmortem bone modification and altered the preservation of diagnostic bone fragments and cremation artifacts. This paper addresses the impact of the newest cremation procedures on forensic analysis of cremated remains.

  13. Yeasts preservation: alternatives for lyophilisation.

    PubMed

    Nyanga, Loveness K; Nout, Martinus J R; Smid, Eddy J; Boekhout, Teun; Zwietering, Marcel H

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effect of two low-cost, low technology traditional methods for drying starter cultures with standard lyophilisation. Lyophilised yeast cultures and yeast cultures preserved in dry rice cakes and dry plant fibre strands were examined for viable cell counts during 6 months storage at 4 and 25 °C. None of the yeast cultures showed a significant loss in viable cell count during 6 months of storage at 4 °C upon lyophilisation and preservation in dry rice cakes. During storage at 25 °C in the dark, yeast cultures preserved in dry rice cakes, and lyophilised cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Issatchenkia orientalis showed no significant loss of viable cells up to 4 months of storage. Yeast cultures preserved in dry plant fibre strands had the greatest loss of viable count during the 6 months of storage at 25 °C. Preservation of yeasts cultures in dry rice cakes provided better survival during storage at 4 °C than lyophilisation. The current study demonstrated that traditional methods can be useful and effective for starter culture preservation in small-scale, low-tech applications.

  14. The probability of duplicate gene preservation by subfunctionalization.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, M; Force, A

    2000-01-01

    It has often been argued that gene-duplication events are most commonly followed by a mutational event that silences one member of the pair, while on rare occasions both members of the pair are preserved as one acquires a mutation with a beneficial function and the other retains the original function. However, empirical evidence from genome duplication events suggests that gene duplicates are preserved in genomes far more commonly and for periods far in excess of the expectations under this model, and whereas some gene duplicates clearly evolve new functions, there is little evidence that this is the most common mechanism of duplicate-gene preservation. An alternative hypothesis is that gene duplicates are frequently preserved by subfunctionalization, whereby both members of a pair experience degenerative mutations that reduce their joint levels and patterns of activity to that of the single ancestral gene. We consider the ways in which the probability of duplicate-gene preservation by such complementary mutations is modified by aspects of gene structure, degree of linkage, mutation rates and effects, and population size. Even if most mutations cause complete loss-of-subfunction, the probability of duplicate-gene preservation can be appreciable if the long-term effective population size is on the order of 10(5) or smaller, especially if there are more than two independently mutable subfunctions per locus. Even a moderate incidence of partial loss-of-function mutations greatly elevates the probability of preservation. The model proposed herein leads to quantitative predictions that are consistent with observations on the frequency of long-term duplicate gene preservation and with observations that indicate that a common fate of the members of duplicate-gene pairs is the partitioning of tissue-specific patterns of expression of the ancestral gene. PMID:10629003

  15. Fertility preservation in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grynberg, Michaël; Bidet, Maud; Benard, Julie; Poulain, Marine; Sonigo, Charlotte; Cédrin-Durnerin, Isabelle; Polak, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Premature ovarian insufficiency is a relatively rare condition that can appear early in life. In a non-negligible number of cases the ovarian dysfunction results from genetic diseases. Turner syndrome (TS), the most common sex chromosome abnormality in females, is associated with an inevitable premature exhaustion of the follicular stockpile. The possible or probable infertility is a major concern for TS patients and their parents, and physicians are often asked about possible options to preserve fertility. Unfortunately, there are no recommendations on fertility preservation in this group. The severely reduced follicle pool even during prepubertal life represents the major limit for fertility preservation and is the root of numerous questions regarding the competence of gametes or ovarian tissue crybanked. In addition, patients suffering from TS show higher than usual rates of spontaneous abortion, fetal anomaly, and maternal morbidity and mortality, which should be considered at the time of fertility preservation and before reutilization of the cryopreserved gametes. Apart from fulfillment of the desire of becoming genetic parents, TS patients may be potential candidates for egg donation, gestational surrogacy, and adoption. The present review discusses the different options for preserving female fertility in TS and the ethical questions raised by these approaches.

  16. Organic preservation of fossil musculature with ultracellular detail

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Maria; Orr, Patrick J.; Kearns, Stuart L.; Alcalá, Luis; Anadón, Pere; Peñalver-Mollá, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    The very labile (decay-prone), non-biomineralized, tissues of organisms are rarely fossilized. Occurrences thereof are invaluable supplements to a body fossil record dominated by biomineralized tissues, which alone are extremely unrepresentative of diversity in modern and ancient ecosystems. Fossil examples of extremely labile tissues (e.g. muscle) that exhibit a high degree of morphological fidelity are almost invariably replicated by inorganic compounds such as calcium phosphate. There is no consensus as to whether such tissues can be preserved with similar morphological fidelity as organic remains, except when enclosed inside amber. Here, we report fossilized musculature from an approximately 18 Myr old salamander from lacustrine sediments of Ribesalbes, Spain. The muscle is preserved organically, in three dimensions, and with the highest fidelity of morphological preservation yet documented from the fossil record. Preserved ultrastructural details include myofilaments, endomysium, layering within the sarcolemma, and endomysial circulatory vessels infilled with blood. Slight differences between the fossil tissues and their counterparts in extant amphibians reflect limited degradation during fossilization. Our results provide unequivocal evidence that high-fidelity organic preservation of extremely labile tissues is not only feasible, but likely to be common. This is supported by the discovery of similarly preserved tissues in the Eocene Grube Messel biota. PMID:19828545

  17. Cryobiological preservation of Drosophila embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.; Schreuders, P.D.; Cole, K.W.; Hall, J.W. ); Mahowald, A.P. )

    1992-12-18

    The inability to cryobiologically preserve the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has required that fly stocks be maintained by frequent transfer of adults. This method is costly in terms of time and can lead to loss of stocks. Traditional slow freezing methods do not succeed because the embryos are highly sensitive to chilling. With the procedures described here, 68 percent of precisely staged 15-hour Oregon R (wild-type) embryos hatch after vitrification at -205[degree]C, and 40 percent of the resulting larvae develop into normal adult flies. These embryos are among the most complex organisms successfully preserved by cryobiology.

  18. Constraints on lunar origin: Evidence preserved in Precambrian stromatolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanyo, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    The existence of subaqueous unicellular algae and bacteria from the Precambrian period is evidenced by strongly abundant fossilized structures consisting of many layers of usually darker algae-bacterial growth alternating with layers of usually lighter sediment-precipitate. The earliest of these are dated to 3.5 billion years ago. A form of these stromatolites, Anabaria juvensis was analyzed and a sinusoidal columnar growth pattern was interpreted to be a response of stromatolite forming microbes to the changing inclination of the Sun over the seasons, with microbe growth rate positively related to solar intensity. Additional specimens are being used to develop a systematic methodology for extracting data evidencing Earth-Moon-Sun dynamics at the time of stromatolite formation. In particular, stromatolites span the time from 1 to 2 billion years ago, critical for several theories of lunar formation and/or Earth/Moon near encounter. Such cataclysmic events would influence stromatolite formation.

  19. Seeking carotenoid pigments in amber-preserved fossil feathers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Daniel B.; Nascimbene, Paul C.; Dove, Carla J.; Grimaldi, David A.; James, Helen F.

    2014-06-01

    Plumage colours bestowed by carotenoid pigments can be important for visual communication and likely have a long evolutionary history within Aves. Discovering plumage carotenoids in fossil feathers could provide insight into the ecology of ancient birds and non-avian dinosaurs. With reference to a modern feather, we sought chemical evidence of carotenoids in six feathers preserved in amber (Miocene to mid-Cretaceous) and in a feather preserved as a compression fossil (Eocene). Evidence of melanin pigmentation and microstructure preservation was evaluated with scanning electron and light microscopies. We observed fine microstructural details including evidence for melanin pigmentation in the amber and compression fossils, but Raman spectral bands did not confirm the presence of carotenoids in them. Carotenoids may have been originally absent from these feathers or the pigments may have degraded during burial; the preservation of microstructure may suggest the former. Significantly, we show that carotenoid plumage pigments can be detected without sample destruction through an amber matrix using confocal Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Automating Preservation Information in RLIN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruger, Betsy

    1988-01-01

    Examines efforts of the Research Libraries Group to use RLIN (Research Libraries Information Network) to support cooperative and individual member library preservation activities. Areas covered include enhancements to make item-specific microform information available and efforts to code information on the physical condition of materials. (30…

  1. A Capital Assets Preservation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiman, Ralph

    1989-01-01

    New York State officials have created an efficient capital planning system that is a prescribed set of procedures and actions within a program planning manual and two software modules. The program is a series of logical steps that school districts must take to successfully implement their preservation plans. (MLF)

  2. Bibliographic Control of Preservation Photocopies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telerski, R. Michele

    This study examines how American Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries catalog full-volume, monographic, non-cartographic, preservation photocopies and explores the use of full, minimal, or dependent bibliographic records. It analyzes On-line Public Access Catalog (OPAC) records structure for multiple versions materials in terms…

  3. Digital Imagery, Preservation and Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesk, Michael; Lynn, M. Stuart

    1990-01-01

    These two reports published by the Commission on Preservation and Access (CPA) include a comparison of digital and microfilm imagery, as well as discussions of chemical deacidification; ASCII (nonimage) files; and storage, conversion, and transmission considerations. A structured glossary of terms relating to media conversion and digital computer…

  4. Preservation and Archives in Vietnam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henchy, Judith

    This report, based on visits to Vietnamese libraries and archives between 1987 and 1997, examines the largely unexplored corpus of Vietnamese textual resources in research institutions and libraries there and elsewhere, the associated problems of bibliographic control, and issues of preservation. The following topics are addressed: the history of…

  5. Leaf metallome preserved over 50 million years.

    PubMed

    Edwards, N P; Manning, P L; Bergmann, U; Larson, P L; van Dongen, B E; Sellers, W I; Webb, S M; Sokaras, D; Alonso-Mori, R; Ignatyev, K; Barden, H E; van Veelen, A; Anné, J; Egerton, V M; Wogelius, R A

    2014-04-01

    Large-scale Synchrotron Rapid Scanning X-ray Fluorescence (SRS-XRF) elemental mapping and X-ray absorption spectroscopy are applied here to fossil leaf material from the 50 Mya Green River Formation (USA) in order to improve our understanding of the chemistry of fossilized plant remains. SRS-XRF of fossilized animals has previously shown that bioaccumulated trace metals and sulfur compounds may be preserved in their original distributions and these elements can also act as biomarkers for specific biosynthetic pathways. Similar spatially resolved chemical data for fossilized plants is sparsely represented in the literature despite the multitude of other chemical studies performed. Here, synchrotron data from multiple specimens consistently show that fossil leaves possess chemical inventories consisting of organometallic and organosulfur compounds that: (1) map discretely within the fossils, (2) resolve fine scale biological structures, and (3) are distinct from embedding sedimentary matrices. Additionally, the chemical distributions in fossil leaves are directly comparable to those of extant leaves. This evidence strongly suggests that a significant fraction of the chemical inventory of the examined fossil leaf material is derived from the living organisms and that original bioaccumulated elements have been preserved in situ for 50 million years. Chemical information of this kind has so far been unknown for fossilized plants and could for the first time allow the metallome of extinct flora to be studied.

  6. Male fertility preservation before gonadotoxic therapies

    PubMed Central

    Wyns, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Recent advances in cancer therapy have resulted in an increased number of long-term cancer survivors. Unfortunately, aggressive chemotherapy, radiotherapy and preparative regimens for bone marrow transplantation can severely affect male germ cells, including spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), and lead to permanent loss of fertility. Different options for fertility preservation are dependent on the pubertal state of the patient. Methods: Relevant studies were identified by an extensive Medline search of English and French language articles. Results: Sperm cryopreservation prior to gonadotoxic treatment is a well established method after puberty. In case of ejaculation failure by masturbation, assisted ejaculation methods or testicular tissue sampling should be considered. Although no effective gonadoprotective drug is yet available for in vivo spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) protection in humans, current evidence supports the feasibility of immature testicular tissue (ITT) cryopreservation. The different cryopreservation protocols and available fertility restoration options from frozen tissue, i.e. cell suspension transplantation, tissue grafting and in vitro maturation, are presented. Results obtained in humans are discussed in the light of lessons learned from animal studies. Conclusion: Advances in reproductive technology have made fertility preservation a real possibility in young patients whose gonadal function is threatened by gonadotoxic therapies. The putative indications for such techniques, as well as their limitations according to disease, are outlined. PMID:25302103

  7. New insights from old bones: DNA preservation and degradation in permafrost preserved mammoth remains.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Carsten; Debruyne, Regis; Kuch, Melanie; McNally, Elizabeth; Schwarcz, Henry; Aubrey, Andrew D; Bada, Jeffrey; Poinar, Hendrik

    2009-06-01

    Despite being plagued by heavily degraded DNA in palaeontological remains, most studies addressing the state of DNA degradation have been limited to types of damage which do not pose a hindrance to Taq polymerase during PCR. Application of serial qPCR to the two fractions obtained during extraction (demineralization and protein digest) from six permafrost mammoth bones and one partially degraded modern elephant bone has enabled further insight into the changes which endogenous DNA is subjected to during diagenesis. We show here that both fractions exhibit individual qualities in terms of the prevailing type of DNA (i.e. mitochondrial versus nuclear DNA) as well as the extent of damage, and in addition observed a highly variable ratio of mitochondrial to nuclear DNA among the six mammoth samples. While there is evidence suggesting that mitochondrial DNA is better preserved than nuclear DNA in ancient permafrost samples, we find the initial DNA concentration in the bone tissue to be as relevant for the total accessible mitochondrial DNA as the extent of DNA degradation post-mortem. We also evaluate the general applicability of indirect measures of preservation such as amino-acid racemization, bone crystallinity index and thermal age to these exceptionally well-preserved samples.

  8. New insights from old bones: DNA preservation and degradation in permafrost preserved mammoth remains

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Carsten; Debruyne, Regis; Kuch, Melanie; McNally, Elizabeth; Schwarcz, Henry; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Bada, Jeffrey; Poinar, Hendrik

    2009-01-01

    Despite being plagued by heavily degraded DNA in palaeontological remains, most studies addressing the state of DNA degradation have been limited to types of damage which do not pose a hindrance to Taq polymerase during PCR. Application of serial qPCR to the two fractions obtained during extraction (demineralization and protein digest) from six permafrost mammoth bones and one partially degraded modern elephant bone has enabled further insight into the changes which endogenous DNA is subjected to during diagenesis. We show here that both fractions exhibit individual qualities in terms of the prevailing type of DNA (i.e. mitochondrial versus nuclear DNA) as well as the extent of damage, and in addition observed a highly variable ratio of mitochondrial to nuclear DNA among the six mammoth samples. While there is evidence suggesting that mitochondrial DNA is better preserved than nuclear DNA in ancient permafrost samples, we find the initial DNA concentration in the bone tissue to be as relevant for the total accessible mitochondrial DNA as the extent of DNA degradation post-mortem. We also evaluate the general applicability of indirect measures of preservation such as amino-acid racemization, bone crystallinity index and thermal age to these exceptionally well-preserved samples. PMID:19321502

  9. Evaluation of Meterorite Amono Acid Analysis Data Using Multivariate Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, G.; Storrie-Lombardi, M.; Nealson, K.

    1999-01-01

    The amino acid distributions in the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite, Mars meteorite ALH84001, and ice from the Allan Hills region of Antarctica are shown, using a multivariate technique known as Principal Component Analysis (PCA), to be statistically distinct from the average amino acid compostion of 101 terrestrial protein superfamilies.

  10. Hybrid Food Preservation Program Improves Food Preservation and Food Safety Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Sarah L.

    2014-01-01

    The growing trend in home food preservation raises concerns about whether the resulting food products will be safe to eat. The increased public demand for food preservation information led to the development of the comprehensive food preservation program, Preserve the Taste of Summer (PTTS). PTTS is a comprehensive hybrid food preservation program…

  11. Precambrian organic geochemistry - Preservation of the record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.; Wedeking, K. W.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1983-01-01

    A review of earlier studies is presented, and new results in Precambrian organic geochemistry are discussed. It is pointed out that two lines of evidence can be developed. One is based on structural organic chemistry, while the other is based on isotopic analyses. In the present investigation, the results of both structural and isotopic investigations of Precambrian organic matter are discussed. Processes and products related to organic geochemistry are examined, taking into account the carbon cycle, an approximate view of the principal pathways of carbon cycling associated with organic matter in the present global ecosystem, processes affecting sedimentary organic matter, and distribution and types of organic matter. Attention is given to chemical fossils in Precambrian sediments, kerogen analyses, the determination of the structural characteristics of kerogen, and data concerning the preservation of the Precambrian organic geochemical record.

  12. Preserved entropy and fragile magnetism

    DOE PAGES

    Canfield, Paul C.; Bud’ko, Sergey L.

    2016-07-05

    Here, a large swath of quantum critical and strongly correlated electron systems can be associated with the phenomena of preserved entropy and fragile magnetism. In this overview we present our thoughts and plans for the discovery and development of lanthanide and transition metal based, strongly correlated systems that are revealed by suppressed, fragile magnetism, quantum criticality, or grow out of preserved entropy. We will present and discuss current examples such as YbBiPt, YbAgGe, YbFe2Zn20, PrAg2In, BaFe2As2, CaFe2As2, LaCrSb3 and LaCrGe3 as part of our motivation and to provide illustrative examples.

  13. Preserved entropy and fragile magnetism.

    PubMed

    Canfield, Paul C; Bud'ko, Sergey L

    2016-08-01

    A large swath of quantum critical and strongly correlated electron systems can be associated with the phenomena of preserved entropy and fragile magnetism. In this overview we present our thoughts and plans for the discovery and development of lanthanide and transition metal based, strongly correlated systems that are revealed by suppressed, fragile magnetism, quantum criticality, or grow out of preserved entropy. We will present and discuss current examples such as YbBiPt, YbAgGe, YbFe2Zn20, PrAg2In, BaFe2As2, CaFe2As2, LaCrSb3 and LaCrGe3 as part of our motivation and to provide illustrative examples.

  14. Preserved entropy and fragile magnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Canfield, Paul C.; Bud’ko, Sergey L.

    2016-07-05

    Here, a large swath of quantum critical and strongly correlated electron systems can be associated with the phenomena of preserved entropy and fragile magnetism. In this overview we present our thoughts and plans for the discovery and development of lanthanide and transition metal based, strongly correlated systems that are revealed by suppressed, fragile magnetism, quantum criticality, or grow out of preserved entropy. We will present and discuss current examples such as YbBiPt, YbAgGe, YbFe2Zn20, PrAg2In, BaFe2As2, CaFe2As2, LaCrSb3 and LaCrGe3 as part of our motivation and to provide illustrative examples.

  15. Mars Hematite Site: Potential for Preservation of Microfossils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Westall, Frances; Longazo, Teresa; Schelble, Rachel; Probst, Luke; Flood, Beverly

    2003-01-01

    Defining locations where conditions may have been favorable for life is a key objective for the exploration of Mars. Of prime importance are sites where conditions may have been favorable for the preservation of evidence of pre-biotic or biotic processes. Areas displaying significant concentrations of the mineral hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) have been identified from orbit by thermal emission spectrometry. The largest such deposit, in Sinus Meridiani, is a strong candidate landing site for one of the twin Mars Exploration Rovers, scheduled to launch in 2003. The Martian hematite site may have significance in the search for evidence of extraterrestrial life. Since iron oxides can form as aqueous mineral precipitates, the potential exists for preserving microscopic evidence of life in ecosystems that deposit iron oxides. Terrestrial hematite deposits proposed as possible analogs for the hematite sites on Mars include massive (banded) iron formations, iron oxide hydrothermal deposits, iron-rich laterites and ferricrete soils, and rock varnish. We are engaged in a systematic effort to document the evidence of life preserved in iron oxide deposits from each of these environments.

  16. Technical Information/Website Preservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    PintoRey, Christian R.

    2010-01-01

    This document reviews the work of the author in NASA's Motivating Undergraduates in Science and Technology (MUST) internship. The intern worked on the Space Shuttles hydraulic systems (i.e., Auxiliary Power Units (APU's) and Hydraulic Pump Units (HPU's)), and website preservation of the hydraulic technology captured in websites relating to the coming.the Space Shuttle Retirement. Several figures and pictures show an overview of the orbiter's hydraulic systems

  17. Preservation solutions used during abdominal transplantation: Current status and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Latchana, Nicholas; Peck, Joshua R; Whitson, Bryan A; Henry, Mitchell L; Elkhammas, Elmahdi A; Black, Sylvester M

    2015-01-01

    Organ preservation remains an important contributing factor to graft and patient outcomes. During donor organ procurement and transportation, cellular injury is mitigated through the use of preservation solutions in conjunction with hypothermia. Various preservation solutions and protocols exist with widespread variability among transplant centers. In this review of abdominal organ preservation solutions, evolution of transplantation and graft preservation are discussed followed by classification of preservation solutions according to the composition of electrolytes, impermeants, buffers, antioxidants, and energy precursors. Lastly, pertinent clinical studies in the setting of hepatic, renal, pancreas, and intestinal transplantation are reviewed for patient and graft survival as well as financial considerations. In liver transplants there may be some benefit with the use of histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK) over University of Wisconsin solution in terms of biliary complications and potential cost savings. Renal grafts may experience increased initial graft dysfunction with the use of Euro-Collins thereby dissuading its use in support of HTK which can lead to substantial cost savings. University of Wisconsin solution and Celsior are favored in pancreas transplants given the concern for pancreatitis and graft thrombosis associated with HTK. No difference was observed with preservation solutions with respect to graft and patient survival in liver, renal, and pancreas transplants. Studies involving intestinal transplants are sparse but University of Wisconsin solution infused intraluminally in combination with an intra-vascular washout is a reasonable option until further evidence can be generated. Available literature can be used to ameliorate extensive variation across centers while potentially minimizing graft dysfunction and improving associated costs. PMID:26722644

  18. Fibres and cellular structures preserved in 75-million–year-old dinosaur specimens

    PubMed Central

    Bertazzo, Sergio; Maidment, Susannah C. R.; Kallepitis, Charalambos; Fearn, Sarah; Stevens, Molly M.; Xie, Hai-nan

    2015-01-01

    Exceptionally preserved organic remains are known throughout the vertebrate fossil record, and recently, evidence has emerged that such soft tissue might contain original components. We examined samples from eight Cretaceous dinosaur bones using nano-analytical techniques; the bones are not exceptionally preserved and show no external indication of soft tissue. In one sample, we observe structures consistent with endogenous collagen fibre remains displaying ∼67 nm banding, indicating the possible preservation of the original quaternary structure. Using ToF-SIMS, we identify amino-acid fragments typical of collagen fibrils. Furthermore, we observe structures consistent with putative erythrocyte remains that exhibit mass spectra similar to emu whole blood. Using advanced material characterization approaches, we find that these putative biological structures can be well preserved over geological timescales, and their preservation is more common than previously thought. The preservation of protein over geological timescales offers the opportunity to investigate relationships, physiology and behaviour of long extinct animals. PMID:26056764

  19. Use of Cymbopogon Citratus Essential Oil in Food Preservation: Recent Advances and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ekpenyong, Christopher E; Akpan, Ernest E

    2015-07-06

    The economic burdens and health implications of food spoilage are increasing. Contamination of food sources by fungi, bacteria, yeast, nematodes, insects, and rodents remains a major public health concern. Research has focused on developing safer natural products and innovations to meet consumers' acceptance as alternatives to synthetic food preservatives. Many recent novel preservative techniques and applications of both natural and synthetic origin continue to proliferate in food and chemical industries. In particular, some essential oils of plant origin are potent food preservatives and are thus attractive alternatives to synthetic preservatives. This paper provides an overview of recent advances and future prospects in assessing the efficacy of theuse of Cymbopogon citratus (lemongrass) essential oil in food preservation. The possible mechanisms of action and toxicological profile as well as evidence for or against the use of this essential oil as an alternative to synthetic food preservatives in domestic and industrial applications are discussed.

  20. Phase-preserved optical elevator

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuan; Zhang, Baile; Han, Tiancheng; Chen, Zhi; Duan, Yubo; Chu, Chia-Wei; Barbastathis, George; Qiu, Cheng Wei

    2013-01-01

    The unique superiority of transformation optics devices designed from coordinate transformation is their capability of recovering both ray trajectory and optical path length in light manipulation. However, very few experiments have been done so far to verify this dual-recovery property from viewpoints of both ray trajectory and optical path length simultaneously. The experimental difficulties arise from the fact that most previous optical transformation optics devices only work at the nano-scale; the lack of intercomparison between data from both optical path length and ray trajectory measurement in these experiments obscured the fact that the ray path was subject to a subwavelength lateral shift that was otherwise not easily perceivable and, instead, was pointed out theoretically [B. Zhang et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 233903, (2010)]. Here, we use a simple macroscopic transformation optics device of phase-preserved optical elevator, which is a typical birefringent optical phenomenon that can virtually lift an optical image by a macroscopic distance, to demonstrate decisively the unique optical path length preservation property of transformation optics. The recovery of ray trajectory is first determined with no lateral shift in the reflected ray. The phase preservation is then verified with incoherent white-light interferometry without ambiguity and phase unwrapping. PMID:23546046

  1. Preservational Pathways of Corresponding Brains of a Cambrian Euarthropod.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoya; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Hou, Xianguang; Goral, Tomasz; Strausfeld, Nicholas J

    2015-11-16

    The record of arthropod body fossils is traceable back to the "Cambrian explosion," marked by the appearance of most major animal phyla. Exceptional preservation provides crucial evidence for panarthropod early radiation. However, due to limited representation in the fossil record of internal anatomy, particularly the CNS, studies usually rely on exoskeletal and appendicular morphology. Recent studiesshow that despite extreme morphological disparities, euarthropod CNS evolution appears to have been remarkably conservative. This conclusion is supported by descriptions from Cambrian panarthropods of neural structures that contribute to understanding early evolution of nervous systems and resolving controversies about segmental homologies. However, the rarity of fossilized CNSs, even when exoskeletons and appendages show high levels of integrity, brought into question data reproducibility because all but one of the aforementioned studies were based on single specimens. Foremost among objections is the lack of taphonomic explanation for exceptional preservation of a tissue that some see as too prone to decay to be fossilized. Here we describe newly discovered specimens of the Chengjiang euarthropod Fuxianhuia protensa with fossilized brains revealing matching profiles, allowing rigorous testing of the reproducibility of cerebral structures. Their geochemical analyses provide crucial insights of taphonomic pathways for brain preservation, ranging from uniform carbon compressions to complete pyritization, revealing that neural tissue was initially preserved as carbonaceous film and subsequently pyritized. This mode of preservation is consistent with the taphonomic pathways of gross anatomy, indicating that no special mode is required for fossilization of labile neural tissue.

  2. PREDON Scientific Data Preservation 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaconu, C.; Kraml, S.; Surace, C.; Chateigner, D.; Libourel, T.; Laurent, A.; Lin, Y.; Schaming, M.; Benbernou, S.; Lebbah, M.; Boucon, D.; Cérin, C.; Azzag, H.; Mouron, P.; Nief, J.-Y.; Coutin, S.; Beckmann, V.

    Scientific data collected with modern sensors or dedicated detectors exceed very often the perimeter of the initial scientific design. These data are obtained more and more frequently with large material and human efforts. A large class of scientific experiments are in fact unique because of their large scale, with very small chances to be repeated and to superseded by new experiments in the same domain: for instance high energy physics and astrophysics experiments involve multi-annual developments and a simple duplication of efforts in order to reproduce old data is simply not affordable. Other scientific experiments are in fact unique by nature: earth science, medical sciences etc. since the collected data is "time-stamped" and thereby non-reproducible by new experiments or observations. In addition, scientific data collection increased dramatically in the recent years, participating to the so-called "data deluge" and inviting for common reflection in the context of "big data" investigations. The new knowledge obtained using these data should be preserved long term such that the access and the re-use are made possible and lead to an enhancement of the initial investment. Data observatories, based on open access policies and coupled with multi-disciplinary techniques for indexing and mining may lead to truly new paradigms in science. It is therefore of outmost importance to pursue a coherent and vigorous approach to preserve the scientific data at long term. The preservation remains nevertheless a challenge due to the complexity of the data structure, the fragility of the custom-made software environments as well as the lack of rigorous approaches in workflows and algorithms. To address this challenge, the PREDON project has been initiated in France in 2012 within the MASTODONS program: a Big Data scientific challenge, initiated and supported by the Interdisciplinary Mission of the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS). PREDON is a study group formed by

  3. 15 CFR 270.311 - Collection of evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAMS NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAMS Collection and Preservation of Evidence; Information Created Pursuant to...

  4. Acid preservation systems for food products

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberio, J. E.; Cirigiano, M. C.

    1984-10-16

    Fumaric acid is used in combination with critical amounts of acetic acid to preserve acid containing food products from microbiological spoilage in the absence of or at reduced levels of chemical preservative.

  5. O-triple Isotopes of Primary and Secondary Minerals Provide Clues to the Past and Present Hydrosphere of Mars: New Experimental Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, R.; Thiemens, M. H.; Khachatryan, A.; Smirnova, V.; Jackson, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen, the most abundant element in terrestrial planets link their lithospheres, hydrospheres and atmospheres, thus providing a powerful tool to fingerprint the physical and chemical processes involved in the exchange of material between these reservoirs (1). The oxygen triple isotopic composition of SNC Martian meteorites minerals provided a record of this unique interaction. Martian silicates showed an O-isotope anomaly (Δ17O = 0.4 ‰) unlike earth's silicate (Δ17O = 0‰). Additionally, there is a signficant variation in the oxygen isotopic composition of primary and secondary minerals both in the oldest (ALH84001: Δ17OCO3 = 0.7‰, Δ17Osilicates = 0.3‰)(2) and younger martian rocks (NWA7034: Δ17OCO3 = 0.0‰, Δ17Osilicates = 0.6‰)(3) indicating substantial changes in the global aqueous chemistry of Mars and its formation. These variations in oxygen isotope anomalies are important, but puzzling due to the lack of knoweldege of the intial conditions and relevant experiments. To understand the origin and nature of heterogeneity in the oxygen triple isotopes of various minerals, laboratory experiments were conducted by simulating current Martian conditions. Ozone, a martian atmospheric constituent, was used as a tracer to identify molecular reactions occurring on the mineral surfaces. The oxygen isotopic composition of decomposed ozone and water was measured following reaction over extended time under defined conditions . The decomposed O2 defines an array with a slope δ17O = 0.87 x δ18O + 5 (r2 = 0.99). The left over ozone after 18hours showed a decrease in slope (δ17O = 0.7 x δ18O + 5 (r2 = 0.97) and significant variations in Δ17O= 20 - 31‰ depending on the mineral used in the experiment. The slope did not pass through the initial ozone and water suggesting the formation of an intermediate species and its reaction and removal that is responsible for the exchange of O-isotopes between water-ozone and mineral oxides. These results coupled with

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Antarctic Martian meteorites, carbonaceous chondrites, and polar ice

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, L. |; Glavin, D.P.; Bada, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Recent analyses of the carbonate globules present in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 have detected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at the ppm level. The distribution of PAHs observed in ALH84001 was interpreted as being inconsistent with a terrestrial origin and were claimed to be indigenous to the meteorite, perhaps derived from an ancient martian biota. We have examined PAHs in the Antarctic shergottite EETA79001, which is also considered to be from Mars, as well as several Antarctic carbonaceous chondrites. We have found that many of the same PAHs detected in the ALH84001 carbonate globules are present in Antarctic carbonaceous chondrites and in both the matrix and carbonate (druse) component of EETA79001. We also investigated PAHs in polar ice and found that carbonate is an effective scavenger of PAHs in ice meltwater. Moreover, the distribution of PAHs in the carbonate extract of Antarctic Allan Hills ice is remarkably similar to that found in both EETA79001 and ALH84001. The reported presence of L-amino acids of apparent terrestrial origin in the EETA79001 druse material suggests that this meteorite is contaminated with terrestrial organics probably derived from Antarctic ice meltwater that had percolated through the meteorite. Our data suggests that the PAHs observed in both ALH84001 and EETA79001 are derived from either the exogenous delivery of organics to Mars or extraterrestrial and terrestrial PAHs present in the ice meltwater or, more likely, from a mixture of these sources. It would appear that PAHs are not useful biomarkers in the search for extinct or extant life on Mars. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Fossil oak galls preserve ancient multitrophic interactions.

    PubMed

    Stone, Graham N; van der Ham, Raymond W J M; Brewer, Jan G

    2008-10-07

    Trace fossils of insect feeding have contributed substantially to our understanding of the evolution of insect-plant interactions. The most complex phenotypes of herbivory are galls, whose diagnostic morphologies often allow the identification of the gall inducer. Although fossil insect-induced galls over 300Myr old are known, most are two-dimensional impressions lacking adequate morphological detail either for the precise identification of the causer or for detection of the communities of specialist parasitoids and inquilines inhabiting modern plant galls. Here, we describe the first evidence for such multitrophic associations in Pleistocene fossil galls from the Eemian interglacial (130000-115000 years ago) of The Netherlands. The exceptionally well-preserved fossils can be attributed to extant species of Andricus gallwasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) galling oaks (Quercus), and provide the first fossil evidence of gall attack by herbivorous inquiline gallwasps. Furthermore, phylogenetic placement of one fossil in a lineage showing obligate host plant alternation implies the presence of a second oak species, Quercus cerris, currently unknown from Eemian fossils in northwestern Europe. This contrasts with the southern European native range of Q. cerris in the current interglacial and suggests that gallwasp invasions following human planting of Q. cerris in northern Europe may represent a return to preglacial distribution limits.

  8. Commission on Preservation and Access Newsletter, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Preservation and Access Newsletter, 1995

    1995-01-01

    The Commission on Preservation and Access was established to foster and support collaboration among libraries and allied organizations in order to ensure the preservation of the published and documentary records in all formats and to provide enhanced access to scholarly information. The Commission's newsletter keeps preservation and access…

  9. The Digital Preservation Consortium: Mission and Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Donald J.; Kenney, Anne

    The development of the National Information Infrastructure (NII) and the growing use of the Internet are creating a rapidly-changing environment for collaborative preservation and access. Within this environment, the Digital Preservation Consortium (DPC) seeks to advance the use and utility of digital technology for the preservation of and access…

  10. Commission on Preservation and Access Newsletter, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Preservation and Access Newsletter, 1996

    1996-01-01

    The Commission on Preservation and Access was established to foster and support collaboration among libraries and allied organizations in order to ensure the preservation of the published and documentary record in all formats and to provide enhanced access to scholarly information. The Commission's newsletter keeps preservation and access…

  11. Orthogonality preserving infinite dimensional quadratic stochastic operators

    SciTech Connect

    Akın, Hasan; Mukhamedov, Farrukh

    2015-09-18

    In the present paper, we consider a notion of orthogonal preserving nonlinear operators. We introduce π-Volterra quadratic operators finite and infinite dimensional settings. It is proved that any orthogonal preserving quadratic operator on finite dimensional simplex is π-Volterra quadratic operator. In infinite dimensional setting, we describe all π-Volterra operators in terms orthogonal preserving operators.

  12. Preservation Assessment and Disaster Response Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisdom, Mark

    This paper addresses the preservation needs unique to small libraries, where the majority of special collections exist. A preservation survey of the Herrick Memorial Library (Wellington, OH) was conducted to ascertain the condition of its 45,000 holdings and develop a practical low-cost disaster plan. Using accepted preservation survey criteria,…

  13. 7 CFR 782.14 - Identity preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Identity preservation. 782.14 Section 782.14... § 782.14 Identity preservation. (a) The importer and all subsequent buyers of the imported wheat shall preserve the identity of the Canadian-produced wheat. (b) Canadian-produced wheat may only be...

  14. 76 FR 74721 - Preserving the Open Internet

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Parts 0 and 8 Preserving the Open Internet AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... protections for broadband service to preserve and reinforce Internet freedom and openness. DATES: Oppositions... any rules of particular applicability. Subject: In the Matter of Preserving the Open...

  15. Preservation of sweet sorghum biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Jasberg, B.K.; Montgomery, R.R.; Anderson, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Sweet sorghum stalks (42% sugar, dry basis (d.b.)) and bagasse (10% sugar, d.b.) from a cane mill were stored to preserve sugar. Bagasse and stalks were stored outdoors in sealed containers (anaerobic conditions). Treatments included using carbon dioxide or sulfur dioxide atmospheres or surface spraying with propionic acid or aqueous ammonia. Stalks were also stored outdoors under aerobic conditions. Treatments included drying the stalks or spraying with propionic acid. After 200 days, propionic acid (anaerobic) and SO/sub 2/-treated stalks had 34% and 19% of the original sugar remaining, respectively. No other samples had more than 3% of the original sugar remaining. 28 references, 6 tables.

  16. Graft preservation solutions in cardiovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Bernhard; Reineke, David; Heinisch, Paul Philip; Schönhoff, Florian; Huber, Christoph; Kadner, Alexander; Englberger, Lars; Carrel, Thierry

    2016-08-01

    Vein grafts are still the most commonly used graft material in cardiovascular surgery and much effort has been spent in recent years on investigating the optimal harvesting technique. One other related topic of similar importance remained more or less an incidental one. The storage solutions of vein grafts following procurement and prior to implantation are, despite their assumed impact, a relatively neglected theme. There is no doubt that the endothelium plays a key role in long-term patency of vein grafts, but the effects of the different storage solutions on the endothelium remain unclear : In a review of the literature, we could find 20 specific papers that addressed the question, of which the currently available preservation solutions are superior, harmless, damaging or ineffective. The focus lies on saline and autologous whole blood. Besides these two storage media, novel or alternative solutions have been investigated with surprising findings. In addition, a few words will be spent on potential alternatives and novel solutions on the market. As there is currently no randomized clinical trial regarding saline versus autologous whole blood available, this review compares all previous studies and methods of analysis to provide a certain level of evidence on this topic. In summary, saline has negative effects on the endothelial layers and therefore may compromise graft patency. Related factors, such as distension pressure, may outbalance the initial benefit of autologous whole blood or storage solutions and intensify the harmful effects of warm saline. In addition, there is no uniform consent on the superiority of autologous whole blood for vein graft storage. This may open the door to alternatives such as the University of Wisconsin solution or one of the specific designed storage solutions like TiProtec™ or Somaluthion™. Whether these preservation solutions are superior or advantageous remains the subject of further studies.

  17. Preserving the Collections of Joyner Library: The Preservation Planning Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elizabeth H.; Barbour, Gordon; Cotter, Michael; Goering, Lawrence

    This report is structured to educate East Carolina University about library materials preservation. The library-wide preservation program began at Joyner Library in 1993 with the organization of the Preservation and Conservation Department. The planning phase of the preservation program began in 1995 with the appointment of the…

  18. Preservation of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC).

    PubMed

    Obeidat, Wasfy M; Schwabe, Kay; Müller, Rainer H; Keck, Cornelia M

    2010-09-01

    Due to their positive features (e.g., increased penetration of actives, re-enforcement of the lipid barrier and increase in skin hydration), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) are used in many dermal formulations. These formulations require preservation, and preservatives can impair the physical stability of disperse systems. Therefore, in this study, the influence of preservatives on the physical stability of Q10-loaded NLC was investigated using 11 different preservative mixtures. Whereas for nanosuspensions, only a limited number of preservatives are known from the literature not affecting their physical stability, a surprisingly high number of seven preservatives could be identified to be suitable for the preservation of NLC dispersions. For Q10-loaded NLC, Hydrolite 5 proved to be the best preservative, as it was found surprisingly to stabilize the NLC dispersion. Based on the data, a preservative classification system is suggested and a mechanistic model describing six key parameters affecting the physical stability of NLC could be developed. As most suitable characterization method to screen for suitable preservatives, light microscopy was identified. By being a simple, fast and cost efficient method, even extensive preservative screening studies can be performed very efficiently.

  19. Development of a forensic evidence protection kit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, Brian; Kelly, Roy

    1999-02-01

    A kit has been developed for the preservation of vital forensic evidence on a suspect following a serious assault, murder or other offense where contamination may occur. This also includes the handling of firearms, explosives and/or drugs.

  20. Saliva Preservative for Diagnostic Purposes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Mehta, Satish K.

    2012-01-01

    Saliva is an important body fluid for diagnostic purposes. Glycoproteins, glucose, steroids, DNA, and other molecules of diagnostic value are found in saliva. It is easier to collect as compared to blood or urine. Unfortunately, saliva also contains large numbers of bacteria that can release enzymes, which can degrade proteins and nucleic acids. These degradative enzymes destroy or reduce saliva s diagnostic value. This innovation describes the formulation of a chemical preservative that prevents microbial growth and inactivates the degradative enzymes. This extends the time that saliva can be stored or transported without losing its diagnostic value. Multiple samples of saliva can be collected if needed without causing discomfort to the subject and it does not require any special facilities to handle after it is collected.

  1. Update on Dark Sky Preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, D. L.

    1998-12-01

    The efforts to protect dark skies for astronomy and for the public are accelerating. An increasing number of cities and states are considering and enacting outdoor lighting control ordinances. Examples of such lighting codes and a model code are available from the International Dark-Sky Association's Web page, at www.darksky.org. There will be a major meeting on Preserving the Astronomical Environment, IAU Symposium #196, co-sponsored by the United Nations, IDA, and others, to be held the week of 12 July 1999 in Vienna, Austria. Further information on this meeting (and others) can also be found on the IDA Web site, which also contains many other resources (and links to other web sites) for those interested in the issues.

  2. Boundary Preserving Dense Local Regions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaechul; Grauman, Kristen

    2015-05-01

    We propose a dense local region detector to extract features suitable for image matching and object recognition tasks. Whereas traditional local interest operators rely on repeatable structures that often cross object boundaries (e.g., corners, scale-space blobs), our sampling strategy is driven by segmentation, and thus preserves object boundaries and shape. At the same time, whereas existing region-based representations are sensitive to segmentation parameters and object deformations, our novel approach to robustly sample dense sites and determine their connectivity offers better repeatability. In extensive experiments, we find that the proposed region detector provides significantly better repeatability and localization accuracy for object matching compared to an array of existing feature detectors. In addition, we show our regions lead to excellent results on two benchmark tasks that require good feature matching: weakly supervised foreground discovery and nearest neighbor-based object recognition.

  3. DNA and bone structure preservation in medieval human skeletons.

    PubMed

    Coulson-Thomas, Yvette M; Norton, Andrew L; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J; Florencio-Silva, Rinaldo; Ali, Nadir; Elmrghni, Samir; Gil, Cristiane D; Sasso, Gisela R S; Dixon, Ronald A; Nader, Helena B

    2015-06-01

    Morphological and ultrastructural data from archaeological human bones are scarce, particularly data that have been correlated with information on the preservation of molecules such as DNA. Here we examine the bone structure of macroscopically well-preserved medieval human skeletons by transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry, and the quantity and quality of DNA extracted from these skeletons. DNA technology has been increasingly used for analyzing physical evidence in archaeological forensics; however, the isolation of ancient DNA is difficult since it is highly degraded, extraction yields are low and the co-extraction of PCR inhibitors is a problem. We adapted and optimised a method that is frequently used for isolating DNA from modern samples, Chelex(®) 100 (Bio-Rad) extraction, for isolating DNA from archaeological human bones and teeth. The isolated DNA was analysed by real-time PCR using primers targeting the sex determining region on the Y chromosome (SRY) and STR typing using the AmpFlSTR(®) Identifiler PCR Amplification kit. Our results clearly show the preservation of bone matrix in medieval bones and the presence of intact osteocytes with well preserved encapsulated nuclei. In addition, we show how effective Chelex(®) 100 is for isolating ancient DNA from archaeological bones and teeth. This optimised method is suitable for STR typing using kits aimed specifically at degraded and difficult DNA templates since amplicons of up to 250bp were successfully amplified.

  4. Female fertility preservation: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    PAVONE, Mary Ellen; CONFINO, Rafael; STEINBERG, Marissa

    2017-01-01

    For patients with cancer, preserving the ability to start a family at a time of their choosing is especially important and may influence decisions pertaining to cancer treatment. For other women who have delayed childbearing for personal or professional reasons, fertility preservation offers the possibility of having a biological child regardless of age. Though these women may be interested in or benefit from fertility preservation, fertility preservation services remain underutilized. While embryo and oocyte cryopreservation remain the standard strategies for female fertility preservation recommended by the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the European Society of Medical Oncology, other strategies (e.g. pharmacological protection of the ovaries and ovarian tissue cryopreservation) are the subject of increasing research. This review will present new data that have become available over the past few years pertaining to all available methods of fertility preservation. PMID:26847846

  5. Sleep for preserving and transforming episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Inostroza, Marion; Born, Jan

    2013-07-08

    Sleep is known to support memory consolidation. Here we review evidence for an active system consolidation occurring during sleep. At the beginning of this process is sleep's ability to preserve episodic experiences preferentially encoded in hippocampal networks. Repeated neuronal reactivation of these representations during slow-wave sleep transforms episodic representations into long-term memories, redistributes them toward extrahippocampal networks, and qualitatively changes them to decontextualized schema-like representations. Electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillations regulate the underlying communication: Hippocampal sharp-wave ripples coalescing with thalamic spindles mediate the bottom-up transfer of reactivated memory information to extrahippocampal regions. Neocortical slow oscillations exert a supraordinate top-down control to synchronize hippocampal reactivations of specific memories to their excitable up-phase, thus allowing plastic changes in extrahippocampal regions. We propose that reactivations during sleep are a general mechanism underlying the abstraction of temporally stable invariants from a flow of input that is solely structured in time, thus representing a basic mechanism of memory formation.

  6. Cryogenic Preservation of Granulocytes and Monocytes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-25

    plateletpheresis bags and preserved with the granulocyte protocol. All cells were recovered after 3 months storage in liquid nitrogen with 94...phagocytic index. Technical Reports. Cryogenic preservation of monocytes from human blood and plateletpheresis cellular residues. December 20, 1980. Long...and Callalan, A.B. : Cryogenic preservation of monocytes from human blood and plateletpheresis cellular residues. Blood 57:592-598, 1981. Arnaout, A.A

  7. A specimen of Rhamphorhynchus with soft tissue preservation, stomach contents and a putative coprolite.

    PubMed

    Hone, David; Henderson, Donald M; Therrien, François; Habib, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Despite being known for nearly two centuries, new specimens of the derived non-pterodactyloid pterosaur Rhamphorhynchus continue to be discovered and reveal new information about their anatomy and palaeobiology. Here we describe a specimen held in the collections of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Alberta, Canada that shows both preservation and impressions of soft tissues, and also preserves material interpreted as stomach contents of vertebrate remains and, uniquely, a putative coprolite. The specimen also preserves additional evidence for fibers in the uropatagium.

  8. A specimen of Rhamphorhynchus with soft tissue preservation, stomach contents and a putative coprolite

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Donald M.; Therrien, François; Habib, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite being known for nearly two centuries, new specimens of the derived non-pterodactyloid pterosaur Rhamphorhynchus continue to be discovered and reveal new information about their anatomy and palaeobiology. Here we describe a specimen held in the collections of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Alberta, Canada that shows both preservation and impressions of soft tissues, and also preserves material interpreted as stomach contents of vertebrate remains and, uniquely, a putative coprolite. The specimen also preserves additional evidence for fibers in the uropatagium. PMID:26312182

  9. Astrobiological Significance of Microbial Extremophiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    The microflora of the cryosphere of planet Earth provides the best analogs for life forms that might be found in the permafrost or polar ice caps of Mars, near the surface of the cometary nuclei, or in the liquid water beneath and the ice crusts of icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn. The importance of study alkaliphilic microorganisms for astrobiology was enhanced by the findings of abundant carbonates and carbonate globules rimmed with possibly biogenic magnetites in association with the putative microfossils in the ALH84001 meteorite. Although the ALH84001 "nanofossils" were to small and simple to be unambiguously recognized as biogenic, they stimulated Astrobiology research and studies of microbial extremophiles and biomarkers in ancient rocks and meteorites. Recent studies of CI and CM carbonaceous meteorites have resulted in the detection of the well-preserved mineralized remains of coccoidal and filamentous microorganisms in cyanobacterial mats. Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis has shown anomalous biogenic element ratios clearly indicating they are not recent biological contaminants. This paper reviews microbial extremophiles in context of their significance to Astrobiology. The study of halophilic microorganisms was started from work with saline soils and lakes, and one of the record of good growth for Haloferax mediterranei was shown at 30 percent NaC1. Although alkali-tolerant nitrifying bacteria had previously been reported, the first described alkaliphilic microorganism was the bacterium Streptococcus faecalis. Halophilic and alkaliphilic forms are relevant to conditions that might be found in closed impact basins and craters on Mars filled with evaporite deposits. The first obligately acidophilic bacterium described was Acidithiobacillus ferrooxydans (formally Thiobacillus ferrooxidans). Later thermophilic lithotrophic acidophiles were found, and the hyperacidophilic moderately thermophilic species of the genus Picrophilus were found to grow at negative p

  10. Hay preservation with propionic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most hay producers are quite familiar with the problems associated with baling moist hays. Normally, these problems include spontaneous heating, increased evidence of mold, losses of dry matter (DM) during storage, poorer nutritive value, and (in extreme cases) spontaneous combustion. Numerous fact...

  11. Feature-Preserving Noise Removal.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Khalid; Jarenwattananon, Nanette N; Bouchard, Louis-S

    2015-09-01

    Conventional image restoration algorithms use transform-domain filters, which separate the noise from the sparse signal among the transform components or apply spatial smoothing filters in real space whose design relies on prior assumptions about the noise statistics. These filters also reduce the information content of the image by suppressing spatial frequencies or by recognizing only a limited set of shapes. Here we show that denoising can be efficiently done using a nonlinear filter, which operates along patch neighborhoods and multiple copies of the original image. The use of patches enables the algorithm to account for spatial correlations in the random field whereas the multiple copies are used to recognize the noise statistics. The nonlinear filter, which is implemented by a hierarchical multistage system of multilayer perceptrons, outperforms state-of-the-art denoising algorithms such as those based on collaborative filtering and total variation. Compared to conventional denoising algorithms, our filter can restore images without blurring them, making it attractive for use in medical imaging where the preservation of anatomical details is critical.

  12. Corn, alfalfa and grass silage preservation principles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ensiling is the primary means of preserving moist forages for feeding livestock. In ensiling, the crop is stored anaerobically, and sugars in the crop are fermented by lactic acid bacteria naturally on the crop. The crop is preserved by the combination of the acids produced by the lactic acid bacter...

  13. Biopolymers for Sample Collection, Protection, and Preservation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-19

    biological materials lose their structural integrity and viability. We review applications of a novel bacterial preservation process , which is nontoxic...based solution. The process of immobilization does not require the use of any additives, accelerators, or plastifiers and does not involve high...so that biological materials lose their structural integrity and viability. We review applications of a novel bacterial preservation process , which

  14. Preservation Film: Platform for Digital Access Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, C. Lee

    Preservation efforts for an increasingly digitally oriented future have turned to advanced and improved methods of preservation on microfilm, which has a life expectancy of more than 500 years when properly prepared, stored, and managed, and can support a wide range of digital access systems. Computer controlled cameras can provide significantly…

  15. Historic Preservation Vocabulary, Designations, and Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Stacy D.

    2011-01-01

    Preservationists use a common language that had its beginnings in the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966. This act created the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties, which defined the terms and treatments that have become the standard for preservation projects and plans. These terms have been used…

  16. 7 CFR 782.14 - Identity preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... § 782.14 Identity preservation. (a) The importer and all subsequent buyers of the imported wheat shall preserve the identity of the Canadian-produced wheat. (b) Canadian-produced wheat may only be commingled with U.S.-produced wheat by the end user, or when loaded onto a conveyance for direct delivery to...

  17. 7 CFR 782.14 - Identity preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... § 782.14 Identity preservation. (a) The importer and all subsequent buyers of the imported wheat shall preserve the identity of the Canadian-produced wheat. (b) Canadian-produced wheat may only be commingled with U.S.-produced wheat by the end user, or when loaded onto a conveyance for direct delivery to...

  18. 7 CFR 782.14 - Identity preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... § 782.14 Identity preservation. (a) The importer and all subsequent buyers of the imported wheat shall preserve the identity of the Canadian-produced wheat. (b) Canadian-produced wheat may only be commingled with U.S.-produced wheat by the end user, or when loaded onto a conveyance for direct delivery to...

  19. 7 CFR 782.14 - Identity preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... § 782.14 Identity preservation. (a) The importer and all subsequent buyers of the imported wheat shall preserve the identity of the Canadian-produced wheat. (b) Canadian-produced wheat may only be commingled with U.S.-produced wheat by the end user, or when loaded onto a conveyance for direct delivery to...

  20. Digital Preservation and Metadata: History, Theory, Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazinger, Susan S.

    This book addresses critical issues of digital preservation, providing guidelines for protecting resources from dealing with obsolescence, to responsibilities, methods of preservation, cost, and metadata formats. It also shows numerous national and international institutions that provide frameworks for digital libraries and archives. The first…

  1. Building a New Historic Preservation Trades Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeg, Rhonda L.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of the program coordinator of a new two-year preservation trades program at Harford Community College in Bel Air, Maryland. The two-year associate in applied sciences degree offered at Harford Community College (HCC) is a Technical Professional Studies program in Building Preservation and Restoration (BPR).…

  2. SYNERGISTIC WOOD PRESERVATIVES FOR REPLACEMENT OF CCA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the potential synergistic combinations of environmentally-safe biocides as wood preservatives. These wood preservatives could be potential replacements for the heavy-metal based CCA.

    Didecyldimethylammonium chloride [DDAC] was...

  3. 76 FR 60754 - Preserving the Open Internet

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 0 Preserving the Open Internet AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION... of September 23, 2011, a document establishing rules to preserve the open Internet. Inadvertently the...) Resolve complaints alleging violations of the open Internet rules. Federal Communications Commission....

  4. A Big Problem for Magellan: Food Preservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvao, Cecilia; Reis, Pedro; Freire, Sofia

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present data related to how a Portuguese teacher developed the module "A big problem for Magellan: Food preservation." Students were asked to plan an investigation in order to identify which were the best food preservation methods in the XV and XVI centuries of Portuguese overseas navigation, and then establish a…

  5. Preservation of hides using low salt methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective, environmentally friendly, economical preservation of hides for shipping to hide processing plants is a major concern to the hides and skins industry. Raw hides are traditionally preserved with a high amount of salt before they are stored and shipped to tanneries to be processed into leat...

  6. National and International Policies for Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feather, John

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the preservation and conservation of materials in libraries and archives and describes national and international policies that have been developed to deal with preservation problems. Highlights include managerial responsibility; paper-making and book production standards; the role of national libraries; coordination of policies;…

  7. Preservation of Mohave History and Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsosie, Michael

    This report represents a project required by the Americans for Indian Opportunity Ambassador Program. The project involved the preservation of Mohave culture for the Mohave tribe, one of four tribes of the Colorado River Indian Tribes reservation. Preservation requires equal access to information as well as the freedom to disseminate information…

  8. Preservation of Library Materials. SPEC Kit 35.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC. Office of Management Studies.

    This Association of Research Libraries (ARL) kit on preservation of library materials contains: (1) descriptions of preservation programs and objectives from Boston University, the University of Michigan, University of Wisconsin, and University of California at Los Angeles; (2) a description of the Library of Congress' National Preservation…

  9. The Preservation Officer's Role in Collection Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham-Kruppa, Ellen

    1992-01-01

    Summarizes the main elements of the library preservation officer's role--planning, administering, and coordinating. Areas in which preservation and collection development staff work together at the University of Texas at Austin are then discussed, including bibliographic review, binding, grant projects, needs assessment, and storage facility…

  10. Structure Preserving Anonymization of Router Configuration Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    IEEE JOURNAL ON SELECTED AREAS IN COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 27, NO. 3, APRIL 2009 349 Structure Preserving Anonymization of Router Configuration Data...exploited by competitors and attackers. This paper describes a method for anonymizing router config- uration files by removing all information that...networking researchers. Anonymizing configuration files has unusual requirements, including preserving relationships between elements of data, anonymizing

  11. Home Food Preservation Training for Extension Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goard, Linnette Mizer; Hill, Melinda; Shumaker, Katharine; Warrix, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    During times of economic downturn, there has been an increased interest in home food preservation. As the primary resource for current research-based recommendations, a team of Extension Family and Consumer Sciences educators with specialization in food safety and food preservation responded to this demand by developing a standardized food…

  12. Whale Preservation. Grades Five to Nine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Racicot, Darlene

    Dedicated to the conservation and preservation of whales, dolphins, and porpoises through public education, this instructional unit for grades 5-9 provides current (1993) facts, lesson plans, activities, and conservation and preservation techniques. Interdisciplinary activities involve students in debates, critical thinking, research, and…

  13. Preservation in the Age of Google: Digitization, Digital Preservation, and Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The cultural heritage preservation community now functions largely within the environment of digital technologies. This article begins by juxtaposing definitions of the terms "digitization for preservation" and "digital preservation" within a sociotechnical environment for which Google serves as a relevant metaphor. It then reviews two reports…

  14. Formation and Preservation of the Depleted and Enriched Shergottite Isotopic Reservoirs in a Convecting Martian Mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Jones, John H.

    2015-01-01

    There is compelling isotopic and crater density evidence for geologically recent volcanism on Mars, in the last 100-200 million years and possibly in the last 50 million years. This volcanism is due to adiabatic decompression melting and thus requires some type of present-day convective upwelling in the martian mantle. On the other hand, martian meteorites preserve evidence for at least 3 distinct radiogenic isotopic reservoirs. Anomalies in short-lived isotopic systems (Sm-146, Nd-142, Hf-182, W-182) require that these reservoirs must have developed in the first 50 to 100 million years of Solar System history. The long-term preservation of chemically distinct reservoirs has sometimes been interpreted as evidence for the absence of mantle convection and convective mixing on Mars for most of martian history, a conclusion which is at odds with the evidence for young volcanism. This apparent paradox can be resolved by recognizing that a variety of processes, including both inefficient mantle mixing and geographic separation of isotopic reservoirs, may preserve isotopic heterogeneity on Mars in an actively convecting mantle. Here, we focus on the formation and preservation of the depleted and enriched isotopic and trace element reservoirs in the shergottites. In particular, we explore the possible roles of processes such as chemical diffusion and metasomatism in dikes and magma chambers for creating the isotopically enriched shergottites. We also consider processes that may preserve the enriched reservoir against convective mixing for most of martian history.

  15. Preservation of bone collagen from the late Cretaceous period studied by immunological techniques and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Avci, R; Schweitzer, M H; Boyd, R D; Wittmeyer, J L; Terán Arce, F; Calvo, J O

    2005-04-12

    Late Cretaceous avian bone tissues from Argentina demonstrate exceptional preservation. Skeletal elements are preserved in partial articulation and suspended in three dimensions in a medium-grained sandstone matrix, indicating unusual perimortem taphonomic conditions. Preservation extends to the microstructural and molecular levels. Bone tissues respond to collagenase digestion and histochemical stains. In situ immunohistochemistry localizes binding sites for avian collagen antibodies in fossil tissues. Immunohistochemical studies do not, however, guarantee the preservation of molecular integrity. A protein may retain sufficient antigenicity for antibody binding even though degradation may render it incapable of original function. Therefore, we have applied atomic force microscopy to address the integrity and functionality of retained organic structures. Collagen pull-off measurements not only support immunochemical evidence for collagen preservation for antibody recognition but also imply preservation of the whole molecular integrity. No appreciable differences in collagen pull-off properties were measured between fossil and extant bone samples under physiological conditions.

  16. Fertility preservation in female classic galactosemia patients.

    PubMed

    van Erven, Britt; Gubbels, Cynthia S; van Golde, Ron J; Dunselman, Gerard A; Derhaag, Josien G; de Wert, Guido; Geraedts, Joep P; Bosch, Annet M; Treacy, Eileen P; Welt, Corrine K; Berry, Gerard T; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2013-07-16

    Almost every female classic galactosemia patient develops primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) as a diet-independent complication of the disease. This is a major concern for patients and their parents, and physicians are often asked about possible options to preserve fertility. Unfortunately, there are no recommendations on fertility preservation in this group. The unique pathophysiology of classic galactosemia with a severely reduced follicle pool at an early age requires an adjusted approach. In this article recommendations for physicians based on current knowledge concerning galactosemia and fertility preservation are made. Fertility preservation is only likely to be successful in very young prepubertal patients. In this group, cryopreservation of ovarian tissue is currently the only available technique. However, this technique is not ready for clinical application, it is considered experimental and reduces the ovarian reserve. Fertility preservation at an early age also raises ethical questions that should be taken into account. In addition, spontaneous conception despite POI is well described in classic galactosemia. The uncertainty surrounding fertility preservation and the significant chance of spontaneous pregnancy warrant counseling towards conservative application of these techniques. We propose that fertility preservation should only be offered with appropriate institutional research ethics approval to classic galactosemia girls at a young prepubertal age.

  17. Visualization of Microbial Biomarkers by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wainwright, Norman R.; Allen, Carlton C.; Child, Alice

    2001-01-01

    We are developing tools to link the biochemical structure of selected biomarkers with putative biogenic structures observed in mineralized samples. The detection of evidence of life on Mars and other planets will rely on methods that can discriminate compounds formed exclusively by living organisms. While biogenic compounds, such as amino acids and nucleotides have been discovered in extraterrestrial sources, such as meteorites and comets, their formation can be explained by abiotic means. The formation of cellular structures, or more elaborate organic molecules, such as complex lipids, proteins or nucleic acids, however, is strongly correlated to the presence of even the most primitive life processes. Recent evidence lends support to the hypothesis that life may have once existed on Mars. Carbonate globules and ppm concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been described in ALH84001, a meteorite originating from Mars ejecta captured by Earth over 13,000 years ago. The localized high concentration of PAHs that follow an increasing gradient from the intact fusion crust towards the interior corresponds to microgram quantities of hydrocarbon. Even though ALH84001 and other similar meteorites have withstood the forces capable of ejecting rock through Mars' escape velocity, upon entering Earth's atmosphere, their core temperatures are likely not to have been raised significantly, as evidenced by the survival of remanent magnetic signatures. Ideal biomarkers of ancient or modern biological life would include molecules that are (or were) pervasive and highly resistant to degradation. Also, requisite methods of detection should be simple, extremely sensitive and broadly inclusive (NASA SP-530). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan or pseudopeptidoglycan and beta-glucan are microbial cell wall components which together cover the entire microbial spectrum of eubacteria, archea and fungi. They are all remarkably resistant to thermal degradation

  18. Desert Varnish - Preservation of Biofabrics/Implcations for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, Luke W.; Allen, Carlton C.; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Longazo, Teresa G.; Nelman-Gonzalez, Mayra A.; Sams, Clarence

    2002-01-01

    Desert varnish is the orange to dark brown rind that accumulates on exposed rock surfaces in many arid environments. Samples from the Sonoran Desert of Arizona are composed predominantly of clays (illite, smectite) and Mn- and Fe- oxides (birnessite, hematite). Features that appear to be single organisms are found within the varnish and at the rock-varnish interface. Many of these features are embedded in films that strongly resemble the water-rich extracellular polysaccharides produced by diverse microorganisms. Most common are rod-shaped celllike objects, 0.5-2 microns in the longest dimension, located within the varnish coatings. Some of these objects are shown to contain amines by fluorescence microscopy. The rod-shaped objects are observed in various states of degradation, as indicated by C and S abundances. Rods with higher C and S abundances appear less degraded than those with lower concentrations of these two elements. Regions rich in apparent microbes are present, while other regions display Mn- and Fe-rich mineral fabrics with microbe-sized voids and no obvious cells. These textures are interpreted as biofabrics, preserved by the precipitation of Mn and Fe minerals. We are researching the preservation of biofabrics by desert varnish in Earth's geological record. Rock coatings may similarly preserve evidence of microbial life on the hyper-arid surface of Mars.

  19. Transgender Reproductive Choice and Fertility Preservation.

    PubMed

    Mitu, Khadija

    2016-11-01

    Increasing numbers of young transgender people are now using medical technologies to achieve a physical gender transition. However, the procedures of physical gender transition might cause temporary or permanent sterility. Thus many transgender people are now using fertility preservation technologies. Nonetheless, they can experience dilemmas in making reproductive and family-building decisions and face challenges in gaining access to and utilizing fertility preservation services. Based on qualitative research conducted with transgender men and women who used reproductive technologies for preserving their fertility before or during their physical transition, this paper contributes to the discourse of reproductive choice by the inclusion of transgender people's experience.

  20. Scientific Data Preservation, Copyright and Open Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouron, Philippe

    The purpose of this paper is to sum up the terms of a discussion about the legal aspects of scientific data preservation. This discussion was presented at the Marseille workshop organized on November 14th. This paper is only a basis for forthcoming works about the main project of preserving scientific data (PREDONx). The paper is focused on intellectual property rights, such as copyright or patent, and their effect on the use of scientific data. Open Science appears to be the best way to ensure the preservation, but also the publication, of scientific data.

  1. Preservation Methods Utilized for Space Food

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vodovotz, Yael; Bourland, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Food for manned space flight has been provided by NASA-Johnson Space Center since 1962. The various mission scenarios and space craft designs dictated the type of food preservation methodologies required to meet mission objectives. The preservation techniques used in space flight include freeze-dehydration, thermostabilization, irradiation, freezing and moisture adjustment. Innovative packaging material and techniques enhanced the shelf-stability of the food items. Future space voyages may include extended duration exploration missions requiring new packaging materials and advanced preservation techniques to meet mission goals of up to 5-year shelf-life foods.

  2. On orthogonality preserving quadratic stochastic operators

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhamedov, Farrukh; Taha, Muhammad Hafizuddin Mohd

    2015-05-15

    A quadratic stochastic operator (in short QSO) is usually used to present the time evolution of differing species in biology. Some quadratic stochastic operators have been studied by Lotka and Volterra. In the present paper, we first give a simple characterization of Volterra QSO in terms of absolutely continuity of discrete measures. Further, we introduce a notion of orthogonal preserving QSO, and describe such kind of operators defined on two dimensional simplex. It turns out that orthogonal preserving QSOs are permutations of Volterra QSO. The associativity of genetic algebras generated by orthogonal preserving QSO is studied too.

  3. Halogen and Cl isotopic systematics in Martian phosphates: Implications for the Cl cycle and surface halogen reservoirs on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, J. J.; Whitehouse, M. J.; John, T.; Nemchin, A. A.; Snape, J. F.; Bland, P. A.; Benedix, G. K.

    2017-01-01

    The Cl isotopic compositions and halogen (Cl, F, Br, and I) abundances in phosphates from eight Martian meteorites, spanning most rock types and ages currently available, have been measured in situ by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). Likewise, the distribution of halogens has been documented by x-ray mapping. Halogen concentrations range over several orders of magnitude up to some of the largest concentrations yet measured in Martian samples or on the Martian surface, and the inter-element ratios are highly variable. Similarly, Cl isotope compositions exhibit a larger range than all pristine terrestrial igneous rocks. Phosphates in ancient (>4 Ga) meteorites (orthopyroxenite ALH 84001 and breccia NWA 7533) have positive δ37Cl anomalies (+1.1 to + 2.5 ‰). These samples also exhibit explicit whole rock and grain scale evidence for hydrothermal or aqueous activity. In contrast, the phosphates in the younger basaltic Shergottite meteorites (<600 Ma) have negative δ37Cl anomalies (-0.2 to - 5.6 ‰). Phosphates with the largest negative δ37Cl anomalies display zonation in which the rims of the grains are enriched in all halogens and have significantly more negative δ37Cl anomalies suggestive of interaction with the surface of Mars during the latest stages of basalt crystallization. The phosphates with no textural, major element, or halogen enrichment evidence for mixing with this surface reservoir have an average δ37Cl of - 0.6 ‰, supporting a similar initial Cl isotope composition for Mars, the Earth, and the Moon. Oxidation and reduction of chlorine are the only processes known to strongly fractionate Cl isotopes, both positively and negatively, and perchlorate has been detected in weight percent concentrations on the Martian surface. The age range and obvious mixing history of the phosphates studied here suggest perchlorate formation and halogen cycling via brines, which have been documented on the Martian surface, has been active throughout Martian

  4. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVI, Part 19

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Patera? 24) Mars Polar Cap Edges Tracked over 3 Full Mars Years; 25) Elemental Abundance in Presolar SiC: Comparing Grains Separated by Acid Residue and Gently Separation Procedures; 26) First Results from the Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) Experiment on the Huygens Entry Probe of Titan; 27) Minor Element Behavior of Pallasite Olivine: Understanding Pallasite Thermal History and Chronology; 28) Canonical Anorthite in a Grosnaja Forsterite-bearing CAI; 29) Experimental Evidence for Condensation of 'Astrophysical' Carbonate; 30) Distribution and Classification of Multiple Coronae on Venus; 31) Recognition of Rayed Craters on Mars in THEMIS Thermal Infrared Imagery: Implications for Martian Meteorite Source Regions; 32) Geochemical Modeling of Evaporites on Mars: Insight from Meridiani Planum; 33) Hadean Crustal Processes Revealed from Oxygen Isotopes and U-Th-Pb Depth Profiling of Pre-4.0 Ga Detrital Zircons from Western Australia; 34) On Modeling the Seepage of Water into the Martian Subsurface; 35) Martial Gullies and Groundwater: A Series of Unfortunate Exceptions; 36) Olivine and Carbonate Globules in ALH84001: A Terrestrial Analog, and Implications for Water on Mars; 37) A Reevaluation of Mass Movements Within the Valles Marineris Region of Mars Using MOLA and MOC Data; 38) Evidence of Hydrated 109P/Swift-Tuttle Meteoroids from Meteor Spectroscopy; 39) Cr-54 Anomalies in the Solar System: Their Extent and Origin; 40) Reevaluation of the Mn-53-Cr-53 Systematic in the Basaltic Achondrites; 41) Effective Liquid Metal-Silicate Mixing Upon Shock by Power-Law Droplet Size Scaling in Richtmyer-Meshkov Like Perturbations; 42) Post-Impact Deformation of Impact Craters: Towards a Better Understanding Through the Study of Mjolnir Crater; 43) Cutting Silica Aerogel for Particle Extraction; 44) Liquid Hydrocarbons on Titan's Surface? How Cassini ISS Observations Fit into the Story (So Far); and 45) Mesoscale Simulations of Polar Circulations: Late Spring to Late Summe

  5. Successful transplantation of rat hearts subjected to extended cold preservation with a novel preservation solution.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Kenji; Fukai, Moto; Yamashita, Kenichiro; Kimura, Taichi; Hirokata, Gentaro; Shibasaki, Susumu; Fukumori, Daisuke; Haga, Sanae; Sugawara, Mitsuru; Suzuki, Tomomi; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Shimamura, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Michitaka; Kamiyama, Toshiya; Todo, Satoru

    2012-06-01

    Since prolonged cold preservation of the heart deteriorates the outcome of heart transplantation, a more protective preservation solution is required. We therefore developed a new solution, named Dsol, and examined whether Dsol, in comparison to UW, could better inhibit myocardial injury resulting from prolonged cold preservation. Syngeneic heterotopic heart transplantation in Lewis rats was performed after cold preservation with UW or Dsol for 24 or 36 h. In addition to graft survival, myocardial injury, ATP content, and Ca(2+) -dependent proteases activity were assessed in the 24-h preservation group. The cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration of H9c2 cardiomyocytes after 24-h cold preservation was assessed. Dsol significantly improved 7-day graft survival after 36-h preservation. After 24-h preservation, Dsol was associated with significantly faster recovery of ATP content and less activation of calpain and caspase-3 after reperfusion. Dsol diminished graft injury significantly, as revealed by the lower levels of infarction, apoptosis, serum LDH and AST release, and graft fibrosis at 7-day. Dsol significantly inhibited Ca(2+) overload during cold preservation. Dsol inhibited myocardial injury and improved graft survival by suppressing Ca(2+) overload during the preservation and the activation of Ca(2+) -dependent proteases. Dsol is therefore considered a better alternative to UW to ameliorate the outcome of heart transplantation.

  6. Color-preserving daytime radiative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2013-11-01

    We introduce a general approach to radiatively lower the temperature of a structure, while preserving its color under sunlight. The cooling effect persists in the presence of considerable convective and conductive heat exchange and for different solar absorptances.

  7. Color-preserving daytime radiative cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2013-11-25

    We introduce a general approach to radiatively lower the temperature of a structure, while preserving its color under sunlight. The cooling effect persists in the presence of considerable convective and conductive heat exchange and for different solar absorptances.

  8. Fertility preservation during cancer treatment: clinical guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Wallberg, Kenny A; Oktay, Kutluk

    2014-01-01

    The majority of children, adolescents, and young adults diagnosed with cancer today will become long-term survivors. The threat to fertility that cancer treatments pose to young patients cannot be prevented in many cases, and thus research into methods for fertility preservation is developing, aiming at offering cancer patients the ability to have biologically related children in the future. This paper discusses the current status of fertility preservation methods when infertility risks are related to surgical oncologic treatments, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy. Several scientific groups and societies have developed consensus documents and guidelines for fertility preservation. Decisions about fertility and imminent potentially gonadotoxic therapies must be made rapidly. Timely and complete information on the impact of cancer treatment on fertility and fertility preservation options should be presented to all patients when a cancer treatment is planned. PMID:24623991

  9. Preserving electronic records: Not the easiest task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Fynnette

    1993-01-01

    The National Archives and Records Administration has had a program for accessioning, describing, preserving and providing reference service to the electronic records (machine-readable records) created by Federal agencies for more than twenty years. Although there have been many changes in the name of the office, its basic mission has remained the same: to preserve and make available those records created by Federal agencies that the National Archives has determined to have value beyond the short-term need of the originating agency. A phrase that was once coined for a preservation conference still applies: the National Archives, when it decides to accept the transfer of records into its custody, is committing itself to preserving these records for perpetuity.

  10. TREATABILITY STUDIES FOR WOOD PRESERVING SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL), Site Management Support Branch, conducted a comprehensive treatability project for wood preserving sites in 1995 and 1996. This is a compilation report on the treatability studi...

  11. Laboratory Exercise to Evaluate Hay Preservatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGraw, R. L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a laboratory exercise designed to demonstrate the effects of moisture on hay preservation products in a manner that does not require large amounts of equipment or instructor time. Materials, procedures, and probable results are discussed. (CW)

  12. Pancreas preservation for pancreas and islet transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Iwanaga, Yasuhiro; Sutherland, David E.R.; Harmon, James V.; Papas, Klearchos K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize advances and limitations in pancreas procurement and preservation for pancreas and islet transplantation, and review advances in islet protection and preservation. Recent findings Pancreases procured after cardiac death, with in-situ regional organ cooling, have been successfully used for islet transplantation. Colloid-free Celsior and histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate preservation solutions are comparable to University of Wisconsin solution when used for cold storage before pancreas transplantation. Colloid-free preservation solutions are inferior to University of Wisconsin solution for pancreas preservation prior to islet isolation and transplantation. Clinical reports on pancreas and islet transplants suggest that the two-layer method may not offer significant benefits over cold storage with the University of Wisconsin solution: improved oxygenation may depend on the graft size; benefits in experimental models may not translate to human organs. Improvements in islet yield and quality occurred from pancreases treated with inhibitors of stress-induced apoptosis during procurement, storage, isolation or culture. Pancreas perfusion may be desirable before islet isolation and transplantation and may improve islet yields and quality. Methods for real-time, noninvasive assessment of pancreas quality during preservation have been implemented and objective islet potency assays have been developed and validated. These innovations should contribute to objective evaluation and establishment of improved pancreas preservation and islet isolation strategies. Summary Cold storage may be adequate for preservation before pancreas transplants, but insufficient when pancreases are processed for islets or when expanded donors are used. Supplementation of cold storage solutions with cytoprotective agents and perfusion may improve pancreas and islet transplant outcomes. PMID:18685343

  13. Preservation of methane hydrate at 1 atm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    A "pressure-release" method that enables reproducible bulk preservation of pure, porous, methane hydrate at conditions 50 to 75 K above its equilibrium T (193 K) at 1 atm is refined. The amount of hydrate preserved by this method appears to be greatly in excess of that reported in the previous citations, and is likely the result of a mechanism different from ice shielding.

  14. Preservation of food products by irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    McGivney, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    The use of irradiation to preserve food has the potential to significantly enhance our capacity to maximize the quality and quantity of the food we consume. In a world in which distribution of food occurs across continents and in which malnourished populations are in dire need of basic food products, any safe, effective, and efficient means of preserving food is more than welcome. Irradiation, as a method for food preservation, has been studied for more than 30 years. This discussion focuses on this most recent method for the preservation of food with particular emphasis on its effects on the safety, nutritive, and aesthetic values of the food preserved by irradiation. The use of ionizing radiation as a method to preserve foods is one that has been demonstrated to be effective for a variety of food classes. Irradiation offers a means to decontaminate, disinfest, and retard the spoilage of the food supply. At the same time, it appears that the wholesomeness of these food products is maintained. Nutritive value can be sustained by use of effective doses of radiation. Concerns over the safety of irradiated food are rooted in questions regarding the potential induction of radioactivity, harmful radiolytic products, and pathogenic radiation-resistant or mutant strains of microorganisms. Research findings have allayed concerns over safety. However, more research is necessary to conclusively resolve these safety issues. Food irradiation is a promising technology that has and will contribute to our ability to feed the people of this world. This technology is but one of many available ways to preserve our greatest natural resource, the food supply. Enhancement of the ability to preserve food by irradiation will facilitate the distribution of food from fertile developed regions to the malnourished peoples of underdeveloped countries. 21 references.

  15. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage for orbital reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Linberg, J.V.; Anderson, R.L.; Edwards, J.J.; Panje, W.R.; Bardach, J.

    1980-07-01

    Human costal cartilage is an excellent implant material for orbital and periorbital reconstruction because of its light weight, strength, homogeneous consistency and the ease with which it can be carved. Its use has been limited by the necessity of a separate surgical procedure to obtain the material. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage has been shown to have almost all the autogenous cartilage and is convenient to use. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage transplants do not elicit rejection reactions, resist infection and rarely undergo absorption.

  16. Innovations in food preservation in pastoral zones.

    PubMed

    Jans, C; Mulwa Kaindi, D W; Meile, L

    2016-11-01

    Food preservation makes a significant contribution to food security and food safety in pastoral communities with limited access to external food sources. Raw materials are preserved by heating, drying, smoking, pickling, salting, curing or fermentation with microorganisms. This article describes preservation techniques in the pastoral context, targeting the major dietary components of milk, meat and cereals; related health risks; and potential innovations for food preservation. Sustainable elimination of pathogenic microorganisms, preventing re-contamination, sporulation and the growth of zoonotic and foodborne microorganisms, is necessary to enhance food safety and ensure food security by reducing post-harvest losses and food waste. However, modern preservation procedures are difficult to adapt to the lifestyles of pastoralists and so are rarely implemented or accepted. Innovations should therefore focus on improving existing accepted procedures by promoting synergistic combinations to compensate for the disadvantages of these traditional techniques and ensure the quality of the raw material right up until consumption. Drying and spontaneous fermentation are key preservation techniques among pastoralists that serve as opportunities for innovation and can be shared across pastoral communities. Further potential for innovation lies in the unique, largely uncharacterised, microflora biodiversity of fermented products. The characterisation, safety assessment and conservation of these microorganisms are needed to develop locally adapted starter cultures that retain or improve on the desired characteristics of the finished product. Careful sensitisation of stakeholders, the study of social acceptance and capacitybuilding at all levels are required to achieve the sustainable implementation of such innovations, which will contribute to enhanced food security and safety.

  17. Preservation methods for kidney and liver

    PubMed Central

    Mangino, Martin J

    2009-01-01

    With the successful testing of the immunosuppressive effects of cyclosporine in transplant patients in 1978, the field of organ transplants began an exponential growth. With that, the field of organ preservation became increasingly important as the need to increase preservation time and improve graft function became paramount. However, for every patient that receives a transplanted organ, there are four more on the waiting list. In addition, a patient dies from the lack of a transplant almost every 1½ hour. To alleviate this donor crisis, there is a need to expand the donor pool to marginal donor organs. The main reason these organs are underutilized is because the current method of static preservation, simple cold storage, is ineffective. This article will provide a general review of the methods of preservation including simple cold storage, hypothermic machine perfusion, normothermic machine perfusion, and oxygen persufflation. In addition, the article will provide a review of how these dynamic preservation methods have improved the recovery and preservation of marginal donor organs including Donation after Cardiac Death and Fatty livers. PMID:20046672

  18. Candidates for larynx preservation: the next step?

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    Nonsurgical treatment approaches to enable larynx preservation in patients who would otherwise undergo laryngectomy have evolved over recent years. Randomized trials have demonstrated that concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy is more effective than doublet cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (PF)-based induction chemotherapy and radiotherapy in enabling larynx preservation. However, concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy is also associated with more toxicities than induction PF followed by radiotherapy. The triplet induction regimen of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-FU (TPF) is more effective than PF and is now considered to be the standard induction chemotherapy regimen for future larynx preservation trials. Manipulating the postinduction treatment regimen may help to improve larynx preservation rates, and possibly survival, and the use of concurrent chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy plus the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor cetuximab has been investigated in this setting. Determining the most effective treatment approach for larynx preservation will involve conducting a trial comparing concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy with sequential TPF induction chemotherapy followed by either radiotherapy or cetuximab plus radiotherapy. Collaboration among international groups is required to assess which approach would be most beneficial in terms of larynx function preservation, disease control, and survival.

  19. Metallothionein in rabbit kidneys preserved for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Elinder, C G; Lundgren, G; Nordberg, M; Palm, B; Piscator, M

    1984-03-01

    Thirteen rabbits were given repeated cadmium injections to achieve cadmium concentrations in kidney cortex ranging from 0.05 to 1 mmole Cd/kg wet weight. Another four animals served as controls. One kidney from each animal was frozen directly to -70 degrees C whereas the other kidney was kept for 24 hr at +4 degrees C in a preservative (Sachs' solution) to simulate conditions for preservation of human donor kidneys before transplantation. Protein binding of cadmium, zinc and copper in kidney homogenates and the concentration of metallothionein (MT) were measured in the kidney that was frozen directly and in the kidney that had been preserved. No gross differences in either the protein binding of cadmium, zinc and copper or in the MT content were seen between the directly frozen and preserved kidneys from the same animal. This indicates that MT is not rapidly broken down in rabbit kidneys which have been preserved similarly to human donor kidneys for 24 hr in a standard preservative solution prior to a transplantation.

  20. Database Design for Preservation Project Management: The California Newspaper Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayman, Lynne M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a database designed to manage a serials preservation project in which issues from multiple repositories are gathered and collated for preservation microfilming. Management information, added to bibliographic and holdings records, supports the production of reports tracking preservation activity. (Author)

  1. 78 FR 46374 - Minority Depository Institution Preservation Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... ADMINISTRATION RIN 3133-AE16 Minority Depository Institution Preservation Program AGENCY: National Credit Union.... SUMMARY: The National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) recognizes the importance of minority credit... Minority Depository Institution Preservation Program to encourage the preservation of Minority...

  2. Arithmetic knowledge in semantic dementia: is it invariably preserved?

    PubMed

    Julien, C L; Thompson, J C; Neary, D; Snowden, J S

    2008-09-01

    There is accumulating evidence of preserved arithmetic knowledge in semantic dementia (SD), contrasting with patients' striking impairment in other domains of semantic memory. This important finding exemplifies domain specificity in the breakdown of semantic memory and supports notions of the functional independence of semantic number knowledge. Nevertheless, evidence for preserved arithmetic knowledge in SD comes largely from single case studies. It is not known whether such preservation is a universal finding, or whether it persists irrespective of disease severity. The present study examined performance of 14 SD patients, varying in the severity of their semantic impairment, on tasks assessing knowledge of arithmetic signs, and on single-digit and multi-digit calculation problems, permitting evaluation of fact retrieval and use of procedures. SD patients performed generally well compared to 10 healthy controls on tests of addition and subtraction. However, abnormalities were elicited, which were not explained by education or hemispheric side of atrophy, but increased as a function of semantic severity. Patients had difficulty identifying arithmetic signs. They used increasingly basic, inflexible strategies to retrieve multiplication table 'facts', and in multi-digit calculations they made procedural errors that pointed to a failure to understand the differential weighting of left and right hand columns. The pattern of responses and error types mirrors in reverse that found in children as they acquire arithmetic competence, and suggests a progressive degradation in conceptual understanding of arithmetic. Longitudinal study of two SD patients demonstrated an association between semantic decline and impaired arithmetic performance. The findings challenge the notion of arithmetic knowledge as a totally separate semantic domain and suggest that the temporal lobes play an important role in arithmetic understanding.

  3. Gunshot residue preservation in seawater.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Anne-Christine; Hoogewerff, Jurian; Athens, Josie; Obertova, Zuzana; Duncan, Warwick; Waddell, Neil; Kieser, Jules

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about the persistence of gunshot residue (GSR) in soft tissue and bones during decomposition in marine environments. For a better understanding, qualitative and quantitative data were obtained on GSR retention on soft tissue and bony gunshot wounds (GSWs). A quantity of 36 fleshed and 36 defleshed bovine ribs were shot at contact range with 0.22 calibre hollow point ammunition using a Stirling 0.22 calibre long rifle. Bone specimens in triplicate were placed in three environments: submerged, intertidal and in supralittoral zone. Sets of triplicates were recovered on day 3, 10, 24 and 38, and analysed with scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX), and inductive coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The SEM-EDX recorded GSR-indicative particles surrounding the bullet entrance on all bone types (fleshed and defleshed) in all environments throughout the study. GSR-unique particles were only detected on the supralittoral bones. The ICP-MS analysis showed faster GSR loss on submerged than intertidal and supralittoral defleshed specimens. Fleshed specimens showed a faster GSR loss on intertidal than submerged and supralittoral specimens. In conclusion, the GSR disappeared faster from submerged and intertidal than non-submerged specimens. The difference of detection of GSR between analysed specimens (defleshed versus fleshed) disappeared upon defleshing. This study highlights the potential of finding evidence of GSR in a submerged body and the potential of microscopic and analytical methods for examining suspected GSW in highly decomposed bodies in marine habitats.

  4. Platelet preservation: agitation and containers.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Pieter F; de Korte, Dirk

    2011-06-01

    For platelets to maintain their in vitro quality and in vivo effectiveness, they need to be stored at room temperature with gentle agitation in gas-permeable containers. The mode of agitation affects the quality of the platelets, and a gentle method of agitation, either a circular or a flat bed movement, provides the best results. Tumblers or elliptical agitators induce platelet activation and subsequent damage. As long as the platelets remain in suspension, the agitation speed is not important. Agitation of the platelet concentrates ensures that the platelets are continuously oxygenated, that sufficient oxygen can enter the storage container and that excess carbon dioxide can be expelled. During transportation of platelet concentrates, nowadays over long distances where they are held without controlled agitation, platelets may tolerate a certain period without agitation. However, evidence is accumulating that during the time without agitation, local hypoxia surrounding the platelets may induce irreversible harm to the platelets. Over the decades, more gas-permeable plastics have been used to manufacture platelet containers. The use of different plastics and their influence on the platelet quality both in vitro and in vivo is discussed. The improved gas-permeability has allowed the extension of platelet storage from 3 days in the early 1980s, to currently at least 7 days. In the light of new developments, particularly the introduction of pathogen reduction techniques, the use of platelet additive solutions and the availability of improved automated separators, further (renewed) research in this area is warranted.

  5. Martian Meteorite Chronology and Effects of Impact Metamorphism (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, A.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Albarede, F.

    2009-12-01

    Martian (SNC) meteorites provide important clues to processes of alteration or shock at the surface of the planet as many of them contain secondary phases and/or high-pressure assemblages, which are the products of aqueous alteration and impact events, respectively. They include gabbros (shergottites), pyroxenites (nakhlites), and dunites (chassignites), and a single orthopyroxenite, ALH 84001. Pb-Pb isotope systematics of Martian meteorites favor three groups of formation ages: 4.3 Ga for depleted shergottites, 4.1 Ga for ALH 84001 and intermediate and enriched shergottites, and 1.3 Ga for nakhlites and Chassigny [1]. This contrasts with the young mineral isochron ages obtained by Ar-Ar dating or phosphate-based chronometers (e.g., U-Pb, Sm-Nd). In addition to Pb-Pb isotope systematics [1], we have obtained preliminary Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf mineral isochron data for the shergottite NWA 480 and find an age of ~345 Ma in contrast to its ~4.1 Ga Pb-Pb age. For the nakhlites MIL 03346 and Yamato-000593, we find Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf ages at ~1335 Ma, consistent with their ~1.3 Ga Pb-Pb age. Hence, all shergottites unambiguously show evidence of resetting events, which is not the case for nakhlites. We interpret the young ages indicated by shergottite Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, Lu-Hf, and U-Pb internal isochrons as recent resetting by fluids, impacts, or both. Internal isochrons date the last closure, whether initial cooling or late resetting, of the chronometric system in coexisting minerals. Problems arise in part because the carriers of the parent and daughter nuclides have been wrongly assigned to major rather than accessory minerals, and in part because, with the exception of the Pb-Pb chronometer, the rock samples have been strongly leached and, hence, the parent and daughter nuclides became fractionated in the process. The Rb-Sr, U-Pb, Sm-Nd, and Lu-Hf mineral isochrons of shergottites show young age clusters around 180, 350, 475, and 575 Ma. Each cluster of young mineral isochron ages

  6. Possible Meteorites in the Martian Hills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    From its winter outpost at 'Low Ridge' inside Gusev Crater, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this spectacular, color mosaic of hilly, sandy terrain and two potential iron meteorites. The two light-colored, smooth rocks about two-thirds of the way up from the bottom of the frame have been labeled 'Zhong Shan' and 'Allan Hills.'

    The two rocks' informal names are in keeping with the rover science team's campaign to nickname rocks and soils in the area after locations in Antarctica. Zhong Shang is an Antarctic base that the People's Republic of China opened on Feb. 26, 1989, at the Larsemann Hills in Prydz Bay in East Antarctica. Allan Hills is a location where researchers have found many Martian meteorites, including the controversial ALH84001, which achieved fame in 1996 when NASA scientists suggested that it might contain evidence for fossilized extraterrestrial life. Zhong Shan was the given name of Dr. Sun Yat-sen (1866-1925), known as the 'Father of Modern China.' Born to a peasant family in Guangdong, Sun moved to live with his brother in Honolulu at age 13 and later became a medical doctor. He led a series of uprisings against the Qing dynasty that began in 1894 and eventually succeeded in 1911. Sun served as the first provisional president when the Republic of China was founded in 1912.

    The Zhong Shan and Allan Hills rocks, at the left and right, respectively, have unusual morphologies and miniature thermal emission spectrometer signatures that resemble those of a rock known as 'Heat Shield' at the Meridiani site explored by Spirit's twin, Opportunity. Opportunity's analyses revealed Heat Shield to be an iron meteorite.

    Spirit acquired this approximately true-color image on the rover's 872nd Martian day, or sol (June 16, 2006), using exposures taken through three of the panoramic camera's filters, centered on wavelengths of 600 nanometers, 530 nanometers, and 480 nanometers.

  7. Geochemistry of Carbonates on Mars: Implications for Climate History and Nature of Aqueous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niles, Paul B.; Catling, David C.; Berger, Gilles; Chassefière, Eric; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Michalski, Joseph R.; Morris, Richard; Ruff, Steven W.; Sutter, Brad

    2013-01-01

    Ongoing research on martian meteorites and a new set of observations of carbonate minerals provided by an unprecedented series of robotic missions to Mars in the past 15 years help define new constraints on the history of martian climate with important crosscutting themes including: the CO2 budget of Mars, the role of Mg-, Fe-rich fluids on Mars, and the interplay between carbonate formation and acidity. Carbonate minerals have now been identified in a wide range of localities on Mars as well as in several martian meteorites. The martian meteorites contain carbonates in low abundances (<1 vol.%) and with a wide range of chemistries. Carbonates have also been identified by remote sensing instruments on orbiting spacecraft in several surface locations as well as in low concentrations (2-5 wt.%) in the martian dust. The Spirit rover also identified an outcrop with 16 to 34 wt.% carbonate material in the Columbia Hills of Gusev Crater that strongly resembled the composition of carbonate found in martian meteorite ALH 84001. Finally, the Phoenix lander identified concentrations of 3-6 wt.% carbonate in the soils of the northern plains. The carbonates discovered to date do not clearly indicate the past presence of a dense Noachian atmosphere, but instead suggest localized hydrothermal aqueous environments with limited water availability that existed primarily in the early to mid-Noachian followed by low levels of carbonate formation from thin films of transient water from the late Noachian to the present. The prevalence of carbonate along with evidence for active carbonate precipitation suggests that a global acidic chemistry is unlikely and a more complex relationship between acidity and carbonate formation is present.

  8. Mars Atmospheric Composition, Isotope Ratios and Seasonal Variations: Overview and Updates of the SAM Measurements at Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, C. R.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Franz, H.; Trainer, M. G.; Wong, M. H.; Mischna, M. A.; Flesch, G.; Farley, K. A.; Owen, T. C.; Niles, P. B.; Jones, J. H.; Christensen, L. E.; Martín-Torres, J.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    We will summarize the in situ measurements of atmospheric composition and the isotopic ratios of D/H in water, 13C/12C, 18O/16O, 17O/16O, and 13C18O/12C16O in carbon dioxide, 38Ar/36Ar, xKr/84Kr, and 15N/14N made in the martian atmosphere at Gale Crater from the Curiosity Rover using the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM)'s Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS) and Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS). With data over 700 sols since the Curiosity landing, we will discuss evidence and implications for changes on seasonal and other timescales. We will also present results for continued methane and methane enrichment experiments over this time period. Comparison between our measurements in the modern atmosphere and those of martian meteorites like ALH 84001 implies that the martian reservoirs of CO2 and H2O were largely established ~4 billion years ago, but that atmospheric loss or surface interaction may be still ongoing. References:[1] Mahaffy P. R. et al., Science, 341, 263-266, 2013, doi:10.1126/science.1237966. [2] Webster C. R. et al. (2013), Science, 341, 260-263, doi:10.1126/science.1237961. [3] Wong, M. H. et al. (2013), Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1002/2013GL057840. [4] Atreya S. K. et al (2013), Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 1-5, doi:10.1002/2013GL057763. The research described here was supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  9. Influence of Microbial Biofilms on the Preservation of Primary Soft Tissue in Fossil and Extant Archosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Joseph E.; Lenczewski, Melissa E.; Scherer, Reed P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Mineralized and permineralized bone is the most common form of fossilization in the vertebrate record. Preservation of gross soft tissues is extremely rare, but recent studies have suggested that primary soft tissues and biomolecules are more commonly preserved within preserved bones than had been presumed. Some of these claims have been challenged, with presentation of evidence suggesting that some of the structures are microbial artifacts, not primary soft tissues. The identification of biomolecules in fossil vertebrate extracts from a specimen of Brachylophosaurus canadensis has shown the interpretation of preserved organic remains as microbial biofilm to be highly unlikely. These discussions also propose a variety of potential mechanisms that would permit the preservation of soft-tissues in vertebrate fossils over geologic time. Methodology/Principal Findings This study experimentally examines the role of microbial biofilms in soft-tissue preservation in vertebrate fossils by quantitatively establishing the growth and morphology of biofilms on extant archosaur bone. These results are microscopically and morphologically compared with soft-tissue extracts from vertebrate fossils from the Hell Creek Formation of southeastern Montana (Latest Maastrichtian) in order to investigate the potential role of microbial biofilms on the preservation of fossil bone and bound organic matter in a variety of taphonomic settings. Based on these analyses, we highlight a mechanism whereby this bound organic matter may be preserved. Conclusions/Significance Results of the study indicate that the crystallization of microbial biofilms on decomposing organic matter within vertebrate bone in early taphonomic stages may contribute to the preservation of primary soft tissues deeper in the bone structure. PMID:20967227

  10. Organic Carbon Exists in Mars Meteorites: where is it on the Martian Surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, David; Clemett, Simon; Gibson, Everett; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie; Wentworth, Susan

    The search for organic carbon on Mars has been a major challenge. The first attempt was the Viking GC-MS in situ experiment which gave inconclusive results at two sites on Mars [1]. After the discovery that the SNC meteorites were from Mars [2], [3-5] reported C isotopic compositional information which suggested a reduced C component present in the Martian meteorites. [6 7] reported the presence of reduced C components (i.e., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) associated with the carbonate globules in ALH84001. Jull et al. [8] noted in Nakhla there was an acid insoluble C component present with more than 75% of its C lacking any 14 C, which is modern-day terrestrial carbon. This C fraction was believed to be either indigenous martian or ancient meteoritic carbon. Fisk et al. [9, 10] have shown textural evidence along with C-enriched areas within fractures in Nakhla and ALH84001. Westall et al. [11] have shown the presence of a large irregular fragment of organic material completely embedded within a chip of ALH84001. Interior samples from the Nakhla SNC made available by the British Museum of Natural His-tory, were analyzed. Petrographic examination [12] of Nakhla showed evidence of fractures ( 0.5 m wide) filled with dark brown to black dendritic material with characteristics similar to those observed by [10]. Iddingsite is also present along fractures in olivine. Fracture filling and dendritic material was examined by SEM-EDX, TEM-EDX, Focused Electron Beam mi-croscopy, Laser Raman Spectroscopy, Nano-SIMS Ion Micro-probe, and Stepped-Combustion Static Mass Spectrometry. Observations from the first three techniques are discussed in [12 and 13]. Nano-SIMS Ion Microprobe studies of the C-bearing fractures, containing the optically dark dendritic material, show direct correlation between C- and CN- abundances. Ion abun-dances for epoxy are distinct from those of the dendritic material[12] . Laser Raman Spectrometry was utilized to examine the optically dark dendritic

  11. Lipid Biomarker Preservation in Silica-Depositing Hydrothermal Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Parenteau, M. N.; Farmer, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    The discovery of extensive silica-rich deposits at Home Plate in the Columbia Hills indicates that hydrothermal conditions once existed on Mars (Squyres et al. 2008). Two types of environments could have been responsible for forming these materials: fumaroles or hydrothermal springs. Examples of both types of these thermal features are found throughout Yellowstone National Park (YNP). The discovery of bona fide microfossils in ancient cherts indicates that silica deposition was an excellent mechanism for organic preservation on the early Earth. Given the importance that organic biomarkers have played in identifying some of the earliest microbial life on Earth and the potential for a similar habitable period on Mars, examination of the preservation of organic biomarkers within various hydrothermal, silica-rich modern analogs is essential for future interpretation of Martian organics. Cyanobacterial mats and biofilms are common inhabitants of hydrothermal spring systems worldwide, at temperatures below 73°C and over a broad range of pH, from acidic to alkaline. Bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs) are the biological precursors for the abundant fossil hopanes recovered from sedimentary rock (Brocks et al. 1999; Summons et al. 1999). The 2-methyl homologs are generally considered a biomarker for cyanobacterial-dominated paleoecosystems. Some evidence exists that the complex molecular structure of BHP is retained upon entombment in hydrothermal silica and that rapid incorporation into the silica matrix may enhance preservation (Gibson et al. 2008). Here we report on the preservation of microbial lipids in several alkaline and acidic, silica-depositing hotsprings in YNP with particular emphasis on the potential for BHP preservation. Brocks JJ et al (1999) Archaean molecular fossils and the early rise of the eukaryotes. Science 185: 1033-1036 Gibson RA et al (2008) Bacteriohopanepolyol signatures of cyanobacterial and methanotrophic bacterial populations recorded in a geothermal

  12. Fertility preservation in young patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suhag, Virender; Sunita, B. S.; Sarin, Arti; Singh, A. K.; Dashottar, S.

    2015-01-01

    Infertility can arise as a consequence of treatment of oncological conditions. The parallel and continued improvement in both the management of oncology and fertility cases in recent times has brought to the forefront the potential for fertility preservation in patients being treated for cancer. Many survivors will maintain their reproductive potential after the successful completion of treatment for cancer. However total body irradiation, radiation to the gonads, and certain high dose chemotherapy regimens can place women at risk for acute ovarian failure or premature menopause and men at risk for temporary or permanent azoospermia. Providing information about risk of infertility and possible interventions to maintain reproductive potential are critical for the adolescent and young adult population at the time of diagnosis. There are established means of preserving fertility before cancer treatment; specifically, sperm cryopreservation for men and in vitro fertilization and embryo cryopreservation for women. Several innovative techniques are being actively investigated, including oocyte and ovarian follicle cryopreservation, ovarian tissue transplantation, and in vitro follicle maturation, which may expand the number of fertility preservation choices for young cancer patients. Fertility preservation may also require some modification of cancer therapy; thus, patients’ wishes regarding future fertility and available fertility preservation alternatives should be discussed before initiation of therapy. PMID:26942145

  13. Constrained Graph Optimization: Interdiction and Preservation Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Schild, Aaron V

    2012-07-30

    The maximum flow, shortest path, and maximum matching problems are a set of basic graph problems that are critical in theoretical computer science and applications. Constrained graph optimization, a variation of these basic graph problems involving modification of the underlying graph, is equally important but sometimes significantly harder. In particular, one can explore these optimization problems with additional cost constraints. In the preservation case, the optimizer has a budget to preserve vertices or edges of a graph, preventing them from being deleted. The optimizer wants to find the best set of preserved edges/vertices in which the cost constraints are satisfied and the basic graph problems are optimized. For example, in shortest path preservation, the optimizer wants to find a set of edges/vertices within which the shortest path between two predetermined points is smallest. In interdiction problems, one deletes vertices or edges from the graph with a particular cost in order to impede the basic graph problems as much as possible (for example, delete edges/vertices to maximize the shortest path between two predetermined vertices). Applications of preservation problems include optimal road maintenance, power grid maintenance, and job scheduling, while interdiction problems are related to drug trafficking prevention, network stability assessment, and counterterrorism. Computational hardness results are presented, along with heuristic methods for approximating solutions to the matching interdiction problem. Also, efficient algorithms are presented for special cases of graphs, including on planar graphs. The graphs in many of the listed applications are planar, so these algorithms have important practical implications.

  14. Cancer and fertility: strategies to preserve fertility.

    PubMed

    Diedrich, K; Fauser, B C J M; Devroey, P

    2011-03-01

    Fertility preservation is a key component of cancer management in young people. The Fourth Evian Annual Reproduction Workshop Meeting was held in April 2009 to discuss cancer and fertility in young adults. Specialists in oncology, assisted reproduction, embryology and clinical genetics presented published data and ongoing research on cancer and fertility, with particular focus on strategies to preserve fertility. This report is based on the expert presentations and group discussions, supplemented with publications from literature searches and the authors' knowledge. Fertility preservation should be considered for all young people undergoing potentially gonadotoxic cancer treatment. A variety of options are required to facilitate safe and effective fertility preservation for individual patients. Sperm banking is a simple and low-cost intervention. Embryo cryopreservation is the only established method of female fertility preservation. Oocyte cryopreservation offers a useful option for women without a male partner. Emergency ovarian stimulation and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue (followed by tissue transplantation or in-vitro maturation of oocytes) are experimental techniques for women who require urgent cancer treatment. Further prospective studies are required to validate cryopreservation of oocytes and ovarian tissue, in-vitro maturation of oocytes and new vitrification techniques and to identify any long-term sequelae of slow freezing of embryos.

  15. Bacteriocins and Their Applications in Food Preservation.

    PubMed

    Ramu, Ramith; Shirahatti, Prithvi S; Devi, Aishwarya T; Prasad, Ashwini; J, Kumuda; M S, Lochana; F, Zameer; B L, Dhananjaya; M N, Nagendra Prasad

    2015-07-20

    Bacteriocins are ribosomally-synthesized antimicrobial peptides or proteinaceous compounds produced by bacterial strains. They are generally effective in inhibiting the growth of similar or closely related bacterial strains. A high diversity of various bacteriocins is produced by many lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and is found in numerous fermented and non-fermented foods. Several bacteriocins from LAB extend potential applications in food preservation, thus help foods to be naturally preserved and richer in organoleptic and nutritional properties. Though chemical preservatives for the preservation of food are successful to some extent, their quality is not as satisfying as fresh food. Hence, an alternative is required and bacteriocins serve the purpose. Nisin is currently the only bacteriocin widely used as a food preservative. Numerous bacteriocins have been characterized chemically, biochemically, genetically and also at the molecular level to understand their basic mode of action. This article gives an overview of classification of bacteriocins, isolation & characterization, and mode of action. Besides, article highlights the optimized parameters for growth of bacteria in the production of bacteriocins and various bioassays for their determination. Special emphasis has been provided on explaining the beneficial aspects of nisin.

  16. Oxygen absorbers in food preservation: a review.

    PubMed

    Cichello, Simon Angelo

    2015-04-01

    The preservation of packaged food against oxidative degradation is essential to establish and improve food shelf life, customer acceptability, and increase food security. Oxygen absorbers have an important role in the removal of dissolved oxygen, preserving the colour, texture and aroma of different food products, and importantly inhibition of food spoilage microbes. Active packaging technology in food preservation has improved over decades mostly due to the sealing of foods in oxygen impermeable package material and the quality of oxygen absorber. Ferrous iron oxides are the most reliable and commonly used oxygen absorbers within the food industry. Oxygen absorbers have been transformed from sachets of dried iron-powder to simple self-adhesive patches to accommodate any custom size, capacity and application. Oxygen concentration can be effectively lowered to 100 ppm, with applications spanning a wide range of food products and beverages across the world (i.e. bread, meat, fish, fruit, and cheese). Newer molecules that preserve packaged food materials from all forms of degradation are being developed, however oxygen absorbers remain a staple product for the preservation of food and pharmaceutical products to reduce food wastage in developed nations and increased food security in the developing & third world.

  17. Selective Preservation of Fossil Ghost Fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meacham, Amanda

    2016-04-01

    A unique type of fossil fish preservation has been discovered in the Angelo Member (Fossil Lake) of the Green River Formation. The Angelo Member is a predominately evaporative deposit dominated by dolomite, but contains facies of fossiliferous laminated calcimicrite. Fossil fish occurring in two beds conspicuously lack bones. Fish in the lower bed are only preserved as organic material, including skin, pigments, and eyes. Fish in the upper bed have three-dimensional etching where bones once existed but also contain skin, pigments, and eyes. The top third of the upper bed often contains calcite crystals that are pseudomorphs after trona and possibly halite. Preliminary mineralogical analysis and mapping of evaporate facies suggests that this unique preservation may be related to lake geochemical conditions, such as high pH and alkalinity. To our knowledge, this is the first time this type of preservation has been observed and studied. Fossils and sediments within these beds are being studied both vertically and laterally through the one-meter thick sequence containing the fossil fish using XRD, isotopic, SEM, thin section, and total organic carbon analysis. Nine quarries, 0.5-1 meter square, were excavated for both fossils and rock samples along with 17 additional rock sample locations across an approximately 25-kilometer square region. This investigation has the capability of reconstructing the paleoenvironment and lake chemistry of Fossil Lake during the deposition of the "ghost-fish" beds and solving the mystery of the "missing bones" and the unusual process of preservation.

  18. Clinical Significance of Symptoms in Smokers with Preserved Pulmonary Function

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Prescott G.; Barr, R. Graham; Bleecker, Eugene; Christenson, Stephanie A.; Couper, David; Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Gouskova, Natalia A.; Hansel, Nadia N.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Kanner, Richard E.; Kleerup, Eric; Lazarus, Stephen C.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Paine, Robert; Rennard, Stephen; Tashkin, Donald P.; Han, MeiLan K.

    2016-01-01

    bronchodilators and 23% used inhaled glucocorticoids. CONCLUSIONS Although they do not meet the current criteria for COPD, symptomatic current or former smokers with preserved pulmonary function have exacerbations, activity limitation, and evidence of airway disease. They currently use a range of respiratory medications without any evidence base. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health; SPIROMICS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01969344.) PMID:27168432

  19. Microbiological preservation of cucumbers for bulk storage by the use of acetic acid and food preservatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial growth did not occur when cucumbers were preserved without a thermal process by storage in solutions containing acetic acid, sodium benzoate, and calcium chloride to maintain tissue firmness. The concentrations of acetic acid and sodium benzoate required to assure preservation were low en...

  20. Preservation Concerns in Construction and Remodeling of Libraries: Planning for Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trinkley, Michael

    To help libraries and other holdings institutions better incorporate preservation concerns in construction, renovation, and routine maintenance, various techniques are presented that allow preservation concerns to be integrated. The following topics are considered: (1) site selection; (2) design of the building envelope; (3) the library interior;…

  1. Cryopreservation for preservation of potato genetic resources

    PubMed Central

    Niino, Takao; Arizaga, Miriam Valle

    2015-01-01

    Cryopreservation is becoming a very important tool for the long-term storage of plant genetic resources and efficient cryopreservation protocols have been developed for a large number of plant species. Practical procedures, developed using in vitro tissue culture, can be a simple and reliable preservation option of potato genetic resources rather than maintaining by vegetative propagation in genebanks due their allogamous nature. Cryopreserved materials insure a long-term backup of field collections against loss of plant germplasm. Occurrence of genetic variation, in tissue culture cells during prolonged subcultures, can be avoided with suitable cryopreservation protocols that provide high regrowth, leading and facilitating a systematic and strategic cryo-banking of plant genetic resources. Cryopreservation protocols for potato reviewed here, can efficiently complement field and in vitro conservation, providing for preservation of genotypes difficult to preserve by other methods, wild types and other species decided as priority collections. PMID:25931979

  2. Antimicrobial preservative effectiveness of natural peptide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kamysz, Wojciech; Turecka, Katarzyna

    2005-01-01

    The constantly growing resistance of microbes to drugs and other substances which fight microbial infections leads to search for new antimicrobial substances. Among substances which attract the scientists attention are antimicrobial peptides. Such compounds are quite common in nature and belong to the most important elements of the innate immune system of all living organisms. Numerous antimicrobial peptides have been isolated from insects, amphibians, mammals, plants and bacterial species. In this study we investigated the in vitro activity of two animal peptides, citropin 1.1 and protegrin 1 alone and in combination against microbial strains proposed for the evaluation of preservatives: Escherichia coli ATCC 8739, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027, Candida albicans ATCC 10231, and Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404. The results of the antimicrobial preservative effectiveness were compared to the values received for benzalkonium chloride, popular preservative of medicines and cosmetics.

  3. Exceptionally preserved jellyfishes from the Middle Cambrian.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Paulyn; Halgedahl, Susan L; Hendricks, Jonathan R; Jarrard, Richard D; Marques, Antonio C; Collins, Allen G; Lieberman, Bruce S

    2007-10-31

    Cnidarians represent an early diverging animal group and thus insight into their origin and diversification is key to understanding metazoan evolution. Further, cnidarian jellyfish comprise an important component of modern marine planktonic ecosystems. Here we report on exceptionally preserved cnidarian jellyfish fossils from the Middle Cambrian (approximately 505 million years old) Marjum Formation of Utah. These are the first described Cambrian jellyfish fossils to display exquisite preservation of soft part anatomy including detailed features of structures interpreted as trailing tentacles and subumbrellar and exumbrellar surfaces. If the interpretation of these preserved characters is correct, their presence is diagnostic of modern jellyfish taxa. These new discoveries may provide insight into the scope of cnidarian diversity shortly after the Cambrian radiation, and would reinforce the notion that important taxonomic components of the modern planktonic realm were in place by the Cambrian period.

  4. Privacy-preserving backpropagation neural network learning.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tingting; Zhong, Sheng

    2009-10-01

    With the development of distributed computing environment , many learning problems now have to deal with distributed input data. To enhance cooperations in learning, it is important to address the privacy concern of each data holder by extending the privacy preservation notion to original learning algorithms. In this paper, we focus on preserving the privacy in an important learning model, multilayer neural networks. We present a privacy-preserving two-party distributed algorithm of backpropagation which allows a neural network to be trained without requiring either party to reveal her data to the other. We provide complete correctness and security analysis of our algorithms. The effectiveness of our algorithms is verified by experiments on various real world data sets.

  5. Sequence Compaction to Preserve Transition Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Pinar, Ali; Liu, C.L.

    2002-12-12

    Simulation-based power estimation is commonly used for its high accuracy despite excessive computation times. Techniques have been proposed to speed it up by compacting an input sequence while preserving its power-consumption characteristics. We propose a novel method to compact a sequence that preserves transition frequencies. We prove the problem is NP-Complete, and propose a graph model to reduce it to that of finding a heaviest weighted trail on a directed graph, along with a heuristic utilizing this model. We also propose using multiple sequences for better accuracy with even shorter sequences. Experiments showed that power dissipation can be estimated with an error of only 2.3 percent, while simulation times are reduced by 10. Proposed methods effectively preserve transition frequencies and generated solutions that are very close to an optimal. Experiments also showed that multiple sequences granted more accurate results with even shorter sequences.

  6. Organ preservation surgery for laryngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Sharad; Carney, Andrew Simon

    2009-01-01

    The principles of management of the laryngeal cancer have evolved over the recent past with emphasis on organ preservation. These developments have paralleled technological advancements as well as refinement in the surgical technique. The surgeons are able to maintain physiological functions of larynx namely speech, respiration and swallowing without compromising the loco-regional control of cancer in comparison to the more radical treatment modalities. A large number of organ preservation surgeries are available to the surgeon; however, careful assessment of the stage of the cancer and selection of the patient is paramount to a successful outcome. A comprehensive review of various organ preservation techniques in vogue for the management of laryngeal cancer is presented. PMID:19442314

  7. Preserving Dark Skies: Do Astronomers Care?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, D. R.; Crawford, D. L.

    2001-12-01

    Ground based telescopes are, even in this era of planetary missions and space telescopes, the dominant source of data on solar system objects. Yet many of the premier observing sites in the world are threatened by increasing artificial light that is scattered into the sky - light pollution. World class observing sites such as Mt. Wilson have long since lost the ability to do cutting edge faint object science and observatories in Southern Arizona have been recently threatened - the Canoa Ranch development being the most recent example. Yet there are actions that can be taken to preserve dark skies, not only for astronomy, but also for the benefit of all humanity. Lead by astronomers, effective outdoor lighting codes have been produced and adopted by many jurisdictional authorities. Advocacy organizations such as the International Dark-sky Association (IDA) distribute educational material on how to preserve dark skies through good outdoor lighting practices. Other institutions, such as the National Park Service, are realizing that dark skies are an integral part of the wilderness experience and are taking steps to preserve the quality of their skies. However, the primary beneficaries of dark sky preservation efforts, namely the ground based astronomical community, have largely failed to become involved in efforts to preserve dark skies. For example, only a few percent of the membership of the American Astronomical Society is active in light pollution work or is even a member of IDA. In this presentation, Iwe will outline what is being done locally to preserve dark skies througout the world. In addition, some observations on the level of support from the astronomical community will be offered.

  8. Exceptional fossil preservation and the cambrian explosion.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Nicholas J

    2003-02-01

    Exceptionally preserved, non-biomineralizing fossils contribute importantly to resolving details of the Cambrian explosion, but little to its overall patterns. Six distinct "types" of exceptional preservation are identified for the terminal Proterozoic-Cambrian interval, each of which is dependent on particular taphonomic circumstances, typically restricted both in space and time. Taphonomic pathways yielding exceptional preservation were particularly variable through the Proterozoic-Cambrian transition, at least in part a consequence of contemporaneous evolutionary innovations. Combined with the reasonably continuous record of "Doushantuo-type preservation," and the fundamentally more robust records of shelly fossils, phytoplankton cysts and trace fossils, these taphonomic perturbations contribute to the documentation of major evolutionary and biogeochemical shifts through the terminal Proterozoic and early Cambrian.Appreciation of the relationship between taphonomic pathway and fossil expression serves as a useful tool for interpreting exceptionally preserved, often problematic, early Cambrian fossils. In shale facies, for example, flattened non-biomineralizing structures typically represent the remains of degradation-resistant acellular and extracellular "tissues" such as chaetae and cuticles, whereas three-dimensional preservation represents labile cellular tissues with a propensity for attracting and precipitating early diagenetic minerals. Such distinction helps to identify the acuticular integument of hyolithids, the chaetae-like nature of Wiwaxia sclerites, the chaetognath-like integument of Amiskwia, the midgut glands of various Burgess Shale arthropods, and the misidentification of deposit-feeding arthropods in the Chengjiang biota. By the same reasoning, putative lobopods in the Sirius Passet biota and putative deuterostomes in the Chengiang biota are better interpreted as arthropods.

  9. Moesin functionality in hypothermic liver preservation injury.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tao; Lindell, Susanne L; Kowalski, Chris; Mangino, Martin J

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine how expression and functionality of the cytoskeletal linker protein moesin is involved in hepatic hypothermic preservation injury. Mouse livers were cold stored in University of Wisconsin (UW) solution and reperfused on an isolated perfused liver (IPL) device for one hour. Human hepatocytes (HepG2) and human or murine sinusoidal endothelial cells (SECs) were cold stored and rewarmed to induce hypothermic preservation injury. The cells were transfected with: wild type moesin, an siRNA duplex specific for moesin, and the moesin mutants T558D and T558A. Tissue and cell moesin expression and its binding to actin were determined by Western blot. Liver IPL functional outcomes deteriorated proportional to the length of cold storage, which correlated with moesin disassociation from the actin cytoskeleton. Cell viability (LDH and WST-8) in the cell models progressively declined with increasing preservation time, which also correlated with moesin disassociation. Transfection of a moesin containing plasmid or an siRNA duplex specific for moesin into HepG2 cells resulted in increased and decreased moesin expression, respectively. Overexpression of moesin protected while moesin knock-down potentiated preservation injury in the HepG2 cell model. Hepatocytes expressing the T558A (inactive) and T558D (active) moesin binding mutants demonstrated significantly more and less preservation injury, respectively. Cold storage time dependently caused hepatocyte detachment from the matrix and cell death, which was prevented by the T558D active moesin mutation. In conclusion, moesin is causally involved in hypothermic liver cell preservation injury through control of its active binding molecular functionality.

  10. Avian genetic stock preservation: an industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Fulton, J E

    2006-02-01

    There are different types of poultry genetic resources including mutants, inbred lines, specialized/selected stocks, standard breeds, and elite commercial pure lines. These resources differ in their degree of value to the poultry industry. There is considerable concern within poultry breeding companies about the continuing losses of these genetic resources, particularly as this loss seems to have escalated over the past decade. Varied genetic stocks can provide fundamental information regarding gene function, genetic interactions, and genetic pathways. This information is important for efficient improvement of commercial poultry performance. Equally important is the role of these genetic resources in teaching and the education of students and future researchers. Currently, the only practical preservation method for birds in the poultry industry involves live bird conservation. Flocks of elite commercial stocks are maintained at multiple locations, providing insurance against disease outbreak and the possibility of quarantine restrictions. The current cryopreservation methods apply only to sperm. Thus, the W chromosome and the mitochondria, which are contributed by the female gamete, cannot be preserved. Cryopreserved semen shows considerable variation in both fertility and hatchability rates, not only among lines, but also among males within lines. The biological basis for this variation is unknown, and there is concern that the use of cryopreserved semen may result in unintended selection and loss of genetic variability. Cryopreservation cannot be applied in the poultry breeding industry until methodologies are developed that produce high viability for both male and female avian preserved gametes. More research is needed in the areas of sources of variation in viability following freeze/thaw, female gamete cryopreservation, and embryo preservation. Because there are currently no appropriate methods of cryopreservation available to the poultry industry, the long

  11. Data Preservation in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, Richard; Brooks, Travis; Le Diberder, Francois; Dubois-Felsmann, Gregory; Neal, Homer; Bellis, Matt; Boehnlein, Amber; Votava, Margaret; White, Vicky; Wolbers, Stephen; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Roser, Robert; Snider, Rick; Lucchesi, Donatella; Denisov, Dmitri; Soldner-Rembold, Stefan; Li, Qizhong; Varnes, Erich; Jonckheere, Alan; Gasthuber, Martin; Gulzow, Volker; /DESY /Marseille, CPPM /Dortmund U. /DESY /Gent U. /DESY, Zeuthen /KEK, Tsukuba /CC, Villeurbanne /CERN /INFN, Bari /Gjovik Coll. Engineering /Karlsruhe, Forschungszentrum /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Carleton U. /Cornell U. /Rutherford

    2012-04-03

    Data from high-energy physics (HEP) experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. At the same time, HEP has no coherent strategy for data preservation and re-use. An inter-experimental Study Group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis was convened at the end of 2008 and held two workshops, at DESY (January 2009) and SLAC (May 2009). This document is an intermediate report to the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) of the reflections of this Study Group. Large data sets accumulated during many years of detector operation at particle accelerators are the heritage of experimental HEP. These data sets offer unique opportunities for future scientific studies, sometimes long after the shut-down of the actual experiments: new theoretical input; new experimental results and analysis techniques; the quest for high-sensitivity combined analyses; the necessity of cross checks. In many cases, HEP data sets are unique; they cannot and most likely will not be superseded by data from newer generations of experiments. Once lost, or in an unusable state, HEP data samples cannot be reasonably recovered. The cost of conserving this heritage through a collaborative, target-oriented long-term data preservation program would be small, compared to the costs of past experimental projects or to the efforts to re-do experiments. However, this cost is not negligible, especially for collaborations close or past their end-date. The preservation of HEP data would provide today's collaborations with a secure way to complete their data analysis and enable them to seize new scientific opportunities in the coming years. The HEP community will benefit from preserved data samples through reanalysis, combination, education and outreach. Funding agencies would receive more scientific return, and a positive image, from their initial investment leading to the production and the first analysis of preserved data.

  12. An edge preserving differential image coding scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rost, Martin C.; Sayood, Khalid

    1992-01-01

    Differential encoding techniques are fast and easy to implement. However, a major problem with the use of differential encoding for images is the rapid edge degradation encountered when using such systems. This makes differential encoding techniques of limited utility, especially when coding medical or scientific images, where edge preservation is of utmost importance. A simple, easy to implement differential image coding system with excellent edge preservation properties is presented. The coding system can be used over variable rate channels, which makes it especially attractive for use in the packet network environment.

  13. Preservation and storage of prepared ballistic gelatine.

    PubMed

    Mattijssen, E J A T; Alberink, I; Jacobs, B; van den Boogaard, Y

    2016-02-01

    The use of ballistic gelatine, generally accepted as a human muscle tissue simulant in wound ballistic studies, might be improved by adding a preservative (Methyl 4-hydroxybenzoate) which inhibits microbial growth. This study shows that replacing a part of the gelatine powder by the preservative does not significantly alter the penetration depth of projectiles. Storing prepared blocks of ballistic gelatine over time decreased the penetration depth of projectiles. Storage of prepared gelatine for 4 week already showed a significant effect on the penetration depth of projectiles.

  14. Privacy-preserving restricted boltzmann machine.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Zhang, Yuan; Ji, Yue

    2014-01-01

    With the arrival of the big data era, it is predicted that distributed data mining will lead to an information technology revolution. To motivate different institutes to collaborate with each other, the crucial issue is to eliminate their concerns regarding data privacy. In this paper, we propose a privacy-preserving method for training a restricted boltzmann machine (RBM). The RBM can be got without revealing their private data to each other when using our privacy-preserving method. We provide a correctness and efficiency analysis of our algorithms. The comparative experiment shows that the accuracy is very close to the original RBM model.

  15. In Situ Preservation of Historic Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, R.; Brooks, R.

    The loss of the Mir space station is shown to symbolize a new consciousness of the value of space artefacts. The reasons why such artefacts as Mir become historic objects worthy of preservation are examined. Preservation of space vehicles in situ is discussed, with particular reference to safety, monitoring and long term costs. An argument is made for a wider definition for World Heritage designations to include material beyond the surface of the Earth, and for international bodies to assess, monitor and oversee these projects. Such heritage sites are seen as an economic driver for the development of space tourism in the 21st century.

  16. Debating the biological reality of modelling preservation.

    PubMed

    ter, Steeg P F; Ueckert, J E

    2002-03-01

    Predictive food microbiology is a rapidly developing science and has made great advances. The aim is to debate a number of issues in modelling preservation: (1) inoculum and prehistory effects on lag times and process susceptibility; (2) mechanistic vs. empirical modelling; and (3) concluding remarks (the Species concept, methodology and biovariability). Increasing the awareness in these issues may bridge the gap between the complex reality in food microbial physiology and the application potential of predictive models. The challenge of bringing integrated preservation or risk analysis further and developing ways to truly model and link biological susceptibility distributions from raw ingredients via process survival to outgrowth probabilities in the final product remains.

  17. Avian artificial insemination and semen preservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.; Risser, Arthur C.; Todd, Frank S.

    1983-01-01

    Summary: Artificial insemination is a practical propagation tool that has been successful with a variety of birds. Cooperative, massage, and electroejaculation and modifications of these three basic methods of semen collection are described for a variety of birds. Semen color and consistency and sperm number, moti!ity, and morphology, as discussed, are useful indicators of semen quality, but the most reliable test of semen quality is the production of fertile eggs. Successful cryogenic preservation of avian semen with DMSO or glycerol as the cryoprotectant has been possible. Although the methods for preservation require special equipment, use of frozen semen requires only simple insemination supplies

  18. 43 CFR 15.12 - Closing of Preserve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Closing of Preserve. 15.12 Section 15.12 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.12 Closing of Preserve. The Preserve may be closed to public use in the event of emergency...

  19. 43 CFR 15.12 - Closing of Preserve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Closing of Preserve. 15.12 Section 15.12 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.12 Closing of Preserve. The Preserve may be closed to public use in the event of emergency...

  20. 43 CFR 15.12 - Closing of Preserve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Closing of Preserve. 15.12 Section 15.12 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.12 Closing of Preserve. The Preserve may be closed to public use in the event of emergency...

  1. 43 CFR 15.12 - Closing of Preserve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Closing of Preserve. 15.12 Section 15.12 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.12 Closing of Preserve. The Preserve may be closed to public use in the event of emergency...

  2. 21 CFR 146.152 - Orange juice with preservative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Orange juice with preservative. 146.152 Section... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.152 Orange juice with preservative. (a) Orange juice with preservative... of orange juice for manufacturing as provided for in § 146.151, except that a preservative is...

  3. 21 CFR 146.152 - Orange juice with preservative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Orange juice with preservative. 146.152 Section... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.152 Orange juice with preservative. (a) Orange juice with preservative... of orange juice for manufacturing as provided for in § 146.151, except that a preservative is...

  4. 21 CFR 146.152 - Orange juice with preservative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Orange juice with preservative. 146.152 Section... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.152 Orange juice with preservative. (a) Orange juice with preservative... of orange juice for manufacturing as provided for in § 146.151, except that a preservative is...

  5. 21 CFR 146.152 - Orange juice with preservative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Orange juice with preservative. 146.152 Section... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.152 Orange juice with preservative. (a) Orange juice with preservative... of orange juice for manufacturing as provided for in § 146.151, except that a preservative is...

  6. 21 CFR 146.152 - Orange juice with preservative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Orange juice with preservative. 146.152 Section... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.152 Orange juice with preservative. (a) Orange juice with preservative... of orange juice for manufacturing as provided for in § 146.151, except that a preservative is...

  7. 43 CFR 15.12 - Closing of Preserve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Closing of Preserve. 15.12 Section 15.12 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.12 Closing of Preserve. The Preserve may be closed to public use in the event of emergency...

  8. The role of vaterite and aragonite in the formation of pseudo-biogenic carbonate structures: implications for Martian exobiology.

    PubMed

    Vecht, A; Ireland, T G

    2000-08-01

    A simple synthesis of various forms of calcium carbonate with spherical and 'floral' morphologies is reported. Vaterite formation occurs at approximately 25 degrees C, aragonite at approximately 70 degrees C and calcite at about approximately 80 degrees C. These are produced when CO2 is reacted with an aqueous solution of calcium chloride in the presence of ammonia. These conditions may have existed at the surface of Mars in the past, leading us to conclude that such mineral formations may be common there. Although the initial phases are modified over time with changing temperature and pressure conditions, they still influence the final morphology of the carbonates observed. A comparison of these structures with those found in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 suggests, but does not confirm, a non-biogenic origin for the ALH84001 carbonates.

  9. Environmental preservation demand: Altruistic, bequest, and intrinsic motives

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.C.; Thompson, C.Y. )

    1993-01-01

    When the demand for environmental preservation is not explicitly revealed in markets, motivating attitudes toward environmental preservation become important. A survey approach allows revelation and measurement of demand for environmental preservation. Indices which measure the altruistic, bequest, intrinsic, and option to use motives and other attitudes are utilized as determinants in a model that measures the demand for environmental preservation. Demand is more likely with greater preservation motives. Preservation demand also depends on individual preferences for economic development, perceptions of affordability and responsibility for preservation of the wetlands. 17 refs., 3 tabs.

  10. Three Preservation Solutions for Cold Storage of Heart Allografts: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongnan; Guo, Shasha; Liu, Gang; Yuan, Yuan; Wang, Wei; Zheng, Zhe; Hu, Shengshou; Ji, Bingyang

    2016-05-01

    Organ preservation solution has been designed to attenuate the detrimental effects during the ischemic period. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the evidence comparing preservation solutions for heart preservation. Studies were searched in PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, the Transplant Library, and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. The primary outcomes were patient survival and donor heart dysfunction. The secondary outcomes were in-hospital mortality and enzyme gene expression. The University of Wisconsin solution (UW) was associated with a significantly improved survival at 30 days and 90 days (hazard ratio = 1.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11-1.22, P < 0.00001; risk difference [RD] = 0.03, 95% CI = 0.01-0.05, P = 0.002), compared with Celsior. Hearts preserved with UW exhibited less ischemic necrosis than those preserved with Celsior (RD = -0.07, 95% CI = -0.08 to 0.05, P < 0.00001). UW was associated with better survival compared with histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution (HTK). There was no statistical difference in donor heart dysfunction and in-hospital mortality outcomes when comparing HTK with Celsior solution. During static cold storage preservation, this study suggests that UW solution has better clinical outcomes for heart transplantation compared with the other two organ preservation solutions. Besides, the protective effect of Celsior solution is similar to HTK solution in donor heart preservation.

  11. Are beta-blockers effective in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction?

    PubMed

    Alegría, Javier; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-11-02

    Beta-blockers constitute standard therapy for heart failure with reduced ejection. However, their role in patients with preserved ejection fraction is not clear. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening multiple databases, we identified four systematic reviews covering 19 primary studies, including seven randomized trials answering the question of this summary. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded the use of beta-blockers probably leads to little or no difference in the risk of death or hospitalization in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

  12. The State of the Art and Practice in Digital Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyong-Ho; Slattery, Oliver; Lu, Richang; Tang, Xiao; McCrary, Victor

    2002-01-01

    The goal of digital preservation is to ensure long-term access to digitally stored information. In this paper, we present a survey of techniques used in digital preservation. We also introduce representative digital preservation projects and case studies that provide insight into the advantages and disadvantages of different preservation strategies. Finally, the pros and cons of current strategies, critical issues for digital preservation, and future directions are discussed. PMID:27446721

  13. Planning for Preservation during Mass Digitization Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teper, Jennifer Hain; Shaw, Emily F.

    2011-01-01

    In anticipation of current and future mass digitization projects in which the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's Library will participate, the Library's Conservation Unit began to gather data on the "scannability" of our general book collections to anticipate potential effects on conservation and preservation work flows. The…

  14. Language Preservation and Human Resources Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverthorne, Joyce A.

    Those who work in the field of preserving Native American languages are an assortment of individuals who come to the work as a central career (linguists), through family heritage (fluent speakers), or through a developed passion (language learners). This paper examines the field from the perspective of R. Wayne Pace, Phillip C. Smith, and Gordon…

  15. [Heritage Education: Teaching a Preservation Ethic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schell, Suzanne B., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This issue focuses on heritage education, the goal of which is to introduce the historic built environment directly into elementary and secondary school curriculums. Kathlyn Hatch discusses how heritage education's linkage with historic preservation can help students relate to society. Earl Jones assesses the status of heritage education,…

  16. Revamping Family Preservation Services for Native Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Heather; Unrau, Yvonne A.; Manyfingers, Brenda

    2001-01-01

    Examines the philosophy and program structures of family preservation services (FPS) in the context of providing services to Native American families with child welfare issues. Explores Native cultural concepts of family, child rearing, time, and spirituality. Outlines cross-cultural training needs for FPS workers related to cultural awareness,…

  17. Digitizing Technologies for Preservation. SPEC Kit 214.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellerman, L. Suzanne, Comp.; Wilson, Rebecca, Comp.

    The Association of Research Libraries distributed a survey to its 119 member libraries to assess the use of state-of-the-art digital technologies as a preservation method. Libraries were asked to report detailed data on all projects designed specifically to: (1) enhance images of faded or brittle originals, (2) provide access to digital images…

  18. Preservation Planning Project Study Team. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittsburgh Univ., PA. Libraries.

    This final report is a product of a comprehensive 14-month Preservation Planning Program (PPP) self-study conducted by the University of Pittsburgh Libraries, working with the Association of Research Libraries' (ARL) Office of Management Studies. The PPP is designed to put self-help tools into the hands of library staff responsible for developing…

  19. Long-Term Information Preservation and Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Sang Chul

    2010-01-01

    An unprecedented amount of information encompassing almost every facet of human activities across the world is generated daily in the form of zeros and ones, and that is often the only form in which such information is recorded. A good fraction of this information needs to be preserved for periods of time ranging from a few years to centuries.…

  20. Preservation and Conservation in the School Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedinger, Theresa

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the necessity of preservation and conservation activities in school libraries to save materials such as school newspapers, programs of events, censorship records, board activities, yearbooks, and student projects. Topics discussed include brittle, deteriorating paper; monitoring the physical environment, including heat, light, humidity,…

  1. Micro-Preservation: Conserving the Small Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCandido, Robert; DeCandido, GraceAnne A.

    1985-01-01

    Offers suggestions and outlines procedures for the preservation of the resources of a small library. Brief sections discuss environment (temperature, humidity, housekeeping, light); library binding; simple in-house repairs; other protective measures (enclosures, microfilming); the care of unique objects; and disaster planning. A 21-item…

  2. Archiving Innovations Preserve Essential Historical Records

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    The Apollo 11 mission left on the Moon a silicon disc inscribed with microscopic recreations of messages from 73 countries. NanoArk Corporation of Fairport, New York, built on that NASA technology to develop a fire and water resistant archiving innovation that provides cost savings and security in preserving documents. Since its launch, NanoArk has grown from 2 to 10 employees.

  3. 78 FR 30810 - Paleontological Resources Preservation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ... for a unified Federal policy for the collection, storage, and preservation of fossils; (2) the need..., regulations, and policies. Section 291.3(f) would state that the proposed regulations would not affect any... associated records would delineate the types of information that are required by 16 U.S.C. 470aaa-4 of...

  4. Dry Preserving the Green Sea Urchin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stimson, Cheryl D.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a project for junior high and senior high school students designed to safely preserve hard-bodied marine invertebrates. Details the materials and procedures used in this technique. Stresses the use of non-toxic solutions and producing a lifelike specimen. (CW)

  5. Digital Storytelling: Preserving a Cultural Tradition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author shows how digital photography could be an effective cultural preservation enabler. On July 1, 2007, with initial funding from Research in Motion and Merit Travel and support of more than 300 family and friends, the author and his team arrived in the small town of Monduli, Tanzania with the purpose of teaching digital…

  6. Survey of colourings and preservatives in drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, I.; Young, E.; Stoneham, M.; Slater, N.; Wilkinson, J. D.; Warner, J. O.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the prevalence of colourings and preservatives in drug formulations in the United Kingdom. DESIGN--Postal survey. PARTICIPANTS--All pharmaceutical manufacturers in the United Kingdom were requested to supply data on drug formulations with particular regard to the content of colourings and preservatives. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Prevalence in proprietary drugs of colourings or preservatives, or both, that have been implicated in adverse reactions. Computation of a list of formulations of bronchodilators, antihistamines, and antibiotics that are free of such additives. RESULTS--A total of 118 out of 120 pharmaceutical companies supplied the data requested. In all, 2204 drug formulations were analysed and found to contain 419 different additives, of which 52 were colourings and preservatives that have been implicated in adverse reactions; 930 formulations contained such an additive. Tartrazine was the fourth most commonly occurring colouring, being present in 124 drug formulations. CONCLUSION--Many drugs contain additives that help to identify them and prolong their shelf life but are implicated in adverse reactions in some people. Some form of labelling of drug additives would enable these people to avoid drugs containing such additives. PMID:2508849

  7. Preserving the 'Athens of Indiana' through Digitization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helling, Bill

    2003-01-01

    Describes a digitization project at the public library in Crawfordsville, Indiana that was designed to preserve their local history collection. Highlights include damage to the collection from fire, termites, use, and age; selecting a scanner and software; creating databases; and making information accessible on the Web. (LRW)

  8. Long Term Preservation of Digital Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorie, Raymond A.

    The preservation of digital data for the long term presents a variety of challenges from technical to social and organizational. The technical challenge is to ensure that the information, generated today, can survive long term changes in storage media, devices, and data formats. This paper presents a novel approach to the problem. It distinguishes…

  9. Conservation, Preservation and Restoration in Nigerian Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojo-Igbinoba, M. E.

    1991-01-01

    Addresses problems involved with the conservation, preservation, and restoration of library materials in Nigeria. Topics discussed include insect pests; light, heat, and humidity; atmospheric pollution and dust; natural disasters including fire and floods; theft and vandalism; acidity of paper; binding and mending; and trained personnel. (15…

  10. Biomarker Preservation Potential of Subsurface Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstott, T. C.; Harris, R. L.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Pedersen, K. A.; Colwell, F. S.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Phelps, T. J.; Kieft, T. L.; Bakermans, C.

    2016-05-01

    If surface life emerged on Mars it may have succumbed to a Gaian bottleneck, whereas subsurface life would have continued to grow and evolve sheltered in rocks with sub-freezing saline pore water and their remains preserved in excavated rock.

  11. Building Digital Audio Preservation Infrastructure and Workflows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Anjanette; Olivieri, Blynne; Eckler, Karl; Gerontakos, Theodore

    2010-01-01

    In 2009 the University of Washington (UW) Libraries special collections received funding for the digital preservation of its audio indigenous language holdings. The university libraries, where the authors work in various capacities, had begun digitizing image and text collections in 1997. Because of this, at the onset of the project, workflows (a…

  12. Coatings Preserve Metal, Stone, Tile, and Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    John B. Schutt, a chemist at Goddard Space Flight Center, created a coating for spacecraft that could resist corrosion and withstand high heat. After retiring from NASA, Schutt used his expertise to create new formulations for Daytona Beach, Florida-based Adsil Corporation, which now manufactures a family of coatings to preserve various surfaces. Adsil has created 150 jobs due to the products.

  13. 2015 Site Environmental Report Fernald Preserve

    SciTech Connect

    Hertel, Bill; Hooten, Gwen

    2016-05-01

    The Fernald Preserve 2015 Site Environmental Report provides stakeholders with the results from the Fernald, Ohio, Site’s environmental monitoring programs for 2015; a summary of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) activities conducted onsite; and a summary of the Fernald Preserve’s compliance with the various environmental regulations, compliance agreements, and DOE policies that govern site activities. This report has been prepared in accordance with the “Integrated Environmental Monitoring Plan,” which is Attachment D of the Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls Plan (LMICP) (DOE 2016). Remediation of the Fernald Preserve has been successfully completed with the exception of the groundwater. During 2015, activities at the Fernald Preserve included: environmental monitoring activities related to direct radiation, groundwater, and surface water; ecological restoration monitoring and maintenance as well as inspections, care, and monitoring of the site and the OSDF to ensure that provisions of the LMICP are fully implemented; OSDF leak detection monitoring and collection, monitoring, and treatment of leachate from the OSDF; extraction, monitoring, and treatment of contaminated groundwater from the Great Miami Aquifer (Operable Unit 5); ongoing operation of the Fernald Preserve Visitors Center, associated outreach, and educational activities; and monitoring as specified in the site’s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. Environmental monitoring programs were developed to ensure that the remedy remains protective of the environment. The requirements of these programs are described in detail in the LMICP and reported in this Site Environmental Report.

  14. Knowledge Preservation and Web-tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreman, Douglas; Dyer, John; Ahmad, Rashed

    1998-01-01

    We propose a library of "netbooks" as part of a national effort, preserving the wisdom of the early Space Program. NASA is losing its rocket scientists who designed the great systems of the past. Few new systems of similar ambition are being built; much of the expertise that took us to the Moon is evaporating. With retiring NASA designers, we work to preserve something of the expertise of these individuals, developed at great national cost. We show others the tools that make preservation easy and cheap. Retiring engineers and scientists can be coached into speaking (without charge) into recording devices about ideas not widely appreciated but of potential future value. Transcripts of the recordings and the audio itself are combined (cheaply) in netbooks accessible via a standard web-browser (free). Selected netbooks are indexed into a rapidly searchable system, an electronic Library. We recruit support in establishing a standards committee for that Library. The system is to be a model for access by the blind as well as for preservation of important, technical knowledge.

  15. Preserving History in a Digital World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Stanford University's (California) Julie Sweetkind-Singer is a recognized authority on digital preservation, and has been honored by the Library of Congress for her work in the field. She currently serves as both the assistant director of Stanford's Geospatial, Cartographic and Scientific Data and Services and as head of the Branner Earth Sciences…

  16. Endothelium Preserving Microwave Treatment for Atherosclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick; Arndt, G. D.; Ngo, Phong

    2003-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of microwave technology for treating Atherosclerosis while preserving the endothelium. The system uses catheter antennas as part of the system that is intended to treat atherosclerosis. The concept is to use a microwave catheter for heating the atherosclerotic lesions, and reduce constriction in the artery.

  17. Coatings to reduce wood preservative leaching.

    PubMed

    Nejad, Mojgan; Cooper, Paul

    2010-08-15

    The efficiency of semitransparent penetrating stains to reduce leaching of wood preservative components was evaluated. Five commercial wood deck finishes were applied to untreated and chromated copper arsenate (CCA), alkaline copper quat (ACQ), and copper azole (CA) treated wood, and leachates were collected and analyzed during 3 years of natural weathering exposure in Toronto, Canada. All stains evaluated effectively reduced the cumulative leaching of all inorganic preservative components by about 60% on average. Although most coatings showed significant film degradation starting around 12 months, the reduced leaching persisted even after 3 years. This suggests that temporary protection of wood with a coating during the early stages of use resulted in long-term reduction in preservative leaching potential. A two-week screening leaching test was able to predict the long-term leaching performance of different coatings reasonably well. Cured coating glass transition temperature (Tg) and liquid coating viscosity were the most important variables affecting a leaching prediction model. To effectively reduce leaching of preservative components from treated wood, coatings should have Tg low enough to withstand stresses caused by freezing in winter and have adequate viscosity to form a barrier film layer on the wood surface.

  18. Polynuclear azaarenes in wood preservative wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.; Giam, C.S.

    1984-05-01

    Polynuclear azaarenes in a creosote-pentachlorophenol wood preservative wastewater were analyzed. The total concentration of azaarenes was determined to be 1300 mg kg/sup -1/. Potential adverse effects of these compounds on environmental quality and health suggest a need to develop analytical protocols for measuing azaarenes in hazardous wastes.

  19. BIOREMEDIATION AT WOOD-PRESERVING SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of organic compounds from ground water during bioremediation at wood-preserving sites is a function of the stoichiometric demand for electron acceptors (oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate) to metabolize the organic contaminants and the supply of the electron acceptors in th...

  20. 36 CFR 910.14 - Historic preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the life of the residents of Washington for more than a century. (b) The Historic Preservation Plan of... regard to height, scale, proportion, rhythm, texture, materials, architectural detail, and the amount of... ensure that these structures maintain their historic or architectural integrity, but will not...

  1. Preservation of Mercury in Polyethylene Containers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piccolino, Samuel Paul

    1983-01-01

    Reports results of experiments favoring use of 0.5 percent nitric acid with an oxidant (potassium dichromate or potassium permanganate) to preserve samples in polyethylene containers for mercury analysis. Includes procedures used and statistical data obtained from the experiments. (JN)

  2. 36 CFR 910.32 - Historic preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE.... Rehabilitation of buildings within the Development Area, which, according to the Plan and the Historic... with the Secretary of the Interior's “Standards for Historic Preservation Projects”: (36 CFR part...

  3. Contact sensitivity to preservatives in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Boyvat, Ayse; Akyol, Aynur; Gürgey, Erbak

    2005-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the frequency of contact sensitivity to 14 common preservatives among patients with contact dermatitis in Turkey. From 2000 to 2004, 308 patients with the diagnosis of contact dermatitis were patch tested in the Department of Dermatology, Ankara University School of Medicine. All patients were patch tested with European standard series. In addition to the four preservatives included in the standard series, patients were also tested with DMDM hydantoin, imidazolidinyl urea, bromonitropropane diol, diazolidinyl urea, thimerosal, propylene glycol, chlorocresol, chloroxylenol, methyldibromoglutaronitrile/phenoxyethanol (MDBGN/PE) and benzalkonium chloride. Out of the 308 patients suspected of having contact dermatitis, 23 patients were found to have positive reactions to one or more preservatives. Preservatives that were the most frequent cause of positive reactions were thimerosal (1.6%), benzalkonium chloride (1.6%), formaldehyde (1.3%) and MDBGN/PE (0.9%). In our study, 65% of the positive reactions were caused by allergens not present in the standard series, such as thimerosal, benzalkonium chloride and MDBGN/PE. Although thimerosal caused a high rate of contact sensitivity, it may not be considered as an important allergen, because clinical relevance could not be found in any of the patients.

  4. Advances in organ preservation for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Ahmer M; Hawthorne, Wayne J; Pleass, Henry C

    2016-08-04

    Organ transplantation provides the best available therapy for a myriad of medical conditions, including end-stage renal disease, hepatic failure and type I diabetes mellitus. The current clinical reality is, however, that there is a significant shortage of organs available for transplantation with respect to the number of patients on organ waiting lists. As such, methods to increase organ supply have been instituted, including improved donor management, organ procurement and preservation strategies, living organ donation, transplantation education and the increased utilization of donation after circulatory death and expanded criteria donors. In particular, especially over the last decade, we have witnessed a significant change in the way donor organs are preserved, away from static cold storage methods to more dynamic techniques centred on machine perfusion (MP). This review highlights the current state and future of organ preservation for transplantation, focusing on both abdominal and thoracic organs. In particular, we focus on MP preservation of renal, hepatic, pancreatic, cardiac and lung allografts, also noting relevant advances in Australasia. MP of organs after procurement holds considerable promise, and has the potential to significantly improve graft viability and function post-transplantation, especially in donors in whom acceptance criteria have been expanded.

  5. 20 CFR 638.304 - Historical preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Funding, Site Selection, and Facilities Management § 638.304 Historical preservation. The Job Corps Director shall review the “National Register of Historic Places,” issued by the National Park Service, to identify sites, buildings, structures,...

  6. 20 CFR 638.304 - Historical preservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Funding, Site Selection, and Facilities Management § 638.304 Historical preservation. The Job Corps Director shall review the “National Register of Historic Places,” issued by the National Park Service, to identify sites, buildings, structures,...

  7. Fossil avian eggshell preserves ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Oskam, Charlotte L; Haile, James; McLay, Emma; Rigby, Paul; Allentoft, Morten E; Olsen, Maia E; Bengtsson, Camilla; Miller, Gifford H; Schwenninger, Jean-Luc; Jacomb, Chris; Walter, Richard; Baynes, Alexander; Dortch, Joe; Parker-Pearson, Michael; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Holdaway, Richard N; Willerslev, Eske; Bunce, Michael

    2010-07-07

    Owing to exceptional biomolecule preservation, fossil avian eggshell has been used extensively in geochronology and palaeodietary studies. Here, we show, to our knowledge, for the first time that fossil eggshell is a previously unrecognized source of ancient DNA (aDNA). We describe the successful isolation and amplification of DNA from fossil eggshell up to 19 ka old. aDNA was successfully characterized from eggshell obtained from New Zealand (extinct moa and ducks), Madagascar (extinct elephant birds) and Australia (emu and owl). Our data demonstrate excellent preservation of the nucleic acids, evidenced by retrieval of both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA from many of the samples. Using confocal microscopy and quantitative PCR, this study critically evaluates approaches to maximize DNA recovery from powdered eggshell. Our quantitative PCR experiments also demonstrate that moa eggshell has approximately 125 times lower bacterial load than bone, making it a highly suitable substrate for high-throughput sequencing approaches. Importantly, the preservation of DNA in Pleistocene eggshell from Australia and Holocene deposits from Madagascar indicates that eggshell is an excellent substrate for the long-term preservation of DNA in warmer climates. The successful recovery of DNA from this substrate has implications in a number of scientific disciplines; most notably archaeology and palaeontology, where genotypes and/or DNA-based species identifications can add significantly to our understanding of diets, environments, past biodiversity and evolutionary processes.

  8. Current Trends in Preservation Research and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunha, George Martin

    1990-01-01

    Overview of current trends in the preservation of library materials discusses collections conservation and management; climate control; insect and mold control; fire control; the effects of compact shelving; freezing and freeze-drying; space drying; alkaline paper; recycled paper; mass deacidification; and paper strengthening. (27 notes and…

  9. Liquid growth hormone: preservatives and buffers.

    PubMed

    Kappelgaard, Anne-Marie; Bojesen, Anders; Skydsgaard, Karsten; Sjögren, Ingrid; Laursen, Torben

    2004-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) treatment is a successful medical therapy for children and adults with GH deficiency as well as for growth retardation due to chronic renal disease, Turner syndrome and in children born small for gestational age. For all of these conditions, treatment is long term and patients receive daily subcutaneous injections of GH for many years. Patient compliance is therefore of critical importance to ensure treatment benefit. One of the major factors influencing compliance is injection pain. Besides the injection device used, pain perception and local tissue reaction following injection are dependent on the preservative used in the formulation and the concentration of GH. Injection pain may also be related to the buffer substance and injection volume. A liquid formulation of GH, Norditropi SimpleXx, has been developed that dispenses with the need for reconstitution before administration. The formulation uses phenol (3 mg/ml) as a preservative (to protect product from microbial degradation or contamination) and histidine as a buffer. Alternative preservatives used in other GH formulations include m-cresol (9 mg/ml) and benzyl alcohol (3-9 mg/ml). Buffering agents include citrate and phosphate. Phenol has been successfully used as a preservative in drug formulations for more than 50 years and is considered a safe and effective agent which complies with strict international requirements for preservatives in drug formulations. In toxicological studies, no or only mild local reactions have been observed following subcutaneous administration of phenol (7.5 mg/ml), m-cresol (3-4 mg/ml) and benzyl alcohol (9 mg/ml). No general toxicity reactions were observed after subcutaneous administration of these agents. Clinical evaluation of the preservatives and buffers used in Norditropin SimpleXx showed that pain perception was similar between formulations containing phenol and benzyl alcohol, whereas m-cresol was associated with more painful injections than benzyl

  10. Small amounts of tissue preserve pancreatic function

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zipeng; Yin, Jie; Wei, Jishu; Dai, Cuncai; Wu, Junli; Gao, Wentao; Xu, Qing; Dai, Hao; Li, Qiang; Guo, Feng; Chen, Jianmin; Xi, Chunhua; Wu, Pengfei; Zhang, Kai; Jiang, Kuirong; Miao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Middle-segment preserving pancreatectomy (MPP) is a novel procedure for treating multifocal lesions of the pancreas while preserving pancreatic function. However, long-term pancreatic function after this procedure remains unclear. The aims of this current study are to investigate short- and long-term outcomes, especially long-term pancreatic endocrine function, after MPP. From September 2011 to December 2015, 7 patients underwent MPP in our institution, and 5 cases with long-term outcomes were further analyzed in a retrospective manner. Percentage of tissue preservation was calculated using computed tomography volumetry. Serum insulin and C-peptide levels after oral glucose challenge were evaluated in 5 patients. Beta-cell secreting function including modified homeostasis model assessment of beta-cell function (HOMA2-beta), area under the curve (AUC) for C-peptide, and C-peptide index were evaluated and compared with those after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) and total pancreatectomy. Exocrine function was assessed based on questionnaires. Our case series included 3 women and 2 men, with median age of 50 (37–81) years. Four patients underwent pylorus-preserving PD together with distal pancreatectomy (DP), including 1 with spleen preserved. The remaining patient underwent Beger procedure and spleen-preserving DP. Median operation time and estimated intraoperative blood loss were 330 (250–615) min and 800 (400–5500) mL, respectively. Histological examination revealed 3 cases of metastatic lesion to the pancreas, 1 case of chronic pancreatitis, and 1 neuroendocrine tumor. Major postoperative complications included 3 cases of delayed gastric emptying and 2 cases of postoperative pancreatic fistula. Imaging studies showed that segments representing 18.2% to 39.5% of the pancreas with good blood supply had been preserved. With a median 35.0 months of follow-ups on pancreatic functions, only 1 patient developed new-onset diabetes mellitus of the 4

  11. The first well-preserved coelophysoid theropod dinosaur from Asia.

    PubMed

    You, Hai-Lu; Azuma, Yoichi; Wang, Tao; Wang, Ya-Ming; Dong, Zhi-Ming

    2014-10-16

    Coelophysoid dinosaurs represent the earliest major radiation of neotheropods. These small-to-medium-sized agile bipeds lived throughout much of Pangaea during the Late Triassic-arly Jurassic. Previously reported coelophysoid material from Asia (excluding the Gondwanan territory of India) is limited to two specimens that comprise only limb fragments. This paper describes a new genus and species of coelophysoid, Panguraptor lufengensis, from the Lower Jurassic Lufeng Formation of Yunnan Province, China. The new taxon is represented by a well-preserved skeleton, including the skull and lower jaw, the presacral vertebral column and partial ribs, the right scapula, a partial forelimb, part of the pelvic girdle, and an almost complete hind limb. It is distinguished from other coelophysoid theropods by the unique combination of the following three character states: 1) diagonal (rostrodorsal-caudoventral) ridge on lateral surface of maxilla, within antorbital fossa, 2) elliptical, laterally facing fenestra caudodorsal to aforementioned diagonal ridge, and 3) hooked craniomedial corner of distal tarsal IV. Cladistic analysis recovers Panguraptor lufengensis deeply nested within Coelophysoidea as a member of Coelophysidae, and it is more closely related to Coelophysis than to "Syntarsus". Panguraptor represents the first well-preserved coelophysoid theropod dinosaur from Asia, and provides fresh evidence supporting the hypothesis that terrestrial tetrapods tended to be distributed pan-continentally during the Early Jurassic.

  12. Preserving Cognitive Function in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lin Md, Tina; Wissner Md, Erik; Tilz Md, Roland; Rillig Md, Andreas; Mathew Md, Shibu; Rausch Md, Peter; Rausch Md, Peter; Lemes Md, Christine; Deiss Md, Sebastian; Kamioka Md, Masashi; Bucur Md, Tudor; Ouyang Md, Feifan; Kuck Md, Karl-Heinz; Metzner Md, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Its prevalence increases with increasing age, and is one of the leading causes of thromboembolism, including ischemic stroke. The prevalence of cognitive dysfunction also increases with increasing age. Although several studies have shown a strong correlation between AF and cognitive dysfunction in patients with and without overt stroke, a direct causative link has yet to be established. Rhythm vs rate control and anticoagulation regimens have been extensively investigated, particularly with the introduction of the novel anticoagulants. With catheter ablation becoming more prevalent for the management of AF and the ongoing development of various new energy sources and catheters, an additional thromboembolism risk is introduced. As cognitive dysfunction decreases the patient's ability to self-care and manage a complex disease such as AF, this increases the burden to our healthcare system. Therefore as the prevalence of AF increases in the general population, it becomes more imperative that we strive to optimize our methods to preserve cognitive function. This review gives an overview of the current evidence behind the association of AF with cognitive dysfunction, and discusses the most up-to-date medical and procedural treatment strategies available for decreasing thromboembolism associated with AF and its treatment, which may lead to preserving cognitive function.

  13. Ridge Preservation for Implant Therapy: a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Tomlin, Elizabeth M; Nelson, Shelby J; Rossmann, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Healing of the extraction socket after tooth removal involves retention of the blood clot followed by a sequence of events that lead to changes in the alveolar process in a three dimensional fashion. This normal healing event results in a minimal loss of vertical height (around 1 mm), but a substantial loss of width in the buccal-lingual plane (4-6 mm). During the first three months following extraction that loss has been shown to be significant and may result in both a hard tissue and soft tissue deformity affecting the ability to restore the site with acceptable esthetics. Procedures that reduce the resorptive process have been shown to be predictable and potentially capable of eliminating secondary surgery for site preparation when implant therapy is planned. The key element is prior planning by the dental therapist to act at the time of extraction to prevent the collapse of the ridge due to the loss of the alveolus. Several techniques have been employed as ridge preservation procedures involving the use of bone grafts, barrier membranes and biologics to provide a better restorative outcome. This review will explore the evidence behind each technique and their efficacy in accomplishing site preparation. The literature does not identify a single technique as superior to others; however, all accepted therapeutic procedures for ridge preservation have been shown to be more effective than blood clot alone in randomized controlled studies. PMID:24893595

  14. Preserving science for the ages--USGS data rescue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wippich, Carol

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is a steward for over 130 years of rich, diverse natural science and information resources. We document one-of-a-kind observations of natural phenomena and cultural impacts on our changing world. In order for society to deal with national and global trends, the USGS must enable access and use of legacy, inaccessible information by including these data in our digital archives and databases. The USGS has conducted scientific assessments on the quality and quantity of the Nation's water resources, provided access to geospatial and natural resource data, and conducted multi-purpose natural science studies. All of these have generated records that need to be accessible and integrated in order to be examined for new information and interpretations that were never intended by the original collector. The Federal Records Act of 1950 mandates that the USGS preserve Federal records containing evidence of the agency's organization, functions, policies, decisions, procedures, and essential transactions. At the USGS, the goal of Open Government is to improve and increase access to scientific information. Therefore, it is incumbent upon the USGS to preserve, make available, and provide accountability for the data that it creates from our scientific projects.

  15. Locality-preserved maximum information projection.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Chen, S; Hu, Z; Zheng, W

    2008-04-01

    Dimensionality reduction is usually involved in the domains of artificial intelligence and machine learning. Linear projection of features is of particular interest for dimensionality reduction since it is simple to calculate and analytically analyze. In this paper, we propose an essentially linear projection technique, called locality-preserved maximum information projection (LPMIP), to identify the underlying manifold structure of a data set. LPMIP considers both the within-locality and the between-locality in the processing of manifold learning. Equivalently, the goal of LPMIP is to preserve the local structure while maximize the out-of-locality (global) information of the samples simultaneously. Different from principal component analysis (PCA) that aims to preserve the global information and locality-preserving projections (LPPs) that is in favor of preserving the local structure of the data set, LPMIP seeks a tradeoff between the global and local structures, which is adjusted by a parameter alpha, so as to find a subspace that detects the intrinsic manifold structure for classification tasks. Computationally, by constructing the adjacency matrix, LPMIP is formulated as an eigenvalue problem. LPMIP yields orthogonal basis functions, and completely avoids the singularity problem as it exists in LPP. Further, we develop an efficient and stable LPMIP/QR algorithm for implementing LPMIP, especially, on high-dimensional data set. Theoretical analysis shows that conventional linear projection methods such as (weighted) PCA, maximum margin criterion (MMC), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and LPP could be derived from the LPMIP framework by setting different graph models and constraints. Extensive experiments on face, digit, and facial expression recognition show the effectiveness of the proposed LPMIP method.

  16. Preservation of samples for dissolved mercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamlin, S.N.

    1989-01-01

    Water samples for dissolved mercury requires special treatment because of the high chemical mobility and volatility of this element. Widespread use of mercury and its compounds has provided many avenues for contamination of water. Two laboratory tests were done to determine the relative permeabilities of glass and plastic sample bottles to mercury vapor. Plastic containers were confirmed to be quite permeable to airborne mercury, glass containers were virtually impermeable. Methods of preservation include the use of various combinations of acids, oxidants, and complexing agents. The combination of nitric acid and potassium dichromate successfully preserved mercury in a large variety of concentrations and dissolved forms. Because this acid-oxidant preservative acts as a sink for airborne mercury and plastic containers are permeable to mercury vapor, glass bottles are preferred for sample collection. To maintain a healthy work environment and minimize the potential for contamination of water samples, mercury and its compounds are isolated from the atmosphere while in storage. Concurrently, a program to monitor environmental levels of mercury vapor in areas of potential contamination is needed to define the extent of mercury contamination and to assess the effectiveness of mercury clean-up procedures.Water samples for dissolved mercury require special treatment because of the high chemical mobility and volatility of this element. Widespread use of mercury and its compounds has provided many avenues for contamination of water. Two laboratory tests were done to determine the relative permeabilities of glass and plastic sample bottles to mercury vapor. Plastic containers were confirmed to be quite permeable to airborne mercury, glass containers were virtually impermeable. Methods of preservation include the use of various combinations of acids, oxidants, and complexing agents. The combination of nitric acid and potassium dichromate successfully preserved mercury in a

  17. Riddling and invariance for discontinuous maps preserving Lebesgue measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwin, Peter; Fu, Xin-Chu; Terry, John R.

    2002-05-01

    In this paper we use the mixture of topological and measure-theoretic dynamical approaches to consider riddling of invariant sets for some discontinuous maps of compact regions of the plane that preserve two-dimensional Lebesgue measure. We consider maps that are piecewise continuous and with invertible except on a closed zero measure set. We show that riddling is an invariant property that can be used to characterize invariant sets, and prove results that give a non-trivial decomposion of what we call partially riddled invariant sets into smaller invariant sets. For a particular example, a piecewise isometry that arises in signal processing (the overflow oscillation map), we present evidence that the closure of the set of trajectories that accumulate on the discontinuity is fully riddled. This supports a conjecture that there are typically an infinite number of periodic orbits for this system.

  18. Magnetic Strips Preserve Record of Ancient Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This image is a map of Martian magnetic fields in the southern highlands near the Terra Cimmeria and Terra Sirenum regions, centered around 180 degrees longitude from the equator to the pole. It is where magnetic stripes possibly resulting from crustal movement are most prominent. The bands are oriented approximately east - west and are about 100 miles wide and 600 miles long, although the longest band stretches more than 1200 miles. The false blue and red colors represent invisible magnetic fields in the Martian crust that point in opposite directions. The magnetic fields appear to be organized in bands, with adjacent bands pointing in opposite directions, giving these stripes a striking similarity to patterns seen in the Earth's crust at the mid-oceanic ridges.

    NASA's Mars Global Surveyor has discovered surprising new evidence of past movement of the Martian crust, suggesting that ancient Mars was a more dynamic, Earth-like planet than it is today.

    Scientists using the spacecraft's magnetometer have found banded patterns of magnetic fields on the Martian surface. The adjacent magnetic bands point in opposite directions, giving these invisible stripes a striking similarity to patterns seen in the crust of Earth's sea floors.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (P50330,MRPS94769)

    Above: An artist's concept comparing the present day magnetic fields on Earth and Mars. Earth's magnetic field is generated by an active dynamo - a hot core of molten metal. The magnetic field surrounds Earth and is considered global (left). The various Martian magnetic fields (right) do not encompass the entire planet and are local. The Martian dynamo is extinct, and its magnetic fields are 'fossil' remnants of its ancient, global magnetic field. I

    On the Earth, the sea floor spreads apart slowly at mid-oceanic ridges as new crust flows up from Earth's hot interior. Meanwhile, the direction of Earth's magnetic field reverses occasionally, resulting in

  19. Challenges in machine perfusion preservation for liver grafts from donation after circulatory death

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Donation after circulatory death (DCD) is a promising solution to the critical shortage of donor graft tissue. Maintaining organ viability after donation until transplantation is essential for optimal graft function and survival. To date, static cold storage is the most widely used form of preservation in clinical practice. However, ischemic damage present in DCD grafts jeopardizes organ viability during cold storage, and whether static cold storage is the most effective method to prevent deterioration of organ quality in the increasing numbers of organs from DCD is unknown. Here we describe the historical background of DCD liver grafts and a new preservation method for experimental and clinical transplantation. To prevent ischemia-reperfusion injury in DCD liver grafts, a hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) technique has recently been developed and may be superior to static cold preservation. We present evidence supporting the need for improving liver perfusion performance and discuss how doing so will benefit liver transplantation recipients. PMID:24283383

  20. An exceptionally preserved myodocopid ostracod from the Silurian of Herefordshire, UK.

    PubMed

    Siveter, David J; Briggs, Derek E G; Siveter, Derek J; Sutton, Mark D

    2010-05-22

    An exceptionally preserved new ostracod crustacean from the Silurian of Herefordshire, UK, represents only the third fully documented Palaeozoic ostracod with soft-part preservation. Appendages, gills, gut system, lateral compound eyes and even a medial eye with a Bellonci organ are preserved, allowing assignment of the fossil to a new genus and species of cylindroleberidid myodocope (Myodocopida, Cylindroleberididae). The Bellonci organ is recorded for the first time in fossil ostracods. The find also represents a rare occurrence of gills in fossil ostracods and confirms the earliest direct evidence of a respiratory-cum-circulatory system in the group. The species demonstrates remarkably conserved morphology within myodocopes over a period of 425 Myr. Its shell morphology more closely resembles several families of myodocopes other than the Cylindroleberididae, especially the Cypridinidae and Sarsiellidae, thus questioning the utility of the carapace alone in establishing the affinity of fossil ostracods.

  1. Preserving the Context of Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janée, G.; Frew, J.

    2008-12-01

    Preserving any type of digital information requires preserving both the "bits" comprising the information, and sufficient context (metadata) to support interpreting the bits in the future. Unfortunately, this context is often implicit or embedded in organizations (e.g., communities of practice) or artifacts (e.g., computing platforms) that are not as survivable as the information itself. Therefore, digital preservation must explicitly preserve context. Two necessary components of digital scientific information context are formats and provenance. Formats describe the syntax and low-level semantics of digital information objects (e.g., files). The library community has promulgated format registries (e.g, PRONOM, GDFR, digitalpreservation.gov) that allow archival objects to refer to format definitions using standardized persistent identifiers. Format registries maintain this context separately from the information that references it, but make no archival guarantees about the context's survival. Meanwhile, the scientific community has focused on capturing the provenance of scientific information, typically as a formal workflow specification of the processing steps that created the information. Unfortunately, there is as yet no standard for scientific workflows, nor any guarantee that a specification that can reproduce information is sufficient for understanding it. We describe new technologies that may prove a better fit for preserving scientific information context. The National Geospatial Digital Archive (NGDA) data model represents formats as archival objects containing specifications, software implementations, and other documentation. A format registry is simply an archive that happens to hold archival objects representing formats. Both format and provenance relationships are represented by typed references. Any archival object may reference any other object for its interpretation: the referenced object may be a "file format" object or an object containing dataset

  2. A well-preserved Cambrian impact exposed in Central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindström, Maurits; Ekvall, Johan; Hagenfeldt, Stefan E.; Säwe, Brigitta; Sturkell, Erik F. F.

    1991-02-01

    Orthoceratite Limestone with the sheared Lower Ordovician Töyen Shale at its base. This local expanse of deformed rock is the remainder after erosion of an extensive nappe of overthrust rocks emplaced during the Caledonian orogeny. The good preservation of the impact structure is due to the nappe cover, which had to be removed before erosion could attack the underlying structures. The rim of the impact crater is outlined by a wall of strongly shattered fragments of Proterozoic crystalline rocks (Fig. 2), which formed the local bedrock ( Strömberg et al., 1984) at the time of impact. The rim wall is best preserved along the western part of the structure. It was referred to as »arkose-like breccia« by Thorslund (1940), who interpreted it as the result of continental weathering, but the components rather show evidence of intense crushing than of weathering ( Simon, 1987a). The »arkose-like breccia« does not contain components derived from the lower Palaeozoic deposits of the area.

  3. Cosmic-ray exposure histories of Martian meteorites studied from neutron capture reactions of Sm and Gd isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidaka, Hiroshi; Yoneda, Shigekazu; Nishiizumi, Kunihiko

    2009-11-01

    The isotopic compositions of Sm and Gd in twelve Martian meteorites, ALH 77005, ALH 84001, DaG 735, Dhofar 019, EET 79001, Lafayette, Los Angeles, Nakhla, SaU 005, Y 000593, Y 000749 and Zagami, were determined to quantify the neutron capture records of individual meteorite specimens. Seven of these twelve samples, ALH 84001, Y 000749, DaG 735, Dhofar 019, EET 79001, SaU 005 and Zagami, showed significant isotopic shifts of 150Sm/ 149Sm and/or 158Gd/ 157Gd corresponding to neutron fluences of (0.7-3.4) × 10 15 n cm - 2 . Among these seven meteorites, the neutron fluences of ALH 84001, Y 000749, and Dhofar 019 apparently correlated with their cosmic-ray exposure ages, indicating that most of the irradiation took place while the meteoroids were small bodies in space after the ejection from Mars. However, our results suggest an accumulation of their inherited irradiation occurred on Mars. On the other hand, the exposure histories of the other four meteorites (basaltic shergottites), DaG 735, EET 79001, SaU 005, and Zagami, cannot be explained as single- or multistage irradiations in space, or as a single irradiation on the Martian surface. The mixing between basaltic lava with a significantly irradiated Martian regolith is a reasonable interpretation of the excess neutron capture records observed in these four basaltic shergottites.

  4. A Mesozoic bird from Gondwana preserving feathers

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Carvalho, Ismar; Novas, Fernando E.; Agnolín, Federico L.; Isasi, Marcelo P.; Freitas, Francisco I.; Andrade, José A.

    2015-01-01

    The fossil record of birds in the Mesozoic of Gondwana is mostly based on isolated and often poorly preserved specimens, none of which has preserved details on feather anatomy. We provide the description of a fossil bird represented by a skeleton with feathers from the Early Cretaceous of Gondwana (NE Brazil). The specimen sheds light on the homology and 3D structure of the rachis-dominated feathers, previously known from two-dimensional slabs. The rectrices exhibit a row of rounded spots, probably corresponding to some original colour pattern. The specimen supports the identification of the feather scapus as the rachis, which is notably robust and elliptical in cross-section. In spite of its juvenile nature, the tail plumage resembles the feathering of adult individuals of modern birds. Documentation of rachis-dominated tail in South American enantiornithines broadens the paleobiogeographic distribution of basal birds with this tail feather morphotype, up to now only reported from China. PMID:26035285

  5. Techniques and Results for Open Hip Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David M.; Hellman, Michael D.; Haughom, Bryan; Stover, Michael D.; Nho, Shane J.

    2015-01-01

    While hip arthroscopy grows in popularity, there are still many circumstances under which open hip preservation is the most appropriately indicated. This article specifically reviews open hip preservation procedures for a variety of hip conditions. Femoral acetabular impingement may be corrected using an open surgical hip dislocation. Acetabular dysplasia may be corrected using a periacetabular osteotomy. Acetabular protrusio may require surgical hip dislocation with rim trimming and a possible valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy. Legg–Calve–Perthes disease produces complex deformities that may be better served with osteotomies of the proximal femur and/or acetabulum. Chronic slipped capital femoral epiphysis may also benefit from a surgical hip dislocation and/or proximal femoral osteotomy. PMID:26649292

  6. Majorization preservation of Gaussian bosonic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbour, Michael G.; García-Patrón, Raúl; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that phase-insensitive Gaussian bosonic channels are majorization-preserving over the set of passive states of the harmonic oscillator. This means that comparable passive states under majorization are transformed into equally comparable passive states by any phase-insensitive Gaussian bosonic channel. Our proof relies on a new preorder relation called Fock-majorization, which coincides with regular majorization for passive states but also induces another order relation in terms of mean boson number, thereby connecting the concepts of energy and disorder of a quantum state. The consequences of majorization preservation are discussed in the context of the broadcast communication capacity of Gaussian bosonic channels. Because most of our results are independent of the specific nature of the system under investigation, they could be generalized to other quantum systems and Hamiltonians, providing a new tool that may prove useful in quantum information theory and especially quantum thermodynamics.

  7. A Mesozoic bird from Gondwana preserving feathers.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ismar de Souza; Novas, Fernando E; Agnolín, Federico L; Isasi, Marcelo P; Freitas, Francisco I; Andrade, José A

    2015-06-02

    The fossil record of birds in the Mesozoic of Gondwana is mostly based on isolated and often poorly preserved specimens, none of which has preserved details on feather anatomy. We provide the description of a fossil bird represented by a skeleton with feathers from the Early Cretaceous of Gondwana (NE Brazil). The specimen sheds light on the homology and 3D structure of the rachis-dominated feathers, previously known from two-dimensional slabs. The rectrices exhibit a row of rounded spots, probably corresponding to some original colour pattern. The specimen supports the identification of the feather scapus as the rachis, which is notably robust and elliptical in cross-section. In spite of its juvenile nature, the tail plumage resembles the feathering of adult individuals of modern birds. Documentation of rachis-dominated tail in South American enantiornithines broadens the paleobiogeographic distribution of basal birds with this tail feather morphotype, up to now only reported from China.

  8. Preservation of cycad and Ginkgo pollen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederiksen, N.O.

    1978-01-01

    Pollen grains of Ginkgo, Cycas, and Encephalartos were chemically treated together with pollen of Quercus, Alnus, and Pinus, the latter three genera being used as standards. The experiments showed that: (1) boiling the pollen for 8-10 hours in 10% KOH had little if any effect on any of the grains; (2) lengthy acetolysis treatment produced some degradation or corrosion, particularly in Ginkgo and Cycas, but the grains of even these genera remained easily recognizable; (3) oxidation with KMnO4 followed by H2O2 showed that pollen of Ginkgo, Cycas, and Encephalartos remains better preserved than that of Quercus and Alnus, and although Ginkgo and Encephalartos probably are slightly less resistant to oxidation than Pinus, no great differences exists between these monosulcate types and Pinus. Thus the experiments show that, at least for sediments low in bacteria, cycad and Ginkgo pollen should be well represented in the fossil record as far as their preservational capabilities are concerned. ?? 1978.

  9. Nanomaterials and preservation mechanisms of architecture monuments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ion, Rodica-Mariana; Radu, Adrian; Teodorescu, Sofia; Fierǎscu, Irina; Fierǎscu, Radu-Claudiu; Ştirbescu, Raluca-Maria; Dulamǎ, Ioana Daniela; Şuicǎ-Bunghez, Ioana-Raluca; Bucuricǎ, Ioan Alin; Ion, Mihaela-Lucia

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of the chemical composition of the building materials of the monuments may help us to preserve and protect them from the pollution of our cities. The aim of this work is to characterize the materials of the walls from ancient buildings, the decay products that could be appear due to the action of pollution and a new method based on nanomaterials (hydroxyapatite -HAp) for a conservative preservation of the treated walls. Some analytical techniques have been used, as follow: X-ray fluorescence energy dispersive (EDXRF) (for the relative abundance of major, minor and trace elements), FTIR and Raman spectroscopy (for stratigraphic study of cross-sections of multi-layered materials found in wall paintings), Optical microscopy (OM), (for morphology of the wall samples). The nanomaterial suspension HAp applied on the sample surface by spraying, decreased the capillary water uptake, do not modify significantly the color of the samples and induced a reduced mass loss for the treated samples.

  10. Application of natural antimicrobials for food preservation.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Brijesh K; Valdramidis, Vasilis P; O'Donnell, Colm P; Muthukumarappan, Kasiviswanathan; Bourke, Paula; Cullen, P J

    2009-07-22

    In this review, antimicrobials from a range of plant, animal, and microbial sources are reviewed along with their potential applications in food systems. Chemical and biochemical antimicrobial compounds derived from these natural sources and their activity against a range of pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms pertinent to food, together with their effects on food organoleptic properties, are outlined. Factors influencing the antimicrobial activity of such agents are discussed including extraction methods, molecular weight, and agent origin. These issues are considered in conjunction with the latest developments in the quantification of the minimum inhibitory (and noninhibitory) concentration of antimicrobials and/or their components. Natural antimicrobials can be used alone or in combination with other novel preservation technologies to facilitate the replacement of traditional approaches. Research priorities and future trends focusing on the impact of product formulation, intrinsic product parameters, and extrinsic storage parameters on the design of efficient food preservation systems are also presented.

  11. Workshop on Preserving High Purity Uranium-233

    SciTech Connect

    Krichinsky, Alan M; Giaquinto, Joseph; Canaan, R Douglas {Doug}

    2016-01-01

    A workshop was held on at the MARC X conference to provide a forum for the scientific community to communicate needs for high-purity 233U and its by-products in order to preserve critical items otherwise slated for downblending and disposal. Currently, only a small portion of the U.S. holdings of separated 233U is being preserved. However, many additional kilograms of 233U (>97% pure) still are destined to be downblended which will permanently destroy their potential value for many other applications. It is not likely that this material will ever be replaced due to a lack of operating production capability. Summaries of information conveyed at the workshop and feedback obtained from the scientific community are presented herein.

  12. Privacy preserving RBF kernel support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoran; Xiong, Li; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Jiang, Xiaoqian

    2014-01-01

    Data sharing is challenging but important for healthcare research. Methods for privacy-preserving data dissemination based on the rigorous differential privacy standard have been developed but they did not consider the characteristics of biomedical data and make full use of the available information. This often results in too much noise in the final outputs. We hypothesized that this situation can be alleviated by leveraging a small portion of open-consented data to improve utility without sacrificing privacy. We developed a hybrid privacy-preserving differentially private support vector machine (SVM) model that uses public data and private data together. Our model leverages the RBF kernel and can handle nonlinearly separable cases. Experiments showed that this approach outperforms two baselines: (1) SVMs that only use public data, and (2) differentially private SVMs that are built from private data. Our method demonstrated very close performance metrics compared to nonprivate SVMs trained on the private data.

  13. Structure-Preserving Smoothing of Biomedical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Debora; Hernàndez-Sabaté, Aura; Burnat, Mireia; Jansen, Steven; Martínez-Villalta, Jordi

    Smoothing of biomedical images should preserve gray-level transitions between adjacent tissues, while restoring contours consistent with anatomical structures. Anisotropic diffusion operators are based on image appearance discontinuities (either local or contextual) and might fail at weak inter-tissue transitions. Meanwhile, the output of block-wise and morphological operations is prone to present a block structure due to the shape and size of the considered pixel neighborhood.

  14. Archiving and Preservation in Electronic Libraries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    that is those libraries that are moving toward provision of materials in electronic form, have been swept up in this attitude as well. But, electronic...for consistency within the presentation and are not indicative of general consensus within the community. Born digital - materials that are created...preservation Digitalpreservation - keeping the bits and bytes safe and unaltered for a long period of time Digitization - converting materials in non

  15. Working Group Proposed to Preserve Archival Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The AAS and AIP co-hosted a Workshop in April 2012 with NSF support (AST-1110231) that recommends establishing a Working Group on Time Domain Astronomy (WGTDA) to encourage and advise on preserving historical observations in a form meaningful for future scientific analysis. Participants specifically considered archival observations that could describe how astronomical objects change over time. Modern techniques and increased storage capacity enable extracting additional information from older media. Despite the photographic plate focus, other formats also concerned participants. To prioritize preservation efforts, participants recommended considering the information density, the amount of previously published data, their format and associated materials, their current condition, and their expected deterioration rate. Because the best digitization still produces an observation of an observation, the originals should be retained. For accessibility, participants recommended that observations and their metadata be available digitally and on-line. Standardized systems for classifying, organizing, and listing holdings should enable discovery of historical observations through the Virtual Astronomical Observatory. Participants recommended pilot projects that produce scientific results, demonstrate the dependence of some advances on heritage data, and open new avenues of exploration. Surveying a broad region of the sky with a long time-base and high cadence should reveal new phenomena and improve statistics for rare events. Adequate financial support is essential. While their capacity to produce new science is the primary motivation for preserving astronomical records, their potential for historical research and citizen science allows targeting cultural institutions and other private sources. A committee was elected to prepare the WGTDA proposal. The WGTDA executive committee should be composed of ~10 members representing modern surveys, heritage materials, data management

  16. Biopolymers for sample collection, protection, and preservation.

    PubMed

    Sorokulova, Iryna; Olsen, Eric; Vodyanoy, Vitaly

    2015-07-01

    One of the principal challenges in the collection of biological samples from air, water, and soil matrices is that the target agents are not stable enough to be transferred from the collection point to the laboratory of choice without experiencing significant degradation and loss of viability. At present, there is no method to transport biological samples over considerable distances safely, efficiently, and cost-effectively without the use of ice or refrigeration. Current techniques of protection and preservation of biological materials have serious drawbacks. Many known techniques of preservation cause structural damages, so that biological materials lose their structural integrity and viability. We review applications of a novel bacterial preservation process, which is nontoxic and water soluble and allows for the storage of samples without refrigeration. The method is capable of protecting the biological sample from the effects of environment for extended periods of time and then allows for the easy release of these collected biological materials from the protective medium without structural or DNA damage. Strategies for sample collection, preservation, and shipment of bacterial, viral samples are described. The water-soluble polymer is used to immobilize the biological material by replacing the water molecules within the sample with molecules of the biopolymer. The cured polymer results in a solid protective film that is stable to many organic solvents, but quickly removed by the application of the water-based solution. The process of immobilization does not require the use of any additives, accelerators, or plastifiers and does not involve high temperature or radiation to promote polymerization.

  17. Energy preserving QMF for image processing.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jian-ao; Wang, Yonghui

    2014-07-01

    Implementation of new biorthogonal filter banks (BFB) for image compression and denoising is performed, using test images with diversified characteristics. These new BFB’s are linear-phase, have odd lengths, and with a critical feature, namely, the filters preserve signal energy very well. Experimental results show that the proposed filter banks demonstrate promising performance improvement over the filter banks of those widely used in the image processing area, such as the CDF 9/7.

  18. Preserved Network Metrics across Translated Texts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabatbat, Josephine Jill T.; Monsanto, Jica P.; Tapang, Giovanni A.

    2014-09-01

    Co-occurrence language networks based on Bible translations and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) translations in different languages were constructed and compared with random text networks. Among the considered network metrics, the network size, N, the normalized betweenness centrality (BC), and the average k-nearest neighbors, knn, were found to be the most preserved across translations. Moreover, similar frequency distributions of co-occurring network motifs were observed for translated texts networks.

  19. Experimental Breeder Reactor I Preservation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Braun

    2006-10-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR I) is a National Historic Landmark located at the Idaho National Laboratory, a Department of Energy laboratory in southeastern Idaho. The facility is significant for its association and contributions to the development of nuclear reactor testing and development. This Plan includes a structural assessment of the interior and exterior of the EBR I Reactor Building from a preservation, rather than an engineering stand point and recommendations for maintenance to ensure its continued protection.

  20. Preservation of female fertility: an essential progress.

    PubMed

    Tulandi, Togas; Huang, Jack Y J; Tan, Seang Lin

    2008-11-01

    Chemotherapy and radiation treatment for malignancies or other conditions such as hematologic and autoimmune disorders, have resulted in improved survival rates but may lead to sterility. Women who postpone conception until late reproductive years are also at increased risk to become infertile. The purpose of our review is to evaluate advances and techniques for fertility preservation. We performed a literature search using the keywords fertility preservation, vitrification, oocytes, embryo, ovarian cryopreservation, and ovarian suspension and conducted the search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database of systematic reviews. The results show that today, it is possible to cryopreserve oocytes, embryos, or ovarian tissue. The most commonly used technique remains embryo cryopreservation. Another improvement is the development of vitrification or rapid freezing technique. For women undergoing local pelvic radiation, one should consider ovarian suspension. Medical professionals, patients, and their families should be aware that in some conditions, the reproductive function can be preserved. Although one cannot guarantee future fertility, a realistic hope for women at risk of having premature ovarian failure can now be offered.

  1. Methods to preserve potentially toxigenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Lucas Costa; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Chalfoun, Sara Maria; Batista, Luís Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms are a source of many high-value compounds which are useful to every living being, such as humans, plants and animals. Since the process of isolating and improving a microorganism can be lengthy and expensive, preserving the obtained characteristic is of paramount importance, so the process does not need to be repeated. Fungi are eukaryotic, achlorophyllous, heterotrophic organisms, usually filamentous, absorb their food, can be either macro or microscopic, propagate themselves by means of spores and store glycogen as a source of storage. Fungi, while infesting food, may produce toxic substances such as mycotoxins. The great genetic diversity of the Kingdom Fungi renders the preservation of fungal cultures for many years relevant. Several international reference mycological culture collections are maintained in many countries. The methodologies that are most fit for preserving microorganisms for extended periods are based on lowering the metabolism until it reaches a stage of artificial dormancy. The goal of this study was to analyze three methods for potentially toxigenic fungal conservation (Castellani's, continuous subculture and lyophilization) and to identify the best among them.

  2. Methods to preserve potentially toxigenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Lucas Costa; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Chalfoun, Sara Maria; Batista, Luís Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms are a source of many high-value compounds which are useful to every living being, such as humans, plants and animals. Since the process of isolating and improving a microorganism can be lengthy and expensive, preserving the obtained characteristic is of paramount importance, so the process does not need to be repeated. Fungi are eukaryotic, achlorophyllous, heterotrophic organisms, usually filamentous, absorb their food, can be either macro or microscopic, propagate themselves by means of spores and store glycogen as a source of storage. Fungi, while infesting food, may produce toxic substances such as mycotoxins. The great genetic diversity of the Kingdom Fungi renders the preservation of fungal cultures for many years relevant. Several international reference mycological culture collections are maintained in many countries. The methodologies that are most fit for preserving microorganisms for extended periods are based on lowering the metabolism until it reaches a stage of artificial dormancy. The goal of this study was to analyze three methods for potentially toxigenic fungal conservation (Castellani’s, continuous subculture and lyophilization) and to identify the best among them. PMID:24948912

  3. Fertility Preservation for Cancer Patients: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ajala, Tosin; Rafi, Junaid; Larsen-Disney, Peter; Howell, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Infertility can arise as a consequence of treatment of oncological conditions. The parallel and continued improvement in both the management of oncology and fertility cases in recent times has brought to the fore-front the potential for fertility preservation in patients being treated for cancer. Oncologists must be aware of situations where their treatment will affect fertility in patients who are being treated for cancer and they must also be aware of the pathways available for procedures such as cryopreservation of gametes and/or embryos. Improved cancer care associated with increased cure rates and long term survival, coupled with advances in fertility treatment means that it is now imperative that fertility preservation is considered as part of the care offered to these patients. This can only be approached within a multidisciplinary setting. There are obvious challenges that still remain to be resolved, especially in the area of fertility preservation in prepubertal patients. These include ethical issues, such as valid consent and research in the area of tissue retrieval, cryopreservation, and transplantation. PMID:20379357

  4. Riverscape and Groundwater Preservation: A Choice Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempesta, T.; Vecchiato, D.

    2013-12-01

    This study presents a quantitative approach to support policy decision making for the preservation of riverscapes, taking into account the EC Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC) and the EC Nitrates Directive (91/676/EEC) concerning the protection of waters against nitrate pollution from agricultural sources. A choice experiment was applied to evaluate the benefits, as perceived by inhabitants, of the implementation of policies aiming to reduce the concentration of nitrates in groundwater, preserve the riverscape by maintaining a minimum water flow and increasing hedges and woods along the Serio River in central northern Italy. Findings suggested that people were particularly concerned about groundwater quality, probably because it is strongly linked to human health. Nevertheless, it was interesting to observe that people expressed a high willingness to pay for actions that affect the riverscape as a whole (such as the minimum water flow maintenance plus reforestation). This is probably due to the close connection between the riverscape and the functions of the river area for recreation, health purposes, and biodiversity preservation.

  5. Preservation technologies for fresh meat - a review.

    PubMed

    Zhou, G H; Xu, X L; Liu, Y

    2010-09-01

    Fresh meat is a highly perishable product due to its biological composition. Many interrelated factors influence the shelf life and freshness of meat such as holding temperature, atmospheric oxygen (O(2)), endogenous enzymes, moisture, light and most importantly, micro-organisms. With the increased demand for high quality, convenience, safety, fresh appearance and an extended shelf life in fresh meat products, alternative non-thermal preservation technologies such as high hydrostatic pressure, superchilling, natural biopreservatives and active packaging have been proposed and investigated. Whilst some of these technologies are efficient at inactivating the micro-organisms most commonly related to food-borne diseases, they are not effective against spores. To increase their efficacy against vegetative cells, a combination of several preservation technologies under the so-called hurdle concept has also been investigated. The objective of this review is to describe current methods and developing technologies for preserving fresh meat. The benefits of some new technologies and their industrial limitations is presented and discussed.

  6. Mass preserving registration for lung CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Lo, Pechin; Loeve, Martine; Tiddens, Harm A.; Sporring, Jon; Nielsen, Mads; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we evaluate a novel image registration method on a set of expiratory-inspiratory pairs of computed tomography (CT) lung scans. A free-form multi resolution image registration technique is used to match two scans of the same subject. To account for the differences in the lung intensities due to differences in inspiration level, we propose to adjust the intensity of lung tissue according to the local expansion or compression. An image registration method without intensity adjustment is compared to the proposed method. Both approaches are evaluated on a set of 10 pairs of expiration and inspiration CT scans of children with cystic fibrosis lung disease. The proposed method with mass preserving adjustment results in significantly better alignment of the vessel trees. Analysis of local volume change for regions with trapped air compared to normally ventilated regions revealed larger differences between these regions in the case of mass preserving image registration, indicating that mass preserving registration is better at capturing localized differences in lung deformation.

  7. Organic Entrainment and Preservation in Volcanic Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Ojha, Lujendra; Brunner, Anna E.; Dufek, Josef D.; Wray, James Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Unaltered pyroclastic deposits have previously been deemed to have "low" potential for the formation, concentration and preservation of organic material on the Martian surface. Yet volcanic glasses that have solidified very quickly after an eruption may be good candidates for containment and preservation of refractory organic material that existed in a biologic system pre-eruption due to their impermeability and ability to attenuate UV radiation. Analysis using NanoSIMS of volcanic glass could then be performed to both deduce carbon isotope ratios that indicate biologic origin and confirm entrainment during eruption. Terrestrial contamination is one of the biggest barriers to definitive Martian organic identification in soil and rock samples. While there is a greater potential to concentrate organics in sedimentary strata, volcanic glasses may better encapsulate and preserve organics over long time scales, and are widespread on Mars. If volcanic glass from many sites on Earth could be shown to contain biologically derived organics from the original environment, there could be significant implications for the search for biomarkers in ancient Martian environments.

  8. Biomarkers to assess graft quality during conventional and machine preservation in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, Cornelia J; Farid, Waqar R R; de Jonge, Jeroen; Metselaar, Herold J; Kazemier, Geert; van der Laan, Luc J W

    2014-09-01

    A global rising organ shortage necessitates the use of extended criteria donors (ECD) for liver transplantation (LT). However, poor preservation and extensive ischemic injury of ECD grafts have been recognized as important factors associated with primary non-function, early allograft dysfunction, and biliary complications after LT. In order to prevent for these ischemia-related complications, machine perfusion (MP) has gained interest as a technique to optimize preservation of grafts and to provide the opportunity to assess graft quality by screening for extensive ischemic injury. For this purpose, however, objective surrogate biomarkers are required which can be easily determined at time of graft preservation and the various techniques of MP. This review provides an overview and evaluation of biomarkers that have been investigated for the assessment of graft quality and viability testing during different types of MP. Moreover, studies regarding conventional graft preservation by static cold storage (SCS) were screened to identify biomarkers that correlated with either allograft dysfunction or biliary complications after LT and which could potentially be applied as predictive markers during MP. The pros and cons of the different biomaterials that are available for biomarker research during graft preservation are discussed, accompanied with suggestions for future research. Though many studies are currently still in the experimental setting or of low evidence level due to small cohort sizes, the biomarkers presented in this review provide a useful handle to monitor recovery of ECD grafts during clinical MP in the near future.

  9. Exceptionally preserved juvenile megalosauroid theropod dinosaur with filamentous integument from the Late Jurassic of Germany.

    PubMed

    Rauhut, Oliver W M; Foth, Christian; Tischlinger, Helmut; Norell, Mark A

    2012-07-17

    Recent discoveries in Asia have greatly increased our understanding of the evolution of dinosaurs' integumentary structures, revealing a previously unexpected diversity of "protofeathers" and feathers. However, all theropod dinosaurs with preserved feathers reported so far are coelurosaurs. Evidence for filaments or feathers in noncoelurosaurian theropods is circumstantial and debated. Here we report an exceptionally preserved skeleton of a juvenile megalosauroid, Sciurumimus albersdoerferi n. gen., n. sp., from the Late Jurassic of Germany, which preserves a filamentous plumage at the tail base and on parts of the body. These structures are identical to the type 1 feathers that have been reported in some ornithischians, the basal tyrannosaur Dilong, the basal therizinosauroid Beipiaosaurus, and, probably, in the basal coelurosaur Sinosauropteryx. Sciurumimus albersdoerferi represents the phylogenetically most basal theropod that preserves direct evidence for feathers and helps close the gap between feathers reported in coelurosaurian theropods and filaments in ornithischian dinosaurs, further supporting the homology of these structures. The specimen of Sciurumimus is the most complete megalosauroid yet discovered and helps clarify significant anatomical details of this important basal theropod clade, such as the complete absence of the fourth digit of the manus. The dentition of this probably early-posthatchling individual is markedly similar to that of basal coelurosaurian theropods, indicating that coelurosaur occurrences based on isolated teeth should be used with caution.

  10. Signal Preservation in Pulsing Turbidity Current Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keevil, G. M.; Dorrell, R. M.; McCaffrey, W. D.

    2014-12-01

    Recent debate has focused on the potential preservation of the signal of seismic events in the sedimentary record via the initiation of large-scale turbidity current flows. The failure of a seismic zone lying across a series of submarine canyon systems may initiate multiple linked turbidity currents from each canyon head. Such events can be distinguished from locally triggered turbidity currents by their deposits. Canyon systems may be expected to become progressively interconnected with depth. Differing run out times of each interconnected channel is expected to result in pulsing flow behavior, a key feature of such turbidity currents. Thus, cyclical waxing to waning flow behavior preserved in the rock record may be a key indicator of a large-scale seismic trigger. Novel experimental research is presented that explores the dynamics of pulsed turbidity currents. The experimental study is used to quantitatively examine controls on the time and length scale of signal preservation in pulsing density driven flows. The experiments consisted of a multi gate lock box, with the gates remotely operated by pneumatic rams. Gate timers allow for accurate experimental repeatability and a careful investigation of the effect of time spacing between flows on pulsing flow dynamics. Parameters investigated include volumes of material released, effective flow density and viscosity (as a proxy of flow mud content). Full flow field visualization was made using an array of interlinked HD cameras. Dyeing separate components of the flow different colors enabled detailed analysis of flow dynamic behavior occurring between head and tail. The secondary pulsing flow was seen to rapidly overtake the first flow. Observations of flow velocity and density suggested that due to stratification the secondary flow was travelling along the density interface between the main body of the primary flow and its turbulent wake. As the pulsing flows created in the laboratory experiments rapidly merged, it

  11. Significance of preoperative calculation of uterine weight as an indicator for preserving the uterus in pelvic reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Qingsong; Ma, Ning; Huang, Huijuan; Xu, Bo; He, Chunni; Song, Yanfeng

    2015-01-01

    Recently, increasing evidence has shown that uterus preservation is beneficial for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) patients, both physiologically and psychologically. However, the preoperative indicators for uterus preservation have rarely been examined. The current study was designed to determine the relationship between the preoperative evaluated uterus weight and the operation selection (preserving the uterus or not) in pelvic reconstructive surgery (PRS) using vaginal meshes. First, in a series of 96 patients undergoing hysterectomy, the uterine weight was calculated by preoperative ultrasound measurements, and was then compared with the postoperative actual weight of the uterus. Subsequently, in a series of 65 patients undergone PRS using vaginal meshes and preserving the uterus, the uterine weight was calculated by preoperative ultrasound measurements. Lastly, in a series of 43 patients with a uterine weight > 56.12 g who had undergone PRS using vaginal meshes, the operation success rate in patients with a preserved uterus was compared to patients for whom the uterus was not preserved. The results showed that uterus weight can be evaluated by ultrasound and used as a preoperative indicator for whether the uterus should be preserved or not in PRS when using vaginal meshes. It was indicated that preoperative evaluation of uterine weight is beneficial for surgical planning and guidance.

  12. TURNING IT UPSIDE DOWN: AREAS OF PRESERVED COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Gold, James M.; Hahn, Britta; Strauss, Gregory P.; Waltz, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia demonstrate marked impairments on most clinical neuropsychological tests. These findings suggest that patients suffer from a generalized form of cognitive impairment, with little evidence of spared performance documented in several large meta-analytic reviews of the clinical literature. In contrast, we review evidence for relative sparing of aspects of attention, procedural memory, and emotional processing observed in studies that have employed experimental approaches adapted from the cognitive and affective neuroscience literature. These islands of preserved performance suggest that the cognitive deficits in schizophrenia are not as general as they appear to be when assayed with clinical neuropsychological methods. The apparent contradiction in findings across methods may offer important clues about the nature of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia. The documentation of preserved cognitive function in schizophrenia may serve to sharpen hypotheses about the biological mechanisms that are implicated in the illness. PMID:19452280

  13. 7 CFR 1.24 - Preservation of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Preservation of records. 1.24 Section 1.24 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Official Records § 1.24 Preservation of records. Agencies shall preserve all correspondence relating to the requests it receives under...

  14. 7 CFR 1.24 - Preservation of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preservation of records. 1.24 Section 1.24 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Official Records § 1.24 Preservation of records. Agencies shall preserve all correspondence relating to the requests it receives under...

  15. The Commission on Preservation and Access Newsletter. 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Preservation and Access Newsletter, 1994

    1994-01-01

    The Commission on Preservation and Access was established in 1986 to foster and support collaboration among libraries and allied organizations in order to ensure the preservation of the published and documentary record in all formats and to provide enhanced access to scholarly information. The Commission's newsletter keeps the preservation and…

  16. Selection for Preservation in the Digital Age: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gertz, Janet

    2001-01-01

    Considers whether conversion to digital form is a preservation action, the contrasts between selection for digital conversion and selection for traditional preservation, and the potential effects on the field of preservation. Topics include value and demand; intellectual property rights; added value; and costs. (LRW)

  17. 14 CFR 136.9 - Life preservers for over water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Life preservers for over water. 136.9... TOURS AND NATIONAL PARKS AIR TOUR MANAGEMENT National Air Tour Safety Standards § 136.9 Life preservers... is wearing a life preserver from before takeoff until flight is no longer over water. (b)...

  18. 33 CFR 144.01-20 - Life preservers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Life preservers. 144.01-20...) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES LIFESAVING APPLIANCES Manned Platforms § 144.01-20 Life preservers. (a) An approved life preserver shall be provided for each person on a manned platform. The...

  19. 14 CFR 136.9 - Life preservers for over water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Life preservers for over water. 136.9... TOURS AND NATIONAL PARKS AIR TOUR MANAGEMENT National Air Tour Safety Standards § 136.9 Life preservers... is wearing a life preserver from before takeoff until flight is no longer over water. (b)...

  20. 14 CFR 136.9 - Life preservers for over water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Life preservers for over water. 136.9... TOURS AND NATIONAL PARKS AIR TOUR MANAGEMENT National Air Tour Safety Standards § 136.9 Life preservers... is wearing a life preserver from before takeoff until flight is no longer over water. (b)...