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Sample records for alhagi sparsifolia shap

  1. Assimilative branches and leaves of the desert plant Alhagi sparsifolia Shap. possesses a different adaptation mechanism to shade.

    PubMed

    Lei, Li; Xiang-yi, Li; Xin-wen, Xu; Li-sha, Lin; Fan-jiang, Zeng; Feng-li, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Leaves and assimilative branches are crucial to the life cycle of Alhagi sparsifolia Shap. (Fabaceae), which grows in high-irradiance environments and is the main vegetation in the forelands of the Taklamakan Desert. This plant has an important role in wind protection and sand fixation at the oasis-desert transition zone. The morphology, physiology, and photosynthesis of A. sparsifolia leaves growing under low-light conditions have been extensively investigated. However, whether the plant's assimilative branches adapt similarly to low light levels is unclear, as are its specific light adaptation mechanisms. In this report, we characterized the biomass allocation, morphology, and chlorophyll a fluorescence of leaves and assimilative branches of A. sparsifolia. The results indicated that low-light conditions limited the normal growth of A. sparsifolia. The fraction of biomass allocated to leaves increased, whereas that to assimilative branches decreased. In addition, leaf thickness and assimilative branch diameter decreased, resulting in higher specific leaf area, specific assimilative branch length, and area for higher light absorbing and higher efficiency of light-usage. The assimilative branches and leaves were responded oppositely under low-light conditions in that leaves had lower photosystem II activity and assimilative branches had higher light-use efficiency to maximize light energy absorption for growth of A. sparsifolia.

  2. Transcriptomic Analysis of the Primary Roots of Alhagi sparsifolia in Response to Water Stress

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Xinwu; Zhang, Chao; Jia, Shirong; Li, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Background Alhagi sparsifolia is a typical desert phreatophyte and has evolved to withstand extreme dry, cold and hot weather. While A. sparsifolia represents an ideal model to study the molecular mechanism of plant adaption to abiotic stress, no research has been done in this aspect to date. Here we took advantage of Illumina platform to survey transcriptome in primary roots of A. sparsifolia under water stress conditions in aim to facilitate the exploration of its genetic basis for drought tolerance. Methodology and Principal Findings We sequenced four primary roots samples individually collected at 0, 6, 24 and 30h from the A. sparsifolia seedlings in the course of 24h of water stress following 6h of rehydration. The resulting 38,763,230, 67,511,150, 49,259,804 and 54,744,906 clean reads were pooled and assembled into 33,255 unigenes with an average length of 1,057 bp. All-unigenes were subjected to functional annotation by searching against the public databases. Based on the established transcriptome database, we further evaluated the gene expression profiles in the four different primary roots samples, and identified numbers of differently expressed genes (DEGs) reflecting the early response to water stress (6h vs. 0h), the late response to water stress (24h vs. 0h) and the response to post water stress rehydration (30h vs. 24h). Moreover, the DEGs specifically regulated at 6, 24 and 30h were captured in order to depict the dynamic changes of gene expression during water stress and subsequent rehydration. Functional categorization of the DEGs indicated the activation of oxidoreductase system, and particularly emphasized the significance of the ‘Glutathione metabolism pathway’ in response to water stress. Conclusions This is the first description of the genetic makeup of A. sparsifolia, thus providing a substantial contribution to the sequence resources for this species. The identified DEGs offer a deep insight into the molecular mechanism of A. sparsifolia

  3. Alhagi: a plant genus rich in bioactives for pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Gulzar; Hussain, Muhammad Ajaz; Anwar, Farooq; Ashraf, Muhammad; Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Alhagi, a plant genus from family Fabaceae, is widely distributed in many countries of Asia, Australia and Europe. Commonly known as camel thorn, Alhagi has many species famous for feed and folk medicinal uses. Different species of Alhagi such as Alhagi pseudalhagi, A. graecorum, A. sparsifolia, A. kirgisorum, A. maurorum, A. camelorum and A. persarum have been explored for their antioxidant potential and nutritive value along with various medicinal properties. A wide array of pharmacologically active secondary metabolites such as flavonoids, alkaloids (alhacidin and alhacin), steroids, pseudalhagin A, phospholipids and polysaccharides have been reported from different parts of Alhagi species. A broad range of biological activities such as antioxidant, cardiovascular, anti-ulcer, hepatoprotective, antispasmodic, antidiarrheal, antinociceptive, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory, anti-rheumatic, antibacterial and antifungal have been ascribed to different parts of Alhagi. In addition, Alhagi plants are also valued as a rich source of digestible protein and important minerals. This review focuses on the medicinal applications and detailed profile of high-value bioactive phytochemicals along with pharmacological attributes and therapeutic potential of these multi-purpose plants.

  4. Recent development of three-dimensional piping code SHAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Zeuch, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the recent development of the three-dimensional, structural, and hydrodynamic analysis piping code SHAPS. Several new features have been incorporated into the program, including (1) an elbow hydrodynamic model for analyzing the effect of global motion on the pressure-wave propagation, (2) a component hydrodynamic model for treating fluid motion in the vicinity of rigid obstacles and baffle plates, (3) the addition of the implicit time integration scheme in the structural-dynamic analysis, (4) the option of an implicit-implicit fluid-structural linking scheme, and (5) provisions for two constitutive equations for materials under various loading conditions. Sample problems are given to illustrate these features. Their results are discussed in detail. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Evaluation of anhedonia with the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS) in adult outpatients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Nakonezny, Paul A; Morris, David W; Greer, Tracy L; Byerly, Matthew J; Carmody, Thomas J; Grannemann, Bruce D; Bernstein, Ira H; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2015-06-01

    Anhedonia or inability to experience pleasure not only is a core symptom of major depressive disorder (MDD), but also is identified as an important component of the positive valence system in the NIMH Research Domain Criteria. The Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS) has been developed for the assessment of hedonic experience or positive valence, but has not been well-studied in depressed outpatient populations. The current study examined the reliability and validity of the SHAPS using a sample of adult outpatients with treatment resistant MDD. Data for the current study were obtained from 122 adult outpatients with a diagnosis of MDD and non-response to adequate treatment with an SSRI and who participated in Project TReatment with Exercise Augmentation for Depression (TREAD). A Principal Components Analysis was used to define the dimensionality of the SHAPS. Convergent and discriminant validity were evaluated via correlations of the SHAPS total score with "gold standard" measures of depression severity and quality of life. The SHAPS was found to have high internal consistency (Cronbach's coefficient α = .82). A Principal Components Analysis suggests that the SHAPS is mainly "unidimensional" and limited to hedonic experience among adult outpatients with MDD. Convergent and discriminant validity were assessed by examining the Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient between the SHAPS total score and the HRSD17 (rs = 0.22, p < .03), IDS-C30 (rs = 0.26, p < .01), IDS-SR30 (rs = 0.23, p < .02), QIDS-C16 (rs = 0.22, p < .03), QIDS-SR16 (rs = 0.17, p < .10), QLES-Q (rs = -0.32, p < .002), and the pleasure/enjoyment item (sub-item 21) of the IDS-C (rs = 0.44, p < .0001) and IDS-SR (rs = 0.38, p < .0002). The self-administered SHAPS showed modest sensitivity (76%) and specificity (54%) with the self-administered pleasure/enjoyment single item (sub-item 21) of IDS-SR30. The current study shows that the SHAPS is a reliable and valid

  6. [Changes and analysis of soil quality under different land use types in oasis rim].

    PubMed

    Gui, Dong-Wei; Lei, Jia-Qiang; Zeng, Fan-Jiang; Mu, Gui-Jin; Yang, Fa-Xiang; Zhu, Jun-Tao

    2010-09-01

    The aggravation process of oasisization leads to changes of land use type in oasis rim. In order to discuss the effects of different land use types on soil properties and soil quality, the four land use types located Cele oasis rim in south margin of Tarim Basin, which are the cotton field, orchard, and Caligonum mongolicum Turcz land use type reclaimed by people and nature state land use type covered by Alhagi sparsifolia SHAP, were selected as study object. The relative soil quality index (RI) and the soil quality synthesis index (SQI) were used to analyse the changes of soil quality between four land use types within 0-20 cm, 2040 cm, 40-60 cm soil depth, respectively. Meantime, the fractal theory was used to analyse the particle-size distribution (PSD) property of top soil under different land use types. The results indicated that there was a significant difference in the soil organic matter and total nitrogen in same soil depth between four land use types; the order ranked according to RI was same to the order ranked according to SQI in each soil depth between four land use types. The cotton field and orchard have an obviously positive effect on soil quality of the top soil, however, the soil quality of Alhagi sparsifolia SHAP land use type was gradually increasing along with the increasing soil depth. The soil properties and soil quality of Caligonum mongolicum Turcz land use type were at the lowest level according to the comparison results among all land use types, and the calculation results of PSD fractal dimension also indicated the Caligonum mongolicum Turcz land use type had the worst ability on maintaining soil fine fractions. PMID:21072954

  7. [Changes and analysis of soil quality under different land use types in oasis rim].

    PubMed

    Gui, Dong-Wei; Lei, Jia-Qiang; Zeng, Fan-Jiang; Mu, Gui-Jin; Yang, Fa-Xiang; Zhu, Jun-Tao

    2010-09-01

    The aggravation process of oasisization leads to changes of land use type in oasis rim. In order to discuss the effects of different land use types on soil properties and soil quality, the four land use types located Cele oasis rim in south margin of Tarim Basin, which are the cotton field, orchard, and Caligonum mongolicum Turcz land use type reclaimed by people and nature state land use type covered by Alhagi sparsifolia SHAP, were selected as study object. The relative soil quality index (RI) and the soil quality synthesis index (SQI) were used to analyse the changes of soil quality between four land use types within 0-20 cm, 2040 cm, 40-60 cm soil depth, respectively. Meantime, the fractal theory was used to analyse the particle-size distribution (PSD) property of top soil under different land use types. The results indicated that there was a significant difference in the soil organic matter and total nitrogen in same soil depth between four land use types; the order ranked according to RI was same to the order ranked according to SQI in each soil depth between four land use types. The cotton field and orchard have an obviously positive effect on soil quality of the top soil, however, the soil quality of Alhagi sparsifolia SHAP land use type was gradually increasing along with the increasing soil depth. The soil properties and soil quality of Caligonum mongolicum Turcz land use type were at the lowest level according to the comparison results among all land use types, and the calculation results of PSD fractal dimension also indicated the Caligonum mongolicum Turcz land use type had the worst ability on maintaining soil fine fractions.

  8. Evaluation of in vitro anticancer activity of Ocimum basilicum, Alhagi maurorum, Calendula officinalis and their parasite Cuscuta campestris.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to study the relationship between presence of cytotoxic compounds in Ocimum basilicum, Alhagi maurorum, Calendula officinalis and their parasite Cuscuta campestris. The cytotoxic activity of the pure compounds was performed by MTT assay against breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and normal breast cell line (MCF 10A). The induction of apoptosis was measured by the expression levels of p53, bcl-2, bax and caspase-3 genes using quantitative Real Time PCR. Three active fractions were detected by nuclear magnetic resonance as lutein, lupeol and eugenol, respectively, in C. officinalis, A. maurorum and O. basilicum. These compounds and their epoxidized forms were also detected in their parasite C. campestris. The cytotoxic activity of lutein epoxide, lupeol epoxide and eugenol epoxide was significantly more than lutein, lupeol and eugenol. The mRNA expression level of p53, caspase-3 and bax genes were increased in both cancer cells treated with all pure compounds. However, bcl-2 gene expression decreased in treated breast cancer cells. In conclusion, all the data indicated that the epoxide forms of lupeol, lutein and eugenol are potential drug candidates for inducing apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.

  9. Evaluation of in vitro anticancer activity of Ocimum basilicum, Alhagi maurorum, Calendula officinalis and their parasite Cuscuta campestris.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to study the relationship between presence of cytotoxic compounds in Ocimum basilicum, Alhagi maurorum, Calendula officinalis and their parasite Cuscuta campestris. The cytotoxic activity of the pure compounds was performed by MTT assay against breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and normal breast cell line (MCF 10A). The induction of apoptosis was measured by the expression levels of p53, bcl-2, bax and caspase-3 genes using quantitative Real Time PCR. Three active fractions were detected by nuclear magnetic resonance as lutein, lupeol and eugenol, respectively, in C. officinalis, A. maurorum and O. basilicum. These compounds and their epoxidized forms were also detected in their parasite C. campestris. The cytotoxic activity of lutein epoxide, lupeol epoxide and eugenol epoxide was significantly more than lutein, lupeol and eugenol. The mRNA expression level of p53, caspase-3 and bax genes were increased in both cancer cells treated with all pure compounds. However, bcl-2 gene expression decreased in treated breast cancer cells. In conclusion, all the data indicated that the epoxide forms of lupeol, lutein and eugenol are potential drug candidates for inducing apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. PMID:25548920

  10. Evaluation of In Vitro Anticancer Activity of Ocimum Basilicum, Alhagi Maurorum, Calendula Officinalis and Their Parasite Cuscuta Campestris

    PubMed Central

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to study the relationship between presence of cytotoxic compounds in Ocimum basilicum, Alhagi maurorum, Calendula officinalis and their parasite Cuscuta campestris. The cytotoxic activity of the pure compounds was performed by MTT assay against breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and normal breast cell line (MCF 10A). The induction of apoptosis was measured by the expression levels of p53, bcl-2, bax and caspase-3 genes using quantitative Real Time PCR. Three active fractions were detected by nuclear magnetic resonance as lutein, lupeol and eugenol, respectively, in C. officinalis, A. maurorum and O. basilicum. These compounds and their epoxidized forms were also detected in their parasite C. campestris. The cytotoxic activity of lutein epoxide, lupeol epoxide and eugenol epoxide was significantly more than lutein, lupeol and eugenol. The mRNA expression level of p53, caspase-3 and bax genes were increased in both cancer cells treated with all pure compounds. However, bcl-2 gene expression decreased in treated breast cancer cells. In conclusion, all the data indicated that the epoxide forms of lupeol, lutein and eugenol are potential drug candidates for inducing apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. PMID:25548920

  11. Comparison of biological activity of phenolic fraction from roots of Alhagi maurorum with properties of commercial phenolic extracts and resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Hamed, Arafa I; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Phenolic compounds have different biological properties, including antioxidative activities, but they may also be prooxidants. The effect of phenolic fraction from roots of Alhagi maurorum on oxidative protein/lipid damages (determined by such parameters as levels of protein thiol groups and the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive species--TBARS) in human blood platelets and human plasma after treatment with hydrogen peroxide--H2O2 (which is the strong biologic oxidant and inflammatory mediator) was studied in vitro. We also studied the effect of A. maurorum extract on blood platelet activation corresponding to thrombin-induced arachidonic acid pathway. Moreover, the present work was designed to study the effect of A. maurorum extract on selected physiological function of blood platelets--adhesion of blood platelets to collagen in vitro. The action of phenolic fraction from A. maurorum was compared with the selected commercial phenolic extracts: extract from berries of Aronia melanocarpa (Aronox®), extract from bark of Yucca schidigera and monomeric polyphenol-resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene). Exposure of blood platelets or plasma to H2O2 resulted in a decrease of the level of thiol groups in proteins, and an increase of TBARS. In the presence of phenolic fraction from A. maurorum (0.5-50 µg/ml), a reduction of thiol groups oxidation together with the decrease of autoperoxidation of lipids and lipid peroxidation caused by H2O2 or thrombin was observed. The inhibitory, concentration-dependent effects of A. maurorum extract on adhesion of thrombin-activated platelets to collagen were also found. The phenolic fraction from A. maurorum acts as an antioxidant and can be useful as the natural factor protecting against diseases associated with oxidative stress. Tested fraction from A. maurorum has more effective antioxidative activity and antiplatelet properties than aronia extract or other commercial extract, however differences between their actions

  12. Changes in Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Enzyme Activities in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes Mellitus in Rats: Role of Alhagi maurorum Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Sheweita, S. A.; Mashaly, S.; Newairy, A. A.; Abdou, H. M.; Eweda, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Alhagi maurorum (camel thorn plant) is a promising medicinal plant due to the presence of flavonoids and phenolic compounds as major contents of its constituents. No previous study has been conducted before on A. maurorum extracts as an antioxidative stress and/or antidiabetic herb in STZ-induced DM in rats. Therefore, four groups of rats were allocated as control (C), STZ-induced DM (D), and STZ-induced DM supplemented with 300 mg/kg BW of either aqueous extract (WE) or ethanolic extract (EE) of A. maurorum. The plasma levels of glucose, TG, TC, LDL-C and VLDL-C, MDA, and bilirubin and the activities of transaminases and GR were significantly increased in the diabetic group. Also, diabetic rats showed severe glucose intolerance and histopathological changes in their livers. In addition, levels of insulin, total proteins, GSH, and HDL-C and the activities of SOD, GPx, and GST were significantly decreased in the diabetic rats compared to those of the control group. The ingestion of A. maurorum extracts lowered the blood glucose levels during the OGTT compared to the diabetic rats and restored all tested parameters to their normal levels with the exception of insulin level that could not be restored. It is concluded that A. maurorum extracts decreased elevated blood glucose levels and hyperlipidemia and suppressed oxidative stress caused by diabetes mellitus in rats. PMID:26885249

  13. SWIR Hemispherical Air-Glow Plotting System SHAPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonglewski, John D.; Myers, Michael M.; Dayton, David C.; Fertig, Gregory; Allen, Jeffrey; Nolasco, Rudolph; Maia, Franscisco

    2010-10-01

    It is well known that luminance from photo-chemical reactions of hydroxyl ions in the upper atmosphere (~85 km altitude) produces a significant amount of night time radiation in the short wave infra-red (SWIR) band of wave length 0.9 to 1.7 μm. Numerous studies of these phenomena have demonstrated that the irradiance shows significant temporal and spatial variations in the night sky. Changes in weather patterns, seasons, sun angle, moonlight, etc have the propensity to alter the SWIR air glow irradiance pattern. By performing multiple SWIR measurements a mosaic representation of the celestial hemisphere was constructed and used to investigate these variations over time and space. The experimental setup consisted of two sensors, an InGaAs SWIR detector and a visible astronomical camera, co-located and bore sighted on an AZ-EL gimbal. This gimbal was programmed to view most of the sky using forty five discrete azimuth and elevation locations. The dwell time at each location was 30 seconds with a total cycle time of less than 30 minutes. The visible astronomical camera collected image data simultaneous with the SWIR camera in order to distinguish SWIR patterns from clouds. Data was reduced through batch processing producing polar representations of the sky irradiance as a function of azimuth, elevation, and time. These spatiotemporal variations in the irradiance, both short and long term, can be used to validate and calibrate physical models of atmospheric chemistry and turbulence. In this paper we describe our experimental setup and present some results of our measurements made over several months in a rural marine environment on the Island of Kauai Hawaii.

  14. Octupole shaps in nuclei, and some rotational consequences thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarewicz, W.; Olanders, P.; Ragnarsson, I.; Dudek, J.; Leander, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    During the last years a large number of experimental papers presenting spectroscopic evidence for collective dipole and octupole deformations have appeared. Many theoretical attempts have been made to explain the observed spectroscopic properties in terms of stable octupole deformations. The coupling by the octupole potential, being proportional to Y/sub 30/, is strongest for those subshells for which ..delta..1 = 3. Therefore the tendency towards octupole deformation occurs just beyond closed shells where the high-j intruder subshells (N,1,j) lie very close to the normal parity subshells (N-1,1-3,j-3), i.e. for the particle numbers 34 (g/sub 9/2/-p/sub 3/2/), 56 (h/sub 11/2/-d/sub 5/2/). 9C (i/sub 13/2/-f/sub 7/2/) and 134 (j/sub 15/2/-g/sub 9/2/). Empirically, it is specifically for the particle numbers listed above that negative parity states are observed at relatively low energies in doubly even nuclei. From the different combinations of octupole-driving particle numbers four regions of likely candidates for octupole deformed equilibrium shapes emerge, namely the neutron-deficient nuclei with Z approx. = 90, N approx. = 134 (light actinides) and Z approx. = 34, N approx. = 34 (A approx. = 70) and the neutron-rich nuclei with Z approx. = 56, N approx. = 90 (heavy Ba) and Z approx. = 34, N/sup 56/ (A approx. = 90). In our calculations we searched for octupole unstable nuclei in these four mass regions. The Strutinsky method with the deformed Woods-Saxon potential was employed. The macroscopic part consists of a finite-range liquid drop energy, where both the surface and Coulomb terms contain a diffuseness correction.

  15. Clonal structure and genetic diversity of three desert phreatophytes.

    PubMed

    Vonlanthen, Beatrix; Zhang, Ximing; Bruelheide, Helge

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this paper was to assess clone sizes of three perennial desert plant species with AFLP markers and to relate them to clonal and genetic diversity and to hydroecology. The study was carried out at the southern rim of the Taklamakan Desert, where sexual regeneration is only possible shortly after rare flooding events, resulting in rarely established cohorts with subsequent extensive vertical growth and horizontal clonal spread. In this environment, repeated seedling establishment is excluded. We expected decreasing clonal and genetic diversity with increasing clone size and increasing distance to the groundwater table and a common response pattern among all study species. Maximum sizes of Populus euphratica and Alhagi sparsifolia clones were 121 ha and 6.1 ha, respectively, while Tamarix ramosissima clones reached a maximum size of only 38 m(2). In P. euphratica and A. sparsifolia, clonal diversity declined with increasing clone size and increasing distance to the groundwater table, while genetic diversity remained unaffected. Tamarix ramosissima differed from the other species because of a much smaller clonality. Clone size and clonal diversity were found to be good proxy variables for clone age. Despite the considerable age of the clones, genetic diversity is maintained in the populations.

  16. [Niche characteristics of plants on four environmental gradients in middle reaches of Tarim River].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiazhen; Chen, Yaning; Zhang, Yuanming

    2004-04-01

    Tarim River is the longest continental river in China. Along its either bank, the natural vegetation belts are composed of arbors, shrubs and grasses. In this paper, the niche breadths and overlaps of nineteen species on four environmental gradients in the middle reaches of Tarim River were calculated and analyzed. The results showed that the nineteen species could be divided into three groups, based on their average niche breadths. Group one included Populus euphratica, Tamarix ramosissima, T. hispida, Lycium ruthernicum, Alhagi sparsifolia and Phragmites australis, which were constructive species in Tarim River and their niche breadths were greater. Group two included T. leptostachys, Aeluropus pungens, Poacynum hendersonii, Cynanchum sibiricum, Karelinia caspica, Inula salsoloides, Taraxacum sp., and Hexinia polydichotoma, and their niche breadths were smaller than that of group one. Group three included Halimodendron halodendron, Glycyrrhiza inflata, Calamagrostis pseudophragmites, Salsola sp., and Sophora alapecuroides. Based on the niche overlaps matrix, the niche overlaps of the plant species pairs were generally smaller on all the four environmental gradients, because of their probable niche shift or the demand for different environmental resources. Soil moisture and soil salinity were the important environmental factors limiting the plant distribution in the middle reaches of Tarim River.

  17. Spectral reflectance properties of major objects in desert oasis: a case study of the Weigan-Kuqa river delta oasis in Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Tiyip, Tashpolat; Ding, Jianli; Sawut, Mamat; Tashpolat, Nigara; Kung, Hsiangte; Han, Guihong; Gui, Dongwei

    2012-08-01

    Aiming at the remote sensing application has been increasingly relying on ground object spectral characteristics. In order to further research the spectral reflectance characteristics in arid area, this study was performed in the typical delta oasis of Weigan and Kuqa rivers located north of Tarim Basin. Data were collected from geo-targets at multiple sites in various field conditions. The spectra data were collected for different soil types including saline-alkaline soil, silt sandy soil, cotton field, and others; vegetations of Alhagi sparsifolia, Phragmites australis, Tamarix, Halostachys caspica, etc., and water bodies. Next, the data were processed to remove high-frequency noise, and the spectral curves were smoothed with the moving average method. The derivative spectrum was generated after eliminating environmental background noise so that to distinguish the original overlap spectra. After continuum removal of the undesirable absorbance, the spectrum curves were able to highlight features for both optical absorbance and reflectance. The spectrum information of each ground object is essential for fully utilizing the multispectrum data generated by remote sensing, which will need a representative spectral library. In this study using ENVI 4.5 software, a preliminary spectral library of surface features was constructed using the data surveyed in the study area. This library can support remote sensing activities such as feature investigation, vegetation classification, and environmental monitoring in the delta oasis region. Future plan will focus on sharing and standardizing the criteria of professional spectral library and to expand and promote the utilization of the spectral databases. PMID:21922179

  18. Spectral reflectance properties of major objects in desert oasis: a case study of the Weigan-Kuqa river delta oasis in Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Tiyip, Tashpolat; Ding, Jianli; Sawut, Mamat; Tashpolat, Nigara; Kung, Hsiangte; Han, Guihong; Gui, Dongwei

    2012-08-01

    Aiming at the remote sensing application has been increasingly relying on ground object spectral characteristics. In order to further research the spectral reflectance characteristics in arid area, this study was performed in the typical delta oasis of Weigan and Kuqa rivers located north of Tarim Basin. Data were collected from geo-targets at multiple sites in various field conditions. The spectra data were collected for different soil types including saline-alkaline soil, silt sandy soil, cotton field, and others; vegetations of Alhagi sparsifolia, Phragmites australis, Tamarix, Halostachys caspica, etc., and water bodies. Next, the data were processed to remove high-frequency noise, and the spectral curves were smoothed with the moving average method. The derivative spectrum was generated after eliminating environmental background noise so that to distinguish the original overlap spectra. After continuum removal of the undesirable absorbance, the spectrum curves were able to highlight features for both optical absorbance and reflectance. The spectrum information of each ground object is essential for fully utilizing the multispectrum data generated by remote sensing, which will need a representative spectral library. In this study using ENVI 4.5 software, a preliminary spectral library of surface features was constructed using the data surveyed in the study area. This library can support remote sensing activities such as feature investigation, vegetation classification, and environmental monitoring in the delta oasis region. Future plan will focus on sharing and standardizing the criteria of professional spectral library and to expand and promote the utilization of the spectral databases.

  19. [Spectral data analysis of salinity soils with ground objects in the delta oasis of Weigan and Kuqa Rivers].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Ding, Jian-li; Tashpolat; Tiyip; He, Qi-sheng

    2008-12-01

    The characteristic of landmark spectrum is not only the physical base of remote sensing technical application but also the base of the quantificational analysis of remote sensing, and the study of landmark spectrum is the main content in the basic research of remote sensing. In the present paper, the authors adopted CI700 portable spectrum apparatus made in American CID Company, and investigated or examined some spots in the delta oasis of Weigan and Kuqa rivers located in the north of Tarim Basin considered as the typical area, based on a great deal of spectral data for different kinds of geo-targets, and the spectral features and changing law of saline-alkaline ground, silver sand ground, dune, cotton ground etc. Alhagi sparsifolia., Phragmites australis, Tamarix, Halostachys caspica etc. were analyzed. According to the actual conditions, we analyzed the data noise characteristic of the spectrum and got rid of the noise. Meanwhile, derivative spectrum technology was used to remove the environmental background influence. Finally, in order to take full advantage of multi-spectrum data, ground information is absolutely necessary, and it is important to build a representative spectral library. The ENVI software was used to build the spectral library of surface features by field survey of the delta oasis of Weigan and Kuqa Rivers, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. This library can be used for features investigation, vegetation surveys, vegetation classification and environmental monitoring in the delta oasis of Weigan and Kuqa Rivers by remote sensing. The result of this research will be significant to the research on the saline-alkali soil in the arid area.

  20. Preliminary study of the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure for Children and its reliability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP) is currently used in the adult population for evaluating the functionality of impaired or prosthetic hands. The SHAP cannot be used for children because of the relatively larger size of the objects used to perform SHAP tasks and unknown clinimetric properties. The aims of this study were to adapt the SHAP for use in children (SHAP-C), to determine norm values for the SHAP-C, and to analyze the reliability of the SHAP-C. Methods The SHAP-C was adapted based on the SHAP protocol. Some objects were downsized, and the timing of tasks was performed by the rater instead of the participant. Intra- and inter-rater reliability were assessed in 24 children (5 [0.54] y/o) with unimpaired hands. The repeatability coefficients (RCs) were calculated. An RC ≤ 75% of the mean SHAP-C task values was considered good reliability. Results Participants were able to perform all SHAP-C tasks. The means of the SHAP-C tasks ranged from 0.75 to 1.21 seconds for abstract objects and from 0.64-19.13 seconds for activities of daily living. The RCs of a single assessor did not exceed 75% in 17/26 SHAP-C tasks, displaying a relatively good intra-rater reliability, whereas the RCs for the inter-rater reliability exceeded 75% in 22/26 SHAP-C tasks, thus displaying poor reliability. Conclusion In this first study that adjusted the SHAP for pediatric use, we found that all SHAP-C objects and tasks could be performed by children. The intra-rater reliability was better than the inter-rater reliability. Although the SHAP-C appears to be a promising instrument, the protocol requires further modifications to provide reliable measurements in children. PMID:24916917

  1. Laser 'Footprints' on the Moon

    NASA Video Gallery

    As the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) circles the moon, a sophisticated instrument bounces laser light off the moon's surface 28 times per second. An array of five sensors arranged in an X-shap...

  2. Measuring Anhedonia in Adolescents: A Psychometric Analysis.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Adam M; Unger, Jennifer B; Audrain-McGovern, Janet; Sussman, Steve; Volk, Heather E; Strong, David R

    2015-01-01

    Anhedonia-the reduced capacity to experience pleasure-is a trait implicated in mental and physical health. Yet, psychometric data on anhedonia measures in adolescents are absent. We conducted an in-depth psychometric analysis of the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS; Snaith et al., 1995 )-a self-report measure of anticipated pleasure response to 14 pleasant experiences-in adolescents. Adolescents (N = 585, M age = 14.5) completed the SHAPS and other paper-and-pencil surveys. Item response theory models were used to evaluate the psychometric performance of each SHAPS item. Correlations of the SHAPS with other personality and psychopathology measures were calculated to evaluate construct validity. Results showed that (a) certain items (e.g., reported pleasure from basic experiences like "seeing smiling faces" or "smelling flowers") provided more information about latent anhedonia than others; and (b) SHAPS scales exhibited construct-consistent convergent and discriminant validity (i.e., stronger correlations with low positive affect constructs, weaker correlations with negative affect). Reporting diminished pleasure from basic pleasant experiences accurately indicates adolescent anhedonia, which is important for future scale development and understanding the phenomenology of anhedonia in teens. These data support using the SHAPS for assessing anhedonia in epidemiological research and school-based universal prevention programming in general adolescent populations.

  3. Measuring Anhedonia in Adolescents: A Psychometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leventhal, Adam M.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Audrain-McGovern, Janet; Sussman, Steve; Volk, Healther E.; Strong, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Anhedonia—the reduced capacity to experience pleasure—is a trait implicated in mental and physical health. Yet, psychometric data on anhedonia measures in adolescents are absent. We conducted an in-depth psychometric analysis of the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS; Snaith et al., 1995)—a self-report measure of anticipated pleasure response to 14 pleasant experiences—in adolescents. Adolescents (N=585; M age=14.5) completed the SHAPS and other paper-and-pencil surveys. Item response theory models were used to evaluate the psychometric performance of each SHAPS item. Correlations of the SHAPS with other personality and psychopathology measures were calculated to evaluate construct validity. Results showed that: (1) certain items (e.g., reported pleasure from basic experiences like “seeing smiling faces” or “smelling flowers”) provided more information about latent anhedonia than others; and (2) SHAPS scales exhibited construct-consistent convergent and discriminant validity (i.e., stronger correlations with low positive affect constructs; weaker correlations with negative affect). Reporting diminished pleasure from basic pleasant experiences accurately indicates adolescent anhedonia, which is important for future scale development and understanding the phenomenology of anhedonia in teens. These data support using the SHAPS for assessing anhedonia in epidemiological research and school-based universal prevention programming in general adolescent populations. PMID:25893676

  4. Properties of novel bone hemostat prepared using sugar-modified hydroxyapatite, phosphoryl oligosaccharides of calcium and thermoplastic resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimira, Tokio; Umeda, Tomohiro; Musha, Yoshiro; Itatani, Kiyoshi

    2013-12-01

    A novel hemostatic agent was prepared using phosphoryl oligosaccharides of calcium (POs-Ca), hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2; HAp) obtained by the hydrolysis of POs-Ca or sugar-containing HAp (s-HAp; 60.3 mass% calcium-deficient HAp and 39.5 mass% organic materials, Ca/P ratio = 1.56) and thermoplastic resin (the mixture of random copolymer of ethylene oxide/propylene oxide (EPO) and polyethylene oxide (EO); EPO : EO : water = 25 : 15 : 60 (mass ratio); 25EPO-15EO). The gel formed by mixing 25EPO-15EO with water (25EPO-15EO/water mass ratio: 0.20) was flash frozen at -80°C, freeze-dried at -50°C for 15 h and then ground using mixer. The consistency conditions of hemostats mixed with POs-Ca or s-HAp were optimized for the practical uses. The mean stanching times of hemostats were: s-HAp/25EPO-15EO (8.2 h; s-HAp/25EPO-15EO = 0.20) > 25EPO-15EO (5.3 h) > POs-Ca/25EPO-15EO (4.7 h; POs-Ca/25EPO-15EO = 0.20). The gentamicin, a typical antibiotic agent, loaded s-HAp/25EPO-15EO composite hemostat showed the steady state releasing in phosphate buffered saline till 10 h immersion at 37.0°C.

  5. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-07-01

    AWARDS Presentations to top students; PHYSICS IN PRIMARY SCIENCE Amaze and inspire; WEB RESOURCES PhysicsClub goes live; EVENTS GIREP develops thinking; RESEARCH FRONTIERS Carbon dating may not run to time; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Vocational qualifications; CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Flanders gears up for curriculum change; EXHIBITIONS Building the Universe; EVENTS Physics Discipline Network VII; SPECIAL NEWS FEATURE Progress in UK post-16 courses; Teaching Advancing Physics... the story so far; An outside observer's view of Advancing Physics; Student views of SHAP; Results from the SHAP pilot: successful and girl-friendly; AWARDS Royal visit to publisher;

  6. The antinociceptive effect of some Egyptian medicinal plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Atta, A H; Abo EL-Sooud, K

    2004-12-01

    The antinociceptive effect of methanolic extracts (200 and 400 mg kg(-1)) of eight Egyptian medicinal plants was studied using acetic acid-induced writhing and tail-flick test in mice. Oral administration of 400 mg kg(-1) methanolic extracts of Convolvulus fatmensis, Alhagi maurorum, Plantago major seeds, Conyza dioscaridis significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited the nociception to acetic acid-induced writhes with a protection of 85.5-61.3%. Schouwia thebaica, Diplotaxis acris, Plantago major leaves and Mentha microphylla, in the large dose, showed a protection of 50.8-45.8%, which were significantly different as compared to control. The smaller dose of the tested plant extracts did not protect animals from painful acetic acid stimulation with the exception of Alhagi maurorum. In the tail-flick test, methanolic extracts of Mentha microphylla, Conyza dioscaridis, Alhagi maurorum, Plantago major leaves, Diplotaxis acris and Convolvulus fatmensis in a dose of 400 mg kg(-1) produced significant increase in the latency to response of tail to thermal stimulation. Mild or no effect was observed by the small dose with the exception of Diplotaxis acris that had significant antinociceptive effect at the dose of 200 mg kg(-1). The extracts of all tested plants in doses up to 2 g kg(-1) b.wt. did not cause any deaths or major signs of acute toxicity. Phytochemical screening indicated the presence of unsaturated sterols, triterpenes, tannins, flavonoids and carbohydrates and/or glycosides as major constituents. PMID:15507342

  7. [Depression in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Shin; Nagayama, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Depression affects Parkinson's disease (PD) patient's QOL. Although it changes with the diagnostic criteria used, the frequency of depression in PD is approximately 10-30%. Anhedonia is characteristic in PD. According to research on anhedonia in PD using the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS), the positive ratio of anhedonia is high in PD. The SHAPS score significantly correlates with the severity of PD and duration of the disease. An examination of the literature on depression before the development of motor symptoms of PD revealed that the risk of PD is high in patients with a history of depression. Pathologically, the substantia nigra is affected in the later stages and raphe nuclei are affected in the early stages. This suggests that depression is a prodromal symptom of PD.

  8. Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and nanorod barcodes

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Scher, Erik C.; Manna, Liberato

    2013-03-26

    Graded core/shell semiconductor nanorods and shapped nanorods are disclosed comprising Group II-VI, Group III-V and Group IV semiconductors and methods of making the same. Also disclosed are nanorod barcodes using core/shell nanorods where the core is a semiconductor or metal material, and with or without a shell. Methods of labeling analytes using the nanorod barcodes are also disclosed.

  9. Kant, Immanuel (1724-1804)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    German philosopher, born in Königsberg, published his view of the universe in General History of Nature and Theory of the Heavens (1755) in which he presented his nebular hypothesis of the formation of the solar system. It was much like the present theory that the Sun and planets formed from the condensation of a rotating disc of interstellar material. Kant identified the Milky Way as a lens-shap...

  10. Functional and Psychosocial Outcomes of Hand Transplantation Compared with Prosthetic Fitting in Below-Elbow Amputees: A Multicenter Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Salminger, Stefan; Sturma, Agnes; Roche, Aidan D.; Hruby, Laura A.; Paternostro-Sluga, Tatjana; Kumnig, Martin; Ninkovic, Marina; Pierer, Gerhard; Schneeberger, Stefan; Gabl, Markus; Chelmonski, Adam; Jablecki, Jerzy; Aszmann, Oskar C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hand-transplantation and improvements in the field of prostheses opened new frontiers in restoring hand function in below-elbow amputees. Both concepts aim at restoring reliable hand function, however, the indications, advantages and limitations for each treatment must be carefully considered depending on level and extent of amputation. Here we report our findings of a multi-center cohort study comparing hand function and quality-of-life of people with transplanted versus prosthetic hands. Methods Hand function in amputees with either transplant or prostheses was tested with Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP) and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand measure (DASH). Quality-of-life was compared with the Short-Form 36 (SF-36). Results Transplanted patients (n = 5) achieved a mean ARAT score of 40.86 ± 8.07 and an average SHAP score of 75.00 ± 11.06. Prosthetic patients (n = 7) achieved a mean ARAT score of 39.00 ± 3.61 and an average SHAP score of 75.43 ± 10.81. There was no significant difference between transplanted and prosthetic hands in ARAT, SHAP or DASH. While quality-of-life metrics were equivocal for four scales of the SF-36, transplanted patients reported significantly higher scores in “role-physical” (p = 0.006), “vitality” (p = 0.008), “role-emotional” (p = 0.035) and “mental-health” (p = 0.003). Conclusions The indications for hand transplantation or prosthetic fitting in below-elbow amputees require careful consideration. As functional outcomes were not significantly different between groups, patient’s best interests and the route of least harm should guide treatment. Due to the immunosuppressive side-effects, the indication for allotransplantation must still be restrictive, the best being bilateral amputees. PMID:27589057

  11. Histological Comparison in Rats between Carbonate Apatite Fabricated from Gypsum and Sintered Hydroxyapatite on Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ayukawa, Yasunori; Suzuki, Yumiko; Tsuru, Kanji; Koyano, Kiyoshi; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    Carbonate apatite (CO3Ap), the form of apatite found in bone, has recently attracted attention. The purpose of the present study was to histologically evaluate the tissue/cellular response toward the low-crystalline CO3Ap fabricated using a dissolution-precipitation reaction with set gypsum as a precursor. When set gypsum was immersed in a 100°C 1 mol/L Na3PO4 aqueous solution for 24 h, the set gypsum transformed into CO3Ap. Both CO3Ap and sintered hydroxyapatite (s-HAp), which was used as a control, were implanted into surgically created tibial bone defects of rats for histological evaluation. Two and 4 weeks after the implantation, histological sections were created and observed using light microscopy. The CO3Ap granules revealed both direct apposition of the bone matrix by osteoblasts and osteoclastic resorption. In contrast, the s-HAp granules maintained their contour even after 4 weeks following implantation which implied that there was a lack of replacement into the bone. The s-HAp granules were sometimes encapsulated with fibrous tissue, and macrophage polykaryon was occasionally observed directly apposed to the implanted granules. From the viewpoint of bone remodeling, the CO3Ap granules mimicked the bone matrix, suggesting that CO3Ap may be an appropriate bone substitute. PMID:26504813

  12. Histological Comparison in Rats between Carbonate Apatite Fabricated from Gypsum and Sintered Hydroxyapatite on Bone Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ayukawa, Yasunori; Suzuki, Yumiko; Tsuru, Kanji; Koyano, Kiyoshi; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    Carbonate apatite (CO3Ap), the form of apatite found in bone, has recently attracted attention. The purpose of the present study was to histologically evaluate the tissue/cellular response toward the low-crystalline CO3Ap fabricated using a dissolution-precipitation reaction with set gypsum as a precursor. When set gypsum was immersed in a 100°C 1 mol/L Na3PO4 aqueous solution for 24 h, the set gypsum transformed into CO3Ap. Both CO3Ap and sintered hydroxyapatite (s-HAp), which was used as a control, were implanted into surgically created tibial bone defects of rats for histological evaluation. Two and 4 weeks after the implantation, histological sections were created and observed using light microscopy. The CO3Ap granules revealed both direct apposition of the bone matrix by osteoblasts and osteoclastic resorption. In contrast, the s-HAp granules maintained their contour even after 4 weeks following implantation which implied that there was a lack of replacement into the bone. The s-HAp granules were sometimes encapsulated with fibrous tissue, and macrophage polykaryon was occasionally observed directly apposed to the implanted granules. From the viewpoint of bone remodeling, the CO3Ap granules mimicked the bone matrix, suggesting that CO3Ap may be an appropriate bone substitute. PMID:26504813

  13. Evaluation of antipyretic activity of some medicinal plants from Cholistan desert Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Alam, Muhammad Khurshid; Ahmed, Saeed; Anjum, Shazia; Akram, Muhammad; Shah, Syed Muhammad Ali; Wariss, Hafiz Muhammad; Usmanghani, Khan

    2016-03-01

    Traditional herbal healers "Hakims" use various plants of the Cholistan desert, Pakistan for treating a number of infectious and non-infectious diseases. However, there has never been a scientific validation of these plant-based therapeutics. We compared the antipyretic effect of Echinops echinatus, Alhagi maurorum, Fagonia cretica, Cymbopogon jwarancusa and Panicum turgidum in animal model. These plants were used to reduce E.coli lysate induced pyrexia in rabbits. There were five groups of rabbits having five rabbits in each group. Among these five groups, three received various doses of experimental treatment, paracetamol was given to fourth group known as positive control. The fifth group of animals served as negative control and received no treatment. Ethanol extracts of Fagonia cretica (500 mg/kg), Panicum turgidum (500 mg/kg and 750 mg/kg), Alhagi maurorum (500 and 750 mg/kg), Cymbopogon jwarancusa (250 mg/kg) and Echinops echinatus (750 mg/kg) showed significant antipyretic effects when compared with controls and experimental counterparts. These results revealed that ethanol extracts of the plants evaluated in this study have dose dependent antipyretic activity. Further detailed screening of these plant species is recommended. PMID:27087078

  14. Household transmission of respiratory viruses – assessment of viral, individual and household characteristics in a population study of healthy Australian adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Household transmission of influenza-like illness (ILI) may vary with viral and demographic characteristics. We examined the effect of these factors in a population-based sample of adults with ILI. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study in community-dwelling Australian adults nested within an influenza vaccine effectiveness trial. On presentation with ILI, participants were swabbed for a range of respiratory viruses and asked to return a questionnaire collecting details of household members with or without similar symptoms. We used logistic and Poisson regression to assess the key characteristics of household transmission. Results 258 participants from multi-occupancy households experienced 279 ILI episodes and returned a questionnaire. Of these, 183 were the primary case in the household allowing assessment of factors associated with transmission. Transmission was significantly associated in univariate analyses with female sex (27% vs. 13%, risk ratio (RR) = 2.13 (1.08, 4.21)) and the presence of a child in the house (33% vs. 17%, RR = 1.90 (1.11, 3.26)). The secondary household attack proportion (SHAP) was 0.14, higher if influenza was isolated (RR = 2.1 (1.0, 4.5)). Vaccinated participants who nonetheless became infected with influenza had a higher SHAP (Incidence RR = 5.24 (2.17, 12.6)). Conclusions The increased SHAP in households of vaccinated participants who nonetheless had confirmed influenza infection supports the hypothesis that in years of vaccine mismatch, not only is influenza vaccine less protective for the vaccine recipient, but that the population’s immunity is also lower. PMID:23231698

  15. Biochemical evolution II: origin of life in tubular microstructures on weathered feldspar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Parsons, I; Lee, M R; Smith, J V

    1998-12-22

    Mineral surfaces were important during the emergence of life on Earth because the assembly of the necessary complex biomolecules by random collisions in dilute aqueous solutions is implausible. Most silicate mineral surfaces are hydrophilic and organophobic and unsuitable for catalytic reactions, but some silica-rich surfaces of partly dealuminated feldspars and zeolites are organophilic and potentially catalytic. Weathered alkali feldspar crystals from granitic rocks at Shap, north west England, contain abundant tubular etch pits, typically 0.4-0.6 microm wide, forming an orthogonal honeycomb network in a surface zone 50 microm thick, with 2-3 x 10(6) intersections per mm2 of crystal surface. Surviving metamorphic rocks demonstrate that granites and acidic surface water were present on the Earth's surface by approximately 3.8 Ga. By analogy with Shap granite, honeycombed feldspar has considerable potential as a natural catalytic surface for the start of biochemical evolution. Biomolecules should have become available by catalysis of amino acids, etc. The honeycomb would have provided access to various mineral inclusions in the feldspar, particularly apatite and oxides, which contain phosphorus and transition metals necessary for energetic life. The organized environment would have protected complex molecules from dispersion into dilute solutions, from hydrolysis, and from UV radiation. Sub-micrometer tubes in the honeycomb might have acted as rudimentary cell walls for proto-organisms, which ultimately evolved a lipid lid giving further shelter from the hostile outside environment. A lid would finally have become a complete cell wall permitting detachment and flotation in primordial "soup." Etch features on weathered alkali feldspar from Shap match the shape of overlying soil bacteria.

  16. Biochemical evolution II: Origin of life in tubular microstructures on weathered feldspar surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Ian; Lee, Martin R.; Smith, Joseph V.

    1998-01-01

    Mineral surfaces were important during the emergence of life on Earth because the assembly of the necessary complex biomolecules by random collisions in dilute aqueous solutions is implausible. Most silicate mineral surfaces are hydrophilic and organophobic and unsuitable for catalytic reactions, but some silica-rich surfaces of partly dealuminated feldspars and zeolites are organophilic and potentially catalytic. Weathered alkali feldspar crystals from granitic rocks at Shap, north west England, contain abundant tubular etch pits, typically 0.4–0.6 μm wide, forming an orthogonal honeycomb network in a surface zone 50 μm thick, with 2–3 × 106 intersections per mm2 of crystal surface. Surviving metamorphic rocks demonstrate that granites and acidic surface water were present on the Earth’s surface by ∼3.8 Ga. By analogy with Shap granite, honeycombed feldspar has considerable potential as a natural catalytic surface for the start of biochemical evolution. Biomolecules should have become available by catalysis of amino acids, etc. The honeycomb would have provided access to various mineral inclusions in the feldspar, particularly apatite and oxides, which contain phosphorus and transition metals necessary for energetic life. The organized environment would have protected complex molecules from dispersion into dilute solutions, from hydrolysis, and from UV radiation. Sub-micrometer tubes in the honeycomb might have acted as rudimentary cell walls for proto-organisms, which ultimately evolved a lipid lid giving further shelter from the hostile outside environment. A lid would finally have become a complete cell wall permitting detachment and flotation in primordial “soup.” Etch features on weathered alkali feldspar from Shap match the shape of overlying soil bacteria. PMID:9860941

  17. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Italy’s Physics Olympiad creates greater interest and motivation House of Experiments: 'humour helps in the teaching of science' Science takes stage in Germany PPARC news: guide and awards Schools newspaper competition focuses on Venus Website offers practical advice SHAP workshop will sharpen up teachers' skills Students will soon use Faulkes Telescope North to see the stars Talk takes a tour of the universe ASE 2004 Welsh physicists share secrets Switch students on to physics Teachers Awards 2004 recognize quality of teaching AAPT spends winter in Miami sun Schools Physics Group meeting will take place at Rugby School

  18. News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-07-01

    Croatia: Rijeka’s 2005 science festival attracts an enthusiastic crowd The Middle East: METSMaC conference reaches out to teachers around the Gulf and beyond Spain: Física en Acción 5: a Spanish festival that will have you cycling the tightrope Czech Republic: Astronomy lessons for everyone Sussex Planetarium: Planetarium sets its sights high TV series: Einstein gets animated for C4 cartoon series Memorial: Honouring the great: memorial to Robert Hooke is unveiled at Westminster Abbey Awards: SHAP awards prizes for exceptional student work Group meeting: IOP’s Education Group to meet in September Forthcoming Events

  19. Self-Assembly of Nano Hydroxyapatite or Aragonite Induced by Molecular Recognition to Soy Globulin 7S or 11S.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dagang; Tian, Huafeng; Kumar, Rakesh; Zhang, Lina

    2009-09-01

    Molecular self-assembly is emerging as a viable 'bottom-up' approach to build stable organic/inorganic nanometer-scale blocks. Herein, under the conditions of appropriate pH and ionic strength, soy globulin 7S or 11S were coprecipitated with hydroxyapatite (HAp) or aragonite (Arag), respectively, to fabricate two organic/inorganic hybrids: 7S/HAp and 11S/Arag. Results from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy show that the hybrids exhibit a nanosized core-shell structure with globulin monomer 7S or 11S as core and HAp or Arag as shells. 7S/HAp and 11S/Arag present a disk and hexagon shape, respectively. After calcinations, monodispersed HAp without support from globulins existed as nanospheres. It was revealed that the globulin as host induces the self-assembly and growth layer by layer of HAp or Arag nanocrystals. The factors of molecular recognition and surface potential definitely affected the size and shape of the hierarchical blocks. This work provided a novel pathway to controllably synthesize a wide variety of precise plant protein/biomineral hybrid biomaterials.

  20. Apathy and anhedonia rating scales in Parkinson's disease: critique and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Leentjens, Albert F G; Dujardin, Kathy; Marsh, Laura; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Richard, Irene H; Starkstein, Sergio E; Weintraub, Daniel; Sampaio, Cristina; Poewe, Werner; Rascol, Oliver; Stebbins, Glenn T; Goetz, Christopher G

    2008-10-30

    Apathy is a common condition in Parkinson's disease (PD) and is generally defined as a lack of motivation. It is associated with more severe cognitive dysfunction and a decrease in activities of daily living (ADL) performance. Anhedonia, the inability to experience pleasure, can be a symptom of both depressive and apathetic syndromes. The Movement Disorder Society (MDS) commissioned a task force to assess the clinimetric properties of apathy and anhedonia scales in PD patients. A systematic literature review was conducted to identify scales that have either been validated or used in PD patients. Apathy scales identified for review include the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES), the Apathy Scale (AS), the Apathy Inventory (AI), and the Lille Apathy Rating Scale (LARS). In addition, item 4 (motivation/initiative) of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and item 7 (apathy) of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) were included. Anhedonia scales identified for review were the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS) and the Chapman scales for physical and social anhedonia. Only the AS is classified as "recommended" to assess apathy in PD. Although item 4 of the UPDRS also meets the criteria to be classified as recommended, it should be considered for screening only because of the obvious limitations of a single item construct. For the assessment of anhedonia, only the SHAPS meets the criteria of "Suggested." Information on the validity of apathy and anhedonia scales is limited because of the lack of consensus on diagnostic criteria for these conditions.

  1. Comparative study of state-of-the-art myoelectric controllers for multigrasp prosthetic hands.

    PubMed

    Segil, Jacob L; Controzzi, Marco; Weir, Richard F ff; Cipriani, Christian

    2014-01-01

    A myoelectric controller should provide an intuitive and effective human-machine interface that deciphers user intent in real-time and is robust enough to operate in daily life. Many myoelectric control architectures have been developed, including pattern recognition systems, finite state machines, and more recently, postural control schemes. Here, we present a comparative study of two types of finite state machines and a postural control scheme using both virtual and physical assessment procedures with seven nondisabled subjects. The Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP) was used in order to compare the effectiveness of the controllers during activities of daily living using a multigrasp artificial hand. Also, a virtual hand posture matching task was used to compare the controllers when reproducing six target postures. The performance when using the postural control scheme was significantly better (p < 0.05) than the finite state machines during the physical assessment when comparing within-subject averages using the SHAP percent difference metric. The virtual assessment results described significantly greater completion rates (97% and 99%) for the finite state machines, but the movement time tended to be faster (2.7 s) for the postural control scheme. Our results substantiate that postural control schemes rival other state-of-the-art myoelectric controllers. PMID:25803683

  2. Bringing physics to life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    `I'm doing a physics that is pulling me towards it.' `I like the course being more up to date.' `You learn the physics but you also think ``well I actually see a point in knowing this physics''.' `This course presents physics in a more interesting way as it focuses on practical activity and applications of physics.' `The industrial visit gives students the opportunity to look for science in action.' These are just some of the comments from students and teachers piloting the new Salters Horners Advanced Physics course (SHAP). Contexts and applications drive the course, providing interest and motivation for students and alerting them to some of the many career areas that involve physics. For example, the operation of a CD player leads to a study of waves and superposition; archaeological surveying and analysis brings in d.c. circuitry and x-ray diffraction; consideration of safety in rail transport involves learning about mechanics and electromagnetism. The course is produced by a team directed from the University of York and funded by a consortium of industrial and charitable sponsors. It is examined by Edexcel and support materials are published by Heinemann. The pilot, involving some 50 centres, began in September 1998 with the new subject core and the AS qualification intermediate between GCSE and the full A-level standard. The course has been fully approved by QCA, and from September 2000 it will be open to all. For comprehensive information about SHAP, visit the project's website: www.york.ac.uk/org/seg/salters/physics . Pilot materials for students, teachers and technicians are available from Heinemann. They will be re-edited and published in full colour for September 2000. Members of the team will attend the annual ASE meeting in Leeds this month; there will be a talk and a hands-on workshop where student activities can be sampled. Materials will be on view at the University of York stand. In addition, Edexcel and the York team are running a series of

  3. Rehand: Realistic electric prosthetic hand created with a 3D printer.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Sato, Ryo; Higashihara, Takanori; Ogasawara, Tsukasa; Kawashima, Noritaka

    2015-01-01

    Myoelectric prosthetic hands provide an appearance with five fingers and a grasping function to forearm amputees. However, they have problems in weight, appearance, and cost. This paper reports on the Rehand, a realistic electric prosthetic hand created with a 3D printer. It provides a realistic appearance that is same as the cosmetic prosthetic hand and a grasping function. A simple link mechanism with one linear actuator for grasping and 3D printed parts achieve low cost, light weight, and ease of maintenance. An operating system based on a distance sensor provides a natural operability equivalent to the myoelectric control system. A supporter socket allows them to wear the prosthetic hand easily. An evaluation using the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP) demonstrated that an amputee was able to operate various objects and do everyday activities with the Rehand.

  4. Factors associated with transmission of influenza-like illness in a cohort of households containing multiple children

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Chelsea R; McCaw, James M; Fairmaid, Emily J; Brown, Lorena E; Leder, Karin; Sinclair, Martha; McVernon, Jodie

    2015-01-01

    Background Household studies of influenza-like illness (ILI) afford opportunities to study determinants of respiratory virus transmission. Objectives We examined predictors of ILI transmission within households containing at least two children. Methods A prospective cohort study recorded ILI symptoms daily for 2712 adult and child participants during the 1998 influenza season in Victoria, Australia. Logistic and Poisson regressions were used to explore predictors of household transmission of ILI and the secondary household attack proportion (SHAP). A date of illness onset during the influenza season was used as a proxy indicator of ILI associated with influenza infection (as opposed to other aetiological causes). Results A total of 1009 ILI episodes were reported by 781 of 2712 (29%) participants residing in 157 households. Transmission, defined as detection of ILI in one or more household members following identification of an index case, was observed in 206 of 705 (29%) household introductions. Transmission of ILI was significantly associated with the onset of ILI in the index case during the peak influenza season compared with the remainder of the observation period (37% versus 27%, odds ratio = 1·59, 95% CI 1·09, 2·31, P = 0·017). The SHAP was 0·12, higher if the index case was of secondary school age [incidence risk ratio (IRR) = 1·80, 95% CI 1·08, 2·98, P = 0·022]. Conclusions Risk of household transmission of ILI was increased during the peak influenza season, indicating an increased burden of disease during the period of influenza circulation. In this cohort, secondary-school-aged children and adults were important transmitters of ILI. PMID:26061755

  5. Sensory feedback by peripheral nerve stimulation improves task performance in individuals with upper limb loss using a myoelectric prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiefer, Matthew; Tan, Daniel; Sidek, Steven M.; Tyler, Dustin J.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Tactile feedback is critical to grip and object manipulation. Its absence results in reliance on visual and auditory cues. Our objective was to assess the effect of sensory feedback on task performance in individuals with limb loss. Approach. Stimulation of the peripheral nerves using implanted cuff electrodes provided two subjects with sensory feedback with intensity proportional to forces on the thumb, index, and middle fingers of their prosthetic hand during object manipulation. Both subjects perceived the sensation on their phantom hand at locations corresponding to the locations of the forces on the prosthetic hand. A bend sensor measured prosthetic hand span. Hand span modulated the intensity of sensory feedback perceived on the thenar eminence for subject 1 and the middle finger for subject 2. We performed three functional tests with the blindfolded subjects. First, the subject tried to determine whether or not a wooden block had been placed in his prosthetic hand. Second, the subject had to locate and remove magnetic blocks from a metal table. Third, the subject performed the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP). We also measured the subject’s sense of embodiment with a survey and his self-confidence. Main results. Blindfolded performance with sensory feedback was similar to sighted performance in the wooden block and magnetic block tasks. Performance on the SHAP, a measure of hand mechanical function and control, was similar with and without sensory feedback. An embodiment survey showed an improved sense of integration of the prosthesis in self body image with sensory feedback. Significance. Sensory feedback by peripheral nerve stimulation improved object discrimination and manipulation, embodiment, and confidence. With both forms of feedback, the blindfolded subjects tended toward results obtained with visual feedback.

  6. New materials systems for advanced tribological and environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wei

    In this study, two different materials systems were developed to address current industrial problems of wear. The first system consisted of sterically hindered aliphatic polyester (SHAP) lubricants for use in hard disk magnetic recording applications. Specific goals included improved adhesion, durability and tribochemical stability compared to commercial perfluoropolyethers. While commercial perfluoropolyether lubricants are subject to catalytic degradation and mechanical scission, or suffer from severe stiction and dewetting problems, SHAP lubricants manifest greatly reduced stiction, superb thermal and oxidation stability, and excellent friction property, and make good candidates for broader applications, such as lubricants for MEMs or general purpose lubricants. The second material system involved a blend of Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and an Aromatic Thermosetting Polyester (ATSP) to achieve greatly improved mechanical properties and wear resistance compared to currently available blends of PTFE. The unique solid bonding capability and liquid crystalline nature of ATSP help form high aspect ratio microstructures, which allows fabrication of PTFE/ATSP composites across the entire composition range with greatly improved performance under greatly simplified conditions. A third project involved the design of new wide-spectrum antibacterial filters for point-of-use systems that are robust and can be easily regenerated and maintained. Silver coated fiberglass with colloidal sized silver particles was developed. Systems made of silver coated fiberglass are highly effective, have high capacity and can be regenerated easily. These disinfection units do not leach silver ions, or add taste or disinfection by-products into the treated water. Protozoa such as Cryptosporidium and Giardia can be held by the filter and destroyed during regeneration. They are an inexpensive, cleaner alternative to current point-of-use systems.

  7. Nitrogen fixation and metabolism by groundwater-dependent perennial plants in a hyperarid desert.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Stefan K; Kahmen, Ansgar; Arampatsis, Christina; Popp, Marianne; Adams, Mark

    2004-11-01

    The Central Asian Taklamakan desert is characterized by a hyperarid climate with less than 50 mm annual precipitation but a permanent shallow groundwater table. The perched groundwater (2-16 m) could present a reliable and constant source of nitrogen throughout the growing season and help overcome temporal nitrogen limitations that are common in arid environments. We investigated the importance of groundwater and nitrogen fixation in the nitrogen metabolism of desert plants by assessing the possible forms and availability of soil N and atmospheric N and the seasonal variation in concentration as well as isotopic composition of plant N. Water availability was experimentally modified in the desert foreland through simulated flooding to estimate the contribution of surface water and temporally increased soil moisture for nutrient uptake and plant-water relations. The natural vegetation of the Taklamakan desert is dominated by plants with high foliar nitrogen concentrations (2-3% DM) and leaf nitrate reductase activity (NRA) (0.2-1 micromol NO2- g(-1) FW h(-1)). There is little evidence that nitrogen is a limiting resource as all perennial plants exhibited fast rates of growth. The extremely dry soil conditions preclude all but minor contributions of soil N to total plant N so that groundwater is suggested as the dominant source of N with concentrations of 100 microM NO3-. Flood irrigation had little beneficial effect on nitrogen metabolism and growth, further confirming the dependence on groundwater. Nitrogen fixation was determined by the 15N natural abundance method and was a significant component of the N-requirement of the legume Alhagi, the average contribution of biologically fixed nitrogen in Alhagi was 54.8%. But nitrogen fixing plants had little ecological advantage owing to the more or less constant supply of N available from groundwater. From our data we conclude that the perennial species investigated have adapted to the environmental conditions through

  8. Ethno-medicinal plants used to cure jaundice by traditional healers of mashhad, iran.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Mohammad Sadegh; Joharchi, Mohammad Reza; Taghavizadehyazdi, Mohammad Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    Jaundice is the commonest ailments affecting the citizens of both developed and poor Asians countries including Iran. An ethnobotanical survey of plants used by the traditional healers for the treatment of jaundice was conducted in the Mashhad city, Northeastern Iran. A total of 37 plants belonging to 32 genera and 26 families have been documented for their therapeutic use against jaundice. The plant families which contained the most commonly used species for their effects are: Fabaceae (5 species), Polygonaceae (4 sp.), Asteraceae (3 sp.), Plantaginaceae (2 sp.) and Salicaceae (2 sp.). The plants were arranged with correct nomenclature along with their common name, family, the part used and their medicinal value. The use of decoction is the most preferred method of herbal preparation. In all cases, the treatment involved oral administration of the extracts 2 to 3 times daily from a week to month till the problem disappears. Cichorium intybus, Salix alba, Cotoneaster nummularius, Descurainia sophia, Malva sylvestris, Berberis integrrima, Rumex acetosella, Phyllanthus emblica and Alhagi maurorum were repeatedly mentioned by the traditional healers as the most widely used for the treatment of jaundice in the study area. The study indicates that the local inhabitants rely on medicinal plants for treatment. This paper suggested that further clinical experimentation is needed to scientifically evaluate these widely used herbal remedies for possible bioactive effects.

  9. Identification of medicinal plants for the treatment of kidney and urinary stones

    PubMed Central

    Bahmani, Mahmoud; Baharvand-Ahmadi, Babak; Tajeddini, Pegah; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Naghdi, Nasrollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Kidney stones are the third most common urinary tract problems after urinary tract infections and prostate pathology. Kidney stones may cause extreme pain and blockage of urine flow. They are usually treated with medications that may cause a number of side-effects. Medicinal herbs are used in different cultures as a reliable source of natural remedies. Objectives: This study aimed to determine native medicinal plants used by traditional healers of Shiraz for the treatment of kidney stones. Materials and Methods: The ethno-medicinal data were collected between July and September 2012 through face-to-face interview with local herbalist. Results: A total of 18 species belonging to 19 botanical families were recorded in study area. Species with the highest frequency of mentions were Alhagi maurorum (51.58%), Tribulus terrestris (51.58%), and Nigella sativa (48.14). The most frequently used plant parts were aerial parts (38%), leaf (33%) and fruits (17%). Decoction (68%) was the most frequently prescribed method of preparation. Most of the medicinal plants recommended by Shirazian herbalists have not been investigated in animal and humane models of renal stone which provides a new area of research. Conclusion: In the case of safety and effectiveness, they can be refined and processed to produce natural drugs. PMID:27689108

  10. Immunomodulatory Properties of Taranjebin (Camel's Thorn) Manna and Its Isolated Carbohydrate Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Hamedi, Azadeh; Farjadian, Shirin; Karami, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    Taranjebin manna is a substance produced by Poophilus nebulosus Leth. (Aphrophoridae) larva that feed from host plant Alhagi maurorum (Leguminosae). In Persian ethnomedicine, it is used as an antipyretic, antiviral, antimicrobial, demulcent, and adaptogen. But it is contraindicated in acute fever and some infections. This controversy might be due to its immunomodulatory properties. This study evaluated immunomodulatory properties of Taranjebin and its macromolecules. Taranjebin solution was prepared as described in traditional literature. After dialysis and precipitation, the macromolecules were isolated on DEAE Sephadex A-25. The cytotoxic/proliferative properties of Taranjebin and its isolated macromolecules on human Jurkat E6.1 cells were investigated (15.62-1000 μg/mL) using WST-1 reagent. Three of 4 isolated acidic polysaccharides inhibited the proliferation of Jurkat cells in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations higher than 31.25 μg/mL (IC50 range of 44.81-147.97 μg/mL). The crude aqueous Taranjebin solution had proliferative effects. These results indicate the immunomodulatory properties of Taranjebin.

  11. Comparative evaluation of oxidative stress status and manganese availability in plants growing on manganese mine.

    PubMed

    Boojar, Massod Mashhadi Akbar; Goodarzi, Faranak

    2008-11-01

    This study pioneered an approach that determined the effects of excess manganese (Mn) on three species; Datura stramonium, Alhagi camelthorn and Chenopodium ambrosioides. We investigated their levels of Mn, antioxidative enzymes and oxidative damage biomarkers in plants (zone 1) in and outside (zone 2) the Mn mine. The results showed that total and available Mn were at toxic levels for plants growing on zone 1. The Mn levels in each plant species were higher in leaves, stems and roots. Mn was only accumulated significantly in leaf vacuoles of A. camelthorn. Antioxidative enzyme activities of C. ambrosioides and/or D. stramonium in zone 1 were higher in leaves, stems and then in their roots. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and dityrosine levels were insignificantly higher in tissues of the studied plants in zone 1 with respect to zone 2. The roots of studied plants showed significantly higher levels of these biomarkers in comparison with their leaves in zone 1. Accordingly, antioxidative enzymatic response to Mn-stress in D. stramonium and C. ambrosioides and possibly accumulation of Mn in leaf vacuoles of A. camelthorn, protected them from oxidative damages and involved in their tolerance in Mn mine.

  12. Ethno-Medicinal Plants Used to Cure Jaundice by Traditional Healers of Mashhad, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Mohammad Sadegh; Joharchi, Mohammad Reza; TaghavizadehYazdi, Mohammad Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    Jaundice is the commonest ailments affecting the citizens of both developed and poor Asians countries including Iran. An ethnobotanical survey of plants used by the traditional healers for the treatment of jaundice was conducted in the Mashhad city, Northeastern Iran. A total of 37 plants belonging to 32 genera and 26 families have been documented for their therapeutic use against jaundice. The plant families which contained the most commonly used species for their effects are: Fabaceae (5 species), Polygonaceae (4 sp.), Asteraceae (3 sp.), Plantaginaceae (2 sp.) and Salicaceae (2 sp.). The plants were arranged with correct nomenclature along with their common name, family, the part used and their medicinal value. The use of decoction is the most preferred method of herbal preparation. In all cases, the treatment involved oral administration of the extracts 2 to 3 times daily from a week to month till the problem disappears. Cichorium intybus, Salix alba, Cotoneaster nummularius, Descurainia sophia, Malva sylvestris, Berberis integrrima, Rumex acetosella, Phyllanthus emblica and Alhagi maurorum were repeatedly mentioned by the traditional healers as the most widely used for the treatment of jaundice in the study area. The study indicates that the local inhabitants rely on medicinal plants for treatment. This paper suggested that further clinical experimentation is needed to scientifically evaluate these widely used herbal remedies for possible bioactive effects. PMID:24734067

  13. Identification of medicinal plants for the treatment of kidney and urinary stones

    PubMed Central

    Bahmani, Mahmoud; Baharvand-Ahmadi, Babak; Tajeddini, Pegah; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Naghdi, Nasrollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Kidney stones are the third most common urinary tract problems after urinary tract infections and prostate pathology. Kidney stones may cause extreme pain and blockage of urine flow. They are usually treated with medications that may cause a number of side-effects. Medicinal herbs are used in different cultures as a reliable source of natural remedies. Objectives: This study aimed to determine native medicinal plants used by traditional healers of Shiraz for the treatment of kidney stones. Materials and Methods: The ethno-medicinal data were collected between July and September 2012 through face-to-face interview with local herbalist. Results: A total of 18 species belonging to 19 botanical families were recorded in study area. Species with the highest frequency of mentions were Alhagi maurorum (51.58%), Tribulus terrestris (51.58%), and Nigella sativa (48.14). The most frequently used plant parts were aerial parts (38%), leaf (33%) and fruits (17%). Decoction (68%) was the most frequently prescribed method of preparation. Most of the medicinal plants recommended by Shirazian herbalists have not been investigated in animal and humane models of renal stone which provides a new area of research. Conclusion: In the case of safety and effectiveness, they can be refined and processed to produce natural drugs.

  14. Biochemical evolution III: polymerization on organophilic silica-rich surfaces, crystal-chemical modeling, formation of first cells, and geological clues.

    PubMed

    Smith, J V; Arnold, F P; Parsons, I; Lee, M R

    1999-03-30

    Catalysis at organophilic silica-rich surfaces of zeolites and feldspars might generate replicating biopolymers from simple chemicals supplied by meteorites, volcanic gases, and other geological sources. Crystal-chemical modeling yielded packings for amino acids neatly encapsulated in 10-ring channels of the molecular sieve silicalite-ZSM-5-(mutinaite). Calculation of binding and activation energies for catalytic assembly into polymers is progressing for a chemical composition with one catalytic Al-OH site per 25 neutral Si tetrahedral sites. Internal channel intersections and external terminations provide special stereochemical features suitable for complex organic species. Polymer migration along nano/micrometer channels of ancient weathered feldspars, plus exploitation of phosphorus and various transition metals in entrapped apatite and other microminerals, might have generated complexes of replicating catalytic biomolecules, leading to primitive cellular organisms. The first cell wall might have been an internal mineral surface, from which the cell developed a protective biological cap emerging into a nutrient-rich "soup." Ultimately, the biological cap might have expanded into a complete cell wall, allowing mobility and colonization of energy-rich challenging environments. Electron microscopy of honeycomb channels inside weathered feldspars of the Shap granite (northwest England) has revealed modern bacteria, perhaps indicative of Archean ones. All known early rocks were metamorphosed too highly during geologic time to permit simple survival of large-pore zeolites, honeycombed feldspar, and encapsulated species. Possible microscopic clues to the proposed mineral adsorbents/catalysts are discussed for planning of systematic study of black cherts from weakly metamorphosed Archaean sediments.

  15. Punding in non-demented Parkinson's disease patients: Relationship with psychiatric and addiction spectrum comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Pettorruso, Mauro; Fasano, Alfonso; De Risio, Luisa; Ricciardi, Lucia; Di Nicola, Marco; Martinotti, Giovanni; Janiri, Luigi; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita

    2016-03-15

    Punding is a stereotyped behavior characterized by an intense fascination with a complex, excessive, non-goal oriented, repetitive activity, associated with dopaminergic replacement therapy (DRT) in patients affected by Parkinson's disease (PD) and with dopamine agonists in several conditions. We studied 25 PD patients with punding behaviors, and compared them to 130 PD controls. The psychiatric evaluation included: the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS); the SCales for Outcomes in PArkinson's disease-Psychiatric Complications (SCOPA-PC); the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, Version 11 (BIS-11); the Mood Disorder Questionnaire; the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS). The occurrence of impulse control disorders (ICDs) was diagnosed through a psychiatric interview. Significantly more punding patients (96% vs. 68%; p<0.01) were in treatment with DA agonists, receiving significantly higher DA agonists levodopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD). Punding behaviors were found to be associated with psychiatric comorbidity, particularly with psychosis and bipolar disorder. In addition, higher anhedonic symptoms were reported by punders. High rate of co-occurring addictive behaviors (pathological gambling, hedonistic homeostatic dysregulation) and ICDs were found. In conclusion, presented data confirm that DRT, in a subset of PD patients, is strongly associated with addiction-like behavioral issues. Punding shares similarities with addictive behaviors and is associated to other psychiatric symptoms involving dopamine system alterations. PMID:26944176

  16. Effects of the dopamine agonist pramipexole on depression, anhedonia and motor functioning in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Matthias R; Brecht, H Michael; Koester, Juergen; Reichmann, Heinz

    2006-10-25

    Depression affects approximately 45% of all patients with Parkinson's disease, reduces quality of live independent of motor symptoms and seems to be underrated and undertreated. Pramipexole shows D(3)- versus D(2)-receptor preference at cortico-frontal dopamine receptors and neurotrophic effects which seem to relate to its antidepressant and anti-anhedonic properties in Parkinson's disease and bipolar depression found in controlled studies. In the present study, effects of pramipexole were investigated under routine clinical conditions. Anhedonia was measured in patients with Parkinson's disease (n=657) using the self-rated Snaith-Hamilton-Pleasure-Scale (SHAPS-D), depression was assessed by the observer-rated Short-Parkinson's-Evaluation Scale (SPES). Anhedonia was present in 45.7% of all patients and in 79.7% of the depressed patients with Parkinson's disease. Mild depression was present in 47%, moderate to severe depression in 22% of the patients. At the end of the study period of 9 weeks on an average, the mean dosage of pramipexole was 1.0+/-0.6 mg/d (range 0.3 to 4.2). Frequency of depression (moderate to severe: 6.8%, mild: 37.6%) and anhedonia (25.5%) as well as motor deficits were significantly reduced during treatment with pramipexole. Drop-outs due to adverse events occurred in 3.5%. Future studies should investigate specificity of anti-anhedonic and antidepressive properties of pramipexole.

  17. Anhedonia in Parkinson's disease patients with and without pathological gambling: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Pettorruso, Mauro; Martinotti, Giovanni; Fasano, Alfonso; Loria, Giovanna; Di Nicola, Marco; De Risio, Luisa; Ricciardi, Lucia; Conte, Gianluigi; Janiri, Luigi; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita

    2014-02-28

    Anhedonia is present in Parkinson's Disease (PD) as well as in addictive behaviors. Pathological Gambling (PG) and other Impulse Control Disorders (ICDs) have emerged as iatrogenic complications associated with dopamine replacement therapy. We studied 154 PD patients, divided into three groups: 11 with PG, 23 with other ICDs (compulsive buying, hypersexuality, binge eating), 120 without ICDs. All patients underwent a thorough clinical, neuropsychological and psychiatric evaluation. The PG-group, compared to the ICDs-group and PD-controls, reported a significantly higher incidence of anhedonia (45% vs. 9% vs. 14% respectively), higher Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS) scores (2.0±1.3 vs. 1.0±1.1 vs. 1.0±1.2), higher levels of impulsivity traits as measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (70.0±10.6 vs. 64.8±11 vs. 60.9±9.3) and more severe frontal dysfunctions (Frontal Assessment Battery, FAB: 12.4±4.9 vs. 15.5±1.6 vs. 14.4±3). A model for PG (incorporating anhedonia, impulsivity levels and frontal impairment) is discussed in the context of the pathophysiology of addictive behaviors. The impairment of hedonic capacity, possibly resulting from an underlying neuropsychological dysfunction, might facilitate loss of control over reward-related behavior, thus favoring the shift towards predominantly habit-based compulsive behaviors.

  18. Erratum: The Hubble Space Telescope Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale. XXVIII. Combining the Constraints on the Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mould, Jeremy R.; Huchra, John P.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.; Ferrarese, Laura; Ford, Holland C.; Gibson, Brad K.; Graham, John A.; Hughes, Shaun M. G.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Kelson, Daniel D.; Macri, Lucas M.; Madore, Barry F.; Sakai, Shoko; Sebo, Kim M.; Silbermann, Nancy A.; Stetson, Peter B.

    2000-12-01

    In the article ``The Hubble Space Telescope Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale. XXVIII. Combining the Constraints on the Hubble Constant'' (ApJ, 529, 786 [2000]), by Jeremy R. Mould, John P. Huchra, Wendy L. Freedman, Robert C. Kennicutt, Jr., Laura Ferrarese, Holland C. Ford, Brad K. Gibson, John A. Graham, Shaun M. G. Hughes, Garth D. Illingworth, Daniel D. Kelson, Lucas M. Macri, Barry F. Madore, Shoko Sakai, Kim M. Sebo, Nancy A. Silbermann, and Peter B. Stetson, some sign errors need to be corrected. 1. In equation (A2) the minus signs should be plus signs. The correct version is Vcosmic=VH+Vc,LG+Vin,Virgo+Vin,GA+Vin,Shap+... 2. In Table A1 the declination of the Great Attractor (GA) is -44°, and that of the Shapley supercluster is -31°, i.e., south declination, not north, as implied in the table. The first error is the authors' and the second occurred in the publication process. In both cases the computer code was correct, and the errors are in the published representation. None of the results presented in the paper are therefore affected in any way. The authors thank Dr. Jim Condon for pointing out the error in equation (A2)

  19. Camera on Vessel: A Camera-Based System to Measure Change in Water Volume in a Drinking Glass.

    PubMed

    Ayoola, Idowu; Chen, Wei; Feijs, Loe

    2015-01-01

    A major problem related to chronic health is patients' "compliance" with new lifestyle changes, medical prescriptions, recommendations, or restrictions. Heart-failure and hemodialysis patients are usually placed on fluid restrictions due to their hemodynamic status. A holistic approach to managing fluid imbalance will incorporate the monitoring of salt-water intake, body-fluid retention, and fluid excretion in order to provide effective intervention at an early stage. Such an approach creates a need to develop a smart device that can monitor the drinking activities of the patient. This paper employs an empirical approach to infer the real water level in a conically shapped glass and the volume difference due to changes in water level. The method uses a low-resolution miniaturized camera to obtain images using an Arduino microcontroller. The images are processed in MATLAB. Conventional segmentation techniques (such as a Sobel filter to obtain a binary image) are applied to extract the level gradient, and an ellipsoidal fitting helps to estimate the size of the cup. The fitting (using least-squares criterion) between derived measurements in pixel and the real measurements shows a low covariance between the estimated measurement and the mean. The correlation between the estimated results to ground truth produced a variation of 3% from the mean. PMID:26393600

  20. Development and validation of the Dimensional Anhedonia Rating Scale (DARS) in a community sample and individuals with major depression.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Sakina J; Quilty, Lena C; Sproule, Beth A; Cyriac, Anna; Michael Bagby, R; Kennedy, Sidney H

    2015-09-30

    Anhedonia, a core symptom of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), is predictive of antidepressant non-response. In contrast to the definition of anhedonia as a "loss of pleasure", neuropsychological studies provide evidence for multiple facets of hedonic function. The aim of the current study was to develop and validate the Dimensional Anhedonia Rating Scale (DARS), a dynamic scale that measures desire, motivation, effort and consummatory pleasure across hedonic domains. Following item selection procedures and reliability testing using data from community participants (N=229) (Study 1), the 17-item scale was validated in an online study with community participants (N=150) (Study 2). The DARS was also validated in unipolar or bipolar depressed patients (n=52) and controls (n=50) (Study 3). Principal components analysis of the 17-item DARS revealed a 4-component structure mapping onto the domains of anhedonia: hobbies, food/drink, social activities, and sensory experience. Reliability of the DARS subscales was high across studies (Cronbach's α=0.75-0.92). The DARS also demonstrated good convergent and divergent validity. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed the DARS showed additional utility over the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS) in predicting reward function and distinguishing MDD subgroups. These studies provide support for the reliability and validity of the DARS. PMID:26250147

  1. Camera on Vessel: A Camera-Based System to Measure Change in Water Volume in a Drinking Glass

    PubMed Central

    Ayoola, Idowu; Chen, Wei; Feijs, Loe

    2015-01-01

    A major problem related to chronic health is patients’ “compliance” with new lifestyle changes, medical prescriptions, recommendations, or restrictions. Heart-failure and hemodialysis patients are usually placed on fluid restrictions due to their hemodynamic status. A holistic approach to managing fluid imbalance will incorporate the monitoring of salt-water intake, body-fluid retention, and fluid excretion in order to provide effective intervention at an early stage. Such an approach creates a need to develop a smart device that can monitor the drinking activities of the patient. This paper employs an empirical approach to infer the real water level in a conically shapped glass and the volume difference due to changes in water level. The method uses a low-resolution miniaturized camera to obtain images using an Arduino microcontroller. The images are processed in MATLAB. Conventional segmentation techniques (such as a Sobel filter to obtain a binary image) are applied to extract the level gradient, and an ellipsoidal fitting helps to estimate the size of the cup. The fitting (using least-squares criterion) between derived measurements in pixel and the real measurements shows a low covariance between the estimated measurement and the mean. The correlation between the estimated results to ground truth produced a variation of 3% from the mean. PMID:26393600

  2. Four-fluid MHD Simulations of the Plasma and Neutral Gas Environment of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Near Perihelion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhenguang; Toth, Gabor; Gombosi, Tamas; Jia, Xianzhe; Rubin, Martin; Fougere, Nicolas; Tenishev, Valeriy; Combi, Michael; Bieler, Andre; Hansen, Kenneth; Shou, Yinsi; Altwegg, Kathrin

    2016-04-01

    The neutral and plasma environment is critical in understanding the interaction of the solar wind and comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (CG), the target of the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission. In this study, we have developed a 3-D four-fluid model, which is based on BATS-R-US (Block-Adaptive Tree Solarwind Roe-type Upwind Scheme) within SWMF (Space Weather Modeling Framework) that solves the governing multi-fluid MHD equations and the Euler equations for the neutral gas fluid. These equations describe the behavior and interactions of the cometary heavy ions, the solar wind protons, the electrons, and the neutrals. We simulated the plasma and neutral gas environment of comet CG with SHAP5 model near perihelion and we showed that the plasma environment in the inner coma region have some new features: magnetic reconnection in the tail region, a magnetic pile-up region on the nightside, and nucleus directed plasma flow inside the nightside reconnection region.

  3. Relationships between growth, morphology and wall stress in the stalk of Acetabularia acetabulum.

    PubMed

    von Dassow, M; Odell, G M; Mandoli, D F

    2001-08-01

    With carbon particles we analyzed patterns of growth in Acetabularia acetabulum (Lam.) P.C. Silva, a giant unicell famous for classic development studies. We focused on the stalk apex, which generates the stalk, whorls of hairs, and whorls of gametophores. To gain visual and physical accessibility, we amputated the youngest whorls of hair and the original apex and performed experiments on the apex that regenerated. Video analysis indicated that most growth occurred near the tip of the new apex. Less growth occured throughout the cut-interwhorl. We also analyzed cell wall thickness along stalks cleared of cytoplasm. Correlating growth data to wall morphology suggests growth near the apex may be proportional to stress on the cell wall. We propose that turgor-pressure wall stress modulates local apical cell wall growth rates. A supplementary model, relating cell wall curvature and growth rate in the cut-interwhorl, characterizes how the stalk's final dimensions and nearly cylindrical shap may arise. See http://faculty.washington.edu/mandoli/vondassow for supplementary data, analysis, and mathematical appendices. We believe this is the first quantiative description of apex morphogenesis of A. acetabulum.

  4. Evolution and taxonomy of native mesorhizobia nodulating medicinal Glycyrrhiza species in China.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyed Abdollah; Li, Li; Wei, Gehong; Räsänen, Leena; Lindström, Kristina

    2016-06-01

    Previously, 159 bacterial strains were isolated from the root nodules of wild perennial Glycyrrhiza legume species grown on 40 sites in central and north-western China, in which 57 strains were classified as "true symbionts" belonging to the genus Mesorhizobium based on amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) genomic fingerprinting and partial sequences of the 16S rRNA gene [20]. In the present work, the phylogeny of Glycyrrhiza nodulating mesorhizobia was further examined by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA). The concatenated gene tree of three housekeeping genes (16S rRNA, recA, and rpoB) of 59 strains including the 29 mesorhizobial test strains and 30 type mesorhizobial species, was constructed applying the maximum likelihood method and Bayesian inference. In the concatenated gene tree, the 29 test strains were distributed in seven separate clades. Seventeen test strains clustered with Mesorhizobium tianshanense, Mesorhizobium temperatum, Mesorhizobium muleiense, and Mesorhizobium alhagi with high bootstrap support (BS>85%). Eight test strains did not cluster with any of the described Mesorhizobium species. Based on the results, we proposed these eight test strains might belong to a putative new species of the genus Mesorhizobium. The sequences of three accessory genes (nodA, nodC, and nifH) of the test strains were also analyzed and were compared with those of representatives of the 30 described mesorhizobial species. The results showed that mesorhizobia involved in symbiosis with Glycyrrhiza plants probably have acquired some genetic material from other rhizobia in co-evolution with Glycyrrhiza and other legume species. PMID:27105685

  5. Evolution and taxonomy of native mesorhizobia nodulating medicinal Glycyrrhiza species in China.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyed Abdollah; Li, Li; Wei, Gehong; Räsänen, Leena; Lindström, Kristina

    2016-06-01

    Previously, 159 bacterial strains were isolated from the root nodules of wild perennial Glycyrrhiza legume species grown on 40 sites in central and north-western China, in which 57 strains were classified as "true symbionts" belonging to the genus Mesorhizobium based on amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) genomic fingerprinting and partial sequences of the 16S rRNA gene [20]. In the present work, the phylogeny of Glycyrrhiza nodulating mesorhizobia was further examined by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA). The concatenated gene tree of three housekeeping genes (16S rRNA, recA, and rpoB) of 59 strains including the 29 mesorhizobial test strains and 30 type mesorhizobial species, was constructed applying the maximum likelihood method and Bayesian inference. In the concatenated gene tree, the 29 test strains were distributed in seven separate clades. Seventeen test strains clustered with Mesorhizobium tianshanense, Mesorhizobium temperatum, Mesorhizobium muleiense, and Mesorhizobium alhagi with high bootstrap support (BS>85%). Eight test strains did not cluster with any of the described Mesorhizobium species. Based on the results, we proposed these eight test strains might belong to a putative new species of the genus Mesorhizobium. The sequences of three accessory genes (nodA, nodC, and nifH) of the test strains were also analyzed and were compared with those of representatives of the 30 described mesorhizobial species. The results showed that mesorhizobia involved in symbiosis with Glycyrrhiza plants probably have acquired some genetic material from other rhizobia in co-evolution with Glycyrrhiza and other legume species.

  6. Ecological investigation of three geophytes in the Deltaic Mediterranean coast of Egypt.

    PubMed

    Maswada, Hanafey F; Elzaawely, Abdelnaser A

    2013-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the ecological features of three geophytes namely Asparagus stipularis, Cyperus capitatus and Stipagrostis lanata which grow naturally in the Nile Delta coast of Egypt. C. capitatus and S. lanata are growing in non-saline sandy soils and can tolerate drought stress while, A. stipularis is growing in saline and non-saline sandy and calcareous clay soils and can tolerate drought and salt stress. Multivariate analysis of the vegetation of 100 sampled stands supporting growth of the three geophytic species in the study area led to the recognition of four vegetation groups namely, (A) Alhagi graecorum, (B) Cyperus capitatus, (C) Lycium schweinfurthii var. schweinfurthii-Asparagus stipularis and (D) Juncus acutus subsp. acutus. Vegetationally, the vegetation groups associated with the three species can be distinguished into two community types. The first one is psammophytic community comprising vegetation groups A and B that may represent the non-saline sand formations (flats, hummocks and dunes). The second one is halophytic community including vegetation groups C and D that may represent the saline sand flats and salt marsh habitat types, respectively. Sodium adsorption ratio, electrical conductivity, sodium cation, chlorides, silt and sand fractions, pH value, moisture content, bicarbonates and available phosphorus were the most effective soil factors that controlling the abundance and distribution of the plant communities associated with the investigated geophytes. This study showed the ecological features of the selected geophytes in terms of their habitats, associated plant communities and the most edaphic factors controlling their richness and distribution in the study area.

  7. An Investigation of the Growth Inhibitory Capacity of Several Medicinal Plants From Iran on Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeilbeig, Maryam; Kouhpayeh, Seyed Amin; Amirghofran, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traditional herbal medicine is a valuable resource that provides new drugs for cancer treatment. Objectives: In this study we aim to screen and investigate the in vitro anti-tumor activities of ten species of plants commonly grown in Southern Iran. Materials and Methods: We used the MTT colorimetric assay to evaluate the cytotoxic activities of the methanol extracts of these plants on various tumor cell lines. The IC50 was calculated as a scale for this evaluation. Results: Satureja bachtiarica, Satureja hortensis, Thymus vulgaris, Thymus daenensis and Mentha lonigfolia showed the inhibitoriest effects on Jurkat cells with > 80% inhibition at 200 µg/mL. Satureja hortensis (IC50: 66.7 µg/mL) was the most effective. These plants also strongly inhibited K562 cell growth; Satureja bachtiarica (IC50: 28.3 µg/mL), Satureja hortensis (IC50: 52 µg/mL) and Thymus vulgaris (IC50: 87 µg/mL) were the most effective extracts. Cichorium intybus, Rheum ribes, Alhagi pseudalhagi and Glycyrrihza glabra also showed notable effects on the leukemia cell lines. The Raji cell line was mostly inhibited by Satureja bachtiarica and Thymus vulgaris with approximately 40% inhibition at 200µg/ml. The influence of these extracts on solid tumor cell lines was not strong. Fen cells were mostly affected by Glycyrrihza glabra (IC50: 182 µg/mL) and HeLa cells by Satureja hortensis (31.6% growth inhibitory effect at 200 µg/mL). Conclusions: Leukemic cell lines were more sensitive to the extracts than the solid tumor cell lines; Satureja hortensis, Satureja bachtiarica, Thymus vulgaris, Thymus daenensis and Mentha lonigfolia showed remarkable inhibitory potential. PMID:26634114

  8. Ecological investigation of three geophytes in the Deltaic Mediterranean coast of Egypt.

    PubMed

    Maswada, Hanafey F; Elzaawely, Abdelnaser A

    2013-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the ecological features of three geophytes namely Asparagus stipularis, Cyperus capitatus and Stipagrostis lanata which grow naturally in the Nile Delta coast of Egypt. C. capitatus and S. lanata are growing in non-saline sandy soils and can tolerate drought stress while, A. stipularis is growing in saline and non-saline sandy and calcareous clay soils and can tolerate drought and salt stress. Multivariate analysis of the vegetation of 100 sampled stands supporting growth of the three geophytic species in the study area led to the recognition of four vegetation groups namely, (A) Alhagi graecorum, (B) Cyperus capitatus, (C) Lycium schweinfurthii var. schweinfurthii-Asparagus stipularis and (D) Juncus acutus subsp. acutus. Vegetationally, the vegetation groups associated with the three species can be distinguished into two community types. The first one is psammophytic community comprising vegetation groups A and B that may represent the non-saline sand formations (flats, hummocks and dunes). The second one is halophytic community including vegetation groups C and D that may represent the saline sand flats and salt marsh habitat types, respectively. Sodium adsorption ratio, electrical conductivity, sodium cation, chlorides, silt and sand fractions, pH value, moisture content, bicarbonates and available phosphorus were the most effective soil factors that controlling the abundance and distribution of the plant communities associated with the investigated geophytes. This study showed the ecological features of the selected geophytes in terms of their habitats, associated plant communities and the most edaphic factors controlling their richness and distribution in the study area. PMID:24506033

  9. Successive development of soil ecosystems at abandoned coal-ash landfills.

    PubMed

    Pen-Mouratov, Stanislav; Shukurov, Nosir; Yu, Jun; Rakhmonkulova, Shakhnoza; Kodirov, Obidjon; Barness, Gineta; Kersten, Michael; Steinberger, Yosef

    2014-07-01

    The main goal of the present study was to determine the effect of the native vegetation on the successive development of the soil ecosystem at abandoned coal-ash landfills of the Angren coal-fired power plant in Uzbekistan. Two different landfills (one not in use for 3 years, termed newer, and the other not in use for 10 years, termed older) with different degrees of vegetation cover were chosen to assess the time and vegetation effects on soil biota and habitat development. The soil biotic structure, including soil microorganisms and soil free-living nematode communities, was investigated both at open plots and under different native plants at the coal-ash landfill area. The observed soil microorganisms were found to be the most important component of the observed ecosystems. Total abundance, biomass, species, trophic and sexual diversity of soil free-living nematodes, along with fungi and organic-matter content, were found to be correlated with trace metals. The nematode trophic and species abundance and diversity increased from the newer toward the older coal-ash landfills. The sex ratio of the nematode communities was found to be dependent on the environmental conditions of the study area, with the males being the most sensitive nematode group. All applied ecological indices confirmed that open landfill plots distant from plants are the most unfavorable areas for soil biota. In that respect, the native plants Alhagi maurorum Desv. and Tamarix sp. were found to be important environmental components for the natural remediation of a soil ecosystem in the coal-ash landfill area. PMID:24676936

  10. Development and validation of an high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector method for the simultaneous determination of six phenolic compounds in abnormal savda munziq decoction

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Shuge; Liu, Wenxian; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Xuejia; Upur, Halmuart

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Given the high-effectiveness and low-toxicity of abnormal savda munziq (ASMQ), its herbal formulation has long been used in traditional Uyghur medicine to treat complex diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Settings and Design: ASMQ decoction by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a diode array detector was successfully developed for the simultaneous quality assessment of gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, caffeic acid, rutin, rosmarinic acid, and luteolin. The six phenolic compounds were separated on an Agilent TC-C18 reversed-phase analytical column (4.6 × 250 mm, 5 μm) by gradient elution using 0.3% aqueous formic acid (v/v) and 0.3% methanol formic acid (v/v) at 1.0 mL/min. Materials and Methods: The plant material was separately ground and mixed at the following ratios (10): Cordia dichotoma (10.6), Anchusa italic (10.6), Euphorbia humifusa (4.9), Adiantum capillus-veneris (4.9), Ziziphus jujube (4.9), Glycyrrhiza uralensis (7.1), Foeniculum vulgare (4.9), Lavandula angustifolia (4.9), Dracocephalum moldavica L. (4.9), and Alhagi pseudoalhagi (42.3). Statistical Analysis Used: The precisions of all six compounds were <0.60%, and the average recoveries ranged from 99.39% to 104.85%. Highly significant linear correlations were found between component concentrations and specific chromatographic peak areas (R2 > 0.999). Results: The proposed method was successfully applied to determine the levels of six active components in ASMQ. Conclusions: Given the simplicity, precision, specificity, and sensitivity of the method, it can be utilized as a quality control approach to simultaneously determining the six phenolic compounds in AMSQ. PMID:25709227

  11. Acute and temporal expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-stimulated gene 6 product, TSG6, in mesenchymal stem cells creates microenvironments required for their successful transplantation into muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Torihashi, Shigeko; Ho, Mioko; Kawakubo, Yuji; Komatsu, Kazumi; Nagai, Masataka; Hirayama, Yuri; Kawabata, Yuka; Takenaka-Ninagawa, Nana; Wanachewin, Orawan; Zhuo, Lisheng; Kimata, Koji

    2015-09-11

    Previously, we demonstrated that when mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from mouse ES cells were transplanted into skeletal muscle, more than 60% of them differentiated into muscles in the crush-injured tibialis anterior muscle in vivo, although MSCs neither differentiated nor settled in the intact muscle. Microenvironments, including the extracellular matrix between the injured and intact muscle, were quite different. In the injured muscle, hyaluronan (HA), heavy chains of inter-α-inhibitor (IαI), CD44, and TNF-α-stimulated gene 6 product (TSG-6) increased 24-48 h after injury, although basement membrane components of differentiated muscle such as perlecan, laminin, and type IV collagen increased gradually 4 days after the crush. We then investigated the microenvironments crucial for cell transplantation, using the lysate of C2C12 myotubules for mimicking injured circumstances in vivo. MSCs settled in the intact muscle when they were transplanted together with the C2C12 lysate or TSG6. MSCs produced and released TSG6 when they were cultured with C2C12 lysates in vitro. MSCs pretreated with the lysate also settled in the intact muscle. Furthermore, MSCs whose TSG6 was knocked down by shRNA, even if transplanted or pretreated with the lysate, could not settle in the muscle. Immunofluorescent staining showed that HA and IαI always co-localized or were distributed closely, suggesting formation of covalent complexes, i.e. the SHAP-HA complex in the presence of TSG6. Thus, TSG6, HA, and IαI were crucial factors for the settlement and probably the subsequent differentiation of MSCs.

  12. [Pramipexole in Parkinson disease. Results of a treatment observation].

    PubMed

    Reichmann, H; Brecht, H M; Kraus, P H; Lemke, M R

    2002-08-01

    Pramipexole is a novel, internationally available selective nonergot D2 dopamine agonist. The effectiveness, tolerability, and safety of pramipexole have been extensively proven in controlled trials in patients in the early and advanced stage of Parkinson's disease as monotherapy and in combination with L dopa. These trials indicated specific activity against tremor, anhedonia, and depression. Therefore, the present prospective, multicenter postmarketing surveillance study evaluated for the first time to what extent the results from the controlled pramipexole trials could be replicated under routine conditions in neurological practice and clinics. Modern scales were applied for the assessment of tremor and mood, i.e., the Short Parkinson's Evaluation Scale (SPES), the Tremor Impact Scale (TIS), and the German version of the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS-D). In 298 German Centers, 657 Parkinson's patients (365 men, 292 women) in advanced disease stages were treated with pramipexole in combination with levodopa. The average ages (+/- SD) were 67 (+/- 8.9) years for men and 69 (+/- 9.4) years for females. Motor functioning, especially tremor, motor complications, depression, and activities of daily living improved highly significantly (P < 0.0005), including self-rating by the patients. The dosage of levodopa could be reduced on average by 8% (P < 0.0001). This might contribute to a slowing of the disease progression in the long run. Dropouts due to side effects were observed only in 3.5% of the patients. Using new assessment scales suitable for routine application allowed confirmation of the results from controlled clinical trials with regard to tremor, anhedonia, and depression. The average daily dosage of pramipexole prescribed was 1.05 mg and thus was definitely lower than the average daily dosages of 2.35-2.66 mg used in controlled trials. This signifies that the option to adjust dosage according to effectiveness and tolerability under routine conditions

  13. Comparison of the effectiveness of duloxetine in depressed patients with and without a family history of affective disorders in first-degree relatives

    PubMed Central

    WANG, Shiliang; QIAN, Mincai; ZHONG, Hua; SONG, Guohua; LU, Meijuan; FENG, Rui; ZHANG, Lei; NI, Jianliang; CHEN, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background It remains unclear whether or not a positive family history of affective disorders predicts the effectiveness of antidepressant treatment of depression. Aims Assess the relationship of a family history of affective disorders to the efficacy of duloxetine in the treatment of depressive disorder. Methods Seventy-seven patients with depressive disorder (as defined by the 10th edition of the International Classification of Diseases, ICD-10) were enrolled in the study and treated with standard doses of duloxetine for 12 weeks. Among these patients 37 had a family history of affective disorder in first-degree relatives and 40 did not. The Hamilton Depression rating scale (HAMD-17), Hamilton Anxiety rating scale (HAMA), Side Effects Rating Scale (SERS), Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were assessed at baseline and at the end of the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, and 12th week after enrollment. Repeated measures analysis of variance and logistic regression were used to analyze the association between a family history of affective disorders and the efficacy of duloxetine. Results Patients with a positive family history of affective disorders had an earlier age of onset, a longer duration of illness, a higher level of psychic anxiety, and more prominent anhedonia. Repeated measures analysis of variance showed a significant improvement in the severity of depression over the 12 weeks but no differences in the magnitude or speed of improvement between the two groups. Treatment was considered effective (i.e., drop in baseline HAMD-17 total score of ≥50%) in 75.7% of those with a family history of affective disorders and in 77.5% of those without a family history (X2=0.04, p=0.850). Conclusions Family history of affective disorders is not associated with the effectiveness of duloxetine in the acute treatment of depressive disorder. PMID:26549960

  14. System training and assessment in simultaneous proportional myoelectric prosthesis control

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pattern recognition control of prosthetic hands take inputs from one or more myoelectric sensors and controls one or more degrees of freedom. However, most systems created allow only sequential control of one motion class at a time. Additionally, only recently have researchers demonstrated proportional myoelectric control in such systems, an option that is believed to make fine control easier for the user. Recent developments suggest improved reliability if the user follows a so-called prosthesis guided training (PGT) scheme. Methods In this study, a system for simultaneous proportional myoelectric control has been developed for a hand prosthesis with two motor functions (hand open/close, and wrist pro-/supination). The prosthesis has been used with a prosthesis socket equivalent designed for normally-limbed subjects. An extended version of PGT was developed for use with proportional control. The control system’s performance was tested for two subjects in the Clothespin Relocation Task and the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP). Simultaneous proportional control was compared with three other control strategies implemented on the same prosthesis: mutex proportional control (the same system but with simultaneous control disabled), mutex on-off control, and a more traditional, sequential proportional control system with co-contractions for state switching. Results The practical tests indicate that the simultaneous proportional control strategy and the two mutex-based pattern recognition strategies performed equally well, and superiorly to the more traditional sequential strategy according to the chosen outcome measures. Conclusions This is the first simultaneous proportional myoelectric control system demonstrated on a prosthesis affixed to the forearm of a subject. The study illustrates that PGT is a promising system training method for proportional control. Due to the limited number of subjects in this study, no definite conclusions can be

  15. Biochemical evolution III: Polymerization on organophilic silica-rich surfaces, crystal–chemical modeling, formation of first cells, and geological clues

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joseph V.; Arnold, Frederick P.; Parsons, Ian; Lee, Martin R.

    1999-01-01

    Catalysis at organophilic silica-rich surfaces of zeolites and feldspars might generate replicating biopolymers from simple chemicals supplied by meteorites, volcanic gases, and other geological sources. Crystal–chemical modeling yielded packings for amino acids neatly encapsulated in 10-ring channels of the molecular sieve silicalite-ZSM-5-(mutinaite). Calculation of binding and activation energies for catalytic assembly into polymers is progressing for a chemical composition with one catalytic Al–OH site per 25 neutral Si tetrahedral sites. Internal channel intersections and external terminations provide special stereochemical features suitable for complex organic species. Polymer migration along nano/micrometer channels of ancient weathered feldspars, plus exploitation of phosphorus and various transition metals in entrapped apatite and other microminerals, might have generated complexes of replicating catalytic biomolecules, leading to primitive cellular organisms. The first cell wall might have been an internal mineral surface, from which the cell developed a protective biological cap emerging into a nutrient-rich “soup.” Ultimately, the biological cap might have expanded into a complete cell wall, allowing mobility and colonization of energy-rich challenging environments. Electron microscopy of honeycomb channels inside weathered feldspars of the Shap granite (northwest England) has revealed modern bacteria, perhaps indicative of Archean ones. All known early rocks were metamorphosed too highly during geologic time to permit simple survival of large-pore zeolites, honeycombed feldspar, and encapsulated species. Possible microscopic clues to the proposed mineral adsorbents/catalysts are discussed for planning of systematic study of black cherts from weakly metamorphosed Archaean sediments. PMID:10097060

  16. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, is the pristine material present anywhere close to the surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossacki, Konrad

    2016-10-01

    Observations of the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko indicate high complexity of the topography (Thomas et al., 2015). Presence of numerous pits, and depressions, as well as scarps suggests complex evolution of the nucleus. This in turn makes uncertain presence of the pristine material anywhere close to the surface. However, non-uniformity of the mechanical strength of the nucleus suggests, that in some locations material can retain initial structure. This should be expected neither in the final Philae landing site Abydos, where the compressive strength of the material is about 2 MPa (Spohn et al., 2015), neither in the location of the first touch down, where beneath a layer of unconsolidated material possibly is a hard material (Biele et al., 2015). Both locations are at low latitudes, where the flux of solar energy is much higher than northern parts of the lobes, illuminated when the comet is far form perihelion. Groussin et al. (2015) investigated what inclination of slopes corresponds to the presence of falling-out boulders and have found, that the average strength is probably lower than 1.5 kPa.I attempted to answer the question, whether in poorly illuminated regions of the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko are possible thermal conditions suitable for preservation of a pristine unconsolidated ice-dust material. For this purpose I calculated evolution of the temperature and structure of the material versus depth in selected locations in region Ma'at. This region is in general smooth (El-Maary et al., 2015), which may indicate presence of a loose dust mantle on the surface. The applied shape model is SHAP4s v1.0 (Preuskner et al., 2015). The performed simulations indicate, that in Scenario A preservation of low uni-axial compressive strength is possible, but only in shadowed locations, beneath a dust mantle of low thermal conductivity, at least few centimeters thick.

  17. Spin-transfer pathways in paramagnetic lithium transition-metal phosphates from combined broadband isotropic solid-state MAS NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Clément, Raphaële J; Pell, Andrew J; Middlemiss, Derek S; Strobridge, Fiona C; Miller, Joel K; Whittingham, M Stanley; Emsley, Lyndon; Grey, Clare P; Pintacuda, Guido

    2012-10-17

    Substituted lithium transition-metal (TM) phosphate LiFe(x)Mn(1-x)PO(4) materials with olivine-type structures are among the most promising next generation lithium ion battery cathodes. However, a complete atomic-level description of the structure of such phases is not yet available. Here, a combined experimental and theoretical approach to the detailed assignment of the (31)P NMR spectra of the LiFe(x)Mn(1-x)PO(4) (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1) pure and mixed TM phosphates is developed and applied. Key to the present work is the development of a new NMR experiment enabling the characterization of complex paramagnetic materials via the complete separation of the individual isotropic chemical shifts, along with solid-state hybrid DFT calculations providing the separate hyperfine contributions of all distinct Mn-O-P and Fe-O-P bond pathways. The NMR experiment, referred to as aMAT, makes use of short high-powered adiabatic pulses (SHAPs), which can achieve 100% inversion over a range of isotropic shifts on the order of 1 MHz and with anisotropies greater than 100 kHz. In addition to complete spectral assignments of the mixed phases, the present study provides a detailed insight into the differences in electronic structure driving the variations in hyperfine parameters across the range of materials. A simple model delimiting the effects of distortions due to Mn/Fe substitution is also proposed and applied. The combined approach has clear future applications to TM-bearing battery cathode phases in particular and for the understanding of complex paramagnetic phases in general.

  18. Categorization of Cathartic (Purgative) Medicines Mentioned in TPM Resources According to Their Specific Function

    PubMed Central

    Abolghasemi, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Background: According to traditional Persian medicine (TPM) resources, the human digestive system includes four steps. In the first step, gastric digestion, the ingested food pours into the stomach and changes into the leachate called chylous due to the heat produced in the stomach. In the second step, hepatic digestion, the chylous enters in the liver through mesenteric vessels and transforms into the quadruple humors, sanguine, phlegm, bile and black bile due to the liver heat. In the case of humor predominance, using moshel or cathartic medicines is considered as a strategic medical plan. In this study, we introduce cathartic (purgative) medicines mentioned in TPM resources according to their specific function. Methods: Literature review of TPM resources, including Canon of Medicine and Aghili’s Makhzan-ul-Adwiah was performed in order to find cathartics cited in the aforementioned books, prescribed specifically for different humor’s predominance in the body. Results: The survey found that the cathartics are categorized into eight groups: Cathartic of “balgham” such as “Citrullus colocynthis and Colchicum autumnale”Cathartic of bile such as “Prunus domestica and Alhagi Camelorum A. maurorum”Cathartic of “sovda” such as “lajward stone and Armenian stone”Cathartic of “Ma’a-e-asfar” such as “Marrubium vulgarre and Rivand extract”Cathartic of melancholy and phlegm such as “Cuscuta epithymum and Adiantum capillus venerisCathartic of bile and phlegm such as “Nepeta menthoides and Fumaria parviflora”Cathartic of “Ma’a-e-asfar and phlegm such as Urtica dioica and Qsa’alhmarCathartic of all mucus such as “Cassia acutifolia” and “kharbaghe Aswad” Conclusion: Medical students of traditional Persian medicine should be familiar with cathartics and purgatives specific for each humor. In this study, cathartics has classified into main cathartics of phlegm, bile, black bile, Ma’a-e-asfar, black bile and phlegm, Ma

  19. [Comporison Sduty of Microstructure by Metallographicalk on the Polarized Light and Texture by XRD of CC 5083 and CC 5182 Aluminium Alloy after Cold Rolling and Recrystallization].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-biao; Li, Yong-wei; Tan, Yuan-biao; Ma, Min; Wang, Xue-min; Liu, Wen-chang

    2015-03-01

    At present the study of relation between microstructure, texture and performance of CC 5083 aluminium alloy after cold tolling and recrystallization processes is still finitude. So that the use of the CC 5083 aluminium alloy be influenced. Be cased into electrical furnace, hot up with unlimited speed followed the furnace hot up to different temperature and annealed 2h respectively, and be cased into salt-beth furnace, hot up quickly to different temperature and annealed 30 min respectively for CC 5083 and CC 5182 aluminum alloy after cold roling with 91.5% reduction. The microstructure be watched use metallographic microscope, the texture be inspected by XRD. The start temperature of recrystallization and grain grow up temperature within annealing in the electric furnace of CC 5083 aluminum alloy board is 343 degrees C, and the shap of grain after grow up with long strip (the innovation point ); The start temperature of recrystallization within annealling in the salt bath furnace of CC 5083 is 343 degrees C. The start temperature and end temperature of recrystallization within annealling of CC 5083 and CC 5182 aluminum alloy is 371 degrees C. The grain grow up outstanding of cold rooled CC 5152 aluminum alloy after annealed with 454 degrees C in the electric furnace and salt bath furnace. The start temperature of grain grow up of CC 5083 alluminurn alloy annealed in the electric furnace and salt bath furnace respectively is higher than the start temperature of grain grow up of CC 5182 alluminum alloy annealed in the electric furnace and salt bath furnace respectively. The strat temperature of recrystallization grain grow up is higher than which annealled with other three manner annealing process. The recrystallization temperature of CC 5182 annealed in the salt bath furnace is higher than which annealed in the electric furnace. The recrystallization temperature of the surface layer of CC 5083 and CC 5182 aluminum alloy is higher than the inner layer (the innovation

  20. Modeling of the VIRTIS-M Observations of the Coma of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fougere, Nicolas; Combi, Michael R.; Tenishev, Valeriy; Bieler, Andre; Migliorini, Alessandra; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico; Toth, Gabor; Huang, Zhenguang; Gombosi, Tamas; Hansen, Kenneth; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Debout, Vincent; Erard, Stephane; Leyrat, Cedric; Fink, Uwe; Rubin, Martin; Altwegg, Kathrin; Tzou, Chia-Yu; Le Roy, Lena; Calmonte, Ursina; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Reme, Henri; Hassig, Myrtha; Fuselier, Stephen; Fiethe, Bjorn; De Keyser, Johan

    2015-11-01

    The recent images of the inner coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (CG) made by the infrared channel of the VIRTIS-M instrument on board the Rosetta spacecraft show the gas distribution as it expands in the coma (Migliorini et al. 2015, DPS abstract).Since VIRTIS is a remote sensing instrument, a proper modeling of these observations requires the computation of the full coma of comet CG, which necessitates the use of a kinetic approach due to the rather low gas densities. Hence, we apply a Direct Simulation Monde Carlo (DSMC) method to solve the Boltzmann equation and describe CG’s coma from the nucleus surface up to a few hundreds of kilometers. The model uses the SHAP5 nucleus shape model from the OSIRIS team. The gas flux distribution takes into account solar illumination, including self-shadowing. The local activity at the surface of the nucleus is given by spherical harmonics expansion reproducing best the ROSINA-DFMS data. The densities from the DSMC model outputs are then integrated along the line-of-sight to create synthetic images that are directly comparable with the VIRTIS-M column density measurements.The good agreement between the observations and the model illustrates our continuously improving understanding of the physics of the coma of comet CG.AcknowledgementsWork at UofM was supported by contracts JPL#1266313, JPL#1266314 and NASA grant NNX09AB59G. Work at UoB was funded by the State of Bern, the Swiss National Science Foundation and by the European Space Agency PRODEX Program. Work at Southwest Research institute was supported by subcontract #1496541 from the JPL. Work at BIRA-IASB was supported by the Belgian Science Policy Office via PRODEX/ROSINA PEA 90020. The authors would like to thank ASI, CNES, DLR, NASA for supporting this research. VIRTIS was built by a consortium formed by Italy, France and Germany, under the scientific responsibility of the IAPS of INAF, which guides also the scientific operations. The consortium includes also the

  1. [Comporison Sduty of Microstructure by Metallographicalk on the Polarized Light and Texture by XRD of CC 5083 and CC 5182 Aluminium Alloy after Cold Rolling and Recrystallization].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-biao; Li, Yong-wei; Tan, Yuan-biao; Ma, Min; Wang, Xue-min; Liu, Wen-chang

    2015-03-01

    At present the study of relation between microstructure, texture and performance of CC 5083 aluminium alloy after cold tolling and recrystallization processes is still finitude. So that the use of the CC 5083 aluminium alloy be influenced. Be cased into electrical furnace, hot up with unlimited speed followed the furnace hot up to different temperature and annealed 2h respectively, and be cased into salt-beth furnace, hot up quickly to different temperature and annealed 30 min respectively for CC 5083 and CC 5182 aluminum alloy after cold roling with 91.5% reduction. The microstructure be watched use metallographic microscope, the texture be inspected by XRD. The start temperature of recrystallization and grain grow up temperature within annealing in the electric furnace of CC 5083 aluminum alloy board is 343 degrees C, and the shap of grain after grow up with long strip (the innovation point ); The start temperature of recrystallization within annealling in the salt bath furnace of CC 5083 is 343 degrees C. The start temperature and end temperature of recrystallization within annealling of CC 5083 and CC 5182 aluminum alloy is 371 degrees C. The grain grow up outstanding of cold rooled CC 5152 aluminum alloy after annealed with 454 degrees C in the electric furnace and salt bath furnace. The start temperature of grain grow up of CC 5083 alluminurn alloy annealed in the electric furnace and salt bath furnace respectively is higher than the start temperature of grain grow up of CC 5182 alluminum alloy annealed in the electric furnace and salt bath furnace respectively. The strat temperature of recrystallization grain grow up is higher than which annealled with other three manner annealing process. The recrystallization temperature of CC 5182 annealed in the salt bath furnace is higher than which annealed in the electric furnace. The recrystallization temperature of the surface layer of CC 5083 and CC 5182 aluminum alloy is higher than the inner layer (the innovation

  2. Study of cliff activity dominating the gas and dust comae of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during the early phase of the Rosetta mission using ROSINA/COPS and OSIRIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschall, Raphael; Su, Cheng-Chin; Liao, Ying; Rubin, Martin; Wu, Jong-Shinn; Thomas, Nicolas; altwegg, kathrin; Sierks, Holger; OSIRIS, ROSINA

    2016-10-01

    The study by [1] has proposed the idea that the cometary dust jets in the northern hemisphere of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko arise mainly from rough cliff like terrain. Using our 3D gas and dust dynamics coma model [2] we have run simulations targeting the question whether areas with high gravitational slopes alone can indeed account for both the ROSINA/COPS and the OSIRIS data obtained for mid August to end October 2014.The basis of our simulations is the shape model "SHAP4S" of [3]. Surface temperatures have been defined using a simple 1-D thermal model (including insolation, shadowing, thermal emission, sublimation but neglecting conduction) computed for each facet of the shape model allowing a consistent and known description of the gas flux and its initial temperature. In a next step we use the DSMC program PDSC++ [4] to calculate the gas properties in 3D space. The gas solution can be compared with the in situ measurements by ROSINA/COPS. In a subsequent step dust particles are introduced into the gas flow to determine dust densities and with a column integrator and Mie theory dust brightnesses that can be compared to OSIRIS data.To examine cliff activity we have divided the surface into two sets. One with gravitational slopes larger than 30° which we call cliffs and one with slopes less than 30° which we shall call plains. We have set up two models, "cliff only" and "plains only" where the respective set of areas are active and the others inert. The outgassing areas are assumed to be purely insolation driven. The "cliffs only" model is a statistically equally good fit to the ROSINA/COPS data as the global insolation driven model presented in [2]. The "plains only" model on the other hand is statistically inferior to the "cliffs only" model. We found in [2] that increased activity in the Hapi region (called inhomogeneous model) of the comet improves the fit of the gas results significantly. We can show in this study that a "cliffs + Hapi" model fits the

  3. Visuomotor behaviours when using a myoelectric prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A recent study showed that the gaze patterns of amputee users of myoelectric prostheses differ markedly from those seen in anatomically intact subjects. Gaze behaviour is a promising outcome measures for prosthesis designers, as it appears to reflect the strategies adopted by amputees to compensate for the absence of proprioceptive feedback and uncertainty/delays in the control system, factors believed to be central to the difficulty in using prostheses. The primary aim of our study was to characterise visuomotor behaviours over learning to use a trans-radial myoelectric prosthesis. Secondly, as there are logistical advantages to using anatomically intact subjects in prosthesis evaluation studies, we investigated similarities in visuomotor behaviours between anatomically intact users of a trans-radial prosthesis simulator and experienced trans-radial myoelectric prosthesis users. Methods In part 1 of the study, we investigated visuomotor behaviours during performance of a functional task (reaching, grasping and manipulating a carton) in a group of seven anatomically intact subjects over learning to use a trans-radial myoelectric prosthesis simulator (Dataset 1). Secondly, we compared their patterns of visuomotor behaviour with those of four experienced trans-radial myoelectric prosthesis users (Dataset 2). We recorded task movement time, performance on the SHAP test of hand function and gaze behaviour. Results Dataset 1 showed that while reaching and grasping the object, anatomically intact subjects using the prosthesis simulator devoted around 90% of their visual attention to either the hand or the area of the object to be grasped. This pattern of behaviour did not change with training, and similar patterns were seen in Dataset 2. Anatomically intact subjects exhibited significant increases in task duration at their first attempts to use the prosthesis simulator. At the end of training, the values had decreased and were similar to those seen in Dataset

  4. Time-temperature evolution of microtextures and contained fluids in a plutonic alkali feldspar during heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Ian; Fitz Gerald, John D.; Lee, James K. W.; Ivanic, Tim; Golla-Schindler, Ute

    2010-08-01

    Microtextural changes brought about by heating alkali feldspar crystals from the Shap granite, northern England, at atmospheric pressure, have been studied using transmission and scanning electron microscopy. A typical unheated phenocryst from Shap is composed of about 70 vol% of tweed orthoclase with strain-controlled coherent or semicoherent micro- and crypto-perthitic albite lamellae, with maximum lamellar thicknesses <1 μm. Semicoherent lamellae are encircled by nanotunnel loops in two orientations and cut by pull-apart cracks. The average bulk composition of this microtexture is Ab27.6Or71.8An0.6. The remaining 30 vol% is deuterically coarsened, microporous patch and vein perthite composed of incoherent subgrains of oligoclase, albite and irregular microcline. The largest subgrains are ~3 μm in diameter. Heating times in the laboratory were 12 to 6,792 h and T from 300°C into the melting interval at 1,100°C. Most samples were annealed at constant T but two were heated to simulate an 40Ar/39Ar step-heating schedule. Homogenisation of strain-controlled lamellae by Na↔K inter-diffusion was rapid, so that in all run products at >700°C, and after >48 h at 700°C, all such regions were essentially compositionally homogeneous, as indicated by X-ray analyses at fine scale in the transmission electron microscope. Changes in lamellar thickness with time at different T point to an activation energy of ~350 kJmol-1. A lamella which homogenised after 6,800 h at 600°C, therefore, would have required only 0.6 s to do so in the melting interval at 1,100°C. Subgrains in patch perthite homogenised more slowly than coherent lamellae and chemical gradients in patches persisted for >5,000 h at 700°C. Homogenisation T is in agreement with experimentally determined solvi for coherent ordered intergrowths, when a 50-100°C increase in T for An1 is applied. Homogenisation of lamellae appears to proceed in an unexpected manner: two smooth interfaces, microstructurally sharp

  5. The combined Mössbauer and XRF Spectrometer MIMOS IIA for In-Situ Geochemical and Mineralogical Analysis of Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingelhöfer, Göstar; Blumers, Mathias; Girones-Lopez, Jordi; Bernhardt, Bodo; Lechner, Peter; Str, Lothar; Maul, Jasmine; Soltau, Heike; Henkel, Hartmut; Br, Johannes; Claude, D.; Henrich, Cristina

    The Miniaturised Müssbauer Spectrometers MIMOS II on board the two NASA Mars Explo-o ration Rovers (MER) have now collected valuable scientific data for more than six years [1-4]. This mission has demonstrated that Müss-bauer spectroscopy is extremely valuable for the in situ exploration of extraterrestrial bodies and the study of Fe-bearing samples. A MIMOS instrument is also on the scientific payload of the Russian mission Phobos Grunt sched-uled for 2011 [5]. The instrument MIMOS IIA originally developed for the ESA ExoMars mission (now 2018) will use newly designed Si-Drift detectors with circular geometry (SDD) [6,7] allowing high resolution X-ray fluores-cence spectroscopy simultaneously to Müssbauer measurements. The new design of the improved MIMOS II instrument is reduced in total mass (less than 400 g). The sensorhead of MIMOS IIA will be equipped with a ring of Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD) optimized for the backscatter geometry of the miniaturized Müssbauer spectrometer. The main goal of the new detector system design was to combine high energy resolution at high counting rates and large detector area while making maximum use of the area close to the collimator of the 57Co Müssbauer source. The active area per SDD segment is 2x45 mm2. The energy resolution at 5.9 keV is ¡ 280 eV at room temperature and 131 eV FWHM at -40oC. This performance will increase the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and reduce the integration time of Müssbauer measurement by a factor of up to 10. In addition to the Müssbauer analysis simultaneous acquisition of the X-ray fluorescence spectrum will provide data on the sample's elemental composition [7]. Preliminary studies at room temperature and normal pressure show detec-tion of X-rays down to 1 keV. A new control-and readout electronics for MIMOS IIA allows spectra acquisition at highest possible countrates available at about 360 mm2 total detector area. This is possible due to digital pulse shap-ing and pulsed JFET reset

  6. Surficial geology of the lower Comb Wash, San Juan County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longpré, Claire I.

    2001-01-01

    . Most precipitation is monsoonal, convective storms that bring moisture from the Gulf of Mexico beginning in early July and ending by October. Large frontal storms during December and January are responsible for most winter precipitation (Figure 2). The record from U.S. Geological Survey gauging station number 09379000 operated by the BLM from 1959 through 1968 indicates that Comb Wash flows in direct response to precipitation events. Most daily discharge and peak events occur in late July through September, coinciding with high intensity monsoon thunderstorms. Comb Wash supports a variety of vegetation typical of the Great Basin Desert and the northern desert shrub zone as described by Fowler and Koch (1982). On the lower alluvial terraces, bushes and shrubs dominate the vegetation, including: sagebrush (Artemesia tridentata), rabbitbrush (Chrysothamnus nauseosus), fourwing saltbush (Atriplex canescens), winterfat (Eurotia lanata), greasewood (Sarcobatus vermiculatus), and shadscale (Atriplex concertifolia). Juniper trees (Juniperus osteosperma) can be found on the rocky colluvial slopes near Comb Ridge and on the higher terrace near Cedar Mesa. The floodplain contains an abundance of riparian vegetation including cottonwood (Populus fremontii), willow (Salix exigua), and tamarisk (Tamarix ramosissima). Tamarisk is one of 7 non-native species present in the lower Comb Wash watershed. At least seven known species of noxious weeds have invaded the watershed, including Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon), field bindweed (Convolvulus avensis), Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense), Russian knapweed (Centaurea repens), tamarisk and camel thorn (Alhagi pseudalhagi). Of these, tamarisk or salt-cedar has most aggressively colonized the southwestern United States, including the San Juan watershed. Graf (1978) estimates that since the late 19th century, tamarisk has spread at a rate of 20 km per year. Tamarisk first appeared in Comb Wash during the mid to early 20th century based on