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Sample records for alice springs northern

  1. Geochemistry of Geothermal Springs In Northern Dominica, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrell, S. R.; Smith, A. L.; Melchiorre, E. B.; Fryxell, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    The island of Dominica, Lesser Antilles contains eight potentially active volcanoes, many of which are associated with geothermal springs. During the period 2003-2007 most of these springs were sampled and analyzed geochemically. The data presented here are for three groups of geothermal springs located in the northern part of the island. One group, the Penville Cold Soufrière, is located within the summit area of Morne Aux Diables volcano. The second group, Picard Warm Springs, is located on the northwestern flank of Morne Diablotins volcano. The third group is located in the Portsmouth area, including the adjacent Prince Rupert Bay, and consists of both subaerial and submarine springs. It is not known with which volcano these springs may be associated. The chemistry of each sample from the geothermal springs was compared to "reference standards" including three seawater samples (standard seawater and two surface samples from Prince Rupert Bay) and three fresh water samples (Emerald Pool and two rainwater samples). Of the more than 38 elements analyzed, 21 elements were consistently two or more orders of magnitude higher when compared to the "reference" standards. When these values were plotted on chemical variation diagrams, two trend lines were consistently developed. One included seawater and the submarine hot springs; the other, the fresh water samples and all the subaerial springs. The intersection of these trend lines is interpreted to represent the composition of a possible magmatic component prior to dilution with seawater and/or meteoric water. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic analysis of the springs for the whole island have also been undertaken. VSMOW graphs of δ 18O and δD indicate that all of the geothermal springs on Dominica lie on a trend between the meteoric water line (MWL) and a magmatic source. The compositions of the geothermal springs from northern Dominica are interpreted to represent mixing of variable amounts of freshwater or seawater with

  2. 27. Spans 25, detail view, eastern spring of northern arch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Spans 2-5, detail view, eastern spring of northern arch rib of Span 5 at east abutment, showing exposed structural steel; view to southwest. - Fifth Street Bridge, Spanning MBTA Fitchburg Commuter Rail Line tracks, Conrail Fitchburg Secondary Line & North Nashua River, Fitchburg, Worcester County, MA

  3. Detail of northern pier, pilaster, spring line, open spandrel arches, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of northern pier, pilaster, spring line, open spandrel arches, and spandrel colmns, facing northwest. Note the simple relief on the pilaster, indicative of the stripped classicism style. - Oakland Avenue Viaduct, Oakland Avenue spanning U.S. Route 62 (State Route 2302) & Pine Run, Sharon, Mercer County, PA

  4. Spring Hydrology Determines Summer Net Carbon Uptake in Northern Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Yonghong; Kimball, John; Reichle, Rolf H.

    2014-01-01

    Increased photosynthetic activity and enhanced seasonal CO2 exchange of northern ecosystems have been observed from a variety of sources including satellite vegetation indices (such as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index; NDVI) and atmospheric CO2 measurements. Most of these changes have been attributed to strong warming trends in the northern high latitudes (greater than or equal to 50N). Here we analyze the interannual variation of summer net carbon uptake derived from atmospheric CO2 measurements and satellite NDVI in relation to surface meteorology from regional observational records. We find that increases in spring precipitation and snow pack promote summer net carbon uptake of northern ecosystems independent of air temperature effects. However, satellite NDVI measurements still show an overall benefit of summer photosynthetic activity from regional warming and limited impact of spring precipitation. This discrepancy is attributed to a similar response of photosynthesis and respiration to warming and thus reduced sensitivity of net ecosystem carbon uptake to temperature. Further analysis of boreal tower eddy covariance CO2 flux measurements indicates that summer net carbon uptake is positively correlated with early growing-season surface soil moisture, which is also strongly affected by spring precipitation and snow pack based on analysis of satellite soil moisture retrievals. This is attributed to strong regulation of spring hydrology on soil respiration in relatively wet boreal and arctic ecosystems. These results document the important role of spring hydrology in determining summer net carbon uptake and contrast with prevailing assumptions of dominant cold temperature limitations to high-latitude ecosystems. Our results indicate potentially stronger coupling of boreal/arctic water and carbon cycles with continued regional warming trends.

  5. Timescales for nitrate contamination of spring waters, northern Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, B.G.; Böhlke, J.K.; Hornsby, H.D.

    2001-01-01

    Residence times of groundwater, discharging from springs in the middle Suwannee River Basin, were estimated using chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), tritium (3H), and tritium/helium-3 (3H/3He) age-dating methods to assess the chronology of nitrate contamination of spring waters in northern Florida. During base-flow conditions for the Suwannee River in 1997-1999, 17 water samples were collected from 12 first, second, and third magnitude springs discharging groundwater from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Extending age-dating techniques, using transient tracers to spring waters in complex karst systems, required an assessment of several models [piston-flow (PFM), exponential mixing (EMM), and binary-mixing (BMM)] to account for different distributions of groundwater age. Multi-tracer analyses of four springs yielded generally concordant PFM ages of around 20 ?? 2 years from CFC-12, CFC-113, 3H, and 3He, with evidence of partial CFC-11 degradation. The EMM gave a reasonable fit to CFC-113, CFC-12, and 3H data, but did not reproduce the observed 3He concentrations or 3H/3He ratios, nor did a combination PFM-EMM. The BMM could reproduce most of the multi-tracer data set only if both endmembers had 3H concentrations not much different from modern values. CFC analyses of 14 additional springs yielded apparent PFM ages from about 10 to 20 years from CFC-113, with evidence of partial CFC-11 degradation and variable CFC-12 contamination. While it is not conclusive, with respect to the age distribution within each spring, the data indicate that the average residence times were in the order of 10-20 years and were roughly proportional to spring magnitude. Applying similar models to recharge and discharge of nitrate based on historical nitrogen loading data yielded contrasting trends for Suwanee County and Lafayette County. In Suwanee County, spring nitrate trends and nitrogen isotope data were consistent with a peak in fertilizer input in the 1970s and a relatively high overall ratio of

  6. The significance of E-W structural trends for the Alice Springs Orogeny in the Charters Towers Province, North Queensland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quentin de Gromard, Raphael

    2013-03-01

    E-W structural and igneous trends in the Charters Towers Province are highly anomalous within the overall N-S trending Tasman orogen of eastern Australia and resulted from a sequence of N-S shortening events. A succession of ~ E-W trending FIAs (Foliation Intersection/Inflexion Axis preserved within porphyroblasts) dated at 474.7 ± 7.2, 413 ± 13 and 381.1 ± 8.1 Ma correspond with adjacent granite crystallization ages and E-W trending FIA ages in the Greenvale Province to the NW. The magnetic anomaly map of Australia reveals that this E-W trending portion of the Tasman orogen links with and truncates several earlier formed orogens. The E-W trend of the Charters Towers Province resulted from overprinting of early Palaeozoic N-S trending structures in the Tasman Orogen by younger E-W ones during the Alice Springs Orogeny (450-300 Ma) resolving the E-W pluton shape and distribution of Cambrian to Devonian magmatic activity plus the truncational nature of aeromagnetic data from Central Australia to the East coast.

  7. Geohydrology of Pipe Spring National Monument area, northern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truini, Margot

    1999-01-01

    Pipe Spring National Monument is on the Arizona Strip, an area between the Utah border to the north and the north rim of the Grand Canyon to the south. Four springs at the base of Winsor Point on Winsor Mountain (known collectively as Pipe Spring) are a part of the historical significance of the monument. The relation between declining discharges from springs in the monument and ground-water development north of the monument was studied to provide information that could be used for management of the monument resources. Ground-water elevations from wells indicate that ground-water movement is from north to south along the west side of a branch of Sevier Fault. Faulting in the areas has downthrown permeable water-bearing sediments relative to impermeable sediments and is evinced by cliffs along the western and northern edges and flat-lying areas to the east. The Navajo Sandstone and Kayenta Formation are the primary water-bearing units on the west side of the fault. The semipermeable sediments of the Chinle and Moenkopi Formations on the east side of the fault inhibit ground-water movement from the west to the east side of the fault. Ground water south of Moccasin Canyon is higher in total dissolved solids than ground water north of Moccasin Canyon. Wells north of Moccasin Canyon are open primarily in the Navajo Sandstone, and wells south of Moccasin Canyon are open primarily in the upper sandstone facies of the Kayenta Formation. A water-budget estimate for the study area indicates a storage deficit of 780 acre-feet per year. This deficit suggests that some recharge may be occurring outside the study area. Oxygen and hydrogen stable- isotopic data suggest no isotopic variation in recharging waters in the study area and surrounding region. Radiocarbon and tritium activities indicate apparent ground-water ages at wells and springs are between 45 and 9,000 years.

  8. Spring snowmelt variability in northern Eurasia 2000-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, A.; Naeimi, V.; McCallum, I.; Shvidenko, A.; Wagner, W.

    2009-04-01

    Snowmelt dynamics play an essential role in the hydrological cycle of northern latitudes. Entire northern Eurasia is seasonally covered by snow. It instantaneously impacts not only surface hydrology and the energy budget but also terrestrial biota and thus the carbon cycle. Scatterometer such as SeaWinds Quikscat (Ku-band) are sensitive to changes at snow surfaces due to thaw and provide several measurements per day at high latitudes. Diurnal differences (frozen in the morning, thawed in the evening) are investigated in a range of studies since they indicate exactly when snowmelt is taking place. The actual number of dates of snow thaw is of most interest for glacier mass balance studies but the final disappearance of snow together with the length of spring thaw is required in regions with seasonal snow cover. Clusters of consecutive days of diurnal cycling of freeze/thaw are characteristic for the final snowmelt period in boreal and tundra environments. The start, end and duration of such periods give insight into spring CO2 emissions, vegetation fire prediction and river runoff behaviour. Results of the clustering of diurnal thaw and refreeze days as detected from active microwave satellite data over polar Eurasia is presented in this paper. The aim is the monitoring of spring snowmelt variability for assessment of impact of climate change on hydrology and energy budget. SeaWinds Quikscat measurements are available since 1999. The first entire snowmelt period on the northern hemisphere is covered in 2000. Large changes in backscatter between morning and evening acquisitions are characteristic for the snowmelt period, when freezing takes place over night and thawing of the surface during the day. A change from volume to surface scattering occurs in case of melting. When significant changes due to freeze/thaw cycling cease, closed snow cover also disappears. The exact day of year of beginning and end of freeze/thaw cycling can be clearly determined with

  9. Ice shelf studies off northern Ellesmere Island, Spring 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, M.O.

    1985-09-01

    In spring 1983 work on the ice shelves of northern Ellesmere Island was continued. A total of 55 m of 7.6 cm diameter ice core was obtained from 10 locations. The longest core of 31.79 m is composed of iced-firn and basement ice and can be divided into three distinct strata according to ice salinity. Oscillating strains in Ward Hunt Ice Shelf were measured with a wire strainmeter. It is suggested that the periodic calving of ice from Ward Hung Ice Shelf might be related to the effects of the high frequency oscillation of 35s to 40s. Ice conditions along 150 km of coastline continue to change. Continued monitoring of the ice shelves and landfast ice is believed to be necessary in view of the offshore development in the Beaufort Sea.

  10. Occurrence of springs in massifs of crystalline rocks, northern Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Fernando António Leal; Alencoão, Ana Maria Pires

    2002-02-01

    An inventory of artesian springs emerging from fractures (fracture springs) was conducted in the Pinhão River Basin and Morais Massif, northern Portugal, comprising an area of approximately 650 km2. Over 1,500 springs were identified and associated with geological domains and fracture sets. Using cross-tabulation analysis, spring distributions by fracture sets were compared among geological environments, and the deviations related to differences in rock structure and, presumably, to differences in deformational histories. The relation between spring frequencies and rock structures was further investigated by spectral determination, the model introduced in this study. Input data are the spring frequencies and fracture lengths in each geological domain, in addition to the angles between fracture strikes and present-day stress-field orientation (θ). The model's output includes the so-called intrinsic densities, a parameter indexing spring occurrence to factors such as fracture type and associated deformational regime and age. The highest densities (12.2 springs/km of lineament) were associated with young shear fractures produced by brittle deformation, and the lowest (0.1) with old tensional and ductile fractures. Spectral determination also relates each orientation class to a dominant structural parameter: where spring occurrence is controlled by θ, the class is parallel to the present-day stress-field orientation; where the control is attributed to the length of fractures, the spring occurrence follows the strike of large-scale normal faults crossing the region. Résumé. Un inventaire des sources artésiennes émergeant de fractures (sources de fractures) a été réalisé dans le bassin de la rivière Pinhão et dans le massif de Morais, dans le nord du Portugal, dans une région couvrant environ 650 km2. Plus de 1,500 sources ont été identifiées et associées à des domaines géologiques et à des ensembles de fractures. Grâce à une analyse de tableaux

  11. Modelling of phosphorus transport during spring flood in northern Sweden.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strömqvist, Johan; Hjerdt, Niclas; Arheimer, Berit

    2010-05-01

    Peaks in phosphorus concentrations are observed in connection to the spring flood in some, mainly unregulated, rivers in northern Sweden draining to the Baltic Sea. The elevated concentrations are only seen during a few days prior and following peak discharge in the rivers. This rapid event is often missed by the water quality monitoring programme with a standard monthly sampling frequency. As a consequence, calculated transport of phosphorus, both from interpolation of measurements and from simulations by models calibrated using observed time series may therefore be significantly lower than the actual transport. Possible explanations of this phenomenon were investigated using two numerical water quality models, the HYPE and HBV-NP models. The hypothesis was that the observed peaks in phosphorus concentrations were due to either river bank erosion, flash-out of previously settled phosphorus-laden particles in rivers and/or elevated loading from land in connection to snowmelt in the lowland areas of the catchment. The modelling exercise was supported by high frequency (daily) measurements of phosphorus concentration during the spring flood of 2008 and 2009 in River Kalixälven and in River Umeälven. Results from the study indicate that different processes may be important in the studied catchments. The dynamics of the simulated phosphorus concentrations from the HBV-NP model, used for the Swedish reporting to HELCOM, greatly improved when a model function controlling sedimentation and resuspension processes in watercourses was activated. Regulated rivers in contrast to unregulated ones have relatively high sustained discharge throughout the winter period which hinders the sedimentation of particles. This could explain why mainly unregulated rivers experience elevated phosphorous concentrations during spring flood. Including bank erosion in the HBV-NP simulations increased simulated phosphorus transport to the right magnitude. Observations showed that the phenomenon

  12. Northern Hemisphere modes of variability and the timing of spring in western North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ault, T.R.; Macalady, A.K.; Pederson, G.T.; Betancourt, J.L.; Schwartz, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns of variability in spring onset are identified across western North America using a spring index (SI) model based on weather station minimum and maximum temperatures (Tmin and Tmax, respectively). Principal component analysis shows that two significant and independent patterns explain roughly half of the total variance in the timing of spring onset from 1920 to 2005. However, these patterns of spring onset do not appear to be linear responses to the primary modes of variability in the Northern Hemisphere: the Pacific-North American pattern (PNA) and the northern annular mode (NAM). Instead, over the period when reanalysis data and the spring index model overlap (1950-2005), the patterns of spring onset are local responses to the state of both the PNA and NAM, which together modulate the onset date of spring by 10-20 days on interannual time scales. They do so by controlling the number and intensity of warm days. There is also a region wide trend in spring advancement of about -1.5 days decade-1 from 1950 to 2005. Trends in the NAM and PNA can only explain about one-third (-0.5 day decade-1) of this trend. ?? 2011 American Meteorological Society.

  13. ALICE Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.

    2014-11-01

    The ALICE Collaboration would like to thank all its engineers and technicians for their invaluable contributions to the construction of the experiment and the CERN accelerator teams for the outstanding performance of the LHC complex.

  14. Hydrogeologic characteristics of four public drinking-water supply springs in northern Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galloway, Joel M.

    2004-01-01

    In October 2000, a study was undertaken by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Arkansas Department of Health to determine the hydrogeologic characteristics, including the extent of the recharge areas, for Hughes Spring, Stark Spring, Evening Shade Spring, and Roaring Spring, which are used for public-water supply in northern Arkansas. Information pertaining to each spring can be used to enable development of effective management plans to protect these water resources and public health. An integrated approach to determine the ground-water characteristics and the extent of the local recharge areas of the four springs incorporated tools and methods of hydrology, structural geology, geomorphology, geophysics, and geochemistry. Analyses of discharge, temperature, and water quality were completed to describe ground-water flow characteristics, source-water characteristics, and connectivity of the ground-water system with surface runoff. Water-level contour maps were constructed to determine ground-water flow directions and ground-water tracer tests were conducted to determine the extent of the recharge areas and ground-water flow velocities. Hughes Spring supplies water for the city of Marshall, Arkansas, and the surrounding area. The mean annual discharge for Hughes Spring was 2.9 and 5.2 cubic feet per second for water years 2001 and 2002, respectively. Recharge to the spring occurs mainly from the Boone Formation (Springfield Plateau aquifer). Ground-water tracer tests indicate the recharge area for Hughes Spring generally coincides with the surface drainage area (15.8 square miles) and that Hughes Spring is connected directly to the surface flow in Brush Creek. The geochemistry of Hughes Spring demonstrated variations with flow conditions and the influence of surface-runoff in the recharge area. Calcite saturation indices, total dissolved solids concentrations, and hardness demonstrate noticeable differences with flow conditions reflecting the

  15. Economic feasibility of segregating dark northern spring wheat by protein concentration during harvest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In-line, optical sensing has been developed for on-combine measurement and mapping of grain protein concentration (GPC). The objective of this study was to estimate changes in costs and net returns from using this technology for segregation of the dark northern spring (DNS) subclass of hard red whe...

  16. Germination characteristics of Zannichellia palustris from a northern California spring-fed river

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The germination characteristics of Zannichellia palustris seeds collected from the spring-fed Fall River of Northern California were investigated across a range of constant temperatures from 4.2 to 40.8 ºC. Germination experiments were conducted on freshly produced and collected seeds. Seeds germina...

  17. Habitat use and movement patterns of Northern Pintails during spring in northern Japan: the importance of agricultural lands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yamaguchi, Noriyuki M.; Hupp, Jerry W.; Flint, Paul L.; Pearce, John M.; Shigeta, Yusuke; Shimada, Tetsuo; Hiraoka, Emiko N.; Higuchi, Hiroyoshi

    2012-01-01

    From 2006 to 2009, we marked 198 Northern Pintails (Anas acuta) with satellite transmitters on their wintering areas in Japan to study their migration routes and habitat use in spring staging areas. We hypothesized that the distribution of pintails during spring staging was influenced by patterns of land use and expected that the most frequently used areas would have more agricultural habitat than lesser-used areas. We obtained 3031 daily locations from 163 migrant pintails marked with satellite transmitters and identified 524 stopover sites. Based on a fixed kernel home range analysis of stopover utilization distribution (UD), core staging areas (areas within the 50% UD) were identified in northern Honshu and western Hokkaido, and were used by 71% of marked pintails. Core staging areas had a greater proportion of rice fields than peripheral (51–95% UD) and rarely used (outside the 95% UD) staging areas. Stopover sites also contained more rice fields and other agricultural land than were available at regional scales, indicating that pintails selected rice and other agricultural habitats at regional and local scales. Pintails remained at spring staging areas an average of 51 d. Prolonged staging in agricultural habitats of northern Japan was likely necessary for pintails to prepare for transoceanic migration to Arctic nesting areas in eastern Russia.

  18. Seasonal variations in Titan's stratosphere observed with Cassini/CIRS after the northern spring equinox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinatier, S.; Teanby, N.; Lebonnois, S.; Bézard, B.; Gorius, N.; Mamoutkine, A.; Achterberg, R.; CIRS Team

    2015-10-01

    Since 2004, Cassini has made more than 110 Titan flybys, observing its atmosphere with instruments including the Cassini Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS). We know from CIRS observations that the global dynamics drastically changed after the northern spring equinox that occurred in August 2009([1], [2], [3], [4]). The pole- to-pole middle atmosphere dynamics (above100 km) experienced a global reversal in less than 2 years after the equinox [4], while the northern hemisphere was entering spring. This new pattern, with downwelling at the south pole, resulted in enrichment of almost all molecules inside the southern polar vortex, while a persistent enhancement due to the northern winter downwelling circulation is still seen in the north pole region (see Fig. 1 for HCN in February 2012). From General Circulation Model calculations, this single circulation cell pattern should remain until 2025.

  19. Dissipation of Titans north polar cloud at northern spring equinox

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Le, Mouelic S.; Rannou, P.; Rodriguez, S.; Sotin, C.; Griffith, C.A.; Le, Corre L.; Barnes, J.W.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.; Tobie, G.

    2012-01-01

    Saturns Moon Titan has a thick atmosphere with a meteorological cycle. We report on the evolution of the giant cloud system covering its north pole using observations acquired by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft. A radiative transfer model in spherical geometry shows that the clouds are found at an altitude between 30 and 65 km. We also show that the polar cloud system vanished progressively as Titan approached equinox in August 2009, revealing at optical wavelengths the underlying sea known as Kraken Mare. This decrease of activity suggests that the north-polar downwelling has begun to shut off. Such a scenario is compared with the Titan global circulation model of Rannou et al. (2006), which predicts a decrease of cloud coverage in northern latitudes at the same period of time. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Large methane emission upon spring thaw from natural wetlands in the northern permafrost region

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Changchun; Xu, Xiaofeng; Sun, Xiaoxin; Tian, Hanqin; Sun, Li; Miao, Yuqing; Wang, Xianwei; Guo, Yuedong

    2012-01-01

    The permafrost carbon climate feedback is one of the major mechanisms in controlling the climate ecosystem interactions in northern high latitudes. Of this feedback, methane (CH4) emission from natural wetlands is critically important due to its high warming potential. The freeze thaw transition has been confirmed to play an important role in annual CH4 budget, yet the magnitude of this effect is uncertain. An intensive field campaign was carried out in the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China to estimate the CH4 emission in the spring freeze thaw transition period. The observation concluded that a large CH4 source was caused by spring thaw; the maximum hourly emission rate was 48.6 g C m 2 h 1, more than three orders of the regularly observed CH4 emission rate in the growing season. In some sporadically observed 'hot spots', the spring thawing effect contributed to a large CH4 source of 31.3 10.1 g C m 2, which is approximately 80% of the previously calculated annual CH4 emission in the same study area. If our results are typical for natural wetlands in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region, we estimate a global CH4 source strength of 0.5 1.0 Tg C (1 Tg =1012 g) caused by spring thaw in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region in the year 2011. Combining with available satellite and flask data, a regional extrapolation reaches a temporal pattern of CH4 emission during 2003 2009 which is consistent with recently observed changes in atmospheric CH4 concentration in the high latitudes. This suggests that the CH4 emission upon spring thaw in the high latitudes might be enhanced by the projected climate warming. These findings indicate that the spring thawing effect is an important mechanism in the permafrost carbon climate feedback and needs to be incorporated in Earth system models.

  1. Attribution of spring snow water equivalent (SWE) changes over the northern hemisphere to anthropogenic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Dae Il; Sushama, Laxmi; Naveed Khaliq, M.

    2016-07-01

    Snow is an important component of the cryosphere and it has a direct and important influence on water storage and supply in snowmelt-dominated regions. This study evaluates the temporal evolution of snow water equivalent (SWE) for the February-April spring period using the GlobSnow observation dataset for the 1980-2012 period. The analysis is performed for different regions of hemispherical to sub-continental scales for the Northern Hemisphere. The detection-attribution analysis is then performed to demonstrate anthropogenic and natural effects on spring SWE changes for different regions, by comparing observations with six CMIP5 model simulations for three different external forcings: all major anthropogenic and natural (ALL) forcings, greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing only, and natural forcing only. The observed spring SWE generally displays a decreasing trend, due to increasing spring temperatures. However, it exhibits a remarkable increasing trend for the southern parts of East Eurasia. The six CMIP5 models with ALL forcings reproduce well the observed spring SWE decreases at the hemispherical scale and continental scales, whereas important differences are noted for smaller regions such as southern and northern parts of East Eurasia and northern part of North America. The effects of ALL and GHG forcings are clearly detected for the spring SWE decline at the hemispherical scale, based on multi-model ensemble signals. The effects of ALL and GHG forcings, however, are less clear for the smaller regions or with single-model signals, indicating the large uncertainty in regional SWE changes, possibly due to stronger influence of natural climate variability.

  2. Greywater Disposal Practices in Northern Botswana—The Silent Spring?

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Kathleen A.; Godrej, Adil

    2015-01-01

    Disposal of greywater is a neglected challenge facing rapidly growing human populations. Here, we define greywater as wastewater that originates from household activities (e.g., washing dishes, bathing, and laundry) but excludes inputs from the toilet. Pollutants in greywater can include both chemical and biological contaminates that can significantly impact human, animal, and environmental health under certain conditions. We evaluate greywater disposal practices in nonsewered, low-income residential areas in Kasane (264 dwellings/ha), Kazungula (100 du/ha), and Lesoma (99 du/ha) villages in Northern Botswana through household surveys (n = 30 per village). Traditional pit latrines were the dominant form of sanitation (69%, n = 90, 95% CI, 59%–79%) while 14% of households did not have access to onsite sanitation (95% CI 0%–22%). While greywater disposal practices varied across villages, respondents in all sites reported dumping greywater into the pit latrine. Frequency varied significantly across villages with the highest level reported in Kasane, where residential density was greatest (p < 0.014, χ2 = 9.13, 61% (n = 23, 95% CI 41%–81%), Kazungula 41% (n = 22, 95% CI 20%–62%), Lesoma 13% (95% CI 0%–29%). Disposal of greywater in this manner was reported to limit contamination of the household compound and reduce odors, as well as pit latrine fecal levels. Some respondents reported being directed by local health authorities to dispose of greywater in this manner. Environmentally hazardous chemicals were also dumped directly into the pit latrine to reduce odors. With high household to pit latrine ratios particularly in rental properties (4.2 households, SD = 3.32, range = 15 units, average household size 5.3, SD = 4.4), these greywater and pit latrine management approaches can significantly alter hydraulic loading and leaching of chemicals, microorganisms, and parasites. This can dramatically expand the environmental footprint of pit latrines and greywater

  3. Greywater Disposal Practices in Northern Botswana--The Silent Spring?

    PubMed

    Alexander, Kathleen A; Godrej, Adil

    2015-11-01

    Disposal of greywater is a neglected challenge facing rapidly growing human populations. Here, we define greywater as wastewater that originates from household activities (e.g., washing dishes, bathing, and laundry) but excludes inputs from the toilet. Pollutants in greywater can include both chemical and biological contaminates that can significantly impact human, animal, and environmental health under certain conditions. We evaluate greywater disposal practices in nonsewered, low-income residential areas in Kasane (264 dwellings/ha), Kazungula (100 du/ha), and Lesoma (99 du/ha) villages in Northern Botswana through household surveys (n = 30 per village). Traditional pit latrines were the dominant form of sanitation (69%, n = 90, 95% CI, 59%-79%) while 14% of households did not have access to onsite sanitation (95% CI 0%-22%). While greywater disposal practices varied across villages, respondents in all sites reported dumping greywater into the pit latrine. Frequency varied significantly across villages with the highest level reported in Kasane, where residential density was greatest (p < 0.014, χ² = 9.13, 61% (n = 23, 95% CI 41%-81%), Kazungula 41% (n = 22, 95% CI 20%-62%), Lesoma 13% (95% CI 0%-29%). Disposal of greywater in this manner was reported to limit contamination of the household compound and reduce odors, as well as pit latrine fecal levels. Some respondents reported being directed by local health authorities to dispose of greywater in this manner. Environmentally hazardous chemicals were also dumped directly into the pit latrine to reduce odors. With high household to pit latrine ratios particularly in rental properties (4.2 households, SD = 3.32, range = 15 units, average household size 5.3, SD = 4.4), these greywater and pit latrine management approaches can significantly alter hydraulic loading and leaching of chemicals, microorganisms, and parasites. This can dramatically expand the environmental footprint of pit latrines and greywater

  4. Impact of Long-Range Dust Transport on Northern California in Spring 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron-Smith, P; Bergmann, D; Chuang, C; Bench, G; Cliff, S; Kelly, P; Perry, K; VanCuren, T

    2005-02-10

    It has been well documented that spectacular dust storms in Asia (e.g. the events in 1998 and 2001) can affect the USA through long-range transport of dust across the Pacific. However, our observations and modeling show that the majority of dust at sites in Lassen National Park and Trinity Alps (Northern California) in spring 2002 (a year with no spectacular Asian dust events) is still from long-range intercontinental transport across the Pacific. We implemented the interactive dust emission algorithm of Ginoux et al. (2004) into the LLNL 3-D global atmospheric chemistry and aerosol transport model (IMPACT), then ran the model using a separate tracer for each dust emission region, using hi-resolution (1 x 1 degree) meteorological data from the NASA GMAO GEOS-3 assimilation system for 2001 and 2002. We also experimentally analyzed size- and time-resolved aerosol samples at Lassen National Park and Trinity Alps in the spring of 2002, which were taken as part of NOAA's ITCT 2k2 measurement campaign. The model-predicted time-series of soil dust over Northern California agrees remarkably well with our measurements, with a strong temporal correlation between the observations and intercontinental transport of dust across the Pacific in the model. Hence, we conclude that the majority of dust we sampled in Northern California in spring 2002, with aerodynamic diameters of 0.56-5 microns, is from long-range intercontinental transport across the Pacific. The strong correlations also strongly validate atmospheric transport in the IMPACT model over the Northern Pacific in spring.

  5. Observations of the northern seasonal polar cap on Mars: I. Spring sublimation activity and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Byrne, S.; Portyankina, G.; Bourke, M.; Dundas, C.; McEwen, A.; Mellon, M.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.

    2013-08-01

    Spring sublimation of the seasonal CO2 northern polar cap is a dynamic process in the current Mars climate. Phenomena include dark fans of dune material propelled out onto the seasonal ice layer, polygonal cracks in the seasonal ice, sand flow down slipfaces, and outbreaks of gas and sand around the dune margins. These phenomena are concentrated on the north polar erg that encircles the northern residual polar cap. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been in orbit for three Mars years, allowing us to observe three northern spring seasons. Activity is consistent with and well described by the Kieffer model of basal sublimation of the seasonal layer of ice applied originally in the southern hemisphere. Three typical weak spots have been identified on the dunes for escape of gas sublimed from the bottom of the seasonal ice layer: the crest of the dune, the interface of the dune with the interdune substrate, and through polygonal cracks in the ice. Pressurized gas flows through these vents and carries out material entrained from the dune. Furrows in the dunes channel gas to outbreak points and may be the northern equivalent of southern radially-organized channels ("araneiform" terrain), albeit not permanent. Properties of the seasonal CO2 ice layer are derived from timing of seasonal events such as when final sublimation occurs. Modification of dune morphology shows that landscape evolution is occurring on Mars today, driven by seasonal activity associated with sublimation of the seasonal CO2 polar cap.

  6. Observations of the northern seasonal polar cap on Mars: I. Spring sublimation activity and processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, C.J.; Byrne, S.; Portyankina, G.; Bourke, M.; Dundas, C.; McEwen, A.; Mellon, M.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.

    2013-01-01

    Spring sublimation of the seasonal CO2 northern polar cap is a dynamic process in the current Mars climate. Phenomena include dark fans of dune material propelled out onto the seasonal ice layer, polygonal cracks in the seasonal ice, sand flow down slipfaces, and outbreaks of gas and sand around the dune margins. These phenomena are concentrated on the north polar erg that encircles the northern residual polar cap. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been in orbit for three Mars years, allowing us to observe three northern spring seasons. Activity is consistent with and well described by the Kieffer model of basal sublimation of the seasonal layer of ice applied originally in the southern hemisphere. Three typical weak spots have been identified on the dunes for escape of gas sublimed from the bottom of the seasonal ice layer: the crest of the dune, the interface of the dune with the interdune substrate, and through polygonal cracks in the ice. Pressurized gas flows through these vents and carries out material entrained from the dune. Furrows in the dunes channel gas to outbreak points and may be the northern equivalent of southern radially-organized channels (“araneiform” terrain), albeit not permanent. Properties of the seasonal CO2 ice layer are derived from timing of seasonal events such as when final sublimation occurs. Modification of dune morphology shows that landscape evolution is occurring on Mars today, driven by seasonal activity associated with sublimation of the seasonal CO2 polar cap.

  7. Spring migration of waterfowl in the Northern Hemisphere: a management and conservation perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stafford, Joshua D.; Janke, Adam K.; Anteau, Michael J.; Pearse, Aaron T.; Fox, Anthony D.; Elmberg, Johan; Straub, Jacob N.; Eichholz, Michael W.; Arzel, Céline

    2014-01-01

    Spring migration is a key part of the annual cycle for waterfowl populations in the northern hemisphere, due to its temporal proximity to the breeding season and because resources may be limited at one or more staging sites. Research based on field observations during spring lags behind other periods of the year, despite the potential for fitness consequences through diminished survival or cross-seasonal effects of conditions experienced during migration. Consequently, conservation strategies for waterfowl on spring migration are often only refined versions of practices used during autumn and winter. Here we discuss the current state of knowledge of habitat requirements for waterfowl at their spring migratory sites and the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that lead to variability in those requirements. The provision of plant foods has become the main conservation strategy during spring because of the birds’ energy requirements at this time, not only to fuel migration but to facilitate early clutch formation on arrival at the breeding grounds. Although energy sources are important to migrants, there is little evidence on the extent to which the availability of carbohydrate-based food is limiting for many migratory waterfowl populations.  Such limitation is relatively unlikely among populations that exploit agricultural grain during migration (e.g. arctic-nesting geese), suggesting that conservation strategies for these populations may be misplaced. In general, however, we found few cases in which an ecological understanding of spring-migrating waterfowl was sufficient to indicate true resource limitation during migration, and still fewer cases where conservation efforts ameliorated these limitations. We propose a framework that aims to address knowledge gaps and apply empirical research results to conservation strategies based on documented limitations and associated fitness impacts on migrating waterfowl. Such a strategy would improve

  8. Geochemical and sulfur isotope signatures of microbial activity in acidic and sulfuric hot springs, northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Chen, K.; Cheng, T.; Hsieh, H.; Lin, L.

    2009-12-01

    Acidic and sulfuric hot springs are natural habitats for thermophilic sulfur-utilizing microorganisms. Integration of bioenergetic evaluation, molecular analysis and stable isotopic signatures may be able to exhibit a full view of microbial activity in such an extreme environment. Widely distributed hot springs hosted by the Tatung volcano group in northern Taiwan provide a chance to evaluate the interplay between geochemical variation and microbial metabolism especially for sulfur. Several hot spring ponds varying in sizes and geochemical characteristics were studied to reveal the possible control of fluid compositions on microbial metabolisms, and vice versa. Sulfate, sulfide, elemental sulfur and dissolved organic carbon were available in spring water and sediments in the ponds. Dominant microbial metabolisms inferred from the bioenergetic evaluation were aerobic oxidations of various reduced compounds, including elemental sulfur, pyrite, ferrous iron and organic carbon. Sulfate and sulfur reductions were thermodynamically favorable but provided less energy flux, while sulfur disproportionation was thermodynamically incapable. The analyses of 16S rRNA genes extracted from the spring water and sediments indicated that aerobic oxidation of sulfur, hydrogen or organic carbon and anaerobic elemental sulfur reduction were possible metabolisms. Since the major portion of 16S rRNA sequences were affiliated with unclassified environmental sequences, their potential metabolisms remained obscure. Sulfur isotopic compositions of dissolved sulfate, pyrite and elemental sulfur exhibited significant variations among the different hot spring ponds. Apparently, the microbial effects on the sulfur isotopic signatures were various. A disproportionation reaction of volcanic gas was required to account for high sulfur isotope difference between sulfate and reduced sulfur in the large hot ponds. In contrary, abiotic or microbial oxidation of reduced sulfur might be dominant in the

  9. Presence of Balamuthia mandrillaris in hot springs from Mazandaran province, northern Iran.

    PubMed

    Latifi, A R; Niyyati, M; Lorenzo-Morales, J; Haghighi, A; Seyyed Tabaei, S J; Lasjerdi, Z

    2016-08-01

    Balamuthia mandrillaris is an opportunistic free-living amoeba that has been reported to cause cutaneous lesions and Balamuthia amoebic encephalitis. The biology and environmental distribution of B. mandrillaris is still poorly understood and isolation of this pathogen from the environment is a rare event. Previous studies have reported that the presence of B. mandrillaris in the environment in Iran may be common. However, no clinical cases have been reported so far in this country. In the present study, a survey was conducted in order to evaluate the presence of B. mandrillaris in hot-spring samples of northern Iran. A total of 66 water samples were analysed using morphological and molecular tools. Positive samples by microscopy were confirmed by performing PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene of B. mandrillaris. Sequencing of the positive amplicons was also performed to confirm morphological data. Two of the 66 collected water samples were positive for B. mandrillaris after morphological and molecular identification. Interestingly, both positive hot springs had low pH values and temperatures ranging from 32 °C to 42 °C. Many locals and tourists use both hot springs due to their medicinal properties and thus contact with water bodies containing the organism increases the likelihood of infection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the isolation of B. mandrillaris from hot-spring sources related to human activity. Therefore, B. mandrillaris should be considered as a possible causative agent if cases of encephalitis are suspected following immersion in hot springs in addition to Acanthamoeba and Naegleria. PMID:27086943

  10. Spatial and temporal variations of spring dust emissions in northern China over the last 30 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hongquan; Zhang, Kesheng; Piao, Shilong; Wan, Shiqiang

    2016-02-01

    Dust emissions caused by wind erosion have significant impacts on land degradation, air quality, and climate change. Dust from the arid and semiarid regions of China is a main contributor to atmospheric dust aerosols in East Asia, and their impacts can stretch far beyond the territory of China. Spatial-temporal patterns of dust emissions in China over the last several decades, however, are still lacking, especially during the spring season. In this study, we simulated the spatial-temporal dynamics of spring dust emissions from 1982 to 2011 in arid and semi-arid areas of China using the Integrated Wind Erosion Modeling System. Results showed that the most severe dust emission events occurred in the Taklimakan Desert, Badain Jaran Desert, Tengger Desert, and Ulan Buh Desert. Over the last three decades, the magnitude of spring dust emissions generally decreased at the regional scale, with an annual spring dust emission of ˜401.10 Tg. Among different vegetation types, the highest annual spring dust emission occurred in the desert steppes (˜163.95 Tg), followed by the deserts (˜103.26 Tg). The dust emission intensity in the desert steppes and the deserts was ˜150.83 kg km-2·yr-1 and ˜205.46 kg km-2·yr-1, respectively. The spatial patterns of the inter-decadal variation are related to climate change and human activities. Mitigation strategies such as returning farmland to grassland, fenced grazing, and adequate grass harvesting, must be taken to prevent further soil losses and grassland degradation in northern China.

  11. Diet of lake trout and burbot in northern Lake Michigan during spring: Evidence of ecological interaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobs, Gregory R.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Bunnell, David B.; Holuszko, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    We used analyses of burbot (Lota lota) and lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) diets taken during spring gill-net surveys in northern Lake Michigan in 2006-2008 to investigate the potential for competition and predator-prey interactions between these two species. We also compared our results to historical data from 1932. During 2006-2008, lake trout diet consisted mainly of alewives (Alosa pseudoharengus) and rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), whereas burbot utilized a much wider prey base including round goby (Neogobius melanostomus), rainbow smelt, alewives, and sculpins. Using the Schoener's diet overlap index, we found a higher potential for interspecific competition in 1932 than in 2006-2008, though diet overlap was not significant in either time period. No evidence of cannibalism by lake trout or lake trout predation on burbot was found in either time period. In 2006-2008, however, lake trout composed 5.4% (by weight) of burbot diet. To determine whether this predation could be having an impact on lake trout rehabilitation efforts in northern Lake Michigan, we developed a bioenergetic-based consumption estimate for burbot on Boulder Reef (a representative reef within the Northern Refuge) and found that burbot alone can consume a considerable proportion of the yearling lake trout stocked annually, depending on burbot density. Overall, we conclude that predation, rather than competition, is the more important ecological interaction between burbot and lake trout, and burbot predation may be contributing to the failed lake trout rehabilitation efforts in Lake Michigan.

  12. Dynamic rupture models of earthquakes on the Bartlett Springs Fault, Northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lozos, Julian C.; Harris, Ruth A.; Murray, Jessica R.; Lienkaemper, James J.

    2015-01-01

    The Bartlett Springs Fault (BSF), the easternmost branch of the northern San Andreas Fault system, creeps along much of its length. Geodetic data for the BSF are sparse, and surface creep rates are generally poorly constrained. The two existing geodetic slip rate inversions resolve at least one locked patch within the creeping zones. We use the 3-D finite element code FaultMod to conduct dynamic rupture models based on both geodetic inversions, in order to determine the ability of rupture to propagate into the creeping regions, as well as to assess possible magnitudes for BSF ruptures. For both sets of models, we find that the distribution of aseismic creep limits the extent of coseismic rupture, due to the contrast in frictional properties between the locked and creeping regions.

  13. Analysis of long-term trends in flow from a Large Spring Complex in northern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grubbs, Jack W.

    2011-01-01

    Nonparametric regression analysis of historic flow and rainfall data was used to estimate declining flows in a river draining a large spring complex in northern Florida, USA. The analysis indicated that flow declined by an estimated 23 percent from 1900 to 2009. The rate of decline appeared to increase over time, from about 0.8 cubic foot per second per year during the period from 1930-1970, to about 1.1 cubic feet per second per year over the period from 1970-2009. The estimated decline for the period prior to 1980 is consistent with evidence indicating groundwater withdrawals to the east of the study area have diverted groundwater that formerly flowed toward the Ichetucknee River under predevelopment conditions.

  14. Dynamic rupture models of earthquakes on the Bartlett Springs Fault, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozos, Julian C.; Harris, Ruth A.; Murray, Jessica R.; Lienkaemper, James J.

    2015-06-01

    The Bartlett Springs Fault (BSF), the easternmost branch of the northern San Andreas Fault system, creeps along much of its length. Geodetic data for the BSF are sparse, and surface creep rates are generally poorly constrained. The two existing geodetic slip rate inversions resolve at least one locked patch within the creeping zones. We use the 3-D finite element code FaultMod to conduct dynamic rupture models based on both geodetic inversions, in order to determine the ability of rupture to propagate into the creeping regions, as well as to assess possible magnitudes for BSF ruptures. For both sets of models, we find that the distribution of aseismic creep limits the extent of coseismic rupture, due to the contrast in frictional properties between the locked and creeping regions.

  15. Changing Images of Alice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, Betty P.; Erdman, Barbara

    This paper examines the depiction of Alice in illustrated versions of "Alice in Wonderland" by Lewis Carroll. The primary concern was to determine if the character of Alice had changed historically through the interpretation of different illustrators and to determine what the changes were and what their impact might have on the interpretation of…

  16. Increasing late winter-early spring fire activity in Northern Spain: climate change or human footprint?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carracedo Martín, Virginia; García Codron, Juan Carlos; Rasilla Álvarez, Domingo

    2016-04-01

    Most of the fire activity across Spain concentrates during the summer months, but a secondary peak appears also during late winter and early spring (February and March). This peak represents a tiny fraction of the burned surface but in northern Spain becomes the main fire season, representing up to 60 % of the total burned surface. Moreover, the impact of this "unseasonal" fire regime is becoming more relevant; an analysis of the temporal evolution of the burned surface since 2005 shows that the suppression efforts of summer forest fires have apparently succeeded, while the opposite has occurred with late winter-early spring forest fires. For example, during March 2012 more than 22,000 ha were burned in the Spanish provinces of Asturias and Cantabria, while about 14,000 suffers the effects of fires in Northern Portugal. Anthropogenic factor (mostly linked to an extensive cattle farming in the mountains) are the main cause of such fire activity, but atmospheric factors also play a relevant role in the spread of this fires. Consequently, the main aim of this poster is to explore if the recent evolution of forest fires in the study area are consequence of an aggravation of the atmospheric conditions driving to more fire risk conditions, or other factor could also explain the increase in fire activity. Burned surface data obtained from official statistics since 1971 were compared with atmospheric data at two temporal scales: daily fire risk values calculated from synoptic records and long term drought indices (SPI and SPEI). The results show a long term increase in both daily fire risk and drought conditions, but this trend can be related to the background warming of the area, rather to an increase in the frequency and magnitude of the extreme fire weather events. Thus, we consider that the regional atmospheric evolution cannot explain by itself the recent increase in late winter-early spring fire activity. Additional anthropogenic factors, such as recent changes in

  17. Winter and spring evolution of northern seasonal deposits on Mars from OMEGA on Mars Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appéré, T.; Schmitt, B.; Langevin, Y.; Douté, S.; Pommerol, A.; Forget, F.; Spiga, A.; Gondet, B.; Bibring, J.-P.

    2011-05-01

    The OMEGA visible/near-infrared imaging spectrometer on Mars Express has observed the retreat of the northern seasonal deposits during Martian year 27-28 from the period of maximum extension, close to the northern winter solstice, to the end of the retreat at Ls 95°. We present the temporal and spatial distributions of both CO2 and H2O ices and propose a scenario that describes the winter and spring evolution of the northern seasonal deposits. During winter, the CO2-rich condensates are initially transparent and could be in slab form. A water ice annulus surrounds the sublimating CO2 ice, extending over 6° of latitude at Ls 320°, decreasing to 2° at Ls 350°, and gradually increasing to 4.5° at Ls 50°. This annulus first consists of thin frost as observed by the Viking Lander 2 and is then overlaid by H2O grains trapped in the CO2-rich ice layer and released during CO2 sublimation. By Ls 50°, H2O ice spectrally dominates most of the deposits. In order to hide the still several tens of centimeters thick CO2 ice layer in central areas of the cap we propose the buildup of an optically thick top layer of H2O ice from ice grains previously embedded in the CO2 ice and by cold trapping of water vapor from the sublimating water ice annulus. The CO2 ice signature locally reappears between Ls 50° and 70°. What emerges from our observations is a very active surface-atmosphere water cycle. These data provide additional constraints to the general circulation models simulating the Martian climate.

  18. Discharge rates of fluid and heat by thermal springs of the Cascade Range, Washington, Oregon, and northern California

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, R.H.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, W.C.; Pringle, M.K.W. )

    1990-11-10

    Fluid and heat discharge rates of thermal springs of the Cascade Range have been determined using the chloride inventory method. Discharge rates of thermal spring groups range from 1 to 120 l/s. Most of the fluid (50%) and heat (61%) are discharged from two hot spring groups in northern Oregon. Total discharge from thermal springs in the Cascade Range of California, Oregon, and Washington is about 340 l/s, which corresponds to about 8.2 {times} 10{sup 4} kJ/s of heat. This does not include hot springs developed on the flanks of Mount St. Helens after the 1980 eruption. The Cascade Range consists of geologically and tectonically distinct segments; rates of convective heat discharge by the thermal springs in these segments correlate with volcanic rock extrusion rates for the last 2 m.y. In Oregon and Washington, many streams without known thermal or mineral springs in their drainage basins also were sampled for chloride and sodium to detect chemical anomalies that might be associated with previously unknown thermal or mineral springs were identified in the streams of the Cascade Range.

  19. Discharge rates of fluid and heat by thermal springs of the Cascade Range, Washington, Oregon, and northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mariner, R.H.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, William C.; Pringle, M.K.W.

    1990-01-01

    Fluid and heat discharge rates of thermal springs of the Cascade Range have been determined using the chloride inventory method. Discharge rates of thermal spring groups range from 1 to 120 L s−1. Most of the fluid (50%) and heat (61%) are discharged from two hot spring groups in northern Oregon. Total discharge from thermal springs in the Cascade Range of California, Oregon, and Washington is about 340 Ls−1, which corresponds to about 8.2×104 kJ s−1 of heat. This does not include hot springs developed on the flanks of Mount St. Helens after the 1980 eruption. The Cascade Range consists of geologically and technically distinct segments; rates of convective heat discharge by the thermal springs in these segments correlate with volcanic rock extrusion rates for the last 2 m. y. In Oregon and Washington, many streams without known thermal or mineral springs in their drainage basins also were sampled for chloride and sodium to detect chemical anomalies that might be associated with previously unknown thermal or mineral waters. Only three chloride anomalies not associated with known thermal or mineral springs were identified in the streams of the Cascade Range.

  20. The hot spring and geyser sinters of El Tatio, Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Turiel, J. L.; Garcia-Valles, M.; Gimeno-Torrente, D.; Saavedra-Alonso, J.; Martinez-Manent, S.

    2005-10-01

    The siliceous sinter deposits of El Tatio geothermal field in northern Chile have been examined petrographically and mineralogically. These sinters consist of amorphous silica (opal-A) deposited around hot springs and geysers from nearly neutral, silica-saturated, sodium chloride waters. Water cooling and evaporation to dryness are the main processes that control the opal-A deposition in both subaqueous and subaerial settings, in close spatial relation to microbial communities. All fingerprints of organisms observed in the studied sinter samples represent microbes and suggest that the microbial community is moderately diverse (cyanobacteria, green bacteria, and diatoms). The most important ecological parameter is the temperature gradient, which is closely related to the observed depositional settings: 1) Geyser setting: water temperature = 70-86 °C (boiling point at El Tatio: 4200 m a.s.l.); coarse laminated sinter macrostructure with rapid local variations; biota comprises non-photosynthetic hyperthermophilic bacteria. 2) Splash areas around geysers: water temperature = 60-75 °C; laminated spicule and column macrostructure, locally forming cupolas (< 30 cm); predominant Synechococcus-like cyanobacteria. 3) Hot spring setting: water temperature = 40-60 °C; laminated spicules and columns and subspherical oncoids characterize the sinter macrostructure; filamentous cyanobacteria Phormidium and diatoms (e.g., Synedra sp.) are the most characteristic microbes. 4) Discharge environments: water temperature = 20-40 °C; sinter composed of laminated spicules and oncoids of varied shape; cyanobacterial mats of Phormidium and Calothrix and diatoms (e.g., Synedra sp.) are abundant. El Tatio is a natural laboratory of great interest because the sedimentary macrostructures and microtextures reflect the geological and biological processes involved in the primary deposition and early diagenesis of siliceous sinters.

  1. Geodatabase and characteristics of springs within and surrounding the Trinity aquifer outcrops in northern Bexar County, Texas, 2010--11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Pedraza, Diana E.; Morris, Robert R.; Garcia, Travis J.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Trinity Glen Rose Groundwater Conservation District, the Edwards Aquifer Authority, and the San Antonio River Authority, developed a geodatabase of springs within and surrounding the Trinity aquifer outcrops in a 331-square-mile study area in northern Bexar County, Texas. The data used to develop the geodatabase were compiled from existing reports and databases, along with spring data collected between October 2010 and September 2011. Characteristics including the location, discharge, and water-quality properties were collected for known springs and documented in the geodatabase. A total of 141 springs were located within the study area, and 46 springs were field verified. The discharge at springs with flow ranged from 0.003 to 1.46 cubic feet per second. The specific conductance of the water discharging from the springs ranged from 167 to 1,130 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius with a majority of values in the range of 500 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius.

  2. Earlier-Season Vegetation Has Greater Temperature Sensitivity of Spring Phenology in Northern Hemisphere

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Miaogen; Tang, Yanhong; Chen, Jin; Yang, Xi; Wang, Cong; Cui, Xiaoyong; Yang, Yongping; Han, Lijian; Li, Le; Du, Jianhui; Zhang, Gengxin; Cong, Nan

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, satellite-derived start of vegetation growing season (SOS) has advanced in many northern temperate and boreal regions. Both the magnitude of temperature increase and the sensitivity of the greenness phenology to temperature–the phenological change per unit temperature–can contribute the advancement. To determine the temperature-sensitivity, we examined the satellite-derived SOS and the potentially effective pre-season temperature (Teff) from 1982 to 2008 for vegetated land between 30°N and 80°N. Earlier season vegetation types, i.e., the vegetation types with earlier SOSmean (mean SOS for 1982–2008), showed greater advancement of SOS during 1982–2008. The advancing rate of SOS against year was also greater in the vegetation with earlier SOSmean even the Teff increase was the same. These results suggest that the spring phenology of vegetation may have high temperature sensitivity in a warmer area. Therefore it is important to consider temperature-sensitivity in assessing broad-scale phenological responses to climatic warming. Further studies are needed to explore the mechanisms and ecological consequences of the temperature-sensitivity of start of growing season in a warming climate. PMID:24505418

  3. ALICE physics --- Theoretical overview

    SciTech Connect

    Alessandro, B.; Aurenche, P.; Baier, R.; Becattini, F.; Botje, M.; Csorgo, T.; de Cataldo, G.; Foka, Y.; Giovannini, A.; Giubellino, P.; Guillet, J.Ph.; Heinz, U.; Hencken, K.; Iancu, E.; Kaidalov, A.B.; Kajantie, K.; Karsch, F.; Koch, V.; Kopeliovich, B.Z.; Kurepin, A.B.; Laine, M.; Lednicky, R.; Mangano, M.; Monteno, M.; Paic, G.; Pilon, E.; Pshenichnov, I.A.; Redlich, K.; Revol, J.-P.; Riggi, F.; Safarik, K.; Salgado, C.A.; Schukraft, J.; Sinyukov, Y.; Tomasik, B.; Treleani, D.; Ugoccioni, R.; Venugopalan, R.; Vogt, R.; Wiedemann, U.A.

    2002-09-15

    ALICE is the dedicated heavy ion experiment at the LHC. This note summarizes theoretical developments in the field of hot and dense matter and their relevance for observables accessible to ALICE in nucleus-nucleus, proton-nucleus and proton-proton collisions. In addition, aspects of specific interest for proton-proton, proton-nucleus, ultraperipheral collisions and cosmic ray physics, which can be addressed by ALICE, are also discussed.

  4. The ALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, Terry C; ALICE, Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    ALICE is the general purpose experiment at the LHC dedicated to the study of heavy-ion collisions. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal) is a late addition to the ALICE suite of detectors with first modules installed in ALICE this year. The EMCal is designed to trigger on high energy gamma-rays and jets, and to enhance the capabilities of ALICE for these measurements. The EMCal is a Pb/scintillator sampling shish-kebab type calorimeter. The EMCal construction, readout, and performance in beam tests at the CERN SPS and PS are described.

  5. The ALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, Terry C; ALICE, Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    ALICE is the general purpose experiment at the LHC dedicated to the study of heavy-ion collisions. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal) is a late addition to the ALICE suite of detectors with first modules installed in ALICE this year. The EMCal is designed to trigger on high energy gamma-rays and jets, and to enhance the capabilities of ALICE for these measurements. The EMCal is a Pb/scintillator sampling shish-kebab type calorimeter. The EMCal construction, readout, and performance in beam tests at the CERN SPS and PS are described.

  6. Variation of phytoplankton absorption coefficients in the northern South China Sea during spring and autumn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Hong, H.; Shang, S.; Dai, M.; Lee, Z.

    2007-05-01

    We examined the temporal and spatial variabilities of phytoplankton absorption coefficients (αphλ)) and their relationships with physical processes in the northern South China Sea from two cruise surveys during spring (May 2001) and late autumn (November 2002). A large river plume induced by heavy precipitation in May stimulated a phytoplankton bloom on the inner shelf, causing significant changes in the surface water in αph values and B/R ratios (αph(440)/αph(675)). This was consistent with the observed one order of magnitude elevation of chlorophyll α and a shift from a pico/nano dominated phytoplankton community to one dominated by micro-algae. At the seasonal level, enhanced vertical mixing due to strengthened northeast monsoon in November has been observed to result in higher surface αph(675) (0.002-0.006 m-1 higher) and less pronounced subsurface maximum on the outer shelf/slope in November as compared that in May. Measurements of αph and B/R ratios from three transects in November revealed a highest surface αph(675) immediately outside the mouth of the Pearl River Estuary, whereas lower αph(675) and higher B/R ratios were featured in the outer shelf/slope waters, demonstrating the respective influence of the Pearl River plume and the oligotrophic nature of South China Sea water. The difference in spectral shapes of phytoplankton absorption (measured by B/R ratios and bathochromic shifts) on these three transects infers that picoprocaryotes are the major component of the phytoplankton community on the outer shelf/slope rather than on the inner shelf. In addition, a regional tuning of the phytoplankton absorption spectral model (Carder et al., 1999) demonstrated a greater spatial variation than seasonal variation in the lead parameter a0(λ). These results suggest that phytoplankton absorption properties in a coastal region such as the northern South China Sea are complex and region-based parameterization is mandatory in order for remote sensing

  7. Impacts of a spring heat wave on canopy processes in a northern hardwood forest.

    PubMed

    Filewod, Ben; Thomas, Sean C

    2014-02-01

    Heat wave frequency, duration, and intensity are predicted to increase with global warming, but the potential impacts of short-term high temperature events on forest functioning remain virtually unstudied. We examined canopy processes in a forest in Central Ontario following 3 days of record-setting high temperatures (31–33 °C) that coincided with the peak in leaf expansion of dominant trees in late May 2010. Leaf area dynamics, leaf morphology, and leaf-level gas-exchange were compared to data from prior years of sampling (2002–2008) at the same site, focusing on Acer saccharum Marsh., the dominant tree in the region. Extensive shedding of partially expanded leaves was observed immediately following high temperature days, with A. saccharum losing ca. 25% of total leaf production but subsequently producing an unusual second flush of neoformed leaves. Both leaf losses and subsequent reflushing were highest in the upper canopy; however, retained preformed leaves and neoformed leaves showed reduced size, resulting in an overall decline in end-of-season leaf area index of 64% in A. saccharum, and 16% in the entire forest. Saplings showed lower leaf losses, but also a lower capacity to reflush relative to mature trees. Both surviving preformed and neoformed leaves had severely depressed photosynthetic capacity early in the summer of 2010, but largely regained photosynthetic competence by the end of the growing season. These results indicate that even short-term heat waves can have severe impacts in northern forests, and suggest a particular vulnerability to high temperatures during the spring period of leaf expansion in temperate deciduous forests. PMID:24038752

  8. Near-coastal ocean variability off southern Tamaulipas - northern Veracruz, western Gulf of Mexico, during spring-summer 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, David

    2016-04-01

    Six months of observations from a near-coastal mooring deployed off southern Tamaulipas-northern Veracruz coast (western Gulf of Mexico) during spring-summer 2013 provides velocity, temperature, salinity, sea level, and dissolved oxygen series in a region which ocean dynamics is still poorly understood. As shown in a preceding analysis of this region's winter circulation for winter 2012-2013, coastal trapped motions associated with the regional invasion of synoptic cold fronts modulate the local variability; this pattern remains in the spring 2013, when even more intense events of alongshore flow (>50 cm/s) are observed. This intensified flow is associated with a significant decrease in the dissolved oxygen, most probably related to an influence of hypoxic waters coming from the northern Gulf. In late spring-mid summer, the wind pattern corresponds to persistent southeasterly winds that favor the occurrence of a local upwelling, which maintains a local thermal reduction (>3 degrees Celsius) and is associated with a persistent northward flow (>30 cm/s). The late summer was characterized by a significant tropical-cyclone activity, when a depression, a storm, and a hurricane affected the western Gulf. These tropical systems caused an intense precipitation and hence an important intensification of the local riverine discharge, and the winds enhanced the mixing of such riverine waters, via mostly kinetic stirring and Ekman pumping.

  9. Causes of spring vegetation greenness trends in the northern mid-high latitudes from 1982 to 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter E; Shilong, Dr. Piao; Xuhui, Dr. Wang

    2012-01-01

    The Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) is applied to explore the spatial temporal patterns of spring (April May) vegetation growth trends over the northern mid high latitudes (NMH) (>25 N) between 1982 and 2004. During the spring season through the 23 yr period, both the satellite-derived and simulated normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) anomalies show a statistically significant correlation and an overall greening trend within the study area. Consistently with the observed NDVI temperature relation, the CLM4 NDVI shows a significant positive association with the spring temperature anomaly for the NMH, North America and Eurasia. Large study areas experience temperature discontinuity associated with contrasting NDVI trends. Before and after the turning point (TP) of the temperature trends, climatic variability plays a dominant role, while the other environmental factors exert minor effects on the NDVI tendencies. Simulated vegetation growth is broadly stimulated by the increasing atmospheric CO2. Trends show that nitrogen deposition increases NDVI mostly in southeastern China, and decreases NDVI mainly in western Russia after the temperature TP. Furthermore, land use-induced NDVI trends vary roughly with the respective changes in land management practices (crop areas and forest coverage). Our results highlight how non-climatic factors mitigate or exacerbate the impact of temperature on spring vegetation growth, particularly across regions with intensive human activity.

  10. Bacterial composition of microbial mats in hot springs in Northern Patagonia: variations with seasons and temperature.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Roy; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos; Díez, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal shifts in bacterial diversity of microbial mats were analyzed in three hot springs (39-68 °C) of Patagonia, using culture-independent methods. Three major bacterial groups were detected in all springs: Phyla Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes, and Order Thermales. Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Green Non-Sulfur Bacteria were also detected in small amounts and only in some samples. Thermophilic filamentous heterocyst-containing Mastigocladus were dominant Cyanobacteria in Porcelana Hot Spring and Geyser, and Calothrix in Cahuelmó, followed by the filamentous non-heterocyst Leptolyngbya and Oscillatoria. Bacteroidetes were detected in a wide temperature range and their relative abundance increased with decreasing temperature in almost all samples. Two Meiothermus populations with different temperature optima were found. Overall, fingerprinting analysis with universal bacterial primers showed high similarities within each hot spring despite differences in temperature. On the other hand, Cahuelmó Hot Spring showed a lower resemblance among samples. Porcelana Hot Spring and Porcelana Geyser were rather similar to each other, possibly due to a common geological substrate given their geographic proximity. This was even more evident with specific cyanobacterial primers. The different geological substrate and the seawater influence in Cahuelmó might have caused the differences in the microbial community structure with the other two hot springs. PMID:23208511

  11. Hydrogeochemical overview and natural arsenic occurrence in groundwater from alpine springs (upper Valtellina, Northern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Reyes, Fredy Alexander; Crosta, Giovanni B.; Frattini, Paolo; Basiricò, Stefano; Della Pergola, Roberto

    2015-10-01

    High arsenic (As) concentrations (up to 230 μg/L) have been historically observed (since 1999) in the upper Valtellina valley groundwater (UVV, central Italian Alps), and measured in samples collected during four campaigns of one full hydrological year (summer 2012-summer 2013). During these campaigns, water has been collected from both cold springs and thermal springs. The hydrogeochemistry of aquifers and superficial waters through the hydrologic year, and the long-term regional As distribution and time variability were analyzed. Although the studied springs belong to different catchments with different hydrochemical and lithological conditions, they present some typical characteristics: (1) the water types are dominated by Ca-Mg and SO4-HCO3 main ions, with seasonal variations for the second end members; (2) the Cl concentration is always very low, and poorly correlated with other ions; (3) the circulation time obtained from isotopic data ranges between 5 and 10 years for thermal springs and it is lower than 2 years for cold springs; (4) dominant oxidizing conditions have been observed for most of the cold and for the thermal springs; (5) anthropogenic contamination is absent, while natural contamination of arsenic affects most of the springs, with a natural background level for the entire UVV of 33 μg/L; (6) both As (V) and As (III) are present in all the springs analyzed, with a marked prevalence of As (V) among the cold ones. These conditions suggest that the latter belong to recent hydrochemical immature aquifers, where the presence of arsenic is mostly related to alkali desorption and sulfide oxidation, while the thermal springs derive from the rapid uprising of deep-circulation water, with a high concentration of geothermal arsenic.

  12. Alice Occultation - Gladstone

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows how the count rate observed by New Horizons’ Alice instrument decreases as Pluto’s atmosphere passes in front of the sun. The decreasing count rate is due to the ultraviolet s...

  13. Hydrogeology of northern Sierra de Chiapas, Mexico: a conceptual model based on a geochemical characterization of sulfide-rich karst brackish springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales Lagarde, Laura; Boston, Penelope J.; Campbell, Andrew R.; Hose, Louise D.; Axen, Gary; Stafford, Kevin W.

    2014-09-01

    Conspicuous sulfide-rich karst springs flow from Cretaceous carbonates in northern Sierra de Chiapas, Mexico. This is a geologically complex, tropical karst area. The physical, geologic, hydrologic and chemical attributes of these springs were determined and integrated into a conceptual hydrogeologic model. A meteoric source and a recharge elevation below 1,500 m are estimated from the spring-water isotopic signature regardless of their chemical composition. Brackish spring water flows at a maximum depth of 2,000 m, as inferred from similar chemical attributes to the produced water from a nearby oil well. Oil reservoirs may be found at depths below 2,000 m. Three subsurface environments or aquifers are identified based on the B, Li+, K+ and SiO2 concentrations, spring water temperatures, and CO2 pressures. There is mixing between these aquifers. The aquifer designated Local is shallow and contains potable water vulnerable to pollution. The aquifer named Northern receives some brackish produced water. The composition of the Southern aquifer is influenced by halite dissolution enhanced at fault detachment surfaces. Epigenic speleogenesis is associated with the Local springs. In contrast, hypogenic speleogenesis is associated with the brackish sulfidic springs from the Northern and the Southern environments.

  14. Characteristics and origins of hot springs in the Tatun Volcano Group, northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, S.; Liu, C.; Tsao, S.

    2009-12-01

    This paper systematically surveys the distributions, field occurrences of 14 hot springs and sampling for geochemical investigations in geothermal area of Tatun Volcano Group (TVG). Based on the Piper diagram, pH value, field occurrence and water-rock interaction, these hot springs are classified into three types: (1) Type I, the SO42--rich acidic water including the LFK, QG, SYK, TYK, SHP, and BY thermal springs which the reservoir is located in the Wuchishan Formation; (2) Type II, the near neutral spring including the TBQ, HS, MT, and LSK thermal waters, which the reservoir is located in volcanic rock body (andesite); and (3) Type III, the Cl--rich acidic one consisting of the SPT, TP and JT thermal waters except CC hot spring, which is the Cl--rich near neutral solution, and the reservoir is located in the Wuchishan Formation. For the isotopic ratio, the δD and δ18O values are close to the right of meteoric water line of the Tatun areas with the values ranging from -26.2 ‰ to -3.5 ‰ and -3.2 ‰ to 1.6 ‰, respectively. However, the δD and δ18O values of hot springs for the samples away from the meteoric water line of Tatun area are -28.4 ‰ to -13.6 ‰ and -5.5 ‰ to -4.2 ‰, respectively. In addition, the δ34S value of thermal water can be distinguished into two groups: one ranges from 25‰ to 29‰ and the other from 1‰ to 8‰. Based on the field occurrences and geochemical characteristics, a model has been provided to illustrate the origin of those geothermal waters.

  15. Seasonal variations in Titan’s stratosphere observed with Cassini/CIRS after the northern spring equinox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinatier, Sandrine; Bézard, Bruno; Teanby, Nick; Lebonnois, Sébastien; Achterberg, Richard; Gorius, Nicolas; Mamoutkine, Andrei; Flasar, F. Michael

    2015-11-01

    Since 2004, Cassini has made more than 110 Titan flybys, observing its atmosphere with instruments including the Cassini Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS). We know from CIRS observations that the global dynamics drastically changed after the northern spring equinox that occurred in August 2009 ([1], [2], [3], [4]). The pole-to-pole middle atmosphere dynamics (above 100 km) experienced a global reversal in less than 2 years after the equinox [4], while the northern hemisphere was entering spring. This new pattern, with downwelling at the south pole, resulted in enrichment of almost all molecules inside the southern polar vortex, while a persistent enhancement due to the former northern winter subsidence is still seen in the north pole region. According to General Circulation Model calculations, this single circulation cell pattern should remain until 2025.We will present new 2015 CIRS limb observations analysis. We will show that many species (C2H2, HCN, HC3N, C6H6, C4H2, CH3CCH, C2H4) are now highly enriched near the south pole, by factors ~100 at 500 km compared to just a few years ago. Such large middle atmospheric enrichments were never observed before and are similar to in situ results from INMS at 1000 km [5].We will also show that the north pole displays for the first time since the beginning of the Cassini mission, a depletion of molecular gas mixing ratios at altitudes higher than 300 km, while deeper levels remains enriched compared to mid-latitude regions.References:[1] Teanby, N., et al., Nature, 491, pp. 733-735, 2012.[2] Achterberg et al., DPS 46, abstract 102.07,Tucson, 2014.[3] Coustenis et al., DPS 46, abstract 102.46, Tucson, 2014.[4] Vinatier et al., Icarus, 250, 95-115, 2015.[5] Cui et al., Icarus, 200, 581-615, 2009.

  16. The ALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Gadrat, S.

    2010-06-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the only LHC experiment at CERN fully dedicated to the study of the quark and gluon plasma. Driven by the RHIC results on jet quenching, the ALICE collaboration has proposed to extend the capabilities of the ALICE detector for the study of high momentum photons and jets by adding a large acceptance calorimeter. This EMCal (ElectroMagnetic Calorimeter) is designed to provide an unbiased fast high-p{sub T} trigger and to measure the neutral energy of jets and photons up to 200 GeV. Four over ten supermodules of the calorimeter have been installed and commissioned at CERN in 2009 which represents 40% of the full acceptance.

  17. MAD - Monitoring ALICE Dataflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Grigoras, C.; Wegrzynek, A.

    2015-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Following a successful Run 1, which ended in February 2013, the ALICE data acquisition (DAQ) entered a consolidation phase to prepare for Run 2 which will start in the beginning of 2015. A new software tool has been developed by the data acquisition project to improve the monitoring of the experiment's dataflow, from the data readout in the DAQ farm up to its shipment to CERN's main computer centre. This software, called ALICE MAD (Monitoring ALICE Dataflow), uses the MonALISA framework as core module to gather, process, aggregate and distribute monitoring values from the different processes running in the distributed DAQ farm. Data are not only pulled from the data sources to MAD but can also be pushed by dedicated data collectors or the data source processes. A large set of monitored metrics (from the backpressure status on the readout links to event counters in each of the DAQ nodes and aggregated data rates for the whole data acquisition) is needed to provide a comprehensive view of the DAQ status. MAD also injects alarms in the Orthos alarm system whenever abnormal conditions are detected. The MAD web-based GUI uses WebSockets to provide dynamic and on-time status displays for the ALICE shift crew. Designed as a widget-based system, MAD supports an easy integration of new visualization blocks and also customization of the information displayed to the shift crew based on the ALICE activities.

  18. The ALICE Pixel Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado-Perez, Jorge

    2002-07-01

    The present document is a brief summary of the performed activities during the 2001 Summer Student Programme at CERN under the Scientific Summer at Foreign Laboratories Program organized by the Particles and Fields Division of the Mexican Physical Society (Sociedad Mexicana de Fisica). In this case, the activities were related with the ALICE Pixel Group of the EP-AIT Division, under the supervision of Jeroen van Hunen, research fellow in this group. First, I give an introduction and overview to the ALICE experiment; followed by a description of wafer probing. A brief summary of the test beam that we had from July 13th to July 25th is given as well.

  19. Convection activity over the Guinean coast and Central Africa during northern spring from synoptic to intra-seasonal timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamsu-Tamo, P. H.; Janicot, S.; Monkam, D.; Lenouo, A.

    2014-12-01

    This study proposes an overview of the main synoptic, medium-range and intraseasonal modes of convection and precipitation in northern spring (March-June 1979-2010) over West and Central Africa, and to understand their atmospheric dynamics. It is based on daily National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration outgoing longwave radiation and Cloud Archive User Service Tb convection data, daily TRMM and Global Precipitation Climatology Project rainfall products and daily ERA-Interim reanalysis atmospheric fields. It is first shown that mesoscale convective systems can be modulated in terms of occurrences number and intensity at such time scales. Based on empirical orthogonal function analyses on the 2-90-day filtered data it is shown that the main mode of convective and rainfall variability is located along the Guinean coast with a moderate to weak extension over Central Africa. Corresponding regressed deseasonalised atmospheric fields highlight an eastward propagation of patterns consistent with convectively coupled equatorial Kelvin wave dynamics. Then a singular spectrum analysis combined with a Hierarchical Ascendant Classification enable to define objectively the main spectral bands of variability within the 2-90-day band, and highlight three main bands, 2-8-, 8-22- and 20-90-day. Within these three bands, space-time spectral decomposition is used to identify the relative impacts of convectively coupled equatorial Kelvin, Rossby and inertia-gravity waves, as well as Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) signal. It confirms that eastward propagating signals (convectively coupled equatorial Kelvin wave and MJO) are highly dominant in these convection and precipitation variability modes over the Guinean coast during northern spring. So, while rain-producing individual systems are moving westward, their activity are highly modulated by sub-regional and regional scales envelops moving to the east. This is a burning issue for operational forecasting centers to be able to

  20. Seasonal variations in Titan’s middle atmosphere of Titan during the northern spring derived from Cassini/CIRS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinatier, Sandrine; Bézard, Bruno; Lebonnois, Sébastien; Teanby, Nick; Achterberg, Richard; de Kok, Remco; Jennings, Donalds

    2014-11-01

    Spectra acquired at the limb and nadir of Titan in the 2009 - 2014 period by the Cassini/Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) were analyzed in order to monitor the seasonal evolution of the thermal, gas composition and aerosol spatial distributions. We are primarily interested here in the seasonal changes after the northern spring equinox, which occurred in August 2009. Data cover the 600-1500 cm-1 spectral range and probe the 150-500 km range for the limb geometry viewing and the 100-200 km region for nadir geometry viewing. We show that the retrieved temperature and mixing ratio latitude/pressure maps are compatible with a reversal of the global dynamics (with a downwelling branch at the South Pole and an upwelling branch at the North Pole) that is effective two years after the northern spring equinox, in agreement with the General Circulation Models predictions. Additionally, in February 2012, we observe an unexpected decrease of the temperature above the South pole around 400 km, while general circulation models predict a warming in this region due to adiabatic heating by the descending branch of the global circulation cell. Enrichment of molecules above the South pole is observed since June 2011 and is explained by the descending branch, bringing enriched air from higher altitude, where molecules are formed, to lower levels. Since November 2012, as the south autumn is progressing, the South pole temperature below 200 km is decreasing, reaching 120 K at 1 mbar (200 km) in May 2013. At that time, we retrieve benzene mixing ratio profiles above the south pole that are compatible with a condensation above 250 km. Benzene could therefore contribute to the cloud composition that is seen above the south pole in the visible range by the Cassini/ISS instrument.

  1. Implications of Preliminary Gravity and Magnetic Surveys to the Understanding of the Bartlett Springs Fault Zone, Northern California Coast Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenheim, V. E.; Jachens, R. C.; Morin, R. L.; McCabe, C. M.; Page, W. D.

    2007-12-01

    We use new gravity and magnetic data in the Lake Pillsbury region to help understand the geometry and character of the Bartlett Springs fault zone, one of the three main strands of the San Andreas system north of the San Francisco Bay area. We collected 153 new gravity stations in the Lake Pillsbury region that complement the sparse regional dataset and are used to estimate the thickness of Quaternary deposits in the inferred Gravelly Valley (Lake Pillsbury) pull-apart basin. We also collected 38 line-km of ground magnetic data on roads and 65 line-km by boat on the lake to supplement regional aeromagnetic surveys and to map concealed fault strands beneath the lake. The new gravity data show a significant northwest-striking gravity gradient at the base of which lies the Bartlett Springs fault zone. Superposed on this major east-facing gravity gradient is a 5 mGal low centered on Lake Pillsbury and Gravelly Valley. Inversion of the gravity field for basin thickness assuming a density contrast of 400 kg/m3 indicates the deepest part of the basin is about 400 m and located in the northern part of the valley, although the inversion lacks gravity stations within the lake. The basin is about 3 km wide and 5 km long and basin edges coincide with strands of the Bartlett Springs fault zone. Our gravity data suggest that Potter Valley, which lies between the Maacama and Bartlett Springs faults, is also as much as 400 m deep in the southern part of the valley, although additional data west of the valley would better isolate the gravity low. Geomorphologic characteristics of the valley suggest that this structure has been quiescent during the late Quaternary. Ground magnetic data are very noisy but the data in conjunction with 9.6 km-spaced NURE aeromagnetic lines suggest that regional analog aeromagnetic data flown in 1962 may suffer from location errors. The regional and NURE data show a northwest-striking magnetic high that extends across Lake Pillsbury. The northeast edge

  2. Spring-summer temperatures reconstructed for northern Switzerland and southwestern Germany from winter rye harvest dates, 1454-1970

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetter, O.; Pfister, C.

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents a unique 517-yr long documentary data-based reconstruction of spring-summer (MAMJJ) temperatures for northern Switzerland and south-western Germany from 1454 to 1970. It is composed of 25 partial series of winter grain (secale cereale) harvest starting dates (WGHD) that are partly based on harvest related bookkeeping of institutions (hospitals, municipalities), partly on (early) phenological observations. The resulting main Basel WGHD series was homogenised with regard to dating style, data type and altitude. The calibration and verification approach was applied using the homogenous HISTALP temperature series from 1774-1824 for calibration (r = 0.78) and from 1920-1970 for verification (r = 0.75). The latter result even suffers from the weak data base available for 1870-1950. Temperature reconstructions based on WGHD are more influenced by spring temperatures than those based on grape harvest dates (GHD), because rye in contrast to vines already begins to grow as soon as sunlight brings the plant to above freezing. The earliest and latest harvest dates were checked for consistency with narrative documentary weather reports. Comparisons with other European documentary-based GHD and WGHD temperature reconstructions generally reveal significant correlations decreasing with the distance from Switzerland. The new Basel WGHD series shows better skills in representing highly climate change sensitive variations of Swiss Alpine glaciers than available GHD series.

  3. Endolithic microbial communities in carbonate precipitates from serpentinite-hosted hyperalkaline springs of the Voltri Massif (Ligurian Alps, Northern Italy).

    PubMed

    Quéméneur, Marianne; Palvadeau, Alexandra; Postec, Anne; Monnin, Christophe; Chavagnac, Valérie; Ollivier, Bernard; Erauso, Gaël

    2015-09-01

    The Voltri Massif is an ophiolitic complex located in the Ligurian Alps close to the city of Genova (Northern Italy) where several springs discharge high pH (up to 11.7), low salinity waters produced by the active serpentinization of the ultramafic basement. Mixing of these hyperalkaline waters with the river waters along with the uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide forms brownish carbonate precipitates covering the bedrock at the springs. Diverse archaeal and bacterial communities were detected in these carbonate precipitates using 454 pyrosequencing analyses of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Archaeal communities were dominated by members of potential methane-producing and/or methane-oxidizing Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales (Euryarchaeota) together with ammonia-oxidizing Nitrososphaerales (Thaumarchaeota) similar to those found in other serpentinization-driven submarine and terrestrial ecosystems. Bacterial communities consisted of members of the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, and Verrucomicrobia phyla, altogether accounting for 92.2% of total retrieved bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences. Amongst Bacteria, potential chemolithotrophy was mainly associated with Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria classes, including nitrogen-fixing, methane-oxidizing or hydrogen-oxidizing representatives of the genera Azospirillum, Methylosinus, and Hydrogenophaga/'Serpentinomonas', respectively. Besides, potential chemoorganotrophy was attributed mainly to representatives of Actinobacteria and Planctomycetales phyla. The reported 16S rRNA gene data strongly suggested that hydrogen, methane, and nitrogen-based chemolithotrophy can sustain growth of the microbial communities inhabiting the carbonate precipitates in the hyperalkaline springs of the Voltri Massif, similarly to what was previously observed in other serpentinite-hosted ecosystems. PMID:25874424

  4. A sedimentological model for the Loves Creek Member of the Bitter Springs Formation, northern Amadeus Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southgate, P. N.

    Sediments of the Loves Creek Member of the Bitter Springs Formation comprise the transgressive and highstand systems tracts of a stratigraphic sequence. The member is bounded top and bottom by disconformity surfaces and is divisible into three sedimentary packages referred to as units. Each unit represents a series of depositional environments related to each other by position on a large-scale sea-level cycle. The uppermost redbed and dolomitic limestone/dolostone unit provides evidence for continued regression and progradation as the underlying marine sediments are succeeded by carbonate rocks and redbeds deposited in lacustrine and terrestrial environments respectively.

  5. The ALICE Electronic Logbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altini, V.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Makhlyueva, I.; Roukoutakis, F.; Schossmaier, K.; Soòs, C.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Von Haller, B.; ALICE Collaboration

    2010-04-01

    All major experiments need tools that provide a way to keep a record of the events and activities, both during commissioning and operations. In ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) at CERN, this task is performed by the Alice Electronic Logbook (eLogbook), a custom-made application developed and maintained by the Data-Acquisition group (DAQ). Started as a statistics repository, the eLogbook has evolved to become not only a fully functional electronic logbook, but also a massive information repository used to store the conditions and statistics of the several online systems. It's currently used by more than 600 users in 30 different countries and it plays an important role in the daily ALICE collaboration activities. This paper will describe the LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) based architecture of the eLogbook, the database schema and the relevance of the information stored in the eLogbook to the different ALICE actors, not only for near real time procedures but also for long term data-mining and analysis. It will also present the web interface, including the different used technologies, the implemented security measures and the current main features. Finally it will present the roadmap for the future, including a migration to the web 2.0 paradigm, the handling of the database ever-increasing data volume and the deployment of data-mining tools.

  6. Alice in Debitland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Washington, DC.

    Designed for the general public and possibly suitable also for high school economics students, this booklet examines the Electronic Fund Transfer Act (EFT), which protects consumers who use debit cards for the electronic transfer of funds. This commercially adapted version of the character in "Alice in Wonderland," uses a story-teller approach to…

  7. Management Strategies to Improve Yield and Nitrogen Use of Spring Wheat and Field Pea in the Semi-Arid Northern Great Plains USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Available water and N fertility are primary constraints to crop production in the northern Great Plains of the USA. A field trial was initiated in 2004 to compare four crop rotations in a complete factorial of two tillage and two management systems. Rotations were continuous spring wheat (SW), pea-...

  8. Does winter region affect spring arrival time and body mass of king eiders in northern Alaska?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Abby N.; Oppel, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    Events during the non-breeding season may affect the body condition of migratory birds and influence performance during the following breeding season. Migratory birds nesting in the Arctic often rely on endogenous nutrients for reproductive efforts, and are thus potentially subject to such carry-over effects. We tested whether king eider (Somateria spectabilis) arrival time and body mass upon arrival at breeding grounds in northern Alaska were affected by their choice of a winter region in the Bering Sea. We captured birds shortly after arrival on breeding grounds in early June 2002–2006 at two sites in northern Alaska and determined the region in which individuals wintered using satellite telemetry or stable isotope ratios of head feathers. We used generalized linear models to assess whether winter region explained variation in arrival body mass among individuals by accounting for sex, site, annual variation, and the date a bird was captured. We found no support for our hypothesis that either arrival time or arrival body mass of king eiders differed among winter regions. We conclude that wintering in different regions in the Bering Sea is unlikely to have reproductive consequences for king eiders in our study areas.

  9. Bacterial abundance, biomass and production during spring blooms in the northern Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturluson, Maria; Gissel Nielsen, Torkel; Wassmann, Paul

    2008-10-01

    To evaluate importance of bacterioplankton in the Barents Sea, we investigated the spatial and temporal distribution of bacterial abundance, biomass and production in relation to spring-bloom stages. During three cruises in 2003-2005, 12 stations were investigated. Average bacterial abundance (±S.D.) in the photic zone was 3.6±3.0×10 5 cells ml -1, corresponding to 7.1±6.1 mg C m -3. Bacterial production in the photic zone was measured using dual labelling technique with 3H-thymidine and 14C-leucine, resulting in average production rates (±S.D.) of 1.5±1.0 and 6.9±4.8 mg C m -3 d -1, respectively. In spite of low water temperature, the bacterial community was well developed and active. Similarity analysis of stations resulted in four distinct spring-bloom stages, covering pre- early-, late- and post-bloom stages. In the photic zone, bacterial biomass on average corresponded to 6±2% of phytoplankton biomass. Highest integrated bacterial biomass was observed at mid- to late-bloom stages. Average bacterial production equalled 32±6% (±S.E., n=24) of particulate primary production. The bacterial production to primary production ratio tended to increase at late-bloom stages. The observed bacterial activity illustrates the importance of the bacterial pathway for channelling carbon from DOC through the microbial food web back into the classical food web, which previously has not been adequately considered in plankton ecosystem models of the Barents Sea.

  10. Winter and early spring CO2 efflux from tundra communities of northern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahnestock, J. T.; Jones, M. H.; Brooks, P. D.; Walker, D. A.; Welker, J. M.

    1998-11-01

    Carbon dioxide concentrations through snow were measured in different arctic tundra communities on the North Slope of Alaska during winter and early spring of 1996. Subnivean CO2 concentrations were always higher than atmospheric CO2. A steady state diffusion model was used to generate conservative estimates of CO2 flux to the atmosphere. The magnitude of CO2 efflux differed with tundra community type, and rates of carbon release increased from March to May. Winter CO2 efflux was highest in riparian and snow bed communities and lowest in dry heath, upland tussock, and wet sedge communities. Snow generally accrues earlier in winter and is deeper in riparian and snow bed communities compared with other tundra communities, which are typically windswept and do not accumulate much snow during the winter. These results support the hypothesis that early and deep snow accumulation may insulate microbial populations from very cold temperatures, allowing sites with earlier snow cover to sustain higher levels of activity throughout winter compared to communities that have later developing snow cover. Extrapolating our estimates of CO2 efflux to the entire snow-covered season indicates that total carbon flux during winter in the Arctic is 13-109 kg CO2-C ha-1, depending on the vegetation community type. Wintertime CO2 flux is a potentially important, yet largely overlooked, part of the annual carbon cycle of tundra, and carbon release during winter should be accounted for in estimates of annual carbon balance in arctic ecosystems.

  11. Intra-seasonal variability and predictability over West and Central Africa in northern spring (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicot, S.; Kamsu-Tamo, P.; Lenouo, A.; Monkam, D.

    2013-12-01

    The main objective of this study is to characterize the intra-seasonal variability of precipitation and convection over the Guinean coast and Central Africa during the spring season March-June. The data used cover the period 1998-2010 and are derived from satellite products for rainfall (TRMM 3B42) and convection (NOAA OLR, CLAUS Brightness Temperature), and ERA-Interim reanalyses to characterize the associated atmospheric patterns. Three main periodicities have been detected at 3-8-day, 8-22-day and 20-90-day, by a Singular Spectral Analysis applied to an OLR index averaged over the Guinean Coast. Both three indices represent a homogeneous convective activity propagating eastward over the Guinean Coast from the western equatorial Atlantic to the equatorial Indian basin. Space-time spectral decompositions show that these modes are significantly controlled by convectively-coupled Kelvin wave dynamics. In this presentation the 8-22-day mode will be detailed. Their medium-range predictability (at 5, 10 and 15-day range) will be evaluated in the TIGGE (THORPEX Interactive Grand Global Ensemble) dataset over the period 2008-2012.

  12. Central diffraction at ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lämsä, J. W.; Orava, R.

    2011-02-01

    The ALICE experiment is shown to be well suited for studies of exclusive final states from central diffractive reactions. The gluon-rich environment of the central system allows detailed QCD studies and searches for exotic meson states, such as glueballs, hybrids and new charmonium-like states. It would also provide a good testing ground for detailed studies of heavy quarkonia. Due to its central barrel performance, ALICE can accurately measure the low-mass central systems with good purity. The efficiency of the Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) and the Forward Shower Counter (FSC) system for detecting rapidity gaps is shown to be adequate for the proposed studies. With this detector arrangement, valuable new data can be obtained by tagging central diffractive processes.

  13. Yield Response of Spring Maize to Inter-Row Subsoiling and Soil Water Deficit in Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ben; Ata-Ul-Karim, Syed Tahir; Xiao, Junfu; Sun, Jingsheng; Ning, Dongfeng; Liu, Zugui; Nan, Jiqin; Duan, Aiwang

    2016-01-01

    Background Long-term tillage has been shown to induce water stress episode during crop growth period due to low water retention capacity. It is unclear whether integrated water conservation tillage systems, such asspringdeepinter-row subsoiling with annual or biennial repetitions, can be developed to alleviate this issue while improve crop productivity. Methods Experimentswere carried out in a spring maize cropping system on Calcaric-fluvicCambisolsatJiaozuoexperimentstation, northern China, in 2009 to 2014. Effects of threesubsoiling depths (i.e., 30 cm, 40 cm, and 50 cm) in combination with annual and biennial repetitionswasdetermined in two single-years (i.e., 2012 and 2014)againstthe conventional tillage. The objectives were to investigateyield response to subsoiling depths and soil water deficit(SWD), and to identify the most effective subsoiling treatment using a systematic assessment. Results Annualsubsoiling to 50 cm (AS-50) increased soil water storage (SWS, mm) by an average of8% in 0–20 cm soil depth, 19% in 20–80 cm depth, and 10% in 80–120 cm depth, followed by AS-40 and BS-50, whereas AS-30 and BS-30 showed much less effects in increasing SWS across the 0–120 cm soil profile, compared to the CK. AS-50 significantly reduced soil water deficit (SWD, mm) by an average of123% during sowing to jointing, 318% during jointing to filling, and 221% during filling to maturity, compared to the CK, followed by AS-40 and BS-50. An integrated effect on increasing SWS and reducing SWD helped AS-50 boost grain yield by an average of 31% and biomass yield by 30%, compared to the CK. A power function for subsoiling depth and a negative linear function for SWD were used to fit the measured yields, showing the deepest subsoiling depth (50 cm) with the lowest SWD contributed to the highest yield. Systematic assessment showed that AS-50 received the highest evaluation index (0.69 out of 1.0) among all treatments. Conclusion Deepinter-row subsoilingwith annual

  14. Growth of C02 frost thickness near Chasma Borealis during northern winter and spring.

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, W. C.; Boynton, W. V.; Prettyman, T. H.; Kelly, N.; Maurice, S.

    2003-01-01

    Epithermal neutron fluxes measured using the Neutron Spectrometer component of the Mars OdysscNGamma-Ray Spectrometer suite of instruments were studied to determ i ne the spatial and temporal dependence of CO2 frost cover of the nor t h polar cap for L, between 329 and 99 arcoccntric longitude. This time period spans the la t e northern xvinter through summer solstice . In the absence of a CO, cuvcr, the entire basement terrain p o l eward of about +55 latitude is vm, rich in I1 :0 . The consequent enhanced abundance of hydrogen in near-surface soils leads to an anomaluusly low flux of oumardly leaking cpithcrmal ncutrons, wh i ch is a prominent signatu r e of epi t hermal neutron maps measured after about L, = 90 . Because the epithermal neutron flux rises monotonically w i t h increasing thickness of t h e CO . fros t cover, it provides a robust measure of the CO2 thickness in space and time .

  15. Development of a geodatabase for springs within and surrounding outcrops of the Trinity aquifer in northern Bexar County, Texas, 2010-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Pedraza, Diane E.

    2013-01-01

    Data for 141 springs within and surrounding the Trinity aquifer outcrops in northern Bexar County were compiled from existing reports and databases. These data were augmented with selected data collected onsite, including the location, discharge, and water-quality characteristics of selected springs, and were entered into the geodatabase. The Trinity aquifer in central Texas is commonly divided into the upper, middle, and lower Trinity aquifers; all of the information that was compiled pertaining to the aquifer is for the upper and middle Trinity aquifers.

  16. Satellite observations of changes in snow-covered land surface albedo during spring in the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atlaskina, K.; Berninger, F.; de Leeuw, G.

    2015-05-01

    Thirteen years of MODIS surface albedo data for the Northern Hemisphere during the spring months (March-May) were analysed to determine temporal and spatial changes over snow-covered land surfaces. Tendencies in land surface albedo change north of 50° N were analysed using data on snow cover fraction, air temperature, vegetation index and precipitation. To this end, the study domain was divided into six smaller areas, based on their geographical position and climate similarity. Strong differences were observed between these areas. As expected, snow cover fraction (SCF) has a strong influence on the albedo in the study area and can explain 56% of variation of albedo in March, 76% in April and 92% in May. Therefore the effects of other parameters were investigated only for areas with 100% SCF. The second largest driver for snow-covered land surface albedo changes is the air temperature when it exceeds -15 °C. At monthly mean air temperatures below this value no albedo changes are observed. Enhanced vegetation index (EVI) and precipitation amount and frequency were independently examined as possible candidates to explain observed changes in albedo for areas with 100% SCF. Amount and frequency of precipitation were identified to influence the albedo over some areas in Eurasia and North America, but no clear effects were observed in other areas. EVI is positively correlated with albedo in Chukotka Peninsula and negatively in Eastern Siberia. For other regions the spatial variability of the correlation fields is too high to reach any conclusions.

  17. Source Of Hydrogen Sulfide To Sulfidic Spring And Watershed Ecosystems In Northern Sierra De Chiapas, Mexico Based On Sulfur And Carbon Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales Lagarde, L.; Boston, P. J.; Campbell, A.

    2013-12-01

    At least four watersheds in northern Sierra de Chiapas, Mexico are fed by conspicuous karst sulfide-rich springs. The toxic hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in these springs nurtures rich ecosystems including especially adapted microorganisms, invertebrates and fish. Sulfur and carbon isotopic analysis of various chemical species in the spring water are integrated within their hydrogeologic context to evaluate the hydrogen sulfide source. Constraining the H2S origin can also increase the understanding of this compound effect in the quality of the nearby hydrocarbon reservoirs, and the extent to which its oxidation to sulfuric acid increases carbonate dissolution and steel corrosion in surface structures. The SO42-/H2S ratio in the spring water varies from 70,000 to 2 meq/L thus sulfate is the dominant species in the groundwater system. This sulfate is mainly produced from anhydrite dissolution based on its isotopic signature. The Δ SO42--H2S range of 16 spring water samples (30-50 ‰) is similar to the values determined by Goldhaber & Kaplan (1975) and Canfield (2001) for low rates of bacterial sulfate reduction suggesting that this is the most important mechanism producing H2S. Although the carbon isotopes do not constrain the nature of the organic matter participating in this reaction, this material likely comes from depth, perhaps as hydrocarbons, due to the apparent stability of the system. The organic matter availability and reactivity probably control the progress of sulfate reduction. The subsurface environments identified in the area also have different sulfur isotopic values. The heavier residual sulfate isotopic value in the Northern brackish springs (δ34S SO42- ≥ 18 ‰) compared to the Southern springs (δ34S SO42- ~18 ‰) suggests sulfate reduction is particularly enhanced in the former, probably by contribution of organic matter associated with oil produced water. In comparison, the composition of the Southern aquifer is mainly influenced by halite

  18. Evolution of Titan's stratospheric properties near the poles since the northern spring equinox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, Athena; Jennings, Donald; Achterberg, Richard; Lavvas, Panayiotis; Nixon, Conor; Flasar, F. Michael; Bampasidis, Georgios; Teanby, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    Since 2010, we observe the appearance at Titan's south pole of several trace species for the first time, such as HC3N and C6H6, observed only at high northern latitudes before equinox. Since 2012 this situation has rapidly evolved with a strong enhancement of gases and condensates in the South pole. We will present an analysis of spectra acquired by Cassini/CIRS at high resolution from 2012 in nadir mode. We investigate here latitudes poleward of 50°S and 50°N from 2010 (after the Southern Autumnal Equinox) until 2014 (Coustenis et al. 2015). For some of the most abundant and longest-lived hydrocarbons (C2H2, C2H6 and C3H8) and CO2, the evolution in the past 4 years at a given latitude is not very significant within error bars especially until mid-2013. In more recent dates, these molecules show a trend for increase in the south. This trend is dramatically more pronounced for the other trace species, especially in 2013-2014, and at 70°S relative to 50°S. These two regions then demonstrate that they are subject to different dynamical processes in and out of the polar vortex region. For most species, we find higher abundances at 50°N compared to 50°S, with the exception of C3H8, CO2, C6H6 and HC3N, which arrive at similar mixing ratios after mid-2013 (Coustenis et al. 2015). While the 70°N data show generally no change with a trend rather to a small decrease for most species within 2014, the 70°S results indicate a strong enhancement in trace stratospheric gases after 2012. The 663 cm-1 HC3N and the C6H6 674 cm-1 emission bands appeared in late 2011/early 2012 in the south polar regions and have since then exhibited a dramatic increase in their abundances. At 70°S HC3N, HCN and C6H6 have increased by 3 orders of magnitude over the past 3-4 years while other molecules, including C2H4, C3H4 and C4H2, have increased less sharply (by 1-2 orders of magnitude). This is a strong indication of the rapid and sudden buildup of the gaseous inventory in the southern

  19. Delineation of ground-water basins and recharge areas for municipal water-supply springs in a karst aquifer system in the Elizabethtown area, northern Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    Ground-water basins and recharge areas for municipal water-supply springs for the Elizabethtown area, northern Kentucky, were delineated using a hydrogeologic-mapping approach, potentiometric map interpretation, anddye-tracing tests. Five distinct ground-water basins drained by major karst springs are present in the Elizabethtown area. These basins are composed of networks of hydraulically interconnected solution conduits and fractures. The boundaries of the basins for Elizabethtown and Dyers Springs-the primary sources of water for the city of Elizabethtown-weredelineated by the positions of inferred ground-water divides on an existing potentiometric contour map. The results of dye-tracing tests, plotted as straight- line flowpaths, were used to confirm the presence and location of inferred ground-water divides and to adjust the position of the basin boundaries. Recharge areas of 4.8 and 2.7 square miles weredelineated for Elizabethtown and Dyers Springs, respectively. Swallets that drain concentrated stormwater runoff from major highways are presentin the recharge areas for both municipal-supply springs. Each spring is therefore potentially vulnerable to stormwater-runoff contaminants oraccidental spills and releases of toxic or hazardous materials into certain highway drainage culverts.

  20. The ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Christian Holm; Gaardhøje, Jens Jørgen; Gulbrandsen, Kristján; Nielsen, Børge Svane; Søgaard, Carsten

    The ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) is a silicon strip detector with 51,200 strips arranged in 5 rings, covering the range -3.4 < η < 5.1. It is placed around the beam pipe at small angles to extend the charged particle acceptance of ALICE into the forward regions, not covered by the central barrel detectors.

  1. Tuff of Bridge Spring: A mid-Miocene ash-flow tuff, northern Colorado River extensional corridor, Nevada and Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.I.; Morikawa, S.A.; Martin, M.W. . Dept. of Geoscience); Gonzales, D.A.; Walker, J.D. . Isotope Geochronology Lab.)

    1993-04-01

    The Tuff of Bridge Spring (TBS) (15.19[+-]0.02 Ma; Gans, 1991) is a compositionally variable dacite to rhyolite ash-flow tuff that crops out over 1800 sq. km in the northern Colorado River extensional corridor. The TBS varies in composition from 59.5 to 74 wt. % SiO[sub 2] and typically contains phenocrysts of sanidine, plagioclase, biotite, clinopyroxene, [+-] sphene, [+-] apatite, [+-] zircon, and [+-] hornblende. The TBS is thickest and displays its greatest compositional range in the center of its area of exposure. The McCullough Range section contains at least three chemically distinct flow units that vary in composition from dacite to rhyolite. The basal and uppermost units are normally zoned and the middle unit is reversely zoned. The complex chemical zonation and zoning reversals in the TBS indicate that it erupted from a magma chamber that was periodically injected by both mafic and felsic magmas. Sections at the edge of the exposure area are thin, contain only one or two chemically definable flow units and have a limited compositional range. To the west at Sheep Mountain, TBS is 2.9 m thick and ranges from 70.2--71.7 wt % SiO[sub 2]. To the east in the White Hills, TBS is 14 m thick and ranges from 59.5--65.3 wt % SiO[sub 2]. This chemical and field data indicate that although the TBS is regionally extensive, individual flow units are not. Isotopic data and chemistry suggest that all sections of the TBS are cogenetic. Comparisons of chemical, geochronological and isotopic data between the TBS and nearby coeval plutons indicate that the Aztec Wash (Eldorado Mts., Nevada) and Mt. Perkins (Black Mountain, Arizona) plutons are possible source for the TBS. Both plutons exhibit ample evidence of magma mixing and commingling, processes that may produce compositional zonation such as that observed in the TBS.

  2. Satellite observations of changes in snow-covered land surface albedo during spring in the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atlaskina, K.; Berninger, F.; de Leeuw, G.

    2015-09-01

    Thirteen years of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) surface albedo data for the Northern Hemisphere during the spring months (March-May) were analyzed to determine temporal and spatial changes over snow-covered land surfaces. Tendencies in land surface albedo change north of 50° N were analyzed using data on snow cover fraction, air temperature, vegetation index and precipitation. To this end, the study domain was divided into six smaller areas, based on their geographical position and climate similarity. Strong differences were observed between these areas. As expected, snow cover fraction (SCF) has a strong influence on the albedo in the study area and can explain 56 % of variation of albedo in March, 76 % in April and 92 % in May. Therefore the effects of other parameters were investigated only for areas with 100 % SCF. The second largest driver for snow-covered land surface albedo changes is the air temperature when it exceeds a value between -15 and -10 °C, depending on the region. At monthly mean air temperatures below this value no albedo changes are observed. The Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) and precipitation amount and frequency were independently examined as possible candidates to explain observed changes in albedo for areas with 100 % SCF. Amount and frequency of precipitation were identified to influence the albedo over some areas in Eurasia and North America, but no clear effects were observed in other areas. EVI is positively correlated with albedo in Chukotka Peninsula and negatively in eastern Siberia. For other regions the spatial variability of the correlation fields is too high to reach any conclusions.

  3. ALICE Expert System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, C.; Carena, F.

    2014-06-01

    The ALICE experiment at CERN employs a number of human operators (shifters), who have to make sure that the experiment is always in a state compatible with taking Physics data. Given the complexity of the system and the myriad of errors that can arise, this is not always a trivial task. The aim of this paper is to describe an expert system that is capable of assisting human shifters in the ALICE control room. The system diagnoses potential issues and attempts to make smart recommendations for troubleshooting. At its core, a Prolog engine infers whether a Physics or a technical run can be started based on the current state of the underlying sub-systems. A separate C++ component queries certain SMI objects and stores their state as facts in a Prolog knowledge base. By mining the data stored in different system logs, the expert system can also diagnose errors arising during a run. Currently the system is used by the on-call experts for faster response times, but we expect it to be adopted as a standard tool by regular shifters during the next data taking period.

  4. Water-quality data collected to determine the presence, source, and concentration of lead in the drinking water supply at Pipe Spring National Monument, northern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macy, Jamie P.; Sharrow, David; Unema, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Pipe Spring National Monument in northern Arizona contains historically significant springs. The groundwater source of these springs is the same aquifer that presently is an important source of drinking water for the Pipe Spring National Monument facilities, the Kaibab Paiute Tribe, and the community of Moccasin. The Kaibab Paiute Tribe monitored lead concentrations from 2004 to 2009; some of the analytical results exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency action level for treatment technique for lead of 15 parts per billion. The National Park Service and the Kaibab Paiute Tribe were concerned that the local groundwater system that provides the domestic water supply might be contaminated with lead. Lead concentrations in water samples collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from three springs, five wells, two water storage tanks, and one faucet were less than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency action level for treatment technique. Lead concentrations of rock samples representative of the rock units in which the local groundwater resides were less than 22 parts per million.

  5. Statistical analysis of the temperature records for the Northern Territory of Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boretti, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    The Northern Territory of Australia has a unique situation of an extension larger than France and a population of 200,000, with only three meteorology stations open for more than 40 years, Darwin (DW), Alice Springs (AS) and Tennant Creek, and only two of them, DW and AS, providing data over 100 years, and from 500 to more than 1,000 km separating these stations and the stations in the neighbouring states of Australia. Homogenizations of data in between different measuring sites for the same location as well as the way to derive the missed data to complete at least 100 years from the neighbouring locations are analysed in details and the effects on the temperature trends are straightforwardly investigated. Using properly homogenised data over 130 years and a linear fitting, the warming maximum and minimum temperatures are +0.009 and +0.057 °C/10 years for Alice Springs and -0.025 and 0.064 °C/10 years for Darwin. With the data available, the only option to produce warming trends is to overweight the cold years in the middle of the 1970s and the subsequent return to warmer temperatures. Starting from 1980, to compute trends, there is still a clear warming in Alice Springs, but also clear cooling in Tennant Creek, and a mixed behaviour with warming maximum temperatures and cooling minimum temperatures in Darwin.

  6. Alice in Wonderland syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose of review: To summarize the literature on Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS), a disorder characterized by distortions of visual perception, the body schema, and the experience of time. Recent findings: On the basis of 169 published case descriptions, the etiology of AIWS is divided into 8 main groups, with neurologic disorders affecting mostly adults and elderly patients and encephalitides affecting mostly patients aged ≤18 years. Symptoms of AIWS are also experienced in the general population, with up to 30% of adolescents reporting nonclinical symptoms. Summary: In clinical cases of AIWS, auxiliary investigations (including blood tests, EEG, and brain MRI) are strongly advised. Treatment should be directed at the suspected underlying condition, although reassurance that the symptoms themselves are not harmful seems to suffice in about 50% of the cases. International classifications such as the DSM and ICD should consider placing the syndrome on their research agenda. PMID:27347442

  7. The Alice in Wonderland syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fine, Edward J

    2013-01-01

    The Alice in Wonderland syndrome is a term applied to altered bizarre perceptions of size and shapes of a patient's body and illusions of changes in the forms, dimensions, and motions of objects that a patient with this syndrome encounters. These metamorphopsias arise during complex partial seizures, migraine headaches, infections, and intoxications. The illusions and hallucinations resemble the strange phenomena that Alice experienced in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, whose nom de plume was Lewis Carroll, experienced metamorphopsias. He described them in the story that he wrote for Alice Liddell and her two sisters after he spun a tale about a long and strange dream that the fictional Alice had on a warm summer day. The author of this chapter suggests that Dodgson suffered from migraine headaches and used these experiences to weave an amusing tale for Alice Liddell. The chapter also discusses the neurology of mercury poisoning affecting the behavior of Mad Hatter character. The author suggests that the ever-somnolent Dormouse suffered from excessive daytime sleepiness due to obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:24290480

  8. Preparing the ALICE DAQ upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Dénes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Grigore, A.; Kiss, T.; Rauch, W.; Rubin, G.; Simonetti, G.; Soós, C.; Telesca, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Von Haller, B.

    2012-12-01

    In November 2009, after 15 years of design and installation, the ALICE experiment started to detect and record the first collisions produced by the LHC. It has been collecting hundreds of millions of events ever since with both proton and heavy ion collisions. The future scientific programme of ALICE has been refined following the first year of data taking. The physics targeted beyond 2018 will be the study of rare signals. Several detectors will be upgraded, modified, or replaced to prepare ALICE for future physics challenges. An upgrade of the triggering and readout systems is also required to accommodate the needs of the upgraded ALICE and to better select the data of the rare physics channels. The ALICE upgrade will have major implications in the detector electronics and controls, data acquisition, event triggering and offline computing and storage systems. Moreover, the experience accumulated during more than two years of operation has also lead to new requirements for the control software. We will review all these new needs and the current R&D activities to address them. Several papers of the same conference present in more details some elements of the ALICE online system.

  9. Weight of evidence and artificial neural networks for potential groundwater spring mapping: an application to the Mt. Modino area (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, Alessandro; Cervi, Federico; Ronchetti, Francesco

    2009-10-01

    Locations of potential groundwater springs were mapped in an area of 68 km 2 in the Northern Apennines of Italy based on Weight of Evidence (WofE) and Radial Basis Function Link Net (RBFLN). A map of more than 200 springs and maps of five causal factors were uploaded to ArcGIS with Spatial Data Modelling extensions. The WofE and RBFLN potential groundwater spring maps had similar prediction rates, allowing about 50% of the training and validation springs to be predicted in about 15 to 20% of the study area. The two maps were merged using a heuristic combination matrix in order to produce two hybrid maps: one representing susceptible areas in both the WofE and RBFLN maps (type A), while the other representing susceptible areas at least in one of the two maps (type B). For small cumulated areas, the success rate of both hybrid maps was higher than that of the parent maps, while for large cumulated areas, only the type B hybrid map performed similarly to the parent maps. This conclusion suggests different applications of these maps to water management purposes.

  10. A new species of the subterranean genus Stygobromus (Amphipoda: Crangonyctidae) from a cave spring in northern Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Holsinger, John R; Sawicki, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    A relatively large, distinct new species of the subterranean amphipod crustacean genus Stygobromus (Amphipoda: Crangonyctidae) measuring 13 mm in length is described from Skipper Spring, a cave spring in the northwestern "panhandle" of Florida, USA. This is the first species of the genus described from the state of Florida where it is described from only 3 females. A fourth much smaller specimen of this species was collected from nearby Miller's Crossing Spring on Holmes Creek. All other stygomorphic amphipod species recorded from the state of Florida have been in the genus Crangonyx. PMID:27395865

  11. ALICE TPC commissioning results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, D. T.; Alice Tpc Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    ALICE is a dedicated heavy-ion experiment at CERN LHC aiming to study the properties of the quark-gluon plasma. A lead-lead collision might produce several 10 00 new particles. Detailed study of the event requires precise measurements of the particle tracks. A 90 m3 Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with more than 500 000 read-out pads was built as the main central barrel tracker. Collisions can be recorded at a rate of up to about 1 kHz. The front-end electronics, designed from FPGAs and custom ASICs, performs shaping, amplification, digitisation and digital filtering of the signals. The data are forwarded to DAQ via 216 1.25 Gb/s fibre-optical links. Configuration, control and monitoring is done by an embedded Linux system on the front-end electronics. Before production runs with beam, extensive commissioning using tracks from cosmics and from the laser system as well as clusters from radioactive krypton gas is needed. Extensive results have been obtained with respect to the performance of the TPC including its sub-systems.

  12. The ALICE forward multiplicity detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbrandsen, K.; Bearden, I.; Bertelsen, P. H.; Christensen, C. H.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Alice Collaboration

    2006-08-01

    The ALICE experiment is designed to study the properties of hadron and nucleus collisions in a new energy regime at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A fundamental observable in such collisions is the multiplicity distribution of charged particles. A forward multiplicity detector has been designed to extend the charged particle multiplicity coverage of the ALICE experiment to pseudorapidities of -3.4<η<-1.7 and 1.7<η<5.0. This detector consists of five rings, each containing 10240 Si strips, divided into sectors comprised of Si sensors bonded and glued to hybrid PC boards equipped with radiation hard preamplifiers. The output of these preamplifiers is multiplexed into custom-made fast ADC chips located directly behind the Si sensors on the detector frame. These ADCs are read out, via optical fibers, to a data acquisition farm of commodity PCs. The design and characteristics of the ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector will be discussed.

  13. ALICE electromagnetic calorimeter prototype test

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, Terry; /Oak Ridge

    2005-09-01

    This Memorandum of Understanding between the Test Beam collaborators and Fermilab is for the use of beam time at Fermilab during the Fall, 2005 Meson Test Beam Run. The experimenters plan to measure the energy, position, and time resolution of prototype modules of a large electromagnetic calorimeter proposed to be installed in the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The ALICE experiment is one of the three large approved LHC experiments, with ALICE placing special emphasis on the LHC heavy-ion program. The large electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal) is a US initiative that is endorsed by the ALICE collaboration and is currently in the early stages of review by the Nuclear Physics Division of the DOE. The installation in the test beam at FNAL and test beam measurements will be carried out by the US members of the ALICE collaboration (ALICE-USA). The overall design of the ALICE EMCal is heavily influenced by its location within the ALICE L3 magnet. The EMCal is to be located inside the large room temperature magnet within a cylindrical integration volume approximately l12cm deep, by 5.6m in length, sandwiched between the ALICE TPC space frame and the L3 magnet coils. The chosen technology is a layered Pb-scintillator sampling calorimeter with a longitudinal pitch of 1.6mm Pb and 1.6mm scintillator. The full detector spans {eta} = -0.7 to {eta} = 0.7 with an azimuthal acceptance of {Delta}{phi} = 120{sup o}. The EMCal readout is of a ''Shish-Kabob'' type similar to the PHENIX Pb-scintillator sampling calorimeter in which the scintillation light is collected via wavelength shifting fibers running through the Pb-scintillator tiles perpendicular to the front surface. The detector is segmented into {approx}14000 towers. The basic structural units of the calorimeter are supermodules, each subtending approximately {approx}20{sup o} in {Delta}{phi} and 0.7 units in {Delta}{eta}. Supermodules are assembled from individual modules. The modules are further segmented into 2 x 2

  14. Simulating dryland water availability and spring wheat production under various management practices in the Northern Great Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural system models are useful tools to synthesize field experimental data and to extrapolate the results to longer periods of weather and other cropping systems. The objectives of this study were: 1) to quantify the effects of planting date, seeding rate, and tillage on spring wheat producti...

  15. Alice in the Real World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Tom

    2012-01-01

    As a fifth-grade mathematics teacher, the author tries to create authentic problem-solving activities that connect to the world in which his students live. He discovered a natural connection to his students' real world at a computer camp. A friend introduced him to Alice, a computer application developed at Carnegie Mellon, under the leadership of…

  16. Alice Childress: A Pioneering Spirit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown-Guillory, Elizabeth

    1987-01-01

    Interview with Alice Childress (born 1920), an actress, playwright, novelist, editor, and lecturer. Her "Gold through the Forest" (1952) was the first play by a Black woman to be produced professionally on the American stage. Her latest play, "Moms," was produced in New York City in 1987. (BJV)

  17. Alice Views Jupiter and Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This graphic illustrates the pointing and shows the data from one of many observations made by the New Horizons Alice ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS) instrument during the Pluto-bound spacecraft's recent encounter with Jupiter. The red lines in the graphic show the scale, orientation, and position of the combined 'box and slot' field of view of the Alice UVS during this observation.

    The positions of Jupiter's volcanic moon, Io, the torus of ionized gas from Io, and Jupiter are shown relative to the Alice field of view. Like a prism, the spectrometer separates light from these targets into its constituent wavelengths.

    Io's volcanoes produce an extremely tenuous atmosphere made up primarily of sulfur dioxide gas, which, in the harsh plasma environment at Io, breaks down into its component sulfur and oxygen atoms. Alice observed the auroral glow from these atoms in Io's atmosphere and their ionized counterparts in the Io torus.

    Io's dayside is deliberately overexposed to bring out faint details in the plumes and on the moon's night side. The continuing eruption of the volcano Tvashtar, at the 1 o'clock position, produces an enormous plume roughly 330 kilometers (200 miles) high, which is illuminated both by sunlight and 'Jupiter light.'

  18. Late winter and early spring home range and habitat use of the endangered Carolina northern flying squirrel in western North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ford, W. Mark; Kelly, Christine A.; Rodrigue, Jane L.; Odom, Richard H.; Newcomb, Douglas; Gilley, L. Michelle; Diggins, Corinne A.

    2014-01-01

    The Carolina northern flying squirrel Glaucomys sabrinus coloratus is an endangered subspecies that is restricted to high elevation forests in the southern Appalachian Mountains. Owing to rugged terrain and nocturnal habits, the subspecies’ natural history, home range characteristics and habitat preferences are poorly known. We radio-tracked 3 female and 2 male Carolina northern flying squirrels during late winter through spring 2012 in the Pisgah National Forest, North Carolina, USA. Tracked squirrels used 13 yellow birch Betula alleghaniensis and 9 red spruce Picea rubens as diurnal dens. Ten of the yellow birch dens were in cavities, whereas the remainders were dreys. Conversely, 8 of the red spruce dens were dreys and one was in a cavity. Mean (±SE) female 95 and 50% adaptive kernel home ranges were 6.50 ± 2.19 and 0.93 ± 0.33 ha, respectively, whereas the corresponding values for males were 12.6 ± 0.9 and 1.45 ± 0.1 ha, respectively. Squirrels used red spruce stands with canopies >20 m more than expected based on availability at the landscape and home range scales. Results should be interpreted cautiously because of small sample sizes and seasonal observations; however, they provide evidence that although northern hardwoods such as yellow birch are an important den habitat component, mature red spruce-dominated habitats with complex structure provide foraging habitats and are also den habitat. Our findings support efforts to improve the structural condition of extant red spruce forests and/or increase red spruce acreage to potentially benefit Carolina northern flying squirrels.

  19. Overview of 2010-2013 spring campaigns of Seven South East Asian Studies (7-SEAS) in the northern Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, N.; Tsay, S.; Hsu, N. C.; Holben, B. N.; Anh, N.; Reid, J. S.; Sheu, G.; Chi, K.; Wang, S.; Lee, C.; Wang, L.; Wang, J.; Chen, W.; Welton, E. J.; Liang, S.; Sopajaree, K.; Maring, H. B.; Janjai, S.; Chantara, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Seven South East Asian Studies (7-SEAS) is a grass-root program and seeks to perform interdisciplinary research in the field of aerosol-meteorology and climate interaction in the Southeast Asian region, particularly for the impact of biomass burning on cloud, atmospheric radiation, hydrological cycle, and regional climate. Participating countries include Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Taiwan, Vietnam, and USA. A series of field experiments have been conducted during springtime biomass burning seasons in northern Southeast Asia, i.e., Dongsha Experiment in 2010, Son La Campaigns in 2011 and 2012, and BASELInE (Biomass-burning Aerosols & Stratocumulus Environment: Lifecycles and Interactions Experiment) in 2013, respectively. Given an example, during 2010 Dongsha Experiment, a monitoring network for ground-based measurements was established, including five stations from northern Thailand and central Vietnam to Taiwan, with a supersite at the Dongsha Island (i.e. Pratas Island) in South China Sea (or East Sea). Aerosol chemistry sampling was performed for each station for characterizing the compositions of PM2.5/PM10 (some for TSP) including water-soluble ions, metal elements, BC/OC, Hg and dioxins. This experiment provides a relatively complete and first dataset of aerosol chemistry and physical observations conducted in the source/sink region for below marine boundary layer and lower free troposphere of biomass burning/air pollutants in the northern SE Asia. This presentation will give an overview of these 7-SEAS activities and their results, particularly for the characterization of biomass-burning aerosol at source regions in northern Thailand and northern Vietnam, and receptor stations in Taiwan, which is rarely studied.

  20. Trace-metal concentrations, waters from selected sky lakes, streams and springs, northern Shawangunk Mountains, New York: geologic and ecologic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, J.D.; Huth, P.C.; Smiley, D.

    1990-01-01

    Reconnaissance sampling and chemical analysis of water from selected lakes, streams and springs of the northern Shawangunk Mountains in 1987 to 1988 to determine the influence of lithology on trace-metal concentrations in surface water, and to establish a base level of concentration of 27 selected metals by ICP-AES and Hg by cold-vapor AAS methods, for geochemical exploration, ecologic, acid-rain, and climatic-change studies, have yielded trace-metal concentrations greater than detection limits for 10 metallic elements. Eighteen additional metallic elements were also present in trace quantities below the quantitative detection limit. Two distinct geochemical populations are related to source lithology and pH. -from Authors

  1. Identification and frequency of atmospheric circulation patterns causing spring frost in the northern French vineyards using the objective version of the Hess-Brezowsky classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quénol, H.; Planchon, O.; Wahl, L.

    2009-04-01

    The possible impacts of climate change at small spatial scales are still very little known. The knowledge of the climate risks at small scales is yet essential for agricultural activities and productions like vine growing, because of their serious economic impacts. Because of their relatively high latitude, the vineyards of the northern Half of France are subjected to spring frost, which can cause serious damages e.g. in the Champagne area on April the 8th, 2003. A detailed study of the variability and frequency of spring frost events in four vineyards (Loire Valley, Champagne, Burgundy and Alsace) was carried out within the framework of the RICLIM-CNRS 2663 multidisciplinary Research Group "Climate Risks" and was supported by the research program TERVICLIM (ANR-JC07-194103) and by the MAIF Foundation (program about air-mass circulation dynamics and climate risks). The northern Half of France is included in the Cfb type of climate (according to the Köppen's classification) of northwestern and central Europe. However, the combined effects of the latitude, the continentality and the topography involve varied regional climates. Among the four studied wine-producing areas, the Loire Valley area is the warmest, the Champagne area is the coolest in summer, and eastern Burgundy and especially Alsace are the most subjected to the continentality effect (highest annual temperature oscillation and highest rainfall amounts in summer). Therefore, these areas are not equally subjected to the frost risk. Spring is a key season for the vine growing and during frost-producing weather patterns, northern France is subjected to a high spatial variability of temperature at regional and local scales. During the period 1960-2007, the number of spring frost day events was three times as high in Colmar (Alsace) than in Saumur (Loire Valley). Among the four wine-producing areas, Alsace records the most hard and frequent frosts in early spring, while the Champagne area records the latest

  2. Spring-summer temperatures reconstructed for northern Switzerland and south-western Germany from winter rye harvest dates, 1454-1970

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetter, O.; Pfister, C.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a unique 517 yr long documentary data - based reconstruction of spring-summer (MAMJJ) temperatures for northern Switzerland and south western Germany from 1454 to 1970. It is composed of 25 partial series of winter grain (secale cereale) harvest starting dates (WGHD) that are in one part based on harvest related bookkeeping of institutions (hospitals, municipalities), in the other part to (early) phenological observations. The resulting main Basel WGHD series was homogenised with regard to dating style, data type and altitude. The calibration and verification approach was applied using the homogenous HISTALP temperature series from 1774-1824 for calibration (r = 0,78) and from 1920-1970 for verification (r = 0.75). The latter result even suffer from the weak data basis available for 1870-1950. Temperature reconstructions based on WGHD are more influenced by spring temperatures than those based on grape harvest dates (GHD), because rye in contrast to vines already begins to grow as soon as sunlight brings the plant to above freezing. The earliest and latest harvest dates were checked for consistency with narrative documentary weather reports. Comparisons with other European documentary-based GHD and WGHD temperature reconstructions generally reveal significant correlations decreasing with the distance from Switzerland. The new Basel WGHD series shows better skills in representing highly climate change sensitive variations of Swiss Alpine glaciers than available GHD series.

  3. Unexpected role of winter precipitation in determining heat requirement for spring vegetation green-up at northern middle and high latitudes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yongshuo H; Piao, Shilong; Zhao, Hongfang; Jeong, Su-Jong; Wang, Xuhui; Vitasse, Yann; Ciais, Philippe; Janssens, Ivan A

    2014-12-01

    Heat requirement, expressed in growing degree days (GDD), is a widely used method to assess and predict the effect of temperature on plant development. Until recently, the analysis of spatial patterns of GDD requirement for spring vegetation green-up onset was limited to local and regional scales, mainly because of the sparse and aggregated spatial availability of ground phenology data. Taking advantage of the large temporal and spatial scales of remote sensing-based green-up onset data, we studied the spatial patterns of GDD requirement for vegetation green-up at northern middle and high latitudes. We further explored the correlations between GDD requirement for vegetation green-up and previous winter season chilling temperatures and precipitation, using spatial partial correlations. We showed that GDD requirement for vegetation green-up onset declines towards the north at a mean rate of 18.8 °C-days per degree latitude between 35°N and 70°N, and vary significantly among different vegetation types. Our results confirmed that the GDD requirement for vegetation green-up is negatively correlated with previous winter chilling, which was defined as the number of chilling days from the day when the land surface froze in the previous autumn to the day of green-up onset. This negative correlation is a well-known phenomenon from local studies. Interestingly, irrespective of the vegetation type, we also found a positive correlation between the GDD requirement and previous winter season precipitation, which was defined as the sum of the precipitation of the month when green-up onset occur and the precipitation that occurred during the previous 2 months. Our study suggests that GDD requirement, chilling and precipitation may have complex interactions in their effects on spring vegetation green-up phenology. These findings have important implications for improving phenology models and could therefore advance our understanding of the interplay between spring phenology and

  4. Monitoring the sandstorm during spring season 2002 and desertification in northern China using the SSM/I data and Getis statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yaqiu; Yan, Fenghua

    2003-04-01

    A massive sandstorm has enveloped most northern China during the spring season 2002. Monitoring the evolution of sandstorm and desertification has become one of most serious problems for China's environment. Since 1989, one of the most advanced and operational passive microwave sensors is the DMSP SSM/I (special sensor microwave imager) operated at seven channels (19, 37, 85GHz with vertical and horizontal polarization and 22GHz with vertical polarization only). In the paper, the sandstorm and desertification indexes, SDI and DI, are derived from the radiative transfer equation, and are employed with multi-channel measurements of the DMSP SSM/I for monitoring the sandstorm and desertification in Northern China. Some SSM/I data in 1997 and 2001 are employed. The algorithm of the Getis statistics is developed to categorize the spatial correlation and its evolution during these days. It is demonstrated that the SSM/I indexes, SDI and DI, and its Getis statistics are well applicable for monitoring the sandstorm and desertification.

  5. Geochemistry of waters from springs, wells, and snowpack on and adjacent to Medicine Lake volcano, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mariner, R.H.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    1999-01-01

    Chemical analyses of waters from cold springs and wells of the Medicine Lake volcano and surrounding region indicate small chloride anomalies that may be due to water-rock interaction or limited mixing with high-temperature geothermal fluids. The Fall River Springs (FRS) with a combined discharge of approximately 37 m3/s, show a negative correlation between chloride (Cl) and temperature, implying that the Cl is not derived from a high-temperature geothermal fluid. The high discharge from the FRS indicates recharge over a large geographic region. Chemical and isotopic variations in the FRS show that they contain a mixture of three distinct waters. The isotopic composition of recharge on and adjacent to the volcano are estimated from the isotopic composition of snow and precipitation amounts adjusted for evapotranspiration. Enough recharge of the required isotopic composition (-100 parts per thousand ??D) is available from a combination of the Medicine Lake caldera, the Fall River basin and the Long Bell basin to support the slightly warmer components of the FRS (32 m3/s). The cold-dilute part of the FRS (approximately 5 m3/s) may recharge in the Bear Creek basin or at lower elevations in the Fall River basin.

  6. Spawning delays of northern capelin (Mallotus villosus) and recovery dynamics: A mismatch with ice-mediated spring bloom?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullowney, Darrell; Maillet, Gary; Dawe, Earl; Rose, George; Rowe, Sherrylynn

    2016-02-01

    The capelin stock off the northeast coast of Newfoundland and southern Labrador collapsed in the early 1990s along with most of the finfish community. Among a host of concomitant physical and behavioral changes was the onset of delayed spawning, a phenomenon that has persisted for over two decades. From the mid-1990s onward, the Newfoundland and Labrador shelf has been warming with ice levels reduced in most years, generally leading to earlier spring plankton blooms. The delayed spawns and earlier blooms have resulted in an increased mismatch between plankton production and larval emergence, which we hypothesized could result in reduced early-life survival and prolonged stock recovery. Among indices associated with the mismatch, including time between blooms and spawning, composition and abundance of zooplankton during early ontogeny, and sea surface temperature and ice coverage, potential linkages were found with first year capelin survival. Increased capelin productivity in recent years has been associated with an increase in preferable and total zooplankton abundance and a decreasing trend in the mismatch with the spring bloom. A generalized linear model incorporating a match-mismatch index and stage I-IV calanus copepods explained 82% of the variance associated with annual age 0 capelin abundance estimates since stock collapse. A central mechanism underlying improvements in capelin productivity appears to be a general reduction in ice coverage associated with a recent warm oceanographic regime that reached record high levels in 2011.

  7. ALICE detector in construction phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peryt, Wiktor S.

    2005-09-01

    ALICE1 collaboration, which prepares one of the biggest physics experiments in the history, came into production phase of its detector. The experiment will start at LHC2 at CERN in 2007/2008. In the meantime about 1000 people from ~70 institutions are involved in this enterprise. ALICE detector consists of many sub-detectors, designed and manufactured in many laboratories and commercial firms, located mainly in Europe, but also in U.S., India, China and Korea. To assure appropriate working environment for such a specific task, strictly related to tests of particular components, measurements and assembly procedures Detector Construction Database system has been designed and implemented at CERN and at some labs involved in these activities. In this paper special attention is paid to this topic not only due to fact of innovative approach to the problem. Another reason is the group of young computer scientists (mainly students) from the Warsaw University of Technology, leaded by the author, has designed and developed the system for the whole experiment3. Another very interesting subject is the Data Acquisition System which has to fulfill very hard requirements concerning speed and high bandwidth. Required technical performance is achieved thanks to using PCI bus (usually in previous high energy physics experiments VME standard has been used) and optical links. Very general overview of the whole detector and physics goals of ALICE experiment will also be given.

  8. Active deformation in the Northern Walker Lane: a detailed geodetic study of the Mohawk Valley and Honey Lake/Warm Springs fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, J. M.; Hammond, W. C.; Kreemer, C. W.; Blewitt, G.

    2012-12-01

    The Mohawk Valley and Honey Lake/Warm Springs faults are parallel, northwest striking, dextral fault systems separated by ~50 km in the westernmost part of the Northern Walker Lane. These two faults work as a cooperative pair to accommodate 3-5 mm/yr of the total 8 mm/yr of right-lateral deformation geodetically observed across the Northern Walker Lane, however it is unclear with fault is dominant. Geologic studies of the faults result in right-lateral slip rates of 1-2.5 mm/yr on the Honey Lake fault and a minimum of 0.3 mm/yr on the Mohawk Valley fault. In contrast, previous geodetic studies estimate slip rates of ~1 mm/yr on the Honey Lake fault and ~3 mm/yr on the Mohawk Valley fault. To reconcile the discrepancy between the distribution of slip on the faults and the differences between sums of the geologically and geodetically estimated slip rates, we use new GPS data to constrain an elastic block model developed specifically to study the Mohawk Valley and Honey Lake/Warm Springs fault systems. We present a dense GPS velocity solution (~10 km average station spacing) that incorporates new data from the semi-continuous Mobile Array of GPS for Nevada Transtension network (MAGNET, http://geodesy.unr.edu/networks) operated by the University of Nevada, Reno with continuous data from the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory and other networks. Data collected during the summer of 2012 bring many MAGNET GPS time series in the Northern Walker Lane to near 5 years in duration. The density of our velocity field and recent advances in data processing give us unprecedented precision in the measurement of contemporary deformation in the Northern Walker Lane. We use the velocity solution to solve for slip rates on the companion fault systems and explore the effects of block model geometry assumptions and tradeoffs. Our model predicts slip rates of 2.2±0.3 mm/yr for the Mohawk Valley fault and 1.1±0.2 mm/yr for the Honey Lake fault. Block model slip rate estimates are

  9. Deep-seated gravitational slope deformations in the Vinschgau (northern Italy) and their association with springs and speleothems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostermann, Marc; Koltai, Gabriella; Spötl, Christoph; Cheng, Hai

    2016-04-01

    Several springs along the lower section of the south-facing slope (Sonnenberg) of the central Vinschgau (Val Venosta) are supersaturated with respect to calcite/aragonite and/or iron oxyhydroxides, and carbonate precipitation occurs locally as tufas and flowstones. These springs occur along the toe of a deep-seated gravitational slope deformation (DSGSD) showing characteristic morphological features including double-ridges, trenches and counterscarps in its upper section. The Sonnenberg DSGSD developed in a complex structural setting, involving the low-angle Schlinig normal fault. Strongly fractured orthogneisses and intercalated paragneisses constitute the host rock whose foliation dips into the slope (20-40°) and strikes NNE-SSW to E-W. Secondary carbonate deposition is strongly connected to the presence of open fractures near the toe of the slope where calcite and aragonite flowstones formed as a result of strong evaporation (Spötl et al. 2002). These waters have mean residence times up to several decades, profoundly interacted with the strongly fractured basement rocks and are part of a large groundwater flow system controlled by the DSGSD. Recharge occurs in the uppermost area of the mass movement above ˜1900 m a.s.l. and discharges near the toe of the slope and/or directly into the extensive alluvial valley fill. Recent seismic investigations show a significant displacement of the bedrock and an interdigitation with alluvial sediments up to 100 m below the surface (Maraio et al. unpublished). U-Th dating of flowstone samples was carried out to constrain the chronology of these mass movements. Flowstone deposition along the toe of the slope started during the Late Glacial period (from ca. 14.2 ka BP) and occurred continuously throughout the Holocene. Thus, gravitational displacements likely commenced soon after the deglaciation. This is consistent with observations from the nearby Mt. Watles DSGSD, where radiocarbon dates suggest a similar timing of the

  10. Occurrence of near-surface ozone depletion in the Arctic spring strongly affected by Northern-Hemispheric climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, J.; Wang, Y.; Jiang, T.; Deng, Y.; Oltmans, S. J.; Solberg, S.

    2013-12-01

    In the Arctic spring, near-surface ozone can decrease to extremely low levels due to chemical removal catalyzed by halogen radicals. These ozone depletion events (ODEs) are usually accompanied by greatly enhanced surface deposition of reactive gaseous mercury. Here we show the effects of regional climate variability on Arctic ODE frequencies by analyzing surface ozone measurements at three monitoring sites (Barrow, Alert, and Zeppelinfjellet) in the past 30 years. Among the various climate variability indices, the Western Pacific (WP) index has the most significant impact. In years with high ODE frequencies at Barrow and Alert in April, the WP teleconnection pattern tends to be in its negative phase with a weakened storm track from the western Pacific to the Arctic and a strengthened subtropical jet across the Pacific, reducing transport of ozone-rich air masses from mid-latitudes to the Arctic. Analysis of the observations at Zeppelinfjellet indicates a much stronger influence of WP pattern in the 2000s than 1990s. Consequently, the WP index may be used as a proxy to assess ODE frequencies and subsequent environmental impacts in future climate projections.

  11. Copepod communities, production and grazing in the Turkish Straits System and the adjacent northern Aegean Sea during spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zervoudaki, S.; Christou, E. D.; Assimakopoulou, G.; Örek, H.; Gucu, A. C.; Giannakourou, A.; Pitta, P.; Terbiyik, T.; Yϋcel, N.; Moutsopoulos, T.; Pagou, K.; Psarra, S.; Özsoy, E.; Papathanassiou, E.

    2011-06-01

    The Mediterranean and the Black Seas are connected through Bosphorus, Marmara Sea and Dardanelles (Turkish Straits System, TSS). In this study, we examined the spatial distribution of copepods and investigate their production and grazing. The aim was to understand the transfer of phytoplankton/microzooplankton production up the food chain in TSS and Aegean Sea during spring. The phytoplankton and microzooplankton biomass and production showed a clear decreasing trend from Bosphorus to the Aegean Sea, whereas copepod biomass did not reveal any distinct trend and only the number of copepod species increased from Bosphorus to the Aegean Sea. Production of copepods and egg production showed similar trends except for the Bosphorus, where production of copepods was very low due to the low copepod biomass in this area. In all areas, the copepod carbon demand was largely met by phytoplankton and microzooplankton production. However, only a low amount of primary production was consumed by copepods and production appeared to flow mostly through other pathways (microbial loop) and/or sediment on the bottom. The results of this study confirm the hypothesis that there is a substantial differentiation within pelagic food web structure and carbon flow from Bosphorus to the Aegean Sea.

  12. Writing siblings: Alice James and her brothers.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Anne Golomb

    2015-02-01

    This essay addresses the relationship of writing to embodiment, through representations of bodily sensation and fantasy in the journal of Alice James. It considers Alice James's writing in relation to her two writer brothers, William and Henry, and in light of their father's experiences of impairment and breakdown. PMID:25688678

  13. Studies for dimuon measurement with ALICE

    SciTech Connect

    Jouan, D.

    1995-07-15

    The idea of measuring dimuon in the ALICE detector is not new, since it already appeared in the Aachen Conference. In the meantime studies were aiming at the use of the two detectors of LHC p-p physics, CMS and ATLAS, already dedicated to dimuon measurement, for these same measurements in heavy ion collisions, whereas the detector dedicated to heavy ions physics at LHC, ALICE, was considering all the other observables. Recently, the interest for dimuon measurements in ALICE was renewed by demands from LHC committee, stiring the activities of a working group in the ALICE collaboration, also associated to a more recent move from new groups. In the following the author briefly describes the interest of measuring dimuons in heavy ion collisions, particularly in ALICE, then the experimental strategy and first estimates of the performances that could be reached with the proposed system.

  14. ALICE moves into warp drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Dénes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Grigore, A.; Simonetti, G.; Soós, C.; Telesca, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; von Haller, B.

    2012-12-01

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Since its successful start-up in 2010, the LHC has been performing outstandingly, providing to the experiments long periods of stable collisions and an integrated luminosity that greatly exceeds the planned targets. To fully explore these privileged conditions, we aim at maximizing the experiment's data taking productivity during stable collisions. We present in this paper the evolution of the online systems towards helping us understand reasons of inefficiency and address new requirements. This paper describes the features added to the ALICE Electronic Logbook (eLogbook) to allow the Run Coordination team to identify, prioritize, fix and follow causes of inefficiency in the experiment. Thorough monitoring of the data taking efficiency provides reports for the collaboration to portray its evolution and evaluate the measures (fixes and new features) taken to increase it. In particular, the eLogbook helps decision making by providing quantitative input, which can be used to better balance risks of changes in the production environment against potential gains in quantity and quality of physics data. It will also present the evolution of the Experiment Control System (ECS) to allow on-the-fly error recovery actions of the detector apparatus while limiting as much as possible the loss of integrated luminosity. The paper will conclude with a review of the ALICE efficiency so far and the future plans to improve its monitoring.

  15. Photon Physics Potential at ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Hisayuki

    2009-10-01

    The ALICE detector has been designed to study the strongly interacting matter created in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In heavy-ion collisions, it is very critical to measure thermal photons, which are known to carry the temperature information of hot created matter. The thermal photon measurements at RHIC are suggesting the systematic study with better photon detectors at LHC. Furthermore, the suppression of high pT hadrons has provided the first strong signature of hot and dense partonic matter created in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC. Therefore, the suppression behavior of various particle species, including photons, up to LHC energy, is a key observable for the study of the hot matter dynamics. The ALICE PHOton Spectrometer (PHOS) consists of 17920 PWO crystals and Avalanche Photo Diode (APD) covering a rapidity range of ±0.3 and an azimuthal range of 100^o. The fine segment structure and small Moliere radius allow to separate two photons from 0̂ decay at pT=30GeV/c with about 100% efficiency and at even higher pT with smaller efficiency. The decay photons from lower pT 0̂ is the largest background in measuring the thermal photons and can be tagged in a very efficient way with a good energy resolution (3%/√E(GeV)). The ALICE EMCAL consists of shashlik lead-scintillator sampling units covering a rapidity range of ±0.7 and an azimuthal range of 110^ o and sits in the opposite coverage azimuthally to PHOS. The jet measurements by EMCAL and other tracking detectors, especially when tagged by a direct photon in the opposite PHOS detector, represent a key probe for investigating jet quenching effects. In this presentation, physics potential with photon detectors at ALICE during the first physics run of LHC will be discussed. The construction and installation status of the photon detectors as well as their expected physics will be presented.

  16. The ALICE analysis train system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Markus; ALICE Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    In the ALICE experiment hundreds of users are analyzing big datasets on a Grid system. High throughput and short turn-around times are achieved by a centralized system called the LEGO trains. This system combines analysis from different users in so-called analysis trains which are then executed within the same Grid jobs thereby reducing the number of times the data needs to be read from the storage systems. The centralized trains improve the performance, the usability for users and the bookkeeping in comparison to single user analysis. The train system builds upon the already existing ALICE tools, i.e. the analysis framework as well as the Grid submission and monitoring infrastructure. The entry point to the train system is a web interface which is used to configure the analysis and the desired datasets as well as to test and submit the train. Several measures have been implemented to reduce the time a train needs to finish and to increase the CPU efficiency.

  17. Effect of Stocking Rate on Soil-Atmosphere CH4 Flux during Spring Freeze-Thaw Cycles in a Northern Desert Steppe, China

    PubMed Central

    Wilkes, Andreas; Jiang, Yuan-Yuan; Han, Guo-Dong

    2012-01-01

    Background Methane (CH4) uptake by steppe soils is affected by a range of specific factors and is a complex process. Increased stocking rate promotes steppe degradation, with unclear consequences for gas exchanges. To assess the effects of grazing management on CH4 uptake in desert steppes, we investigated soil-atmosphere CH4 exchange during the winter-spring transition period. Methodology/Main Finding The experiment was conducted at twelve grazing plots denoting four treatments defined along a grazing gradient with three replications: non-grazing (0 sheep/ha, NG), light grazing (0.75 sheep/ha, LG), moderate grazing (1.50 sheep/ha, MG) and heavy grazing (2.25 sheep/ha, HG). Using an automatic cavity ring-down spectrophotometer, we measured CH4 fluxes from March 1 to April 29 in 2010 and March 2 to April 27 in 2011. According to the status of soil freeze-thaw cycles (positive and negative soil temperatures occurred in alternation), the experiment was divided into periods I and II. Results indicate that mean CH4 uptake in period I (7.51 µg CH4–C m−2 h−1) was significantly lower than uptake in period II (83.07 µg CH4–C m−2 h−1). Averaged over 2 years, CH4 fluxes during the freeze-thaw period were −84.76 µg CH4–C m−2 h−1 (NG), −88.76 µg CH4–C m−2 h−1 (LG), −64.77 µg CH4–C m−2 h−1 (MG) and −28.80 µg CH4–C m−2 h−1 (HG). Conclusions/Significance CH4 uptake activity is affected by freeze-thaw cycles and stocking rates. CH4 uptake is correlated with the moisture content and temperature of soil. MG and HG decreases CH4 uptake while LG exerts a considerable positive impact on CH4 uptake during spring freeze-thaw cycles in the northern desert steppe in China. PMID:22590610

  18. Characterizing Recent Slip on the Kuikui Fault, a Link Between the Green Valley and Bartlett Springs Fault Zones, Wilson Valley, Northern California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienkaemper, J. J.; DeLong, S. B.; McPherson, R. C.; Mielke, J.; Avdievitch, N.; Pickering, A.; Lloyd, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Green Valley and Bartlett Springs faults (GVF-BSF) together form the third largest branch of the dextral San Andreas transform fault system in northern California. Wilson Valley lies at the center of a tectonic pull-apart basin formed in the 2.5-km stepover between the Hunting Creek fault (northernmost section of the GVF) and the Highway-20 section of the BSF. A major regional drainage, Cache Creek flows through this depression and has been offset ~6 km right-laterally by the GVF-BSF during the Quaternary. We recently discovered the Kuikui fault, a dextral-oblique slip fault within the stepover, using high-resolution imagery from LiDAR acquired by USGS in 2011 along major northern California fault zones (ARRA11_USGS, DOI: 10.5069/G9H70CRD, http://dx.doi.org/10.5069/G9H70CRD). The Kuikui fault is ~2-3 km in length and forms steep, well-preserved scarps up to ~2.5 m high. It has only subtle expression of dextral slip, so its ratio of dip slip to strike slip is uncertain. Any evidence of large paleoearthquakes in the Wilson Valley stepover might indicate rupture of either the GVF or the BSF or both together, and timing information could be used to correlate events with other paleoseismic sites on the fault system. Additionally, fault creep has been documented on both the Highway 20 and Hunting Creek fault sections, so that any fault offset on the Kuikui fault might also include some aseismic slip. Because wilderness regulations required manual excavation, several participants from USGS, HSU, other colleagues and volunteers together dug an 8-m long by ≤1 m deep trench by hand to expose faulting in thin layers of alluvium deposited across the Kuikui fault. The youngest, and currently active soil layer is vertically offset by a minimum of 7 cm on a single fault strand. A much broader fault zone suggests larger movement has occurred. This exposure did not allow us to discriminate whether slip occurred as creep or by dynamic rupture. Future additional exposures may

  19. Water-soluble dicarboxylic acids and ω-oxocarboxylic acids in size-segregated aerosols over northern Japan during spring: sources and formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Dhananjay Kumar; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Kobayashi, Minoru; Gowda, Divyavani

    2016-04-01

    Seven sets (AF01-AF07) of size-segregated aerosol (12-sizes) samples were collected using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) in Sapporo, Japan during the spring of 2001 to understand the sources and atmospheric processes of water-soluble organic aerosols in the outflow region of Asian dusts. The samples were analyzed for dicarboxylic acids (C2-C12) and ω-oxocarboxylic acids as well as inorganic ions. The molecular distribution of diacids showed the predominance of oxalic acid (C2) followed by malonic and succinic acids whereas ω-oxoacids showed the predominance of glyoxylic acid (ωC2) in size-segregated aerosols. SO42- and NH4+ are enriched in submicron mode whereas NO3- and Ca2+ are in supermicron mode. Most of diacids and ω-oxoacids are enriched in supermicron mode in the samples (AF01-AF03) influenced by the long-range transport of mineral dusts whereas enhanced presence in submicron mode was observed in other sample sets. The strong correlations of C2 with Ca2+ (r = 0.95-0.99) and NO3- (r = 0.96-0.98) in supermicron mode in the samples AF01-AF03 suggest the adsorption or production of C2 diacid via heterogeneous reaction on the surface of mineral dust during long-range atmospheric transport. The preferential enrichment of diacids and ω-oxoacids in mineral dust has important implications for the solubility and cloud nucleation properties of the dominant fraction of water-soluble organic aerosols. This study demonstrates that biofuel and biomass burning and mineral dust originated in East Asia are two major factors to control the size distribution of diacids and related compounds over northern Japan.

  20. Event shape engineering with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrin, A.

    2013-05-01

    The strong fluctuations in the initial energy density of heavy-ion collisions allow an efficient selection of events corresponding to a specific initial geometry. For such "shape engineered events", the elliptic flow coefficient, v2, of unidentified charged particles, pions and (anti-)protons in Pb-Pb collisions at sNN=2.76 TeV is measured by the ALICE collaboration. v2 obtained with the event plane method at mid-rapidity, |η|<0.8, is reported for different collision centralities as a function of transverse momentum, pT, out to pT=20 GeV/c. The measured v2 for the shape engineered events is significantly larger or smaller than the average which demonstrates the ability to experimentally select events with the desired shape of the initial spatial asymmetry.

  1. Spring Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    22 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dunes in the north polar region of Mars. In this scene, the dunes, and the plain on which the dunes reside, are at least in part covered by a bright carbon dioxide frost. Dark spots indicate areas where the frost has begun to change, either by subliming away to expose dark sand, changing to a coarser particle size, or both. The winds responsible for the formation of these dunes blew from the lower left (southwest) toward the upper right (northeast).

    Location near: 76.3oN, 261.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  2. Prospects for strangeness measurement in ALICE

    SciTech Connect

    Vernet, R.

    2008-09-15

    The study of strangeness production at LHC will bring significant information on the bulk chemical properties, its dynamics, and the hadronization mechanisms involved at these energies. The ALICE experiment will measure strange particles from topology (secondary vertices) and from resonance decays over a wide range in transverse momentum and shed light on this new QCD regime. These motivations will be presented as well as the identification performance of ALICE for strange hadrons.

  3. ALICE: The Quest for 'Primordial' Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Fabjan, C. W.

    2008-04-21

    ALICE - An LHC Ion Collider Experiment - is being prepared to study, in an optimized and dedicated approach, the physics of nuclear matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density. The LHC Ion programme is the logical sequel in the quest to study the novel form of matter, the Quark-Gluon Plasma, the form of matter believed to have existed in our Universe during the first microsecond after the Big Bang. The status of ALICE, its research programme and discovery potential are presented.

  4. Excess nitrogen in selected thermal and mineral springs of the Cascade Range in northern California, Oregon, and Washington: sedimentary or volcanic in origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariner, R. H.; Evans, W. C.; Presser, T. S.; White, L. D.

    2003-02-01

    Anomalous N 2/Ar values occur in many thermal springs and mineral springs, some volcanic fumaroles, and at least one acid-sulfate spring of the Cascade Range. Our data show that N 2/Ar values are as high as 300 in gas from some of the hot springs, as high as 1650 in gas from some of the mineral springs, and as high as 2400 in gas from the acid-sulfate spring on Mt. Shasta. In contrast, gas discharging from hot springs that contain nitrogen and argon solely of atmospheric origin typically exhibits N 2/Ar values of 40-80, depending on the spring temperature. If the excess nitrogen in the thermal and mineral springs is of sedimentary origin then the geothermal potential of the area must be small, but if the nitrogen is of volcanic origin then the geothermal potential must be very large. End-member excess nitrogen (δ 15N) is +5.3‰ for the thermal waters of the Oregon Cascades but is only about +1‰ for fumaroles on Mt. Hood and the acid-sulfate spring on Mt. Shasta. Dissolved nitrogen concentrations are highest for thermal springs associated with aquifers between 120 and 140°C. Chloride is the major anion in most of the nitrogen-rich springs of the Cascade Range, and N 2/Ar values generally increase as chloride concentrations increase. Chloride and excess nitrogen in the thermal waters of the Oregon Cascades probably originate in an early Tertiary marine formation that has been buried by the late Tertiary and Quaternary lava flows of the High Cascades. The widespread distribution of excess nitrogen that has been generated in low to moderate-temperature sedimentary environments is further proof of the restricted geothermal potential of the Cascade Range.

  5. The ALICE data acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Dénes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Grigore, A.; Kiss, T.; Simonetti, G.; Soós, C.; Telesca, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; von Haller, B.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we describe the design, the construction, the commissioning and the operation of the Data Acquisition (DAQ) and Experiment Control Systems (ECS) of the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The DAQ and the ECS are the systems used respectively for the acquisition of all physics data and for the overall control of the experiment. They are two computing systems made of hundreds of PCs and data storage units interconnected via two networks. The collection of experimental data from the detectors is performed by several hundreds of high-speed optical links. We describe in detail the design considerations for these systems handling the extreme data throughput resulting from central lead ions collisions at LHC energy. The implementation of the resulting requirements into hardware (custom optical links and commercial computing equipment), infrastructure (racks, cooling, power distribution, control room), and software led to many innovative solutions which are described together with a presentation of all the major components of the systems, as currently realized. We also report on the performance achieved during the first period of data taking (from 2009 to 2013) often exceeding those specified in the DAQ Technical Design Report.

  6. Changes of soil CO2 flux under different stocking rates during spring-thaw period in a northern desert steppe, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shiming; Zhang, Yujuan; Guo, Yupin; Zhai, Xiajie; Wilkes, Andreas; Han, Guodong; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Kesi; Zhou, Pei; Wang, Kun; Wang, Chengjie

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) plays an important role in the radiative balance of the earth's atmosphere. Most studies have primarily focused on the growing season. However, few reports are available on CO2 emissions in the Inner Mongolian desert steppe ecosystem during the spring thaw period. To assess the responses of soil-atmosphere CO2 exchange to different stocking rates in the desert steppe, we conducted this study during the winter-spring transition period. The experiment was conducted with four treatments defined along a grazing gradient of un-grazing (UG), light grazing (LG), moderate grazing (MG) and heavy grazing (HG) with three replications of each treatment in the desert steppe of Inner Mongolia during the spring thaw period in 2010 and 2011. Soil CO2 fluxes were measured using Picarro G1301 (an automatic cavity ring-down spectrophotometer) in twelve grazing areas. Our results indicate that mean CO2 emission during the spring thaw period was 8.23 mg CO2-C m-2 h-1. Average CO2 fluxes over the two years during the spring thaw period were 10.59 mg CO2-C m-2 h-1 (UG), 8.10 mg CO2-C m-2 h-1 (LG), 7.89 mg CO2-C m-2 h-1 (MG) and 6.35 mg CO2-C m-2 h-1 (HG). Cumulative CO2 emission amounted to 118.51 kg C ha-1 during the spring thaw period (March-April) on average over two years. In this study, grazing practice significantly reduced CO2 emission during the spring thaw period in the desert steppe. Our results are in accordance with other findings suggesting that emissions of CO2 are regulated significantly by soil temperature during the spring thaw period in this area. The significant empirical relationships provide a simple way to estimate regional amounts of CO2 emission from desert steppe during the spring thaw period.

  7. Archives Library Information Center (ALIC) Notes, 1989-1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALIC Notes, 1992

    1992-01-01

    The Archives Library Information Center (ALIC) within the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) collects printed material on archives, manuscripts, and records management. ALIC compiles a database of these materials, sources of archival services and supplies, and information on significant archival projects. "ALIC Notes" is a brief…

  8. The ALICE Central Trigger Processor (CTP) upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivda, M.; Alexandre, D.; Barnby, L. S.; Evans, D.; Jones, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Lietava, R.; Pospíšil, J.; Villalobos Baillie, O.

    2016-03-01

    The ALICE Central Trigger Processor (CTP) at the CERN LHC has been upgraded for LHC Run 2, to improve the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) data-taking efficiency and to improve the physics performance of ALICE. There is a new additional CTP interaction record sent using a new second Detector Data Link (DDL), a 2 GB DDR3 memory and an extension of functionality for classes. The CTP switch has been incorporated directly onto the new LM0 board. A design proposal for an ALICE CTP upgrade for LHC Run 3 is also presented. Part of the development is a low latency high bandwidth interface whose purpose is to minimize an overall trigger latency.

  9. 77 FR 21761 - Alice Falls Corporation, Alice Falls Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of License...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Alice Falls Corporation, Alice Falls Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of License, and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On February 23, 2012, Alice...

  10. Vertical cloud structure of Uranus from UKIRT/UIST observations and changes seen during Uranus’ northern spring equinox from 2006 to 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, P. G. J.; Teanby, N. A.; Davis, G. R.

    2009-09-01

    Long-slit spectroscopy observations of Uranus by the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope UIST instrument in 2006, 2007 and 2008 have been used to monitor the change in Uranus' vertical and latitudinal cloud structure through the planet's northern spring equinox in December 2007. The observed reflectance spectra in the Long J (1.17-1.31 μm) and H (1.45-1.65 μm) bands, obtained with the slit aligned along Uranus' central meridian, have been fitted with an optimal estimation retrieval model to determine the vertical cloud profile from 0.1 to 6-8 bar over a wide range of latitudes. Context images in a number of spectral bands were used to discriminate general zonal cloud structural changes from passing discrete clouds. From 2006 to 2007 reflection from deep clouds at pressures between 2 and 6-8 bar increased at all latitudes, although there is some systematic uncertainty in the absolute pressure levels resulting from extrapolating the methane coefficients of Irwin et al. (Irwin, P.G.J., Sromovsky, L.A., Strong, E.K., Sihra, K., Teanby, N.A., Bowles, N., Calcutt, S.B., Remedios, J.J. [2006] Icarus, 181, 309-319) at pressures greater than 1 bar, as noted by Tomasko et al. and Karkoschka and Tomasko (Tomasko, M.G., Bezard, B., Doose, L., Engel, S., Karkoschka, E. [2008] Planet. Space Sci., 56, 624-647; Karkoschka, E., Tomasko, M. [2009] Icarus). However, from 2007 to 2008 reflection from these clouds throughout the southern hemisphere and from both northern and southern mid-latitudes (30° N,S) diminished. As a result, the southern polar collar at 45°S has diminished in brightness relative to mid-latitudes, a similar collar at 45°N has become more prominent (e.g. Rages, K.A., Hammel, H.B., Sromovsky, L. [2007] Bull. Am. Astron. Soc., 39, 425; Sromovsky, L.A., Fry, P.M., Ahue, W.M., Hammel, H.B., de Pater, I., Rages, K.A., Showalter, M.R., van Dam, M.A. [2008] vol. 40 of AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts, pp. 488-489; Sromovsky, L.A., Ahue, W

  11. The Mathematics of "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Susan B.

    2005-01-01

    The mathematician Charles Dodgson delighted in creating mathematical puzzles for his friends and students. This article describes some items that he included in "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and explores ways of helping students become aware of the mathematics in the book. (Contains 6 figures.)

  12. Evaluation of LLNL-ALICE code contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.

    1994-03-24

    We summarize some of the areas of comparison with experimental data for which the ALICE code did poorly. We suggest some aspects which might be improved in the future. A crude accuracy factor is estimated as a predictive reliability based on the intercomparison exercise.

  13. Alice, Greenfoot, and Scratch--A Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utting, Ian; Cooper, Stephen; Kolling, Michael; Maloney, John; Resnick, Mitchel

    2010-01-01

    This article distills a discussion about the goals, mechanisms, and effects of three environments which aim to support the acquisition and development of computing concepts (problem solving and programming) in pre-University and non-technical students: Alice, Greenfoot, and Scratch. The conversation started in a special session on the topic at the…

  14. Alice Munro: "Wild Swans" and Things.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raabe, David

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how to analyze short stories by Alice Munro. Explains importance of metonymy in reading and teaching these stories. Suggests that the endings of Munro's stories should be examined closely. Concludes that teaching Munro's stories in this way brings students to a greater understanding of her stories. (PM)

  15. Strangeness detection in ALICE experiment at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Safarik, K.

    1995-07-15

    The authors present some parameters of the ALICE detector which concern the detection of strange particles. The results of a simulation for neutral strange particles and cascades, together with estimated rates are presented. They also briefly discuss the detection of charged K-mesons. Finally, they mention the possibility of open charm particle detection.

  16. Gender roles for Alice and Bob

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Philip

    2013-04-01

    As the head of a department that is striving to achieve bronze status under the Athena SWAN (Scientific Women's Academic Network) programme, I have become extremely sensitive to gender stereotyping, and I am afraid that the "Alice and Bob" image on the cover of your March issue on quantum frontiers set off some alarm bells.

  17. ALICE: Physics Performance Report, Volume II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALICE Collaboration; Alessandro, B.; Antinori, F.; Belikov, J. A.; Blume, C.; Dainese, A.; Foka, P.; Giubellino, P.; Hippolyte, B.; Kuhn, C.; Martínez, G.; Monteno, M.; Morsch, A.; Nayak, T. K.; Nystrand, J.; López Noriega, M.; Paic, G.; Pluta, J.; Ramello, L.; Revol, J.-P.; Safarík, K.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Scomparin, E.; Snellings, R.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vercellin, E.

    2006-09-01

    ALICE is a general-purpose heavy-ion experiment designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark gluon plasma in nucleus nucleus collisions at the LHC. It currently involves more than 900 physicists and senior engineers, from both the nuclear and high-energy physics sectors, from over 90 institutions in about 30 countries. The ALICE detector is designed to cope with the highest particle multiplicities above those anticipated for Pb Pb collisions (dNch/dy up to 8000) and it will be operational at the start-up of the LHC. In addition to heavy systems, the ALICE Collaboration will study collisions of lower-mass ions, which are a means of varying the energy density, and protons (both pp and pA), which primarily provide reference data for the nucleus nucleus collisions. In addition, the pp data will allow for a number of genuine pp physics studies. The detailed design of the different detector systems has been laid down in a number of Technical Design Reports issued between mid-1998 and the end of 2004. The experiment is currently under construction and will be ready for data taking with both proton and heavy-ion beams at the start-up of the LHC. Since the comprehensive information on detector and physics performance was last published in the ALICE Technical Proposal in 1996, the detector, as well as simulation, reconstruction and analysis software have undergone significant development. The Physics Performance Report (PPR) provides an updated and comprehensive summary of the performance of the various ALICE subsystems, including updates to the Technical Design Reports, as appropriate. The PPR is divided into two volumes. Volume I, published in 2004 (CERN/LHCC 2003-049, ALICE Collaboration 2004 J. Phys. G: Nucl. Part. Phys. 30 1517 1763), contains in four chapters a short theoretical overview and an extensive reference list concerning the physics topics of interest to ALICE, the experimental conditions at the LHC, a short summary and update of

  18. Effects of the spring snowmelt recession on abiotic and biotic conditions in northern Sierra Nevada CA rivers with varying flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarnell, S. M.; Peek, R.; Viers, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Recent research has discussed the importance of the spring snowmelt recession in montane environments for driving physical and biological stream processes and supporting the success of native riverine species adapted to its predictability, yet there have been no field-based studies that directly address the relationship between the snowmelt recession and stream ecology. There are a variety of studies that explore the relationship between the flow regime and an individual species, the flow regime and riparian habitat, and flow and sediment movement. However, there are few, if any, studies that attempt to delineate the relationship between recession flows and stream ecology or quantify key characteristics of the flow regime beyond determinations of minimum instream flows or peak magnitudes of geomorphic flows. Regulated flow management issues such as suitable ramping rates to transition from peak flows to baseflow or a suitable duration of flooding that provides the greatest habitat heterogeneity during the ecologically-sensitive spring season have not previously been addressed. In this study, we examined the geomorphic, hydraulic and riparian habitat in relation to aquatic biological diversity at six stream study sites across two basins with varying flow regime types: unimpaired, semi-impaired (regulated-bypass reaches), and fully impaired (regulated-peaking or regulated-augmented reaches). In two very different water year types (2011-wet, 2012-dry), we quantified the variability in the spring flow regime using flow metrics (e.g. daily recession rate, timing) and compared it to variability in abiotic stream conditions (e.g. diversity of hydraulic habitat, diversity of riparian habitat) and diversity of biotic conditions (e.g. algal abundance, EPT index). In addition, we analyzed the relationship between habitat heterogeneity and species diversity across flow regime types in both water years. Results indicate both flow regime and water year type contribute to the

  19. Alice and Bob in an expanding spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Helder; de Souza, Gustavo; Mansfield, Paul; Sampaio, Marcos

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the teleportation of a qubit between two observers Alice and Bob in an asymptotically flat Robertson-Walker expanding spacetime. We use scalar or fermionic field modes inside Alice's and Bob's ideal cavities and show the degradation of the teleportation quality, as measured by the fidelity, through a mechanism governed by spacetime expansion. This reduction is demonstrated to increase with the rapidity of the expansion and to be highly sensitive to the coupling of the field to spacetime curvature, becoming considerably stronger as it reduces from conformal to minimal. We explore a perturbative approach in the cosmological parameters to compute the Bogoliubov coefficients in order to evaluate and compare the fidelity degradation of fermionic and scalar fields.

  20. Upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, M.

    2015-03-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is studying heavy-ion collisions at the CERN LHC, with the aim of forming, under extreme conditions of temperature and energy density, a Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) and studying its properties. The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major upgrade of the experimental apparatus, planned for installation in the second long LHC shutdown in the years 2018-2019. A key element of the ALICE upgrade is the construction of a new, ultra-light, high-resolution Inner Tracking System (ITS) . The primary focus of the new ITS is on improving the performance for detection of heavy-flavour hadrons, and of thermal photons and low-mass di-electrons emitted by the QGP . With respect to the current detector, the new ITS will significantly enhance the determination of the distance of closest approach of a track to the primary vertex, the tracking efficiency at low transverse momenta, and the read-out rate capabilities. This will be achieved by seven concentric detector layers based on a 50 μm thick CMOS pixel sensor with a pixel pitch of about 30× 30 μm2. A key feature of the new ITS, which is optimized for high tracking accuracy at low transverse momenta, is the very low mass of the three innermost layers, which feature a material thickness of 0.3% X0 per layer. This contribution describes the design goals and layout of the new ALICE ITS, a summary of the R&D activities, with focus on the technical implementation of the main detector components, and the projected detector performance.

  1. The Silicon Pixel Detector for ALICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fabris, D.; Bombonati, C.; Dima, R.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Pepato, A.; Bohus, L. Sajo; Scarlassara, F.; Segato, G.; Shen, D.; Turrisi, R.; Viesti, G.; Anelli, G.; Boccardi, A.; Burns, M.; Campbell, M.; Ceresa, S.; Conrad, J.; Kluge, A.; Kral, M.

    2007-10-26

    The Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE experiment is made of position sensitive detectors which have to operate in a region where the track density may be as high as 50 tracks/cm{sup 2}. To handle such densities detectors with high precision and granularity are mandatory. The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD), the innermost part of the ITS, has been designed to provide tracking information close to primary interaction point. The assembly of the entire SPD has been completed.

  2. The ALICE Software Release Validation cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzano, D.; Krzewicki, M.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most important steps of software lifecycle is Quality Assurance: this process comprehends both automatic tests and manual reviews, and all of them must pass successfully before the software is approved for production. Some tests, such as source code static analysis, are executed on a single dedicated service: in High Energy Physics, a full simulation and reconstruction chain on a distributed computing environment, backed with a sample “golden” dataset, is also necessary for the quality sign off. The ALICE experiment uses dedicated and virtualized computing infrastructures for the Release Validation in order not to taint the production environment (i.e. CVMFS and the Grid) with non-validated software and validation jobs: the ALICE Release Validation cluster is a disposable virtual cluster appliance based on CernVM and the Virtual Analysis Facility, capable of deploying on demand, and with a single command, a dedicated virtual HTCondor cluster with an automatically scalable number of virtual workers on any cloud supporting the standard EC2 interface. Input and output data are externally stored on EOS, and a dedicated CVMFS service is used to provide the software to be validated. We will show how the Release Validation Cluster deployment and disposal are completely transparent for the Release Manager, who simply triggers the validation from the ALICE build system's web interface. CernVM 3, based entirely on CVMFS, permits to boot any snapshot of the operating system in time: we will show how this allows us to certify each ALICE software release for an exact CernVM snapshot, addressing the problem of Long Term Data Preservation by ensuring a consistent environment for software execution and data reprocessing in the future.

  3. Performance optimisations for distributed analysis in ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betev, L.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Grigoras, C.; Hristov, P.

    2014-06-01

    Performance is a critical issue in a production system accommodating hundreds of analysis users. Compared to a local session, distributed analysis is exposed to services and network latencies, remote data access and heterogeneous computing infrastructure, creating a more complex performance and efficiency optimization matrix. During the last 2 years, ALICE analysis shifted from a fast development phase to the more mature and stable code. At the same time, the frameworks and tools for deployment, monitoring and management of large productions have evolved considerably too. The ALICE Grid production system is currently used by a fair share of organized and individual user analysis, consuming up to 30% or the available resources and ranging from fully I/O-bound analysis code to CPU intensive correlations or resonances studies. While the intrinsic analysis performance is unlikely to improve by a large factor during the LHC long shutdown (LS1), the overall efficiency of the system has still to be improved by an important factor to satisfy the analysis needs. We have instrumented all analysis jobs with "sensors" collecting comprehensive monitoring information on the job running conditions and performance in order to identify bottlenecks in the data processing flow. This data are collected by the MonALISa-based ALICE Grid monitoring system and are used to steer and improve the job submission and management policy, to identify operational problems in real time and to perform automatic corrective actions. In parallel with an upgrade of our production system we are aiming for low level improvements related to data format, data management and merging of results to allow for a better performing ALICE analysis.

  4. Overview of anisotropic flow measurements from ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, You

    2016-05-01

    Anisotropic flow is an important observable to study the properties of the hot and dense matter, the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), created in heavy-ion collisions. Measurements of anisotropic flow for inclusive and identified charged hadrons are reported in Pb-Pb, p-Pb and pp collisions with the ALICE detector. The comparison of experimental measurements to various theoretical calculations are also presented in these proceedings.

  5. First Run II results from ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toia, Alberica

    2016-07-01

    The ALICE Collaboration is collecting data with both Minimum Bias and Muon triggers with pp collisions at √s = 13 TeV in the ongoing LHC Run II. An excellent performance of tracking and PID in the central barrel and in the muon spectrometer has been obtained. First results on the charged-particle pseudorapidity density and on identified particle transverse momentum spectra at √s = 13 TeV is presented.

  6. ALICE: Physics Performance Report, Volume I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALICE Collaboration; Carminati, F.; Foka, P.; Giubellino, P.; Morsch, A.; Paic, G.; Revol, J.-P.; Safarík, K.; Schutz, Y.; Wiedemann, U. A.

    2004-11-01

    ALICE is a general-purpose heavy-ion experiment designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC. It currently includes more than 900 physicists and senior engineers, from both nuclear and high-energy physics, from about 80 institutions in 28 countries. The experiment was approved in February 1997. The detailed design of the different detector systems has been laid down in a number of Technical Design Reports issued between mid-1998 and the end of 2001 and construction has started for most detectors. Since the last comprehensive information on detector and physics performance was published in the ALICE Technical Proposal in 1996, the detector as well as simulation, reconstruction and analysis software have undergone significant development. The Physics Performance Report (PPR) will give an updated and comprehensive summary of the current status and performance of the various ALICE subsystems, including updates to the Technical Design Reports, where appropriate, as well as a description of systems which have not been published in a Technical Design Report. The PPR will be published in two volumes. The current Volume I contains: a short theoretical overview and an extensive reference list concerning the physics topics of interest to ALICE, relevant experimental conditions at the LHC, a short summary and update of the subsystem designs, and a description of the offline framework and Monte Carlo generators. Volume II, which will be published separately, will contain detailed simulations of combined detector performance, event reconstruction, and analysis of a representative sample of relevant physics observables from global event characteristics to hard processes.

  7. Upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushpil, Svetlana; ALICE Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    ALICE detector was constructed to study the properties of hot and dense hadronic matter formed in relativistic nuclear collisions. During the second long LHC shutdown in 2019-2020, the collaboration plans to upgrade the current vertex detector, the Inner Tracking System (ITS), in order to increase the reconstruction accuracy of secondary vertices and to lower the threshold of particle transverse momentum measurement. The upgrade strategy of ITS is based on the application of new Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) designed in 0.18 μm CMOS technology. The 50 μm thick chip consists of a single silicon die incorporating a 0.18 μm high-resistivity silicon epitaxial layer (sensor active volume) and matrix of charge collection diodes (pixels) with readout electronics. Radiation hardness of the upgraded ITS is one of the crucial moments in the overall performance of the system. A wide set of MAPS structures with different read-out circuits was produced and is being studied by the ALICE collaboration to optimize the pixel sensor functionality. An overview of the ALICE ITS upgrade and the expected performance improvement will be presented together with selected results from a campaign that includes several irradiation and beam tests.

  8. Spring Tire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asnani, Vivake M.; Benzing, Jim; Kish, Jim C.

    2011-01-01

    The spring tire is made from helical springs, requires no air or rubber, and consumes nearly zero energy. The tire design provides greater traction in sandy and/or rocky soil, can operate in microgravity and under harsh conditions (vastly varying temperatures), and is non-pneumatic. Like any tire, the spring tire is approximately a toroidal-shaped object intended to be mounted on a transportation wheel. Its basic function is also similar to a traditional tire, in that the spring tire contours to the surface on which it is driven to facilitate traction, and to reduce the transmission of vibration to the vehicle. The essential difference between other tires and the spring tire is the use of helical springs to support and/or distribute load. They are coiled wires that deform elastically under load with little energy loss.

  9. Did the late spring frost in 2007 and 2011 affect tree-ring width and earlywood vessel size in Pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) in northern Poland?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchałka, Radosław; Koprowski, Marcin; Przybylak, Julia; Przybylak, Rajmund; Dąbrowski, Henryk P.

    2015-11-01

    Trees are sensitive to extreme weather and environmental conditions. This sensitivity is visible in tree-ring widths and cell structure. In our study, we hypothesized that the sudden frost noted at the beginning of May in both 2007 and 2011 affected cambial activity and, consequently, the number and size of vessels in the tree rings. It was decided to test this hypothesis after damage to leaves was observed. The applied response function model did not show any significant relationships between spring temperature and growth. However, this method uses average values for long periods and sometimes misses the short-term effects. This is why we decided to study each ring separately, comparing them with rings unaffected by the late frost. Our study showed that the short-term effect of sudden frost in late spring did not affect tree rings and selected cell parameters. The most likely reasons for this are (i) cambial activity producing the earlywood vessels before the occurrence of the observed leaf damage, (ii) the forest micro-climate protecting the trees from the harsh frost and (iii) the temperature decline being too short-lived an event to affect the oaks. On the other hand, the visible damage may be occasional and not affect cambium activity and tree vitality at all. We conclude that oak is well-adapted to this phenomenon.

  10. Did the late spring frost in 2007 and 2011 affect tree-ring width and earlywood vessel size in Pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) in northern Poland?

    PubMed

    Puchałka, Radosław; Koprowski, Marcin; Przybylak, Julia; Przybylak, Rajmund; Dąbrowski, Henryk P

    2016-08-01

    Trees are sensitive to extreme weather and environmental conditions. This sensitivity is visible in tree-ring widths and cell structure. In our study, we hypothesized that the sudden frost noted at the beginning of May in both 2007 and 2011 affected cambial activity and, consequently, the number and size of vessels in the tree rings. It was decided to test this hypothesis after damage to leaves was observed. The applied response function model did not show any significant relationships between spring temperature and growth. However, this method uses average values for long periods and sometimes misses the short-term effects. This is why we decided to study each ring separately, comparing them with rings unaffected by the late frost. Our study showed that the short-term effect of sudden frost in late spring did not affect tree rings and selected cell parameters. The most likely reasons for this are (i) cambial activity producing the earlywood vessels before the occurrence of the observed leaf damage, (ii) the forest micro-climate protecting the trees from the harsh frost and (iii) the temperature decline being too short-lived an event to affect the oaks. On the other hand, the visible damage may be occasional and not affect cambium activity and tree vitality at all. We conclude that oak is well-adapted to this phenomenon. PMID:26607274

  11. Did the late spring frost in 2007 and 2011 affect tree-ring width and earlywood vessel size in Pedunculate oak ( Quercus robur) in northern Poland?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchałka, Radosław; Koprowski, Marcin; Przybylak, Julia; Przybylak, Rajmund; Dąbrowski, Henryk P.

    2016-08-01

    Trees are sensitive to extreme weather and environmental conditions. This sensitivity is visible in tree-ring widths and cell structure. In our study, we hypothesized that the sudden frost noted at the beginning of May in both 2007 and 2011 affected cambial activity and, consequently, the number and size of vessels in the tree rings. It was decided to test this hypothesis after damage to leaves was observed. The applied response function model did not show any significant relationships between spring temperature and growth. However, this method uses average values for long periods and sometimes misses the short-term effects. This is why we decided to study each ring separately, comparing them with rings unaffected by the late frost. Our study showed that the short-term effect of sudden frost in late spring did not affect tree rings and selected cell parameters. The most likely reasons for this are (i) cambial activity producing the earlywood vessels before the occurrence of the observed leaf damage, (ii) the forest micro-climate protecting the trees from the harsh frost and (iii) the temperature decline being too short-lived an event to affect the oaks. On the other hand, the visible damage may be occasional and not affect cambium activity and tree vitality at all. We conclude that oak is well-adapted to this phenomenon.

  12. ALICE and The state of matter at LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Assembly and installation of ALICE, the LHC heavy ion experiment dedicated to the study of matter at extreme temperature and pressure, is nearing completion and the commissioning of the detector is well under way. A good time to look back, to the making of ALICE, and to look forward, to the first physics with proton and heavy ion beams.

  13. Using "Alice in Wonderland" to Teach Multiplication of Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Susan B.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how the story of Alice in Wonderland helps students understand the operation of multiplying by a rational number less than 1 and related aspects of ratio and proportion. Included with this article is a "How Tall Is Alice?" Worksheet. (Contains 1 table and 6 figures.)

  14. Status of the ALICE experiment at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera Corral, G.

    2008-11-13

    The Large Hadron Collider will provide soon, beams of protons and collisions at high energy to the experiments. ALICE stands for A Large Ion Collider Experiment. It is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. ALICE will be dedicated to the study of heavy ion collisions. The main goal of ALICE is the observation of the transition of ordinary matter into a plasma of quarks and gluons. ALICE consists of 16 systems of detection. Two of them were designed and constructed in Mexico: i) The V0A detector, located at 3.2 mts. from the interaction point and ii) The cosmic ray detector on the top of the magnet. After a quick review of the LHC and the ALICE experiment we will focus on the description of these systems.

  15. Particle identification in ALICE: a Bayesian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Albuquerque, D. S. D.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Balasubramanian, S.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Benacek, P.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Cabala, J.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, A. S.; Gonzalez, V.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grachov, O. A.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.

    2016-05-01

    We present a Bayesian approach to particle identification (PID) within the ALICE experiment. The aim is to more effectively combine the particle identification capabilities of its various detectors. After a brief explanation of the adopted methodology and formalism, the performance of the Bayesian PID approach for charged pions, kaons and protons in the central barrel of ALICE is studied. PID is performed via measurements of specific energy loss ( d E/d x) and time of flight. PID efficiencies and misidentification probabilities are extracted and compared with Monte Carlo simulations using high-purity samples of identified particles in the decay channels K0S → π-π+, φ→ K-K+, and Λ→ p π- in p-Pb collisions at √{s_{NN}}=5.02 TeV. In order to thoroughly assess the validity of the Bayesian approach, this methodology was used to obtain corrected pT spectra of pions, kaons, protons, and D0 mesons in pp collisions at √{s}=7 TeV. In all cases, the results using Bayesian PID were found to be consistent with previous measurements performed by ALICE using a standard PID approach. For the measurement of D0 → K-π+, it was found that a Bayesian PID approach gave a higher signal-to-background ratio and a similar or larger statistical significance when compared with standard PID selections, despite a reduced identification efficiency. Finally, we present an exploratory study of the measurement of Λc+ → p K-π+ in pp collisions at √{s}=7 TeV, using the Bayesian approach for the identification of its decay products.

  16. V0L detector at ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro, Ruben; Becerril, Ana; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Martinez-Davalos, Arnulfo; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo

    2003-04-01

    The V0 system is part of the FMD in the ALICE experiment. This system consist of two sub-detectors: V0L and V0R located on both sides of the collision vertex. The system must provide information about: minimum bias trigger and multiplicity. It also plays an important role at level 0 trigger. Therefore, besides the mechanical constrains, timing and good light collection are important issues in the design and construction of both sub-detectors. Mechanical construction and results of the beam test performed to V0L prototype, being built at the UNAM, are presented. Improvements and alternative designs will be discussed.

  17. Phoenix Robotic Arm connects with `Alice'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm comes into contact with a rock informally named 'Alice' near the 'Snow White' trench.

    This image was acquired by Phoenix's NASA's Surface Stereo Imager on July 13 during the 48th Martian day, or sol, since Phoenix landed.

    For scale, the width of the scoop at the end of the arm is about 8.5 centimeters (3.3 inches).

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. The ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALICE Collaboration; Aamodt, K.; Abrahantes Quintana, A.; Achenbach, R.; Acounis, S.; Adamová, D.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.; Agnese, F.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad, S.; Akindinov, A.; Akishin, P.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro, R.; Alfarone, G.; Alici, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Amend, W.; Andrei, C.; Andres, Y.; Andronic, A.; Anelli, G.; Anfreville, M.; Angelov, V.; Anzo, A.; Anson, C.; Anticić, T.; Antonenko, V.; Antonczyk, D.; Antinori, F.; Antinori, S.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Aprodu, V.; Arba, M.; Arcelli, S.; Argentieri, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Arefiev, A.; Arsene, I.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Awes, T. C.; Äysto, J.; Danish Azmi, M.; Bablock, S.; Badalà, A.; Badyal, S. K.; Baechler, J.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldit, A.; Bán, J.; Barbera, R.; Barberis, P.-L.; Barbet, J. M.; Barnäfoldi, G.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Bartos, D.; Basile, M.; Basmanov, V.; Bastid, N.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baudot, J.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I.; Becker, B.; Belikov, J.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belogianni, A.; Belyaev, S.; Benato, A.; Beney, J. L.; Benhabib, L.; Benotto, F.; Beolé, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdermann, E.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bernard, C.; Berny, R.; Berst, J. D.; Bertelsen, H.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Baskar, P.; Bhati, A.; Bianchi, N.; Bielčik, J.; Bielčiková, J.; Bimbot, L.; Blanchard, G.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Blyth, S.; Boccioli, M.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bombonati, C.; Bondila, M.; Bonnet, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Borel, H.; Borotto, F.; Borshchov, V.; Bortoli, Y.; Borysov, O.; Bose, S.; Bosisio, L.; Botje, M.; Böttger, S.; Bourdaud, G.; Bourrion, O.; Bouvier, S.; Braem, A.; Braun, M.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bravina, L.; Bregant, M.; Bruckner, G.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Brunasso, O.; Bruno, G. E.; Bucher, D.; Budilov, V.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Buncic, P.; Burns, M.; Burachas, S.; Busch, O.; Bushop, J.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calaon, F.; Caldogno, M.; Cali, I.; Camerini, P.; Campagnolo, R.; Campbell, M.; Cao, X.; Capitani, G. P.; Romeo, G. Cara; Cardenas-Montes, M.; Carduner, H.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Cariola, P.; Carminati, F.; Casado, J.; Casanova Diaz, A.; Caselle, M.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castor, J.; Catanescu, V.; Cattaruzza, E.; Cavazza, D.; Cerello, P.; Ceresa, S.; Černý, V.; Chambert, V.; Chapeland, S.; Charpy, A.; Charrier, D.; Chartoire, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chepurnov, V.; Chernenko, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chochula, P.; Chiavassa, E.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Choi, J.; Christakoglou, P.; Christiansen, P.; Christensen, C.; Chykalov, O. A.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli-Strolin, L.; Ciobanu, M.; Cindolo, F.; Cirstoiu, C.; Clausse, O.; Cleymans, J.; Cobanoglu, O.; Coffin, J.-P.; Coli, S.; Colla, A.; Colledani, C.; Combaret, C.; Combet, M.; Comets, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J.; Cormier, T.; Corsi, F.; Cortese, P.; Costa, F.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cuautle, E.; Cussonneau, J.; Dahlinger, M.; Dainese, A.; Dalsgaard, H. H.; Daniel, L.; Das, I.; Das, T.; Dash, A.; Da Silva, R.; Davenport, M.; Daues, H.; DeCaro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; DeCuveland, J.; DeFalco, A.; de Gaspari, M.; de Girolamo, P.; de Groot, J.; DeGruttola, D.; DeHaas, A.; DeMarco, N.; DePasquale, S.; DeRemigis, P.; de Vaux, D.; Decock, G.; Delagrange, H.; DelFranco, M.; Dellacasa, G.; Dell'Olio, C.; Dell'Olio, D.; Deloff, A.; Demanov, V.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; Derkach, D.; Devaux, A.; Di Bari, D.; Di Bartelomen, A.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dialinas, M.; Diaz, L.; Díaz Valdes, R.; Dietel, T.; Dima, R.; Ding, H.; Dinca, C.; Divià, R.; Dobretsov, V.; Dobrin, A.; Doenigus, B.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domínguez, I.; Dorn, M.; Drouet, S.; Dubey, A. E.; Ducroux, L.; Dumitrache, F.; Dumonteil, E.; Dupieux, P.; Duta, V.; Dutta Majumdar, A.; Dutta Majumdar, M.; Dyhre, Th; Efimov, L.; Efremov, A.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engster, C.; Enokizono, A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Evangelista, A.; Evans, D.; Evrard, S.; Fabjan, C. W.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Farano, R.; Fearick, R.; Fedorov, O.; Fekete, V.; Felea, D.; Feofilov, G.; Férnandez Téllez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Fichera, F.; Filchagin, S.; Filoni, E.; Finck, C.; Fini, R.; Fiore, E. M.; Flierl, D.; Floris, M.; Fodor, Z.; Foka, Y.; Fokin, S.; Force, P.; Formenti, F.; Fragiacomo, E.; Fragkiadakis, M.; Fraissard, D.; Franco, A.; Franco, M.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fratino, U.; Fresneau, S.; Frolov, A.; Fuchs, U.; Fujita, J.; Furget, C.; Furini, M.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J.-J.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadrat, S.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gaido, L.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Gallio, M.; Gandolfi, E.; Ganoti, P.; Ganti, M.; Garabatos, J.; Garcia Lopez, A.; Garizzo, L.; Gaudichet, L.; Gemme, R.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Giolu, G.; Giraudo, G.; Giubellino, P.; Glasow, R.; Glässel, P.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Gonzalez Gutierrez, C.; Gonzales-Trueba, L. H.; Gorbunov, S.; Gorbunov, Y.; Gos, H.; Gosset, J.; Gotovac, S.; Gottschlag, H.; Gottschalk, D.; Grabski, V.; Grassi, T.; Gray, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grebieszkow, K.; Gregory, C.; Grigoras, C.; Grion, N.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, C.; Grigoryan, S.; Grishuk, Y.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Grynyov, B.; Guarnaccia, C.; Guber, F.; Guerin, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, M.; Guichard, A.; Guida, M.; Guilloux, G.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, V.; Gustafsson, H.-A.; Gutbrod, H.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamar, G.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hansen, J. C.; Hardy, P.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Harris, J. W.; Hartig, M.; Harutyunyan, A.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Hasch, D.; Hasegan, D.; Hehner, J.; Heine, N.; Heinz, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herlant, S.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hetland, K.; Hille, P.; Hinke, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hoch, M.; Hoebbel, H.; Hoedlmoser, H.; Horaguchi, T.; Horner, M.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Hu, S.; Guo, C. Hu; Humanic, T.; Hurtado, A.; Hwang, D. S.; Ianigro, J. C.; Idzik, M.; Igolkin, S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Imhoff, M.; Innocenti, P. G.; Ionescu, E.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Insa, C.; Inuzuka, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jacobs, P.; Jacholkowski, A.; Jančurová, L.; Janik, R.; Jasper, M.; Jena, C.; Jirden, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jones, G. T.; Jorgensen, C.; Jouve, F.; Jovanović, P.; Junique, A.; Jusko, A.; Jung, H.; Jung, W.; Kadija, K.; Kamal, A.; Kamermans, R.; Kapusta, S.; Kaidalov, A.; Kakoyan, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kang, E.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplin, V.; Karadzhev, K.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Karpio, K.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Mohsin Khan, M.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kikola, D.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D.; Kim, D. S.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, H. N.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, S.; Kinson, J. B.; Kiprich, S. K.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, T.; Kiworra, V.; Klay, J.; Klein Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Klimov, A.; Klovning, A.; Kluge, A.; Kluit, R.; Kniege, S.; Kolevatov, R.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kornas, E.; Koshurnikov, E.; Kotov, I.; Kour, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Kozlov, K.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kraus, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krawutschke, T.; Krivda, M.; Kryshen, E.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugler, A.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, N.; Kumpumaeki, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. N.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kutovsky, M.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M.; Labbé, J.-C.; Lackner, F.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lafage, V.; La Rocca, P.; Lamont, M.; Lara, C.; Larsen, D. T.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzeroni, C.; LeBornec, Y.; LeBris, N.; LeGailliard, C.; Lebedev, V.; Lecoq, J.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. C.; Lefévre, F.; Legrand, I.; Lehmann, T.; Leistam, L.; Lenoir, P.; Lenti, V.; Leon, H.; Monzon, I. Leon; Lévai, P.; Li, Q.; Li, X.; Librizzi, F.; Lietava, R.; Lindegaard, N.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M.; Listratenko, O. M.; Littel, F.; Liu, Y.; Lo, J.; Lobanov, V.; Loginov, V.; López Noriega, M.; López-Ramírez, R.; López Torres, E.; Lorenzo, P. M.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, S.; Ludolphs, W.; Lunardon, M.; Luquin, L.; Lusso, S.; Lutz, J.-R.; Luvisetto, M.; Lyapin, V.; Maevskaya, A.; Magureanu, C.; Mahajan, A.; Majahan, S.; Mahmoud, T.; Mairani, A.; Mahapatra, D.; Makarov, A.; Makhlyueva, I.; Malek, M.; Malkiewicz, T.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manea, C.; Mangotra, L. K.; Maniero, D.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marcel, A.; Marchini, S.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marin, A.; Marin, J.-C.; Marras, D.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Martínez Garcia, G.; Martini, S.; Marzari Chiesa, A.; Marzocca, C.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masetti, M.; Maslov, N. I.; Masoni, A.; Massera, F.; Mast, M.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z. L.; Mayer, B.; Mazza, G.; Mazzaro, M. D.; Mazzoni, A.; Meddi, F.; Meleshko, E.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meneghini, S.; Meoni, M.; Mercado Perez, J.; Mereu, P.; Meunier, O.; Miake, Y.; Michalon, A.; Michinelli, R.; Miftakhov, N.; Mignone, M.; Mikhailov, K.; Milosevic, J.; Minaev, Y.; Minafra, F.; Mischke, A.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitsyn, V.; Mitu, C.; Mohanty, B.; Moisa, D.; Molnar, L.; Mondal, M.; Mondal, N.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Morando, M.; Morel, M.; Moretto, S.; Morhardt, Th; Morsch, A.; Moukhanova, T.; Mucchi, M.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Müller, H.; Müller, W.; Munoz, J.; Mura, D.; Musa, L.; Muraz, J. F.; Musso, A.; Nania, R.; Nandi, B.; Nappi, E.; Navach, F.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T.; Nazarenko, S.; Nazarov, G.; Nellen, L.; Nendaz, F.; Nianine, A.; Nicassio, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B.; Nitti, M.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noto, F.; Nouais, D.; Nyiri, A.; Nystrand, J.; Odyniec, G.; Oeschler, H.; Oinonen, M.; Oldenburg, M.; Oleks, I.; Olsen, E. K.; Onuchin, V.; Oppedisano, C.; Orsini, F.; Ortiz-Velázquez, A.; Oskamp, C.; Oskarsson, A.; Osmic, F.; Österman, L.; Otterlund, I.; Ovrebekk, G.; Oyama, K.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S.; Pal, S.; Pálla, G.; Palmeri, A.; Pancaldi, G.; Panse, R.; Pantaleo, A.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pastirčák, B.; Pastore, C.; Patarakin, O.; Paticchio, V.; Patimo, G.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pénichot, Y.; Pepato, A.; Pereira, H.; Peresunko, D.; Perez, C.; Perez Griffo, J.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Peters, A. J.; Petráček, V.; Petridis, A.; Petris, M.; Petrov, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Peyré, J.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pichot, P.; Piemonte, C.; Pikna, M.; Pilastrini, R.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pini, B.; Pinsky, L.; Pinto Morais, V.; Pismennaya, V.; Piuz, F.; Platt, R.; Ploskon, M.; Plumeri, S.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Podesta, P.; Poggio, F.; Poghosyan, M.; Poghosyan, T.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Polozov, P.; Polyakov, V.; Pommeresch, B.; Pompei, F.; Pop, A.; Popescu, S.; Posa, F.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Pouthas, J.; Prasad, S.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Prodan, L.; Prono, G.; Protsenko, M. A.; Pruneau, C. A.; Przybyla, A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Pulvirenti, A.; Punin, A.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Quartieri, J.; Quercigh, E.; Rachevskaya, I.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Radomski, S.; Radu, A.; Rak, J.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Rasmussen, O. B.; Rasson, J.; Razin, V.; Read, K.; Real, J.; Redlich, K.; Reichling, C.; Renard, C.; Renault, G.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Ricaud, H.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Rigalleau, L. M.; Riggi, F.; Riegler, W.; Rindel, E.; Riso, J.; Rivetti, A.; Rizzi, M.; Rizzi, V.; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M.; Røed, K.; Röhrich, D.; Román-López, S.; Romanato, M.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosinsky, P.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Rostchin, V.; Rotondo, F.; Roukoutakis, F.; Rousseau, S.; Roy, C.; Roy, D.; Roy, P.; Royer, L.; Rubin, G.; Rubio, A.; Rui, R.; Rusanov, I.; Russo, G.; Ruuskanen, V.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Saini, J.; Saiz, P.; Salur, S.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sann, H.; Santiard, J.-C.; Santo, R.; Santoro, R.; Sargsyan, G.; Saturnini, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Schackert, B.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schioler, T.; Schippers, J. D.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H.; Schneider, R.; Schossmaier, K.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Schyns, E.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Snow, H.; Sedykh, S.; Segato, G.; Sellitto, S.; Semeria, F.; Senyukov, S.; Seppänen, H.; Serci, S.; Serkin, L.; Serra, S.; Sesselmann, T.; Sevcenco, A.; Sgura, I.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharkov, E.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shileev, K.; Shukla, P.; Shurygin, A.; Shurygina, M.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddi, E.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Sigward, M. H.; Silenzi, A.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestri, R.; Simili, E.; Simion, V.; Simon, R.; Simonetti, L.; Singaraju, R.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B.; Sinha, T.; Siska, M.; Sitár, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, B.; Skowronski, P.; Slodkowski, M.; Smirnov, N.; Smykov, L.; Snellings, R.; Snoeys, W.; Soegaard, C.; Soerensen, J.; Sokolov, O.; Soldatov, A.; Soloviev, A.; Soltveit, H.; Soltz, R.; Sommer, W.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Soyk, D.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Stachel, J.; Staley, F.; Stan, I.; Stavinskiy, A.; Steckert, J.; Stefanini, G.; Stefanek, G.; Steinbeck, T.; Stelzer, H.; Stenlund, E.; Stocco, D.; Stockmeier, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolpovsky, P.; Strmeň, P.; Stutzmann, J. S.; Su, G.; Sugitate, T.; Šumbera, M.; Suire, C.; Susa, T.; Sushil Kumar, K.; Swoboda, D.; Symons, J.; Szarka, I.; Szostak, A.; Szuba, M.; Szymanski, P.; Tadel, M.; Tagridis, C.; Tan, L.; Tapia Takaki, D.; Taureg, H.; Tauro, A.; Tavlet, M.; Tejeda Munoz, G.; Thäder, J.; Tieulent, R.; Timmer, P.; Tolyhy, T.; Topilskaya, N.; Torcato de Matos, C.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Tosello, F.; Tournaire, A.; Traczyk, T.; Tröger, G.; Tromeur, W.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W.; Tsiledakis, G.; Tsilis, E.; Tsvetkov, A.; Turcato, M.; Turrisi, R.; Tuveri, M.; Tveter, T.; Tydesjo, H.; Tykarski, L.; Tywoniuk, K.; Ugolini, E.; Ullaland, K.; Urbán, J.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Usseglio, M.; Vacchi, A.; Vala, M.; Valiev, F.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Van Den Brink, A.; Van Eijndhoven, N.; Van Der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vannucci, L.; Vanzetto, S.; Vanuxem, J.-P.; Vargas, M. A.; Varma, R.; Vascotto, A.; Vasiliev, A.; Vassiliou, M.; Vasta, P.; Vechernin, V.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Verhoeven, W.; Veronese, F.; Vetlitskiy, I.; Vernet, R.; Victorov, V.; Vidak, L.; Viesti, G.; Vikhlyantsev, O.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y.; Vodopianov, A.; Volpe, G.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wabnitz, C.; Wagner, V.; Wallet, L.; Wan, R.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wheadon, R.; Weis, R.; Wen, Q.; Wessels, J.; Westergaard, J.; Wiechula, J.; Wiesenaecker, A.; Wikne, J.; Wilk, A.; Wilk, G.; Williams, C.; Willis, N.; Windelband, B.; Witt, R.; Woehri, H.; Wyllie, K.; Xu, C.; Yang, C.; Yang, H.; Yermia, F.; Yin, Z.; Yin, Z.; Ky, B. Yun; Yushmanov, I.; Yuting, B.; Zabrodin, E.; Zagato, S.; Zagreev, B.; Zaharia, P.; Zalite, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampolli, C.; Zanevskiy, Y.; Zarochentsev, A.; Zaudtke, O.; Závada, P.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zepeda, A.; Zeter, V.; Zgura, I.; Zhalov, M.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, S.; Zhu, G.; Zichichi, A.; Zinchenko, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zubarev, A.; Zucchini, A.; Zuffa, M.

    2008-08-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a general-purpose, heavy-ion detector at the CERN LHC which focuses on QCD, the strong-interaction sector of the Standard Model. It is designed to address the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at extreme values of energy density and temperature in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Besides running with Pb ions, the physics programme includes collisions with lighter ions, lower energy running and dedicated proton-nucleus runs. ALICE will also take data with proton beams at the top LHC energy to collect reference data for the heavy-ion programme and to address several QCD topics for which ALICE is complementary to the other LHC detectors. The ALICE detector has been built by a collaboration including currently over 1000 physicists and engineers from 105 Institutes in 30 countries. Its overall dimensions are 16 × 16 × 26 m3 with a total weight of approximately 10 000 t. The experiment consists of 18 different detector systems each with its own specific technology choice and design constraints, driven both by the physics requirements and the experimental conditions expected at LHC. The most stringent design constraint is to cope with the extreme particle multiplicity anticipated in central Pb-Pb collisions. The different subsystems were optimized to provide high-momentum resolution as well as excellent Particle Identification (PID) over a broad range in momentum, up to the highest multiplicities predicted for LHC. This will allow for comprehensive studies of hadrons, electrons, muons, and photons produced in the collision of heavy nuclei. Most detector systems are scheduled to be installed and ready for data taking by mid-2008 when the LHC is scheduled to start operation, with the exception of parts of the Photon Spectrometer (PHOS), Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) and Electro Magnetic Calorimeter (EMCal). These detectors will be completed for the high-luminosity ion run expected in 2010. This

  19. An analysis of fast photochemistry over high northern latitudes during spring and summer using in-situ observations from ARCTAS and TOPSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, J. R.; Crawford, J. H.; Brune, W.; Mao, J.; Ren, X.; Fried, A.; Anderson, B.; Apel, E.; Beaver, M.; Blake, D.; Chen, G.; Crounse, J.; Dibb, J.; Diskin, G.; Hall, S. R.; Huey, L. G.; Knapp, D.; Richter, D.; Riemer, D.; St. Clair, J.; Ullmann, K.; Walega, J.; Weibring, P.; Weinheimer, A.; Wennberg, P.; Wisthaler, A.

    2012-08-01

    Observations of chemical constituents and meteorological quantities obtained during the two Arctic phases of the airborne campaign ARCTAS (Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites) are analyzed using an observationally constrained steady state box model. Measurements of OH and HO2 from the Penn State ATHOS instrument are compared to model predictions. Forty percent of OH measurements below 2 km are at the limit of detection during the spring phase (ARCTAS-A). While the median observed-to-calculated ratio is near one, both the scatter of observations and the model uncertainty for OH are at the magnitude of ambient values. During the summer phase (ARCTAS-B), model predictions of OH are biased low relative to observations and demonstrate a high sensitivity to the level of uncertainty in NO observations. Predictions of HO2 using observed CH2O and H2O2 as model constraints are up to a factor of two larger than observed. A temperature-dependent terminal loss rate of HO2 to aerosol recently proposed in the literature is shown to be insufficient to reconcile these differences. A comparison of ARCTAS-A to the high latitude springtime portion of the 2000 TOPSE campaign (Tropospheric Ozone Production about the Spring Equinox) shows similar meteorological and chemical environments with the exception of peroxides; observations of H2O2 during ARCTAS-A were 2.5 to 3 times larger than those during TOPSE. The cause of this difference in peroxides remains unresolved and has important implications for the Arctic HOx budget. Unconstrained model predictions for both phases indicate photochemistry alone is unable to simultaneously sustain observed levels of CH2O and H2O2; however when the model is constrained with observed CH2O, H2O2 predictions from a range of rainout parameterizations bracket its observations. A mechanism suitable to explain observed concentrations of CH2O is uncertain. Free tropospheric observations of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO

  20. An analysis of fast photochemistry over high northern latitudes during spring and summer using in-situ observations from ARCTAS and TOPSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, J. R.; Crawford, J. H.; Brune, W.; Mao, J.; Ren, X.; Fried, A.; Anderson, B.; Apel, E.; Beaver, M.; Blake, D.; Chen, G.; Crounse, J.; Dibb, J.; Diskin, G.; Hall, S. R.; Huey, L. G.; Knapp, D.; Richter, D.; Riemer, D.; St. Clair, J.; Ullmann, K.; Walega, J.; Weibring, P.; Weinheimer, A.; Wennberg, P.; Wisthaler, A.

    2012-04-01

    Observations of chemical constituents and meteorological quantities obtained during the two Arctic phases of the airborne campaign ARCTAS (Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites) are analyzed using an observationally constrained steady state box model. Measurements of OH and HO2 from the Penn State ATHOS instrument are compared to model predictions. Forty percent of OH measurements below 2 km are at the limit of detection during the spring phase (ARCTAS-A). While the median observed-to-calculated ratio is near one, both the scatter of observations and the model uncertainty for OH are at the magnitude of ambient values. During the summer phase (ARCTAS-B), model predictions of OH are biased low relative to observations and demonstrate a high sensitivity to the level of uncertainty in NO observations. Predictions of HO2 using observed CH2O and H2O2 as model constraints are up to a factor of two larger than observed. A temperature-dependent terminal loss rate of HO2 to aerosol recently proposed in the literature is shown to be insufficient to reconcile these differences. A comparison of ARCTAS-A to the high latitude springtime portion of the 2000 TOPSE campaign (Tropospheric Ozone Production about the Spring Equinox) shows similar meteorological and chemical environments with the exception of peroxides; observations of H2O2 during ARCTAS-A were 2.5 to 3 times larger than those during TOPSE. The cause of this difference in peroxides remains unresolved and has important implications for the Arctic HOx budget. Unconstrained model predictions for both phases indicate photochemistry alone is unable to simultaneously sustain observed levels of CH2O and H2O2; however when the model is constrained with observed CH2O, H2O2 predictions from a range of rainout parameterizations bracket its observations. A mechanism suitable to explain observed concentrations of CH2O is uncertain. Free tropospheric observations of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO

  1. Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study: Northern Basin and Range Province, Leach Hot Springs Area, Pershing County, Nevada. Final report, April 1979-December 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    A Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study was conducted in the Leach Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area of Pershing County, Nevada. The case study included the drilling of twenty-three temperature gradient wells, a magnetotelluric survey, seismic data acquisition and processing, and the drilling of one exploratory well. Existing data from prior investigations, which included water geochemistry, gravity, photogeologic reports and a hydrothermal alteration study, was also provided. The exploratory well was drilled to total depth of 8565' with no significant mud losses or other drilling problems. A maximum temperature of 260/sup 0/F was recorded at total depth. The relatively low temperature and the lack of permeability (as shown by absence of mud loss) indicated that a current, economic geothermal resource had not been located, and the well was subsequently plugged and abandoned. However, the type and extent of rock alteration found implied that an extensive hot water system had existed in this area at an earlier time. This report is a synopsis of the case study activities and the data obtained from these activities.

  2. Temporal variation and stoichiometric ratios of organic matter remineralization in bottom waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico during late spring and summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jianhong; Cai, Wei-Jun; Hu, Xinping; Huang, Wei-Jen; Lohrenz, Steven E.; Gundersen, Kjell

    2015-12-01

    An improved extended optimum multiparameter (eOMP) analysis was applied to hydrographic (temperature and salinity), and water chemistry data, including dissolved oxygen (O2), nutrients (nitrate plus nitrite, phosphate, and silicate), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and total alkalinity (TAlk) data collected during late spring and summer from 2006 to 2012 in bottom waters off the Louisiana coast, to explore the dynamics and stoichiometry of DIC production during the development and maintenance of summer hypoxia. Our analysis demonstrated that DIC in bottom water was relatively low from April to June, but increased significantly in July, peaked in August, and dropped slightly in September. Furthermore, DIC production resulted from both aerobic organic carbon (OC) respiration and denitrification, as well as substantial loss due to vertical mixing with surface water. The average summer gross OC respiration rate was estimated to be 0.19 g C m-2 d-1, with the highest values occurring in late summer when hypoxic conditions dominated. We also found that Corg/N/P/-O2 remineralization ratios for aerobic respiration were generally consistent with the classic Redfield ratio (106/16/1/138) except individual C/N and C/P ratios were slightly lower, indicating that marine OC was the major source of the DIC production in the bottom water. This study quantified the role of temporal bottom-water microbial respiration to seasonal DIC dynamics and provided a means for studying the stoichiometry of biogeochemical processes in coastal waters.

  3. Revealing the Biodiversity in Chironomidae (Diptera): Results From an Emergence Trap Study of a Ravine Spring-run in Northern Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, B. A.; Rasmussen, A. K.; Pescador, M. L.

    2005-05-01

    Research for this project was conducted as part of a larger scale investigation of the aquatic insect fauna of a Florida spring-run ravine system that focused especially on stonefly and caddisfly taxa. The present research focused largely on documenting chironomid midge species diversity, emergence phenology, and overall composition by utilizing repeated emergence trap sampling at a single site within a first order, forested ravine stream in the Florida panhandle area. The approximate two year survey revealed a rich and distinctive chironomid fauna, with a variety of feeding types and microhabitat specific taxa. Many of the study species were considered to be common and widespread; however, several species and two genera were new records for the state. Several undescribed species were also noted. Emergence occurred in all months but with greatest densities generally recorded from December through March of the second year. The single location examined to date on this ravine stream ranks near the upper range of chironomid species richness reported on a world-wide basis for first order lotic systems. Other aspects of composition and apparent community patterns, was well as the importance and significance of first order stream biodiversity, are examined and discussed.

  4. Registration of 'Rollag' spring wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) (caused primarily by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe) is a disease that annually threatens wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown in the northern plains of the United States. Resistance to this disease is a high priority trait in the University of Minnesota’s spring wheat breedi...

  5. MAPS development for the ALICE ITS upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, P.; Aglieri, G.; Cavicchioli, C.; Chalmet, P. L.; Chanlek, N.; Collu, A.; Gao, C.; Hillemanns, H.; Junique, A.; Kofarago, M.; Keil, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.; Lattuca, A.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Marras, D.; Mager, M.; Martinengo, P.; Mazza, G.; Mugnier, H.; Musa, L.; Puggioni, C.; Rousset, J.; Reidt, F.; Riedler, P.; Snoeys, W.; Siddhanta, S.; Usai, G.; van Hoorne, J. W.; Yi, J.

    2015-03-01

    Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) offer the possibility to build pixel detectors and tracking layers with high spatial resolution and low material budget in commercial CMOS processes. Significant progress has been made in the field of MAPS in recent years, and they are now considered for the upgrades of the LHC experiments. This contribution will focus on MAPS detectors developed for the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS) upgrade and manufactured in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS imaging sensor process on wafers with a high resistivity epitaxial layer. Several sensor chip prototypes have been developed and produced to optimise both charge collection and readout circuitry. The chips have been characterised using electrical measurements, radioactive sources and particle beams. The tests indicate that the sensors satisfy the ALICE requirements and first prototypes with the final size of 1.5 × 3 cm2 have been produced in the first half of 2014. This contribution summarises the characterisation measurements and presents first results from the full-scale chips.

  6. Readout of the upgraded ALICE-ITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepankiewicz, A.

    2016-07-01

    The ALICE experiment will undergo a major upgrade during the second long shutdown of the CERN LHC. As part of this program, the present Inner Tracking System (ITS), which employs different layers of hybrid pixels, silicon drift and strip detectors, will be replaced by a completely new tracker composed of seven layers of monolithic active pixel sensors. The upgraded ITS will have more than twelve billion pixels in total, producing 300 Gbit/s of data when tracking 50 kHz Pb-Pb events. Two families of pixel chips realized with the TowerJazz CMOS imaging process have been developed as candidate sensors: the ALPIDE, which uses a proprietary readout and sparsification mechanism and the MISTRAL-O, based on a proven rolling shutter architecture. Both chips can operate in continuous mode, with the ALPIDE also supporting triggered operations. As the communication IP blocks are shared among the two chip families, it has been possible to develop a common Readout Electronics. All the sensor components (analog stages, state machines, buffers, FIFOs, etc.) have been modelled in a system level simulation, which has been extensively used to optimize both the sensor and the whole readout chain design in an iterative process. This contribution covers the progress of the R&D efforts and the overall expected performance of the ALICE-ITS readout system.

  7. The ALICE Glance Shift Accounting Management System (SAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins Silva, H.; Abreu Da Silva, I.; Ronchetti, F.; Telesca, A.; Maidantchik, C.

    2015-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is an experiment at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider) studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma. The experiment operation requires a 24 hours a day and 7 days a week shift crew at the experimental site, composed by the ALICE collaboration members. Shift duties are calculated for each institute according to their correlated members. In order to ensure the full coverage of the experiment operation as well as its good quality, the ALICE Shift Accounting Management System (SAMS) is used to manage the shift bookings as well as the needed training. ALICE SAMS is the result of a joint effort between the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) and the ALICE Collaboration. The Glance technology, developed by the UFRJ and the ATLAS experiment, sits at the basis of the system as an intermediate layer isolating the particularities of the databases. In this paper, we describe the ALICE SAMS development process and functionalities. The database has been modelled according to the collaboration needs and is fully integrated with the ALICE Collaboration repository to access members information and respectively roles and activities. Run, period and training coordinators can manage their subsystem operation and ensure an efficient personnel management. Members of the ALICE collaboration can book shifts and on-call according to pre-defined rights. ALICE SAMS features a user profile containing all the statistics and user contact information as well as the Institutes profile. Both the user and institute profiles are public (within the scope of the collaboration) and show the credit balance in real time. A shift calendar allows the Run Coordinator to plan data taking periods in terms of which subsystems shifts are enabled or disabled and on-call responsible people and slots. An overview display presents the shift crew present in the control room and allows the Run Coordination team to confirm the presence

  8. Controls Interfaces for Two ALICE Subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomen, Robert

    2007-10-01

    Software for the control of a laser alignment system for the Inner Tacking System (ITS) and for the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMC) was developed for the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) at CERN. The interfaces for both subsystems use the CERN-standard hardware controls system PVSS (Prozessvisualisierungs- und Steuerungs-System). Software for the ITS has been created to measure the relative alignment of the ITS with the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) so to ensure accurate particle tracking. The ITS alignment system locates laser images in four cameras. The EMC requires several subsystems to be running in order to operate properly. Software has been created and tested for the detector's high and low voltage systems, and temperature monitoring hardware. The ITS and EMC software specifications and design requirements are presented and their performance is analyzed.

  9. Jet measurements by ALICE at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultanov, Rishat

    2015-12-01

    Jets are collimated sprays of particles originating from fragmentation of high energy partons produced in a hard collision. They are an important diagnostic tool in studies of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). The modification of the jet fragmentation pattern and its structure is a signature for the influence of hot and dense matter on the parton fragmentation process. Jet measurements in proton-proton collisions provide a baseline for similar measurements in heavy-ion collisions, while studies in proton-nucleus system allow to estimate cold nuclear matter effects. Here we present jet studies in different colliding systems (p-p, p-Pb, Pb-Pb) performed by the ALICE collaboration at LHC energies. Results on jet spectra, cross sections, nuclear modification factors, jet structure and other kinematic observables will be presented.

  10. Jet measurements by ALICE at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Sultanov, Rishat; Collaboration: ALICE Collaboration

    2015-12-15

    Jets are collimated sprays of particles originating from fragmentation of high energy partons produced in a hard collision. They are an important diagnostic tool in studies of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). The modification of the jet fragmentation pattern and its structure is a signature for the influence of hot and dense matter on the parton fragmentation process. Jet measurements in proton-proton collisions provide a baseline for similar measurements in heavy-ion collisions, while studies in proton-nucleus system allow to estimate cold nuclear matter effects. Here we present jet studies in different colliding systems (p–p, p–Pb, Pb–Pb) performed by the ALICE collaboration at LHC energies. Results on jet spectra, cross sections, nuclear modification factors, jet structure and other kinematic observables will be presented.

  11. External access to ALICE controls conditions data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadlovský, J.; Jadlovská, A.; Sarnovský, J.; Jajčišin, Š.; Čopík, M.; Jadlovská, S.; Papcun, P.; Bielek, R.; Čerkala, J.; Kopčík, M.; Chochula, P.; Augustinus, A.

    2014-06-01

    ALICE Controls data produced by commercial SCADA system WINCCOA is stored in ORACLE database on the private experiment network. The SCADA system allows for basic access and processing of the historical data. More advanced analysis requires tools like ROOT and needs therefore a separate access method to the archives. The present scenario expects that detector experts create simple WINCCOA scripts, which retrieves and stores data in a form usable for further studies. This relatively simple procedure generates a lot of administrative overhead - users have to request the data, experts needed to run the script, the results have to be exported outside of the experiment network. The new mechanism profits from database replica, which is running on the CERN campus network. Access to this database is not restricted and there is no risk of generating a heavy load affecting the operation of the experiment. The developed tools presented in this paper allow for access to this data. The users can use web-based tools to generate the requests, consisting of the data identifiers and period of time of interest. The administrators maintain full control over the data - an authorization and authentication mechanism helps to assign privileges to selected users and restrict access to certain groups of data. Advanced caching mechanism allows the user to profit from the presence of already processed data sets. This feature significantly reduces the time required for debugging as the retrieval of raw data can last tens of minutes. A highly configurable client allows for information retrieval bypassing the interactive interface. This method is for example used by ALICE Offline to extract operational conditions after a run is completed. Last but not least, the software can be easily adopted to any underlying database structure and is therefore not limited to WINCCOA.

  12. The ALICE DAQ infoLogger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeland, S.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Dénes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Grigore, A.; Ionita, C.; Delort, C.; Simonetti, G.; Soós, C.; Telesca, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Von Haller, B.; Alice Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a heavy-ion experiment studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The ALICE DAQ (Data Acquisition System) is based on a large farm of commodity hardware consisting of more than 600 devices (Linux PCs, storage, network switches). The DAQ reads the data transferred from the detectors through 500 dedicated optical links at an aggregated and sustained rate of up to 10 Gigabytes per second and stores at up to 2.5 Gigabytes per second. The infoLogger is the log system which collects centrally the messages issued by the thousands of processes running on the DAQ machines. It allows to report errors on the fly, and to keep a trace of runtime execution for later investigation. More than 500000 messages are stored every day in a MySQL database, in a structured table keeping track for each message of 16 indexing fields (e.g. time, host, user, ...). The total amount of logs for 2012 exceeds 75GB of data and 150 million rows. We present in this paper the architecture and implementation of this distributed logging system, consisting of a client programming API, local data collector processes, a central server, and interactive human interfaces. We review the operational experience during the 2012 run, in particular the actions taken to ensure shifters receive manageable and relevant content from the main log stream. Finally, we present the performance of this log system, and future evolutions.

  13. Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Ate There

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Gordon T.

    2002-05-01

    In the book Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There by Lewis Carroll, Alice (of Alice-in-Wonderland fame) walks through a mirror into a mirror-image world. Assuming that she is not changed by this transition, her enzymes are still only capable of processing molecules of the handedness of her native world. In short, she has a problem that will severely curtail the duration of her stay because her body cannot make use of most of the calorie-containing molecules that would exist naturally in the mirror-image world. So the question is, what can Alice eat in the mirror-image world that provides nutritional value to her?

    Featured on the Cover

  14. Performance of the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alice Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    ALICE is the heavy-ion experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The experiment continuously took data during the first physics campaign of the machine from fall 2009 until early 2013, using proton and lead-ion beams. In this paper we describe the running environment and the data handling procedures, and discuss the performance of the ALICE detectors and analysis methods for various physics observables.

  15. Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands: Reconnaissance geological observations during and after the volcanic crisis of spring 1990, and monitoring prior to the May 2003 eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowland, S.K.; Lockwood, J.P.; Trusdell, F.A.; Moore, R.B.; Sako, M.K.; Koyanagi, R.Y.; Kojima, G.

    2005-01-01

    samples, and set up a geophysical monitoring network. Results at this time were inconclusive with respect to determining whether the activity was anomalous. Water in some of the geothermal pits within the pit crater was boiling, and pH values as low as 0.7 were recorded in the field. An electronic distance measurement (EDM) network was installed, and over a ???1-week period, up to 9 cm of extension occurred across some lines but not others. Seismicity was characterized by intermittent local earthquakes but no sustained swarms or tremor. A brief visit in June 1990 revealed that the shallow lake near the boiling pits was gone, but activity in the pits themselves was similar to that of April 1990. Only minor extension had occurred along a single EDM line since the previous visit, and no earthquakes >M2.5 occurred during the visit. Subsequent 1- to 2-day visits occurred in October 1990, May 1992, May 1994, and June 2001. Activity within the geothermal pits was relatively constant during every visit, although during this 11-year period the level of the water in each pit decreased. In June 2001, a ???50-m-wide region of mud pots and steaming ground in the central part of the geothermal area had developed. No geologic evidence, however, suggested that an eruption would occur <2 years afterward. Most of the EDM lines showed slight extension between late 1990 and 1992, followed by very gradual contraction from 1992 to 2001. A more extensive seismic-monitoring system was installed on the Northern Mariana Islands during these visits, and it recorded a small seismic swarm at Anatahan from May to July 1993. The telemetry component of the seismic equipment broke prior to 2001 and had not been repaired by the time of the May 2003 eruption, so no precursory seismic data were recorded to indicate pre-eruption unrest. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Commissioning of the ALICE data acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anticic, T.; Barroso, V.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Cobanoglu, O.; Dénes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Kiss, T.; Makhlyueva, I.; Ozok, F.; Roukoutakis, F.; Schossmaier, K.; Soós, C.; Vyvre, P. V.; Vergara, S.

    2008-07-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A flexible, large bandwidth Data Acquisition System (DAQ) has been designed and deployed to collect sufficient statistics in the short running time foreseen per year for heavy ions and to accommodate very different requirements originated from the 18 sub-detectors. The Data Acquisition and Test Environment (DATE) is the software framework handling the data from the detector electronics up to the mass storage. This paper reviews the DAQ software and hardware architecture, including the latest features of the final design, such as the handling of the numerous calibration procedures in a common framework. We also discuss the large scale tests conducted on the real hardware to assess the standalone DAQ performances, its interfaces with the other online systems and the extensive commissioning performed in order to be ready for cosmics data taking scheduled to start in November 2007. The test protocols followed to integrate and validate each sub-detector with DAQ and Trigger hardware synchronized by the Experiment Control System are described. Finally, we give an overview of the experiment logbook, and some operational aspects of the deployment of our computing facilities. The implementation of a Transient Data Storage able to cope with the 1.25 GB/s recorded by the event-building machines and the data quality monitoring framework are covered in separate papers.

  17. Hierarchical trigger of the ALICE calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Hans; Awes, Terry C.; Novitzky, Norbert; Kral, Jiri; Rak, Jan; Schambach, Jo; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Dong; Zhou, Daicui

    2010-05-01

    The trigger of the ALICE electromagnetic calorimeters is implemented in 2 hierarchically connected layers of electronics. In the lower layer, level-0 algorithms search shower energy above threshold in locally confined Trigger Region Units (TRU). The top layer is implemented as a single, global trigger unit that receives the trigger data from all TRUs as input to the level-1 algorithm. This architecture was first developed for the PHOS high pT photon trigger before it was adopted by EMCal also for the jet trigger. TRU units digitize up to 112 analogue input signals from the Front End Electronics (FEE) and concentrate their digital stream in a single FPGA. A charge and time summing algorithm is combined with a peakfinder that suppresses spurious noise and is precise to single LHC bunches. With a peak-to-peak noise level of 150 MeV the linear dynamic range above threshold spans from MIP energies at 215 up to 50 GeV. Local level-0 decisions take less than 600 ns after LHC collisions, upon which all TRUs transfer their level-0 trigger data to the upstream global trigger module which searches within the remaining level-1 latency for high pT gamma showers (PHOS) and/or for Jet cone areas (EMCaL).

  18. ALICE tomography section: measurements and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibison, M. G.; Hock, K. M.; Holder, D. J.; Muratori, B. D.; Wolski, A.

    2012-04-01

    The ALICE tomography section at Daresbury is a diagnostic setup in the injection line of EMMA, the world's first non-scaling FFAG accelerator. We present our measurements and analysis of the transverse emittance, Twiss parameters and phase space distribution of the electron beam that is injected into EMMA. The measurements are carried out at 12 MeV, for bunch charges from 20 to 80 pC. Quadrupole scans and tomography are used. The results show that space charge effect does not change the beam emittance significantly over the length of the tomography section. Starting from projections of the beam images, the quadrupole scan technique can be applied to give the emittance and Twiss parameters. The same projections can be processed using tomography to give the phase space distribution. A careful treatment of the background noise is required to produce consistent emittances between quadrupole scans at different locations. Extending this in a natural way to tomography, we are also able to remove most of the the streaking artefacts from reconstructions obtained using the Filtered Back Projection technique.

  19. The Anatomy of A.L.I.C.E.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Richard S.

    This paper is a technical presentation of Artificial Linguistic Internet Computer Entity (A.L.I.C.E.) and Artificial Intelligence Markup Language (AIML), set in context by historical and philosophical ruminations on human consciousness. A.L.I.C.E., the first AIML-based personality program, won the Loebner Prize as "the most human computer" at the annual Turing Test contests in 2000, 2001, and 2004. The program, and the organization that develops it, is a product of the world of free software. More than 500 volunteers from around the world have contributed to her development. This paper describes the history of A.L.I.C.E. and AIML-free software since 1995, noting that the theme and strategy of deception and pretense upon which AIML is based can be traced through the history of Artificial Intelligence research. This paper goes on to show how to use AIML to create robot personalities like A.L.I.C.E. that pretend to be intelligent and selfaware. The paper winds up with a survey of some of the philosophical literature on the question of consciousness. We consider Searle's Chinese Room, and the view that natural language understanding by a computer is impossible. We note that the proposition "consciousness is an illusion" may be undermined by the paradoxes it apparently implies. We conclude that A.L.I.C.E. does pass the Turing Test, at least, to paraphrase Abraham Lincoln, for some of the people some of the time.

  20. BLACKJACK SPRINGS WILDERNESS, WISCONSIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, Klaus J.

    1984-01-01

    The mineral-resource potential of the Blackjack Springs Wilderness in northern Wisconsin was evaluated. The lack of bedrock exposures in or near the wilderness and the thick mantle of glacial sediments precludes a detailed assessment of the mineral potential of the wilderness. However, based on presently available data, the area is concluded to offer little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. If mineral deposits exist in the area, they would be under thick glacial cover and probably be of the massive sulfide type in association with metavolcanic rocks or be magmatic copper-nickel in association with metamorphosed mafic intrusive rocks. Sand and gravel resources occur in the wilderness, but they are abundant regionally, outside the wilderness. No other metallic or energy resources were identified in this study.

  1. High pt and photon physics with ALICE at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dai-Cui; Wan, Ren-Zhuo; Mao, Ya-Xian; Schutz, Y.; Wang, Meng-Liang; Ma, Ke; Wang, Ya-Ping; Yin, Zhong-Bao; Cai, Xu; Kharlov, Y.; Conesa, G.; C., Roy

    2010-09-01

    ALICE, A Large Ion Collider Experiment, is dedicated to study the QCD matter at extreme high temperature and density to understand the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) and phase transition. High-transverse-momentum photons and neutral mesons from the initial hard scattering of partons can be measured with ALICE calorimeters, PHOS (PHOton Spectrometer) and EMCAL (ElectroMagnetic CALorimeter). Combing the additional central tracking detectors, the γ-jet and π0-jet measurements thus can be accessed. These measurements offer us a sensitive tomography probe of the hot-dense medium generated in the heavy ion collisions. In this paper, high pT and photon physics is discussed and the ALICE calorimeters capabilities of high-transverse-momentum neutral mesons and γ-jet measurements are presented.

  2. Readout system of the ALICE Muon tracking detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Sylvain

    2010-11-01

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) will be aimed at studying heavy ion collisions at the extreme energy densities accessible at the CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where the formation of the Quark Gluon Plasma is expected. The ALICE muon forward spectrometer will identify muons with momentum above 4 GeV/c, allowing the study of quarkonia and heavy flavors in the pseudorapidity range -4.0< η<-2.5 with 2 π azimuthal coverage. The muon tracking system consists of 10 Cathode Pad Chambers (CPC) with 1.1 million of pads that represent the total number of acquisition channels to manage. In this article, we will give an overview of the ALICE Muon Spectrometer. Afterward, we will focus on tracking system Front end Electronics (FEE) and readout system. We will show that the Digital Signal Processor (DSP) architecture fulfills all the requirements, including radiation hardness against neutrons. Finally, real-time performances are discussed.

  3. Far-UV Eclipse Observations of Ganymede's Atmosphere with New Horizons Alice: New Constraints to the Atomic Oxygen Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retherford, K. D.; Steffl, A. J.; Spencer, J. R.; Gladstone, R.; Roth, L.; Saur, J.; Strobel, D. F.; Stern, S. A.; Parker, J. W.; Versteeg, M. H.; Davis, M. W.; Cunningham, N. J.; McGrath, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Ganymede's atmosphere is a surface-bounded-exosphere composed mainly of molecular oxygen. The bulk density of the O2 atmosphere is inferred from the diagnostic ratio between far-UV auroral emission line brightnesses observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), but this measurement is relatively uncertain owing to a lack of information available for the energies of the electrons in Ganymede's magnetosphere that dissociatively excite the OI 130.4 nm and 135.6 nm emissions. Only a few other species such as H have been detected, and the abundance of atomic oxygen has been constrained only in relation to lower limits for the O2 density based on the line ratios. The New Horizons (NH) spacecraft observed Ganymede with the Pluto-Alice (P-Alice) instrument during the Jupiter flyby in spring of 2007. HST Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) far-UV images of Ganymede complement the P-Alice far-UV spectroscopy at this time. OI 130.4 nm and 135.6 nm emissions were detected in both data sets. The ACS Ganymede images are consistent with previous Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) imaging. P-Alice observed two Ganymede eclipse events, viewing the sunlit sub-Jupiter and nightside anti-Jupiter hemispheres, separately, from before ingress through after egress. Through comparisons of the P-Alice spectra in sunlight to those in eclipse we are able to disentangle the component of the OI 130.4 nm emission line brightness attributed to processes other than electron impact dissociation of O2, namely a combination of solar reflectance and solar resonant scattering by atomic oxygen atoms. The CII 133.5 nm solar emission feature in the sunlit hemisphere dataset also disappears in eclipse and was not detected in the nightside hemisphere spectra, as expected, providing distinct fits to the solar reflectance component. We thereby provide the first meaningful constraint on the atomic oxygen atmosphere revealed through the solar resonant scattering emission source. We briefly discuss the

  4. The high-level trigger of ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilsner, H.; Alt, T.; Aurbakken, K.; Grastveit, G.; Helstrup, H.; Lindenstruth, V.; Loizides, C.; Nystrand, J.; Roehrich, D.; Skaali, B.; Steinbeck, T.; Ullaland, K.; Vestbo, A.; Vik, T.

    One of the main tracking detectors of the forthcoming ALICE Experiment at the LHC is a cylindrical Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with an expected data volume of about 75 MByte per event. This data volume, in combination with the presumed maximum bandwidth of 1.2 GByte/s to the mass storage system, would limit the maximum event rate to 20 Hz. In order to achieve higher event rates, online data processing has to be applied. This implies either the detection and read-out of only those events which contain interesting physical signatures or an efficient compression of the data by modeling techniques. In order to cope with the anticipated data rate, massive parallel computing power is required. It will be provided in form of a clustered farm of SMP-nodes, based on off-the-shelf PCs, which are connected with a high bandwidth low overhead network. This High-Level Trigger (HLT) will be able to process a data rate of 25 GByte/s online. The front-end electronics of the individual sub-detectors is connected to the HLT via an optical link and a custom PCI card which is mounted in the clustered PCs. The PCI card is equipped with an FPGA necessary for the implementation of the PCI-bus protocol. Therefore, this FPGA can also be used to assist the host processor with first-level processing. The first-level processing done on the FPGA includes conventional cluster-finding for low multiplicity events and local track finding based on the Hough Transformation of the raw data for high multiplicity events. PACS: 07.05.-t Computers in experimental physics - 07.05.Hd Data acquisition: hardware and software - 29.85.+c Computer data analysis

  5. The time projection chamber for the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, Luciano; ALICE Collaboration

    2003-03-01

    The Time Projection Chamber is the main tracking detector in the central barrel of the ALICE experiment. The task of large acceptance tracking in a heavy ion experiment is similar to that encountered in the NA49 and STAR experiments at the SPS and RHIC respectively. However, the extreme multiplicities of ion collisions at the LHC set qualitatively and quantitatively new demands making new designs indispensable. In this paper we present an overview of the main components, with special focus on the front-end and readout electronics, and some of the most crucial aspects addressed by the R&D activities that have preceded the design and construction of the ALICE TPC.

  6. Alice, Benzene, and Coffee: The ABCs of Ecopharmacognosy.

    PubMed

    Cordell, Geoffrey A

    2015-12-01

    The sesquicentennial celebrations of the publication of "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and the structure of benzene offer a unique opportunity to develop a contemporary interpretation of aspects of Alice's adventures, illuminate the symbolism of benzene, and contextualize both with the globalization of coffee, transitioning to how the philosophy and sustainable practices of ecopharmacognosy may be applied to modulating approaches to the quality, safety, efficacy, and consistency (QSEC) of traditional medicines and dietary supplements through technology integration, thereby improving patient-centered health care. PMID:26882696

  7. Variable stiffness torsion springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

  8. Variable stiffness torsion springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

  9. [THE OTHER SIDE OF INSTITUTIONALIZATION. ALICE MUNRO'S VERSION].

    PubMed

    Matusevich, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe some aspects of the aging process, the Alzheimer and the nursing home starting from the analysis of some fragments of the tale The bear come over the mountain written by Alice Munro. PMID:26650414

  10. Educating the Imagination: An Interview with Alice Notley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrigan, Anselm

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Alice Notley about her experience of writing the epic poem "The Descent of Alette." Notes that Notley set herself the task of not only engaging the epic tradition, but changing it at the same time by creating a female protagonist. Discusses how epic poems are stories of cultural consolidation. (PM)

  11. Alice Walker's Politics or the Politics of "The Color Purple."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Cynthia

    1988-01-01

    Alice Walker's "The Color Purple" portrays Black women's oppression as the result of patriarchy, and proposes the acceptance of middle-class values--home ownership and entrepreneurship--as the solution to exploitation. She relies on stereotypes to characterize Black men and women, and depicts an ideology of submission. (BJV)

  12. Close view of the Alice Paul Bedroom door, looking from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close view of the Alice Paul Bedroom door, looking from the east at the dead bolt lock and escutcheon on the inside of the (closed) door, with scale - Sewall-Belmont House, 144 Constitution Avenue, Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  13. Detail view of the Alice Paul Bedroom door lock and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the Alice Paul Bedroom door lock and escutcheon, and dead bolt lock above, looking from the east at the inside of the (closed) door, with scale - Sewall-Belmont House, 144 Constitution Avenue, Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions: Alice H. Eagly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Alice H. Eagly, winner of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions, is cited for her work in the field of social psychology, the psychology of gender, and the use of meta-analytic techniques. She envisions a psychology that extends from individual cognitions to societal structures. In addition to the citation, a biography and selected…

  15. Upgrade of the ALICE Experiment: Letter Of Intent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALICE collaboration; Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Masoodi, A. Ahmad; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Anderssen, E. C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badala, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bairathi, V.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastian Van Beelen, J.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Battistin, M.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baudot, J.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Benettoni, M.; Benotto, F.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Besson, A.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhatti, A.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Boehmer, F. V.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bornschein, J.; Borshchov, V. N.; Bortolin, C.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Cariola, P.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Caudron, T.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Claus, G.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Coli, S.; Colledani, C.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Da Riva, E.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Decosse, C.; DelagrangeI, H.; Deloff, A.; Déenes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Robertis, G.; De Roo, K.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Divia, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dorheim, S.; Dorokhov, A.; Doziere, G.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dulinski, W.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Ehlers, R. J., III; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernádez Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fiorenza, G.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Franco, M.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gajanana, D.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubilato, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; Gomez Marzoa, M.; Gonzáalez-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.

    2014-08-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is studying the physics of strongly interacting matter, and in particular the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), using proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major upgrade of the experimental apparatus, planned for installation in the second long LHC shutdown in the years 2018-2019. These plans are presented in the ALICE Upgrade Letter of Intent, submitted to the LHCC (LHC experiments Committee) in September 2012. In order to fully exploit the physics reach of the LHC in this field, high-precision measurements of the heavy-flavour production, quarkonia, direct real and virtual photons, and jets are necessary. This will be achieved by an increase of the LHC Pb-Pb instant luminosity up to 6×1027 cm-2s-1 and running the ALICE detector with the continuous readout at the 50 kHz event rate. The physics performance accessible with the upgraded detector, together with the main detector modifications, are presented.

  16. Alice in Wonderland Syndrome: somesthetic vs visual perceptual disturbance.

    PubMed

    Lanska, John Robert; Lanska, Douglas J

    2013-03-26

    In 1955, English psychiatrist John Todd (1914-1987) described Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS) as self-experienced paroxysmal body image illusions involving distortions of the size, mass, or shape of the patient's own body or its position in space, often occurring with depersonalization and derealization.(1) Todd named AIWS for the perceptual disorder of altered body image experienced by the protagonist in the novel Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865), written by Lewis Carroll(2) (the pseudonym of Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson [1832-1898]), possibly based in part on Dodgson's own migrainous experiences.(3) In the story, Alice followed a talking white rabbit down a rabbit hole and then experienced several dramatic changes in her own body size and shape (e.g., shrinking to 10 inches high, growing unnaturally large, and growing unnaturally tall but not any wider).(2) Although Todd's report was the most influential, Lippman(4) provided an earlier description in 1952. In Lippman's article, one of the patients reported feeling short and wide as she walked, and referenced Alice's Adventures in Wonderland in regard to her body image illusions, referring to them as a "Tweedledum" or "Tweedledee" feeling. PMID:23446681

  17. Enquiring Mind, Rebellious Spirit: Alice and Pinocchio as Nonmodel Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Ann Lawson

    1999-01-01

    Discusses Pinocchio and Alice in Wonderland considering how both characters have acquired a mythic status as iconic images of individualism in childhood. Discusses how they can be termed pivotal since they embodied an abrupt detachment from a long-established tradition in writing for children and a dramatic departure in a radical new direction…

  18. CACTUS SPRING ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matti, Jonathan C.; Kuizon, Lucia

    1984-01-01

    Geologic, geochemical, and geophysical studies together with a review of historic mining and prospecting activities indicate that the Cactus Spring Roadless Area in California has little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Marble bodies occur in the northern part of the roadless area and are possible resources for building stone, crushed and quarried aggregate, and lime and magnesium for Portland cement and industrial applications. It is recommended that the terrane of marble be mapped and sampled carefully in order to evaluate the quantity and quality of the carbonate resources.

  19. [History of hot spring bath treatment in China].

    PubMed

    Hao, Wanpeng; Wang, Xiaojun; Xiang, Yinghong; Gu Li, A Man; Li, Ming; Zhang, Xin

    2011-07-01

    As early as the 7th century B.C. (Western Zhou Dynasty), there is a recording as 'spring which contains sulfur could treat disease' on the Wentang Stele written by WANG Bao. Wenquan Fu written by ZHANG Heng in the Easten Han Dynasty also mentioned hot spring bath treatment. The distribution of hot springs in China has been summarized by LI Daoyuan in the Northern Wei Dynasty in his Shuijingzhu which recorded hot springs in 41 places and interpreted the definition of hot spring. Bencao Shiyi (by CHEN Cangqi, Tang Dynasty) discussed the formation of and indications for hot springs. HU Zai in the Song Dynasty pointed out distinguishing hot springs according to water quality in his book Yuyin Conghua. TANG Shenwei in the Song Dynasty noted in Jingshi Zhenglei Beiji Bencao that hot spring bath treatment should be combined with diet. Shiwu Bencao (Ming Dynasty) classified hot springs into sulfur springs, arsenicum springs, cinnabar springs, aluminite springs, etc. and pointed out their individual indications. Geologists did not start the work on distribution and water quality analysis of hot springs until the first half of the 20th century. There are 972 hot springs in Wenquan Jiyao (written by geologist ZHANG Hongzhao and published in 1956). In July 1982, the First National Geothermal Conference was held and it reported that there were more than 2600 hot springs in China. Since the second half of the 20th century, hot spring sanatoriums and rehabilitation centers have been established, which promoted the development of hot spring bath treatment. PMID:22169492

  20. Status of Fast Interaction Trigger for ALICE Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavicheva, T. L.; Kurepin, A. B.; Trzaska, W. H.

    2015-06-01

    As a result of the LHC upgrade after the Long Shutdown 2, the expected luminosity and collision rate during the so called Run 3 will considerably exceed the design parameters for several of the key ALICE detectors systems including the forward trigger detectors. Furthermore, the introduction of a new Muon Forward Tracker significantly reduces the space envelope available for the upgraded Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT) detector on the muon spectrometer side. At the same time, FIT is expected to match and even exceed the functionality and performance currently secured by three ALICE sub-detectors: the time zero detector (T0), the VZERO system, and the Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD). The harsh conditions of Run 3 would accelerate the ageing and radiation damage (detectable already during Run 1) of the FIT detector if we were to use standard PMTs. The solution came thanks to the latest developments in MCP-PMT technology providing compact photo sensors with excellent characteristics and stability.

  1. Asymmetric Gaussian steering: When Alice and Bob disagree

    SciTech Connect

    Midgley, S. L. W.; Ferris, A. J.; Olsen, M. K.

    2010-02-15

    Asymmetric steering is an effect whereby an inseparable bipartite system can be found to be described by either quantum mechanics or local hidden variable theories depending on which one of Alice or Bob makes the required measurements. We show that, even with an inseparable bipartite system, situations can arise where Gaussian measurements on one half are not sufficient to answer the fundamental question of which theory gives an adequate description and the whole system must be considered. This phenomenon is possible because of an asymmetry in the definition of the original Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox and in this article we show theoretically that it may be demonstrated, at least in the case where Alice and Bob can only make Gaussian measurements, using the intracavity nonlinear coupler.

  2. The Silicon Drift Detector of the ALICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Batigne, G.

    2005-10-12

    The ALICE experiment studies the properties of quark-gluon plasma and requires a good tracking system. This document presents the silicon drift detector which is part of the Inner Tracking System. Its principle and main features are given, especially its sensitivity to temperature variation and the effect of parasitic fields on measurement. Finally, the typical spatial resolution of this detector, which has been measured during beam tests, is shown.

  3. AliEn—ALICE environment on the GRID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Bunčić, P.; Piskač, R.; Revsbech, J.-E.; Šego, V.; Alice Collaboration

    2003-04-01

    AliEn ( http://alien.cern.ch) (ALICE Environment) is a Grid framework built on top of the latest Internet standards for information exchange and authentication (SOAP, PKI) and common Open Source components. AliEn provides a virtual file catalogue that allows transparent access to distributed datasets and a number of collaborating Web services which implement the authentication, job execution, file transport, performance monitor and event logging. In the paper we will present the architecture and components of the system.

  4. Anti–nuclei production at the LHC measured with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufalino, Stefania; ALICE Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The excellent tracking and particle identification capabilities of the ALICE apparatus combined with the high particle production rates reached at the LHC in pp, p–Pb and in particular in Pb–Pb collisions allow for detailed study of the production of nuclei and anti-nuclei. In this paper, recent results on the production of the (anti-)deuteron and (anti-)helium are presented and compared with the expectations from statistical (thermal) particle production and coalescence models.

  5. The ALICE High Level Trigger: status and plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Rohr, David; Gorbunov, Sergey; Breitner, Timo; Lehrbach, Johannes; Lindenstruth, Volker; Berzano, Dario

    2015-12-01

    The ALICE High Level Trigger (HLT) is an online reconstruction, triggering and data compression system used in the ALICE experiment at CERN. Unique among the LHC experiments, it extensively uses modern coprocessor technologies like general purpose graphic processing units (GPGPU) and field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) in the data flow. Realtime data compression is performed using a cluster finder algorithm implemented on FPGA boards. These data, instead of raw clusters, are used in the subsequent processing and storage, resulting in a compression factor of around 4. Track finding is performed using a cellular automaton and a Kalman filter algorithm on GPGPU hardware, where both CUDA and OpenCL technologies can be used interchangeably. The ALICE upgrade requires further development of online concepts to include detector calibration and stronger data compression. The current HLT farm will be used as a test bed for online calibration and both synchronous and asynchronous processing frameworks already before the upgrade, during Run 2. For opportunistic use as a Grid computing site during periods of inactivity of the experiment a virtualisation based setup is deployed.

  6. The C-RORC PCIe card and its application in the ALICE and ATLAS experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borga, A.; Costa, F.; Crone, G. J.; Engel, H.; Eschweiler, D.; Francis, D.; Green, B.; Joos, M.; Kebschull, U.; Kiss, T.; Kugel, A.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Soos, C.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Tremblet, L.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Vandelli, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Werner, P.; Wickens, F. J.

    2015-02-01

    The ALICE and ATLAS DAQ systems read out detector data via point-to-point serial links into custom hardware modules, the ALICE RORC and ATLAS ROBIN. To meet the increase in operational requirements both experiments are replacing their respective modules with a new common module, the C-RORC. This card, developed by ALICE, implements a PCIe Gen 2 x8 interface and interfaces to twelve optical links via three QSFP transceivers. This paper presents the design of the C-RORC, its performance and its application in the ALICE and ATLAS experiments.

  7. Spring Wheat Breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common wheat, known as bread wheat, is one of major crops for human food consumption. It is further classified into spring and winter wheat based on the distinct growing seasons. Spring wheat is grown worldwide and usually planted in the spring and harvested in late summer or early fall. In this c...

  8. Water Treatment Technology - Springs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on springs provides instructional materials for two competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on spring basin construction and spring protection. For each competency, student…

  9. 1. LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING IODINE SPRING (FOREGROUND), SALT SULPHUR SPRING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING IODINE SPRING (FOREGROUND), SALT SULPHUR SPRING (LEFT BACKGROUND), AND TWIN COTTAGES (UPPER RIGHT) (4 x 5 negative; 5 x 7 print) - Salt Sulpher Springs, U.S. Route 219, Salt Sulphur Springs, Monroe County, WV

  10. Proton-proton physics with the ALICE muon spectrometer at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Bastid, N.

    2008-09-15

    ALICE, the dedicated heavy-ion experiment at the LHC, has also an important proton-proton physics program. The ALICE muon spectrometer will be presented and the corresponding physics analysis will be reviewed. A particular emphasis will be placed on heavy-flavor measurement.

  11. JPL stories: story on the story (series) Careering through JPL, presented by Alice M. Fairhurst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrickson, S.

    2002-01-01

    Alice Fairhurst, co-author of Effective Teaching, Effective Learning, presented an enthusiastic overview of her tenure as a JPL career development and mentoring coordinator (1991-2001). Among other things, Alice is an expert in Keirseyian Temperament and Myers-Briggs typology.

  12. Alice Buckton (1867-1944): The Legacy of a Froebelian in the Landscape of Glastonbury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathivet, Stephanie

    2006-01-01

    Alice Buckton was a Froebelian educator who was involved in early childhood education and the training of teachers. She was a prolific writer, at first writing articles for the Froebelian journal "Child Life" and later writing poetry and plays, which were read and performed in London and elsewhere. Alice Buckton became interested in the spiritual…

  13. The Relationship Between Soil Moisture Observed By in Situ Probes and Satellite Derived Surface Wetness in Northern Kazakhstan (Calibrating the Satellite on In Situ Measurements for Near Real Time Monitoring of Spring Wheat Yields)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basist, A. N.; Kauazov, A.; Dolgih, S.; Thomas, N.

    2014-12-01

    Soil moisture is the critical factor effecting the production of wheat across northern Kazazhstan, and food security and inter-national stability in central Asia is strongly related to the wheat yield in Kazakhstan. In an effort to understand and monitor how soil moisture effects yields, we used probe data to detect these fluctuations, and relate this variability to satellite derived wetness values. The soil moisture observations provided by probes measurements serve as calibration points to the satellite measurements. The regression equations derived from these relationships, identify the covariance between the quantities. Many of the relationships between the probe data and wetness index were meaningful, and can be used to effectively identify how upper level moisture fluctuates in Northern Kazakhstan during the important period of wheat production. The slope and intercepts of the equations determine the ratio between the two measurements, and the intercept identifies when the soil is effectively dry, relative to the satellite observation. Generally, there were two unique relationships, one for the summer season (June, July and August) and one for May, when there was nominal vegetation covering the surface. Findings from this study were highly significant and can be applied in near real time, in order to monitor the distribution of upper level soil moisture across the northern oblasts of Kazakhstan, where the production of wheat is critical to food security in central Asia.

  14. Springs of Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenau, Jack C.; Faulkner, Glen L.; Hendry, Charles W., Jr.; Hull, Robert W.

    1977-01-01

    The first comprehensive report of Florida's springs, which contains both a story of the springs and a collection of facts about them, was published thirty years ago (Ferguson and others, 1947). Since then, much additional data on springs have been gathered and the current report, Springs of Florida, makes a wealth of information on springs available to the public. Springs of Florida, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Bureau of Geology, Florida Department of Natural Resources, publishers, and the Bureau of Water Resources Management, Florida Department of Environmental Regulation, is intended to provide sufficient background information for a lucid understanding of the nature and occurrence of the springs in the State.

  15. Radiometric performance results of the New Horizons' ALICE UV imaging spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, David C.; Davis, Michael W.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Scherrer, John; Stern, S. Alan

    2005-09-01

    We describe the radiometric performance and calibration results of the New Horizons' ALICE flight model. This ALICE is a lightweight (4.4 kg), low-power (4.4 W), ultraviolet spectrograph based on the ALICE instrument now in flight aboard the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft. Its primary job will be to detect a variety of important atomic and molecular species in Pluto's atmosphere, and to determine their relative abundances so that a complete picture of Pluto's atmospheric composition can be determined for the first time. ALICE will also be used to search for an atmosphere around Pluto's moon, Charon, as well as the Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) New Horizons hopes to fly by after Pluto-Charon. Detailed radiometric performance results of the ALICE flight model are presented and discussed.

  16. Travertine Hot Springs, Mono County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Chesterman, C.W.; Kleinhampl, F.J.

    1991-08-01

    This article is an abridgement of Special Report 172, Travertine Hot Springs at Bridgeport, Mono County, California, in preparation at the California Division of Mines and Geology. The Travertine Hot Springs area is on the northern edge of what many consider to be one of the most tectonically active areas in the United States. There is abundant geothermal and seismic activity. The landscape is dotted with volcanic features- cones, craters, domes, flows, fumaroles and hot springs-indicators of unrest in the present as well as reminders of activity in the past. Travertine, also known as calcareous sinter, is limestone formed by chemical precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) from ground or surface waters. It forms stalactites and stalagmites in caves, fills some veins and spring conduits and can also be found at the mouths of springs, especially hot springs. The less compact variety is called tufa and the dense, banded variety is known as Mexican onyx, or onyx marble. True onyx, however, is a banded silicate.

  17. Spring joint with overstrain sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, Peter M. (Inventor); Gaither, Bryan W. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A flexible joint may include a conductive compression spring and a pair of non-conductive spring cages disposed at opposite ends of the compression spring to support the compression spring. A conductive member disposed inside the compression spring may extend between the pair of spring cages. One end of the conductive member may be fixed for movement with one of the spring cages and another end of the conductive member may be fixed for movement with the other of the spring cages.

  18. Gender relations: Alice Munro's "Differently" and "Carried Away".

    PubMed

    Pruitt, V D

    2000-01-01

    In two of her works of short fiction--"Differently" (1989) and "Carried Away" (1991)--the eminent contemporary Canadian writer Alice Munro delineates a series of psychologically complicated interactions between heterosexual couples. These psychodynamics have not been identified and explored in existing literary criticism on these stories. Assisted by the clinical experiences and judgments of psychiatrists and psychologists who have analyzed the intricacies of romantic love and passion, the author examines the often puzzling behaviors exhibited in these narratives by characters involved in erotic relationships. She also identifies two paradigms for personal fulfillment implicit in both stories. PMID:11070619

  19. Common read-out receiver card for ALICE Run2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, H.; Kebschull, U.

    2013-12-01

    ALICE at CERN LHC uses custom FPGA-based computer plug-in cards as interface between the optical detector read-out link and the PC clusters of Data Acquisition (DAQ) and High-Level Trigger (HLT). The cards used at DAQ and HLT during Run1 have been developed as independent projects and are now facing similar problems with obsolete major interfaces and limited link speeds and processing capabilities. A new common card has been developed to enable the upgrade of the read-out chain towards higher link rates while providing backward compatibility with the current architecture. First prototypes could be tested successfully and raised interest from other collaborations.

  20. The upgrade of the Inner Tracking System of ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddhanta, Sabyasachi

    2014-11-01

    ALICE has devised a comprehensive upgrade strategy to enhance its physics capabilities and to exploit the LHC running conditions after the second long shutdown of the LHC scheduled in 2018-2019. Within this upgrade programme, the upgrade of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) forms an important part. The upgraded ITS will have a barrel geometry consisting of seven layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) with high granularity, which would fulfil the material budget, readout and radiation hardness requirements for the upgrade. In this contribution, an overview of the upgraded ITS, its technology and performance studies are presented.

  1. Test Beam Results for ALICE TPC Upgrade Prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, James; Alice Tpc-Upgrade Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The ALICE detector is one of four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and its main purpose is to study the quark-gluon plasma created in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main tracking detector within ALICE, and currently has an intrinsic rate limitation of 3 kHz. The LHC will be upgraded during Long Shutdown 2 in 2018 to have Pb-Pb collision rates up to 50 kHz, and so the TPC readout must be accordingly upgraded. This will be done by replacing the current Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber assembly, which uses a gating grid to prevent ion backflow, with Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors such as Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) and Micro-Mesh Gaseous Structures (MMGs), which allow for continuous rather than gated readout. A substantial R&D effort is underway for a 4-GEM design, as well as an alternate 2-GEM/MMG design. Prototypes of each design were tested in November-December 2014 at the PS and SPS beams at CERN; the results for the 2-GEM/MMG chambers will be presented.

  2. ALFA: The new ALICE-FAIR software framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Turany, M.; Buncic, P.; Hristov, P.; Kollegger, T.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Lebedev, A.; Lindenstruth, V.; Manafov, A.; Richter, M.; Rybalchenko, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Winckler, N.

    2015-12-01

    The commonalities between the ALICE and FAIR experiments and their computing requirements led to the development of large parts of a common software framework in an experiment independent way. The FairRoot project has already shown the feasibility of such an approach for the FAIR experiments and extending it beyond FAIR to experiments at other facilities[1, 2]. The ALFA framework is a joint development between ALICE Online- Offline (O2) and FairRoot teams. ALFA is designed as a flexible, elastic system, which balances reliability and ease of development with performance using multi-processing and multithreading. A message- based approach has been adopted; such an approach will support the use of the software on different hardware platforms, including heterogeneous systems. Each process in ALFA assumes limited communication and reliance on other processes. Such a design will add horizontal scaling (multiple processes) to vertical scaling provided by multiple threads to meet computing and throughput demands. ALFA does not dictate any application protocols. Potentially, any content-based processor or any source can change the application protocol. The framework supports different serialization standards for data exchange between different hardware and software languages.

  3. Managing operational documentation in the ALICE Detector Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechman, M.; Augustinus, A.; Bond, P.; Chochula, P.; Kurepin, A.; Pinazza, O.; Rosinsky, P.

    2012-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is one of the big LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiments at CERN in Geneve, Switzerland. The experiment is composed of 18 sub-detectors controlled by an integrated Detector Control System (DCS) that is implemented using the commercial SCADA package PVSSII. The DCS includes over 1200 network devices, over 1,000,000 monitored parameters and numerous custom made software components that are prepared by over 100 developers from all around the world. This complex system is controlled by a single operator via a central user interface. One of his/her main tasks is the recovery of anomalies and errors that may occur during operation. Therefore, clear, complete and easily accessible documentation is essential to guide the shifter through the expert interfaces of different subsystems. This paper describes the idea of the management of the operational documentation in ALICE using a generic repository that is built on a relational database and is integrated with the control system. The experience gained and the conclusions drawn from the project are also presented.

  4. Experiences and evolutions of the ALICE DAQ Detector Algorithms framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeland, Sylvain; Carena, Franco; Carena, Wisla; Chibante Barroso, Vasco; Costa, Filippo; Denes, Ervin; Divia, Roberto; Fuchs, Ulrich; Grigore, Alexandru; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Soos, Csaba; Telesca, Adriana; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; von Haller, Barthelemy

    2012-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The 18 ALICE sub-detectors are regularly calibrated in order to achieve most accurate physics measurements. Some of these procedures are done online in the DAQ (Data Acquisition System) so that calibration results can be directly used for detector electronics configuration before physics data taking, at run time for online event monitoring, and offline for data analysis. A framework was designed to collect statistics and compute calibration parameters, and has been used in production since 2008. This paper focuses on the recent features developed to benefit from the multi-cores architecture of CPUs, and to optimize the processing power available for the calibration tasks. It involves some C++ base classes to effectively implement detector specific code, with independent processing of events in parallel threads and aggregation of partial results. The Detector Algorithm (DA) framework provides utility interfaces for handling of input and output (configuration, monitored physics data, results, logging), and self-documentation of the produced executable. New algorithms are created quickly by inheritance of base functionality and implementation of few ad-hoc virtual members, while the framework features are kept expandable thanks to the isolation of the detector calibration code. The DA control system also handles unexpected processes behaviour, logs execution status, and collects performance statistics.

  5. Radiation hard analog circuits for ALICE ITS upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajanana, D.; Gromov, V.; Kuijer, P.; Kugathasan, T.; Snoeys, W.

    2016-03-01

    The ALICE experiment is planning to upgrade the ITS (Inner Tracking System) [1] detector during the LS2 shutdown. The present ITS will be fully replaced with a new one entirely based on CMOS monolithic pixel sensor chips fabricated in TowerJazz CMOS 0.18 μ m imaging technology. The large (3 cm × 1.5 cm = 4.5 cm2) ALPIDE (ALICE PIxel DEtector) sensor chip contains about 500 Kpixels, and will be used to cover a 10 m2 area with 12.5 Gpixels distributed over seven cylindrical layers. The ALPOSE chip was designed as a test chip for the various building blocks foreseen in the ALPIDE [2] pixel chip from CERN. The building blocks include: bandgap and Temperature sensor in four different flavours, and LDOs for powering schemes. One flavour of bandgap and temperature sensor will be included in the ALPIDE chip. Power consumption numbers have dropped very significantly making the use of LDOs less interesting, but in this paper all blocks are presented including measurement results before and after irradiation with neutrons to characterize robustness against displacement damage.

  6. Future upgrade and physics perspectives of the ALICE TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunji, Taku

    2014-11-01

    The ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) proposes major detector upgrades to fully exploit the increase of the luminosity of the LHC in RUN 3 and to extend the physics reach for rare probes at low transverse momentum. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is one of the main tracking and PID devices in the central barrel of ALICE. The maximum trigger rate of the TPC is currently limited to about 3.5 kHz by the operation of a gating grid system. In order to make full use of the luminosity in RUN 3, the TPC is foreseen to be operated in an ungated mode with continuous readout. The existing MWPC readout will be replaced by a Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detector (MPGD) based readout, which provides intrinsic ion capture capability without gating. Extensive detector R&D employing Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and Micro-Mesh Gaseous detector (Micromegas) technologies, and simulation studies to advance the techniques for the corrections of space-charge distortions have been performed since 2012. In this paper, the expected detector performance and the status of the R&D program to achieve this ambitious goal are described.

  7. Intrusion Prevention and Detection in Grid Computing - The ALICE Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Andres; Lara, Camilo; Kebschull, Udo

    2015-12-01

    Grids allow users flexible on-demand usage of computing resources through remote communication networks. A remarkable example of a Grid in High Energy Physics (HEP) research is used in the ALICE experiment at European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN. Physicists can submit jobs used to process the huge amount of particle collision data produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Grids face complex security challenges. They are interesting targets for attackers seeking for huge computational resources. Since users can execute arbitrary code in the worker nodes on the Grid sites, special care should be put in this environment. Automatic tools to harden and monitor this scenario are required. Currently, there is no integrated solution for such requirement. This paper describes a new security framework to allow execution of job payloads in a sandboxed context. It also allows process behavior monitoring to detect intrusions, even when new attack methods or zero day vulnerabilities are exploited, by a Machine Learning approach. We plan to implement the proposed framework as a software prototype that will be tested as a component of the ALICE Grid middleware.

  8. How beam driven operations optimize ALICE efficiency and safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinazza, Ombretta; Augustinus, André; Bond, Peter M.; Chochula, Peter C.; Kurepin, Alexander N.; Lechman, Mateusz; Rosinsky, Peter

    2012-12-01

    ALICE is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN (Geneva, Switzerland). The ALICE DCS is responsible for the coordination and monitoring of the various detectors and of central systems, for collecting and managing alarms, data and commands. Furthermore, it's the central tool to monitor and verify the beam status with special emphasis on safety. In particular, it is important to ensure that the experiment's detectors are brought to and stay in a safe state, e.g. reduced voltages during the injection, acceleration, and adjusting phases of the LHC beams. Thanks to its central role, it's the appropriate system to implement automatic actions that were normally left to the initiative of the shift leader; where decisions come from the knowledge of detectors’ statuses and of the beam, combined together to fulfil the scientific requirements, keeping safety as a priority in all cases. This paper shows how the central DCS is interpreting the daily operations from a beam driven point of view. A tool is being implemented where automatic actions can be set and monitored through expert panels, with a custom level of automatization. Some routine operations are already automated, when a particular beam mode is declared by the LHC, which can represent a safety concern. This beam driven approach is proving to be a tool for the shift crew to optimize the efficiency of data taking, while improving the safety of the experiment.

  9. Operational experience with the ALICE High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szostak, Artur

    2012-12-01

    The ALICE HLT is a dedicated real-time system for online event reconstruction and triggering. Its main goal is to reduce the raw data volume read from the detectors by an order of magnitude, to fit within the available data acquisition bandwidth. This is accomplished by a combination of data compression and triggering. When HLT is enabled, data is recorded only for events selected by HLT. The combination of both approaches allows for flexible data reduction strategies. Event reconstruction places a high computational load on HLT. Thus, a large dedicated computing cluster is required, comprising 248 machines, all interconnected with InfiniBand. Running a large system like HLT in production mode proves to be a challenge. During the 2010 pp and Pb-Pb data-taking period, many problems were experienced that led to a sub-optimal operational efficiency. Lessons were learned and certain crucial changes were made to the architecture and software in preparation for the 2011 Pb-Pb run, in which HLT had a vital role performing data compression for ALICE's largest detector, the TPC. An overview of the status of the HLT and experience from the 2010/2011 production runs are presented. Emphasis is given to the overall performance, showing an improved efficiency and stability in 2011 compared to 2010, attributed to the significant improvements made to the system. Further opportunities for improvement are identified and discussed.

  10. Mediated definite delegation - Certified Grid jobs in ALICE and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, Steffen; Grigoras, Costin; Litmaath, Maarten; Betev, Latchezar; Buchmann, Johannes

    2012-12-01

    Grid computing infrastructures need to provide traceability and accounting of their users’ activity and protection against misuse and privilege escalation, where the delegation of privileges in the course of a job submission is a key concern. This work describes an improved handling of Multi-user Grid Jobs in the ALICE Grid Services. A security analysis of the ALICE Grid job model is presented with derived security objectives, followed by a discussion of existing approaches of unrestricted delegation based on X.509 proxy certificates and the Grid middleware gLExec. Unrestricted delegation has severe security consequences and limitations, most importantly allowing for identity theft and forgery of jobs and data. These limitations are discussed and formulated, both in general and with respect to an adoption in line with Multi-user Grid Jobs. A new general model of mediated definite delegation is developed, allowing a broker to dynamically process and assign Grid jobs to agents while providing strong accountability and long-term traceability. A prototype implementation allowing for fully certified Grid jobs is presented as well as a potential interaction with gLExec. The achieved improvements regarding system security, malicious job exploitation, identity protection, and accountability are emphasized, including a discussion of non-repudiation in the face of malicious Grid jobs.

  11. Light flavour hadron production in the ALICE experiment at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalà, Angela

    2016-05-01

    Unique among the LHC experiments, ALICE has excellent particle identification capabilities for the measurement of light-flavour hadrons. A large number of hadron species from pions to multi-strange baryons and light nuclei have been measured over a large transverse momentum region. The measurement of the production of these particles is a valuable tool to study the properties of the medium formed in heavy-ion collisions. In particular they give information on the collective phenomena of the fireball, on the parton energy loss in the hot QCD medium and on the hadronization mechanisms such as recombination and statistical hadronization. The measurements in pp and in p-nucleus collisions provide the necessary baseline for heavy-ion data and help to investigate the effects of the ordinary nuclear matter. In this paper some of the main ALICE results on identified light-flavour hadron production in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV and p-Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV will be presented.

  12. Coil spring venting arrangement

    DOEpatents

    McCugh, R.M.

    1975-10-21

    A simple venting device for trapped gas pockets in hydraulic systems is inserted through a small access passages, operated remotely, and removed completely. The device comprises a small diameter, closely wound coil spring which is pushed through a guide temporarily inserted in the access passage. The guide has a central passageway which directs the coil spring radially upward into the pocket, so that, with the guide properly positioned for depth and properly oriented, the coil spring can be pushed up into the top of the pocket to vent it. By positioning a seal around the free end of the guide, the spring and guide are removed and the passage is sealed.

  13. Spring and valve skirt

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, L.

    1986-07-29

    This patent describes an engine having a valve guide operatively mounting a valve stem and its associated valve spring and spring retainer for actuation of the valve stem by a valve actuator. An improvement is described comprising: a hollow, generally cylindrical shaped skirt means having a side portion forming an interior with one open end and having at its other end an end portion extending inwardly and formed with an axial opening therein communicating to the interior. The skirt means is mounted on and about the valve stem and spring retainer and about its spring so as to move with the valve stem and to cover the spring retainer and most of the portion of the valve spring and the valve stem extending outwardly from the valve guide except for an outermost end of the stem which extends through the opening in the end portion for actuation by the actuator , such that the inwardly extending end portion lies between the outermost end of the stem and an outermost end of the spring retainer to allow for retrofitting insertion of the skirt means over existing valve stems without removal of the spring and spring retainer. Excessive oil is presented from seeping between and valve guide and the valve stem thus preventing excessive carbon build-up in the combustion area, sticking valves, fouled plugs and high exhaust emissions.

  14. [Alice's adventures in the wonderland of knowledge: the path to current literacy].

    PubMed

    Sanz-Valero, Javier; Castiel, Luis David; Wanden-Berghe, Carmina

    2010-03-01

    Alice wants to study with amusing books filled with colorful drawings. "Alice's adventures in Wonderland" serves as excuse to introduce and discuss the current importance of digital literacy and how communication and information technologies have changed the way of transmitting and disseminating knowledge. Considering as a corollary, Alice today would have access to a multitude of beautiful multimedia documents, of greater or lesser quality, available through multiple paths. However, given her incipient education, knowing their true worth and aptitude is a privilege she has yet to obtain. This is her challenge! PMID:21461500

  15. DDL, the ALICE data transmission protocol and its evolution from 2 to 6 Gb/s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Chapeland, S.; Delort, C.; Dénes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Grigore, A.; Ionita, C.; Kiss, T.; Simonetti, G.; Soós, C.; Telesca, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Von Haller, B.

    2015-04-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the detector system at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) that studies the behaviour of strongly interacting matter and the quark gluon plasma. The information sent by the sub-detectors composing ALICE are read out by DATE (Data Acquisition and Test Environment), the ALICE data acquisition software, using hundreds of multi-mode optical links called DDL (Detector Data Link). To cope with the higher luminosity of the LHC, the bandwidth of the DDL links will be upgraded in 2015. This paper will describe the evolution of the DDL protocol from 2 to 6 Gbit/s.

  16. A Magnet Spring Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, T. H.; Mead, L.

    2006-01-01

    The paper discusses an elementary spring model representing the motion of a magnet suspended from the ceiling at one end of a vertical spring which is held directly above a second magnet fixed on the floor. There are two cases depending upon the north-south pole orientation of the two magnets. The attraction or repelling force induced by the…

  17. Geologic Map of the Izzenhood Spring Quadrangle, Lander County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, David A.; Wrucke, Chester T.

    2002-01-01

    The Izzenhood Spring quadrangle covers about 145 km2 of the southwestern part of the Sheep Creek Range in northern Lander County, Nevada. The quadrangle is underlain by Lower Paleozoic rocks that are unconformably overlain and intruded by thick sequences of Miocene igneous rocks related to the northern Nevada rift (Stewart and McKee, 1977; Wallace and John, 1998; John and others, 2000). Much of the eastern part of the quadrangle is covered by thin Quaternary surficial deposits.

  18. Valve-spring Surge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, Willy

    1937-01-01

    Test equipment is described that includes a system of three quartz indicators whereby three different pressures could be synchronized and simultaneously recorded on a single oscillogram. This equipment was used to test the reliction of waves at ends of valve spring, the dynamical stress of the valve spring for a single lift of the valve, and measurement of the curve of the cam tested. Other tests included simultaneous recording of the stress at both ends of the spring, spring oscillation during a single lift as a function of speed, computation of amplitude of oscillation for a single lift by harmonic analysis, effect of cam profile, the setting up of resonance, and forced spring oscillation with damping.

  19. Rotary spring energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, S.

    1981-07-01

    The goal was to design a lightweight system, for bicycles, that can level the input energy requirement (human exertion) in accordance with variations in road load (friction, wind, and grade) and/or to provide a system for regenerative braking, that is, to store energy normally lost in brake pad friction for brief periods until it required for re-acceleration or hill-climbing. The rotary spring, also called the coil, motor, spiral, or power spring is governed by the equations reviewed. Materials used in spring manufacture are briefly discussed, and justification for steel as the design choice of material is given. Torque and power requirements for a bicycle and rider are provided as well as estimated human power output levels. These criteria are examined to define spring size and possible orientations on a bicycle. Patents and designs for coupling the spring to the drive train are discussed.

  20. ALICE: Project Overview and High Level Science Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soummer, Remi; Choquet, Elodie; Pueyo, Laurent; Brendan Hagan, J.; Gofas-Salas, Elena; Rajan, Abhijith; Perrin, Marshall D.; Chen, Christine; Debes, John H.; Golimowski, David A.; Hines, Dean C.; Schneider, Glenn; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Mawet, Dimitri; Marois, Christian; Barman, Travis

    2015-01-01

    We report on the status of the ALICE project (Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments), which consists in a consistent reanalysis of the entire HST-NICMOS coronagraphic archive. Over the last two years, we have developed a sophisticated pipeline able to handle the data of the 400 stars of the archive. This pipeline builds on the Karhunen-Loeve Image Projection (KLIP) algorithm, and was completed in the fall of 2014. We discuss the first processing and analysis results of the overall reduction campaign. As we will deliver high-level science products to the STScI MAST archive, we are defining a new standard format for high-contrast science products, which will be compatible with every new high-contrast imaging instrument (GPI, SPHERE, P1640, CHARIS, etc.) and used by the JWST coronagraphs. We present here the specifications of this standard.

  1. 3D Modeling of the ALICE Photoinjector Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, J. W.; Militsyn, B. L.; Saveliev, Y. M.

    2009-08-04

    The injector for the ALICE machine (Accelerators and Lasers In Combined Experiments) at Daresbury Laboratory is based around a 350 kV DC photocathode electron gun. An upgrade is proposed to introduce a load-lock GaAs photocathode preparation facility to allow rapid transfer of photocathodes to the gun without breaking the vacuum system. In the current design this requires side-loading of the photocathodes into the cathode ball. An alternative is to relocate the ceramic insulator vertically which will allow back-loading and also backillumination of the photocathodes. 3D electrostatic simulations of the gun chamber are presented for both options along with 3D beam dynamic simulations for an off-axis photocathode, introduced to increase photocathode lifetime by reducing damage by ion backbombardment. Beam dynamic simulations are also presented for the entire injector beamline as well as for a proposed extension to the injector beamline to include a diagnostic section.

  2. The Laser of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault, G.; Nielsen, B. S.; Westergaard, J.; Gaardhøje, J. J.

    The large TPC (95 m3) of the ALICE detector at the CERN LHC was commissioned in summer 2006. The first tracks were observed both from the cosmic ray muons and from the laser rays injected into the TPC. In this article the basic principles of operating the 266 nm lasers are presented, showing the installation and adjustment of the optical system and describing the control system. To generate the laser tracks, a wide laser beam is split into several hundred narrow beams by fixed micro-mirrors at stable and known positions throughout the TPC. In the drift volume, these narrow beams generate straight tracks at many angles. Here we describe the generation of the first tracks and compare them with simulations.

  3. Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments (ALICE). Survey results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soummer, Remi; Choquet, Elodie; Pueyo, Laurent; Brendan Hagan, J.; Gofas-Salas, Elena; Rajan, Abhijith; Chen, Christine; Perrin, Marshall D.; Debes, John H.; Golimowski, David A.; Hines, Dean C.; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Schneider, Glenn; Mawet, Dimitri; Marois, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We report on the status of the ALICE project (Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments. HST/AR-12652), which consists in a consistent reanalysis of the entire HST-NICMOS coronagraphic archive with advanced post-processing techniques. Over the last two years, we have developed a sophisticated pipeline able to handle the data of the 400 stars of the archive. We present the results of the overall reduction campaign and discuss the first statistical analysis of the candidate detections. As we will deliver high-level science products to the STScI MAST archive, we are defining a new standard format for high-contrast science products, which will be compatible with every new high-contrast imaging instrument and used by the JWST coronagraphs. We present here an update and overview of the specifications of this standard.

  4. The Neutron Zero Degree Calorimeter for the ALICE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellacasa, G.; Cortese, P.; Cicaló, C.; de Falco, A.; Masoni, A.; Puddu, G.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Usai, G.; Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; de Marco, N.; Ferretti, A.; Gallio, M.; Gemme, R.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Scomparin, E.; Travaglia, G.; Vercellin, E.

    2005-02-01

    The neutron Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZN) for the ALICE experiment will measure the energy of the spectator neutrons in heavy ion collisions. The ZN is a spaghetti calorimeter, that exploits the Cherenkov light produced by the shower particles in silica optical fibers embedded in a W-alloy absorber. The calorimeter was tested at the CERN SPS using pion and positron beams of different momenta ranging from 50 to 150 GeV/c. The main features of the detector are presented: the linearity and energy resolution as a function of energy, the shower's transverse profile, the position resolution. Moreover the response of the calorimeter to a 158A GeV/c Indium beam has been investigated; in particular the energy resolution and the linearity as a function of the number of incident nucleons were measured.

  5. The zero degree calorimeters for the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puddu, G.; Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicaló, C.; Cortese, P.; De Falco, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Ferretti, A.; Floris, M.; Gagliardi, M.; Gallio, M.; Gemme, R.; Locci, G.; Masoni, A.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Poggio, F.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Stocco, D.; Usai, G.; Vercellin, E.; Yermia, F.

    2007-10-01

    The Zero Degree Calorimeters (ZDC) for the ALICE experiment will measure the energy of the spectator nucleons in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC, providing a direct measure of the centrality of the collisions. ZDC are spaghetti calorimeters, which detect the Cherenkov light produced by the shower particles in silica optical fibers embedded in a dense absorber. The main characteristics of the ZP and ZN detectors are described in this article. The calorimeters were tested at the CERN SPS using pion and electron beams with momenta ranging from 50 to 200 GeV/c. Test beam results such as the calorimeter response, the energy resolution, the signal uniformity and the localizing capability are presented.

  6. The Neutron Zero Degree Calorimeter for the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicalò, C.; Cortese, P.; De Falco, A.; Dellacasa, G.; De Marco, N.; Ferretti, A.; Gallio, M.; Gemme, R.; Masoni, A.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Poggio, F.; Puddu, G.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Travaglia, G.; Usai, G.; Vercellin, E.

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, we present the performance of the Neutron Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZN) for the ALICE experiment. The ZN is a quartz-fiber spaghetti calorimeter, which will measure the energy of the spectator neutrons in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC. Its principle of operation is based on the detection of the Cherenkov light produced by the charged particles of the shower in silica optical fibers, embedded in a W-alloy absorber. The detector was tested at CERN SPS using positive hadron and positron beams with momenta ranging from 50 to 150 GeV/c. The response of the calorimeter, the energy resolution, the localizing capability, the signal uniformity and the transverse profile of the detectable hadronic shower are presented.

  7. Performance simulation studies for the ALICE TPC GEM upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljunggren, M.

    2016-07-01

    To be able to exploit the anticipated interaction rate of 50 kHz in Pb-Pb collisions during run 3 of the LHC (beyond 2019), the ALICE TPC will be upgraded to allow continuous readout. As this is not possible with the current Multi Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) based amplification, the readout will be replaced with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) readout chambers that can suppress ~ 99% of the ion back flow. The space charge of the remaining 1% ion back flow, however, will cause significant distortions to the measured tracks of order cm. Simulation studies to characterize the distortions and test correction strategies have been performed, which show that the intrinsic momentum resolution, without these distortions, can be recovered.

  8. An overview of resonance measurements at the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knospe, A. G.

    2016-05-01

    Resonances play a unique role in the study of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Resonance yields, which may be modified by rescattering and regeneration after hadronization, can be used to study the properties of the hadronic phase of the collision. The transversemomentum spectra of the proton and the ϕ(1020) can be used to study the mechanisms of particle production. In addition, resonance measurements in pp and p-Pb collisions help to distinguish initial-state effects from the effects of the hot and dense final state. The ALICE Collaboration has studied the K*(892)0 and ϕ(1020) mesons in pp, p-Pb, and Pb-Pb collisions. Measurements of many resonance properties, including pT spectra, integrated yields, masses, widths, mean pT values, and the nuclear modification factors RAA and RpPb, are presented and compared to measurements from other experiments, non-resonances, and the predictions of theoretical models.

  9. Upgrade of the ALICE TPC FEE online radiation monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RØed, K.; Alme, J.; Askeland, E.; David, E.; Gunji, T.; Helstrup, H.; Kiss, T.; Lippmann, C.; Rehman, A.; Röhrich, D.; Ullaland, K.; Velure, A.; Zhao, C.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the radiation monitoring system on the Readout Control Unit (RCU) of the the ALICE TPC Front End Electronics. In Run 1, Single Event Upsets (SEUs) in the configuration memory of an SRAM based FPGA were counted, and the results from different run periods with stable beam conditions are presented. For Run 2, a new RCU, the RCU2, has been designed in order to achieve higher data readout rates and increase radiation tolerance. The RCU2 also includes a new radiation monitor solution with increased sensitivity, which is based on counting the number of SEUs in dedicated SRAM memories. The paper presents this new solution together with the results from the targeted irradiation campaigns.

  10. Breaking bounds: Alice Profé, radical and emancipationist.

    PubMed

    Pfister, G

    2001-01-01

    Alice Prof was the first female sport physician in Germany and she influenced ideas on female bodies and female sports for more than 40 years. Her dream to become a doctor could be realized only in Switzerland because women were not admitted to universities in Prussia before 1908. After her examination and her PhD she established herself as one of the first female doctors in Berlin in 1905 and she worked there until her death in 1946 as general practitioner and medical specialist for pediatrics and sport medicine. As an expert on the female body she was active in many committees and organizations. Alice Prof worked her whole life for the improvement of the situation of girls and women. The focus of her work was physical education and sport and she was always active in different types of sports herself. Her first article on this topic was published in 1906. In the following years over and over again she 'took the floor' criticizing traditional stereotypes of women and the female body, demanding resources for the education of girls and women. Her efforts also helped to reduce anxieties about women in sport and to encourage women to participate in sport. In her articles and in her lectures she encouraged women to decide for themselves about their involvement in sport. She rejected all attempts to patronize female athletes and refused to accept their exclusion from many sports. Prof propagated ideas which were not popular and she never swam with the tide. In one obituary it is stated: 'you never changed your ideas about life for material rewards or professional advancement. You stayed yourself'. Her ideas are relevant even today. PMID:18159656

  11. Open heavy-flavor measurements with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailhache, R.

    2016-01-01

    ALICE is well equipped to reconstruct heavy-flavor particles down to low transverse momentum pT at mid and forward rapidity. An overview of the ALICE results obtained with the Run 1 data in pp (√5=2.76TeV and √s=7TeV), Pb-Pb (√Snn=2.76TeV) and p-Pb (√sNN=5.02 TeV) collisions is presented. In pp collisions the measured cross sections are well described by pQCD calculations. The charged-particle multiplicity dependence of heavy-flavor yields indicates that Multi-Parton Interactions contribute to the high-multiplicity pp collisions and affect charm and beauty production in a similar way. In p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions the measured nuclear modification factors indicate a final-state energy loss of heavy- quarks in central Pb-Pb collisions. Furthermore, the observed positive heavy-flavor elliptic flow in semi-central Pb-Pb collisions gives a hint that charm quarks participate in the collective expansion of the medium at low pT. In high-multiplicity p-Pb collisions, a double-ridge structure is observed in the heavy-flavor decay electron-hadron azimuthal correlations at low pT similar to what is measured in the light-flavor sector. Such long-range correlations in ŋ could originate from a collective expansion of the system, as well as from gluon saturation in the initial state (color-glass condensate) or other mechanisms.

  12. Pluto's Extended Atmosphere: New Horizons Alice Lyman-α Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retherford, Kurt D.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.; Young, Leslie A.; Ennico, Kimberly A.; Olkin, Cathy B.; Cheng, Andy F.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Hinson, David P.; Kammer, Joshua A.; Linscott, Ivan R.; Parker, Alex H.; Parker, Joel Wm.; Pryor, Wayne R.; Schindhelm, Eric; Singer, Kelsi N.; Steffl, Andrew J.; Strobel, Darrell F.; Summers, Michael E.; Tsang, Constantine C. C.; Tyler, G. Len; Versteeg, Maarten H.; Woods, William W.; Cunningham, Nathaniel J.; Curdt, Werner

    2015-11-01

    Pluto's upper atmosphere is expected to extend several planetary radii, proportionally more so than for any planet in our solar system. Atomic hydrogen is readily produced at lower altitudes due to photolysis of methane and transported upward to become an important constituent. The Interplanetary Medium (IPM) provides a natural light source with which to study Pluto's atomic hydrogen atmosphere. While direct solar Lyman-α emissions dominate the signal at 121.6 nm at classical solar system distances, the contribution of diffuse illumination by IPM Lyman-α sky-glow is roughly on par at Pluto (Gladstone et al., Icarus, 2015). Hydrogen atoms in Pluto's upper atmosphere scatter these bright Lyα emission lines, and detailed simulations of the radiative transfer for these photons indicate that Pluto would appear dark against the IPM Lyα background. The Pluto-Alice UV imaging spectrograph on New Horizons conducted several observations of Pluto during the encounter to search for airglow emissions, characterize its UV reflectance spectra, and to measure the radial distribution of IPM Lyα near the disk. Our early results suggest that these model predictions for the darkening of IPM Lyα with decreasing altitude being measureable by Pluto-Alice were correct. We'll report our progress toward extracting H and CH4 density profiles in Pluto's upper atmosphere through comparisons of these data with detailed radiative transfer modeling. These New Horizons findings will have important implications for determining the extent of Pluto's atmosphere and related constraints to high-altitude vertical temperature structure and atmospheric escape.This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.

  13. Crop diversification, tillage, and management system influences on spring wheat yield and soil water use

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Depleted soil quality, decreased water availability, and increased weed competition constrain spring wheat production in the northern Great Plains. Integrated crop management systems are necessary for improved crop productivity. We conducted a field experiment from 2004-2010 comparing productivity...

  14. Characterization of a G1P[8] rotavirus causing an outbreak of gastroenteritis in the Northern Territory, Australia, in the vaccine era

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Celeste M; Cowley, Daniel; Snelling, Thomas L; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, a large outbreak of rotavirus gastroenteritis occurred in the Alice Springs region of the Northern Territory, Australia. The outbreak occurred 43 months after the introduction of the G1P[8] rotavirus vaccine Rotarix®. Forty-three infants were hospitalized during the outbreak and analysis of fecal samples from each infant revealed a G1P[8] rotavirus strain. The outbreak strain was adapted to cell culture and neutralization assays were performed using VP7 and VP4 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. The outbreak strain exhibited a distinct neutralization resistance pattern compared to the Rotarix® vaccine strain. Whole genome sequencing of the 2010 outbreak virus strain demonstrated numerous amino acid differences compared to the Rotarix® vaccine strain in the characterized neutralization epitopes of the VP7 and VP4 proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of the outbreak strain revealed a close genetic relationship to global strains, in particular RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE0098/2009/G1P[8] and RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE00038/2008/G1P[8] for numerous genes. The 2010 outbreak strain was likely introduced from a globally circulating population of strains rather than evolving from an endemic Australian strain. The outbreak strain possessed antigenic differences in the VP7 and VP4 proteins compared to the Rotarix® vaccine strain. The outbreak was associated with moderate vaccine coverage and possibly low vaccine take in the population. PMID:26038746

  15. Characterization of a G1P[8] rotavirus causing an outbreak of gastroenteritis in the Northern Territory, Australia, in the vaccine era.

    PubMed

    Donato, Celeste M; Cowley, Daniel; Snelling, Thomas L; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2014-07-01

    In 2010, a large outbreak of rotavirus gastroenteritis occurred in the Alice Springs region of the Northern Territory, Australia. The outbreak occurred 43 months after the introduction of the G1P[8] rotavirus vaccine Rotarix(®). Forty-three infants were hospitalized during the outbreak and analysis of fecal samples from each infant revealed a G1P[8] rotavirus strain. The outbreak strain was adapted to cell culture and neutralization assays were performed using VP7 and VP4 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. The outbreak strain exhibited a distinct neutralization resistance pattern compared to the Rotarix(®) vaccine strain. Whole genome sequencing of the 2010 outbreak virus strain demonstrated numerous amino acid differences compared to the Rotarix(®) vaccine strain in the characterized neutralization epitopes of the VP7 and VP4 proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of the outbreak strain revealed a close genetic relationship to global strains, in particular RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE0098/2009/G1P[8] and RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE00038/2008/G1P[8] for numerous genes. The 2010 outbreak strain was likely introduced from a globally circulating population of strains rather than evolving from an endemic Australian strain. The outbreak strain possessed antigenic differences in the VP7 and VP4 proteins compared to the Rotarix(®) vaccine strain. The outbreak was associated with moderate vaccine coverage and possibly low vaccine take in the population. PMID:26038746

  16. Alice Walker: "The Diary of an African Nun" and Dubois Double Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontenot, Chester J.

    1977-01-01

    Analyzes Alice Walker's novel and notes that the plight of the African nun is that of the black intellectual or middle-class who find themselves caught between two worlds which are at once complementary and contradictory. (Author)

  17. Paleostress perturbations and salt tectonics in the Subhercynian Basin, northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, C.; Schmidt, C.; Tanner, D.; Winsemann, J.

    2012-04-01

    .J. Proceedings of the Central Australian Basins Symposium (CABS), Alice Springs, Northern Territory, 16-18 August, 2005. Northern Territory Geological Survey, Special Publication 2, 388-396

  18. SPRING_TANK

    EPA Science Inventory

    This point coverage shows springs and water tanks on Salt River Indian Reservation in Arizona. This coverage was digitized off of USGS 7.5 minute quad maps by the Phoenix office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

  19. Harbingers of Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrao, John

    1976-01-01

    Emphasizing the spring migration of frogs, toads, and salamanders to their watery breeding sites, this article presents information on numerous amphibians and suggests both indoor and outdoor educational activities appropriate for elementary and/or early secondary instruction. (JC)

  20. Utilizing the Greenseeker to Evaluate Spring Wheat Growth and Yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is currently little information on the use of existing sensor-based technologies for in-season application of nitrogen (N) to spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the northern Great Plains. Over the past decade researchers in the southern Great Plains have developed the Greenseeker as a too...

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF WESTERN NORTH ATLANTIC RIGHT WHALE SPRING FEEDING HABITAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Great South Channel region of the southwestern Gulf of Maine, between George's Bank and Cape Cod, is the primary spring feeding ground for the western North Atlantic population of the I northern right whale, E. glacialis .Since this whale is so endangered, it is critical to i...

  2. Employer Occupational Needs Assessment, Elko, Nevada, Spring, 1991. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferry, Cliff

    In spring 1991, a survey was conducted by Northern Nevada Community College (NNCC) to determine the vocational education needs of local employers. Ninety-one employers were interviewed at their worksites using a modified open-ended question approach. Survey findings included the following: (1) employers most frequently used newspapers to obtain…

  3. Stable Water Isotope Climate Archives in Springs from the Olympic Mountains, Washington

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 18O and 2H (HDO) compositions are summarized for sampled springs (n = 81) within the Elwha watershed (≈ 692 km2) on the northern Olympic Peninsula. Samples, collected during 2001–2009, of springs (n = 158), precipitation (n = 520), streams (n...

  4. Measurements of the near-nucleus coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko with the Alice far-ultraviolet spectrograph on Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Paul D.; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Feaga, Lori M.; Parker, Joel Wm.; Schindhelm, Eric; Steffl, Andrew J.; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.; Sierks, Holger; Vincent, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-11-01

    Aims: The Alice far-ultraviolet spectrograph onboard Rosetta is designed to observe emissions from various atomic and molecular species from within the coma of comet 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko and to determine their spatial distribution and evolution with time and heliocentric distance. Methods: Following orbit insertion in August 2014, Alice made observations of the inner coma above the limbs of the nucleus of the comet from cometocentric distances varying between 10 and 80 km. Depending on the position and orientation of the slit relative to the nucleus, emissions of atomic hydrogen and oxygen were initially detected. These emissions are spatially localized close to the nucleus and spatially variable with a strong enhancement above the comet's neck at northern latitudes. Weaker emission from atomic carbon and CO were subsequently detected. Results: Analysis of the relative line intensities suggests photoelectron impact dissociation of H2O vapor as the source of the observed H i and O i emissions. The electrons are produced by photoionization of H2O. The observed C i emissions are also attributed to electron impact dissociation, of CO2, and their relative brightness to H i reflects the variation of CO2 to H2O column abundance in the coma.

  5. Ultrabasic Spring Geomicrobiology of the Cedars Peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, O. J.; Morrill, P.; Muyzer, G.; Kuenen, J. G.; Nealson, K. H.

    2006-12-01

    Peridotite hosted aquifers are becoming well-known as a modern analog for both extraterrestrial and early- Earth habitats despite relatively few studies on microbes in ultramafic systems. To investigate the microbiology associated with aquifers of the actively serpentinizing Cedars Peridotite in coastal Northern California an interdisciplinary approach involving molecular phylogenetics, organic and inorganic geochemistry, as well as culture-based ecophysiological methods are being utilized. Based on our findings, Cedars spring microorganisms endure one of the harshest low-temperature aqueous environments on Earth with pH greater than 11.8, Eh less than -600 mV, undetectable dissolved CO2 and O2 and a lack of other obvious e- acceptors. Despite these conditions, life inhabits solid substrate surfaces within the springs to a concentration of 10E6-10E7 cells/sq. cm, but planktonic cell densities are extremely low (much less than 10E3/ml). Preliminary 16S data of 3 ultrabasic fluids reveals a community comprised primarily of bacteria that appears to be of low-diversity. Methanogens are strongly suggested to be present based on the isotopic composition of methane bubbling from the springs, but have not yet been identified via molecular techniques. Community level metagenomic sequencing of the ultrabasic spring microorganisms sampled from peridotite-associated mineral surfaces and glass slides incubated in specially designed flow- through chambers are currently in-progress and are likely to reveal several novel metabolic pathways.

  6. Segmented tubular cushion springs and spring assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslim, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A spring (10) includes a tube (12) having an elliptical cross section, with the greater axial dimension (22) extending laterally and the lesser axial dimension (24) extending vertically. A plurality of cuts (20) in the form of slots passing through most of a wall of the tube (12) extend perpendicularly to a longitudinal axis (16) extending along the tube (12). An uncut portion (26) of the tube wall extends along the tube (12) for bonding or fastening the tube to a suitable base, such as a bottom (28) of a seat cushion (30).

  7. Segmented tubular cushion springs and spring assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslim, L. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A spring which includes a tube with an elliptical cross section, with the greater axial dimension extending laterally and the lesser axial dimension extending vertically is disclosed. A plurality of cuts in the form of slots passing through most of a wall of the tube extend perpendiculary to a longitudinal axis extending along the tube. An uncut portion of the tube wall extends along the tube for bonding or fastening the tube to a suitable base, such as a bottom of a seat cushion.

  8. Early season spring small grains proportion estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, D. E.; Trichel, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    An accurate, automated method for estimating early season spring small grains from Landsat MSS data is discussed. The method is summarized and the results of its application to 100 sample segment-years of data from the US Northern Great Plains in 1976, 1977, 1978, and 1979 are summarized. The results show that this estimator provides accurate estimates earlier in the growing season than previous methods. Ground truth is required only in the estimator development, and data storage, transmission, preprocessing, and processing requirements are minimal.

  9. Walking with springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugar, Thomas G.; Hollander, Kevin W.; Hitt, Joseph K.

    2011-04-01

    Developing bionic ankles poses great challenges due to the large moment, power, and energy that are required at the ankle. Researchers have added springs in series with a motor to reduce the peak power and energy requirements of a robotic ankle. We developed a "robotic tendon" that reduces the peak power by altering the required motor speed. By changing the required speed, the spring acts as a "load variable transmission." If a simple motor/gearbox solution is used, one walking step would require 38.8J and a peak motor power of 257 W. Using an optimized robotic tendon, the energy required is 21.2 J and the peak motor power is reduced to 96.6 W. We show that adding a passive spring in parallel with the robotic tendon reduces peak loads but the power and energy increase. Adding a passive spring in series with the robotic tendon reduces the energy requirements. We have built a prosthetic ankle SPARKy, Spring Ankle with Regenerative Kinetics, that allows a user to walk forwards, backwards, ascend and descend stairs, walk up and down slopes as well as jog.

  10. Orthos, an alarm system for the ALICE DAQ operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeland, Sylvain; Carena, Franco; Carena, Wisla; Chibante Barroso, Vasco; Costa, Filippo; Denes, Ervin; Divia, Roberto; Fuchs, Ulrich; Grigore, Alexandru; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Soos, Csaba; Telesca, Adriana; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; von Haller, Barthelemy

    2012-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The DAQ (Data Acquisition System) facilities handle the data flow from the detectors electronics up to the mass storage. The DAQ system is based on a large farm of commodity hardware consisting of more than 600 devices (Linux PCs, storage, network switches), and controls hundreds of distributed hardware and software components interacting together. This paper presents Orthos, the alarm system used to detect, log, report, and follow-up abnormal situations on the DAQ machines at the experimental area. The main objective of this package is to integrate alarm detection and notification mechanisms with a full-featured issues tracker, in order to prioritize, assign, and fix system failures optimally. This tool relies on a database repository with a logic engine, SQL interfaces to inject or query metrics, and dynamic web pages for user interaction. We describe the system architecture, the technologies used for the implementation, and the integration with existing monitoring tools.

  11. Recent COMPASS results and future prospects for ALICE

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Suh-Urk

    2015-04-10

    The COMPASS Collaboration has accumulated the world’s highest statistics on the reaction π{sup −} p → π{sup +}π{sup −}π{sup −} p at 190 GeV/c. The results, presented in Section 1, show that a new state J{sup PC} = 1{sup ++} state never reported before, the a{sub 1}(1420), decaying to f{sub 0}(980)π followed by f{sub 0}(980) → ππ. In addition, the Collaboration reports an exotic J{sup PC} = 1{sup −+} state, the π{sub 1}(1600), which cannot be a quarkonium. Both states are likely to be a tetra-quark, i.e. qq{sup ¯}+qq{sup ¯} or a gluonic hybrid, a qq{sup ¯} object with an excited gluon inside it. Section 2 is devoted to a brief discussion of the central production of resonances, which is being investigated by both COMPASS and ALICE collaborations. However, the results are not yet released, so it is limited to a broad discussion of the central production, with emphasis on different analyses dictated by differences in the experimental setup.

  12. A continuous read-out TPC for the ALICE upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippmann, C.

    2016-07-01

    The largest gaseous Time Projection Chamber (TPC) in the world, the ALICE TPC, will be upgraded based on Micro Pattern Gas Detector technology during the second long shutdown of the CERN Large Hadron Collider in 2018/19. The upgraded detector will operate continuously without the use of a triggered gating grid. It will thus be able to read all minimum bias Pb-Pb events that the LHC will deliver at the anticipated peak interaction rate of 50 kHz for the high luminosity heavy-ion era. New read-out electronics will send the continuous data stream to a new online farm at rates up to 1 TByte/s. A fractional ion feedback of below 1% is required to keep distortions due to space charge in the TPC drift volume at a tolerable level. The new read-out chambers will consist of quadruple stacks of Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM), combining GEM foils with a different hole pitch. Other key requirements such as energy resolution and operational stability have to be met as well. A careful optimisation of the performance in terms of all these parameters was achieved during an extensive R&D program. A working point well within the design specifications was identified with an ion backflow of 0.63%, a local energy resolution of 11.3% (sigma) and a discharge probability comparable to that of standard triple GEM detectors.

  13. Strangeness Production in Jets with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Chrismond; Harton, Austin; Garcia, Edmundo; Alice Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The study of strange particle production is an important tool for understanding the properties of the hot and dense QCD medium created in heavy-ion collisions at ultra-relativistic energies. The study of strange particles in these collisions provides information on parton fragmentation, a fundamental QCD process. While measurements at low and intermediate pT, are already in progress at the LHC, the study of high momentum observables is equally important for a complete understanding of the QCD matter, this can be achieved by studying jet interactions. We propose the measurement of the characteristics of the jets containing strange particles. Starting with proton-proton collisions, we have calculated the inclusive pTJet spectra and the spectra for jets containing strange particles (K-short or lambda), and we are extending this analysis to lead-lead collisions. In this talk the ALICE experiment will be described, the methodology used for the data analysis and the available results will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants PHY-1305280 and PHY-1407051.

  14. Spring polar ozone behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding of the springtime behavior of polar stratospheric ozone as of mid 1990 is summarized. Heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds as hypothesis for ozone loss are considered and a simplified description of the behavior of Antarctic ozone in winter and spring is given. Evidence that the situation is more complicated than described by the theory is produced. Many unresolved scientific issues remain and some of the most important problems are identified. Ozone changes each spring since 1979 have clearly established for the first time that man made chlorine compounds influence stratospheric ozone. Long before important advances in satellite and in situ investigations, it was Dobson's decision to place a total ozone measuring spectrometer at Halley Bay in Antarctica during the International Geophysical Year and subsequent continuous monitoring which led to the discovery that ozone was being destroyed each spring by chlorine processed by polar stratospheric clouds.

  15. Grid Computing at GSI for ALICE and FAIR - present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Kilian; Uhlig, Florian; Karabowicz, Radoslaw; Montiel-Gonzalez, Almudena; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Preuss, Carsten

    2012-12-01

    The future FAIR experiments CBM and PANDA have computing requirements that fall in a category that could currently not be satisfied by one single computing centre. One needs a larger, distributed computing infrastructure to cope with the amount of data to be simulated and analysed. Since 2002, GSI operates a tier2 center for ALICE@CERN. The central component of the GSI computing facility and hence the core of the ALICE tier2 centre is a LSF/SGE batch farm, currently split into three subclusters with a total of 15000 CPU cores shared by the participating experiments, and accessible both locally and soon also completely via Grid. In terms of data storage, a 5.5 PB Lustre file system, directly accessible from all worker nodes is maintained, as well as a 300 TB xrootd-based Grid storage element. Based on this existing expertise, and utilising ALICE's middleware ‘AliEn’, the Grid infrastructure for PANDA and CBM is being built. Besides a tier0 centre at GSI, the computing Grids of the two FAIR collaborations encompass now more than 17 sites in 11 countries and are constantly expanding. The operation of the distributed FAIR computing infrastructure benefits significantly from the experience gained with the ALICE tier2 centre. A close collaboration between ALICE Offline and FAIR provides mutual advantages. The employment of a common Grid middleware as well as compatible simulation and analysis software frameworks ensure significant synergy effects.

  16. Distributed Russian Tier-2 - RDIG in Simulation and Analysis of Alice Data From LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, A.; Jancurova, L.; Kiryanov, A.; Kotlyar, V.; Mitsyn, V.; Lyublev, Y.; Ryabinkin, E.; Shabratova, G.; Smirnov, S.; Stepanova, L.; Urazmetov, W.; Zarochentsev, A.

    2011-12-01

    On the threshold of LHC data there were intensive test and upgrade of GRID application software for all LHC experiments at the top of the modern LCG middleware (gLite). The update of such software for ALICE experiment at LHC, AliEn[1] had provided stable and secure operation of sites developing LHC data. The activity of Russian RDIG (Russian Data Intensive GRID) computer federation which is the distributed Tier-2 centre are devoted to simulation and analysis of LHC data in accordance with the ALICE computing model [2]. Eight sites of this federation interesting in ALICE activity upgrade their middle ware in accordance with requirements of ALICE computing what ensured success of MC production and end-user analysis activity at all eight sites. The result of occupancy and efficiency of each site in the time of LHC operation will be presented in the report. The outline the results of CPU and disk space usage at RDIG sites for the data simulation and analysis of first LHC data from the exposition of ALICE detector [3] will be presented as well. There will be presented also the information about usage of parallel analysis facility based on PROOF [4].

  17. The GridKa Tier-1 Computing Center within the ALICE Grid Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, WooJin J.; Christopher, Jung; Heiss, Andreas; Petzold, Andreas; Schwarz, Kilian

    2014-06-01

    The GridKa computing center, hosted by Steinbuch Centre for Computing at the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology (KIT) in Germany, is serving as the largest Tier-1 center used by the ALICE collaboration at the LHC. In 2013, GridKa provides 30k HEPSPEC06, 2.7 PB of disk space, and 5.25 PB of tape storage to ALICE. The 10Gbit/s network connections from GridKa to CERN, several Tier-1 centers and the general purpose network are used by ALICE intensively. In 2012 a total amount of ~1 PB was transferred to and from GridKa. As Grid framework, AliEn (ALICE Environment) is being used to access the resources, and various monitoring tools including the MonALISA (MONitoring Agent using a Large Integrated Services Architecture) are always running to alert in case of any problem. GridKa on-call engineers provide 24/7 support to guarantee minimal loss of availability of computing and storage resources in case of hardware or software problems. We introduce the GridKa Tier-1 center from the viewpoint of ALICE services.

  18. Spring Dust Storm Smothers Beijing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A few days earlier than usual, a large, dense plume of dust blew southward and eastward from the desert plains of Mongolia-quite smothering to the residents of Beijing. Citizens of northeastern China call this annual event the 'shachenbao,' or 'dust cloud tempest.' However, the tempest normally occurs during the spring time. The dust storm hit Beijing on Friday night, March 15, and began coating everything with a fine, pale brown layer of grit. The region is quite dry; a problem some believe has been exacerbated by decades of deforestation. According to Chinese government estimates, roughly 1 million tons of desert dust and sand blow into Beijing each year. This true-color image was made using two adjacent swaths (click to see the full image) of data from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the OrbView-2 satellite, on March 17, 2002. The massive dust storm (brownish pixels) can easily be distinguished from clouds (bright white pixels) as it blows across northern Japan and eastward toward the open Pacific Ocean. The black regions are gaps between SeaWiFS' viewing swaths and represent areas where no data were collected. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  19. Northern Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Territories Dept. of Education, Yellowknife.

    This guide contains nutrition information and nutrition education strategies aimed at residents of the Canadian Arctic. Section I: (1) defines nutrition terms; (2) describes the sources and functions of essential nutrients; (3) explains Canada's food guide and special considerations for the traditional northern Native diet and for lactose…

  20. The Life of the Party: Alice McGrath, Multiracial Coalitions, and the Struggle for Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armbruster-Sandoval, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    This essay explores the life of Alice Greenfield McGrath, a key player in the Sleepy Lagoon Defense Committee and a longtime activist whose involvement in social justice issues spanned eight decades. While best known for her role in the Sleepy Lagoon case in the 1940s, Alice fought the "good fight" for virtually her entire life, supporting the…

  1. The spring migration of adult North American Ospreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martell, Mark S.; Bierregaard, Richard O., Jr.; Washburn, Brian E.; Elliott, John E.; Henny, Charles J.; Kennedy, Robert S.; MacLeod, Iain

    2014-01-01

    Most North American Ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) are migratory, breeding in northern latitudes and migrating long distances to and from their wintering grounds in the tropics. Although fall migration patterns of North American Ospreys have been described and studied, very little has been published about the spring migration of these birds. We used satellite telemetry to: (1) determine the characteristics (timing, duration, migratory routes) of spring migrations of Ospreys; (2) determine if differences in spring migration patterns existed between sexes and among three breeding populations (east coast, midwestern, and western); and (3) compare consecutive fall and spring migrations of individual Ospreys. The median dates for departure from the wintering grounds and arrival on the breeding grounds did not differ significantly between adult male and female Ospreys. Compared to their fall migrations, all male and all east coast Ospreys spent fewer days on migration, fewer days in stopover periods along the migration route, traveled shorter distances overall, and traveled farther (on average) each day during spring. In contrast, fall and spring migration characteristics of all female and western Ospreys were similar. Our findings suggest that, although sex and breeding location might influence the spring migration strategy used by individual Ospreys, both males and females minimize the time spent on migration to ensure a timely arrival on the breeding grounds to establish or defend a nesting territory.

  2. Earlier vegetation green-up has reduced spring dust storms.

    PubMed

    Fan, Bihang; Guo, Li; Li, Ning; Chen, Jin; Lin, Henry; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Shen, Miaogen; Rao, Yuhan; Wang, Cong; Ma, Lei

    2014-01-01

    The observed decline of spring dust storms in Northeast Asia since the 1950s has been attributed to surface wind stilling. However, spring vegetation growth could also restrain dust storms through accumulating aboveground biomass and increasing surface roughness. To investigate the impacts of vegetation spring growth on dust storms, we examine the relationships between recorded spring dust storm outbreaks and satellite-derived vegetation green-up date in Inner Mongolia, Northern China from 1982 to 2008. We find a significant dampening effect of advanced vegetation growth on spring dust storms (r = 0.49, p = 0.01), with a one-day earlier green-up date corresponding to a decrease in annual spring dust storm outbreaks by 3%. Moreover, the higher correlation (r = 0.55, p < 0.01) between green-up date and dust storm outbreak ratio (the ratio of dust storm outbreaks to times of strong wind events) indicates that such effect is independent of changes in surface wind. Spatially, a negative correlation is detected between areas with advanced green-up dates and regional annual spring dust storms (r = -0.49, p = 0.01). This new insight is valuable for understanding dust storms dynamics under the changing climate. Our findings suggest that dust storms in Inner Mongolia will be further mitigated by the projected earlier vegetation green-up in the warming world. PMID:25343265

  3. Editors' Spring Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    While they do not represent the rainbow of reading tastes American public libraries accommodate, Book Review editors are a wildly eclectic bunch. One look at their bedside tables and ereaders would reveal very little crossover. This article highlights an eclectic array of spring offerings ranging from print books to an audiobook to ebook apps. It…

  4. Spring black stem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spring black stem is the most destructive alfalfa diseases in temperate regions of the U.S., Canada, Australia, and countries of Europe, Asia, and South America. The disease causes serious yield losses by reducing canopy dry matter and also decreases seed weight and crown and root mass. Forage qua...

  5. The News. Spring 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Ray, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This Spring issue of the quarterly newsletter of the Community College League of California contains the following articles: (1) Enrollment Drops; Fees to Blame?; (2) Senate's Grad Proposal Triggers Debate on Mission, Access; (3) Compton Decision has Affected Perceptions of Commission (discussion with Barbara Beno); (4) Dynamic New Architectural…

  6. Atascocita Springs Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigaglioni, Irene; Yocham, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    With the significant amount of time invested in researching the best techniques for delivering instruction to their students, Humble ISD is always on the forefront of education. Taking the recommendations of their active and vocal community groups, the district embarked in the design of the 26th elementary school, Atascocita Springs Elementary…

  7. Planar torsion spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Parsons, Adam H. (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A torsion spring comprises an inner mounting segment. An outer mounting segment is located concentrically around the inner mounting segment. A plurality of splines extends from the inner mounting segment to the outer mounting segment. At least a portion of each spline extends generally annularly around the inner mounting segment.

  8. Energy Matters - Spring 2002

    SciTech Connect

    2002-03-01

    Quarterly newsletter from DOE's Industrial Technologies Program to promote the use of energy-efficient industrial systems. The focus of the Spring 2002 Issue of Energy Matters focuses on premium energy efficiency systems, with articles on new gas technologies, steam efficiency, the Augusta Newsprint Showcase, and more.

  9. A Quadratic Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2010-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, we study examples of the forced quadratic spring equation [image omitted]. By performing trial-and-error numerical experiments, we demonstrate the existence of stability boundaries in the phase plane indicating initial conditions yielding bounded solutions, investigate the resonance boundary in the [omega]…

  10. Echoes of Spring Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyken, J. Clarine J.

    Designed to preserve the rich heritage of the rural school system which passed from the education scene in the 1930's and 1940's, this narrative, part history and part nostalgia, describes the author's own elementary education and the secure community life centered in the one room Spring Valley School in Hamilton County, Iowa, in the early decades…

  11. Permian Bone Spring formation: Sandstone play in the Delaware basin. Part I - slope

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, S.L.

    1997-08-01

    New exploration in the Permian (Leonardian) Bone Spring formation has indicated regional potential in several sandstone sections across portions of the northern Delaware basin. Significant production has been established in the first, second, and third Bone Spring sandstones, as well as in a new reservoir interval, the Avalon sandstone, above the first Bone Spring sandstone. These sandstones were deposited as submarine-fan systems within the northern Delaware basin during periods of lowered sea level. The Bone Spring as a whole consists of alternating carbonate and siliciclastic intervals representing the downdip equivalents to thick Abo-Yeso/Wichita-Clear Fork carbonate buildups along the Leonardian shelf margin. Hydrocarbon exploration in the Bone Spring has traditionally focused on debris-flow carbonate deposits restricted to the paleoslope. Submarine-fan systems, in contrast, extend a considerable distance basinward of these deposits and have been recently proven productive as much as 40-48 km south of the carbonate trend.

  12. 9. CONTEXTUAL VIEW SOUTHSOUTHEAST TOWARDS SPRING SITE. SPRING LEFT CORNER. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. CONTEXTUAL VIEW SOUTH-SOUTHEAST TOWARDS SPRING SITE. SPRING LEFT CORNER. - Juniata Mill Complex, 22.5 miles Southwest of Hawthorne, between Aurora Crater & Aurora Peak, Hawthorne, Mineral County, NV

  13. Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments (ALICE). Candidates point sources and high-level science products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choquet, Elodie; Chen, C.; Debes, J. H.; Golimowski, D. A.; Hagan, J.; Hines, D. C.; Lonsdale, S.; Marois, C.; Mawet, D.; Mittal, T.; Moerchen, M.; N'Diaye, M.; Perrin, M. D.; Pueyo, L.; Rajan, A.; Reid, I. N.; Schneider, G.; Wolff, S.; Soummer, R.

    2014-01-01

    The Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments (ALICE) project (HST/AR program 12652; PI Soummer) is currently conducting a comprehensive and consistent reprocessing of HST-NICMOS coronagraphic survey data to search for point sources and disks using advanced PSF subtraction. The Karhunen-Loeve Image Projection (KLIP) algorithm based on principal component analysis was developed for this project. We present the main concept for the pipeline, reduction strategy, and PSF subtraction implementation and performance. The ALICE pipeline was designed to process automatically approximately 400 targets in the NICMOS coronagraphic archive, and to deliver High-Level Science Products (HLSPs) back to the MAST archive at STScI. The HLSPs are defined in collaboration with other similar projects to define a standard format for high-contrast imaging. We present and discuss the ALICE point source candidates detected in the NICMOS archive together with a statistical analysis of the population of background objects.

  14. Particle identification with the ALICE Time-Of-Flight detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alici, A.

    2014-12-01

    High performance Particle Identification system (PID) is a distinguishing characteristic of the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Charged particles in the intermediate momentum range are identified in ALICE by the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) detector. The TOF exploits the Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) technology, capable of an intrinsic time resolution at the level of few tens of ps with an overall efficiency close to 100% and a large operation plateau. The full system is made of 1593 MRPC chambers with a total area of 141 m2, covering the pseudorapidity interval [-0.9,+0.9] and the full azimuthal angle. The ALICE TOF system has shown very stable operation during the first 3 years of collisions at the LHC. In this paper a summary of the system performance as well as main results with data from collisions will be reported.

  15. Recent Developments on ALICE (Accelerators and Lasers In Combined Experiments) at Daresbury Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Saveliev, Y M; Buckley, R K; Buckley, S R; Clarke, J A; Corlett, P A; Dunning, D J; Goulden, A R; Hill, S F; Jackson, F; Jamison, S P; Jones, J K; Jones, L B; Leonard, S; McIntosh, P A; McKenzie, J W; Middleman, K J; Militsyn, B L; Moss, A J; Muratori, B D; Orrett, J F; Pattalwar, S M; Phillips, P J; Scott, D J; Seddon, E A; Shepherd, B.J.A.; Smith, S L; Thompson, N; Wheelhouse, A E; Williams, P H; Harrison, P; Holder, D J; Holder, G M; Schofield, A L; Weightman, P; Williams, R L; Laundry, D; Powers, T; Priebe, G; Surman, M

    2010-05-01

    Progress made in ALICE (Accelerators and Lasers In Combined Experiments) commissioning and a summary of the latest experimental results are presented in this paper. After an extensive work on beam loading effects in SC RF linac (booster) and linac cavities conditioning, ALICE can now operate in full energy recovery mode at the bunch charge of 40pC, the beam energy of 30MeV and train lengths of up to 100us. This improved operation of the machine resulted in generation of coherently enhanced broadband THz radiation with the energy of several tens of uJ per pulse and in successful demonstration of the Compton Backscattering x-ray source experiment. The next steps in the ALICE scientific programme are commissioning of the IR FEL and start of the research on the first non-scaling FFAG accelerator EMMA. Results from both projects will be also reported.

  16. Recent developments of the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian containment code ALICE-II. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Zeuch, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    The ANL arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian containment code ALICE was developed for use in fast reactor containment studies and is particularly suited for problems involving complex fluid-structure interactions. Many improvements have been made which has resulted in a second version of the code, ALICE-II. A selection of some important improvements are given in this paper. To realistically analyze the above-core hydrodynamics containing a movable upper internal structure (UIS), a 3-D pipe element has been adopted to calculate the response of the UIS columns that connect the UIS to the vessel head. A corotational coordinate scheme for large displacement, small strain, elastic-plastic structural-dynamic analysis is utilized in the formulation. Both geometric and material nonlinearities are considered. The governing equations are integrated explicitly using a central difference procedure. Many sample problems are presented, including comparisons of ALICE-II and ICECO-CEL results on the APRICOT Phase 3 problems.

  17. Performance of the High Momentum Particle Identification Detector in ALICE at Lhc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cataldo, Giacinto

    2008-06-01

    The ALICE High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (HMPID) is a proximity focusing ring imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH), 10 m2 of active area for the hadron identification at high transverse momenta: 1 < pt < 3 GeV/c for charged π and K, 1 < pt < 5 GeV/c for p. It has been installed in ALICE since September 2006 in view of the first collisions expected mid-2008. After a short description of the detector and the online data quality monitoring this paper focuses on the HMPID particle identification (PID) capabilities even in the higher expected track multiplicity dNch/dη = 6000, simulated in central Pb-Pb ALICE events.

  18. The Rosetta UV imaging spectrometer ALICE: First light optical and radiometric performance results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, D. C.; Stern, S. A.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Bertaux, J. L.; Feldman, P. D.; Festou, M. C.

    2000-10-01

    We describe the design, scientific objectives, and "first-light" radiometric testing results of the Rosetta/ALICE instrument. ALICE is a lightweight (2.7 kg), low-power (4 W), and low-cost imaging spectrometer optimized for cometary ultraviolet spectroscopy. ALICE, which is funded by NASA (with hardware contributions from CNES, France), will fly on the ESA Rosetta Orbiter to characterize the cometary nucleus, coma, and nucleus/coma coupling of the target comet 46P/Wirtanen. It will obtain spatially-resolved, far-UV spectra of Wirtanen's nucleus and coma in the 700-2050 Å passband with a spectral resolution of 5-10 Å for extended sources that fill the entrance slit's field- of-view. ALICE is also the UV spectrometer model for the PERSI remote sensing suite proposed for the Pluto Kuiper Express (PKE) mission. ALICE uses modern technology to achieve its low mass and low power design specifications. It employs an off-axis telescope feeding a 0.15-m normal incidence Rowland circle spectrograph with a concave (toroidal) holographic reflection grating. The imaging microchannel plate (MCP) detector utilizes dual solar-blind opaque photocathodes of KBr and CsI deposited on a cylindrically-curved (7.5-cm radius) MCP Z-stack, and a matching 2-D cylindrically-curved double delay-line readout array with a 1024 x 32 pixel array format. This array format provides a point source response that is twice that originally proposed (Δ λ 3 Å). Three data taking modes are possible: (i) histogram image mode for 2-D images, (ii) pixel list mode with periodic time hacks for temporal studies, and (iii) count rate mode for broadband photometric studies. Optical and radiometric sensitivity performance results based on subsystem tests of the flight optics, detector, and preliminary integrated system level tests of the integrated ALICE flight model are presented and discussed.

  19. Studying Springs in Series Using a Single Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serna, Juan D.; Joshi, Amitabh

    2011-01-01

    Springs are used for a wide range of applications in physics and engineering. Possibly, one of their most common uses is to study the nature of restoring forces in oscillatory systems. While experiments that verify Hooke's law using springs are abundant in the physics literature, those that explore the combination of several springs together are…

  20. Titan's Stratospheric Condensibles at High Northern Latitudes During Northern Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Carrie; Samuelson, R.; Achterberg, R.

    2012-01-01

    The Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer (IRIS) instrument on board Voyager 1 caught the first glimpse of an unidentified particulate feature in Titan's stratosphere that spectrally peaks at 221 per centimeter. Until recently, this feature that we have termed 'the haystack,' has been seen persistently at high northern latitudes with the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument onboard Cassini, The strength of the haystack emission feature diminishes rapidly with season, becoming drastically reduced at high northern latitudes, as Titan transitions from northern winter into spring, In contrast to IRIS whose shortest wavenumber was 200 per centimeter, CIRS extends down to 10 per centimeter, thus revealing an entirely unexplored spectral region in which nitrile ices have numerous broad lattice vibration features, Unlike the haystack, which is only found at high northern latitudes during northern winter/early northern spring, this geometrically thin nitrile cloud pervades Titan's lower stratosphere, spectrally peaking at 160 per centimeter, and is almost global in extent spanning latitudes 85 N to 600 S, The inference of nitrile ices are consistent with the highly restricted altitude ranges over which these features are observed, and appear to be dominated by a mixture of HCN and HC3N, The narrow range in altitude over which the nitrile ices extend is unlike the haystack, whose vertical distribution is significantly broader, spanning roughly 70 kilometers in altitude in Titan's lower stratosphere, The nitrile clouds that CIRS observes are located in a dynamically stable region of Titan's atmosphere, whereas CH4 clouds, which ordinarily form in the troposphere, form in a more dynamically unstable region, where convective cloud systems tend to occur. In the unusual situation where Titan's tropopause cools significantly from the HASI 70.5K temperature minimum, CH4 should condense in Titan's lower stratosphere, just like the aforementioned nitrile clouds, although

  1. L0 Trigger for the EMCal Detector of the ALICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kral, Jiri; Awes, Terry C; Muller, Hans; Rak, Jan; Schambach, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator was designed to study ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The ALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMCal) was built to provide measurement of photons, electrons, and jets, and trigger selection of hard-QCD events containing them. The EMCal single-shower L0 trigger, which triggers on large energy deposit within a 4 x 4 tower sliding window, became operational in 2010. The implementation of the real-time FPGA based algorithm optimized to provide a fast L0 decision is presented.

  2. Readout electronics upgrade on ALICE/PHOS detector for Run 2 of LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Zhang, F.; Feng, W.; Huang, G.; Song, Z.; Yin, Z.; Zhou, D.

    2015-02-01

    The ALICE/PHOS detector is carrying out a major upgrade of its readout electronics for the RUN 2 of LHC (2015-2017). A new architecture based on the point to point link is developed. The event readout rate can achieve 30 kHz by replacing the old parallel GTL bus with DTC links. The communication stability of the interface between front-end electronic boards and readout concentrators is significantly improved. A new FPGA firmware is designed to be compatible with the upgraded ALICE trigger system and DATE software.

  3. Spring bloom onset in the Nordic Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignot, Alexandre; Ferrari, Raffaele; Mork, Kjell Arne

    2016-06-01

    The North Atlantic spring bloom is a massive annual growth event of marine phytoplankton, tiny free-floating algae that form the base of the ocean's food web and generates a large fraction of the global primary production of organic matter. The conditions that trigger the onset of the spring bloom in the Nordic Seas, at the northern edge of the North Atlantic, are studied using in situ data from six bio-optical floats released north of the Arctic Circle. It is often assumed that spring blooms start as soon as phytoplankton cells daily irradiance is sufficiently abundant that division rates exceed losses. The bio-optical float data instead suggest the tantalizing hypothesis that Nordic Seas blooms start when the photoperiod, the number of daily light hours experienced by phytoplankton, exceeds a critical value, independently of division rates. The photoperiod trigger may have developed at high latitudes where photosynthesis is impossible during polar nights and phytoplankton enters into a dormant stage in winter. While the first accumulation of biomass recorded by the bio-optical floats is consistent with the photoperiod hypothesis, it is possible that some biomass accumulation started before the critical photoperiod but at levels too low to be detected by the fluorometers. More precise observations are needed to test the photoperiod hypothesis.

  4. Geothermal systems of northern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hose, Richard Kenneth; Taylor, Bruce Edward

    1974-01-01

    Hot springs are numerous and nearly uniformly distributed in northern Nevada. Most occur on the flanks of basins, along Basin and Range (late Miocene to Holocene) faults, while some occur in the inner parts of the basins. Surface temperatures of the springs range from slightly above ambient to, boiling; some springs are superheated. Maximum subsurface water temperatures calculated on the basis of quartz solubility range as high as 252?C, although most are below 190?C. Flows range from a trickle to several hundred liters per minute. The Nevada geothermal systems differ markedly from the power-producing system at The Geysers, Calif., and from those areas with a high potential, for power production (e.g., Yellowstone Park, Wyo.; Jemez Mountains, N. Mex.). These other systems are associated with Quaternary felsic volcanic rocks and probably derive their heat from cooling magma rather high in the crust. In northern Nevada, however, felsic volcanic rocks are virtually all older than 10 million years, and. analogous magmatic heat sources are, therefore, probably lacking. Nevada is part of an area of much higher average heat flow than the rest of the United States. In north-central Nevada, geothermal gradients are as great as 64?C per kilometer in bedrock and even higher in basin fill. The high gradients probably result from a combination of thin crust and high temperature upper mantle. We suggest that the geothermal systems of northern Nevada result from circulation of meteoric waters along Basin and Range faults and that their temperature chiefly depends upon (1) depth of circulation and (2) the geothermal gradient near the faults.

  5. Evolution of Titan's Seas and Lakes during Northern Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotin, C.; Lawrence, K. J.; Le Mouelic, S.; MacKenzie, S.; Barnes, J. W.; Brown, R. H.; Cornet, T.; Rodriguez, S.; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.; Soderblom, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Titan is the only body in the solar system, besides Earth, to have stable liquid seas at its surface [1]. The three main seas, known as Kraken Mare, Ligeia Mare, and Punga Mare are located at the North Pole where they cover a surface area of 500,000-, 126,000-, and 50,000-km2, respectively. In addition, several hundreds of small lakes are present, raising the questions of their relationships with the large seas. These hydrocarbon lakes and seas can be better imaged at optical wavelengths as the season moves towards summer solstice. At the same time, the North Pole area is receiving more solar light, which modifies the atmospheric circulation. Global Circulation Models (GCMs) predict stronger winds, more evaporation, and formation of methane clouds [2]. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) has observed the North Pole area during several high inclined flybys. Mosaics in seven infrared atmospheric windows have been constructed. Several units can be distinguished by their surface albedo. The 5-micron bright unit has been interpreted as evaporitic material based on its location relative to the lakes and seas [3]. The spectral characteristics cannot be matched by a simple mixture of water ice and 'typical Titan organic material' known as tholins. The composition of these different units is therefore still enigmatic. In addition, some of the spectral characteristics may be related to the texture of the units. The few passes over the North Pole have allowed the VIMS team to image some places several times looking for changes on the surface or/and in the lower atmosphere. Although GCMs predict evaporation of the seas and lakes and the formation of methane clouds [2], neither changes in the shorelines, nor clouds have been identified. Very recent specular reflection observations suggest the formation of waves on Punga [4], and therefore more active winds. In addition, the VIMS recently observed a brightening of the area between Punga, Kraken and Ligeia. Whether this change is related to surface processes or evaporation of the seas is being investigated. This work has been performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. [1] Stofan E.R. et al., Science, 2007 ; [2] Schneider T. et al., Nature, 2012 ; [3] MacKenzie S.M. et al., Icarus, in press ; [4] Barnes J.W., Ap.J., 2014.

  6. Surface Temperatures on Titan during Northern Winter and Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, D. E.; Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Romani, P. N.; Samuelson, R. E.; Mamoutkine, A.; Gorius, N. J. P.; Coustenis, A.; Tokano, T.

    2016-01-01

    Meridional brightness temperatures were measured on the surface of Titan during the 2004-2014 portion of the Cassini mission by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer. Temperatures mapped from pole to pole during five two-year periods show a marked seasonal dependence. The surface temperature near the south pole over this time decreased by 2 K from 91.7 ± 0.3 to 89.7 ± 0.5 K while at the north pole the temperature increased by 1 K from 90.7 ± 0.5 to 91.5 ± 0.2 K. The latitude of maximum temperature moved from 19 S to 16 N, tracking the sub-solar latitude. As the latitude changed, the maximum temperature remained constant at 93.65 ± 0.15 K. In 2010 our temperatures repeated the north-south symmetry seen by Voyager one Titan year earlier in 1980. Early in the mission, temperatures at all latitudes had agreed with GCM predictions, but by 2014 temperatures in the north were lower than modeled by 1 K. The temperature rise in the north may be delayed by cooling of sea surfaces and moist ground brought on by seasonal methane precipitation and evaporation.

  7. Surface Temperatures on Titan During Northern Winter and Spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.; Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde ,V. G.; Romani, P. N.; Samuelson, R. E.; Mamoutkine, A.; Gorius, N. J. P.; Coustenis, A.; Tokano, T.

    2016-01-01

    Meridional brightness temperatures were measured on the surface of Titan during the 2004-2014 portion of the Cassini mission by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer. Temperatures mapped from pole to pole during five two year periods show a marked seasonal dependence. The surface temperature near the south pole over this time decreased by 2 K from 91.7 plus or minus 0.3 to 89.7 plus or minus 0.5 K while at the north pole the temperature increased by 1 K from 90.7 plus or minus 0.5 to 91.5 plus or minus 0.2 K. The latitude of maximum temperature moved from 19 S to 16 N, tracking the subsolar latitude. As the latitude changed, the maximum temperature remained constant at 93.65 plus or minus 0.15 K. In 2010 our temperatures repeated the north-south symmetry seen by Voyager one Titan year earlier in 1980. Early in the mission, temperatures at all latitudes had agreed with GCM predictions, but by 2014 temperatures in the north were lower than modeled by 1 K. The temperature rise in the north may be delayed by cooling of sea surfaces and moist ground brought on by seasonal methane precipitation and evaporation.

  8. Hot Spring Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    López-López, Olalla; Cerdán, María Esperanza; González-Siso, María Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Hot springs have been investigated since the XIX century, but isolation and examination of their thermophilic microbial inhabitants did not start until the 1950s. Many thermophilic microorganisms and their viruses have since been discovered, although the real complexity of thermal communities was envisaged when research based on PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes arose. Thereafter, the possibility of cloning and sequencing the total environmental DNA, defined as metagenome, and the study of the genes rescued in the metagenomic libraries and assemblies made it possible to gain a more comprehensive understanding of microbial communities—their diversity, structure, the interactions existing between their components, and the factors shaping the nature of these communities. In the last decade, hot springs have been a source of thermophilic enzymes of industrial interest, encouraging further study of the poorly understood diversity of microbial life in these habitats. PMID:25369743

  9. The joys of spring.

    PubMed

    Riby, Leigh M

    2013-01-01

    This study used Vivaldi's Four Seasons, an extraordinary example of program music, to explore the consequence of music exposure on cognitive event-related potentials (ERPs). Seventeen participants performed a three-stimulus visual odd-ball task while ERPs were recorded. Participants were required to differentiate between a rare target stimulus (to elicit a memory updating component; P3b), a rare novel stimulus (to elicit a novelty attention component; P3a), and a frequent nontarget stimulus. During task performance participants listened to the four concertos: Spring, Summer, Autumn, and Winter in comparison to a silent control condition. Additionally, the three movements of each concerto have a fast, slow, fast structure that enabled examination of the impact of tempo. The data revealed that "Spring," particularly the well-recognized, vibrant, emotive, and uplifting first movement, had the ability to enhance mental alertness and brain measures of attention and memory. PMID:22851380

  10. Spring operated accelerator and constant force spring mechanism therefor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shillinger, G. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A spring assembly consisting of an elongate piece of flat spring material formed into a spiral configuration and a free running spool in circumscribing relation to which this spring is disposed was developed. The spring has a distal end that is externally accessible so that when the distal end is drawn along a path, the spring unwinds against a restoring force present in the portion of the spring that resides in a transition region between a relatively straight condition on the path and a fully wound condition on the spool. When the distal end is released, the distal end is accelerated toward the spool by the force existing at the transition region which force is proportional to the cross-sectional area of the spring.

  11. Spring magnet films.

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, S. D.; Fullerton, E. E.; Gornakov, V. S.; Inomata, A.; Jiang, J. S.; Nikitenko, V. I.; Shapiro, A. J.; Shull, R. D.; Sowers, C. H.

    1999-03-29

    The properties of exchange-spring-coupled bilayer and superlattice films are highlighted for Sm-Co hard magnet and Fe or Co soft magnet layers. The hexagonal Sm-Co is grown via magnetron sputtering in a- and b-axis epitaxial orientations. In both cases the c-axis, in the film plane, is the easy axis of magnetization. Trends in coercivity with film thickness are established and related to the respective microstructure of the two orientations. The magnetization reversal process for the bilayers is examined by magnetometry and magneto-optical imaging, as well as by simulations that utilize a one-dimensional model to provide the spin configuration for each atomic layer. The Fe magnetization is pinned to that of the Sm-Co at the interface, and reversal proceeds via a progressive twisting of the Fe magnetization. The Fe demagnetization curves are reversible as expected for a spring magnet. Comparison of experiment and simulations indicates that the spring magnet behavior can be understood from the intrinsic properties of the hard and soft layers. Estimated are made of the ultimate gain in performance that can potentially be realized in this system.

  12. The morphology and hydrology of small spring-dominated channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Ronald E.; Anderson, Diana E.; Springer, Abraham E.

    2008-12-01

    Small, low order channels located in wet meadows along the Mogollon Rim of northern Arizona that receive the bulk of their flow from spring discharge exhibit a morphology that differs markedly from channels that receive the bulk of their flow from runoff. These small, spring-dominated channels generally have dense vegetation cover, vertical (or near vertical) banks with flat channel beds that are armored with clasts up to 60 mm. Clasts armoring the spring-dominated channels become mobile at 45 to 85% of the bankfull depth. The lack of fine-grained material in the bed of the spring-dominated channels reflects the small drainage size, lack of fine grain input from the spring, and winnowing affect of the consistent discharge. Minor amounts of large woody debris were present in some of the spring-dominated channels, however, unlike previous studies it does not appear to play a role in the spring-dominated channel morphology. Sinuosity values for spring-dominated channels averaged 1.19, while the average sinuosity values for the runoff-dominated channels, 1.08, were significantly lower. Measured width-to-depth ratios averaged 2.4 in the spring-dominated channels, much lower than the average ratio of 11.6 found for the runoff-dominated channels. The standard deviation of width-to-depth ratios was higher for runoff-dominated channels, reflecting a more variable channel profile. A third channel type, here referred to as hybrid channels, receive significant flow from both springs and runoff. These channels have characteristics that fall between spring-dominated and runoff-dominated channels. Elevation, gradient, organic matter content, and sediment grain size distribution of the wet meadows in which the channels are formed do not exhibit significant differences between channel types, suggesting that these factors are not responsible for the observed differences in channel morphologies. The major differences in controls on the channel morphology found between the spring

  13. Influence of Alice 3: Reducing the Hurdles to Success in a CS1 Programming Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Tebring

    2013-01-01

    Learning the syntax, semantics, and concepts behind software engineering can be a challenging task for many individuals. This paper examines the Alice 3 software, a three-dimensional visual environment for teaching programming concepts, to determine if it is an effective tool for improving student achievement, raising self-efficacy, and engaging…

  14. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko’s Increasing Atomic Sulfur Abundance Observed by Rosetta Alice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feaga, Lori M.; Feldman, Paul D.; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Keeney, Brian A.; Knight, Matthew M.; Noonan, John; Parker, Joel Wm.; Schindhelm, Eric; Steffl, Andrew J.; Stern, S. Alan; Vervack, Ronald J.; Weaver, Harold A.

    2015-11-01

    Alice, NASA’s lightweight and low-power far-ultraviolet (FUV) imaging spectrograph onboard ESA’s comet orbiting spacecraft Rosetta (Stern et al. 2007), is continuing its characterization of the nucleus and coma of the Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (C-G) as it approaches and recedes from perihelion. With a spectral range from 700-2050 Å, Alice has the ability to detect the atomic sulfur multiplets at 1429 Å, 1479 Å and 1814 Å. Sulfur in C-G’s coma is most likely a dissociation product of CS2 and OCS, but could also be produced after a secondary dissociation from H2S and SO2, all molecular species measured in C-G’s coma by ROSINA, the Rosetta orbiter’s mass spectrometer.Due to low abundances, Alice did not detect sulfur atoms at C-G until May 2015 when the comet was at ~1.7 AU and still 3 months from perihelion. Now, sulfur is ubiquitous in Alice observations above the limb of the nucleus. There is evidence that there is not a strong dependence of the abundance of sulfur on the distance from the nucleus in the pre-perihelion radial profiles of the gas, which may be indicative of the parent molecule and its distribution. This will be investigated further. The evolution of the presence of the three sulfur multiplets, their relative abundances and excitation processes, and behavior pre- and post-perihelion will be presented.

  15. Does Morality Harm Children? Alice Miller on Morality and Poisonous Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fridley, William L.

    2006-01-01

    Alice Miller, the former psychoanalyst, has gained world renown for her controversial and provocative writings on child rearing. Miller contends that traditional child rearing practices--in schools, ecclesiastical settings, and the family--consist of physical and emotional cruelty that she labels "poisonous pedagogy." According to…

  16. Alice Carey Inskeep (1875-1942): A Pioneering Iowa Music Educator and MENC Founding Member

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedden, Debra Gordon; Heller, George N.; Humphreys, Jere T.; Slattery, Valerie A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the professional contributions of Alice Carey Inskeep (1875-1942), who contributed significantly to music education through her "positive and effective teaching, supervising, community service, and leadership in music education". Inskeep was born, in Ottumwa, Iowa, and taught for five years in that city's…

  17. Black Matrilineage: The Case of Alice Walker and Zora Neale Hurston.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadoff, Diane F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the relationship of the Black contemporary author, Alice Walker, to folklorist Zora Neale Hurston and presents a clarification of the relationship of gender and race in a revised theory of literary influence. Argues that Black women authors sometimes misread literary forbears in order to discover and express a positive matrilineage…

  18. "Spend Your Whole Life Learning and Giving!": An Interview with Alice Sterling Honig

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Early Childhood Research & Practice, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an interview with Dr. Alice Sterling Honig which took place in Syracuse, New York, in May 2009. Michele Jachim Barrett of Syracuse University conducted the interview using questions prepared by the editors of "ECRP." Dr. Honig is currently Professor Emerita at Syracuse University. Her work in early childhood development, care,…

  19. Effects of Using Alice and Scratch in an Introductory Programming Course for Corrective Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chih-Kai

    2014-01-01

    Scratch, a visual programming language, was used in many studies in computer science education. Most of them reported positive results by integrating Scratch into K-12 computer courses. However, the object-oriented concept, one of the important computational thinking skills, is not represented well in Scratch. Alice, another visual programming…

  20. Response to Intervention: Alice Birney Middle School's Model, Experience, and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brundage, Amber; Beckmann-Bartlett, Carol; Burns, Matthew K.

    2010-01-01

    In January 2008, the school-wide data for Alice Birney Middle School in North Charleston, South Carolina were concerning. According to the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Reading data, 40% to 48% of the students fell below the 25th percentile at each grade level. The authors realized that these students were not all undiagnosed special…

  1. Literary and Visual Literacy for All: A Fourth-Grade Study of "Alice in Wonderland."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strangman, Nicole

    2003-01-01

    Interviews Monica Edinger, a fourth-grade teacher who strives to foster a love of literature in her classroom by reading "Alice in Wonderland" aloud to her students. Describes the rest of this project, which includes a close study of the book's illustrators and culminates in a student-produced Toy Theater production of the book, which is digitally…

  2. A design study for the upgraded ALICE O2 computing facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    An upgrade of the ALICE detector is currently prepared for the Run 3 period of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN starting in 2020. The physics topics under study by ALICE during this period will require the inspection of all collisions at a rate of 50 kHz for minimum bias Pb-Pb and 200 kHz for pp and p-Pb collisions in order to extract physics signals embedded into a large background. The upgraded ALICE detector will produce more than 1 TByte/s of data. Both collision and data rate impose new challenges onto the detector readout and compute system. Some detectors will not use a triggered readout, which will require a continuous processing of the detector data. The challenging requirements will be met by a combined online and offline facility developed and managed by the ALICE O2 project. The combined facility will accommodate the necessary substantial increase of data taking rate. In this paper we present first results of a prototype with estimates for scalability and feasibility for a full scale system.

  3. A Linguistic Analysis of Rhetorical Strategies in Selected Narratives of Alice Walker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matunda, Robert Stephen Mokaya

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to analyze rhetorical strategies of Alice Walker in four narratives, namely, "The Color Purple, In Search of Our Mother's Gardens, Possessing the Secret of Joy, and Now Is the Time To Open Your Heart". As such, this study helps to expand the body of investigation relating linguistics to literature and medium…

  4. Programming in Pairs with Alice to Improve Confidence, Enjoyment, and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop-Clark, Cathy; Courte, Jill; Howard, Elizabeth V.

    2006-01-01

    Students in an introductory computing class participated in a study investigating the impact of using a graphics programming environment (Alice) and pair-programming on confidence, enjoyment and achievement. Sixty-four participants completed a short questionnaire and a content pre-test about computer programming concepts. Students were then…

  5. Early Spring Dust Storms at the North Pole of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Early spring typically brings dust storms to northern polar Mars. As the north polar cap begins to thaw, the temperature difference between the cold frost region and recently thawed surface results in swirling winds. The choppy dust clouds of at least three dust storms are visible in this mosaic of images taken by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft in 2002. The white polar cap is frozen carbon dioxide.

  6. ALICE: the ultraviolet imaging spectrograph aboard the New Horizons Pluto mission spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, S. Alan; Scherrer, John; Slater, David C.; Gladstone, G. R.; Dirks, Greg; Stone, John; Davis, Michael; Versteeg, Marteen; Siegmund, O. H. W.

    2005-09-01

    The ALICE instrument is a lightweight (4.4 kg), low-power (4.4 W) imaging spectrograph that is planned to fly aboard the New Horizons mission to Pluto/Charon and the Kuiper Belt. Its primary job is to detect a variety of important atomic and molecular species in Pluto's atmosphere, and to determine their relative abundances as a function of altitude so that a complete picture of Pluto's atmospheric composition and structure can be determined for the first time. ALICE would also be used to search for an atmosphere around Pluto's moon, Charon, as well as the Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) that New Horizons hopes to fly by after Pluto-Charon. The New Horizons ALICE design, based on the Rosetta ALICE instrument design now en route to Comet 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko aboard the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft, incorporates an off-axis telescope feeding a Rowland-circle spectrograph with a 520-1870 Å spectral passband, a spectral point spread function of 3-6 Å FWHM, and an instantaneous spatial field-of-view of 6 degrees. Two separate input apertures that feed the telescope allow for both airglow and solar occultation observations during the mission. The focal plane camera is an imaging microchannel plate (MCP) double delay-line detector with dual solar-blind opaque photocathodes (KBr and CsI) and a focal surface that matches the 15-cm diameter Rowland-circle. Data taking modes include both histogram and pixel list exposures. We describe the scientific objectives of ALICE as well as the design, build, and environmental testing results of the flight model.

  7. Lomonosov In Spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    26 September 2004 This blue wide angle Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the frost-covered rims of Lomonosov Crater in late martian spring. At the north (top) end of the image, low, ground-hugging fog can be seen in association with the retreating seasonal polar cap. Lomonosov Crater is about 150 km (93 mi) in diameter and located at 65oN, 9oW. The image is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  8. Fun with Automobile Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Klaus

    2006-10-01

    Simple measurements on car suspension systems and their analysis can raise student interest in the elementary discussion of the behavior of springs in oscillating systems. To understand these complicated oscillating systems and to interpret measurements properly, models may be used. Students find out how to make approximations and extract useful information from marginal data using common sense, basic physics, and simple software tools. Basic experiments on a physical model of a car suspension and on a passenger car, as well as the analysis of the data, will be presented. In particular, a value of the bounce mode frequency of a car was obtained using several approaches.

  9. Connections between winter snowpack and subsequent spring floods in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichting, Lena; Engeland, Kolbjørn; Holmqvist, Erik; Bache Stranden, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    correlation coefficient of 0.5 or higher. Flood volume had the highest correlation to SWE, followed by flood duration and peak. The geographical distribution of correlation shows that the correlation is the highest for inland catchments and in Northern Norway. Lower correlations were observed for catchments near the west coast. Regression models were established for these stations in order to predict the spring flood peak, duration and volume based on SWE data. In summary, we have (i) identified for which catchments SWE might be used to predict spring flood and (ii) established regression models for predicting spring flood peak, duration and volume based on the winter snowpack.

  10. Cold Springs in Permafrost on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, D. T.; Pollard, W. H.; McKay, C. P.; Heldmann, J. L.; Toon, O. B.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2000-12-01

    Perennial springs located on west central Axel Heiberg Island in the Canadian High Arctic occur in a region with a mean annual air temperature of -17 degrees C and flow through continuous permafrost over 600 meters thick. The spring water is a low temperature (up to 6 degrees C) brine flow that maintains constant discharge temperatures and flow rate throughout the year. Here we report on observations of the thermal regime associated with these springs and develop a combined flow and thermal model of the subsurface flow using the measured geothermal gradient. We also consider the implications these springs have for the search for similar environments, past or present, on Mars. This work was supported by grants from NASA's Exobiology program, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs Northern Scientific Training Program, NASA's Astrobiology Integration Office, and the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado. Logistical support was provided by the Canadian Polar Continental Shelf Project and McGill University's High Arctic Research Station.

  11. BACTERIOPLANKTON DYNAMICS IN NORTHERN SAN FRANCISCO BAY: ROLE OF PARTICLE ASSOCIATION AND SEASONAL FRESHWATER FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterioplankton abundance and metabolic characteristics were observed in northern San Francisco Bay, California, during spring and summer 1996 at three sites: Central Bay, Suisun Bay, and the Sacramento River. These sites spanned a salinity gradient from marine to freshwater, an...

  12. Spring-Tab Lock Washer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Jeff; Rogers, Dylan; Rodriguez, Pete

    1993-01-01

    Improved spring-tab lock washer offers alternative to such positive-locking devices as cotter pins and lock wires and to conventional split-ring lock washers. Does not dig into fastened parts with sharp edges; less likely to inflict scratches causing cracks. Contains three winglike spring tabs and three alignment pips, pressed into mating dimples in surface of part to be fastened. Spring tabs on lock washer allow only clockwise rotation (tightening) of bolt or nut.

  13. Measurement of J/ψ production in Pb—Pb and pp collisions at the LHC with the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, Martino; ALICE Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) aims to study the behaviour of nuclear matter at high energy densities and the transition to Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), expected to occur in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Quarkonia are important probes of nuclear matter and QGP, through the modification of their yield in the hot and dense medium formed in heavy ion collisions. Their measurement in pp collisions is also crucial to the ALICE physics program. ALICE measures quarkonium production at both forward (in the dimuon channel) and mid-rapidity (in the dielectron channel). In 2010 and 2011 the Large Hadron Collider has provided pp collisions at TeV and 2.76 TeV and Pb-Pb collisions at TeV. The ALICE results on J/ψ production in both Pb-Pb and pp collisions are presented.

  14. The influence of boreal winter extratropical North Pacific Oscillation on Australian spring rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Linye; Li, Yun; Duan, Wansuo

    2016-08-01

    The North Pacific Oscillation (NPO) is a key atmospheric intrinsic mode. This study concerns mechanisms that the NPO influences Southern Hemisphere climate anomalies after several months. It is found that the boreal wintertime NPO has a significant negative connection with austral spring rainfall anomalies in Australia, particularly in the Northern Territory, Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria. A positive NPO phase tends to be followed by dry conditions, while a negative phase by wet conditions in austral spring over much of northern and eastern Australia. The physical mechanism by which the boreal winter NPO affects Australian rainfall arises from the NPO seasonal footprinting mechanism that generates significant tropical central and eastern Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) warming anomalies during austral spring. Then, the positive NPO-related SST warming anomalies over the tropical central-eastern Pacific further induce a weakened Walker circulation, with its western subsiding branch over Australia, suppressing convection and thereby reducing rainfall. Furthermore, the NPO plays an important role in contributing to the significant long-term trends of the Northern Territory and Queensland rainfalls. The decreasing amplitude of the NPO contributes much of the observed rainfall wetting trends in the Northern Territory (~50 %) and Queensland (~60 %) regions during 1951-2010. Noted that caution is recommended regarding the Australian spring rainfall trend results obtained in this study as the austral spring rainfall trends may be sensitive to the choice of the selected time period.

  15. The influence of boreal winter extratropical North Pacific Oscillation on Australian spring rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Linye; Li, Yun; Duan, Wansuo

    2015-11-01

    The North Pacific Oscillation (NPO) is a key atmospheric intrinsic mode. This study concerns mechanisms that the NPO influences Southern Hemisphere climate anomalies after several months. It is found that the boreal wintertime NPO has a significant negative connection with austral spring rainfall anomalies in Australia, particularly in the Northern Territory, Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria. A positive NPO phase tends to be followed by dry conditions, while a negative phase by wet conditions in austral spring over much of northern and eastern Australia. The physical mechanism by which the boreal winter NPO affects Australian rainfall arises from the NPO seasonal footprinting mechanism that generates significant tropical central and eastern Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) warming anomalies during austral spring. Then, the positive NPO-related SST warming anomalies over the tropical central-eastern Pacific further induce a weakened Walker circulation, with its western subsiding branch over Australia, suppressing convection and thereby reducing rainfall. Furthermore, the NPO plays an important role in contributing to the significant long-term trends of the Northern Territory and Queensland rainfalls. The decreasing amplitude of the NPO contributes much of the observed rainfall wetting trends in the Northern Territory (~50 %) and Queensland (~60 %) regions during 1951-2010. Noted that caution is recommended regarding the Australian spring rainfall trend results obtained in this study as the austral spring rainfall trends may be sensitive to the choice of the selected time period.

  16. Springing into Spring: Reading Games for the Season

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, D. Jackson

    2008-01-01

    As spring arrives, more time is spent outdoors. Unfortunately, as spring fever hits, books and learning often take a backseat. The goal is for educators to find a way to re-engage learners. In this article, the author presents a seasonal story and game that can help catch students' attention by making learning both informative and entertaining.…

  17. Climate-induced warming imposes a threat to north European spring ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Jyväsjärvi, Jussi; Marttila, Hannu; Rossi, Pekka M; Ala-Aho, Pertti; Olofsson, Bo; Nisell, Jakob; Backman, Birgitta; Ilmonen, Jari; Virtanen, Risto; Paasivirta, Lauri; Britschgi, Ritva; Kløve, Bjørn; Muotka, Timo

    2015-12-01

    Interest in climate change effects on groundwater has increased dramatically during the last decade. The mechanisms of climate-related groundwater depletion have been thoroughly reviewed, but the influence of global warming on groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDEs) remains poorly known. Here we report long-term water temperature trends in 66 northern European cold-water springs. A vast majority of the springs (82%) exhibited a significant increase in water temperature during 1968-2012. Mean spring water temperatures were closely related to regional air temperature and global radiative forcing of the corresponding year. Based on three alternative climate scenarios representing low (RCP2.6), intermediate (RCP6) and high-emission scenarios (RCP8.5), we estimate that increase in mean spring water temperature in the region is likely to range from 0.67 °C (RCP2.6) to 5.94 °C (RCP8.5) by 2086. According to the worst-case scenario, water temperature of these originally cold-water ecosystems (regional mean in the late 1970s: 4.7 °C) may exceed 12 °C by the end of this century. We used bryophyte and macroinvertebrate species data from Finnish springs and spring-fed streams to assess ecological impacts of the predicted warming. An increase in spring water temperature by several degrees will likely have substantial biodiversity impacts, causing regional extinction of native, cold-stenothermal spring specialists, whereas species diversity of headwater generalists is likely to increase. Even a slight (by 1 °C) increase in water temperature may eliminate endemic spring species, thus altering bryophyte and macroinvertebrate assemblages of spring-fed streams. Climate change-induced warming of northern regions may thus alter species composition of the spring biota and cause regional homogenization of biodiversity in headwater ecosystems. PMID:26300476

  18. Spring loaded thermocouple module

    DOEpatents

    McKelvey, Thomas E.; Guarnieri, Joseph J.

    1985-01-01

    A thermocouple arrangement is provided for mounting in a blind hole of a specimen. The thermocouple arrangement includes a cup-like holder member, which receives an elongated thermal insulator, one end of which is seated at an end wall of the holder. A pair of thermocouple wires, threaded through passageways in the insulator, extend beyond the insulator member, terminating in free ends which are joined together in a spherical weld bead. A spring, held captive within the holder, applies a bias force to the weld bead, through the insulator member. The outside surface of the holder is threaded for engagement with the blind hole of the specimen. When the thermocouple is installed in the specimen, the spherical contact surface of the weld bead is held in contact with the end wall of the blind hole, with a predetermined bias force.

  19. Spring loaded thermocouple module

    DOEpatents

    McKelvey, T.E.; Guarnieri, J.J.

    1984-03-13

    A thermocouple arrangement is provided for mounting in a blind hole of a specimen. The thermocouple arrangement includes a cup-like holder member, which receives an elongated thermal insulator, one end of which is seated at an end wall of the holder. A pair of thermocouple wires, threaded through passageways in the insulator, extend beyond the insulator member, terminating in free ends which are joined together in a spherical weld bead. A spring, held captive within the holder, applies a bias force to the weld bead, through the insulator member. The outside surface of the holder is threaded for engagement with the blind hole of the specimen. When the thermocouple is installed in the specimen, the spherical contact surface of the weld bead is held in contact with the end wall of the blind hole, with a predetermined bias force.

  20. J/{psi} measurements in 7 TeV p-p collisions with ALICE using EMCal-triggered events

    SciTech Connect

    Figueredo, M. A.; Collaboration: ALICE Collaboration

    2013-03-25

    J/{psi} measurements can be performed with the ALICE experiment through the dilepton decay into e{sup -}e{sup +} (for rapidity Double-Vertical-Line y Double-Vertical-Line <0.9) and {mu}{sup -}{mu}{sup +} (for rapidity -4.0ALICE physics program, since they provide baseline results to be compared with Pb-Pb, where one expects the production of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Moreover, these measurements are interesting per se because the mechanism of charmonium production in hadron interactions is not yet fully understood. The ALICE Eletromagnetic Calorimeter (EMCal) p{sub T} extends the range of J/{psi} measurements, since it provides electron/hadron discrimination for higher p{sub T} values in comparison to other electron PID techniques in ALICE. The EMCal can also provide fast triggers for events containing high energy electrons. In 2011, during proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV, the ALICE EMCal trigger was intensively used for event selection of showers above 4.8 GeV. In this work, some results from 2011 proton-proton collisions are presented, showing a J/{psi} measurement for transversal momentum above 6 GeV/c, due to a combination of the ALICE EMCal PID and trigger system.

  1. Balneological Evaluation of the Tafadek Spring, Agadez Region, Niger Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nghargbu, K.; Latour, T.; Ponikowska, I.; Kurowska, E.

    2012-04-01

    West Africa, particularly Niger Republic is home to thousands of tourists annually. The vast Saharan desert and it's numerous oases in the northern parts of the Republic are a hot attraction on their own. However, in a recent survey of medicinal springs within the West African sub-region, the only hot spring in this country known locally for its therapeutic egress was analyzed. Located about 160km West of Agadez, the "Tafadek" spring with a yield of over 5l/s and temperature of about 50oC, rich in fluoride and silica is a specific water with capacity for application in balneotherapy for the treatment of orthopaedic, rheumatological, neurological, urinary tract infections, and osteoporosis. If the Tafadek spring is developed into a modern health resort promoting balneotherapy, health (balnear) tourism which is non-existent in Niger Republic today could kick start a new dawn in the health/economic development of the nation and the sub-region at large. Keywords: West Africa, Nigeria, Balneotherapy, Health tourism, Spring

  2. Spring loaded locator pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Groll, T.A.; White, J.P.

    1998-03-03

    This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece. 5 figs.

  3. Spring loaded locator pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Groll, Todd A.; White, James P.

    1998-01-01

    This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece.

  4. Experimenting with Inexpensive Plastic Springs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Leander; Marques, Adriana; Sánchez, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Acommon undergraduate laboratory experience is the determination of the elastic constant of a spring, whether studying the elongation under a static load or studying the damped harmonic motion of the spring with a suspended mass. An alternative approach to this laboratory experience has been suggested by Menezes et al., aimed at studying the…

  5. Spring Flooding on the Mississippi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The mighty Mississippi River, from its source at Lake Itasca, Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico, is approximately 3780 kilometers long and has flooded many times during its history. In April 2001, residents of Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Illinois once again battled near-record water levels. These Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) images, acquired one month apart, illustrate the effects of snowmelt and heavy rainfall on areas traversed by the upper Mississippi River.

    Each image in this pair covers an identical 195-kilometer x 339-kilometer area. The one on the left was acquired March 26, 2001 (Terra orbit 6762), and the one on the right is from April 27 (Terra orbit 7228). Both are false-color composites, displaying data from the near-infrared band of the instrument's nadir (vertical-viewing) camera as red; the green band of the nadir camera as green; and the red band of the 26-degree forward camera as blue. Data from the forward-viewing camera is included to enhance the reflectivity of water. The near-infrared data provide a good indicator of the abundance of vegetation since plants are highly reflective in this spectral region. The redder color of the right-hand image is due to increased vegetation cover brought about by wet conditions and the onset of spring.

    Locations of major cities are marked on the left-hand image; major rivers are marked on the right. The portion of the Mississippi River captured in these views extends from just north of La Crosse, Wisconsin to south of Davenport, Iowa. The Wisconsin River joins the Mississippi just below Prairie du Chien. On March 26, snow can clearly be seen over much of the northern portions of the left-hand image. At this point in time, the snow had already begun to melt and the Wapsipinicon River was 52 centimeters above flood stage at De Witt, Iowa (between Clinton and Davenport). By mid-April heavy rainfall swelled the Mississippi and Wisconsin rivers. In the early morning of April 25, two days

  6. Single-Crystal Springs For Accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, Thomas R.; Kaiser, William J.; Kenny, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal noise reduced, enabling use of smaller proof masses. Spring-and-mass accelerometers in which springs made of single-crystal material being developed. In spring-and-mass accelerometer, proof mass attached to one end of spring, and acceleration of object at other end of spring measured in terms of deflection of spring, provided frequency spectrum of acceleration lies well below resonant frequency of spring-and-proof-mass system. Use of single-crystal spring materials instead of such polycrystalline spring materials as ordinary metals makes possible to construct highly sensitive accelerometers (including seismometers) with small proof masses.

  7. Herbicide contamination and dispersion pattern in lowland springs.

    PubMed

    Laini, Alex; Bartoli, Marco; Lamastra, Lucrezia; Capri, Ettore; Balderacchi, Matteo; Trevisan, Marco

    2012-11-01

    Herbicides reduce the diversity of flora and fauna in freshwater ecosystems and also contaminate groundwater due to leaching. Herbicide contamination can be a serious threat for all groundwater-dependent ecosystems (GDE), altering their chemical and biological quality. Successful management to protect GDE is dependent on detailed knowledge of the hydrogeological and hydrochemical features of the surrounding environment. We consider the possible diffuse contamination by herbicides of groundwater and of GDE as lowland springs, semi-artificial ecosystems with elevated biodiversity. The main objectives of the present work were thus: (1) to map herbicide contamination in lowland springs, (2) to evaluate the potential risk for biota and (3) to quantify the extent of the area from which the herbicide use can affect the water quality of lowland springs. In June and August 2009, nearly 23 springs within the Po River Plain (Northern Italy) were sampled and analyzed for five herbicides used to control weeds in maize. Hydrogeological properties, half-lives of the herbicides and their concentrations in both groundwater and springs were used to quantify the area from which the contamination could originate. Such evaluation was performed by means of GIS techniques. Terbuthylazine were the only herbicide found, together with its metabolite desethylterbuthylazine. In 16 out of 84 measurements, their concentrations were above the threshold for drinking water; however, they were always below the ecotoxicological end-points of aquatic flora and fauna. Spatial analyses reveal that the theoretical area from which herbicides can contaminate spring water is within a distance varying between a few and 1800 m. Our findings indicate that conservation plans should focus on the fields adjacent to or surrounding the springs and should address the optimization of irrigation practices, restoration of buffer strips, crop rotation and in general more sustainable agricultural practices in the

  8. [Alice Hamilton (1869-1970): a pioneer of occupational medicine and public health].

    PubMed

    Kowalska, M; Steplewski, Z

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Alice Hamilton (1869-1970) was the mother of occupational health a pioneer in public health in the United States. She worked as a doctor in Hull House, the first settlement house, and she was an advocate of the birth-control movement. She led pioneering studies of occupational head, mercury, carbon monoxide poisoning and many other chemical intoxications of workers. She was an assistant professor of industrial medicine at the Harvard Medical School (1919-1935). During the years 1924-1930 she worked for the Health Organization of the League of Nations. From 1943 she acted as a vice-president of the American Health Association. Alice Hamilton was an expert in the field of occupational lead poisoning. PMID:10438256

  9. Status and performance of the ALICE MRPC-based Time-Of-Flight detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alici, A.

    2012-10-01

    ALICE is the dedicated heavy-ion experiment at the CERN LHC. One of the main detectors devoted to charged hadron identification in the ALICE central barrel is a large Time-Of-Flight (TOF) array; it allows separation among pions, kaons and protons up to a few GeV/c, covering the full azimuthal angle and -0.9 < η < 0.9. The very good performance required for such a system has been achieved by means of the Multigap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) whose intrinsic time resolution is better than 50 ps with an overall efficiency close to 100% and a large operational plateau; the full array consists of 1593 MRPCs covering a cylindrical surface of 141 m2. In this report, the status of the TOF detector and the performance achieved during the 2010 and 2011 data taking periods are reported together with selected physics results obtained with pp and Pb-Pb collisions.

  10. The MRPC-based ALICE time-of-flight detector: Status andperformance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alici, A.; ALICE Collaboration

    2013-04-01

    The large time-of-flight (TOF) array is one of the main detectors devoted to charged hadron identification in the mid-rapidity region of the ALICE experiment at the LHC. It allows separation among pions, kaons and protons up to a few GeV/c, covering the full azimuthal angle and -0.9<η<0.9. The TOF exploits the innovative MRPC technology capable of an intrinsic time resolution better than 50 ps with an efficiency close to 100% and a large operational plateau; the full array consists of 1593 MRPCs covering a cylindrical surface of 141 m2. The TOF detector has been efficiently taking data since the first pp collisions recorded in ALICE in December 2009. In this report, the status of the TOF detector and the performance achieved for both pp and Pb-Pb collisions aredescribed.

  11. Potentials for J/{psi} from b decays measurement in the ALICE experiment at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Di Giglio, Carmelo

    2010-12-22

    The ALICE potentials in proton-proton collisions for the measurement of the fraction of J/{psi} produced at central rapidity (|y|<0.9) in beauty hadrons semi-inclusive decays, namely B{yields}J/{psi}X, is discussed.This measurement relies on the combined use of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC), for tracking and particle identification via dE/dx measurement; the Inner Tracking System (ITS) for tracking and detection of displaced vertices; the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) for particle identification.The description of the analysis method developed and the discussion of the estimate for a total J/{psi} statistics corresponding to one year of ALICE data taking in p-p collisions at {radical}(s) = 7 TeV is provided in the article.

  12. (Multi-)strange hadron and light (anti-)nuclei production with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Ramona

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to its excellent tracking performance and particle identification capabilities, the ALICE detector allows for the identification of light (anti-)(hyper)nuclei and for the measurement of (multi-)strange particles over a wide range of transverse momentum. Deuterons, 3He and 4He and their corresponding anti-nuclei are identified via their specific energy loss in the Time Projection Chamber and the velocity measurement provided by the Time-Of-Flight detector. Strange and multi-strange baryons and mesons as well as (anti-)hypertritons are reconstructed via their topological decays. Detailed measurements of (multi-)strange hadron production in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collision and of light (anti-)nuclei and (anti-)hypertritons in Pb-Pb collisions with ALICE at the LHC are presented. The experimental results will be compared with the predictions of both statistical hadronization and coalescence models.

  13. Transverse sphericity of minimum bias proton-proton collisions in ALICE

    SciTech Connect

    Velasquez, A. Ortiz

    2011-04-26

    In this work we report the measurement of the shape of minimum bias events reconstructed by ALICE at 0.9 and 7 TeV. The evolution of the transverse sphericity (S{sub perpendicular}) with the multiplicity is studied as an approach to test the MC models using the transverse sphericity as the event shape variable. The results show that at high multiplicity the sphericity of ALICE events is 15% larger than predicted by the MC models. A second approach is based on the hardness. The sample was divided in the so-called 'soft' and 'hard' events defined by a cut in the transverse momentum of the leading particle (p{sub perpendicular}) = 2 GeV/c). With this definition, the soft events are more spherical than the hard ones. We found that MC models describe very well the soft events, but they fail for the hard ones.

  14. Mallow Springs, County Cork, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldwell, C. R.

    1996-03-01

    Because of its copious and reliable rainfall, Ireland has an abundance of springs. Many of the larger ones issue from the Carboniferous limestone that occurs in over 40% of the country. The spring water is mainly a calcium bicarbonate type with a temperature of about 10°C. In the 18th century, warm and cold springs were developed as spas in various parts of Ireland. The popularity of these springs was short and most were in major decline by 1850. Today only one cold spa at Lisdoonvarna, Co. Clare is still operating. Springs in Ireland were places of religious significance for the pre-Christian Druidic religion. In the Christian period they became holy wells, under the patronage of various saints. Cures for many different ailments were attributed to water from these wells.

  15. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spring rigging. 229.65 Section 229.65....65 Spring rigging. (a) Protective construction or safety hangers shall be provided to prevent spring planks, spring seats or bolsters from dropping to track structure in event of a hanger or spring...

  16. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spring rigging. 229.65 Section 229.65....65 Spring rigging. (a) Protective construction or safety hangers shall be provided to prevent spring planks, spring seats or bolsters from dropping to track structure in event of a hanger or spring...

  17. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spring rigging. 229.65 Section 229.65....65 Spring rigging. (a) Protective construction or safety hangers shall be provided to prevent spring planks, spring seats or bolsters from dropping to track structure in event of a hanger or spring...

  18. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Spring rigging. 229.65 Section 229.65....65 Spring rigging. (a) Protective construction or safety hangers shall be provided to prevent spring planks, spring seats or bolsters from dropping to track structure in event of a hanger or spring...

  19. Linear magnetic spring and spring/motor combination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patt, Paul J. (Inventor); Stolfi, Fred R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A magnetic spring, or a spring and motor combination, providing a linear spring force characteristic in each direction from a neutral position, in which the spring action may occur for any desired coordinate of a typical orthogonal coordinate system. A set of magnets are disposed, preferably symmetrically about a coordinate axis, poled orthogonally to the desired force direction. A second set of magnets, respectively poled opposite the first set, are arranged on the sprung article. The magnets of one of the sets are spaced a greater distance apart than those of the other, such that an end magnet from each set forms a pair having preferably planar faces parallel to the direction of spring force, the faces being offset so that in a neutral position the outer edge of the closer spaced magnet set is aligned with the inner edge of the greater spaced magnet set. For use as a motor, a coil can be arranged with conductors orthogonal to both the magnet pole directions and the direction of desired spring force, located across from the magnets of one set and fixed with respect to the magnets of the other set. In a cylindrical coordinate system having axial spring force, the magnets are radially poled and motor coils are concentric with the cylinder axis.

  20. Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments (ALICE): Overview and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choquet, E.; Soummer, R.; Pueyo, L.; Perrin, M.; Chen, C.; Debes, J.; Golimowski, D. A.; Hagan, J. B.; Hines, D. C.; Marois, C.; Mawet, D.; Mittal, T.; Moerchen, M.; N'Diaye, M.; Rajan, A.; Reid, N.; Wolff, S.; Schneider, G.

    2014-03-01

    We are currently conducting a comprehensive and consistent reprocessing of archival HST-NICMOS coronagraphic surveys using advanced PSF subtraction methods, entitled the Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments program (ALICE, HST/AR 12652). This virtual campaign of about 400 HST orbits has already produced numerous new detections of previously unidentified point sources and circumstellar structures. We present five newly spatially resolved debris disks revealed in scattered light by our analysis of the archival data. Three of these disks (HD 30447, HD 35841, and HD 141943) appear to be edge-on, the fourth (HD 191089) appears to be an asymmetric inclined ring, and the fifth, HD 202917 confirms a dramatic asymmetric arc that had previously been detected in ACS GTO observations. These images provide new views of material around young solar-type stars at ages corresponding to the period of terrestrial planet formation in our solar system. We have also detected several new candidate substellar companions, for which there is an ongoing followup campaign, and discuss preliminary statistical constraints ALICE places on the occurrence of brown dwarf and exo-planet companions around nearby stars. Since the methods developed as part of ALICE are directly applicable to future missions (JWST, AFTA coronagraph) we emphasize the importance of devising optimal PSF subtraction methods for upcoming coronagraphic imaging missions. We describe efforts in defining direct imaging highlevel science products (HLSP) standards that can be applicable to other coronagraphic campaigns, including ground-based (e.g., Gemini Planet Imager), and future space instruments (e.g., JWST). ALICE will deliver a first release of HLSPs to the community through the MAST archive at STScI in 2014.

  1. Simulation of the job processing performance at an ALICE Tier-2 site with MONARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zach, Č.; Betev, L.; Adamová, D.; ALICE Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The MONARC (MOdels of Networked Analysis at Regional Centers) framework has been developed and designed with the aim to provide a tool for realistic simulations of large scale distributed computing systems, with a special focus on the Grid systems of the experiments at the CERN LHC. In this paper, we describe a usage of the MONARC framework and tools for a simulation of the job processing performance at an ALICE Tier-2 site.

  2. R&D on a Detector for Very High Momentum Charged Hadron Identification in ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallas, A.

    2006-04-01

    The latest theoretical and experimental results from experiments at RHIC suggest investigating a physics domain in heavy ion collisions for pt higher than the one planned to be covered at present by the Particle Identification (PID) system of the ALICE experiment. We present here a possible upgrade of the High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (HMPID) based on the idea of the Threshold Imaging Cherenkov (TIC) detector operated for the first time by the NA44 experiment.

  3. Integrated Field Analyses of Thermal Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shervais, K.; Young, B.; Ponce-Zepeda, M. M.; Rosove, S.

    2011-12-01

    A group of undergraduate researchers through the SURE internship offered by the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) have examined thermal springs in southern Idaho, northern Utah as well as mud volcanoes in the Salton Sea, California. We used an integrated approach to estimate the setting and maximum temperature, including water chemistry, Ipad-based image and data-base management, microbiology, and gas analyses with a modified Giggenbach sampler.All springs were characterized using GISRoam (tmCogent3D). We are performing geothermometry calculations as well as comparisons with temperature gradient data on the results while also analyzing biological samples. Analyses include water temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, and TDS measured in the field. Each sample is sealed and chilled and delivered to a water lab within 12 hours.Temperatures are continuously monitored with the use of Solinst Levelogger Juniors. Through partnership with a local community college geology club, we receive results on a monthly basis and are able to process initial data earlier in order to evaluate data over a longer time span. The springs and mudpots contained microbial organisms which were analyzed using methods of single colony isolation, polymerase chain reaction, and DNA sequencing showing the impact of the organisms on the springs or vice versa. Soon we we will collect gas samples at sites that show signs of gas. This will be taken using a hybrid of the Giggenbach method and our own methods. Drawing gas samples has proven a challenge, however we devised a method to draw out gas samples utilizing the Giggenbach flask, transferring samples to glass blood sample tubes, replacing NaOH in the Giggenbach flask, and evacuating it in the field for multiple samples using a vacuum pump. We also use a floating platform devised to carry and lower a levelogger, to using an in-line fuel filter from a tractor in order to keep mud from contaminating the equipment.The use of raster

  4. Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments (ALICE): Overview and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soummer, Remi; Barman, T. S.; Chen, C.; Choquet, E.; Comeau, T.; Debes, J. H.; Golimowski, D. A.; Hagan, J.; Hines, D. C.; Lonsdale, S.; Marois, C.; Mawet, D.; Mittal, T.; Moerchen, M.; N'Diaye, M.; Perrin, M. D.; Pueyo, L.; Rajan, A.; Reid, I. N.; Schneider, G.; Wolff, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments (ALICE) project ((HST/AR program 12652) is currently conducting a comprehensive and consistent reprocessing of HST-NICMOS coronagraphic survey data to search for point sources and disks using advanced PSF subtraction. This project has already been very successful with numerous detections of previously unseen point sources and several debris disks that we are currently following up by multiple avenues. We give an overview of the project including preliminary scientific results with companion candidates, improved images of known disks, and first scattered light image of several disks. ALICE will deliver high-level science products (HLSPs) to the community through the MAST archive at STScI. The goal is to define a HLSP standard that can be applicable to other projects including ground-based (e.g., Gemini Planet Imager), and future space instruments (e.g., JWST). The ALICE pipeline takes full advantage of the LAPLACE PSF library (Schneider et al. 2012) for coronagraphic data, which provides enhanced calibration of NICMOS coronagraphic data and is available from the MAST archive.

  5. Integration of XRootD into the cloud infrastructure for ALICE data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompaniets, Mikhail; Shadura, Oksana; Svirin, Pavlo; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Zarochentsev, Andrey

    2015-12-01

    Cloud technologies allow easy load balancing between different tasks and projects. From the viewpoint of the data analysis in the ALICE experiment, cloud allows to deploy software using Cern Virtual Machine (CernVM) and CernVM File System (CVMFS), to run different (including outdated) versions of software for long term data preservation and to dynamically allocate resources for different computing activities, e.g. grid site, ALICE Analysis Facility (AAF) and possible usage for local projects or other LHC experiments. We present a cloud solution for Tier-3 sites based on OpenStack and Ceph distributed storage with an integrated XRootD based storage element (SE). One of the key features of the solution is based on idea that Ceph has been used as a backend for Cinder Block Storage service for OpenStack, and in the same time as a storage backend for XRootD, with redundancy and availability of data preserved by Ceph settings. For faster and easier OpenStack deployment was applied the Packstack solution, which is based on the Puppet configuration management system. Ceph installation and configuration operations are structured and converted to Puppet manifests describing node configurations and integrated into Packstack. This solution can be easily deployed, maintained and used even in small groups with limited computing resources and small organizations, which usually have lack of IT support. The proposed infrastructure has been tested on two different clouds (SPbSU & BITP) and integrates successfully with the ALICE data analysis model.

  6. Flexible event reconstruction software chains with the ALICE High-Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, D.; Breitner, T.; Szostak, A.

    2012-12-01

    The ALICE High-Level Trigger (HLT) has a large high-performance computing cluster at CERN whose main objective is to perform real-time analysis on the data generated by the ALICE experiment and scale it down to at-most 4GB/sec - which is the current maximum mass-storage bandwidth available. Data-flow in this cluster is controlled by a custom designed software framework. It consists of a set of components which can communicate with each other via a common control interface. The software framework also supports the creation of different configurations based on the detectors participating in the HLT. These configurations define a logical data processing “chain” of detector data-analysis components. Data flows through this software chain in a pipelined fashion so that several events can be processed at the same time. An instance of such a chain can run and manage a few thousand physics analysis and data-flow components. The HLT software and the configuration scheme used in the 2011 heavy-ion runs of ALICE, has been discussed in this contribution.

  7. The ALICE Data Quality Monitoring: qualitative and quantitative review of three years of operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Haller, Barthélémy; Bellini, Francesca; Telesca, Adriana; Foka, Yiota; Alice Dqm Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter produced in heavy-ion collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Due to the complexity of ALICE in terms of number of detectors and performance requirements, Data Quality Monitoring (DQM) plays an essential role in providing online feedback on the data being recorded. It intends to provide shifters with precise and complete information to quickly identify problems, and as a consequence to ensure acquisition of high quality data. This paper presents a review of the ALICE DQM system during the first three years of LHC operations from a quantitative and qualitative point of view. We start by presenting the DQM software and tools before moving on to the various analyses carried out. An overview of the produced monitoring quantities is given, presenting the diversity of usage and flexibility of the DQM. Well-prepared shifters and experts, in addition to a precise organisation, were required to ensure smooth and successful operations. The description of the measures taken to ensure both aspects and an account of the DQM shifters' job are followed by a summary of the evolution of the system. We then give a quantitative review of the final setup of the system used during the whole year 2012. We conclude the paper with use cases where the DQM proved to be very valuable, scalable and efficient and with the plans for the coming years.

  8. Jet-underlying event studies with ALICE detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, Betty

    2011-10-01

    Relativistic heavy ion collisions produce a state of strongly interacting matter of quarks and gluons, called the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Measuring particle production via fragmentation (specifically in jets) and understanding parton energy loss in the QGP enables one to directly probe the medium. One of the necessary components in studying jets in heavy ion events is the ability to isolate jets from the soft physics background, i.e., the underlying event. Thus it is important to understand the underlying event properties, in particular, energy fluctuations. This presentation will address the initial studies done to map out the underlying event in √{ s} = 7 TeV pp collisions measured with the ALICE detector at the LHC, as preparation for extending these studies to Pb-Pb collisions. The focus will be on the analyses performed with the ALICE Electro-Magnetic Calorimeter (EMCal). EMCal is especially well-suited for the measurement of high-momentum particles which are produced predominantly in jets and therefore is a useful tool in subtracting the jet cone from the underlying event. For the ALICE Collaboration.

  9. Technical Design Report for the Upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALICE Collaboration; Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Masoodi, A. Ahmad; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Anderssen, E. C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badala, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bairathi, V.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J..; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastian Van Beelen, J.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Battistin, M.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baudot, J.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Benettoni, M.; Benotto, F.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Besson, A.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhatti, A.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Boehmer, F. V.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bornschein, J.; Borshchov, V. N.; Bortolin, C.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Cariola, P.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Caudron, T.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Claus, G.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Coli, S.; Colledani, C.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Da Riva, E.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Decosse, C.; DelagrangeI, H.; Deloff, A.; Déenes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Robertis, G.; De Roo, K.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Divia, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dorheim, S.; Dorokhov, A.; Doziere, G.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dulinski, W.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Ehlers, R. J., III; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernádez Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fiorenza, G.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Franco, M.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gajanana, D.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubilato, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; Gomez Marzoa, M.; Gonzáalez-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.

    2014-08-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is studying the physics of strongly interacting matter, and in particular the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), using proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major upgrade of the experimental apparatus, planned for installation in the second long LHC shutdown in the years 2018-2019. A key element of the ALICE upgrade is the construction of a new, ultra-light, high-resolution Inner Tracking System (ITS) based on monolithic CMOS pixel detectors. The primary focus of the ITS upgrade is on improving the performance for detection of heavy-flavour hadrons, and of thermal photons and low-mass di-electrons emitted by the QGP. With respect to the current detector, the new Inner Tracking System will significantly enhance the determination of the distance of closest approach to the primary vertex, the tracking efficiency at low transverse momenta, and the read-out rate capabilities. This will be obtained by seven concentric detector layers based on a 50 μm thick CMOS pixel sensor with a pixel pitch of about 30×30 μm2. This document, submitted to the LHCC (LHC experiments Committee) in September 2013, presents the design goals, a summary of the R&D activities, with focus on the technical implementation of the main detector components, and the projected detector and physics performance.

  10. Study of muon bundles from extensive air showers with the ALICE detector at CERN LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtejer, K.

    2016-05-01

    ALICE is one of four large experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, specially designed to study particle production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Located 52 meters underground with 28 meters of overburden rock, it has also been used to detect muons produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the upper atmosphere. The large size and excellent tracking capability of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber are exploited to study the muonic component of extensive air showers. We present the multiplicity distribution of these atmospheric muons and its comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. The latest version of the QGSJET hadronic interaction model was used to simulate the development of the resulting air showers. High multiplicity events containing more than 100 reconstructed muons were also studied. Similar events have been studied in previous underground experiments such as ALEPH and DELPHI at LEP without satisfactory explanations for the frequency of the highest multiplicity events. We demonstrate that the high muon-multiplicity events observed in ALICE stem from primary cosmic rays with energies above 1016 eV and that the frequency of these events can be successfully described by assuming a heavy mass composition of primary cosmic rays in this energy range.

  11. Event Plane Resolution Simulations for The Fast Interaction Trigger Detector of ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaimon, Isiaka; Harton, Austin; Garcia, Edmundo; Alice-Fit Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    CERN (European Center for Nuclear Research) is a global laboratory that studies proton and heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is one of four large experiments of the LHC. ALICE is dedicated to the study of the transition of matter to Quark Gluon Plasma in heavy ion collisions. In the present ALICE detector there are two sub-detectors, (the T0 and V0), that provide minimum bias trigger, multiplicity trigger, beam-gas event rejection, collision time for other sub detectors, on line multiplicity and event plane determination. In order to adapt these functionalities to the collision rates expected for the LHC upgrade after 2020, it is planned to replace these systems by a single detector system, called the Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT). In this presentation we describe the performance parameters of the FIT upgrade; show the proposed characteristics of the T0-Plus and the simulations that support the conceptual design of this detector. In particular we describe the performance simulations of the event plane resolution. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants NSF-PHY-0968903 and NSF-PHY-1305280.

  12. Alignment of the ALICE Inner Tracking System with Cosmic-Ray Tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Aamodt, K.; Awes, Terry C; Enokizono, Akitomo; Silvermyr, David O; ALICE, Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiment devoted to investigating the strongly interacting matter created in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC energies. The ALICE ITS, Inner Tracking System, consists of six cylindrical layers of silicon detectors with three different technologies; in the outward direction: two layers of pixel detectors, two layers each of drift, and strip detectors. The number of parameters to be determined in the spatial alignment of the 2198 sensor modules of the ITS is about 13,000. The target alignment precision is well below 10 {micro}m in some cases (pixels). The sources of alignment information include survey measurements, and the reconstructed tracks from cosmic rays and from proton-proton collisions. The main track-based alignment method uses the Millepede global approach. An iterative local method was developed and used as well. We present the results obtained for the ITS alignment using about 10{sup 5} charged tracks from cosmic rays that have been collected during summer 2008, with the ALICE solenoidal magnet switched off.

  13. Chemical and isotopic data for water from thermal springs and wells of Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, R.H.; Swanson, J.R.; Orris, G.J.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    The thermal springs of Oregon range in composition from dilute NaHCO/sub 3/ waters to moderately saline CO/sub 2/-charged NaCl-NaHCO/sub 3/ waters. Most of the thermal springs are located in southeastern or southcentral Oregon, with a few in northeastern Oregon and near the contact of the Western Cascades with the High Cascades. Thermal springs in the central and northern parts of the Cascades generally issue moderately saline NaCl waters. Farther south in the Cascades, the thermal waters are high in CO/sub 2/ as well as chloride. Most thermal springs in northeastern Oregon issue dilute NaHCO/sub 3/ waters of high pH (>8.5). These waters are similar to the thermal waters which issue from the Idaho batholith, farther east. Most of the remaining thermal waters are Na mixed-anion waters. Based on the chemical geothermometers, Mickey Srpings, Hot Borax Lake, Alvord Hot Springs, Neal Hot Springs, Vale Hot Springs, Crump Well, Hunters (Lakeview) Hot Springs, and perhaps some of the springs in the Cascades are associated with the highest temperature systems (>150/sup 0/C).

  14. Prairie grasses as hosts of the northern corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated 27 prairie grass species thought to be among those domi-nant 200 years ago in the northern Midwest as larval hosts of the northern corn rootworm, Diabrotica barberi Smith and Lawrence. Maize (Zea mays L.), spring wheat (Tritcum aestivum L.), and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) were includ...

  15. Piston and spring powered engine

    SciTech Connect

    Samodovitz, A. J.

    1985-12-10

    The invention is an improved piston engine, either two stroke or four stroke. In one, two stroke, one cylinder embodiment, the improvement comprises two springs connecting between the piston and the base of the piston. These springs are relatively relaxed when the crank is at top dead center. Then during the power/intake stroke, some of the fuel's energy is delivered to the crankshaft and some is used to compress the springs. The stored energy in the springs is delivered to the crankshaft during the exhaust/compression stroke while the springs return to their relatively relaxed condition. As a result, energy is delivered to the crankshaft during both strokes of the cycle, and the engine runs smooth. In one, four stroke, two cylinder embodiment, each cylinder has springs as described above, the cranks of each cylinder are aligned, and the cam sets one cylinder in the power stroke while the other is in the intake stroke. As a result, the engine runs smooth because energy is delivered to the crankshaft during all four strokes of the cycle, during two of the strokes by the burning fuel and during the other two by the release of energy in the springs. In both embodiments, a heavy crankshaft is not needed because of the more uniform power delivery.

  16. Groundwater flow cycling between a submarine spring and an inland fresh water spring.

    PubMed

    Davis, J Hal; Verdi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs are large first magnitude springs that derive water from the Upper Floridan Aquifer. The submarine Spring Creek Springs are located in a marine estuary and Wakulla Springs are located 18 km inland. Wakulla Springs has had a consistent increase in flow from the 1930s to the present. This increase is probably due to the rising sea level, which puts additional pressure head on the submarine Spring Creek Springs, reducing its fresh water flow and increasing flows in Wakulla Springs. To improve understanding of the complex relations between these springs, flow and salinity data were collected from June 25, 2007 to June 30, 2010. The flow in Spring Creek Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and salt water intrusion, and the flow in Wakulla Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and the flow in Spring Creek Springs. Flows from the springs were found to be connected, and composed of three repeating phases in a karst spring flow cycle: Phase 1 occurred during low rainfall periods and was characterized by salt water backflow into the Spring Creek Springs caves. The higher density salt water blocked fresh water flow and resulted in a higher equivalent fresh water head in Spring Creek Springs than in Wakulla Springs. The blocked fresh water was diverted to Wakulla Springs, approximately doubling its flow. Phase 2 occurred when heavy rainfall resulted in temporarily high creek flows to nearby sinkholes that purged the salt water from the Spring Creek Springs caves. Phase 3 occurred after streams returned to base flow. The Spring Creek Springs caves retained a lower equivalent fresh water head than Wakulla Springs, causing them to flow large amounts of fresh water while Wakulla Springs flow was reduced by about half. PMID:24138490

  17. Groundwater flow cycling between a submarine spring and an inland fresh water spring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J. Hal; Verdi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs are large first magnitude springs that derive water from the Upper Floridan Aquifer. The submarine Spring Creek Springs are located in a marine estuary and Wakulla Springs are located 18 km inland. Wakulla Springs has had a consistent increase in flow from the 1930s to the present. This increase is probably due to the rising sea level, which puts additional pressure head on the submarine Spring Creek Springs, reducing its fresh water flow and increasing flows in Wakulla Springs. To improve understanding of the complex relations between these springs, flow and salinity data were collected from June 25, 2007 to June 30, 2010. The flow in Spring Creek Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and salt water intrusion, and the flow in Wakulla Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and the flow in Spring Creek Springs. Flows from the springs were found to be connected, and composed of three repeating phases in a karst spring flow cycle: Phase 1 occurred during low rainfall periods and was characterized by salt water backflow into the Spring Creek Springs caves. The higher density salt water blocked fresh water flow and resulted in a higher equivalent fresh water head in Spring Creek Springs than in Wakulla Springs. The blocked fresh water was diverted to Wakulla Springs, approximately doubling its flow. Phase 2 occurred when heavy rainfall resulted in temporarily high creek flows to nearby sinkholes that purged the salt water from the Spring Creek Springs caves. Phase 3 occurred after streams returned to base flow. The Spring Creek Springs caves retained a lower equivalent fresh water head than Wakulla Springs, causing them to flow large amounts of fresh water while Wakulla Springs flow was reduced by about half.

  18. Hydrogeology of the mineral springs at Manitou Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Maslyn, R.M.; Blomquist, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    Manitou Springs, a small resort community located at the base of 14,110 foot Pikes Peak, is situated at the south end of the southward plunging Williams Canyon Anticline. This is truncated south of town by the Ute Pass Reverse Fault, with over 30,000 feet of displacement. Paleozoic limestones are exposed north of Manitou Springs in north-south trending Williams Canyon. The Mississippian age Leadville Limestone and underlying Ordovician age Manitou Limestone contain over 40 caves, including the 8500-foot long Cave of the Winds system. These limestones continue under Manitou Springs, where cave forming processes have resulted in water-filled caverns. The 28 natural springs and flowing wells in Manitou Springs source in the limestone caverns. This carbonate aquifer is bounded by the Ute Pass Fault on the west and southwest, the Rampart Range Fault to the east, and open to recharge from exposed limestone to the north. Areal extent of the aquifer is approximately 3.5 spare miles, containing an estimated 10 billion gallons. In the past 100 years, spring development has lowered the potentiometric surface 50 feet. Contemporary and historical chemical analyses of the mineral water show high concentrations of calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, and carbon dioxide gas. This suggests prolonged exposure of the water to limestone, as confirmed by Carbon 14 age-dating values of up to 30,000 years.

  19. Isolated Northern Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    This VIS image was taken at 81 degrees North latitude during Northern spring. In this region, the dunes are isolated from each other. The dunes are just starting to emerge from the winter frost covering appearing dark with bright crests. These dunes are located on top of ice.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 82.1, Longitude 191.3 East (168.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. Northern Sand Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    This VIS image was taken at 82 degrees North latitude during Northern spring. The image is completely dominated by dunes. In sand seas, it is very common for a single type of dune to occur, and for a single predominate wind to control the alignment of the dunes.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 82.2, Longitude 152.5 East (207.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Oil fields of northern Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Duey, H.D.

    1989-03-01

    Since 1954 four oil fields have been discovered in northern Railroad Valley: Eagle Springs, Trap Springs, Currant, and Kate Spring. Though similar in many aspects, each is unique in structure, stratigraphy, and reservoir conditions. Oil accumulation in all four fields is related to faulting, and all reservoirs are either fractured or enhanced by fractures. The reservoir rocks vary from Tertiary ignimbrites to Tertiary lacustrine sediments to Paleozoic carbonates. A Tertiary unconformity controls the seal at Trap Spring, Eagle Springs, and Kate Spring. At Currant the seal is the Tertiary Sheep Pass shale. There are two basic oil types. Oil has been generated from shales of the Tertiary Sheep Pass Formation and the Mississippian Chainman Formation. Oil generation is probably recent and continuing. These oils are mixed in at least two reservoirs. Over 10 million bbl of oil have been produced in northern Railroad Valley, and despite the variability of the stratigraphy, structure, and oil generation, the area is still a viable hunting ground for modest reserves. Using these fields along with their permutations and combinations as models makes exploration in the rest of the Basin and Range province inspiring.

  2. Spring wheat production and associated pests in conventional and diversified cropping systems in north central Montana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Producers in the northern Plains are diversifying and intensifying traditional wheat-based cropping systems by reducing summer fallow and including legume and oilseed crops. This study examined the influence of diversification and intensification on spring wheat yield and quality, and associated ins...

  3. EVALUATION OF DURUM SPRING WHEAT SUSCEPTIBILITY TO WHEAT STEM SAWFLY (HYMENOPTERA: CEPHIDAE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The wheat stem sawfly, Cephus cinctus Norton, is the primary arthropod pest of wheat, Triticum aestivum, in the Northern Great Plains. Rotation to non-host crops should decrease infestation of susceptible spring or winter wheats. Information is unavailable on wheat stem sawfly infestation potentia...

  4. Spring Small Grains Area Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, W. F.; Mohler, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    SSG3 automatically estimates acreage of spring small grains from Landsat data. Report describes development and testing of a computerized technique for using Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) data to estimate acreage of spring small grains (wheat, barley, and oats). Application of technique to analysis of four years of data from United States and Canada yielded estimates of accuracy comparable to those obtained through procedures that rely on trained analysis.

  5. Ecohydrology of seepage springs in an urban National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knee, K.; Melone, J.; Friedel, B.; Fong, D.

    2014-12-01

    Shallow groundwater-fed seepage springs, also known as hypotelminorheic habitats, are found around the Washington, DC area, including in the George Washington Parkway, a National Park unit in northern Virginia. These springs differ from better-known vernal pools both in their hydrology and their ecology: because they are groundwater-fed, they are more resistant to drying out than vernal pools, and they harbor cave-adapted arthropod species including amphipods of the genus Stygobroumus. This project seeks to understand the ecohydrology of the hypotelminorheic habitats that support these species, some of which are endangered, and which comprise an important but underappreciated component of biodiversity in DC-area National Parks. Our study focuses on two hypotelminorheic habitats in the GW Parkway area and consists of three main components: (1) a weekly population census of Stygobroumus using multiple mark-recapture methodology, (2) weekly monitoring of dissolved radon, a tracer of groundwater discharge, as well as conductivity, dissolved oxygen, and pH, and (3) continuous logging of spring water temperature. This poster presents preliminary data from the Stygobroumus population census and explores how these animals may be affected by spring hydrology. Specifically, we use temperature, conductivity, radon activity and precipitation data from a nearby weather station to understand how the springs respond to episodic and seasonal variation in temperature, precipitation and groundwater seepage and how this affects Stygobromus populations. We also explore whether variations in Stygobromus counts reflect (1) active migration between the surficial spring and the larger subterranean habitat, or (2) passive flushing driven by groundwater discharge. Our results provide basic hydrologic data about a little-understood habitat type and will help managers protect Stygobromus in the urban park environment.

  6. DISTRIBUTION AND COMPOSITION OF DISSOLVED AND PARTICULATE ORGANIC CARBON IN NORTHERN SAN FRANCISCO BAY DURING LOW FRESHWATER FLOW CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The distribution of organic matter was studied in northern San Francisco Bay monthly through spring and summer 1996 along the salinity gradient from the Sacramento River to Central Bay. Dissolved constituents included monosaccharides (MONO), total carbohydrates (TCHO), dissolved ...

  7. Health risks of metals in contaminated farmland soils and spring wheat irrigated with Yellow River water in Baotou, China.

    PubMed

    Si, Wantong; Liu, Jumei; Cai, Lu; Jiang, Haiming; Zheng, Chunli; He, Xiaoying; Wang, Jianying; Zhang, Xuefeng

    2015-02-01

    The consumption of water and food crops contaminated with metals is a major food chain route for human exposure. We investigated the health risks of metals in Yellow River (YR) water, farmland soil and spring wheat in the Baotou region, northern China. Data indicated that long-term irrigation with polluted YR water led to metal accumulation in local farmland soil and spring wheat. The consumption of YR water and spring wheat in Baotou region can cause adverse health effects to local people, specifically because of Hg, Pb, and Se in YR water and Cu, Zn, Cd, and Mn in spring wheat. The integrative risk of various metals depends mainly on the spring wheat intake. Current results emphasized the need for routine monitoring and management in order to avoid contamination of YR water and spring wheat from the wastewater irrigation system in Baotou region. PMID:25476736

  8. Earlier green-up and spring warming amplification over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shaoxiu; Pitman, Andy J.; Lorenz, Ruth; Kala, Jatin; Srbinovsky, Jhan

    2016-03-01

    The onset of green-up of plants has advanced in response to climate change. This advance has the potential to affect heat waves via biogeochemical and biophysical processes. Here a climate model was used to investigate only the biophysical feedbacks of earlier green-up on climate as the biogeochemical feedbacks have been well addressed. Earlier green-up by 5 to 30 days amplifies spring warming in Europe, especially heat waves, but makes few differences to heat waves in summer. This spring warming is most noticeable within 30 days of advanced green-up and is associated with a decrease in low- and middle-layer clouds and associated increases of downward short wave and net radiation. We find negligible differences in the Southern Hemisphere and low latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. Our results provide an estimate of the level of skill necessary in phenology models to avoid introducing biases in climate simulations.

  9. Evaluation of recent trends in Australian pome fruit spring phenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbyshire, Rebecca; Webb, Leanne; Goodwin, Ian; Barlow, E. W. R.

    2013-05-01

    Temporal and temperature driven analyses were conducted for eight spring phenology datasets from three Australian pome fruit growing regions ranging from 24 to 43 years in length. This, the first such analysis for Australia, indicated significant temporal change in phenophase timing for only one of the datasets. To determine relationships to temperature, a sequential chill and growth method as well as mean springtime temperatures were used to estimate phenophase timing. Expected advancement of phenophase ranged from 4.1 to 7.7 days per degree Celsius increase in temperature. The sequential chill and growth approach proved superior, with coefficients of determination between 0.49 and 0.85, indicating the inclusion of chill conditions are important for spring phenology modelling. Compared to similar phenological research in the Northern Hemisphere, the changes in response variables were often shallower in Australia, although significance of observed hemispheric differences were not found.

  10. Northern hemisphere dust storms on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, P. B.

    1993-01-01

    Dust storms in the northern hemisphere of Mars appear to be less common than the more familiar southern hemisphere storms, and essentially, no activity north of about 30 latittude has been documented. The data are, however, subject to an observational bias because Mars is near aphelion during oppositions, which occur during the most likely seasons for dust activity in the north. The amount of dust activity in the northern hemisphere is clearly very relevant to the role of atmospheric transport in the dust cycle. The classic global storms that occur during spring in the southern hemisphere are observed to transport dust from sources in the southern hemisphere to sinks or temporary depositories in the north. The question of whether atmospheric transport can close the dust cycle, i.e., return the dust to the southern hemisphere sources on some timescale, is clearly relevant to the solution of the puzzle of how the dust storm cycle is modulated, i.e., why storms occur in some years but not in others. There are data that suggest that the spring/early summer season in the northern hemisphere of Mars during the year following the major 1977 storms observed by Viking was very dusty. A number of observations of the vicinity of the receding north polar cap showed clear evidence of substantial dust activity in the sub-Arctic region.

  11. Illuminating Northern California's Active Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, Carol S.; Crosby, Christopher J.; Whitehill, Caroline S.; Arrowsmith, J. Ramón; Furlong, Kevin P.; Phillips, David A.

    2009-02-01

    Newly acquired light detection and ranging (lidar) topographic data provide a powerful community resource for the study of landforms associated with the plate boundary faults of northern California (Figure 1). In the spring of 2007, GeoEarthScope, a component of the EarthScope Facility construction project funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, acquired approximately 2000 square kilometers of airborne lidar topographic data along major active fault zones of northern California. These data are now freely available in point cloud (x, y, z coordinate data for every laser return), digital elevation model (DEM), and KMZ (zipped Keyhole Markup Language, for use in Google Earth™ and other similar software) formats through the GEON OpenTopography Portal (http://www.OpenTopography.org/data). Importantly, vegetation can be digitally removed from lidar data, producing high-resolution images (0.5- or 1.0-meter DEMs) of the ground surface beneath forested regions that reveal landforms typically obscured by vegetation canopy (Figure 2).

  12. Groundwater management in northern Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevanovic, Zoran; Iurkiewicz, Adrian

    2009-03-01

    Groundwater is vital and the sole resource in most of the studied region of northern Iraq. It has a significant role in agriculture, water supply and health, and the elimination of poverty in rural areas. Although Iraq is currently dramatically disturbed by complex political and socio-economic problems, in its northern part, i.e. the Kurdish-inhabited region, fast urbanization and economic expansion are visible everywhere. Monitoring and water management schemes are necessary to prevent aquifer over-exploitation in the region. Artificial recharge with temporary runoff water, construction of subsurface dams and several other aquifer management and regulation measures have been designed, and some implemented, in order to improve the water situation. Recommendations, presented to the local professionals and decision-makers in water management, include creation of Water Master Plans and Water User Associations, synchronization of drilling programmes, rehabilitation of the existing well fields, opening of new well fields, and the incorporation of new spring intakes in some areas with large groundwater reserves, as well as construction of numerous small-scale schemes for initial in situ water treatment where saline groundwater is present.

  13. 14 CFR 23.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Spring devices. 23.687 Section 23.687... Systems § 23.687 Spring devices. The reliability of any spring device used in the control system must be established by tests simulating service conditions unless failure of the spring will not cause flutter...

  14. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section 236.822... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original position after being trailed through and holds them under spring compression....

  15. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Spring rigging. 230.111 Section 230.111... Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.111 Spring rigging. (a) Arrangement of springs and equalizers. Springs and equalizers shall be arranged to ensure the proper distribution of weight to...

  16. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., except when that spring is part of a nest of three or more springs and none of the other springs in the nest has its top leaf or any other three leaves broken. An outer coil spring or saddle may not...

  17. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section 236.822... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original position after being trailed through and holds them under spring compression....

  18. 14 CFR 23.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Spring devices. 23.687 Section 23.687... Systems § 23.687 Spring devices. The reliability of any spring device used in the control system must be established by tests simulating service conditions unless failure of the spring will not cause flutter...

  19. 14 CFR 23.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spring devices. 23.687 Section 23.687... Systems § 23.687 Spring devices. The reliability of any spring device used in the control system must be established by tests simulating service conditions unless failure of the spring will not cause flutter...

  20. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spring rigging. 230.111 Section 230.111... Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.111 Spring rigging. (a) Arrangement of springs and equalizers. Springs and equalizers shall be arranged to ensure the proper distribution of weight to...

  1. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spring rigging. 230.111 Section 230.111... Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.111 Spring rigging. (a) Arrangement of springs and equalizers. Springs and equalizers shall be arranged to ensure the proper distribution of weight to...

  2. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section 236.822... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original position after being trailed through and holds them under spring compression....

  3. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Spring rigging. 230.111 Section 230.111... Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.111 Spring rigging. (a) Arrangement of springs and equalizers. Springs and equalizers shall be arranged to ensure the proper distribution of weight to...

  4. 14 CFR 23.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Spring devices. 23.687 Section 23.687... Systems § 23.687 Spring devices. The reliability of any spring device used in the control system must be established by tests simulating service conditions unless failure of the spring will not cause flutter...

  5. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spring rigging. 230.111 Section 230.111... Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.111 Spring rigging. (a) Arrangement of springs and equalizers. Springs and equalizers shall be arranged to ensure the proper distribution of weight to...

  6. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section 236.822... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original position after being trailed through and holds them under spring compression....

  7. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section 236.822... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original position after being trailed through and holds them under spring compression....

  8. 14 CFR 23.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Spring devices. 23.687 Section 23.687... Systems § 23.687 Spring devices. The reliability of any spring device used in the control system must be established by tests simulating service conditions unless failure of the spring will not cause flutter...

  9. Innate Sex Differences in the Timing of Spring Migration in a Songbird

    PubMed Central

    Maggini, Ivan; Bairlein, Franz

    2012-01-01

    In migrating animals protandry is the phenomenon whereby males of a species arrive at the breeding grounds earlier than females. In the present study we investigated the proximate causes of protandry in a migratory songbird, the northern wheatear Oenanthe oenanthe. Previous experiments with caged birds revealed that males and females show differentiated photoperiod-induced migratory habits. However, it remained open whether protandry would still occur without photoperiodic cues. In this study we kept captive first-year birds under constant photoperiod and environmental conditions in a “common garden” experiment. Male northern wheatears started their spring migratory activity earlier than females, even in the absence of environmental cues. This indicates that protandry in the northern wheatear has an endogenous basis with an innate earlier spring departure of males than females. PMID:22312443

  10. A time projection chamber for high-rate experiments: Towards an upgrade of the ALICE TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketzer, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    A Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is a powerful detector for three-dimensional tracking and particle identification for ultra-high multiplicity events. It is the central tracking device of many experiments, e.g. of the ALICE experiment at CERN. The necessity of a switching electrostatic gate, which prevents ions produced in the amplification region of the MWPCs from entering the drift volume, however, restricts its application to trigger rates of the order of 1 kHz. Charge amplification by Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) foils instead of proportional wires offers an intrinsic suppression of the ion backflow, although not to the same level as a gating grid. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations have shown that the distortions due to residual space charge from back-drifting ions can be limited to a few cm, and thus can be corrected using standard calibration techniques. A prototype GEM-TPC has been built with the largest active volume to date for a detector of this type. It has been commissioned with cosmic rays and with particle beams at the FOPI experiment at GSI, and was employed for a physics measurement with pion beams. For the future operation of the ALICE TPC at the CERN LHC beyond 2019, where Pb-Pb collision rates of 50 kHz are expected, it is planned to replace the existing MWPCs by GEM detectors, operated in a continuous, triggerless readout mode, thus allowing an increase in event rate by a factor of 100. As a first step of the R&D program, a prototype of an Inner Readout Chamber was equipped with large-size GEM foils and exposed to beams of protons, pions and electrons from the CERN PS. In this paper, new results are shown concerning ion backflow, spatial and momentum resolution of the FOPI GEM-TPC, detector calibration, and dE/dx resolution with both detector prototypes. The perspectives of a GEM-TPC for ALICE with continuous readout will be discussed.

  11. ALPIDE, the Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor for the ALICE ITS upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mager, M.

    2016-07-01

    A new 10 m2 inner tracking system based on seven concentric layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors will be installed in the ALICE experiment during the second long shutdown of LHC in 2019-2020. The monolithic pixel sensors will be fabricated in the 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor process of TowerJazz. The ALPIDE design takes full advantage of a particular process feature, the deep p-well, which allows for full CMOS circuitry within the pixel matrix, while at the same time retaining the full charge collection efficiency. Together with the small feature size and the availability of six metal layers, this allowed a continuously active low-power front-end to be placed into each pixel and an in-matrix sparsification circuit to be used that sends only the addresses of hit pixels to the periphery. This approach led to a power consumption of less than 40 mWcm-2, a spatial resolution of around 5 μm, a peaking time of around 2 μs, while being radiation hard to some 1013 1 MeVneq /cm2, fulfilling or exceeding the ALICE requirements. Over the last years of R & D, several prototype circuits have been used to verify radiation hardness, and to optimize pixel geometry and in-pixel front-end circuitry. The positive results led to a submission of full-scale (3 cm×1.5 cm) sensor prototypes in 2014. They are being characterized in a comprehensive campaign that also involves several irradiation and beam tests. A summary of the results obtained and prospects towards the final sensor to instrument the ALICE Inner Tracking System are given.

  12. System performance monitoring of the ALICE Data Acquisition System with Zabbix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telesca, A.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Dénes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Grigore, A.; Ionita, C.; Delort, C.; Simonetti, G.; Soós, C.; Vande Vyvre, P.; von Haller, B.; Alice Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a heavy-ion detector studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The ALICE Data-AcQuisition (DAQ) system handles the data flow from the sub-detector electronics to the permanent data storage in the CERN computing center. The DAQ farm consists of about 1000 devices of many different types ranging from direct accessible machines to storage arrays and custom optical links. The system performance monitoring tool used during the LHC run 1 will be replaced by a new tool for run 2. This paper shows the results of an evaluation that has been conducted on six publicly available monitoring tools. The evaluation has been carried out by taking into account selection criteria such as scalability, flexibility, reliability as well as data collection methods and display. All the tools have been prototyped and evaluated according to those criteria. We will describe the considerations that have led to the selection of the Zabbix monitoring tool for the DAQ farm. The results of the tests conducted in the ALICE DAQ laboratory will be presented. In addition, the deployment of the software on the DAQ machines in terms of metrics collected and data collection methods will be described. We will illustrate how remote nodes are monitored with Zabbix by using SNMP-based agents and how DAQ specific metrics are retrieved and displayed. We will also show how the monitoring information is accessed and made available via the graphical user interface and how Zabbix communicates with the other DAQ online systems for notification and reporting.

  13. Automated Inventory and Monitoring of the ALICE HLT Cluster Resources with the SysMES Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, J.; Lara, C.; Haaland, Ø.; Böttger, S.; Röhrich, D.; Kebschull, U.

    2012-12-01

    The High-Level-Trigger (HLT) cluster of the ALICE experiment is a computer cluster with about 200 nodes and 20 infrastructure machines. In its current state, the cluster consists of nearly 10 different configurations of nodes in terms of installed hardware, software and network structure. In such a heterogeneous environment with a distributed application, information about the actual configuration of the nodes is needed to automatically distribute and adjust the application accordingly. An inventory database provides a unified interface to such information. To be useful, the data in the inventory has to be up to date, complete and consistent. Manual maintenance of such databases is error-prone and data tends to become outdated. The inventory module of the ALICE HLT cluster overcomes these drawbacks by automatically updating the actual state periodically and, in contrast to existing solutions, it allows the definition of a target state for each node. A target state can simply be a fully operational state, i.e. a state without malfunctions, or a dedicated configuration of the node. The target state is then compared to the actual state to detect deviations and malfunctions which could induce severe problems when running the application. The inventory module of the ALICE HLT cluster has been integrated into the monitoring and management framework SysMES in order to use existing functionality like transactionality and monitoring infrastructure. Additionally, SysMES allows to solve detected problems automatically via its rule-system. To describe the heterogeneous environment with all its specifics, like custom hardware, the inventory module uses an object-oriented model which is based on the Common Information Model. The inventory module provides an automatically updated actual state of the cluster, detects discrepancies between the actual and the target state and is able to solve detected problems automatically. This contribution presents the current implementation

  14. Fossilization Processes in Thermal Springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Jack D.; Cady, Sherry; Desmarais, David J.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    To create a comparative framework for the study of ancient examples, we have been carrying out parallel studies of the microbial biosedimentology, taphonomy and geochemistry of modem and sub-Recent thermal spring deposits. One goal of the research is the development of integrated litho- and taphofacies models for siliceous and travertline sinters. Thermal springs are regarded as important environments for the origin and early evolution of life on Earth, and we seek to utilize information from the fossil record to reconstruct the evolution of high temperature ecosystems. Microbial contributions to the fabric of thermal spring sinters occur when population growth rates keep pace with, or exceed rates of inorganic precipitation, allowing for the development of continuous biofilms or mats. In siliceous thermal springs, microorganisms are typically entombed while viable. Modes of preservation reflect the balance between rates of organic matter degradation, silica precipitation and secondary infilling. Subaerial sinters are initially quite porous and permeable and at temperatures higher than about 20 C, organic materials are usually degraded prior to secondary infilling of sinter frameworks. Thus, organically-preserved microfossils are rare and fossil information consists of characteristic biofabrics formed by the encrustation and underplating of microbial mat surfaces. This probably accounts for the typically low total organic carbon values observed in thermal spring deposits. In mid-temperature, (approx. 35 - 59 C) ponds and outflows, the surface morphology of tufted Phormidium mats is preserved through mat underplating by thin siliceous: crusts. Microbial taxes lead to clumping of ceils and/or preferred filament orientations that together define higher order composite fabrics in thermal spring stromatolites (e.g. network, coniform, and palisade). At lower temperatures (less than 35 C), Calothrix mats cover shallow terracette pools forming flat carpets or pustular

  15. Do regions matter in ALICE?. Social relationships and data exchanges in the Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widmer, E. D.; Viry, G.; Carminati, F.; Galli-Carminati, G.

    2012-02-01

    This study aims at investigating the impact of regional affiliations of centres on the organisation of collaborations within the Distributed Computing ALICE infrastructure, based on social networks methods. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to all centre managers about support, email interactions and wished collaborations in the infrastructure. Several additional measures, stemming from technical observations were collected, such as bandwidth, data transfers and Internet Round Trip Time (RTT) were also included. Information for 50 centres were considered (about 70% response rate). Empirical analysis shows that despite the centralisation on CERN, the network is highly organised by regions. The results are discussed in the light of policy and efficiency issues.

  16. Femtoscopy of pp and Pb-Pb collisions with the ALICE experiment at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loggins, Vera; Alice Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Femtoscopy is unique among all analysis techniques utilized in subatomic collision experiments as it directly addresses the space-time structure of the evolving system at the femtometer scale. We report on the results of two-particle Bose-Einstein correlation analyses in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV and √{sNN} = 2 . 76 TeV, respectively, recorded by the ALICE experiment at the LHC. We discuss femtoscopic correlations for pions, kaons, and protons as a function of event multiplicity and total pair momentum.

  17. Archival Legacy Investigations of Circumstellar Environments (ALICE): Statistical assessment of point source detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choquet, Élodie; Pueyo, Laurent; Soummer, Rémi; Perrin, Marshall D.; Hagan, J. Brendan; Gofas-Salas, Elena; Rajan, Abhijith; Aguilar, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    The ALICE program, for Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environment, is currently conducting a virtual survey of about 400 stars, by re-analyzing the HST-NICMOS coronagraphic archive with advanced post-processing techniques. We present here the strategy that we adopted to identify detections and potential candidates for follow-up observations, and we give a preliminary overview of our detections. We present a statistical analysis conducted to evaluate the confidence level on these detection and the completeness of our candidate search.

  18. Dust Outbursts From Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Observed by Rosetta-Alice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffl, Andrew J.; Feldman, Paul D.; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Feaga, Lori M.; Keeney, Brian A.; Knight, Matthew M.; Noonan, John; Parker, Joel Wm.; Schindhelm, Eric R.; Stern, S. Alan; Vervack, Ronald J.; Weaver, Harold A.

    2015-11-01

    The comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, passed through perihelion on 13 August 2015. In the weeks surrounding the perihelion passage, several dramatic outbursts of dust have been observed by instruments aboard ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft. These outbursts are typically intense and short-lived, with timescales on the order of several tens of minutes to a few hours. We report on the two largest of these dusty outbursts observed by the Alice far-ultraviolet (700-2050Å) spectrograph, which occurred on 10 July 2015 and 22 August 2015. On 10 July 2015 02:06 UTC, Alice spectra of the sunward limb, nucleus and anti-sunward limb show typical levels of dust-scattered sunlight, with the sunward limb 3-4x brighter than the anti-sunward limb. Beginning around 02:10 UTC, the dust on the anti-sunward side of the nucleus brightened rapidly, increasing by a factor of 21 over pre-outburst levels, when integrated over a 10-minute exposure. A 40s exposure beginning at 02:20 showed an additional factor of two increase in brightness. During the outburst, the dust became significantly brighter than the sunlit nucleus. Concurrent NAVCAM images show a large dust cloud expanding out from the night side of the nucleus. Despite this forty-fold increase in dust brightness, the Alice data show no evidence of enhancements of H2O, CO, CO2, O2, O, or H in the post-outburst spectra. By 04:24 UTC, after a 2-hour data gap, the comet had returned to pre-event levels. Although complicated by the scanning motion of the spacecraft, the start of Alice observations on 22 August 2015 revealed a major dust outburst in progress, this time confined to the sunward side of the nucleus. Between 07:03 and 07:54, the brightness of dust on the sunward side faded by a factor of 7. NAVCAM images from this period also show a dramatic fan-shaped cloud of dust. Unlike the 10 July event, the 22 August event shows some evidence of increased gas emissions.

  19. Status of the construction and performances of the neutron Zero Degree Calorimeters of the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddi, E.; Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicaló, C.; Cortese, P.; De Falco, A.; Dellacasa, G.; De Marco, N.; Ferretti, A.; Gallio, M.; Masoni, A.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Puddu, G.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Travaglia, G.; Usai, G.; Vercellin, E.

    2004-12-01

    The details of the construction of the neutron Zero Degree Calorimeters (ZN) of the ALICE Experiment, as well as their performances, will be presented. These spaghetti calorimeters will measure the energy lost by spectator nucleons in heavy-ion collisions. They are made of an absorber (tungsten alloy) filled with silica fibers, in which the charged particles of the shower produce Cherenkov light. The final neutron calorimeters have been built and their performances studied at the CERN SPS using pion and positron beams with momentum ranging from 50 to 150 GeV/ c. The main features like linearity of the response and resolution as a function of energy will be presented.

  20. First performance results of the ALICE TPC Readout Control Unit 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Appelshäuser, H.; Bratrud, L.; Castro, A.; Costa, F.; David, E.; Gunji, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kiss, T.; Langøy, R.; Lien, J.; Lippmann, C.; Oskarsson, A.; Rehman, A. Ur; Røed, K.; Röhrich, D.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Stuart, M.; Ullaland, K.; Velure, A.; Yang, S.; Österman, L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the first performance results of the ALICE TPC Readout Control Unit 2 (RCU2). With the upgraded hardware typology and the new readout scheme in FPGA design, the RCU2 is designed to achieve twice the readout speed of the present Readout Control Unit. Design choices such as using the flash-based Microsemi Smartfusion2 FPGA and applying mitigation techniques in interfaces and FPGA design ensure a high degree of radiation tolerance. This paper presents the system level irradiation test results as well as the first commissioning results of the RCU2. Furthermore, it will be concluded with a discussion of the planned updates in firmware.

  1. The Dependence of the Spring Constant in the Linear Range on Spring Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khotimah, Siti Nurul; Viridi, Sparisoma; Widayani; Khairurrijal

    2011-01-01

    In basic physics laboratories, springs are normally used to determine both spring constants and the Earth's gravitational acceleration. Students generally do not notice that the spring constant is not a universal constant, but depends on the spring parameters. This paper shows and verifies that the spring constant in the linear range is inversely…

  2. Chlorine-36, bromide, and the origin of spring water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, S.N.; Cecil, L.D.; Zreda, M.; Moysey, S.

    2001-01-01

    Natural ratios of chlorine-36 (36Cl) to stable chlorine (i.e., 36Cl/Cl ?? 10-15) vary in shallow groundwater of the United States from about 50 in coastal areas to about 1400 in the northern Rocky Mountains. Ratios lower than these indicate the presence of chloride (Cl-) that has been isolated from the atmosphere for hundreds of thousands of years, if not longer. Higher ratios, which can exceed 5000, usually originate from fallout from testing thermonuclear devices in the western Pacific in the 1950s. Natural mass ratios of chloride to bromide (Cl-/Br-) in precipitation vary in the United States from about 250 in coastal areas to about 50 in the north-central states. Lower ratios may suggest contamination from human sources. Higher ratios, which may exceed 2000, commonly reflect the dissolution of halite. Seawater has a Cl-/Br- ratio of 290. Both 36Cl and Cl-/Br- ratios have been measured in 21 samples of spring water collected from springs in 10 different states. Brackish water from Saratoga Springs area in New York has low values for both 36Cl and Cl-/Br- ratios. This indicates that a large component of the water has a very deep origin. Brackish water from Alexander Springs in Florida has a low 36Cl ratio but a high Cl-/Br- ratio similar to seawater. This suggests the addition of ancient seawater that may be trapped in the aquifer. Big Spring in Iowa discharges water with a very high Cl-/Br- ratio but a moderate 36Cl ratio. The high ratio of Cl-/Br- may be produced by dissolution of road salt or agricultural chemicals. Of the 21 springs sampled, only 10 appeared to have potable water not significantly affected by human activity. Chlorine-36 from testing of nuclear devices is still being flushed out of four of the spring systems that were sampled. Thus, more than 45 years have passed since 36Cl was introduced into the aquifers feeding the springs and the systems, as yet, have not been purged. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  3. Study of new FNAL-NICADD extruded scintillator as active media of large EMCal of ALICE at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Oleg A. Grachov et al.

    2004-05-04

    The current conceptual design of proposed Large EMCal of ALICE at LHC is based largely on the scintillating mega-tile/fiber technology implemented in CDF Endplug upgrade project and in both barrel and endcap electromagnetic calorimeters of the STAR. The cost of scintillating material leads us to the choice of extruded polystyrene based scintillator, which is available in new FNAL-NICADD facility. Result of optical measurements, such as light yield and light yield variation, show that it is possible to use this material as active media of Large EMCal of ALICE at LHC.

  4. Motor gasoline assessment, Spring 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The springs of 1996 and 1997 provide an excellent example of contrasting gasoline market dynamics. In spring 1996, tightening crude oil markets pushed up gasoline prices sharply, adding to the normal seasonal gasoline price increases; however, in spring 1997, crude oil markets loosened and crude oil prices fell, bringing gasoline prices down. This pattern was followed throughout the country except in California. As a result of its unique reformulated gasoline, California prices began to vary significantly from the rest of the country in 1996 and continued to exhibit distinct variations in 1997. In addition to the price contrasts between 1996 and 1997, changes occurred in the way in which gasoline markets were supplied. Low stocks, high refinery utilizations, and high imports persisted through 1996 into summer 1997, but these factors seem to have had little impact on gasoline price spreads relative to average spread.

  5. Spring-Blade Impact Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Alan M.; Champagne, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Record of energy relationships retrieved from compact, portable tester. Spring-blade impact tester developed to support evaluation of tolerance to damage of struts under consideration for use in Space Station. Approach offers potential for determining damage as function of change in relationship between applied and absorbed energies as applied energy successively increased with each impact. Impactor strikes specimen at moment of maximum kinetic energy after spring blades released from cocked position. Concept also provides potential for measuring behavior during impact, and energy relationships retrievable from oscilloscope traces of impact.

  6. The Influence of Drought on Spring Vegetation Green-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. F.; Ji, L.; Gallant, A.; Kauffman, M.

    2015-12-01

    Herbivore species such as elk and deer depend on the availability of herbaceous plants and deciduous shrubs for forage. These vegetation types are most nutritious for herbivores during the early part of the growing season, so characterizing spring vegetation phenology over decades can provide crucial information towards understanding how shifts in climate could affect animal behavior and health. Many studies have shown that spring vegetation growth is sensitive to temperature, but less research exists on the influence of drought on phenology. We tested hypotheses on the interactions of recent drought and the phenology of forage utilized by herbivores across the state of Wyoming, USA. Phenological indicators, including the start of season time (SOST), the time of maximum change (in greenness response) (MCT), length of the green-up window (GUW: days from SOST to time of peak greenness), and early spring window (ESW: days from the SOST to the MCT) developed from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite imagery at 250-m resolution, provided broad coverage of the temporal and spatial characteristics of green-up cycles. Gridded precipitation data generated with the Precipitation-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) were used to characterize drought conditions at a coarser spatial scale. We found evidence to prove an initial hypothesis that drought advanced spring development. Spring drought conditions were statistically related to advanced vegetation green-up in SOST and MCT variables, especially across higher elevations and in forested land cover, as well as in some shrublands and grasslands. We did not find evidence that drought made green-up occur faster (based on GUW and ESW variables), although the ESW showed slight acceleration across the northern third of Wyoming. We are further investigating whether the phenological signal of vegetation in more arid areas has been too subtle to detect a significant response to drought.

  7. Common Readout Unit (CRU) - A new readout architecture for the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, J.; Khan, S. A.; Mukherjee, S.; Paul, R.

    2016-03-01

    The ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is presently going for a major upgrade in order to fully exploit the scientific potential of the upcoming high luminosity run, scheduled to start in the year 2021. The high interaction rate and the large event size will result in an experimental data flow of about 1 TB/s from the detectors, which need to be processed before sending to the online computing system and data storage. This processing is done in a dedicated Common Readout Unit (CRU), proposed for data aggregation, trigger and timing distribution and control moderation. It act as common interface between sub-detector electronic systems, computing system and trigger processors. The interface links include GBT, TTC-PON and PCIe. GBT (Gigabit transceiver) is used for detector data payload transmission and fixed latency path for trigger distribution between CRU and detector readout electronics. TTC-PON (Timing, Trigger and Control via Passive Optical Network) is employed for time multiplex trigger distribution between CRU and Central Trigger Processor (CTP). PCIe (Peripheral Component Interconnect Express) is the high-speed serial computer expansion bus standard for bulk data transport between CRU boards and processors. In this article, we give an overview of CRU architecture in ALICE, discuss the different interfaces, along with the firmware design and implementation of CRU on the LHCb PCIe40 board.

  8. Results from the first p+p runs of the ALICE High Level Trigger at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaki, Kalliopi; ALICE HLT Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The High Level Trigger for the ALICE experiment at LHC is a powerful, sophisticated tool aimed at compressing the raw data volume and issuing selective triggers for events with desirable physics content. At its current state it integrates information from all major ALICE detectors, i. e. the inner tracking system, the time projection chamber, the electromagnetic calorimeters, the transition radiation detector and the muon spectrometer performing real-time event reconstruction. The steam engine behind HLT is a high performance computing cluster of several hundred nodes. It has to reduce the data rate from 25 GB/s to 1.25 GB/s for fitting the DAQ mass storage bandwidth. The cluster is served by a full GigaBit Ethernet network, in addition to an InfiniBand backbone network. To cope with the great challenge of Pb+Pb collisions in autumn 2010, its performance capabilities are being enhanced with the addition of new nodes. Towards the same end the first GPU co-processors are in place. During the first period of data taking with p+p collisions the HLT was extensively used to reconstruct, analyze and display data from the various participating detectors. Among other tasks it contributed to the monitoring of the detector performance, selected events for their calibration and efficiency studies, and estimated primary and secondary vertices from p+p collisions identifying V0 topologies. The experience gained during these first months of online operation will be presented.

  9. The ALICE high-level trigger read-out upgrade for LHC Run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, H.; Alt, T.; Breitner, T.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Kollegger, T.; Krzewicki, M.; Lehrbach, J.; Rohr, D.; Kebschull, U.

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE experiment uses an optical read-out protocol called Detector Data Link (DDL) to connect the detectors with the computing clusters of Data Acquisition (DAQ) and High-Level Trigger (HLT). The interfaces of the clusters to these optical links are realized with FPGA-based PCI-Express boards. The High-Level Trigger is a computing cluster dedicated to the online reconstruction and compression of experimental data. It uses a combination of CPU, GPU and FPGA processing. For Run 2, the HLT has replaced all of its previous interface boards with the Common Read-Out Receiver Card (C-RORC) to enable read-out of detectors at high link rates and to extend the pre-processing capabilities of the cluster. The new hardware also comes with an increased link density that reduces the number of boards required. A modular firmware approach allows different processing and transport tasks to be built from the same source tree. A hardware pre-processing core includes cluster finding already in the C-RORC firmware. State of the art interfaces and memory allocation schemes enable a transparent integration of the C-RORC into the existing HLT software infrastructure. Common cluster management and monitoring frameworks are used to also handle C-RORC metrics. The C-RORC is in use in the clusters of ALICE DAQ and HLT since the start of LHC Run 2.

  10. The ALICE Inner Tracking System: Design, physics performance and R&D issues

    SciTech Connect

    Giubellino, P.

    1995-07-15

    ALICE is a dedicated Heavy-Ion experiment proposed for the future LHC collider at CERN. The main goals of the ALICE Inner Tracking System are the reconstruction of secondary vertexes and the tracking and identification of low-p{sub t} electrons; at the same time, it will provide a significant improvement of the momentum resolution at large p{sub t} and the tracking and identification of low-p{sub t} hadrons. The ITS will consist of five cilindrical layers of radii from 7.5 to 50 cm. of high-resolution detectors. The unprecedented particle density foreseen, of up to 8000 particles per unit {eta}, imposes the use of sophisticated, and often innovative, technologies for the detectors, the electronics and the support and cooling system. Therefore, extensive R&D programs are now being pursued on various aspects of the project. Here are presented the basic ideas for the design, a few examples of the expected performance, and a brief overview of the ongoing R&D.

  11. O2: A novel combined online and offline computing system for the ALICE Experiment after 2018

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananya; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, A.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Alt, T.; Aphecetche, L.; Agrawal, N.; Avasthi, A.; Bach, M.; Bala, R.; Barnafoldi, G.; Bhasin, A.; Belikov, J.; Bellini, F.; Betev, L.; Breitner, T.; Buncic, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Cliff, F.; Costa, F.; Cunqueiro Mendez, L.; Dash, S.; Delort, C.; Denes, E.; Divia, R.; Doenigus, B.; Engel, H.; Eschweiler, D.; Fuchs, U.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gorbunov, S.; Graczykowski, L.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigore, A.; Grosso, R.; Guernane, R.; Gupta, A.; Hrivnacova, I.; Hristov, P.; Ionita, C.; Ivanov, M.; Janik, M.; Kalcher, S.; Kassalias, N.; Kebschull, U.; Khandelwal, R.; Kushpil, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiss, T.; Kollegger, T.; Kowalski, M.; Kretz, M.; Kulakov, I.; Lafage, V.; Lara, C.; Legrand, I.; Lindenstruth, V.; Maevskaya, A.; Malzacher, P.; Morsch, A.; Nandi, B.; Niculescu, M.; Pillot, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Rajput, S.; Read, K.; Ribon, A.; Rohr, D.; Rubin, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, A.; Simonetti, G.; Smorholm, O.; Soós, C.; Szymanski, M.; Telesca, A.; Thaeder, J.; Udupa, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Vennedey, F.; von Haller, B.; Wenzel, S.; Zampolli, C.; Zyzak, M.; Alice Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a detector dedicated to the studies with heavy ion collisions exploring the physics of strongly interacting nuclear matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). After the second long shutdown of the LHC, the ALICE Experiment will be upgraded to make high precision measurements of rare probes at low pT, which cannot be selected with a trigger, and therefore require a very large sample of events recorded on tape. The online computing system will be completely redesigned to address the major challenge of sampling the full 50 kHz Pb-Pb interaction rate increasing the present limit by a factor of 100. This upgrade will also include the continuous un-triggered read-out of two detectors: ITS (Inner Tracking System) and TPC (Time Projection Chamber)) producing a sustained throughput of 1 TB/s. This unprecedented data rate will be reduced by adopting an entirely new strategy where calibration and reconstruction are performed online, and only the reconstruction results are stored while the raw data are discarded. This system, already demonstrated in production on the TPC data since 2011, will be optimized for the online usage of reconstruction algorithms. This implies much tighter coupling between online and offline computing systems. An R&D program has been set up to meet this huge challenge. The object of this paper is to present this program and its first results.

  12. A Very High Momentum Particle Identification Detector for the ALICE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mayani, Daniel

    2011-04-26

    The main purpose of the ALICE experiment at CERN is to identify and study the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) in heavy ion collisions at the LHC. Among others, hadrochemistry allows for a detailed insight into the characteristics of the high temperature and density system created in these events. It is therefore important to be able to identify charged particles on a track by track basis. Moreover, results from high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions obtained by other experiments (e.g. at RHIC) indicate that it is imperative to extend the detection capability of ALICE to higher momenta. To meet these challenges, we propose the construction of the Very High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (VHMPID), which aims to identify charged pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons in the momentum range of 10 GeV/c

  13. Spring feeding on ungulate carcasses by grizzly bears in Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, Gerald I.; Mattson, D.J.; Peek, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    We studied the spring use of ungulate carcasses by grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) on ungulate winter ranges in Yellowstone National Park. We observed carcasses and bear tracks on survey routes that were travelled biweekly during spring of 1985-90 in the Firehole-Gibbon winter range and spring of 1987-90 in the Northern winter range. The probability that grizzly bears used a carcass was positively related to elevation and was lower within 400 m of a road, or within 5 km of a major recreational development compared to elsewhere. Carcass use peaked in April, coincident with peak ungulate deaths. Grizzly bears also were more likely to use carcasses in the Firehole-Gibbon compared to Northern Range study area. We attributed the effects of study area and elevation to the fact that grizzly bears den and are first active in the spring at high elevations and to differences in densities of competing scavengers. Probability of grizzly bear use was strongly related to body mass of carcasses on the Northern Range where densities of coyotes (Canis latrans) and black bears (U. americanus) appeared to be much higher than in the Firehole-Gibbon study area. We suggest that additional restrictions on human activity in ungulate winter ranges or movement of carcasses to remote areas could increase grizzly bear use of carrion. Fewer competing scavengers and greater numbers of adult ungulates vulnerable to winter mortality could have the same effect.

  14. NOVA Spring 2000 Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colombo, Luann; Gregoire, Tanya; Ransick, Kristina; Sammons, Fran Lyons; Sammons, James

    This teacher's guide complements six programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the spring of 2000. Programs include: (1) "Lost on Everest"; (2) "Lost Tribes of Israel"; (3) "Crocodiles"; (4) "Lost at Sea: The Search for Longitude"; (5) "Global Warming"; and (6) "Secrets of Lost Empires". It provides activity set-ups related to…

  15. TEACH Evaluation, Spring 2002. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuschke, Daylene M; Dixon, P. Scott; Gribbons, Barry C.

    TEACH is a partnership program involving California State University, Bakersfield (CSUB), College of the Canyons (COC) and the Newhall and Hart School Districts to provide students with supervised fieldwork and specialized support services while pursuing a California teaching credential. This Spring 2002 TEACH evaluation reports on surveys of COC…

  16. The Forced Hard Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2006-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, various examples of the Duffing type forced spring equation with epsilon positive, are studied. Since [epsilon] is positive, all solutions to the associated homogeneous equation are periodic and the same is true with the forcing applied. The damped equation exhibits steady state trajectories with the interesting…

  17. The Forced Soft Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, T. H.

    2006-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, this paper studies examples of the forced Duffing type spring equation with [epsilon] negative. By performing trial-and-error numerical experiments, the existence is demonstrated of stability boundaries in the phase plane indicating initial conditions yielding bounded solutions. Subharmonic boundaries are…

  18. Spring for It: First Novels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    How do publishers describe the first novels they will be releasing this spring and summer? "Amazing," "fabulous," and "unique" are words that pop up frequently, though hats off to one publicist forthright or cheeky enough to call a work "weird Western/horror." The proof of such praise is in the reading, but why not check out this preview of first…

  19. Finding Spring on Planet X

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew J.

    2007-01-01

    For a given orbital period and eccentricity, we determine the maximum time lapse between the winter solstice and the spring equinox on a planet. In addition, given an axial precession path, we determine the effects on the seasons. This material can be used at various levels to illustrate ideas such as periodicity, eccentricity, polar coordinates,…

  20. A Breath of Spring Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Marilyn L.

    2009-01-01

    The most promising sights of spring in Nebraska this year were two conferences for women. One event, sponsored by Metropolitan Community College in Omaha, was a Women's History Month Tea. A second conference was the meeting of the Nebraska Women in Higher Education. These two events suggest that there is a continuing interest in women's leadership…

  1. Voronoi Diagrams and Spring Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perham, Arnold E.; Perham, Faustine L.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this geometry project is to use Voronoi diagrams, a powerful modeling tool across disciplines, and the integration of technology to analyze spring rainfall from rain gauge data over a region. In their investigation, students use familiar equipment from their mathematical toolbox: triangles and other polygons, circumcenters and…

  2. NOVA Spring 1999 Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colombo, Luann; Ransick, Kristina; Recio, Belinda

    This teacher's guide complements six programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the spring of 1999. Programs include: (1) "Surviving AIDS"; (2) "Secrets of Making Money"; (3) "Escape!: Fire"; (4) "Escape!: Car Crash"; (5) "Volcanoes of the Deep"; and (6) "Odyssey of Life: Part 1. The Ultimate Journey". It provides activity…

  3. To Colorado Springs and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millard, Richard M.

    Developments that highlight the importance of state oversight and authorization of higher education institutions and the objectives of the current Colorado Springs seminar on this topic are considered. In addition to the basic fact that states are the origin of chartering, licensing, and authorization of educational institutions, states have…

  4. Carnivorous arthropods after spring flood

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spring flooding is a common practice in Wisconsin cranberries, but flooding as insect control produces variable results among marshes. This project is aimed at figuring out why it works, and why it sometimes doesn’t. We have focused on tracking arthropod populations to explain the observed patterns ...

  5. Probability-based classifications for spatially characterizing the water temperatures and discharge rates of hot springs in the Tatun Volcanic Region, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Jang, Cheng-Shin

    2015-05-01

    Accurately classifying the spatial features of the water temperatures and discharge rates of hot springs is crucial for environmental resources use and management. This study spatially characterized classifications of the water temperatures and discharge rates of hot springs in the Tatun Volcanic Region of Northern Taiwan by using indicator kriging (IK). The water temperatures and discharge rates of the springs were first assigned to high, moderate, and low categories according to the two thresholds of the proposed spring classification criteria. IK was then used to model the occurrence probabilities of the water temperatures and discharge rates of the springs and probabilistically determine their categories. Finally, nine combinations were acquired from the probability-based classifications for the spatial features of the water temperatures and discharge rates of the springs. Moreover, various combinations of spring water features were examined according to seven subzones of spring use in the study region. The research results reveal that probability-based classifications using IK provide practicable insights related to propagating the uncertainty of classifications according to the spatial features of the water temperatures and discharge rates of the springs. The springs in the Beitou (BT), Xingyi Road (XYR), Zhongshanlou (ZSL), and Lengshuikeng (LSK) subzones are suitable for supplying tourism hotels with a sufficient quantity of spring water because they have high or moderate discharge rates. Furthermore, natural hot springs in riverbeds and valleys should be developed in the Dingbeitou (DBT), ZSL, Xiayoukeng (XYK), and Macao (MC) subzones because of low discharge rates and low or moderate water temperatures. PMID:25917185

  6. The Mother of Microloans (and Obama): A Q&A with Anthropologist and Author, Alice G. Dewey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maitland, Christine

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Alice G. Dewey, professor emeritus at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa and granddaughter of the renowned American philosopher John Dewey. She is an economic anthropologist who did ground-breaking research on local markets in Indonesia in the 1950s. She recently co-edited "Surviving Against the Odds:…

  7. "All of Her Changes Have Made Me Think about My Changes": Fan Readings of Phyllis Reynolds Naylor's "Alice" Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinecken, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    This essay follows the insights of reader response theory to examine how readers of Phyllis Reynolds Naylor's Alice McKinley series negotiate textual meaning and construct particular identities in relation to the series' controversial content. Ranking second on the American Library Association's top one hundred list of banned and challenged books…

  8. Using Hydrogen Isotopes to Distinguish Allochthony and Autochthony in Hot Springs Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hungate, J.; DeSousa, T. M.; Ong, J. C.; Caron, M. M.; Brown, J. R.; Patel, N.; Dijkstra, P.; Hedlund, B. P.; Hungate, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    Hot springs are hosts to abundant and diverse microbial communities. Above the temperature threshold for photosynthesis (~73 degrees C), a variety of chemosynthetic organisms support autochthonous primary production in hot springs ecosystems. These organisms are thought to drive the carbon and energy budgets of these ecosystems, but the importance of energy inputs from the surrounding terrestrial environments - allochthonous inputs - is not well known. Here, we tested the efficacy of stable isotopes of hydrogen in distinguishing autochthonous from allochthonous sources of organic matter in hot springs ecosystems. Under laboratory conditions and in pure culture, we grew autotrophic, mixotrophic, and heterotrophic organisms from the Great Boiling Springs in northern Nevada as well as organisms typical of other hot springs environments. We measured the δ2H composition of biomass, water and organic matter sources used by the organisms to produce that biomass. We also surveyed organic matter in and around hot springs in Nevada and in the Tengchong geothermal region in China, sampling terrestrial plants at the hot springs margin, microorganisms (either scraped from surfaces or in the water column), and organic matter in the sediment accruing in the spring itself as an integrative measure of the relative importance of organic matter sources to the spring ecosystem. We found that autotrophic production in culture results in strongly depleted δ2H signatures, presumably because of fractionation against 2H-H2O during chemosynthesis. The observed difference between microbial biomass and water was larger than that typically found for terrestrial plants during photosynthesis, setting the stage for using δ2H to distinguish allochthonous from autochthonous sources of productivity in hot springs. In surveys of natural hot springs, microbial biomass sampled from the water column or from surfaces was often strongly depleted in δ2H, consistent with in situ chemosynthesis. Organic

  9. Portrait of a Geothermal Spring, Hunter's Hot Springs, Oregon.

    PubMed

    Castenholz, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Although alkaline Hunter's Hot Springs in southeastern Oregon has been studied extensively for over 40 years, most of these studies and the subsequent publications were before the advent of molecular methods. However, there are many field observations and laboratory experiments that reveal the major aspects of the phototrophic species composition within various physical and chemical gradients of these springs. Relatively constant temperature boundaries demark the upper boundary of the unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus at 73-74 °C (the world-wide upper limit for photosynthesis), and 68-70 °C the upper limit for Chloroflexus. The upper limit for the cover of the filamentous cyanobacterium, Geitlerinema (Oscillatoria) is at 54-55 °C, and the in situ lower limit at 47-48 °C for all three of these phototrophs due to the upper temperature limit for the grazing ostracod, Thermopsis. The in situ upper limit for the cyanobacteria Pleurocapsa and Calothrix is at ~47-48 °C, which are more grazer-resistant and grazer dependent. All of these demarcations are easily visible in the field. In addition, there is a biosulfide production in some sections of the springs that have a large impact on the microbiology. Most of the temperature and chemical limits have been explained by field and laboratory experiments. PMID:25633225

  10. Monitoring the data quality of the real-time event reconstruction in the ALICE High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austrheim Erdal, Hege; Richther, Matthias; Szostak, Artur; Toia, Alberica

    2012-12-01

    ALICE is a dedicated heavy ion experiment at the CERN LHC. The ALICE High Level Trigger was designed to select events with desirable physics properties. Data from several of the major subdetectors in ALICE are processed by the HLT for real-time event reconstruction, for instance the Inner Tracking System, the Time Projection Chamber, the electromagnetc calorimeters, the Transition Radiation Detector and the muon spectrometer. The HLT reconstructs events in real-time and thus provides input for trigger algorithms. It is necessary to monitor the quality of the reconstruction where one focuses on track and event properties. Also, HLT implemented data compression for the TPC during the heavy ion data taking in 2011 to reduce the data rate from the ALICE detector. The key for the data compression is to store clusters (spacepoints) calculated by HLT rather than storing raw data. It is thus very important to monitor the cluster finder performance as a way to monitor the data compression. The data monitoring is divided into two stages. The first stage is performed during data taking. A part of the HLT production chain is dedicated to performing online monitoring and facilities are available in the HLT production cluster to have real-time access to the reconstructed events in the ALICE control room. This includes track and event properties, and in addition, this facility gives a way to display a small fraction of the reconstructed events in an online display. The second part of the monitoring is performed after the data has been transferred to permanent storage. After a post-process of the real-time reconstructed data, one can look in more detail at the cluster finder performance, the quality of the reconstruction of tracks, vertices and vertex position. The monitoring solution is presented in detail, with special attention to the heavy ion data taking of 2011.

  11. 14 CFR 29.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Spring devices. 29.687 Section 29.687... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  12. 14 CFR 27.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Spring devices. 27.687 Section 27.687... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  13. 75 FR 39241 - Hooper Springs Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... Bonneville Power Administration Hooper Springs Project AGENCY: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA... Hooper Springs Project). The new BPA substation would be called Hooper Springs Substation and would be... 115-kV Lane Creek Substation, east of the City of Wayan, Idaho. The proposed project would...

  14. 14 CFR 27.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spring devices. 27.687 Section 27.687... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  15. Effective Mass of an Oscillating Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Eduardo E.; Gesnouin, Gabriel A.

    2007-01-01

    We present an experimental method to obtain the effective mass of an unloaded oscillating spring. We measure the period "T"("n") of the partial springs that result when hanging "n" of the total "N" coils of a given spring. Data are correlated with the expectation of a simple model for "T"("n") that takes into account the effective mass of the…

  16. 14 CFR 29.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Spring devices. 29.687 Section 29.687... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  17. 14 CFR 27.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Spring devices. 27.687 Section 27.687... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  18. 14 CFR 27.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Spring devices. 27.687 Section 27.687... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  19. 14 CFR 29.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Spring devices. 29.687 Section 29.687... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  20. 14 CFR 29.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Spring devices. 29.687 Section 29.687... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  1. 14 CFR 27.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Spring devices. 27.687 Section 27.687... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  2. 14 CFR 29.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spring devices. 29.687 Section 29.687... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  3. From Fall to Spring, or Spring to Fall? Seasonal Cholera Transmission Cycles and Implications for Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanda, A. S.; Jutla, A. S.; Huq, A.; Colwell, R.; Islam, S.; WE Reason

    2010-12-01

    Cholera remains a major public health threat in many developing countries around the world. The striking seasonality and the annual recurrence of this infectious disease in endemic areas continues to be of considerable interest to scientists and public health workers. Despite major advances in the ecological, and microbiological understanding of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent, the role of underlying macro-scale hydroclimatic processes in propagating the disease in different seasons and years is not well understood. The incidence of cholera in the Bengal Delta region, the ‘native homeland’ of cholera, shows distinct biannual peaks in the southern floodplains, as opposed to single annual peaks in coastal areas and the northern parts of Bangladesh, as well as other cholera-endemic regions in the world. A coupled analysis of the regional hydroclimate and cholera incidence reveals a strong association of the spatio-temporal variability of incidence peaks with seasonal processes and extreme events. At a seasonal scale, the cycles indicate a spring-fall transmission pattern, contrary to the prevalent notion of a fall-spring transmission cycle. We show that the asymmetric seasonal hydroclimatology affects regional cholera dynamics by providing a coastal growth environment for bacteria in spring, while propagating transmission to fall by flooding. This seasonal interpretation of the progression of cholera has important implications, for formulating effective cholera intervention and mitigation efforts through improved water management and understanding the impacts of changing climate patterns on seasonal cholera transmission. (Water Environental Research Education Actionable Solutions Network)

  4. Ultraviolet resources over Northern Eurasia.

    PubMed

    Chubarova, Natalia; Zhdanova, Yekaterina

    2013-10-01

    We propose a new climatology of UV resources over Northern Eurasia, which includes the assessments of both detrimental (erythema) and positive (vitamin D synthesis) effects of ultraviolet radiation on human health. The UV resources are defined by using several classes and subclasses - UV deficiency, UV optimum, and UV excess - for 6 different skin types. To better quantifying the vitamin D irradiance threshold we accounted for an open body fraction S as a function of effective air temperature. The spatial and temporal distribution of UV resources was estimated by radiative transfer (RT) modeling (8 stream DISORT RT code) with 1×1° grid and monthly resolution. For this purpose special datasets of main input geophysical parameters (total ozone content, aerosol characteristics, surface UV albedo, UV cloud modification factor) have been created over the territory of Northern Eurasia. The new approaches were used to retrieve aerosol parameters and cloud modification factor in the UV spectral region. As a result, the UV resources were obtained for clear-sky and mean cloudy conditions for different skin types. We show that the distribution of UV deficiency, UV optimum and UV excess is regulated by various geophysical parameters (mainly, total ozone, cloudiness and open body fraction) and can significantly deviate from latitudinal dependence. We also show that the UV optimum conditions can be simultaneously observed for people with different skin types (for example, for 4-5 skin types at the same time in spring over Western Europe). These UV optimum conditions for different skin types occupy a much larger territory over Europe than that over Asia. PMID:23933245

  5. FOSSIL SPRINGS ROADLESS AREA, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beard, L.S.; Ellis, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    Based on field studies, the Fossil Springs Roadless Area in central Arizona is concluded to have little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Rocks in the Supai Formation (Pennsylvanian-Permian) near the central part of the roadless area contain widespread but spotty copper mineralization and trace amounts of uranium. Analyses obtained during the study define geochemical anomalies in two portions of the area that remain unexplained. The suites of anomalous metals suggest the possibility of hydrothermal veins and the presence of ultramafic rocks; neither were found in the field. Although there is little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources in the Fossil Springs Roadless Area, studies to identify the source of the geochemical anomalies could have valuable implications for regional studies and mineral exploration in the surrounding area.

  6. A global review on ambient Limestone-Precipitating Springs (LPS): Hydrogeological setting, ecology, and conservation.

    PubMed

    Cantonati, Marco; Segadelli, Stefano; Ogata, Kei; Tran, Ha; Sanders, Diethard; Gerecke, Reinhard; Rott, Eugen; Filippini, Maria; Gargini, Alessandro; Celico, Fulvio

    2016-10-15

    Springs are biodiversity hotspots and unique habitats that are threatened, especially by water overdraft. Here we review knowledge on ambient-temperature (non-geothermal) freshwater springs that achieve sufficient oversaturation for CaCO3 -by physical CO2 degassing and activity of photoautotrophs- to deposit limestone, locally resulting in scenic carbonate structures: Limestone-Precipitating Springs (LPS). The most characteristic organisms in these springs are those that contribute to carbonate precipitation, e.g.: the mosses Palustriella and Eucladium, the crenophilous desmid Oocardium stratum, and cyanobacteria (e.g., Rivularia). These organisms appear to be sensitive to phosphorus pollution. Invertebrate diversity is modest, and highest in pools with an aquatic-terrestrial interface. Internationally, comprehensive legislation for spring protection is still relatively scarce. Where available, it covers all spring types. The situation in Europe is peculiar: the only widespread spring type included in the EU Habitat Directive is LPS, mainly because of landscape aesthetics. To support LPS inventorying and management to meet conservation-legislation requirements we developed a general conceptual model to predict where LPS are more likely to occur. The model is based on the pre-requisites for LPS: an aquifer lithology that enables build-up of high bicarbonate and Ca(2+) to sustain CaCO3 oversaturation after spring emergence, combined with intense groundwater percolation especially along structural discontinuities (e.g., fault zones, joints, schistosity), and a proper hydrogeological structure of the discharging area. We validated this model by means of the LPS information system for the Emilia-Romagna Region (northern Italy). The main threats to LPS are water diversion, nutrient enrichment, and lack of awareness by non-specialized persons and administrators. We discuss an emblematic case study to provide management suggestions. The present review is devoted to LPS but

  7. Force of an actin spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jennifer; Mahadevan, L.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The acrosomal process of the horseshoe crab sperm is a novel mechanochemical molecular spring that converts its elastic stain energy to mechanical work upon the chemical activation by Ca2+. Twisted and bent, the initial state of the acrosomal bundle features a high degree of complexity in its structure and the energy is believed to be stored in the highly strained actin filaments as an elastic potential energy. When activated, the bundle relaxes from the coil of the highly twisted and bent filaments to its straight conformation at a mean velocity of 15um/s. The mean extension velocity increases dramatically from 3um/s to 27um/s when temperature of the medium is changed from 9.6C to 32C (respective viscosities of 1.25-0.75cp), yet it exhibits a very weak dependence on changes in the medium viscosity (1cp-33cp). These experiments suggest that the uncoiling of the actin spring should be limited not by the viscosity of the medium but by the unlatching events of involved proteins at a molecular level. Unlike the viscosity-limited processes, where force is directly related to the rate of the reaction, a direct measurement is required to obtain the spring force of the acrosomal process. The extending acrosomal bundle is forced to push against a barrier and its elastic buckling response is analyzed to measure the force generated during the uncoiling.

  8. Design and performance of the ALICE TRD front-end electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelov, Venelin

    2006-07-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) of the ALICE experiment at CERN incorporates 1.2 million channels which are individually read out and processed. The front-end electronics (FEE) utilizes two custom chips: an 18 channel analog preamplifier and shaper (PASA) and a mixed-signal chip, performing 10 bit analog-to-digital conversion, event buffering and local tracking (TRAP). Both chips together are packaged as a 4×4 cm2 ball grid array multi chip module (MCM). More than 65 k of these will be integrated on the detector. In fall 2004, a small prototype implementing 140 MCMs was successfully tested at CERN. The MCMs demonstrate an ADC performance of 9.5 effective bits while the digital back-end is operating, including four RISC processors. The electronic noise of the PASA mounted on the detector was measured with the digital back-end to be below 1200 electrons.

  9. Do regions of ALICE matter? Social relationships and data exchanges in the Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widmer, E. D.; Carminati, F.; Grigoras, C.; Viry, G.; Galli Carminati, G.

    2012-06-01

    Following a previous publication [1], this study aims at investigating the impact of regional affiliations of centres on the organisation of collaboration within the Distributed Computing ALICE infrastructure, based on social networks methods. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to all centre managers about support, email interactions and wished collaborations in the infrastructure. Several additional measures, stemming from technical observations were produced, such as bandwidth, data transfers and Internet Round Trip Time (RTT) were also included. Information for 50 centres were considered (60% response rate). Empirical analysis shows that despite the centralisation on CERN, the network is highly organised by regions. The results are discussed in the light of policy and efficiency issues.

  10. SAMPA chip: a new ASIC for the ALICE TPC and MCH upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza, S. H. I.; Bregant, M.; Chambert, V.; Espagnon, B.; Hernandez Herrera, H. D.; Mahmood, S. M.; Moraes, D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Noël, G.; Pilyar, A.; Russo, P.; Sanches, B. C. S.; Tambave, G. J.; Tun-Lanoë, K. M. M.; van Noije, W.; Velure, A.; Vereschagin, S.; Weber, T. O.; Zaporozhets, S.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the SAMPA, an ASIC designed for the upgrade of read-out front end electronics of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and Muon Chambers (MCH). SAMPA is made in a 130 nm CMOS technology with 1.25 V nominal voltage supply and includes 32 channels, with selectable input polarity, and five possible combinations of shaping time and sensitivity. Each channel comprises a Charge Sensitive Amplifier, a semi-Gaussian shaper and a 10-bit ADC, followed by a Digital Signal Processor. A prototype in a multi project run was submitted to evaluate the performance of each of these blocks. The experimental results of the tests on these building blocks are presented, showing a substantial agreement with requirements.

  11. Kaethe Kollwitz (1867-1945): the artist who may have suffered from Alice in Wonderland Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Drysdale, Graeme R

    2009-05-01

    Kaethe Kollwitz was a 20th century German artist who grew to fame for her socio-political impressions of Germany during World Wars I and II. In her diary, Kollwitz self-described symptoms of Alice in Wonderland Syndrome during her childhood. She complained of episodes where objects appeared to grow larger or smaller and perceptual distortions where she felt she was diminishing in size. This may explain why Kollwitz's artistic style appeared to shift from naturalism to expressionism, and why her artistic subjects are often shaped with large hands and faces. The distortion present in her visual art may have less to do with a deliberate emphasis of the artist's feelings and more to do with her perceptual experience. PMID:19401515

  12. Neutral meson production in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC with ALICE

    SciTech Connect

    Borissov, Alexander; Collaboration: ALICE Collaboration

    2013-04-15

    The first measurements of the invariant differential cross sections of inclusive {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} meson production with ALICE are presented for pp collisions at {radical}(s) = 0.9 and 7 TeV. Next-to-Leading Order perturbative QCD calculations overestimate the data at {radical}(s) = 7TeV, but are consistent with the {pi}{sup 0} spectrum at {radical}(s) = 0.9TeV and with the measured {pi}{sup 0}/{eta} cross section ratio at {radical}(s) = 7TeV. The nuclear modification factors (R{sub AA}) of {pi}{sup 0} production at different centralities show a strong suppression with respect to pp collisions.

  13. Geothermal resource assessment of Hot Sulphur Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Pearl, R.H.; Zacharakis, T.G.; Ringrose, C.D.

    1982-01-01

    Approximately 10 springs whose waters are used for recreation, steam baths and laundry purposes are located at Hot Sulphur Springs. Estimated heat-flow at Hot Sulphur Springs is approximately 100 mW/m2, which is about normal for western Colorado. Recent work tends to show that surface and reduced heat flow in the mountains of northern Colorado could be high. The thermal waters have an estimated discharge of 50 gpm, a temperature that ranges from 104/sup 0/F (40/sup 0/C) to a high of 111/sup 0/F (44/sup 0/C), and a total dissolved solid content of 1200 mg/l. The waters are a sodium bicarbonate type with a large concentration of sulphate. It is estimated that the most likely reservoir temperature of this system ranges from 167/sup 0/F (75/sup 0/F) to 302/sup 0/F (150/sup 0/C) and that the areal extent of the system could encompass 1.35 sq mi (3.50 sq km) and could contain 0.698 Q's (1015 B.T.U.'s) of heat energy. Soil mercury and electrical resistivity surveys were conducted. The geophysical survey delineated several areas of low resistivity associated with the north trending fault that passes just to the west of the spring area. It appears that this fault is saturated with thermal waters and may be the conduit along which the thermal waters are moving up from depth. The appendices to this report include tables showing water temperatures required for various industrial processes, as well as dissolved minerals, trace elements and radioactivity levels found in the thermal waters. Also presented are a complete description of the factors affecting the electrical resistivity measurements, a description of the electrical resistivity equipment used, and the resistivity field procedures. Electrical resistivity calculations are also included in the appendices.

  14. Jet production in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions measured by ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Rosi; ALICE Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    Particle jets, formed when a hard scattered parton fragments into a jet of hadrons, are an ideal probe of the medium formed in heavy-ion collisions. The hard-scattered partons that produce them come from early in the collision, prior to the medium formation. These partons lose energy as they traverse the medium, and eventually fragment into jets of hadrons, which exhibit a modification when compared to jets produced in pp and p-Pb collisions. At LHC energies, the parton production cross-section is much larger than at RHIC, allowing jets to be reconstructed over a much wider kinematic range. Jet reconstruction allows for a more differential investigation of the parton energy loss than single hadrons, which have been used as jet proxies in the past, as the jets collect a larger percentage of the final state energy, which means their kinematics are more closely correlated to the kinematics of the initial parton. Jets are reconstructed in ALICE either using information from the tracking systems, or by combining this with the ALICE electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal). In these proceedings, jet spectra from 2.76 TeV Pb-Pb and pp collisions will be presented. In particular, the centrality and event-plane dependence of the measured spectra and the background will be discussed. Jets from different centrality classes and event-plane orientations provide additional information necessary for understanding the path-length and temperature dependence of energy loss mechanisms. The reconstruction and correction procedures for jets will be shown. Results from Pb-Pb events will be compared to the baseline pp and p-Pb results, which allows the initial state and cold nuclear matter effects to be disentangled from hot medium effects. The jet nuclear modification, which quantifies the suppression, will be compared to energy-loss models.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Northern epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Northern epilepsy Northern epilepsy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Northern epilepsy is a genetic condition that causes recurrent seizures ( ...

  16. Fall- and spring-applied poultry litter effectiveness as corn fertilizer in the mid-southern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effectiveness of fall- or winter-applied poultry litter, relative to spring-applied litter, as row crop fertilizer in the southern and southeastern US has not been well researched. A 3-yr field research was conducted in northern Mississippi to determine the effectiveness of litter as corn fertil...

  17. 1. NORTHWEST FRONT, SOUTHWEST SIDE (SPRING HOUSE IN FOREGROUND; BATH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. NORTHWEST FRONT, SOUTHWEST SIDE (SPRING HOUSE IN FOREGROUND; BATH HOUSE AT REAR) (4 x 5 negative; 5 x 7 print) - Salt Sulphur Springs, Spring House, U.S. Route 219, Salt Sulphur Springs, Monroe County, WV

  18. Subaqueous hot springs in Köyceǧiz Lake and Dalyan Channel (SW Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avşar, Özgür; Avşar, Ulaş; Kurtuluş, Bedri; Arslan, Şebnem; Güleç, Nilgün

    2014-05-01

    The preliminary investigations within the scope of a subaqueous geothermal exploration project revealed a total of seven underwater hot springs in the Köyceǧiz Lake and through its outlet, namely Dalyan Channel. Within the scope of this project, horizontal temperature and electrical conductivity profiles of the lake water were obtained by using an YSI CTD probe along a dense survey grid. Any anomaly in the temperature and/or electrical conductivity profiles was inspected by scuba divers in detail, and water samples were taken from the explored hot springs by using a syringe type sampler. Four of these explored hot springs are located on the southern shore of Köyceǧiz Lake and the remaining ones are on the northern part of the Dalyan Channel. The temperature of the subaqueous hot springs range from 26.41 to 29.57 °C, which is slightly lower than the temperature range of the on-land hot springs in the region (i.e., 30-39 °C). Discovery of subaqueous hot springs and investigation of chemistry of these sources will lead a more comprehensive assessment of the hydrogeochemistry of the region.

  19. Fast TPC Online Tracking on GPUs and Asynchronous Data Processing in the ALICE HLT to facilitate Online Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohr, David; Gorbunov, Sergey; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Breitner, Timo; Kretz, Matthias; Lindenstruth, Volker

    2015-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Heavy Ion Experiment) is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which is today the most powerful particle accelerator worldwide. The High Level Trigger (HLT) is an online compute farm of about 200 nodes, which reconstructs events measured by the ALICE detector in real-time. The HLT uses a custom online data-transport framework to distribute data and workload among the compute nodes. ALICE employs several calibration-sensitive subdetectors, e.g. the TPC (Time Projection Chamber). For a precise reconstruction, the HLT has to perform the calibration online. Online- calibration can make certain Offline calibration steps obsolete and can thus speed up Offline analysis. Looking forward to ALICE Run III starting in 2020, online calibration becomes a necessity. The main detector used for track reconstruction is the TPC. Reconstructing the trajectories in the TPC is the most compute-intense step during event reconstruction. Therefore, a fast tracking implementation is of great importance. Reconstructed TPC tracks build the basis for the calibration making a fast online-tracking mandatory. We present several components developed for the ALICE High Level Trigger to perform fast event reconstruction and to provide features required for online calibration. As first topic, we present our TPC tracker, which employs GPUs to speed up the processing, and which bases on a Cellular Automaton and on the Kalman filter. Our TPC tracking algorithm has been successfully used in 2011 and 2012 in the lead-lead and the proton-lead runs. We have improved it to leverage features of newer GPUs and we have ported it to support OpenCL, CUDA, and CPUs with a single common source code. This makes us vendor independent. As second topic, we present framework extensions required for online calibration. The extensions, however, are generic and can be used for other purposes as well. We have extended the framework to support asynchronous compute

  20. Seventeen-year trends in spring and autumn phenophases of Betula pubescens in a boreal environment.

    PubMed

    Poikolainen, Jarmo; Tolvanen, Anne; Karhu, Jouni; Kubin, Eero

    2016-08-01

    Trends in the timing of spring and autumn phenophases of Betula pubescens were investigated in the southern, middle, and northern boreal zones in Finland. The field observations were carried out at 21 sites in the Finnish National Phenological Network in 1997-2013. The effective temperature sum of the thermal growth period, i.e. the sum of the positive differences between diurnal mean temperatures and 5 °C (ETS1), increased annually on average by 6-7 degree day units. Timing of bud burst remained constant in the southern and middle boreal zones but advanced annually by 0.5 day in the northern boreal zone. The effective temperature sum at bud burst (ETS2) showed no trend in the southern and middle boreal zones, whereas ETS2 increased on average from 20-30 to 50 degree day units in the northern boreal zone, almost to the same level as in the other zones. Increase in ETS2 indicates that the trees did not start their growth in very early spring despite warmer spring temperatures. The timing of leaf colouring and leaf fall remained almost constant in the southern boreal zones, whereas these advanced annually by 0.3 and 0.6 day in the middle boreal zone and by 0.6 and 0.4 day in the northern boreal zone, respectively. The duration of the growth period remained constant in all boreal zones. The results indicate high buffering capacity of B. pubescens against temperature changes. The study also shows the importance of the duration of phenological studies: some trends in spring phenophases had levelled out, while new trends in autumn phases had emerged after earlier studies in the same network for a shorter observation period. PMID:26686678

  1. Seventeen-year trends in spring and autumn phenophases of Betula pubescens in a boreal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poikolainen, Jarmo; Tolvanen, Anne; Karhu, Jouni; Kubin, Eero

    2015-12-01

    Trends in the timing of spring and autumn phenophases of Betula pubescens were investigated in the southern, middle, and northern boreal zones in Finland. The field observations were carried out at 21 sites in the Finnish National Phenological Network in 1997-2013. The effective temperature sum of the thermal growth period, i.e. the sum of the positive differences between diurnal mean temperatures and 5 °C (ETS1), increased annually on average by 6-7 degree day units. Timing of bud burst remained constant in the southern and middle boreal zones but advanced annually by 0.5 day in the northern boreal zone. The effective temperature sum at bud burst (ETS2) showed no trend in the southern and middle boreal zones, whereas ETS2 increased on average from 20-30 to 50 degree day units in the northern boreal zone, almost to the same level as in the other zones. Increase in ETS2 indicates that the trees did not start their growth in very early spring despite warmer spring temperatures. The timing of leaf colouring and leaf fall remained almost constant in the southern boreal zones, whereas these advanced annually by 0.3 and 0.6 day in the middle boreal zone and by 0.6 and 0.4 day in the northern boreal zone, respectively. The duration of the growth period remained constant in all boreal zones. The results indicate high buffering capacity of B. pubescens against temperature changes. The study also shows the importance of the duration of phenological studies: some trends in spring phenophases had levelled out, while new trends in autumn phases had emerged after earlier studies in the same network for a shorter observation period.

  2. Seventeen-year trends in spring and autumn phenophases of Betula pubescens in a boreal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poikolainen, Jarmo; Tolvanen, Anne; Karhu, Jouni; Kubin, Eero

    2016-08-01

    Trends in the timing of spring and autumn phenophases of Betula pubescens were investigated in the southern, middle, and northern boreal zones in Finland. The field observations were carried out at 21 sites in the Finnish National Phenological Network in 1997-2013. The effective temperature sum of the thermal growth period, i.e. the sum of the positive differences between diurnal mean temperatures and 5 °C (ETS1), increased annually on average by 6-7 degree day units. Timing of bud burst remained constant in the southern and middle boreal zones but advanced annually by 0.5 day in the northern boreal zone. The effective temperature sum at bud burst (ETS2) showed no trend in the southern and middle boreal zones, whereas ETS2 increased on average from 20-30 to 50 degree day units in the northern boreal zone, almost to the same level as in the other zones. Increase in ETS2 indicates that the trees did not start their growth in very early spring despite warmer spring temperatures. The timing of leaf colouring and leaf fall remained almost constant in the southern boreal zones, whereas these advanced annually by 0.3 and 0.6 day in the middle boreal zone and by 0.6 and 0.4 day in the northern boreal zone, respectively. The duration of the growth period remained constant in all boreal zones. The results indicate high buffering capacity of B. pubescens against temperature changes. The study also shows the importance of the duration of phenological studies: some trends in spring phenophases had levelled out, while new trends in autumn phases had emerged after earlier studies in the same network for a shorter observation period.

  3. Audiomagnetotelluric data from Spring, Cave, and Coyote Spring Valleys, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPhee, Darcy K.; Chuchel, Bruce A.; Pellerin, Louise

    2006-01-01

    Audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) data along four profiles in Spring, Cave, and Coyote Spring Valleys are presented here. The AMT method is used to estimate the electrical resistivity of the earth over depth ranges of a few meters to greater than one kilometer. This method is a valuable tool for revealing subsurface structure and stratigraphy within the Basin and Range of eastern Nevada, therefore helping to define the geohydrologic framework in this region. We collected AMT data using the Geometrics StrataGem EH4 system, a four-channel, natural and controlled- source tensor system recording in the range of 10 to 92,000 Hz. To augment the low signal in the natural field, an unpolarized transmitter comprised of two horizontal-magnetic dipoles was used from 1,000 to 70,000 Hz. Profiles were 1.4 - 12.6 km in length with station spacing of 100-400 m. Data were recorded with the electrical (E) field parallel to and perpendicular to the regional geologic strike direction. Station locations and sounding curves, showing apparent resistivity, phase data, and coherency data, are presented here.

  4. Comment on Origin of Groundwater Discharge at Fall River Springs

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, T

    2006-10-20

    I'm writing at the request of the Pit River Tribe to offer my professional opinion as a geochemist regarding the origin of groundwater discharge at the Fall River Springs, Shasta Co., California. In 1997, I conducted a study of the large volume cold springs associated with the Cascade Volcanoes in northern California, in collaboration with one of my colleagues. This work was published as a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory report (Davisson and Rose, 1997). The Fall River Springs emerge from the distal end of the Giant Crater Lava Field, a laterally extensive basalt flow that stretches from the southern flank of Medicine Lake Volcano southward for a distance of 40 km. Both Medicine Lake Volcano and the Giant Crater Lava Field have virtually no surface water drainages. Precipitation that falls in these areas is inferred to seep into fractures in the rock, where it is carried down gradient under the force of gravity. Mean annual precipitation rates on Medicine Lake Volcano and the Giant Crater Lava field are adequate to account for the {approx}1200 ft{sup 3}/sec discharge of the Fall River Springs. To evaluate the origin of the springs using geochemical methods, water samples were collected from the Fall River Springs and the Medicine Lake highlands and analyzed for oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios. The isotope ratios measured for a groundwater sample are diagnostic of the average composition of the precipitation from which the water was derived. The isotope ratios of rain and snow also vary systematically with elevation, such that groundwater derived from recharge at higher elevations can be distinguished from that which originated at lower elevations. The stable isotope data for the Fall River Springs are consistent with groundwater recharge on the Medicine Lake Volcano and adjacent lava field. Mass balance calculations suggest that approximately half of the Fall River Springs flow is derived from the volcanic edifice. Rose and Davisson (1996) showed that the

  5. Timing and magnitude of spring bloom and effects of physical environments over the Grand Banks of Newfoundland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Han, Guoqi; Wang, Dongxiao

    2013-12-01

    bloom is a dominant feature of seasonal phytoplankton cycles in the northwest Atlantic continental shelf. In this study, we investigate temporal and spatial variations of spring-bloom timing and intensity over the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, using satellite ocean color data and other oceanographic measurements from January 1998 to December 2009. The spring bloom has strong interannual and meridional changes in its timing and intensities. Physical oceanographic conditions including the sea surface temperature (SST), wind speed, and mixed layer depth (MLD) also show evident interannual variations. The spring boom starts first in the southern Bank in February-March and often in the central and northern Bank in April, respectively. An early initiation of spring blooms is generally associated with high SST, weak winds, and shallow MLD at the beginning stage of the spring blooms, and tends to result in stronger intensities. However, the photosynthesis available radiance does not seem to affect the bloom initiation in the southern area or the bloom intensity over the entire Banks. In the southern area, higher SST does not lead to larger bloom magnitude. Our analysis shows that the effect of the SST in the northern area is primarily through the earlier ice melting. It also indicates that Sverdrup's critical depth criteria are suitable for conditions over the Grand Banks. The present study points to the significant sub-bank-scale differences in the timing and magnitude of the spring bloom attributable to underlying physical environments, important for the integrated management of the Grand Banks ecosystem.

  6. Quantum model for entropic springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chiao-Hsuan; Taylor, Jacob M.

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by understanding the emergence of thermodynamic restoring forces and oscillations, we develop a quantum-mechanical model of a bath of spins coupled to the elasticity of a material. We show our model reproduces the behavior of a variety of entropic springs while enabling investigation of nonequilibrium resonator states in the quantum domain. We find our model emerges naturally in disordered elastic media, such as glasses, and is an additional expected effect in systems with anomalous specific heat and 1 /f noise at low temperatures due to two-level systems that fluctuate.

  7. Spring, 1980, DECUS symposium review

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.J.; Duffy, J.M.; McDonald, W.M.; Oppenheimer, J.L.; Brandt, J.J.; Grant, C.W.; O'Brien, D.W.; VanLehn, A.L.

    1980-10-24

    The Digital Equipment Computer Users Society (DECUS) holds biannual symposia where its membership and the host company can exchange ideas, problems, and solutions. This report by the newly formed DECUS Local User Group at LLL collects information gathered at the Spring '80 symposium in Chicago on April 22-25. Information is presented for the following special interest groups (SIGs): RSX/IAS SIG, VAX/VSM SIG, PASCAL (languages) SIG, networks SIG, TECO SIG, LSI-11 SIG, RT-11 SIG, site manager SIG, and database SIG. (RWR)

  8. Community impacts of mid-May frost event during an anomalously warm spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hufkens, K.; Sonnentag, O.; Keenan, T. F.; Richardson, A. D.; Melaas, E. K.; Bailey, A.; O'Keefe, J.; Friedl, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Global land and ocean surface temperatures of 2010 have gone on record as one of the warmest of the last 131 years. In the northeastern US extraordinarily warm spring temperatures were recorded, averaging +3 °C above the long term mean, causing very early leaf development. However, the entire northeastern US region was hit by a severe frost event. Leveraging the coincidence of an anomalously warm spring and a late spring frost event we assess species specific responses of these combined extremes for three northern hardwood species(sugar maple, American beech, yellow birch) across an elevational gradient. We integrated ground observations with satellite and near-surface remote sensing data to address the following questions: 1) How did different species respond to a gradient in altitude / freezing temperatures? 2) How does phenological strategy influence this response? 3) To what extent were regional effects measurable? 4) How did the late spring frost event alter the carbon balance of a northern hardwood forest? 5) Finally, what changes do we foresee in community ecology? Our results show an early onset for all species, triggered by the anomalously warm spring. However, the three species responded differently to a late spring frost event. Where both yellow birch and American beech remained largely unaffected by frost, by comparison, sugar maple showed severe frost damage with increasing altitude resulting in leaf loss and delayed canopy development. Conservative estimates of gross carbon exchange losses due to the frost event ranged from 63 g C m-2 to 156 g C m-2, or ~5% to ~13 % of the annual gross carbon exchange of a northern hardwood forest. Our results suggest that the additional pressure on forest succession at high altitude range margins due to late spring frost events may provide a competitive advantage for yellow birch and American beech, at the expense of sugar maple. Consequently, a late spring frost does not only affect the short term carbon balance

  9. Slightly thermal springs and non-thermal springs at Mount Shasta, California: Chemistry and recharge elevations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, M.; Thompson, J.M.; White, L.D.

    2003-01-01

    Temperature measurements, isotopic contents, and dissolved constituents are presented for springs at Mount Shasta to understand slightly thermal springs in the Shasta Valley based on the characteristics of non-thermal springs. Non-thermal springs on Mount Shasta are generally cooler than mean annual air temperatures for their elevation. The specific conductance of non-thermal springs increases linearly with discharge temperature. Springs at higher and intermediate elevations on Mount Shasta have fairly limited circulation paths, whereas low-elevation springs have longer paths because of their higher-elevation recharge. Springs in the Shasta Valley are warmer than air temperatures for their elevation and contain significant amounts of chloride and sulfate, constituents often associated with volcanic hydrothermal systems. Data for the Shasta Valley springs generally define mixing trends for dissolved constituents and temperature. The isotopic composition of the Shasta Valley springs indicates that water fell as precipitation at a higher elevation than any of the non-thermal springs. It is possible that the Shasta Valley springs include a component of the outflow from a proposed 210??C hydrothermal system that boils to supply steam for the summit acid-sulfate spring. In order to categorize springs such as those in the Shasta Valley, we introduce the term slightly thermal springs for springs that do not meet the numerical criterion of 10??C above air temperature for thermal springs but have temperatures greater than non-thermal springs in the area and usually also have dissolved constituents normally found in thermal waters. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Slightly thermal springs and non-thermal springs at Mount Shasta, California: Chemistry and recharge elevations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathenson, M.; Thompson, J. M.; White, L. D.

    2003-02-01

    Temperature measurements, isotopic contents, and dissolved constituents are presented for springs at Mount Shasta to understand slightly thermal springs in the Shasta Valley based on the characteristics of non-thermal springs. Non-thermal springs on Mount Shasta are generally cooler than mean annual air temperatures for their elevation. The specific conductance of non-thermal springs increases linearly with discharge temperature. Springs at higher and intermediate elevations on Mount Shasta have fairly limited circulation paths, whereas low-elevation springs have longer paths because of their higher-elevation recharge. Springs in the Shasta Valley are warmer than air temperatures for their elevation and contain significant amounts of chloride and sulfate, constituents often associated with volcanic hydrothermal systems. Data for the Shasta Valley springs generally define mixing trends for dissolved constituents and temperature. The isotopic composition of the Shasta Valley springs indicates that water fell as precipitation at a higher elevation than any of the non-thermal springs. It is possible that the Shasta Valley springs include a component of the outflow from a proposed 210°C hydrothermal system that boils to supply steam for the summit acid-sulfate spring. In order to categorize springs such as those in the Shasta Valley, we introduce the term slightly thermal springs for springs that do not meet the numerical criterion of 10°C above air temperature for thermal springs but have temperatures greater than non-thermal springs in the area and usually also have dissolved constituents normally found in thermal waters.

  11. Centrality determination of Pb-Pb collisions at sNN=2.76 TeV with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaráz Aviña, E.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Böttger, S.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Braidot, E.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caballero Orduna, D.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carlin Filho, N.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castillo Hernandez, J. F.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Alaniz, E.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Das, K.; Dash, S.; Dash, A.; De, S.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; De Marco, N.; Dénes, E.; De Pasquale, S.; Deppman, A.; D Erasmo, G.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Di Bari, D.; Dietel, T.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Driga, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fearick, R.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Fenton-Olsen, B.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Geuna, C.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Girard, M. R.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; Ferreiro, E. G.; González-Trueba, L. H.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Goswami, A.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, R.; Gupta, A.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.

    2013-10-01

    This publication describes the methods used to measure the centrality of inelastic Pb-Pb collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV per colliding nucleon pair with ALICE. The centrality is a key parameter in the study of the properties of QCD matter at extreme temperature and energy density, because it is directly related to the initial overlap region of the colliding nuclei. Geometrical properties of the collision, such as the number of participating nucleons and the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions, are deduced from a Glauber model with a sharp impact parameter selection and shown to be consistent with those extracted from the data. The centrality determination provides a tool to compare ALICE measurements with those of other experiments and with theoretical calculations.

  12. Large methane emissions from a subarctic lake during spring thaw: Mechanisms and landscape significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jammet, Mathilde; Crill, Patrick; Dengel, Sigrid; Friborg, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The ice-cover season and subsequent spring thaw are thought to be of particular importance for the biogeochemical cycle of northern lakes and wetlands. Yet the magnitude of their methane emissions during an entire cold season is uncertain due to scarce measurements. While wetlands are known to be the highest natural emitters of methane, emissions from northern lakes are an uncertain component of terrestrial carbon budgets. To evaluate the importance of methane emissions from a subarctic lake during winter and spring, surface methane fluxes were recorded with the eddy covariance method in a subarctic fen-type wetland and in an adjacent shallow lake, from freezeup to complete ice out. The fen was a steady emitter of methane throughout winter. While no detectable flux was observed from the ice-covered lake surface during winter, it was the largest methane source of the landscape in spring, with a cumulative release 1.7-fold higher than at the fen, accounting for 53% of annual lake emissions. The high temporal resolution of the measurements allowed making a direct link between breakdown of the temperature stratification after ice breakup and the highest release of methane from the lake surface. A sediment upwelling at the end of the thaw season likely contributed to these emissions. We suggest that, unlike wetlands, shallow seasonally ice-covered lakes can have their highest methane emission potential in the cold season, likely dominating the spring methane release of subarctic landscapes with high lake coverage.

  13. A novel analysis of spring phenological patterns over Europe based on co-clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaojing; Zurita-Milla, Raul; Kraak, Menno-Jan

    2016-06-01

    The study of phenological patterns and their dynamics provides insights into the impacts of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems. Here we present a novel analytical workflow, based on co-clustering, that enables the concurrent study of spatio-temporal patterns in spring phenology. The workflow is illustrated with a long-term time series of first leaf dates (FLD) over Europe, northern Africa, and Turkey calculated using the extended spring index models and the European E-OBS daily maximum and minimum temperatures (1950 to 2011 with a spatial resolution of 0.25°). This FLD dataset was co-clustered using the Bregman block average co-clustering with I-divergence (BBAC_I), and the results were refined using k-means. These refined co-clusters were mapped to provide a first spatially-continuous delineation of phenoregions in Europe. Our results show that the study area exhibits four main spatial phenological patterns of spring onset. The temporal dynamics of these phenological patterns indicate that the first years of the study period tend to have late spring onsets and the recent years have early spring onsets. Our results also show that the study period exhibits 12 main temporal phenological patterns of spring onset. The spatial distributions of these temporal phenological patterns show that western Turkey tends to have the most variable spring onsets. Changes in the boundaries of other phenoregions can also be observed. These results indicate that this co-clustering based analytical workflow effectively enables the simultaneous study of both spatial patterns and their temporal dynamics and of temporal patterns and their spatial dynamics in spring phenology.

  14. Thermal springs in Lake Baikal

    SciTech Connect

    Shanks, W.C. III; Callender, E. )

    1992-06-01

    Pore waters extracted from sediment cores were analyzed for their oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions and major ion chemistry to determine the source of water from a vent area for diffuse lake-bottom thermal springs or seeps in Frolikha Bay, northeastern Lake Baikal. The {delta}{sup 18}O values of pore waters range from {minus}15.2{per thousand} to {minus}16.7{per thousand}, and {delta}D values range from {minus}119{per thousand} to {minus}126{per thousand} (both isotopes determined relative to standard mean ocean water (SMOW)). Bottom water in Lake Baikal has a {delta}{sup 18}O value of {minus}5.6{per thousand} and a {delta}D values of {minus}120{per thousand}. Pore waters in the vent area are significantly enriched in Mg, K, Ca, and especially Na and have the lowest {delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O values; these pore waters are isotopically and chemically distinct from pore waters in other, more typical parts of the lake. The pore-water isotopic data fall on a local meteoric water line, and covariations in water isotopes and chemistry are not consistent with evaporation or hydrothermal water-rock interaction. The thermal springs represent discharging meteoric waters that have been gently heated during subsurface circulation and are largely unaltered isotopically. Chemical variations are most likely due to dissolution of subsurface evaporites.

  15. Results from particle identification in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions measured with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barile, F.

    2014-06-01

    The particle identification capability of the ALICE apparatus is unique among the LHC experiments as it exploits almost all known techniques. In this paper, the working principles of the relevant PID detectors in the central barrel will be discussed. A particular emphasis will be given to recent results on identified particle spectra and production yield ratios at mid-rapidity in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions.

  16. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease--priorities in prevention, diagnosis and management. A report of the CSANZ Indigenous Cardiovascular Health Conference, Alice Springs 2011.

    PubMed

    Rémond, M G W; Wheaton, G R; Walsh, W F; Prior, D L; Maguire, G P

    2012-10-01

    Three priority areas in the prevention, diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) were identified and discussed in detail: 1. Echocardiography and screening/diagnosis of RHD – Given the existing uncertainty it remains premature to advocate for or to incorporate echocardiographic screening for RHD into Australian clinical practice. Further research is currently being undertaken to evaluate the potential for echocardiography screening. 2. Secondary prophylaxis – Secondary prophylaxis (long acting benzathine penicillin injections) must be seen as a priority. Systems-based approaches are necessary with a focus on the development and evaluation of primary health care-based or led strategies incorporating effective health information management systems. Better/novel systems of delivery of prophylactic medications should be investigated. 3. Management of advanced RHD – National centres of excellence for the diagnosis, assessment and surgical management of RHD are required. Early referral for surgical input is necessary with multidisciplinary care and team-based decision making that includes patient, family, and local health providers. There is a need for a national RHD surgical register and research strategy for the assessment, intervention and long-term outcome of surgery and other interventions for RHD. PMID:22726405

  17. Study of cosmic ray events with high muon multiplicity using the ALICE detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The ALICE Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    ALICE is one of four large experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, specially designed to study particle production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Located 52 meters underground with 28 meters of overburden rock, it has also been used to detect muons produced by cosmic ray interactions in the upper atmosphere. In this paper, we present the multiplicity distribution of these atmospheric muons and its comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. This analysis exploits the large size and excellent tracking capability of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber. A special emphasis is given to the study of high multiplicity events containing more than 100 reconstructed muons and corresponding to a muon areal density ρμ > 5.9 m-2. Similar events have been studied in previous underground experiments such as ALEPH and DELPHI at LEP. While these experiments were able to reproduce the measured muon multiplicity distribution with Monte Carlo simulations at low and intermediate multiplicities, their simulations failed to describe the frequency of the highest multiplicity events. In this work we show that the high multiplicity events observed in ALICE stem from primary cosmic rays with energies above 1016 eV and that the frequency of these events can be successfully described by assuming a heavy mass composition of primary cosmic rays in this energy range. The development of the resulting air showers was simulated using the latest version of QGSJET to model hadronic interactions. This observation places significant constraints on alternative, more exotic, production mechanisms for these events.

  18. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of mafic-ultramafic suites of the Irindina Province, Northern Territory, Australia: Implications for the Neoproterozoic to Devonian evolution of central Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Madeline L.; Jowitt, Simon M.; Saleem, Ahmad

    2015-10-01

    voluminous magmatic event within the study area. Suite A samples are more alkaline and cannot be correlated with any known magmatic events; however, they probably represent an unidentified alkaline phase of the Kalkarindji LIP event derived from a deep mantle source region. This suite is similar to the more widespread Kalkarindji and Suite B/Stanovos magmas in that these magmas assimilated arc material (i.e., Suite D) prior to emplacement. The last magmatic event occurred during the exhumation and inversion of the Irindina basin during the 450-300 Ma Alice Springs Orogeny, resulting in the formation of melts derived from a deep mantle source. These melts subsequently became contaminated en route to emplacement as the ~ 409 Ma Suite C Lloyd Gabbro.

  19. Principal facts for gravity stations in the vicinity of Coyote Spring Valley, Nevada, with initial gravity modeling results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phelps, Geoffrey A.; Jewel, E.B.; Langenheim, V.E.; Jachens, R.C.

    2000-01-01

    Gravity measurements were made along 5 profiles across parts of the Coyote Spring Valley and vicinity in order to aid in modeling the depth and shapes of the underlying basins and to locate faults concealed beneath the basin fill. Measurements were taken at 200 m (660 ft) spacing along the profiles. Models based on these and existing regional data reveal two north-south-trending basins beneath Coyote Spring Valley that reach maximum depths of greater than 1 km (0.6 mi). A small valley, located just east of Coyote Spring Valley and containing Dead Man Wash, includes a small basin about 500 m (1600 ft) deep that appears to be the southern continuation of the northern basin beneath Coyote Spring Valley. The profile gravity data are further used to identify the locations of possible faults concealed beneath the basin fill.

  20. Is there a geomorphic expression of interbasin groundwater flow in watersheds? Interactions between interbasin groundwater flow, springs, streams, and geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisbee, Marty D.; Tysor, Elizabeth H.; Stewart-Maddox, Noah S.; Tsinnajinnie, Lani M.; Wilson, John L.; Granger, Darryl E.; Newman, Brent D.

    2016-02-01

    Interbasin groundwater flow (IGF) can play a significant role in the generation and geochemical evolution of streamflow. However, it is exceedingly difficult to identify IGF and to determine the location and quantity of water that is exchanged between watersheds. How does IGF affect landscape/watershed geomorphic evolution? Can geomorphic metrics be used to identify the presence of IGF? We examine these questions in two adjacent sedimentary watersheds in northern New Mexico using a combination of geomorphic/landscape metrics, springflow residence times, and spatial geochemical patterns. IGF is expressed geomorphically in the landscape placement of springs and flow direction and shape of stream channels. Springs emerge preferentially on one side of stream valleys where landscape incision has intercepted IGF flow paths. Stream channels grow toward the IGF source and show little bifurcation. In addition, radiocarbon residence times of springs decrease and the geochemical composition of springs changes as the connection to IGF is lost.