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Sample records for alice springs australia

  1. Education, Equity, and the Crisis in the Rural Community. Proceedings of the Rural Education Research Association Conference (Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia, February, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, J. M. R., Ed.; Griffith, D. A., Ed.

    This document summarizes the proceedings of a national forum for persons with an interest in and commitment to research into issues affecting people living in rural and remote areas across Australia. The six sub-themes of the conference were: (1) the role of the community in teacher preparation; (2) the quality of education in rural Australia; (3)…

  2. Hydrogeophysical evidence for ground water mixing at Freeling Spring Group, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailey, Meghan Kathleen Marie

    2011-12-01

    The Great Artesian Basin (GAB) is an aquifer system that extends across Australia covering over 22% of the continent and is a vital support system for ecosystems in the region. As part of the Australian National Water Commission's (NWC) GAB Project, research is being conducted to understand the aquifer including studying the discharge of springs and determining flow paths of the aquifer. Water sampling at springs that are a part of the Freeling Spring Group were used along with Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI) data to evaluate evidence of mixing between the GAB aquifer and waters from the adjacent basement aquifer in the Peake and Dennison Ranges (PD). Nine springs were used to evaluate fluid chemistry of the Freeling Spring Group. ERI data were collected along three orientations over the Freeling Spring site. The ERI data, which extend for 550 meters laterally and 110 meters vertically, indicate three possible flow lines providing mixing at the spring orifice similar to what would be predicted from traditional conceptual models. Regional water samples of springs were used as end members to evaluate chemical mixing models for waters at the site. The chemistry of spring water samples indicates that the water emanating from the Freeling Spring Group is a mixture of waters from both the GAB and the PD, which confirms the ERI evidence for mixing at the site. The data suggest the mixing occurs along a structural feature in the Peake and Dennison Ranges and that the spring water maintains a strong PD signature even well east of the fault zone.

  3. Mound Spring Complexes in Central Australia: An Analog for Martian Groundwater Fed Outflow Channels?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, J. D. A.; Stoker, C.

    2003-01-01

    The arid inland of Australia contains a diversity of landscapes and landscape processes, often of great antiquity, extending back to the Mesozoic and Paleozoic. The potential of this landscape as a source of Mars analogs has, however, been little explored. The few examples studied so far include radiation-tolerant microbes in thermal springs and hematite-silica hydrothermal alteration near Arkaroola in the Finders Ranges, and aeolian landforms at Gurra Gurra water hole the north east of Arkaroola. Further Australian Mars analog studies were provided by the studies of Bourke and Zimbelman of the paleoflood record of the Todd and Hale Rivers in central Australia. To facilitate study of such analogues, Mars Society Australia has embarked on a project to construct a Mars Analog Research Station near Arkaroola. The international scientific community will soon have the opportunity to participate in Mars analog studies in central Australia utilizing this facility. An area of considerable Mars analog potential is the mound spring complexes that occur at the margins of the Great Artesian Basin (GAB) which underlies 22% of the Australian continent and covers 1.7 million km2. The mound springs are formed when ground water flows to a topographic low, and subsurface strata dips up causing a hydrological head at the surface. Minerals precipitated at the spring discharge zone form low mesas or "mounds", the height of which are controlled by the hydrological head. This paper describes the Dalhousie Mound Spring Complex (DMC) in the northern part of South Australia (Figure 1), and its potential as a Mars analog. Hydrogeology: The DMC consists of a cluster of more than 60 active springs formed by natural discharge from the GAB). Total measured discharge from the GAB is 1.74 GL per day, estimated unfocussed natural leakage through the aquaclude is thought be approximately equal to this figure. Some 54 ML per day are currently discharged by the DMC, 3% of the measured total. The

  4. Trace metal contamination of mineral spring water in an historical mining area in regional Victoria, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Rachael; Dowling, Kim

    2013-11-01

    Significant global consumption of spring and mineral water is fuelled by perceived therapeutic and medicinal qualities, cultural habits and taste. The Central Victorian Mineral Springs Region, Australia comprises approximately 100 naturally effervescent, cold, high CO2 content springs with distinctive tastes linked to a specific spring or pump. The area has a rich settlement history. It was first settled by miners in the 1840s closely followed by the first commercial operations of a health resort 1895. The landscape is clearly affected by gold mining with geographically proximal mine waste, mullock heaps or tailings. Repeated mineral springs sampling since 1985 has revealed elevated arsenic concentrations. In 1985 an arsenic concentration five times the current Australian Drinking Water Guideline was recorded at a popular tourist spring site. Recent sampling and analyses have confirmed elevated levels of heavy metals/metalloids, with higher concentrations occurring during periods of low rainfall. Despite the elevated levels, mineral water source points remain accessible to the public with some springs actively promoting the therapeutic benefits of the waters. In light of our analysis, the risk to consumers (some of whom are likely to be negatively health-affected or health-compromised) needs to be considered with a view to appropriate and verified analyses made available to the public.

  5. Reclaiming Indigenous Youth in Australia: Families and Schools Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mechielsen,Jack; Galbraith, Mal; White, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Australia's Northern Territory is twice the size of Texas, with only 230,000 people living in its enormous space. About half reside in the capital Darwin in the tropical far north; the next biggest town with a population of 25,000 people is Alice Springs, 1600 kilometers south in the central desert. Some 70,000 Indigenous people form 30% of the…

  6. Lithofacies and biofacies of mid-Paleozoic thermal spring deposits in the Drummond Basin, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, M. R.; Desmarais, D.; Farmer, J. D.; Hinman, N. W.

    1996-01-01

    The Devonian to Carboniferous sinters of the Drummond Basin, Australia, are among the oldest well established examples of fossil subaerial hot springs. Numerous subaerial and subaqueous spring deposits are known from the geological record as a result of the occurrence of economic mineral deposits in many of them. Some are reported to contain fossils, but very few have been studied by paleobiologists; they represent an untapped source of paleobiological information on the history of hydrothermal ecosystems. Such systems are of special interest, given the molecular biological evidence that thermophilic bacteria lie near the root of the tree of extant life. The Drummond Basin sinters are very closely comparable with modern examples in Yellowstone National Park and elsewhere. Thirteen microfacies are recognisable in the field, ranging from high temperature apparently abiotic geyserite through various forms of stromatolitic sinter probably of cyanobacterial origin to ambient temperature marsh deposits. Microfossils in the stromatolites are interpreted as cyanobacterial sheaths. Herbaceous lycopsids occur in the lower temperature deposits.

  7. ALICE Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kadyshevskiy, V.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil SVN, M.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Sahoo, P.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H. O.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Sánchez Rodríguez, F. J.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-11-01

    The ALICE Collaboration would like to thank all its engineers and technicians for their invaluable contributions to the construction of the experiment and the CERN accelerator teams for the outstanding performance of the LHC complex.

  8. Australia.

    PubMed

    1989-03-01

    The smallest continent and one of the largest countries, Australia is a country of diverse geographical conditions and differing cultures of people unified by one predominant language and political system. Mountains, desert and rivers are some of the varying landscape features of Australia, although the climate and condition for most of the country is tropical. Original Australians, a hunting-gathering people called Aborigines, came to Australia over 38,000 years ago. Today the Aborigines compose about 1% of the population and live in traditional tribal areas as well as cities. The 1st European settlement came in 1788 from Great Britain. After World War II, the population doubled. Although the population is primarily composed of British and Irish immigrants, immigrants from other European countries such as Italy and Greece as well as refugees from Indochina, Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos are a significant factor to the growing Australian population. Australian and Aboriginal culture has took hold and took notice in the areas of opera, art, literature and film. The Australian Commonwealth is based on a constitution similar to that of the United States government. The National Parliament is bicameral with both the Senate and the House of Representatives having a select number of elected officials from each state and territory. The Australian economy is predominantly reliant on the sale of mineral and agricultural exports. History, economic changes, defense, international relations and notes to the traveler are also discussed in this overview of Australia.

  9. Statistical analysis of the temperature records for the Northern Territory of Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boretti, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    The Northern Territory of Australia has a unique situation of an extension larger than France and a population of 200,000, with only three meteorology stations open for more than 40 years, Darwin (DW), Alice Springs (AS) and Tennant Creek, and only two of them, DW and AS, providing data over 100 years, and from 500 to more than 1,000 km separating these stations and the stations in the neighbouring states of Australia. Homogenizations of data in between different measuring sites for the same location as well as the way to derive the missed data to complete at least 100 years from the neighbouring locations are analysed in details and the effects on the temperature trends are straightforwardly investigated. Using properly homogenised data over 130 years and a linear fitting, the warming maximum and minimum temperatures are +0.009 and +0.057 °C/10 years for Alice Springs and -0.025 and 0.064 °C/10 years for Darwin. With the data available, the only option to produce warming trends is to overweight the cold years in the middle of the 1970s and the subsequent return to warmer temperatures. Starting from 1980, to compute trends, there is still a clear warming in Alice Springs, but also clear cooling in Tennant Creek, and a mixed behaviour with warming maximum temperatures and cooling minimum temperatures in Darwin.

  10. Impacts of Groundwater Discharge at Myora Springs (North Stradbroke Island, Australia) on the Phenolic Metabolism of Eelgrass, Zostera muelleri, and Grazing by the Juvenile Rabbitfish, Siganus fuscescens

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Thomas; Freundlich, Grace; Weilnau, Taylor; Verdi, Arielle; Tibbetts, Ian R.

    2014-01-01

    Myora Springs is one of many groundwater discharge sites on North Stradbroke Island (Queensland, Australia). Here spring waters emerge from wetland forests to join Moreton Bay, mixing with seawater over seagrass meadows dominated by eelgrass, Zostera muelleri. We sought to determine how low pH / high CO2 conditions near the spring affect these plants and their interactions with the black rabbitfish (Siganus fuscescens), a co-occurring grazer. In paired-choice feeding trials S. fuscescens preferentially consumed Z. muelleri shoots collected nearest to Myora Springs. Proximity to the spring did not significantly alter the carbon and nitrogen contents of seagrass tissues but did result in the extraordinary loss of soluble phenolics, including Folin-reactive phenolics, condensed tannins, and phenolic acids by ≥87%. Conversely, seagrass lignin contents were, in this and related experiments, unaffected or increased, suggesting a shift in secondary metabolism away from the production of soluble, but not insoluble, (poly)phenolics. We suggest that groundwater discharge sites such as Myora Springs, and other sites characterized by low pH, are likely to be popular feeding grounds for seagrass grazers seeking to reduce their exposure to soluble phenolics. PMID:25127379

  11. Alice Occultation - Gladstone

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows how the count rate observed by New Horizons’ Alice instrument decreases as Pluto’s atmosphere passes in front of the sun. The decreasing count rate is due to the ultraviolet s...

  12. Dolly and Alice.

    PubMed

    Burk, Dan L

    2015-11-01

    The opinion of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, In re Roslin Institute, rejecting patent claims to mammals cloned from somatic cells, was rendered about a month before the United States Supreme Court's decision in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank International. The Alice opinion explicitly sets out the standard for determining whether an invention falls within statutory patentable subject matter. Thus one is thus left to wonder what the Roslin opinion might have looked like had it been decided only a few weeks later, after the Alice decision was published, with the benefit of the Supreme Court's further direction on patentable subject matter. In this essay I explore whether in hindsight the Alice standard might have dictated a different outcome in Roslin, suggesting how the two-part test articulated by the Supreme Court in Alice might apply to a 'products of nature' analysis for cloned mammals. Drawing on that analysis, I then use the Roslin case as a vehicle to highlight certain issues with the Supreme Court's current subject matter jurisprudence as applied to biotechnology. By juxtaposing Dolly with Alice, it becomes clear that the Supreme Court has revivified a number of dormant biotechnology patent problems in the guise of subject matter analysis.

  13. Dolly and Alice

    PubMed Central

    Burk, Dan L.

    2015-01-01

    The opinion of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, In re Roslin Institute, rejecting patent claims to mammals cloned from somatic cells, was rendered about a month before the United States Supreme Court's decision in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank International. The Alice opinion explicitly sets out the standard for determining whether an invention falls within statutory patentable subject matter. Thus one is thus left to wonder what the Roslin opinion might have looked like had it been decided only a few weeks later, after the Alice decision was published, with the benefit of the Supreme Court's further direction on patentable subject matter. In this essay I explore whether in hindsight the Alice standard might have dictated a different outcome in Roslin, suggesting how the two-part test articulated by the Supreme Court in Alice might apply to a ‘products of nature’ analysis for cloned mammals. Drawing on that analysis, I then use the Roslin case as a vehicle to highlight certain issues with the Supreme Court's current subject matter jurisprudence as applied to biotechnology. By juxtaposing Dolly with Alice, it becomes clear that the Supreme Court has revivified a number of dormant biotechnology patent problems in the guise of subject matter analysis. PMID:27774214

  14. The Sky Is No Longer the Limit for Alice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monge, Louise

    2016-01-01

    In March 2016, representatives from Australian Science Teachers Association (ASTA) were invited to BHP Billiton's head office in Melbourne, Australia, to listen to astronautical engineer and NASA New Horizons Mission Operations Manager Alice Bowman discuss her career trajectory and the role her choices in education played in her success. Alice…

  15. MAD - Monitoring ALICE Dataflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Grigoras, C.; Wegrzynek, A.

    2015-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Following a successful Run 1, which ended in February 2013, the ALICE data acquisition (DAQ) entered a consolidation phase to prepare for Run 2 which will start in the beginning of 2015. A new software tool has been developed by the data acquisition project to improve the monitoring of the experiment's dataflow, from the data readout in the DAQ farm up to its shipment to CERN's main computer centre. This software, called ALICE MAD (Monitoring ALICE Dataflow), uses the MonALISA framework as core module to gather, process, aggregate and distribute monitoring values from the different processes running in the distributed DAQ farm. Data are not only pulled from the data sources to MAD but can also be pushed by dedicated data collectors or the data source processes. A large set of monitored metrics (from the backpressure status on the readout links to event counters in each of the DAQ nodes and aggregated data rates for the whole data acquisition) is needed to provide a comprehensive view of the DAQ status. MAD also injects alarms in the Orthos alarm system whenever abnormal conditions are detected. The MAD web-based GUI uses WebSockets to provide dynamic and on-time status displays for the ALICE shift crew. Designed as a widget-based system, MAD supports an easy integration of new visualization blocks and also customization of the information displayed to the shift crew based on the ALICE activities.

  16. The ALICE Pixel Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado-Perez, Jorge

    2002-07-01

    The present document is a brief summary of the performed activities during the 2001 Summer Student Programme at CERN under the Scientific Summer at Foreign Laboratories Program organized by the Particles and Fields Division of the Mexican Physical Society (Sociedad Mexicana de Fisica). In this case, the activities were related with the ALICE Pixel Group of the EP-AIT Division, under the supervision of Jeroen van Hunen, research fellow in this group. First, I give an introduction and overview to the ALICE experiment; followed by a description of wafer probing. A brief summary of the test beam that we had from July 13th to July 25th is given as well.

  17. Alice in Debitland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Washington, DC.

    Designed for the general public and possibly suitable also for high school economics students, this booklet examines the Electronic Fund Transfer Act (EFT), which protects consumers who use debit cards for the electronic transfer of funds. This commercially adapted version of the character in "Alice in Wonderland," uses a story-teller…

  18. Overview of recent ALICE results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakomov, Igor

    2016-10-01

    ALICE is one of the four largest LHC experiments. It is dedicated to the study of the properties of the deconfined state of matter formed at large energy densities in heavy-ion collisions — the Quark-Gluon Plasma. The ALICE Collaboration also participated in the pp and p-Pb data-taking periods at the LHC. An overview of recent ALICE results is presented for three collision systems: pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb.

  19. Central Diffraction in ALICE

    SciTech Connect

    Schicker, R.

    2011-07-15

    The ALICE experiment consists of a central barrel in the pseudorapidity range -0.9<{eta}<0.9 and of additional detectors covering about 3 units of pseudorapidity on either side of the central barrel. Such a geometry allows the tagging of single and double gap events. The status of the analysis of such diffractive events in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s) = 7 TeV is presented.

  20. Overview: the 2nd Indigenous Cardiovascular Health Conference of the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alex; Kritharides, Leonard

    2012-10-01

    Recent years have seen the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ) focus its attention on improving outcomes for Indigenous people within Australia and New Zealand. The most visible of these activities has been the convening of conferences devoted specifically to understanding and overcoming the burden of cardiovascular disparities experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders within Australia and Maori and Pacific Islander populations within New Zealand. Following from the success of the first meeting, the second was held in Alice Springs in 2011. Alongside plenary sessions discussing primary prevention, improved care, secondary prevention and the social and cultural determinants of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), targeted workshops outlined the issues and priority activities for the CSANZ into the future. These included discussion of Workforce, Improving Chronic Care, Reducing the burden of Rheumatic Heart Disease and Reducing Disparities in Hospital Care.

  1. Recent mantle degassing recorded by carbonic spring deposits along sinistral strike-slip faults, south-central Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ring, Uwe; Tonguç Uysal, I.; Yüce, Galip; Ünal-İmer, Ezgi; Italiano, Francesco; İmer, Ali; Zhao, Jian-xin

    2016-11-01

    The interior of the Australian continent shows evidence for late Quaternary to Recent fault-controlled mantle 3He and CO2 degassing. A series of interconnected NW-striking sinistral faults, the Norwest fault zone (NFZ), in south-central Australia are associated with travertine mounds, the latter show a regular spacing of 50-70 km. U-series ages on 26 samples range from 354 ± 7 to 1.19 ± 0.02ka (2σ errors) and suggest a clustering every ∼3-4 ka since ∼26 ka. Geochemical data demonstrate a remarkable mantle-to-groundwater connection. Isotopic data indicate that the groundwater is circulating to depths >3 km and interacting with Neoproterozoic/Cambrian basement and mantle volatiles. 3He/4He isotope ratios show that the He comes in part from the mantle. This demonstrates that the NFZ cuts through the entire crust and provides pathways for mantle degassing. Scaling relationships suggest that the series of sinistral faults that make up the NFZ are interconnected at depths and have a significant strike length of 60-70 km or more. The NFZ occurs where a major compositional boundary and a significant heat flow anomaly occurs, and a major step in lithospheric thickness has been mapped. We discuss a tectonic model in which recent stress field, heat flow and lithospheric structure in central Australia reactivated a set of steeply dipping Neoproterozoic faults, which may now be growing into a crustal/lithospheric-scale structure.

  2. Combining aboriginal and non-aboriginal knowledge to assess and manage feral water buffalo impacts on perennial freshwater springs of the aboriginal-owned Arnhem Plateau, Australia.

    PubMed

    Ens, Emilie-Jane; Cooke, Peter; Nadjamerrek, Ray; Namundja, Seraine; Garlngarr, Victor; Yibarbuk, Dean

    2010-04-01

    Aboriginal land managers have observed that feral Asian water buffalo (Bubalis bubalis Lydekker) are threatening the ecological and cultural integrity of perennial freshwater sources in Arnhem Land, Australia. Here we present collaborative research between the Aboriginal Rangers from Warddeken Land Management Limited and Western scientists which quantified the ground-level impacts of buffalo on seven perennial freshwater springs of the Arnhem Plateau. A secondary aim was to build the capacity of Aboriginal Rangers to self-monitor and evaluate the ecological outcomes of their land management activities. Sites with high buffalo abundance had significantly different ground, ground cover, and water quality attributes compared to sites with low buffalo abundance. The low buffalo abundance sites were characterized by tall herbaceous vegetation and flat ground, whereas wallows, bare ground, and short ungrazed grasses were indicators of sites with high buffalo abundance. Water turbidity was greater when buffalo abundance was high. The newly acquired monitoring skills and derived indicators of buffalo damage will be used by Aboriginal Rangers to assess the ecological outcomes of their future buffalo control efforts on the Arnhem Plateau.

  3. Combining Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Knowledge to Assess and Manage Feral Water Buffalo Impacts on Perennial Freshwater Springs of the Aboriginal-Owned Arnhem Plateau, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ens, Emilie-Jane; Cooke, Peter; Nadjamerrek, Ray; Namundja, Seraine; Garlngarr, Victor; Yibarbuk, Dean

    2010-04-01

    Aboriginal land managers have observed that feral Asian water buffalo ( Bubalis bubalis Lydekker) are threatening the ecological and cultural integrity of perennial freshwater sources in Arnhem Land, Australia. Here we present collaborative research between the Aboriginal Rangers from Warddeken Land Management Limited and Western scientists which quantified the ground-level impacts of buffalo on seven perennial freshwater springs of the Arnhem Plateau. A secondary aim was to build the capacity of Aboriginal Rangers to self-monitor and evaluate the ecological outcomes of their land management activities. Sites with high buffalo abundance had significantly different ground, ground cover, and water quality attributes compared to sites with low buffalo abundance. The low buffalo abundance sites were characterized by tall herbaceous vegetation and flat ground, whereas wallows, bare ground, and short ungrazed grasses were indicators of sites with high buffalo abundance. Water turbidity was greater when buffalo abundance was high. The newly acquired monitoring skills and derived indicators of buffalo damage will be used by Aboriginal Rangers to assess the ecological outcomes of their future buffalo control efforts on the Arnhem Plateau.

  4. Alice in Wonderland syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose of review: To summarize the literature on Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS), a disorder characterized by distortions of visual perception, the body schema, and the experience of time. Recent findings: On the basis of 169 published case descriptions, the etiology of AIWS is divided into 8 main groups, with neurologic disorders affecting mostly adults and elderly patients and encephalitides affecting mostly patients aged ≤18 years. Symptoms of AIWS are also experienced in the general population, with up to 30% of adolescents reporting nonclinical symptoms. Summary: In clinical cases of AIWS, auxiliary investigations (including blood tests, EEG, and brain MRI) are strongly advised. Treatment should be directed at the suspected underlying condition, although reassurance that the symptoms themselves are not harmful seems to suffice in about 50% of the cases. International classifications such as the DSM and ICD should consider placing the syndrome on their research agenda. PMID:27347442

  5. Highlights from ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giubellino, Paolo

    The LHC has delivered for the first time collisions of Nuclei in November 2010, at an energy of 2.76 TeV per nucleon pair, which represents a jump of more than an order of magnitude over the highest energy nuclear collisions ever studied before. The high energy, the quality of the state-of-the art detectors, and the readiness of the experimental collaborations at the LHC have allowed a rich harvest of important scientific results. In this lecture a short overview will be given of how the results from the LHC, and in particular from the ALICE experiment, have provided new insight on the properties of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure, analogous to the conditions present in the early phases of the evolution of the Universe. Results from the proton-nucleus run, which took place in early 2013, will also be presented. Finally, a very short outlook to the future will be given.

  6. AD, the ALICE diffractive detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tello, Abraham Villatoro

    2017-03-01

    ALICE is one of the four large experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As a complement to its Heavy-Ion physics program, ALICE started during Run 1 of LHC an extensive program dedicated to the study of proton-proton diffractive processes. In order to optimize its trigger efficiencies and purities in selecting diffractive events, the ALICE Collaboration installed a very forward AD detector during the Long Shut Down 1 of LHC. This new forward detector system consists of two stations made of two layers of scintillator pads, one station on each side of the interaction point. With this upgrade, ALICE has substantially increased its forward physics coverage, including the double rapidity gap based selection of central production, as well as the measurements of inclusive diffractive cross sections.

  7. ESR and U-series analyses of faunal material from Cuddie Springs, NSW, Australia: implications for the timing of the extinction of the Australian megafauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grün, Rainer; Eggins, Stephen; Aubert, Maxime; Spooner, Nigel; Pike, Alistair W. G.; Müller, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    The timing and cause of late Pleistocene faunal extinctions in Australia are subjects of a debate that has become polarised by two vigorously defended views. One contends that the late Pleistocene extinction was a short event caused by humans colonising the Australian continent, whereas the other promotes a gradual demise of the fauna, over a period of at least 10-20 ka, due to a combination of climatic changes and ecological pressures by humans. Cuddie Springs is central to this debate as it is the only site known in continental Australia where archaeological and megafauna remains co-occur. We have analysed more than 60 bones and teeth from the site by laser ablation ICP-MS to determine U, and Th concentrations and distributions, and those with sufficiently high U concentrations were analysed for U-series isotopes. Twenty-nine teeth were analysed by ESR. These new results, as well as previously published geochronological data, contradict the hypothesis that the clastic sediments of Stratigraphic Unit 6 (SU6) are in primary context with the faunal, archaeological and other materials found in SU6, and that all have ages consistent with the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) estimates of 30-36 ka. These young OSL results were used to argue for a relatively recent age of the extinct fauna. Our results imply that SU6 is either significantly older than the OSL results, or that a large fraction of the faunal material and the charcoal found in SU6 was derived from older, lateral deposits. Our U and Th laser ablation ICPMS results as well as the REE profiles reported by Trueman et al. [2008. Comparing rates of recystallisation and the potential for preservation of biomolecules from the distribution of trace elements in fossil bones. C.R. Palevol. General Paleontology (Taphonomy and Fossilization) 7, 145-158] contradict the interpretation of previously reported rare earth element compositions of bones, and the argument based thereon for the primary context of faunal

  8. Alice C. Evans: breaking barriers.

    PubMed Central

    Colwell, R. R.

    1999-01-01

    Despite severe and persistent criticism of her research, Alice Evans persevered in her pioneering work on the bacterial contamination of milk, identifying the organism that caused undulant fever and demonstrating that drinking unpasteurized cow's milk could transmit the disease, undulant fever, to humans. The opprobrium that Alice Evans endured was unrelenting, even after her election as the first President of the Society of American Bacteriologists, (now the American Society for Microbiology), but she remained undeterred, a true heroine of American microbiology and a magnificent public health worker. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:11049166

  9. Overview of recent ALICE results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunji, Taku

    2016-12-01

    The ALICE experiment explores the properties of strongly interacting QCD matter at extremely high temperatures created in Pb-Pb collisions at LHC and provides further insight into small-system physics in (high-multiplicity) pp and p-Pb collisions. The ALICE collaboration presented 27 parallel talks, 50 posters, and 1 flash talk at Quark Matter 2015 and covered various topics including collective dynamics, correlations and fluctuations, heavy flavors, quarkonia, jets and high pT hadrons, electromagnetic probes, small system physics, and the upgrade program. This paper highlights some of the selected results.

  10. Alice Views Jupiter and Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This graphic illustrates the pointing and shows the data from one of many observations made by the New Horizons Alice ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS) instrument during the Pluto-bound spacecraft's recent encounter with Jupiter. The red lines in the graphic show the scale, orientation, and position of the combined 'box and slot' field of view of the Alice UVS during this observation.

    The positions of Jupiter's volcanic moon, Io, the torus of ionized gas from Io, and Jupiter are shown relative to the Alice field of view. Like a prism, the spectrometer separates light from these targets into its constituent wavelengths.

    Io's volcanoes produce an extremely tenuous atmosphere made up primarily of sulfur dioxide gas, which, in the harsh plasma environment at Io, breaks down into its component sulfur and oxygen atoms. Alice observed the auroral glow from these atoms in Io's atmosphere and their ionized counterparts in the Io torus.

    Io's dayside is deliberately overexposed to bring out faint details in the plumes and on the moon's night side. The continuing eruption of the volcano Tvashtar, at the 1 o'clock position, produces an enormous plume roughly 330 kilometers (200 miles) high, which is illuminated both by sunlight and 'Jupiter light.'

  11. Alice in the Real World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Tom

    2012-01-01

    As a fifth-grade mathematics teacher, the author tries to create authentic problem-solving activities that connect to the world in which his students live. He discovered a natural connection to his students' real world at a computer camp. A friend introduced him to Alice, a computer application developed at Carnegie Mellon, under the leadership of…

  12. "Alice in Wonderland." [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyman, Judith B.

    Based on Lewis Carroll's novel "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that he used nonsense and absurdity to comment on reality; and that surrealist painters are also known for including absurd elements in their works. The main activity of the lesson involves students…

  13. Alice Paul and the ERA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Amelia R.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the work of Alice Paul in her 49-year struggle to pass the Equal Rights Amendment. Discusses the differences between her proposed language for the amendment, drafted in 1922, and what she considered the flawed language of the amendment that passed Congress in 1972. Includes a legislative chronology for the Equal Rights Amendment. (CFR)

  14. Alice Childress: A Pioneering Spirit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown-Guillory, Elizabeth

    1987-01-01

    Interview with Alice Childress (born 1920), an actress, playwright, novelist, editor, and lecturer. Her "Gold through the Forest" (1952) was the first play by a Black woman to be produced professionally on the American stage. Her latest play, "Moms," was produced in New York City in 1987. (BJV)

  15. Education of the Isolated: Geographic and Cultural Aspects. Selected Papers from the Annual Conference of the Australian College of Education (22nd, Alice Springs and Darwin, Australia, May 14-20, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, R. F., Ed.

    The 11 papers in this collection focus on isolation in education, with emphasis on problems associated with geographical remoteness, and with socio-cultural barriers also giving rise to isolation. Five papers concentrate on distance education and possible measures which can be used in social and educational processes to deal with isolation;…

  16. The effects of smoke and dust aerosols on UV-B radiation in Australia from ground-based and satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, Olga V.; Mills, Franklin P.; Eldering, Annmarie; Anderson, Don; Mitchell, Ross

    2005-08-01

    An understanding of the effect of aerosols on biologically- and photochemically-active UV radiation reaching the Earth's surface is important for many ongoing climate, biophysical, and air pollution studies. In particular, estimates of the UV characteristics of the most common Australian aerosols will be valuable inputs to UV Index forecasts, air quality studies, and assessments of the impact of regional environmental changes. Based on MODIS fire maps and MISR aerosol property retrievals, we have analyzed the climatological distributions of Australian dust and smoke particles and have identified sites where collocated ground-based UV-B and ozone measurements were available during episodes of relatively high aerosol activity. Since at least June 2003, overhead ozone and surface UV spectra (285-450 nm) have been measured routinely at Darwin and Alice Springs in Australia by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BoM). Using collocated AERONET sunphotometer measurements at Darwin and collocated BoM sunphotometer measurements at Darwin and Alice Springs, we identified several episodes of relatively high aerosol activity that could be used to study the effects of dust and smoke on the UV-B solar irradiance at the Earth's surface. To assess smoke effect we compared the measured UV irradiances at Darwin with irradiancies simulated with the LibRadtran radiative transfer model for aerosol-free conditions. We found that for otherwise similar atmospheric conditions, aerosols reduced the UVB irradiance by 50% near the fire source and up to 15% downwind. We also found the effect of smoke particles to be 5 to 10% larger in the UV-B part of the spectrum. For the selected period at Darwin, changes in the aerosol loadings gave larger variations in the surface UV irradiances than previously reported changes seen in the ozone column. We are continuing similar investigations for the Alice Springs site to assess spectral differences between smoke and dust aerosols.

  17. Writing siblings: Alice James and her brothers.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Anne Golomb

    2015-02-01

    This essay addresses the relationship of writing to embodiment, through representations of bodily sensation and fantasy in the journal of Alice James. It considers Alice James's writing in relation to her two writer brothers, William and Henry, and in light of their father's experiences of impairment and breakdown.

  18. Studies for dimuon measurement with ALICE

    SciTech Connect

    Jouan, D.

    1995-07-15

    The idea of measuring dimuon in the ALICE detector is not new, since it already appeared in the Aachen Conference. In the meantime studies were aiming at the use of the two detectors of LHC p-p physics, CMS and ATLAS, already dedicated to dimuon measurement, for these same measurements in heavy ion collisions, whereas the detector dedicated to heavy ions physics at LHC, ALICE, was considering all the other observables. Recently, the interest for dimuon measurements in ALICE was renewed by demands from LHC committee, stiring the activities of a working group in the ALICE collaboration, also associated to a more recent move from new groups. In the following the author briefly describes the interest of measuring dimuons in heavy ion collisions, particularly in ALICE, then the experimental strategy and first estimates of the performances that could be reached with the proposed system.

  19. ALICE moves into warp drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Dénes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Grigore, A.; Simonetti, G.; Soós, C.; Telesca, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; von Haller, B.

    2012-12-01

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Since its successful start-up in 2010, the LHC has been performing outstandingly, providing to the experiments long periods of stable collisions and an integrated luminosity that greatly exceeds the planned targets. To fully explore these privileged conditions, we aim at maximizing the experiment's data taking productivity during stable collisions. We present in this paper the evolution of the online systems towards helping us understand reasons of inefficiency and address new requirements. This paper describes the features added to the ALICE Electronic Logbook (eLogbook) to allow the Run Coordination team to identify, prioritize, fix and follow causes of inefficiency in the experiment. Thorough monitoring of the data taking efficiency provides reports for the collaboration to portray its evolution and evaluate the measures (fixes and new features) taken to increase it. In particular, the eLogbook helps decision making by providing quantitative input, which can be used to better balance risks of changes in the production environment against potential gains in quantity and quality of physics data. It will also present the evolution of the Experiment Control System (ECS) to allow on-the-fly error recovery actions of the detector apparatus while limiting as much as possible the loss of integrated luminosity. The paper will conclude with a review of the ALICE efficiency so far and the future plans to improve its monitoring.

  20. 77 FR 21761 - Alice Falls Corporation, Alice Falls Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of License...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Alice Falls Corporation, Alice Falls Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of License, and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On February 23, 2012, Alice Falls Corporation (transferor) and Alice Falls Hydro, LLC (transferee) filed an ] application for transfer...

  1. The impact of "unseasonably" warm spring temperatures on acute myocardial infarction hospital admissions in Melbourne, Australia: a city with a temperate climate.

    PubMed

    Loughnan, Margaret; Tapper, Nigel; Loughnan, Terence

    2014-01-01

    The effects of extreme temperatures on human health have been well described. However, the adverse health effects of warm weather that occurs outside the summer period have had little attention. We used daily anomalous AMI morbidity and daily anomalous temperature to determine the impact of "unseasonable" temperature on human health. The "unseasonably" warm weather was attributed to a slow moving high pressure system to the east of Melbourne. No morbidity displacement was noted during either of these periods suggesting that morbidity due to "unseasonable" temperatures is avoidable. An increase in warmer weather during the cooler months of spring may result in increased morbidity, and an alert system based on summer thresholds may not be appropriate for early season heat health warnings. A straightforward alert system based on calculating anomalous temperature from daily weather forecasts may reduce the public health impact of "unseasonably" warm weather.

  2. The Impact of “Unseasonably” Warm Spring Temperatures on Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions in Melbourne, Australia: A City with a Temperate Climate

    PubMed Central

    Tapper, Nigel; Loughnan, Terence

    2014-01-01

    The effects of extreme temperatures on human health have been well described. However, the adverse health effects of warm weather that occurs outside the summer period have had little attention. We used daily anomalous AMI morbidity and daily anomalous temperature to determine the impact of “unseasonable” temperature on human health. The “unseasonably” warm weather was attributed to a slow moving high pressure system to the east of Melbourne. No morbidity displacement was noted during either of these periods suggesting that morbidity due to “unseasonable” temperatures is avoidable. An increase in warmer weather during the cooler months of spring may result in increased morbidity, and an alert system based on summer thresholds may not be appropriate for early season heat health warnings. A straightforward alert system based on calculating anomalous temperature from daily weather forecasts may reduce the public health impact of “unseasonably” warm weather. PMID:25002870

  3. Northern Australia

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Tropical Northern Australia     View Larger Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) images of tropical northern Australia were acquired on June 1, 2000 (Terra orbit 2413) during the long dry ...

  4. Archives Library Information Center (ALIC) Notes, 1989-1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALIC Notes, 1992

    1992-01-01

    The Archives Library Information Center (ALIC) within the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) collects printed material on archives, manuscripts, and records management. ALIC compiles a database of these materials, sources of archival services and supplies, and information on significant archival projects. "ALIC Notes" is…

  5. Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Ate There.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yee, Gordon T.

    2002-01-01

    In the book, 'Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There', Alice walks through a mirror into a mirror-image world. Assuming that she is not changed by this transition, her enzymes are still only capable of processing molecules of the handedness of her native world. So the question is, what can Alice eat in the mirror-image world that…

  6. Charge injectors of ALICE Silicon Drift Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashevsky, A.; Batigne, G.; Beole, S.; Coli, S.; Crescio, E.; Deremigis, P.; Giraudo, G.; Mazza, G.; Prino, F.; Riccati, L.; Rivetti, A.; Toscano, L.; Tosello, F.; Vacchi, A.; Wheadon, R.; Zampa, G.

    2007-03-01

    Large area, 7.25×8.76 cm2, Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) has been developed for the ALICE experiment at CERN [A. Vacchi, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 306 (1991) 187; A. Rashevsky, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 461 (2001) 133-138; A. Rashevsky, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 485 (2002) 54; P. Burger, C. Piemonte, A. Rashevsky, A. Roncastri, A. Vacchi, INFN/TC-02/07; C. Piemonte, A. Rashevsky, INFN/TC-02/08; C. Piemonte, A. Rashevsky, D. Nouais, INFN/TC-00/04. C. Piemonte, A. Rashevsky, A. Vacchi, ALICE-INT-2002-15, 2002; Inner Tracking System, CERN/LHCC, June 1999]. SDDs form two out of six cylindrical layers of the ALICE inner tracking system. The 260 high-quality SDDs needed to equip these two layers have been selected. One of the detector design elements devoted to allow controlled operating conditions is the on-board arrays of point-like charge injectors [D. Nouais, et al., CERN-ALICE-PUB-99-31; V. Bonvicini, et al., Il Nuovo Cimento 112AN (1-2) (1999) 137-146]. In the case of an SDD they are essential to trace, with the required frequency and precision, the changes in drift velocity induced by temperature variations. In order to ensure operating stability during the 10 years of the ALICE experiment the bias scheme of the charge injectors exploits the electrical properties not only of a detector itself, but also those of the cables mounted onto it, thus constituting a module. Computer simulations of the equivalent circuit revealed a significant improvement of the injection efficiency. Subsequent experimental tests of the first assembled modules confirmed the predicted performances. We report the layout of the charge injectors integrated in the ALICE SDD, as well as test results.

  7. The ALICE TPC: Status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; ALICE Experiment

    2010-06-01

    The ALICE TPC is the largest Time Projection Chamber ever built. Given the performance requirements it is also, and justifiably so, dubbed the most challenging one. In this paper we browse through the often contradictory optimization strategies and outline the solutions taken to meet the specifications. Mainly on the basis of the commissioning data taken in 2008 and 2009 we will examine to which extend the ALICE TPC came up to its performance expectations, which were outlined elsewhere [1, 14]. First results on the performance of the TPC with proton-proton collisions in December 2009 are presented.

  8. Alice, Greenfoot, and Scratch--A Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utting, Ian; Cooper, Stephen; Kolling, Michael; Maloney, John; Resnick, Mitchel

    2010-01-01

    This article distills a discussion about the goals, mechanisms, and effects of three environments which aim to support the acquisition and development of computing concepts (problem solving and programming) in pre-University and non-technical students: Alice, Greenfoot, and Scratch. The conversation started in a special session on the topic at the…

  9. The World Wide Web: Alice Meets Cyberspace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koos, Marybeth; Smith-Shank, Deborah L.

    1996-01-01

    Uses excerpts from "Alice In Wonderland" as introductions to a tour of the uses of the World Wide Web in art education. Discusses such issues as access, copyrights, costs, and benefits. Includes an index of terms, list of related Websites, and suggested teaching activities. (MJP)

  10. The ALICE experiment at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crochet, P.

    2008-12-01

    After a general introduction on the Quark Gluon Plasma and a short overview of the experimental results obtained so far with heavy-ion collisions at the SPS and at the RHIC, the physics goals of the ALICE experiment at the LHC are presented.

  11. Gender roles for Alice and Bob

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Philip

    2013-04-01

    As the head of a department that is striving to achieve bronze status under the Athena SWAN (Scientific Women's Academic Network) programme, I have become extremely sensitive to gender stereotyping, and I am afraid that the "Alice and Bob" image on the cover of your March issue on quantum frontiers set off some alarm bells.

  12. Playing around in Lewis Carroll's "Alice" Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Susina, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Mathematician Charles Dodgson's love of play and his need for rules came together in his use of popular games as part of the structure of the two famous children's books, "Alice in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking-Glass," he wrote under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. The author of this article looks at the interplay between…

  13. Strangeness detection in ALICE experiment at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Safarik, K.

    1995-07-15

    The authors present some parameters of the ALICE detector which concern the detection of strange particles. The results of a simulation for neutral strange particles and cascades, together with estimated rates are presented. They also briefly discuss the detection of charged K-mesons. Finally, they mention the possibility of open charm particle detection.

  14. The Mathematics of "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Susan B.

    2005-01-01

    The mathematician Charles Dodgson delighted in creating mathematical puzzles for his friends and students. This article describes some items that he included in "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and explores ways of helping students become aware of the mathematics in the book. (Contains 6 figures.)

  15. Geothermal development in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, K. L.; Creelman, R. A.; Buckingham, N. W.; Harrington, H. J.

    In Australia, natural hot springs and hot artesian bores have been developed for recreational and therapeutic purposes. A district heating system at Portland, in the Otway Basin of western Victoria, has provided uninterrupted service for 12 Sears without significant problems, is servicing a building area of 18 990 sq m, and has prospects of expansion to manufacturing uses. A geothermal well has provided hot water for paper manufacture at Traralgon, in the Gippsland Basin of eastern Victoria. Power production from hot water aquifers was tested at Mulka in South Australia, and is undergoing a four-year production trial at Birdsville in Queensland. An important Hot Dry Rock resource has been confirmed in the Cooper Basin. It has been proposed to build an HDR experimental facility to test power production from deep conductive resources in the Sydney Basin near Muswellbrook.

  16. Geothermal development in Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, K.L.; Creelman, R.A.; Buckingham, N.W.; Harrington, H.J. |

    1995-03-01

    In Australia, natural hot springs and hot artesian bores have been developed for recreational and therapeutic purposes. A district heating system at Portland, in the Otway Basin of western Victoria, has provided uninterrupted service for 12 Sears without significant problems, is servicing a building area of 18 990 m{sup 2}, and has prospects of expansion to manufacturing uses. A geothermal well has provided hot water for paper manufacture at Traralgon, in the Gippsland Basin of eastern Victoria. Power production from hot water aquifers was tested at Mulka in South Australia, and is undergoing a four-year production trial at Birdsville in Queensland. An important Hot Dry Rock resource has been confirmed in the Cooper Basin. It has been proposed to build an HDR experimental facility to test power production from deep conductive resources in the Sydney Basin near Muswellbrook.

  17. Alice and Bob in an expanding spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Helder; de Souza, Gustavo; Mansfield, Paul; Sampaio, Marcos

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the teleportation of a qubit between two observers Alice and Bob in an asymptotically flat Robertson-Walker expanding spacetime. We use scalar or fermionic field modes inside Alice's and Bob's ideal cavities and show the degradation of the teleportation quality, as measured by the fidelity, through a mechanism governed by spacetime expansion. This reduction is demonstrated to increase with the rapidity of the expansion and to be highly sensitive to the coupling of the field to spacetime curvature, becoming considerably stronger as it reduces from conformal to minimal. We explore a perturbative approach in the cosmological parameters to compute the Bogoliubov coefficients in order to evaluate and compare the fidelity degradation of fermionic and scalar fields.

  18. New Fast Interaction Trigger for ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk

    2017-02-01

    The LHC heavy-ion luminosity and collision rate from 2021 onwards will considerably exceed the design parameters of the present ALICE forward trigger detectors and the introduction of the Muon Forward Tracker (MFT) will significantly reduce the space available for the new trigger detectors. To comply with these conditions a new Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT) will be built. FIT will be the main forward trigger, luminometer, and interaction-time detector. It will also determine multiplicity, centrality, and reaction plane of heavy-ion collisions. FIT will consist of two arrays of Cherenkov quartz radiators with MCP-PMT sensors and of a plastic scintillator ring. By increasing the overall acceptance of FIT, the scintillator will improve centrality and event plane resolution. It will also add sensitivity for the detection of beam-gas events and provide some degree of redundancy. FIT is currently undergoing an intense R&D and prototyping period. It is scheduled for installation in ALICE during 2020.

  19. Upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Iouri

    2016-10-01

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) is built to study the properties of the strongly interacting matter created in heavy-ion collisions at the LHC. With the upgrade of its Inner Tracking System (ITS), the ALICE experiment is going to increase the rate of data taking by almost two orders of magnitude. At the same time, the precision of secondary vertex reconstruction will become by at least a factor 3 better than it currently is. In this talk, we briefly show some selected physics results motivating the upgrade of the ITS, describe the design goals and the layout of the new detector, and highlight a few important measurements that will be realized after the completion of this upgrade.

  20. Operational experience with the ALICE pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastroserio, A.

    2017-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) constitutes the two innermost layers of the Inner Tracking System of the ALICE experiment and it is the closest detector to the interaction point. As a vertex detector, it has the unique feature of generating a trigger signal that contributes to the L0 trigger of the ALICE experiment. The SPD started collecting data since the very first pp collisions at LHC in 2009 and since then it has taken part in all pp, Pb-Pb and p-Pb data taking campaigns. This contribution will present the main features of the SPD, the detector performance and the operational experience, including calibration and optimization activities from Run 1 to Run 2.

  1. The ALICE Software Release Validation cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzano, D.; Krzewicki, M.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most important steps of software lifecycle is Quality Assurance: this process comprehends both automatic tests and manual reviews, and all of them must pass successfully before the software is approved for production. Some tests, such as source code static analysis, are executed on a single dedicated service: in High Energy Physics, a full simulation and reconstruction chain on a distributed computing environment, backed with a sample “golden” dataset, is also necessary for the quality sign off. The ALICE experiment uses dedicated and virtualized computing infrastructures for the Release Validation in order not to taint the production environment (i.e. CVMFS and the Grid) with non-validated software and validation jobs: the ALICE Release Validation cluster is a disposable virtual cluster appliance based on CernVM and the Virtual Analysis Facility, capable of deploying on demand, and with a single command, a dedicated virtual HTCondor cluster with an automatically scalable number of virtual workers on any cloud supporting the standard EC2 interface. Input and output data are externally stored on EOS, and a dedicated CVMFS service is used to provide the software to be validated. We will show how the Release Validation Cluster deployment and disposal are completely transparent for the Release Manager, who simply triggers the validation from the ALICE build system's web interface. CernVM 3, based entirely on CVMFS, permits to boot any snapshot of the operating system in time: we will show how this allows us to certify each ALICE software release for an exact CernVM snapshot, addressing the problem of Long Term Data Preservation by ensuring a consistent environment for software execution and data reprocessing in the future.

  2. The Silicon Pixel Detector for ALICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fabris, D.; Bombonati, C.; Dima, R.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Pepato, A.; Bohus, L. Sajo; Scarlassara, F.; Segato, G.; Shen, D.; Turrisi, R.; Viesti, G.; Anelli, G.; Boccardi, A.; Burns, M.; Campbell, M.; Ceresa, S.; Conrad, J.; Kluge, A.; Kral, M.

    2007-10-26

    The Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE experiment is made of position sensitive detectors which have to operate in a region where the track density may be as high as 50 tracks/cm{sup 2}. To handle such densities detectors with high precision and granularity are mandatory. The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD), the innermost part of the ITS, has been designed to provide tracking information close to primary interaction point. The assembly of the entire SPD has been completed.

  3. Foward Calorimetry in ALICE at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chujo, Tatsuya; Alice Focal Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    We present an upgrade proposal for calorimetry in the forward direction, FOCAL, to measure direct photons in η = 3 . 3 - 5 . 3 in ALICE at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We suggest to use an electromagnetic calorimeter based on the novel technology of silicon sensors with W absorbers for photons, together with a conventional hadron calorimeter for jet measurements and photon isolation. The current status of the FOCAL R&D project will be presented.

  4. The Mexican Participation in the ALICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera Corral, G.; Paic, G.

    2006-09-25

    A large portion of the Mexican community of experimental high energy and nuclear physicists has joined the ALICE collaboration with the aim to contribute effectively to the design and construction of the experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. This decision has long term consequences on the development of the physics in Mexico. We will review the main features of this commitment and the results obtained so far.

  5. Performance optimisations for distributed analysis in ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betev, L.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Grigoras, C.; Hristov, P.

    2014-06-01

    Performance is a critical issue in a production system accommodating hundreds of analysis users. Compared to a local session, distributed analysis is exposed to services and network latencies, remote data access and heterogeneous computing infrastructure, creating a more complex performance and efficiency optimization matrix. During the last 2 years, ALICE analysis shifted from a fast development phase to the more mature and stable code. At the same time, the frameworks and tools for deployment, monitoring and management of large productions have evolved considerably too. The ALICE Grid production system is currently used by a fair share of organized and individual user analysis, consuming up to 30% or the available resources and ranging from fully I/O-bound analysis code to CPU intensive correlations or resonances studies. While the intrinsic analysis performance is unlikely to improve by a large factor during the LHC long shutdown (LS1), the overall efficiency of the system has still to be improved by an important factor to satisfy the analysis needs. We have instrumented all analysis jobs with "sensors" collecting comprehensive monitoring information on the job running conditions and performance in order to identify bottlenecks in the data processing flow. This data are collected by the MonALISa-based ALICE Grid monitoring system and are used to steer and improve the job submission and management policy, to identify operational problems in real time and to perform automatic corrective actions. In parallel with an upgrade of our production system we are aiming for low level improvements related to data format, data management and merging of results to allow for a better performing ALICE analysis.

  6. Upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushpil, Svetlana; ALICE Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    ALICE detector was constructed to study the properties of hot and dense hadronic matter formed in relativistic nuclear collisions. During the second long LHC shutdown in 2019-2020, the collaboration plans to upgrade the current vertex detector, the Inner Tracking System (ITS), in order to increase the reconstruction accuracy of secondary vertices and to lower the threshold of particle transverse momentum measurement. The upgrade strategy of ITS is based on the application of new Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) designed in 0.18 μm CMOS technology. The 50 μm thick chip consists of a single silicon die incorporating a 0.18 μm high-resistivity silicon epitaxial layer (sensor active volume) and matrix of charge collection diodes (pixels) with readout electronics. Radiation hardness of the upgraded ITS is one of the crucial moments in the overall performance of the system. A wide set of MAPS structures with different read-out circuits was produced and is being studied by the ALICE collaboration to optimize the pixel sensor functionality. An overview of the ALICE ITS upgrade and the expected performance improvement will be presented together with selected results from a campaign that includes several irradiation and beam tests.

  7. Moho geometry along a north-south passive seismic transect through Central Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippl, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Receiver functions from a temporary deployment of 25 broadband stations along a north-south transect through Central Australia are used to retrieve crustal and uppermost mantle structural constraints from a combination of different methods. Using H-K stacking as well as receiver function inversion, overall thick crust with significant thickness variation along the profile (40 to ≥ 55 km) is found. Bulk crustal vp/vs values are largely in the felsic to intermediate range, with the southernmost stations on the Gawler Craton exhibiting higher values in excess of 1.8. A common conversion point (CCP) stacking profile shows three major discontinuities of the crust-mantle boundary: (1) a two-sided Moho downwarp beneath the Musgrave Province, which has previously been associated with the Neoproterozoic to early Cambrian Petermann Orogeny, (2) a Moho offset along the Redbank Shear Zone further north attributed to the Middle to Late Paleozoic Alice Springs Orogeny, and (3) another Moho offset further north, located at the boundary between the Davenport and Warramunga Provinces, which has not been imaged before. In all cases, the difference in crustal thickness between the two sides of the offset is > 8-10 km. Unlike the two southern Moho offsets, the northernmost one does not coincide with a prominent gravity anomaly. Its location and the absence of known reactivation events in the region make it likely that it belongs to a Proterozoic suture zone that marks a previously unknown block boundary within the North Australian Craton.

  8. Spring Tire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asnani, Vivake M.; Benzing, Jim; Kish, Jim C.

    2011-01-01

    The spring tire is made from helical springs, requires no air or rubber, and consumes nearly zero energy. The tire design provides greater traction in sandy and/or rocky soil, can operate in microgravity and under harsh conditions (vastly varying temperatures), and is non-pneumatic. Like any tire, the spring tire is approximately a toroidal-shaped object intended to be mounted on a transportation wheel. Its basic function is also similar to a traditional tire, in that the spring tire contours to the surface on which it is driven to facilitate traction, and to reduce the transmission of vibration to the vehicle. The essential difference between other tires and the spring tire is the use of helical springs to support and/or distribute load. They are coiled wires that deform elastically under load with little energy loss.

  9. ALICE and The state of matter at LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Assembly and installation of ALICE, the LHC heavy ion experiment dedicated to the study of matter at extreme temperature and pressure, is nearing completion and the commissioning of the detector is well under way. A good time to look back, to the making of ALICE, and to look forward, to the first physics with proton and heavy ion beams.

  10. Status of the ALICE experiment at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera Corral, G.

    2008-11-13

    The Large Hadron Collider will provide soon, beams of protons and collisions at high energy to the experiments. ALICE stands for A Large Ion Collider Experiment. It is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. ALICE will be dedicated to the study of heavy ion collisions. The main goal of ALICE is the observation of the transition of ordinary matter into a plasma of quarks and gluons. ALICE consists of 16 systems of detection. Two of them were designed and constructed in Mexico: i) The V0A detector, located at 3.2 mts. from the interaction point and ii) The cosmic ray detector on the top of the magnet. After a quick review of the LHC and the ALICE experiment we will focus on the description of these systems.

  11. Southeastern Australia

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument onboard NASA's Terra satellite. The year 2002 was one of Australia's hottest and driest on record, ... These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbits 14999 and 16858. The panels cover an area ...

  12. Particle identification in ALICE: a Bayesian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Albuquerque, D. S. D.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Balasubramanian, S.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Benacek, P.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Cabala, J.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, A. S.; Gonzalez, V.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grachov, O. A.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamon, J. C.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Hellbär, E.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Horak, D.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacazio, N.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovska, S.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Mohisin Khan, M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Klewin, S.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kostarakis, P.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, S.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Lehas, F.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Lutz, T. H.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Mcdonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Munzer, R. H.; Murakami, H.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Naik, B.; Nair, R.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Natal da Luz, H.; Nattrass, C.; Navarro, S. R.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, R.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Oravec, M.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, D.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pimentel, L. O. D. L.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Rami, F.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Saarinen, S.; Sadhu, S.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sarkar, D.; Sarkar, N.; Sarma, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Šefčík, M.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Senyukov, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shahzad, M. I.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Sheikh, A. I.; Shigaki, K.; Shou, Q.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Souza, R. D. de; Sozzi, F.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stankus, P.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Suljic, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Tabassam, U.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thakur, D.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trombetta, G.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Villatoro Tello, A.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Weiser, D. F.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Whitehead, A. M.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yasin, Z.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J. H.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a Bayesian approach to particle identification (PID) within the ALICE experiment. The aim is to more effectively combine the particle identification capabilities of its various detectors. After a brief explanation of the adopted methodology and formalism, the performance of the Bayesian PID approach for charged pions, kaons and protons in the central barrel of ALICE is studied. PID is performed via measurements of specific energy loss ( d E/d x) and time of flight. PID efficiencies and misidentification probabilities are extracted and compared with Monte Carlo simulations using high-purity samples of identified particles in the decay channels K0S → π-π+, φ→ K-K+, and Λ→ p π- in p-Pb collisions at √{s_{NN}}=5.02 TeV. In order to thoroughly assess the validity of the Bayesian approach, this methodology was used to obtain corrected pT spectra of pions, kaons, protons, and D0 mesons in pp collisions at √{s}=7 TeV. In all cases, the results using Bayesian PID were found to be consistent with previous measurements performed by ALICE using a standard PID approach. For the measurement of D0 → K-π+, it was found that a Bayesian PID approach gave a higher signal-to-background ratio and a similar or larger statistical significance when compared with standard PID selections, despite a reduced identification efficiency. Finally, we present an exploratory study of the measurement of Λc+ → p K-π+ in pp collisions at √{s}=7 TeV, using the Bayesian approach for the identification of its decay products.

  13. Phoenix Robotic Arm connects with `Alice'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm comes into contact with a rock informally named 'Alice' near the 'Snow White' trench.

    This image was acquired by Phoenix's NASA's Surface Stereo Imager on July 13 during the 48th Martian day, or sol, since Phoenix landed.

    For scale, the width of the scoop at the end of the arm is about 8.5 centimeters (3.3 inches).

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Readout of the upgraded ALICE-ITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepankiewicz, A.

    2016-07-01

    The ALICE experiment will undergo a major upgrade during the second long shutdown of the CERN LHC. As part of this program, the present Inner Tracking System (ITS), which employs different layers of hybrid pixels, silicon drift and strip detectors, will be replaced by a completely new tracker composed of seven layers of monolithic active pixel sensors. The upgraded ITS will have more than twelve billion pixels in total, producing 300 Gbit/s of data when tracking 50 kHz Pb-Pb events. Two families of pixel chips realized with the TowerJazz CMOS imaging process have been developed as candidate sensors: the ALPIDE, which uses a proprietary readout and sparsification mechanism and the MISTRAL-O, based on a proven rolling shutter architecture. Both chips can operate in continuous mode, with the ALPIDE also supporting triggered operations. As the communication IP blocks are shared among the two chip families, it has been possible to develop a common Readout Electronics. All the sensor components (analog stages, state machines, buffers, FIFOs, etc.) have been modelled in a system level simulation, which has been extensively used to optimize both the sensor and the whole readout chain design in an iterative process. This contribution covers the progress of the R&D efforts and the overall expected performance of the ALICE-ITS readout system.

  15. The ALICE Glance Shift Accounting Management System (SAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins Silva, H.; Abreu Da Silva, I.; Ronchetti, F.; Telesca, A.; Maidantchik, C.

    2015-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is an experiment at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider) studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma. The experiment operation requires a 24 hours a day and 7 days a week shift crew at the experimental site, composed by the ALICE collaboration members. Shift duties are calculated for each institute according to their correlated members. In order to ensure the full coverage of the experiment operation as well as its good quality, the ALICE Shift Accounting Management System (SAMS) is used to manage the shift bookings as well as the needed training. ALICE SAMS is the result of a joint effort between the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) and the ALICE Collaboration. The Glance technology, developed by the UFRJ and the ATLAS experiment, sits at the basis of the system as an intermediate layer isolating the particularities of the databases. In this paper, we describe the ALICE SAMS development process and functionalities. The database has been modelled according to the collaboration needs and is fully integrated with the ALICE Collaboration repository to access members information and respectively roles and activities. Run, period and training coordinators can manage their subsystem operation and ensure an efficient personnel management. Members of the ALICE collaboration can book shifts and on-call according to pre-defined rights. ALICE SAMS features a user profile containing all the statistics and user contact information as well as the Institutes profile. Both the user and institute profiles are public (within the scope of the collaboration) and show the credit balance in real time. A shift calendar allows the Run Coordinator to plan data taking periods in terms of which subsystems shifts are enabled or disabled and on-call responsible people and slots. An overview display presents the shift crew present in the control room and allows the Run Coordination team to confirm the presence

  16. ALICE Diffractive Detector Control System for RUN-II in the ALICE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanillas, J. C.; Martínez, M. I.; León, I.

    2016-10-01

    The ALICE Diffractive (AD0) detector has been installed and commissioned for the second phase of operation (RUN-II). With this new detector it is possible to achieve better measurements by expanding the range of pseudo-rapidity in which the production of particles can be detected. Specifically the selection of diffractive events in the ALICE experiment which was limited by the range over which rapidity gaps occur. Any new detector should be able to take data synchronously with all other detectors and to be operated through the ALICE central systems. One of the key elements developed for the AD0 detector is the Detector Control System (DCS). The DCS is designed to operate safely and correctly this detector. Furthermore, the DCS must also provide optimum operating conditions for the acquisition and storage of physics data and ensure these are of the highest quality. The operation of AD0 implies the configuration of about 200 parameters, as electronics settings and power supply levels and the generation of safety alerts. It also includes the automation of procedures to get the AD0 detector ready for taking data in the appropriate conditions for the different run types in ALICE. The performance of AD0 detector depends on a certain number of parameters such as the nominal voltages for each photomultiplier tube (PMT), the threshold levels to accept or reject the incoming pulses, the definition of triggers, etc. All these parameters affect the efficiency of AD0 and they have to be monitored and controlled by the AD0 DCS.

  17. Upgrade of the ALICE inner tracking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossegger, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    The Inner Tracking System (ITS) is the key ALICE detector for the study of heavy flavor production at LHC. Heavy flavor can be studied via the identification of short-lived hadrons containing heavy quarks which have a mean proper decay length in the order of 100-300 μm. To accomplish this task, the ITS is composed of six cylindrical layers of silicon detectors (two pixel, two drift and two strip) with a radial coverage from 3.9 to 43 cm and an average material budget of 1.1% X0 per layer. In order to enhance the ALICE physics capabilities, and, in particular, the tracking performance for heavy-flavor detection, the possibility of an ITS upgrade has been studied in great detail. It will make use of the spectacular progress made in the field of imaging sensors over the last 10 years as well as the possibility to install a smaller radius beampipe. The upgraded detector will have greatly improved features in terms of the impact parameter resolution, standalone tracking efficiency at low pt, momentum resolution and readout capabilities. The usage of the most recent monolithic and/or hybrid pixel detector technologies allows the improvement of the detector material budget and the intrinsic spatial resolution both by a factor of three with respect to the present ITS. The installation of a smaller beam-pipe reduces the distance between the first detector layer and the interaction vertex. Under these assumptions, simulations show that an overall improvement of the impact parameter resolution by a factor of three is possible. The Conceptual Design Report for the Upgrade of the ALICE ITS, which covers the design and performance requirements, the upgrade options, as well as the necessary R&D efforts, was made public in September 2012. An intensive R&D program has been launched to review the different technological options under consideration. The new detector should be ready to be installed during the long LHC shutdown period scheduled in 2017-2018.

  18. Jet measurements by ALICE at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Sultanov, Rishat; Collaboration: ALICE Collaboration

    2015-12-15

    Jets are collimated sprays of particles originating from fragmentation of high energy partons produced in a hard collision. They are an important diagnostic tool in studies of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). The modification of the jet fragmentation pattern and its structure is a signature for the influence of hot and dense matter on the parton fragmentation process. Jet measurements in proton-proton collisions provide a baseline for similar measurements in heavy-ion collisions, while studies in proton-nucleus system allow to estimate cold nuclear matter effects. Here we present jet studies in different colliding systems (p–p, p–Pb, Pb–Pb) performed by the ALICE collaboration at LHC energies. Results on jet spectra, cross sections, nuclear modification factors, jet structure and other kinematic observables will be presented.

  19. Strangeness in ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, Francesca; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Strangeness production has been measured by the ALICE experiment in different collision systems at the unprecedented center-of-mass energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. In Pb–Pb collisions at TeV the relative production of strange and multi-strange baryons relative to pions is observed to follow a saturating trend with increasing centrality, and reaching values that are consistent with those predicted by thermal model calculations in the Grand-Canonical ensemble. More recently, the multiplicity dependence of strangeness production in small systems such as pp and p–Pb has also been investigated. An overview of the most recent results on strangeness production is reported, including the first observation of strangeness enhancement with charged particle multiplicity in pp collisions.

  20. Health promotion in Australian multi-disciplinary primary health care services: case studies from South Australia and the Northern Territory.

    PubMed

    Baum, Fran; Freeman, Toby; Jolley, Gwyn; Lawless, Angela; Bentley, Michael; Värttö, Kaisu; Boffa, John; Labonte, Ronald; Sanders, David

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports on the health promotion and disease prevention conducted at Australian multi-disciplinary primary health care (PHC) services and considers the ways in which the organizational environment affects the extent and type of health promotion and disease prevention activity. The study involves five PHC services in Adelaide and one in Alice Springs. Four are managed by a state health department and two by boards of governance. The study is based on an audit of activities and on 68 interviews conducted with staff. All the sites undertake health promotion and recognize its importance but all report that this activity is under constant pressure resulting from the need to provide services to people who have health problems. We also found an increased focus on chronic disease management and prevention which prioritized individuals and behavioural change strategies rather than addressing social determinants affecting whole communities. There was little health promotion work that reflected a salutogenic approach to the creation of health. Most activity falls under three types: parenting and child development, chronic disease prevention and mental health. Only the non-government organizations reported advocacy on broader policy issues. Health reform and consequent reorganizations were seen to reduce the ability of some services to undertake health promotion. The paper concludes that PHC in Australia plays an important role in disease prevention, but that there is considerable scope to increase the amount of community-based health promotion which focuses on a salutogenic view of health and which engages in community partnerships.

  1. Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Ate There

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Gordon T.

    2002-05-01

    In the book Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There by Lewis Carroll, Alice (of Alice-in-Wonderland fame) walks through a mirror into a mirror-image world. Assuming that she is not changed by this transition, her enzymes are still only capable of processing molecules of the handedness of her native world. In short, she has a problem that will severely curtail the duration of her stay because her body cannot make use of most of the calorie-containing molecules that would exist naturally in the mirror-image world. So the question is, what can Alice eat in the mirror-image world that provides nutritional value to her?

    Featured on the Cover

  2. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of mafic-ultramafic suites of the Irindina Province, Northern Territory, Australia: Implications for the Neoproterozoic to Devonian evolution of central Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Madeline L.; Jowitt, Simon M.; Saleem, Ahmad

    2015-10-01

    voluminous magmatic event within the study area. Suite A samples are more alkaline and cannot be correlated with any known magmatic events; however, they probably represent an unidentified alkaline phase of the Kalkarindji LIP event derived from a deep mantle source region. This suite is similar to the more widespread Kalkarindji and Suite B/Stanovos magmas in that these magmas assimilated arc material (i.e., Suite D) prior to emplacement. The last magmatic event occurred during the exhumation and inversion of the Irindina basin during the 450-300 Ma Alice Springs Orogeny, resulting in the formation of melts derived from a deep mantle source. These melts subsequently became contaminated en route to emplacement as the ~ 409 Ma Suite C Lloyd Gabbro.

  3. External access to ALICE controls conditions data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadlovský, J.; Jadlovská, A.; Sarnovský, J.; Jajčišin, Š.; Čopík, M.; Jadlovská, S.; Papcun, P.; Bielek, R.; Čerkala, J.; Kopčík, M.; Chochula, P.; Augustinus, A.

    2014-06-01

    ALICE Controls data produced by commercial SCADA system WINCCOA is stored in ORACLE database on the private experiment network. The SCADA system allows for basic access and processing of the historical data. More advanced analysis requires tools like ROOT and needs therefore a separate access method to the archives. The present scenario expects that detector experts create simple WINCCOA scripts, which retrieves and stores data in a form usable for further studies. This relatively simple procedure generates a lot of administrative overhead - users have to request the data, experts needed to run the script, the results have to be exported outside of the experiment network. The new mechanism profits from database replica, which is running on the CERN campus network. Access to this database is not restricted and there is no risk of generating a heavy load affecting the operation of the experiment. The developed tools presented in this paper allow for access to this data. The users can use web-based tools to generate the requests, consisting of the data identifiers and period of time of interest. The administrators maintain full control over the data - an authorization and authentication mechanism helps to assign privileges to selected users and restrict access to certain groups of data. Advanced caching mechanism allows the user to profit from the presence of already processed data sets. This feature significantly reduces the time required for debugging as the retrieval of raw data can last tens of minutes. A highly configurable client allows for information retrieval bypassing the interactive interface. This method is for example used by ALICE Offline to extract operational conditions after a run is completed. Last but not least, the software can be easily adopted to any underlying database structure and is therefore not limited to WINCCOA.

  4. Upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedler, P.

    2016-12-01

    During the long shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2019-20 (LS2) the present Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE experiment based on silicon pixel, silicon drift and silicon strip detectors, will be entirely replaced by a new tracker using novel monolithic silicon pixel chips. This new tracker will significantly enhance heavy flavour measurements, which are out of reach for the present system, e.g. charmed baryons, such as the ΛC, and will allow studying hadrons containing a beauty quark. The new tracker will provide an improved pointing resolution in rϕ and z, decreasing the present values by a factor 3 and 5, respectively, to about 40 μm for a pT of 500 MeV/c. Each of the seven layers will be constructed using 50 μm, respectively 100 μm thin silicon chips on a very light weight carbon fibre based support structure for the innermost and the outer layers. The material budget for the first three layers corresponds to 0.3% X0/layer while the four outer layers will have an average material budget of 1% X0/layer. The innermost layer will be placed at 23 mm radius, compared to presently 39 mm. Furthermore, the readout rate of the new ITS will increase from presently 1 kHz to 50 kHz for Pb-Pb collisions and 400 kHz for p-p collisions, thus matching the expected event rate for Pb-Pb collisions after LS2. This contribution will provide an overview of the upgrade of the ALICE ITS and the expected performance improvement and will present the actual status of the R&D.

  5. The ALICE DAQ infoLogger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeland, S.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Dénes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Grigore, A.; Ionita, C.; Delort, C.; Simonetti, G.; Soós, C.; Telesca, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Von Haller, B.; Alice Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a heavy-ion experiment studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The ALICE DAQ (Data Acquisition System) is based on a large farm of commodity hardware consisting of more than 600 devices (Linux PCs, storage, network switches). The DAQ reads the data transferred from the detectors through 500 dedicated optical links at an aggregated and sustained rate of up to 10 Gigabytes per second and stores at up to 2.5 Gigabytes per second. The infoLogger is the log system which collects centrally the messages issued by the thousands of processes running on the DAQ machines. It allows to report errors on the fly, and to keep a trace of runtime execution for later investigation. More than 500000 messages are stored every day in a MySQL database, in a structured table keeping track for each message of 16 indexing fields (e.g. time, host, user, ...). The total amount of logs for 2012 exceeds 75GB of data and 150 million rows. We present in this paper the architecture and implementation of this distributed logging system, consisting of a client programming API, local data collector processes, a central server, and interactive human interfaces. We review the operational experience during the 2012 run, in particular the actions taken to ensure shifters receive manageable and relevant content from the main log stream. Finally, we present the performance of this log system, and future evolutions.

  6. "Alice in Wonderland syndrome" associated with topiramate for migraine prevention.

    PubMed

    Jürgens, T P; Ihle, K; Stork, J-H; May, A

    2011-02-01

    Various visual and sensory phenomena have been described in migraine with aura. Among those, the 'Alice in Wonderland' syndrome is defined as a distortion of the body image with the patient being aware of its unreal nature. Here, the case of a 17-year-old girl with migraine without aura who developed an 'Alice in Wonderland' syndrome repeatedly on topiramate treatment was presented and potential pathophysiological concepts were discussed.

  7. The ALICE Experiment at the LHC and the Mexican Contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera Corral, G.

    2007-06-19

    The final installation of the detectors that form ALICE has started on year 2005. The first device of ALICE that was completed and set up to work was the Cosmic Ray Detector. The V0A detector will be installed and commissioned on the summer of 2007. These two detectors were designed and built in Mexico. Here we give a very general description of these two devices.

  8. Alice, Benzene, and Coffee: The ABCs of Ecopharmacognosy.

    PubMed

    Cordell, Geoffrey A

    2015-12-01

    The sesquicentennial celebrations of the publication of "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and the structure of benzene offer a unique opportunity to develop a contemporary interpretation of aspects of Alice's adventures, illuminate the symbolism of benzene, and contextualize both with the globalization of coffee, transitioning to how the philosophy and sustainable practices of ecopharmacognosy may be applied to modulating approaches to the quality, safety, efficacy, and consistency (QSEC) of traditional medicines and dietary supplements through technology integration, thereby improving patient-centered health care.

  9. Southern Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    South-central Australia is home to several deserts, including the Simpson Desert, whose reddish-orange sands are seen in the upper left quadrant of this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from July 1, 2002. Several impermanent, salty, lakes stand whitely out against the arid terrain. The largest is North Lake Eyre, southwest of center. At bottom center, Spencer Gulf separates the triangular Eyre Peninsula from the Yorke Peninsula. The Gulf of St. Vincent separates Yorke Peninsula from the mainland. In Spencer Gulf, colorful blue-green swirls indicate the presence of a bloom of marine plants called phytoplankton, whose brightly colored photosynthetic pigments stain the water. Water quality in the Gulf is an ongoing problem for Australia, as irrigation projects have diverted the already small flow of freshwater that empties into the Gulf. Other problems include contamination with pesticides and agricultural and residential fertilizer. On both the Eyre Peninsula and in the Victoria Territory to the east of Spencer Gulf, dark-colored rectangles show the boundaries of parks and nature preserves where the natural, drought-tolerant vegetation thrives.

  10. Blind quantum computation protocol in which Alice only makes measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2013-05-01

    Blind quantum computation is a new secure quantum computing protocol which enables Alice (who does not have sufficient quantum technology) to delegate her quantum computation to Bob (who has a full-fledged quantum computer) in such a way that Bob cannot learn anything about Alice's input, output, and algorithm. In previous protocols, Alice needs to have a device which generates quantum states, such as single-photon states. Here we propose another type of blind computing protocol where Alice does only measurements, such as the polarization measurements with a threshold detector. In several experimental setups, such as optical systems, the measurement of a state is much easier than the generation of a single-qubit state. Therefore our protocols ease Alice's burden. Furthermore, the security of our protocol is based on the no-signaling principle, which is more fundamental than quantum physics. Finally, our protocols are device independent in the sense that Alice does not need to trust her measurement device in order to guarantee the security.

  11. Quantum Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chao-Jun; Li, Xin-Zhou

    In this paper, we will give a short review on quantum spring, which is a Casimir effect from the helix boundary condition that proposed in our earlier works. The Casimir force parallel to the axis of the helix behaves very much like the force on a spring that obeys the Hooke's law when the ratio r of the pitch to the circumference of the helix is small, but in this case, the force comes from a quantum effect, so we would like to call it quantum spring. On the other hand, the force perpendicular to the axis decreases monotonously with the increasing of the ratio r. Both forces are attractive and their behaviors are the same in two and three dimensions.

  12. Spring Defrosting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    12 May 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows defrosting south high latitude dunes. In late winter and into the spring season, dark spots commonly form on dunes and other surfaces as seasonal carbon dioxide begins to sublime away.

    Location near: 59.3oS, 343.3oW Image width: 2 km (1.2 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  13. Thermal history and differential exhumation across the Eastern Musgrave Province, South Australia: Insights from low-temperature thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glorie, Stijn; Agostino, Kate; Dutch, Rian; Pawley, Mark; Hall, James; Danišík, Martin; Evans, Noreen J.; Collins, Alan S.

    2017-04-01

    Multi-method geo- and thermochronological data obtained for Palaeo- and Mesoproterozoic granitoids traversing the main structural architecture of the eastern Musgrave Province within South Australia reveal multiphase cooling histories. Apatite U-Pb dating on six samples yield consistent ages of 1075-1025 Ma, suggesting a thermal reset coinciding with mantle-derived magmatism of the greater Warakurna Large Igneous Province ( 1080-1040 Ma). Apatite fission track (AFT) analysis indicate that four discrete thermal events affected the study area, inducing cooling through the AFT partial annealing zone ( 60-120 °C), supported by apatite and zircon (U-Th-Sm)/He data. Late Neoproterozoic cooling from deep crustal levels to temperatures < 200 °C was discerned, which is thought to be related to exhumation and denudation during the Petermann Orogeny. Subsequent cooling events at 450-400 Ma (Silurian-Devonian) and 310-290 Ma (Late Carboniferous) are interpreted to represent exhumation associated with the Alice Springs Orogeny. The latter event exhumed the sampled plutons to shallow crustal depths. An additional Triassic - early Jurassic thermal event, likely recording elevated geothermal gradients at that time, was observed throughout the study area, however, more data is needed to further support this interpretation. The high sample density across the structural architecture of the study area furthermore reveals patterns of fault reactivation and resulting differential exhumation, indicating shallower exhumation levels in the centre and deeper exhumation towards the margins of the sampled transect. The observed differential exhumation patterns match with existing seismic data and fit a model of an inverted graben system for the Phanerozoic evolution of the eastern Musgraves. The results highlight a complex Phanerozoic thermal history for the eastern Musgraves and help to elucidate the poorly appreciated tectonic evolution of inland Australia. This study further demonstrates

  14. Upgrade of the ALICE muon trigger electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupieux, P.; Joly, B.; Jouve, F.; Manen, S.; Vandaële, R.

    2014-09-01

    The ALICE muon trigger is a large scale detector based on single gap bakelite RPCs. An upgrade of the electronics is needed in order to withstand the increase of luminosity after the LHC Long Shutdown-2 in 2018-2019. The detector will be read out at the minimum bias rate of 100 kHz in Pb-Pb collisions (including a safety factor of 2), two orders of magnitude above the present design. For the most exposed RPCs and in the present conditions of operation, the total integrated charge could be as high as 100 mC/cm2 with rates up to 100 Hz/cm2, which is above the present limit for safe operation. In order to overcome these limitations, upgrade projects of the Front-End (FE) and Readout Electronics are scheduled. The readout upgrade at high rate with low dead time requires changing most of the present electronics. It involves a new design for the 234 Local cards receiving the LVDS signals from the FE electronics and the 16 Regional concentrator cards. The readout chain is completed by a single Common Readout Unit developed for most ALICE sub-detectors. The new architecture of the muon trigger readout will be briefly presented. The present FE electronics, designed for the streamer mode, must be replaced to prevent ageing of the RPCs in the future operating conditions. The new FE called FEERIC (for Front-End Electronics Rapid Integrated Circuit) will have to perform amplification of the analog input signals. This will allow for RPC operation in a low-gain avalanche mode, with a much smaller charge deposit (factor 3-5) in the detector as compared to the present conditions. The purpose is to discriminate RPC signals with a charge threshold around 100 fC, in both polarities, and with a time jitter below 1 ns. We will describe the FE card and FEERIC ASIC features and first prototype performance, report on test results obtained on a cosmic test bench and discuss ongoing developments.

  15. Palaeomagnetic results from the Palaeozoic basement of the southern Drummond Basin, central Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Kari L.; Lackie, Mark A.; Clark, David A.

    2004-11-01

    Palaeomagnetic results from the Theresa Creek Volcanics and the Middle Devonian (~380 Ma) Retreat Batholith, located in the southern Drummond Basin, central Queensland, Australia, reveal up to three components of magnetization. Component 1 is characteristically of reversed polarity with a mean palaeopole at 64.0°S, 79.7°E (N= 7, A95= 11.5°), possibly reflecting a remagnetization event associated with the Middle Carboniferous Alice Springs Orogeny, is found in both units. A shallow to very shallow roughly north-south direction, Component 2, was isolated in seven sites, predominantly within the Retreat Batholith, D= 345.8°, I=-6.7° (α95= 10.1°, k= 36.8). The corresponding palaeomagnetic pole lies at 66.0°S, 290.7°E (A95= 9.1°). This pole is consistent with the Middle Devonian segment of Australia's apparent polar wander path (APWP) and is thought to reflect a primary magnetization related to the emplacement and cooling of the batholith. Component 3 is found exclusively within the Theresa Creek Volcanics and is characterized by east-west directions with moderate to steep inclinations, D= 62.4°, I= 59.5° (α95= 10.5°, k= 25.0). A consistent set of site level virtual geomagnetic pole (VGPs) yield a palaeopole at 4.1°N, 188.9°E (N= 9, A95= 14.0°). The presumed Middle Devonian age for the volcanics is at odds with this direction, with respect to the Australian Early to Middle Palaeozoic APWP, suggesting the characteristic direction found in the volcanics reflects an Ordovician or possibly Early Silurian magnetization age. A pre-Middle Devonian magnetization age for the Theresa Creek Volcanics is supported by a positive contact test between the volcanics and the hornfelsing Retreat Batholith as both units are characterized by stable magnetizations whose palaeopoles are dissimilar from each other and younger segments of Australia's APWP.

  16. The Anatomy of A.L.I.C.E.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Richard S.

    This paper is a technical presentation of Artificial Linguistic Internet Computer Entity (A.L.I.C.E.) and Artificial Intelligence Markup Language (AIML), set in context by historical and philosophical ruminations on human consciousness. A.L.I.C.E., the first AIML-based personality program, won the Loebner Prize as "the most human computer" at the annual Turing Test contests in 2000, 2001, and 2004. The program, and the organization that develops it, is a product of the world of free software. More than 500 volunteers from around the world have contributed to her development. This paper describes the history of A.L.I.C.E. and AIML-free software since 1995, noting that the theme and strategy of deception and pretense upon which AIML is based can be traced through the history of Artificial Intelligence research. This paper goes on to show how to use AIML to create robot personalities like A.L.I.C.E. that pretend to be intelligent and selfaware. The paper winds up with a survey of some of the philosophical literature on the question of consciousness. We consider Searle's Chinese Room, and the view that natural language understanding by a computer is impossible. We note that the proposition "consciousness is an illusion" may be undermined by the paradoxes it apparently implies. We conclude that A.L.I.C.E. does pass the Turing Test, at least, to paraphrase Abraham Lincoln, for some of the people some of the time.

  17. Neutral meson production measurements with the ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganoti, Paraskevi

    2017-03-01

    Identified hadron spectra are considered to be sensitive to the transport properties of strongly interacting matter produced in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. π0 and η mesons in ALICE are identified via their two-photon decays by using calorimeters and the central tracking system. In the latter, photons are measured via their conversion to electron-positron pairs in the material of the inner ALICE barrel tracking detectors. The measured production spectra in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at mid-rapidity and over a wide pT range will be presented in the available Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies of Run I. The resulting nuclear modification factor RAA at different centrality classes shows a clear pattern of strong suppression in the hot QCD medium with respect to pp collisions. Comparison of the ALICE results on neutral mesons with lower-energy experiments is also discussed.

  18. Fluid induced microstructures in granulites from the Reynolds Range, central Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prent, Alexander; Beinlich, Andreas; Raimondo, Tom; Putnis, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Fluids play a major role in the evolution of the Earth's crust, driving metamorphic reactions, facilitating transport of mass and heat, and changing the physical properties of rock. Shear zones present in intraplate orogens are ideal natural laboratories to study the relationship of fluid-driven rock weakening to deformation, and thus the impact of fluid availability on the tectonic reworking of continental interiors. Here we present preliminary observations from the Aileron Shear Zone (ASZ), Reynolds Range, central Australia, a major crustal-scale thrust of the Palaeozoic Alice Springs Orogen (ASO). This study focuses on the effects of fluids on the mineralogy and mineral chemistry of deep crustal rocks collected from a transect running through the ASZ. The ASZ is thought to have been of major importance during exhumation of the ASO, and exhumes a partly retrogressed suite of felsic and metasedimentary granulite facies gneisses. Hydration reactions associated with retrogression resulted in the partial replacement of orthopyroxene and numerous myrmekite textures associated with plagioclase and mica. In undeformed samples, orthopyroxene (En56 Fer44) rims are partly replaced by a zoned sequence of biotite (Phl70 Ann30), sub-parallel rims of magnetite, biotite and K-feldspar (Or87). Deformed samples gradually show an increase in dynamic recrystallization of quartz, with fully recrystallized bands of foam texture quartz defining the foliation together with biotite. Quartz and minor biotite replacement then dominates the mineral assemblage with increasing strain. The presence of fluid-driven mineral replacement reactions in undeformed samples suggests that hydration predates shearing and exhumation, and furthermore, that strain may have been localised in areas of intense hydration and rock weakening. Retrograde reactions and myrmekite textures suggest the availability of a silica-saturated fluid. Additional mass-balance calculations will be applied to constrain the

  19. Far-UV Eclipse Observations of Ganymede's Atmosphere with New Horizons Alice: New Constraints to the Atomic Oxygen Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retherford, K. D.; Steffl, A. J.; Spencer, J. R.; Gladstone, R.; Roth, L.; Saur, J.; Strobel, D. F.; Stern, S. A.; Parker, J. W.; Versteeg, M. H.; Davis, M. W.; Cunningham, N. J.; McGrath, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Ganymede's atmosphere is a surface-bounded-exosphere composed mainly of molecular oxygen. The bulk density of the O2 atmosphere is inferred from the diagnostic ratio between far-UV auroral emission line brightnesses observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), but this measurement is relatively uncertain owing to a lack of information available for the energies of the electrons in Ganymede's magnetosphere that dissociatively excite the OI 130.4 nm and 135.6 nm emissions. Only a few other species such as H have been detected, and the abundance of atomic oxygen has been constrained only in relation to lower limits for the O2 density based on the line ratios. The New Horizons (NH) spacecraft observed Ganymede with the Pluto-Alice (P-Alice) instrument during the Jupiter flyby in spring of 2007. HST Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) far-UV images of Ganymede complement the P-Alice far-UV spectroscopy at this time. OI 130.4 nm and 135.6 nm emissions were detected in both data sets. The ACS Ganymede images are consistent with previous Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) imaging. P-Alice observed two Ganymede eclipse events, viewing the sunlit sub-Jupiter and nightside anti-Jupiter hemispheres, separately, from before ingress through after egress. Through comparisons of the P-Alice spectra in sunlight to those in eclipse we are able to disentangle the component of the OI 130.4 nm emission line brightness attributed to processes other than electron impact dissociation of O2, namely a combination of solar reflectance and solar resonant scattering by atomic oxygen atoms. The CII 133.5 nm solar emission feature in the sunlit hemisphere dataset also disappears in eclipse and was not detected in the nightside hemisphere spectra, as expected, providing distinct fits to the solar reflectance component. We thereby provide the first meaningful constraint on the atomic oxygen atmosphere revealed through the solar resonant scattering emission source. We briefly discuss the

  20. Prototype readout electronics for the upgraded ALICE Inner Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sielewicz, K. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Bonora, M.; Ferencei, J.; Giubilato, P.; Rossewij, M. J.; Schambach, J.; Vanat, T.

    2017-01-01

    The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major upgrade to the experimental apparatus. A key element of the upgrade is the construction of a new silicon-based Inner Tracking System containing 12 Gpixels in an area of 10 m2. Its readout system consists of 192 readout units that control the pixel sensors and the power units, and deliver the sensor data to the counting room. A prototype readout board has been designed to test: the interface between the sensor modules and the readout electronics, the signal integrity and reliability of data transfer, the interface to the ALICE DAQ and trigger, and the susceptibility of the system to the expected radiation level.

  1. Intraplate deformation on north-dipping basement structures in the Northern Gawler Craton, Australia: reactivation of original terrane boundaries or later intra-cratonic thrusts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baines, G.; Giles, D.; Betts, P. G.; Backé, G.

    2007-12-01

    Multiple intraplate orogenic events have deformed Neoproterozoic to Carboniferous sedimentary sequences that cover the Archean to Mesoproterozoic basement of the northern Gawler Craton, Australia. These intraplate orogenies reactivated north-dipping basement penetrating faults that are imaged on seismic reflection profiles. These north-dipping structures pre-date Neoproterozoic deposition but their relationships to significant linear magnetic and gravity anomalies that delineate unexposed Archean to Early Mesoproterozoic basement terranes are unclear. The north-dipping structures are either terrane boundaries that formed during continental amalgamation or later faults, which formed during a mid- to late-Mesoproterozoic transpressional orogeny and cross-cut the original lithological terrane boundaries. We model magnetic and gravity data to determine the 3D structure of the unexposed basement of the northern Gawler Craton. These models are constrained by drill hole and surface observations, seismic reflection profiles and petrophysical data, such that geologically reasonable models that can satisfy the data are limited. The basement structures revealed by this modelling approach constrain the origin and significance of the north-dipping structures that were active during the later intraplate Petermann, Delamerian and Alice Springs Orogenies. These results have bearing on which structures are likely to be active during present-day intraplate deformation in other areas, including, for example, current seismic activity along similar basement structures in the Adelaide "Geosyncline".

  2. Spring Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    22 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dunes in the north polar region of Mars. In this scene, the dunes, and the plain on which the dunes reside, are at least in part covered by a bright carbon dioxide frost. Dark spots indicate areas where the frost has begun to change, either by subliming away to expose dark sand, changing to a coarser particle size, or both. The winds responsible for the formation of these dunes blew from the lower left (southwest) toward the upper right (northeast).

    Location near: 76.3oN, 261.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  3. Alice Freeman Palmer: The Evolution of a New Woman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordin, Ruth

    This book presents a biographical account of the life of Alice Freeman Palmer (1855-1902) who is credited with expanding academic horizons for women in the United States during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It tells of the obstacles she confronted as she chose both marriage and a professional career as well as illuminates this…

  4. Detail view of the Alice Paul Bedroom door lock and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the Alice Paul Bedroom door lock and escutcheon, and dead bolt lock above, looking from the east at the inside of the (closed) door, with scale - Sewall-Belmont House, 144 Constitution Avenue, Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  5. Close view of the Alice Paul Bedroom door, looking from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close view of the Alice Paul Bedroom door, looking from the east at the dead bolt lock and escutcheon on the inside of the (closed) door, with scale - Sewall-Belmont House, 144 Constitution Avenue, Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  6. Alice Moore and the Kanawha County Textbook Controversy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincheloe, Joe

    1980-01-01

    The author considers the 1974 Kanawha County textbook censorship controversy as an attempt by fundamentalist parents to banish "alien" moral influences from the schools and to strengthen community control over learning. He focuses on the role and views of school board member Alice Moore, a leading spokesperson of the fundamentalists.…

  7. Alice in Numberland: Through the Standards in Wonderland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Donna; Lambe, Karen; Payson, Christine; Carnevale, Patricia; Scarpelli, Debra

    2008-01-01

    A whimsical mathematics event for children and adults, derived from Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, was held at the Providence Children's Museum in Rhode Island. NCTM's Standards were the basis of all the activities. (Contains 10 figures and 1 table.)

  8. Educating the Imagination: An Interview with Alice Notley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrigan, Anselm

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Alice Notley about her experience of writing the epic poem "The Descent of Alette." Notes that Notley set herself the task of not only engaging the epic tradition, but changing it at the same time by creating a female protagonist. Discusses how epic poems are stories of cultural consolidation. (PM)

  9. Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions: Alice H. Eagly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Alice H. Eagly, winner of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions, is cited for her work in the field of social psychology, the psychology of gender, and the use of meta-analytic techniques. She envisions a psychology that extends from individual cognitions to societal structures. In addition to the citation, a biography and selected…

  10. Alice Walker's Politics or the Politics of "The Color Purple."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Cynthia

    1988-01-01

    Alice Walker's "The Color Purple" portrays Black women's oppression as the result of patriarchy, and proposes the acceptance of middle-class values--home ownership and entrepreneurship--as the solution to exploitation. She relies on stereotypes to characterize Black men and women, and depicts an ideology of submission. (BJV)

  11. Helical spring holder assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Wyatt S. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A helically-threaded spring holder on which a helically wound spring is mounted has a groove formed in one side of the thread at the end where the spring engages the spring holder. The groove relieves the portion of the side in which it is formed from restricting the spring against axial movement during deflection of the spring. The circumferential length of this groove is chosen to establish the number of spring coils which can be deflected without contacting the side of the thread. The end of the thread is also made rigid to prevent flexing thereof during maximal elongation of the spring.

  12. ESO and Australia to Discuss Future Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-01-01

    For some time, the astronomical community in Australia has expressed interest in closer ties to ESO. One of the main reasons is the construction of the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT), of which the first 8.2 m unit telescope is scheduled for completion less than 2 years from now. The science of astronomy and astrophysics is highly developed in Australia and researchers in this country already have access to several excellent observational facilities, notably the 3.9 m optical telescope at the Siding Spring Observatory, the 64 m Parkes radio telescope and the Australia Telescope, one of the largest radio interferometric instruments in the world. On this important background, it is understandable that there is now an expressed desire among Australian scientists to participate in the VLT project and thus to partake in the front-line science and technology at the world's largest optical telescope. The related moves have been channelled through the Australian National Committee for Astronomy and the first formal contacts between Australia and ESO were made 1/2 year ago, cf. ESO Press Release 07/95 of 8 June 1995. ESO has welcomed the prospects of a closer, future collaboration with Australia, in particular because of the acknowledged expertise in that country within the important field of optical interferometry, a main feature of the VLT project. The Australian Government recently announced a new master plan 'Innovate Australia' which aims at updating and further development of science and technology in this country. It incorporates important support towards the modernization of the Australia Telescope, and certain funds are also foreseen for participation in international projects within the field of astronomy and astrophysics. At the request of the Australian Government, a high-ranking Australian delegation will visit the ESO Headquarters in Garching (Germany) in order to explore with ESO in some detail possible modes of future collaboration. This visit will take place

  13. Rosetta Alice Far Ultraviolet Observations of (2867) Steins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feaga, L. M.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Steffl, A. J.; Parker, J. W.; Stern, S. A.; Feldman, P. D.; Weaver, H. A.; Bertaux, J.; Slater, D. C.; Throop, H.

    2009-05-01

    During Rosetta's flyby of the main-belt, E-type asteroid (2867) Steins on 5 Sept. 2008, the U.S. Alice UV imaging spectrometer was used to obtain the first far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectrum of an asteroid. A ten minute integration, averaging over a variety of geometries at closest approach, shows very good signal from 850 Å to 2000 Å representing the first spectrum of an E-type asteroid below the atmospheric cutoff. We find that the far ultraviolet albedo of Steins is very low, ˜5%, compared to its visible albedo, 41% (Keller et al. 2009; Weissman et al. 2008; Jorda et al. 2008), as is expected from the UV behavior of many refractory materials. We also find that the albedo does not show a dramatic color variation over the FUV spectral range; however, there is a pronounced dip near 1600 Å. In addition, Alice obtained the total FUV count rate integrated with 1 second resolution during the encounter to determine the average variation of reflected UV flux with phase angle. In comparison to the OSIRIS WAC data, Alice data show clear wavelength dependent phase reddening and that the opposition effect is greater in the FUV than in the visible. In addition to observing Steins at closest approach, a ˜22 hour exosphere search was conducted prior to closest approach with Steins in the Alice slit. As expected from the only existing model (Schläppi et al. 2008), a deep search for any exosphere (e.g., hydrogen, oxygen) yielded no obvious detections in our initial analysis. We have placed upper limits on an atomic hydrogen and oxygen exosphere at Steins. Jorda, L., et al. 2008. A. and Ap. 487, 1171. Keller, H. U., et al. 2009. Rosetta Steins Fly-by Scientific Workshop, Tegernsee, Germany. Schläppi, B., K. Altwegg, and P. Wurz 2008. Icarus 195, 674. Weissman, P.R., et al., 2008. Meteoritics and Planetary Science, 43, 1-10.

  14. Children's Television in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, John P.

    1978-01-01

    Reviews developments in the television industry in Australia with specific reference to children's television. Advertising regulations and research and publications related to children's television are also noted. (RAO)

  15. The Fast Interaction Trigger detector for the ALICE Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavicheva, T. L.; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    As a result of the LHC injectors upgrade after the Long Shutdown (2019-2020), the expected Pb-Pb luminosity and collision rate during the so called Runs 3 and 4 will considerably exceed the design parameters for several of the key ALICE detectors systems including the forward trigger detectors. Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT) will be the primary forward trigger, luminosity, and collision time measurement detector. It will also determine multiplicity, centrality, and reaction plane of heavy ion collisions. FIT is expected to match and even exceed the functionality and performance currently secured by three ALICE sub-detectors: the time zero detector (T0), the VZERO system (V0), and the Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD). FIT will consist of two arrays of Cherenkov radiators with MCP-PMT sensors and of a single, large-size scintillator ring. Because of the presence of the muon spectrometer, the placement of the FIT arrays will be asymmetric: ∼800 mm from the interaction point (IP) on the absorber side and ∼3200 mm from IP on the opposite side. The ongoing beam tests and Monte Carlo studies verify the physics performance and refine the geometry of the FIT arrays. The presentation gives a short description of FIT, triggers and readout requirement for the ALICE Upgrade, a summary of the performance, and the outcome of the simulations and beam tests.

  16. Production and assembly of the ALICE silicon drift detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beolè, S.; Antinori, S.; Coli, S.; Crescio, E.; Falchieri, D.; Arteche Diaz, R.; Di Liberto, S.; Gabrielli, A.; Giraudo, G.; Giubellino, P.; Martoiu, S.; Masetti, G.; Mazza, G.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Rashevsky, A.; Riccati, L.; Rivetti, A.; Simonetti, L.; Toscano, L.; Tosello, F.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Vacchi, A.; Wheadon, R.

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at the LHC will study collisions of heavy-ions at a centre-of-mass energy ˜5.5 TeV per nucleon. The main aim of the experiment is to study in detail the behaviour of nuclear matter at high densities and temperatures, in view of probing deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration. Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) have been selected to equip the two intermediate layers of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS) [ALICE Collaboration, Technical Design Report, CERN/LHCC 99-12], since they couple a very good multi-track capability with dE/dx information and excellent spatial resolution as described in [E. Gatti, P. Rehak, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 225 (1984) 608; S. Beolé, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 377 (1996) 393; S. Beolé, et al., Il Nuovo Cimento 109A (9) (1996)]. In this paper we describe the different components of the SDD system as well as the different procedure of the system assembly.

  17. The Fast Interaction Trigger Detector of ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Keenan; Brown, Shanice; Powell, Calvin; Harton, Austin; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo; Alice-Fit Team

    2017-01-01

    CERN (European Center for Nuclear Research) is a global laboratory that studies proton and heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is one of four large experiments at the LHC. ALICE is dedicated to the study of the transition of matter to Quark-Gluon Plasma in heavy ion collisions. The experiment is preparing for the LHC upgrade after the second long shutdown (LS2) in 2019-20. To this end, ALICE is undertaking a major initiative to extend its physics capabilities. Among these improvements is a new Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT). The FIT will be replacing the current T0 and V0 trigger detectors. The purpose of the FIT will be to determine multiplicity, centrality, and reaction plane. The FIT will also serve as the primary forward trigger, luminosity, and collision time detector. This presentation will discuss the FIT upgrade and the results from the performance of the FIT detectors in simulations and test beams that support the current design parameters. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under grants NSF-PHY-1407051, NSF-PHY-1305280, NSF-PHY-1613118, and NSF-PHY-1625081.

  18. Online processing in the ALICE DAQ The detector algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeland, S.; Altini, V.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Makhlyueva, I.; Roukoutakis, F.; Schossmaier, K.; Soós, C.; Vande Vyvre, P.; von Haller, B.; ALICE Collaboration

    2010-04-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Some specific calibration tasks are performed regularly for each of the 18 ALICE sub-detectors in order to achieve most accurate physics measurements. These procedures involve events analysis in a wide range of experimental conditions, implicating various trigger types, data throughputs, electronics settings, and algorithms, both during short sub-detector standalone runs and long global physics runs. A framework was designed to collect statistics and compute some of the calibration parameters directly online, using resources of the Data Acquisition System (DAQ), and benefiting from its inherent parallel architecture to process events. This system has been used at the experimental area for one year, and includes more than 30 calibration routines in production. This paper describes the framework architecture and the synchronization mechanisms involved at the level of the Experiment Control System (ECS) of ALICE. The software libraries interfacing detector algorithms (DA) to the online data flow, configuration database, experiment logbook, and offline system are reviewed. The test protocols followed to integrate and validate each sub-detector component are also discussed, including the automatic build system and validation procedures used to ensure a smooth deployment. The offline post-processing and archiving of the DA results is covered in a separate paper.

  19. Handbook on Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    A study unit on Australia for secondary students is divided into eight sections. Section 1 introduces students to the states, territories, and capitals of the country. Section two, land and people, discusses the size, location, geology, climate, flora and fauna, and population of Australia. Sections 3 and 4 outline Australian history and include…

  20. Australia's earliest planispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, W.

    2003-12-01

    Australia's earliest-known planispheres were made by a Sydney amateur astronomer named George Butterfield in 1870 and 1877, although a similar but more crudely-made 'noctural dial' was created by Philip Parker King in 1852. This paper discusses these pioneering endeavours, other nineteenth century attempts to popularise astronomy, and the prevailing astronomical climate in Australia at that time.

  1. Online Training in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuzic, Joze

    2013-01-01

    On-line training is becoming an interesting phenomenon in Australia and has attracted a lot of interest across many industries and businesses (Chan and Ngai, 2007). The research reported here looks at the use of online training in corporations in Australia. It focuses on two aspects of online training, the factors that "warrant" its…

  2. Community Music in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Gillian

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a historical perspective to the development of community music in Australia. Finding political support in Australia's progressive arts policies of the late 1970s, community music is discussed as embracing the principles of access and equity and supporting the development of musical skills in the context of social change and…

  3. Coral reproduction in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, James; Speed, Conrad W; Babcock, Russ

    2016-01-01

    Larval production and recruitment underpin the maintenance of coral populations, but these early life history stages are vulnerable to extreme variation in physical conditions. Environmental managers aim to minimise human impacts during significant periods of larval production and recruitment on reefs, but doing so requires knowledge of the modes and timing of coral reproduction. Most corals are hermaphroditic or gonochoric, with a brooding or broadcast spawning mode of reproduction. Brooding corals are a significant component of some reefs and produce larvae over consecutive months. Broadcast spawning corals are more common and display considerable variation in their patterns of spawning among reefs. Highly synchronous spawning can occur on reefs around Australia, particularly on the Great Barrier Reef. On Australia's remote north-west coast there have been fewer studies of coral reproduction. The recent industrial expansion into these regions has facilitated research, but the associated data are often contained within confidential reports. Here we combine information in this grey-literature with that available publicly to update our knowledge of coral reproduction in WA, for tens of thousands of corals and hundreds of species from over a dozen reefs spanning 20° of latitude. We identified broad patterns in coral reproduction, but more detailed insights were hindered by biased sampling; most studies focused on species of Acropora sampled over a few months at several reefs. Within the existing data, there was a latitudinal gradient in spawning activity among seasons, with mass spawning during autumn occurring on all reefs (but the temperate south-west). Participation in a smaller, multi-specific spawning during spring decreased from approximately one quarter of corals on the Kimberley Oceanic reefs to little participation at Ningaloo. Within these seasons, spawning was concentrated in March and/or April, and October and/or November, depending on the timing of the

  4. JPL stories: story on the story (series) Careering through JPL, presented by Alice M. Fairhurst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrickson, S.

    2002-01-01

    Alice Fairhurst, co-author of Effective Teaching, Effective Learning, presented an enthusiastic overview of her tenure as a JPL career development and mentoring coordinator (1991-2001). Among other things, Alice is an expert in Keirseyian Temperament and Myers-Briggs typology.

  5. 76 FR 53352 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Alice, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... instrument approach procedures at Old Hoppe Place Airport, Agua Dulce, TX, has made this action necessary for..., area. Controlled airspace extending upward from 700 feet above the surface is being removed at Old... feet or more above the surface of the earth. * * * * * ASW TX E5 Alice, TX Alice International...

  6. Alice Buckton (1867-1944): The Legacy of a Froebelian in the Landscape of Glastonbury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathivet, Stephanie

    2006-01-01

    Alice Buckton was a Froebelian educator who was involved in early childhood education and the training of teachers. She was a prolific writer, at first writing articles for the Froebelian journal "Child Life" and later writing poetry and plays, which were read and performed in London and elsewhere. Alice Buckton became interested in the…

  7. Folklore in the Fiction of Alice Walker: A Perpetuation of Historical and Literary Traditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Trudier

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the fiction of Alice Walker, showing that, in employing folklore for the purposes of defining characters, illustrating relationships among them, and developing plot, Alice Walker comments on the racial situation in the United States, often chastising her black characters for their attitudes toward themselves. (JM)

  8. A new detector array for diffractive physics in ALICE at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Corral, Gerardo Herrera

    2011-07-15

    We discuss some aspects of a new sub-detector for the ALICE experiment at the LHC. This detector would enhance the capabilities of ALICE to study several topics of diffractive as well as of photon induced physics. It consists of four stations of scintillator pads that would tag the diffractive gap more efficiently.

  9. Proton-proton physics with the ALICE muon spectrometer at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Bastid, N.

    2008-09-15

    ALICE, the dedicated heavy-ion experiment at the LHC, has also an important proton-proton physics program. The ALICE muon spectrometer will be presented and the corresponding physics analysis will be reviewed. A particular emphasis will be placed on heavy-flavor measurement.

  10. Pattern recognition and PID procedure with the ALICE-HMPID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, Giacomo

    2014-12-01

    The ALICE apparatus is dedicated to the study of pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions provided by LHC. ALICE has unique particle identification (PID) capabilities among the LHC experiments exploiting different PID techniques, i.e., energy loss, time-of-flight measurements, Cherenkov and transition radiation detection, calorimetry and topological ID. The ALICE-HMPID is devoted to the identification of charged hadrons. It consists of seven identical RICH counters, with liquid C6F14 as Cherenkov radiator (n≈1.299 at λph=175 nm). Photons and charged particles detection is performed by a proportional chamber, coupled with a pad segmented CsI coated photo-cathode. In pp and p-Pb events HMPID provides 3 sigmas separation for pions and kaons up to pT = 3 GeV / c and for protons up to pT = 5 GeV / c. PID is performed by means of photon emission angle measurement, a challenging task in the high multiplicity environment of the most central Pb-Pb collisions. A dedicated algorithm has been implemented to evaluate the Cherenkov angle starting from the bi-dimensional ring pattern on the photons detector, it is based on the Hough Transform Method (HTM) to separate signal from background. In this way HMPID is able to contribute to inclusive hadrons spectra measurement as well as to measurements where high purity PID is required, by means of statistical or track-by-track PID. The pattern recognition, the results from angular resolution studies and the PID strategy with HMPID are presented.

  11. Mexican contribution to ALICE and first data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cuautle, Eleazar

    2010-07-29

    On November 2009 the Large Hadron Collider produced the first p+p collisions. These, together with the upcoming Pb+Pb data, open up the possibility to answer some of the intriguing questions regarding the Standard Model and likely bring to light new phenomena. In this work I present a short review of the mexican participation in the ALICE experiment, focusing on the detector building and phenemological as well as Monte Carlo simulation work regarding the proton as well as the heavy ion program. I also briefly mention some of the wide spectrum of possible first topics that can be analyzed.

  12. Ombla Spring, Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanović, P.

    1996-03-01

    Ombla Spring is located on the Adriatic coast near the town of Dubrovnik. The spring discharges at sea level. To eliminate the influence of the tide, a small dam was constructed 50 m downstream of the spring outlet. The spring water overflows the dam crest at an elevation of 2.40 m. Since 1897 the springwater has been used for the water supply for Dubrovnik.

  13. Water Treatment Technology - Springs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on springs provides instructional materials for two competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on spring basin construction and spring protection. For each competency, student…

  14. Spring Wheat Breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common wheat, known as bread wheat, is one of major crops for human food consumption. It is further classified into spring and winter wheat based on the distinct growing seasons. Spring wheat is grown worldwide and usually planted in the spring and harvested in late summer or early fall. In this c...

  15. 1. LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING IODINE SPRING (FOREGROUND), SALT SULPHUR SPRING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING IODINE SPRING (FOREGROUND), SALT SULPHUR SPRING (LEFT BACKGROUND), AND TWIN COTTAGES (UPPER RIGHT) (4 x 5 negative; 5 x 7 print) - Salt Sulpher Springs, U.S. Route 219, Salt Sulphur Springs, Monroe County, WV

  16. MOBILESAT: Australia's own

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagg, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Australia will be introducing a dedicated Mobile Satellite Communications System following the launch of the AUSSAT-B satellites late in 1991. The Mobile Satellite System, MOBILESAT, will provide circuit switched voice/data services and packet-switched data services for land, aeronautical and maritime users. Here, an overview is given of the development program being undertaken within Australia to enable a fully commercial service to be introduced in 1992.

  17. Alice in Wonderland Syndrome: A Clinical and Pathophysiological Review.

    PubMed

    Mastria, Giulio; Mancini, Valentina; Viganò, Alessandro; Di Piero, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Alice in Wonderland Syndrome (AIWS) is a perceptual disorder, principally involving visual and somesthetic integration, firstly reported by Todd, on the literary suggestion of the strange experiences described by Lewis Carroll in Alice in Wonderland books. Symptoms may comprise among others aschematia and dysmetropsia. This syndrome has many different etiologies; however EBV infection is the most common cause in children, while migraine affects more commonly adults. Many data support a strict relationship between migraine and AIWS, which could be considered in many patients as an aura or a migraine equivalent, particularly in children. Nevertheless, AIWS seems to have anatomical correlates. According to neuroimaging, temporoparietal-occipital carrefour (TPO-C) is a key region for developing many of AIWS symptoms. The final part of this review aims to find the relationship between AIWS symptoms, presenting a pathophysiological model. In brief, AIWS symptoms depend on an alteration of TPO-C where visual-spatial and somatosensory information are integrated. Alterations in these brain regions may cause the cooccurrence of dysmetropsia and disorders of body schema. In our opinion, the association of other symptoms reported in literature could vary depending on different etiologies and the lack of clear diagnostic criteria.

  18. ALFA: The new ALICE-FAIR software framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Turany, M.; Buncic, P.; Hristov, P.; Kollegger, T.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Lebedev, A.; Lindenstruth, V.; Manafov, A.; Richter, M.; Rybalchenko, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Winckler, N.

    2015-12-01

    The commonalities between the ALICE and FAIR experiments and their computing requirements led to the development of large parts of a common software framework in an experiment independent way. The FairRoot project has already shown the feasibility of such an approach for the FAIR experiments and extending it beyond FAIR to experiments at other facilities[1, 2]. The ALFA framework is a joint development between ALICE Online- Offline (O2) and FairRoot teams. ALFA is designed as a flexible, elastic system, which balances reliability and ease of development with performance using multi-processing and multithreading. A message- based approach has been adopted; such an approach will support the use of the software on different hardware platforms, including heterogeneous systems. Each process in ALFA assumes limited communication and reliance on other processes. Such a design will add horizontal scaling (multiple processes) to vertical scaling provided by multiple threads to meet computing and throughput demands. ALFA does not dictate any application protocols. Potentially, any content-based processor or any source can change the application protocol. The framework supports different serialization standards for data exchange between different hardware and software languages.

  19. [Obligatory and facultative symptoms of the Alice in wonderland syndrome].

    PubMed

    Podoll, K; Ebel, H; Robinson, D; Nicola, U

    2002-08-01

    The Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS), as described by Todd in 1955, denotes a variety of self-experienced paroxysmal body schema disturbances (obligatory core symptoms of the AIWS) which may co-occur with depersonalization, derealization, visual illusions and disorders of the time perception (facultative symptoms of the AIWS). The name comes, of course, from Lewis Carroll's 1865 novel "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland", which is believed to have been inspired by Carroll's own migraine experiences documented as early as 1856. Recent studies of the AIWS occurring as somesthetic migraine aura indicated that the body schema disturbance of macrosomatognosia most frequently affects the head and upper extremities, paralleling the extension of their representation in the human brain. As a misapprehension commonly encountered in the medical literature, it has been suggested to define the AIWS by the presence of visual rather than somesthetic perceptual disturbances, e.g. metamorphopsia and/or visual hallucinations, but this change and broadening of Todd's definition of the AIWS turns it to a both scientifically and clinically useless concept.

  20. Alice in Wonderland Syndrome: A Clinical and Pathophysiological Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Alice in Wonderland Syndrome (AIWS) is a perceptual disorder, principally involving visual and somesthetic integration, firstly reported by Todd, on the literary suggestion of the strange experiences described by Lewis Carroll in Alice in Wonderland books. Symptoms may comprise among others aschematia and dysmetropsia. This syndrome has many different etiologies; however EBV infection is the most common cause in children, while migraine affects more commonly adults. Many data support a strict relationship between migraine and AIWS, which could be considered in many patients as an aura or a migraine equivalent, particularly in children. Nevertheless, AIWS seems to have anatomical correlates. According to neuroimaging, temporoparietal-occipital carrefour (TPO-C) is a key region for developing many of AIWS symptoms. The final part of this review aims to find the relationship between AIWS symptoms, presenting a pathophysiological model. In brief, AIWS symptoms depend on an alteration of TPO-C where visual-spatial and somatosensory information are integrated. Alterations in these brain regions may cause the cooccurrence of dysmetropsia and disorders of body schema. In our opinion, the association of other symptoms reported in literature could vary depending on different etiologies and the lack of clear diagnostic criteria. PMID:28116304

  1. Managing operational documentation in the ALICE Detector Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechman, M.; Augustinus, A.; Bond, P.; Chochula, P.; Kurepin, A.; Pinazza, O.; Rosinsky, P.

    2012-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is one of the big LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiments at CERN in Geneve, Switzerland. The experiment is composed of 18 sub-detectors controlled by an integrated Detector Control System (DCS) that is implemented using the commercial SCADA package PVSSII. The DCS includes over 1200 network devices, over 1,000,000 monitored parameters and numerous custom made software components that are prepared by over 100 developers from all around the world. This complex system is controlled by a single operator via a central user interface. One of his/her main tasks is the recovery of anomalies and errors that may occur during operation. Therefore, clear, complete and easily accessible documentation is essential to guide the shifter through the expert interfaces of different subsystems. This paper describes the idea of the management of the operational documentation in ALICE using a generic repository that is built on a relational database and is integrated with the control system. The experience gained and the conclusions drawn from the project are also presented.

  2. Exploring Jet-Hadron correlations at the LHC with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazer, Joel

    2016-08-01

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the conditions are met to produce the hot and dense, strongly interacting medium known as the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). The QGP, a state of matter created shortly after the Big Bang, is a phase where the deconfinement of quarks and gluons is hypothesized. Jets, the collimated sprays of hadrons from fragmenting partons, are a key probe of the medium. The experimental methods used for jet measurements at ALICE to remove, reduce, and correct for the underlying background event will be presented. In pp collisions, jet production is well understood within the framework of perturbative QCD and acts as a rigorous baseline measurement for jet quenching measurements. By comparing to heavy ion collision systems, we can study the suppression of the number of jets seen and study the modification of the pT or angular distributions of jet fragments. Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a full (charged + neutral) reconstructed (trigger) jet in Pb-Pb and pp collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV in ALICE will be presented here. Newly developed combinatoric background subtraction methods and their improvement compared to prior techniques will be discussed.

  3. Radiation hard analog circuits for ALICE ITS upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajanana, D.; Gromov, V.; Kuijer, P.; Kugathasan, T.; Snoeys, W.

    2016-03-01

    The ALICE experiment is planning to upgrade the ITS (Inner Tracking System) [1] detector during the LS2 shutdown. The present ITS will be fully replaced with a new one entirely based on CMOS monolithic pixel sensor chips fabricated in TowerJazz CMOS 0.18 μ m imaging technology. The large (3 cm × 1.5 cm = 4.5 cm2) ALPIDE (ALICE PIxel DEtector) sensor chip contains about 500 Kpixels, and will be used to cover a 10 m2 area with 12.5 Gpixels distributed over seven cylindrical layers. The ALPOSE chip was designed as a test chip for the various building blocks foreseen in the ALPIDE [2] pixel chip from CERN. The building blocks include: bandgap and Temperature sensor in four different flavours, and LDOs for powering schemes. One flavour of bandgap and temperature sensor will be included in the ALPIDE chip. Power consumption numbers have dropped very significantly making the use of LDOs less interesting, but in this paper all blocks are presented including measurement results before and after irradiation with neutrons to characterize robustness against displacement damage.

  4. Raw-data display and visual reconstruction validation in ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadel, M.

    2008-07-01

    ALICE Event Visualization Environment (AliEVE) is based on ROOT and its GUI, 2D & 3D graphics classes. A small application kernel provides for registration and management of visualization objects. CINT scripts are used as an extensible mechanism for data extraction, selection and processing as well as for steering of frequent event-related tasks. AliEVE is used for event visualization in offline and high-level trigger frameworks. Mechanisms and base-classes provided for visual representation of raw-data for different detector-types are described. Common infrastructure for thresholding and color-coding of signal/time information, placement of detector-modules in various 2D/3D layouts and for user-interaction with displayed data is presented. Methods for visualization of raw-data on different levels of detail are discussed as they are expected to play an important role during early detector operation with poorly understood detector calibration, occupancy and noise-levels. Since September 2006 ALICE applies a regular visual-scanning procedure to simulated proton-proton data to detect any shortcomings in cluster finding, tracking and primary & secondary vertex reconstruction. A high-level of interactivity is required to allow in-depth exploration of event-structure. Navigation back to simulation records is supported for debugging purposes. Standard 2D projections and transformations are available for clusters, tracks and simplified detector geometry.

  5. Mediated definite delegation - Certified Grid jobs in ALICE and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, Steffen; Grigoras, Costin; Litmaath, Maarten; Betev, Latchezar; Buchmann, Johannes

    2012-12-01

    Grid computing infrastructures need to provide traceability and accounting of their users’ activity and protection against misuse and privilege escalation, where the delegation of privileges in the course of a job submission is a key concern. This work describes an improved handling of Multi-user Grid Jobs in the ALICE Grid Services. A security analysis of the ALICE Grid job model is presented with derived security objectives, followed by a discussion of existing approaches of unrestricted delegation based on X.509 proxy certificates and the Grid middleware gLExec. Unrestricted delegation has severe security consequences and limitations, most importantly allowing for identity theft and forgery of jobs and data. These limitations are discussed and formulated, both in general and with respect to an adoption in line with Multi-user Grid Jobs. A new general model of mediated definite delegation is developed, allowing a broker to dynamically process and assign Grid jobs to agents while providing strong accountability and long-term traceability. A prototype implementation allowing for fully certified Grid jobs is presented as well as a potential interaction with gLExec. The achieved improvements regarding system security, malicious job exploitation, identity protection, and accountability are emphasized, including a discussion of non-repudiation in the face of malicious Grid jobs.

  6. Intrusion Prevention and Detection in Grid Computing - The ALICE Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Andres; Lara, Camilo; Kebschull, Udo

    2015-12-01

    Grids allow users flexible on-demand usage of computing resources through remote communication networks. A remarkable example of a Grid in High Energy Physics (HEP) research is used in the ALICE experiment at European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN. Physicists can submit jobs used to process the huge amount of particle collision data produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Grids face complex security challenges. They are interesting targets for attackers seeking for huge computational resources. Since users can execute arbitrary code in the worker nodes on the Grid sites, special care should be put in this environment. Automatic tools to harden and monitor this scenario are required. Currently, there is no integrated solution for such requirement. This paper describes a new security framework to allow execution of job payloads in a sandboxed context. It also allows process behavior monitoring to detect intrusions, even when new attack methods or zero day vulnerabilities are exploited, by a Machine Learning approach. We plan to implement the proposed framework as a software prototype that will be tested as a component of the ALICE Grid middleware.

  7. Nonthermal springs of Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mundorff, J.C.

    1971-01-01

    Data are presented for about 4,500 nonthermal springs that discharge in the State of Utah. Most major springs having discharge of several cubic feet per second or more are in or near mountain ranges or plateaus where precipitation is much greater than in other parts of the State. The largest instantaneous discharge observed at any spring was 314 cfs at Mammoth Spring in southwestern Utah.  Discharges exceeding 200 cfs have been observed at Swan Creek Spring in extreme northern Utah, and discharges of 200 cfs have been reported for Big Brush Creek Spring in northeastern Utah. Maximum discharges generally are during or within a few weeks after the main period of snowmelt, which is usually from late April to the middle of June.The largest springs generally discharge form or very near carbonate rocks in which solution channels and fractures are numerous or from areas of porous or fractured volcanic rocks. Most nonthermal springs in Utah probably are variable springs – that is, their variability of discharge exceeds 100 percent.Most of the major springs discharge water that contains less than 500 ppm (parts per million) of dissolved solids, and most of the water is of the calcium bicarbonate type. Water from springs is used for domestic, municipal, irrigation, livestock, mining, and industrial purposes.

  8. Spring joint with overstrain sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, Peter M. (Inventor); Gaither, Bryan W. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A flexible joint may include a conductive compression spring and a pair of non-conductive spring cages disposed at opposite ends of the compression spring to support the compression spring. A conductive member disposed inside the compression spring may extend between the pair of spring cages. One end of the conductive member may be fixed for movement with one of the spring cages and another end of the conductive member may be fixed for movement with the other of the spring cages.

  9. LVDS tester: a systematic test of cable signal transmission at the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnby, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bombara, M.; Evans, D.; Jones, G. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jovanović, P.; Jusko, A.; Kour, R.; Králik, I.; Krivda, M.; Lazzeroni, C.; Lietava, R.; Matthews, Z. L.; Navin, S.; Palaha, A.; Petrov, P.; Platt, R.; Šándor, L.; Scott, P.; Urbán, J.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    In the ALICE experiment, the Low-Voltage Differential Signalling (LVDS) format is used for the transmission of trigger inputs from the detectors to the Central Trigger Processor (CTP), the L0 trigger outputs from Local Trigger Units (LTU) boards back to the detectors and the BUSY inputs from the sub-detectors to the CTP. ALICE has designed a set-up, called the LVDS transmission tester, that aims to measure various transmission quality parameters and the bit-error rate (BER) for long period runs in an automatic way. In this paper, this method is described and the conclusions from these tests for the ALICE LVDS cables are discussed.

  10. Coral reproduction in Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Speed, Conrad W.; Babcock, Russ

    2016-01-01

    Larval production and recruitment underpin the maintenance of coral populations, but these early life history stages are vulnerable to extreme variation in physical conditions. Environmental managers aim to minimise human impacts during significant periods of larval production and recruitment on reefs, but doing so requires knowledge of the modes and timing of coral reproduction. Most corals are hermaphroditic or gonochoric, with a brooding or broadcast spawning mode of reproduction. Brooding corals are a significant component of some reefs and produce larvae over consecutive months. Broadcast spawning corals are more common and display considerable variation in their patterns of spawning among reefs. Highly synchronous spawning can occur on reefs around Australia, particularly on the Great Barrier Reef. On Australia’s remote north-west coast there have been fewer studies of coral reproduction. The recent industrial expansion into these regions has facilitated research, but the associated data are often contained within confidential reports. Here we combine information in this grey-literature with that available publicly to update our knowledge of coral reproduction in WA, for tens of thousands of corals and hundreds of species from over a dozen reefs spanning 20° of latitude. We identified broad patterns in coral reproduction, but more detailed insights were hindered by biased sampling; most studies focused on species of Acropora sampled over a few months at several reefs. Within the existing data, there was a latitudinal gradient in spawning activity among seasons, with mass spawning during autumn occurring on all reefs (but the temperate south-west). Participation in a smaller, multi-specific spawning during spring decreased from approximately one quarter of corals on the Kimberley Oceanic reefs to little participation at Ningaloo. Within these seasons, spawning was concentrated in March and/or April, and October and/or November, depending on the timing of

  11. Australia's polio risk.

    PubMed

    Martin, Nicolee; Paterson, Beverley J; Durrheim, David N

    2014-06-30

    Australia, like all polio-free countries and regions, remains at risk of a wild poliovirus importation until polio is eradicated globally. The most probable route of importation will be through a traveller arriving in Australia either by air or sea from a polio-endemic or re-infected country. While the overall risk of an imported wild poliovirus infection leading to transmission within Australia is assessed as being low, some areas of the country have been identified as at increased risk. Local areas with relatively high arrivals from polio endemic countries, areas of low vaccination coverage and the potential for transmission to occur when these 2 factors are combined, were identified by this review as Australia's main polio risk. The risk of an importation event leading to locally acquired cases is mitigated by generally high polio vaccination coverage in Australia. This high coverage extends to residents of the Torres Strait Islands who are in close proximity to Papua New Guinea, a country identified as at high risk of poliovirus transmission should an importation occur. In 2012, all states and territories had vaccination coverage of greater than 90% at 1 year of age and all exceeded 93% at 2 years of age. Population immunity to wild poliovirus type 1, which remains the major cause of paralysis globally, has been estimated at 82%. This is sufficient to prevent outbreaks of this type in Australia. Of the 211 eligible non-polio acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases classified between 2008 and 2011, 91% (193) were vaccinated against polio at least once. High quality surveillance for AFP, which is supplemented by sentinel enterovirus and environmental surveillance activities, gives confidence that an imported case would be detected and appropriate public health action would ensue.

  12. Coil spring venting arrangement

    DOEpatents

    McCugh, R.M.

    1975-10-21

    A simple venting device for trapped gas pockets in hydraulic systems is inserted through a small access passages, operated remotely, and removed completely. The device comprises a small diameter, closely wound coil spring which is pushed through a guide temporarily inserted in the access passage. The guide has a central passageway which directs the coil spring radially upward into the pocket, so that, with the guide properly positioned for depth and properly oriented, the coil spring can be pushed up into the top of the pocket to vent it. By positioning a seal around the free end of the guide, the spring and guide are removed and the passage is sealed.

  13. Cyclone Chris Hits Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This false-color image shows Cyclone Chris shortly after it hit Australia's northwestern coast on February 6, 2002. This scene was acquired by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. (Please note that this scene has not been reprojected.) Cyclone Chris is one of the most powerful storms ever to hit Australia. Initially, the storm contained wind gusts of up to 200 km per hour (125 mph), but shortly after making landfall it weakened to a Category 4 storm. Meteorologists expect the cyclone to weaken quickly as it moves further inland.

  14. Alice in Wonderland syndrome associated with mycoplasma infection.

    PubMed

    Omata, Taku; Fujii, Katsunori; Kuroki, Haruo; Shimojo, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS) is a rare condition in which patients report distorted size perception of objects and their own bodies. Although specific causes and pathology have not been elucidated, an association between AIWS and infection has been suggested. To our knowledge, mycoplasma-induced AIWS has not been examined. A girl aged 7 years 11 months presented with fever (temperature, 40°C) and cough. Although the fever disappeared after approximately 10 days, she complained that her mother's face suddenly appeared smaller to her. Subsequently, she complained that objects intermittently appeared smaller than normal. Particle agglutination test indicated elevated serum antibodies against Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The patient was therefore diagnosed the patient with AIWS secondary to mycoplasma infection. Although mycoplasma infection is known to cause various central nervous system symptoms, this is the first report involving AIWS, suggesting that mycoplasma could affect visual function in children.

  15. ALICE: Project Overview and High Level Science Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soummer, Remi; Choquet, Elodie; Pueyo, Laurent; Brendan Hagan, J.; Gofas-Salas, Elena; Rajan, Abhijith; Perrin, Marshall D.; Chen, Christine; Debes, John H.; Golimowski, David A.; Hines, Dean C.; Schneider, Glenn; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Mawet, Dimitri; Marois, Christian; Barman, Travis

    2015-01-01

    We report on the status of the ALICE project (Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments), which consists in a consistent reanalysis of the entire HST-NICMOS coronagraphic archive. Over the last two years, we have developed a sophisticated pipeline able to handle the data of the 400 stars of the archive. This pipeline builds on the Karhunen-Loeve Image Projection (KLIP) algorithm, and was completed in the fall of 2014. We discuss the first processing and analysis results of the overall reduction campaign. As we will deliver high-level science products to the STScI MAST archive, we are defining a new standard format for high-contrast science products, which will be compatible with every new high-contrast imaging instrument (GPI, SPHERE, P1640, CHARIS, etc.) and used by the JWST coronagraphs. We present here the specifications of this standard.

  16. Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments (ALICE). Survey results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soummer, Remi; Choquet, Elodie; Pueyo, Laurent; Brendan Hagan, J.; Gofas-Salas, Elena; Rajan, Abhijith; Chen, Christine; Perrin, Marshall D.; Debes, John H.; Golimowski, David A.; Hines, Dean C.; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Schneider, Glenn; Mawet, Dimitri; Marois, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We report on the status of the ALICE project (Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments. HST/AR-12652), which consists in a consistent reanalysis of the entire HST-NICMOS coronagraphic archive with advanced post-processing techniques. Over the last two years, we have developed a sophisticated pipeline able to handle the data of the 400 stars of the archive. We present the results of the overall reduction campaign and discuss the first statistical analysis of the candidate detections. As we will deliver high-level science products to the STScI MAST archive, we are defining a new standard format for high-contrast science products, which will be compatible with every new high-contrast imaging instrument and used by the JWST coronagraphs. We present here an update and overview of the specifications of this standard.

  17. Alice Walker: "The Diary of an African Nun" and Dubois Double Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontenot, Chester J.

    1977-01-01

    Analyzes Alice Walker's novel and notes that the plight of the African nun is that of the black intellectual or middle-class who find themselves caught between two worlds which are at once complementary and contradictory. (Author)

  18. Clinical trials with Alice strain, live, attenuated, serum inhibitor-resistant intranasal influenza A vaccine.

    PubMed

    Spencer, M J; Cherry, J D; Powell, K R; Sumaya, C V; Garakian, A J

    1975-10-01

    Two clinical trials with Alice strain intranasal influenza vaccine were performed. In study no. 1 (utilizing random selection and double-blind control), 50 subjects received a bivalent inactivated influenza vaccine intramuscularly, 99 subjects received Alice strain vaccine intranasally, and 50 subjects received a placebo intranasally. No symptomatology could be attributed to the intranasal route of immunization. Convalescent-phase geometric mean titers of hemagglutination inhibition antibody were higher after intramuscular vaccination; seroconversion occurred in 16 or 17 recipients of the Alice strain, with initial titers of less than 1:8. Clinical and virologic surveillance for 20 weeks after vaccination revealed no influenza A illnesses in participants of the study. In study no. 2, 75% of the subjects with initial nasal antibody titers of less than 1:3 developed measurable nasal antibody after receiving Alice strain vaccine.

  19. Breaking bounds: Alice Profé, radical and emancipationist.

    PubMed

    Pfister, G

    2001-01-01

    Alice Prof was the first female sport physician in Germany and she influenced ideas on female bodies and female sports for more than 40 years. Her dream to become a doctor could be realized only in Switzerland because women were not admitted to universities in Prussia before 1908. After her examination and her PhD she established herself as one of the first female doctors in Berlin in 1905 and she worked there until her death in 1946 as general practitioner and medical specialist for pediatrics and sport medicine. As an expert on the female body she was active in many committees and organizations. Alice Prof worked her whole life for the improvement of the situation of girls and women. The focus of her work was physical education and sport and she was always active in different types of sports herself. Her first article on this topic was published in 1906. In the following years over and over again she 'took the floor' criticizing traditional stereotypes of women and the female body, demanding resources for the education of girls and women. Her efforts also helped to reduce anxieties about women in sport and to encourage women to participate in sport. In her articles and in her lectures she encouraged women to decide for themselves about their involvement in sport. She rejected all attempts to patronize female athletes and refused to accept their exclusion from many sports. Prof propagated ideas which were not popular and she never swam with the tide. In one obituary it is stated: 'you never changed your ideas about life for material rewards or professional advancement. You stayed yourself'. Her ideas are relevant even today.

  20. Neutral meson and direct photon analysis with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, A. M.; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of neutral mesons, particularly π0, s and η’s, plays an important role in the study of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), the hot and dense medium created in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. Parton energy loss in the QGP, often called jet quenching, can be assessed via measuring the suppression of high-pT π0, s in heavy-ion collisions, when compared to pp collisions using the nuclear modification factor (Raa). Furthermore, neutral mesons are the dominant source of photons in pp and Pb-Pb collisions, and their precise measurement is required to measure direct photons that are produced thermally within the QGP or in hard initial scatterings in the earliest phases of the collision. In both cases, high- quality measurements in pp collisions are required as a reference for Pb-Pb collisions. ALICE measurements of neutral meson spectra cover a large p T range, with the Photon Conversion Method - which requires measurements from the ITS and TPC - covering low to intermediate p T and the PHOS and EMCal electromagnetic calorimeters covering an intermediate to high p T range. In this presentation, measurements of π0, s and η’s obtained from the ALICE experiment, for pp collisions at several collisional center of mass energies ≤ft(\\sqrt{{s}NN}\\right), from 0.9 TeV to 8 TeV and in Pb-Pb collisions at \\sqrt{{s}NN}=2.76 {{TeV}}, will be presented. The reconstruction of neutral mesons using the Photon Conversion Method (PCM) will also be discussed.

  1. Teaching about Australia. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prior, Warren R.

    Many reasons can be offered for teaching about Australia. The field of Australian studies offers many opportunities for U.S. teachers and students to critically analyze aspects of their own culture, for there are many experiences in the history of Australia that parallel the U.S. experience. Australia and the United States have strong ongoing…

  2. Media Matters in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Kell

    1998-01-01

    Describes how a teacher helped transform a K-12 Christian school near Sydney, Australia, from a book-bound media studies program into a hands-on learning experience for students. Various projects allow students to operate advanced equipment, evaluate their own and their peers' work, present research results to the class, and produce live media…

  3. Career Development in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCowan, Colin; Mountain, Elizabeth

    Australia has a federal system, comprising the national Commonwealth government and eight state and territory governments. At the Commonwealth level, the ministries of Education, Training and Youth Affairs, and Employment, Workplace Relations and Small Business have primary roles in the career information and services field. Education and training…

  4. Australia's nuclear graveyard

    SciTech Connect

    Milliken, R.

    1987-04-01

    Britain and Australia have become locked in a battle of wills and wits over a nuclear legacy that is now more than 30 years old. At stake is the issue of who will pay to clean up a stretch of the central Australian outback where at least 23 kilograms of plutonium are buried in nuclear graveyards or scattered in fine particles on the ground. The plutonium was left there after a series of British nuclear weapons tests in the 1950s and 1960s. The cost of cleaning it up today, and rendering the ground safe the the Aborigines who claim it as their tribal homeland, has been estimated at up to $158 million. Australia's minister for resources, Senator Gareth Evans, went to London in October 1986 to try to involve the British in the cleanup. But Britain is still taking the stand that it had discharged any obligations on this score long ago. This question is at the heart of controversy that began mounting in the late 1970s over the British nuclear tests. It was then that Aborigines and test veterans from Britain and Australia started alleging that they had been exposed to unduly high doses of radiation. Clearly, the nuclear tests, which began as a political exercise between Britain and Australia more than 30 years ago, seem destined to remain the source of much legal, diplomatic, and financial fallout between the two countries for a long time to come.

  5. Australia's Regional Youth Exodus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, M.

    2002-01-01

    Examines media coverage of youth outmigration from Tasmania in the context of Australia's regional crisis. Focuses on how young people are constructed by others and positioned in others' visions of their rural home towns. Discusses two recurring narratives: strategies to keep youth at home, and preoccupation with the "best and brightest"…

  6. Agricultural Education in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farquhar, R. N.

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of a comprehensive survey of education and training for agriculture in Australia. The present facilities are described, and then set against estimates of present and future needs. Constructive proposals are made as to how these needs can best be met by agricultural…

  7. Australia: Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, Edward

    2004-01-01

    This new addition to the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) library of international publications is a guide for United States admissions officers to the structure and content of the education system of Australia together with a formal set of placement recommendations based upon the author's research.…

  8. A Magnet Spring Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, T. H.; Mead, L.

    2006-01-01

    The paper discusses an elementary spring model representing the motion of a magnet suspended from the ceiling at one end of a vertical spring which is held directly above a second magnet fixed on the floor. There are two cases depending upon the north-south pole orientation of the two magnets. The attraction or repelling force induced by the…

  9. Early palaeozoic palaeomagnetism in Australia I. Cambrian results from the Flinders Ranges, South Australia II. Late Early Cambrian results from Kangaroo Island, South Australia III. Middle to early-Late Cambrian results from the Amadeus Basin, Northern Territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klootwijk, C. T.

    1980-04-01

    considerable intensity. Two characteristic magnetic components have been identified: (A) A secondary magnetic component of Late Cambrian—Early Ordovician age (S-pole at: 75.8°E 17.4°N, d p = 4.2°, d m = 1.9°, N = 54 specimens), attributed to thermochemical activity predating the main folding phases of the Delamarian Orogeny. (B) A primary magnetic component corresponding to a S-pole position at 15.1°E 33.8°S (d p = 6.2°, d m = 12.3°, N = 16 sites). Both the primary and the secondary magnetic component are in very good directional agreement with the magnetization pattern from the correlated Billy Creek Formation of the Flinders Ranges (I). Consequently, noticeable rotational movement since late-Early Cambrian times between Kangaroo Island and the northwestern part of the Adelaide "Geosyncline" can be ruled out. III. Middle to early-Late Cambrian results from the Amadeus Basin (Northern Territory) A total of 328 samples from a Middle Cambrian red-bed succession and a Middle to early-Late Cambrian carbonate succession in the Amadeus Basin (Central Australia) have been analyzed through thermal demagnetization studies. All samples contained a recent field component of considerable intensity which became broken down, respectively below 200°C in the carbonate samples and between 300°C and 500°C in the red-bed samples. Another recent field component, broken down between 600°C and 675°C, was noted in some of the red-bed samples. Three characteristic magnetic components have been identified: (A) A secondary magnetic component of Late Devonian—Early Carboniferous age (S-pole at 110.5°E 46.9°S, N = 2 localities) which predates the main folding phase of the Early Carboniferous Alice Springs Orogeny. (B) Another secondary magnetic component (S-pole at 60.8°E 33.8°N, N = 2 localities) which is very similar to a thermo-chemically induced Cambro-Ordovician magnetic component, noted in rocks from the Adelaide "Geosyncline". (C) A primary magnetic component which suggests

  10. Australia: a full house.

    PubMed

    Short, R

    1994-01-01

    Australia had a population of 17.6 million in 1991. In 1992, Australia's population grew at the rate of 1.06%, 0.8% due to natural increase and 0.26% from immigration. The recent Australian Bureau of Statistics Report estimates that it will grow to 18.9 million by the end of the century and 23.1 million by 2025, assuming fertility remains at current levels and net migration stabilizes at 70,000 per annum from the year 2000. The World Bank estimates that Australia's population will stabilize at 25 million some time in the future. Since Australia's politicians and economists fail to understand that the country already has a large enough population, no national population policy has been declared. The Department of Immigration and Ethnic Affairs, responsible for all population issues, gives no thought to the long-term environmental consequences of the rapidly growing population and determines the annual migrant intake simply on the basis of the nation's economic needs, demands from new immigrants for admission of their next of kin, and humanitarian considerations with regard to refugees. Population growth in Australia needs to be checked as soon as possible. Reducing the annual migrant intake to below 50,000, Australia could achieve a stable population of approximately 23 million by 2040; the annual intake of 150,000 immigrants will grow the population to 37 million. The total fertility rate (TFR) has been below replacement level since 1976, but the population's skewed age distribution will cause it to continue to grow through natural increase at the current rate of approximately 0.8% per year for some time to come. Improving educational opportunities for women and ensuring that all have ready access to modern contraception could help produce a further decline in TFR. Moreover, education about contraception must be made a part of every school curriculum. Steps taken now may avert any future flood of millions of ecological refugees from Southeast Asia, particularly

  11. Valve-spring Surge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, Willy

    1937-01-01

    Test equipment is described that includes a system of three quartz indicators whereby three different pressures could be synchronized and simultaneously recorded on a single oscillogram. This equipment was used to test the reliction of waves at ends of valve spring, the dynamical stress of the valve spring for a single lift of the valve, and measurement of the curve of the cam tested. Other tests included simultaneous recording of the stress at both ends of the spring, spring oscillation during a single lift as a function of speed, computation of amplitude of oscillation for a single lift by harmonic analysis, effect of cam profile, the setting up of resonance, and forced spring oscillation with damping.

  12. Evaluation of recent trends in Australian pome fruit spring phenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbyshire, Rebecca; Webb, Leanne; Goodwin, Ian; Barlow, E. W. R.

    2013-05-01

    Temporal and temperature driven analyses were conducted for eight spring phenology datasets from three Australian pome fruit growing regions ranging from 24 to 43 years in length. This, the first such analysis for Australia, indicated significant temporal change in phenophase timing for only one of the datasets. To determine relationships to temperature, a sequential chill and growth method as well as mean springtime temperatures were used to estimate phenophase timing. Expected advancement of phenophase ranged from 4.1 to 7.7 days per degree Celsius increase in temperature. The sequential chill and growth approach proved superior, with coefficients of determination between 0.49 and 0.85, indicating the inclusion of chill conditions are important for spring phenology modelling. Compared to similar phenological research in the Northern Hemisphere, the changes in response variables were often shallower in Australia, although significance of observed hemispheric differences were not found.

  13. The regolith in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollier, C. D.

    1988-12-01

    Australian regolith materials are described, many of which are complex. Much Australian regolith dates back to the Tertiary, Mesozoic or earlier. There is a progressive change in the nature of alluvium through the Tertiary. Aridity, revealed through sand dunes and evaporites, is confined to the Quaternary. Ferricretes and silcretes are formed on lower slopes, often followed by inversion of relief. Tectonic isolation of Australia as well as climatic change is responsible for the change in the nature of terrestrial sediments since the Cretaceous.

  14. Harbingers of Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrao, John

    1976-01-01

    Emphasizing the spring migration of frogs, toads, and salamanders to their watery breeding sites, this article presents information on numerous amphibians and suggests both indoor and outdoor educational activities appropriate for elementary and/or early secondary instruction. (JC)

  15. Mineral springs and miracles.

    PubMed Central

    Forster, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    Development of hot springs in the Canadian Rockies was closely linked to their reputed medicinal value. In 1885, the federal government created a small reserve around the springs at Sulphur Mountain, an area later enlarged to become Banff National Park, in recognition of the "great sanitary and curative advantage to the public." Images p730-a p731-a p732-a p733-a p734-a p736-a PMID:8199525

  16. Spring Deposits and Mud Volcanoes on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, C. C.; Oehler, D. Z.; Baker, D. M.

    2008-12-01

    We report evidence for spring deposits in Vernal Crater, Arabia Terra. The Vernal structures are low mounds, each approximately 250 m by 500 m in extent, with terraced flanks, apical depressions, river-like channels, concentric fractures, and elliptical tonal anomalies. All of these features are common in terrestrial springs such as the Dalhousie complex in Australia. The structures occur in an apparent unit of interdune, water-laid sediment and are associated with evidence of subsurface fluid flow in sets of aligned outcrops. The Vernal springs may be part of a larger complex of spring deposits and lineations, suggesting that fluid flow in this region was relatively extensive. The structures in Vernal Crater are coated with a thin layer of dust, which prevents mineral identification from orbit. In an attempt to find evidence for additional spring mounds, we conducted a survey of nearly 2,000 locations for which CRISM spectral images are available. We used CRISM data to identify dust-free, hydrated areas and HiRISE, CTX, and MOC images to evaluate morphology. This study covered all longitudes and latitudes from 50N to 70S, except near Tharsis where data were analyzed south of 15S. No location exhibited morphological features that closely resembled those in Vernal Crater, suggesting that these putative spring mounds are not common in the highlands of Mars. Our search led us to concentrate on a dust-free area, centered at 41.8N, 332.5E in Acidalia Planitia where Farrand et al. (2005) identified features resembling spring mounds or mud volcanoes. Tanaka et al. (2005) mapped this region as part of the Early Amazonian Vastitas Borealis Unit, interpreted as reworked sediments from outflow channels and highland sources. We mapped over 20 high-albedo pitted domes in the area covered by one HiRISE frame, with dome diameters ranging from 350 m to 1 km. Nearby, similar domes have measured heights ranging from 36 to 65 m. The dome material is darker in THEMIS nighttime IR than

  17. Light flavor results in p-Pb collisions with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Antonio

    2016-12-01

    Particle ratios provide insight into the hadrochemistry of the event and the mechanisms for particle production. In Pb-Pb collisions the relative multi-strange baryon yields exhibit an enhancement with respect to pp collisions, whereas the short-lived K*0 resonance is suppressed in the most central events due to re-scattering of its decay daughter particles. Measurements in p-Pb allow us to investigate the development of these effects as a function of the system size. We report comprehensive results on light-flavor hadron production measured with the ALICE detector in p-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV, covering a wide range of particle species which includes long-lived hadrons, resonances and multi-strange baryons. The measurements include the transverse momentum spectra and the ratios of spectra among different species, and extend over a very large transverse momentum region, from ≈ 100 MeV / c to ≈ 20 GeV / c, depending on the particle species.

  18. Orthos, an alarm system for the ALICE DAQ operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeland, Sylvain; Carena, Franco; Carena, Wisla; Chibante Barroso, Vasco; Costa, Filippo; Denes, Ervin; Divia, Roberto; Fuchs, Ulrich; Grigore, Alexandru; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Soos, Csaba; Telesca, Adriana; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; von Haller, Barthelemy

    2012-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The DAQ (Data Acquisition System) facilities handle the data flow from the detectors electronics up to the mass storage. The DAQ system is based on a large farm of commodity hardware consisting of more than 600 devices (Linux PCs, storage, network switches), and controls hundreds of distributed hardware and software components interacting together. This paper presents Orthos, the alarm system used to detect, log, report, and follow-up abnormal situations on the DAQ machines at the experimental area. The main objective of this package is to integrate alarm detection and notification mechanisms with a full-featured issues tracker, in order to prioritize, assign, and fix system failures optimally. This tool relies on a database repository with a logic engine, SQL interfaces to inject or query metrics, and dynamic web pages for user interaction. We describe the system architecture, the technologies used for the implementation, and the integration with existing monitoring tools.

  19. Open-charm production measurements with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, P.

    2016-11-01

    The LHC heavy-ion physics program aims at investigating the properties of strongly-interacting matter under extreme conditions of temperature and energy density where the formation of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) is expected. Heavy-flavour hadrons, containing charm and beauty quarks, are considered efficient probes to investigate the properties of the QGP produced in heavy-ion collisions. Heavy quarks are produced in hard partonic scattering processes in the initial stage of hadronic collisions and propagate through the hot and dense medium created in the collision losing energy interacting with the medium via radiative and collisional processes. The high precision tracking, good vertexing capabilities and excellent particle identification offered by the ALICE experiment allow us to measure particles containing heavy quarks in a wide transversemomentum range in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions. A review of the main results on prompt D-mesons production, reconstructed via their hadronic decays at mid-rapidity, in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV, p-Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV and Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV will be shown.

  20. A continuous read-out TPC for the ALICE upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippmann, C.

    2016-07-01

    The largest gaseous Time Projection Chamber (TPC) in the world, the ALICE TPC, will be upgraded based on Micro Pattern Gas Detector technology during the second long shutdown of the CERN Large Hadron Collider in 2018/19. The upgraded detector will operate continuously without the use of a triggered gating grid. It will thus be able to read all minimum bias Pb-Pb events that the LHC will deliver at the anticipated peak interaction rate of 50 kHz for the high luminosity heavy-ion era. New read-out electronics will send the continuous data stream to a new online farm at rates up to 1 TByte/s. A fractional ion feedback of below 1% is required to keep distortions due to space charge in the TPC drift volume at a tolerable level. The new read-out chambers will consist of quadruple stacks of Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM), combining GEM foils with a different hole pitch. Other key requirements such as energy resolution and operational stability have to be met as well. A careful optimisation of the performance in terms of all these parameters was achieved during an extensive R&D program. A working point well within the design specifications was identified with an ion backflow of 0.63%, a local energy resolution of 11.3% (sigma) and a discharge probability comparable to that of standard triple GEM detectors.

  1. Recent COMPASS results and future prospects for ALICE

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Suh-Urk

    2015-04-10

    The COMPASS Collaboration has accumulated the world’s highest statistics on the reaction π{sup −} p → π{sup +}π{sup −}π{sup −} p at 190 GeV/c. The results, presented in Section 1, show that a new state J{sup PC} = 1{sup ++} state never reported before, the a{sub 1}(1420), decaying to f{sub 0}(980)π followed by f{sub 0}(980) → ππ. In addition, the Collaboration reports an exotic J{sup PC} = 1{sup −+} state, the π{sub 1}(1600), which cannot be a quarkonium. Both states are likely to be a tetra-quark, i.e. qq{sup ¯}+qq{sup ¯} or a gluonic hybrid, a qq{sup ¯} object with an excited gluon inside it. Section 2 is devoted to a brief discussion of the central production of resonances, which is being investigated by both COMPASS and ALICE collaborations. However, the results are not yet released, so it is limited to a broad discussion of the central production, with emphasis on different analyses dictated by differences in the experimental setup.

  2. Recent COMPASS results and future prospects for ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Suh-Urk

    2015-04-01

    The COMPASS Collaboration has accumulated the world's highest statistics on the reaction π- p → π+π-π- p at 190 GeV/c. The results, presented in Section 1, show that a new state JPC = 1++ state never reported before, the a1(1420), decaying to f0(980)π followed by f0(980) → ππ. In addition, the Collaboration reports an exotic JPC = 1-+ state, the π1(1600), which cannot be a quarkonium. Both states are likely to be a tetra-quark, i.e. q q ¯+q q ¯ or a gluonic hybrid, a q q ¯ object with an excited gluon inside it. Section 2 is devoted to a brief discussion of the central production of resonances, which is being investigated by both COMPASS and ALICE collaborations. However, the results are not yet released, so it is limited to a broad discussion of the central production, with emphasis on different analyses dictated by differences in the experimental setup.

  3. Distributed Russian Tier-2 - RDIG in Simulation and Analysis of Alice Data From LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, A.; Jancurova, L.; Kiryanov, A.; Kotlyar, V.; Mitsyn, V.; Lyublev, Y.; Ryabinkin, E.; Shabratova, G.; Smirnov, S.; Stepanova, L.; Urazmetov, W.; Zarochentsev, A.

    2011-12-01

    On the threshold of LHC data there were intensive test and upgrade of GRID application software for all LHC experiments at the top of the modern LCG middleware (gLite). The update of such software for ALICE experiment at LHC, AliEn[1] had provided stable and secure operation of sites developing LHC data. The activity of Russian RDIG (Russian Data Intensive GRID) computer federation which is the distributed Tier-2 centre are devoted to simulation and analysis of LHC data in accordance with the ALICE computing model [2]. Eight sites of this federation interesting in ALICE activity upgrade their middle ware in accordance with requirements of ALICE computing what ensured success of MC production and end-user analysis activity at all eight sites. The result of occupancy and efficiency of each site in the time of LHC operation will be presented in the report. The outline the results of CPU and disk space usage at RDIG sites for the data simulation and analysis of first LHC data from the exposition of ALICE detector [3] will be presented as well. There will be presented also the information about usage of parallel analysis facility based on PROOF [4].

  4. The GridKa Tier-1 Computing Center within the ALICE Grid Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, WooJin J.; Christopher, Jung; Heiss, Andreas; Petzold, Andreas; Schwarz, Kilian

    2014-06-01

    The GridKa computing center, hosted by Steinbuch Centre for Computing at the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology (KIT) in Germany, is serving as the largest Tier-1 center used by the ALICE collaboration at the LHC. In 2013, GridKa provides 30k HEPSPEC06, 2.7 PB of disk space, and 5.25 PB of tape storage to ALICE. The 10Gbit/s network connections from GridKa to CERN, several Tier-1 centers and the general purpose network are used by ALICE intensively. In 2012 a total amount of ~1 PB was transferred to and from GridKa. As Grid framework, AliEn (ALICE Environment) is being used to access the resources, and various monitoring tools including the MonALISA (MONitoring Agent using a Large Integrated Services Architecture) are always running to alert in case of any problem. GridKa on-call engineers provide 24/7 support to guarantee minimal loss of availability of computing and storage resources in case of hardware or software problems. We introduce the GridKa Tier-1 center from the viewpoint of ALICE services.

  5. Segmented tubular cushion springs and spring assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslim, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A spring (10) includes a tube (12) having an elliptical cross section, with the greater axial dimension (22) extending laterally and the lesser axial dimension (24) extending vertically. A plurality of cuts (20) in the form of slots passing through most of a wall of the tube (12) extend perpendicularly to a longitudinal axis (16) extending along the tube (12). An uncut portion (26) of the tube wall extends along the tube (12) for bonding or fastening the tube to a suitable base, such as a bottom (28) of a seat cushion (30).

  6. The Life of the Party: Alice McGrath, Multiracial Coalitions, and the Struggle for Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armbruster-Sandoval, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    This essay explores the life of Alice Greenfield McGrath, a key player in the Sleepy Lagoon Defense Committee and a longtime activist whose involvement in social justice issues spanned eight decades. While best known for her role in the Sleepy Lagoon case in the 1940s, Alice fought the "good fight" for virtually her entire life,…

  7. A Quantitative and Qualitative Investigation of Using Alice Programming to Improve Confidence, Enjoyment and Achievement among Non-Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop-Clark, Cathy; Courte, Jill; Evans, Donna; Howard, Elizabeth V.

    2007-01-01

    In this investigation, the use of the Alice programming language in an introductory computing class was studied from both a quantitative and qualitative perspective. Students in an introductory computing class participated in a 2.5-week unit to learn programming through the graphical programming environment of Alice. Quantitatively, students were…

  8. Is Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Shanmugakumar, Sharanyaa; Playford, Denese; Burkitt, Tessa; Tennant, Marc; Bowles, Tom

    2016-03-31

    Objective Despite public interest in the rural workforce, there are few published data on the geographical distribution of Australia's rural surgeons, their practice skill set, career stage or work-life balance (on-call burden). Similarly, there has not been a peer-reviewed skills audit of rural training opportunities for surgical trainees. The present study undertook this baseline assessment for Western Australia (WA), which has some of the most remote practice areas in Australia.Methods Hospital staff from all WA Country Health Service hospitals with surgical service (20 of 89 rural health services) were contacted by telephone. A total of 18 of 20 provided complete data. The study questionnaire explored hospital and practice locations of practicing rural surgeons, on-call rosters, career stage, practice skill set and the availability of surgical training positions. Data were tabulated in excel and geographic information system geocoded. Descriptive statistics were calculated in Excel.Results Of the seven health regions for rural Western Australia, two (28.6%) were served by resident surgeons at a ratio consistent with Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS) guidelines. General surgery was offered in 16 (89%) hospitals. In total, 16 (89%) hospitals were served by fly-in, fly-out (FIFO) surgical services. Two hospitals with resident surgeons did not use FIFO services, but all hospitals without resident surgeons were served by FIFO surgical specialists. The majority of resident surgeons (62.5%) and FIFO surgeons (43.2%) were perceived to be mid-career by hospital staff members. Three hospitals (16.7%) offered all eight of the identified surgical skill sets, but 16 (89%) offered general surgery.Conclusions Relatively few resident rural surgeons are servicing large areas of WA, assisted by the widespread provision of FIFO surgical services. The present audit demonstrates strength in general surgical skills throughout regional WA, and augers well for the training

  9. Australia and Gondwanaland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teichert, C.

    1959-01-01

    Along the western margin of the Australian continent there exist four major sedimentary basins, filled with predominantly marine rocks from Cambrian to Tertiary in age, and up to 40,000 feet thick. Seaward these basins continue into depressions recognizable in the continental shelf and even the continental slope. Their very presence, the nature of their sediments and the composition and relationships of their fossil faunas indicate the existence of an open ocean to the west of Australia since early Paleozoic time. Composition of the Australian fossil land vertebrate faunas suggests isolation of the Australian continent since at least Permian time. ?? 1959 Ferdinand Enke Verlag Stuttgart.

  10. Damper Spring For Omega Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maclaughlin, Scott T.; Montgomery, Stuart K.

    1993-01-01

    Damper spring reduces deflections of omega-cross-section seal, reducing probability of failure and extending life of seal. Spring is split ring with U-shaped cross section. Placed inside omega seal and inserted with seal into seal cavity. As omega seal compressed into cavity, spring and seal make contact near convolution of seal, and spring becomes compressed also. During operation, when seal dynamically loaded, spring limits deflection of seal, reducing stress on seal.

  11. Performance Study for a Muon Forward Tracker in the ALICE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uras, A.

    2012-08-01

    ALICE is the experiment dedicated to the study of the quark gluon plasma in heavy-ion collisions at the CERN LHC. Improvements of ALICE subdetectors are envisaged for the upgrade plans of year 2017. The Muon Forward Tracker (MFT) is a proposal in view of this upgrade, motivated both by the possibility to increase the physics potential of the muon spectrometer and to allow new measurements of general interest for the whole ALICE physics. In order to evaluate the feasibility of this upgrade, a detailed simulation of the MFT setup is being performed within the AliRoot framework, with emphasis on the tracking capabilities as a function of the number, position and size of the pixel planes, and the corresponding physics performances. In this report, we present preliminary results on the MFT performances in a low-multiplicity environment.

  12. Recent developments of the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian containment code ALICE-II. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Zeuch, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    The ANL arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian containment code ALICE was developed for use in fast reactor containment studies and is particularly suited for problems involving complex fluid-structure interactions. Many improvements have been made which has resulted in a second version of the code, ALICE-II. A selection of some important improvements are given in this paper. To realistically analyze the above-core hydrodynamics containing a movable upper internal structure (UIS), a 3-D pipe element has been adopted to calculate the response of the UIS columns that connect the UIS to the vessel head. A corotational coordinate scheme for large displacement, small strain, elastic-plastic structural-dynamic analysis is utilized in the formulation. Both geometric and material nonlinearities are considered. The governing equations are integrated explicitly using a central difference procedure. Many sample problems are presented, including comparisons of ALICE-II and ICECO-CEL results on the APRICOT Phase 3 problems.

  13. Particle identification with the ALICE Time-Of-Flight detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alici, A.

    2014-12-01

    High performance Particle Identification system (PID) is a distinguishing characteristic of the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Charged particles in the intermediate momentum range are identified in ALICE by the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) detector. The TOF exploits the Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) technology, capable of an intrinsic time resolution at the level of few tens of ps with an overall efficiency close to 100% and a large operation plateau. The full system is made of 1593 MRPC chambers with a total area of 141 m2, covering the pseudorapidity interval [-0.9,+0.9] and the full azimuthal angle. The ALICE TOF system has shown very stable operation during the first 3 years of collisions at the LHC. In this paper a summary of the system performance as well as main results with data from collisions will be reported.

  14. Recent Developments on ALICE (Accelerators and Lasers In Combined Experiments) at Daresbury Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Saveliev, Y M; Buckley, R K; Buckley, S R; Clarke, J A; Corlett, P A; Dunning, D J; Goulden, A R; Hill, S F; Jackson, F; Jamison, S P; Jones, J K; Jones, L B; Leonard, S; McIntosh, P A; McKenzie, J W; Middleman, K J; Militsyn, B L; Moss, A J; Muratori, B D; Orrett, J F; Pattalwar, S M; Phillips, P J; Scott, D J; Seddon, E A; Shepherd, B.J.A.; Smith, S L; Thompson, N; Wheelhouse, A E; Williams, P H; Harrison, P; Holder, D J; Holder, G M; Schofield, A L; Weightman, P; Williams, R L; Laundry, D; Powers, T; Priebe, G; Surman, M

    2010-05-01

    Progress made in ALICE (Accelerators and Lasers In Combined Experiments) commissioning and a summary of the latest experimental results are presented in this paper. After an extensive work on beam loading effects in SC RF linac (booster) and linac cavities conditioning, ALICE can now operate in full energy recovery mode at the bunch charge of 40pC, the beam energy of 30MeV and train lengths of up to 100us. This improved operation of the machine resulted in generation of coherently enhanced broadband THz radiation with the energy of several tens of uJ per pulse and in successful demonstration of the Compton Backscattering x-ray source experiment. The next steps in the ALICE scientific programme are commissioning of the IR FEL and start of the research on the first non-scaling FFAG accelerator EMMA. Results from both projects will be also reported.

  15. ALICE Grid Computing at the GridKa Tier-1 Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, C.; Petzold, A.; Pfeiler, C.-E.; Schwarz, K.

    2012-12-01

    The GridKa center at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology is the largest ALICE Tier-1 center. It hosts 40,000 HEPSEPC'06, approximately 2.75 PB of disk space, and 5.25 PB of tape space for the ‘A Large Ion Collider Experiment’ (ALICE), at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These resources are accessed via the AliEn (ALICE Environment) middleware. The storage is divided into two instances, both using the storage middleware xrootd. We will focus on the set-up of these resources and on the topic of monitoring. The latter serves a vast number of purposes, ranging from efficiency statistics for process and procedure optimization to alerts for on-call duty engineers.

  16. Spring polar ozone behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding of the springtime behavior of polar stratospheric ozone as of mid 1990 is summarized. Heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds as hypothesis for ozone loss are considered and a simplified description of the behavior of Antarctic ozone in winter and spring is given. Evidence that the situation is more complicated than described by the theory is produced. Many unresolved scientific issues remain and some of the most important problems are identified. Ozone changes each spring since 1979 have clearly established for the first time that man made chlorine compounds influence stratospheric ozone. Long before important advances in satellite and in situ investigations, it was Dobson's decision to place a total ozone measuring spectrometer at Halley Bay in Antarctica during the International Geophysical Year and subsequent continuous monitoring which led to the discovery that ozone was being destroyed each spring by chlorine processed by polar stratospheric clouds.

  17. The Rosetta UV imaging spectrometer ALICE: First light optical and radiometric performance results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, D. C.; Stern, S. A.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Bertaux, J. L.; Feldman, P. D.; Festou, M. C.

    2000-10-01

    We describe the design, scientific objectives, and "first-light" radiometric testing results of the Rosetta/ALICE instrument. ALICE is a lightweight (2.7 kg), low-power (4 W), and low-cost imaging spectrometer optimized for cometary ultraviolet spectroscopy. ALICE, which is funded by NASA (with hardware contributions from CNES, France), will fly on the ESA Rosetta Orbiter to characterize the cometary nucleus, coma, and nucleus/coma coupling of the target comet 46P/Wirtanen. It will obtain spatially-resolved, far-UV spectra of Wirtanen's nucleus and coma in the 700-2050 Å passband with a spectral resolution of 5-10 Å for extended sources that fill the entrance slit's field- of-view. ALICE is also the UV spectrometer model for the PERSI remote sensing suite proposed for the Pluto Kuiper Express (PKE) mission. ALICE uses modern technology to achieve its low mass and low power design specifications. It employs an off-axis telescope feeding a 0.15-m normal incidence Rowland circle spectrograph with a concave (toroidal) holographic reflection grating. The imaging microchannel plate (MCP) detector utilizes dual solar-blind opaque photocathodes of KBr and CsI deposited on a cylindrically-curved (7.5-cm radius) MCP Z-stack, and a matching 2-D cylindrically-curved double delay-line readout array with a 1024 x 32 pixel array format. This array format provides a point source response that is twice that originally proposed (Δ λ 3 Å). Three data taking modes are possible: (i) histogram image mode for 2-D images, (ii) pixel list mode with periodic time hacks for temporal studies, and (iii) count rate mode for broadband photometric studies. Optical and radiometric sensitivity performance results based on subsystem tests of the flight optics, detector, and preliminary integrated system level tests of the integrated ALICE flight model are presented and discussed.

  18. Determination of the event collision time with the ALICE detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Albuquerque, D. S. D.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; An, M.; Andrei, C.; Andrews, H. A.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Anwar, R.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Balasubramanian, S.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Beltran, L. G. E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bonora, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buhler, P.; Buitron, S. A. I.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Cabala, J.; Caffarri, D.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crkovská, J.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Souza, R. D.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Duggal, A. K.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eulisse, G.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Francisco, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gajdosova, K.; Gallio, M.; Galvan, C. D.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garg, K.; Garg, P.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; Germain, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, A. S.; Gonzalez, V.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Greiner, L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grosso, R.; Gruber, L.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Guzman, I. B.; Haake, R.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamon, J. C.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Hellbär, E.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, F.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Horak, D.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Hughes, C.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Isakov, V.; Islam, M. S.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacak, B.; Jacazio, N.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovska, S.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Mohisin Khan, M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Khatun, A.; Khuntia, A.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Klewin, S.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, S.; Kundu, S.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lapidus, K.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lazaridis, L.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, S.; Lehas, F.; Lehner, S.; Lehrbach, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Llope, W.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Lupi, M.; Lutz, T. H.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzilli, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Mhlanga, S.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Mishra, T.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montes, E.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Münning, K.; Munzer, R. H.; Murakami, H.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Myers, C. J.; Naik, B.; Nair, R.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Natal da Luz, H.; Nattrass, C.; Navarro, S. R.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, R.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Negrao De Oliveira, R. A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Ohlson, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Oravec, M.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pacik, V.; Pagano, D.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pal, S. K.; Palni, P.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, J.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Peng, X.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Peresunko, D.; Perez Lezama, E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pimentel, L. O. D. L.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Poppenborg, H.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Pozdniakov, V.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Rami, F.; Rana, D. B.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Ratza, V.; Ravasenga, I.; Read, K. F.; Redlich, K.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Saarinen, S.; Sadhu, S.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sarkar, D.; Sarkar, N.; Sarma, P.; Sas, M. H. P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schmidt, M.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Šefčík, M.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Senyukov, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sett, P.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Sheikh, A. I.; Shigaki, K.; Shou, Q.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Sozzi, F.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stankus, P.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Suljic, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S.; Szabo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Tabassam, U.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thakur, D.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Tikhonov, A.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Tripathy, S.; Trogolo, S.; Trombetta, G.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Umaka, E. N.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vala, M.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vázquez Doce, O.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Velure, A.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Vértesi, R.; Vickovic, L.; Vigolo, S.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Villatoro Tello, A.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Voscek, D.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Weiser, D. F.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Whitehead, A. M.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Willems, G. A.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Witt, W. E.; Yalcin, S.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J. H.; Yurchenko, V.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zmeskal, J.

    2017-02-01

    Particle identification is an important feature of the ALICE detector at the LHC. In particular, for particle identification via the time-of-flight technique, the precise determination of the event collision time represents an important ingredient of the quality of the measurement. In this paper, the different methods used for such a measurement in ALICE by means of the T0 and the TOF detectors are reviewed. Efficiencies, resolution and the improvement of the particle identification separation power of the methods used are presented for the different LHC colliding systems (pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb) during the first period of data taking of LHC (RUN 1).

  19. Planning Australia’s Defense Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    Alexander, Australia Since Federation (Melbourne: Thomas Nelson (Australia) Ltd., 1976), p. 208-210. 5. Charles Wilson, Australia 1788-1988: The Creation...p. 2. 9. Hughes, p. 48. 10. Charles Wilson, Australia 1788-1988: The Creation of a Nation (Totowa, NJ: Barnes & Noble, 1988), p. 9. 11. Hughes, p. 52...Australia’s Defence Forces," Army Quarterly and Defence Journal," October 1986, p. 462. 15. Babbage , "Australia: Defence Palnning Patchy and Rudderless," 251

  20. Australia: The Dictation Test Redux?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Tim

    2009-01-01

    In its late colonial history and early years as an independent nation, Australia practised a policy of ruthless exclusion of immigrants on the basis of race by means of a language test: the notorious Dictation Test. In the 50 years following World War II, Australia adopted policies encouraging immigration with bipartisan political support.…

  1. Major thermal springs of Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mundorff, J.C.

    1970-01-01

    As part of a study of the springs of Utah, reconnaissance data were obtained on the thermal, chemical, and geologic characteristics of the major thermal springs or Utah. Only three of the springs have temperatures near the boiling point of water; the maximum recorded temperatures of these springs range from 185° to 189° F. All three springs are in or near areas of late Tertiary or Quaternary volcanism.Temperatures of the thermal springs studied ranged from 68° to 189° F. Nearly all thermal springs in Utah are in or near fault zones. Very few of these springs issue from volcanic rocks, but several springs are close to areas of late Tertiary or Quaternary volcanic rocks.

  2. Spa, springs and safety.

    PubMed

    Sukthana, Yaowalark; Lekkla, Amorn; Sutthikornchai, Chantira; Wanapongse, Paitoon; Vejjajiva, Athasit; Bovornkitti, Somchai

    2005-01-01

    Natural mineral water has long been used worldwide for bathing and health purposes. At present, Thailand is famous for health spas and natural hot springs among local people and tourists. Due to possible risks of exposure to harmful agents, we studied hazardous pollutants at 57 natural hot springs from 11 provinces in northern, central, eastern and southern Thailand. Pathogenic, free-living amebae of the genera Naegleria and Acanthamoeba, which can cause central nervous system infection, were found in 26.3% (15/57) and 15.8% (9/ 57), respectively. Dissolved radon, a soil gas with carcinogenic properties, was present in nearly all hot springs sites, with concentration ranging from 0.87-76,527 Becquerels/m3. There were 5 water samples in which radon concentration exceeded the safety limit for drinking. Legionella pneumoniphila (serogroups 1, 3, 5, 6, 7 10 and 13) were found in samples from 71.9% (41/57) of studied sites. Because spas and natural springs are popular tourist attractions, health authorities should be aware of possible hazards and provide tactful measures and guidelines to ensure safety without causing undue alarm to foreign and Thai tourists.

  3. Energy Matters - Spring 2002

    SciTech Connect

    2002-03-01

    Quarterly newsletter from DOE's Industrial Technologies Program to promote the use of energy-efficient industrial systems. The focus of the Spring 2002 Issue of Energy Matters focuses on premium energy efficiency systems, with articles on new gas technologies, steam efficiency, the Augusta Newsprint Showcase, and more.

  4. Echoes of Spring Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyken, J. Clarine J.

    Designed to preserve the rich heritage of the rural school system which passed from the education scene in the 1930's and 1940's, this narrative, part history and part nostalgia, describes the author's own elementary education and the secure community life centered in the one room Spring Valley School in Hamilton County, Iowa, in the early decades…

  5. Editors' Spring Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    While they do not represent the rainbow of reading tastes American public libraries accommodate, Book Review editors are a wildly eclectic bunch. One look at their bedside tables and ereaders would reveal very little crossover. This article highlights an eclectic array of spring offerings ranging from print books to an audiobook to ebook apps. It…

  6. Planar torsion spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Parsons, Adam H. (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A torsion spring comprises an inner mounting segment. An outer mounting segment is located concentrically around the inner mounting segment. A plurality of splines extends from the inner mounting segment to the outer mounting segment. At least a portion of each spline extends generally annularly around the inner mounting segment.

  7. A Quadratic Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2010-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, we study examples of the forced quadratic spring equation [image omitted]. By performing trial-and-error numerical experiments, we demonstrate the existence of stability boundaries in the phase plane indicating initial conditions yielding bounded solutions, investigate the resonance boundary in the [omega]…

  8. Australia's marine virtual laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Roger; Gillibrand, Philip; Oke, Peter; Rosebrock, Uwe

    2014-05-01

    In all modelling studies of realistic scenarios, a researcher has to go through a number of steps to set up a model in order to produce a model simulation of value. The steps are generally the same, independent of the modelling system chosen. These steps include determining the time and space scales and processes of the required simulation; obtaining data for the initial set up and for input during the simulation time; obtaining observation data for validation or data assimilation; implementing scripts to run the simulation(s); and running utilities or custom-built software to extract results. These steps are time consuming and resource hungry, and have to be done every time irrespective of the simulation - the more complex the processes, the more effort is required to set up the simulation. The Australian Marine Virtual Laboratory (MARVL) is a new development in modelling frameworks for researchers in Australia. MARVL uses the TRIKE framework, a java-based control system developed by CSIRO that allows a non-specialist user configure and run a model, to automate many of the modelling preparation steps needed to bring the researcher faster to the stage of simulation and analysis. The tool is seen as enhancing the efficiency of researchers and marine managers, and is being considered as an educational aid in teaching. In MARVL we are developing a web-based open source application which provides a number of model choices and provides search and recovery of relevant observations, allowing researchers to: a) efficiently configure a range of different community ocean and wave models for any region, for any historical time period, with model specifications of their choice, through a user-friendly web application, b) access data sets to force a model and nest a model into, c) discover and assemble ocean observations from the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN, http://portal.aodn.org.au/webportal/) in a format that is suitable for model evaluation or data assimilation, and

  9. 9. CONTEXTUAL VIEW SOUTHSOUTHEAST TOWARDS SPRING SITE. SPRING LEFT CORNER. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. CONTEXTUAL VIEW SOUTH-SOUTHEAST TOWARDS SPRING SITE. SPRING LEFT CORNER. - Juniata Mill Complex, 22.5 miles Southwest of Hawthorne, between Aurora Crater & Aurora Peak, Hawthorne, Mineral County, NV

  10. MISR Views Northern Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    MISR images of tropical northern Australia acquired on June 1, 2000 (Terra orbit 2413) during the long dry season. Left: color composite of vertical (nadir) camera blue, green, and red band data. Right: multi-angle composite of red band data only from the cameras viewing 60 degrees aft, 60 degrees forward, and nadir. Color and contrast have been enhanced to accentuate subtle details. In the left image, color variations indicate how different parts of the scene reflect light differently at blue, green, and red wavelengths; in the right image color variations show how these same scene elements reflect light differently at different angles of view. Water appears in blue shades in the right image, for example, because glitter makes the water look brighter at the aft camera's view angle. The prominent inland water body is Lake Argyle, the largest human-made lake in Australia, which supplies water for the Ord River Irrigation Area and the town of Kununurra (pop. 6500) just to the north. At the top is the southern edge of Joseph Bonaparte Gulf; the major inlet at the left is Cambridge Gulf, the location of the town of Wyndham (pop. 850), the port for this region. This area is sparsely populated, and is known for its remote, spectacular mountains and gorges. Visible along much of the coastline are intertidal mudflats of mangroves and low shrubs; to the south the terrain is covered by open woodland merging into open grassland in the lower half of the pictures.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  11. Australia's Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Great Barrier Reef extends for 2,000 kilometers along the northeastern coast of Australia. It is not a single reef, but a vast maze of reefs, passages, and coral cays (islands that are part of the reef). This nadir true-color image was acquired by the MISR instrument on August 26, 2000 (Terra orbit 3679), and shows part of the southern portion of the reef adjacent to the central Queensland coast. The width of the MISR swath is approximately 380 kilometers, with the reef clearly visible up to approximately 200 kilometers from the coast. It may be difficult to see the myriad details in the browse image, but if you retrieve the higher resolution version, a zoomed display reveals the spectacular structure of the many reefs.

    The more northerly coastal area in this image shows the vast extent of sugar cane cultivation, this being the largest sugar producing area in Australia, centered on the city of Mackay. Other industries in the area include coal, cattle, dairying, timber, grain, seafood, and fruit. The large island off the most northerly part of the coast visible in this image is Whitsunday Island, with smaller islands and reefs extending southeast, parallel to the coast. These include some of the better known resort islands such as Hayman, Lindeman, Hamilton, and Brampton Islands.

    Further south, just inland of the small semicircular bay near the right of the image, is Rockhampton, the largest city along the central Queensland coast, and the regional center for much of central Queensland. Rockhampton is just north of the Tropic of Capricorn. Its hinterland is a rich pastoral, agricultural, and mining region.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  12. Studying Springs in Series Using a Single Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serna, Juan D.; Joshi, Amitabh

    2011-01-01

    Springs are used for a wide range of applications in physics and engineering. Possibly, one of their most common uses is to study the nature of restoring forces in oscillatory systems. While experiments that verify Hooke's law using springs are abundant in the physics literature, those that explore the combination of several springs together are…

  13. Epiphanic Awakenings in Raymond Carver's "Cathedral" and Alice Walker's "Everyday Use"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadeq, Ala Eddin; Al-Badawi, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores how two short stories from very different backgrounds conclude in a significant epiphany for the characters. Raymond Carver's short story "Cathedral" and Alice Walker's "Everyday Use" are studied to see how the husband in Carver's work is blinder than his visually-impaired overnight guest, and the…

  14. Influence of Alice 3: Reducing the Hurdles to Success in a CS1 Programming Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Tebring

    2013-01-01

    Learning the syntax, semantics, and concepts behind software engineering can be a challenging task for many individuals. This paper examines the Alice 3 software, a three-dimensional visual environment for teaching programming concepts, to determine if it is an effective tool for improving student achievement, raising self-efficacy, and engaging…

  15. A design study for the upgraded ALICE O2 computing facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    An upgrade of the ALICE detector is currently prepared for the Run 3 period of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN starting in 2020. The physics topics under study by ALICE during this period will require the inspection of all collisions at a rate of 50 kHz for minimum bias Pb-Pb and 200 kHz for pp and p-Pb collisions in order to extract physics signals embedded into a large background. The upgraded ALICE detector will produce more than 1 TByte/s of data. Both collision and data rate impose new challenges onto the detector readout and compute system. Some detectors will not use a triggered readout, which will require a continuous processing of the detector data. The challenging requirements will be met by a combined online and offline facility developed and managed by the ALICE O2 project. The combined facility will accommodate the necessary substantial increase of data taking rate. In this paper we present first results of a prototype with estimates for scalability and feasibility for a full scale system.

  16. Black Matrilineage: The Case of Alice Walker and Zora Neale Hurston.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadoff, Diane F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the relationship of the Black contemporary author, Alice Walker, to folklorist Zora Neale Hurston and presents a clarification of the relationship of gender and race in a revised theory of literary influence. Argues that Black women authors sometimes misread literary forbears in order to discover and express a positive matrilineage…

  17. Alice Walker in the Classroom: "Living by the Word." The NCTE High School Literature Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jago, Carol

    This small book is a handy guide for bringing the work of author Alice Walker into the classroom. It includes biographical information, ideas for literature circles using Walker's short stories, sample writing lessons using Walker's poems, suggestions for teaching "The Color Purple," and a wealth of resources for further investigation of…

  18. Curriculum Change as a Social Process: A Historical Perspective on the Curriculum Ideas of Alice Miel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeager, Elizabeth Anne

    1997-01-01

    Reviews contributions of Alice Miel, a prominent curriculum development scholar-practitioner at Columbia University Teacher's College from 1942 to 1971. Miel advocated development of democratic behavior as schooling's ultimate goal and worked to democratize thee overall school structure. She emphasized that curricular change was a social process…

  19. Democracy, Social Studies, and Diversity in the Elementary School Classroom: The Progressive Ideas of Alice Miel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeager, Elizabeth Anne

    1998-01-01

    Examines the contributions of Alice Miel to the practice and theory of children's democratic social learning. Miel advocated the development of democratic behavior as the ultimate goal of schooling. Views her work as historical antecedent to current research on diversity in the social studies and the elementary classroom. (DSK)

  20. An Introduction to Alice Miel [and] Curriculum That Matters: Vision of What Ought to Be.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeager, Elizabeth Anne; Miel, Alice

    1996-01-01

    Alice Miel notes disturbing trends such as people being ill informed, terrorism increasing, and failure to recognize the need to balance individual rights with the common good. She advocates curricular emphasis on group membership skills, increasing diversity, and problem solving. (SK)

  1. "Princess Alice Is Watching You": Children's Belief in an Invisible Person Inhibits Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piazza, Jared; Bering, Jesse M.; Ingram, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    Two child groups (5-6 and 8-9 years of age) participated in a challenging rule-following task while they were (a) told that they were in the presence of a watchful invisible person ("Princess Alice"), (b) observed by a real adult, or (c) unsupervised. Children were covertly videotaped performing the task in the experimenter's absence. Older…

  2. Using Alice 2.0 to Design Games for People with Stroke.

    PubMed

    Proffitt, Rachel; Kelleher, Caitlin; Baum, M Carolyn; Engsberg, Jack

    2012-08-01

    Computer and videogames are gaining in popularity as rehabilitation tools. Unfortunately, most systems still require extensive programming/engineering knowledge to create, something that therapists, as novice programmers, do not possess. There is software designed to allow novice programmers to create storyboard and games through simple drag-and-drop formats; however, the applications for therapeutic game development have not been studied. The purpose of this study was to have an occupational therapy (OT) student with no prior computer programming experience learn how to create computer games for persons with stroke using Alice 2.0, a drag-and-drop editor, designed by Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, PA). The OT student learned how to use Alice 2.0 through a textbook, tutorials, and assistance from computer science students. She kept a journal of her process, detailing her successes and challenges. The OT student created three games for people with stroke using Alice 2.0. She found that although there were many supports in Alice for creating stories, it lacked critical pieces necessary for game design. Her recommendations for a future programming environment for therapists were that it (1) be efficient, (2) include basic game design pieces so therapists do not have to create them, (3) provide technical support, and (4) be simple. With the incorporation of these recommendations, a future programming environment for therapists will be an effective tool for therapeutic game development.

  3. Does Morality Harm Children? Alice Miller on Morality and Poisonous Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fridley, William L.

    2006-01-01

    Alice Miller, the former psychoanalyst, has gained world renown for her controversial and provocative writings on child rearing. Miller contends that traditional child rearing practices--in schools, ecclesiastical settings, and the family--consist of physical and emotional cruelty that she labels "poisonous pedagogy." According to…

  4. Online Reconstruction and Calibration with Feedback Loop in the ALICE High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohr, David; Shahoyan, Ruben; Zampolli, Chiara; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Wiechula, Jens; Gorbunov, Sergey; Chauvin, Alex; Schweda, Kai; Lindenstruth, Volker

    2016-11-01

    ALICE (A Large Heavy Ion Experiment) is one of the four large scale experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The High Level Trigger (HLT) is an online computing farm, which reconstructs events recorded by the ALICE detector in real-time. The most computing-intensive task is the reconstruction of the particle trajectories. The main tracking devices in ALICE are the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and the Inner Tracking System (ITS). The HLT uses a fast GPU-accelerated algorithm for the TPC tracking based on the Cellular Automaton principle and the Kalman filter. ALICE employs gaseous subdetectors which are sensitive to environmental conditions such as ambient pressure and temperature and the TPC is one of these. A precise reconstruction of particle trajectories requires the calibration of these detectors. As our first topic, we present some recent optimizations to our GPU-based TPC tracking using the new GPU models we employ for the ongoing and upcoming data taking period at LHC. We also show our new approach to fast ITS standalone tracking. As our second topic, we present improvements to the HLT for facilitating online reconstruction including a new flat data model and a new data flow chain. The calibration output is fed back to the reconstruction components of the HLT via a feedback loop. We conclude with an analysis of a first online calibration test under real conditions during the Pb-Pb run in November 2015, which was based on these new features.

  5. "Spend Your Whole Life Learning and Giving!": An Interview with Alice Sterling Honig

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Early Childhood Research & Practice, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an interview with Dr. Alice Sterling Honig which took place in Syracuse, New York, in May 2009. Michele Jachim Barrett of Syracuse University conducted the interview using questions prepared by the editors of "ECRP." Dr. Honig is currently Professor Emerita at Syracuse University. Her work in early childhood development, care,…

  6. A Linguistic Analysis of Rhetorical Strategies in Selected Narratives of Alice Walker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matunda, Robert Stephen Mokaya

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to analyze rhetorical strategies of Alice Walker in four narratives, namely, "The Color Purple, In Search of Our Mother's Gardens, Possessing the Secret of Joy, and Now Is the Time To Open Your Heart". As such, this study helps to expand the body of investigation relating linguistics to literature and medium…

  7. Programming in Pairs with Alice to Improve Confidence, Enjoyment, and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop-Clark, Cathy; Courte, Jill; Howard, Elizabeth V.

    2006-01-01

    Students in an introductory computing class participated in a study investigating the impact of using a graphics programming environment (Alice) and pair-programming on confidence, enjoyment and achievement. Sixty-four participants completed a short questionnaire and a content pre-test about computer programming concepts. Students were then…

  8. Writing a Rationale for a Controversial Common Reading Book: Alice Walker's "The Color Purple."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthington, Pepper

    1985-01-01

    Offers a rationale that can be used to defend the assignment of Alice Walker's controversial novel for class reading. Indicates four issues that might evoke calls for censorship: (1) subject matter, (2) vocabulary, (3) grammar, and (4) the epistolary form of the work. (RBW)

  9. Effects of Using Alice and Scratch in an Introductory Programming Course for Corrective Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chih-Kai

    2014-01-01

    Scratch, a visual programming language, was used in many studies in computer science education. Most of them reported positive results by integrating Scratch into K-12 computer courses. However, the object-oriented concept, one of the important computational thinking skills, is not represented well in Scratch. Alice, another visual programming…

  10. The influence of boreal winter extratropical North Pacific Oscillation on Australian spring rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Linye; Li, Yun; Duan, Wansuo

    2016-08-01

    The North Pacific Oscillation (NPO) is a key atmospheric intrinsic mode. This study concerns mechanisms that the NPO influences Southern Hemisphere climate anomalies after several months. It is found that the boreal wintertime NPO has a significant negative connection with austral spring rainfall anomalies in Australia, particularly in the Northern Territory, Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria. A positive NPO phase tends to be followed by dry conditions, while a negative phase by wet conditions in austral spring over much of northern and eastern Australia. The physical mechanism by which the boreal winter NPO affects Australian rainfall arises from the NPO seasonal footprinting mechanism that generates significant tropical central and eastern Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) warming anomalies during austral spring. Then, the positive NPO-related SST warming anomalies over the tropical central-eastern Pacific further induce a weakened Walker circulation, with its western subsiding branch over Australia, suppressing convection and thereby reducing rainfall. Furthermore, the NPO plays an important role in contributing to the significant long-term trends of the Northern Territory and Queensland rainfalls. The decreasing amplitude of the NPO contributes much of the observed rainfall wetting trends in the Northern Territory (~50 %) and Queensland (~60 %) regions during 1951-2010. Noted that caution is recommended regarding the Australian spring rainfall trend results obtained in this study as the austral spring rainfall trends may be sensitive to the choice of the selected time period.

  11. Algae Reefs in Shark Bay, Western Australia, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Numerous algae reefs are seen in Shark Bay, Western Australia, Australia (26.0S, 113.5E) especially in the southern portions of the bay. The south end is more saline because tidal flow in and out of the bay is restricted by sediment deposited at the north and central end of the bay opposite the mouth of the Wooramel River. This extremely arid region produces little sediment runoff so that the waters are very clear, saline and rich in algae.

  12. Hot Spring Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    López-López, Olalla; Cerdán, María Esperanza; González-Siso, María Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Hot springs have been investigated since the XIX century, but isolation and examination of their thermophilic microbial inhabitants did not start until the 1950s. Many thermophilic microorganisms and their viruses have since been discovered, although the real complexity of thermal communities was envisaged when research based on PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes arose. Thereafter, the possibility of cloning and sequencing the total environmental DNA, defined as metagenome, and the study of the genes rescued in the metagenomic libraries and assemblies made it possible to gain a more comprehensive understanding of microbial communities—their diversity, structure, the interactions existing between their components, and the factors shaping the nature of these communities. In the last decade, hot springs have been a source of thermophilic enzymes of industrial interest, encouraging further study of the poorly understood diversity of microbial life in these habitats. PMID:25369743

  13. Extraordinary micro-endemism in Australian desert spring amphipods.

    PubMed

    Murphy, N P; Adams, M; Guzik, M T; Austin, A D

    2013-03-01

    Increasing pressure for water in the Australian arid zone is placing enormous stress on the diverse endemic communities inhabiting desert springs. Detailed information about the evolutionary processes occurring within and between individual endemic species will help to develop effective and biologically relevant management strategies this fragile ecosystem. To help determine conservation priorities, we documented the genetic structure of the endemic freshwater amphipod populations in springs fed by the Great Artesian Basin in central Australia. Phylogenetic and phylogeographic history and genetic diversity measures were examined using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA from approximately 500 chiltoniid amphipods across an entire group of springs. Pronounced genetic diversity was identified, demonstrating that levels of endemism have been grossly underestimated in these amphipods. Using the GMYC model, 13 genetically divergent lineages were recognized as Evolutionarily Significant Units (ESUs), all of which could be considered as separate species. The results show that due to the highly fragmented ecosystem, these taxa have highly restricted distributions. Many of the identified ESUs are endemic to a very small number of already degraded springs, with the rarest existing in single springs. Despite their extraordinarily small ranges, most ESUs showed relative demographic stability and high levels of genetic diversity, and genetic diversity was not directly linked to habitat extent. The relatively robust genetic health of ESUs does not preclude them from endangerment, as their limited distributions ensure they will be highly vulnerable to future water extraction.

  14. Spring magnet films.

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, S. D.; Fullerton, E. E.; Gornakov, V. S.; Inomata, A.; Jiang, J. S.; Nikitenko, V. I.; Shapiro, A. J.; Shull, R. D.; Sowers, C. H.

    1999-03-29

    The properties of exchange-spring-coupled bilayer and superlattice films are highlighted for Sm-Co hard magnet and Fe or Co soft magnet layers. The hexagonal Sm-Co is grown via magnetron sputtering in a- and b-axis epitaxial orientations. In both cases the c-axis, in the film plane, is the easy axis of magnetization. Trends in coercivity with film thickness are established and related to the respective microstructure of the two orientations. The magnetization reversal process for the bilayers is examined by magnetometry and magneto-optical imaging, as well as by simulations that utilize a one-dimensional model to provide the spin configuration for each atomic layer. The Fe magnetization is pinned to that of the Sm-Co at the interface, and reversal proceeds via a progressive twisting of the Fe magnetization. The Fe demagnetization curves are reversible as expected for a spring magnet. Comparison of experiment and simulations indicates that the spring magnet behavior can be understood from the intrinsic properties of the hard and soft layers. Estimated are made of the ultimate gain in performance that can potentially be realized in this system.

  15. Spring operated accelerator and constant force spring mechanism therefor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shillinger, G. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A spring assembly consisting of an elongate piece of flat spring material formed into a spiral configuration and a free running spool in circumscribing relation to which this spring is disposed was developed. The spring has a distal end that is externally accessible so that when the distal end is drawn along a path, the spring unwinds against a restoring force present in the portion of the spring that resides in a transition region between a relatively straight condition on the path and a fully wound condition on the spool. When the distal end is released, the distal end is accelerated toward the spool by the force existing at the transition region which force is proportional to the cross-sectional area of the spring.

  16. Adult Learners' Week in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, John

    2002-01-01

    Promotional materials and activities for Australia's Adult Learners Week, which are shaped by a variety of stakeholders , include media strategies and a website. Activities are evaluated using a market research company and website and telephone hotline statistics. (SK)

  17. Australia's Next Top Fraction Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peter Gould suggests Australia's next top fraction model should be a linear model rather than an area model. He provides a convincing argument and gives examples of ways to introduce a linear model in primary classrooms.

  18. Genesis of the central zone of the Nolans Bore rare earth element deposit, Northern Territory, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoneveld, Louise; Spandler, Carl; Hussey, Kelvin

    2015-08-01

    the surrounding host rocks. Where allanite and fluorapatite are texturally related, the fluorapatite is relatively depleted in the light rare earth elements (LREEs), whereas allanite is relatively LREE enriched, suggesting co-crystallisation. We tentatively date the BX1 ore stage to 1440 ± 80 Ma based on U-Pb dating of thorianite. Sm-Nd isotope isochrons derived from in situ isotope analysis of cognate apatite and allanite date the BX2 and BX3 events to ca. 400 Ma, while U-Pb dating of late-stage monazite from the BX4 ore stage returned an age of ca. 350 Ma. Therefore, formation of the central zone at Nolans Bore involved multiple alteration/brecciation events that collectively span over 1 billion years in duration. We suggest that the BX1-type veins and breccias were formed from REE-rich, saline (F- and Cl-bearing) fluids that infiltrated the granulite-grade host rocks in association with either shear activation events of the Redbank Shear Zone (1500-1400 Ma) or intrusion of late-stage pegmatites of the Mt Boothby area. BX2, BX3, and BX4 events record deformation and hydrothermal alteration associated with the Alice Springs Orogeny (400-350 Ma). These hydrothermal events occurred at temperatures of 450 to ~600 °C, due to inflow of highly acidic hydrous fluids derived from a magmatic source, or from mixing of meteoric and metamorphic fluids. Our data testify to the long and complex geological history of not only the Nolans Bore REE deposit, but also of the rocks of the eastern Reynolds Range, and demonstrate the great utility of using hydrothermally derived REE minerals to trace the timing of crustal deformation events and source of associated hydrothermal fluids.

  19. Neutron scattering in Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, R.B.

    1994-12-31

    Neutron scattering techniques have been part of the Australian scientific research community for the past three decades. The High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR) is a multi-use facility of modest performance that provides the only neutron source in the country suitable for neutron scattering. The limitations of HIFAR have been recognized and recently a Government initiated inquiry sought to evaluate the future needs of a neutron source. In essence, the inquiry suggested that a delay of several years would enable a number of key issues to be resolved, and therefore a more appropriate decision made. In the meantime, use of the present source is being optimized, and where necessary research is being undertaken at major overseas neutron facilities either on a formal or informal basis. Australia has, at present, a formal agreement with the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) for access to the spallation source ISIS. Various aspects of neutron scattering have been implemented on HIFAR, including investigations of the structure of biological relevant molecules. One aspect of these investigations will be presented. Preliminary results from a study of the interaction of the immunosuppressant drug, cyclosporin-A, with reconstituted membranes suggest that the hydrophobic drug interdigitated with lipid chains.

  20. Heron Island, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Heron Island is located at the sourthern end of Australia's 2,050 km-long Great Barrier Reef. Surrounded by coral reef and home to over 1000 species of fish, scuba divers and scientists alike are drawn to the island's resort and research station. The true-color image above was taken by Space Imaging's Ikonos satellite with a resolution of 4 meters per pixel-high enough to see individual boats tied up at the small marina. The narrow channel leading from the marina to the ocean was blasted and dredged decades ago, before the island became a national park. Since then the Australian government has implemented conservation measures, such as limiting the number of tourists and removing or recycling, instead of incinerating, all trash. One of the applications of remote sensing data from Ikonos is environmental monitoring, including studies of coral reef health. For more information about the island, read Heron Island. Image by Robert Simmon, based on data copyright Space Imaging

  1. Indigenous actinorhizal plants of Australia.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, Nishath K; Kennedy, Ivan R

    2013-11-01

    Indigenous species of actinorhizal plants of Casuarinaceae, Elaeagnaceae and Rhamnaceae are found in specific regions of Australia. Most of these plants belong to Casuarinaceae, the dominant actinorhizal family in Australia. Many of them have significant environmental and economical value. The other two families with their indigenous actinorhizal plants have only a minor presence in Australia. Most Australian actinorhizal plants have their native range only in Australia, whereas two of these plants are also found indigenously elsewhere. The nitrogen-fixing ability of these plants varies between species. This ability needs to be investigated in some of these plants. Casuarinas form a distinctive but declining part of the Australian landscape. Their potential has rarely been applied in forestry in Australia despite their well-known uses, which are being judiciously exploited elsewhere. To remedy this oversight, a programme has been proposed for increasing and improving casuarinas that would aid in greening more regions of Australia, increasing the soil fertility and the area of wild life habitat (including endangered species). Whether these improved clones would be productive with local strains of Frankia or they need an external inoculum of Frankia should be determined and the influence of mycorrhizal fungi on these clones also should be investigated.

  2. [Biomineralization at hot springs and mineral springs, and their significance in relation to the Earth's history].

    PubMed

    Akai, J

    2000-12-01

    Yunokoya hot spring, black and brittle stromatolitic structures which were composed of amorphous Mn minerals are growing. The form of these structures are hemispherical. Many bacteria that were coated with amorphous Mn minerals were found on these structures. Furthermore, Precambrian (Proterozoic : Wittenoom-Chichester region, western Australia) manganese stromatolite was briefly shown in comparison. The black stromatolite has been clarified to be composed of todorokite. Small spotty and donuts-like shaped todorokite aggregates which are very similar to biologically induced Mn-precipitates were found in massive dolomite layers.

  3. The Radiometric Map of Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minty, Brian; Franklin, Ross; Milligan, Peter; Richardson, Murray; Wilford, John

    2009-12-01

    Geoscience Australia and the Australian State and Territory Geological Surveys have systematically surveyed most of the Australian continent over the past 40 years using airborne gamma-ray spectrometry to map potassium, uranium and thorium elemental concentrations at the Earth's surface. However, the individual surveys that comprise the national gamma-ray spectrometric radioelement database are not all registered to the same datum. This limits the usefulness of the database as it is not possible to easily combine surveys into regional compilations or make accurate comparisons between radiometric signatures in different survey areas. To solve these problems, Geoscience Australia has undertaken an Australia-Wide Airborne Geophysical Survey (AWAGS), funded under the Australian Government's Onshore Energy Security Program, to serve as a radioelement baseline for all current and future airborne gamma-ray spectrometric surveys in Australia. The AWAGS survey has been back-calibrated to the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) radioelement datum. We have used the AWAGS data to level the national radioelement database by estimating survey correction factors that, once applied, minimise both the differences in radioelement estimates between surveys (where these surveys overlap) and the differences between the surveys and the AWAGS traverses. The database is thus effectively levelled to the IAEA datum. The levelled database has been used to produce the first `Radiometric Map of Australia' - levelled and merged composite potassium (% K), uranium (ppm eU) and thorium (ppm eTh) grids over Australia at 100m resolution. Interpreters can use the map to reliably compare the radiometric signatures observed over different parts of Australia. This enables the assessment of key mineralogical and geochemical properties of bedrock and regolith materials from different geological provinces and regions with contrasting landscape histories.

  4. Irradiation behaviour of a tritium breeding material, γ-LiAlO 2- results of two in-pile experiments: ALICE I and ALICE II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botter, F.; Rasneur, B.; Roth, E.

    1988-11-01

    γ-LiAlO 2 has been studied at CEA as potential breeder material for fusion reactors within the scope of the EEC fusion technology program. Radiation damage was investigated by irradiating unclad aluminate samples in the core of the OSIRIS reactor at Saclay. As part of the international breeder material comparison program named BEATRIX, US samples were irradiated along with those prepared in Saclay; samples of natural 6Li content and 96% enriched ones were irradiated. Shapes were chosen to enable postirradiation examinations (PIE), and microstructures were optimized for tritium release. The ALICE 1 experiment was carried out during 25.7 full power days (FPD), ALICE II lasted 36.3 FPD. Temperatures ranged from 400 to 600°C in the first, from 750 to 850°C in the second ALICE irradiation (sample core temperatures). In both cases the maximum flux on the samples was 2.1 × 10 18n m -2 s -1 fast, and 0.7 × 10 18n m -2 s -2 thermal Power dissipated was up to 100 W/cm 3, higher than the average in most reactor blanket designs by a factor 3 to 10, thus enabling the highest burn-ups to correspond to more than two years of possible operation in a full-scale reactor. In the lower temperature range of irradiation no significant damage was observed. In the higher one shrinkage due to sintering was induced. Whatever the microstructure, the flux and temperature, all samples (but one) not exceeding 5 mm diameter and length were mechanically intact. Above those dimensions cracking, which can be assigned to excessive thermal stress, could be observed. Given anticipated operating conditions of blankets being designed, the behaviour of γ-LiAlO 2 under irradiation is that of a very promising material.

  5. Inherited structure and coupled crust-mantle lithosphere evolution: Numerical models of Central Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Philip J.; Pysklywec, Russell N.

    2016-05-01

    Continents have a rich tectonic history that have left lasting crustal impressions. In analyzing Central Australian intraplate orogenesis, complex continental features make it difficult to identify the controls of inherited structure. Here the tectonics of two types of inherited structures (e.g., a thermally enhanced or a rheologically strengthened region) are compared in numerical simulations of continental compression with and without "glacial buzzsaw" erosion. We find that although both inherited structures produce deformation in the upper crust that is confined to areas where material contrasts, patterns of deformation in the deep lithosphere differ significantly. Furthermore, our models infer that glacial buzzsaw erosion has little impact at depth. This tectonic isolation of the mantle lithosphere from glacial processes may further assist in the identification of a controlling inherited structure in intraplate orogenesis. Our models are interpreted in the context of Central Australian tectonics (specifically the Petermann and Alice Springs orogenies).

  6. Review of Australia's polio surveillance.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Beverley J; Durrheim, David N

    2013-06-30

    With eradication almost within reach, the importance of detecting every poliomyelitis case has taken on additional significance. The selected surveillance strategy must be effective and efficient. A review of polio surveillance in Australia was conducted to consider whether current strategies were optimal. Document review and semi-structured key informant interviews were used to conduct the review. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. The review was an iterative process with feedback on the findings sought from interviewees. Since Western Pacific Regional polio-elimination status was certified, one imported adult case was detected in 2007 in Australia, with no evidence of further transmission, and no Australian paediatric cases identified. Respondents reported that: it was not possible to prevent importations; paediatric cases were more likely to be identified than adult cases; and there may be a low level of suspicion among clinicians. Case detection and outbreak mitigation were considered key reasons to undertake polio surveillance. While Australia has not achieved one of the key World Health Organization (WHO) surveillance targets, this did not compromise Australias polio-free status. Identified issues with polio surveillance were the potential for an importation with high attendant investigation and containment costs, low stool sample collection rates, and the opportunity to improve safeguards around the importation and laboratory storage of biological samples containing poliovirus. The review found strong support for ongoing polio surveillance, particularly to detect imported cases and to demonstrate commitment to maintaining a polio-free region. Existing polio surveillance strategies were considered appropriate for Australia.

  7. Tuberculosis notifications in Australia, 2011.

    PubMed

    Bareja, Christina; Waring, Justin; Stapledon, Richard; Toms, Cindy; Douglas, Paul

    2014-12-31

    The National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System received 1,385 tuberculosis (TB) notifications in 2011, representing a rate of 6.2 cases per 100,000 population. While Australia has maintained a rate of 5 to 6 cases per 100,000 for TB since the mid-1980s, there has been a steady increase in incidence over the past decade. In 2011, Australia's overseas-born population continued to represent the majority of TB notifications (88%) with a notification rate of 20.2 per 100,000. The incidence of TB in the Australian-born Indigenous population has fluctuated over the last decade and showed no clear trend; however, in 2011 the notification rate was 4.9 per 100,000, which is a notable decrease from the 7.5 per 100,000 recorded in 2010. The incidence of TB in the Australian-born non-Indigenous population has continued to remain low at 0.9 per 100,000. Australia continued to record only a small number of multi-drug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) cases nationally (n=25), all of which were identified in the overseas-born population. To ensure that Australia can retain its low TB rate and work toward reducing rates further, it is essential that Australia maintains good centralised national TB reporting to monitor trends and identify at-risk populations, and continues to contribute to global TB control initiatives.

  8. First ceratosaurian dinosaur from Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Erich M. G.; Carrano, Matthew T.; Holland, Timothy; Wagstaff, Barbara E.; Pickering, David; Rich, Thomas H.; Vickers-Rich, Patricia

    2012-05-01

    The basal theropod dinosaur clade Ceratosauria, and its subclade Abelisauroidea, is characteristic of late Mesozoic terrestrial vertebrate faunas in western Gondwana (South America, Africa, Madagascar, and India) and Europe. Yet unambiguous records of ceratosaurs have hitherto been absent from Australia, where the theropod assemblage appears to include several typically Laurasian clades. Here, we report the first evidence of ceratosaurs (and potentially abelisauroids) from eastern Gondwana--a diagnostic astragalocalcaneum from the Aptian (121-125 Ma) of Victoria, Australia. Ceratosauria thus occurred in both western and eastern Gondwana during the Early Cretaceous. This fossil adds to the poorly known dinosaur fauna of Australia, a major clade of basal theropods, emphasising that its mid-Cretaceous theropod diversity was surprisingly cosmopolitan despite relative geographic isolation, including clades that have been thought to be typical of both Gondwana and Laurasia--Ceratosauria, Spinosauridae, Carcharodontosauria, Tyrannosauroidea, and Deinonychosauria. Such a contemporaneous association of theropod clades is unknown from other Gondwanan continents and questions the views that the late Mesozoic dinosaur fauna of Australia was dominated by Gondwanan or Laurasian elements, extreme isolation, relictualism, and/or novelty as a `centre of origin'. The cosmopolitan theropod fauna of Australia probably reflects the global distribution of these clades early in their history, prior to significant continental breakup.

  9. First ceratosaurian dinosaur from Australia.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Erich M G; Carrano, Matthew T; Holland, Timothy; Wagstaff, Barbara E; Pickering, David; Rich, Thomas H; Vickers-Rich, Patricia

    2012-05-01

    The basal theropod dinosaur clade Ceratosauria, and its subclade Abelisauroidea, is characteristic of late Mesozoic terrestrial vertebrate faunas in western Gondwana (South America, Africa, Madagascar, and India) and Europe. Yet unambiguous records of ceratosaurs have hitherto been absent from Australia, where the theropod assemblage appears to include several typically Laurasian clades. Here, we report the first evidence of ceratosaurs (and potentially abelisauroids) from eastern Gondwana--a diagnostic astragalocalcaneum from the Aptian (121-125 Ma) of Victoria, Australia. Ceratosauria thus occurred in both western and eastern Gondwana during the Early Cretaceous. This fossil adds to the poorly known dinosaur fauna of Australia, a major clade of basal theropods, emphasising that its mid-Cretaceous theropod diversity was surprisingly cosmopolitan despite relative geographic isolation, including clades that have been thought to be typical of both Gondwana and Laurasia--Ceratosauria, Spinosauridae, Carcharodontosauria, Tyrannosauroidea, and Deinonychosauria. Such a contemporaneous association of theropod clades is unknown from other Gondwanan continents and questions the views that the late Mesozoic dinosaur fauna of Australia was dominated by Gondwanan or Laurasian elements, extreme isolation, relictualism, and/or novelty as a 'centre of origin'. The cosmopolitan theropod fauna of Australia probably reflects the global distribution of these clades early in their history, prior to significant continental breakup.

  10. Australia`s southeastern Bonaparte basin has plenty of potential

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, S.

    1997-04-21

    Situated in the Timor Sea and Joseph Bonaparte Gulf regions, the Bonaparte basin is one of the Phanerozoic basins of what is now called the North West Shelf of Australia. This basin consists of a number of Paleozoic and Mesozoic synclines and horsts. Drilling success rate for this basin is one of the highest in Australia in the last 5 years. New opportunities are available in the southeastern Bonaparte basin, where seven vacant tracts have just been released for application for exploration permits. The paper discusses the regional geology, previous exploration activities, and potentials of the southern Petrel sub-basin and Darwin shelf.

  11. Changes in distribution and frequency of fungi associated with a foliar disease complex of pyrethrum in Australia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Australia, pyrethrum is affected by a foliar disease complex which can substantially reduce green leaf area and deleteriously affect yield. Traditionally, the dominant disease in spring has been ray blight, caused by Stagonosporopsis tanaceti, with other foliar diseases more prevalent during aut...

  12. (Multi-)strange hadron and light (anti-)nuclei production with ALICE at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, Ramona

    2016-01-22

    Thanks to its excellent tracking performance and particle identification capabilities, the ALICE detector allows for the identification of light (anti-)(hyper)nuclei and for the measurement of (multi-)strange particles over a wide range of transverse momentum. Deuterons, {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He and their corresponding anti-nuclei are identified via their specific energy loss in the Time Projection Chamber and the velocity measurement provided by the Time-Of-Flight detector. Strange and multi-strange baryons and mesons as well as (anti-)hypertritons are reconstructed via their topological decays. Detailed measurements of (multi-)strange hadron production in pp, p–Pb and Pb–Pb collision and of light (anti-)nuclei and (anti-)hypertritons in Pb–Pb collisions with ALICE at the LHC are presented. The experimental results will be compared with the predictions of both statistical hadronization and coalescence models.

  13. Open charm meson analysis in proton-proton collisions at the LHC with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortona, G.

    2010-06-01

    The extremely high energies that will be reached with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will allow studying the production of open charm with high statistics in both proton-proton and Pb-Pb collisions. The study of open charm (D) mesons in Pb-Pb collisions will be a powerful tool to investigate the production of heavy flavours and their interaction with the medium produced in such collisions (QGP). Heavy flavour yields will provide also a normalization for quarkonia production. We will present a general overview of the ALICE collaboration heavy flavour program, then we will focus on the analysis and reconstruction strategies developed for the study of the charmed (D) mesons by the ALICE collaboration for proton-proton collisions, with special emphasis on the charged D mesons. Finally, some expected results obtained with MonteCarlo production will be shown.

  14. The MRPC-based ALICE time-of-flight detector: Status andperformance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alici, A.; ALICE Collaboration

    2013-04-01

    The large time-of-flight (TOF) array is one of the main detectors devoted to charged hadron identification in the mid-rapidity region of the ALICE experiment at the LHC. It allows separation among pions, kaons and protons up to a few GeV/c, covering the full azimuthal angle and -0.9<η<0.9. The TOF exploits the innovative MRPC technology capable of an intrinsic time resolution better than 50 ps with an efficiency close to 100% and a large operational plateau; the full array consists of 1593 MRPCs covering a cylindrical surface of 141 m2. The TOF detector has been efficiently taking data since the first pp collisions recorded in ALICE in December 2009. In this report, the status of the TOF detector and the performance achieved for both pp and Pb-Pb collisions aredescribed.

  15. Status and performance of the ALICE MRPC-based Time-Of-Flight detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alici, A.

    2012-10-01

    ALICE is the dedicated heavy-ion experiment at the CERN LHC. One of the main detectors devoted to charged hadron identification in the ALICE central barrel is a large Time-Of-Flight (TOF) array; it allows separation among pions, kaons and protons up to a few GeV/c, covering the full azimuthal angle and -0.9 < η < 0.9. The very good performance required for such a system has been achieved by means of the Multigap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) whose intrinsic time resolution is better than 50 ps with an overall efficiency close to 100% and a large operational plateau; the full array consists of 1593 MRPCs covering a cylindrical surface of 141 m2. In this report, the status of the TOF detector and the performance achieved during the 2010 and 2011 data taking periods are reported together with selected physics results obtained with pp and Pb-Pb collisions.

  16. Strangeness production in p–Pb and Pb–Pb collisions with ALICE at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colella, Domenico; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The main goal of the ALICE experiment is to study the properties of the hot and dense medium created in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The measurement of the (multi-)strange particles is an important tool to understand particle production mechanisms and the dynamics of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). We report on the production of in proton-lead (p–Pb) collisions at and lead-lead (Pb–Pb) collisions at measured by ALICE at the LHC. The comparison of the hyperon-to-pion ratios in the two colliding systems may provide insight into strangeness production mechanisms, while the comparison of the nuclear modification factors helps to determine the contribution of initial state effects and the suppression from strange quark energy loss in nuclear matter.

  17. Recent resonance results measured with the ALICE detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalcin, Serpil; Uysal, Ayben Karasu

    2017-02-01

    Resonances are extremely short lived particles (τ ˜ 10-23 s). Due to their lifetime, they may decay, re-scatter and regenerate between chemical and kinetic freeze-outs. For this reason, they are very significant probes to understand the evolution of the medium and particle production mechanism in heavy ion collisions. Different than other particles, resonance properties such as mass, width and yield can be modified by the medium created in the relativistic collisions. Moreover, comparison of resonances produced in different collisions provide evidences about possible in medium effects and system size dependency of their production. ALICE (A Large Heavy Ion Experiment) is one of the detectors at the LHC specifically designed to investigate the features of the quark gluon plasma (QGP). In this proceeding, the recent ALICE resonance results in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC energies are presented.

  18. Quality assurance of GEM foils for the upgrade of the ALICE TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, M.; Ketzer, B.; Ottnad, J.; Ratza, V.; Urban, S.

    2017-01-01

    With the planned upgrade of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) the current readout technology will be replaced by a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM)—based readout technology in order to allow for a continuous operation at high interaction rates up to 50 kHz. A stack of four GEM stages with non-standard field configuration was chosen to achieve a suppression of the ion backflow below 1%, while maintaining a good energy resolution below σ / E= \\unit[12]% for 55 Fe. A discharge probability of 10‑10 for α-particles was confirmed for this low ion backflow field configuration. This is comparable to standard triple GEM detectors in low discharge settings. To upgrade all the Inner and Outer Readout Chambers of ALICE, 576 GEM foils will be needed. Only GEM foils that fullfill the highest quality criteria can be used. Therefore a quality assurance scheme has been developed that includes a large set of quality assurance measurements.

  19. Humans, water, and the colonization of Australia

    PubMed Central

    O’Grady, Damien

    2016-01-01

    The Pleistocene global dispersal of modern humans required the transit of arid and semiarid regions where the distribution of potable water provided a primary constraint on dispersal pathways. Here, we provide a spatially explicit continental-scale assessment of the opportunities for Pleistocene human occupation of Australia, the driest inhabited continent on Earth. We establish the location and connectedness of persistent water in the landscape using the Australian Water Observations from Space dataset combined with the distribution of small permanent water bodies (springs, gnammas, native wells, waterholes, and rockholes). Results demonstrate a high degree of directed landscape connectivity during wet periods and a high density of permanent water points widely but unevenly distributed across the continental interior. A connected network representing the least-cost distance between water bodies and graded according to terrain cost shows that 84% of archaeological sites >30,000 y old are within 20 km of modern permanent water. We further show that multiple, well-watered routes into the semiarid and arid continental interior were available throughout the period of early human occupation. Depletion of high-ranked resources over time in these paleohydrological corridors potentially drove a wave of dispersal farther along well-watered routes to patches with higher foraging returns. PMID:27671630

  20. Humans, water, and the colonization of Australia.

    PubMed

    Bird, Michael I; O'Grady, Damien; Ulm, Sean

    2016-10-11

    The Pleistocene global dispersal of modern humans required the transit of arid and semiarid regions where the distribution of potable water provided a primary constraint on dispersal pathways. Here, we provide a spatially explicit continental-scale assessment of the opportunities for Pleistocene human occupation of Australia, the driest inhabited continent on Earth. We establish the location and connectedness of persistent water in the landscape using the Australian Water Observations from Space dataset combined with the distribution of small permanent water bodies (springs, gnammas, native wells, waterholes, and rockholes). Results demonstrate a high degree of directed landscape connectivity during wet periods and a high density of permanent water points widely but unevenly distributed across the continental interior. A connected network representing the least-cost distance between water bodies and graded according to terrain cost shows that 84% of archaeological sites >30,000 y old are within 20 km of modern permanent water. We further show that multiple, well-watered routes into the semiarid and arid continental interior were available throughout the period of early human occupation. Depletion of high-ranked resources over time in these paleohydrological corridors potentially drove a wave of dispersal farther along well-watered routes to patches with higher foraging returns.

  1. Spring viremia of carp

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahne, W.; Bjorklund, H.V.; Essbauer, S.; Fijan, N.; Kurath, G.; Winton, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    pring viremia of carp (SVC) is an important disease affecting cyprinids, mainly common carp Cyprinus carpio. The disease is widespread in European carp culture, where it causes significant morbidity and mortality. Designated a notifiable disease by the Office International des Epizooties, SVC is caused by a rhabdovirus, spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV). Affected fish show destruction of tissues in the kidney, spleen and liver, leading to hemorrhage, loss of water-salt balance and impairment of immune response. High mortality occurs at water temperatures of 10 to 17°C, typically in spring. At higher temperatures, infected carp develop humoral antibodies that can neutralize the spread of virus and such carp are protected against re-infection by solid immunity. The virus is shed mostly with the feces and urine of clinically infected fish and by carriers. Waterborne transmission is believed to be the primary route of infection, but bloodsucking parasites like leeches and the carp louse may serve as mechanical vectors of SVCV. The genome of SVCV is composed of a single molecule of linear, negative-sense, single-stranded RNA containing 5 genes in the order 3¹-NPMGL-5¹ coding for the viral nucleoprotein, phosphoprotein, matrix protein, glycoprotein, and polymerase, respectively. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the viral proteins, and sequence homologies between the genes and gene junctions of SVCV and vesicular stomatitis viruses, have led to the placement of the virus as a tentative member of the genus Vesiculovirus in the family Rhabdoviridae. These methods also revealed that SVCV is not related to fish rhabdoviruses of the genus Novirhabdovirus. In vitro replication of SVCV takes place in the cytoplasm of cultured cells of fish, bird and mammalian origin at temperatures of 4 to 31°C, with an optimum of about 20°C. Spring viremia of carp can be diagnosed by clinical signs, isolation of virus in cell culture and molecular methods. Antibodies directed

  2. Test Beam Results for The Fast Interaction Trigger Detector of ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Calvin; Harton, Austin; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo; Alice-Fit Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    CERN (European Center for Nuclear Research) is a global laboratory that studies proton and heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is one of four large experiments at the LHC. ALICE is dedicated to the study of the transition of matter to Quark-Gluon Plasma in heavy ion collisions. In the present ALICE detector, there are two sub-detectors, (the T0 and V0), that provide minimum bias trigger, multiplicity trigger, beam-gas event rejection, collision time for other sub-detectors, online multiplicity and event plane determination. In order to adapt these functionalities to the collision rates expected for the LHC upgrade after 2020, it is planned to replace these systems with a single system, called the Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT). In this poster we describe the FIT upgrade; show the proposed characteristics of the FIT detectors and present test beam performance results that support the current design parameters. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants NSF-PHY-1407051 and NSF-PHY-1305280.

  3. A Calibration Technique for the ALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossyleon, Karen; Thomas, Chaan; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo; Ploskon, Mateusz; Jacobs, Peter

    2011-10-01

    The Large Hadron Collider at CERN is the world's largest and highest energy, particle and heavy ion collider. The LHC explores the frontiers of particle physics using high energy proton + proton collisions and the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma through the collision of heavy nuclei. ALICE is one of the four LHC experiments, specialized for the study of heavy ion collisions. This study presents our work on a detector of ALICE, the Electromagnetic Calorimeter. We are analyzing the proton-proton collision data recorded at 2.76 TeV. The ALICE TPC is used to isolate the tracks of eee- pairs that originate from the decay of J/ Ψ particle and that fall within the EMCal's acceptance. The TPC measures the momentum of these electron tracks, which is compared to the energy deposited by them in the EMCal. We therefore use the precise measurement of TPC momentum as the reference to calibrate the EMCal energy measurement. In this presentation we will show the steps taken to analyze the data, how we performed the matching of electron tracks from the J/ Ψ decay with the energy deposited in the EMCal and some preliminary results. Research funded by NSF grant PHY-0968903.

  4. Study of muon bundles from extensive air showers with the ALICE detector at CERN LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtejer, K.

    2016-05-01

    ALICE is one of four large experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, specially designed to study particle production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Located 52 meters underground with 28 meters of overburden rock, it has also been used to detect muons produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the upper atmosphere. The large size and excellent tracking capability of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber are exploited to study the muonic component of extensive air showers. We present the multiplicity distribution of these atmospheric muons and its comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. The latest version of the QGSJET hadronic interaction model was used to simulate the development of the resulting air showers. High multiplicity events containing more than 100 reconstructed muons were also studied. Similar events have been studied in previous underground experiments such as ALEPH and DELPHI at LEP without satisfactory explanations for the frequency of the highest multiplicity events. We demonstrate that the high muon-multiplicity events observed in ALICE stem from primary cosmic rays with energies above 1016 eV and that the frequency of these events can be successfully described by assuming a heavy mass composition of primary cosmic rays in this energy range.

  5. Technical Design Report for the Upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALICE Collaboration; Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Masoodi, A. Ahmad; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Anderssen, E. C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badala, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bairathi, V.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J..; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastian Van Beelen, J.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Battistin, M.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baudot, J.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Benettoni, M.; Benotto, F.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Besson, A.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhatti, A.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Boehmer, F. V.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bornschein, J.; Borshchov, V. N.; Bortolin, C.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Cariola, P.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Caudron, T.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Claus, G.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Coli, S.; Colledani, C.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Da Riva, E.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Decosse, C.; DelagrangeI, H.; Deloff, A.; Déenes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Robertis, G.; De Roo, K.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Divia, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dorheim, S.; Dorokhov, A.; Doziere, G.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dulinski, W.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Ehlers, R. J., III; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernádez Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fiorenza, G.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Franco, M.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gajanana, D.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubilato, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; Gomez Marzoa, M.; Gonzáalez-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Greiner, L. C.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grondin, D.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Hennes, E.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hillemanns, H.; Himmi, A.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Hu-Guo, C.; Humanic, T. J.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Igolkin, S.; Ijzermans, P.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Junique, A.; Jusko, A.; Kalcher, S.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keil, M.; Ketzer, B.; Khan, M. Mohisin.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Krymov, E. B.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; Lesenechal, Y.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Listratenko, O. M.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loddo, F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.; Luzzi, C.; Gago, A. M.; Jacobs, P. M.; Ma, R.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'kevich, D.; Maltsev, N. A.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mapelli, A.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Marras, D.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Blanco, J. Martin; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Maslov, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Mattiazzo, S.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazumder, R.; Mazza, G.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitu, C. M.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Mongelli, M.; Montanõ Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Morel, F.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Bhopal, F. Muhammad; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Okatan, A.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paíc, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palmeri, A.; Panati, S.; Pant, D.; Pantano, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Passfeld, A.; Pastore, C.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Peryt, I. W.; Pesci, A.; Pestov, Y.; Petagna, P.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Pham, H.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Pohjoisaho, E. H. O.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Protsenko, M. A.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Puggioni, C.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rasson, J. E.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohni, S.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossewij, M. J.; Rossi, A.; Roudier, S.; Rousset, J.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sacchetti, M.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Sánchez Rodríguez, F. J.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Santoro, R.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schipper, J. D.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, P. A.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senyukhov, S.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Sgura, I.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snoeys, W.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, V. Sooden F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Špalek, J.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vasquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Šuljić, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Ter Minasyan, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turchetta, R.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Tymchuk, I. T.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Palomo, L. Valencia; Valentino, V.; Valin, I.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Vannucci, L.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vasta, P.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Verlaat, B.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, V.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Winter, M.; Xiang, C.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yang, S.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2014-08-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is studying the physics of strongly interacting matter, and in particular the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), using proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major upgrade of the experimental apparatus, planned for installation in the second long LHC shutdown in the years 2018-2019. A key element of the ALICE upgrade is the construction of a new, ultra-light, high-resolution Inner Tracking System (ITS) based on monolithic CMOS pixel detectors. The primary focus of the ITS upgrade is on improving the performance for detection of heavy-flavour hadrons, and of thermal photons and low-mass di-electrons emitted by the QGP. With respect to the current detector, the new Inner Tracking System will significantly enhance the determination of the distance of closest approach to the primary vertex, the tracking efficiency at low transverse momenta, and the read-out rate capabilities. This will be obtained by seven concentric detector layers based on a 50 μm thick CMOS pixel sensor with a pixel pitch of about 30×30 μm2. This document, submitted to the LHCC (LHC experiments Committee) in September 2013, presents the design goals, a summary of the R&D activities, with focus on the technical implementation of the main detector components, and the projected detector and physics performance.

  6. Spring loaded thermocouple module

    DOEpatents

    McKelvey, T.E.; Guarnieri, J.J.

    1984-03-13

    A thermocouple arrangement is provided for mounting in a blind hole of a specimen. The thermocouple arrangement includes a cup-like holder member, which receives an elongated thermal insulator, one end of which is seated at an end wall of the holder. A pair of thermocouple wires, threaded through passageways in the insulator, extend beyond the insulator member, terminating in free ends which are joined together in a spherical weld bead. A spring, held captive within the holder, applies a bias force to the weld bead, through the insulator member. The outside surface of the holder is threaded for engagement with the blind hole of the specimen. When the thermocouple is installed in the specimen, the spherical contact surface of the weld bead is held in contact with the end wall of the blind hole, with a predetermined bias force.

  7. Spring loaded thermocouple module

    DOEpatents

    McKelvey, Thomas E.; Guarnieri, Joseph J.

    1985-01-01

    A thermocouple arrangement is provided for mounting in a blind hole of a specimen. The thermocouple arrangement includes a cup-like holder member, which receives an elongated thermal insulator, one end of which is seated at an end wall of the holder. A pair of thermocouple wires, threaded through passageways in the insulator, extend beyond the insulator member, terminating in free ends which are joined together in a spherical weld bead. A spring, held captive within the holder, applies a bias force to the weld bead, through the insulator member. The outside surface of the holder is threaded for engagement with the blind hole of the specimen. When the thermocouple is installed in the specimen, the spherical contact surface of the weld bead is held in contact with the end wall of the blind hole, with a predetermined bias force.

  8. Springing into Spring: Reading Games for the Season

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, D. Jackson

    2008-01-01

    As spring arrives, more time is spent outdoors. Unfortunately, as spring fever hits, books and learning often take a backseat. The goal is for educators to find a way to re-engage learners. In this article, the author presents a seasonal story and game that can help catch students' attention by making learning both informative and entertaining.…

  9. Brackish karstic springs model: application to Almiros spring in Crete.

    PubMed

    Maramathas, Athanasios; Maroulis, Zacharias; Marinos-Kouris, Dimitrios

    2003-01-01

    A mathematical model is proposed to simulate brackish karstic springs. Rainfall data constitutes model input information while output information is the discharge and the chloride concentration of the water versus time. The model was constructed by considering the mass and mechanical energy balance on the hydrodynamic analog, which includes three reservoirs outflowing in a tube that lies adjacent to the spring. Two reservoirs emulate the karstic system, and the third one emulates the sea. The discharge of the spring is given by the sum of the discharge of the reservoirs, and the chloride concentration by the solution of the mixing problem between the fresh and the salty water, which exists in the tube leading to the spring. The model is applied to the spring of Almiros at Heraklion, Crete, Greece. The agreement between model values and field measurements is very good for depletion periods and satisfactory for recharge periods.

  10. Large springs of east Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Pao-chang P.; Criner, J.H.; Poole, J.L.

    1963-01-01

    Springs constitute an important source of water in east Tennessee, and many individual springs are capable of supplying the large quantities needed for municipal and industrial supplies. Most of the springs in east Tennessee issue from solution openings and fractured and faulted zones in limestone and dolomite of the Knox Group, Chickamauga Limestone, and Conasauga Group. The ability of these rocks to yield a sustained flow of water to springs is dependent on a system of interconnected openings through which water can infiltrate from the land surface and move to points of natural discharge. Ninety springs were selected for detailed study, and 84 of these are analyzed in terms of magnitude and variability of discharge. Of the 84 springs analyzed, 4 flow at an average rate of 10 to 100 cfs (cubic feet per second), 62 at an average rate of 1 to 10 cfs, and 18 at an average rate of 1 cfs or less. Of the 90 springs, 75 are variable in their discharge; that is, the ratio of their fluctuations to their average discharges exceeds 100 percent. Mathematical analysis of the flow recession curve of Mill Spring near Jefferson City shows that the hydrologic system contributing to the flow of the spring has an effective capacity of about 70 million cubic feet of water. The rate of depletion of this volume of water, in the absence of significant precipitation, averages 0.0056 cfs per day between the time when the hydrologic system is full and the time when the spring ceases to flow. From such a curve it is possible to determine at any time the residual volume of water remaining in the system and the expected rate of decrease in discharge from that time to cessation of flow. Correlation of discharge measurements of 22 springs with those of Mill Spring shows that rough approximations of discharge can be projected for springs for which few measurements are available. Seventeen of the springs analyzed in this manner show good correlation with Mill Spring: that is, their coefficients

  11. Experimenting with Inexpensive Plastic Springs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Leander; Marques, Adriana; Sánchez, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Acommon undergraduate laboratory experience is the determination of the elastic constant of a spring, whether studying the elongation under a static load or studying the damped harmonic motion of the spring with a suspended mass. An alternative approach to this laboratory experience has been suggested by Menezes et al., aimed at studying the…

  12. Spring loaded locator pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Groll, Todd A.; White, James P.

    1998-01-01

    This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece.

  13. Spring loaded locator pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Groll, T.A.; White, J.P.

    1998-03-03

    This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece. 5 figs.

  14. Mallow Springs, County Cork, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldwell, C. R.

    1996-03-01

    Because of its copious and reliable rainfall, Ireland has an abundance of springs. Many of the larger ones issue from the Carboniferous limestone that occurs in over 40% of the country. The spring water is mainly a calcium bicarbonate type with a temperature of about 10°C. In the 18th century, warm and cold springs were developed as spas in various parts of Ireland. The popularity of these springs was short and most were in major decline by 1850. Today only one cold spa at Lisdoonvarna, Co. Clare is still operating. Springs in Ireland were places of religious significance for the pre-Christian Druidic religion. In the Christian period they became holy wells, under the patronage of various saints. Cures for many different ailments were attributed to water from these wells.

  15. High Technology in Australia: Rhetoric or Reality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sekhon, J. G.; Shannon, A. G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper outlines the imbalance in Australia's intellectual and high technology trade, and argues that if Australia is to move beyond being a high technology colony, a new attitude toward research and development needs to be engendered, particularly in the private sector of industry. It is noted that Australia supplies a small number of the…

  16. Contextualising Multilingualism in Australia Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    This paper will begin by looking at globalisation, education and transnationalism in the context of Australia's post-war immigration history leading to a brief examination of the international literature surrounding second and third generation immigration. A brief review of international educational trends in English language teaching in recent…

  17. Governing International Education in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidhu, Ravinder

    2004-01-01

    This paper uses the international education sector in Australia as a case study to argue against understanding globalization as an exogenous force. It introduces the notion of globalization as a governmentality and discusses alternative interpretations which take into account notions of subjectivity, positionality and space/time. The paper…

  18. Education Policy Making in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, R. F., Ed.

    Thirteen papers and a speech address the theme of who makes education policy in Australia. Kwong Lee Dow's address assesses national planning in uncertain times and urges flexibility. John Steinle outlines the operation of Australian policy-making and recommends developing think tanks. Edward Holdaway analyzes the complex relationship between…

  19. Improving Reading in Australia's Outback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharratt, Lyn; Hayes, Peter; Coutts, James

    2015-01-01

    Ten years ago, six teachers established a program of literacy intervention and professional learning in remote northwestern Australia based on the Reading Recovery principles. This group of teachers was determined to learn what had to happen in order for them to make a difference with students and then to make it happen. Their work led to getting…

  20. Linear magnetic spring and spring/motor combination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patt, Paul J. (Inventor); Stolfi, Fred R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A magnetic spring, or a spring and motor combination, providing a linear spring force characteristic in each direction from a neutral position, in which the spring action may occur for any desired coordinate of a typical orthogonal coordinate system. A set of magnets are disposed, preferably symmetrically about a coordinate axis, poled orthogonally to the desired force direction. A second set of magnets, respectively poled opposite the first set, are arranged on the sprung article. The magnets of one of the sets are spaced a greater distance apart than those of the other, such that an end magnet from each set forms a pair having preferably planar faces parallel to the direction of spring force, the faces being offset so that in a neutral position the outer edge of the closer spaced magnet set is aligned with the inner edge of the greater spaced magnet set. For use as a motor, a coil can be arranged with conductors orthogonal to both the magnet pole directions and the direction of desired spring force, located across from the magnets of one set and fixed with respect to the magnets of the other set. In a cylindrical coordinate system having axial spring force, the magnets are radially poled and motor coils are concentric with the cylinder axis.

  1. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Spring rigging. 229.65 Section 229.65....65 Spring rigging. (a) Protective construction or safety hangers shall be provided to prevent spring planks, spring seats or bolsters from dropping to track structure in event of a hanger or spring...

  2. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spring rigging. 229.65 Section 229.65....65 Spring rigging. (a) Protective construction or safety hangers shall be provided to prevent spring planks, spring seats or bolsters from dropping to track structure in event of a hanger or spring...

  3. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Spring rigging. 229.65 Section 229.65....65 Spring rigging. (a) Protective construction or safety hangers shall be provided to prevent spring planks, spring seats or bolsters from dropping to track structure in event of a hanger or spring...

  4. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spring rigging. 229.65 Section 229.65....65 Spring rigging. (a) Protective construction or safety hangers shall be provided to prevent spring planks, spring seats or bolsters from dropping to track structure in event of a hanger or spring...

  5. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spring rigging. 229.65 Section 229.65....65 Spring rigging. (a) Protective construction or safety hangers shall be provided to prevent spring planks, spring seats or bolsters from dropping to track structure in event of a hanger or spring...

  6. The crustal thickness of Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clitheroe, G.; Gudmundsson, O.; Kennett, B.L.N.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the crustal structure of the Australian continent using the temporary broadband stations of the Skippy and Kimba projects and permanent broadband stations. We isolate near-receiver information, in the form of crustal P-to-S conversions, using the receiver function technique. Stacked receiver functions are inverted for S velocity structure using a Genetic Algorithm approach to Receiver Function Inversion (GARFI). From the resulting velocity models we are able to determine the Moho depth and to classify the width of the crust-mantle transition for 65 broadband stations. Using these results and 51 independent estimates of crustal thickness from refraction and reflection profiles, we present a new, improved, map of Moho depth for the Australian continent. The thinnest crust (25 km) occurs in the Archean Yilgarn Craton in Western Australia; the thickest crust (61 km) occurs in Proterozoic central Australia. The average crustal thickness is 38.8 km (standard deviation 6.2 km). Interpolation error estimates are made using kriging and fall into the range 2.5-7.0 km. We find generally good agreement between the depth to the seismologically defined Moho and xenolith-derived estimates of crustal thickness beneath northeastern Australia. However, beneath the Lachlan Fold Belt the estimates are not in agreement, and it is possible that the two techniques are mapping differing parts of a broad Moho transition zone. The Archean cratons of Western Australia appear to have remained largely stable since cratonization, reflected in only slight variation of Moho depth. The largely Proterozoic center of Australia shows relatively thicker crust overall as well as major Moho offsets. We see evidence of the margin of the contact between the Precambrian craton and the Tasman Orogen, referred to as the Tasman Line. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. "Down the language rabbit hole with alice": a case study of a deaf girl with a cochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Jean F; Dionne, Vickie

    2011-01-01

    Alice, a deaf girl who was implanted after age three years of age was exposed to four weeks of storybook sessions conducted in American Sign Language (ASL) and speech (English). Two research questions were address: (1) how did she use her sign bimodal/bilingualism, codeswitching, and code mixing during reading activities and (2) what sign bilingual code-switching and code-mixing strategies did she use while attending to stories delivered under two treatments: ASL only and speech only. Retelling scores were collected to determine the type and frequency of her codeswitching/codemixing strategies between both languages after Alice was read to a story in ASL and in spoken English. Qualitative descriptive methods were utilized. Teacher, clinician and student transcripts of the reading and retelling sessions were recorded. Results showed Alice frequently used codeswitching and codeswitching strategies while retelling the stories retold under both treatments. Alice increased in her speech production retellings of the stories under both the ASL storyreading and spoken English-only reading of the story. The ASL storyreading did not decrease Alice's retelling scores in spoken English. Professionals are encouraged to consider the benefits of early sign bimodal/bilingualism to enhance the overall speech, language and reading proficiency of deaf children with cochlear implants.

  8. Petroleum system of the Gippsland Basin, Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bishop, Michele G.

    2000-01-01

    The Gippsland Basin Province 3930, located on the southeastern coast of Australia, is formed from two successive failed rifts that developed into a passive margin during the Cretaceous. Formation of this basin is related to the break up of Gondwana, which resulted in the separation of Antarctica from Australia, and the separation of the New Zealand and Lord Howe Rise continental crust from Australia. Coals and coaly shales of Late Cretaceous through Eocene age are the source rocks for oil and gas that accumulated predominantly in anticlinal traps. The basin was Australia?s major producing basin until 1996 when daily oil/condensate production from the North West Shelf surpassed it.

  9. Piston and spring powered engine

    SciTech Connect

    Samodovitz, A. J.

    1985-12-10

    The invention is an improved piston engine, either two stroke or four stroke. In one, two stroke, one cylinder embodiment, the improvement comprises two springs connecting between the piston and the base of the piston. These springs are relatively relaxed when the crank is at top dead center. Then during the power/intake stroke, some of the fuel's energy is delivered to the crankshaft and some is used to compress the springs. The stored energy in the springs is delivered to the crankshaft during the exhaust/compression stroke while the springs return to their relatively relaxed condition. As a result, energy is delivered to the crankshaft during both strokes of the cycle, and the engine runs smooth. In one, four stroke, two cylinder embodiment, each cylinder has springs as described above, the cranks of each cylinder are aligned, and the cam sets one cylinder in the power stroke while the other is in the intake stroke. As a result, the engine runs smooth because energy is delivered to the crankshaft during all four strokes of the cycle, during two of the strokes by the burning fuel and during the other two by the release of energy in the springs. In both embodiments, a heavy crankshaft is not needed because of the more uniform power delivery.

  10. Surveillance of Space in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsam, G.

    Australia's geography and technology base got it off to a flying start in the early days of surveillance of space, starting with CSIRO's first radio telescope in the 1940's and climaxing in NASA's establishment of station 43 in the Deep Space Network at Tidbinbilla in 1965. But Britain's exit from space and the subsequent closure of the Woomera launch range and associated space tracking facilities in the early 1970's saw the start of a long draw-down of capability. Programs such as CSIRO's radio astronomy telescopes, Electro-Optic Systems' adoption of laser technology for satellite laser ranging and tracking system, and the exploration of the use of technology developed in Australia's over-the-horizon-radar program for surveillance of space, kept some interest in the problem alive, but there has been no serious national investment in the area for the last thirty years. Recently, however, increased awareness of the vulnerability of space systems and the need to include potential opponents' space capabilities in operations planning has led to a revival of interest in space situational awareness within the Australian Defence Organisation. While firm commitments to new systems must wait on the next Defence White Paper due out at the end of 2007 and the policy directions it formally endorses, discussions have already started with the US on participating in the Space Surveillance Network (SSN) and developing a comprehensive space situational awareness capability. In support of these initiatives the Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) is drawing up an inventory of relevant Australian capabilities, technologies and activities: the paper will describe the findings of this inventory, and in particular local technologies and systems that might be deployed in Australia to contribute to the SSN. In the optical regime the available options are rather limited; they centre primarily on the satellite laser ranging technology developed by Electro-Optic Systems and

  11. Groundwater flow cycling between a submarine spring and an inland fresh water spring.

    PubMed

    Davis, J Hal; Verdi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs are large first magnitude springs that derive water from the Upper Floridan Aquifer. The submarine Spring Creek Springs are located in a marine estuary and Wakulla Springs are located 18 km inland. Wakulla Springs has had a consistent increase in flow from the 1930s to the present. This increase is probably due to the rising sea level, which puts additional pressure head on the submarine Spring Creek Springs, reducing its fresh water flow and increasing flows in Wakulla Springs. To improve understanding of the complex relations between these springs, flow and salinity data were collected from June 25, 2007 to June 30, 2010. The flow in Spring Creek Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and salt water intrusion, and the flow in Wakulla Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and the flow in Spring Creek Springs. Flows from the springs were found to be connected, and composed of three repeating phases in a karst spring flow cycle: Phase 1 occurred during low rainfall periods and was characterized by salt water backflow into the Spring Creek Springs caves. The higher density salt water blocked fresh water flow and resulted in a higher equivalent fresh water head in Spring Creek Springs than in Wakulla Springs. The blocked fresh water was diverted to Wakulla Springs, approximately doubling its flow. Phase 2 occurred when heavy rainfall resulted in temporarily high creek flows to nearby sinkholes that purged the salt water from the Spring Creek Springs caves. Phase 3 occurred after streams returned to base flow. The Spring Creek Springs caves retained a lower equivalent fresh water head than Wakulla Springs, causing them to flow large amounts of fresh water while Wakulla Springs flow was reduced by about half.

  12. Groundwater flow cycling between a submarine spring and an inland fresh water spring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J. Hal; Verdi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs are large first magnitude springs that derive water from the Upper Floridan Aquifer. The submarine Spring Creek Springs are located in a marine estuary and Wakulla Springs are located 18 km inland. Wakulla Springs has had a consistent increase in flow from the 1930s to the present. This increase is probably due to the rising sea level, which puts additional pressure head on the submarine Spring Creek Springs, reducing its fresh water flow and increasing flows in Wakulla Springs. To improve understanding of the complex relations between these springs, flow and salinity data were collected from June 25, 2007 to June 30, 2010. The flow in Spring Creek Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and salt water intrusion, and the flow in Wakulla Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and the flow in Spring Creek Springs. Flows from the springs were found to be connected, and composed of three repeating phases in a karst spring flow cycle: Phase 1 occurred during low rainfall periods and was characterized by salt water backflow into the Spring Creek Springs caves. The higher density salt water blocked fresh water flow and resulted in a higher equivalent fresh water head in Spring Creek Springs than in Wakulla Springs. The blocked fresh water was diverted to Wakulla Springs, approximately doubling its flow. Phase 2 occurred when heavy rainfall resulted in temporarily high creek flows to nearby sinkholes that purged the salt water from the Spring Creek Springs caves. Phase 3 occurred after streams returned to base flow. The Spring Creek Springs caves retained a lower equivalent fresh water head than Wakulla Springs, causing them to flow large amounts of fresh water while Wakulla Springs flow was reduced by about half.

  13. Epidemiology of osteoarthritis in Australia.

    PubMed

    March, Lynette M; Bagga, Hanish

    2004-03-01

    Arthritis affects around 3 million people in Australia, representing about 15% of the population. Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of pain and disability among the elderly. Osteoarthritis is the third leading cause of life-years lost due to disability. Obesity and joint injury are important potentially modifiable risk factors for the development of osteoarthritis. Obesity is also an important predictor of progression of osteoarthritis. Currently, about 19000 hip and 20000 knee replacements are performed for osteoarthritis in Australia each year. Prevalence of osteoarthritis and the need for total joint replacement surgery are likely to increase because of a combination of increasing risk factors (age, obesity, injury), increasing expectations for improved quality of life, and improved surgical and anaesthetic techniques making surgery possible for more people. Services to provide these cost-effective procedures need to be increased. Primary and secondary prevention programs aimed at reducing obesity, preventing injury and improving rehabilitation and physical activity are urgently required.

  14. ALPIDE, the Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor for the ALICE ITS upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mager, M.

    2016-07-01

    A new 10 m2 inner tracking system based on seven concentric layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors will be installed in the ALICE experiment during the second long shutdown of LHC in 2019-2020. The monolithic pixel sensors will be fabricated in the 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor process of TowerJazz. The ALPIDE design takes full advantage of a particular process feature, the deep p-well, which allows for full CMOS circuitry within the pixel matrix, while at the same time retaining the full charge collection efficiency. Together with the small feature size and the availability of six metal layers, this allowed a continuously active low-power front-end to be placed into each pixel and an in-matrix sparsification circuit to be used that sends only the addresses of hit pixels to the periphery. This approach led to a power consumption of less than 40 mWcm-2, a spatial resolution of around 5 μm, a peaking time of around 2 μs, while being radiation hard to some 1013 1 MeVneq /cm2, fulfilling or exceeding the ALICE requirements. Over the last years of R & D, several prototype circuits have been used to verify radiation hardness, and to optimize pixel geometry and in-pixel front-end circuitry. The positive results led to a submission of full-scale (3 cm×1.5 cm) sensor prototypes in 2014. They are being characterized in a comprehensive campaign that also involves several irradiation and beam tests. A summary of the results obtained and prospects towards the final sensor to instrument the ALICE Inner Tracking System are given.

  15. Evolving telehealth reimbursement in Australia.

    PubMed

    Bursell, S-E; Zang, S; Keech, A C; Jenkins, A J

    2016-08-01

    Video-based consultation is the only telehealth service reimbursed by the Medicare Benefits Schedule in Australia, but the uptake of telehealth is still low and inconsistent. There is a clear need for the development of appropriate medical evidence to support implementation of telehealth services. With the ubiquitous use of mobile phones, mobile health becomes important in facilitating health services and impacting clinical outcomes anywhere.

  16. Hammersley Range, northern Western Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The oval shaped basin of the sedimentary rocks of the Hammersley Range, northern Western Australia (23.0S, 119.0E) dominates the center of this near nadir view. The Fortescue River is the remarkably straight, fault controlled feature bordering the Hammersley on the north. Sand dunes are the main surface features in the northeast and southwest. Many dry lakebeds can be seen to the east as light grey colored patches along the watercourses.

  17. Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Along the coast of Queensland, Australia (18.0S, 147.5E), timbered foothills of the Great Dividing Range separate the semi-arid interior of Queensland from the farmlands of the coastal plains. Prominent cleared areas in the forest indicate deforestation for farm and pasture lands. Offshore, islands and the Great Barrier Reef display sand banks along the southern sides of the structures indicating a dominant southerly wind and current direction.

  18. Spring Small Grains Area Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, W. F.; Mohler, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    SSG3 automatically estimates acreage of spring small grains from Landsat data. Report describes development and testing of a computerized technique for using Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) data to estimate acreage of spring small grains (wheat, barley, and oats). Application of technique to analysis of four years of data from United States and Canada yielded estimates of accuracy comparable to those obtained through procedures that rely on trained analysis.

  19. Silent Spring after 50 years.

    PubMed

    Davis, Frederick R

    2012-12-01

    As Silent Spring passed the half-century mark, historians have continued to reflect on its significance. For this issue of Endeavour, we drew together six articles that explore a few of the many legacies of this remarkable book. Given the impressive scope and breadth of the papers in this issue, it is clear that Silent Spring, and the shock waves surrounding its publication, continue to provide rich fodder for historical analysis.

  20. ALICE inner tracking system readout electronics prototype testing with the CERN ``Giga Bit Transceiver''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schambach, J.; Rossewij, M. J.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Bonora, M.; Ferencei, J.; Giubilato, P.; Vanat, T.

    2016-12-01

    The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major detector upgrade for the LHC Run 3, which includes the construction of a new silicon pixel based Inner Tracking System (ITS). The ITS readout system consists of 192 readout boards to control the sensors and their power system, receive triggers, and deliver sensor data to the DAQ. To prototype various aspects of this readout system, an FPGA based carrier board and an associated FMC daughter card containing the CERN Gigabit Transceiver (GBT) chipset have been developed. This contribution describes laboratory and radiation testing results with this prototype board set.

  1. Study of new FNAL-NICADD extruded scintillator as active media of large EMCal of ALICE at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Oleg A. Grachov et al.

    2004-05-04

    The current conceptual design of proposed Large EMCal of ALICE at LHC is based largely on the scintillating mega-tile/fiber technology implemented in CDF Endplug upgrade project and in both barrel and endcap electromagnetic calorimeters of the STAR. The cost of scintillating material leads us to the choice of extruded polystyrene based scintillator, which is available in new FNAL-NICADD facility. Result of optical measurements, such as light yield and light yield variation, show that it is possible to use this material as active media of Large EMCal of ALICE at LHC.

  2. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spring rigging. 230.111 Section 230.111... Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.111 Spring rigging. (a) Arrangement of springs and equalizers. Springs and equalizers shall be arranged to ensure the proper distribution of weight to...

  3. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Spring rigging. 230.111 Section 230.111... Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.111 Spring rigging. (a) Arrangement of springs and equalizers. Springs and equalizers shall be arranged to ensure the proper distribution of weight to...

  4. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spring rigging. 230.111 Section 230.111... Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.111 Spring rigging. (a) Arrangement of springs and equalizers. Springs and equalizers shall be arranged to ensure the proper distribution of weight to...

  5. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Spring rigging. 230.111 Section 230.111... Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.111 Spring rigging. (a) Arrangement of springs and equalizers. Springs and equalizers shall be arranged to ensure the proper distribution of weight to...

  6. 14 CFR 23.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Spring devices. 23.687 Section 23.687... Systems § 23.687 Spring devices. The reliability of any spring device used in the control system must be established by tests simulating service conditions unless failure of the spring will not cause flutter...

  7. 14 CFR 23.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Spring devices. 23.687 Section 23.687... Systems § 23.687 Spring devices. The reliability of any spring device used in the control system must be established by tests simulating service conditions unless failure of the spring will not cause flutter...

  8. 14 CFR 23.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Spring devices. 23.687 Section 23.687... Systems § 23.687 Spring devices. The reliability of any spring device used in the control system must be established by tests simulating service conditions unless failure of the spring will not cause flutter...

  9. 14 CFR 23.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Spring devices. 23.687 Section 23.687... Systems § 23.687 Spring devices. The reliability of any spring device used in the control system must be established by tests simulating service conditions unless failure of the spring will not cause flutter...

  10. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spring rigging. 230.111 Section 230.111... Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.111 Spring rigging. (a) Arrangement of springs and equalizers. Springs and equalizers shall be arranged to ensure the proper distribution of weight to...

  11. 14 CFR 23.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spring devices. 23.687 Section 23.687... Systems § 23.687 Spring devices. The reliability of any spring device used in the control system must be established by tests simulating service conditions unless failure of the spring will not cause flutter...

  12. Cryptosporidiosis: A Disease of Tropical and Remote Areas in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Aparna; Cornish, Lisa Michelle; Fearnley, Emily; Glass, Kathryn; Kirk, Martyn

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis causes gastroenteritis and is transmitted to humans via contaminated water and food, and contact with infected animals and people. We analyse long-term cryptosporidiosis patterns across Australia (2001–2012) and review published Australian studies and jurisdictional health bulletins to identify high risk populations and potential risk factors for disease. Using national data on reported cryptosporidiosis, the average annual rate of reported illness was 12.8 cases per 100 000 population, with cycles of high and low reporting years. Reports of illness peak in summer, similar to other infectious gastrointestinal diseases. States with high livestock densities like New South Wales and Queensland also record a spring peak in illnesses. Children aged less than four years have the highest rates of disease, along with adult females. Rates of reported cryptosporidiosis are highest in the warmer, remote regions and in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations. Our review of 34 published studies and seven health department reports on cryptosporidiosis in Australia highlights a lack of long term, non-outbreak studies in these regions and populations, with an emphasis on outbreaks and risk factors in urban areas. The high disease rates in remote, tropical and subtropical areas and in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations underscore the need to develop interventions that target the sources of infection, seasonal exposures and risk factors for cryptosporidiosis in these settings. Spatial epidemiology can provide an evidence base to identify priorities for intervention to prevent and control cryptosporidiosis in high risk populations. PMID:26393508

  13. Cryptosporidiosis: A Disease of Tropical and Remote Areas in Australia.

    PubMed

    Lal, Aparna; Cornish, Lisa Michelle; Fearnley, Emily; Glass, Kathryn; Kirk, Martyn

    2015-09-01

    Cryptosporidiosis causes gastroenteritis and is transmitted to humans via contaminated water and food, and contact with infected animals and people. We analyse long-term cryptosporidiosis patterns across Australia (2001-2012) and review published Australian studies and jurisdictional health bulletins to identify high risk populations and potential risk factors for disease. Using national data on reported cryptosporidiosis, the average annual rate of reported illness was 12.8 cases per 100 000 population, with cycles of high and low reporting years. Reports of illness peak in summer, similar to other infectious gastrointestinal diseases. States with high livestock densities like New South Wales and Queensland also record a spring peak in illnesses. Children aged less than four years have the highest rates of disease, along with adult females. Rates of reported cryptosporidiosis are highest in the warmer, remote regions and in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations. Our review of 34 published studies and seven health department reports on cryptosporidiosis in Australia highlights a lack of long term, non-outbreak studies in these regions and populations, with an emphasis on outbreaks and risk factors in urban areas. The high disease rates in remote, tropical and subtropical areas and in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations underscore the need to develop interventions that target the sources of infection, seasonal exposures and risk factors for cryptosporidiosis in these settings. Spatial epidemiology can provide an evidence base to identify priorities for intervention to prevent and control cryptosporidiosis in high risk populations.

  14. Upper Devonian microvertebrates from the Canning Basin, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelofs, Brett; Playton, Ted; Barham, Milo; Trinajstic, Kate

    2015-03-01

    A diverse microvertebrate fauna is described from the Virgin Hills and Napier formations, Bugle Gap Limestone Canning Basin, Western Australia. Measured sections at Horse Spring and Casey Falls (Virgin Hills Formation) and South Oscar Range (Napier Formation) comprise proximal to distal slope carbonates ranging in age from the Late Devonian Frasnian to middle Famennian. A total of 18 chondrichthyan taxa are identified based on teeth, including the first record of Thrinacodus tranquillus, Cladoides wildungensis, Protacrodus serra and Lissodus lusavorichi from the Canning Basin. A new species, Diademodus dominicus sp. nov. is also described and provides the first record of this genus outside of Laurussia. In addition, the upper range of Australolepis seddoni has been extended to Late Devonian conodont Zone 11, making it the youngest known occurrence for this species. The Virgin Hills and Napier formations microvertebrate faunas show close affinities to faunas recovered from other areas of Gondwana, including eastern Australia, Iran, Morocco and South China, which is consistent with known conodont and trilobite faunas of the same age.

  15. The ALICE high-level trigger read-out upgrade for LHC Run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, H.; Alt, T.; Breitner, T.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Kollegger, T.; Krzewicki, M.; Lehrbach, J.; Rohr, D.; Kebschull, U.

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE experiment uses an optical read-out protocol called Detector Data Link (DDL) to connect the detectors with the computing clusters of Data Acquisition (DAQ) and High-Level Trigger (HLT). The interfaces of the clusters to these optical links are realized with FPGA-based PCI-Express boards. The High-Level Trigger is a computing cluster dedicated to the online reconstruction and compression of experimental data. It uses a combination of CPU, GPU and FPGA processing. For Run 2, the HLT has replaced all of its previous interface boards with the Common Read-Out Receiver Card (C-RORC) to enable read-out of detectors at high link rates and to extend the pre-processing capabilities of the cluster. The new hardware also comes with an increased link density that reduces the number of boards required. A modular firmware approach allows different processing and transport tasks to be built from the same source tree. A hardware pre-processing core includes cluster finding already in the C-RORC firmware. State of the art interfaces and memory allocation schemes enable a transparent integration of the C-RORC into the existing HLT software infrastructure. Common cluster management and monitoring frameworks are used to also handle C-RORC metrics. The C-RORC is in use in the clusters of ALICE DAQ and HLT since the start of LHC Run 2.

  16. Heavy-ion physics with the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Schukraft, J

    2012-02-28

    After close to 20 years of preparation, the dedicated heavy-ion experiment A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) took first data at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator with proton collisions at the end of 2009 and with lead nuclei at the end of 2010. After a short introduction into the physics of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, this article recalls the main design choices made for the detector and summarizes the initial operation and performance of ALICE. Physics results from this first year of operation concentrate on characterizing the global properties of typical, average collisions, both in proton-proton (pp) and nucleus-nucleus reactions, in the new energy regime of the LHC. The pp results differ, to a varying degree, from most quantum chromodynamics-inspired phenomenological models and provide the input needed to fine tune their parameters. First results from Pb-Pb are broadly consistent with expectations based on lower energy data, indicating that high-density matter created at the LHC, while much hotter and larger, still behaves like a very strongly interacting, almost perfect liquid.

  17. Charmonium production in Pb-Pb collisions with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira Da Costa, H.

    2016-12-01

    We report on published charmonium measurements performed by ALICE, at the LHC, in Pb - Pb collisions at a center of mass energy per nucleon-nucleon collision √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV, at both mid (| y | < 0.8) and forward (2.5 < y < 4) rapidities. The nuclear modification factor of inclusive J / ψ is presented as a function of the collision centrality and the J / ψ transverse momentum, pT. The variation of the J/ψ mean transverse momentum square as a function of the collision centrality is also discussed. These measurements are compared to state of the art models that include one or several of the following mechanisms: color screening of the charm quarks, statistical hadronization at the QGP phase boundary, balance between J / ψ dissociation and regeneration in the QGP, J / ψ interaction with a dense comoving medium. Results on the production of the heavier and less bound ψ(2S) meson in Pb-Pb collisions at forward-rapidity are also presented and compared to both models and measurements performed by other experiments. At mid-rapidity we also report on ALICE unique capability to separate prompt and non-prompt J / ψ production down to low pT (≥ 1.5 GeV / c) and thus disentangle between effects on prompt J / ψ mesons and energy loss of b quarks in the QGP.

  18. Non prompt D-meson measurements with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzilli, Marianna

    2016-11-01

    The production of hadrons with open heavy flavour (charm and beauty) in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions is a powerful tool to study the properties of the deconfined phase of strongly interacting matter known as the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). The production of charm and beauty quarks occurs in hard partonic scattering processes in the early stage of the collisions. ALICE is the LHC experiment devoted to the study of heavy-ion physics. It is able to reconstruct charmed mesons in exclusive decays (e.g. D0→K-π+) and beauty hadrons in semi-inclusive decays (e.g. B→eX, B→J/ψ X) . At LHC energies a significant component of the inclusive D-meson yield originates from the decay of beauty-flavoured hadrons, whose knowledge is essential to determine the production of prompt D mesons coming from charm quarks. A precise determination of the non-prompt fraction combined with the determination of the inclusive D-meson yield would allow a measurement of beauty production. A data-driven method that exploits the different shapes of the distributions of the transverse-plane impact parameter to the primary vertex of prompt and feed-down D mesons in p-Pb collisions is used in ALICE. An alternative approach based on the D-meson decay length for Pb-Pb collisions is under study.

  19. Development of CMOS pixel sensors for the upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, L.

    2014-12-01

    The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major upgrade of the current detector, planned for installation during the second long LHC shutdown in the years 2018-19, in order to enhance its low-momentum vertexing and tracking capability, and exploit the planned increase of the LHC luminosity with Pb beams. One of the cornerstones of the ALICE upgrade strategy is to replace the current Inner Tracking System in its entirety with a new, high resolution, low-material ITS detector. The new ITS will consist of seven concentric layers equipped with Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) implemented using the 0.18 μm CMOS technology of TowerJazz. In this contribution, the main key features of the ITS upgrade will be illustrated with emphasis on the functionality of the pixel chip. The ongoing developments on the readout architectures, which have been implemented in several fabricated prototypes, will be discussed. The operational features of these prototypes as well as the results of the characterisation tests before and after irradiation will also be presented.

  20. Prospects for heavy-flavour measurements with the ALICE inner and forward tracker upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fionda, F.

    2016-01-01

    During the second long shutdown (LS2) of the LHC the ALICE detector will be improved with the installation of an upgraded Inner Tracking System (ITS) and a new Muon Forward Tracker (MFT). These detectors will crucially contribute to the precise characterization of the high-temperature, strongly-interacting medium created in ultra-relativistic Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.5 TeV. In the central barrel, the upgraded ITS will consist of seven cylindrical layers of silicon pixel detectors, starting at a radial distance of 22.4 mm from the beam axis. At forward rapidity, the MFT will be composed of five silicon pixel planes added in the acceptance of the existing Muon Spectrometer (-4 < ƞ < -2.5), upstream to the hadron absorber. Detailed results on the expected performances for heavy-flavour (HF) measurements down to low transverse momentum, with the upgraded ITS and MFT, will be given for central Pb-Pb collisions for various benchmark analyses, assuming an integrated luminosity of 10 nb-1, as foreseen for the ALICE upgrade programme.

  1. Overview of ALICE results on azimuthal correlations using neutral- and heavy-flavor triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochybova, Sona; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-02-01

    The ALICE detector is dedicated to studying the properties of hot and dense matter created in heavy-ion collisions. Among the probes used to investigate these properties are high-momentum particles, which originate in hard-scatterings occurring before the fireball creation. The fragments of hard scatterings interact with the hot and dense matter and via this interaction their spectra and azimuthal distributions are modified. This is probed by the measurement of the nuclear modification factor, where the p T spectra obtained in Pb–Pb collisions are compared to a pp baseline. A strong suppression of charged hadrons as well as neutral- and heavy-flavor mesons was observed at p T > 4 GeV/c. Azimuthal correlations, using high-momentum (p T > 4 GeV/c) hadrons as triggers, can provide further insight into how the presence of the medium modifies the final kinematic distributions of the particles. Comparison with theoretical models can be used to test their predictions about the properties of the medium. We give an overview of ALICE azimuthal-correlation measurements of neutral- and heavy-flavor mesons with charged hadrons in pp collisions at \\sqrt s = 7{{ TeV}} and Pb–Pb collisions at \\sqrt {{s{{NN}}}} = 2.76{{ TeV}}. We also present a measurement of the π 0 correlation with jets in pp collisions at \\sqrt s = 7{{ TeV}}.

  2. Results from the first p+p runs of the ALICE High Level Trigger at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaki, Kalliopi; ALICE HLT Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The High Level Trigger for the ALICE experiment at LHC is a powerful, sophisticated tool aimed at compressing the raw data volume and issuing selective triggers for events with desirable physics content. At its current state it integrates information from all major ALICE detectors, i. e. the inner tracking system, the time projection chamber, the electromagnetic calorimeters, the transition radiation detector and the muon spectrometer performing real-time event reconstruction. The steam engine behind HLT is a high performance computing cluster of several hundred nodes. It has to reduce the data rate from 25 GB/s to 1.25 GB/s for fitting the DAQ mass storage bandwidth. The cluster is served by a full GigaBit Ethernet network, in addition to an InfiniBand backbone network. To cope with the great challenge of Pb+Pb collisions in autumn 2010, its performance capabilities are being enhanced with the addition of new nodes. Towards the same end the first GPU co-processors are in place. During the first period of data taking with p+p collisions the HLT was extensively used to reconstruct, analyze and display data from the various participating detectors. Among other tasks it contributed to the monitoring of the detector performance, selected events for their calibration and efficiency studies, and estimated primary and secondary vertices from p+p collisions identifying V0 topologies. The experience gained during these first months of online operation will be presented.

  3. The ALICE Inner Tracking System: Design, physics performance and R&D issues

    SciTech Connect

    Giubellino, P.

    1995-07-15

    ALICE is a dedicated Heavy-Ion experiment proposed for the future LHC collider at CERN. The main goals of the ALICE Inner Tracking System are the reconstruction of secondary vertexes and the tracking and identification of low-p{sub t} electrons; at the same time, it will provide a significant improvement of the momentum resolution at large p{sub t} and the tracking and identification of low-p{sub t} hadrons. The ITS will consist of five cilindrical layers of radii from 7.5 to 50 cm. of high-resolution detectors. The unprecedented particle density foreseen, of up to 8000 particles per unit {eta}, imposes the use of sophisticated, and often innovative, technologies for the detectors, the electronics and the support and cooling system. Therefore, extensive R&D programs are now being pursued on various aspects of the project. Here are presented the basic ideas for the design, a few examples of the expected performance, and a brief overview of the ongoing R&D.

  4. Common Readout Unit (CRU) - A new readout architecture for the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, J.; Khan, S. A.; Mukherjee, S.; Paul, R.

    2016-03-01

    The ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is presently going for a major upgrade in order to fully exploit the scientific potential of the upcoming high luminosity run, scheduled to start in the year 2021. The high interaction rate and the large event size will result in an experimental data flow of about 1 TB/s from the detectors, which need to be processed before sending to the online computing system and data storage. This processing is done in a dedicated Common Readout Unit (CRU), proposed for data aggregation, trigger and timing distribution and control moderation. It act as common interface between sub-detector electronic systems, computing system and trigger processors. The interface links include GBT, TTC-PON and PCIe. GBT (Gigabit transceiver) is used for detector data payload transmission and fixed latency path for trigger distribution between CRU and detector readout electronics. TTC-PON (Timing, Trigger and Control via Passive Optical Network) is employed for time multiplex trigger distribution between CRU and Central Trigger Processor (CTP). PCIe (Peripheral Component Interconnect Express) is the high-speed serial computer expansion bus standard for bulk data transport between CRU boards and processors. In this article, we give an overview of CRU architecture in ALICE, discuss the different interfaces, along with the firmware design and implementation of CRU on the LHCb PCIe40 board.

  5. Fossilization Processes in Thermal Springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Jack D.; Cady, Sherry; Desmarais, David J.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    To create a comparative framework for the study of ancient examples, we have been carrying out parallel studies of the microbial biosedimentology, taphonomy and geochemistry of modem and sub-Recent thermal spring deposits. One goal of the research is the development of integrated litho- and taphofacies models for siliceous and travertline sinters. Thermal springs are regarded as important environments for the origin and early evolution of life on Earth, and we seek to utilize information from the fossil record to reconstruct the evolution of high temperature ecosystems. Microbial contributions to the fabric of thermal spring sinters occur when population growth rates keep pace with, or exceed rates of inorganic precipitation, allowing for the development of continuous biofilms or mats. In siliceous thermal springs, microorganisms are typically entombed while viable. Modes of preservation reflect the balance between rates of organic matter degradation, silica precipitation and secondary infilling. Subaerial sinters are initially quite porous and permeable and at temperatures higher than about 20 C, organic materials are usually degraded prior to secondary infilling of sinter frameworks. Thus, organically-preserved microfossils are rare and fossil information consists of characteristic biofabrics formed by the encrustation and underplating of microbial mat surfaces. This probably accounts for the typically low total organic carbon values observed in thermal spring deposits. In mid-temperature, (approx. 35 - 59 C) ponds and outflows, the surface morphology of tufted Phormidium mats is preserved through mat underplating by thin siliceous: crusts. Microbial taxes lead to clumping of ceils and/or preferred filament orientations that together define higher order composite fabrics in thermal spring stromatolites (e.g. network, coniform, and palisade). At lower temperatures (less than 35 C), Calothrix mats cover shallow terracette pools forming flat carpets or pustular

  6. White sulphur springs, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.

    1996-05-01

    A large, historic, health-oriented mineral springs resort, The Greenbrier, occupies 2,600 ha (6,500 acres) in an upland valley of the Allegheny Mountains near the West Virginia-Virginia border in the eastern US Natural mineral water at 17{degree}C (62.5{degree}F) and with a high sulfate content is piped to individual soaking tubs of the mineral-bath wing, where it is heated by electricity to the desired temperature. Tubs are drained and filled after each use, so no chemical treatment is required. Water from a fresh-water spring is piped to an outdoor pool and the Grand Indoor Pool, where it is treated with chlorine and heated by steam. Thus, this mineral spring is not really geothermal, but has a two-century history of use by a spa resort. A chemical analysis of the spring gives a flow of 1.6 L/s (25 gpm) with sulphate 1400 mg/L, bicarbonate 210 mg/L, magnesium 130 mg/L, sodium 22 mg/L, silica 17 mg/L, chloride 17 mg/L, hydrogen sulfide 13 mg/L, potassium 1.2 mg/L and iron 1.1 mg/L (from Springs of West Virginia, West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey, 1986).

  7. Vocational Training and Lifelong Learning in Australia and Germany. Australia Centre Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Gerald, Ed.; Reuling, Jochen, Ed.

    This document contains 17 papers on vocational training and lifelong learning in Australia and Germany. The following papers are included: "Vocational Training and Lifelong Learning in Australia and Germany: Background" (Gerald Burke); "Vocational Training and Lifelong Learning in Australia: Observations and Conclusions from a…

  8. The Dependence of the Spring Constant in the Linear Range on Spring Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khotimah, Siti Nurul; Viridi, Sparisoma; Widayani; Khairurrijal

    2011-01-01

    In basic physics laboratories, springs are normally used to determine both spring constants and the Earth's gravitational acceleration. Students generally do not notice that the spring constant is not a universal constant, but depends on the spring parameters. This paper shows and verifies that the spring constant in the linear range is inversely…

  9. Historical Thermometer Exposures in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, Neville; Tapp, Roger; Burrows, Kevin; Richards, David

    1996-06-01

    There is ample contempory evidence that most meteorological themometers in Australia were not exposed in Stevenson screens until very late in the nineteenth century, and in many places not until well into the twentieth century. There is also evidence, from a long-running comparision at Adelaide, that mean temperatures in a Stevenson screen are lower than in an open stand in Australian conditions. Thus, there are strong grounds for expecting that ninteenth century, and some early twentieth century, Australian temperatures are biased warm, relative to modern exposures.

  10. Bouncing dynamics of a spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, M.; Ludewig, F.; Dorbolo, S.; Vandewalle, N.

    2014-04-01

    We consider the dynamics of a deformable object bouncing on an oscillating plate and we propose to model its deformations. For this purpose, we use a spring linked to a damper. Elastic properties and viscous effects are taken into account. From the bouncing spring equations of motion, we emphasize the relevant parameters of the dynamics. We discuss the range of parameters in which elastic deformations do not influence the bouncing dynamics of this object and compare this behavior with the bouncing ball dynamics. By calculating the spring bouncing threshold, we evidence the effect of resonance and prove that elastic properties can make the bounce easier. This effect is for example encountered in the case of bouncing droplets. We also consider bifurcation diagrams in order to describe the consequences of a dependence on the frequency. Finally, hysteresis in the dynamics is presented.

  11. A First Step in Learning Analytics: Pre-Processing Low-Level Alice Logging Data of Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Linda; McDowell, Charlie; Denner, Jill

    2013-01-01

    Educational data mining can miss or misidentify key findings about student learning without a transparent process of analyzing the data. This paper describes the first steps in the process of using low-level logging data to understand how middle school students used Alice, an initial programming environment. We describe the steps that were…

  12. The Care and Feeding of the Creative Spirit: Teaching Alice Walker's "In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Terry

    1997-01-01

    Asserts that Alice Walker is one contemporary writer whose voice deserves to be heard in secondary English language arts classrooms. Suggests a number of class activities (dealing with imagery, organization, literary techniques, and writing and identity) for Walker's essay "In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens." (SR)

  13. 75 FR 76481 - Notice of Intent To Prepare Environmental Impact Statement for the HOPE SF Development at Alice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Intent To Prepare Environmental Impact Statement for the HOPE SF Development... (EIS) for redevelopment of the Alice Griffith Public Housing as part of its HOPE SF development program... operating subsidies for mixed income developments authorized under the U.S. Housing Act of 1937, Section...

  14. "All of Her Changes Have Made Me Think about My Changes": Fan Readings of Phyllis Reynolds Naylor's "Alice" Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinecken, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    This essay follows the insights of reader response theory to examine how readers of Phyllis Reynolds Naylor's Alice McKinley series negotiate textual meaning and construct particular identities in relation to the series' controversial content. Ranking second on the American Library Association's top one hundred list of banned and challenged books…

  15. Silver Oak, Inc. d/b/a Alice Patrcia Homes Residential Development - Clean Water Act Public Notice

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of an Administrative Penalty Assessment in the form of an Expedited Storm Water Settlement Agreement against Silver Oak, Inc. d/b/a Alice Patricia Homes Residential Development, a business located at 10430 New York Ave, Suite C,

  16. The Mother of Microloans (and Obama): A Q&A with Anthropologist and Author, Alice G. Dewey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maitland, Christine

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Alice G. Dewey, professor emeritus at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa and granddaughter of the renowned American philosopher John Dewey. She is an economic anthropologist who did ground-breaking research on local markets in Indonesia in the 1950s. She recently co-edited "Surviving Against the Odds:…

  17. On the hydrology of the bauxite oases, Cape York Peninsula, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, M.; Tweed, S.; Lyon, B. J.; Bailey, J.; Franklin, C. E.; Harrington, G.; Suckow, A.

    2015-09-01

    One of the world's largest bauxite deposits is located in the Cape York Peninsula, North-East Australia. Little is known about the hydrology of these remote bauxite deposits. Here, we present results from a multidisciplinary study that used remote sensing, hydrochemistry, and hydrodynamics to analyse the occurrence of several large oases in connection with the bauxite plateaus. Across this vast region, otherwise dominated by savannah, these oases are sustained by permanent springs and support rich and diverse new sub-ecosystems (spring forests) of high cultural values to the local indigenous population. The spring water chemistry reveals a well-mixed system with minor inter-spring variation; TDS values of spring waters are low (27-72 mg L-1), major ion compositions are homogenous (Na-Si-DIC-Cl) and δ18O and δ2H values are reflective of rainwater origin with little evaporation prior to recharge. Dating of spring waters with anthropogenic trace gases (CFC-12 and SF6) indicates mean groundwater residence times ranging from <1 to 30 years. An artificial tracing experiment highlighted the existence of a flow pathway from the bauxite land surface to the sandy aquifer that feeds the springs through discontinuities in the ferricrete layer. In addition, the soil infiltrability tests showed the bauxite land surface has very high infiltrability (15 mm min-1), about four times greater than other adjacent land surfaces. Across the lower part of the Wenlock Basin, satellite data indicate a total number of 57 oases consistently located on the edge of the bauxite plateaus. This super-group of permanent hillslope springs and their ecosystems adds another important attribute to the list of natural and cultural values of the Cape York Peninsula.

  18. Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Ray

    1993-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of 25 items published by the Australian Government Publications Service in 1992-93 that deal with a wide variety of issues, including trade performance, indigenous Australians, multiculturalism, the environment, aging, privacy versus law enforcement, urban life, health, violence against women, cultural tourism,…

  19. The influence of multiple dispersal mechanisms and landscape structure on population clustering and connectivity in fragmented artesian spring snail populations.

    PubMed

    Worthington Wilmer, J; Elkin, C; Wilcox, C; Murray, L; Niejalke, D; Possingham, H

    2008-08-01

    Many organisms occupy heterogeneous landscapes that contain both barriers to movement as well as corridors that facilitate dispersal. The extent to which such features determine population connectivity will depend on the mechanisms utilized by organisms to disperse. Here we examined the interaction between landscape structure and dispersal in the endemic aquatic snail, Fonscochlea accepta, in the fragmented artesian spring ecosystem of arid central Australia. We used frequentist and Bayesian analyses of microsatellite data to identify population structure and immigration for 1130 snails sampled from 50 springs across an entire spring complex. We introduce a modified isolation-by-distance analysis to test hypotheses about how populations are clustered and to distinguish the most likely dispersal pathways within and between those clusters. Highly significant differences in F(ST) values and significant isolation-by-distance patterns were detected among springs across the entire complex, while Bayesian assignment tests revealed the presence of two hierarchical levels of spring clustering. Clusters were defined by the spatial aggregation of springs, dynamic aquatic habitat connections between springs and the ecology of the snails. Bayesian immigrant identification and our modified isolation-by-distance analysis revealed that dispersal occurs at two geographical scales via two very different mechanisms. Short range dispersal (usually springs while long-range dispersal (>or= 3 km) is likely facilitated by an animal vector (phoresy). These results underline the importance of both dispersal mode and landscape structure in influencing connectivity rates and patterns among populations.

  20. Epithermal sinters of Paleozoic age in north Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, N. C.; Wood, D. G.; Lee, M. C.

    1989-08-01

    Silica sinters deposited from hot springs have been found associated with volcanic rocks of Late Devonian to late Carboniferous age in north Queensland, Australia. These deposits have many features in common with modern hot-spring sinters, such as those of the Taupo Volcanic Zone in New Zealand. They occur associated with subaerial volcanic rocks and are locally found with air-fall tuffs and fluvial and lake deposits in which hydrothermal eruption breccias are common. The associated rocks are extensively hydrothermally altered and are cut by silica veins showing characteristic epithermal vein textures; the silica veins contain low-salinity fluid inclusions trapped at epithermal temperatures, and there is evidence of boiling. Textures preserved in the sinters are identical to those found in modern sinters; they include columnar structures similar to bacterial stromatolites described from Yellowstone National Park, as well as striated surfaces apparently resulting from silica deposition on filamentous algae. Plant fossils, including Oxroadia gracilis, are abundant. Criteria applied to identify these ancient sinters may be applied to other possible sinter deposits and may provide evidence indicating the level of exposure of the former geothermal system, which may be an important guide in exploration for epithermal precious-metal deposits.

  1. Strange particle production in proton-proton collisions at sqrt{s}=0.9 mbox {TeV} with ALICE at the LHC. The ALICE Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aamodt, K.; Abrahantes Quintana, A.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agocs, A. G.; Aguilar Salazar, S.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Masoodi, A. Ahmad; Ahn, S. U.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaráz Aviña, E.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldit, A.; Bán, J.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdermann, E.; Berdnikov, Y.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biolcati, E.; Blanc, A.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Bock, N.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bombonati, C.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Bortolin, C.; Bose, S.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Böttger, S.; Boyer, B.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bravina, L.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Caselle, M.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chiavassa, E.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Coccetti, F.; Coffin, J.-P.; Coli, S.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Constantin, P.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Erasmo, G. D.; Dainese, A.; Dalsgaard, H. H.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Azevedo Moregula, A.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Remigis, R.; de Rooij, R.; Delagrange, H.; Delgado Mercado, Y.; Dellacasa, G.; Deloff, A.; Demanov, V.; Dénes, E.; Deppman, A.; Di Bari, D.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dietel, T.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domínguez, I.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Driga, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubuisson, J.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Dutta Majumdar, M. R.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erdal, H. A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evrard, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabjan, C. W.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fearick, R.; Fedunov, A.; Fehlker, D.; Fekete, V.; Felea, D.; Feofilov, G.; Téllez, A. Fernández; Ferretti, A.; Ferretti, R.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Fini, R.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Fragkiadakis, M.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furano, F.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gadrat, S.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Gemme, R.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Geuna, C.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Girard, M. R.; Giraudo, G.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; González-Trueba, L. H.; González-Zamora, P.; González Santos, H.; Gorbunov, S.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerra Gutierrez, C.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Gutbrod, H.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Harris, J. W.; Hartig, M.; Hasch, D.; Hasegan, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heide, M.; Heinz, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Hernández, C.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hille, P. T.; Hippolyte, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Huang, M.; Huber, S.; Humanic, T. J.; Hwang, D. S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, G. M.; Innocenti, P. G.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jancurová, L.; Jangal, S.; Janik, R.; Jayarathna, S. P.; Jena, S.; Jirden, L.; Jones, G. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jovanović, P.; Jung, H.; Jung, W.; Jusko, A.; Kalcher, S.; Kaliňák, P.; Kalisky, M.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kamermans, R.; Kanaki, K.; Kang, E.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, M. M.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D. S.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, H. N.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, S. H.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Klovning, A.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Koch, K.; Köhler, M. K.; Kolevatov, R.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskih, A.; Kornaś, E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Kour, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Kozlov, K.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kraus, I.; Krawutschke, T.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krumbhorn, D.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Rocca, P.; Ladrón de Guevara, P.; Lafage, V.; Lara, C.; Larsen, D. T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lea, R.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. C.; Lefèvre, F.; Lehnert, J.; Leistam, L.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Lévai, P.; Li, X.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, L.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohn, S.; Lohner, D.; Lopez, X.; López Noriega, M.; López Torres, E.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Luquin, L.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, K.; Ma, R.; Madagodahettige-Don, D. M.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Mangotra, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Martashvili, I.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez Davalos, A.; Martínez García, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastromarco, M.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z. L.; Matyja, A.; Mayani, D.; Mazza, G.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mendez Lorenzo, P.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Mereu, P.; Miake, Y.; Midori, J.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Müller, H.; Muhuri, S.; Munhoz, M. G.; Munoz, J.; Musa, L.; Musso, A.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Navach, F.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nazarov, G.; Nedosekin, A.; Nendaz, F.; Newby, J.; Nicassio, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Nilsson, M. S.; Noferini, F.; Nooren, G.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nystrand, J.; Obayashi, H.; Ochirov, A.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S. K.; Oleniacz, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Ortona, G.; Oskarsson, A.; Ostrowski, P.; Otterlund, I.; Otwinowski, J.; Øvrebekk, G.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Padilla, F.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S.; Pal, S. K.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Paticchio, V.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Peters, A. J.; Petráček, V.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piuz, F.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Platt, R.; Płoskoń, M.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Pop, A.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pulvirenti, A.; Punin, V.; Putiš, M.; Putschke, J.; Quercigh, E.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Rademakers, O.; Radomski, S.; Räihä, T. S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Ramírez Reyes, A.; Rammler, M.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Ricaud, H.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosinský, P.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Rousseau, S.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Rusanov, I.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saiz, P.; Sakai, S.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C. A.; Samanta, T.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Santo, R.; Santoro, R.; Sarkamo, J.; Saturnini, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schreiner, S.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, P. A.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Senyukov, S.; Seo, J.; Serci, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siciliano, M.; Sicking, E.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silenzi, A.; Silvermyr, D.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Søgaard, C.; Soloviev, A.; Soltz, R.; Son, H.; Song, M.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Stefanini, G.; Steinbeck, T.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stocco, D.; Stock, R.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vásquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Swoboda, D.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szostak, A.; Tagridis, C.; Takahashi, J.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tauro, A.; Tavlet, M.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Tosello, F.; Traczyk, T.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Urbán, J.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Vacchi, A.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; van der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Vannucci, L.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Vikhlyantsev, O.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, V.; Wan, R.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, A.; Wilk, G.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Yang, H.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yuan, X.; Yushmanov, I.; Zabrodin, E.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zenin, A.; Zgura, I.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, X.; Zhou, D.; Zichichi, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.

    2011-03-01

    The production of mesons containing strange quarks (mbox {mathrm {K0S}}, φ) and both singly and doubly strange baryons (mbox {mathrm {Λ }}, mbox {overline {Λ }}, and mbox {mathrm {Ξ -+overline {Ξ }+}}) are measured at mid-rapidity in pp collisions at sqrt{s} = 0.9 TeV with the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The results are obtained from the analysis of about 250 k minimum bias events recorded in 2009. Measurements of yields (d N/d y) and transverse momentum spectra at mid-rapidity for inelastic pp collisions are presented. For mesons, we report yields () of 0.184±0.002( stat.)±0.006( syst.) for mbox {mathrm {K0S}} and 0.021±0.004( stat.)±0.003( syst.) for φ. For baryons, we find =0.048±0.001( stat.)±0.004( syst.) for mbox {mathrm {Λ }}, 0.047±0.002( stat.)±0.005( syst.) for mbox {overline {Λ }} and 0.0101±0.0020( stat.)±0.0009( syst.) for mbox {mathrm {Ξ -+overline {Ξ }+}}. The results are also compared with predictions for identified particle spectra from QCD-inspired models and provide a baseline for comparisons with both future pp measurements at higher energies and heavy-ion collisions.

  2. Favorable conditions noted for Australia shale oil

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    After brief descriptions of the Rundle, Condor, and Stuart/Kerosene Creek oil shale projects in Queensland, the competitive advantages of oil shale development and the state and federal governments' attitudes towards an oil shale industry in Australia are discussed. It is concluded that Australia is the ideal country in which to start an oil shale industry.

  3. Unity in Diversity: Multicultural Education in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Barbara, Ed.; Harris, Joy, Ed.

    Papers presented at two institutes held in Australia to discuss multicultural education are presented. Topics discussed include demographic background of Australia, principles of Australian pluralism, problems and issues for teachers making decisions on curriculum, the educational experience of children of migrant origin, the objectives and…

  4. Australia's First Public Private Partnership School Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The design and construction of nine schools has commenced in Australia using a Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) methodology. This is the first project in Australia where social infrastructure has been acquired in this way. The Australian project is being managed by the New South Wales (NSW) State Government through its Department of Education…

  5. Language Planning and Placenaming in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Flavia

    2007-01-01

    Before colonisation Australia was fully named by its Indigenous population, but that complex network of naming was largely overlooked as Europeans introduced their own names for features and settlements. Each of Australia's states and territories now has a nomenclature authority, whose activities are coordinated through the Committee for…

  6. Imported case of poliomyelitis, Melbourne, Australia, 2007.

    PubMed

    Stewardson, Andrew J; Roberts, Jason A; Beckett, Carolyn L; Prime, Hayden T; Loh, Poh-Sien; Thorley, Bruce R; Daffy, John R

    2009-01-01

    Wild poliovirus-associated paralytic poliomyelitis has not been reported in Australia since 1977. We report type 1 wild poliovirus infection in a man who had traveled from Pakistan to Australia in 2007. Poliomyelitis should be considered for patients with acute flaccid paralysis or unexplained fever who have been to poliomyelitis-endemic countries.

  7. Serum immunoglobulin levels in Australia antigen positive and Australia antigen negative hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Peters, C. J.; Johnson, K. M.

    1972-01-01

    Ig levels were determined by radial immunodiffusion in uncomplicated cases of acute hepatitis with or without Australia antigenaemia. Initial sera from Australia antigen negative cases showed a striking elevation in IgM levels when compared to Australia antigen positive cases (6·5 versus 1·9 mg/ml). None of twenty-four Australia antigen positive cases exceeded 3 mg/ml IgM, and only 3/58 Australia antigen negative cases exhibited values below 3 mg/ml. Intial sera from Australia antigen positive and Australia antigen negative subjects did not differ in concentration of IgG, IgA, or IgD. Serial determinations of IgG revealed a transient fall in patients with Australia antigen positive hepatitis, and a rise in Australia antigen negative cases. Asymptomatic, Australia antigen positive, Guaymi Indian subjects were compared to matched Australia antigen negative controls from the same indigenous group and no differences in the concentration of IgG, IgM, IgA or IgD were found, although elevations of IgG and IgM were common in both groups. No evidence of abnormal proteins was found when sera were tested by cellulose acetate electrophoresis or by immunoelectrophoresis versus immunoglobulin-specific antisera. Ultracentrifugal analysis failed to detect `7S' IgM. PMID:4625396

  8. The Forced Hard Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2006-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, various examples of the Duffing type forced spring equation with epsilon positive, are studied. Since [epsilon] is positive, all solutions to the associated homogeneous equation are periodic and the same is true with the forcing applied. The damped equation exhibits steady state trajectories with the interesting…

  9. The Forced Soft Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, T. H.

    2006-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, this paper studies examples of the forced Duffing type spring equation with [epsilon] negative. By performing trial-and-error numerical experiments, the existence is demonstrated of stability boundaries in the phase plane indicating initial conditions yielding bounded solutions. Subharmonic boundaries are…

  10. Carnivorous arthropods after spring flood

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spring flooding is a common practice in Wisconsin cranberries, but flooding as insect control produces variable results among marshes. This project is aimed at figuring out why it works, and why it sometimes doesn’t. We have focused on tracking arthropod populations to explain the observed patterns ...

  11. NOVA Spring 2000 Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colombo, Luann; Gregoire, Tanya; Ransick, Kristina; Sammons, Fran Lyons; Sammons, James

    This teacher's guide complements six programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the spring of 2000. Programs include: (1) "Lost on Everest"; (2) "Lost Tribes of Israel"; (3) "Crocodiles"; (4) "Lost at Sea: The Search for Longitude"; (5) "Global Warming"; and (6) "Secrets of…

  12. Registration of 'Rollag' spring wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) (caused primarily by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe) is a disease that annually threatens wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown in the northern plains of the United States. Resistance to this disease is a high priority trait in the University of Minnesota’s spring wheat breedi...

  13. A Breath of Spring Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Marilyn L.

    2009-01-01

    The most promising sights of spring in Nebraska this year were two conferences for women. One event, sponsored by Metropolitan Community College in Omaha, was a Women's History Month Tea. A second conference was the meeting of the Nebraska Women in Higher Education. These two events suggest that there is a continuing interest in women's leadership…

  14. Voronoi Diagrams and Spring Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perham, Arnold E.; Perham, Faustine L.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this geometry project is to use Voronoi diagrams, a powerful modeling tool across disciplines, and the integration of technology to analyze spring rainfall from rain gauge data over a region. In their investigation, students use familiar equipment from their mathematical toolbox: triangles and other polygons, circumcenters and…

  15. TEACH Evaluation, Spring 2002. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuschke, Daylene M; Dixon, P. Scott; Gribbons, Barry C.

    TEACH is a partnership program involving California State University, Bakersfield (CSUB), College of the Canyons (COC) and the Newhall and Hart School Districts to provide students with supervised fieldwork and specialized support services while pursuing a California teaching credential. This Spring 2002 TEACH evaluation reports on surveys of COC…

  16. Sources of antibiotics: Hot springs.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Girish B; Balachandran, Lakshmi

    2016-11-24

    The discovery of antibiotics heralded an era of improved health care. However, the over-prescription and misuse of antibiotics resulted in the development of resistant strains of various pathogens. Since then, there has been an incessant search for discovering novel compounds from bacteria at various locations with extreme conditions. The soil is one of the most explored locations for bioprospecting. In recent times, hypersaline environments and symbiotic associations have been investigated for novel antimicrobial compounds. Among the extreme environments, hot springs are comparatively less explored. Many researchers have reported the presence of microbial life and secretion of antimicrobial compounds by microorganisms in hot springs. A pioneering research in the corresponding author's laboratory resulted in the identification of the antibiotic Fusaricidin B isolated from a hot spring derived eubacteria, Paenibacillus polymyxa, which has been assigned a new application for its anti-tubercular properties. The corresponding author has also reported anti-MRSA and anti-VRE activity of 73 bacterial isolates from hot springs in India.

  17. NOVA Spring 1999 Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colombo, Luann; Ransick, Kristina; Recio, Belinda

    This teacher's guide complements six programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the spring of 1999. Programs include: (1) "Surviving AIDS"; (2) "Secrets of Making Money"; (3) "Escape!: Fire"; (4) "Escape!: Car Crash"; (5) "Volcanoes of the Deep"; and (6) "Odyssey of Life:…

  18. Finding Spring on Planet X

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew J.

    2007-01-01

    For a given orbital period and eccentricity, we determine the maximum time lapse between the winter solstice and the spring equinox on a planet. In addition, given an axial precession path, we determine the effects on the seasons. This material can be used at various levels to illustrate ideas such as periodicity, eccentricity, polar coordinates,…

  19. Spring for It: First Novels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    How do publishers describe the first novels they will be releasing this spring and summer? "Amazing," "fabulous," and "unique" are words that pop up frequently, though hats off to one publicist forthright or cheeky enough to call a work "weird Western/horror." The proof of such praise is in the reading, but why not check out this preview of first…

  20. Archaeal Nitrification in Hot Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, A.; Daims, H.; Reigstad, L.; Wanek, W.; Wagner, M.; Schleper, C.

    2006-12-01

    Biological nitrification, i.e. the aerobic conversion of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, is a major component of the global nitrogen cycle. Until recently, it was thought that the ability to aerobically oxidize ammonia was confined to bacteria of the phylum Proteobacteria. However, it has recently been shown that Archaea of the phylum Crenarchaeota are also capable of ammonia oxidation. As many Crenarchaeota are thermophilic or hyperthermophilic, and at least some of them are capable of ammonia oxidation we speculated on the existence of (hyper)thermophilic ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). Using PCR primers specifically targeting the archaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene, we were indeed able to confirm the presence of such organisms in several hot springs in Reykjadalur, Iceland. These hot springs exhibited temperatures well above 80 °C and pH values ranging from 2.0 to 4.5. To proof that nitrification actually took place under these extreme conditions, we measured gross nitrification rates by the isotope pool dilution method; we added 15N-labelled nitrate to the mud and followed the dilution of the label by nitrate production from ammonium either in situ (incubation in the hot spring) or under controlled conditions in the laboratory (at 80 °C). The nitrification rates in the hot springs ranged from 0.79 to 2.22 mg nitrate-N per L of mud and day. Controls, in which microorganisms were killed before the incubations, demonstrated that the nitrification was of biological origin. Addition of ammonium increased the gross nitrification rate approximately 3-fold, indicating that the nitrification was ammonium limited under the conditions used. Collectively, our study provides evidence that (1) AOA are present in hot springs and (2) that they are actively nitrifying. These findings have major implications for our understanding of nitrogen cycling of hot environments.

  1. Alice's Dream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iddi-Gubbels, Alice Azumi

    2006-01-01

    Over the years, the author has observed the vicious cycle that undermines the effectiveness of and access to good basic education in her own village and family, and in poor rural areas in general. Located in one of the most deprived areas of rural Ghana, there is a huge "reality gap" between school and children's everyday lives. The weak…

  2. Variability in rainfall over tropical Australia during summer and relationships with the Bilybara High

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reason, C. J. C.

    2017-03-01

    Variability in summer rainfall over tropical Australia, defined here as that part of the continent north of 25° S, and its linkages with regional circulation are examined. In particular, relationships with the mid-level anticyclone (termed the Bilybara High) that exists over the northwestern Australia/Timor Sea region between August and April are considered. This High forms to the southwest of the upper-level anticyclone via a balance between the upper-level divergence over the region of tropical precipitation maximum and planetary vorticity advection and moves south and strengthens during the spring and summer. It is shown that variations in the strength and position of the Bilybara High are related to anomalies in precipitation and temperature over large parts of tropical Australia as well as some areas in the south and southeast of the landmass. Some of the interannual variations in the High are related to ENSO, but there are also a number of neutral years with large anomalies in the High and hence in rainfall. On decadal time scales, a strong relationship exists between the leading mode of tropical Australian rainfall and the Bilybara High. On both interannual and decadal scales, the relationships between the High and the regional rainfall involve changes in the monsoonal northwesterlies blowing towards northern Australia, and further south, in the easterly trade winds over the region.

  3. The impact of future changes in weather patterns on extreme sea levels over southern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colberg, Frank; McInnes, Kathleen L.

    This study first compares two methods by which the global, variable resolution Cubic Conformal Atmospheric Model (CCAM) is forced by reanalysis over Australia. The methods are the spectral nudging and bias-corrected sea surface temperature (SST) forcing. Surface winds and sea level pressure are compared since these influence coastal sea levels. SST forcing was found to better preserve the mean and standard deviation of these quantities. Second, a hydrodynamic model is used to model sea levels over southern Australia over 1980-1999 and 2080-2099 to investigate how changes in weather patterns affect extreme sea levels. Forcing from one Global Climate Model (GCM) and two CCAM simulations in which CCAM was used to downscale two GCMs over Australia with bias-corrected SST forcing (including the GCM considered in this study) were used. While there are differences in the spatial patterns of change between seasons over the modeled coastline between the three models, extreme sea levels were mostly lower in the future period over the southern mainland coastline from autumn to spring due to reduced westerlies in the climate models. The sea level changes around Tasmania varied from positive to negative depending on the model and season. The projected extreme sea level changes were within 10 cm of current climate values. This suggests that over southern Australia extreme sea level changes will be dominated by changes in mean sea level due to thermal expansion and ice sheet and glacier melt rather than changes in weather patterns.

  4. Photon and neutral meson measurements with the ALICE experiment at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vauthier, A.

    2016-08-01

    The measurements of photons and neutral mesons, such as ϕ0 and ϕ, allow to explore the QCD matter created in heavy-ions collisions. In pp collisions, observables such as differential particle production cross sections can be used to test perturbative QCD calculations and constrain PDFs. In Pb-Pb collisions, neutral meson spectra address the medium induced suppression, whereas low transverse momentum direct photons allow to obtain information on the QCD medium temperature or anisotropic flow. We present an overview of photon and neutral meson measurements, employing three different methods which use both ALICE calorimeters, as well as the central tracking system via the photon conversion method. These experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions.

  5. Probing 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko's Electron Environment Through Ultraviolet Emission by Rosetta Alice Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindhelm, Eric; Noonan, John; Keeney, Brian A.; Broiles, Thomas; Bieler, Andre; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Feaga, Lori M.; Feldman, Paul D.; Parker, Joel Wm.; Steffl, Andrew Joseph; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.

    2016-10-01

    The Alice Far-Ultraviolet (FUV) Spectrograph onboard ESA's Rosetta spacecraft has observed the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from far approach in summer 2014 until the end of mission in September 2016. We present an overall perspective of the bright FUV emission lines (HI 1026 Å, OI 1302/1305/1306 Å multiplet, OI] 1356 Å, CO 1510 (1-0) Å, and CI 1657 Å) above the sunward hemisphere, detailing their spatial extent and brightness as a function of time and the heliocentric distance of the comet. We compare our observed gas column densities derived using electron temperatures and densities from the Ion Electron Sensor (IES) with those derived using the Inner Coma Environment Simulator (ICES) models in periods when electron-impact excited emission dominates over solar fluorescence emission. The electron population is characterized with 2 three-dimensional kappa functions, one dense and warm, one rarefied and hot.

  6. Characterization of the first prototype of the ALICE SAMPA ASIC for LHC Run 3 and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambave, G.; Engeseth, K. P.; Velure, A.

    2017-03-01

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is planing to upgrade its Time Projection Chamber (TPC) due to the expected higher Pb-Pb collision-rates in the next running period (Run 3) of the LHC starting in 2020. In the upgraded TPC, Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) chambers and continuous readout system will replace Multi-Wire Proportional (MWP) chambers and conventional triggered readout. In the continuous readout, GEM signals will be processed using a 32 channel SAMPA ASIC. The first version of the SAMPA (MPW1) was delivered in 2014 and the production of final version is in progress. In this paper, the test results obtained for charge injection to the device using pulse generator as well as GEM detector prototype are reported.

  7. National space program in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, G. M.

    1992-11-01

    An overview of the Australian space activity history and present status is presented in the following aspects: (1) full-scale space activities since the establishment of the Australian Space Board in 1987 and the start of governmental budgetary support to national space program; (2) cooperation with NASA and ESA through satellite ground stations in satellite communication and ground support; (3) Australian private enterprises contract to provide launch support for INTERSAT and other satellites and schedule to start mobile satellite communication all over the country; and (4) supporting the second ground station construction to facilitate acquisition of the southern Pacific Ocean data of the wide area covering from the end of Antarctic continent to the eastern end of New Zealand. The remote sensing equipment development, launch service business plan, present status of supersonic technology in Australia and Australian space policy are outlined.

  8. Skin cancer prevention in Australia.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, C; Foley, P

    2009-11-01

    Australia has one of the highest skin cancer incidence and mortality rates in the world. The reason for these high rates is due in part to the high ambient UV radiation levels, combined with a predominantly susceptible fair-skinned population. To address this problem, since 1980 Australians have been exposed to social marketing campaigns to raise awareness of skin cancer prevention. These campaigns have used mass media alongside interventions in schools, workplaces, and in community and leisure settings to motivate sun protective behaviour. As a result of these interventions it can be demonstrated that social marketing campaigns can be a very effective method to not only motivate behaviour change, reduce sunburn, and increase awareness but more importantly, reduce melanoma rates and bring positive economic returns to government. However long term investment in this area is required otherwise any population gains in behaviour are very likely to be quickly eroded.

  9. The abortion debate in Australia.

    PubMed

    Read, Christine Margaret

    2006-09-01

    I recently watched a fascinating documentary about the crusade of Dr Bertram Wainer in the 1960s to bring the practice of illegal abortion in Victoria to an end. It documented the profound horror of the backyard abortion that so often ended in infection, sterility or death, and served as a potent reminder of a practice to which we must never return. Of course that cant happen again, abortion is legal now, isnt it? In Victoria in 1969 a Supreme Court judge ruled that an abortion is not unlawful if a doctor believed that: the abortion is necessary to preserve the woman from serious danger to her life or physical or mental health (Menhennit ruling). In Australia today however, abortion law remains conditional, unclear and inconsistent and, except in the ACT, is still part of criminal statutes.

  10. Religion and BMI in Australia.

    PubMed

    Kortt, Michael A; Dollery, Brian

    2014-02-01

    We estimated the relationship between religion and body mass index (BMI) for a general and representative sample of the Australia population. Data from the Household Income Labour Dynamics survey were analysed for 9,408 adults aged 18 and older. OLS regression analyses revealed that religious denomination was significantly related to higher BMI, after controlling for socio-demographic, health behaviours, and psychosocial variables. 'Baptist' men had, on average, a 1.3 higher BMI compared to those reporting no religious affiliation. Among women, 'Non-Christians' had, on average, a 1 unit lower BMI compared to those reporting no religious affiliation while 'Other Christian' women reported, on average, a 1 unit higher BMI. Our results also indicate that there was a negative relationship between religious importance and BMI among Australian women.

  11. Ageing Holocaust survivors in Australia.

    PubMed

    Paratz, Elizabeth D; Katz, Benny

    2011-02-21

    In recent years, a phenomenon of "late effects of the Holocaust" has emerged, with impacts on the psychological and physical health of ageing Holocaust survivors. As Holocaust survivors age, they may experience heightened anxiety around normal processes of ageing, worsened post-traumatic stress disorder with cognitive decline, and fear of the medical system. Holocaust survivors are at increased risk of osteoporosis, cardiometabolic disease due to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction, cancer, and sequelae of Nazi medical experiments. From existing medical literature on this topic, practical principles of management are derived to create a framework for sensitive medical management of Holocaust survivors in Australia. The issues discussed are also relevant to the wider geriatric refugee or prisoner-of-war experience.

  12. Very high Momentum Particle Identification detector for ALICE at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Edmundo

    2009-04-20

    The anomalies observed at RHIC for the baryon-meson ratios have prompted a number of theoretical works on the nature of the hadrochemistry in the hadronisation stage of the pp collisions and in the evolution of the dense system formed in heavy ion collisions. Although the predictions differ in the theoretical approach, generally a substantial increase in the baryon production is predicted in the range 10-30 GeV/c. This raises the problem of baryon identification to much higher momenta than originally planned in the LHC experiments. After a review of the present status of theoretical predictions we will present the possibilities of a gas ring imaging Cherenkov detector of limited acceptance which would be able to identify track-by-track protons until 26 GeV/c. The physics capabilities of such a detector in conjunction with the ALICE experiment will be contemplated as well as the triggering options to enrich the sample of interesting events with a dedicated trigger or/and using the ALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter. The use of the electromagnetic calorimeter opens interesting possibility to distinguish quark and gluon jets in gamma--jet events and subsequently the study of the probability of fragmentation in proton, kaon and pion or triggering on jets in the EMCAL. Such a detector would be identify pions until 14 GeV/c kaons from 9 till 14 GeV/c and protons from 18 till 24/GeV/c in a positive way and by absence of signal from 9-18 GeV/c.

  13. The First Far Ultraviolet Spectrum of an Asteroid: ALICE Observations During Rosetta's Flyby of (2867) Steins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A'Hearn, Michael F.; Feaga, L. M.; Steffl, A. J.; Parker, J. W.; Feldman, P. D.; Weaver, H. A.; Bertaux, J.; Slater, D. C.; Stern, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    During Rosetta's flyby of the main-belt, E-type asteroid (2867) Steins on 5 Sept. 2008, the U. S. ALICE UV imaging spectrometer was used to obtain the first far-ultraviolet spectrum of an asteroid. A ten-minute integration, averaging over a variety of geometries, shows very good signal from 850 Å to 2000 Å. These data also represent the first spectrum of an E-type asteroid below the atmospheric cutoff and the first ultraviolet spectrum of a small asteroid and they extend to shorter wavelengths than have been observed for any other asteroid. We find that the far ultraviolet albedo of Steins is very low compared to its visible albedo (Weissman et al. 2008; Jorda et al. 2008), as is expected from the UV behavior of many refractory materials. We also find that the albedo does not show a dramatic color variation over the FUV spectral range. In addition, Alice obtained the total FUV count rate integrated with 1-second resolution during the encounter to determine the average variation of reflected UV flux with phase angle, which we will present. As expected from the only existing model (Schläppi et al. 2008), a deep search for any exosphere, e.g., hydrogen, yielded no obvious detections in our initial analysis. Funded by NASA. Jorda, L., et al. 2008. A. & Ap. 487, 1171. Schläppi, B., K. Altwegg, and P. Wurz 2008. Icarus 195, 674. Weissman, P.R., et al., 2008. Meteoritics and Planetary Science, 43, 1-10

  14. STS-61B Astronaut Spring During EASE Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The crew assigned to the STS-61B mission included Bryan D. O'Conner, pilot; Brewster H. Shaw, commander; Charles D. Walker, payload specialist; mission specialists Jerry L. Ross, Mary L. Cleave, and Sherwood C. Spring; and Rodolpho Neri Vela, payload specialist. Launched aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis November 28, 1985 at 7:29:00 pm (EST), the STS-61B mission's primary payload included three communications satellites: MORELOS-B (Mexico); AUSSAT-2 (Australia); and SATCOM KU-2 (RCA Americom). Two experiments were conducted to test assembling erectable structures in space: EASE (Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extravehicular Activity), and ACCESS (Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structure). In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, and the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the EASE and ACCESS were developed and demonstrated at MSFC's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS). In this STS-61B onboard photo, astronaut Spring was working on the EASE during an Extravehicular Activity (EVA). The primary objective of this experiment was to test the structural assembly concepts for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction.

  15. Fast TPC Online Tracking on GPUs and Asynchronous Data Processing in the ALICE HLT to facilitate Online Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohr, David; Gorbunov, Sergey; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Breitner, Timo; Kretz, Matthias; Lindenstruth, Volker

    2015-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Heavy Ion Experiment) is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which is today the most powerful particle accelerator worldwide. The High Level Trigger (HLT) is an online compute farm of about 200 nodes, which reconstructs events measured by the ALICE detector in real-time. The HLT uses a custom online data-transport framework to distribute data and workload among the compute nodes. ALICE employs several calibration-sensitive subdetectors, e.g. the TPC (Time Projection Chamber). For a precise reconstruction, the HLT has to perform the calibration online. Online- calibration can make certain Offline calibration steps obsolete and can thus speed up Offline analysis. Looking forward to ALICE Run III starting in 2020, online calibration becomes a necessity. The main detector used for track reconstruction is the TPC. Reconstructing the trajectories in the TPC is the most compute-intense step during event reconstruction. Therefore, a fast tracking implementation is of great importance. Reconstructed TPC tracks build the basis for the calibration making a fast online-tracking mandatory. We present several components developed for the ALICE High Level Trigger to perform fast event reconstruction and to provide features required for online calibration. As first topic, we present our TPC tracker, which employs GPUs to speed up the processing, and which bases on a Cellular Automaton and on the Kalman filter. Our TPC tracking algorithm has been successfully used in 2011 and 2012 in the lead-lead and the proton-lead runs. We have improved it to leverage features of newer GPUs and we have ported it to support OpenCL, CUDA, and CPUs with a single common source code. This makes us vendor independent. As second topic, we present framework extensions required for online calibration. The extensions, however, are generic and can be used for other purposes as well. We have extended the framework to support asynchronous compute

  16. Suicide and drought in New South Wales, Australia, 1970–2007

    PubMed Central

    Hanigan, Ivan C.; Butler, Colin D.; Kokic, Philip N.; Hutchinson, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    There is concern in Australia that droughts substantially increase the incidence of suicide in rural populations, particularly among male farmers and their families. We investigated this possibility for the state of New South Wales (NSW), Australia between 1970 and 2007, analyzing data on suicides with a previously established climatic drought index. Using a generalized additive model that controlled for season, region, and long-term suicide trends, we found an increased relative risk of suicide of 15% (95% confidence interval, 8%–22%) for rural males aged 30–49 y when the drought index rose from the first quartile to the third quartile. In contrast, the risk of suicide for rural females aged >30 y declined with increased values of the drought index. We also observed an increased risk of suicide in spring and early summer. In addition there was a smaller association during unusually warm months at any time of year. The spring suicide increase is well documented in nontropical locations, although its cause is unknown. The possible increased risk of suicide during drought in rural Australia warrants public health focus and concern, as does the annual, predictable increase seen each spring and early summer. Suicide is a complex phenomenon with many interacting social, environmental, and biological causal factors. The relationship between drought and suicide is best understood using a holistic framework. Climate change projections suggest increased frequency and severity of droughts in NSW, accompanied and exacerbated by rising temperatures. Elucidating the relationships between drought and mental health will help facilitate adaptation to climate change. PMID:22891347

  17. FOSSIL SPRINGS ROADLESS AREA, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beard, L.S.; Ellis, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    Based on field studies, the Fossil Springs Roadless Area in central Arizona is concluded to have little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Rocks in the Supai Formation (Pennsylvanian-Permian) near the central part of the roadless area contain widespread but spotty copper mineralization and trace amounts of uranium. Analyses obtained during the study define geochemical anomalies in two portions of the area that remain unexplained. The suites of anomalous metals suggest the possibility of hydrothermal veins and the presence of ultramafic rocks; neither were found in the field. Although there is little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources in the Fossil Springs Roadless Area, studies to identify the source of the geochemical anomalies could have valuable implications for regional studies and mineral exploration in the surrounding area.

  18. 75 FR 39241 - Hooper Springs Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... Bonneville Power Administration Hooper Springs Project AGENCY: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA... Hooper Springs Project). The new BPA substation would be called Hooper Springs Substation and would be... 115-kV Lane Creek Substation, east of the City of Wayan, Idaho. The proposed project would...

  19. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section 236.822 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original...

  20. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section 236.822 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original...

  1. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section 236.822 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original...

  2. 14 CFR 27.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Spring devices. 27.687 Section 27.687... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  3. 14 CFR 27.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Spring devices. 27.687 Section 27.687... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  4. 14 CFR 29.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Spring devices. 29.687 Section 29.687... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  5. 14 CFR 29.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Spring devices. 29.687 Section 29.687... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  6. 14 CFR 29.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Spring devices. 29.687 Section 29.687... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  7. 14 CFR 27.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Spring devices. 27.687 Section 27.687... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  8. 14 CFR 27.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Spring devices. 27.687 Section 27.687... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  9. 14 CFR 29.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Spring devices. 29.687 Section 29.687... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  10. 14 CFR 27.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spring devices. 27.687 Section 27.687... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  11. Effective Mass of an Oscillating Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Eduardo E.; Gesnouin, Gabriel A.

    2007-01-01

    We present an experimental method to obtain the effective mass of an unloaded oscillating spring. We measure the period "T"("n") of the partial springs that result when hanging "n" of the total "N" coils of a given spring. Data are correlated with the expectation of a simple model for "T"("n") that takes into account the effective mass of the…

  12. 14 CFR 29.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spring devices. 29.687 Section 29.687... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  13. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section 236.822 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original...

  14. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section 236.822 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original...

  15. NAVO MSRC Navigator. Spring 2008

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    CFD), Climate/Weather/Ocean Modeling and Simulation (CWO), Environmental Quality Modeling and Simulation (EQM), Computational Electromagnetic...EINSTEIN and DAVINCI Come to the MSRC The Porthole 19 Visitors to the Naval Oceanographic Office Major Shared Resource Center Navigator Tools and...Events 5SPRING 2008NAVO MSRC NAVIGATOR IntroductIon Higher-altitude missile and re-entry vehicle flowfield simulations often require the

  16. Controlling proteins through molecular springs.

    PubMed

    Zocchi, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    We argue that the mechanical control of proteins-the notion of controlling chemical reactions and processes by mechanics-is conceptually interesting. We give a brief review of the main accomplishments so far, leading to our present approach of using DNA molecular springs to exert controlled stresses on proteins. Our focus is on the physical principles that underlie both artificial mechanochemical devices and natural mechanisms of allostery.

  17. Mesozoic/Cenozoic tectonic events around Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, R. Dietmar; Gaina, Carmen; Tikku, Anahita; Mihut, Dona; Cande, Steven C.; Stock, Joann M.

    We use an absolute and relative plate motion model for the plates around Australia to identify major plate tectonic events, evaluate their causes, and investigate their effects on anomalous intraplate subsidence or uplift and on the history of oceanic crustal accretion. An event at ˜136 Ma is marked by the onset of sea floor spreading between Greater India and Australia. At about this time long-lived subduction east of Australia ceased, probably due to subduction of the Phoenix-Pacific spreading ridge, changing this plate boundary to a transform margin. Between 130 and 80 Ma, Australia and East Antarctica moved eastward in the Atlantic-Indian mantle hotspot reference frame. This can be plausibly linked to ridge push from the NW-SE oriented spreading center NW of Australia and to the inferred geometry and continued subduction of the Phoenix plate beneath the West Antarctic margin. A drastic change in spreading direction between the Indian and Australian plates from NE-SW to N-S occurred at about 99 Ma, possibly caused by a change in absolute motion of the Pacific Plate. Chron 27 (˜61 Ma) marks the onset of relative motion between East and West Antarctica, and a change in the relative motion between Australia and Antarctica. It may be linked to the subduction of a segment of the Neo-Tethyan Ridge. Both events caused anomalous subsidence on the Northwest Shelf of Australia. The almost stationary position of Australia w.r.t. the mantle from ˜80 Ma to ˜40 Ma may reflect the progressive subduction of the Pacific-Phoenix ridge to the east of New Zealand preceding 80 Ma, resulting in a diminished trench suction force east of Australia. Preliminary reconstructions to close the Pacific-Australian plate circuit based on recently collected geophysical data indicate that a tectonic event at 43 Ma may mark the onset of renewed subduction east of Australia. At the same time spreading in the Wharton Basin between India and Australia ceased, and tectonic reactivation is

  18. Force of an actin spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jennifer; Mahadevan, L.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The acrosomal process of the horseshoe crab sperm is a novel mechanochemical molecular spring that converts its elastic stain energy to mechanical work upon the chemical activation by Ca2+. Twisted and bent, the initial state of the acrosomal bundle features a high degree of complexity in its structure and the energy is believed to be stored in the highly strained actin filaments as an elastic potential energy. When activated, the bundle relaxes from the coil of the highly twisted and bent filaments to its straight conformation at a mean velocity of 15um/s. The mean extension velocity increases dramatically from 3um/s to 27um/s when temperature of the medium is changed from 9.6C to 32C (respective viscosities of 1.25-0.75cp), yet it exhibits a very weak dependence on changes in the medium viscosity (1cp-33cp). These experiments suggest that the uncoiling of the actin spring should be limited not by the viscosity of the medium but by the unlatching events of involved proteins at a molecular level. Unlike the viscosity-limited processes, where force is directly related to the rate of the reaction, a direct measurement is required to obtain the spring force of the acrosomal process. The extending acrosomal bundle is forced to push against a barrier and its elastic buckling response is analyzed to measure the force generated during the uncoiling.

  19. VGP highlights of Spring Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, S. A.

    Two special events of interest to Union and VGP section members will take place on Tuesday afternoon, May 25, during AGU's Spring Meeting in Baltimore.R. A. Daly Lecture: Every section of AGU has an established “Bowie Lecture” named after a distinguished scientist associated with the work of the section. These lectures are delivered by special invitation during the annual AGU Spring or Fall meetings and are highlighted in the program. The VGP lecture is named for Reginald A. Daly, but it has never been given. Its inauguration at this year's Spring Meeting celebrates the distinguished career of this famous Harvard professor and author of the seminal Igneous Rocks and the Depths of the Earth (1914, 1933). Most fittingly, the inaugural lecture will be given by David Walker of Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory after a day-long Union session on discontinuities in the mantle. Dave's lecture, “Errors in Earth Evolution,” will start at 4:45 P.M. We can expect to hear an original and provocative talk that features exciting, new data.

  20. TRAPPIST monitoring of comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opitom, Cyrielle; Jehin, Emmanuël; Manfroid, Jean; Hutsemékers, Damien; Gillon, Michaël

    2014-11-01

    C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) is a long period comet discovered by Robert H McNaught at Siding Spring Observatory in Australia on January 3, 2013 at 7.2 au from the Sun. This comet will make a close encounter with Mars on October 19, 2014. At this occasion the comet will be extensively observed both from Earth and from several orbiters around Mars.On September 20, 2013 when the comet was around 5 au from the Sun, we started a monitoring with the TRAPPIST robotic telescope installed at La Silla observatory [1]. A set of narrowband cometary filters designed by the NASA for the Hale-Bopp Observing Campaign [2] is permanently mounted on the telescope along with classic Johnson-Cousins B, V, Rc, and Ic filters.We observed the comet continuously at least once a week from September 20, 2013 to April 6, 2014 with broad band filters. We then recovered the comet on May 20. At this time we could detect the gas and started the observations with narrow band filters until early November, covering the close approach to Mars and the perihelion passage.We present here our first results about comet Siding Springs. From the images in the broad band filters and in the dust continuum filters we derived A(θ)fρ values [3] and studied the evolution of the comet activity with the heliocentric distance from September 20, 2013 to early November 2014. We could also detect gas since May 20, 2014. We thus derived gas production rates using a Haser model [4]. We present the evolution of gas production rates and gas production rates ratios with the heliocentric distance.Finally, we discuss the dust and gas coma morphology.

  1. Studies of Λc production in pp and p-Pb collisions 1 with ALICE at 2 the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meninno, Elisa

    2017-03-01

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) was designed to study the strongly interacting medium created in heavy-ion collisions at LHC energies, the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Heavy quarks (charm and beauty), produced in the early stages of the collisions, are among the most powerful probes to study this state of matter. To study the QGP effects, it is important to establish reference data, which is done by analysing results from pp and p-Pb collisions. We report on the charmed baryon Λc measurement in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV and in p-Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV with the ALICE experiment, through the reconstruction of the decay channels Λc+ → p KS0 and Λc+ → pK-π+.

  2. Alice Welford (1887-1918), a nurse in World War I: The impact of kindness and compassion.

    PubMed

    Watkins, PeterJ; Watkins, Valerie J

    2017-02-01

    The contribution of nurses to the morale of wounded and dying young men during World War 1 was immense. Alice Welford came from the small North Yorkshire village of Crathorne, joined the Queen Alexandra Imperial Military Nursing Service in 1915 and spent the following two and one half years in nursing casualties from some of the fiercest battles of the war including Gallipoli and Salonika. She kept an autograph book inscribed by wounded and dying soldiers, with poignant verses and humorous drawings showing love, wit and tragedy. Despite the dreadful conditions, kindness and compassion brought them comfort and raised their morale - a critical message for today, and Alice's gift to us from World War I.

  3. What causes southeast Australia's worst droughts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummenhofer, Caroline C.; England, Matthew H.; McIntosh, Peter C.; Meyers, Gary A.; Pook, Michael J.; Risbey, James S.; Gupta, Alexander Sen; Taschetto, Andréa S.

    2009-02-01

    Since 1995, a large region of Australia has been gripped by the most severe drought in living memory, the so-called ``Big Dry''. The ramifications for affected regions are dire, with acute water shortages for rural and metropolitan areas, record agricultural losses, the drying-out of two of Australia's major river systems and far-reaching ecosystem damage. Yet the drought's origins have remained elusive. For Southeast Australia, we show here that the ``Big Dry'' and other iconic 20th Century droughts, including the Federation Drought (1895-1902) and World War II drought (1937-1945), are driven by Indian Ocean variability, not Pacific Ocean conditions as traditionally assumed. Specifically, a conspicuous absence of Indian Ocean temperature conditions conducive to enhanced tropical moisture transport has deprived southeastern Australia of its normal rainfall quota. In the case of the ``Big Dry'', its unprecedented intensity is also related to recent higher temperatures.

  4. Total Solar Eclipse Australia - Nov. 13, 2012

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Nov. 13, 2012, a narrow corridor in the southern hemisphere experienced a total solar eclipse. The corridor lay mostly over the ocean but also cut across the northern tip of Australia where both...

  5. Volusia Blue Spring - A Hydrological Treasure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    German, Edward R.

    2008-01-01

    Springs are natural openings in the ground through which water beneath the surface discharges into hydrologic features such as lakes, rivers, or the ocean. The beautiful springs and spring rivers are among Florida's most valued natural resources; their gemlike refreshing waters have been a focal point of life from prehistoric times to the present (2008). The steady flow of freshwater at a nearly constant water temperature attracted animals now long absent from Florida's landscape. Fossil remains and human artifacts, discovered by divers from many spring runs, attest to the importance of springs to the State's earliest inhabitants. Explorers of Florida, from Ponce de Leon to John and William Bartram and others, often mentioned the springs that were scattered across central and northern Florida. As colonists and settlers began to inhabit Florida, springs continued to be the focus of human activity, becoming sites of missions, towns, and steamboat landings.

  6. 1. NORTHWEST FRONT, SOUTHWEST SIDE (SPRING HOUSE IN FOREGROUND; BATH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. NORTHWEST FRONT, SOUTHWEST SIDE (SPRING HOUSE IN FOREGROUND; BATH HOUSE AT REAR) (4 x 5 negative; 5 x 7 print) - Salt Sulphur Springs, Spring House, U.S. Route 219, Salt Sulphur Springs, Monroe County, WV

  7. Using NERSC High-Performance Computing (HPC) systems for high-energy nuclear physics applications with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasel, Markus

    2016-10-01

    High-Performance Computing Systems are powerful tools tailored to support large- scale applications that rely on low-latency inter-process communications to run efficiently. By design, these systems often impose constraints on application workflows, such as limited external network connectivity and whole node scheduling, that make more general-purpose computing tasks, such as those commonly found in high-energy nuclear physics applications, more difficult to carry out. In this work, we present a tool designed to simplify access to such complicated environments by handling the common tasks of job submission, software management, and local data management, in a framework that is easily adaptable to the specific requirements of various computing systems. The tool, initially constructed to process stand-alone ALICE simulations for detector and software development, was successfully deployed on the NERSC computing systems, Carver, Hopper and Edison, and is being configured to provide access to the next generation NERSC system, Cori. In this report, we describe the tool and discuss our experience running ALICE applications on NERSC HPC systems. The discussion will include our initial benchmarks of Cori compared to other systems and our attempts to leverage the new capabilities offered with Cori to support data-intensive applications, with a future goal of full integration of such systems into ALICE grid operations.

  8. Study of cosmic ray events with high muon multiplicity using the ALICE detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The ALICE Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    ALICE is one of four large experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, specially designed to study particle production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Located 52 meters underground with 28 meters of overburden rock, it has also been used to detect muons produced by cosmic ray interactions in the upper atmosphere. In this paper, we present the multiplicity distribution of these atmospheric muons and its comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. This analysis exploits the large size and excellent tracking capability of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber. A special emphasis is given to the study of high multiplicity events containing more than 100 reconstructed muons and corresponding to a muon areal density ρμ > 5.9 m-2. Similar events have been studied in previous underground experiments such as ALEPH and DELPHI at LEP. While these experiments were able to reproduce the measured muon multiplicity distribution with Monte Carlo simulations at low and intermediate multiplicities, their simulations failed to describe the frequency of the highest multiplicity events. In this work we show that the high multiplicity events observed in ALICE stem from primary cosmic rays with energies above 1016 eV and that the frequency of these events can be successfully described by assuming a heavy mass composition of primary cosmic rays in this energy range. The development of the resulting air showers was simulated using the latest version of QGSJET to model hadronic interactions. This observation places significant constraints on alternative, more exotic, production mechanisms for these events.

  9. An optimization of the ALICE XRootD storage cluster at the Tier-2 site in Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamova, D.; Horky, J.

    2012-12-01

    ALICE, as well as the other experiments at the CERN LHC, has been building a distributed data management infrastructure since 2002. Experience gained during years of operations with different types of storage managers deployed over this infrastructure has shown, that the most adequate storage solution for ALICE is the native XRootD manager developed within a CERN - SLAC collaboration. The XRootD storage clusters exhibit higher stability and availability in comparison with other storage solutions and demonstrate a number of other advantages, like support of high speed WAN data access or no need for maintaining complex databases. Two of the operational characteristics of XRootD data servers are a relatively high number of open sockets and a high Unix load. In this article, we would like to describe our experience with the tuning/optimization of machines hosting the XRootD servers, which are part of the ALICE storage cluster at the Tier-2 WLCG site in Prague, Czech Republic. The optimization procedure, in addition to boosting the read/write performance of the servers, also resulted in a reduction of the Unix load.

  10. Comparative spring mechanics in mantis shrimp.

    PubMed

    Patek, S N; Rosario, M V; Taylor, J R A

    2013-04-01

    Elastic mechanisms are fundamental to fast and efficient movements. Mantis shrimp power their fast raptorial appendages using a conserved network of exoskeletal springs, linkages and latches. Their appendages are fantastically diverse, ranging from spears to hammers. We measured the spring mechanics of 12 mantis shrimp species from five different families exhibiting hammer-shaped, spear-shaped and undifferentiated appendages. Across species, spring force and work increase with size of the appendage and spring constant is not correlated with size. Species that hammer their prey exhibit significantly greater spring resilience compared with species that impale evasive prey ('spearers'); mixed statistical results show that species that hammer prey also produce greater work relative to size during spring loading compared with spearers. Disabling part of the spring mechanism, the 'saddle', significantly decreases spring force and work in three smasher species; cross-species analyses show a greater effect of cutting the saddle on the spring force and spring constant in species without hammers compared with species with hammers. Overall, the study shows a more potent spring mechanism in the faster and more powerful hammering species compared with spearing species while also highlighting the challenges of reconciling within-species and cross-species mechanical analyses when different processes may be acting at these two different levels of analysis. The observed mechanical variation in spring mechanics provides insights into the evolutionary history, morphological components and mechanical behavior, which were not discernible in prior single-species studies. The results also suggest that, even with a conserved spring mechanism, spring behavior, potency and component structures can be varied within a clade with implications for the behavioral functions of power-amplified devices.

  11. Intra-seasonal drivers of extreme heat over Australia in observations and POAMA-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, A. G.; Hudson, D.; Wheeler, M. C.; Alves, O.; Hendon, H. H.; Pook, M. J.; Risbey, J. S.

    2014-10-01

    We assess the occurrence and probability of extreme heat over Australia in association with the Southern Annular Mode (SAM), persistent anticyclones over the Tasman Sea, and the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), which have previously been shown to be key drivers of intra-seasonal variations of Australian climate. In this study, extreme heat events are defined as occurring when weekly-mean maximum temperature anomalies exceed the 90th percentile. The observed probability of exceedance is reduced during the positive phase of the SAM and enhanced during the negative phase of the SAM over most of Australia. Persistent anticyclones over the Tasman Sea are described in terms of (1) split-flow blocking at 160°E and (2) high pressure systems located in the vicinity of the subtropical ridge (STRHs), about 10° north of the split-flow blocking region, for which we devise a simple index. Split-flow blocks and STRHs have contrasting impacts on the occurrence of extreme heat over Australia, with STRHs showing enhanced probability of upper decile heat events over southern Australia in all seasons. The observed probability of an upper decile heat event varies according to MJO phase and time of year, with the greatest impact of the MJO on extreme heat occurring over southern Australia (including the Mallee agricultural region) in spring during phases 2-3. We show that this modulation of the probability of extreme heat by the SAM, persistent anticyclones over the Tasman Sea, and the MJO is well simulated in the Bureau of Meteorology dynamical intra-seasonal/seasonal forecast model POAMA-2 at lead times of 2-3 weeks. We further show that predictability of heat extremes increases in association with the negative SAM phase, STRH and MJO, thus providing a basis for skilful intra-seasonal prediction of heat extremes.

  12. Audiomagnetotelluric data from Spring, Cave, and Coyote Spring Valleys, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPhee, Darcy K.; Chuchel, Bruce A.; Pellerin, Louise

    2006-01-01

    Audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) data along four profiles in Spring, Cave, and Coyote Spring Valleys are presented here. The AMT method is used to estimate the electrical resistivity of the earth over depth ranges of a few meters to greater than one kilometer. This method is a valuable tool for revealing subsurface structure and stratigraphy within the Basin and Range of eastern Nevada, therefore helping to define the geohydrologic framework in this region. We collected AMT data using the Geometrics StrataGem EH4 system, a four-channel, natural and controlled- source tensor system recording in the range of 10 to 92,000 Hz. To augment the low signal in the natural field, an unpolarized transmitter comprised of two horizontal-magnetic dipoles was used from 1,000 to 70,000 Hz. Profiles were 1.4 - 12.6 km in length with station spacing of 100-400 m. Data were recorded with the electrical (E) field parallel to and perpendicular to the regional geologic strike direction. Station locations and sounding curves, showing apparent resistivity, phase data, and coherency data, are presented here.

  13. Long-term changes in the numbers of Helicoverpa punctigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in a cotton production landscape in northern New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Baker, G H; Tann, C R

    2017-04-01

    Two noctuid moths, Helicoverpa punctigera and Helicoverpa armigera, are pests of several agricultural crops in Australia, most notably cotton. Cotton is a summer crop, grown predominantly in eastern Australia. The use of transgenic (Bt) cotton has reduced the damage caused by Helicoverpa spp., but the development of Bt resistance in these insects remains a threat. In the past, large populations of H. punctigera have built up in inland Australia, following autumn-winter rains. Moths have then migrated to the cropping regions in spring, when their inland host plants dried off. To determine if there have been any long-term changes in this pattern, pheromone traps were set for H. punctigera throughout a cropping landscape in northern New South Wales from 1992 to 2015. At least three generations of moths were caught from spring to autumn. The 1st generation (mostly spring migrants) was the most numerous. Trap captures varied between sites and decreased in time, especially for moths in the 1st generation. Nearby habitat type influenced the size of catch and there was some evidence that local weather also influenced the numbers of moths caught. There was no correlation between trap catches in the cropping region and rainfall in the inland. In addition, there was little evidence that Bt cotton has reduced the abundance of H. punctigera at landscape scale. The apparent decline in the number of presumably Bt susceptible moths arriving each spring in the cropping regions from inland habitats is of concern in relation to the management of Bt resistance.

  14. ERDC MSRC Resource. Spring 2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    OMB control number . 1. REPORT DATE 2005 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2005 to 00-00-2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ERDC MSRC Resource...Spring 2005 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER ...Ferry Road,Vicksburg,MS,39180-6199 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR

  15. Hydrology at the Spring Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A special, full-day session on “Investigation of Mesoscale Precipitation Fields” is being organized by the precipitation committee of AGU's Hydrology Section for the 1984 AGU Spring Meeting under the joint sponsorship of the Hydrology and Atmospheric Sciences sections. This session will contain about 10 invited talks by hydrologists, atmospheric scientists, statisticians, and mathematicians, with a new focus on interdisciplinary research in modeling precipitation fields. In the evening, a 2-hour panel discussion will be held to explore in depth the scope of interdisciplinary research and climatic variability. For additional details contact: Vijay K. Gupta, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Univ. of Mississippi, University, MS 38677 (telephone 601-232-5366).

  16. CACTUS SPRING ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matti, Jonathan C.; Kuizon, Lucia

    1984-01-01

    Geologic, geochemical, and geophysical studies together with a review of historic mining and prospecting activities indicate that the Cactus Spring Roadless Area in California has little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Marble bodies occur in the northern part of the roadless area and are possible resources for building stone, crushed and quarried aggregate, and lime and magnesium for Portland cement and industrial applications. It is recommended that the terrane of marble be mapped and sampled carefully in order to evaluate the quantity and quality of the carbonate resources.

  17. Quantum model for entropic springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chiao-Hsuan; Taylor, Jacob M.

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by understanding the emergence of thermodynamic restoring forces and oscillations, we develop a quantum-mechanical model of a bath of spins coupled to the elasticity of a material. We show our model reproduces the behavior of a variety of entropic springs while enabling investigation of nonequilibrium resonator states in the quantum domain. We find our model emerges naturally in disordered elastic media, such as glasses, and is an additional expected effect in systems with anomalous specific heat and 1 /f noise at low temperatures due to two-level systems that fluctuate.

  18. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease--priorities in prevention, diagnosis and management. A report of the CSANZ Indigenous Cardiovascular Health Conference, Alice Springs 2011.

    PubMed

    Rémond, M G W; Wheaton, G R; Walsh, W F; Prior, D L; Maguire, G P

    2012-10-01

    Three priority areas in the prevention, diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) were identified and discussed in detail: 1. Echocardiography and screening/diagnosis of RHD – Given the existing uncertainty it remains premature to advocate for or to incorporate echocardiographic screening for RHD into Australian clinical practice. Further research is currently being undertaken to evaluate the potential for echocardiography screening. 2. Secondary prophylaxis – Secondary prophylaxis (long acting benzathine penicillin injections) must be seen as a priority. Systems-based approaches are necessary with a focus on the development and evaluation of primary health care-based or led strategies incorporating effective health information management systems. Better/novel systems of delivery of prophylactic medications should be investigated. 3. Management of advanced RHD – National centres of excellence for the diagnosis, assessment and surgical management of RHD are required. Early referral for surgical input is necessary with multidisciplinary care and team-based decision making that includes patient, family, and local health providers. There is a need for a national RHD surgical register and research strategy for the assessment, intervention and long-term outcome of surgery and other interventions for RHD.

  19. ALPIDE: the Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor for the ALICE ITS upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šuljić, M.

    2016-11-01

    The upgrade of the ALICE vertex detector, the Inner Tracking System (ITS), is scheduled to be installed during the next long shutdown period (2019-2020) of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) . The current ITS will be replaced by seven concentric layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) with total active surface of ~10 m2, thus making ALICE the first LHC experiment implementing MAPS detector technology on a large scale. The ALPIDE chip, based on TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS Imaging Process, is being developed for this purpose. A particular process feature, the deep p-well, is exploited so the full CMOS logic can be implemented over the active sensor area without impinging on the deposited charge collection. ALPIDE is implemented on silicon wafers with a high resistivity epitaxial layer. A single chip measures 15 mm by 30 mm and contains half a million pixels distributed in 512 rows and 1024 columns. In-pixel circuitry features amplification, shaping, discrimination and multi-event buffering. The readout is hit driven i.e. only addresses of hit pixels are sent to the periphery. The upgrade of the ITS presents two different sets of requirements for sensors of the inner and of the outer layers due to the significantly different track density, radiation level and active detector surface. The ALPIDE chip fulfils the stringent requirements in both cases. The detection efficiency is higher than 99%, fake-hit probability is orders of magnitude lower than the required 10-6 and spatial resolution within the required 5 μm. This performance is to be maintained even after a total ionising does (TID) of 2.7 Mrad and a non-ionising energy loss (NIEL) fluence of 1.7 × 1013 1 MeV neq/cm2, which is above what is expected during the detector lifetime. Readout rate of 100 kHz is provided and the power density of ALPIDE is less than 40 mW/cm2. This contribution will provide a summary of the ALPIDE features and main test results.

  20. Immigration in two federations: Canada and Australia.

    PubMed

    Atchison, J

    1988-03-01

    The need for increasingly widespread application of a policy or program, settlement, and multiculturalism is urgent in both Canada and Australia. For both countries there is a clear pattern of coalescence and divergence and the distinct growth of immigration as a federal function. While Australia has strengthened federal functions in a area of increasingly geo-political need, Canada is moving towards a looser model of federalism. By 1918 both countries were strengthening their federal functions in immigration as discussions within the British Empire on the recommendations of the 1917 Dominions Royal Commission took root. Both countries were interested in agricultural immigration and land settlement. The Great Depression caused a major reduction in population growth rates. From 1933-1948 Canada had a poor record of providing sanctuary for Jews. In Australia, however, Jewish voluntary agencies were aiding the reception of refugees by 1937. The 1st permanent embodiment of commonwealth jurisdiction over immigration was the establishment of an Immigration Branch within the Department of Interior around 1938. Australia needed extra population for defense. The major structural link between government and the immigrant communities was through the Good Neighbor Movement, which began on a nationwide basis in 1950. Both Canada and Australia are major receiving countries for refugees. In 1973 Australia reached the position of effective, practical nondiscrimination achieved by Canada in 1967. Prime Minister Trudeau's policy was multiculturalism within a framework of bilingualism. By 1978 Australia had a new federalism policy, which in all areas concerned with immigrants, refugees and ethnicity, rationalized resources allocation and imposed a political philosophy. The foci of multiculturalism in Australia are 1) community languages; 2) creation of a tolerant, non-discriminatory society; and 3) equity and participation. In 1978 Australia specified population replacement and

  1. Slightly thermal springs and non-thermal springs at Mount Shasta, California: Chemistry and recharge elevations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathenson, M.; Thompson, J. M.; White, L. D.

    2003-02-01

    Temperature measurements, isotopic contents, and dissolved constituents are presented for springs at Mount Shasta to understand slightly thermal springs in the Shasta Valley based on the characteristics of non-thermal springs. Non-thermal springs on Mount Shasta are generally cooler than mean annual air temperatures for their elevation. The specific conductance of non-thermal springs increases linearly with discharge temperature. Springs at higher and intermediate elevations on Mount Shasta have fairly limited circulation paths, whereas low-elevation springs have longer paths because of their higher-elevation recharge. Springs in the Shasta Valley are warmer than air temperatures for their elevation and contain significant amounts of chloride and sulfate, constituents often associated with volcanic hydrothermal systems. Data for the Shasta Valley springs generally define mixing trends for dissolved constituents and temperature. The isotopic composition of the Shasta Valley springs indicates that water fell as precipitation at a higher elevation than any of the non-thermal springs. It is possible that the Shasta Valley springs include a component of the outflow from a proposed 210°C hydrothermal system that boils to supply steam for the summit acid-sulfate spring. In order to categorize springs such as those in the Shasta Valley, we introduce the term slightly thermal springs for springs that do not meet the numerical criterion of 10°C above air temperature for thermal springs but have temperatures greater than non-thermal springs in the area and usually also have dissolved constituents normally found in thermal waters.

  2. Slightly thermal springs and non-thermal springs at Mount Shasta, California: Chemistry and recharge elevations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, M.; Thompson, J.M.; White, L.D.

    2003-01-01

    Temperature measurements, isotopic contents, and dissolved constituents are presented for springs at Mount Shasta to understand slightly thermal springs in the Shasta Valley based on the characteristics of non-thermal springs. Non-thermal springs on Mount Shasta are generally cooler than mean annual air temperatures for their elevation. The specific conductance of non-thermal springs increases linearly with discharge temperature. Springs at higher and intermediate elevations on Mount Shasta have fairly limited circulation paths, whereas low-elevation springs have longer paths because of their higher-elevation recharge. Springs in the Shasta Valley are warmer than air temperatures for their elevation and contain significant amounts of chloride and sulfate, constituents often associated with volcanic hydrothermal systems. Data for the Shasta Valley springs generally define mixing trends for dissolved constituents and temperature. The isotopic composition of the Shasta Valley springs indicates that water fell as precipitation at a higher elevation than any of the non-thermal springs. It is possible that the Shasta Valley springs include a component of the outflow from a proposed 210??C hydrothermal system that boils to supply steam for the summit acid-sulfate spring. In order to categorize springs such as those in the Shasta Valley, we introduce the term slightly thermal springs for springs that do not meet the numerical criterion of 10??C above air temperature for thermal springs but have temperatures greater than non-thermal springs in the area and usually also have dissolved constituents normally found in thermal waters. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Measles surveillance in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yung-Hsuan J.; Andrews, Ross M.; Lambert, Stephen B.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Many countries are implementing measles elimination strategies. In Australia, the State of Victoria has conducted enhanced measles surveillance since 1997 using case interviews and home-based specimen collection for laboratory confirmation. We attempted to identify features of notified cases that would better target surveillance resources. METHODS: We retrospectively classified notifications received from 1998 to 2003 as having been received in an epidemic (one or more laboratory-confirmed cases) or an interepidemic period (no laboratory-confirmed cases). We labelled the first case notified in any epidemic period that was not laboratory-confirmed at the time of notification as a "sentinel case". To maximize detection of sentinel cases while minimizing the follow-up of eventually discarded notifications, we generated algorithms using sentinel cases and interepidemic notifications. FINDINGS: We identified 10 sentinel cases with 422 interepidemic notifications from 1281 Victorian notifications. Sentinel cases were more likely to report fever at rash onset (odds ratio (OR) 15.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) CI: 2.1-688.9), cough (OR 10.4, 95% CI: 1.4-456.7), conjunctivitis (OR 7.9, 95% CI: 1.8-39.1), or year of birth between 1968 and 1981 (OR 31.8, 95% CI: 6.7-162.3). Prospective application of an algorithm consisting of fever at rash onset or born between 1968 and 1981 in the review period would have detected all sentinel cases and avoided the need for enhanced follow-up of 162 of the 422 eventually discarded notifications. CONCLUSION: Elimination strategies should be refined to suit regional and local priorities. The prospective application of an algorithm in Victoria is likely to reduce enhanced measles surveillance resource use in interepidemic periods, while still detecting early cases during measles outbreaks. PMID:16501727

  4. Unlocking Australia's Language Potential. Profiles of 9 Key Languages in Australia. Volume 7: Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marriott, Helen; And Others

    The report on the status of Japanese language teaching in Australia gives a broad view of Japanese study and discusses current educational issues in some detail. An introductory chapter offers a brief overview of the history, objectives, and issues of Japanese language instruction in Australia. The second chapter details features of instructional…

  5. Study of isolated prompt photon production in p -Pb collisions for the ALICE kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goharipour, Muhammad; Mehraban, Hossein

    2017-03-01

    Prompt photon production is known as a powerful tool for testing perturbative QCD predictions and also the validity of parton densities in the nucleon and nuclei, especially of the gluon. In this work, we have performed a detailed study on this subject, focusing on the isolated prompt photon production in p -Pb collisions at forward rapidity at the LHC. The impact of input nuclear modifications obtained from different global analyses by various groups on several quantities has been investigated to estimate the order of magnitude of the difference between their predictions. We have also studied in detail the theoretical uncertainties in the results due to various sources. We found that there is a remarkable difference between the predictions from the nCTEQ15 and other groups in all ranges of photon transverse momentum pTγ. Their differences become more explicit in the calculation of the nuclear modification ratio and also the yield asymmetry between the forward and backward rapidities rather than single differential cross sections. We emphasize that future measurements with ALICE will be very useful, not only for decreasing the uncertainty of the gluon nuclear modification, but also to accurately determine its central values, especially in the shadowing region.

  6. Femtoscopy of identified particles in Pb-Pb collisions with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinina, L. V.

    2016-12-01

    Femtoscopy provides information on system size and its dynamics due to the effects of quantum statistics and final-state interactions. The results of femtoscopic correlations of different identified particles measured by ALICE in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV are presented. Hydrodynamic models predict a decrease of the radii with increasing pair transverse mass (mT) due to radial flow. Correlation measurements of heavy particles extend the range over which the transverse mass dependence of the source radii can be studied and thus can serve as a tool to learn about the dynamics of the deconfined medium. In particular, the measured three-dimensional radii of kaons are compared with a model where the hydrodynamic phase is succeeded by a hadronic rescattering phase and a purely hydrodynamical calculation. The latter predicts an approximate mT scaling of source radii obtained from pion and kaon correlations. This mT scaling appears to be broken in the data. The breaking of scaling is well reproduced by the full hydro-kinetic model calculations, thereby indicating the importance of the rescattering phase at LHC energies. The emission duration and the decoupling time of the system are also estimated for kaons and pions.

  7. Inclusive photon production at forward rapidities in pp collisions at LHC energies with the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudipan Dethe ALICE Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of particles produced in pp collisions are important for the study of particle production mechanisms and to obtain baseline distributions to be compared with those from heavy-ion collisions. The inclusive photon measurements (dominated by π0 decays) are complementary to the charged particle measurements. The present work focuses on the forward rapidity region with comparisons to different models such as PYTHIA and PHOJET. We report the measurements of multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of inclusive photons using the ALICE Photon Multiplicity Detector (PMD) at forward rapidities (2.3 < η < 3.9) in pp collisions at = 0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV. It is observed that the photon multiplicity distributions are well described by negative binomial distributions (NBD). Multiplicity distributions are studied in terms of KNO variables for each energy. It is shown that the increase in the average photon multiplicity as a function of beam energy is compatible with both a logarithmic and power law dependence. The results are compared to different model predictions. These models reproduce experimental results at lower energy while they are not accurate at higher energies.

  8. Identified particle production in pp collisions at = 7 and 13 TeV measured with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derradi de Souza, R.; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Proton-proton (pp) collisions have been used extensively as a reference for the study of interactions of larger colliding systems at the LHC. Recent measurements performed in high-multiplicity pp and proton-lead (p-Pb) collisions have shown features that are reminiscent of those observed in lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions. In this context, the study of identified particle spectra and yields as a function of multiplicity is a key tool for the understanding of similarities and differences between small and large systems. We report on the production of pions, kaons, protons, , Λ, Ξ, Ω and K *0 as a function of multiplicity in pp collisions at = 7 TeV measured with the ALICE experiment. The work presented here represents the most comprehensive set of results on identified particle production in pp collisions at the LHC. Spectral shapes, studied both for individual particles and via particle ratios as a function of p T, exhibit an evolution with charged particle multiplicity that is similar to the one observed in larger systems. In addition, results on the production of light flavour hadrons in pp collisions at = 13 TeV, the highest centre-of-mass energy ever reached in the laboratory, are also presented and compared with previous, lower energy results.

  9. The new ALICE DQM client: a web access to ROOT-based objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Haller, B.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Delort, C.; Dénes, E.; Diviá, R.; Fuchs, U.; Niedziela, J.; Simonetti, G.; Soós, C.; Telesca, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Wegrzynek, A.

    2015-12-01

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The online Data Quality Monitoring (DQM) plays an essential role in the experiment operation by providing shifters with immediate feedback on the data being recorded in order to quickly identify and overcome problems. An immediate access to the DQM results is needed not only by shifters in the control room but also by detector experts worldwide. As a consequence, a new web application has been developed to dynamically display and manipulate the ROOT-based objects produced by the DQM system in a flexible and user friendly interface. The architecture and design of the tool, its main features and the technologies that were used, both on the server and the client side, are described. In particular, we detail how we took advantage of the most recent ROOT JavaScript I/O and web server library to give interactive access to ROOT objects stored in a database. We describe as well the use of modern web techniques and packages such as AJAX, DHTMLX and jQuery, which has been instrumental in the successful implementation of a reactive and efficient application. We finally present the resulting application and how code quality was ensured. We conclude with a roadmap for future technical and functional developments.

  10. The ALPIDE pixel sensor chip for the upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca

    2017-02-01

    The ALPIDE chip is a CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor being developed for the Upgrade of the ITS of the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The ALPIDE chip is implemented with a 180 nm CMOS Imaging Process and fabricated on substrates with a high-resistivity epitaxial layer. It measures 15 mm×30 mm and contains a matrix of 512×1024 pixels with in-pixel amplification, shaping, discrimination and multi-event buffering. The readout of the sensitive matrix is hit driven. There is no signaling activity over the matrix if there are no hits to read out and power consumption is proportional to the occupancy. The sensor meets the experimental requirements of detection efficiency above 99%, fake-hit probability below 10-5 and a spatial resolution of 5 μm. The capability to read out Pb-Pb interactions at 100 kHz is provided. The power density of the ALPIDE chip is projected to be less than 35 mW/cm2 for the application in the Inner Barrel Layers and below 20 mW/cm2 for the Outer Barrel Layers, where the occupancy is lower. This contribution describes the architecture and the main features of the final ALPIDE chip, planned for submission at the beginning of 2016. Early results from the experimental qualification of full scale prototype predecessors are also reported.

  11. ULTRAVIOLET DISCOVERIES AT ASTEROID (21) LUTETIA BY THE ROSETTA ALICE ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, S. A.; Parker, J. Wm.; Steffl, A.; Birath, E.; Graps, A.; Feldman, P. D.; Weaver, H. A.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Feaga, L.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Cunningham, N.

    2011-06-15

    The NASA Alice ultraviolet (UV) imaging spectrograph on board the ESA Rosetta comet orbiter successfully conducted a series of flyby observations of the large asteroid (21) Lutetia in the days surrounding Rosetta's closest approach on 2010 July 10. Observations included a search for emission lines from gas, and spectral observations of the Lutetia's surface reflectance. No emissions from gas around Lutetia were observed. Regarding the surface reflectance, we found that Lutetia has a distinctly different albedo and slope than both the asteroid (2867) Steins and Earth's moon, the two most analogous objects studied in the far ultraviolet (FUV). Further, Lutetia's {approx}10% geometric albedo near 1800 A is significantly lower than its 16%-19% albedo near 5500 A. Moreover, the FUV albedo shows a precipitous drop (to {approx}4%) between 1800 A and 1600 A, representing the strongest spectral absorption feature observed in Lutetia's spectrum at any observed wavelength. Our surface reflectance fits are not unique but are consistent with a surface dominated by an EH5 chondrite, combined with multiple other possible surface constituents, including anorthite, water frost, and SO{sub 2} frost or a similar mid-UV absorber. The water frost identification is consistent with some data sets but inconsistent with others. The anorthite (feldspar) identification suggests that Lutetia is a differentiated body.

  12. Identified charged hadron production in pp and Pb-Pb collisions with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileiou, Maria

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear matter under extreme conditions can be investigated in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The measurement of transverse momentum distributions and yields of identified particles is a fundamental step in understanding collective and thermal properties of the matter produced in such collisions. The ALICE Experiment results on identified charged hadron production are presented for pp collisions at √s = 0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV and for Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV. Spectral shapes, production yields and nuclear modification factors are shown and compared to previous experiments and Monte Carlo predictions. The spectral shapes in Pb-Pb collisions indicate a strong increase of the radial flow velocity with respect to RHIC energies, which in hydrodynamic models is expected as a consequence of the increasing particle density. The observed suppression of high transverse momentum particles in central Pb-Pb collisions provides evidence for strong parton energy loss in the hot and dense medium.

  13. Does Lyme disease exist in Australia?

    PubMed

    Collignon, Peter J; Lum, Gary D; Robson, Jennifer Mb

    2016-11-07

    There is no convincing evidence that classic Lyme disease occurs in Australia, nor is there evidence that the causative agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, is found in Australian animals or ticks. Lyme disease, however, can be acquired overseas but diagnosed in Australia; most people presenting with laboratory-confirmed Lyme disease in Australia were infected in Europe. Despite the lack of evidence that Lyme disease can be acquired in Australia, growing numbers of patients, their supporters, and some politicians demand diagnoses and treatment according to the protocols of the "chronic Lyme disease" school of thought. Antibiotic therapy for chronic "Lyme disease-like illness" can cause harm to both the individual (eg, cannula-related intravenous sepsis) and the broader community (increased antimicrobial resistance rates). Until there is strong evidence from well performed clinical studies that bacteria present in Australia cause a chronic debilitating illness that responds to prolonged antibiotics, treating patients with "Lyme disease-like illness" with prolonged antibiotic therapy is unjustified, and is likely to do much more harm than good.

  14. Concentrated Language Encounters: The International Biography of a Curriculum Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Brian; Cazden, Courtney B.

    This paper is about a teaching program that was developed at a school in Alice Springs, a small town in Australia that has influenced teaching programs for Aboriginal children in that country. At Traeger Park school, the Aboriginal children speak English, although the speech of many children is characterized as Aboriginal English dialect. The…

  15. Environment mapping with spacecraft photography: A Central Australian example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonett, D. S.; Cochrane, G. R.; Morain, S. A.; Egbert, D. E.

    1969-01-01

    Boundary delineation from space photographs as a precursor to area typing was studied for characterization of land use for resource mapping near Alice Springs, Australia, where both boundary detection and categorization are complicated by the variations of the landscape. The detection and meaning of boundaries, and sources of confusion during categorization are discussed.

  16. The paleoclimate context and future trajectory of extreme summer hydroclimate in eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Palmer, Jonathan G.; Cook, Edward R.; Turney, Chris S. M.; Allen, Kathryn; Fenwick, Pavla; O'Donnell, Alison; Lough, Janice M.; Grierson, Pauline F.; Ho, Michelle; Baker, Patrick J.

    2016-11-01

    Eastern Australia recently experienced an intense drought (Millennium Drought, 2003-2009) and record-breaking rainfall and flooding (austral summer 2010-2011). There is some limited evidence for a climate change contribution to these events, but such analyses are hampered by the paucity of information on long-term natural variability. Analyzing a new reconstruction of summer (December-January-February) Palmer Drought Severity Index (the Australia-New Zealand Drought Atlas; ANZDA, 1500-2012 Common Era), we find moisture deficits during the Millennium Drought fall within the range of the last 500 years of natural hydroclimate variability. This variability includes periods of multidecadal drought in the 1500s more persistent than any event in the historical record. However, the severity of the Millennium Drought, which was caused by autumn (March-April-May) precipitation declines, may be underestimated in the ANZDA because the reconstruction is biased toward summer and antecedent spring (September-October-November) precipitation. The pluvial in 2011, however, which was characterized by extreme summer rainfall faithfully captured by the ANZDA, is likely the wettest year in the reconstruction for Coastal Queensland. Climate projections (Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) 8.5 scenario) suggest that eastern Australia will experience long-term drying during the 21st century. While the contribution of anthropogenic forcing to recent extremes remains an open question, these projections indicate an amplified risk of multiyear drought anomalies matching or exceeding the intensity of the Millennium Drought.

  17. Positive Indian Ocean Dipole events precondition southeast Australia bushfires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, W.; Cowan, T.; Raupach, M.

    2009-10-01

    The devastating “Black Saturday” bushfire inferno in the southeast Australian state of Victoria in early February 2009 and the “Ash Wednesday” bushfires in February 1983 were both preceded by a positive Indian Ocean Dipole (pIOD) event. Is there a systematic pIOD linkage beyond these two natural disasters? We show that out of 21 significant bushfires seasons since 1950, 11 were preceded by a pIOD. During Victoria's wet season, particularly spring, a pIOD contributes to lower rainfall and higher temperatures exacerbating the dry conditions and increasing the fuel load leading into summer. Consequently, pIODs are effective in preconditioning Victoria for bushfires, more so than El Niño events, as seen in the impact on soil moisture on interannual time scales and in multi-decadal changes since the 1950s. Given that the recent increase in pIOD occurrences is consistent with what is expected from global warming, an increased bushfire risk in the future is likely across southeast Australia.

  18. Thermal springs in Lake Baikal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanks, Wayne C.; Callender, E.

    1992-01-01

    The ??18O values of pore wqters range from -15.2??? to -16.7???, and ??D values range from -119??? to -126??? (both isotopes determined relative to standard mean ocean water [SMOW]). Bottom water in Lake Baikal has a ??18O value of -5.6??? and a ??D value of -120???. Pore waters in the vent area are significantly enriched in Mg, K, Ca, and especially Na and have the lowest ??D and ??18O values; these pore waters are isotopically and chemically distinct from pore waters in other, more typical parts of the lake. The pore-water isotopic data fall on a local meteoric water line, and covariations in water isotopes and chemistry are not consistent with evaporation or hydrothermal water-rock interaction. The thermal springs represent discharging meteoric waters that have been gently heated during subsurface circulation and are largely unaltered isotopically. Chemical variations are most likely due to dissolution of subsurface evaporites. -from Authors

  19. Dynamics of an actin spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera, Christophe; Mahadevan, L.; Shin, Jennifer; Matsudaira, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The acrosome of the sperm of the horseshoe crab (Limulus Polyphemus) is an unusual actin based system that shows a spectacular dynamical transition in the presence of Ca++ that is present in abundance in the neighborhood of the egg. During this process, the bundle, which is initially bent and twisted uncoils and becomes straight in a matter of a few seconds. Based on microstructural data, we propose a model for the dynamics of uncoiling that is best represented by a triple-well potential corresponding to the different structural arrangements of the supertwisted filaments. Each of the false, true and coiled states corresponds to a local minimum of the energy, with the true state being the one with the lowest energy. Using an evolution equation derived by balancing torques, we investigate the nucleation and propagation of the phase transition and compare the results with those of experiments. Our model quantifies the hypothesis that the acrosomal bundle behaves like a mechano-chemical spring.

  20. Emergence of neural angiostrongyliasis in eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Aghazadeh, Mahdis; Jones, Malcolm K; Aland, Kieran V; Reid, Simon A; Traub, Rebecca J; McCarthy, James S; Lee, Rogan

    2015-03-01

    Despite an apparent increase in cases of angiostrongyliasis in humans and animals in Australia, the epidemiology of infection with the two species of Angiostrongylus that co-exist in this country, namely A. cantonensis and A. mackerrasae, is poorly understood. This knowledge gap is particularly important with respect to A. mackerrasae, a species evidently native to Australia, as its ability to cause disease in humans is unknown. Likewise, there is little information on the roles of native and introduced species of rodents and molluscs as hosts of Angiostrongylus species in Australia. This review focuses on the gaps in the knowledge about the two species, highlighting the need for epidemiological and pathogenesis studies on the native lungworm A. mackerrasae.

  1. Variability of Root Traits in Spring Wheat Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Sruthi; Mohan, Amita; Gill, Kulvinder S.; Prasad, P. V. Vara

    2014-01-01

    Root traits influence the amount of water and nutrient absorption, and are important for maintaining crop yield under drought conditions. The objectives of this research were to characterize variability of root traits among spring wheat genotypes and determine whether root traits are related to shoot traits (plant height, tiller number per plant, shoot dry weight, and coleoptile length), regions of origin, and market classes. Plants were grown in 150-cm columns for 61 days in a greenhouse under optimal growth conditions. Rooting depth, root dry weight, root: shoot ratio, and shoot traits were determined for 297 genotypes of the germplasm, Cultivated Wheat Collection (CWC). The remaining root traits such as total root length and surface area were measured for a subset of 30 genotypes selected based on rooting depth. Significant genetic variability was observed for root traits among spring wheat genotypes in CWC germplasm or its subset. Genotypes Sonora and Currawa were ranked high, and genotype Vandal was ranked low for most root traits. A positive relationship (R2≥0.35) was found between root and shoot dry weights within the CWC germplasm and between total root surface area and tiller number; total root surface area and shoot dry weight; and total root length and coleoptile length within the subset. No correlations were found between plant height and most root traits within the CWC germplasm or its subset. Region of origin had significant impact on rooting depth in the CWC germplasm. Wheat genotypes collected from Australia, Mediterranean, and west Asia had greater rooting depth than those from south Asia, Latin America, Mexico, and Canada. Soft wheat had greater rooting depth than hard wheat in the CWC germplasm. The genetic variability identified in this research for root traits can be exploited to improve drought tolerance and/or resource capture in wheat. PMID:24945438

  2. Second memorandum on the flow of Aqua Caliente Spring after road construction at Palm Springs, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, J.F.; Dutcher, L.C.

    1953-01-01

    This memorandum was prepared at the request of Henry Harris, Acting Area Director, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Sacramento, Calif., to report on recent conditions at the Agua Caliente Spring, Palm Springs, Calif., and to suggest further possibilities for restoring the spring discharge to its pre-road-construction condition.

  3. The Moho in Australia and New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, M.; Kennett, B. L. N.; Stern, T.; Aitken, A. R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Australia and New Zealand share in part a history in the Gondwana supercontinent. Australia has a long and complex tectonic history with the last major accretion in the early Paleozoic, whereas New Zealand is still undergoing major plate boundary processes. The Australian continent is relatively well covered with both active and passive seismic techniques. Multiple sources of information are therefore available for building a model of Moho depth. Results from on-shore and off-shore refraction experiments are supplemented by receiver functions from a large number of portable stations and the recently augmented set of permanent stations. Moho picks from more than 10 500 km of full-crustal reflection profiles provide valuable additional constraints. The composite data set provides good sampling of much of Australia, though coverage remains low in some remote desert areas. The various datasets provide multiple estimates of the depth to Moho in many regions, and the consistency between the different techniques is high. Some of the thinnest crust lies beneath the Archean craton in the Pilbara, and in the neighbourhood of the Simpson desert. Thick crust is encountered beneath parts of the Proterozoic in Central Australia, and beneath the Paleozoic Lachlan fold belt in southeastern Australia. There are a number of zones of sharp contrast in depth to Moho, notably in the southern part of Central Australia. Despite most of the continental material around New Zealand being submerged, Moho data for this region is mainly onshore concentrating on the Australia-Pacific plate boundary. Two major wide-angle reflection transects provide the bulk of the active source data with just a few traditional reflection profiles offshore. The plate boundary provides an abundance of local earthquakes for tomographic imaging and this data is supplemented with receiver functions from both portable and permanent networks. Onshore the combined coverage is as dense as that of Australia, although it

  4. The Moho in Australia and New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Michelle; Kennett, Brian; Sambridge, Malcolm; Stern, Tim

    2013-04-01

    Australia and New Zealand share in part a history in the Gondwana supercontinent. Australia has a long and complex tectonic history with the last major accretion in the early Paleozoic, whereas New Zealand is still undergoing major plate boundary processes. The Australian continent is relatively well covered with both active and passive seismic techniques. Multiple sources of information are therefore available for building a model of Moho depth. Results from on-shore and off-shore refraction experiments are supplemented by receiver functions from a large number of portable stations and the recently augmented set of permanent stations. Moho picks from more than 10500 km of full-crustal reflection profiles provide valuable additional constraints. The composite data set provides good sampling of much of Australia, though coverage remains low in some remote desert areas. The various datasets provide multiple estimates of the depth to Moho in many regions, and the consistency between the different techniques is high. Some of the thinnest crust lies beneath the Archean craton in the Pilbara, and in the neighbourhood of the Simpson desert. Thick crust is encountered beneath parts of the Proterozoic in Central Australia, and beneath the Paleozoic Lachlan fold belt in southeastern Australia. There are a number of zones of sharp contrast in depth to Moho, notably in the southern part of Central Australia. Despite most of the continental material around New Zealand being submerged, Moho data for this region is mainly onshore concentrating on the Australia-Pacific plate boundary. Two major wide-angle reflection transects provide the bulk of the active source data with just a few traditional reflection profiles offshore. The plate bound- ary provides an abundance of local earthquakes for tomographic imaging and this data is supplemented with receiver functions from both portable and permanent networks.Onshore the combined coverage is as dense as that of Australia, although it

  5. Status of Women In Physics in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, C. P.

    2009-04-01

    The status of women in physics is Australia has remained mostly steady until recently, with the appointment of several eminent women in major government of public roles. Australia seems to maintain the same gender ratio for those studying and working in physics. There is no overall coordination of programs to assist women into the workplace but there is generally goodwill. Success in attracting and retaining women in the physics workforce appears to depend on the local culture, initiatives, and attitude of the most senior person in the organization.

  6. End of Mission, High Resolution Observations of the Coma and Surface of Comet 67P from the Rosetta-Alice, UV Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Joel Wm; Stern, S. Alan; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Feaga, Lori M.; Feldman, Paul D.; Noonan, John; Schindhelm, Eric; Steffl, Andrew; Weaver, Harold A.

    2016-10-01

    On or about 2016 September 30, just prior to this DPS meeting, the Rosetta spacecraft will end its two-year exploration of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko with a controlled impact onto the nucleus. Rosetta provided revolutionary results from the first long-term, in situ orbital study of a cometary nucleus and its inner coma. Among the suite of instruments on Rosetta is the NASA Alice ultraviolet spectrograph, the first UV spectrograph to collect data on a cometary mission. During the final two months of operations before impact, the Rosetta project plans to execute over a dozen flybys at altitudes closer than 2 km from the surface, resulting in unprecedented Alice spatial resolutions on the nucleus at 1-10 meter scales; coma observations at low altitudes also are planned and will provide observations on length scales as small as 10s of meters. We will report on this unique, late breaking, final dataset from the Rosetta-Alice project.

  7. 1988 Hanford riverbank springs characterization report

    SciTech Connect

    Dirkes, R.L.

    1990-12-01

    This reports presents the results of a special study undertaken to characterize the riverbank springs (i.e., ground-water seepage) entering the Columbia River along the Hanford Site. Radiological and nonradiological analyses were performed. River water samples were also analyzed from upstream and downstream of the Site as well as from the immediate vicinity of the springs. In addition, irrigation return water and spring water entering the river along the shoreline opposite Hanford were analyzed. Hanford-origin contaminants were detected in spring water entering the Columbia River along the Hanford Site. The type and concentrations of contaminants in the spring water were similar to those known to exist in the ground water near the river. The location and extent of the contaminated discharges compared favorably with recent ground-water reports and predictions. Spring discharge volumes remain very small relative to the flow of the Columbia. Downstream river sampling demonstrates the impact of ground-water discharges to be minimal, and negligible in most cases. Radionuclide concentrations were below US Department of Energy Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs) with the exception {sup 90}Sr near the 100-N Area. Tritium, while below the DCG, was detected at concentrations above the US Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standards in several springs. All other radionuclide concentrations were below drinking water standards. Nonradiological contaminants were generally undetectable in the spring water. River water contaminant concentrations, outside of the immediate discharge zones, were below drinking water standards in all cases. 19 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs.

  8. Spring Flowers: Harvest of a Sensitive Eye

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Eloise; Levin, Ted

    1978-01-01

    Defining and describing a number of spring flowers, this article includes illustrations and explanations that demonstrate "art and science are born of the same parents". The flowers discussed are skunk cabbage, bellwort, spring beauty, jack-in-the-pulpit, Solomon's seal, wild geranium, showy orchids, moccasin flower, bluets, apple, and Indian…

  9. Nonlinear Vibration of a Magnetic Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhong, Juhua; Cheng, Zhongqi; Ge, Ziming; Zhang, Yuelan; Lu, Wenqiang; Song, Feng; Li, Chuanyong

    2012-01-01

    To demonstrate the different vibration characteristics of a magnetic spring compared with those of a metal one, a magnetic spring apparatus was constructed from a pair of circular magnets of the same size with an inside diameter of 2.07 cm and an outside diameter of 4.50 cm. To keep the upper magnet in a suspension state, the two magnets were…

  10. Rooster Springs Elementary Teams Up for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    For many schools, membership in PTA can become "expected," instead of being a positive, fun opportunity to involve parents and support students and teachers. With more than 800 students each year, Rooster Springs Elementary PTA (RSE PTA) in Dripping Springs, Texas, never worried about membership recruitment. The PTA often assumed that…

  11. Joystick With Cable Springs Offers Better Feel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James; Ecklund, Wayne

    1992-01-01

    Improved joystick allows motion in 6 degrees of freedom, biased toward central position and orientation by 16 segments of cable serving as springs. Improvement in feel and control results from nonlinear compliance of cable-spring assembly. Nonlinear variations accommodate natural reactions of hand and brain. Operator functions as part of feedback control loop. More comfortable, increases ability to exert control and reduces fatigue.

  12. Spring control of wire harness loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curcio, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    Negator spring control guides wire harness between movable and fixed structure. It prevents electrical wire harness loop from jamming or being severed as wire moves in response to changes in position of aircraft rudder. Spring-loaded coiled cable controls wire loop regardless of rudder movement.

  13. Status of solid oxide fuel cell development in Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Badwal, S.P.S.; Foger, K.

    1995-12-31

    Ceramic Fuel Cells Limited, owned by a consortium consisting of BHP -- Australia`s largest company; CSIRO -- Australia`s major R and D Organization; Energy Research and Development Corporation -- Federal Government agency; Strategic Industry Research Foundation -- Victorian State Government agency and five major main land electricity utilities Pacific Power (New South Wales), ETSA (South Australia), Generation Victoria (Victoria), QEC (Queensland), SECWA (Western Australia) has been established to provide a national focus for the development of SOFC technology in Australia with a number of universities and research organizations contributing to its program. In this paper the status of solid oxide fuel cell R and D in Australia and within Ceramic Fuel Cells Ltd has been described. The SOFC development effort, the R and D infrastructure and significant achievements made since the incorporation of the Company in manufacture of single cells and stacks and their performance has been discussed.

  14. 76 FR 65988 - Importation of Mangoes From Australia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ..., Mangifera indica L., from Australia into the Continental United States, A Pathway-Initiated Risk Analysis... (Mangifera indica) may be imported into the continental United States from Australia only under the...

  15. Rocky Mountain Carbonate Spring Deposit development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainey, Dustin Kyle

    Relict Holocene carbonate spring deposits containing diverse biotic and abiotic depositional textures are present at Fall Creek cold sulphur springs, Alberta, Fairmont Hot Springs, British Columbia, and Hot Creek cold springs, British Columbia. The relict deposits are formed mainly of low-magnesium crystalline calcite contained in laterally continuous strata. Paleo-flow regimes were characterized by extensive sheet flow that increased the surface area of spring water exposed to the atmosphere. Calcite precipitated inorganically from spring water that attained CaCO3 supersaturation through agitation-induced CO2 degassing that was facilitated by elevated flow rates and a large surface area as spring water flowed down-slope. Thus, the deposits contain only minor amounts of detrital, mechanically deposited, and biogenic carbonate. Evaporation was only a minor contributor to CaCO3 supersaturation, mainly in quiescent environments. Photosynthetic CO2 removal did not measurably contribute to CaCO3 supersaturation. Calcite crystals precipitated in biotic facies formed from low to moderately supersaturated spring water, whereas abiotic dendrite crystals formed rapidly from highly supersaturated spring water. Calcite passively nucleated on cyanobacteria, bryophytes and macrophytes, and was probably facilitated by cyanobacterial extracellular polymeric substances. Cyanobacterial filaments and stromatolites are integral parts of all three deposits, whereas bryophytes were restricted to the Fall Creek and Hot Creek deposits. Diagenetic microbial degradation of crystalline calcite was common to all three deposits, but recrystallization was limited to the Fall Creek deposit. The amount and location of calcite precipitation relative to the vents was controlled by the concentrations of Ca2+ and HCO3- in solution, and discharge volume fluctuations. Spring water with high [Ca2+] and [HCO 3-] precipitated large amounts of calcite proximal to the vents (e.g. Fairmont), whereas spring

  16. Study of cosmic ray events with high muon multiplicity using the ALICE detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration: ALICE Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    ALICE is one of four large experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, specially designed to study particle production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Located 52 meters underground with 28 meters of overburden rock, it has also been used to detect muons produced by cosmic ray interactions in the upper atmosphere. In this paper, we present the multiplicity distribution of these atmospheric muons and its comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. This analysis exploits the large size and excellent tracking capability of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber. A special emphasis is given to the study of high multiplicity events containing more than 100 reconstructed muons and corresponding to a muon areal density ρ{sub μ} > 5.9 m{sup −2}. Similar events have been studied in previous underground experiments such as ALEPH and DELPHI at LEP. While these experiments were able to reproduce the measured muon multiplicity distribution with Monte Carlo simulations at low and intermediate multiplicities, their simulations failed to describe the frequency of the highest multiplicity events. In this work we show that the high multiplicity events observed in ALICE stem from primary cosmic rays with energies above 10{sup 16} eV and that the frequency of these events can be successfully described by assuming a heavy mass composition of primary cosmic rays in this energy range. The development of the resulting air showers was simulated using the latest version of QGSJET to model hadronic interactions. This observation places significant constraints on alternative, more exotic, production mechanisms for these events.

  17. Study of cosmic ray events with high muon multiplicity using the ALICE detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, J.

    2016-01-19

    ALICE is one of four large experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, specially designed to study particle production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Located 52 meters underground with 28 meters of overburden rock, it has also been used to detect muons produced by cosmic ray interactions in the upper atmosphere. Here, we present the multiplicity distribution of these atmospheric muons and its comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. Our analysis exploits the large size and excellent tracking capability of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber. A special emphasis is given to the study of high multiplicity events containing more than 100 reconstructed muons and corresponding to a muon areal density rho(mu) > 5.9 m(-2). Similar events have been studied in previous underground experiments such as ALEPH and DELPHI at LEP. While these experiments were able to reproduce the measured muon multiplicity distribution with Monte Carlo simulations at low and intermediate multiplicities, their simulations failed to describe the frequency of the highest multiplicity events. In this work we show that the high multiplicity events observed in ALICE stem from primary cosmic rays with energies above 10(16) eV and that the frequency of these events can be successfully described by assuming a heavy mass composition of primary cosmic rays in this energy range. Furthermore, the development of the resulting air showers was simulated using the latest version of QGSJET to model hadronic interactions. This observation places significant constraints on alternative, more exotic, production mechanisms for these events.

  18. Study of cosmic ray events with high muon multiplicity using the ALICE detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    DOE PAGES

    Adam, J.

    2016-01-19

    ALICE is one of four large experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, specially designed to study particle production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Located 52 meters underground with 28 meters of overburden rock, it has also been used to detect muons produced by cosmic ray interactions in the upper atmosphere. Here, we present the multiplicity distribution of these atmospheric muons and its comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. Our analysis exploits the large size and excellent tracking capability of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber. A special emphasis is given to the study of high multiplicity events containing more thanmore » 100 reconstructed muons and corresponding to a muon areal density rho(mu) > 5.9 m(-2). Similar events have been studied in previous underground experiments such as ALEPH and DELPHI at LEP. While these experiments were able to reproduce the measured muon multiplicity distribution with Monte Carlo simulations at low and intermediate multiplicities, their simulations failed to describe the frequency of the highest multiplicity events. In this work we show that the high multiplicity events observed in ALICE stem from primary cosmic rays with energies above 10(16) eV and that the frequency of these events can be successfully described by assuming a heavy mass composition of primary cosmic rays in this energy range. Furthermore, the development of the resulting air showers was simulated using the latest version of QGSJET to model hadronic interactions. This observation places significant constraints on alternative, more exotic, production mechanisms for these events.« less

  19. Charged particle production in Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC with the ALICE detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floris, M.

    2013-08-01

    The ALICE collaboration measured charged particle production in √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC. We report on results on charged particle multiplicity and transverse momentum spectra. All the results are presented as a function of the centrality of the collision, estimated with a Glauber Monte Carlo fit to multiplicity distributions reconstructed in various detectors. The applicability of the Glauber model at LHC energies, the precision of the centrality determination and the related systematic uncertainties are discussed in detail. Particles are tracked in the pseudorapidity window | η | ≲ 0.9 with the silicon Inner Tracking System (ITS) and the Time Projection Chamber (TPC), over the range 0.15

  20. Bose-Einstein correlations in pp and PbPb collisions with ALICE at the LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    We report on the results of identical pion femtoscopy at the LHC. The Bose-Einstein correlation analysis was performed on the large-statistics ALICE p+p at sqrt{s}= 0.9 TeV and 7 TeV datasets collected during 2010 LHC running and the first Pb+Pb dataset at sqrt{s_NN}= 2.76 TeV. Detailed pion femtoscopy studies in heavy-ion collisions have shown that emission region sizes ("HBT radii") decrease with increasing pair momentum, which is understood as a manifestation of the collective behavior of matter. 3D radii were also found to universally scale with event multiplicity. In p+p collisions at 7 TeV one measures multiplicities which are comparable with those registered in peripheral AuAu and CuCu collisions at RHIC, so direct comparisons and tests of scaling laws are now possible. We show the results of double-differential 3D pion HBT analysis, as a function of multiplicity and pair momentum. The results for two collision energies are compared to results obtained in the heavy-ion collisions at similar multiplicity and p+p collisions at lower energy. We identify the relevant scaling variables for the femtoscopic radii and discuss the similarities and differences to results from heavy-ions. The observed trends give insight into the soft particle production mechanism in p+p collisions and suggest that a self-interacting collective system may be created in sufficiently high multiplicity events. First results for the central Pb+Pb collisions are also shown. A significant increase of the reaction zone volume and lifetime in comparison to RHIC is observed. Signatures of collective hydrodynamics-like behavior of the system are also apparent, and are compared to model predictions.

  1. Bose-Einstein correlations in pp and PbPb collisions with ALICE at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-15

    We report on the results of identical pion femtoscopy at the LHC. The Bose-Einstein correlation analysis was performed on the large-statistics ALICE p+p at sqrt{s}= 0.9 TeV and 7 TeV datasets collected during 2010 LHC running and the first Pb+Pb dataset at sqrt{s_NN}= 2.76 TeV. Detailed pion femtoscopy studies in heavy-ion collisions have shown that emission region sizes ("HBT radii") decrease with increasing pair momentum, which is understood as a manifestation of the collective behavior of matter. 3D radii were also found to universally scale with event multiplicity. In p+p collisions at 7 TeV one measures multiplicities which are comparable with those registered in peripheral AuAu and CuCu collisions at RHIC, so direct comparisons and tests of scaling laws are now possible. We show the results of double-differential 3D pion HBT analysis, as a function of multiplicity and pair momentum. The results for two collision energies are compared to results obtained in the heavy-ion collisions at similar multiplicity and p+p collisions at lower energy. We identify the relevant scaling variables for the femtoscopic radii and discuss the similarities and differences to results from heavy-ions. The observed trends give insight into the soft particle production mechanism in p+p collisions and suggest that a self-interacting collective system may be created in sufficiently high multiplicity events. First results for the central Pb+Pb collisions are also shown. A significant increase of the reaction zone volume and lifetime in comparison to RHIC is observed. Signatures of collective hydrodynamics-like behavior of the system are also apparent, and are compared to model predictions.

  2. Richard Doll and Alice Stewart: reputation and the shaping of scientific "truth".

    PubMed

    Greene, Gayle

    2011-01-01

    As the world watched the Fukushima reactors release radionuclides into the ocean and atmosphere, the warnings of Dr. Alice Stewart about radiation risk and the reassurances of Sir Richard Doll assumed renewed relevance. Doll and Stewart, pioneer cancer epidemiologists who made major contributions in the 1950s-he by demonstrating the link between lung cancer and smoking, she by discovering that fetal X-rays double the chance of a childhood cancer-were locked into opposition about low-dose radiation risk. When she went public with the discovery that radiation at a fraction of the dose "known" to be dangerous could kill a child, her reputation plummeted, whereas Doll, foremost among her detractors, was knighted and lauded as "the world's most distinguished medical epidemiologist" for his work. Their lives and careers, so closely intertwined, took contrary courses, he becoming "more of the establishment" (as he said), while she became more oppositional. When it was discovered, after his death, that he'd been taking large sums of money from industries whose chemicals he was clearing of cancer risk, his reputation remained unscathed; it is now enshrined in the "Authorized Biography" (2009) commissioned by the Wellcome Institute, along with Doll's denigration of Stewart as an "embittered" woman and biased scientist. Stewart lived long enough to see radiation science move her way, to see international committees affirm, in the 1990s, that there is no threshold beneath which radiation ceases to be dangerous; recent evidence from Chernobyl is bearing out her warnings. But a look at the making and breaking of these reputations reveals the power of status, position, and image to shape scientific "knowledge" and social policy.

  3. New Horizons Alice sky Lyman-α at Pluto encounter: Importance for photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retherford, K. D.; Gladstone, R.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Young, L. A.; Olkin, C.; Cheng, A. F.; Greathouse, T.; Kammer, J.; Linscott, I.; Parker, A. H.; Parker, J. W.; Schindhelm, E.; Singer, K. N.; Steffl, A.; Strobel, D. F.; Summers, M. E.; Tsang, C.; Tyler, G. L.; Versteeg, M.; Woods, W. W.; Ennico Smith, K.; Hinson, D. P.; Pryor, W. R.; Cunningham, N. J.; Curdt, W.

    2015-12-01

    The third zone of our solar system, including the Pluto system, has a unique illumination environment at UV wavelengths. While direct solar Lyman-α emissions dominate the signal at 121.6 nm at classical solar system distances, the contribution of illumination by Interplanetary Medium (IPM) Lyman-α sky-glow is roughly on par at Pluto (Gladstone et al. 2015). The Pluto-Alice UV imaging spectrograph on New Horizons conducted several dedicated sky scans to measure the IPM Lyman-α both en route to and while at Pluto. These scans provide 6° by 360° great-circle swaths while spinning the spacecraft. Three sets of scans conducted en route are reported in Gladstone et al. (2012). During the Pluto encounter, sets of scans with six such swaths evenly spaced ~30° apart for all-sky coverage were obtained just before closest approach and again just after. These measurements agree well with brightness variations expected for IPM brightnesses peaking in the sunward direction and interspersed with detections of UV bright stars and other sky features. Previous studies estimated contributions of ~2/3rds direct solar Lyα and 1/3rd IPM Lyα. Our early results suggest that these model predictions need revision. These findings have important implications for determining the rates of photochemical reactions within Pluto's atmosphere that are driven by UV photons at 121.6 nm. Similarly, new constraints are provided to the rates of photolysis on Charon's polar winter nightside. These constraints are useful for understanding the volatile transport and long-term stability of the dark red region near Charon's pole discovered by New Horizons.

  4. Prevalence of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) in wild house mice (Mus musculis) in southeastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Faedo, Margaret; Hinds, Lyn A; Singleton, Grant R; Rawlinson, William D

    2007-10-01

    We determined the prevalence of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) in introduced, free-roaming, wild house mice (Mus musculus domesticus) [corrected] and compared envelope (env) and long terminal repeat (LTR) nucleotide sequences of viruses from wild mice and other sources. Mice were trapped on two occasions, in October (spring) and the following May (autumn) of 2003-2004 in the Mallee region of northwestern Victoria, Australia. Animals were assigned to three cohorts (subadult, young, and old adults) based on their body length. The DNA from salivary glands (62 of 62 mice) and mammary glands (19 of 32 female mice) was screened for the MMTV envelope (env) gene, and the long terminal repeat (LTR) region including the superantigen (SAg) sequence was amplified from a subset. Positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results for the MMTV env PCR were detected from salivary gland tissues from 60 of 62 (97%) mice and from mammary gland tissues from 19 of 19 (100%) female mice. All but two mice were positive for MMTV env across both sexes and the three cohorts. Similarity of the SAg carboxy-terminal nucleotide sequence between free-roaming wild house mice varied from 64% to 99%, although most of this variation was due to DNA sequences from two mice (M4 and M5). Phylogenetic analysis of the LTR region did not result in distinct grouping of sequences derived from mice when comparisons were made among sequences from mice in the US, Europe, and Australia, and MMTV-like virus (MMTV-LV) env sequences derived from human hosts. We report a high prevalence of the MMTV env sequence during a sampling period when peak mouse density was low. This indicates that MMTV is an enzootic virus in a population of wild, free-ranging mice in northwestern Victoria, in Australia. Phylogenetic analysis, based upon env and LTR sequence data, indicated minor variation among all isolates. This represents the first report on the prevalence of MMTV in mouse populations in Australia.

  5. Database of historically documented springs and spring flow measurements in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Reece, Brian D.

    2003-01-01

    Springs are naturally occurring features that convey excess ground water to the land surface; they represent a transition from ground water to surface water. Water issues through one opening, multiple openings, or numerous seeps in the rock or soil. The database of this report provides information about springs and spring flow in Texas including spring names, identification numbers, location, and, if available, water source and use. This database does not include every spring in Texas, but is limited to an aggregation of selected digital and hard-copy data of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB), and Capitol Environmental Services.

  6. Anisotropic flow measurements in Pb–Pb collisions at = 5.02 TeV with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, You; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Anisotropic flow is a sensitive probe of the initial conditions and the transport properties of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) produced in heavy-ion collisions. In these proceedings, we present the first results of elliptic (v 2), triangular (v 3) and quadrangular flow (v 4) of charged particles in Pb–Pb collisions at = 5.02 TeV with the ALICE detector. In addition, comparisons of experimental measurements with various theoretical calculations will be discussed. This provides a unique opportunity to test the validity of the hydrodynamic picture and to discriminate between various possibilities for the temperature dependence of shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of the produced QGP.

  7. 1. Photocopy of map (from The Virginia Springs, and the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of map (from The Virginia Springs, and the Springs of the South and West by Moorman) No date 'MAP OF ROUTES AND DISTANCES TO THE VIRGINIA SPRINGS' - White Sulphur Springs, U.S. Route 60, White Sulphur Springs, Greenbrier County, WV

  8. Exploring virtualisation tools with a new virtualisation provisioning method to test dynamic grid environments for ALICE grid jobs over ARC grid middleware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, B.; Kileng, B.; Alice Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The Nordic Tier-1 centre for LHC is distributed over several computing centres. It uses ARC as the internal computing grid middleware. ALICE uses its own grid middleware AliEn to distribute jobs and the necessary software application stack. To make use of most of the AliEn infrastructure and software deployment methods for running ALICE grid jobs on ARC, we are investigating different possible virtualisation technologies. For this a testbed and possible framework for bridging different middleware systems is under development. It allows us to test a variety of virtualisation methods and software deployment technologies in the form of different virtual machines.

  9. 22 CFR 120.35 - Australia Implementing Arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Australia Implementing Arrangement. 120.35 Section 120.35 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.35 Australia Implementing Arrangement. Australia Implementing Arrangement means...

  10. Internationalization in Australia and Canada: Lessons for the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the internationalization of postsecondary education in Australia and Canada. The author discusses the contextual similarities and differences between the two countries, the shifting rationale "from aid to trade" behind Australia's internationalization attempts and some of the reasons for Australia's success.…

  11. Biodiversity in Australia: What, Where, and for How Long?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panizzon, Debra; Boulton, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Australia's most serious environmental problem is the loss of biological diversity, or biodiversity. Australia harbors much of the world's species diversity and has remarkably high numbers of endemic species. Reviews current threats to biodiversity and efforts to protect and enhance it in Australia. (Contains 29 references.) (Author/ASK)

  12. 7 CFR 319.56-61 - Litchi from Australia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Litchi from Australia. 319.56-61 Section 319.56-61... from Australia. Litchi (Litchi chinensis) may be imported into the continental United States from Australia only under the following conditions and in accordance with all other applicable provisions of...

  13. Global Position and Position Taking: The Case of Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marginson, Simon

    2007-01-01

    From 1990 to 2003, Australia's share of the global market in cross-border degrees grew from 1% to 9%. Full fee-paying foreign students now constitute one quarter of enrolments, and education is Australia's third largest services export. Positioned as an Anglo-American system on the edge of Asia, Australia has differentiated itself from the United…

  14. Sex Education in South Australia: The Past and the Present

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talukdar, Joy; Aspland, Tania; Datta, Poulomee

    2013-01-01

    In South Australia, sex education has been controversial since its inception. The Australasian White Cross league and the Family Planning Association of South Australia were the pioneers of sex education in South Australia. The framing of a national framework and the implementation of the SHARE (Sexual Health and Relationships Education) project…

  15. Spring plant phenology and false springs in the conterminous US during the 21st century

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allstadt, Andrew J.; Vavrus, Stephen J.; Heglund, Patricia J.; Pidgeon, Anna M.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Radeloff, Volker C.

    2015-01-01

    The onset of spring plant growth has shifted earlier in the year over the past several decades due to rising global temperatures. Earlier spring onset may cause phenological mismatches between the availability of plant resources and dependent animals, and potentially lead to more false springs, when subsequent freezing temperatures damage new plant growth. We used the extended spring indices to project changes in spring onset, defined by leaf out and by first bloom, and predicted false springs until 2100 in the conterminous United States (US) using statistically-downscaled climate projections from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 ensemble. Averaged over our study region, the median shift in spring onset was 23 days earlier in the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 scenario with particularly large shifts in the Western US and the Great Plains. Spatial variation in phenology was due to the influence of short-term temperature changes around the time of spring onset versus season long accumulation of warm temperatures. False spring risk increased in the Great Plains and portions of the Midwest, but remained constant or decreased elsewhere. We conclude that global climate change may have complex and spatially variable effects on spring onset and false springs, making local predictions of change difficult.

  16. Spring plant phenology and false springs in the conterminous US during the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allstadt, Andrew J.; Vavrus, Stephen J.; Heglund, Patricia J.; Pidgeon, Anna M.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Radeloff, Volker C.

    2015-10-01

    The onset of spring plant growth has shifted earlier in the year over the past several decades due to rising global temperatures. Earlier spring onset may cause phenological mismatches between the availability of plant resources and dependent animals, and potentially lead to more false springs, when subsequent freezing temperatures damage new plant growth. We used the extended spring indices to project changes in spring onset, defined by leaf out and by first bloom, and predicted false springs until 2100 in the conterminous United States (US) using statistically-downscaled climate projections from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 ensemble. Averaged over our study region, the median shift in spring onset was 23 days earlier in the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 scenario with particularly large shifts in the Western US and the Great Plains. Spatial variation in phenology was due to the influence of short-term temperature changes around the time of spring onset versus season-long accumulation of warm temperatures. False spring risk increased in the Great Plains and portions of the Midwest, but remained constant or decreased elsewhere. We conclude that global climate change may have complex and spatially variable effects on spring onset and false springs, making local predictions of change difficult.

  17. The Future of Nuclear Science in Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Dillich, Jack

    2002-07-01

    The replacement of Australia's only nuclear reactor, the 44 year old HIFAR, with a state-of-the-art research facility represents an exciting development in nuclear science. The design for the replacement reactor incorporates many safety features, including extraordinary defence-in-depth. The facilities will include advanced capabilities in the areas of radiopharmaceutical production and neutron scattering research. (author)

  18. "Smartening Up": Ongoing Challenges for Australia's Outback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cradduck, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    As the international community moves inexorably towards a "smart" future, the position of Australia's non-urban areas in that future is less certain. The (re-elected) Australian federal government made a commitment to moving Australian cities forward as part of the international "smart city" movement. However, the effectiveness…

  19. Remote access laboratories in Australia and Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, H.; Ahfock, T.; Yusaf, T.

    2011-06-01

    Remote access laboratories (RALs) were first developed in 1994 in Australia and Switzerland. The main purposes of developing them are to enable students to do their experiments at their own pace, time and locations and to enable students and teaching staff to get access to facilities beyond their institutions. Currently, most of the experiments carried out through RALs in Australia are heavily biased towards electrical, electronic and computer engineering disciplines. However, the experiments carried out through RALs in Europe had more variety, in addition to the traditional electrical, electronic and computer engineering disciplines, there were experiments in mechanical and mechatronic disciplines. It was found that RALs are now being developed aggressively in Australia and Europe and it can be argued that RALs will develop further and faster in the future with improving Internet technology. The rising costs of real experimental equipment will also speed up their development because by making the equipment remotely accessible, the cost can be shared by more universities or institutions and this will improve their cost-effectiveness. Their development would be particularly rapid in large countries with small populations such as Australia, Canada and Russia, because of the scale of economy. Reusability of software, interoperability in software implementation, computer supported collaborative learning and convergence with learning management systems are the required development of future RALs.

  20. International Higher Education in Australia: Unplanned Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Mahsood; Nair, Chenicheri Sid

    2011-01-01

    International education is the third largest export industry in Australia and is worth almost A$20 billion. The last ten years have witnessed significant growth in both onshore and offshore enrolments of international students in Australian universities. The offshore component of all Australian universities has been subject to scrutiny by the…

  1. Australia's Contribution to International School Librarianship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallein, Joe; And Others

    Australia has played a very active role in promoting and developing school librarianship on an international basis. Most aid projects in school library development have been in the Asia/Pacific region, but programs have been implemented in other areas as well. The largest school library development project that has been carried out by Australians…

  2. Language Planning and Language Policy in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddicoat, Anthony, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    A five-year period of particular activity in Australian language policy and language planning culminated with the 1991 publication of the White Paper called Australia's Language, which outlines proposed government programs in languages until 1994. Many of the papers in this theme issue of the journal of the Applied Linguistics Association of…

  3. Teaching about National Conservation Strategy for Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenall, Annette

    1986-01-01

    This article describes the development and content of the National Conservation Strategy for Australia (NCSA). The Australian Department of Arts, Heritage, and Environment has produced a teacher's guide designed to help teachers bring the content of the NCSA to their classroom. A description of the guide and ordering information are provided. (JDH)

  4. Tertiary Education in Australia: Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Edward Wilfrid; Berends, Willem

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the foundation and development of universities in Australia and New Zealand and demonstrates how these universities were established on a secular basis. Educators from other continents with a mainly Christian history are often surprised that there is so little evidence of Christian input into the university sector in…

  5. The First Suggestopedia German Course in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gassner-Roberts, Sigrid

    An account of personal experiences and experiments with a suggestopedic German course taught at the University of Adelaide in Australia is presented. Summaries of the students' background and of their continuous achievements in the German class are provided. The class was conducted primarily according to the "Manual of Classroom Procedures…

  6. Worker Education in Australia and New Zealand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagglund, George

    The history of the recent development of worker education in Australia and New Zealand shows that, in just the past 15 years or so, very significant improvements have occurred in delivery of trade union education. To a very large degree these developments took place because of the existence of a close relationship between the union movement and…

  7. Public Engagement and Nanotechnology in Australia.

    PubMed

    Dalton-Brown, Sally

    2016-07-01

    Upstream engagement is commonly regarded as necessary for the smooth implementation of new technologies, particularly when there is an impact on health. Is the healthcare context in Australia geared toward such public engagement? There are established engagement practices for issues of healthcare resourcing, for example; however, the situation becomes more complex with the introduction of a new technology such as nanomedicine.

  8. Medical e-commerce for regional Australia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, D K; Mikelaitis, P

    2001-12-01

    The residents of rural and regional Australia have less access to health care services than in capital cities. There is a reluctance of General Practitioners to practice in the country. New information technology and government initiatives are now addressing this problem. High bandwidth videoconferencing is now being routinely used to provide psychiatric consultations to areas without this service. But this (like many other implementations of telecommunication technologies to health) has resulted in loss of revenue to regional Australia while benefiting capital cities. Thus, the current implementation of telecommunication technology to health has resulted in loss of revenue of the regions while increasing the bias towards the cities. Further, the system is not economically viable and requires the Government to inject funds for the smooth operation of the system. This paper proposes the use of telecommunication technology for enabling the communities of regional Australia to access health facilities via physical and virtual clinics. The proposed technique is self supporting and is based in the country with the intent to prevent the drain of resources from regional Australia. The technique attempts to eradicate the problem at the root level by providing a business opportunity that is based in and to cater for the needs of the remote communities. The proposed system would provide health services by physical and virtual clinics and while serving the communities would be profit centres- and thus attracting doctors and other resources to the remote communities.

  9. Hendra Virus Infection in Dog, Australia, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Gabor, Melinda; Poe, Ian; Neale, Kristie; Chaffey, Kim; Finlaison, Deborah S.; Gu, Xingnian; Hick, Paul M.; Read, Andrew J.; Wright, Therese; Middleton, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Hendra virus occasionally causes severe disease in horses and humans. In Australia in 2013, infection was detected in a dog that had been in contact with an infected horse. Abnormalities and viral RNA were found in the dog’s kidney, brain, lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Dogs should be kept away from infected horses. PMID:26583697

  10. Occupational Forecasting of Librarians in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stall, Roy

    This paper reviews the principal sources and methods used by the Manpower Research and Information Branches of the Department of Employment and Industrial Relations (DEIR) to forecast the over or undersupply of librarians in Australia. After differentiating between manpower policy, planning, and forecasting, the role of the commonwealth government…

  11. Eritrea: Lessons for Australia's Language Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreoni, Helen

    1997-01-01

    Discusses language policy matters and the management of cultural and linguistic diversity in the area of education, with particular reference to Eritrea in East Africa and its application to Australia's language situation. The article presents examples of the impact of the tyrannical imposition of language usage, including the long-term…

  12. Australia's Universities--Through the Looking Glass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penington, David

    1991-01-01

    Upheaval in Australia's university system in recent years can be attributed in large part to two influences dating to 1987: accession of John Dawkins to the Ministry of Employment, Education, and Training and the advent of federal regulation of industrial relations in education, which has undermined the collegial decision-making tradition. (MSE)

  13. South Pacific: Australia comes back strong

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    Exploration and production action experienced mixed fortunes last year. Exploration improved markedly with increased Australian activity. Liquids output declined, but gas production was up overall. The paper discusses exploration, drilling, development, and production in Australia, the Zone of Cooperation, New Zealand, and Papua New Guinea.

  14. Food Literacy at Secondary Schools in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronto, Rimante; Ball, Lauren; Pendergast, Donna; Harris, Neil D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Food literacy can encourage adolescents to develop healthy dietary patterns. This study examined home economics teachers' (HET) perspectives of the importance, curriculum, self-efficacy, and food environments regarding food literacy in secondary schools in Australia. Methods: A 20-item cross-sectional survey was completed by 205 HETs.…

  15. Mapping Music Education Research in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Robin S.; McPherson, Gary E.

    2004-01-01

    Music education research in Australia has grown almost exponentially over the past 25 years. Particularly in the area of doctoral research studies, there has been a substantial increase in the number of theses completed from two in 1977 to 72 in 2002. In addition, there have been increases in professional research undertaken by university…

  16. School Security Assessment Programme in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marrapodi, John

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a successful security risk management programme in Australia. The state-wide programme follows a structured risk management approach focusing on the safety and security of people, information, provision, and assets in the school environment. To assist school principals, a Security Risk Assessment Programme was developed on a…

  17. Improving the Quality of Teaching in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinham, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Australia needs to more effectively attract, train, support, retain, recognize, and reward quality teachers throughout their careers. After a slow start and decades of debate, the pieces of the quality teaching puzzle are now coming together. Increased federal government intervention and financial support, along with state and territorial support…

  18. Internet advertising of artificial tanning in Australia.

    PubMed

    Team, Victoria; Markovic, Milica

    2006-08-01

    Artificial tanning, defined as deliberate exposure to ultraviolet rays produced by artificial tanning devices, is a new and emerging public health issue in Australia and globally. Epidemiological research suggests that artificial tanning may contribute to the incidence of melanoma, nonmelanoma skin cancer as well as other health problems. Given that Australia has a high incidence of skin cancer, we have undertaken a study to explore how artificial tanning has been promoted to its users. The aim was to analyze the completeness and accuracy of information about artificial tanning. A content analysis of web sites of tanning salons and distributors of tanning equipment in Australia was conducted. A total of 22 web sites were analyzed. None of the solarium operators or distributors of equipment provided full information about the risks of artificial tanning. Fifty-nine percent of web advertisements had no information and 41% provided only partial information regarding the risks of artificial tanning. Pictures with the image of bronze-tanned bodies, predominantly women, were used by all web advertisers. In light of the success of sun-safety campaigns in Australia, the findings of future epidemiological research on the prevalence of artificial tanning and sociological and anthropological research on why people utilize artificial tanning should be a basis for developing effective targeted health promotion on the elimination of artificial tanning in the country.

  19. The Teaching of Japanese in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marriott, Helen E.

    1992-01-01

    The article surveys the development of Japanese language courses in Australia, noting a variety of factors contribute to the growth and recent intensification of interest in the subject. It examines problems within Japanese language teaching and discusses further innovative course development, differentiation of needs, employer perceptions, and…

  20. The Inclusive Secondary School Teacher in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    As a result of the 1992 Disability Discrimination Act in Australia and parental support for inclusion, regular teachers now include students with disabilities in their classes. Inclusion has been more successful in primary than in secondary schools. Secondary schools remain a challenge due to their traditional focus on curriculum, examinations,…