Science.gov

Sample records for alice springs orogeny

  1. The significance of E-W structural trends for the Alice Springs Orogeny in the Charters Towers Province, North Queensland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quentin de Gromard, Raphael

    2013-03-01

    E-W structural and igneous trends in the Charters Towers Province are highly anomalous within the overall N-S trending Tasman orogen of eastern Australia and resulted from a sequence of N-S shortening events. A succession of ~ E-W trending FIAs (Foliation Intersection/Inflexion Axis preserved within porphyroblasts) dated at 474.7 ± 7.2, 413 ± 13 and 381.1 ± 8.1 Ma correspond with adjacent granite crystallization ages and E-W trending FIA ages in the Greenvale Province to the NW. The magnetic anomaly map of Australia reveals that this E-W trending portion of the Tasman orogen links with and truncates several earlier formed orogens. The E-W trend of the Charters Towers Province resulted from overprinting of early Palaeozoic N-S trending structures in the Tasman Orogen by younger E-W ones during the Alice Springs Orogeny (450-300 Ma) resolving the E-W pluton shape and distribution of Cambrian to Devonian magmatic activity plus the truncational nature of aeromagnetic data from Central Australia to the East coast.

  2. Orogeny can be very short

    PubMed Central

    Dewey, John F.

    2005-01-01

    In contrast to continent/continent collision, arc–continent collision generates very short-lived orogeny because the buoyancy-driven impedance of the subduction of continental lithosphere, accompanied by arc/suprasubduction-zone ophiolite obduction, is relieved by subduction polarity reversal (flip). This tectonic principle is illustrated by the early Ordovician Grampian Orogeny in the British and Irish Caledonides, in which a wealth of detailed sedimentologic, heavy mineral, and geochronologic data pin the Orogeny to a very short Arenig/Llanvirn event. The Orogeny, from the initial subduction of continental margin sediments to the end of postflip shortening, lasted ≈18 million years (my). The collisional shortening, prograde-metamorphic phase of the Orogeny lasted 8 my, extensional collapse and exhumation of midcrustal rocks lasted 1.5 my, and postflip shortening lasted 4.5 my. Strain rates were a typical plate-boundary-zone 10-15. Metamorphism, to the second sillimanite isograd, with extensive partial melting, occurred within a few my after initial collision, indicating that conductive models for metamorphic heat transfer in Barrovian terrains are incorrect and must be replaced by advective models in which large volumes of mafic/ultramafic magma are emplaced, syn-tectonically, below and into evolving nappe stacks. Arc/continent collision generates fast and very short orogeny, regional metamorphism, and exhumation. PMID:16126898

  3. Orogeny can be very short.

    PubMed

    Dewey, John F

    2005-10-25

    In contrast to continent/continent collision, arc-continent collision generates very short-lived orogeny because the buoyancy-driven impedance of the subduction of continental lithosphere, accompanied by arc/suprasubduction-zone ophiolite obduction, is relieved by subduction polarity reversal (flip). This tectonic principle is illustrated by the early Ordovician Grampian Orogeny in the British and Irish Caledonides, in which a wealth of detailed sedimentologic, heavy mineral, and geochronologic data pin the Orogeny to a very short Arenig/Llanvirn event. The Orogeny, from the initial subduction of continental margin sediments to the end of postflip shortening, lasted approximately 18 million years (my). The collisional shortening, prograde-metamorphic phase of the Orogeny lasted 8 my, extensional collapse and exhumation of midcrustal rocks lasted 1.5 my, and postflip shortening lasted 4.5 my. Strain rates were a typical plate-boundary-zone 10(-15). Metamorphism, to the second sillimanite isograd, with extensive partial melting, occurred within a few my after initial collision, indicating that conductive models for metamorphic heat transfer in Barrovian terrains are incorrect and must be replaced by advective models in which large volumes of mafic/ultramafic magma are emplaced, syn-tectonically, below and into evolving nappe stacks. Arc/continent collision generates fast and very short orogeny, regional metamorphism, and exhumation. PMID:16126898

  4. Episodicity of Orogeny Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condie, K. C.; Aster, R. C.

    2008-12-01

    Although it is well established that orogeny is episodic, the duration, correlation and geographic distribution of orogenic episodes is not well constrained. Using large numbers of concordant U/Pb zircon ages from subduction-related granitoids (> 7000), it is now possible to better constrain these variables. Monte Carlo simulation probabilistic histograms of zircon age spectra remove questionable and spurious age peaks, yet allow resolution of peaks with >10 My duration with the data sets. Orogenic episodes with durations < 20 My, herein called pulses, are generally of regional geographic extent, whereas long-lived events (100-250 My), herein called periods, may be of regional or global extent. Orogenic periods comprise several to many pulses. Most orogenic pulses reflect geographic variations in intensity of subduction or/and plate collisions as for instance recorded around the perimeter of the Pacific basin in the last 100 My. Neither of the widely recognized pulses at 2.7 nor 1.9 Ga is global in extent. Orogenic pulses at 2700 and 2680 Ma occur on four continents each (2700: Superior, Hearne-Rae, Nain, North China; 2680: Yilgarn, Africa, Slave, Wyoming). Likewise, an orogenic pulse at 1880 is found on four continents (Laurentia, Baltica, East Asia, South America), and another pulse at 1860 Ma occurs on three continents (Africa, Siberia, Australia). Some orogenic pulses track lateral continental growth, such as 2730, 2715, and 2700 Ma pulses in the Abitibi greenstone belt, and 850, 800 and 750 Ma pulses in the Arabian-Nubian shield. Major orogenic periods are recognized at 2750-2650, 1900-1650, and 1250-1000 Ma and each of these is associated with supercontinent formation. Orogenic periods at 2600-2500 (China and India) and 2150-2050 Ma (West Africa, Amazonia, Rio de la Plata) may be associated with the formation of small supercontinents. Our results suggest that orogenic periods with intervening gaps may not require sudden and short-lived changes in mantle

  5. ALICE Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.

    2014-11-01

    The ALICE Collaboration would like to thank all its engineers and technicians for their invaluable contributions to the construction of the experiment and the CERN accelerator teams for the outstanding performance of the LHC complex.

  6. Changing Images of Alice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, Betty P.; Erdman, Barbara

    This paper examines the depiction of Alice in illustrated versions of "Alice in Wonderland" by Lewis Carroll. The primary concern was to determine if the character of Alice had changed historically through the interpretation of different illustrators and to determine what the changes were and what their impact might have on the interpretation of…

  7. ALICE physics --- Theoretical overview

    SciTech Connect

    Alessandro, B.; Aurenche, P.; Baier, R.; Becattini, F.; Botje, M.; Csorgo, T.; de Cataldo, G.; Foka, Y.; Giovannini, A.; Giubellino, P.; Guillet, J.Ph.; Heinz, U.; Hencken, K.; Iancu, E.; Kaidalov, A.B.; Kajantie, K.; Karsch, F.; Koch, V.; Kopeliovich, B.Z.; Kurepin, A.B.; Laine, M.; Lednicky, R.; Mangano, M.; Monteno, M.; Paic, G.; Pilon, E.; Pshenichnov, I.A.; Redlich, K.; Revol, J.-P.; Riggi, F.; Safarik, K.; Salgado, C.A.; Schukraft, J.; Sinyukov, Y.; Tomasik, B.; Treleani, D.; Ugoccioni, R.; Venugopalan, R.; Vogt, R.; Wiedemann, U.A.

    2002-09-15

    ALICE is the dedicated heavy ion experiment at the LHC. This note summarizes theoretical developments in the field of hot and dense matter and their relevance for observables accessible to ALICE in nucleus-nucleus, proton-nucleus and proton-proton collisions. In addition, aspects of specific interest for proton-proton, proton-nucleus, ultraperipheral collisions and cosmic ray physics, which can be addressed by ALICE, are also discussed.

  8. The ALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, Terry C; ALICE, Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    ALICE is the general purpose experiment at the LHC dedicated to the study of heavy-ion collisions. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal) is a late addition to the ALICE suite of detectors with first modules installed in ALICE this year. The EMCal is designed to trigger on high energy gamma-rays and jets, and to enhance the capabilities of ALICE for these measurements. The EMCal is a Pb/scintillator sampling shish-kebab type calorimeter. The EMCal construction, readout, and performance in beam tests at the CERN SPS and PS are described.

  9. The ALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, Terry C; ALICE, Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    ALICE is the general purpose experiment at the LHC dedicated to the study of heavy-ion collisions. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal) is a late addition to the ALICE suite of detectors with first modules installed in ALICE this year. The EMCal is designed to trigger on high energy gamma-rays and jets, and to enhance the capabilities of ALICE for these measurements. The EMCal is a Pb/scintillator sampling shish-kebab type calorimeter. The EMCal construction, readout, and performance in beam tests at the CERN SPS and PS are described.

  10. Late Paleozoic orogeny in Alaska's Farewell terrane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, D.C.; Dumoulin, J.; Layer, P.; Sunderlin, D.; Roeske, S.; McClelland, B.; Harris, A.G.; Abbott, G.; Bundtzen, T.; Kusky, T.

    2003-01-01

    Evidence is presented for a previously unrecognized late Paleozoic orogeny in two parts of Alaska's Farewell terrane, an event that has not entered into published scenarios for the assembly of Alaska. The Farewell terrane was long regarded as a piece of the early Paleozoic passive margin of western Canada, but is now thought, instead, to have lain between the Siberian and Laurentian (North American) cratons during the early Paleozoic. Evidence for a late Paleozoic orogeny comes from two belts located 100-200 km apart. In the northern belt, metamorphic rocks dated at 284-285 Ma (three 40Ar/39Ar white-mica plateau ages) provide the main evidence for orogeny. The metamorphic rocks are interpreted as part of the hinterland of a late Paleozoic mountain belt, which we name the Browns Fork orogen. In the southern belt, thick accumulations of Pennsylvanian-Permian conglomerate and sandstone provide the main evidence for orogeny. These strata are interpreted as the eroded and deformed remnants of a late Paleozoic foreland basin, which we name the Dall Basin. We suggest that the Browns Fork orogen and Dall Basin comprise a matched pair formed during collision between the Farewell terrane and rocks to the west. The colliding object is largely buried beneath Late Cretaceous flysch to the west of the Farewell terrane, but may have included parts of the so-called Innoko terrane. The late Paleozoic convergent plate boundary represented by the Browns Fork orogen likely connected with other zones of plate convergence now located in Russia, elsewhere in Alaska, and in western Canada. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Fluid-controlled rheological responses during intraplate orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondo, Tom; Howlett, Daniel; Hand, Martin; Clark, Chris

    2016-04-01

    The intraplate Alice Springs Orogen, central Australia, is characterised by fluid-rock systems that systematically vary in their depth, structural style, fluid sources and magnitude of rehydration and reworking. Discrete metre-scale cataclastic faults in the northwestern Reynolds-Anmatjira Ranges progress into ten- to hundred metre-scale metasomatised shear zones at the southeastern margin of this terrane, associated with low δ18O and δD values indicative of a meteoric fluid source. Continuing along strike to the southeast, these structures are succeeded by kilometre-scale schist belts transecting Palaeoproterozoic granulites in the Strangways Metamorphic Complex, followed by a ˜7500 km2 zone of pervasive Palaeozoic amphibolite facies retrogression and voluminous partial melting in the Harts Range and Entia Gneiss Complex further east. Strongly deformed outcrops of the basal sedimentary unit of the Amadeus Basin (Heavitree Quartzite) are preserved in these areas, and discrete shifts to elevated δ18O values suggest that shear zones of the Strangways Metamorphic Complex contain fluids sourced from its prograde dewatering. Intriguingly, despite being part of a laterally-continuous, anastomosing shear belt that forms the dominant structural network of the Alice Springs Orogen, the fluid-rock systems described above appear to be diachronous. Garnet Sm-Nd and monazite U-Pb geochronology from garnet-staurolite-biotite-muscovite-quartz ± kyanite ± sillimanite schists of the Strangways Metamorphic Complex indicate metamorphic ages of ca 445 Ma, ca 380 Ma, ca 360 Ma and ca 330 Ma, spanning approximately 120 Myr of fluid-rock interaction and partial melting. P-T evolutions constrained by petrography, EPMA X-ray maps and calculated pseudosections also demonstrate multiple prograde thermal cycles across this interval, while field relationships indicate the reactivation of contractional structures by overprinting extensional ultramylonites, attesting to a prolonged and

  12. Alice Occultation - Gladstone

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows how the count rate observed by New Horizons’ Alice instrument decreases as Pluto’s atmosphere passes in front of the sun. The decreasing count rate is due to the ultraviolet s...

  13. Subduction & orogeny: Introduction to the special volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, Y.; Bosch, D.; Guillot, S.; de Sigoyer, J.; Martinod, J.; Agard, P.; Yamato, P.

    2016-05-01

    Subduction processes play a major role in plate tectonics and the subsequent geological evolution of Earth. This special issue focuses on ongoing research in subduction dynamics to a large extent (oceanic subduction, continental subduction, obduction…) for both past and active subduction zones and into mountain building processes and the early evolution of orogens. It puts together various approaches combining geophysics (imaging of subduction zones), petrology/geochemistry (metamorphic analysis of HP-UHP rocks, fluid geochemistry and magmatic signal, geochronology), seismology and geodesy (present-day evolution of subduction zones, active tectonics), structural geology (structure and evolution of mountain belts), and numerical modelling to provide a full spectrum of tools that can be used to constrain the nature and evolution of subduction processes and orogeny. Studies presented in this special issue range from the long-term (orogenic cycle) to short-term (seismic cycle).

  14. The ALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Gadrat, S.

    2010-06-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the only LHC experiment at CERN fully dedicated to the study of the quark and gluon plasma. Driven by the RHIC results on jet quenching, the ALICE collaboration has proposed to extend the capabilities of the ALICE detector for the study of high momentum photons and jets by adding a large acceptance calorimeter. This EMCal (ElectroMagnetic Calorimeter) is designed to provide an unbiased fast high-p{sub T} trigger and to measure the neutral energy of jets and photons up to 200 GeV. Four over ten supermodules of the calorimeter have been installed and commissioned at CERN in 2009 which represents 40% of the full acceptance.

  15. The Rio Doce Orogeny, Southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, M. C. Campos; Figueiredo, M. C. H.

    1995-04-01

    The Neoproterozoic-Eopaleozoic superposed orogenic system of Southeastern Brazil, which was active during the Brasiliano-Pan-African Cycle during the assembly of this sector of the Gondwana Supercontinent, includes distinct terranes such as the Guanhães, Curitiba, Apiaí-Guaxupé and Serra do Mar microplates and the Juiz de Fora Thrust Belt. These orogenic systems also affected the reworked border of the São Francisco Craton. The collisional or ocean plate subduction-controlled "Brasiliano I" Orogeny was responsible for the generation of fold belts along the southeastern border of the São Francisco Craton, the accretion of different microplates and the formation of a magmatic arc associated with the roots of a northwestward trending thrust belt. The "Brasiliano I" evolution occurred during the Neoproterozoic and by 600 Ma was already in a post-orogenic stage in the Apiaí-Guaxupé Microplate, with the intrusion of rapakivi-like granitoids. The Rio Doce Orogeny is best characterized in the Serra do Mar Microplate by a magmatic arc, active between 590 and 570 Ma, with batholithic calc-alkaline plutonism exhibiting subduction zone components and a chemical zonation indicative of northwestward subduction. The collisional stage (560-530 Ma) accounted for the accretion of the Serra do Mar Microplate to the former orogenic domains. Anatexis of mostly metasediments producing peraluminous migmatites and granites, began at the calc-alkaline magmatic arc stage and culminated during crustal thickening associated with the northwesterly piling-up of large thrust slices. The post-collisional plutonism (520-480 Ma) is characterized by plutons and dikes of mainly alkali-calcic granitoids enriched in incompatible elements.

  16. MAD - Monitoring ALICE Dataflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Grigoras, C.; Wegrzynek, A.

    2015-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Following a successful Run 1, which ended in February 2013, the ALICE data acquisition (DAQ) entered a consolidation phase to prepare for Run 2 which will start in the beginning of 2015. A new software tool has been developed by the data acquisition project to improve the monitoring of the experiment's dataflow, from the data readout in the DAQ farm up to its shipment to CERN's main computer centre. This software, called ALICE MAD (Monitoring ALICE Dataflow), uses the MonALISA framework as core module to gather, process, aggregate and distribute monitoring values from the different processes running in the distributed DAQ farm. Data are not only pulled from the data sources to MAD but can also be pushed by dedicated data collectors or the data source processes. A large set of monitored metrics (from the backpressure status on the readout links to event counters in each of the DAQ nodes and aggregated data rates for the whole data acquisition) is needed to provide a comprehensive view of the DAQ status. MAD also injects alarms in the Orthos alarm system whenever abnormal conditions are detected. The MAD web-based GUI uses WebSockets to provide dynamic and on-time status displays for the ALICE shift crew. Designed as a widget-based system, MAD supports an easy integration of new visualization blocks and also customization of the information displayed to the shift crew based on the ALICE activities.

  17. The ALICE Pixel Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado-Perez, Jorge

    2002-07-01

    The present document is a brief summary of the performed activities during the 2001 Summer Student Programme at CERN under the Scientific Summer at Foreign Laboratories Program organized by the Particles and Fields Division of the Mexican Physical Society (Sociedad Mexicana de Fisica). In this case, the activities were related with the ALICE Pixel Group of the EP-AIT Division, under the supervision of Jeroen van Hunen, research fellow in this group. First, I give an introduction and overview to the ALICE experiment; followed by a description of wafer probing. A brief summary of the test beam that we had from July 13th to July 25th is given as well.

  18. The ALICE Electronic Logbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altini, V.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Makhlyueva, I.; Roukoutakis, F.; Schossmaier, K.; Soòs, C.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Von Haller, B.; ALICE Collaboration

    2010-04-01

    All major experiments need tools that provide a way to keep a record of the events and activities, both during commissioning and operations. In ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) at CERN, this task is performed by the Alice Electronic Logbook (eLogbook), a custom-made application developed and maintained by the Data-Acquisition group (DAQ). Started as a statistics repository, the eLogbook has evolved to become not only a fully functional electronic logbook, but also a massive information repository used to store the conditions and statistics of the several online systems. It's currently used by more than 600 users in 30 different countries and it plays an important role in the daily ALICE collaboration activities. This paper will describe the LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) based architecture of the eLogbook, the database schema and the relevance of the information stored in the eLogbook to the different ALICE actors, not only for near real time procedures but also for long term data-mining and analysis. It will also present the web interface, including the different used technologies, the implemented security measures and the current main features. Finally it will present the roadmap for the future, including a migration to the web 2.0 paradigm, the handling of the database ever-increasing data volume and the deployment of data-mining tools.

  19. Alice in Debitland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Washington, DC.

    Designed for the general public and possibly suitable also for high school economics students, this booklet examines the Electronic Fund Transfer Act (EFT), which protects consumers who use debit cards for the electronic transfer of funds. This commercially adapted version of the character in "Alice in Wonderland," uses a story-teller approach to…

  20. Central diffraction at ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lämsä, J. W.; Orava, R.

    2011-02-01

    The ALICE experiment is shown to be well suited for studies of exclusive final states from central diffractive reactions. The gluon-rich environment of the central system allows detailed QCD studies and searches for exotic meson states, such as glueballs, hybrids and new charmonium-like states. It would also provide a good testing ground for detailed studies of heavy quarkonia. Due to its central barrel performance, ALICE can accurately measure the low-mass central systems with good purity. The efficiency of the Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) and the Forward Shower Counter (FSC) system for detecting rapidity gaps is shown to be adequate for the proposed studies. With this detector arrangement, valuable new data can be obtained by tagging central diffractive processes.

  1. How do orogenies end? The rise and stop of the Caledonian Orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, D.

    2011-12-01

    During the Caledonian Orogeny, sedimentary rocks (Dalradian Supergroup) deposited in the Late Precambrian and Early Palaeozoic underwent polyphase deformation and metamorphism. They were intruded by syn-orogenic gabbros and granites and also by post-orogenic "newer" granites. Peak metamorphism of the rampian episode was at about 470 Ma (Middle Ordovician). Exhumation must have been rapid, as several outliers of Old Red Sandstone rocks (Silurian-Devonian) unconformably overlie deformed Dalradian and syn-orogenic intrusions in the Eastern Highlands of Scotland. The old Red Sandstone outliers are found dominantly at intermediate altitudes at the present day (400-600 m). The unconformity mantles significant pre-existing topography. Dating of these outliers is not precise, but exhumation rates must have been in the range 200-400 m Ma-1 in the period from 470-400 Ma, and may have been as high as 2,000 m Ma-1. The newer granites were emplaced between 425-405 Ma, during this period of rapid exhumation. It is noteworthy that not one of the Old Red Sandstone outliers is unconformable on newer granites, despite the widespread nature of both geologic units, and that the newer granites are all topographically higher than the inliers. Topographic modelling of the base of the inliers across highland Scotland suggests that the unconformity below the Old Red Sandstone is the surface that controls the present-day topography of the Scottish Highlands. There is no evidence for any marine sedimentation across the Highlands after the end of the Caledonian Orogeny, and the sub-Triassic unconformity onlaps the Old Red Sandstone unconformity, suggesting that the area has remained topographically elevated for at least 400 Ma. In this paper, I suggest that the orogeny ended with a major phase of extension in the Late Silurian, which led to accelerated exhumation and permitted the rise of the newer granites. The evidence of the distribution of the newer granites and the Old Red Sandstone

  2. The ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Christian Holm; Gaardhøje, Jens Jørgen; Gulbrandsen, Kristján; Nielsen, Børge Svane; Søgaard, Carsten

    The ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) is a silicon strip detector with 51,200 strips arranged in 5 rings, covering the range -3.4 < η < 5.1. It is placed around the beam pipe at small angles to extend the charged particle acceptance of ALICE into the forward regions, not covered by the central barrel detectors.

  3. ALICE Expert System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, C.; Carena, F.

    2014-06-01

    The ALICE experiment at CERN employs a number of human operators (shifters), who have to make sure that the experiment is always in a state compatible with taking Physics data. Given the complexity of the system and the myriad of errors that can arise, this is not always a trivial task. The aim of this paper is to describe an expert system that is capable of assisting human shifters in the ALICE control room. The system diagnoses potential issues and attempts to make smart recommendations for troubleshooting. At its core, a Prolog engine infers whether a Physics or a technical run can be started based on the current state of the underlying sub-systems. A separate C++ component queries certain SMI objects and stores their state as facts in a Prolog knowledge base. By mining the data stored in different system logs, the expert system can also diagnose errors arising during a run. Currently the system is used by the on-call experts for faster response times, but we expect it to be adopted as a standard tool by regular shifters during the next data taking period.

  4. Alice in Wonderland syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose of review: To summarize the literature on Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS), a disorder characterized by distortions of visual perception, the body schema, and the experience of time. Recent findings: On the basis of 169 published case descriptions, the etiology of AIWS is divided into 8 main groups, with neurologic disorders affecting mostly adults and elderly patients and encephalitides affecting mostly patients aged ≤18 years. Symptoms of AIWS are also experienced in the general population, with up to 30% of adolescents reporting nonclinical symptoms. Summary: In clinical cases of AIWS, auxiliary investigations (including blood tests, EEG, and brain MRI) are strongly advised. Treatment should be directed at the suspected underlying condition, although reassurance that the symptoms themselves are not harmful seems to suffice in about 50% of the cases. International classifications such as the DSM and ICD should consider placing the syndrome on their research agenda. PMID:27347442

  5. The Alice in Wonderland syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fine, Edward J

    2013-01-01

    The Alice in Wonderland syndrome is a term applied to altered bizarre perceptions of size and shapes of a patient's body and illusions of changes in the forms, dimensions, and motions of objects that a patient with this syndrome encounters. These metamorphopsias arise during complex partial seizures, migraine headaches, infections, and intoxications. The illusions and hallucinations resemble the strange phenomena that Alice experienced in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, whose nom de plume was Lewis Carroll, experienced metamorphopsias. He described them in the story that he wrote for Alice Liddell and her two sisters after he spun a tale about a long and strange dream that the fictional Alice had on a warm summer day. The author of this chapter suggests that Dodgson suffered from migraine headaches and used these experiences to weave an amusing tale for Alice Liddell. The chapter also discusses the neurology of mercury poisoning affecting the behavior of Mad Hatter character. The author suggests that the ever-somnolent Dormouse suffered from excessive daytime sleepiness due to obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:24290480

  6. Preparing the ALICE DAQ upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Dénes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Grigore, A.; Kiss, T.; Rauch, W.; Rubin, G.; Simonetti, G.; Soós, C.; Telesca, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Von Haller, B.

    2012-12-01

    In November 2009, after 15 years of design and installation, the ALICE experiment started to detect and record the first collisions produced by the LHC. It has been collecting hundreds of millions of events ever since with both proton and heavy ion collisions. The future scientific programme of ALICE has been refined following the first year of data taking. The physics targeted beyond 2018 will be the study of rare signals. Several detectors will be upgraded, modified, or replaced to prepare ALICE for future physics challenges. An upgrade of the triggering and readout systems is also required to accommodate the needs of the upgraded ALICE and to better select the data of the rare physics channels. The ALICE upgrade will have major implications in the detector electronics and controls, data acquisition, event triggering and offline computing and storage systems. Moreover, the experience accumulated during more than two years of operation has also lead to new requirements for the control software. We will review all these new needs and the current R&D activities to address them. Several papers of the same conference present in more details some elements of the ALICE online system.

  7. ALICE TPC commissioning results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, D. T.; Alice Tpc Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    ALICE is a dedicated heavy-ion experiment at CERN LHC aiming to study the properties of the quark-gluon plasma. A lead-lead collision might produce several 10 00 new particles. Detailed study of the event requires precise measurements of the particle tracks. A 90 m3 Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with more than 500 000 read-out pads was built as the main central barrel tracker. Collisions can be recorded at a rate of up to about 1 kHz. The front-end electronics, designed from FPGAs and custom ASICs, performs shaping, amplification, digitisation and digital filtering of the signals. The data are forwarded to DAQ via 216 1.25 Gb/s fibre-optical links. Configuration, control and monitoring is done by an embedded Linux system on the front-end electronics. Before production runs with beam, extensive commissioning using tracks from cosmics and from the laser system as well as clusters from radioactive krypton gas is needed. Extensive results have been obtained with respect to the performance of the TPC including its sub-systems.

  8. The ALICE forward multiplicity detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbrandsen, K.; Bearden, I.; Bertelsen, P. H.; Christensen, C. H.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Alice Collaboration

    2006-08-01

    The ALICE experiment is designed to study the properties of hadron and nucleus collisions in a new energy regime at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A fundamental observable in such collisions is the multiplicity distribution of charged particles. A forward multiplicity detector has been designed to extend the charged particle multiplicity coverage of the ALICE experiment to pseudorapidities of -3.4<η<-1.7 and 1.7<η<5.0. This detector consists of five rings, each containing 10240 Si strips, divided into sectors comprised of Si sensors bonded and glued to hybrid PC boards equipped with radiation hard preamplifiers. The output of these preamplifiers is multiplexed into custom-made fast ADC chips located directly behind the Si sensors on the detector frame. These ADCs are read out, via optical fibers, to a data acquisition farm of commodity PCs. The design and characteristics of the ALICE Forward Multiplicity Detector will be discussed.

  9. ALICE electromagnetic calorimeter prototype test

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, Terry; /Oak Ridge

    2005-09-01

    This Memorandum of Understanding between the Test Beam collaborators and Fermilab is for the use of beam time at Fermilab during the Fall, 2005 Meson Test Beam Run. The experimenters plan to measure the energy, position, and time resolution of prototype modules of a large electromagnetic calorimeter proposed to be installed in the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The ALICE experiment is one of the three large approved LHC experiments, with ALICE placing special emphasis on the LHC heavy-ion program. The large electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal) is a US initiative that is endorsed by the ALICE collaboration and is currently in the early stages of review by the Nuclear Physics Division of the DOE. The installation in the test beam at FNAL and test beam measurements will be carried out by the US members of the ALICE collaboration (ALICE-USA). The overall design of the ALICE EMCal is heavily influenced by its location within the ALICE L3 magnet. The EMCal is to be located inside the large room temperature magnet within a cylindrical integration volume approximately l12cm deep, by 5.6m in length, sandwiched between the ALICE TPC space frame and the L3 magnet coils. The chosen technology is a layered Pb-scintillator sampling calorimeter with a longitudinal pitch of 1.6mm Pb and 1.6mm scintillator. The full detector spans {eta} = -0.7 to {eta} = 0.7 with an azimuthal acceptance of {Delta}{phi} = 120{sup o}. The EMCal readout is of a ''Shish-Kabob'' type similar to the PHENIX Pb-scintillator sampling calorimeter in which the scintillation light is collected via wavelength shifting fibers running through the Pb-scintillator tiles perpendicular to the front surface. The detector is segmented into {approx}14000 towers. The basic structural units of the calorimeter are supermodules, each subtending approximately {approx}20{sup o} in {Delta}{phi} and 0.7 units in {Delta}{eta}. Supermodules are assembled from individual modules. The modules are further segmented into 2 x 2

  10. Plate Tectonics and Taiwan Orogeny based on TAIGER Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, F. T.; Kuochen, H.; McIntosh, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    Plate tectonics framework is usually complex in a collision zone, where continental lithosphere is involved. In the young Taiwan orogeny, with geologic understanding and large new geodetic and subsurface datasets now available an environment has been created for testing tectonic hypotheses regarding collision and orogeny. Against the background of the commonly accepted view of Taiwan as a southward propagating, self-similar 2-D orogen, a fully 3-D structure is envisaged. Along the whole length of the island the convergence of the Eurasian plate (EUP) the Philippine Sea plate (PSP) takes shape with different plate configurations. In northern Taiwan the convergence occurs with simultaneous collision of the oceanic PSP with continental EUP and the northward subduction of the PSP; in the south, EUP, in the guise of the South China Sea rifted Eurasian continent, subducts toward the east; in central Taiwan collision of oceanic PSP with continental EUP dominates. When relocated seismicity and focal mechanisms are superposed on subsurface P and Vp/Vs velocity images the configurations and the kinematics of the PSP and EUP collision and subduction become clear. While in northern Taiwan the subduction/collision explains well the high peaks and their dwindling (accompanied by crustal thinning) toward the north. In the south, mountains rise above the east-dipping EUP subduction zone as the Eurasian continental shelf veers toward the southwest, divergent from the trend of the Luzon Arc - calling into question the frequently cited arc-continent collision model of Taiwan orogeny. High velocity anomaly and Benioff seismicity coexist in the south. Going north toward Central Taiwan the high velocity anomaly persists for another 150 km or so, but it becomes seismically quiescent. Above the quiescent section the PSP and EUP collide to build the main part of the Central Range and its parallel neighbor the eastern Coastal Range. Key implications regarding orogeny include: 1) Significant

  11. Alice in the Real World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Tom

    2012-01-01

    As a fifth-grade mathematics teacher, the author tries to create authentic problem-solving activities that connect to the world in which his students live. He discovered a natural connection to his students' real world at a computer camp. A friend introduced him to Alice, a computer application developed at Carnegie Mellon, under the leadership of…

  12. Alice Childress: A Pioneering Spirit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown-Guillory, Elizabeth

    1987-01-01

    Interview with Alice Childress (born 1920), an actress, playwright, novelist, editor, and lecturer. Her "Gold through the Forest" (1952) was the first play by a Black woman to be produced professionally on the American stage. Her latest play, "Moms," was produced in New York City in 1987. (BJV)

  13. Alice Views Jupiter and Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This graphic illustrates the pointing and shows the data from one of many observations made by the New Horizons Alice ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS) instrument during the Pluto-bound spacecraft's recent encounter with Jupiter. The red lines in the graphic show the scale, orientation, and position of the combined 'box and slot' field of view of the Alice UVS during this observation.

    The positions of Jupiter's volcanic moon, Io, the torus of ionized gas from Io, and Jupiter are shown relative to the Alice field of view. Like a prism, the spectrometer separates light from these targets into its constituent wavelengths.

    Io's volcanoes produce an extremely tenuous atmosphere made up primarily of sulfur dioxide gas, which, in the harsh plasma environment at Io, breaks down into its component sulfur and oxygen atoms. Alice observed the auroral glow from these atoms in Io's atmosphere and their ionized counterparts in the Io torus.

    Io's dayside is deliberately overexposed to bring out faint details in the plumes and on the moon's night side. The continuing eruption of the volcano Tvashtar, at the 1 o'clock position, produces an enormous plume roughly 330 kilometers (200 miles) high, which is illuminated both by sunlight and 'Jupiter light.'

  14. ALICE detector in construction phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peryt, Wiktor S.

    2005-09-01

    ALICE1 collaboration, which prepares one of the biggest physics experiments in the history, came into production phase of its detector. The experiment will start at LHC2 at CERN in 2007/2008. In the meantime about 1000 people from ~70 institutions are involved in this enterprise. ALICE detector consists of many sub-detectors, designed and manufactured in many laboratories and commercial firms, located mainly in Europe, but also in U.S., India, China and Korea. To assure appropriate working environment for such a specific task, strictly related to tests of particular components, measurements and assembly procedures Detector Construction Database system has been designed and implemented at CERN and at some labs involved in these activities. In this paper special attention is paid to this topic not only due to fact of innovative approach to the problem. Another reason is the group of young computer scientists (mainly students) from the Warsaw University of Technology, leaded by the author, has designed and developed the system for the whole experiment3. Another very interesting subject is the Data Acquisition System which has to fulfill very hard requirements concerning speed and high bandwidth. Required technical performance is achieved thanks to using PCI bus (usually in previous high energy physics experiments VME standard has been used) and optical links. Very general overview of the whole detector and physics goals of ALICE experiment will also be given.

  15. The Eurekan Orogeny: convergent intraplate deformation through accretionary tectonics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Philip; Pysklywec, Russell; Stephenson, Randell

    2015-04-01

    The Eurekan Orogeny, which created much of the high topography (~1-2km) of Ellesmere Island and adjacent Greenland, exhibits a crustal architecture linked to intraplate orogenesis in the Cenozoic. These features occurred as a result of mountain-building processes the dynamics of which are not well understood. It is generally considered that the rotation of Greenland in the Eocene (related to sedimentary basin formation in Baffin Bay) produced compressional tectonics between Greenland and Ellesmere Island. As part of this process, the Eurekan Orogeny formed away from a traditional convergent ocean-closure plate boundary, and may represent a style of intraplate deformation. One hypothesis is the amalgamation of continental material (i.e., micro-plates) leave deformational `scars' in the crust and mantle lithosphere (specifically in the Ellesmere Island case through accretionary orogenesis in the Palaeozoic). This weakening of the lithosphere may produce episodic reactivation of faults within continental interiors. For example, lithospheric shortening at a time after continental collision could cause the previously deformed crust and mantle lithosphere to produce intraplate deformation. In this work, the geodynamic evolution of the Eurekan Orogeny and its relationship to the tectonics of the Canadian polar margin and northern Baffin Basin is explored using high-resolution thermal-mechanical numerical experiments with the modelling code SOPALE. The modelling of the High Arctic is constrained by the first-order crustal structure of the region (deduced by local gravity field and passive seismological data). Presented are suites of numerical experiments that investigate how the pre-existing lithospheric structures (both crustal and sub-crustal) control the evolution of the resulting intraplate orogen. The influence of other primary modelling parameters, such as crustal thickness and assumed rheology, is also explored. To highlight the role of surface processes on plate

  16. Incipient orogeny and UHP rocks: a genetic link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perchuk, L. L.; Gerya, T. V.; Burg, J.

    2005-12-01

    Initial stages of orogeny are often manifested by variety of geodynamic processes such as transition from subduction to continental collision, break off of subducted slab, lithospheric delamination, deep subduction and exhumation of the continental crust playing crucial role for the generation of geological structure of resulting orogenic system. Indeed, these initial stages are still very poorly understood. On the basis of well known P-T-t paths and using two-dimensional numerical modeling of transition from subduction of an oceanic slab to continent-continent collision we found a genetic link between initiation of orogeny and formation and exhumation of coesite- and diamond-bearing UHP rocks metamorphosed at T>700°C in presence of the dense supercritical silicate fluid and/or melts. Formation of these rocks is explained by a ``hot channel effect''. This process involves the transient formation of a hot tectonic channel in crustal and mantle rocks at the beginning of collision. The channel formed along the plate interface and could penetrate toward the bottom of the lithosphere of the overriding plate (150-200 km) within the range of 700 and 1000°C. Anomalously high temperature is caused by intense viscous and radiogenic heating produced in the channel by deeply subducted radiogenic upper-crustal rocks (e.g., sediments of passive margin origin). Heating is also associated with intense aqueous fluid flow released in the course of rapid dehydration (deserpentinization) of the mantle lithosphere of the overriding plate that has been hydrated during previous subduction stages. Lower effective viscosity of rocks subjected to increased temperature, partial melting, and fluid infiltration promotes the melange of hydrated mantle and crustal rocks within the hot channel. This channel may exist only at the earliest stages of orogeny and producing rapidly large amounts of UHP-HT rocks. Further collision closes the channel through squeezing rheologically weak (partially

  17. Timescales of orogeny: Jurassic construction of the Klamath Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Bradley R.; Donato, Mary M.; Barnes, Calvin G.; McWilliams, M. O.; Ernst, W. G.

    1995-06-01

    An electronic supplement of this material may be obtained on a diskette or Anonymous FTP from KOSMOS.AGU.ORG (LOGIN to AGU's FTP account using ANONYMOUS as the username and GUEST as the password. Go to the right directory by typing CD APEND. Type LS to see what files are available. Type GET and the name of the file to get it. Finally, type EXIT to leave the system.) (Paper 94YCJ2454, Timescales of orogeny: Jurassic construction of the Klamath Mountains, B.R. Hacker, M.M. Donato, C.G. Barnes, M.O. McWilliams, and W.G. Ernst). Diskette may be ordered from American Geophysical Union, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009; $15.00. Payment must accompany order. Classical interpretations of orogeny were based on relatively imprecise biostratigraphic and isotopic age determinations that necessitated grouping apparently related features that may in reality have been greatly diachronous. Isotopic age techniques now have the precision required to resolve the timing of orogenic events on a scale much smaller than that of entire mountain belts. Forty-five new 40Ar/39Ar ages from the Klamath Mountains illuminate the deformation, metamorphism, magmatism, and sedimentation involved in the Jurassic construction of that orogen, leading to a new level of understanding regarding how preserved orogenic features relate to ancient plate tectonic processes. The new geochronologic relationships show that many Jurassic units of the Klamath Mountains had 200 Ma or older volcanoplutonic basement. Subsequent formation of a large ˜170 Ma arc was followed by contractional collapse of the arc. Collision with a spreading ridge may have led to large-scale NW-SE extension in the central and northern Klamaths from 167 to ˜155 Ma, coincident with the crystallization of voluminous plutonic and volcanic suites. Marked cooling of a large region of the central Klamath Mountains to below ˜350°C at ˜150 Ma may have occurred as the igneous belt was extinguished by subduction of colder

  18. Lithospheric records of orogeny within the continental U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Ryan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Holt, William E.

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand the tectonic evolution of the North American continent, we utilize data from the EarthScope Transportable Array network to calculate a three-dimensional shear velocity model for the continental United States. This model was produced through the inversion of Rayleigh wave phase velocities calculated using ambient noise tomography and wave gradiometry, which allows for sensitivity to a broad depth range. Shear velocities within this model highlight the influence of orogenic and postorogenic events on the evolution of the lithosphere. Most notable is the contrast in crustal and upper mantle structure between the relatively slow western and relatively fast eastern North America. These differences are unlikely to stem solely from thermal variations within the lithosphere and highlight both the complexities in lithospheric structure across the continental U.S. and the varying impacts that orogeny can have on the crust and upper mantle.

  19. East African and Kuunga Orogenies in Tanzania - South Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, H.; Hauzenberger, C. A.; Tenczer, V.

    2012-04-01

    Tanzania and southern Kenya hold a key position for reconstructing Gondwana consolidation because here different orogen belts with different tectonic styles interfere. The older, ca. 650-620 Ma East African Orogeny resulted from the amalgamation of arc terranes in the northern Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS) and continental collision between East African pieces and parts of the Azania terrane in the south (Collins and Pisarevsky, 2005). The change form arc suturing to continental collision settings is found in southern Kenya where southernmost arcs of the ANS conjoin with thickened continental margin suites of the Eastern Granulite Belt. The younger ca. 570-530 Ma Kuunga orogeny heads from the Damara - Zambesi - Irumide Belts (De Waele et al., 2006) over Tanzania - Mozambique to southern India and clashes with the East African orogen in southern-central Tanzania. Two transitional orogen settings may be defined, (1) that between island arcs and inverted passive continental margin within the East African Orogen and, (2) that between N-S trending East African and W-E trending Kuungan orogenies. The Neoproterozoic island arc suites of SE-Kenya are exposed as a narrow stripe between western Azania and the Eastern Granulite belt. This suture is a steep, NNW stretched belt that aligns roughly with the prominent southern ANS shear zones that converge at the southern tip of the ANS (Athi and Aswa shear zones). Oblique convergence resulted in low-vorticity sinstral shear during early phases of deformation. Syn-magmatic and syn-tectonic textures are compatible with deformation at granulite metamorphic conditions and rocks exhumed quickly during ongoing transcurrent motion. The belt is typified as wrench tectonic belt with horizontal northwards flow of rocks within deeper portions of an island arc. The adjacent Eastern Granulite Nappe experienced westward directed, subhorizontal, low-vorticity, high temperature flow at partly extreme metamorphic conditions (900°C, 1.2 to 1.4 GPa

  20. Writing siblings: Alice James and her brothers.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Anne Golomb

    2015-02-01

    This essay addresses the relationship of writing to embodiment, through representations of bodily sensation and fantasy in the journal of Alice James. It considers Alice James's writing in relation to her two writer brothers, William and Henry, and in light of their father's experiences of impairment and breakdown. PMID:25688678

  1. Studies for dimuon measurement with ALICE

    SciTech Connect

    Jouan, D.

    1995-07-15

    The idea of measuring dimuon in the ALICE detector is not new, since it already appeared in the Aachen Conference. In the meantime studies were aiming at the use of the two detectors of LHC p-p physics, CMS and ATLAS, already dedicated to dimuon measurement, for these same measurements in heavy ion collisions, whereas the detector dedicated to heavy ions physics at LHC, ALICE, was considering all the other observables. Recently, the interest for dimuon measurements in ALICE was renewed by demands from LHC committee, stiring the activities of a working group in the ALICE collaboration, also associated to a more recent move from new groups. In the following the author briefly describes the interest of measuring dimuons in heavy ion collisions, particularly in ALICE, then the experimental strategy and first estimates of the performances that could be reached with the proposed system.

  2. ALICE moves into warp drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Dénes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Grigore, A.; Simonetti, G.; Soós, C.; Telesca, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; von Haller, B.

    2012-12-01

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Since its successful start-up in 2010, the LHC has been performing outstandingly, providing to the experiments long periods of stable collisions and an integrated luminosity that greatly exceeds the planned targets. To fully explore these privileged conditions, we aim at maximizing the experiment's data taking productivity during stable collisions. We present in this paper the evolution of the online systems towards helping us understand reasons of inefficiency and address new requirements. This paper describes the features added to the ALICE Electronic Logbook (eLogbook) to allow the Run Coordination team to identify, prioritize, fix and follow causes of inefficiency in the experiment. Thorough monitoring of the data taking efficiency provides reports for the collaboration to portray its evolution and evaluate the measures (fixes and new features) taken to increase it. In particular, the eLogbook helps decision making by providing quantitative input, which can be used to better balance risks of changes in the production environment against potential gains in quantity and quality of physics data. It will also present the evolution of the Experiment Control System (ECS) to allow on-the-fly error recovery actions of the detector apparatus while limiting as much as possible the loss of integrated luminosity. The paper will conclude with a review of the ALICE efficiency so far and the future plans to improve its monitoring.

  3. Photon Physics Potential at ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Hisayuki

    2009-10-01

    The ALICE detector has been designed to study the strongly interacting matter created in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In heavy-ion collisions, it is very critical to measure thermal photons, which are known to carry the temperature information of hot created matter. The thermal photon measurements at RHIC are suggesting the systematic study with better photon detectors at LHC. Furthermore, the suppression of high pT hadrons has provided the first strong signature of hot and dense partonic matter created in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC. Therefore, the suppression behavior of various particle species, including photons, up to LHC energy, is a key observable for the study of the hot matter dynamics. The ALICE PHOton Spectrometer (PHOS) consists of 17920 PWO crystals and Avalanche Photo Diode (APD) covering a rapidity range of ±0.3 and an azimuthal range of 100^o. The fine segment structure and small Moliere radius allow to separate two photons from 0̂ decay at pT=30GeV/c with about 100% efficiency and at even higher pT with smaller efficiency. The decay photons from lower pT 0̂ is the largest background in measuring the thermal photons and can be tagged in a very efficient way with a good energy resolution (3%/√E(GeV)). The ALICE EMCAL consists of shashlik lead-scintillator sampling units covering a rapidity range of ±0.7 and an azimuthal range of 110^ o and sits in the opposite coverage azimuthally to PHOS. The jet measurements by EMCAL and other tracking detectors, especially when tagged by a direct photon in the opposite PHOS detector, represent a key probe for investigating jet quenching effects. In this presentation, physics potential with photon detectors at ALICE during the first physics run of LHC will be discussed. The construction and installation status of the photon detectors as well as their expected physics will be presented.

  4. The ALICE analysis train system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Markus; ALICE Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    In the ALICE experiment hundreds of users are analyzing big datasets on a Grid system. High throughput and short turn-around times are achieved by a centralized system called the LEGO trains. This system combines analysis from different users in so-called analysis trains which are then executed within the same Grid jobs thereby reducing the number of times the data needs to be read from the storage systems. The centralized trains improve the performance, the usability for users and the bookkeeping in comparison to single user analysis. The train system builds upon the already existing ALICE tools, i.e. the analysis framework as well as the Grid submission and monitoring infrastructure. The entry point to the train system is a web interface which is used to configure the analysis and the desired datasets as well as to test and submit the train. Several measures have been implemented to reduce the time a train needs to finish and to increase the CPU efficiency.

  5. Event shape engineering with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrin, A.

    2013-05-01

    The strong fluctuations in the initial energy density of heavy-ion collisions allow an efficient selection of events corresponding to a specific initial geometry. For such "shape engineered events", the elliptic flow coefficient, v2, of unidentified charged particles, pions and (anti-)protons in Pb-Pb collisions at sNN=2.76 TeV is measured by the ALICE collaboration. v2 obtained with the event plane method at mid-rapidity, |η|<0.8, is reported for different collision centralities as a function of transverse momentum, pT, out to pT=20 GeV/c. The measured v2 for the shape engineered events is significantly larger or smaller than the average which demonstrates the ability to experimentally select events with the desired shape of the initial spatial asymmetry.

  6. The Scandian collision revisited - when did the orogeny start?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladenberger, A.; Gee, D. G.; Be'eri Shlevin, Y.; Claesson, S.; Majka, J.

    2012-04-01

    Scandian Orogeny, the result of the collision of continents Baltica and Laurentia, was first defined in the mid 1970`s on the basis of two main criteria: the sedimentary record of the Baltoscandian foreland basin, and the numerous, but rather imprecise isotopic age determinations that apparently correlated with the basin stratigraphy. With regard to the stratigraphy and sedimentology of the foreland basin, attention was drawn to the deposition of turbidites in the Mid Ordovician, followed by shallowing of the depositional environments near the end of the Ordovician, with the deposition of quartz sandstones and then limestones in the earliest Silurian. The basin deepened again in the mid Llandovery (early Telychian), as seen in the rapid transition into black shales and then turbidites and the latter coarsen upwards and are overlain by shallow water quartz sandstones. These may correlate in time with the facies changes from carbonates and shales into fluvial sandstones that occurred in the mid-late Wenlock farther south in the Scandes, in the Oslo area. With regard to the isotope age data, it is important to note that, in the early 1970`s, the radiometric time-scale was less well defined; the base of the Silurian was thought to be about ten million years younger than it is today. The best estimate for the base of the Silurian today is 443-444 Ma and the base of Telychian is 436 Ma. These ages fit well the evidence of granulite facies migmatization in the Åreskutan Nappe of the Seve Nappe Complex of west-central Jämtland, where new SIMS U/Pb zircon data provide ages of 442-441Ma for peak (T) metamorphism of migmatites and leucogranites and a leucosome segregation in mafic paleosome yields a particularly precise age of 436Ma. These new data confirm previous zircon, titanite and monazite studies that Scandian orogeny started at c. 440Ma, rather than 430Ma (as has been generally accepted since the 1970´s). Evidence of previous higher pressure metamorphism in the Seve

  7. Prospects for strangeness measurement in ALICE

    SciTech Connect

    Vernet, R.

    2008-09-15

    The study of strangeness production at LHC will bring significant information on the bulk chemical properties, its dynamics, and the hadronization mechanisms involved at these energies. The ALICE experiment will measure strange particles from topology (secondary vertices) and from resonance decays over a wide range in transverse momentum and shed light on this new QCD regime. These motivations will be presented as well as the identification performance of ALICE for strange hadrons.

  8. ALICE: The Quest for 'Primordial' Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Fabjan, C. W.

    2008-04-21

    ALICE - An LHC Ion Collider Experiment - is being prepared to study, in an optimized and dedicated approach, the physics of nuclear matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density. The LHC Ion programme is the logical sequel in the quest to study the novel form of matter, the Quark-Gluon Plasma, the form of matter believed to have existed in our Universe during the first microsecond after the Big Bang. The status of ALICE, its research programme and discovery potential are presented.

  9. Synthesis of Early and Middle Proterozoic orogenies in the southwest

    SciTech Connect

    Karlstrom, K.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-02-01

    Accretion of juvenile crust from 1.8 (Colorado) to 1.72 (Arizona) was accompanied by formation, evolution, and assembly of oceanic island arcs in an Indonesian-style orogenic belt. 2.5--2.0 Ga crust formed basement for arcs in the Mojave Province. The Hualapai block marks a zone where arcs were built across the transition from 2.5--2.0 Ga (NW) to juvenile 1.75--1.72 Ga crust (SE). Early NW-striking low-angle foliations formed between 1.74--1.72 Ga and record arc accretion and outboard collisions. Sutures and major transcurrent boundaries between arcs terranes remain cryptic because of 1.7--1.69 Ga crustal shortening that records welding of terranes to Laurentia. 1.7 Ga quartzite-rhyolite sections from a belt parallel to the southern extent of 1.8--1.72 Ga crust and were syntectonic craton margin and intracratonic basins. Depositions of 1.65 Ga quartzite-rhyolite sections took place during the collision of the Mazatzal province. A major boundary between crustal provinces is marked by the Slate Creek shear zone (AZ) - Jemez lineament (NM) although Mazatzal (1.65 Ga) deformation affected the foreland of the Yavapai Province to the north. The Laurasian supercontinent was assembled by 1.6 Ga and tectonism paused in the Southwest (1.6--1.5 Ga) without appreciable uplift of crust. Middle Proterozoic tectonism (1.5--1.3 Ga) has many of the hallmarks of an orogeny rather than anorogeny'. It involved massive lower crustal melting, granitoid plutonism, regional uplift and unroofing of 10-15 km, regional resetting of Rb-Sr and K-Ar isotopic systems, addition of juvenile crust in the Mid-continent, and locally important deformation and metamorphism around plutons and perhaps over large regions. Pluton generation and ascent were strongly controlled by Early Proterozoic lithospheric structure.

  10. Timing of the Acadian Orogeny in Northern New Hampshire.

    PubMed

    Eusden Jr; Guzofski; Robinson; Tucker

    2000-03-01

    New U-Pb geochronology constrains the timing of the Acadian orogeny in the Central Maine Terrane of northern New Hampshire. Sixteen fractions of one to six grains each of zircon or monazite have been analyzed from six samples: (1) an early syntectonic diorite that records the onset of the Acadian; (2) a schist, a migmatite, and two granites that together record the peak of the Acadian; and (3) a postkinematic pluton that records the end of the Acadian. Zircon from the syntectonic Wamsutta Diorite gives a 207Pb/206Pb age of circa 408 Ma, the time at which the boundary between the deforming orogenic wedge and the foreland basin was in the vicinity of the Presidential Range. This age agrees well with the Emsian position of the northwest migrating Acadian orogenic front and records the beginning of the Acadian in this part of the Central Maine Terrane. We propose a possible Acadian tectonic model that incorporates the geochronologic, structural, and stratigraphic data. Monazite from the schist, migmatite, Bigelow Lawn Granite, and Slide Peak Granite gives 207Pb/206U ages, suggesting the peak of Acadian metamorphism and intrusion of two-mica granites occurred at circa 402-405 Ma, the main pulse of Acadian orogenesis. Previously reported monazite ages from schists that likely record the peak metamorphism in the Central Maine Terrane of New Hampshire and western Maine range from circa 406-384 Ma, with younger ages in southeastern New Hampshire and progressively older ages to the west, north, and northeast. Acadian orogenesis in the Presidential Range had ended by circa 355 Ma, the 207Pb/235U age of monazite from the Peabody River Granite. From 408 to perhaps at least 394 Ma, Acadian orogenesis in the Presidential Range was typical of the tectonic style, dominated by synkinematic metamorphism, seen in central and southern New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Connecticut. From no earlier than 394 Ma to as late as 355 Ma, the orogenesis was typical of the style in parts of

  11. The ALICE data acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Dénes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Grigore, A.; Kiss, T.; Simonetti, G.; Soós, C.; Telesca, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; von Haller, B.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we describe the design, the construction, the commissioning and the operation of the Data Acquisition (DAQ) and Experiment Control Systems (ECS) of the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The DAQ and the ECS are the systems used respectively for the acquisition of all physics data and for the overall control of the experiment. They are two computing systems made of hundreds of PCs and data storage units interconnected via two networks. The collection of experimental data from the detectors is performed by several hundreds of high-speed optical links. We describe in detail the design considerations for these systems handling the extreme data throughput resulting from central lead ions collisions at LHC energy. The implementation of the resulting requirements into hardware (custom optical links and commercial computing equipment), infrastructure (racks, cooling, power distribution, control room), and software led to many innovative solutions which are described together with a presentation of all the major components of the systems, as currently realized. We also report on the performance achieved during the first period of data taking (from 2009 to 2013) often exceeding those specified in the DAQ Technical Design Report.

  12. Archives Library Information Center (ALIC) Notes, 1989-1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALIC Notes, 1992

    1992-01-01

    The Archives Library Information Center (ALIC) within the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) collects printed material on archives, manuscripts, and records management. ALIC compiles a database of these materials, sources of archival services and supplies, and information on significant archival projects. "ALIC Notes" is a brief…

  13. The ALICE Central Trigger Processor (CTP) upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivda, M.; Alexandre, D.; Barnby, L. S.; Evans, D.; Jones, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Lietava, R.; Pospíšil, J.; Villalobos Baillie, O.

    2016-03-01

    The ALICE Central Trigger Processor (CTP) at the CERN LHC has been upgraded for LHC Run 2, to improve the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) data-taking efficiency and to improve the physics performance of ALICE. There is a new additional CTP interaction record sent using a new second Detector Data Link (DDL), a 2 GB DDR3 memory and an extension of functionality for classes. The CTP switch has been incorporated directly onto the new LM0 board. A design proposal for an ALICE CTP upgrade for LHC Run 3 is also presented. Part of the development is a low latency high bandwidth interface whose purpose is to minimize an overall trigger latency.

  14. 77 FR 21761 - Alice Falls Corporation, Alice Falls Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of License...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Alice Falls Corporation, Alice Falls Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of License, and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On February 23, 2012, Alice...

  15. The Mathematics of "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Susan B.

    2005-01-01

    The mathematician Charles Dodgson delighted in creating mathematical puzzles for his friends and students. This article describes some items that he included in "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and explores ways of helping students become aware of the mathematics in the book. (Contains 6 figures.)

  16. Evaluation of LLNL-ALICE code contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, M.

    1994-03-24

    We summarize some of the areas of comparison with experimental data for which the ALICE code did poorly. We suggest some aspects which might be improved in the future. A crude accuracy factor is estimated as a predictive reliability based on the intercomparison exercise.

  17. Alice, Greenfoot, and Scratch--A Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utting, Ian; Cooper, Stephen; Kolling, Michael; Maloney, John; Resnick, Mitchel

    2010-01-01

    This article distills a discussion about the goals, mechanisms, and effects of three environments which aim to support the acquisition and development of computing concepts (problem solving and programming) in pre-University and non-technical students: Alice, Greenfoot, and Scratch. The conversation started in a special session on the topic at the…

  18. Alice Munro: "Wild Swans" and Things.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raabe, David

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how to analyze short stories by Alice Munro. Explains importance of metonymy in reading and teaching these stories. Suggests that the endings of Munro's stories should be examined closely. Concludes that teaching Munro's stories in this way brings students to a greater understanding of her stories. (PM)

  19. Strangeness detection in ALICE experiment at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Safarik, K.

    1995-07-15

    The authors present some parameters of the ALICE detector which concern the detection of strange particles. The results of a simulation for neutral strange particles and cascades, together with estimated rates are presented. They also briefly discuss the detection of charged K-mesons. Finally, they mention the possibility of open charm particle detection.

  20. Gender roles for Alice and Bob

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Philip

    2013-04-01

    As the head of a department that is striving to achieve bronze status under the Athena SWAN (Scientific Women's Academic Network) programme, I have become extremely sensitive to gender stereotyping, and I am afraid that the "Alice and Bob" image on the cover of your March issue on quantum frontiers set off some alarm bells.

  1. ALICE: Physics Performance Report, Volume II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALICE Collaboration; Alessandro, B.; Antinori, F.; Belikov, J. A.; Blume, C.; Dainese, A.; Foka, P.; Giubellino, P.; Hippolyte, B.; Kuhn, C.; Martínez, G.; Monteno, M.; Morsch, A.; Nayak, T. K.; Nystrand, J.; López Noriega, M.; Paic, G.; Pluta, J.; Ramello, L.; Revol, J.-P.; Safarík, K.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Scomparin, E.; Snellings, R.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vercellin, E.

    2006-09-01

    ALICE is a general-purpose heavy-ion experiment designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark gluon plasma in nucleus nucleus collisions at the LHC. It currently involves more than 900 physicists and senior engineers, from both the nuclear and high-energy physics sectors, from over 90 institutions in about 30 countries. The ALICE detector is designed to cope with the highest particle multiplicities above those anticipated for Pb Pb collisions (dNch/dy up to 8000) and it will be operational at the start-up of the LHC. In addition to heavy systems, the ALICE Collaboration will study collisions of lower-mass ions, which are a means of varying the energy density, and protons (both pp and pA), which primarily provide reference data for the nucleus nucleus collisions. In addition, the pp data will allow for a number of genuine pp physics studies. The detailed design of the different detector systems has been laid down in a number of Technical Design Reports issued between mid-1998 and the end of 2004. The experiment is currently under construction and will be ready for data taking with both proton and heavy-ion beams at the start-up of the LHC. Since the comprehensive information on detector and physics performance was last published in the ALICE Technical Proposal in 1996, the detector, as well as simulation, reconstruction and analysis software have undergone significant development. The Physics Performance Report (PPR) provides an updated and comprehensive summary of the performance of the various ALICE subsystems, including updates to the Technical Design Reports, as appropriate. The PPR is divided into two volumes. Volume I, published in 2004 (CERN/LHCC 2003-049, ALICE Collaboration 2004 J. Phys. G: Nucl. Part. Phys. 30 1517 1763), contains in four chapters a short theoretical overview and an extensive reference list concerning the physics topics of interest to ALICE, the experimental conditions at the LHC, a short summary and update of

  2. An alternative hypothesis for the mid-Paleozoic Antler orogeny in Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ketner, Keith B.

    2012-01-01

    A great volume of Mississippian orogenic deposits supports the concept of a mid-Paleozoic orogeny in Nevada, and the existence and timing of that event are not questioned here. The nature of the orogeny is problematic, however, and new ideas are called for. The cause of the Antler orogeny, long ascribed to plate convergence, is here attributed to left-lateral north-south strike-slip faulting in northwestern Nevada. The stratigraphic evidence originally provided in support of an associated regional thrust fault, the Roberts Mountains thrust, is now known to be invalid, and abundant, detailed map evidence testifies to post-Antler ages of virtually all large folds and thrust faults in the region. The Antler orogeny was not characterized by obduction of the Roberts Mountains allochthon; rocks composing the "allochthon" essentially were deposited in situ. Instead, the orogeny was characterized by appearance of an elongate north-northeast-trending uplift through central Nevada and by two parallel flanking depressions. The eastern depression was the Antler foreland trough, into which sediments flowed from both east and west in the Mississippian. The western depression was the Antler hinterland trough into which sediments also flowed from both east and west during the Mississippian. West of the hinterland trough, across a left-lateral strike-slip fault, an exotic landmass originally attached to the northwestern part of the North American continent was moved southward 1700 km along a strike-slip fault. An array of isolated blocks of shelf carbonate rocks, long thought to be autochthonous exposures in windows of the Roberts Mountains allochthon, is proposed here as an array of gravity-driven slide blocks dislodged from the shelf, probably initiated by the Late Devonian Alamo impact event.

  3. Alice and Bob in an expanding spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Helder; de Souza, Gustavo; Mansfield, Paul; Sampaio, Marcos

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the teleportation of a qubit between two observers Alice and Bob in an asymptotically flat Robertson-Walker expanding spacetime. We use scalar or fermionic field modes inside Alice's and Bob's ideal cavities and show the degradation of the teleportation quality, as measured by the fidelity, through a mechanism governed by spacetime expansion. This reduction is demonstrated to increase with the rapidity of the expansion and to be highly sensitive to the coupling of the field to spacetime curvature, becoming considerably stronger as it reduces from conformal to minimal. We explore a perturbative approach in the cosmological parameters to compute the Bogoliubov coefficients in order to evaluate and compare the fidelity degradation of fermionic and scalar fields.

  4. Upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, M.

    2015-03-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is studying heavy-ion collisions at the CERN LHC, with the aim of forming, under extreme conditions of temperature and energy density, a Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) and studying its properties. The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major upgrade of the experimental apparatus, planned for installation in the second long LHC shutdown in the years 2018-2019. A key element of the ALICE upgrade is the construction of a new, ultra-light, high-resolution Inner Tracking System (ITS) . The primary focus of the new ITS is on improving the performance for detection of heavy-flavour hadrons, and of thermal photons and low-mass di-electrons emitted by the QGP . With respect to the current detector, the new ITS will significantly enhance the determination of the distance of closest approach of a track to the primary vertex, the tracking efficiency at low transverse momenta, and the read-out rate capabilities. This will be achieved by seven concentric detector layers based on a 50 μm thick CMOS pixel sensor with a pixel pitch of about 30× 30 μm2. A key feature of the new ITS, which is optimized for high tracking accuracy at low transverse momenta, is the very low mass of the three innermost layers, which feature a material thickness of 0.3% X0 per layer. This contribution describes the design goals and layout of the new ALICE ITS, a summary of the R&D activities, with focus on the technical implementation of the main detector components, and the projected detector performance.

  5. The Silicon Pixel Detector for ALICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fabris, D.; Bombonati, C.; Dima, R.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Pepato, A.; Bohus, L. Sajo; Scarlassara, F.; Segato, G.; Shen, D.; Turrisi, R.; Viesti, G.; Anelli, G.; Boccardi, A.; Burns, M.; Campbell, M.; Ceresa, S.; Conrad, J.; Kluge, A.; Kral, M.

    2007-10-26

    The Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE experiment is made of position sensitive detectors which have to operate in a region where the track density may be as high as 50 tracks/cm{sup 2}. To handle such densities detectors with high precision and granularity are mandatory. The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD), the innermost part of the ITS, has been designed to provide tracking information close to primary interaction point. The assembly of the entire SPD has been completed.

  6. The ALICE Software Release Validation cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzano, D.; Krzewicki, M.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most important steps of software lifecycle is Quality Assurance: this process comprehends both automatic tests and manual reviews, and all of them must pass successfully before the software is approved for production. Some tests, such as source code static analysis, are executed on a single dedicated service: in High Energy Physics, a full simulation and reconstruction chain on a distributed computing environment, backed with a sample “golden” dataset, is also necessary for the quality sign off. The ALICE experiment uses dedicated and virtualized computing infrastructures for the Release Validation in order not to taint the production environment (i.e. CVMFS and the Grid) with non-validated software and validation jobs: the ALICE Release Validation cluster is a disposable virtual cluster appliance based on CernVM and the Virtual Analysis Facility, capable of deploying on demand, and with a single command, a dedicated virtual HTCondor cluster with an automatically scalable number of virtual workers on any cloud supporting the standard EC2 interface. Input and output data are externally stored on EOS, and a dedicated CVMFS service is used to provide the software to be validated. We will show how the Release Validation Cluster deployment and disposal are completely transparent for the Release Manager, who simply triggers the validation from the ALICE build system's web interface. CernVM 3, based entirely on CVMFS, permits to boot any snapshot of the operating system in time: we will show how this allows us to certify each ALICE software release for an exact CernVM snapshot, addressing the problem of Long Term Data Preservation by ensuring a consistent environment for software execution and data reprocessing in the future.

  7. Performance optimisations for distributed analysis in ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betev, L.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Grigoras, C.; Hristov, P.

    2014-06-01

    Performance is a critical issue in a production system accommodating hundreds of analysis users. Compared to a local session, distributed analysis is exposed to services and network latencies, remote data access and heterogeneous computing infrastructure, creating a more complex performance and efficiency optimization matrix. During the last 2 years, ALICE analysis shifted from a fast development phase to the more mature and stable code. At the same time, the frameworks and tools for deployment, monitoring and management of large productions have evolved considerably too. The ALICE Grid production system is currently used by a fair share of organized and individual user analysis, consuming up to 30% or the available resources and ranging from fully I/O-bound analysis code to CPU intensive correlations or resonances studies. While the intrinsic analysis performance is unlikely to improve by a large factor during the LHC long shutdown (LS1), the overall efficiency of the system has still to be improved by an important factor to satisfy the analysis needs. We have instrumented all analysis jobs with "sensors" collecting comprehensive monitoring information on the job running conditions and performance in order to identify bottlenecks in the data processing flow. This data are collected by the MonALISa-based ALICE Grid monitoring system and are used to steer and improve the job submission and management policy, to identify operational problems in real time and to perform automatic corrective actions. In parallel with an upgrade of our production system we are aiming for low level improvements related to data format, data management and merging of results to allow for a better performing ALICE analysis.

  8. Overview of anisotropic flow measurements from ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, You

    2016-05-01

    Anisotropic flow is an important observable to study the properties of the hot and dense matter, the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), created in heavy-ion collisions. Measurements of anisotropic flow for inclusive and identified charged hadrons are reported in Pb-Pb, p-Pb and pp collisions with the ALICE detector. The comparison of experimental measurements to various theoretical calculations are also presented in these proceedings.

  9. First Run II results from ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toia, Alberica

    2016-07-01

    The ALICE Collaboration is collecting data with both Minimum Bias and Muon triggers with pp collisions at √s = 13 TeV in the ongoing LHC Run II. An excellent performance of tracking and PID in the central barrel and in the muon spectrometer has been obtained. First results on the charged-particle pseudorapidity density and on identified particle transverse momentum spectra at √s = 13 TeV is presented.

  10. ALICE: Physics Performance Report, Volume I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALICE Collaboration; Carminati, F.; Foka, P.; Giubellino, P.; Morsch, A.; Paic, G.; Revol, J.-P.; Safarík, K.; Schutz, Y.; Wiedemann, U. A.

    2004-11-01

    ALICE is a general-purpose heavy-ion experiment designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC. It currently includes more than 900 physicists and senior engineers, from both nuclear and high-energy physics, from about 80 institutions in 28 countries. The experiment was approved in February 1997. The detailed design of the different detector systems has been laid down in a number of Technical Design Reports issued between mid-1998 and the end of 2001 and construction has started for most detectors. Since the last comprehensive information on detector and physics performance was published in the ALICE Technical Proposal in 1996, the detector as well as simulation, reconstruction and analysis software have undergone significant development. The Physics Performance Report (PPR) will give an updated and comprehensive summary of the current status and performance of the various ALICE subsystems, including updates to the Technical Design Reports, where appropriate, as well as a description of systems which have not been published in a Technical Design Report. The PPR will be published in two volumes. The current Volume I contains: a short theoretical overview and an extensive reference list concerning the physics topics of interest to ALICE, relevant experimental conditions at the LHC, a short summary and update of the subsystem designs, and a description of the offline framework and Monte Carlo generators. Volume II, which will be published separately, will contain detailed simulations of combined detector performance, event reconstruction, and analysis of a representative sample of relevant physics observables from global event characteristics to hard processes.

  11. Upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushpil, Svetlana; ALICE Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    ALICE detector was constructed to study the properties of hot and dense hadronic matter formed in relativistic nuclear collisions. During the second long LHC shutdown in 2019-2020, the collaboration plans to upgrade the current vertex detector, the Inner Tracking System (ITS), in order to increase the reconstruction accuracy of secondary vertices and to lower the threshold of particle transverse momentum measurement. The upgrade strategy of ITS is based on the application of new Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) designed in 0.18 μm CMOS technology. The 50 μm thick chip consists of a single silicon die incorporating a 0.18 μm high-resistivity silicon epitaxial layer (sensor active volume) and matrix of charge collection diodes (pixels) with readout electronics. Radiation hardness of the upgraded ITS is one of the crucial moments in the overall performance of the system. A wide set of MAPS structures with different read-out circuits was produced and is being studied by the ALICE collaboration to optimize the pixel sensor functionality. An overview of the ALICE ITS upgrade and the expected performance improvement will be presented together with selected results from a campaign that includes several irradiation and beam tests.

  12. Spring Tire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asnani, Vivake M.; Benzing, Jim; Kish, Jim C.

    2011-01-01

    The spring tire is made from helical springs, requires no air or rubber, and consumes nearly zero energy. The tire design provides greater traction in sandy and/or rocky soil, can operate in microgravity and under harsh conditions (vastly varying temperatures), and is non-pneumatic. Like any tire, the spring tire is approximately a toroidal-shaped object intended to be mounted on a transportation wheel. Its basic function is also similar to a traditional tire, in that the spring tire contours to the surface on which it is driven to facilitate traction, and to reduce the transmission of vibration to the vehicle. The essential difference between other tires and the spring tire is the use of helical springs to support and/or distribute load. They are coiled wires that deform elastically under load with little energy loss.

  13. Stratigraphic evidence from the Appalachian Basin for continuation of the Taconian orogeny into Early Silurian time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettensohn, Frank R.; Brett, Carlton E.

    2002-01-01

    Traditional interpretations of the Appalachian Basin during Silurian time suggest a period of tectonic stability between Taconian and Acadian orogenies. However, recent interpretations of evidence from deformation and igneous sources in the northern Appalachians indicate Silurian tectonism centered on and near the St. Lawrence promontory and that this tectonism probably effected sedimentation in parts of the Appalachian Basin during much of Silurian time. Of special interest is the tectonism that extended from latest Ordovician into Early Silurian time and the nature of its relationships with known orogenic events. Although evidence and interpretations from deformation and igneous sources have become increasingly well established, there has been little support from the stratigraphic record. Now, however, criteria based on the implications of flexural models, namely the nature and distribution of unconformities, the presence of flexural stratigraphic sequences, and the distribution in time and space of dark-shale-filled foreland basins, provide stratigraphic evidence from the Appalachian Basin that supports Early Silurian (Medinan; early Llandoverian) tectonism related to Taconian orogeny. In particular, the distribution and local angularity of the Ordovician-Silurian or Cherokee unconformity suggest major tectonic influence and a latest Ordovician to Early Silurian inception for that tectonism. An overlying flexural stratigraphic sequence represented by the Lower Silurian Medina Group and the presence of a dark-shale-filled foreland basin reflected by the Power Glen-lower Cabot Head shales support interpretations of flexural subsidence related to deformational loading. Moreover, the distribution in space and time of the foreland basin containing these shales indicates that the basin is more likely a continuation of the northwestwardly shifting trend of earlier Taconian basins than that of later Salinic basins. Although the kinematic regime may be different from

  14. Evolution of a Paleoproterozoic “weak type” orogeny in the West African Craton (Ivory Coast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, M.; Gumiaux, C.; Cagnard, F.; Pouclet, A.; Ouattara, G.; Pichon, M.

    2009-11-01

    The Paleoproterozoic domain of the Ivory Coast lies in the central part of the West African Craton (WAC) and is mainly constituted by TTG, greenstones, supracrustal rocks and leucogranites. A compilation of metamorphic and radiometric data highlights that: i) metamorphic conditions are rather homogeneous through the domain, without important metamorphic jumps, ii) HP-LT assemblages are absent and iii) important volumes of magmas emplaced during the overall Paleoproterozoic orogeny suggesting the occurrence of long-lived rather hot geotherms. Results of the structural analysis, focused on three areas within the Ivory Coast, suggest that the deformation is homogeneous and distributed through the Paleoproterozoic domain. In details, results of this study point out the long-lived character of vertical movements during the Eburnean orogeny with a two folds evolution. The first stage is characterized by the development of "domes and basins" geometries without any boundary tectonic forces and the second stage is marked by coeval diapiric movements and horizontal regional-scale shortening. These features suggest that the crust is affected by vertical movements during the overall orogeny. The Eburnean orogen can then be considered as an example of long-lived Paleoproterozoic "weak type" orogen.

  15. Glacial erosion during orogenesis: A study of the intraplate Eurekan Orogeny of Ellesmere Island.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housam, J. M.; Pysklywec, R. N.; Heron, P.; Stephenson, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Eurekan Orogeny of northeastern Ellesmere Island in the Canadian arctic was formed as a result of mountain-building processes in the Paleogene. The orogen developed relatively distant from any active convergent plate boundaries making it a representation of a class of intraplate mountain-building. In this work we investigate the geodynamics of the Eurekan and in particular focus on the potential role of glacial erosion in modifying the orogenesis. The study is motivated by important recent research that has demonstrated a significant interaction between (climate-controlled) surface processes and solid Earth tectonics at collision. Glacial erosion is thought to have the capability of eroding at a rate which matches with that of rock uplift in active orogens, referred to as the "buzz saw" effect of glaciers. Using the geodynamic modelling code of SOPALE we developed forward 2D models of the idealized Ellesmerian lithospheric structure and imposed shortening to explore Eurekan-style orogenic deformation. In the numerical experiments, we modified the erosional algorithm in the model such to investigate various implementations of the glacial buzz saw. The model results show how the surface topography and internal lithospheric structure of the orogeny are modified by variable glacial erosion. In addition to illustrating how the Eurekan orogeny may have evolved, the results provide insight into how the generic orogenic zones may develop in a glacial environment.

  16. ALICE and The state of matter at LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Assembly and installation of ALICE, the LHC heavy ion experiment dedicated to the study of matter at extreme temperature and pressure, is nearing completion and the commissioning of the detector is well under way. A good time to look back, to the making of ALICE, and to look forward, to the first physics with proton and heavy ion beams.

  17. Using "Alice in Wonderland" to Teach Multiplication of Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Susan B.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how the story of Alice in Wonderland helps students understand the operation of multiplying by a rational number less than 1 and related aspects of ratio and proportion. Included with this article is a "How Tall Is Alice?" Worksheet. (Contains 1 table and 6 figures.)

  18. Signatures of Pacific-type orogeny in Lleyn and Anglesey areas, northwest Wales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, H.; Okada, Y.; Sawaki, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Hirata, T.; Maruyama, S.

    2014-12-01

    The orogeny is a fundamental process of plate tectonics, and its record is useful for understanding of ancient plate motion. Geotectonic history of British isles has been explained by collision-type orogeny accompanied by closure of Iapetus ocean. High pressure metamorphic rocks such as blueschist and eclogite characterizing Pacific-type orogeny occur in some places, but have not attracted much interests because of their smallness. The subduction-related (Pacific-type) orogeny is characterized by contemporaneous formation of a batholith belt, a regional metamorphic belt (high P/T type) and an accretionary complex. Late Proterozoic-Cambrian (677-498 Ma) calc-alkaline volcano-plutonic complexes crop out in Lleyn and Anglesey areas, northwest Wales. The metamorphic age of high-P/T metamorphic belt in eastern Anglesey was constrained by Ar-Ar isochron age of 560-550 Ma. However, depositional age of the rocks composing accretionary complex wasn't fully constrained due to the limited zircon U-Pb age data and vague microfossil records. Monian Supergroup at Lleyn and Anglesey areas includes three groups; South Stack Group (Gp), New Harbour Gp and Gwna Gp. The Gwna Gp is located at the structural top and includes typical rocks of an ocean plate stratigraphy (OPS), a fundamental unit composing of an accretionary complex. We described detailed geological map and reconstructed the OPSs at some localities with careful attention to layer-parallel thrust. In order to constrain the sedimentary ages of each OPS, we collected sandstones from individual OPSs. We determined U-Pb ages of detrital zircons from the sandstones with LA-ICP-MS at Kyoto University. We adopted the youngest age of the detrital zircons as a constraint of sedimentary age. The results indicate that sediments in Gwna Gp deposited from 623 ± 17 Ma to 535 ± 14 Ma. These are contemporary with the ages of both batholith belt and regional metamorphic belt. In addition, it became evident that structurally upper level

  19. Status of the ALICE experiment at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera Corral, G.

    2008-11-13

    The Large Hadron Collider will provide soon, beams of protons and collisions at high energy to the experiments. ALICE stands for A Large Ion Collider Experiment. It is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. ALICE will be dedicated to the study of heavy ion collisions. The main goal of ALICE is the observation of the transition of ordinary matter into a plasma of quarks and gluons. ALICE consists of 16 systems of detection. Two of them were designed and constructed in Mexico: i) The V0A detector, located at 3.2 mts. from the interaction point and ii) The cosmic ray detector on the top of the magnet. After a quick review of the LHC and the ALICE experiment we will focus on the description of these systems.

  20. Particle identification in ALICE: a Bayesian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Albuquerque, D. S. D.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Balasubramanian, S.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Benacek, P.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Cabala, J.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, A. S.; Gonzalez, V.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grachov, O. A.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.

    2016-05-01

    We present a Bayesian approach to particle identification (PID) within the ALICE experiment. The aim is to more effectively combine the particle identification capabilities of its various detectors. After a brief explanation of the adopted methodology and formalism, the performance of the Bayesian PID approach for charged pions, kaons and protons in the central barrel of ALICE is studied. PID is performed via measurements of specific energy loss ( d E/d x) and time of flight. PID efficiencies and misidentification probabilities are extracted and compared with Monte Carlo simulations using high-purity samples of identified particles in the decay channels K0S → π-π+, φ→ K-K+, and Λ→ p π- in p-Pb collisions at √{s_{NN}}=5.02 TeV. In order to thoroughly assess the validity of the Bayesian approach, this methodology was used to obtain corrected pT spectra of pions, kaons, protons, and D0 mesons in pp collisions at √{s}=7 TeV. In all cases, the results using Bayesian PID were found to be consistent with previous measurements performed by ALICE using a standard PID approach. For the measurement of D0 → K-π+, it was found that a Bayesian PID approach gave a higher signal-to-background ratio and a similar or larger statistical significance when compared with standard PID selections, despite a reduced identification efficiency. Finally, we present an exploratory study of the measurement of Λc+ → p K-π+ in pp collisions at √{s}=7 TeV, using the Bayesian approach for the identification of its decay products.

  1. V0L detector at ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro, Ruben; Becerril, Ana; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Martinez-Davalos, Arnulfo; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo

    2003-04-01

    The V0 system is part of the FMD in the ALICE experiment. This system consist of two sub-detectors: V0L and V0R located on both sides of the collision vertex. The system must provide information about: minimum bias trigger and multiplicity. It also plays an important role at level 0 trigger. Therefore, besides the mechanical constrains, timing and good light collection are important issues in the design and construction of both sub-detectors. Mechanical construction and results of the beam test performed to V0L prototype, being built at the UNAM, are presented. Improvements and alternative designs will be discussed.

  2. Phoenix Robotic Arm connects with `Alice'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm comes into contact with a rock informally named 'Alice' near the 'Snow White' trench.

    This image was acquired by Phoenix's NASA's Surface Stereo Imager on July 13 during the 48th Martian day, or sol, since Phoenix landed.

    For scale, the width of the scoop at the end of the arm is about 8.5 centimeters (3.3 inches).

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. The ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALICE Collaboration; Aamodt, K.; Abrahantes Quintana, A.; Achenbach, R.; Acounis, S.; Adamová, D.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.; Agnese, F.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad, S.; Akindinov, A.; Akishin, P.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro, R.; Alfarone, G.; Alici, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Amend, W.; Andrei, C.; Andres, Y.; Andronic, A.; Anelli, G.; Anfreville, M.; Angelov, V.; Anzo, A.; Anson, C.; Anticić, T.; Antonenko, V.; Antonczyk, D.; Antinori, F.; Antinori, S.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Aprodu, V.; Arba, M.; Arcelli, S.; Argentieri, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Arefiev, A.; Arsene, I.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Awes, T. C.; Äysto, J.; Danish Azmi, M.; Bablock, S.; Badalà, A.; Badyal, S. K.; Baechler, J.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldit, A.; Bán, J.; Barbera, R.; Barberis, P.-L.; Barbet, J. M.; Barnäfoldi, G.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Bartos, D.; Basile, M.; Basmanov, V.; Bastid, N.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baudot, J.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I.; Becker, B.; Belikov, J.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belogianni, A.; Belyaev, S.; Benato, A.; Beney, J. L.; Benhabib, L.; Benotto, F.; Beolé, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdermann, E.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bernard, C.; Berny, R.; Berst, J. D.; Bertelsen, H.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Baskar, P.; Bhati, A.; Bianchi, N.; Bielčik, J.; Bielčiková, J.; Bimbot, L.; Blanchard, G.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Blyth, S.; Boccioli, M.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bombonati, C.; Bondila, M.; Bonnet, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Borel, H.; Borotto, F.; Borshchov, V.; Bortoli, Y.; Borysov, O.; Bose, S.; Bosisio, L.; Botje, M.; Böttger, S.; Bourdaud, G.; Bourrion, O.; Bouvier, S.; Braem, A.; Braun, M.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bravina, L.; Bregant, M.; Bruckner, G.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Brunasso, O.; Bruno, G. E.; Bucher, D.; Budilov, V.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Buncic, P.; Burns, M.; Burachas, S.; Busch, O.; Bushop, J.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calaon, F.; Caldogno, M.; Cali, I.; Camerini, P.; Campagnolo, R.; Campbell, M.; Cao, X.; Capitani, G. P.; Romeo, G. Cara; Cardenas-Montes, M.; Carduner, H.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Cariola, P.; Carminati, F.; Casado, J.; Casanova Diaz, A.; Caselle, M.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castor, J.; Catanescu, V.; Cattaruzza, E.; Cavazza, D.; Cerello, P.; Ceresa, S.; Černý, V.; Chambert, V.; Chapeland, S.; Charpy, A.; Charrier, D.; Chartoire, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chepurnov, V.; Chernenko, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chochula, P.; Chiavassa, E.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Choi, J.; Christakoglou, P.; Christiansen, P.; Christensen, C.; Chykalov, O. A.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli-Strolin, L.; Ciobanu, M.; Cindolo, F.; Cirstoiu, C.; Clausse, O.; Cleymans, J.; Cobanoglu, O.; Coffin, J.-P.; Coli, S.; Colla, A.; Colledani, C.; Combaret, C.; Combet, M.; Comets, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J.; Cormier, T.; Corsi, F.; Cortese, P.; Costa, F.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cuautle, E.; Cussonneau, J.; Dahlinger, M.; Dainese, A.; Dalsgaard, H. H.; Daniel, L.; Das, I.; Das, T.; Dash, A.; Da Silva, R.; Davenport, M.; Daues, H.; DeCaro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; DeCuveland, J.; DeFalco, A.; de Gaspari, M.; de Girolamo, P.; de Groot, J.; DeGruttola, D.; DeHaas, A.; DeMarco, N.; DePasquale, S.; DeRemigis, P.; de Vaux, D.; Decock, G.; Delagrange, H.; DelFranco, M.; Dellacasa, G.; Dell'Olio, C.; Dell'Olio, D.; Deloff, A.; Demanov, V.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; Derkach, D.; Devaux, A.; Di Bari, D.; Di Bartelomen, A.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dialinas, M.; Diaz, L.; Díaz Valdes, R.; Dietel, T.; Dima, R.; Ding, H.; Dinca, C.; Divià, R.; Dobretsov, V.; Dobrin, A.; Doenigus, B.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domínguez, I.; Dorn, M.; Drouet, S.; Dubey, A. E.; Ducroux, L.; Dumitrache, F.; Dumonteil, E.; Dupieux, P.; Duta, V.; Dutta Majumdar, A.; Dutta Majumdar, M.; Dyhre, Th; Efimov, L.; Efremov, A.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engster, C.; Enokizono, A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Evangelista, A.; Evans, D.; Evrard, S.; Fabjan, C. W.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Farano, R.; Fearick, R.; Fedorov, O.; Fekete, V.; Felea, D.; Feofilov, G.; Férnandez Téllez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Fichera, F.; Filchagin, S.; Filoni, E.; Finck, C.; Fini, R.; Fiore, E. M.; Flierl, D.; Floris, M.; Fodor, Z.; Foka, Y.; Fokin, S.; Force, P.; Formenti, F.; Fragiacomo, E.; Fragkiadakis, M.; Fraissard, D.; Franco, A.; Franco, M.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fratino, U.; Fresneau, S.; Frolov, A.; Fuchs, U.; Fujita, J.; Furget, C.; Furini, M.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J.-J.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadrat, S.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gaido, L.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Gallio, M.; Gandolfi, E.; Ganoti, P.; Ganti, M.; Garabatos, J.; Garcia Lopez, A.; Garizzo, L.; Gaudichet, L.; Gemme, R.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Giolu, G.; Giraudo, G.; Giubellino, P.; Glasow, R.; Glässel, P.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Gonzalez Gutierrez, C.; Gonzales-Trueba, L. H.; Gorbunov, S.; Gorbunov, Y.; Gos, H.; Gosset, J.; Gotovac, S.; Gottschlag, H.; Gottschalk, D.; Grabski, V.; Grassi, T.; Gray, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grebieszkow, K.; Gregory, C.; Grigoras, C.; Grion, N.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, C.; Grigoryan, S.; Grishuk, Y.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Grynyov, B.; Guarnaccia, C.; Guber, F.; Guerin, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, M.; Guichard, A.; Guida, M.; Guilloux, G.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, V.; Gustafsson, H.-A.; Gutbrod, H.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamar, G.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hansen, J. C.; Hardy, P.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Harris, J. W.; Hartig, M.; Harutyunyan, A.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Hasch, D.; Hasegan, D.; Hehner, J.; Heine, N.; Heinz, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herlant, S.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hetland, K.; Hille, P.; Hinke, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hoch, M.; Hoebbel, H.; Hoedlmoser, H.; Horaguchi, T.; Horner, M.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Hu, S.; Guo, C. Hu; Humanic, T.; Hurtado, A.; Hwang, D. S.; Ianigro, J. C.; Idzik, M.; Igolkin, S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Imhoff, M.; Innocenti, P. G.; Ionescu, E.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Insa, C.; Inuzuka, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jacobs, P.; Jacholkowski, A.; Jančurová, L.; Janik, R.; Jasper, M.; Jena, C.; Jirden, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jones, G. T.; Jorgensen, C.; Jouve, F.; Jovanović, P.; Junique, A.; Jusko, A.; Jung, H.; Jung, W.; Kadija, K.; Kamal, A.; Kamermans, R.; Kapusta, S.; Kaidalov, A.; Kakoyan, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kang, E.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplin, V.; Karadzhev, K.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Karpio, K.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Mohsin Khan, M.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kikola, D.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D.; Kim, D. S.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, H. N.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, S.; Kinson, J. B.; Kiprich, S. K.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, T.; Kiworra, V.; Klay, J.; Klein Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Klimov, A.; Klovning, A.; Kluge, A.; Kluit, R.; Kniege, S.; Kolevatov, R.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kornas, E.; Koshurnikov, E.; Kotov, I.; Kour, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Kozlov, K.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kraus, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krawutschke, T.; Krivda, M.; Kryshen, E.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugler, A.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, N.; Kumpumaeki, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. N.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kutovsky, M.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M.; Labbé, J.-C.; Lackner, F.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lafage, V.; La Rocca, P.; Lamont, M.; Lara, C.; Larsen, D. T.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzeroni, C.; LeBornec, Y.; LeBris, N.; LeGailliard, C.; Lebedev, V.; Lecoq, J.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. C.; Lefévre, F.; Legrand, I.; Lehmann, T.; Leistam, L.; Lenoir, P.; Lenti, V.; Leon, H.; Monzon, I. Leon; Lévai, P.; Li, Q.; Li, X.; Librizzi, F.; Lietava, R.; Lindegaard, N.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M.; Listratenko, O. M.; Littel, F.; Liu, Y.; Lo, J.; Lobanov, V.; Loginov, V.; López Noriega, M.; López-Ramírez, R.; López Torres, E.; Lorenzo, P. M.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, S.; Ludolphs, W.; Lunardon, M.; Luquin, L.; Lusso, S.; Lutz, J.-R.; Luvisetto, M.; Lyapin, V.; Maevskaya, A.; Magureanu, C.; Mahajan, A.; Majahan, S.; Mahmoud, T.; Mairani, A.; Mahapatra, D.; Makarov, A.; Makhlyueva, I.; Malek, M.; Malkiewicz, T.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manea, C.; Mangotra, L. K.; Maniero, D.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marcel, A.; Marchini, S.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marin, A.; Marin, J.-C.; Marras, D.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Martínez Garcia, G.; Martini, S.; Marzari Chiesa, A.; Marzocca, C.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masetti, M.; Maslov, N. I.; Masoni, A.; Massera, F.; Mast, M.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z. L.; Mayer, B.; Mazza, G.; Mazzaro, M. D.; Mazzoni, A.; Meddi, F.; Meleshko, E.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meneghini, S.; Meoni, M.; Mercado Perez, J.; Mereu, P.; Meunier, O.; Miake, Y.; Michalon, A.; Michinelli, R.; Miftakhov, N.; Mignone, M.; Mikhailov, K.; Milosevic, J.; Minaev, Y.; Minafra, F.; Mischke, A.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitsyn, V.; Mitu, C.; Mohanty, B.; Moisa, D.; Molnar, L.; Mondal, M.; Mondal, N.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Morando, M.; Morel, M.; Moretto, S.; Morhardt, Th; Morsch, A.; Moukhanova, T.; Mucchi, M.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Müller, H.; Müller, W.; Munoz, J.; Mura, D.; Musa, L.; Muraz, J. F.; Musso, A.; Nania, R.; Nandi, B.; Nappi, E.; Navach, F.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T.; Nazarenko, S.; Nazarov, G.; Nellen, L.; Nendaz, F.; Nianine, A.; Nicassio, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B.; Nitti, M.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noto, F.; Nouais, D.; Nyiri, A.; Nystrand, J.; Odyniec, G.; Oeschler, H.; Oinonen, M.; Oldenburg, M.; Oleks, I.; Olsen, E. K.; Onuchin, V.; Oppedisano, C.; Orsini, F.; Ortiz-Velázquez, A.; Oskamp, C.; Oskarsson, A.; Osmic, F.; Österman, L.; Otterlund, I.; Ovrebekk, G.; Oyama, K.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S.; Pal, S.; Pálla, G.; Palmeri, A.; Pancaldi, G.; Panse, R.; Pantaleo, A.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pastirčák, B.; Pastore, C.; Patarakin, O.; Paticchio, V.; Patimo, G.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pénichot, Y.; Pepato, A.; Pereira, H.; Peresunko, D.; Perez, C.; Perez Griffo, J.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Peters, A. J.; Petráček, V.; Petridis, A.; Petris, M.; Petrov, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Peyré, J.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pichot, P.; Piemonte, C.; Pikna, M.; Pilastrini, R.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pini, B.; Pinsky, L.; Pinto Morais, V.; Pismennaya, V.; Piuz, F.; Platt, R.; Ploskon, M.; Plumeri, S.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Podesta, P.; Poggio, F.; Poghosyan, M.; Poghosyan, T.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Polozov, P.; Polyakov, V.; Pommeresch, B.; Pompei, F.; Pop, A.; Popescu, S.; Posa, F.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Pouthas, J.; Prasad, S.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Prodan, L.; Prono, G.; Protsenko, M. A.; Pruneau, C. A.; Przybyla, A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Pulvirenti, A.; Punin, A.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Quartieri, J.; Quercigh, E.; Rachevskaya, I.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Radomski, S.; Radu, A.; Rak, J.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Rasmussen, O. B.; Rasson, J.; Razin, V.; Read, K.; Real, J.; Redlich, K.; Reichling, C.; Renard, C.; Renault, G.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Ricaud, H.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Rigalleau, L. M.; Riggi, F.; Riegler, W.; Rindel, E.; Riso, J.; Rivetti, A.; Rizzi, M.; Rizzi, V.; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M.; Røed, K.; Röhrich, D.; Román-López, S.; Romanato, M.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosinsky, P.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Rostchin, V.; Rotondo, F.; Roukoutakis, F.; Rousseau, S.; Roy, C.; Roy, D.; Roy, P.; Royer, L.; Rubin, G.; Rubio, A.; Rui, R.; Rusanov, I.; Russo, G.; Ruuskanen, V.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Saini, J.; Saiz, P.; Salur, S.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sann, H.; Santiard, J.-C.; Santo, R.; Santoro, R.; Sargsyan, G.; Saturnini, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Schackert, B.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schioler, T.; Schippers, J. D.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H.; Schneider, R.; Schossmaier, K.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Schyns, E.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Snow, H.; Sedykh, S.; Segato, G.; Sellitto, S.; Semeria, F.; Senyukov, S.; Seppänen, H.; Serci, S.; Serkin, L.; Serra, S.; Sesselmann, T.; Sevcenco, A.; Sgura, I.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharkov, E.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shileev, K.; Shukla, P.; Shurygin, A.; Shurygina, M.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddi, E.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Sigward, M. H.; Silenzi, A.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestri, R.; Simili, E.; Simion, V.; Simon, R.; Simonetti, L.; Singaraju, R.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B.; Sinha, T.; Siska, M.; Sitár, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, B.; Skowronski, P.; Slodkowski, M.; Smirnov, N.; Smykov, L.; Snellings, R.; Snoeys, W.; Soegaard, C.; Soerensen, J.; Sokolov, O.; Soldatov, A.; Soloviev, A.; Soltveit, H.; Soltz, R.; Sommer, W.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Soyk, D.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Stachel, J.; Staley, F.; Stan, I.; Stavinskiy, A.; Steckert, J.; Stefanini, G.; Stefanek, G.; Steinbeck, T.; Stelzer, H.; Stenlund, E.; Stocco, D.; Stockmeier, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolpovsky, P.; Strmeň, P.; Stutzmann, J. S.; Su, G.; Sugitate, T.; Šumbera, M.; Suire, C.; Susa, T.; Sushil Kumar, K.; Swoboda, D.; Symons, J.; Szarka, I.; Szostak, A.; Szuba, M.; Szymanski, P.; Tadel, M.; Tagridis, C.; Tan, L.; Tapia Takaki, D.; Taureg, H.; Tauro, A.; Tavlet, M.; Tejeda Munoz, G.; Thäder, J.; Tieulent, R.; Timmer, P.; Tolyhy, T.; Topilskaya, N.; Torcato de Matos, C.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Tosello, F.; Tournaire, A.; Traczyk, T.; Tröger, G.; Tromeur, W.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W.; Tsiledakis, G.; Tsilis, E.; Tsvetkov, A.; Turcato, M.; Turrisi, R.; Tuveri, M.; Tveter, T.; Tydesjo, H.; Tykarski, L.; Tywoniuk, K.; Ugolini, E.; Ullaland, K.; Urbán, J.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Usseglio, M.; Vacchi, A.; Vala, M.; Valiev, F.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Van Den Brink, A.; Van Eijndhoven, N.; Van Der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vannucci, L.; Vanzetto, S.; Vanuxem, J.-P.; Vargas, M. A.; Varma, R.; Vascotto, A.; Vasiliev, A.; Vassiliou, M.; Vasta, P.; Vechernin, V.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Verhoeven, W.; Veronese, F.; Vetlitskiy, I.; Vernet, R.; Victorov, V.; Vidak, L.; Viesti, G.; Vikhlyantsev, O.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y.; Vodopianov, A.; Volpe, G.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wabnitz, C.; Wagner, V.; Wallet, L.; Wan, R.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wheadon, R.; Weis, R.; Wen, Q.; Wessels, J.; Westergaard, J.; Wiechula, J.; Wiesenaecker, A.; Wikne, J.; Wilk, A.; Wilk, G.; Williams, C.; Willis, N.; Windelband, B.; Witt, R.; Woehri, H.; Wyllie, K.; Xu, C.; Yang, C.; Yang, H.; Yermia, F.; Yin, Z.; Yin, Z.; Ky, B. Yun; Yushmanov, I.; Yuting, B.; Zabrodin, E.; Zagato, S.; Zagreev, B.; Zaharia, P.; Zalite, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampolli, C.; Zanevskiy, Y.; Zarochentsev, A.; Zaudtke, O.; Závada, P.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zepeda, A.; Zeter, V.; Zgura, I.; Zhalov, M.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, S.; Zhu, G.; Zichichi, A.; Zinchenko, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zubarev, A.; Zucchini, A.; Zuffa, M.

    2008-08-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a general-purpose, heavy-ion detector at the CERN LHC which focuses on QCD, the strong-interaction sector of the Standard Model. It is designed to address the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at extreme values of energy density and temperature in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Besides running with Pb ions, the physics programme includes collisions with lighter ions, lower energy running and dedicated proton-nucleus runs. ALICE will also take data with proton beams at the top LHC energy to collect reference data for the heavy-ion programme and to address several QCD topics for which ALICE is complementary to the other LHC detectors. The ALICE detector has been built by a collaboration including currently over 1000 physicists and engineers from 105 Institutes in 30 countries. Its overall dimensions are 16 × 16 × 26 m3 with a total weight of approximately 10 000 t. The experiment consists of 18 different detector systems each with its own specific technology choice and design constraints, driven both by the physics requirements and the experimental conditions expected at LHC. The most stringent design constraint is to cope with the extreme particle multiplicity anticipated in central Pb-Pb collisions. The different subsystems were optimized to provide high-momentum resolution as well as excellent Particle Identification (PID) over a broad range in momentum, up to the highest multiplicities predicted for LHC. This will allow for comprehensive studies of hadrons, electrons, muons, and photons produced in the collision of heavy nuclei. Most detector systems are scheduled to be installed and ready for data taking by mid-2008 when the LHC is scheduled to start operation, with the exception of parts of the Photon Spectrometer (PHOS), Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) and Electro Magnetic Calorimeter (EMCal). These detectors will be completed for the high-luminosity ion run expected in 2010. This

  4. MAPS development for the ALICE ITS upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, P.; Aglieri, G.; Cavicchioli, C.; Chalmet, P. L.; Chanlek, N.; Collu, A.; Gao, C.; Hillemanns, H.; Junique, A.; Kofarago, M.; Keil, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.; Lattuca, A.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Marras, D.; Mager, M.; Martinengo, P.; Mazza, G.; Mugnier, H.; Musa, L.; Puggioni, C.; Rousset, J.; Reidt, F.; Riedler, P.; Snoeys, W.; Siddhanta, S.; Usai, G.; van Hoorne, J. W.; Yi, J.

    2015-03-01

    Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) offer the possibility to build pixel detectors and tracking layers with high spatial resolution and low material budget in commercial CMOS processes. Significant progress has been made in the field of MAPS in recent years, and they are now considered for the upgrades of the LHC experiments. This contribution will focus on MAPS detectors developed for the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS) upgrade and manufactured in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS imaging sensor process on wafers with a high resistivity epitaxial layer. Several sensor chip prototypes have been developed and produced to optimise both charge collection and readout circuitry. The chips have been characterised using electrical measurements, radioactive sources and particle beams. The tests indicate that the sensors satisfy the ALICE requirements and first prototypes with the final size of 1.5 × 3 cm2 have been produced in the first half of 2014. This contribution summarises the characterisation measurements and presents first results from the full-scale chips.

  5. Readout of the upgraded ALICE-ITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepankiewicz, A.

    2016-07-01

    The ALICE experiment will undergo a major upgrade during the second long shutdown of the CERN LHC. As part of this program, the present Inner Tracking System (ITS), which employs different layers of hybrid pixels, silicon drift and strip detectors, will be replaced by a completely new tracker composed of seven layers of monolithic active pixel sensors. The upgraded ITS will have more than twelve billion pixels in total, producing 300 Gbit/s of data when tracking 50 kHz Pb-Pb events. Two families of pixel chips realized with the TowerJazz CMOS imaging process have been developed as candidate sensors: the ALPIDE, which uses a proprietary readout and sparsification mechanism and the MISTRAL-O, based on a proven rolling shutter architecture. Both chips can operate in continuous mode, with the ALPIDE also supporting triggered operations. As the communication IP blocks are shared among the two chip families, it has been possible to develop a common Readout Electronics. All the sensor components (analog stages, state machines, buffers, FIFOs, etc.) have been modelled in a system level simulation, which has been extensively used to optimize both the sensor and the whole readout chain design in an iterative process. This contribution covers the progress of the R&D efforts and the overall expected performance of the ALICE-ITS readout system.

  6. A geologic history of the north-central Appalachians, part 3. The Alleghany orogeny

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faill, R.T.

    1998-01-01

    The north-central Appalachians occupy a critical position within the 3000+ km-long Appalachian orogen, lying southwest of the boundary between the central and northern Appalachians (CNAB). The one-billion-year-long history of tectonic activity in eastern Laurentia includes the creation and evolution of the Appalachian orogen during the Paleozoic and the Mesozoic transformation of the orogen into a passive margin during Pangea's disassembly. A most important ingredient in the evolution of the orogen was the Alleghany orogeny, which was driven by the convergence and collision between Laurentia (Laurussia) and West Gondwana (Africa). The Alleghany orogeny in the central and southern Appalachians was a de??collement tectonism that involved a larger part of eastern Laurentia than had the previous three orogenies. The fundamental element was a very low-angle thrust (de??collement) that originated in mid-crustal levels east of the presently-exposed Appalachians and rose westwardly to progressively higher levels in the upper crust and the supra-crustal Paleozoic section. Alleghany deformation was widely developed in the hanging-wall block (allochthon), primarily in the form of thrust faults and fold-and-thrust structures, both of which splayed upward from the basal de??collement. The youngest manifestations of the Alleghany orogeny were northeast-trending strike-slip faults and dextral shear zones in the Piedmont. In the north-central Appalachians, the exposed allochthon consists of two parts: the sedimentary externides (Appalachian Plateau and Valley and Ridge provinces) and the crystalline externides (Reading Prong, Blue Ridge belt, and Piedmont province). Long, thrust-cored anticlines predominate in the sedimentary externides. A widespread layer-parallel shortening preceded the folding; it is largely coaxial with the folding but extends considerably farther to the northwest toward the craton. It is hypothesized that the folding developed in reverse order, sequentially

  7. Character of the Alleghanian orogeny in the hinterland of the southern Appalachians: Kinematics and tectonic models

    SciTech Connect

    Secor, D.T. Jr.; Pray, J.R.; West, T.E. Jr. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Maher, H.D. Jr. . Dept. of Geography and Geology)

    1994-03-01

    Historically, an obvious manifestation of the Alleghanian orogeny has been the foreland fold and thrust belt and adjacent Carboniferous and Permian foreland basin along the northwest side of the Appalachians. However, evidence for Alleghanian tectonothermal activity in the Piedmont has gradually accumulated, and it is now clear that the hinterland preserves a rich and diverse record of the Alleghanian orogeny. In South Carolina and Georgia, the following events comprise the Alleghanian orogeny: (1) during c. 295--315 Ma, hot rocks of the Savannah River terrane were juxtaposed against cool rocks of the Carolina terrane by motion along the Modoc Fault; (2) following c. 295 Ma the eastern piedmont rocks were folded and thrust to the N26W along the gently dipping Box Ankle; (3) the Modoc and Box Ankle faults were truncated and/or overprinted by northeast trending dextral shear zones such as the Irmo (near vertical) and the Goat Rock (gently southeast dipping) prior to c. 275 Ma; (4) at c. 275 Ma, the gently southeast dipping Augusta normal fault juxtaposed shallow crustal rocks of the Augusta terrane against hotter deep crustal rocks of the Savannah River terrane. The above events are interpreted to be the result of a dextral transpressive collision between Laurentia and Gondwanna at the end of the Paleozoic. The Modoc fault may be the result of crustal delamination at the onset of collision, and the Augusta normal fault may indicate postorogenic collapse. The configuration of Alleghanian faults is reminiscent of the ''orogenic float'' hypothesis of Oldow and others (1990).

  8. The ALICE Glance Shift Accounting Management System (SAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins Silva, H.; Abreu Da Silva, I.; Ronchetti, F.; Telesca, A.; Maidantchik, C.

    2015-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is an experiment at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider) studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma. The experiment operation requires a 24 hours a day and 7 days a week shift crew at the experimental site, composed by the ALICE collaboration members. Shift duties are calculated for each institute according to their correlated members. In order to ensure the full coverage of the experiment operation as well as its good quality, the ALICE Shift Accounting Management System (SAMS) is used to manage the shift bookings as well as the needed training. ALICE SAMS is the result of a joint effort between the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) and the ALICE Collaboration. The Glance technology, developed by the UFRJ and the ATLAS experiment, sits at the basis of the system as an intermediate layer isolating the particularities of the databases. In this paper, we describe the ALICE SAMS development process and functionalities. The database has been modelled according to the collaboration needs and is fully integrated with the ALICE Collaboration repository to access members information and respectively roles and activities. Run, period and training coordinators can manage their subsystem operation and ensure an efficient personnel management. Members of the ALICE collaboration can book shifts and on-call according to pre-defined rights. ALICE SAMS features a user profile containing all the statistics and user contact information as well as the Institutes profile. Both the user and institute profiles are public (within the scope of the collaboration) and show the credit balance in real time. A shift calendar allows the Run Coordinator to plan data taking periods in terms of which subsystems shifts are enabled or disabled and on-call responsible people and slots. An overview display presents the shift crew present in the control room and allows the Run Coordination team to confirm the presence

  9. Late Precambrian Sixtymile Formation and orogeny at top of the Grand Canyon Supergroup, northern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elston, Donald Parker

    1979-01-01

    The Sixtymile Formation, a 60-m-thick red-bed unit at the top of the late Precambrian Chuar Group, crops out at three places in the Chuar syncline in the eastern Grand Canyon. Its base is marked by a transition from gray marine shale to red sandstone. The Sixtymile was deposited in the deepening trough of the north-trending Chuar syncline during and as a consequence of regional uplift, tilting, and large-scale block faulting. Folding to form the Chuar syncline occurred in response to faulting on the parallel-trending Butte fault, about 1 km to the east. About 3.2 km of structural relief was developed across the Butte fault, principally during deposition of the lower member of the Sixtymile Formation. Landslide debris shed from the upthrown block on the east constitutes a major part of the material in the lower member. Conglomeratic strata of the upper member of the Sixtymile were deposited after the last increment of subsidence on the Chuar syncline, indicating that deposition of the Sixty mile Formation spanned the time of the structural disturbance. The folding and faulting are part of a regional structural episode that here is called the Grand Canyon orogeny, an event that signaled the end of deposition of strata of the Grand Canyon Supergroup and the beginning of a long interval of erosion. The age of the Grand Canyon orogeny is estimated at about 830 m.y., inferred from an evaluation of maximum and minimum reset K-Ar ages reported for the 1,100-m.y.-old Cardenas Lavas of the Unkar Group. In age and structural style, the Grand Canyon orogeny appears generally correlative with the East Kootenay orogeny of British Columbia, which separates the Purcell (Belt) and Windermere Supergroups. By analogy, strata of the Chuar Group below the Sixtymile Formation are correlated with strata of the upper part of the Belt Supergroup, and conglomeratic strata of the Sixtymile deposited after the structural episode are correlated with conglomeratic strata of the Windermere that

  10. Slab rollback orogeny in the Alps inferred from the stratigraphic evolution of the Swiss Molasse basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlunegger, Fritz; Kissling, Edi

    2016-04-01

    The stratigraphic development of foreland basins have been related to orogenic processes, where continent- continent collision resulted in the construction of topography and the downwarping of the foreland plate. These mechanisms have been used to explain the Oligocene to Miocene evolution of the Molasse basin, situated on the northern side of the European Alps. Continuous flexural bending of the subducting European lithosphere as a consequence of topographic loads alone would imply that the Alpine topography would have increased at least between 30 Ma and ca. 5-10 Ma when the basin accumulated the erosional detritus. This, however, is neither consistent with observations nor with isostatic mass balancing models. In particular, the use of empirical relationships between the spacing of alluvial megafans, orogen width and morphometric properties of stream channels feeding the fans imply a general trend towards an increasing total fluvial relief until 1,900±1,000 m at ca. 20 Ma, followed by a prolonged period of time during which this variable has remained nearly constant. Accordingly, larger topographic loads cannot be invoked to explain the continuous deflection of the foreland plate. Alternatively, a scenario where horizontal forces cause a downward dragging of the foreland plate would offer a valuable explanation for the decoupling between basin depth and topographic loads. However, such a scenario would be associated with the occurrence of compressional forces within the foreland plate, which is not in agreement with observations in the Molasse Basin, at least for the present, where focal mechanisms of current seismic events imply the occurrence of extensional forces at work. We suggest that rollback orogeny, driven by the gravitational pull of the European slab, provides a mechanism to explain the increasing deflection of the foreland in the absence of larger topographic forcing, and it agrees with the geologic record that the subducting European plate did not

  11. Controls Interfaces for Two ALICE Subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomen, Robert

    2007-10-01

    Software for the control of a laser alignment system for the Inner Tacking System (ITS) and for the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMC) was developed for the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) at CERN. The interfaces for both subsystems use the CERN-standard hardware controls system PVSS (Prozessvisualisierungs- und Steuerungs-System). Software for the ITS has been created to measure the relative alignment of the ITS with the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) so to ensure accurate particle tracking. The ITS alignment system locates laser images in four cameras. The EMC requires several subsystems to be running in order to operate properly. Software has been created and tested for the detector's high and low voltage systems, and temperature monitoring hardware. The ITS and EMC software specifications and design requirements are presented and their performance is analyzed.

  12. Jet measurements by ALICE at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultanov, Rishat

    2015-12-01

    Jets are collimated sprays of particles originating from fragmentation of high energy partons produced in a hard collision. They are an important diagnostic tool in studies of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). The modification of the jet fragmentation pattern and its structure is a signature for the influence of hot and dense matter on the parton fragmentation process. Jet measurements in proton-proton collisions provide a baseline for similar measurements in heavy-ion collisions, while studies in proton-nucleus system allow to estimate cold nuclear matter effects. Here we present jet studies in different colliding systems (p-p, p-Pb, Pb-Pb) performed by the ALICE collaboration at LHC energies. Results on jet spectra, cross sections, nuclear modification factors, jet structure and other kinematic observables will be presented.

  13. Jet measurements by ALICE at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Sultanov, Rishat; Collaboration: ALICE Collaboration

    2015-12-15

    Jets are collimated sprays of particles originating from fragmentation of high energy partons produced in a hard collision. They are an important diagnostic tool in studies of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). The modification of the jet fragmentation pattern and its structure is a signature for the influence of hot and dense matter on the parton fragmentation process. Jet measurements in proton-proton collisions provide a baseline for similar measurements in heavy-ion collisions, while studies in proton-nucleus system allow to estimate cold nuclear matter effects. Here we present jet studies in different colliding systems (p–p, p–Pb, Pb–Pb) performed by the ALICE collaboration at LHC energies. Results on jet spectra, cross sections, nuclear modification factors, jet structure and other kinematic observables will be presented.

  14. External access to ALICE controls conditions data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadlovský, J.; Jadlovská, A.; Sarnovský, J.; Jajčišin, Š.; Čopík, M.; Jadlovská, S.; Papcun, P.; Bielek, R.; Čerkala, J.; Kopčík, M.; Chochula, P.; Augustinus, A.

    2014-06-01

    ALICE Controls data produced by commercial SCADA system WINCCOA is stored in ORACLE database on the private experiment network. The SCADA system allows for basic access and processing of the historical data. More advanced analysis requires tools like ROOT and needs therefore a separate access method to the archives. The present scenario expects that detector experts create simple WINCCOA scripts, which retrieves and stores data in a form usable for further studies. This relatively simple procedure generates a lot of administrative overhead - users have to request the data, experts needed to run the script, the results have to be exported outside of the experiment network. The new mechanism profits from database replica, which is running on the CERN campus network. Access to this database is not restricted and there is no risk of generating a heavy load affecting the operation of the experiment. The developed tools presented in this paper allow for access to this data. The users can use web-based tools to generate the requests, consisting of the data identifiers and period of time of interest. The administrators maintain full control over the data - an authorization and authentication mechanism helps to assign privileges to selected users and restrict access to certain groups of data. Advanced caching mechanism allows the user to profit from the presence of already processed data sets. This feature significantly reduces the time required for debugging as the retrieval of raw data can last tens of minutes. A highly configurable client allows for information retrieval bypassing the interactive interface. This method is for example used by ALICE Offline to extract operational conditions after a run is completed. Last but not least, the software can be easily adopted to any underlying database structure and is therefore not limited to WINCCOA.

  15. The ALICE DAQ infoLogger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeland, S.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Dénes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Grigore, A.; Ionita, C.; Delort, C.; Simonetti, G.; Soós, C.; Telesca, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Von Haller, B.; Alice Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a heavy-ion experiment studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The ALICE DAQ (Data Acquisition System) is based on a large farm of commodity hardware consisting of more than 600 devices (Linux PCs, storage, network switches). The DAQ reads the data transferred from the detectors through 500 dedicated optical links at an aggregated and sustained rate of up to 10 Gigabytes per second and stores at up to 2.5 Gigabytes per second. The infoLogger is the log system which collects centrally the messages issued by the thousands of processes running on the DAQ machines. It allows to report errors on the fly, and to keep a trace of runtime execution for later investigation. More than 500000 messages are stored every day in a MySQL database, in a structured table keeping track for each message of 16 indexing fields (e.g. time, host, user, ...). The total amount of logs for 2012 exceeds 75GB of data and 150 million rows. We present in this paper the architecture and implementation of this distributed logging system, consisting of a client programming API, local data collector processes, a central server, and interactive human interfaces. We review the operational experience during the 2012 run, in particular the actions taken to ensure shifters receive manageable and relevant content from the main log stream. Finally, we present the performance of this log system, and future evolutions.

  16. Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Ate There

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Gordon T.

    2002-05-01

    In the book Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There by Lewis Carroll, Alice (of Alice-in-Wonderland fame) walks through a mirror into a mirror-image world. Assuming that she is not changed by this transition, her enzymes are still only capable of processing molecules of the handedness of her native world. In short, she has a problem that will severely curtail the duration of her stay because her body cannot make use of most of the calorie-containing molecules that would exist naturally in the mirror-image world. So the question is, what can Alice eat in the mirror-image world that provides nutritional value to her?

    Featured on the Cover

  17. Performance of the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alice Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    ALICE is the heavy-ion experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The experiment continuously took data during the first physics campaign of the machine from fall 2009 until early 2013, using proton and lead-ion beams. In this paper we describe the running environment and the data handling procedures, and discuss the performance of the ALICE detectors and analysis methods for various physics observables.

  18. Temporal and spatial correlations between Canada basin opening and the Brookian orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemonnier, Nicolas; Labrousse, Loic; Agard, Philippe; Till, Alison; Roeske, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    The opening of the Canada Basin (CB) is currently a matter of debate both in terms of timing of inception (between 190 and 140 Ma) and mechanisms. Contrasting models were published, in which the CB is bounded by extensional margins and transform faults with a wide variety of combinations. The structure of the margins (and the detailed chronologies of the different events affecting them) are thus of prior importance to discriminate between the different models. Its North-Alaskan margin comprises the Brooks Range, which results from the collision of the Koyukuk island arc with the continental margin of Northern Alaska subducted toward the south.. Most recent palinspastic models assume that the CB opened in a back-arc position (with a rotation pole located as close as in the Mackenzie delta) during a change of polarity of the overall subduction, from a S-dipping to a N-dipping Pacific-type subduction. However, neither the detailed timing of the Brookian orogeny (between ~160 and 100 Ma) nor the existence and timing of the hypothesized subduction flip are precisely constrained. According to present knowledge, one can only say that the CB opening seems broadly coeval with the Brooks range orogeny. Improved chronological constraints are thus needed for the Brooks range, as well as indications as to whether (1) their inner structure witnesses a drastic change in boundary conditions during this period and (2) structures responsible for the exhumation of the inner parts of Brooks Range are compressional (i.e., syn-collisional nappe-stacking) or extensional (i.e., post-collisional extensional detachment). Improving our knowledge of the Brookian orogeny may also help to constrain possible geodynamic scenarios on a larger scale and identify driving mechanisms for the CB opening. Our thermal evolution (RSCM) study along a regional transect of the Alaskan peninsula associated with field observations and the contribution of numerical models gives independent constraints and

  19. Andean subduction orogeny: feedbacks between tectonics, relief evolution and global climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacassin, Robin; Armijo, Rolando; Coudurier-Curveur, Aurélie; Carrizo, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The Andean subduction margin, largest tectonic relief on the Earth (13 km vertically from the trench to the Altiplano) has a stepped morphology, which results of the evolution over the past 50 Myr of two parallel flat-ramp thrust systems, at the - previously unidentified - West Andean Thrust (WAT), and at the subduction interface. The evolution of those thrusts appears concomitant with increasing aridity in the Atacama Desert, which keeps a large-scale record of interplaying tectonics and Cenozoic climate change. The coastal morphology is dominated by the Atacama Bench, a giant uplifted terrace at 1-2km asl. Geomorphic and climatic data, numerical experiments of drainage formation are consistent with the development of a flat Atacama morphology close to sea level, interrupted at ≤10 Ma by tectonic uplift prevailing to the present. This suggests recent trench-ward relief growth by incorporation of the coastal Atacama Bench to the Andes reliefs. Thrust splay structures and other complexities above the subduction interface may explain this relief growth, as well as the distribution of asperities under the oceanward forearc, and the down-dip segmentation of coupling and seismicity on the megathrust. Combining those results with geological knowledge at the scale of the whole Central Andes, we show that the Andean orogeny results from protracted processes of bivergent crustal shortening in a wide region squeezed between the rigid Marginal Block and the S America Plate. The overall growth curve of Andean orogeny over the past 50 Myr appears synchronous with the onset of the "ramp-shaped" temperature decrease since the Early Eocene climatic optimum. Andean growth and global cooling may have operated under the same forcing mechanism at plate-scale, involving viscous flow in the mantle. But Andean growth appears modulated by climatic feedbacks causative of stepwise reductions of erosive power over the Andean margin. The first of such events is coeval with Late Eocene

  20. The Cambrian Ross Orogeny in northern Victoria Land (Antarctica) and New Zealand: A synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Federico, L.; Capponi, G.; Crispini, L.; Bradshaw, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    In the Cambrian, the paleo-Pacific margin of the Gondwana supercontinent included East Antarctica, Australia, Tasmania and New Zealand and was affected by themajor Ross-Delamerian Orogeny. In Antarctica, evidence suggests that this resulted from oblique subduction and that in northern Victoria Land it was accompanied by the opening and subsequent closure of a back-arc basin. Comparison of the type and timing of sedimentary, magmatic and metamorphic events in areas noted above shows strong similarities between northern Victoria Land and New Zealand. In both regions Middle Cambrian volcanites are interpreted as arc/back-arc assemblages produced by west-directed subduction; sediments interbedded with the volcanites show provenance both from the arc and from the Gondwana margin and therefore place the basin close to the continent. Back-arc closure in the Late Cambrian was likely accomplished through a second subduction system

  1. Slab rollback orogeny in the Alps and evolution of the Swiss Molasse basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlunegger, Fritz; Kissling, Edi

    2015-10-01

    The stratigraphies of foreland basins have been related to orogeny, where continent-continent collision causes the construction of topography and the downwarping of the foreland plate. These mechanisms have been inferred for the Molasse basin, stretching along the northern margin of the European Alps. Continuous flexural bending of the subducting European lithosphere as a consequence of topographic loads alone would imply that the Alpine topography would have increased at least between 30 Ma and ca. 5-10 Ma when the basin accumulated the erosional detritus. This, however, is neither consistent with observations nor with isostatic mass balancing models because paleoaltimetry estimates suggest that the topography has not increased since 20 Ma. Here we show that a rollback mechanism for the European plate is capable of explaining the construction of thick sedimentary successions in the Molasse foreland basin where the extra slab load has maintained the Alpine surface at low, but constant, elevations.

  2. Slab rollback orogeny in the Alps and evolution of the Swiss Molasse basin

    PubMed Central

    Schlunegger, Fritz; Kissling, Edi

    2015-01-01

    The stratigraphies of foreland basins have been related to orogeny, where continent–continent collision causes the construction of topography and the downwarping of the foreland plate. These mechanisms have been inferred for the Molasse basin, stretching along the northern margin of the European Alps. Continuous flexural bending of the subducting European lithosphere as a consequence of topographic loads alone would imply that the Alpine topography would have increased at least between 30 Ma and ca. 5–10 Ma when the basin accumulated the erosional detritus. This, however, is neither consistent with observations nor with isostatic mass balancing models because paleoaltimetry estimates suggest that the topography has not increased since 20 Ma. Here we show that a rollback mechanism for the European plate is capable of explaining the construction of thick sedimentary successions in the Molasse foreland basin where the extra slab load has maintained the Alpine surface at low, but constant, elevations. PMID:26472498

  3. Slab rollback orogeny in the Alps and evolution of the Swiss Molasse basin.

    PubMed

    Schlunegger, Fritz; Kissling, Edi

    2015-01-01

    The stratigraphies of foreland basins have been related to orogeny, where continent-continent collision causes the construction of topography and the downwarping of the foreland plate. These mechanisms have been inferred for the Molasse basin, stretching along the northern margin of the European Alps. Continuous flexural bending of the subducting European lithosphere as a consequence of topographic loads alone would imply that the Alpine topography would have increased at least between 30 Ma and ca. 5-10 Ma when the basin accumulated the erosional detritus. This, however, is neither consistent with observations nor with isostatic mass balancing models because paleoaltimetry estimates suggest that the topography has not increased since 20 Ma. Here we show that a rollback mechanism for the European plate is capable of explaining the construction of thick sedimentary successions in the Molasse foreland basin where the extra slab load has maintained the Alpine surface at low, but constant, elevations. PMID:26472498

  4. Palaeogeography of Late Triassic red-beds in Singapore and the Indosinian Orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Grahame; Prave, Anthony

    2013-10-01

    A red-bed facies of the Upper Triassic Jurong Formation has been logged on Sentosa Island, Singapore. An overall coarsening and thickening-upward pattern is well developed. The lower part of the section is dominated by purple-red, massive to finely laminated illite-smectite-kaolin-rich mudstones containing thin, discontinuous lenses of fine sandstone marked by low-angle lamination and small ripples. One dinosaur-like foot print has been discovered in a loose block of red mudstone. It is concluded that this is a lacustrine sequence and it is proposed to name the lake, Lake Sentosa. The upper part of the sequence consists of flat-laminated to trough cross-bedded medium-grained sandstone and granule to cobble conglomerates alternating with purple-red mudstone. The mudstone-sandstone packages are arranged in decametre-scale coarsening-upward cycles. The channelling and decimetre-scale cross-bedding characterising the sandstone and conglomeratic beds is evidence for deposition by flashy fluvial flood processes, possibly feeding into the lake as a fresh water delta. One possible dinosaur trackway in granule size conglomerate has been located. Detrital zircon U-Pb ages vary from 2.7 Ba to 209 Ma with significant populations at ˜245 Ma and 220 Ma. These ages throw light on the timing of the Indosinian Orogeny. The molasse red-beds of the Jurong Formation were deposited in a half graben formed in the hangingwall of the Bukit Timah Fault when central Peninsular Malaysia went into extension following the climax of the Indosinian Orogeny in the Late Triassic.

  5. Intraplate orogenesis within accreted and scarred lithosphere: Example of the Eurekan Orogeny, Ellesmere Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Philip J.; Pysklywec, Russell N.; Stephenson, Randell

    2015-11-01

    The Eurekan Orogeny, which created much of the high topography of Ellesmere Island and adjacent Greenland, exhibits a crustal architecture linked to intraplate orogenesis in the Cenozoic. It is generally considered that the rotation of Greenland in the Eocene (related to sedimentary basin formation in Baffin Bay) produced compressional intraplate tectonics. Deformation in the region is notably localized to the Central Ellesmere Domain and the Northern Ellesmere Domain. However, an important tectonic feature of Ellesmere Island is the Hazen Stable Block, which shows horizontal Paleogene Eureka Sound group strata overlying Palaeozoic-age steeply dipping beds. The intense deformation in the Hazen Stable Block is related to continental orogenesis in the Late Silurian-Devonian. Therefore, the Hazen Stable Block is thought to have undergone only minor Eurekan-age (55-35 Ma) deformation, while surrounding (highly deformed) units may have re-activated faults from Paleocene continental amalgamation. Here, high-resolution thermal-mechanical numerical experiments are implemented to explore lithospheric deformation (related to continental shortening) for a range of tectonic scenarios, namely, the presence of inherent deformational "scars" and rheologically strengthened crust/mantle lithosphere (both due to ancient continental accretion). This study marks the first geodynamic excursion to this high Arctic region, and we present some of the first interpretations of the development of Eurekan-age lithospheric evolution. Our results show that a rheologically strong Hazen Stable Block crust produces tectonics similar to the Eurekan Orogeny. Furthermore, lithospheric scars can generate more localized deformation and topography than rheological changes to the lithosphere and may offer a new interpretation on enigmatic intraplate tectonics.

  6. Farallon plate dynamics prior to the Laramide orogeny: Numerical models of flat subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sibiao; Currie, Claire A.

    2016-01-01

    The Laramide orogeny (~ 80-50 Ma) was an anomalous period of mountain-building in the western United States that occurred more than 1000 km inboard of the Farallon Plate subduction margin. It is widely believed that this orogeny is coincident with a period of flat (subhorizontal) subduction. However, the factors that caused the Farallon Plate to evolve from a normal (steep) geometry to flat subduction are not well understood. Three proposed factors are: (1) a westward (trenchward) increase in North America motion, (2) an increased slab suction force owing to the presence of thick Colorado Plateau lithosphere, and (3) subduction of a low-density oceanic plateau. This study uses 2D upper mantle scale numerical models to investigate these factors. The models show that trenchward continental motion is the primary control on subduction geometry, with decreasing slab dip as velocity increases. However, this can only create low-angle subduction, as the Farallon Plate was old (> 100 Myr) and denser than the mantle. A transition to flat subduction requires: (1) subduction of a buoyant oceanic plateau that includes an 18-km-thick crust that does not undergo metamorphic densification and an underlying depleted harzburgite layer, and (2) a slab break-off at the landward side of the plateau. The break-off removes the dense frontal slab, and flat subduction develops as the buoyant plateau deflects the slab upward. The slab suction force has only a minor effect on slab flattening, but the thickness of the Colorado Plateau lithosphere controls the depth of the flat slab. With a continental velocity of 4 cm/yr and a 400-km-wide oceanic plateau, flat subduction develops within 15 Ma after plateau subduction. The flat slab underthrusts the continent at ~ 200 km depth, eventually extending > 1500 km inboard of the trench.

  7. Archaean Crustal Growth, Proterozoic Terrane Amalgamation and the Pan-African Orogeny, as Recorded in the NE African Sedimentary Record.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najman, Y.; Fielding, L.; Millar, I.; Butterworth, P.; Andò, S.; Padoan, M.; Barfod, D. N.; Kneller, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    The cratons of Central Africa are formed of various blocks of Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic crust, flanked or truncated by Palaeoproterozoic to Mesoproterozoic orogenic belts. The geology of east Africa has largely been shaped by the events of the Pan-African Orogeny when east and west Gondwana collided to form 'Greater Gondwana' at the end of the Neoproterozoic. The Pan-African orogeny in NE Africa involved the collision of Archaean cratons and the Saharan Metacraton with the Arabian Nubian Shield, a terrane comprising Neoproterozoic juvenile oceanic island arcs. Phanerozoic cover sedimentary rocks, eroded from the Pan-African orogenies, blanket much of NE Africa. Detrital data from these Phanerozoic cover sedimentary rocks, and modern rivers draining both the cover the basement, provide a wealth of information on basement evolution, of particular relevance for regions where the basement itself is poorly exposed due to ancient or modern sedimentary cover. From samples collected in Uganda, Ethiopia, Sudan and Egypt, we provide combined U-Pb and Hf-isotope zircon, U-Pb rutile and Ar-Ar mica datasets, heavy mineral analyses, and bulk trace element data, from Archaean basement, Phanerozoic cover and modern river sediment from the Nile and its tributaries to document the evolution of the North African crust. The data document early crust-forming events in the Congo Craton and Sahara Metacraton, phased development of the Arabian Nubian Shield culminating in the Neoproterozoic assembly of Gondwana during the Pan African Orogeny, and the orogen's subsequent erosion, with deposition of voluminous Phanerozoic cover.

  8. Commissioning of the ALICE data acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anticic, T.; Barroso, V.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Cobanoglu, O.; Dénes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Kiss, T.; Makhlyueva, I.; Ozok, F.; Roukoutakis, F.; Schossmaier, K.; Soós, C.; Vyvre, P. V.; Vergara, S.

    2008-07-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A flexible, large bandwidth Data Acquisition System (DAQ) has been designed and deployed to collect sufficient statistics in the short running time foreseen per year for heavy ions and to accommodate very different requirements originated from the 18 sub-detectors. The Data Acquisition and Test Environment (DATE) is the software framework handling the data from the detector electronics up to the mass storage. This paper reviews the DAQ software and hardware architecture, including the latest features of the final design, such as the handling of the numerous calibration procedures in a common framework. We also discuss the large scale tests conducted on the real hardware to assess the standalone DAQ performances, its interfaces with the other online systems and the extensive commissioning performed in order to be ready for cosmics data taking scheduled to start in November 2007. The test protocols followed to integrate and validate each sub-detector with DAQ and Trigger hardware synchronized by the Experiment Control System are described. Finally, we give an overview of the experiment logbook, and some operational aspects of the deployment of our computing facilities. The implementation of a Transient Data Storage able to cope with the 1.25 GB/s recorded by the event-building machines and the data quality monitoring framework are covered in separate papers.

  9. Hierarchical trigger of the ALICE calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Hans; Awes, Terry C.; Novitzky, Norbert; Kral, Jiri; Rak, Jan; Schambach, Jo; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Dong; Zhou, Daicui

    2010-05-01

    The trigger of the ALICE electromagnetic calorimeters is implemented in 2 hierarchically connected layers of electronics. In the lower layer, level-0 algorithms search shower energy above threshold in locally confined Trigger Region Units (TRU). The top layer is implemented as a single, global trigger unit that receives the trigger data from all TRUs as input to the level-1 algorithm. This architecture was first developed for the PHOS high pT photon trigger before it was adopted by EMCal also for the jet trigger. TRU units digitize up to 112 analogue input signals from the Front End Electronics (FEE) and concentrate their digital stream in a single FPGA. A charge and time summing algorithm is combined with a peakfinder that suppresses spurious noise and is precise to single LHC bunches. With a peak-to-peak noise level of 150 MeV the linear dynamic range above threshold spans from MIP energies at 215 up to 50 GeV. Local level-0 decisions take less than 600 ns after LHC collisions, upon which all TRUs transfer their level-0 trigger data to the upstream global trigger module which searches within the remaining level-1 latency for high pT gamma showers (PHOS) and/or for Jet cone areas (EMCaL).

  10. ALICE tomography section: measurements and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibison, M. G.; Hock, K. M.; Holder, D. J.; Muratori, B. D.; Wolski, A.

    2012-04-01

    The ALICE tomography section at Daresbury is a diagnostic setup in the injection line of EMMA, the world's first non-scaling FFAG accelerator. We present our measurements and analysis of the transverse emittance, Twiss parameters and phase space distribution of the electron beam that is injected into EMMA. The measurements are carried out at 12 MeV, for bunch charges from 20 to 80 pC. Quadrupole scans and tomography are used. The results show that space charge effect does not change the beam emittance significantly over the length of the tomography section. Starting from projections of the beam images, the quadrupole scan technique can be applied to give the emittance and Twiss parameters. The same projections can be processed using tomography to give the phase space distribution. A careful treatment of the background noise is required to produce consistent emittances between quadrupole scans at different locations. Extending this in a natural way to tomography, we are also able to remove most of the the streaking artefacts from reconstructions obtained using the Filtered Back Projection technique.

  11. The Anatomy of A.L.I.C.E.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Richard S.

    This paper is a technical presentation of Artificial Linguistic Internet Computer Entity (A.L.I.C.E.) and Artificial Intelligence Markup Language (AIML), set in context by historical and philosophical ruminations on human consciousness. A.L.I.C.E., the first AIML-based personality program, won the Loebner Prize as "the most human computer" at the annual Turing Test contests in 2000, 2001, and 2004. The program, and the organization that develops it, is a product of the world of free software. More than 500 volunteers from around the world have contributed to her development. This paper describes the history of A.L.I.C.E. and AIML-free software since 1995, noting that the theme and strategy of deception and pretense upon which AIML is based can be traced through the history of Artificial Intelligence research. This paper goes on to show how to use AIML to create robot personalities like A.L.I.C.E. that pretend to be intelligent and selfaware. The paper winds up with a survey of some of the philosophical literature on the question of consciousness. We consider Searle's Chinese Room, and the view that natural language understanding by a computer is impossible. We note that the proposition "consciousness is an illusion" may be undermined by the paradoxes it apparently implies. We conclude that A.L.I.C.E. does pass the Turing Test, at least, to paraphrase Abraham Lincoln, for some of the people some of the time.

  12. High pt and photon physics with ALICE at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dai-Cui; Wan, Ren-Zhuo; Mao, Ya-Xian; Schutz, Y.; Wang, Meng-Liang; Ma, Ke; Wang, Ya-Ping; Yin, Zhong-Bao; Cai, Xu; Kharlov, Y.; Conesa, G.; C., Roy

    2010-09-01

    ALICE, A Large Ion Collider Experiment, is dedicated to study the QCD matter at extreme high temperature and density to understand the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) and phase transition. High-transverse-momentum photons and neutral mesons from the initial hard scattering of partons can be measured with ALICE calorimeters, PHOS (PHOton Spectrometer) and EMCAL (ElectroMagnetic CALorimeter). Combing the additional central tracking detectors, the γ-jet and π0-jet measurements thus can be accessed. These measurements offer us a sensitive tomography probe of the hot-dense medium generated in the heavy ion collisions. In this paper, high pT and photon physics is discussed and the ALICE calorimeters capabilities of high-transverse-momentum neutral mesons and γ-jet measurements are presented.

  13. Readout system of the ALICE Muon tracking detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Sylvain

    2010-11-01

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) will be aimed at studying heavy ion collisions at the extreme energy densities accessible at the CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where the formation of the Quark Gluon Plasma is expected. The ALICE muon forward spectrometer will identify muons with momentum above 4 GeV/c, allowing the study of quarkonia and heavy flavors in the pseudorapidity range -4.0< η<-2.5 with 2 π azimuthal coverage. The muon tracking system consists of 10 Cathode Pad Chambers (CPC) with 1.1 million of pads that represent the total number of acquisition channels to manage. In this article, we will give an overview of the ALICE Muon Spectrometer. Afterward, we will focus on tracking system Front end Electronics (FEE) and readout system. We will show that the Digital Signal Processor (DSP) architecture fulfills all the requirements, including radiation hardness against neutrons. Finally, real-time performances are discussed.

  14. Status and targets in the Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almqvist, Bjarne; Juhlin, Christopher; Lorenz, Henning; Gee, David; Pascal, Christophe; Tsang, Chin-fu; Pedersen, Karsten; Roberts, Nick; Rosberg, Jan-Erik

    2015-04-01

    The COSC project is a multidisciplinary international project with the aim to provide a deeper understanding of mountain belt dynamics in the Scandinavian Caledonides. Scientific investigations include a range of topics, from understanding the ancient orogeny to the present-day hydrological cycle. Six working groups comprise the project and include 1) tectonics, 2) geophysics, 3) geothermics, 4) hydrology, 5) microbiology and 6) drilling management and technology. This presentation provides an overview of the scientific goals of COSC and the first phase of drilling activities, which took place from April 28 until August 26, 2014 (COSC-1). COSC investigations and drilling activities are focused in central Scandinavia, near Åre (Sweden), where rocks from the mid to lower crust of the orogen are exposed. Rock units of interest include granulite facies migmatites (locally ultra-high pressure), gneisses and amphibolites in the middle allochthon (Seve nappe) that overlie greenschist facies metasedimentary rocks in the lower allochthons (Särv and Jämtlandian nappes). The base of the lower allochthon marks the contact with the autochthonos Precambrian basement. Scientific drilling is a central part of the COSC project, and is motivated from a tectonic viewpoint to obtain (i) better understanding of the exhumation and emplacement of the hot middle allochthon, which may enable comparison with exhumation processes in the Himalaya-Tibet orogen, (ii) a broad understanding of orogeny and deformation in the middle to deep crust and upper mantle of mountain belts, and (iii) constraints on the abundant geophysical data that has been collected in the area. Drilling is divided into two phases, firstly to drill through the high grade Seve nappe into the underlying allochthon. The second phase (COSC-2) will target the tectonostratigraphic units below COSC-1 including the Caledonian décollement and the autochthonos Precambrian basement, and investigate the involvement of the

  15. Far-UV Eclipse Observations of Ganymede's Atmosphere with New Horizons Alice: New Constraints to the Atomic Oxygen Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retherford, K. D.; Steffl, A. J.; Spencer, J. R.; Gladstone, R.; Roth, L.; Saur, J.; Strobel, D. F.; Stern, S. A.; Parker, J. W.; Versteeg, M. H.; Davis, M. W.; Cunningham, N. J.; McGrath, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Ganymede's atmosphere is a surface-bounded-exosphere composed mainly of molecular oxygen. The bulk density of the O2 atmosphere is inferred from the diagnostic ratio between far-UV auroral emission line brightnesses observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), but this measurement is relatively uncertain owing to a lack of information available for the energies of the electrons in Ganymede's magnetosphere that dissociatively excite the OI 130.4 nm and 135.6 nm emissions. Only a few other species such as H have been detected, and the abundance of atomic oxygen has been constrained only in relation to lower limits for the O2 density based on the line ratios. The New Horizons (NH) spacecraft observed Ganymede with the Pluto-Alice (P-Alice) instrument during the Jupiter flyby in spring of 2007. HST Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) far-UV images of Ganymede complement the P-Alice far-UV spectroscopy at this time. OI 130.4 nm and 135.6 nm emissions were detected in both data sets. The ACS Ganymede images are consistent with previous Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) imaging. P-Alice observed two Ganymede eclipse events, viewing the sunlit sub-Jupiter and nightside anti-Jupiter hemispheres, separately, from before ingress through after egress. Through comparisons of the P-Alice spectra in sunlight to those in eclipse we are able to disentangle the component of the OI 130.4 nm emission line brightness attributed to processes other than electron impact dissociation of O2, namely a combination of solar reflectance and solar resonant scattering by atomic oxygen atoms. The CII 133.5 nm solar emission feature in the sunlit hemisphere dataset also disappears in eclipse and was not detected in the nightside hemisphere spectra, as expected, providing distinct fits to the solar reflectance component. We thereby provide the first meaningful constraint on the atomic oxygen atmosphere revealed through the solar resonant scattering emission source. We briefly discuss the

  16. The high-level trigger of ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilsner, H.; Alt, T.; Aurbakken, K.; Grastveit, G.; Helstrup, H.; Lindenstruth, V.; Loizides, C.; Nystrand, J.; Roehrich, D.; Skaali, B.; Steinbeck, T.; Ullaland, K.; Vestbo, A.; Vik, T.

    One of the main tracking detectors of the forthcoming ALICE Experiment at the LHC is a cylindrical Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with an expected data volume of about 75 MByte per event. This data volume, in combination with the presumed maximum bandwidth of 1.2 GByte/s to the mass storage system, would limit the maximum event rate to 20 Hz. In order to achieve higher event rates, online data processing has to be applied. This implies either the detection and read-out of only those events which contain interesting physical signatures or an efficient compression of the data by modeling techniques. In order to cope with the anticipated data rate, massive parallel computing power is required. It will be provided in form of a clustered farm of SMP-nodes, based on off-the-shelf PCs, which are connected with a high bandwidth low overhead network. This High-Level Trigger (HLT) will be able to process a data rate of 25 GByte/s online. The front-end electronics of the individual sub-detectors is connected to the HLT via an optical link and a custom PCI card which is mounted in the clustered PCs. The PCI card is equipped with an FPGA necessary for the implementation of the PCI-bus protocol. Therefore, this FPGA can also be used to assist the host processor with first-level processing. The first-level processing done on the FPGA includes conventional cluster-finding for low multiplicity events and local track finding based on the Hough Transformation of the raw data for high multiplicity events. PACS: 07.05.-t Computers in experimental physics - 07.05.Hd Data acquisition: hardware and software - 29.85.+c Computer data analysis

  17. Spring Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    22 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dunes in the north polar region of Mars. In this scene, the dunes, and the plain on which the dunes reside, are at least in part covered by a bright carbon dioxide frost. Dark spots indicate areas where the frost has begun to change, either by subliming away to expose dark sand, changing to a coarser particle size, or both. The winds responsible for the formation of these dunes blew from the lower left (southwest) toward the upper right (northeast).

    Location near: 76.3oN, 261.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  18. Demise of Flat-slab Subduction at the end of the Laramide Orogeny (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, E.

    2013-12-01

    Increasingly constrained interpretations for how the Laramide orogeny ended, and how the ignimbrite flareup followed, are derived from recent upper mantle tomograms in conjunction with the volcanic and tectonic record. Tomography is used to identify subducted slab, magmatic re-initiation indicates removal of the Laramide flat slab from the base of North America, and vertical motions are used to infer the evolving sub-crustal density distribution. The general story is not so much one of flat-slab rollback, but rather one of progressive abandonment of large fragments of ocean lithosphere at North America's base and a subsequent foundering of this slab. I infer the following history. Subduction of a large ocean plateau (Shatsky conjugate) occurred beneath southern California, the Colorado Plateau and Wyoming, where it stopped ~75 Ma and where it resides today (below ~150 km of Wyoming craton). Its buoyant lithosphere has elevated Wyoming; its (dense eclogite) crust is absent, probably lost at ~75 Ma when rapid subsidence of Wyoming ended, followed by uplift. The next major event was the ~53 Ma accretion of Farallon ocean lithosphere to the margin of NW U.S. and beneath much of NW U.S. This accretion ended the Laramide orogeny at this latitude, from where it propagated southward. Immediately, thrusting switched to (core complex) extension and magmatic quiescence switched to volcanic flareup (Challis-Absoraka volcanism) as the slab delaminated from North America. This slab is imaged as a vertical curtain extending from the Idaho batholith down into the transition zone. Subduction jumped outboard to create Cascadia, and the Cascade arc soon followed, indicating normal-dip subduction. Flat-slab subduction continued south of central Oregon, necessitating a slab tear across central Oregon. The volcanic flareup propagated south from the tear across the northern Basin and Range, indicating a progressive N-to-S removal of the flat slab, probably by sideways rollback. An

  19. The time projection chamber for the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, Luciano; ALICE Collaboration

    2003-03-01

    The Time Projection Chamber is the main tracking detector in the central barrel of the ALICE experiment. The task of large acceptance tracking in a heavy ion experiment is similar to that encountered in the NA49 and STAR experiments at the SPS and RHIC respectively. However, the extreme multiplicities of ion collisions at the LHC set qualitatively and quantitatively new demands making new designs indispensable. In this paper we present an overview of the main components, with special focus on the front-end and readout electronics, and some of the most crucial aspects addressed by the R&D activities that have preceded the design and construction of the ALICE TPC.

  20. Alice, Benzene, and Coffee: The ABCs of Ecopharmacognosy.

    PubMed

    Cordell, Geoffrey A

    2015-12-01

    The sesquicentennial celebrations of the publication of "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and the structure of benzene offer a unique opportunity to develop a contemporary interpretation of aspects of Alice's adventures, illuminate the symbolism of benzene, and contextualize both with the globalization of coffee, transitioning to how the philosophy and sustainable practices of ecopharmacognosy may be applied to modulating approaches to the quality, safety, efficacy, and consistency (QSEC) of traditional medicines and dietary supplements through technology integration, thereby improving patient-centered health care. PMID:26882696

  1. Alpine Post-Collisional Orogeny: topics of debate and possible targets for AlpArray research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissling, Edi

    2016-04-01

    In all aspects, the Alps are by far the best documented orogen. Within their only 1000km lengths from Nice to Vienna, the Alps exhibit an extraordinary variation in structure along strike and from surface to great depth. The modern well-accepted mountain building concept calls for a material flux carefully balanced by mantle flow, plate convergence, subduction, crustal delamination, surface topography, uplift and erosion. The Alpine data set provides a basis to relate subduction processes with Penninic nappes evolution and overthrusting of Austroalpine lid, collision and oceanic slab break-off with build-up of topography, and post-collisional slab rollback and isostatic rebound due to erosional unloading to exhumation of deep European basement structures such as Tauern and Aar massiv. Temporal and spatial variations and relative importance of these processes and their relation to the overall convergence between the Adriatic/Africa and European continental plates, however, are still poorly understood and remain matters of debate. While the AlpArray Seismic Experiment will provide new geophysical information of unprecedented resolution and reliability, discussions and interdisciplinary earth science research among AlpArray community targeted at key questions will lead to a better understanding of collisional orogeny in general and Alpine evolution in particular.

  2. Jurassic Cordilleran dike swarm-shear zones: Implications for the Nevadan orogeny and North American plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, M.B.; Saleeby, J.B. )

    1992-08-01

    A cogenetic and coeval tonalitic and mafic dike swarm has been identified within a southern fragment (the Owens Mountain area) of the western Foothills terrane (California). The dikes were mylonitized and transposed (rotated into subparallel orientation) during emplacement, from 155 to 148 Ma (U-Pb zircon data), which coincides in time with the Nevadan orogeny. Steeply southeast-plunging fold axes and S-fold geometries indicate a sinistral-sense of shear, possibly with some dip-slip motion as well. This shear zone may be the southern and possibly deeper extension of the Bear Mountains fault zone. This and other Late Jurassic Cordilleran dike swarms record a complex pattern of sinistral-sense transtension-transpression that developed at the apparent-polar-wander J2 cusp ([approximately] 150 Ma) and during subsequent, rapid, northwestward acceleration of North America. The Late Jurassic Nevadan orogeny is a manifestation of these dramatic changes in magnitude and direction of North American motion.

  3. Variable stiffness torsion springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

  4. Variable stiffness torsion springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

  5. [THE OTHER SIDE OF INSTITUTIONALIZATION. ALICE MUNRO'S VERSION].

    PubMed

    Matusevich, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe some aspects of the aging process, the Alzheimer and the nursing home starting from the analysis of some fragments of the tale The bear come over the mountain written by Alice Munro. PMID:26650414

  6. Educating the Imagination: An Interview with Alice Notley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrigan, Anselm

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Alice Notley about her experience of writing the epic poem "The Descent of Alette." Notes that Notley set herself the task of not only engaging the epic tradition, but changing it at the same time by creating a female protagonist. Discusses how epic poems are stories of cultural consolidation. (PM)

  7. Alice Walker's Politics or the Politics of "The Color Purple."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Cynthia

    1988-01-01

    Alice Walker's "The Color Purple" portrays Black women's oppression as the result of patriarchy, and proposes the acceptance of middle-class values--home ownership and entrepreneurship--as the solution to exploitation. She relies on stereotypes to characterize Black men and women, and depicts an ideology of submission. (BJV)

  8. Close view of the Alice Paul Bedroom door, looking from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close view of the Alice Paul Bedroom door, looking from the east at the dead bolt lock and escutcheon on the inside of the (closed) door, with scale - Sewall-Belmont House, 144 Constitution Avenue, Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. Detail view of the Alice Paul Bedroom door lock and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the Alice Paul Bedroom door lock and escutcheon, and dead bolt lock above, looking from the east at the inside of the (closed) door, with scale - Sewall-Belmont House, 144 Constitution Avenue, Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions: Alice H. Eagly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Alice H. Eagly, winner of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions, is cited for her work in the field of social psychology, the psychology of gender, and the use of meta-analytic techniques. She envisions a psychology that extends from individual cognitions to societal structures. In addition to the citation, a biography and selected…

  11. Upgrade of the ALICE Experiment: Letter Of Intent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALICE collaboration; Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Masoodi, A. Ahmad; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Anderssen, E. C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badala, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bairathi, V.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastian Van Beelen, J.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Battistin, M.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baudot, J.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Benettoni, M.; Benotto, F.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Besson, A.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhatti, A.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Boehmer, F. V.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bornschein, J.; Borshchov, V. N.; Bortolin, C.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Cariola, P.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Caudron, T.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Claus, G.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Coli, S.; Colledani, C.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Da Riva, E.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Decosse, C.; DelagrangeI, H.; Deloff, A.; Déenes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Robertis, G.; De Roo, K.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Divia, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dorheim, S.; Dorokhov, A.; Doziere, G.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dulinski, W.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Ehlers, R. J., III; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernádez Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fiorenza, G.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Franco, M.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gajanana, D.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubilato, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; Gomez Marzoa, M.; Gonzáalez-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.

    2014-08-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is studying the physics of strongly interacting matter, and in particular the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), using proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major upgrade of the experimental apparatus, planned for installation in the second long LHC shutdown in the years 2018-2019. These plans are presented in the ALICE Upgrade Letter of Intent, submitted to the LHCC (LHC experiments Committee) in September 2012. In order to fully exploit the physics reach of the LHC in this field, high-precision measurements of the heavy-flavour production, quarkonia, direct real and virtual photons, and jets are necessary. This will be achieved by an increase of the LHC Pb-Pb instant luminosity up to 6×1027 cm-2s-1 and running the ALICE detector with the continuous readout at the 50 kHz event rate. The physics performance accessible with the upgraded detector, together with the main detector modifications, are presented.

  12. Alice in Wonderland Syndrome: somesthetic vs visual perceptual disturbance.

    PubMed

    Lanska, John Robert; Lanska, Douglas J

    2013-03-26

    In 1955, English psychiatrist John Todd (1914-1987) described Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS) as self-experienced paroxysmal body image illusions involving distortions of the size, mass, or shape of the patient's own body or its position in space, often occurring with depersonalization and derealization.(1) Todd named AIWS for the perceptual disorder of altered body image experienced by the protagonist in the novel Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865), written by Lewis Carroll(2) (the pseudonym of Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson [1832-1898]), possibly based in part on Dodgson's own migrainous experiences.(3) In the story, Alice followed a talking white rabbit down a rabbit hole and then experienced several dramatic changes in her own body size and shape (e.g., shrinking to 10 inches high, growing unnaturally large, and growing unnaturally tall but not any wider).(2) Although Todd's report was the most influential, Lippman(4) provided an earlier description in 1952. In Lippman's article, one of the patients reported feeling short and wide as she walked, and referenced Alice's Adventures in Wonderland in regard to her body image illusions, referring to them as a "Tweedledum" or "Tweedledee" feeling. PMID:23446681

  13. Enquiring Mind, Rebellious Spirit: Alice and Pinocchio as Nonmodel Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Ann Lawson

    1999-01-01

    Discusses Pinocchio and Alice in Wonderland considering how both characters have acquired a mythic status as iconic images of individualism in childhood. Discusses how they can be termed pivotal since they embodied an abrupt detachment from a long-established tradition in writing for children and a dramatic departure in a radical new direction…

  14. Subduction dynamics and the origin of Andean orogeny and the Bolivian orocline.

    PubMed

    Capitanio, F A; Faccenna, C; Zlotnik, S; Stegman, D R

    2011-12-01

    The building of the Andes results from the subduction of the oceanic Nazca plate underneath the South American continent. However, how and why the Andes and their curvature, the Bolivian orocline, formed in the Cenozoic era (65.5 million years (Myr) ago to present), despite subduction continuing since the Mesozoic era (251.0-65.5 Myr ago), is still unknown. Three-dimensional numerical subduction models demonstrate that variations in slab thickness, arising from the Nazca plate's age at the trench, produce a cordilleran morphology consistent with that observed. The age-dependent sinking of the slab in the mantle drives traction towards the trench at the base of the upper plate, causing it to thicken. Thus, subducting older Nazca plate below the Central Andes can explain the locally thickened crust and higher elevations. Here we demonstrate that resultant thickening of the South American plate modifies both shear force gradients and migration rates along the trench to produce a concave margin that matches the Bolivian orocline. Additionally, the varying forcing along the margin allows stress belts to form in the upper-plate interior, explaining the widening of the Central Andes and the different tectonic styles found on their margins, the Eastern and Western Cordilleras. The rise of the Central Andes and orocline formation are directly related to the local increase of Nazca plate age and an age distribution along the margin similar to that found today; the onset of these conditions only occurred in the Eocene epoch. This may explain the enigmatic delay of the Andean orogeny, that is, the formation of the modern Andes. PMID:22113613

  15. Leucogranites of the Teton Range, Wyoming: A record of Archean collisional orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Carol D.; Swapp, Susan M.; Frost, B. Ronald; Finley-Blasi, Lee; Fitz-Gerald, D. Braden

    2016-07-01

    Leucogranitic rocks formed by crustal melting are a prominent feature of collisional orogens of all ages. This study describes leucogranitic gneisses associated with an Archean collisional orogeny preserved in the Teton Range of northwestern Wyoming, USA. These leucogneisses formed at 2.68 Ga, and initial Nd isotopic compositions suggest they are derived from relatively juvenile sources. Two distinct groups of leucogneisses, both trondhjemitic, are identified on the basis of field relations, petrology, and geochemistry. The Webb Canyon gneiss forms large, sheet-like bodies of hornblende biotite trondhjemite and granodiorite. This gneiss is silica-rich (SiO2 = 70-80%), strongly ferroan, comparatively low in alumina, and is characterized by high Zr and Y, low Sr, and high REE contents that define "seagull"-shaped REE patterns. The Bitch Creek gneiss forms small sills, dikes, and plutons of biotite trondhjemite. Silica, Zr, Y, and REE are lower and alumina and Sr are higher than in the Webb Canyon gneiss. These differences reflect different melting conditions: the Webb Canyon gneiss formed by dehydration melting in which amphibole and quartz breaks down, accounting for the low alumina, high FeO, high silica content and observed trace element characteristics. The Bitch Creek gneiss formed by H2O-excess melting in which plagioclase breaks down leaving an amphibole-rich restite, producing magmas higher in alumina and Sr and lower in FeO and HREE. Both melt mechanisms are expected in collisional environments: dehydration melting accompanies gravitational collapse and tectonic extension of dramatically thickened crust, and water-excess melting may occur when collision places a relatively cool, hydrous lower plate beneath a hotter upper plate. The Archean leucogranitic gneisses of the Teton Range are calcic trondhjemites and granodiorites whereas younger collisional leucogranites typically are true granites. The difference in leucogranite composition reflects the

  16. Processes of subduction and exhumation of continental blocks in collisional orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirel, C.; Brun, J.; Burov, E. B.; Wortel, M. J.; Lebedev, S.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the mechanism of accretion, subduction and exhumation of rocks during orogeny is a fundamental issue for plate tectonics. Numerous models have been proposed in order to explain the tectonic events that accompany continental subduction. Here, in order to examine the different processes in a simple, self-consistent manner, the fully coupled thermo-mechanical numerical code PARAFLAM is used to perform a parametric study on the subduction mode and, particularly, on the continental subduction processes. A wide range of parameters including slab-pull magnitude, temperature and viscosity distribution, initial geometry of the subduction zone and rheology, is explored to understand the dynamics of accretion, the different processes of exhumation, the deformation of the slab and the deformation of the overriding plate. The first results of this study show the evolution of one or two small continental blocks (terranes) reaching the subduction-zone continental margin. A set of experiments demonstrates that the progressive incorporation of a continental block into the over-riding plate is governed by the dynamics of subduction. Initially, the continental block is partly or entirely subducted, which increases its buoyancy and induces its detachment from the subducting slab. By the time the emplacement of the block into the continental margin is completed, exhumation is likely to have occurred, depending mainly on the slab pull magnitude and the rheology of the continental block itself. As an example, some experiments show the continuous subduction of a continental block followed by an UHP-HP exhumation and a metamorphic-core-complex type of exhumation. These cases can be compared with the pattern of deformation observed in the Aegean-Sea domain or in the Tyrrhenian one.

  17. A combined magnetometry and gravity study across Zagros orogeny in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, Maysam; Oskooi, Behrooz

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the structural geology and the tectonic conditions of the Zagros orogeny along the route of Qom to Kermanshah cities were investigated using the combined geophysical methods of the airborne magnetometry and the ground-based gravity data. Airborne magnetometry data of Iran with a line space of survey, 7.5 km, were used to model the magnetic susceptibility property along the route. At first, the airborne magnetic data were stably 500-m downward continued to the ground surface in order to enhance minor changes of the Earth's magnetic field over the studied region. Afterward, 3D inverse modeling of the magnetic data was implemented to the downward continued data, and subsequently the section of magnetic susceptibility variation along the desired route was extracted and imaged at depth. The acquired model could appropriately predict the observed magnetic data, showing low misfit values between the observation and the predicted data. The analytic signal filter was applied to the reduced-to-pole (RTP) magnetic data leading to the determination of the active and probable hidden faults in the structural zones of the Zagros, such as Sanandaj-Sirjan, Central Domain (CD) and Urumieh-Dokhtar based upon the generated peaks along the profile of analytic signal filter. In addition, the density variations of the subsurface geological layers were determined by 3D inverting of the ground-based gravity data over the whole study area, and extracting this property along the route. The joint models of magnetic susceptibility and density variation could appropriately localize the traces of faults along with the geologically and tectonically structural boundaries in the region. The locations of faults correspond well to the variation of geophysical parameters on the inverted sections. Probable direction, slope and extension at depth of these faults were also determined on the sections, indicating a high tectonized zone of the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ) parallel to the zone of

  18. 2-D magnetotelluric experiment to investigate the Nassugtoqidian orogeny in South-East Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heincke, Björn; Chen, Jin; Riisager, Peter; Kolb, Jochen; Jørgensen, Asta F.

    2015-04-01

    The northwest-trending Palaeoproterozoic Nagssugtoqidian orogen extends over 250 km along the east coast of Greenland in the area around the village Tasiilaq. The geological evolution of this area closely compares with the ones of the Lewisian complex of Scotland and the Nagssugtoqidian orogen in western Greenland and, hence, leads to the suggestion that they belong to the same continental-scale orogenic belt. However, an accurate correlation across the inland ice is challenging and still ambiguous and therefore more detailed knowledge about the individual orogens might help to understand their relationship. Details about the large-scale tectonic evolution during the Nagssugtoqidian orogeny in this remote Arctic region are not known due to complex geology, relatively coarse geological mapping and the lack of extensive geophysical investigations. E.g. the vergence of the orogen, subduction-related magmatism and accretion history are matters of ongoing discussion (Kalsbeek et al., 1993; Nutman et al., 2008 and Kolb, 2013). We performed a 2-D magnetotelluric (MT) experiment across the southern part of the orogen along the Sermilik Fjord in order to improve our understanding of the orogenic process in general and to better constrain the location and vergence of the suture zone. However, because of the rough climate and the lack of infrastructure, this study is considered as a first test to investigate how MT surveys can be most efficiently performed in this remote part of the world. The NE-SW trending profile consists of eight MT stations and has a total length of ~70 km using long period LEMI-420 systems. The quality of the data is severely affected by polar electrojets that do not satisfy the plane wave assumptions, which is typical for regions close to the magnetic poles. In order to reduce the distortion from these signals onto the impedance estimates, we tested different advanced processing schemes. In addition to the more conventional robust response function

  19. Status of Fast Interaction Trigger for ALICE Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavicheva, T. L.; Kurepin, A. B.; Trzaska, W. H.

    2015-06-01

    As a result of the LHC upgrade after the Long Shutdown 2, the expected luminosity and collision rate during the so called Run 3 will considerably exceed the design parameters for several of the key ALICE detectors systems including the forward trigger detectors. Furthermore, the introduction of a new Muon Forward Tracker significantly reduces the space envelope available for the upgraded Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT) detector on the muon spectrometer side. At the same time, FIT is expected to match and even exceed the functionality and performance currently secured by three ALICE sub-detectors: the time zero detector (T0), the VZERO system, and the Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD). The harsh conditions of Run 3 would accelerate the ageing and radiation damage (detectable already during Run 1) of the FIT detector if we were to use standard PMTs. The solution came thanks to the latest developments in MCP-PMT technology providing compact photo sensors with excellent characteristics and stability.

  20. Asymmetric Gaussian steering: When Alice and Bob disagree

    SciTech Connect

    Midgley, S. L. W.; Ferris, A. J.; Olsen, M. K.

    2010-02-15

    Asymmetric steering is an effect whereby an inseparable bipartite system can be found to be described by either quantum mechanics or local hidden variable theories depending on which one of Alice or Bob makes the required measurements. We show that, even with an inseparable bipartite system, situations can arise where Gaussian measurements on one half are not sufficient to answer the fundamental question of which theory gives an adequate description and the whole system must be considered. This phenomenon is possible because of an asymmetry in the definition of the original Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox and in this article we show theoretically that it may be demonstrated, at least in the case where Alice and Bob can only make Gaussian measurements, using the intracavity nonlinear coupler.

  1. The Silicon Drift Detector of the ALICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Batigne, G.

    2005-10-12

    The ALICE experiment studies the properties of quark-gluon plasma and requires a good tracking system. This document presents the silicon drift detector which is part of the Inner Tracking System. Its principle and main features are given, especially its sensitivity to temperature variation and the effect of parasitic fields on measurement. Finally, the typical spatial resolution of this detector, which has been measured during beam tests, is shown.

  2. AliEn—ALICE environment on the GRID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Bunčić, P.; Piskač, R.; Revsbech, J.-E.; Šego, V.; Alice Collaboration

    2003-04-01

    AliEn ( http://alien.cern.ch) (ALICE Environment) is a Grid framework built on top of the latest Internet standards for information exchange and authentication (SOAP, PKI) and common Open Source components. AliEn provides a virtual file catalogue that allows transparent access to distributed datasets and a number of collaborating Web services which implement the authentication, job execution, file transport, performance monitor and event logging. In the paper we will present the architecture and components of the system.

  3. Anti–nuclei production at the LHC measured with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufalino, Stefania; ALICE Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The excellent tracking and particle identification capabilities of the ALICE apparatus combined with the high particle production rates reached at the LHC in pp, p–Pb and in particular in Pb–Pb collisions allow for detailed study of the production of nuclei and anti-nuclei. In this paper, recent results on the production of the (anti-)deuteron and (anti-)helium are presented and compared with the expectations from statistical (thermal) particle production and coalescence models.

  4. The ALICE High Level Trigger: status and plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Rohr, David; Gorbunov, Sergey; Breitner, Timo; Lehrbach, Johannes; Lindenstruth, Volker; Berzano, Dario

    2015-12-01

    The ALICE High Level Trigger (HLT) is an online reconstruction, triggering and data compression system used in the ALICE experiment at CERN. Unique among the LHC experiments, it extensively uses modern coprocessor technologies like general purpose graphic processing units (GPGPU) and field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) in the data flow. Realtime data compression is performed using a cluster finder algorithm implemented on FPGA boards. These data, instead of raw clusters, are used in the subsequent processing and storage, resulting in a compression factor of around 4. Track finding is performed using a cellular automaton and a Kalman filter algorithm on GPGPU hardware, where both CUDA and OpenCL technologies can be used interchangeably. The ALICE upgrade requires further development of online concepts to include detector calibration and stronger data compression. The current HLT farm will be used as a test bed for online calibration and both synchronous and asynchronous processing frameworks already before the upgrade, during Run 2. For opportunistic use as a Grid computing site during periods of inactivity of the experiment a virtualisation based setup is deployed.

  5. The C-RORC PCIe card and its application in the ALICE and ATLAS experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borga, A.; Costa, F.; Crone, G. J.; Engel, H.; Eschweiler, D.; Francis, D.; Green, B.; Joos, M.; Kebschull, U.; Kiss, T.; Kugel, A.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Soos, C.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Tremblet, L.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Vandelli, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Werner, P.; Wickens, F. J.

    2015-02-01

    The ALICE and ATLAS DAQ systems read out detector data via point-to-point serial links into custom hardware modules, the ALICE RORC and ATLAS ROBIN. To meet the increase in operational requirements both experiments are replacing their respective modules with a new common module, the C-RORC. This card, developed by ALICE, implements a PCIe Gen 2 x8 interface and interfaces to twelve optical links via three QSFP transceivers. This paper presents the design of the C-RORC, its performance and its application in the ALICE and ATLAS experiments.

  6. Deformation Record Associated To The Valdoviño Fault (Variscan Orogeny, NW Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llana-Funez, S.; Fernández, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Valdoviño Fault is a subvertical left-lateral strike-slip fault that exceeding a hundred kms in length formed in the late stages of the Variscan orogeny in NW Iberia. The fault cuts through the pile of allochthonous thrust sheets that conform the suture zone of the orogen and constitutes the eastern boundary of one of them, the Ordenes complex. In the section along the Atlantic coast, the fault core has a thickness of about 100 m in width with foliated rocks showing a subvertical attitude. It is formed by several rock types, beginning from the west these are: coarse grained foliated granitoids, tectonic breccia with fragments of high grade mafic rocks, fine-grained gneiss, serpentinites, fine-grained amphibolites and two-mica granites. The fault zone samples some of the lithologies found to the base of the Ordenes complex, emplaced and deformed prior to the nucleation of the Valdoviño Fault. Intense deformation produces extreme grain comminution particularly in felsic and basic rocks. Planolinear fabrics are predominant, with a subhorizontal lineation. The intensity of the deformation and the reduction in thickness of the various lithotypes is interpreted as indicative of the amount of strain accumulated during its tectonic history. Two types of tectonites stand out along the trace of the fault: the tectonic breccias at the coastal section (nucleated in basic rocks and in serpentinites) and the SC fabrics in syntectonic granitoids. Both evidence different deformation conditions during the activity of the fault. The band of tectonic breccias developed in basic rocks is a few meters thick and has a number of mm-thick ultracataclasites cutting sharply the breccia. The ultracataclasites show one straight side that cuts through the various components of the breccias (either earlier fault rocks as fragments of metabasites). The slipping surfaces all have a subvertical attitude consistent to the current orientation of the major fault. Earlier ultracataclastic bands

  7. How Complex is Orogeny? the Role of Rift Inheritance in the Evolution of the Western Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrando, M.; Mohn, G.; Manatschal, G.

    2012-12-01

    margins, which are characterized by a third type of transitional lithosphere, comprising the so-called Zone of Exhumed Subcontinental Mantle and the distal continental margin. The partial preservation on a regional scale of the rift-related relationships between rock units that underwent subduction to (U)HP conditions indicates that (1) the association of serpentinites and continental basement does not necessarily derive from chaotic counter-flow in a subduction channel, (2) the regional lack of pre-rift sediments at the interface between continental basement and post-rift sediments is not necessarily a result of orogeny-related tectonic excision and (3) the process of tectonic burial and exhumation is not chaotic but large coherent slivers ranging in thickness between 200 m and 2 km behave relatively rigidly, while well-defined movement zones accommodate most of the deformation. Furthermore, a re-assessment of basement-cover relationships in the major Alpine tectonic units indicates that the most deformed/metamorphosed part of the Western Alps, between the Insubric Line and the Penninic Front, samples the distal Adriatic and European margins, together with the Western Tethys, largely floored by serpentinized mantle. The overall tectonometamorphic evolution and the location of the main movement zones is controlled by lateral gradients in lithospheric thickness and serpentinization inherited from Jurassic rifting.

  8. Spring Wheat Breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common wheat, known as bread wheat, is one of major crops for human food consumption. It is further classified into spring and winter wheat based on the distinct growing seasons. Spring wheat is grown worldwide and usually planted in the spring and harvested in late summer or early fall. In this c...

  9. Water Treatment Technology - Springs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on springs provides instructional materials for two competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on spring basin construction and spring protection. For each competency, student…

  10. 1. LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING IODINE SPRING (FOREGROUND), SALT SULPHUR SPRING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING IODINE SPRING (FOREGROUND), SALT SULPHUR SPRING (LEFT BACKGROUND), AND TWIN COTTAGES (UPPER RIGHT) (4 x 5 negative; 5 x 7 print) - Salt Sulpher Springs, U.S. Route 219, Salt Sulphur Springs, Monroe County, WV

  11. Proton-proton physics with the ALICE muon spectrometer at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Bastid, N.

    2008-09-15

    ALICE, the dedicated heavy-ion experiment at the LHC, has also an important proton-proton physics program. The ALICE muon spectrometer will be presented and the corresponding physics analysis will be reviewed. A particular emphasis will be placed on heavy-flavor measurement.

  12. JPL stories: story on the story (series) Careering through JPL, presented by Alice M. Fairhurst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrickson, S.

    2002-01-01

    Alice Fairhurst, co-author of Effective Teaching, Effective Learning, presented an enthusiastic overview of her tenure as a JPL career development and mentoring coordinator (1991-2001). Among other things, Alice is an expert in Keirseyian Temperament and Myers-Briggs typology.

  13. Alice Buckton (1867-1944): The Legacy of a Froebelian in the Landscape of Glastonbury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathivet, Stephanie

    2006-01-01

    Alice Buckton was a Froebelian educator who was involved in early childhood education and the training of teachers. She was a prolific writer, at first writing articles for the Froebelian journal "Child Life" and later writing poetry and plays, which were read and performed in London and elsewhere. Alice Buckton became interested in the spiritual…

  14. Springs of Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenau, Jack C.; Faulkner, Glen L.; Hendry, Charles W., Jr.; Hull, Robert W.

    1977-01-01

    The first comprehensive report of Florida's springs, which contains both a story of the springs and a collection of facts about them, was published thirty years ago (Ferguson and others, 1947). Since then, much additional data on springs have been gathered and the current report, Springs of Florida, makes a wealth of information on springs available to the public. Springs of Florida, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Bureau of Geology, Florida Department of Natural Resources, publishers, and the Bureau of Water Resources Management, Florida Department of Environmental Regulation, is intended to provide sufficient background information for a lucid understanding of the nature and occurrence of the springs in the State.

  15. Radiometric performance results of the New Horizons' ALICE UV imaging spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, David C.; Davis, Michael W.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Scherrer, John; Stern, S. Alan

    2005-09-01

    We describe the radiometric performance and calibration results of the New Horizons' ALICE flight model. This ALICE is a lightweight (4.4 kg), low-power (4.4 W), ultraviolet spectrograph based on the ALICE instrument now in flight aboard the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft. Its primary job will be to detect a variety of important atomic and molecular species in Pluto's atmosphere, and to determine their relative abundances so that a complete picture of Pluto's atmospheric composition can be determined for the first time. ALICE will also be used to search for an atmosphere around Pluto's moon, Charon, as well as the Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) New Horizons hopes to fly by after Pluto-Charon. Detailed radiometric performance results of the ALICE flight model are presented and discussed.

  16. Spring joint with overstrain sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, Peter M. (Inventor); Gaither, Bryan W. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A flexible joint may include a conductive compression spring and a pair of non-conductive spring cages disposed at opposite ends of the compression spring to support the compression spring. A conductive member disposed inside the compression spring may extend between the pair of spring cages. One end of the conductive member may be fixed for movement with one of the spring cages and another end of the conductive member may be fixed for movement with the other of the spring cages.

  17. Gender relations: Alice Munro's "Differently" and "Carried Away".

    PubMed

    Pruitt, V D

    2000-01-01

    In two of her works of short fiction--"Differently" (1989) and "Carried Away" (1991)--the eminent contemporary Canadian writer Alice Munro delineates a series of psychologically complicated interactions between heterosexual couples. These psychodynamics have not been identified and explored in existing literary criticism on these stories. Assisted by the clinical experiences and judgments of psychiatrists and psychologists who have analyzed the intricacies of romantic love and passion, the author examines the often puzzling behaviors exhibited in these narratives by characters involved in erotic relationships. She also identifies two paradigms for personal fulfillment implicit in both stories. PMID:11070619

  18. Common read-out receiver card for ALICE Run2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, H.; Kebschull, U.

    2013-12-01

    ALICE at CERN LHC uses custom FPGA-based computer plug-in cards as interface between the optical detector read-out link and the PC clusters of Data Acquisition (DAQ) and High-Level Trigger (HLT). The cards used at DAQ and HLT during Run1 have been developed as independent projects and are now facing similar problems with obsolete major interfaces and limited link speeds and processing capabilities. A new common card has been developed to enable the upgrade of the read-out chain towards higher link rates while providing backward compatibility with the current architecture. First prototypes could be tested successfully and raised interest from other collaborations.

  19. The upgrade of the Inner Tracking System of ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddhanta, Sabyasachi

    2014-11-01

    ALICE has devised a comprehensive upgrade strategy to enhance its physics capabilities and to exploit the LHC running conditions after the second long shutdown of the LHC scheduled in 2018-2019. Within this upgrade programme, the upgrade of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) forms an important part. The upgraded ITS will have a barrel geometry consisting of seven layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) with high granularity, which would fulfil the material budget, readout and radiation hardness requirements for the upgrade. In this contribution, an overview of the upgraded ITS, its technology and performance studies are presented.

  20. Slowly ascending magmas in long-lived accretionary orogens: unraveling temporal variations in the Cordilleran-style Sveconorwegian Orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bybee, G. M.; Slagstad, T.; Roberts, N. M. W.; Coint, N.; Ashwal, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Southwestern Norway is host to spatially associated magmatic provinces that have been interpreted as magmatic products of the Sveconorwegian Orogeny. The Sirdal Magmatic Belt (SMB) and the Hornblende-Biotite Granite (HBG) Suite were emplaced between 1050-1020 Ma and 980-930 Ma, respectively. Geochronology of the Rogaland Anorthosite Province (RAP) indicates that magmatism began at 1041 Ma (high pressure, cogenetic megacrysts) and culminated in anorthosite emplacement at ±930 Ma. Decompression exsolution ages for these high-P megacrysts indicate that decompression during anorthosite ascent took place ±80-100 m.y. after crystallization at the Moho. The contact aureole of the RAP shows concordant arrays of zircon ages between 1050-930 Ma, recording continuous, long-lived high temperature magmatic events in southwestern Norway. Zircon ages from outside the contact aureole show a metamorphic event at ±1035 Ma, but show no younger concordant arrays. Metapelites from the contact aureole of the RAP also show a spread of monazite ages, where monazite inclusions in garnet record ages of 1038-992 Ma, while groundmass monazite preserve ages of 952±10 Ma, indicative of multiple and/or long-lived thermal events. Age coincidence for several events, including matrix monazite formation, megacryst decompression (and anorthosite emplacement) and HBG granite crystallization suggest a dynamic system with multiple feedback loops. Varying isotopic signatures recorded in the region hint at changing sources and processes associated with the genesis of the magmas. These observations indicate that the Sveconorwegian orogeny was a long-lived magmatic system that featured slowly ascending magmas, punctuated periods of magmatism and temporal geochemical variation - features analogous to younger Cordilleran systems. When estimating magmatic tempos in arc environments, factors such as large degrees of differentiation in the lower crust, polybaric magma evolution and slow magma ascent rates

  1. Test Beam Results for ALICE TPC Upgrade Prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, James; Alice Tpc-Upgrade Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The ALICE detector is one of four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and its main purpose is to study the quark-gluon plasma created in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main tracking detector within ALICE, and currently has an intrinsic rate limitation of 3 kHz. The LHC will be upgraded during Long Shutdown 2 in 2018 to have Pb-Pb collision rates up to 50 kHz, and so the TPC readout must be accordingly upgraded. This will be done by replacing the current Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber assembly, which uses a gating grid to prevent ion backflow, with Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors such as Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) and Micro-Mesh Gaseous Structures (MMGs), which allow for continuous rather than gated readout. A substantial R&D effort is underway for a 4-GEM design, as well as an alternate 2-GEM/MMG design. Prototypes of each design were tested in November-December 2014 at the PS and SPS beams at CERN; the results for the 2-GEM/MMG chambers will be presented.

  2. ALFA: The new ALICE-FAIR software framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Turany, M.; Buncic, P.; Hristov, P.; Kollegger, T.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Lebedev, A.; Lindenstruth, V.; Manafov, A.; Richter, M.; Rybalchenko, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Winckler, N.

    2015-12-01

    The commonalities between the ALICE and FAIR experiments and their computing requirements led to the development of large parts of a common software framework in an experiment independent way. The FairRoot project has already shown the feasibility of such an approach for the FAIR experiments and extending it beyond FAIR to experiments at other facilities[1, 2]. The ALFA framework is a joint development between ALICE Online- Offline (O2) and FairRoot teams. ALFA is designed as a flexible, elastic system, which balances reliability and ease of development with performance using multi-processing and multithreading. A message- based approach has been adopted; such an approach will support the use of the software on different hardware platforms, including heterogeneous systems. Each process in ALFA assumes limited communication and reliance on other processes. Such a design will add horizontal scaling (multiple processes) to vertical scaling provided by multiple threads to meet computing and throughput demands. ALFA does not dictate any application protocols. Potentially, any content-based processor or any source can change the application protocol. The framework supports different serialization standards for data exchange between different hardware and software languages.

  3. Managing operational documentation in the ALICE Detector Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechman, M.; Augustinus, A.; Bond, P.; Chochula, P.; Kurepin, A.; Pinazza, O.; Rosinsky, P.

    2012-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is one of the big LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiments at CERN in Geneve, Switzerland. The experiment is composed of 18 sub-detectors controlled by an integrated Detector Control System (DCS) that is implemented using the commercial SCADA package PVSSII. The DCS includes over 1200 network devices, over 1,000,000 monitored parameters and numerous custom made software components that are prepared by over 100 developers from all around the world. This complex system is controlled by a single operator via a central user interface. One of his/her main tasks is the recovery of anomalies and errors that may occur during operation. Therefore, clear, complete and easily accessible documentation is essential to guide the shifter through the expert interfaces of different subsystems. This paper describes the idea of the management of the operational documentation in ALICE using a generic repository that is built on a relational database and is integrated with the control system. The experience gained and the conclusions drawn from the project are also presented.

  4. Experiences and evolutions of the ALICE DAQ Detector Algorithms framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeland, Sylvain; Carena, Franco; Carena, Wisla; Chibante Barroso, Vasco; Costa, Filippo; Denes, Ervin; Divia, Roberto; Fuchs, Ulrich; Grigore, Alexandru; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Soos, Csaba; Telesca, Adriana; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; von Haller, Barthelemy

    2012-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The 18 ALICE sub-detectors are regularly calibrated in order to achieve most accurate physics measurements. Some of these procedures are done online in the DAQ (Data Acquisition System) so that calibration results can be directly used for detector electronics configuration before physics data taking, at run time for online event monitoring, and offline for data analysis. A framework was designed to collect statistics and compute calibration parameters, and has been used in production since 2008. This paper focuses on the recent features developed to benefit from the multi-cores architecture of CPUs, and to optimize the processing power available for the calibration tasks. It involves some C++ base classes to effectively implement detector specific code, with independent processing of events in parallel threads and aggregation of partial results. The Detector Algorithm (DA) framework provides utility interfaces for handling of input and output (configuration, monitored physics data, results, logging), and self-documentation of the produced executable. New algorithms are created quickly by inheritance of base functionality and implementation of few ad-hoc virtual members, while the framework features are kept expandable thanks to the isolation of the detector calibration code. The DA control system also handles unexpected processes behaviour, logs execution status, and collects performance statistics.

  5. Radiation hard analog circuits for ALICE ITS upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajanana, D.; Gromov, V.; Kuijer, P.; Kugathasan, T.; Snoeys, W.

    2016-03-01

    The ALICE experiment is planning to upgrade the ITS (Inner Tracking System) [1] detector during the LS2 shutdown. The present ITS will be fully replaced with a new one entirely based on CMOS monolithic pixel sensor chips fabricated in TowerJazz CMOS 0.18 μ m imaging technology. The large (3 cm × 1.5 cm = 4.5 cm2) ALPIDE (ALICE PIxel DEtector) sensor chip contains about 500 Kpixels, and will be used to cover a 10 m2 area with 12.5 Gpixels distributed over seven cylindrical layers. The ALPOSE chip was designed as a test chip for the various building blocks foreseen in the ALPIDE [2] pixel chip from CERN. The building blocks include: bandgap and Temperature sensor in four different flavours, and LDOs for powering schemes. One flavour of bandgap and temperature sensor will be included in the ALPIDE chip. Power consumption numbers have dropped very significantly making the use of LDOs less interesting, but in this paper all blocks are presented including measurement results before and after irradiation with neutrons to characterize robustness against displacement damage.

  6. Future upgrade and physics perspectives of the ALICE TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunji, Taku

    2014-11-01

    The ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) proposes major detector upgrades to fully exploit the increase of the luminosity of the LHC in RUN 3 and to extend the physics reach for rare probes at low transverse momentum. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is one of the main tracking and PID devices in the central barrel of ALICE. The maximum trigger rate of the TPC is currently limited to about 3.5 kHz by the operation of a gating grid system. In order to make full use of the luminosity in RUN 3, the TPC is foreseen to be operated in an ungated mode with continuous readout. The existing MWPC readout will be replaced by a Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detector (MPGD) based readout, which provides intrinsic ion capture capability without gating. Extensive detector R&D employing Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and Micro-Mesh Gaseous detector (Micromegas) technologies, and simulation studies to advance the techniques for the corrections of space-charge distortions have been performed since 2012. In this paper, the expected detector performance and the status of the R&D program to achieve this ambitious goal are described.

  7. Intrusion Prevention and Detection in Grid Computing - The ALICE Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Andres; Lara, Camilo; Kebschull, Udo

    2015-12-01

    Grids allow users flexible on-demand usage of computing resources through remote communication networks. A remarkable example of a Grid in High Energy Physics (HEP) research is used in the ALICE experiment at European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN. Physicists can submit jobs used to process the huge amount of particle collision data produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Grids face complex security challenges. They are interesting targets for attackers seeking for huge computational resources. Since users can execute arbitrary code in the worker nodes on the Grid sites, special care should be put in this environment. Automatic tools to harden and monitor this scenario are required. Currently, there is no integrated solution for such requirement. This paper describes a new security framework to allow execution of job payloads in a sandboxed context. It also allows process behavior monitoring to detect intrusions, even when new attack methods or zero day vulnerabilities are exploited, by a Machine Learning approach. We plan to implement the proposed framework as a software prototype that will be tested as a component of the ALICE Grid middleware.

  8. How beam driven operations optimize ALICE efficiency and safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinazza, Ombretta; Augustinus, André; Bond, Peter M.; Chochula, Peter C.; Kurepin, Alexander N.; Lechman, Mateusz; Rosinsky, Peter

    2012-12-01

    ALICE is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN (Geneva, Switzerland). The ALICE DCS is responsible for the coordination and monitoring of the various detectors and of central systems, for collecting and managing alarms, data and commands. Furthermore, it's the central tool to monitor and verify the beam status with special emphasis on safety. In particular, it is important to ensure that the experiment's detectors are brought to and stay in a safe state, e.g. reduced voltages during the injection, acceleration, and adjusting phases of the LHC beams. Thanks to its central role, it's the appropriate system to implement automatic actions that were normally left to the initiative of the shift leader; where decisions come from the knowledge of detectors’ statuses and of the beam, combined together to fulfil the scientific requirements, keeping safety as a priority in all cases. This paper shows how the central DCS is interpreting the daily operations from a beam driven point of view. A tool is being implemented where automatic actions can be set and monitored through expert panels, with a custom level of automatization. Some routine operations are already automated, when a particular beam mode is declared by the LHC, which can represent a safety concern. This beam driven approach is proving to be a tool for the shift crew to optimize the efficiency of data taking, while improving the safety of the experiment.

  9. Operational experience with the ALICE High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szostak, Artur

    2012-12-01

    The ALICE HLT is a dedicated real-time system for online event reconstruction and triggering. Its main goal is to reduce the raw data volume read from the detectors by an order of magnitude, to fit within the available data acquisition bandwidth. This is accomplished by a combination of data compression and triggering. When HLT is enabled, data is recorded only for events selected by HLT. The combination of both approaches allows for flexible data reduction strategies. Event reconstruction places a high computational load on HLT. Thus, a large dedicated computing cluster is required, comprising 248 machines, all interconnected with InfiniBand. Running a large system like HLT in production mode proves to be a challenge. During the 2010 pp and Pb-Pb data-taking period, many problems were experienced that led to a sub-optimal operational efficiency. Lessons were learned and certain crucial changes were made to the architecture and software in preparation for the 2011 Pb-Pb run, in which HLT had a vital role performing data compression for ALICE's largest detector, the TPC. An overview of the status of the HLT and experience from the 2010/2011 production runs are presented. Emphasis is given to the overall performance, showing an improved efficiency and stability in 2011 compared to 2010, attributed to the significant improvements made to the system. Further opportunities for improvement are identified and discussed.

  10. Mediated definite delegation - Certified Grid jobs in ALICE and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, Steffen; Grigoras, Costin; Litmaath, Maarten; Betev, Latchezar; Buchmann, Johannes

    2012-12-01

    Grid computing infrastructures need to provide traceability and accounting of their users’ activity and protection against misuse and privilege escalation, where the delegation of privileges in the course of a job submission is a key concern. This work describes an improved handling of Multi-user Grid Jobs in the ALICE Grid Services. A security analysis of the ALICE Grid job model is presented with derived security objectives, followed by a discussion of existing approaches of unrestricted delegation based on X.509 proxy certificates and the Grid middleware gLExec. Unrestricted delegation has severe security consequences and limitations, most importantly allowing for identity theft and forgery of jobs and data. These limitations are discussed and formulated, both in general and with respect to an adoption in line with Multi-user Grid Jobs. A new general model of mediated definite delegation is developed, allowing a broker to dynamically process and assign Grid jobs to agents while providing strong accountability and long-term traceability. A prototype implementation allowing for fully certified Grid jobs is presented as well as a potential interaction with gLExec. The achieved improvements regarding system security, malicious job exploitation, identity protection, and accountability are emphasized, including a discussion of non-repudiation in the face of malicious Grid jobs.

  11. Light flavour hadron production in the ALICE experiment at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalà, Angela

    2016-05-01

    Unique among the LHC experiments, ALICE has excellent particle identification capabilities for the measurement of light-flavour hadrons. A large number of hadron species from pions to multi-strange baryons and light nuclei have been measured over a large transverse momentum region. The measurement of the production of these particles is a valuable tool to study the properties of the medium formed in heavy-ion collisions. In particular they give information on the collective phenomena of the fireball, on the parton energy loss in the hot QCD medium and on the hadronization mechanisms such as recombination and statistical hadronization. The measurements in pp and in p-nucleus collisions provide the necessary baseline for heavy-ion data and help to investigate the effects of the ordinary nuclear matter. In this paper some of the main ALICE results on identified light-flavour hadron production in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV and p-Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV will be presented.

  12. Coil spring venting arrangement

    DOEpatents

    McCugh, R.M.

    1975-10-21

    A simple venting device for trapped gas pockets in hydraulic systems is inserted through a small access passages, operated remotely, and removed completely. The device comprises a small diameter, closely wound coil spring which is pushed through a guide temporarily inserted in the access passage. The guide has a central passageway which directs the coil spring radially upward into the pocket, so that, with the guide properly positioned for depth and properly oriented, the coil spring can be pushed up into the top of the pocket to vent it. By positioning a seal around the free end of the guide, the spring and guide are removed and the passage is sealed.

  13. Spring and valve skirt

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, L.

    1986-07-29

    This patent describes an engine having a valve guide operatively mounting a valve stem and its associated valve spring and spring retainer for actuation of the valve stem by a valve actuator. An improvement is described comprising: a hollow, generally cylindrical shaped skirt means having a side portion forming an interior with one open end and having at its other end an end portion extending inwardly and formed with an axial opening therein communicating to the interior. The skirt means is mounted on and about the valve stem and spring retainer and about its spring so as to move with the valve stem and to cover the spring retainer and most of the portion of the valve spring and the valve stem extending outwardly from the valve guide except for an outermost end of the stem which extends through the opening in the end portion for actuation by the actuator , such that the inwardly extending end portion lies between the outermost end of the stem and an outermost end of the spring retainer to allow for retrofitting insertion of the skirt means over existing valve stems without removal of the spring and spring retainer. Excessive oil is presented from seeping between and valve guide and the valve stem thus preventing excessive carbon build-up in the combustion area, sticking valves, fouled plugs and high exhaust emissions.

  14. [Alice's adventures in the wonderland of knowledge: the path to current literacy].

    PubMed

    Sanz-Valero, Javier; Castiel, Luis David; Wanden-Berghe, Carmina

    2010-03-01

    Alice wants to study with amusing books filled with colorful drawings. "Alice's adventures in Wonderland" serves as excuse to introduce and discuss the current importance of digital literacy and how communication and information technologies have changed the way of transmitting and disseminating knowledge. Considering as a corollary, Alice today would have access to a multitude of beautiful multimedia documents, of greater or lesser quality, available through multiple paths. However, given her incipient education, knowing their true worth and aptitude is a privilege she has yet to obtain. This is her challenge! PMID:21461500

  15. DDL, the ALICE data transmission protocol and its evolution from 2 to 6 Gb/s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Chapeland, S.; Delort, C.; Dénes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Grigore, A.; Ionita, C.; Kiss, T.; Simonetti, G.; Soós, C.; Telesca, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Von Haller, B.

    2015-04-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the detector system at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) that studies the behaviour of strongly interacting matter and the quark gluon plasma. The information sent by the sub-detectors composing ALICE are read out by DATE (Data Acquisition and Test Environment), the ALICE data acquisition software, using hundreds of multi-mode optical links called DDL (Detector Data Link). To cope with the higher luminosity of the LHC, the bandwidth of the DDL links will be upgraded in 2015. This paper will describe the evolution of the DDL protocol from 2 to 6 Gbit/s.

  16. A Magnet Spring Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, T. H.; Mead, L.

    2006-01-01

    The paper discusses an elementary spring model representing the motion of a magnet suspended from the ceiling at one end of a vertical spring which is held directly above a second magnet fixed on the floor. There are two cases depending upon the north-south pole orientation of the two magnets. The attraction or repelling force induced by the…

  17. Valve-spring Surge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, Willy

    1937-01-01

    Test equipment is described that includes a system of three quartz indicators whereby three different pressures could be synchronized and simultaneously recorded on a single oscillogram. This equipment was used to test the reliction of waves at ends of valve spring, the dynamical stress of the valve spring for a single lift of the valve, and measurement of the curve of the cam tested. Other tests included simultaneous recording of the stress at both ends of the spring, spring oscillation during a single lift as a function of speed, computation of amplitude of oscillation for a single lift by harmonic analysis, effect of cam profile, the setting up of resonance, and forced spring oscillation with damping.

  18. Rotary spring energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, S.

    1981-07-01

    The goal was to design a lightweight system, for bicycles, that can level the input energy requirement (human exertion) in accordance with variations in road load (friction, wind, and grade) and/or to provide a system for regenerative braking, that is, to store energy normally lost in brake pad friction for brief periods until it required for re-acceleration or hill-climbing. The rotary spring, also called the coil, motor, spiral, or power spring is governed by the equations reviewed. Materials used in spring manufacture are briefly discussed, and justification for steel as the design choice of material is given. Torque and power requirements for a bicycle and rider are provided as well as estimated human power output levels. These criteria are examined to define spring size and possible orientations on a bicycle. Patents and designs for coupling the spring to the drive train are discussed.

  19. ALICE: Project Overview and High Level Science Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soummer, Remi; Choquet, Elodie; Pueyo, Laurent; Brendan Hagan, J.; Gofas-Salas, Elena; Rajan, Abhijith; Perrin, Marshall D.; Chen, Christine; Debes, John H.; Golimowski, David A.; Hines, Dean C.; Schneider, Glenn; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Mawet, Dimitri; Marois, Christian; Barman, Travis

    2015-01-01

    We report on the status of the ALICE project (Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments), which consists in a consistent reanalysis of the entire HST-NICMOS coronagraphic archive. Over the last two years, we have developed a sophisticated pipeline able to handle the data of the 400 stars of the archive. This pipeline builds on the Karhunen-Loeve Image Projection (KLIP) algorithm, and was completed in the fall of 2014. We discuss the first processing and analysis results of the overall reduction campaign. As we will deliver high-level science products to the STScI MAST archive, we are defining a new standard format for high-contrast science products, which will be compatible with every new high-contrast imaging instrument (GPI, SPHERE, P1640, CHARIS, etc.) and used by the JWST coronagraphs. We present here the specifications of this standard.

  20. 3D Modeling of the ALICE Photoinjector Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, J. W.; Militsyn, B. L.; Saveliev, Y. M.

    2009-08-04

    The injector for the ALICE machine (Accelerators and Lasers In Combined Experiments) at Daresbury Laboratory is based around a 350 kV DC photocathode electron gun. An upgrade is proposed to introduce a load-lock GaAs photocathode preparation facility to allow rapid transfer of photocathodes to the gun without breaking the vacuum system. In the current design this requires side-loading of the photocathodes into the cathode ball. An alternative is to relocate the ceramic insulator vertically which will allow back-loading and also backillumination of the photocathodes. 3D electrostatic simulations of the gun chamber are presented for both options along with 3D beam dynamic simulations for an off-axis photocathode, introduced to increase photocathode lifetime by reducing damage by ion backbombardment. Beam dynamic simulations are also presented for the entire injector beamline as well as for a proposed extension to the injector beamline to include a diagnostic section.

  1. The Laser of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault, G.; Nielsen, B. S.; Westergaard, J.; Gaardhøje, J. J.

    The large TPC (95 m3) of the ALICE detector at the CERN LHC was commissioned in summer 2006. The first tracks were observed both from the cosmic ray muons and from the laser rays injected into the TPC. In this article the basic principles of operating the 266 nm lasers are presented, showing the installation and adjustment of the optical system and describing the control system. To generate the laser tracks, a wide laser beam is split into several hundred narrow beams by fixed micro-mirrors at stable and known positions throughout the TPC. In the drift volume, these narrow beams generate straight tracks at many angles. Here we describe the generation of the first tracks and compare them with simulations.

  2. Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments (ALICE). Survey results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soummer, Remi; Choquet, Elodie; Pueyo, Laurent; Brendan Hagan, J.; Gofas-Salas, Elena; Rajan, Abhijith; Chen, Christine; Perrin, Marshall D.; Debes, John H.; Golimowski, David A.; Hines, Dean C.; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Schneider, Glenn; Mawet, Dimitri; Marois, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We report on the status of the ALICE project (Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments. HST/AR-12652), which consists in a consistent reanalysis of the entire HST-NICMOS coronagraphic archive with advanced post-processing techniques. Over the last two years, we have developed a sophisticated pipeline able to handle the data of the 400 stars of the archive. We present the results of the overall reduction campaign and discuss the first statistical analysis of the candidate detections. As we will deliver high-level science products to the STScI MAST archive, we are defining a new standard format for high-contrast science products, which will be compatible with every new high-contrast imaging instrument and used by the JWST coronagraphs. We present here an update and overview of the specifications of this standard.

  3. The Neutron Zero Degree Calorimeter for the ALICE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellacasa, G.; Cortese, P.; Cicaló, C.; de Falco, A.; Masoni, A.; Puddu, G.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Usai, G.; Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; de Marco, N.; Ferretti, A.; Gallio, M.; Gemme, R.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Scomparin, E.; Travaglia, G.; Vercellin, E.

    2005-02-01

    The neutron Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZN) for the ALICE experiment will measure the energy of the spectator neutrons in heavy ion collisions. The ZN is a spaghetti calorimeter, that exploits the Cherenkov light produced by the shower particles in silica optical fibers embedded in a W-alloy absorber. The calorimeter was tested at the CERN SPS using pion and positron beams of different momenta ranging from 50 to 150 GeV/c. The main features of the detector are presented: the linearity and energy resolution as a function of energy, the shower's transverse profile, the position resolution. Moreover the response of the calorimeter to a 158A GeV/c Indium beam has been investigated; in particular the energy resolution and the linearity as a function of the number of incident nucleons were measured.

  4. The zero degree calorimeters for the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puddu, G.; Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicaló, C.; Cortese, P.; De Falco, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Ferretti, A.; Floris, M.; Gagliardi, M.; Gallio, M.; Gemme, R.; Locci, G.; Masoni, A.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Poggio, F.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Stocco, D.; Usai, G.; Vercellin, E.; Yermia, F.

    2007-10-01

    The Zero Degree Calorimeters (ZDC) for the ALICE experiment will measure the energy of the spectator nucleons in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC, providing a direct measure of the centrality of the collisions. ZDC are spaghetti calorimeters, which detect the Cherenkov light produced by the shower particles in silica optical fibers embedded in a dense absorber. The main characteristics of the ZP and ZN detectors are described in this article. The calorimeters were tested at the CERN SPS using pion and electron beams with momenta ranging from 50 to 200 GeV/c. Test beam results such as the calorimeter response, the energy resolution, the signal uniformity and the localizing capability are presented.

  5. The Neutron Zero Degree Calorimeter for the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicalò, C.; Cortese, P.; De Falco, A.; Dellacasa, G.; De Marco, N.; Ferretti, A.; Gallio, M.; Gemme, R.; Masoni, A.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Poggio, F.; Puddu, G.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Travaglia, G.; Usai, G.; Vercellin, E.

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, we present the performance of the Neutron Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZN) for the ALICE experiment. The ZN is a quartz-fiber spaghetti calorimeter, which will measure the energy of the spectator neutrons in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC. Its principle of operation is based on the detection of the Cherenkov light produced by the charged particles of the shower in silica optical fibers, embedded in a W-alloy absorber. The detector was tested at CERN SPS using positive hadron and positron beams with momenta ranging from 50 to 150 GeV/c. The response of the calorimeter, the energy resolution, the localizing capability, the signal uniformity and the transverse profile of the detectable hadronic shower are presented.

  6. Performance simulation studies for the ALICE TPC GEM upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljunggren, M.

    2016-07-01

    To be able to exploit the anticipated interaction rate of 50 kHz in Pb-Pb collisions during run 3 of the LHC (beyond 2019), the ALICE TPC will be upgraded to allow continuous readout. As this is not possible with the current Multi Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) based amplification, the readout will be replaced with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) readout chambers that can suppress ~ 99% of the ion back flow. The space charge of the remaining 1% ion back flow, however, will cause significant distortions to the measured tracks of order cm. Simulation studies to characterize the distortions and test correction strategies have been performed, which show that the intrinsic momentum resolution, without these distortions, can be recovered.

  7. An overview of resonance measurements at the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knospe, A. G.

    2016-05-01

    Resonances play a unique role in the study of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Resonance yields, which may be modified by rescattering and regeneration after hadronization, can be used to study the properties of the hadronic phase of the collision. The transversemomentum spectra of the proton and the ϕ(1020) can be used to study the mechanisms of particle production. In addition, resonance measurements in pp and p-Pb collisions help to distinguish initial-state effects from the effects of the hot and dense final state. The ALICE Collaboration has studied the K*(892)0 and ϕ(1020) mesons in pp, p-Pb, and Pb-Pb collisions. Measurements of many resonance properties, including pT spectra, integrated yields, masses, widths, mean pT values, and the nuclear modification factors RAA and RpPb, are presented and compared to measurements from other experiments, non-resonances, and the predictions of theoretical models.

  8. Upgrade of the ALICE TPC FEE online radiation monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RØed, K.; Alme, J.; Askeland, E.; David, E.; Gunji, T.; Helstrup, H.; Kiss, T.; Lippmann, C.; Rehman, A.; Röhrich, D.; Ullaland, K.; Velure, A.; Zhao, C.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the radiation monitoring system on the Readout Control Unit (RCU) of the the ALICE TPC Front End Electronics. In Run 1, Single Event Upsets (SEUs) in the configuration memory of an SRAM based FPGA were counted, and the results from different run periods with stable beam conditions are presented. For Run 2, a new RCU, the RCU2, has been designed in order to achieve higher data readout rates and increase radiation tolerance. The RCU2 also includes a new radiation monitor solution with increased sensitivity, which is based on counting the number of SEUs in dedicated SRAM memories. The paper presents this new solution together with the results from the targeted irradiation campaigns.

  9. Metamorphic record and Thermo-mechanical modelling of lower crust exhumation during the Palaeoproterozoic Eburnean orogeny, West African Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbault, Muriel; Ganne, Jerome; Block, Sylvain

    2014-05-01

    A thermo-mechanical interpretation of the metamorphic evolution of moderate- to high-pressure volcano-sedimentary rocks (6-8 to >10 Kb) in the Birimian Province (2.2-2.0 Ga) of the West African Craton is explored in terms of burial and exhumation processes. Metamorphic data collected in Burkina Faso, southwest Ghana and eastern Senegal suggest that during the Eburnean orogeny (~2.1 Ga),this Palaeoproterozoic Birimian crust was dominated by moderate apparent geothermal gradients of 20-30°C/km (M2a), that produced greenschist- to amphibolite-facies metamorphic assemblages associated with regional shortening and granitoid intrusions. The M2a gradient is superimposed on a colder thermal regime (M1 : <10-15 °C/km) that produced high-P greenschist- to blueschist-facies metamorphic assemblages, and which most likely recorded the earlier formation of the protolith. The geodynamical origin of M1 is not directly addressed here. Thermo-mechanical two-dimensional numerical models were built in order to test whether late-stage compressional tectonics could generate the exhumation of meta-sediments, collected in Ca0-poor granitoids and which record elevated metamorphic pressures (P> 6-8 Kb). The poor data quality provide limited constraints on the appropriate initial setup conditions, and a number of tests have led us to conceptualize the spatial distribution of a hypothezised succession of volcanic island arcs emplaced on top of CaO rich TTG (Tonalite- Trondjhemite-Granodiorite suites) basement, tectonically paired with sedimentary basins. We postulated therefore the preexistence of wide (about 250 km) and thick flexural sedimentary basins (depth 15 km) in an orogenic mafic crust (about 20 km thick), underplated by a more felsic and lighter layer representing a TTG melange. The numerical results show that a mechanism of burial, heating and exhumation of meta-sediments can occur by simultaneous folding and gravitational instabilities within the broad extent of the basin

  10. Geophysical constraints on the link between cratonization and orogeny: Evidence from the Tibetan Plateau and the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongjie; Teng, Jiwen; Romanelli, Fabio; Braitenberg, Carla; Ding, Zhifeng; Zhang, Xuemei; Fang, Lihua; Zhang, Sufang; Wu, Jianping; Deng, Yangfan; Ma, Ting; Sun, Ruomei; Panza, Giuliano F.

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the geodynamic process of orogeny and cratonization, and their transition is among the key topics of research in evaluating the link between plate tectonics and continental dynamics. The Tibetan Plateau and the North China Craton (NCC), two key areas in mainland China, offer excellent laboratories to understand continental tectonics over a broad span of Earth history. Particularly, the deep structure of the lithosphere as imaged from geophysical data on the Tibetan Plateau and the NCC provide important clues in understanding orogeny and cratonization. The Tibetan Plateau is the largest and highest plateau on Earth in terms of mean altitude, and is an important region for understanding the mechanisms of continent-continent collision and Cenozoic plateau uplift. The NCC is an Archean craton that underwent lithospheric disruption during the Mesozoic. Here we reconstruct the main features of the structure of the crust and upper mantle from surface wave tomography and gravity modeling in Tibet and its neighboring regions, in order to understand the modality of the convergence and collision process between the Indian and Eurasian plates, and the influence of this process on the uplift of the plateau. In the NCC, geological, geochemical, geophysical and tectonic investigations demonstrate that lithospheric destruction mainly occurred in the Eastern Block. The crustal structure of the NCC is reconstructed from ambient noise surface wave tomography and the different possible disruption mechanisms are evaluated. The Vs (shear-wave velocity) tomography results, and the density (ρ) structure of the crust and upper mantle (to about 350 km depth) demonstrate the lateral variation of the thickness of the metasomatic lid between the south and north of the Bangong-Nujiang suture (BNS) and the west and east of Tibet, which suggest that the leading edge of the subducting Indian slab reaches the BNS. The subduction angle of Indian Plate indicates a transition from steep

  11. Breaking bounds: Alice Profé, radical and emancipationist.

    PubMed

    Pfister, G

    2001-01-01

    Alice Prof was the first female sport physician in Germany and she influenced ideas on female bodies and female sports for more than 40 years. Her dream to become a doctor could be realized only in Switzerland because women were not admitted to universities in Prussia before 1908. After her examination and her PhD she established herself as one of the first female doctors in Berlin in 1905 and she worked there until her death in 1946 as general practitioner and medical specialist for pediatrics and sport medicine. As an expert on the female body she was active in many committees and organizations. Alice Prof worked her whole life for the improvement of the situation of girls and women. The focus of her work was physical education and sport and she was always active in different types of sports herself. Her first article on this topic was published in 1906. In the following years over and over again she 'took the floor' criticizing traditional stereotypes of women and the female body, demanding resources for the education of girls and women. Her efforts also helped to reduce anxieties about women in sport and to encourage women to participate in sport. In her articles and in her lectures she encouraged women to decide for themselves about their involvement in sport. She rejected all attempts to patronize female athletes and refused to accept their exclusion from many sports. Prof propagated ideas which were not popular and she never swam with the tide. In one obituary it is stated: 'you never changed your ideas about life for material rewards or professional advancement. You stayed yourself'. Her ideas are relevant even today. PMID:18159656

  12. Open heavy-flavor measurements with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailhache, R.

    2016-01-01

    ALICE is well equipped to reconstruct heavy-flavor particles down to low transverse momentum pT at mid and forward rapidity. An overview of the ALICE results obtained with the Run 1 data in pp (√5=2.76TeV and √s=7TeV), Pb-Pb (√Snn=2.76TeV) and p-Pb (√sNN=5.02 TeV) collisions is presented. In pp collisions the measured cross sections are well described by pQCD calculations. The charged-particle multiplicity dependence of heavy-flavor yields indicates that Multi-Parton Interactions contribute to the high-multiplicity pp collisions and affect charm and beauty production in a similar way. In p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions the measured nuclear modification factors indicate a final-state energy loss of heavy- quarks in central Pb-Pb collisions. Furthermore, the observed positive heavy-flavor elliptic flow in semi-central Pb-Pb collisions gives a hint that charm quarks participate in the collective expansion of the medium at low pT. In high-multiplicity p-Pb collisions, a double-ridge structure is observed in the heavy-flavor decay electron-hadron azimuthal correlations at low pT similar to what is measured in the light-flavor sector. Such long-range correlations in ŋ could originate from a collective expansion of the system, as well as from gluon saturation in the initial state (color-glass condensate) or other mechanisms.

  13. Pluto's Extended Atmosphere: New Horizons Alice Lyman-α Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retherford, Kurt D.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.; Young, Leslie A.; Ennico, Kimberly A.; Olkin, Cathy B.; Cheng, Andy F.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Hinson, David P.; Kammer, Joshua A.; Linscott, Ivan R.; Parker, Alex H.; Parker, Joel Wm.; Pryor, Wayne R.; Schindhelm, Eric; Singer, Kelsi N.; Steffl, Andrew J.; Strobel, Darrell F.; Summers, Michael E.; Tsang, Constantine C. C.; Tyler, G. Len; Versteeg, Maarten H.; Woods, William W.; Cunningham, Nathaniel J.; Curdt, Werner

    2015-11-01

    Pluto's upper atmosphere is expected to extend several planetary radii, proportionally more so than for any planet in our solar system. Atomic hydrogen is readily produced at lower altitudes due to photolysis of methane and transported upward to become an important constituent. The Interplanetary Medium (IPM) provides a natural light source with which to study Pluto's atomic hydrogen atmosphere. While direct solar Lyman-α emissions dominate the signal at 121.6 nm at classical solar system distances, the contribution of diffuse illumination by IPM Lyman-α sky-glow is roughly on par at Pluto (Gladstone et al., Icarus, 2015). Hydrogen atoms in Pluto's upper atmosphere scatter these bright Lyα emission lines, and detailed simulations of the radiative transfer for these photons indicate that Pluto would appear dark against the IPM Lyα background. The Pluto-Alice UV imaging spectrograph on New Horizons conducted several observations of Pluto during the encounter to search for airglow emissions, characterize its UV reflectance spectra, and to measure the radial distribution of IPM Lyα near the disk. Our early results suggest that these model predictions for the darkening of IPM Lyα with decreasing altitude being measureable by Pluto-Alice were correct. We'll report our progress toward extracting H and CH4 density profiles in Pluto's upper atmosphere through comparisons of these data with detailed radiative transfer modeling. These New Horizons findings will have important implications for determining the extent of Pluto's atmosphere and related constraints to high-altitude vertical temperature structure and atmospheric escape.This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.

  14. Alice Walker: "The Diary of an African Nun" and Dubois Double Consciousness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontenot, Chester J.

    1977-01-01

    Analyzes Alice Walker's novel and notes that the plight of the African nun is that of the black intellectual or middle-class who find themselves caught between two worlds which are at once complementary and contradictory. (Author)

  15. The Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) Project: Investigating Exposed Middle Crust Through Geological Mapping, Drilling and Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhlin, C.; Almqvist, B. S. G.; Lorenz, H.; Berthet, T.; Hedin, P.; Gee, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    The COSC project aims to provide a deeper understanding of mountain belt dynamics in the Scandinavian Caledonides. Scientific investigations include a range of topics, from understanding the ancient orogeny to the present-day hydrological cycle. Main objectives of the project, from a tectonic viewpoint, are to obtain (i) better understanding of the exhumation and emplacement of the hot middle allochthon, which may enable comparison with exhumation processes in the Himalaya-Tibet orogen, (ii) a broad understanding of orogeny and deformation in the middle to deep crust and upper mantle of mountain belts, and (iii) constraints on the abundant geophysical data that have been acquired in the area. COSC investigations and drilling activities are focused in central Scandinavia, near Åre (Sweden), where rocks from the mid to lower crust of the orogen are exposed. Rock units of interest include granulite facies migmatites (locally ultra-high pressure), gneisses and amphibolites in the middle allochthon (Seve nappe) that overlie greenschist facies metasedimentary rocks in the lower allochthons (Särv and Jämtlandian nappes). The base of the lower allochthon marks the contact with the autochthonous Precambrian basement. To investigate the high grade Seve nappe the COSC-1 borehole was drilled to 2496 m, with almost 100 % core recovery, during summer 2014. The top 1800 m consists mostly of sub-horizontal and shallowly dipping intermittent layers of gneiss and amphibolite, with lesser amounts of calc-silicates, metagabbro, marble and lenses of pegmatite. The first signs of increasing strain appear shortly below 1700 m in the form of narrow deformation bands and thin mylonites. Below c. 2100 m, mylonites dominate and garnets become common. A transition from gneiss into lower-grade metasedimentary rocks occurs between 2345 and 2360 m. The lower part of the drill core to TD is dominated by quartzites and metasandstones of unclear tectonostratigraphic position that are mylonitized

  16. Towards an integrated magmatic, structural and metamorphic model for the 1.1-0.9 Ga Sveconorwegian orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagstad, Trond; Roberts, Nick M. W.; Røhr, Torkil S.; Marker, Mogens K.

    2013-04-01

    Orogeny involves magmatic, metamorphic, deformational and erosional processes that are caused by or lead to crustal thickening and the development of high topography. In general, these processes operate along the margins of continental plates, either as a result of subduction of oceanic crust (accretionary) or collision between two or more continental plates (collisional). Many of these processes are common to accretionary and collisional orogeny, and do not uniquely discriminate between the two. With only a fragmented geological record, unravelling the style of orogenesis in ancient orogens may, therefore, be far from straightforward. Adding to the complexity, modern continental margins, e.g., the southern Asian margin, display significant variation in orogenic style along strike, rendering along-strike comparisons and correlations unreliable. The late Mesoproterozoic Sveconorwegian province in SW Baltica is traditionally interpreted as the eastward continuation of the Grenville province in Canada, resulting from collision with Amazonia and forming a central part in the assembly of the Rodinia supercontinent. We recently proposed that the Sveconorwegian segment of this orogen formed as a result of accretionary processes rather than collision. This hypothesis was based mainly on considerations of the Sveconorwegian magmatic evolution. Here, we show how the metamorphic/structural record supports (or at least may be integrated in) our model as well. The key elements in our accretionary model are: 1) formation of the Sirdal Magmatic Belt (SMB) between 1070 and 1020 Ma, most likely representing a continental arc batholith. Coeval deformation and high-grade metamorphism farther east in the orogen could represent deformation in the retroarc. 2) cessation of SMB magmatism at 1020 Ma followed by UHT conditions at 1010-1005 Ma, with temperatures in excess of 1000°C at 7.5 kbar. Subduction of a spreading ridge at ca. 1020 Ma would result in an end to arc magmatism and

  17. Thrust segment from the Antler orogeny identified north of the Snake River Plain, south-central Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Skipp, B. )

    1993-04-01

    A small segment of folded thrust fault places silicified, cleaved, folded, graptolite-bearing black mudstone, sandstone, and minor granule conglomerate of the Ordovician Phi Kappa Formation over unnamed cleaved, yellow, calcareous siltstone and silty limestone of Devonian to Silurian age in the Long Canyon area near Fish Creek Reservoir, within a kilometer of the north-central margin of the Snake River Plain. The thrust fault and rocks of both hanging wall and footwall are overlain by sandy limestone and pebble conglomerate of the Middle Pennsylvanian Hailey Member of the Wood River Formation along a locally faulted unconformable contact. Thus, the age of the thrust is bracketed as post-Devonian and pre-Middle Pennsylvanian, a period that encompasses the Antler orogeny. The Long Canyon thrust fault is the first direct evidence of contraction within rocks of the postulated Mississippian Antler highland in western Idaho. Indirect evidence such as penetrative axial plane cleavage in Devonian argillites of the Milligen Formation, not present in younger argillites, has been recognized for several years. The entire sequence of Ordovician through Pennsylvanian rocks constitutes the southernmost exposure of the hanging wall of the Mesozoic Pioneer thrust fault system. In this area, the footwall of the Pioneer thrust comprises Silurian through Devonian platform carbonate rocks overlain unconformably by Mississippian orogenic detritus derived from the western Antler highland.

  18. Vertical displacement during late-collisional escape tectonics (Brasiliano Orogeny) in the Ribeira Belt, São Paulo State, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackspacher, P. C.; Godoy, A. M.

    1999-07-01

    During the Brasiliano-Pan-African Orogeny, West Gondwana formed by collisional processes around the São Francisco-Congo Craton. The Ribeira belt, in southeastern Brazil, resulted from northwestward collision (650-600 Ma), followed by large-scale northeast-southwest dextral strike-slip shear movements related to late-collisional escape tectonics ( ca 600 Ma). In São Paulo State, three groups, also interpreted as terranes, are recognised in the Ribeira Belt, the Embu, Itapira and São Roque Groups. The Embu and Itapira Groups are formed of sillimanite-gneisses, schists and migmatites intruded by Neoproterozoic calc-alkaline granitoids, all thrusted northwestward. The São Roque Group is composed of metasediments and metavolcanics in greenschist-facies. Its deformation indicates a transpressional regime associated with tectonic escape. Sub-alkaline granites were emplaced in shallow levels during this regime. Microstructural studies along the Itu, Moreiras and Taxaquara Shear Zones demonstrate the coexistence of horizontal and vertical displacement components during the transpressional regime. The vertical component is regarded as responsible for the lateral juxtaposition of different crustal levels.

  19. SPRING_TANK

    EPA Science Inventory

    This point coverage shows springs and water tanks on Salt River Indian Reservation in Arizona. This coverage was digitized off of USGS 7.5 minute quad maps by the Phoenix office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

  20. Harbingers of Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrao, John

    1976-01-01

    Emphasizing the spring migration of frogs, toads, and salamanders to their watery breeding sites, this article presents information on numerous amphibians and suggests both indoor and outdoor educational activities appropriate for elementary and/or early secondary instruction. (JC)

  1. Segmented tubular cushion springs and spring assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslim, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A spring (10) includes a tube (12) having an elliptical cross section, with the greater axial dimension (22) extending laterally and the lesser axial dimension (24) extending vertically. A plurality of cuts (20) in the form of slots passing through most of a wall of the tube (12) extend perpendicularly to a longitudinal axis (16) extending along the tube (12). An uncut portion (26) of the tube wall extends along the tube (12) for bonding or fastening the tube to a suitable base, such as a bottom (28) of a seat cushion (30).

  2. Segmented tubular cushion springs and spring assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslim, L. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A spring which includes a tube with an elliptical cross section, with the greater axial dimension extending laterally and the lesser axial dimension extending vertically is disclosed. A plurality of cuts in the form of slots passing through most of a wall of the tube extend perpendiculary to a longitudinal axis extending along the tube. An uncut portion of the tube wall extends along the tube for bonding or fastening the tube to a suitable base, such as a bottom of a seat cushion.

  3. Walking with springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugar, Thomas G.; Hollander, Kevin W.; Hitt, Joseph K.

    2011-04-01

    Developing bionic ankles poses great challenges due to the large moment, power, and energy that are required at the ankle. Researchers have added springs in series with a motor to reduce the peak power and energy requirements of a robotic ankle. We developed a "robotic tendon" that reduces the peak power by altering the required motor speed. By changing the required speed, the spring acts as a "load variable transmission." If a simple motor/gearbox solution is used, one walking step would require 38.8J and a peak motor power of 257 W. Using an optimized robotic tendon, the energy required is 21.2 J and the peak motor power is reduced to 96.6 W. We show that adding a passive spring in parallel with the robotic tendon reduces peak loads but the power and energy increase. Adding a passive spring in series with the robotic tendon reduces the energy requirements. We have built a prosthetic ankle SPARKy, Spring Ankle with Regenerative Kinetics, that allows a user to walk forwards, backwards, ascend and descend stairs, walk up and down slopes as well as jog.

  4. I-type granitoids in the eastern Yangtze Block: implications for the Early Paleozoic intracontinental orogeny in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yili; Yuan, Chao; Sun, Min; Wilde, Simon; Long, Xiaoping; Huang, Xiaolong; Wang, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    MMEs have relatively low Sr/Y (9-17) and (La/Yb)N (3-15) ratios, mixing of the lithospheric mantle-derived melt with an adakite-like melt would dilute the adakitic signature and make composition of the mixture deviate from adakitic characteristics. A comprehensive evaluation of geochronological data for magmatism and metamorphism in the orogeny reveals two phases of orogenesis: one before and one after ca. 440 Ma. The temporal and spatial developments of tectonomagmatism, as well as the increase in metamorphic grade, are interpreted to record the progress of the intracontinental orogeny, which started in the Wuyi-Yunkai domains of the Cathysia Block in the Ordovician and propagated westward into the Yangtze Block in the Silurian.

  5. Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC): Scientific objectives for the planned 2.5 km deep COSC-2 borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhlin, Christopher; Anderson, Mark; Dopson, Mark; Lorenz, Henning; Pascal, Christophe; Piazolo, Sandra; Roberts, Nick; Rosberg, Jan-Erik; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2016-04-01

    The Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) scientific drilling project employs two fully cored boreholes for investigating mountain building processes at mid-crustal levels in a deeply eroded Paleozoic collisional orogen of Alpine-Himalayan size. The two COSC boreholes will provide a unique c. 5 km deep composite section from a hot allochthon through the underlying 'colder' nappes, the main décollement and into the basement of the collisional underriding plate. COSC's unprecedented wealth of geophysical field and borehole data combined with the petrology, geochronology and rock physics information obtained from the drill cores will develop into an integrated model for a major collisional mountain belt. This can be utilized as an analogue to better understand similar modern tectonic settings (Himalaya, Izu-Bonin-Mariana, amongst others) and, thus, advance our understanding of such complex systems and how they affect the (human) environment. COSC investigations and drilling activities are focused in the Åre-Mörsil area (Sweden) of central Scandinavia. The first drill hole, COSC-1, was completed in late August 2014 with near 100% core recovery down to 2.5 km. It targeted the high-grade metamorphic Seve Nappe Complex (SNC) and its contact with the underlying allochthon, investigating how this metasedimentary unit, that was initially deeply subducted during orogeny, was exhumed and then, still hot, emplaced as an allochthon onto the foreland of the underriding plate. COSC-2 will investigate the main Caledonian décollement, which is the major detachment that separates the Caledonian allochthons from the autochthonous basement of the Fennoscandian Shield, and the character of the deformation in the basement. Combined seismic, magnetotelluric (MT) and magnetic data provide control on the basement structure and the depth to the main décollement, believed to be hosted in the carbon-rich highly conductive Alum Shale. Key targets are to understand the

  6. Phanerozoic orogeny triggers reactivation and exhumation in the northern part of the Archean-Paleoproterozoic North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-Fu; Zou, Dong-Ya; Santosh, M.; Zhu, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Cratons and orogenic belts are integral components of ancient continents. In some cases, stable continents can be reactivated and even largely destroyed by younger events. The mechanisms of reactivation or destruction of ancient cratons remain equivocal. Here we compile zircon U-Pb data from the metamorphic rocks of the Hongqiyingzi Group in the northern part of the North China Craton (NCC) to evaluate this problem. The results reveal episodic tectonothermal events related to three major periods of Latest Neoarchean-Earliest Paleoproterozoic (2.6-2.4 Ga), Paleoproterozoic (1.85-1.95 Ma) and Phanerozoic (480-220 Ma, with peak at 360-320 Ma). The Neoarchean-Paleoproterozoic crust as represented by the Hongqiyingzi Group was subducted to eclogite facies at ca. 1.95 Ga, followed by the final collision between the Eastern and Western Blocks at ca. 1.85 Ga to produce the Trans-North China Orogen (TNCO). The ubiquitous presence of Phanerozoic concordant zircons in the Hongqiyingzi Group suggests the episodic exhumation of the TNCO in the northern segment during the Phanerozoic. The 460-420 Ma concordant zircons record the onset of exhumation, triggered by the Ordovician-Silurian southward subduction of the Paleoasian Ocean. Widespread occurrence of 360-320 Ma metamorphic and magmatic zircons in the Hongqiyingzi Group demonstrates that the Carboniferous-Permian was an important period of exhumation for the TNCO, possibly related to back-arc extension. A few Permian-Triassic concordant zircons record late Permian accretion and Triassic post-accretional uplifting. Our study demonstrates that the young orogeny during the formation of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt resulted in extensive reactivation of not only the Archean continental crust but also the Paleoproterozoic orogen in the northern NCC.

  7. New insights on the final stages of the Appalachian orogeny in the southeast U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, E.; Fischer, K. M.; Wagner, L. S.; Hawman, R. B.; Rondenay, S.

    2015-12-01

    The processes of continental collision that built the Appalachian Mountains are at least partially preserved by the suture between Laurentia and the Gondwanan Suwannee terrane, left behind in the southeastern U.S. by Mesozoic rifting. High resolution imaging of this suture provides insight into collisional deformation, important both to local tectonic history and as case study of continental collision that helps us to understand ancient and active orogenies worldwide. We analyze Sp phases recorded by SESAME (Southeastern Suture of the Appalachian Margin Experiment) and other nearby broadband stations. Sp receiver functions were common conversion point stacked using local crust and mantle velocity models. In the crust, we observe a south-dipping positive velocity gradient with depth (PVG) that extends from the surface to the mid-crust. Further north, we observe a positive/negative gradient pair. These phases exist in eastern and western Georgia, indicating along-strike continuity for at least 170 km. Modeling with synthetic waveforms shows they are not artefacts of shallow sediments. The dipping PVG is spatially correlated with COCORP reflectors that were previously interpreted as a steep suture intersecting the Moho. However, the dip and greater horizontal extent of the PVG leads to a different interpretation: the existence of a large-scale detachment with a down-dip continuity of >330 km. This structure implies significant shortening and underthrusting of deep Laurentian or peri-Gondwanan basement beneath Suwannee crust during the final stages of the collision on a scale comparable to India-Eurasia crustal detachments. In the mantle, we observe a sharp lithosphere-asthenosphere velocity gradient in the northwest part of the study region only, consistent with disruption of lithosphere in the southeast by Mesozoic rifting. Ongoing work with wavefield migration (Bostock et al., 2001) should better resolve discontinuity dips and depths.

  8. By analogy with late paleozoic orogeny in the Venezuelan Andes, Maracaibo Basin is en route to a granitic event

    SciTech Connect

    Shagam, R.; Giegengack, R.F.; Lutz, T.M.

    1985-01-01

    Postulated stages of orogeny in a continental crustal setting are:- 1. Stresses of plate convergence lead to block uplift and complementary basin subsidence. The basin fills with 12-14 km of illite-rich flysch (1km/3Ma). This about doubles the thickness of K-rich sial. 2. In situ heating of the flysch by radioactive decay provides a thermal gradient of c.35/sup 0/C/km and it is metamorphosed (pre-deformation) to greenschists facies. 3. After maximum crustal subsidence continued compression results in updoming of crust and overlying flysch. Cannibalism of flysch, cooling and mild subsidence follow; autometamorphism declines. 4. Thin deltaic-marine deposits complete basin fill over the meta-flysch. The unconformity (a span of only 5-10 Ma) is of minor import. 5. Resetting of the thermal profile of the depressed crust lags far behind that in the flysch. Parallels to the above in the Maracalbo basin fill are: -thickness (approx.11km), nature (flysch abounds), rate of deposition (c.1km/3-4Ma), thermal gradient (c.33/sup 0/C/km) and overall tesselar shape. Presence of impermeable strata in the Maracaibo Basin suggests that large-scale fluid convection is inhibited; conductive models of heat transfer can be used. Computer modeling suggests that radiogenic heat, augmented by exothermic oxidation of organic matter, and with a normal mantle heat flow will explain the autometamorphism of the flysch. Alternative orogenic models invoking pull-apart basins do not explain the great thickness of sediments and absence of volcanic activity.

  9. Polymetamorphism accompanied switching in horizontal shortening during Isan Orogeny: Example from the Eastern Fold Belt, Mount Isa Inlier, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Sharib, A. S. A. A.; Sanislav, I. V.

    2013-03-01

    Mesoproterozoic low-P/high-T volcano-sedimentary rocks of the Soldiers Cap Group, the southeastern corner of Mount Isa Inlier, record a complex polymetamorphic history that accompanied four periods of bulk horizontal shortening directed NE-SW, N-S, W-E and NW-SE during the long-lived Isan Orogeny (~ 1650-1500 Ma). Low-P/high-T metamorphism (M1) prevailed during a period of NE-SW bulk horizontal shortening as indicated by the early growth of cordierite porphyroblasts, which entrap monazite grains that gave an average age of 1649 ± 12 Ma. This was followed by medium-P/high-T (M2) and high-P/high-T (M3) metamorphisms that accompanied periods of N-S and W-E bulk horizontal shortening, respectively. Growth of first generation garnet, andalusite and staurolite porphyroblasts having an average age of 1645 ± 7 Ma identify the former, whereas growth of the 1591 ± 10 Ma second generation garnet, staurolite and andalusite porphyroblasts together with fewer kyanite porphyroblasts characterizes the latter. The sediments of the Soldiers Cap Group were deposited in a tectonic setting that has the characteristics of an intra-continental rift basin. The upper limit of the age of sedimentation is constrained by detrital zircons at 1654 ± 4 Ma suggesting that tectonism and metamorphism were either active during the final stage of the basin filling or immediate after deposition. Introduction of mafic dykes and sills at different stratigraphic levels over a wide time span was the major source of heat.

  10. Orthos, an alarm system for the ALICE DAQ operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeland, Sylvain; Carena, Franco; Carena, Wisla; Chibante Barroso, Vasco; Costa, Filippo; Denes, Ervin; Divia, Roberto; Fuchs, Ulrich; Grigore, Alexandru; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Soos, Csaba; Telesca, Adriana; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; von Haller, Barthelemy

    2012-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The DAQ (Data Acquisition System) facilities handle the data flow from the detectors electronics up to the mass storage. The DAQ system is based on a large farm of commodity hardware consisting of more than 600 devices (Linux PCs, storage, network switches), and controls hundreds of distributed hardware and software components interacting together. This paper presents Orthos, the alarm system used to detect, log, report, and follow-up abnormal situations on the DAQ machines at the experimental area. The main objective of this package is to integrate alarm detection and notification mechanisms with a full-featured issues tracker, in order to prioritize, assign, and fix system failures optimally. This tool relies on a database repository with a logic engine, SQL interfaces to inject or query metrics, and dynamic web pages for user interaction. We describe the system architecture, the technologies used for the implementation, and the integration with existing monitoring tools.

  11. Recent COMPASS results and future prospects for ALICE

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Suh-Urk

    2015-04-10

    The COMPASS Collaboration has accumulated the world’s highest statistics on the reaction π{sup −} p → π{sup +}π{sup −}π{sup −} p at 190 GeV/c. The results, presented in Section 1, show that a new state J{sup PC} = 1{sup ++} state never reported before, the a{sub 1}(1420), decaying to f{sub 0}(980)π followed by f{sub 0}(980) → ππ. In addition, the Collaboration reports an exotic J{sup PC} = 1{sup −+} state, the π{sub 1}(1600), which cannot be a quarkonium. Both states are likely to be a tetra-quark, i.e. qq{sup ¯}+qq{sup ¯} or a gluonic hybrid, a qq{sup ¯} object with an excited gluon inside it. Section 2 is devoted to a brief discussion of the central production of resonances, which is being investigated by both COMPASS and ALICE collaborations. However, the results are not yet released, so it is limited to a broad discussion of the central production, with emphasis on different analyses dictated by differences in the experimental setup.

  12. A continuous read-out TPC for the ALICE upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippmann, C.

    2016-07-01

    The largest gaseous Time Projection Chamber (TPC) in the world, the ALICE TPC, will be upgraded based on Micro Pattern Gas Detector technology during the second long shutdown of the CERN Large Hadron Collider in 2018/19. The upgraded detector will operate continuously without the use of a triggered gating grid. It will thus be able to read all minimum bias Pb-Pb events that the LHC will deliver at the anticipated peak interaction rate of 50 kHz for the high luminosity heavy-ion era. New read-out electronics will send the continuous data stream to a new online farm at rates up to 1 TByte/s. A fractional ion feedback of below 1% is required to keep distortions due to space charge in the TPC drift volume at a tolerable level. The new read-out chambers will consist of quadruple stacks of Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM), combining GEM foils with a different hole pitch. Other key requirements such as energy resolution and operational stability have to be met as well. A careful optimisation of the performance in terms of all these parameters was achieved during an extensive R&D program. A working point well within the design specifications was identified with an ion backflow of 0.63%, a local energy resolution of 11.3% (sigma) and a discharge probability comparable to that of standard triple GEM detectors.

  13. Strangeness Production in Jets with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Chrismond; Harton, Austin; Garcia, Edmundo; Alice Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The study of strange particle production is an important tool for understanding the properties of the hot and dense QCD medium created in heavy-ion collisions at ultra-relativistic energies. The study of strange particles in these collisions provides information on parton fragmentation, a fundamental QCD process. While measurements at low and intermediate pT, are already in progress at the LHC, the study of high momentum observables is equally important for a complete understanding of the QCD matter, this can be achieved by studying jet interactions. We propose the measurement of the characteristics of the jets containing strange particles. Starting with proton-proton collisions, we have calculated the inclusive pTJet spectra and the spectra for jets containing strange particles (K-short or lambda), and we are extending this analysis to lead-lead collisions. In this talk the ALICE experiment will be described, the methodology used for the data analysis and the available results will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants PHY-1305280 and PHY-1407051.

  14. Spring polar ozone behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding of the springtime behavior of polar stratospheric ozone as of mid 1990 is summarized. Heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds as hypothesis for ozone loss are considered and a simplified description of the behavior of Antarctic ozone in winter and spring is given. Evidence that the situation is more complicated than described by the theory is produced. Many unresolved scientific issues remain and some of the most important problems are identified. Ozone changes each spring since 1979 have clearly established for the first time that man made chlorine compounds influence stratospheric ozone. Long before important advances in satellite and in situ investigations, it was Dobson's decision to place a total ozone measuring spectrometer at Halley Bay in Antarctica during the International Geophysical Year and subsequent continuous monitoring which led to the discovery that ozone was being destroyed each spring by chlorine processed by polar stratospheric clouds.

  15. Grid Computing at GSI for ALICE and FAIR - present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Kilian; Uhlig, Florian; Karabowicz, Radoslaw; Montiel-Gonzalez, Almudena; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Preuss, Carsten

    2012-12-01

    The future FAIR experiments CBM and PANDA have computing requirements that fall in a category that could currently not be satisfied by one single computing centre. One needs a larger, distributed computing infrastructure to cope with the amount of data to be simulated and analysed. Since 2002, GSI operates a tier2 center for ALICE@CERN. The central component of the GSI computing facility and hence the core of the ALICE tier2 centre is a LSF/SGE batch farm, currently split into three subclusters with a total of 15000 CPU cores shared by the participating experiments, and accessible both locally and soon also completely via Grid. In terms of data storage, a 5.5 PB Lustre file system, directly accessible from all worker nodes is maintained, as well as a 300 TB xrootd-based Grid storage element. Based on this existing expertise, and utilising ALICE's middleware ‘AliEn’, the Grid infrastructure for PANDA and CBM is being built. Besides a tier0 centre at GSI, the computing Grids of the two FAIR collaborations encompass now more than 17 sites in 11 countries and are constantly expanding. The operation of the distributed FAIR computing infrastructure benefits significantly from the experience gained with the ALICE tier2 centre. A close collaboration between ALICE Offline and FAIR provides mutual advantages. The employment of a common Grid middleware as well as compatible simulation and analysis software frameworks ensure significant synergy effects.

  16. Distributed Russian Tier-2 - RDIG in Simulation and Analysis of Alice Data From LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, A.; Jancurova, L.; Kiryanov, A.; Kotlyar, V.; Mitsyn, V.; Lyublev, Y.; Ryabinkin, E.; Shabratova, G.; Smirnov, S.; Stepanova, L.; Urazmetov, W.; Zarochentsev, A.

    2011-12-01

    On the threshold of LHC data there were intensive test and upgrade of GRID application software for all LHC experiments at the top of the modern LCG middleware (gLite). The update of such software for ALICE experiment at LHC, AliEn[1] had provided stable and secure operation of sites developing LHC data. The activity of Russian RDIG (Russian Data Intensive GRID) computer federation which is the distributed Tier-2 centre are devoted to simulation and analysis of LHC data in accordance with the ALICE computing model [2]. Eight sites of this federation interesting in ALICE activity upgrade their middle ware in accordance with requirements of ALICE computing what ensured success of MC production and end-user analysis activity at all eight sites. The result of occupancy and efficiency of each site in the time of LHC operation will be presented in the report. The outline the results of CPU and disk space usage at RDIG sites for the data simulation and analysis of first LHC data from the exposition of ALICE detector [3] will be presented as well. There will be presented also the information about usage of parallel analysis facility based on PROOF [4].

  17. The GridKa Tier-1 Computing Center within the ALICE Grid Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, WooJin J.; Christopher, Jung; Heiss, Andreas; Petzold, Andreas; Schwarz, Kilian

    2014-06-01

    The GridKa computing center, hosted by Steinbuch Centre for Computing at the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology (KIT) in Germany, is serving as the largest Tier-1 center used by the ALICE collaboration at the LHC. In 2013, GridKa provides 30k HEPSPEC06, 2.7 PB of disk space, and 5.25 PB of tape storage to ALICE. The 10Gbit/s network connections from GridKa to CERN, several Tier-1 centers and the general purpose network are used by ALICE intensively. In 2012 a total amount of ~1 PB was transferred to and from GridKa. As Grid framework, AliEn (ALICE Environment) is being used to access the resources, and various monitoring tools including the MonALISA (MONitoring Agent using a Large Integrated Services Architecture) are always running to alert in case of any problem. GridKa on-call engineers provide 24/7 support to guarantee minimal loss of availability of computing and storage resources in case of hardware or software problems. We introduce the GridKa Tier-1 center from the viewpoint of ALICE services.

  18. The Life of the Party: Alice McGrath, Multiracial Coalitions, and the Struggle for Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armbruster-Sandoval, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    This essay explores the life of Alice Greenfield McGrath, a key player in the Sleepy Lagoon Defense Committee and a longtime activist whose involvement in social justice issues spanned eight decades. While best known for her role in the Sleepy Lagoon case in the 1940s, Alice fought the "good fight" for virtually her entire life, supporting the…

  19. Editors' Spring Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    While they do not represent the rainbow of reading tastes American public libraries accommodate, Book Review editors are a wildly eclectic bunch. One look at their bedside tables and ereaders would reveal very little crossover. This article highlights an eclectic array of spring offerings ranging from print books to an audiobook to ebook apps. It…

  20. Spring black stem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spring black stem is the most destructive alfalfa diseases in temperate regions of the U.S., Canada, Australia, and countries of Europe, Asia, and South America. The disease causes serious yield losses by reducing canopy dry matter and also decreases seed weight and crown and root mass. Forage qua...

  1. The News. Spring 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Ray, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This Spring issue of the quarterly newsletter of the Community College League of California contains the following articles: (1) Enrollment Drops; Fees to Blame?; (2) Senate's Grad Proposal Triggers Debate on Mission, Access; (3) Compton Decision has Affected Perceptions of Commission (discussion with Barbara Beno); (4) Dynamic New Architectural…

  2. Atascocita Springs Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigaglioni, Irene; Yocham, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    With the significant amount of time invested in researching the best techniques for delivering instruction to their students, Humble ISD is always on the forefront of education. Taking the recommendations of their active and vocal community groups, the district embarked in the design of the 26th elementary school, Atascocita Springs Elementary…

  3. Planar torsion spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Parsons, Adam H. (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A torsion spring comprises an inner mounting segment. An outer mounting segment is located concentrically around the inner mounting segment. A plurality of splines extends from the inner mounting segment to the outer mounting segment. At least a portion of each spline extends generally annularly around the inner mounting segment.

  4. Energy Matters - Spring 2002

    SciTech Connect

    2002-03-01

    Quarterly newsletter from DOE's Industrial Technologies Program to promote the use of energy-efficient industrial systems. The focus of the Spring 2002 Issue of Energy Matters focuses on premium energy efficiency systems, with articles on new gas technologies, steam efficiency, the Augusta Newsprint Showcase, and more.

  5. A Quadratic Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2010-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, we study examples of the forced quadratic spring equation [image omitted]. By performing trial-and-error numerical experiments, we demonstrate the existence of stability boundaries in the phase plane indicating initial conditions yielding bounded solutions, investigate the resonance boundary in the [omega]…

  6. Echoes of Spring Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyken, J. Clarine J.

    Designed to preserve the rich heritage of the rural school system which passed from the education scene in the 1930's and 1940's, this narrative, part history and part nostalgia, describes the author's own elementary education and the secure community life centered in the one room Spring Valley School in Hamilton County, Iowa, in the early decades…

  7. 9. CONTEXTUAL VIEW SOUTHSOUTHEAST TOWARDS SPRING SITE. SPRING LEFT CORNER. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. CONTEXTUAL VIEW SOUTH-SOUTHEAST TOWARDS SPRING SITE. SPRING LEFT CORNER. - Juniata Mill Complex, 22.5 miles Southwest of Hawthorne, between Aurora Crater & Aurora Peak, Hawthorne, Mineral County, NV

  8. Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments (ALICE). Candidates point sources and high-level science products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choquet, Elodie; Chen, C.; Debes, J. H.; Golimowski, D. A.; Hagan, J.; Hines, D. C.; Lonsdale, S.; Marois, C.; Mawet, D.; Mittal, T.; Moerchen, M.; N'Diaye, M.; Perrin, M. D.; Pueyo, L.; Rajan, A.; Reid, I. N.; Schneider, G.; Wolff, S.; Soummer, R.

    2014-01-01

    The Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments (ALICE) project (HST/AR program 12652; PI Soummer) is currently conducting a comprehensive and consistent reprocessing of HST-NICMOS coronagraphic survey data to search for point sources and disks using advanced PSF subtraction. The Karhunen-Loeve Image Projection (KLIP) algorithm based on principal component analysis was developed for this project. We present the main concept for the pipeline, reduction strategy, and PSF subtraction implementation and performance. The ALICE pipeline was designed to process automatically approximately 400 targets in the NICMOS coronagraphic archive, and to deliver High-Level Science Products (HLSPs) back to the MAST archive at STScI. The HLSPs are defined in collaboration with other similar projects to define a standard format for high-contrast imaging. We present and discuss the ALICE point source candidates detected in the NICMOS archive together with a statistical analysis of the population of background objects.

  9. Particle identification with the ALICE Time-Of-Flight detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alici, A.

    2014-12-01

    High performance Particle Identification system (PID) is a distinguishing characteristic of the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Charged particles in the intermediate momentum range are identified in ALICE by the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) detector. The TOF exploits the Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) technology, capable of an intrinsic time resolution at the level of few tens of ps with an overall efficiency close to 100% and a large operation plateau. The full system is made of 1593 MRPC chambers with a total area of 141 m2, covering the pseudorapidity interval [-0.9,+0.9] and the full azimuthal angle. The ALICE TOF system has shown very stable operation during the first 3 years of collisions at the LHC. In this paper a summary of the system performance as well as main results with data from collisions will be reported.

  10. Recent Developments on ALICE (Accelerators and Lasers In Combined Experiments) at Daresbury Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Saveliev, Y M; Buckley, R K; Buckley, S R; Clarke, J A; Corlett, P A; Dunning, D J; Goulden, A R; Hill, S F; Jackson, F; Jamison, S P; Jones, J K; Jones, L B; Leonard, S; McIntosh, P A; McKenzie, J W; Middleman, K J; Militsyn, B L; Moss, A J; Muratori, B D; Orrett, J F; Pattalwar, S M; Phillips, P J; Scott, D J; Seddon, E A; Shepherd, B.J.A.; Smith, S L; Thompson, N; Wheelhouse, A E; Williams, P H; Harrison, P; Holder, D J; Holder, G M; Schofield, A L; Weightman, P; Williams, R L; Laundry, D; Powers, T; Priebe, G; Surman, M

    2010-05-01

    Progress made in ALICE (Accelerators and Lasers In Combined Experiments) commissioning and a summary of the latest experimental results are presented in this paper. After an extensive work on beam loading effects in SC RF linac (booster) and linac cavities conditioning, ALICE can now operate in full energy recovery mode at the bunch charge of 40pC, the beam energy of 30MeV and train lengths of up to 100us. This improved operation of the machine resulted in generation of coherently enhanced broadband THz radiation with the energy of several tens of uJ per pulse and in successful demonstration of the Compton Backscattering x-ray source experiment. The next steps in the ALICE scientific programme are commissioning of the IR FEL and start of the research on the first non-scaling FFAG accelerator EMMA. Results from both projects will be also reported.

  11. Recent developments of the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian containment code ALICE-II. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Zeuch, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    The ANL arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian containment code ALICE was developed for use in fast reactor containment studies and is particularly suited for problems involving complex fluid-structure interactions. Many improvements have been made which has resulted in a second version of the code, ALICE-II. A selection of some important improvements are given in this paper. To realistically analyze the above-core hydrodynamics containing a movable upper internal structure (UIS), a 3-D pipe element has been adopted to calculate the response of the UIS columns that connect the UIS to the vessel head. A corotational coordinate scheme for large displacement, small strain, elastic-plastic structural-dynamic analysis is utilized in the formulation. Both geometric and material nonlinearities are considered. The governing equations are integrated explicitly using a central difference procedure. Many sample problems are presented, including comparisons of ALICE-II and ICECO-CEL results on the APRICOT Phase 3 problems.

  12. Performance of the High Momentum Particle Identification Detector in ALICE at Lhc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cataldo, Giacinto

    2008-06-01

    The ALICE High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (HMPID) is a proximity focusing ring imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH), 10 m2 of active area for the hadron identification at high transverse momenta: 1 < pt < 3 GeV/c for charged π and K, 1 < pt < 5 GeV/c for p. It has been installed in ALICE since September 2006 in view of the first collisions expected mid-2008. After a short description of the detector and the online data quality monitoring this paper focuses on the HMPID particle identification (PID) capabilities even in the higher expected track multiplicity dNch/dη = 6000, simulated in central Pb-Pb ALICE events.

  13. The Rosetta UV imaging spectrometer ALICE: First light optical and radiometric performance results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, D. C.; Stern, S. A.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Bertaux, J. L.; Feldman, P. D.; Festou, M. C.

    2000-10-01

    We describe the design, scientific objectives, and "first-light" radiometric testing results of the Rosetta/ALICE instrument. ALICE is a lightweight (2.7 kg), low-power (4 W), and low-cost imaging spectrometer optimized for cometary ultraviolet spectroscopy. ALICE, which is funded by NASA (with hardware contributions from CNES, France), will fly on the ESA Rosetta Orbiter to characterize the cometary nucleus, coma, and nucleus/coma coupling of the target comet 46P/Wirtanen. It will obtain spatially-resolved, far-UV spectra of Wirtanen's nucleus and coma in the 700-2050 Å passband with a spectral resolution of 5-10 Å for extended sources that fill the entrance slit's field- of-view. ALICE is also the UV spectrometer model for the PERSI remote sensing suite proposed for the Pluto Kuiper Express (PKE) mission. ALICE uses modern technology to achieve its low mass and low power design specifications. It employs an off-axis telescope feeding a 0.15-m normal incidence Rowland circle spectrograph with a concave (toroidal) holographic reflection grating. The imaging microchannel plate (MCP) detector utilizes dual solar-blind opaque photocathodes of KBr and CsI deposited on a cylindrically-curved (7.5-cm radius) MCP Z-stack, and a matching 2-D cylindrically-curved double delay-line readout array with a 1024 x 32 pixel array format. This array format provides a point source response that is twice that originally proposed (Δ λ 3 Å). Three data taking modes are possible: (i) histogram image mode for 2-D images, (ii) pixel list mode with periodic time hacks for temporal studies, and (iii) count rate mode for broadband photometric studies. Optical and radiometric sensitivity performance results based on subsystem tests of the flight optics, detector, and preliminary integrated system level tests of the integrated ALICE flight model are presented and discussed.

  14. 3D thermo-mechanical model of the orogeny in Pamir constrained by geological and geophysical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, S. V.; Tympel, J.; Ratschbacher, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Pamir-Hindu Kush orogenic belt is the result of the indentation of the western corner of the India plate into Eurasia. It has accommodated the highest strain over the shortest meridional distance of the India-Eurasia collision zone. Recent high-resolution seismic tomographic and receiver function studies confirm the presence of a south-dipping continental lithosphere, which has been traced to the depth of more than 200-300 km beneath the northern Pamir (Pamir slab). Balanced cross-section document crustal shortening associated with the corresponding frontal thrust system of a few tens of km, which is much less than the expected (>200-300 km) for intra-continental subduction zone, based on the seismically imaged length of the Pamir slab. Another unique feature of Pamir is the presence of large gneiss domes with the exhumation reaching a depth of 30-40 km.We employ the finite-element thermomechanical modelling technique SLIM3D to simulate the evolution of the Pamir orogeny during the last 25 Myr. The technique is using advanced non-linear elasto-visco-plastic rheology with parameters based on laboratory experiments. Our 3D model extends 1100 km N-S, 800 km E-W, and 300 km deep, and replicates indentation of the western half of India promontory into Eurasia. The moving modelling-window technique allows focusing at the most extensively deforming domains, and a 3D model setup and boundary conditions allow lateral material flow to the west, i.e. perpendicular to the direction of tectonic shortening.The model replicates major features of the lithospheric structure and geological history. For instance, we demonstrate that large part of the roll back of the Pamir slab may be caused by the delamination of the mantle lithosphere together with the lower crust, rather than classical intra-continental subduction involving thrust-imbrication of the uppermost crust. The resulting shortening at the Pamir frontal thrust system appears to be lower than 50 km in accord with

  15. Himalayan orogeny and palaeovegetational changes: a relook into the factors controlling global expansion of C4 grasslands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; Awasthi, A.; Parkash, B.; Kumar, S.

    2012-04-01

    The Himalayan orogeny constitutes a significant tectonic event in the Earth's Cenozoic history which encompasses a series of events resulting in long-term climatic cooling and drying. Establishing synchroneity of palaeoecological events through floral and faunal changes in proxy-records could help in documenting factors responsible for this change in global climate. Based on geological evidences, various workers in different parts of the world have established C4 grassland appearance during late Cenozoic, though the expansion is confined largely to Late Miocene. However, causes of this worldwide C4 grassland expansion have remained controversial since its discovery. Resolution of such controversies ultimately lies in undertaking more detailed local palaeo-vegetational studies of Cenozoic sediments and subsequent correlation at regional and global scale. The aim of the present work is to study the Himalayan Cenozoic sediments of India and the results are then compared with other similar studies done in different parts of the world. Carbon isotope analysis of soil carbonate, largely nodules, had been carried out from Samba-Mansar (S-M) section in the Jammu & Kashmir state of India which is placed laterally ~ 40-50Km along strike from another comparable Jammu-Nandni (J-N) section. Analyses of a total of 141 samples in the Ramnagar sub-basin, spanning a period from ~ 12Ma to ~ 0.4Ma, have been coherent so as to have a better view of palaeovegetational change across the sub-basin, both at comparable temporal and spatial regional scale. Herein the isotopic results show the dominance of C3 vegetation pre-7Ma and C4 vegetation post-5Ma with first appearance of C4 plants at ~6.8Ma. Percentage abundance of C4 vegetation was less than 20% pre-7Ma but was increased to more than 40% post-5Ma reaching up to 100% in the youngest analyzed sediments. The results are in conformity with patterns of change in vegetation documented in other parts of the Himalayan belt. These indicate

  16. Glacial climate driven sedimentation overwhelms tectonics in the battle for control of margin architecture: Southeast Alaska, St. Elias Orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, S. P.; Jaeger, J. M.; Willems, B.; Powell, R. D.; Lowe, L. A.

    2006-12-01

    The interplay of tectonic and climatic processes is fundamental to the development of mountain belts and the ensuing patterns of deformation and erosion. Of equal significance is the interaction of tectonic and climatic processes in the development of orogenic sedimentary basins, or in the case of a coastal mountain belt, in the growth of a continental margin. The Chugach-St. Elias Orogeny, which is driven by the collision of the Yakutat microplate with North America in southeast Alaska, has generated the highest coastal relief in the world. The combined forces of tectonic uplift and glacial erosion have resulted in the accumulation of over 5 km of sediment to form the continental shelf and the creation of the Surveyor Fan that is over 2 km thick proximally. High-resolution GI-gun seismic data allow for detailed examination of the margin architecture off the Bering Glacier within the leading edge of the Yakutat block. The deformation and growth of the margin appears to have first undergone a tectonically dominated phase followed more recently by a glacially dominated phase. During the tectonically dominated period a broad anticline-syncline system helped create accommodation space and the margin both shallowed and widened to its current 50 km width. Based on ties with industry well cuttings, the dominance switched sometime between 0.75 and 1.25 Ma to being completely controlled by glacial advance-retreat patterns. The mappable glacial sequences are undeformed by the underlying anticlines and display several notable features: 1) erosional bases that can often be mapped across the entire shelf, terminating at the shelf edge, 2) little evidence for terminal or retreat moraines on the shelf suggesting very rapid and single phase retreat of the glacier, 3) incomplete glacial sequences due to erosion by later advances, and 4) minimal creation of accommodation space. We investigate the cause of the switch to glacial dominance, the mechanisms and causes of the potentially

  17. Variscan orogeny in Corsica: new structural and geochronological insights, and its place in the Variscan geodynamic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Michel; Rossi, Philippe; Gaché, Julien; Melleton, Jérémie; Frei, Dirk; Li, Xianhua; Lin, Wei

    2014-09-01

    In Western Corsica, remnants of pre-batholitic lithological and metamorphic assemblages are preserved as km-scale septa enclosed within Lower Carboniferous to Early Permian plutons. Two groups of septa were recognized: (1) the Argentella and Agriates-Tenda fragments correspond to Neoproterozoic rocks deformed and metamorphosed during the Cadomian-Panafrican orogeny, and (2) the Zicavo, Porto-Vecchio, Solenzara-Fautea, Belgodère, Topiti, and Vignola fragments consist of Variscan metamorphic rocks. The lithological content and the main ductile deformation events for each septum are presented. In the Zicavo, Porto-Vecchio, and Topiti septa, a top-to-the-SW ductile shearing (D1 event) coeval with an amphibolite facies metamorphism is responsible for crustal thickening at ca 360 Ma. This main event was preceded by eclogite and granulite facies metamorphic events preserved as restites within migmatites dated at ca 345-330 Ma. A top-to-the-SE ductile shearing (D2 event) coeval with the crustal melting accommodated the exhumation of the D1 event. In contrast, the Belgodère segment is peculiar as it exhibits a top-to-the-E vergence, although retrogressed high-pressure rocks are also recognized. The pre-Permian fragments are arranged in four NW-SE-striking stripes that define a SW-NE zoning with (1) a Western domain in Topiti, Vignola, Zicavo, Porto-Vecchio, and Solenzara-Fautea; (2) a Neoproterozoic basement with its unconformable Early Paleozoic sedimentary cover in Argentella; (3) an Eastern metamorphic domain in Belgodère; (4) another Neoproterozoic basement with its Upper Paleozoic sedimentary cover in Agriates-Tenda. The Argentella basement is separated from the Western and Eastern domains by two sutures: S1 and S2. The Variscan Corsica represents the Eastern part of the Sardinia-Corsica-Maures segment. The comparison of this segment with other Variscan domains allows us to propose some possible correlations. We argue that the Western domain, Argentella, Belgod

  18. Studying Springs in Series Using a Single Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serna, Juan D.; Joshi, Amitabh

    2011-01-01

    Springs are used for a wide range of applications in physics and engineering. Possibly, one of their most common uses is to study the nature of restoring forces in oscillatory systems. While experiments that verify Hooke's law using springs are abundant in the physics literature, those that explore the combination of several springs together are…

  19. L0 Trigger for the EMCal Detector of the ALICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kral, Jiri; Awes, Terry C; Muller, Hans; Rak, Jan; Schambach, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator was designed to study ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The ALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMCal) was built to provide measurement of photons, electrons, and jets, and trigger selection of hard-QCD events containing them. The EMCal single-shower L0 trigger, which triggers on large energy deposit within a 4 x 4 tower sliding window, became operational in 2010. The implementation of the real-time FPGA based algorithm optimized to provide a fast L0 decision is presented.

  20. Readout electronics upgrade on ALICE/PHOS detector for Run 2 of LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Zhang, F.; Feng, W.; Huang, G.; Song, Z.; Yin, Z.; Zhou, D.

    2015-02-01

    The ALICE/PHOS detector is carrying out a major upgrade of its readout electronics for the RUN 2 of LHC (2015-2017). A new architecture based on the point to point link is developed. The event readout rate can achieve 30 kHz by replacing the old parallel GTL bus with DTC links. The communication stability of the interface between front-end electronic boards and readout concentrators is significantly improved. A new FPGA firmware is designed to be compatible with the upgraded ALICE trigger system and DATE software.

  1. Hot Spring Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    López-López, Olalla; Cerdán, María Esperanza; González-Siso, María Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Hot springs have been investigated since the XIX century, but isolation and examination of their thermophilic microbial inhabitants did not start until the 1950s. Many thermophilic microorganisms and their viruses have since been discovered, although the real complexity of thermal communities was envisaged when research based on PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes arose. Thereafter, the possibility of cloning and sequencing the total environmental DNA, defined as metagenome, and the study of the genes rescued in the metagenomic libraries and assemblies made it possible to gain a more comprehensive understanding of microbial communities—their diversity, structure, the interactions existing between their components, and the factors shaping the nature of these communities. In the last decade, hot springs have been a source of thermophilic enzymes of industrial interest, encouraging further study of the poorly understood diversity of microbial life in these habitats. PMID:25369743

  2. The joys of spring.

    PubMed

    Riby, Leigh M

    2013-01-01

    This study used Vivaldi's Four Seasons, an extraordinary example of program music, to explore the consequence of music exposure on cognitive event-related potentials (ERPs). Seventeen participants performed a three-stimulus visual odd-ball task while ERPs were recorded. Participants were required to differentiate between a rare target stimulus (to elicit a memory updating component; P3b), a rare novel stimulus (to elicit a novelty attention component; P3a), and a frequent nontarget stimulus. During task performance participants listened to the four concertos: Spring, Summer, Autumn, and Winter in comparison to a silent control condition. Additionally, the three movements of each concerto have a fast, slow, fast structure that enabled examination of the impact of tempo. The data revealed that "Spring," particularly the well-recognized, vibrant, emotive, and uplifting first movement, had the ability to enhance mental alertness and brain measures of attention and memory. PMID:22851380

  3. Spring operated accelerator and constant force spring mechanism therefor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shillinger, G. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A spring assembly consisting of an elongate piece of flat spring material formed into a spiral configuration and a free running spool in circumscribing relation to which this spring is disposed was developed. The spring has a distal end that is externally accessible so that when the distal end is drawn along a path, the spring unwinds against a restoring force present in the portion of the spring that resides in a transition region between a relatively straight condition on the path and a fully wound condition on the spool. When the distal end is released, the distal end is accelerated toward the spool by the force existing at the transition region which force is proportional to the cross-sectional area of the spring.

  4. Spring magnet films.

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, S. D.; Fullerton, E. E.; Gornakov, V. S.; Inomata, A.; Jiang, J. S.; Nikitenko, V. I.; Shapiro, A. J.; Shull, R. D.; Sowers, C. H.

    1999-03-29

    The properties of exchange-spring-coupled bilayer and superlattice films are highlighted for Sm-Co hard magnet and Fe or Co soft magnet layers. The hexagonal Sm-Co is grown via magnetron sputtering in a- and b-axis epitaxial orientations. In both cases the c-axis, in the film plane, is the easy axis of magnetization. Trends in coercivity with film thickness are established and related to the respective microstructure of the two orientations. The magnetization reversal process for the bilayers is examined by magnetometry and magneto-optical imaging, as well as by simulations that utilize a one-dimensional model to provide the spin configuration for each atomic layer. The Fe magnetization is pinned to that of the Sm-Co at the interface, and reversal proceeds via a progressive twisting of the Fe magnetization. The Fe demagnetization curves are reversible as expected for a spring magnet. Comparison of experiment and simulations indicates that the spring magnet behavior can be understood from the intrinsic properties of the hard and soft layers. Estimated are made of the ultimate gain in performance that can potentially be realized in this system.

  5. Influence of Alice 3: Reducing the Hurdles to Success in a CS1 Programming Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Tebring

    2013-01-01

    Learning the syntax, semantics, and concepts behind software engineering can be a challenging task for many individuals. This paper examines the Alice 3 software, a three-dimensional visual environment for teaching programming concepts, to determine if it is an effective tool for improving student achievement, raising self-efficacy, and engaging…

  6. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko’s Increasing Atomic Sulfur Abundance Observed by Rosetta Alice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feaga, Lori M.; Feldman, Paul D.; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Keeney, Brian A.; Knight, Matthew M.; Noonan, John; Parker, Joel Wm.; Schindhelm, Eric; Steffl, Andrew J.; Stern, S. Alan; Vervack, Ronald J.; Weaver, Harold A.

    2015-11-01

    Alice, NASA’s lightweight and low-power far-ultraviolet (FUV) imaging spectrograph onboard ESA’s comet orbiting spacecraft Rosetta (Stern et al. 2007), is continuing its characterization of the nucleus and coma of the Jupiter family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (C-G) as it approaches and recedes from perihelion. With a spectral range from 700-2050 Å, Alice has the ability to detect the atomic sulfur multiplets at 1429 Å, 1479 Å and 1814 Å. Sulfur in C-G’s coma is most likely a dissociation product of CS2 and OCS, but could also be produced after a secondary dissociation from H2S and SO2, all molecular species measured in C-G’s coma by ROSINA, the Rosetta orbiter’s mass spectrometer.Due to low abundances, Alice did not detect sulfur atoms at C-G until May 2015 when the comet was at ~1.7 AU and still 3 months from perihelion. Now, sulfur is ubiquitous in Alice observations above the limb of the nucleus. There is evidence that there is not a strong dependence of the abundance of sulfur on the distance from the nucleus in the pre-perihelion radial profiles of the gas, which may be indicative of the parent molecule and its distribution. This will be investigated further. The evolution of the presence of the three sulfur multiplets, their relative abundances and excitation processes, and behavior pre- and post-perihelion will be presented.

  7. Does Morality Harm Children? Alice Miller on Morality and Poisonous Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fridley, William L.

    2006-01-01

    Alice Miller, the former psychoanalyst, has gained world renown for her controversial and provocative writings on child rearing. Miller contends that traditional child rearing practices--in schools, ecclesiastical settings, and the family--consist of physical and emotional cruelty that she labels "poisonous pedagogy." According to…

  8. Alice Carey Inskeep (1875-1942): A Pioneering Iowa Music Educator and MENC Founding Member

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedden, Debra Gordon; Heller, George N.; Humphreys, Jere T.; Slattery, Valerie A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the professional contributions of Alice Carey Inskeep (1875-1942), who contributed significantly to music education through her "positive and effective teaching, supervising, community service, and leadership in music education". Inskeep was born, in Ottumwa, Iowa, and taught for five years in that city's…

  9. Black Matrilineage: The Case of Alice Walker and Zora Neale Hurston.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadoff, Diane F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the relationship of the Black contemporary author, Alice Walker, to folklorist Zora Neale Hurston and presents a clarification of the relationship of gender and race in a revised theory of literary influence. Argues that Black women authors sometimes misread literary forbears in order to discover and express a positive matrilineage…

  10. "Spend Your Whole Life Learning and Giving!": An Interview with Alice Sterling Honig

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Early Childhood Research & Practice, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an interview with Dr. Alice Sterling Honig which took place in Syracuse, New York, in May 2009. Michele Jachim Barrett of Syracuse University conducted the interview using questions prepared by the editors of "ECRP." Dr. Honig is currently Professor Emerita at Syracuse University. Her work in early childhood development, care,…

  11. Effects of Using Alice and Scratch in an Introductory Programming Course for Corrective Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chih-Kai

    2014-01-01

    Scratch, a visual programming language, was used in many studies in computer science education. Most of them reported positive results by integrating Scratch into K-12 computer courses. However, the object-oriented concept, one of the important computational thinking skills, is not represented well in Scratch. Alice, another visual programming…

  12. Response to Intervention: Alice Birney Middle School's Model, Experience, and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brundage, Amber; Beckmann-Bartlett, Carol; Burns, Matthew K.

    2010-01-01

    In January 2008, the school-wide data for Alice Birney Middle School in North Charleston, South Carolina were concerning. According to the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Reading data, 40% to 48% of the students fell below the 25th percentile at each grade level. The authors realized that these students were not all undiagnosed special…

  13. Literary and Visual Literacy for All: A Fourth-Grade Study of "Alice in Wonderland."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strangman, Nicole

    2003-01-01

    Interviews Monica Edinger, a fourth-grade teacher who strives to foster a love of literature in her classroom by reading "Alice in Wonderland" aloud to her students. Describes the rest of this project, which includes a close study of the book's illustrators and culminates in a student-produced Toy Theater production of the book, which is digitally…

  14. A design study for the upgraded ALICE O2 computing facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Matthias

    2015-12-01

    An upgrade of the ALICE detector is currently prepared for the Run 3 period of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN starting in 2020. The physics topics under study by ALICE during this period will require the inspection of all collisions at a rate of 50 kHz for minimum bias Pb-Pb and 200 kHz for pp and p-Pb collisions in order to extract physics signals embedded into a large background. The upgraded ALICE detector will produce more than 1 TByte/s of data. Both collision and data rate impose new challenges onto the detector readout and compute system. Some detectors will not use a triggered readout, which will require a continuous processing of the detector data. The challenging requirements will be met by a combined online and offline facility developed and managed by the ALICE O2 project. The combined facility will accommodate the necessary substantial increase of data taking rate. In this paper we present first results of a prototype with estimates for scalability and feasibility for a full scale system.

  15. A Linguistic Analysis of Rhetorical Strategies in Selected Narratives of Alice Walker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matunda, Robert Stephen Mokaya

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to analyze rhetorical strategies of Alice Walker in four narratives, namely, "The Color Purple, In Search of Our Mother's Gardens, Possessing the Secret of Joy, and Now Is the Time To Open Your Heart". As such, this study helps to expand the body of investigation relating linguistics to literature and medium…

  16. Programming in Pairs with Alice to Improve Confidence, Enjoyment, and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop-Clark, Cathy; Courte, Jill; Howard, Elizabeth V.

    2006-01-01

    Students in an introductory computing class participated in a study investigating the impact of using a graphics programming environment (Alice) and pair-programming on confidence, enjoyment and achievement. Sixty-four participants completed a short questionnaire and a content pre-test about computer programming concepts. Students were then…

  17. From extension to shortening: Dating the onset of the Brasiliano Orogeny in eastern Borborema Province (NE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Sérgio P.; Bruguier, Olivier; da Silva, José Maurício Rangel; Mariano, Gorki; da Silva Filho, Adejardo F.; Teixeira, Cristiane M. L.

    2015-03-01

    the PEAL were also dated. The ages of the youngest zircon grains in sample BB-9 (655-642 Ma) overlap the crystallization age of the Altinho orthogneiss, implying that sedimentation is younger than or, at best, synchronous with magmatism. The age of low Th/U grains in samples CA-34 (615 ± 8 Ma) and SB-1 (587 ± 12 Ma) are related to a subsequent metamorphic overprint, which is loosely constrained between 580 and 620 Ma. These observations, combined with evidence provided by previous studies, suggest that the change from an extensional to a contracional setting occurred at ca. 640-630 Ma. In contrast with most collisional orogens, where a long period of oceanic subduction precedes collision, the inferred tectonic evolution suggests that the Brasiliano Orogeny resulted from inversion of continental and/or proto oceanic rifts.

  18. Argon-40/argon-39 whole-rock slate ages from the Robertson Bay terrane, northern Victoria Land: Documenting diachronous orogeny as a result of terrane accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Dallmeyer, R.D.

    1987-09-01

    In models of tectonic convergence, oceanic material enters subduction zones, descends, and is deformed. Over time subduction cuts across areas of deformation and should become younger in a direction opposite the dip of the subduction zone. Typically, geologists have found it difficult to document this because of insufficient cross-strike exposure, uncertainties in interpretation of radiometric ages, and overprinting of later tectonothermal events. The Robertson Bay and Bowers terranes of northern Victoria Land, which were accreted to the east antarctic craton (Gondwana margin) during the Ordovician Ross Orogeny, offer a unique opportunity to document a potentially diachronous deformation associated with an Ordovician orogeny. Exposed over a large area, these terranes display nearly uniform lithology, low metamorphic grade, and structural style and are combined with the absence of a regionally significant tectonothermal over print. Reconnaissance age analysis by potassium/argon and argon-40/argon-39 methods suggests that ages decrease eastward across the Robertson Bay terrane. The objective is systematically to collect samples of and perform argon-40/argon-39 age analysis on a whole-rock suite from the Bowers and Robertson Bay terranes. The resultant ages would more clearly document the suggested diachronism and allow more rigorous evaluation of the various tectonothermal models proposed for the evolution of the Gondwana margin.

  19. ALICE: the ultraviolet imaging spectrograph aboard the New Horizons Pluto mission spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, S. Alan; Scherrer, John; Slater, David C.; Gladstone, G. R.; Dirks, Greg; Stone, John; Davis, Michael; Versteeg, Marteen; Siegmund, O. H. W.

    2005-09-01

    The ALICE instrument is a lightweight (4.4 kg), low-power (4.4 W) imaging spectrograph that is planned to fly aboard the New Horizons mission to Pluto/Charon and the Kuiper Belt. Its primary job is to detect a variety of important atomic and molecular species in Pluto's atmosphere, and to determine their relative abundances as a function of altitude so that a complete picture of Pluto's atmospheric composition and structure can be determined for the first time. ALICE would also be used to search for an atmosphere around Pluto's moon, Charon, as well as the Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) that New Horizons hopes to fly by after Pluto-Charon. The New Horizons ALICE design, based on the Rosetta ALICE instrument design now en route to Comet 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko aboard the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft, incorporates an off-axis telescope feeding a Rowland-circle spectrograph with a 520-1870 Å spectral passband, a spectral point spread function of 3-6 Å FWHM, and an instantaneous spatial field-of-view of 6 degrees. Two separate input apertures that feed the telescope allow for both airglow and solar occultation observations during the mission. The focal plane camera is an imaging microchannel plate (MCP) double delay-line detector with dual solar-blind opaque photocathodes (KBr and CsI) and a focal surface that matches the 15-cm diameter Rowland-circle. Data taking modes include both histogram and pixel list exposures. We describe the scientific objectives of ALICE as well as the design, build, and environmental testing results of the flight model.

  20. Lomonosov In Spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    26 September 2004 This blue wide angle Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the frost-covered rims of Lomonosov Crater in late martian spring. At the north (top) end of the image, low, ground-hugging fog can be seen in association with the retreating seasonal polar cap. Lomonosov Crater is about 150 km (93 mi) in diameter and located at 65oN, 9oW. The image is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  1. Fun with Automobile Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Klaus

    2006-10-01

    Simple measurements on car suspension systems and their analysis can raise student interest in the elementary discussion of the behavior of springs in oscillating systems. To understand these complicated oscillating systems and to interpret measurements properly, models may be used. Students find out how to make approximations and extract useful information from marginal data using common sense, basic physics, and simple software tools. Basic experiments on a physical model of a car suspension and on a passenger car, as well as the analysis of the data, will be presented. In particular, a value of the bounce mode frequency of a car was obtained using several approaches.

  2. Spring-Tab Lock Washer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Jeff; Rogers, Dylan; Rodriguez, Pete

    1993-01-01

    Improved spring-tab lock washer offers alternative to such positive-locking devices as cotter pins and lock wires and to conventional split-ring lock washers. Does not dig into fastened parts with sharp edges; less likely to inflict scratches causing cracks. Contains three winglike spring tabs and three alignment pips, pressed into mating dimples in surface of part to be fastened. Spring tabs on lock washer allow only clockwise rotation (tightening) of bolt or nut.

  3. Measurement of J/ψ production in Pb—Pb and pp collisions at the LHC with the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, Martino; ALICE Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) aims to study the behaviour of nuclear matter at high energy densities and the transition to Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), expected to occur in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Quarkonia are important probes of nuclear matter and QGP, through the modification of their yield in the hot and dense medium formed in heavy ion collisions. Their measurement in pp collisions is also crucial to the ALICE physics program. ALICE measures quarkonium production at both forward (in the dimuon channel) and mid-rapidity (in the dielectron channel). In 2010 and 2011 the Large Hadron Collider has provided pp collisions at TeV and 2.76 TeV and Pb-Pb collisions at TeV. The ALICE results on J/ψ production in both Pb-Pb and pp collisions are presented.

  4. Late Paleozoic granitoid magmatism in Chukotka and its relation to Ellesmerian orogeny in Arctic Alaska and Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchitskaya, Marina; Sokolov, Sergey; Kotov, Alexander; Katkov, Sergey; Sal'nikova, Elena; Yakovleva, Sonya

    2013-04-01

    Chukotka fold area (Mesozoides) was formed as a result of collision between Chukotka - Arctic Alaska microplate and active margin of Siberian continent [1]. At present the majority of researches distinguish at least three stages of granitoid magmatism of Chukotka Mesozoides: 147-139, 127-100 and 82.4-78.8 Ma [2]. Granites of first two stages intrude metamorphic basement and Paleozoic-Mesozoic fold structures. Formation of Early Cretaceous granitoids are often considered in relation to granite-metamorphic core complexes evolution [3-5]. Intrusion of the third stage granitoid intrusions corresponds to Okhotsk-Chukotka volcanic belt activity. At the same time in several publications there is information of existence of more ancient Paleozoic granitoids. For orthogneisses of East Chukotka there are age estimations 380-320 Ma (U-Pb SHRIMP, [6]). V.V.Akinin [7] showed that protoliths of Velinkenay and Kuekvun plutons have Late Devonian (380-360 Ma) age. Granites of Kibera Peninsula were dated as 439±32 Ma [Rb-Sr method, 8]. Besides basal conglomerates of Carboniferous deposits contain granite pebbles. At the same time on the existing geological maps granites are indicated as Early Cretaceous ones [9]. Thus there are contradictions on the age estimations and scales of Paleozoic and Mesozoic granitoid magmatism manifestation within Chukotka Mesozoides. As a result of this interregional correlations, first of all correlation of Caledonian and Ellesmerian orogenies events in Arctic region, are complicated. So we carried out U-Pb geochronological studies of some reference granitoid plutons of Central Chukotka, located in the cores of antiform structures, composed of Paleozoic deposits, namely granodiorites of Kibera and quartz syenites of Kuekvyun plutons (Kuul and Kuekvyun rises respectively). Granitoids of Kibera pluton (coastal clippings of Kibera Peninsula, coast of East-Siberian Sea) intrude terrigenous Devonian deposits with carbonate units which are overlain with

  5. Springing into Spring: Reading Games for the Season

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, D. Jackson

    2008-01-01

    As spring arrives, more time is spent outdoors. Unfortunately, as spring fever hits, books and learning often take a backseat. The goal is for educators to find a way to re-engage learners. In this article, the author presents a seasonal story and game that can help catch students' attention by making learning both informative and entertaining.…

  6. BLACKJACK SPRINGS WILDERNESS, WISCONSIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, Klaus J.

    1984-01-01

    The mineral-resource potential of the Blackjack Springs Wilderness in northern Wisconsin was evaluated. The lack of bedrock exposures in or near the wilderness and the thick mantle of glacial sediments precludes a detailed assessment of the mineral potential of the wilderness. However, based on presently available data, the area is concluded to offer little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. If mineral deposits exist in the area, they would be under thick glacial cover and probably be of the massive sulfide type in association with metavolcanic rocks or be magmatic copper-nickel in association with metamorphosed mafic intrusive rocks. Sand and gravel resources occur in the wilderness, but they are abundant regionally, outside the wilderness. No other metallic or energy resources were identified in this study.

  7. Spring loaded thermocouple module

    DOEpatents

    McKelvey, Thomas E.; Guarnieri, Joseph J.

    1985-01-01

    A thermocouple arrangement is provided for mounting in a blind hole of a specimen. The thermocouple arrangement includes a cup-like holder member, which receives an elongated thermal insulator, one end of which is seated at an end wall of the holder. A pair of thermocouple wires, threaded through passageways in the insulator, extend beyond the insulator member, terminating in free ends which are joined together in a spherical weld bead. A spring, held captive within the holder, applies a bias force to the weld bead, through the insulator member. The outside surface of the holder is threaded for engagement with the blind hole of the specimen. When the thermocouple is installed in the specimen, the spherical contact surface of the weld bead is held in contact with the end wall of the blind hole, with a predetermined bias force.

  8. Spring loaded thermocouple module

    DOEpatents

    McKelvey, T.E.; Guarnieri, J.J.

    1984-03-13

    A thermocouple arrangement is provided for mounting in a blind hole of a specimen. The thermocouple arrangement includes a cup-like holder member, which receives an elongated thermal insulator, one end of which is seated at an end wall of the holder. A pair of thermocouple wires, threaded through passageways in the insulator, extend beyond the insulator member, terminating in free ends which are joined together in a spherical weld bead. A spring, held captive within the holder, applies a bias force to the weld bead, through the insulator member. The outside surface of the holder is threaded for engagement with the blind hole of the specimen. When the thermocouple is installed in the specimen, the spherical contact surface of the weld bead is held in contact with the end wall of the blind hole, with a predetermined bias force.

  9. J/{psi} measurements in 7 TeV p-p collisions with ALICE using EMCal-triggered events

    SciTech Connect

    Figueredo, M. A.; Collaboration: ALICE Collaboration

    2013-03-25

    J/{psi} measurements can be performed with the ALICE experiment through the dilepton decay into e{sup -}e{sup +} (for rapidity Double-Vertical-Line y Double-Vertical-Line <0.9) and {mu}{sup -}{mu}{sup +} (for rapidity -4.0ALICE physics program, since they provide baseline results to be compared with Pb-Pb, where one expects the production of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Moreover, these measurements are interesting per se because the mechanism of charmonium production in hadron interactions is not yet fully understood. The ALICE Eletromagnetic Calorimeter (EMCal) p{sub T} extends the range of J/{psi} measurements, since it provides electron/hadron discrimination for higher p{sub T} values in comparison to other electron PID techniques in ALICE. The EMCal can also provide fast triggers for events containing high energy electrons. In 2011, during proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV, the ALICE EMCal trigger was intensively used for event selection of showers above 4.8 GeV. In this work, some results from 2011 proton-proton collisions are presented, showing a J/{psi} measurement for transversal momentum above 6 GeV/c, due to a combination of the ALICE EMCal PID and trigger system.

  10. Late Paleozoic-Mesozoic tectonic evolution of SW Japan: A review - Reappraisal of the accretionary orogeny and revalidation of the collisional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvet, Jacques

    2013-08-01

    This paper makes a review of the interpretations of the tectonic evolution of SW Japan during the last three decades. In the late 1970s, the dominant model was the so-called "Pacific-type orogeny", emphasizing the purported absence of nappes and the contrast with the alpine chains, and interpreting the evolution as due to a steady oceanic subduction since the Paleozoic time. In the 80s, the discovery of the actual structure made of a pile of large thrust sheets led authors to propose collisional models, involving the intermittent underthrusting of buoyant blocks like micro-continents. At the same time, the use of high-resolution biostratigraphy allowed several authors to recognize ancient accretionary wedges, with a reconstructed ocean plate stratigraphy of individual accreted units, especially in the Tanba and Shimanto zones. Also, precise radiometric dating permitted the distinction of metamorphosed units, especially in Sanbagawa and Shimanto belts. As a result of these new data, since the 1990s, the plate tectonic interpretation of the history of the Japanese Islands was revised by Japanese scientists and presented again in terms of accretionary processes linked to a steadily oceanic subduction, with an episodic ridge subduction: the so-called "Miyashiro-type orogeny". The review of different data leads to the following conclusions. The structure of SW Japan is made of a pile of sub-horizontal nappes, polydeformed, with a geometry similar to the one encountered in collisional orogens. The geodynamic mechanisms advocated for the tectonic building within the accretionary orogeny concept (Miyashiro-type orogeny) are inappropriate. A permanent oceanic subduction with the intermittent "collision" (actually subduction) of an active ridge or seamount chain is unable to build such structures, as this process induces in fact an acceleration of the tectonic erosion and collapse of the upper plate; the underthrusting of a micro-continent or mature arc is likely needed. The

  11. Spring loaded locator pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Groll, T.A.; White, J.P.

    1998-03-03

    This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece. 5 figs.

  12. Spring loaded locator pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Groll, Todd A.; White, James P.

    1998-01-01

    This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece.

  13. Experimenting with Inexpensive Plastic Springs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Leander; Marques, Adriana; Sánchez, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Acommon undergraduate laboratory experience is the determination of the elastic constant of a spring, whether studying the elongation under a static load or studying the damped harmonic motion of the spring with a suspended mass. An alternative approach to this laboratory experience has been suggested by Menezes et al., aimed at studying the…

  14. The late stages of the Pampean Orogeny, Córdoba (Argentina): Evidence of postcollisional Early Cambrian slab break-off magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Victor A.; Escayola, Mónica; Leal, Pablo; Pimentel, Marcio M.; Santos, João O. S.

    2015-12-01

    Widespread rhyolitic and mafic volcanism in the northern and southern sectors respectively of Eastern Sierras Pampeanas, central western Argentina, are associated with an important phase of extension and uplift linked to slab break-off on latest stages of the Pampean Orogeny. The main orogenic deformation took place between 540 and 535 Ma based on new ages available for this region. New U-Pb ages in zircons from the Oncán Rhyolite and new and old recalculated zircons from Los Burros Rhyodacite in the northern sector of Sierras de Córdoba, together with new U-Pb ages of the southern sector, indicate that volcanic and subvolcanic rocks of both sectors are partially coeval and unconformably overlying and/or intruding the basement rocks during a period of exhumation and subsequent cooling at 530-520 Ma. These data are in agreement with previous estimates for the final uplift of the Sierras de Córdoba based on the K-Ar cooling ages. The southern sector of Eastern Sierras Pampeanas may represent deeper structural levels within the crust and is characterized by the occurrence of small mafic bodies with OIB-like signature. New and reinterpreted U-Pb SHRIMP and TIMS ages on zircons and monazites in the metamorphic associated rocks date this episode, which is related to a rapid slab break-off event at 519-515 Ma. This episode is also associated with the emplacement of peraluminous granitoids, and with the extension, cooling and final uplift of the rocks affected by the Pampean Orogeny all along the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas.

  15. Single-Crystal Springs For Accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, Thomas R.; Kaiser, William J.; Kenny, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal noise reduced, enabling use of smaller proof masses. Spring-and-mass accelerometers in which springs made of single-crystal material being developed. In spring-and-mass accelerometer, proof mass attached to one end of spring, and acceleration of object at other end of spring measured in terms of deflection of spring, provided frequency spectrum of acceleration lies well below resonant frequency of spring-and-proof-mass system. Use of single-crystal spring materials instead of such polycrystalline spring materials as ordinary metals makes possible to construct highly sensitive accelerometers (including seismometers) with small proof masses.

  16. [Alice Hamilton (1869-1970): a pioneer of occupational medicine and public health].

    PubMed

    Kowalska, M; Steplewski, Z

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Alice Hamilton (1869-1970) was the mother of occupational health a pioneer in public health in the United States. She worked as a doctor in Hull House, the first settlement house, and she was an advocate of the birth-control movement. She led pioneering studies of occupational head, mercury, carbon monoxide poisoning and many other chemical intoxications of workers. She was an assistant professor of industrial medicine at the Harvard Medical School (1919-1935). During the years 1924-1930 she worked for the Health Organization of the League of Nations. From 1943 she acted as a vice-president of the American Health Association. Alice Hamilton was an expert in the field of occupational lead poisoning. PMID:10438256

  17. Status and performance of the ALICE MRPC-based Time-Of-Flight detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alici, A.

    2012-10-01

    ALICE is the dedicated heavy-ion experiment at the CERN LHC. One of the main detectors devoted to charged hadron identification in the ALICE central barrel is a large Time-Of-Flight (TOF) array; it allows separation among pions, kaons and protons up to a few GeV/c, covering the full azimuthal angle and -0.9 < η < 0.9. The very good performance required for such a system has been achieved by means of the Multigap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) whose intrinsic time resolution is better than 50 ps with an overall efficiency close to 100% and a large operational plateau; the full array consists of 1593 MRPCs covering a cylindrical surface of 141 m2. In this report, the status of the TOF detector and the performance achieved during the 2010 and 2011 data taking periods are reported together with selected physics results obtained with pp and Pb-Pb collisions.

  18. The MRPC-based ALICE time-of-flight detector: Status andperformance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alici, A.; ALICE Collaboration

    2013-04-01

    The large time-of-flight (TOF) array is one of the main detectors devoted to charged hadron identification in the mid-rapidity region of the ALICE experiment at the LHC. It allows separation among pions, kaons and protons up to a few GeV/c, covering the full azimuthal angle and -0.9<η<0.9. The TOF exploits the innovative MRPC technology capable of an intrinsic time resolution better than 50 ps with an efficiency close to 100% and a large operational plateau; the full array consists of 1593 MRPCs covering a cylindrical surface of 141 m2. The TOF detector has been efficiently taking data since the first pp collisions recorded in ALICE in December 2009. In this report, the status of the TOF detector and the performance achieved for both pp and Pb-Pb collisions aredescribed.

  19. Potentials for J/{psi} from b decays measurement in the ALICE experiment at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Di Giglio, Carmelo

    2010-12-22

    The ALICE potentials in proton-proton collisions for the measurement of the fraction of J/{psi} produced at central rapidity (|y|<0.9) in beauty hadrons semi-inclusive decays, namely B{yields}J/{psi}X, is discussed.This measurement relies on the combined use of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC), for tracking and particle identification via dE/dx measurement; the Inner Tracking System (ITS) for tracking and detection of displaced vertices; the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) for particle identification.The description of the analysis method developed and the discussion of the estimate for a total J/{psi} statistics corresponding to one year of ALICE data taking in p-p collisions at {radical}(s) = 7 TeV is provided in the article.

  20. (Multi-)strange hadron and light (anti-)nuclei production with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Ramona

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to its excellent tracking performance and particle identification capabilities, the ALICE detector allows for the identification of light (anti-)(hyper)nuclei and for the measurement of (multi-)strange particles over a wide range of transverse momentum. Deuterons, 3He and 4He and their corresponding anti-nuclei are identified via their specific energy loss in the Time Projection Chamber and the velocity measurement provided by the Time-Of-Flight detector. Strange and multi-strange baryons and mesons as well as (anti-)hypertritons are reconstructed via their topological decays. Detailed measurements of (multi-)strange hadron production in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collision and of light (anti-)nuclei and (anti-)hypertritons in Pb-Pb collisions with ALICE at the LHC are presented. The experimental results will be compared with the predictions of both statistical hadronization and coalescence models.

  1. Transverse sphericity of minimum bias proton-proton collisions in ALICE

    SciTech Connect

    Velasquez, A. Ortiz

    2011-04-26

    In this work we report the measurement of the shape of minimum bias events reconstructed by ALICE at 0.9 and 7 TeV. The evolution of the transverse sphericity (S{sub perpendicular}) with the multiplicity is studied as an approach to test the MC models using the transverse sphericity as the event shape variable. The results show that at high multiplicity the sphericity of ALICE events is 15% larger than predicted by the MC models. A second approach is based on the hardness. The sample was divided in the so-called 'soft' and 'hard' events defined by a cut in the transverse momentum of the leading particle (p{sub perpendicular}) = 2 GeV/c). With this definition, the soft events are more spherical than the hard ones. We found that MC models describe very well the soft events, but they fail for the hard ones.

  2. Mallow Springs, County Cork, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldwell, C. R.

    1996-03-01

    Because of its copious and reliable rainfall, Ireland has an abundance of springs. Many of the larger ones issue from the Carboniferous limestone that occurs in over 40% of the country. The spring water is mainly a calcium bicarbonate type with a temperature of about 10°C. In the 18th century, warm and cold springs were developed as spas in various parts of Ireland. The popularity of these springs was short and most were in major decline by 1850. Today only one cold spa at Lisdoonvarna, Co. Clare is still operating. Springs in Ireland were places of religious significance for the pre-Christian Druidic religion. In the Christian period they became holy wells, under the patronage of various saints. Cures for many different ailments were attributed to water from these wells.

  3. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spring rigging. 229.65 Section 229.65....65 Spring rigging. (a) Protective construction or safety hangers shall be provided to prevent spring planks, spring seats or bolsters from dropping to track structure in event of a hanger or spring...

  4. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spring rigging. 229.65 Section 229.65....65 Spring rigging. (a) Protective construction or safety hangers shall be provided to prevent spring planks, spring seats or bolsters from dropping to track structure in event of a hanger or spring...

  5. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spring rigging. 229.65 Section 229.65....65 Spring rigging. (a) Protective construction or safety hangers shall be provided to prevent spring planks, spring seats or bolsters from dropping to track structure in event of a hanger or spring...

  6. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Spring rigging. 229.65 Section 229.65....65 Spring rigging. (a) Protective construction or safety hangers shall be provided to prevent spring planks, spring seats or bolsters from dropping to track structure in event of a hanger or spring...

  7. Linear magnetic spring and spring/motor combination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patt, Paul J. (Inventor); Stolfi, Fred R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A magnetic spring, or a spring and motor combination, providing a linear spring force characteristic in each direction from a neutral position, in which the spring action may occur for any desired coordinate of a typical orthogonal coordinate system. A set of magnets are disposed, preferably symmetrically about a coordinate axis, poled orthogonally to the desired force direction. A second set of magnets, respectively poled opposite the first set, are arranged on the sprung article. The magnets of one of the sets are spaced a greater distance apart than those of the other, such that an end magnet from each set forms a pair having preferably planar faces parallel to the direction of spring force, the faces being offset so that in a neutral position the outer edge of the closer spaced magnet set is aligned with the inner edge of the greater spaced magnet set. For use as a motor, a coil can be arranged with conductors orthogonal to both the magnet pole directions and the direction of desired spring force, located across from the magnets of one set and fixed with respect to the magnets of the other set. In a cylindrical coordinate system having axial spring force, the magnets are radially poled and motor coils are concentric with the cylinder axis.

  8. Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments (ALICE): Overview and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choquet, E.; Soummer, R.; Pueyo, L.; Perrin, M.; Chen, C.; Debes, J.; Golimowski, D. A.; Hagan, J. B.; Hines, D. C.; Marois, C.; Mawet, D.; Mittal, T.; Moerchen, M.; N'Diaye, M.; Rajan, A.; Reid, N.; Wolff, S.; Schneider, G.

    2014-03-01

    We are currently conducting a comprehensive and consistent reprocessing of archival HST-NICMOS coronagraphic surveys using advanced PSF subtraction methods, entitled the Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments program (ALICE, HST/AR 12652). This virtual campaign of about 400 HST orbits has already produced numerous new detections of previously unidentified point sources and circumstellar structures. We present five newly spatially resolved debris disks revealed in scattered light by our analysis of the archival data. Three of these disks (HD 30447, HD 35841, and HD 141943) appear to be edge-on, the fourth (HD 191089) appears to be an asymmetric inclined ring, and the fifth, HD 202917 confirms a dramatic asymmetric arc that had previously been detected in ACS GTO observations. These images provide new views of material around young solar-type stars at ages corresponding to the period of terrestrial planet formation in our solar system. We have also detected several new candidate substellar companions, for which there is an ongoing followup campaign, and discuss preliminary statistical constraints ALICE places on the occurrence of brown dwarf and exo-planet companions around nearby stars. Since the methods developed as part of ALICE are directly applicable to future missions (JWST, AFTA coronagraph) we emphasize the importance of devising optimal PSF subtraction methods for upcoming coronagraphic imaging missions. We describe efforts in defining direct imaging highlevel science products (HLSP) standards that can be applicable to other coronagraphic campaigns, including ground-based (e.g., Gemini Planet Imager), and future space instruments (e.g., JWST). ALICE will deliver a first release of HLSPs to the community through the MAST archive at STScI in 2014.

  9. Simulation of the job processing performance at an ALICE Tier-2 site with MONARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zach, Č.; Betev, L.; Adamová, D.; ALICE Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The MONARC (MOdels of Networked Analysis at Regional Centers) framework has been developed and designed with the aim to provide a tool for realistic simulations of large scale distributed computing systems, with a special focus on the Grid systems of the experiments at the CERN LHC. In this paper, we describe a usage of the MONARC framework and tools for a simulation of the job processing performance at an ALICE Tier-2 site.

  10. R&D on a Detector for Very High Momentum Charged Hadron Identification in ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallas, A.

    2006-04-01

    The latest theoretical and experimental results from experiments at RHIC suggest investigating a physics domain in heavy ion collisions for pt higher than the one planned to be covered at present by the Particle Identification (PID) system of the ALICE experiment. We present here a possible upgrade of the High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (HMPID) based on the idea of the Threshold Imaging Cherenkov (TIC) detector operated for the first time by the NA44 experiment.

  11. Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments (ALICE): Overview and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soummer, Remi; Barman, T. S.; Chen, C.; Choquet, E.; Comeau, T.; Debes, J. H.; Golimowski, D. A.; Hagan, J.; Hines, D. C.; Lonsdale, S.; Marois, C.; Mawet, D.; Mittal, T.; Moerchen, M.; N'Diaye, M.; Perrin, M. D.; Pueyo, L.; Rajan, A.; Reid, I. N.; Schneider, G.; Wolff, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments (ALICE) project ((HST/AR program 12652) is currently conducting a comprehensive and consistent reprocessing of HST-NICMOS coronagraphic survey data to search for point sources and disks using advanced PSF subtraction. This project has already been very successful with numerous detections of previously unseen point sources and several debris disks that we are currently following up by multiple avenues. We give an overview of the project including preliminary scientific results with companion candidates, improved images of known disks, and first scattered light image of several disks. ALICE will deliver high-level science products (HLSPs) to the community through the MAST archive at STScI. The goal is to define a HLSP standard that can be applicable to other projects including ground-based (e.g., Gemini Planet Imager), and future space instruments (e.g., JWST). The ALICE pipeline takes full advantage of the LAPLACE PSF library (Schneider et al. 2012) for coronagraphic data, which provides enhanced calibration of NICMOS coronagraphic data and is available from the MAST archive.

  12. Integration of XRootD into the cloud infrastructure for ALICE data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompaniets, Mikhail; Shadura, Oksana; Svirin, Pavlo; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Zarochentsev, Andrey

    2015-12-01

    Cloud technologies allow easy load balancing between different tasks and projects. From the viewpoint of the data analysis in the ALICE experiment, cloud allows to deploy software using Cern Virtual Machine (CernVM) and CernVM File System (CVMFS), to run different (including outdated) versions of software for long term data preservation and to dynamically allocate resources for different computing activities, e.g. grid site, ALICE Analysis Facility (AAF) and possible usage for local projects or other LHC experiments. We present a cloud solution for Tier-3 sites based on OpenStack and Ceph distributed storage with an integrated XRootD based storage element (SE). One of the key features of the solution is based on idea that Ceph has been used as a backend for Cinder Block Storage service for OpenStack, and in the same time as a storage backend for XRootD, with redundancy and availability of data preserved by Ceph settings. For faster and easier OpenStack deployment was applied the Packstack solution, which is based on the Puppet configuration management system. Ceph installation and configuration operations are structured and converted to Puppet manifests describing node configurations and integrated into Packstack. This solution can be easily deployed, maintained and used even in small groups with limited computing resources and small organizations, which usually have lack of IT support. The proposed infrastructure has been tested on two different clouds (SPbSU & BITP) and integrates successfully with the ALICE data analysis model.

  13. Flexible event reconstruction software chains with the ALICE High-Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, D.; Breitner, T.; Szostak, A.

    2012-12-01

    The ALICE High-Level Trigger (HLT) has a large high-performance computing cluster at CERN whose main objective is to perform real-time analysis on the data generated by the ALICE experiment and scale it down to at-most 4GB/sec - which is the current maximum mass-storage bandwidth available. Data-flow in this cluster is controlled by a custom designed software framework. It consists of a set of components which can communicate with each other via a common control interface. The software framework also supports the creation of different configurations based on the detectors participating in the HLT. These configurations define a logical data processing “chain” of detector data-analysis components. Data flows through this software chain in a pipelined fashion so that several events can be processed at the same time. An instance of such a chain can run and manage a few thousand physics analysis and data-flow components. The HLT software and the configuration scheme used in the 2011 heavy-ion runs of ALICE, has been discussed in this contribution.

  14. The ALICE Data Quality Monitoring: qualitative and quantitative review of three years of operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Haller, Barthélémy; Bellini, Francesca; Telesca, Adriana; Foka, Yiota; Alice Dqm Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter produced in heavy-ion collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Due to the complexity of ALICE in terms of number of detectors and performance requirements, Data Quality Monitoring (DQM) plays an essential role in providing online feedback on the data being recorded. It intends to provide shifters with precise and complete information to quickly identify problems, and as a consequence to ensure acquisition of high quality data. This paper presents a review of the ALICE DQM system during the first three years of LHC operations from a quantitative and qualitative point of view. We start by presenting the DQM software and tools before moving on to the various analyses carried out. An overview of the produced monitoring quantities is given, presenting the diversity of usage and flexibility of the DQM. Well-prepared shifters and experts, in addition to a precise organisation, were required to ensure smooth and successful operations. The description of the measures taken to ensure both aspects and an account of the DQM shifters' job are followed by a summary of the evolution of the system. We then give a quantitative review of the final setup of the system used during the whole year 2012. We conclude the paper with use cases where the DQM proved to be very valuable, scalable and efficient and with the plans for the coming years.

  15. Jet-underlying event studies with ALICE detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, Betty

    2011-10-01

    Relativistic heavy ion collisions produce a state of strongly interacting matter of quarks and gluons, called the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Measuring particle production via fragmentation (specifically in jets) and understanding parton energy loss in the QGP enables one to directly probe the medium. One of the necessary components in studying jets in heavy ion events is the ability to isolate jets from the soft physics background, i.e., the underlying event. Thus it is important to understand the underlying event properties, in particular, energy fluctuations. This presentation will address the initial studies done to map out the underlying event in √{ s} = 7 TeV pp collisions measured with the ALICE detector at the LHC, as preparation for extending these studies to Pb-Pb collisions. The focus will be on the analyses performed with the ALICE Electro-Magnetic Calorimeter (EMCal). EMCal is especially well-suited for the measurement of high-momentum particles which are produced predominantly in jets and therefore is a useful tool in subtracting the jet cone from the underlying event. For the ALICE Collaboration.

  16. Technical Design Report for the Upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALICE Collaboration; Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Masoodi, A. Ahmad; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Anderssen, E. C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badala, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bairathi, V.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J..; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastian Van Beelen, J.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Battistin, M.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baudot, J.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Benettoni, M.; Benotto, F.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Besson, A.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhatti, A.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Boehmer, F. V.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bornschein, J.; Borshchov, V. N.; Bortolin, C.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Cariola, P.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Caudron, T.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Claus, G.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Coli, S.; Colledani, C.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Da Riva, E.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Decosse, C.; DelagrangeI, H.; Deloff, A.; Déenes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Robertis, G.; De Roo, K.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Divia, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dorheim, S.; Dorokhov, A.; Doziere, G.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dulinski, W.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Ehlers, R. J., III; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernádez Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fiorenza, G.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Franco, M.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gajanana, D.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubilato, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; Gomez Marzoa, M.; Gonzáalez-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.

    2014-08-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is studying the physics of strongly interacting matter, and in particular the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), using proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major upgrade of the experimental apparatus, planned for installation in the second long LHC shutdown in the years 2018-2019. A key element of the ALICE upgrade is the construction of a new, ultra-light, high-resolution Inner Tracking System (ITS) based on monolithic CMOS pixel detectors. The primary focus of the ITS upgrade is on improving the performance for detection of heavy-flavour hadrons, and of thermal photons and low-mass di-electrons emitted by the QGP. With respect to the current detector, the new Inner Tracking System will significantly enhance the determination of the distance of closest approach to the primary vertex, the tracking efficiency at low transverse momenta, and the read-out rate capabilities. This will be obtained by seven concentric detector layers based on a 50 μm thick CMOS pixel sensor with a pixel pitch of about 30×30 μm2. This document, submitted to the LHCC (LHC experiments Committee) in September 2013, presents the design goals, a summary of the R&D activities, with focus on the technical implementation of the main detector components, and the projected detector and physics performance.

  17. Study of muon bundles from extensive air showers with the ALICE detector at CERN LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtejer, K.

    2016-05-01

    ALICE is one of four large experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, specially designed to study particle production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Located 52 meters underground with 28 meters of overburden rock, it has also been used to detect muons produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the upper atmosphere. The large size and excellent tracking capability of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber are exploited to study the muonic component of extensive air showers. We present the multiplicity distribution of these atmospheric muons and its comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. The latest version of the QGSJET hadronic interaction model was used to simulate the development of the resulting air showers. High multiplicity events containing more than 100 reconstructed muons were also studied. Similar events have been studied in previous underground experiments such as ALEPH and DELPHI at LEP without satisfactory explanations for the frequency of the highest multiplicity events. We demonstrate that the high muon-multiplicity events observed in ALICE stem from primary cosmic rays with energies above 1016 eV and that the frequency of these events can be successfully described by assuming a heavy mass composition of primary cosmic rays in this energy range.

  18. Event Plane Resolution Simulations for The Fast Interaction Trigger Detector of ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaimon, Isiaka; Harton, Austin; Garcia, Edmundo; Alice-Fit Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    CERN (European Center for Nuclear Research) is a global laboratory that studies proton and heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is one of four large experiments of the LHC. ALICE is dedicated to the study of the transition of matter to Quark Gluon Plasma in heavy ion collisions. In the present ALICE detector there are two sub-detectors, (the T0 and V0), that provide minimum bias trigger, multiplicity trigger, beam-gas event rejection, collision time for other sub detectors, on line multiplicity and event plane determination. In order to adapt these functionalities to the collision rates expected for the LHC upgrade after 2020, it is planned to replace these systems by a single detector system, called the Fast Interaction Trigger (FIT). In this presentation we describe the performance parameters of the FIT upgrade; show the proposed characteristics of the T0-Plus and the simulations that support the conceptual design of this detector. In particular we describe the performance simulations of the event plane resolution. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants NSF-PHY-0968903 and NSF-PHY-1305280.

  19. Alignment of the ALICE Inner Tracking System with Cosmic-Ray Tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Aamodt, K.; Awes, Terry C; Enokizono, Akitomo; Silvermyr, David O; ALICE, Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiment devoted to investigating the strongly interacting matter created in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC energies. The ALICE ITS, Inner Tracking System, consists of six cylindrical layers of silicon detectors with three different technologies; in the outward direction: two layers of pixel detectors, two layers each of drift, and strip detectors. The number of parameters to be determined in the spatial alignment of the 2198 sensor modules of the ITS is about 13,000. The target alignment precision is well below 10 {micro}m in some cases (pixels). The sources of alignment information include survey measurements, and the reconstructed tracks from cosmic rays and from proton-proton collisions. The main track-based alignment method uses the Millepede global approach. An iterative local method was developed and used as well. We present the results obtained for the ITS alignment using about 10{sup 5} charged tracks from cosmic rays that have been collected during summer 2008, with the ALICE solenoidal magnet switched off.

  20. Piston and spring powered engine

    SciTech Connect

    Samodovitz, A. J.

    1985-12-10

    The invention is an improved piston engine, either two stroke or four stroke. In one, two stroke, one cylinder embodiment, the improvement comprises two springs connecting between the piston and the base of the piston. These springs are relatively relaxed when the crank is at top dead center. Then during the power/intake stroke, some of the fuel's energy is delivered to the crankshaft and some is used to compress the springs. The stored energy in the springs is delivered to the crankshaft during the exhaust/compression stroke while the springs return to their relatively relaxed condition. As a result, energy is delivered to the crankshaft during both strokes of the cycle, and the engine runs smooth. In one, four stroke, two cylinder embodiment, each cylinder has springs as described above, the cranks of each cylinder are aligned, and the cam sets one cylinder in the power stroke while the other is in the intake stroke. As a result, the engine runs smooth because energy is delivered to the crankshaft during all four strokes of the cycle, during two of the strokes by the burning fuel and during the other two by the release of energy in the springs. In both embodiments, a heavy crankshaft is not needed because of the more uniform power delivery.

  1. Permo-Triassic changes in bulk crustal shortening direction during deformation and metamorphism of the Taebaeksan Basin, South Korea using foliation intersection/inflection axes: Implications for tectonic movement at the eastern margin of Eurasia during the Songrim (Indosinian) orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeong Soo; Ree, Jin-Han

    2013-03-01

    The Permo-Triassic Songrim (Indosinian) orogeny in South Korea was a major tectonic event involving complicated continental collisions at the eastern margin of Eurasia. Previous studies have examined the structural and metamorphic features of the Songrim orogeny in each of the Paleozoic terranes of the orogenic belt (i.e., the Taebaeksan Basin, the Okcheon Basin, and the Imjingang Belt), but correlations of these features among the terranes remain uncertain. The aim of this paper is to reveal deformation history including bulk crustal shortening directions in the Taebaeksan Basin, and to correlate the tectono-metamorphic evolution of the Taebaeksan Basin with other Phanerozoic mobile belts in eastern Asia based on a combined analysis of foliation intersection/inflection axes (FIA) trends and metamorphic P-T and T-t (time) paths. The orientations and relative timing of FIA preserved as inclusion trails within porphyroblasts of andalusite, chloritoid, garnet, and staurolite reveal two age groups of inclusion trails in the Pyeongan Supergroup at the northeastern margin of the Taebaeksan Basin. These microstructures indicate the development of early NNW-NNE-trending structures and fabrics, followed by later E-W-trending ones. These observations suggest a change in the orientation of bulk crustal shortening from E-W to N-S during the Songrim orogeny. Based on the similar microstructures and temperature-time paths of the three Paleozoic terranes, we interpret that the E-W bulk crustal shortening influenced the eastern part of the Korean Peninsula during the early stages of the Songrim orogeny, presumably related to amalgamation between the proto-Japan terrane and the eastern margin of Eurasia, whereas the N-S bulk crustal shortening was stronger in the western part of the peninsula during the later stages of the orogeny, related to collision between the South and North China blocks.

  2. Groundwater flow cycling between a submarine spring and an inland fresh water spring.

    PubMed

    Davis, J Hal; Verdi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs are large first magnitude springs that derive water from the Upper Floridan Aquifer. The submarine Spring Creek Springs are located in a marine estuary and Wakulla Springs are located 18 km inland. Wakulla Springs has had a consistent increase in flow from the 1930s to the present. This increase is probably due to the rising sea level, which puts additional pressure head on the submarine Spring Creek Springs, reducing its fresh water flow and increasing flows in Wakulla Springs. To improve understanding of the complex relations between these springs, flow and salinity data were collected from June 25, 2007 to June 30, 2010. The flow in Spring Creek Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and salt water intrusion, and the flow in Wakulla Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and the flow in Spring Creek Springs. Flows from the springs were found to be connected, and composed of three repeating phases in a karst spring flow cycle: Phase 1 occurred during low rainfall periods and was characterized by salt water backflow into the Spring Creek Springs caves. The higher density salt water blocked fresh water flow and resulted in a higher equivalent fresh water head in Spring Creek Springs than in Wakulla Springs. The blocked fresh water was diverted to Wakulla Springs, approximately doubling its flow. Phase 2 occurred when heavy rainfall resulted in temporarily high creek flows to nearby sinkholes that purged the salt water from the Spring Creek Springs caves. Phase 3 occurred after streams returned to base flow. The Spring Creek Springs caves retained a lower equivalent fresh water head than Wakulla Springs, causing them to flow large amounts of fresh water while Wakulla Springs flow was reduced by about half. PMID:24138490

  3. Groundwater flow cycling between a submarine spring and an inland fresh water spring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J. Hal; Verdi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Spring Creek Springs and Wakulla Springs are large first magnitude springs that derive water from the Upper Floridan Aquifer. The submarine Spring Creek Springs are located in a marine estuary and Wakulla Springs are located 18 km inland. Wakulla Springs has had a consistent increase in flow from the 1930s to the present. This increase is probably due to the rising sea level, which puts additional pressure head on the submarine Spring Creek Springs, reducing its fresh water flow and increasing flows in Wakulla Springs. To improve understanding of the complex relations between these springs, flow and salinity data were collected from June 25, 2007 to June 30, 2010. The flow in Spring Creek Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and salt water intrusion, and the flow in Wakulla Springs was most sensitive to rainfall and the flow in Spring Creek Springs. Flows from the springs were found to be connected, and composed of three repeating phases in a karst spring flow cycle: Phase 1 occurred during low rainfall periods and was characterized by salt water backflow into the Spring Creek Springs caves. The higher density salt water blocked fresh water flow and resulted in a higher equivalent fresh water head in Spring Creek Springs than in Wakulla Springs. The blocked fresh water was diverted to Wakulla Springs, approximately doubling its flow. Phase 2 occurred when heavy rainfall resulted in temporarily high creek flows to nearby sinkholes that purged the salt water from the Spring Creek Springs caves. Phase 3 occurred after streams returned to base flow. The Spring Creek Springs caves retained a lower equivalent fresh water head than Wakulla Springs, causing them to flow large amounts of fresh water while Wakulla Springs flow was reduced by about half.

  4. Hydrogeology of the mineral springs at Manitou Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Maslyn, R.M.; Blomquist, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    Manitou Springs, a small resort community located at the base of 14,110 foot Pikes Peak, is situated at the south end of the southward plunging Williams Canyon Anticline. This is truncated south of town by the Ute Pass Reverse Fault, with over 30,000 feet of displacement. Paleozoic limestones are exposed north of Manitou Springs in north-south trending Williams Canyon. The Mississippian age Leadville Limestone and underlying Ordovician age Manitou Limestone contain over 40 caves, including the 8500-foot long Cave of the Winds system. These limestones continue under Manitou Springs, where cave forming processes have resulted in water-filled caverns. The 28 natural springs and flowing wells in Manitou Springs source in the limestone caverns. This carbonate aquifer is bounded by the Ute Pass Fault on the west and southwest, the Rampart Range Fault to the east, and open to recharge from exposed limestone to the north. Areal extent of the aquifer is approximately 3.5 spare miles, containing an estimated 10 billion gallons. In the past 100 years, spring development has lowered the potentiometric surface 50 feet. Contemporary and historical chemical analyses of the mineral water show high concentrations of calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, and carbon dioxide gas. This suggests prolonged exposure of the water to limestone, as confirmed by Carbon 14 age-dating values of up to 30,000 years.

  5. Spring Small Grains Area Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, W. F.; Mohler, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    SSG3 automatically estimates acreage of spring small grains from Landsat data. Report describes development and testing of a computerized technique for using Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) data to estimate acreage of spring small grains (wheat, barley, and oats). Application of technique to analysis of four years of data from United States and Canada yielded estimates of accuracy comparable to those obtained through procedures that rely on trained analysis.

  6. 14 CFR 23.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Spring devices. 23.687 Section 23.687... Systems § 23.687 Spring devices. The reliability of any spring device used in the control system must be established by tests simulating service conditions unless failure of the spring will not cause flutter...

  7. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section 236.822... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original position after being trailed through and holds them under spring compression....

  8. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Spring rigging. 230.111 Section 230.111... Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.111 Spring rigging. (a) Arrangement of springs and equalizers. Springs and equalizers shall be arranged to ensure the proper distribution of weight to...

  9. 49 CFR 229.65 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., except when that spring is part of a nest of three or more springs and none of the other springs in the nest has its top leaf or any other three leaves broken. An outer coil spring or saddle may not...

  10. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section 236.822... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original position after being trailed through and holds them under spring compression....

  11. 14 CFR 23.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Spring devices. 23.687 Section 23.687... Systems § 23.687 Spring devices. The reliability of any spring device used in the control system must be established by tests simulating service conditions unless failure of the spring will not cause flutter...

  12. 14 CFR 23.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spring devices. 23.687 Section 23.687... Systems § 23.687 Spring devices. The reliability of any spring device used in the control system must be established by tests simulating service conditions unless failure of the spring will not cause flutter...

  13. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spring rigging. 230.111 Section 230.111... Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.111 Spring rigging. (a) Arrangement of springs and equalizers. Springs and equalizers shall be arranged to ensure the proper distribution of weight to...

  14. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spring rigging. 230.111 Section 230.111... Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.111 Spring rigging. (a) Arrangement of springs and equalizers. Springs and equalizers shall be arranged to ensure the proper distribution of weight to...

  15. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section 236.822... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original position after being trailed through and holds them under spring compression....

  16. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Spring rigging. 230.111 Section 230.111... Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.111 Spring rigging. (a) Arrangement of springs and equalizers. Springs and equalizers shall be arranged to ensure the proper distribution of weight to...

  17. 14 CFR 23.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Spring devices. 23.687 Section 23.687... Systems § 23.687 Spring devices. The reliability of any spring device used in the control system must be established by tests simulating service conditions unless failure of the spring will not cause flutter...

  18. 49 CFR 230.111 - Spring rigging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spring rigging. 230.111 Section 230.111... Tenders Trucks, Frames and Equalizing System § 230.111 Spring rigging. (a) Arrangement of springs and equalizers. Springs and equalizers shall be arranged to ensure the proper distribution of weight to...

  19. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section 236.822... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original position after being trailed through and holds them under spring compression....

  20. 49 CFR 236.822 - Switch, spring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Switch, spring. 236.822 Section 236.822... Switch, spring. A switch equipped with a spring device which forces the points to their original position after being trailed through and holds them under spring compression....

  1. 14 CFR 23.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Spring devices. 23.687 Section 23.687... Systems § 23.687 Spring devices. The reliability of any spring device used in the control system must be established by tests simulating service conditions unless failure of the spring will not cause flutter...

  2. A time projection chamber for high-rate experiments: Towards an upgrade of the ALICE TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketzer, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    A Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is a powerful detector for three-dimensional tracking and particle identification for ultra-high multiplicity events. It is the central tracking device of many experiments, e.g. of the ALICE experiment at CERN. The necessity of a switching electrostatic gate, which prevents ions produced in the amplification region of the MWPCs from entering the drift volume, however, restricts its application to trigger rates of the order of 1 kHz. Charge amplification by Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) foils instead of proportional wires offers an intrinsic suppression of the ion backflow, although not to the same level as a gating grid. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations have shown that the distortions due to residual space charge from back-drifting ions can be limited to a few cm, and thus can be corrected using standard calibration techniques. A prototype GEM-TPC has been built with the largest active volume to date for a detector of this type. It has been commissioned with cosmic rays and with particle beams at the FOPI experiment at GSI, and was employed for a physics measurement with pion beams. For the future operation of the ALICE TPC at the CERN LHC beyond 2019, where Pb-Pb collision rates of 50 kHz are expected, it is planned to replace the existing MWPCs by GEM detectors, operated in a continuous, triggerless readout mode, thus allowing an increase in event rate by a factor of 100. As a first step of the R&D program, a prototype of an Inner Readout Chamber was equipped with large-size GEM foils and exposed to beams of protons, pions and electrons from the CERN PS. In this paper, new results are shown concerning ion backflow, spatial and momentum resolution of the FOPI GEM-TPC, detector calibration, and dE/dx resolution with both detector prototypes. The perspectives of a GEM-TPC for ALICE with continuous readout will be discussed.

  3. ALPIDE, the Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor for the ALICE ITS upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mager, M.

    2016-07-01

    A new 10 m2 inner tracking system based on seven concentric layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors will be installed in the ALICE experiment during the second long shutdown of LHC in 2019-2020. The monolithic pixel sensors will be fabricated in the 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor process of TowerJazz. The ALPIDE design takes full advantage of a particular process feature, the deep p-well, which allows for full CMOS circuitry within the pixel matrix, while at the same time retaining the full charge collection efficiency. Together with the small feature size and the availability of six metal layers, this allowed a continuously active low-power front-end to be placed into each pixel and an in-matrix sparsification circuit to be used that sends only the addresses of hit pixels to the periphery. This approach led to a power consumption of less than 40 mWcm-2, a spatial resolution of around 5 μm, a peaking time of around 2 μs, while being radiation hard to some 1013 1 MeVneq /cm2, fulfilling or exceeding the ALICE requirements. Over the last years of R & D, several prototype circuits have been used to verify radiation hardness, and to optimize pixel geometry and in-pixel front-end circuitry. The positive results led to a submission of full-scale (3 cm×1.5 cm) sensor prototypes in 2014. They are being characterized in a comprehensive campaign that also involves several irradiation and beam tests. A summary of the results obtained and prospects towards the final sensor to instrument the ALICE Inner Tracking System are given.

  4. System performance monitoring of the ALICE Data Acquisition System with Zabbix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telesca, A.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Dénes, E.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Grigore, A.; Ionita, C.; Delort, C.; Simonetti, G.; Soós, C.; Vande Vyvre, P.; von Haller, B.; Alice Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a heavy-ion detector studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The ALICE Data-AcQuisition (DAQ) system handles the data flow from the sub-detector electronics to the permanent data storage in the CERN computing center. The DAQ farm consists of about 1000 devices of many different types ranging from direct accessible machines to storage arrays and custom optical links. The system performance monitoring tool used during the LHC run 1 will be replaced by a new tool for run 2. This paper shows the results of an evaluation that has been conducted on six publicly available monitoring tools. The evaluation has been carried out by taking into account selection criteria such as scalability, flexibility, reliability as well as data collection methods and display. All the tools have been prototyped and evaluated according to those criteria. We will describe the considerations that have led to the selection of the Zabbix monitoring tool for the DAQ farm. The results of the tests conducted in the ALICE DAQ laboratory will be presented. In addition, the deployment of the software on the DAQ machines in terms of metrics collected and data collection methods will be described. We will illustrate how remote nodes are monitored with Zabbix by using SNMP-based agents and how DAQ specific metrics are retrieved and displayed. We will also show how the monitoring information is accessed and made available via the graphical user interface and how Zabbix communicates with the other DAQ online systems for notification and reporting.

  5. Automated Inventory and Monitoring of the ALICE HLT Cluster Resources with the SysMES Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, J.; Lara, C.; Haaland, Ø.; Böttger, S.; Röhrich, D.; Kebschull, U.

    2012-12-01

    The High-Level-Trigger (HLT) cluster of the ALICE experiment is a computer cluster with about 200 nodes and 20 infrastructure machines. In its current state, the cluster consists of nearly 10 different configurations of nodes in terms of installed hardware, software and network structure. In such a heterogeneous environment with a distributed application, information about the actual configuration of the nodes is needed to automatically distribute and adjust the application accordingly. An inventory database provides a unified interface to such information. To be useful, the data in the inventory has to be up to date, complete and consistent. Manual maintenance of such databases is error-prone and data tends to become outdated. The inventory module of the ALICE HLT cluster overcomes these drawbacks by automatically updating the actual state periodically and, in contrast to existing solutions, it allows the definition of a target state for each node. A target state can simply be a fully operational state, i.e. a state without malfunctions, or a dedicated configuration of the node. The target state is then compared to the actual state to detect deviations and malfunctions which could induce severe problems when running the application. The inventory module of the ALICE HLT cluster has been integrated into the monitoring and management framework SysMES in order to use existing functionality like transactionality and monitoring infrastructure. Additionally, SysMES allows to solve detected problems automatically via its rule-system. To describe the heterogeneous environment with all its specifics, like custom hardware, the inventory module uses an object-oriented model which is based on the Common Information Model. The inventory module provides an automatically updated actual state of the cluster, detects discrepancies between the actual and the target state and is able to solve detected problems automatically. This contribution presents the current implementation

  6. Fossilization Processes in Thermal Springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Jack D.; Cady, Sherry; Desmarais, David J.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    To create a comparative framework for the study of ancient examples, we have been carrying out parallel studies of the microbial biosedimentology, taphonomy and geochemistry of modem and sub-Recent thermal spring deposits. One goal of the research is the development of integrated litho- and taphofacies models for siliceous and travertline sinters. Thermal springs are regarded as important environments for the origin and early evolution of life on Earth, and we seek to utilize information from the fossil record to reconstruct the evolution of high temperature ecosystems. Microbial contributions to the fabric of thermal spring sinters occur when population growth rates keep pace with, or exceed rates of inorganic precipitation, allowing for the development of continuous biofilms or mats. In siliceous thermal springs, microorganisms are typically entombed while viable. Modes of preservation reflect the balance between rates of organic matter degradation, silica precipitation and secondary infilling. Subaerial sinters are initially quite porous and permeable and at temperatures higher than about 20 C, organic materials are usually degraded prior to secondary infilling of sinter frameworks. Thus, organically-preserved microfossils are rare and fossil information consists of characteristic biofabrics formed by the encrustation and underplating of microbial mat surfaces. This probably accounts for the typically low total organic carbon values observed in thermal spring deposits. In mid-temperature, (approx. 35 - 59 C) ponds and outflows, the surface morphology of tufted Phormidium mats is preserved through mat underplating by thin siliceous: crusts. Microbial taxes lead to clumping of ceils and/or preferred filament orientations that together define higher order composite fabrics in thermal spring stromatolites (e.g. network, coniform, and palisade). At lower temperatures (less than 35 C), Calothrix mats cover shallow terracette pools forming flat carpets or pustular

  7. Formation and tectonic evolution of early Mesozoic intramontane basins in the Ogcheon belt (South Korea): A reappraisal of the Jurassic "Daebo orogeny"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cluzel, D.

    The upper Triassic to lower Jurassic(?) Daedong Supergroup of Korea has been deposited syntectonically during the late stages of "Songnim" transcurrent tectonism. In the Daedong basins, the Jurassic Daebo tectonism resulted in heterogeneous deformation due to the reactivation of pre-existing large faults during two main phases of folding and high angle thrusting. During the first phase, the bounding faults of the Daedong basins have been reactivated as high angle imbricated thrusts associated with gentle folds that display northeast-southwest axial trends and are generally southeast facing. The second tectonic phase is a result of north-south-directed convergence. The axes of gentle second phase folds strike east-west on average and are overturned to the south. Major NE-SW faults were then reactivated as south-directed sinistral wrench thrusts. This tectonic episode likely occurred in the late Jurassic to early Cretaceous period, and finally generated half-grabens or pull-apart basins located along the margins of the Ogcheon belt. The so-called "Daebo granites" have intruded from late Triassic to late Jurassic times. The Daebo granites and Funatsu granites of the same age in the Hida belt (Japan), are likely to be generated in a post-collisional setting as a consequence of the late Permian to Triassic Akiyoshi orogeny of southwest Japan.

  8. Do regions matter in ALICE?. Social relationships and data exchanges in the Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widmer, E. D.; Viry, G.; Carminati, F.; Galli-Carminati, G.

    2012-02-01

    This study aims at investigating the impact of regional affiliations of centres on the organisation of collaborations within the Distributed Computing ALICE infrastructure, based on social networks methods. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to all centre managers about support, email interactions and wished collaborations in the infrastructure. Several additional measures, stemming from technical observations were collected, such as bandwidth, data transfers and Internet Round Trip Time (RTT) were also included. Information for 50 centres were considered (about 70% response rate). Empirical analysis shows that despite the centralisation on CERN, the network is highly organised by regions. The results are discussed in the light of policy and efficiency issues.

  9. Femtoscopy of pp and Pb-Pb collisions with the ALICE experiment at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loggins, Vera; Alice Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Femtoscopy is unique among all analysis techniques utilized in subatomic collision experiments as it directly addresses the space-time structure of the evolving system at the femtometer scale. We report on the results of two-particle Bose-Einstein correlation analyses in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV and √{sNN} = 2 . 76 TeV, respectively, recorded by the ALICE experiment at the LHC. We discuss femtoscopic correlations for pions, kaons, and protons as a function of event multiplicity and total pair momentum.

  10. Archival Legacy Investigations of Circumstellar Environments (ALICE): Statistical assessment of point source detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choquet, Élodie; Pueyo, Laurent; Soummer, Rémi; Perrin, Marshall D.; Hagan, J. Brendan; Gofas-Salas, Elena; Rajan, Abhijith; Aguilar, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    The ALICE program, for Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environment, is currently conducting a virtual survey of about 400 stars, by re-analyzing the HST-NICMOS coronagraphic archive with advanced post-processing techniques. We present here the strategy that we adopted to identify detections and potential candidates for follow-up observations, and we give a preliminary overview of our detections. We present a statistical analysis conducted to evaluate the confidence level on these detection and the completeness of our candidate search.

  11. Dust Outbursts From Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Observed by Rosetta-Alice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffl, Andrew J.; Feldman, Paul D.; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Feaga, Lori M.; Keeney, Brian A.; Knight, Matthew M.; Noonan, John; Parker, Joel Wm.; Schindhelm, Eric R.; Stern, S. Alan; Vervack, Ronald J.; Weaver, Harold A.

    2015-11-01

    The comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, passed through perihelion on 13 August 2015. In the weeks surrounding the perihelion passage, several dramatic outbursts of dust have been observed by instruments aboard ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft. These outbursts are typically intense and short-lived, with timescales on the order of several tens of minutes to a few hours. We report on the two largest of these dusty outbursts observed by the Alice far-ultraviolet (700-2050Å) spectrograph, which occurred on 10 July 2015 and 22 August 2015. On 10 July 2015 02:06 UTC, Alice spectra of the sunward limb, nucleus and anti-sunward limb show typical levels of dust-scattered sunlight, with the sunward limb 3-4x brighter than the anti-sunward limb. Beginning around 02:10 UTC, the dust on the anti-sunward side of the nucleus brightened rapidly, increasing by a factor of 21 over pre-outburst levels, when integrated over a 10-minute exposure. A 40s exposure beginning at 02:20 showed an additional factor of two increase in brightness. During the outburst, the dust became significantly brighter than the sunlit nucleus. Concurrent NAVCAM images show a large dust cloud expanding out from the night side of the nucleus. Despite this forty-fold increase in dust brightness, the Alice data show no evidence of enhancements of H2O, CO, CO2, O2, O, or H in the post-outburst spectra. By 04:24 UTC, after a 2-hour data gap, the comet had returned to pre-event levels. Although complicated by the scanning motion of the spacecraft, the start of Alice observations on 22 August 2015 revealed a major dust outburst in progress, this time confined to the sunward side of the nucleus. Between 07:03 and 07:54, the brightness of dust on the sunward side faded by a factor of 7. NAVCAM images from this period also show a dramatic fan-shaped cloud of dust. Unlike the 10 July event, the 22 August event shows some evidence of increased gas emissions.

  12. Status of the construction and performances of the neutron Zero Degree Calorimeters of the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddi, E.; Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicaló, C.; Cortese, P.; De Falco, A.; Dellacasa, G.; De Marco, N.; Ferretti, A.; Gallio, M.; Masoni, A.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Puddu, G.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Travaglia, G.; Usai, G.; Vercellin, E.

    2004-12-01

    The details of the construction of the neutron Zero Degree Calorimeters (ZN) of the ALICE Experiment, as well as their performances, will be presented. These spaghetti calorimeters will measure the energy lost by spectator nucleons in heavy-ion collisions. They are made of an absorber (tungsten alloy) filled with silica fibers, in which the charged particles of the shower produce Cherenkov light. The final neutron calorimeters have been built and their performances studied at the CERN SPS using pion and positron beams with momentum ranging from 50 to 150 GeV/ c. The main features like linearity of the response and resolution as a function of energy will be presented.

  13. First performance results of the ALICE TPC Readout Control Unit 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Appelshäuser, H.; Bratrud, L.; Castro, A.; Costa, F.; David, E.; Gunji, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kiss, T.; Langøy, R.; Lien, J.; Lippmann, C.; Oskarsson, A.; Rehman, A. Ur; Røed, K.; Röhrich, D.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Stuart, M.; Ullaland, K.; Velure, A.; Yang, S.; Österman, L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the first performance results of the ALICE TPC Readout Control Unit 2 (RCU2). With the upgraded hardware typology and the new readout scheme in FPGA design, the RCU2 is designed to achieve twice the readout speed of the present Readout Control Unit. Design choices such as using the flash-based Microsemi Smartfusion2 FPGA and applying mitigation techniques in interfaces and FPGA design ensure a high degree of radiation tolerance. This paper presents the system level irradiation test results as well as the first commissioning results of the RCU2. Furthermore, it will be concluded with a discussion of the planned updates in firmware.

  14. The Dependence of the Spring Constant in the Linear Range on Spring Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khotimah, Siti Nurul; Viridi, Sparisoma; Widayani; Khairurrijal

    2011-01-01

    In basic physics laboratories, springs are normally used to determine both spring constants and the Earth's gravitational acceleration. Students generally do not notice that the spring constant is not a universal constant, but depends on the spring parameters. This paper shows and verifies that the spring constant in the linear range is inversely…

  15. Study of new FNAL-NICADD extruded scintillator as active media of large EMCal of ALICE at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Oleg A. Grachov et al.

    2004-05-04

    The current conceptual design of proposed Large EMCal of ALICE at LHC is based largely on the scintillating mega-tile/fiber technology implemented in CDF Endplug upgrade project and in both barrel and endcap electromagnetic calorimeters of the STAR. The cost of scintillating material leads us to the choice of extruded polystyrene based scintillator, which is available in new FNAL-NICADD facility. Result of optical measurements, such as light yield and light yield variation, show that it is possible to use this material as active media of Large EMCal of ALICE at LHC.

  16. Motor gasoline assessment, Spring 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The springs of 1996 and 1997 provide an excellent example of contrasting gasoline market dynamics. In spring 1996, tightening crude oil markets pushed up gasoline prices sharply, adding to the normal seasonal gasoline price increases; however, in spring 1997, crude oil markets loosened and crude oil prices fell, bringing gasoline prices down. This pattern was followed throughout the country except in California. As a result of its unique reformulated gasoline, California prices began to vary significantly from the rest of the country in 1996 and continued to exhibit distinct variations in 1997. In addition to the price contrasts between 1996 and 1997, changes occurred in the way in which gasoline markets were supplied. Low stocks, high refinery utilizations, and high imports persisted through 1996 into summer 1997, but these factors seem to have had little impact on gasoline price spreads relative to average spread.

  17. Spring-Blade Impact Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Alan M.; Champagne, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Record of energy relationships retrieved from compact, portable tester. Spring-blade impact tester developed to support evaluation of tolerance to damage of struts under consideration for use in Space Station. Approach offers potential for determining damage as function of change in relationship between applied and absorbed energies as applied energy successively increased with each impact. Impactor strikes specimen at moment of maximum kinetic energy after spring blades released from cocked position. Concept also provides potential for measuring behavior during impact, and energy relationships retrievable from oscilloscope traces of impact.

  18. Common Readout Unit (CRU) - A new readout architecture for the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, J.; Khan, S. A.; Mukherjee, S.; Paul, R.

    2016-03-01

    The ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is presently going for a major upgrade in order to fully exploit the scientific potential of the upcoming high luminosity run, scheduled to start in the year 2021. The high interaction rate and the large event size will result in an experimental data flow of about 1 TB/s from the detectors, which need to be processed before sending to the online computing system and data storage. This processing is done in a dedicated Common Readout Unit (CRU), proposed for data aggregation, trigger and timing distribution and control moderation. It act as common interface between sub-detector electronic systems, computing system and trigger processors. The interface links include GBT, TTC-PON and PCIe. GBT (Gigabit transceiver) is used for detector data payload transmission and fixed latency path for trigger distribution between CRU and detector readout electronics. TTC-PON (Timing, Trigger and Control via Passive Optical Network) is employed for time multiplex trigger distribution between CRU and Central Trigger Processor (CTP). PCIe (Peripheral Component Interconnect Express) is the high-speed serial computer expansion bus standard for bulk data transport between CRU boards and processors. In this article, we give an overview of CRU architecture in ALICE, discuss the different interfaces, along with the firmware design and implementation of CRU on the LHCb PCIe40 board.

  19. Results from the first p+p runs of the ALICE High Level Trigger at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaki, Kalliopi; ALICE HLT Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The High Level Trigger for the ALICE experiment at LHC is a powerful, sophisticated tool aimed at compressing the raw data volume and issuing selective triggers for events with desirable physics content. At its current state it integrates information from all major ALICE detectors, i. e. the inner tracking system, the time projection chamber, the electromagnetic calorimeters, the transition radiation detector and the muon spectrometer performing real-time event reconstruction. The steam engine behind HLT is a high performance computing cluster of several hundred nodes. It has to reduce the data rate from 25 GB/s to 1.25 GB/s for fitting the DAQ mass storage bandwidth. The cluster is served by a full GigaBit Ethernet network, in addition to an InfiniBand backbone network. To cope with the great challenge of Pb+Pb collisions in autumn 2010, its performance capabilities are being enhanced with the addition of new nodes. Towards the same end the first GPU co-processors are in place. During the first period of data taking with p+p collisions the HLT was extensively used to reconstruct, analyze and display data from the various participating detectors. Among other tasks it contributed to the monitoring of the detector performance, selected events for their calibration and efficiency studies, and estimated primary and secondary vertices from p+p collisions identifying V0 topologies. The experience gained during these first months of online operation will be presented.

  20. The ALICE high-level trigger read-out upgrade for LHC Run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, H.; Alt, T.; Breitner, T.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Kollegger, T.; Krzewicki, M.; Lehrbach, J.; Rohr, D.; Kebschull, U.

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE experiment uses an optical read-out protocol called Detector Data Link (DDL) to connect the detectors with the computing clusters of Data Acquisition (DAQ) and High-Level Trigger (HLT). The interfaces of the clusters to these optical links are realized with FPGA-based PCI-Express boards. The High-Level Trigger is a computing cluster dedicated to the online reconstruction and compression of experimental data. It uses a combination of CPU, GPU and FPGA processing. For Run 2, the HLT has replaced all of its previous interface boards with the Common Read-Out Receiver Card (C-RORC) to enable read-out of detectors at high link rates and to extend the pre-processing capabilities of the cluster. The new hardware also comes with an increased link density that reduces the number of boards required. A modular firmware approach allows different processing and transport tasks to be built from the same source tree. A hardware pre-processing core includes cluster finding already in the C-RORC firmware. State of the art interfaces and memory allocation schemes enable a transparent integration of the C-RORC into the existing HLT software infrastructure. Common cluster management and monitoring frameworks are used to also handle C-RORC metrics. The C-RORC is in use in the clusters of ALICE DAQ and HLT since the start of LHC Run 2.

  1. The ALICE Inner Tracking System: Design, physics performance and R&D issues

    SciTech Connect

    Giubellino, P.

    1995-07-15

    ALICE is a dedicated Heavy-Ion experiment proposed for the future LHC collider at CERN. The main goals of the ALICE Inner Tracking System are the reconstruction of secondary vertexes and the tracking and identification of low-p{sub t} electrons; at the same time, it will provide a significant improvement of the momentum resolution at large p{sub t} and the tracking and identification of low-p{sub t} hadrons. The ITS will consist of five cilindrical layers of radii from 7.5 to 50 cm. of high-resolution detectors. The unprecedented particle density foreseen, of up to 8000 particles per unit {eta}, imposes the use of sophisticated, and often innovative, technologies for the detectors, the electronics and the support and cooling system. Therefore, extensive R&D programs are now being pursued on various aspects of the project. Here are presented the basic ideas for the design, a few examples of the expected performance, and a brief overview of the ongoing R&D.

  2. O2: A novel combined online and offline computing system for the ALICE Experiment after 2018

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananya; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, A.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Alt, T.; Aphecetche, L.; Agrawal, N.; Avasthi, A.; Bach, M.; Bala, R.; Barnafoldi, G.; Bhasin, A.; Belikov, J.; Bellini, F.; Betev, L.; Breitner, T.; Buncic, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Cliff, F.; Costa, F.; Cunqueiro Mendez, L.; Dash, S.; Delort, C.; Denes, E.; Divia, R.; Doenigus, B.; Engel, H.; Eschweiler, D.; Fuchs, U.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gorbunov, S.; Graczykowski, L.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigore, A.; Grosso, R.; Guernane, R.; Gupta, A.; Hrivnacova, I.; Hristov, P.; Ionita, C.; Ivanov, M.; Janik, M.; Kalcher, S.; Kassalias, N.; Kebschull, U.; Khandelwal, R.; Kushpil, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiss, T.; Kollegger, T.; Kowalski, M.; Kretz, M.; Kulakov, I.; Lafage, V.; Lara, C.; Legrand, I.; Lindenstruth, V.; Maevskaya, A.; Malzacher, P.; Morsch, A.; Nandi, B.; Niculescu, M.; Pillot, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Rajput, S.; Read, K.; Ribon, A.; Rohr, D.; Rubin, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, A.; Simonetti, G.; Smorholm, O.; Soós, C.; Szymanski, M.; Telesca, A.; Thaeder, J.; Udupa, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Vennedey, F.; von Haller, B.; Wenzel, S.; Zampolli, C.; Zyzak, M.; Alice Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a detector dedicated to the studies with heavy ion collisions exploring the physics of strongly interacting nuclear matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). After the second long shutdown of the LHC, the ALICE Experiment will be upgraded to make high precision measurements of rare probes at low pT, which cannot be selected with a trigger, and therefore require a very large sample of events recorded on tape. The online computing system will be completely redesigned to address the major challenge of sampling the full 50 kHz Pb-Pb interaction rate increasing the present limit by a factor of 100. This upgrade will also include the continuous un-triggered read-out of two detectors: ITS (Inner Tracking System) and TPC (Time Projection Chamber)) producing a sustained throughput of 1 TB/s. This unprecedented data rate will be reduced by adopting an entirely new strategy where calibration and reconstruction are performed online, and only the reconstruction results are stored while the raw data are discarded. This system, already demonstrated in production on the TPC data since 2011, will be optimized for the online usage of reconstruction algorithms. This implies much tighter coupling between online and offline computing systems. An R&D program has been set up to meet this huge challenge. The object of this paper is to present this program and its first results.

  3. A Very High Momentum Particle Identification Detector for the ALICE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mayani, Daniel

    2011-04-26

    The main purpose of the ALICE experiment at CERN is to identify and study the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) in heavy ion collisions at the LHC. Among others, hadrochemistry allows for a detailed insight into the characteristics of the high temperature and density system created in these events. It is therefore important to be able to identify charged particles on a track by track basis. Moreover, results from high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions obtained by other experiments (e.g. at RHIC) indicate that it is imperative to extend the detection capability of ALICE to higher momenta. To meet these challenges, we propose the construction of the Very High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (VHMPID), which aims to identify charged pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons in the momentum range of 10 GeV/c

  4. NOVA Spring 2000 Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colombo, Luann; Gregoire, Tanya; Ransick, Kristina; Sammons, Fran Lyons; Sammons, James

    This teacher's guide complements six programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the spring of 2000. Programs include: (1) "Lost on Everest"; (2) "Lost Tribes of Israel"; (3) "Crocodiles"; (4) "Lost at Sea: The Search for Longitude"; (5) "Global Warming"; and (6) "Secrets of Lost Empires". It provides activity set-ups related to…

  5. Registration of 'Rollag' spring wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) (caused primarily by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe) is a disease that annually threatens wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown in the northern plains of the United States. Resistance to this disease is a high priority trait in the University of Minnesota’s spring wheat breedi...

  6. TEACH Evaluation, Spring 2002. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuschke, Daylene M; Dixon, P. Scott; Gribbons, Barry C.

    TEACH is a partnership program involving California State University, Bakersfield (CSUB), College of the Canyons (COC) and the Newhall and Hart School Districts to provide students with supervised fieldwork and specialized support services while pursuing a California teaching credential. This Spring 2002 TEACH evaluation reports on surveys of COC…

  7. The Forced Hard Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    2006-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, various examples of the Duffing type forced spring equation with epsilon positive, are studied. Since [epsilon] is positive, all solutions to the associated homogeneous equation are periodic and the same is true with the forcing applied. The damped equation exhibits steady state trajectories with the interesting…

  8. The Forced Soft Spring Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, T. H.

    2006-01-01

    Through numerical investigations, this paper studies examples of the forced Duffing type spring equation with [epsilon] negative. By performing trial-and-error numerical experiments, the existence is demonstrated of stability boundaries in the phase plane indicating initial conditions yielding bounded solutions. Subharmonic boundaries are…

  9. Spring for It: First Novels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    How do publishers describe the first novels they will be releasing this spring and summer? "Amazing," "fabulous," and "unique" are words that pop up frequently, though hats off to one publicist forthright or cheeky enough to call a work "weird Western/horror." The proof of such praise is in the reading, but why not check out this preview of first…

  10. Finding Spring on Planet X

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew J.

    2007-01-01

    For a given orbital period and eccentricity, we determine the maximum time lapse between the winter solstice and the spring equinox on a planet. In addition, given an axial precession path, we determine the effects on the seasons. This material can be used at various levels to illustrate ideas such as periodicity, eccentricity, polar coordinates,…

  11. A Breath of Spring Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Marilyn L.

    2009-01-01

    The most promising sights of spring in Nebraska this year were two conferences for women. One event, sponsored by Metropolitan Community College in Omaha, was a Women's History Month Tea. A second conference was the meeting of the Nebraska Women in Higher Education. These two events suggest that there is a continuing interest in women's leadership…

  12. Voronoi Diagrams and Spring Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perham, Arnold E.; Perham, Faustine L.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this geometry project is to use Voronoi diagrams, a powerful modeling tool across disciplines, and the integration of technology to analyze spring rainfall from rain gauge data over a region. In their investigation, students use familiar equipment from their mathematical toolbox: triangles and other polygons, circumcenters and…

  13. NOVA Spring 1999 Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colombo, Luann; Ransick, Kristina; Recio, Belinda

    This teacher's guide complements six programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the spring of 1999. Programs include: (1) "Surviving AIDS"; (2) "Secrets of Making Money"; (3) "Escape!: Fire"; (4) "Escape!: Car Crash"; (5) "Volcanoes of the Deep"; and (6) "Odyssey of Life: Part 1. The Ultimate Journey". It provides activity…

  14. To Colorado Springs and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millard, Richard M.

    Developments that highlight the importance of state oversight and authorization of higher education institutions and the objectives of the current Colorado Springs seminar on this topic are considered. In addition to the basic fact that states are the origin of chartering, licensing, and authorization of educational institutions, states have…

  15. Carnivorous arthropods after spring flood

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spring flooding is a common practice in Wisconsin cranberries, but flooding as insect control produces variable results among marshes. This project is aimed at figuring out why it works, and why it sometimes doesn’t. We have focused on tracking arthropod populations to explain the observed patterns ...

  16. Nd, Sr-isotopic provenance and trace element geochemistry of Amazonian foreland basin fluvial sands, Bolivia and Peru: implications for ensialic Andean orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Asish R.; Sharma, Mukul; DeCelles, Peter G.

    1990-10-01

    Precambrian continental crust of the western Brazilian Shield. The depleted mantle average Nd model age of 1.46 Ga for the fluvial sands reflects the average age of the Brazilian continental crustal source. The development of the Andean orogenic belt has been discussed schematically with the isotopic data of the sands. The model describes a trailing edge prism of sediments, derived from the Brazilian Shield during the late Paleozoic-early Mesozoic. The prism becomes part of the fold-thrust belt during the Andean orogeny in the Neogene, when the foreland basin develops with the basin fill partly derived from the fold-thrust belt. The sedimentary rocks in the fold-thrust belt are also a major source of contaminants for the Andean magmas. The contiguous nature of the Andean magmatic trend and the fluvial sand data in theɛ Sr(O)-ɛ Nd(O) diagram suggests that the ensialic Andean magmatic arc has remained connected to its parent continent, the western Brazilian Shield, throughout the development of the Andean orogeny.

  17. The Mother of Microloans (and Obama): A Q&A with Anthropologist and Author, Alice G. Dewey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maitland, Christine

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Alice G. Dewey, professor emeritus at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa and granddaughter of the renowned American philosopher John Dewey. She is an economic anthropologist who did ground-breaking research on local markets in Indonesia in the 1950s. She recently co-edited "Surviving Against the Odds:…

  18. "All of Her Changes Have Made Me Think about My Changes": Fan Readings of Phyllis Reynolds Naylor's "Alice" Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinecken, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    This essay follows the insights of reader response theory to examine how readers of Phyllis Reynolds Naylor's Alice McKinley series negotiate textual meaning and construct particular identities in relation to the series' controversial content. Ranking second on the American Library Association's top one hundred list of banned and challenged books…

  19. Portrait of a Geothermal Spring, Hunter's Hot Springs, Oregon.

    PubMed

    Castenholz, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Although alkaline Hunter's Hot Springs in southeastern Oregon has been studied extensively for over 40 years, most of these studies and the subsequent publications were before the advent of molecular methods. However, there are many field observations and laboratory experiments that reveal the major aspects of the phototrophic species composition within various physical and chemical gradients of these springs. Relatively constant temperature boundaries demark the upper boundary of the unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus at 73-74 °C (the world-wide upper limit for photosynthesis), and 68-70 °C the upper limit for Chloroflexus. The upper limit for the cover of the filamentous cyanobacterium, Geitlerinema (Oscillatoria) is at 54-55 °C, and the in situ lower limit at 47-48 °C for all three of these phototrophs due to the upper temperature limit for the grazing ostracod, Thermopsis. The in situ upper limit for the cyanobacteria Pleurocapsa and Calothrix is at ~47-48 °C, which are more grazer-resistant and grazer dependent. All of these demarcations are easily visible in the field. In addition, there is a biosulfide production in some sections of the springs that have a large impact on the microbiology. Most of the temperature and chemical limits have been explained by field and laboratory experiments. PMID:25633225

  20. Monitoring the data quality of the real-time event reconstruction in the ALICE High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austrheim Erdal, Hege; Richther, Matthias; Szostak, Artur; Toia, Alberica

    2012-12-01

    ALICE is a dedicated heavy ion experiment at the CERN LHC. The ALICE High Level Trigger was designed to select events with desirable physics properties. Data from several of the major subdetectors in ALICE are processed by the HLT for real-time event reconstruction, for instance the Inner Tracking System, the Time Projection Chamber, the electromagnetc calorimeters, the Transition Radiation Detector and the muon spectrometer. The HLT reconstructs events in real-time and thus provides input for trigger algorithms. It is necessary to monitor the quality of the reconstruction where one focuses on track and event properties. Also, HLT implemented data compression for the TPC during the heavy ion data taking in 2011 to reduce the data rate from the ALICE detector. The key for the data compression is to store clusters (spacepoints) calculated by HLT rather than storing raw data. It is thus very important to monitor the cluster finder performance as a way to monitor the data compression. The data monitoring is divided into two stages. The first stage is performed during data taking. A part of the HLT production chain is dedicated to performing online monitoring and facilities are available in the HLT production cluster to have real-time access to the reconstructed events in the ALICE control room. This includes track and event properties, and in addition, this facility gives a way to display a small fraction of the reconstructed events in an online display. The second part of the monitoring is performed after the data has been transferred to permanent storage. After a post-process of the real-time reconstructed data, one can look in more detail at the cluster finder performance, the quality of the reconstruction of tracks, vertices and vertex position. The monitoring solution is presented in detail, with special attention to the heavy ion data taking of 2011.

  1. 14 CFR 29.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Spring devices. 29.687 Section 29.687... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  2. 14 CFR 27.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Spring devices. 27.687 Section 27.687... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  3. 75 FR 39241 - Hooper Springs Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... Bonneville Power Administration Hooper Springs Project AGENCY: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA... Hooper Springs Project). The new BPA substation would be called Hooper Springs Substation and would be... 115-kV Lane Creek Substation, east of the City of Wayan, Idaho. The proposed project would...

  4. 14 CFR 27.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spring devices. 27.687 Section 27.687... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  5. Effective Mass of an Oscillating Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Eduardo E.; Gesnouin, Gabriel A.

    2007-01-01

    We present an experimental method to obtain the effective mass of an unloaded oscillating spring. We measure the period "T"("n") of the partial springs that result when hanging "n" of the total "N" coils of a given spring. Data are correlated with the expectation of a simple model for "T"("n") that takes into account the effective mass of the…

  6. 14 CFR 29.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Spring devices. 29.687 Section 29.687... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  7. 14 CFR 27.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Spring devices. 27.687 Section 27.687... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  8. 14 CFR 27.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Spring devices. 27.687 Section 27.687... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  9. 14 CFR 29.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Spring devices. 29.687 Section 29.687... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  10. 14 CFR 29.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Spring devices. 29.687 Section 29.687... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  11. 14 CFR 27.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Spring devices. 27.687 Section 27.687... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  12. 14 CFR 29.687 - Spring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spring devices. 29.687 Section 29.687... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.687 Spring devices. (a) Each control system spring device whose failure could cause flutter or other unsafe...

  13. FOSSIL SPRINGS ROADLESS AREA, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beard, L.S.; Ellis, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    Based on field studies, the Fossil Springs Roadless Area in central Arizona is concluded to have little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Rocks in the Supai Formation (Pennsylvanian-Permian) near the central part of the roadless area contain widespread but spotty copper mineralization and trace amounts of uranium. Analyses obtained during the study define geochemical anomalies in two portions of the area that remain unexplained. The suites of anomalous metals suggest the possibility of hydrothermal veins and the presence of ultramafic rocks; neither were found in the field. Although there is little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources in the Fossil Springs Roadless Area, studies to identify the source of the geochemical anomalies could have valuable implications for regional studies and mineral exploration in the surrounding area.

  14. Force of an actin spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jennifer; Mahadevan, L.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The acrosomal process of the horseshoe crab sperm is a novel mechanochemical molecular spring that converts its elastic stain energy to mechanical work upon the chemical activation by Ca2+. Twisted and bent, the initial state of the acrosomal bundle features a high degree of complexity in its structure and the energy is believed to be stored in the highly strained actin filaments as an elastic potential energy. When activated, the bundle relaxes from the coil of the highly twisted and bent filaments to its straight conformation at a mean velocity of 15um/s. The mean extension velocity increases dramatically from 3um/s to 27um/s when temperature of the medium is changed from 9.6C to 32C (respective viscosities of 1.25-0.75cp), yet it exhibits a very weak dependence on changes in the medium viscosity (1cp-33cp). These experiments suggest that the uncoiling of the actin spring should be limited not by the viscosity of the medium but by the unlatching events of involved proteins at a molecular level. Unlike the viscosity-limited processes, where force is directly related to the rate of the reaction, a direct measurement is required to obtain the spring force of the acrosomal process. The extending acrosomal bundle is forced to push against a barrier and its elastic buckling response is analyzed to measure the force generated during the uncoiling.

  15. Design and performance of the ALICE TRD front-end electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelov, Venelin

    2006-07-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) of the ALICE experiment at CERN incorporates 1.2 million channels which are individually read out and processed. The front-end electronics (FEE) utilizes two custom chips: an 18 channel analog preamplifier and shaper (PASA) and a mixed-signal chip, performing 10 bit analog-to-digital conversion, event buffering and local tracking (TRAP). Both chips together are packaged as a 4×4 cm2 ball grid array multi chip module (MCM). More than 65 k of these will be integrated on the detector. In fall 2004, a small prototype implementing 140 MCMs was successfully tested at CERN. The MCMs demonstrate an ADC performance of 9.5 effective bits while the digital back-end is operating, including four RISC processors. The electronic noise of the PASA mounted on the detector was measured with the digital back-end to be below 1200 electrons.

  16. Do regions of ALICE matter? Social relationships and data exchanges in the Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widmer, E. D.; Carminati, F.; Grigoras, C.; Viry, G.; Galli Carminati, G.

    2012-06-01

    Following a previous publication [1], this study aims at investigating the impact of regional affiliations of centres on the organisation of collaboration within the Distributed Computing ALICE infrastructure, based on social networks methods. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to all centre managers about support, email interactions and wished collaborations in the infrastructure. Several additional measures, stemming from technical observations were produced, such as bandwidth, data transfers and Internet Round Trip Time (RTT) were also included. Information for 50 centres were considered (60% response rate). Empirical analysis shows that despite the centralisation on CERN, the network is highly organised by regions. The results are discussed in the light of policy and efficiency issues.

  17. SAMPA chip: a new ASIC for the ALICE TPC and MCH upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza, S. H. I.; Bregant, M.; Chambert, V.; Espagnon, B.; Hernandez Herrera, H. D.; Mahmood, S. M.; Moraes, D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Noël, G.; Pilyar, A.; Russo, P.; Sanches, B. C. S.; Tambave, G. J.; Tun-Lanoë, K. M. M.; van Noije, W.; Velure, A.; Vereschagin, S.; Weber, T. O.; Zaporozhets, S.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the SAMPA, an ASIC designed for the upgrade of read-out front end electronics of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and Muon Chambers (MCH). SAMPA is made in a 130 nm CMOS technology with 1.25 V nominal voltage supply and includes 32 channels, with selectable input polarity, and five possible combinations of shaping time and sensitivity. Each channel comprises a Charge Sensitive Amplifier, a semi-Gaussian shaper and a 10-bit ADC, followed by a Digital Signal Processor. A prototype in a multi project run was submitted to evaluate the performance of each of these blocks. The experimental results of the tests on these building blocks are presented, showing a substantial agreement with requirements.

  18. Kaethe Kollwitz (1867-1945): the artist who may have suffered from Alice in Wonderland Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Drysdale, Graeme R

    2009-05-01

    Kaethe Kollwitz was a 20th century German artist who grew to fame for her socio-political impressions of Germany during World Wars I and II. In her diary, Kollwitz self-described symptoms of Alice in Wonderland Syndrome during her childhood. She complained of episodes where objects appeared to grow larger or smaller and perceptual distortions where she felt she was diminishing in size. This may explain why Kollwitz's artistic style appeared to shift from naturalism to expressionism, and why her artistic subjects are often shaped with large hands and faces. The distortion present in her visual art may have less to do with a deliberate emphasis of the artist's feelings and more to do with her perceptual experience. PMID:19401515

  19. Neutral meson production in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC with ALICE

    SciTech Connect

    Borissov, Alexander; Collaboration: ALICE Collaboration

    2013-04-15

    The first measurements of the invariant differential cross sections of inclusive {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} meson production with ALICE are presented for pp collisions at {radical}(s) = 0.9 and 7 TeV. Next-to-Leading Order perturbative QCD calculations overestimate the data at {radical}(s) = 7TeV, but are consistent with the {pi}{sup 0} spectrum at {radical}(s) = 0.9TeV and with the measured {pi}{sup 0}/{eta} cross section ratio at {radical}(s) = 7TeV. The nuclear modification factors (R{sub AA}) of {pi}{sup 0} production at different centralities show a strong suppression with respect to pp collisions.

  20. Jet production in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions measured by ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Rosi; ALICE Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    Particle jets, formed when a hard scattered parton fragments into a jet of hadrons, are an ideal probe of the medium formed in heavy-ion collisions. The hard-scattered partons that produce them come from early in the collision, prior to the medium formation. These partons lose energy as they traverse the medium, and eventually fragment into jets of hadrons, which exhibit a modification when compared to jets produced in pp and p-Pb collisions. At LHC energies, the parton production cross-section is much larger than at RHIC, allowing jets to be reconstructed over a much wider kinematic range. Jet reconstruction allows for a more differential investigation of the parton energy loss than single hadrons, which have been used as jet proxies in the past, as the jets collect a larger percentage of the final state energy, which means their kinematics are more closely correlated to the kinematics of the initial parton. Jets are reconstructed in ALICE either using information from the tracking systems, or by combining this with the ALICE electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal). In these proceedings, jet spectra from 2.76 TeV Pb-Pb and pp collisions will be presented. In particular, the centrality and event-plane dependence of the measured spectra and the background will be discussed. Jets from different centrality classes and event-plane orientations provide additional information necessary for understanding the path-length and temperature dependence of energy loss mechanisms. The reconstruction and correction procedures for jets will be shown. Results from Pb-Pb events will be compared to the baseline pp and p-Pb results, which allows the initial state and cold nuclear matter effects to be disentangled from hot medium effects. The jet nuclear modification, which quantifies the suppression, will be compared to energy-loss models.

  1. Diagenesis of Upper Carboniferous rocks in the Ouachita foreland shelf in mid-continent USA: an overview of widespread effects of a Variscan-equivalent orogeny

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walton, A.W.; Wojcik, K.M.; Goldstein, R.H.; Barker, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    Diagenesis of Upper Carboniferous foreland shelf rocks in southeastern Kansas took place at temperatures as high as 100-150?? C at a depth of less than 2 km. High temperatures are the result of the long distance (hundreds of kilometers) advection of groundwater related to collisional orogeny in the Ouachita tectonic belt to the south. Orogenic activity in the Ouachita area was broadly Late Carboniferous, equivalent to the Variscan activity of Europe. Mississippi Valley-type Pb-Zn deposits and oil and gas fields in the US midcontinent and elsewhere are commonly attributed to regional groundwater flow resulting from such collisional events. This paper describes the diagenesis and thermal effects in sandstone and limestone of Upper Carboniferous siliciclastic and limestone-shale cyclothems, the purported confining layer of a supposed regional aquifer. Diagenesis took place in early, intermediate, and late stages. Many intermediate and late stage events in the sandstones have equivalents in the limestones, suggesting that the causes were regional. The sandstone paragenesis includes siderite cement (early stage), quartz overgrowths (intermediate stage), dissolution of feldspar and carbonates, followed by minor Fe calcite, pore-filling kaolinite and sub-poikilotopic Ca ankerite (late stage). The limestone paragenesis includes calcite cement (early stage); megaquartz, chalcedony, and Fe calcite spar (intermediate stage); and dissolution, Ca-Fe dolomite and kaolinite (late stage). The Rm value of vitrinite shows a regional average of 0.6-0.7%; Rock-Eval TmaX suggests a comparable degree of organic maturity. The Th of aqueous fluid inclusions in late stage Ca-Fe-Mg carbonates ranges from 90 to 160?? and Tmice indicates very saline water (>200000 ppm NaCl equivalent); ??18O suggests that the water is of basinal origin. Local warm spots have higher Rm, Tmax, and Th. The results constrain numerical models of regional fluid migration, which is widely viewed as an artesian flow

  2. Implications for the tectonic transition zone of active orogeny in Hoping drainage basin, by landscape evolution at the multi-temporal timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Q.; Chen, R. F.; Lin, W.; Hsieh, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    In an actively orogeny the landscape are transient state of disequilibrium in response to climatic and tectonic inputs. At the catchment scale, sensitivity of river systems plays an important role in landscape evolution. Hoping drainage basin is located at the tectonic transition zone in the north-eastern Taiwan, where the behavior of Philippine Sea plate switches from overriding above the east-dipping Eurasian Continental plate to northward subducting under the Ryukyu arc. However, extensive deep-seated landslides, debris flow, and numerous large alluvial terraces can be observed, suggesting strong surface processes in this watershed. This effect on regional climate fundamentally changed the landscape by reconfiguring drainage patterns and creating a vast influx of sediments into the basin. In this study we review the morphological evidence from multi-temporal timescale, including in-situ cosmogenic nuclides denudation rate and suspension load data, coupled with the analysis of the longitudinal profiles. The main goal of this study is to compare Holocene erosion rates with thermochronology and radiometric dating of river terraces to investigate the erosion history of Hoping area. The result shows that short-term erosion rate is around twice as large as the long-term denudation rate, which might due to the climate-driven erosion events such as typhoon-induced landslide. We've also mapped detail morphological features by using the high-resolution LiDAR image, which help us to identify not only the landslide but also tectonic features such as lineation, fault scarps, and fracture zones. The tectonic surface features and field investigation results show that the drainage basin is highly fractured, suggesting that even though the vertical tectonic activity rate is small, the horizontal shortening influenced by both southward opening of the back-arc Okinawa trough and the north-western collision in this area is significant. This might cause the reducing in rock strength

  3. 1. NORTHWEST FRONT, SOUTHWEST SIDE (SPRING HOUSE IN FOREGROUND; BATH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. NORTHWEST FRONT, SOUTHWEST SIDE (SPRING HOUSE IN FOREGROUND; BATH HOUSE AT REAR) (4 x 5 negative; 5 x 7 print) - Salt Sulphur Springs, Spring House, U.S. Route 219, Salt Sulphur Springs, Monroe County, WV

  4. Fast TPC Online Tracking on GPUs and Asynchronous Data Processing in the ALICE HLT to facilitate Online Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohr, David; Gorbunov, Sergey; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Breitner, Timo; Kretz, Matthias; Lindenstruth, Volker

    2015-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Heavy Ion Experiment) is one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which is today the most powerful particle accelerator worldwide. The High Level Trigger (HLT) is an online compute farm of about 200 nodes, which reconstructs events measured by the ALICE detector in real-time. The HLT uses a custom online data-transport framework to distribute data and workload among the compute nodes. ALICE employs several calibration-sensitive subdetectors, e.g. the TPC (Time Projection Chamber). For a precise reconstruction, the HLT has to perform the calibration online. Online- calibration can make certain Offline calibration steps obsolete and can thus speed up Offline analysis. Looking forward to ALICE Run III starting in 2020, online calibration becomes a necessity. The main detector used for track reconstruction is the TPC. Reconstructing the trajectories in the TPC is the most compute-intense step during event reconstruction. Therefore, a fast tracking implementation is of great importance. Reconstructed TPC tracks build the basis for the calibration making a fast online-tracking mandatory. We present several components developed for the ALICE High Level Trigger to perform fast event reconstruction and to provide features required for online calibration. As first topic, we present our TPC tracker, which employs GPUs to speed up the processing, and which bases on a Cellular Automaton and on the Kalman filter. Our TPC tracking algorithm has been successfully used in 2011 and 2012 in the lead-lead and the proton-lead runs. We have improved it to leverage features of newer GPUs and we have ported it to support OpenCL, CUDA, and CPUs with a single common source code. This makes us vendor independent. As second topic, we present framework extensions required for online calibration. The extensions, however, are generic and can be used for other purposes as well. We have extended the framework to support asynchronous compute

  5. Audiomagnetotelluric data from Spring, Cave, and Coyote Spring Valleys, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPhee, Darcy K.; Chuchel, Bruce A.; Pellerin, Louise

    2006-01-01

    Audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) data along four profiles in Spring, Cave, and Coyote Spring Valleys are presented here. The AMT method is used to estimate the electrical resistivity of the earth over depth ranges of a few meters to greater than one kilometer. This method is a valuable tool for revealing subsurface structure and stratigraphy within the Basin and Range of eastern Nevada, therefore helping to define the geohydrologic framework in this region. We collected AMT data using the Geometrics StrataGem EH4 system, a four-channel, natural and controlled- source tensor system recording in the range of 10 to 92,000 Hz. To augment the low signal in the natural field, an unpolarized transmitter comprised of two horizontal-magnetic dipoles was used from 1,000 to 70,000 Hz. Profiles were 1.4 - 12.6 km in length with station spacing of 100-400 m. Data were recorded with the electrical (E) field parallel to and perpendicular to the regional geologic strike direction. Station locations and sounding curves, showing apparent resistivity, phase data, and coherency data, are presented here.

  6. CACTUS SPRING ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matti, Jonathan C.; Kuizon, Lucia

    1984-01-01

    Geologic, geochemical, and geophysical studies together with a review of historic mining and prospecting activities indicate that the Cactus Spring Roadless Area in California has little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Marble bodies occur in the northern part of the roadless area and are possible resources for building stone, crushed and quarried aggregate, and lime and magnesium for Portland cement and industrial applications. It is recommended that the terrane of marble be mapped and sampled carefully in order to evaluate the quantity and quality of the carbonate resources.

  7. Quantum model for entropic springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chiao-Hsuan; Taylor, Jacob M.

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by understanding the emergence of thermodynamic restoring forces and oscillations, we develop a quantum-mechanical model of a bath of spins coupled to the elasticity of a material. We show our model reproduces the behavior of a variety of entropic springs while enabling investigation of nonequilibrium resonator states in the quantum domain. We find our model emerges naturally in disordered elastic media, such as glasses, and is an additional expected effect in systems with anomalous specific heat and 1 /f noise at low temperatures due to two-level systems that fluctuate.

  8. Spring, 1980, DECUS symposium review

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.J.; Duffy, J.M.; McDonald, W.M.; Oppenheimer, J.L.; Brandt, J.J.; Grant, C.W.; O'Brien, D.W.; VanLehn, A.L.

    1980-10-24

    The Digital Equipment Computer Users Society (DECUS) holds biannual symposia where its membership and the host company can exchange ideas, problems, and solutions. This report by the newly formed DECUS Local User Group at LLL collects information gathered at the Spring '80 symposium in Chicago on April 22-25. Information is presented for the following special interest groups (SIGs): RSX/IAS SIG, VAX/VSM SIG, PASCAL (languages) SIG, networks SIG, TECO SIG, LSI-11 SIG, RT-11 SIG, site manager SIG, and database SIG. (RWR)

  9. Slightly thermal springs and non-thermal springs at Mount Shasta, California: Chemistry and recharge elevations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, M.; Thompson, J.M.; White, L.D.

    2003-01-01

    Temperature measurements, isotopic contents, and dissolved constituents are presented for springs at Mount Shasta to understand slightly thermal springs in the Shasta Valley based on the characteristics of non-thermal springs. Non-thermal springs on Mount Shasta are generally cooler than mean annual air temperatures for their elevation. The specific conductance of non-thermal springs increases linearly with discharge temperature. Springs at higher and intermediate elevations on Mount Shasta have fairly limited circulation paths, whereas low-elevation springs have longer paths because of their higher-elevation recharge. Springs in the Shasta Valley are warmer than air temperatures for their elevation and contain significant amounts of chloride and sulfate, constituents often associated with volcanic hydrothermal systems. Data for the Shasta Valley springs generally define mixing trends for dissolved constituents and temperature. The isotopic composition of the Shasta Valley springs indicates that water fell as precipitation at a higher elevation than any of the non-thermal springs. It is possible that the Shasta Valley springs include a component of the outflow from a proposed 210??C hydrothermal system that boils to supply steam for the summit acid-sulfate spring. In order to categorize springs such as those in the Shasta Valley, we introduce the term slightly thermal springs for springs that do not meet the numerical criterion of 10??C above air temperature for thermal springs but have temperatures greater than non-thermal springs in the area and usually also have dissolved constituents normally found in thermal waters. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Slightly thermal springs and non-thermal springs at Mount Shasta, California: Chemistry and recharge elevations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathenson, M.; Thompson, J. M.; White, L. D.

    2003-02-01

    Temperature measurements, isotopic contents, and dissolved constituents are presented for springs at Mount Shasta to understand slightly thermal springs in the Shasta Valley based on the characteristics of non-thermal springs. Non-thermal springs on Mount Shasta are generally cooler than mean annual air temperatures for their elevation. The specific conductance of non-thermal springs increases linearly with discharge temperature. Springs at higher and intermediate elevations on Mount Shasta have fairly limited circulation paths, whereas low-elevation springs have longer paths because of their higher-elevation recharge. Springs in the Shasta Valley are warmer than air temperatures for their elevation and contain significant amounts of chloride and sulfate, constituents often associated with volcanic hydrothermal systems. Data for the Shasta Valley springs generally define mixing trends for dissolved constituents and temperature. The isotopic composition of the Shasta Valley springs indicates that water fell as precipitation at a higher elevation than any of the non-thermal springs. It is possible that the Shasta Valley springs include a component of the outflow from a proposed 210°C hydrothermal system that boils to supply steam for the summit acid-sulfate spring. In order to categorize springs such as those in the Shasta Valley, we introduce the term slightly thermal springs for springs that do not meet the numerical criterion of 10°C above air temperature for thermal springs but have temperatures greater than non-thermal springs in the area and usually also have dissolved constituents normally found in thermal waters.

  11. Centrality determination of Pb-Pb collisions at sNN=2.76 TeV with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaráz Aviña, E.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Böttger, S.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Braidot, E.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caballero Orduna, D.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carlin Filho, N.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castillo Hernandez, J. F.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Alaniz, E.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Das, K.; Dash, S.; Dash, A.; De, S.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; De Marco, N.; Dénes, E.; De Pasquale, S.; Deppman, A.; D Erasmo, G.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Di Bari, D.; Dietel, T.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Driga, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fearick, R.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Fenton-Olsen, B.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Geuna, C.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Girard, M. R.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; Ferreiro, E. G.; González-Trueba, L. H.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Goswami, A.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, R.; Gupta, A.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.

    2013-10-01

    This publication describes the methods used to measure the centrality of inelastic Pb-Pb collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV per colliding nucleon pair with ALICE. The centrality is a key parameter in the study of the properties of QCD matter at extreme temperature and energy density, because it is directly related to the initial overlap region of the colliding nuclei. Geometrical properties of the collision, such as the number of participating nucleons and the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions, are deduced from a Glauber model with a sharp impact parameter selection and shown to be consistent with those extracted from the data. The centrality determination provides a tool to compare ALICE measurements with those of other experiments and with theoretical calculations.

  12. Thermal springs in Lake Baikal

    SciTech Connect

    Shanks, W.C. III; Callender, E. )

    1992-06-01

    Pore waters extracted from sediment cores were analyzed for their oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions and major ion chemistry to determine the source of water from a vent area for diffuse lake-bottom thermal springs or seeps in Frolikha Bay, northeastern Lake Baikal. The {delta}{sup 18}O values of pore waters range from {minus}15.2{per thousand} to {minus}16.7{per thousand}, and {delta}D values range from {minus}119{per thousand} to {minus}126{per thousand} (both isotopes determined relative to standard mean ocean water (SMOW)). Bottom water in Lake Baikal has a {delta}{sup 18}O value of {minus}5.6{per thousand} and a {delta}D values of {minus}120{per thousand}. Pore waters in the vent area are significantly enriched in Mg, K, Ca, and especially Na and have the lowest {delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O values; these pore waters are isotopically and chemically distinct from pore waters in other, more typical parts of the lake. The pore-water isotopic data fall on a local meteoric water line, and covariations in water isotopes and chemistry are not consistent with evaporation or hydrothermal water-rock interaction. The thermal springs represent discharging meteoric waters that have been gently heated during subsurface circulation and are largely unaltered isotopically. Chemical variations are most likely due to dissolution of subsurface evaporites.

  13. Results from particle identification in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions measured with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barile, F.

    2014-06-01

    The particle identification capability of the ALICE apparatus is unique among the LHC experiments as it exploits almost all known techniques. In this paper, the working principles of the relevant PID detectors in the central barrel will be discussed. A particular emphasis will be given to recent results on identified particle spectra and production yield ratios at mid-rapidity in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions.

  14. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease--priorities in prevention, diagnosis and management. A report of the CSANZ Indigenous Cardiovascular Health Conference, Alice Springs 2011.

    PubMed

    Rémond, M G W; Wheaton, G R; Walsh, W F; Prior, D L; Maguire, G P

    2012-10-01

    Three priority areas in the prevention, diagnosis and management of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) were identified and discussed in detail: 1. Echocardiography and screening/diagnosis of RHD – Given the existing uncertainty it remains premature to advocate for or to incorporate echocardiographic screening for RHD into Australian clinical practice. Further research is currently being undertaken to evaluate the potential for echocardiography screening. 2. Secondary prophylaxis – Secondary prophylaxis (long acting benzathine penicillin injections) must be seen as a priority. Systems-based approaches are necessary with a focus on the development and evaluation of primary health care-based or led strategies incorporating effective health information management systems. Better/novel systems of delivery of prophylactic medications should be investigated. 3. Management of advanced RHD – National centres of excellence for the diagnosis, assessment and surgical management of RHD are required. Early referral for surgical input is necessary with multidisciplinary care and team-based decision making that includes patient, family, and local health providers. There is a need for a national RHD surgical register and research strategy for the assessment, intervention and long-term outcome of surgery and other interventions for RHD. PMID:22726405

  15. Study of cosmic ray events with high muon multiplicity using the ALICE detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The ALICE Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    ALICE is one of four large experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, specially designed to study particle production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Located 52 meters underground with 28 meters of overburden rock, it has also been used to detect muons produced by cosmic ray interactions in the upper atmosphere. In this paper, we present the multiplicity distribution of these atmospheric muons and its comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. This analysis exploits the large size and excellent tracking capability of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber. A special emphasis is given to the study of high multiplicity events containing more than 100 reconstructed muons and corresponding to a muon areal density ρμ > 5.9 m-2. Similar events have been studied in previous underground experiments such as ALEPH and DELPHI at LEP. While these experiments were able to reproduce the measured muon multiplicity distribution with Monte Carlo simulations at low and intermediate multiplicities, their simulations failed to describe the frequency of the highest multiplicity events. In this work we show that the high multiplicity events observed in ALICE stem from primary cosmic rays with energies above 1016 eV and that the frequency of these events can be successfully described by assuming a heavy mass composition of primary cosmic rays in this energy range. The development of the resulting air showers was simulated using the latest version of QGSJET to model hadronic interactions. This observation places significant constraints on alternative, more exotic, production mechanisms for these events.

  16. Timing of maturation of a Neoproterozoic oceanic arc during Pan-African Orogeny: the Asmlil complex (Anti-Atlas, South Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantafyllou, Antoine; Berger, Julien; Baele, Jean-Marc; Bruguier, Olivier; Diot, Hervé; Ennih, Nasser; Plissart, Gaëlle; Monnier, Christophe; Watlet, Arnaud; Vandycke, Sara

    2016-04-01

    produced by partial melting of a REE-depleted gabbronorite with cpx + garnet-rich residue, as typically observed in the basal crustal part of paleo-arc sections (e.g. Talkeetna, Kohistan arcs). Field observations, geochemical signatures, P-T estimates and new geochronological data allow to track the timing of Asmlil arc maturation. Combining our results to the entire Pan-African suture (Sirwa and Bou Azzer inliers), geochronological data clearly show that three distinct flare-ups give the tempo of arc magmatism during Pan-African Orogeny. First event is the early construction of the 755-745 My oceanic arc marked by intermediate volcanic to subvolcanic massifs. Second event occurred around 700 My and results from mafic products intruding previous arc. A last event also dated at 660-650 My in the Sirwa window marks the emplacement of hot hornblenditic arc-magmas into older arc massifs during the tectonic extrusion of the arc section. This late event is also related to intense melt production at different level of the arc contributing to differentiation of the whole arc complex. We thus interpreted the Asmlil complex as the final composite product of successive magmatic pulses during arc life cycle which can be compared to relatively long-lived and paced active arc systems (e.g. Aleutian, IBM arcs).

  17. The Blackwater Intrusion of the Grampian Orogeny: Implications for the Younger Basics and the Tectonic-Metamorphic Zonation of the Grampian Terrane, NE Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Gareth; Raub, Timothy

    2014-05-01

    The Dalradian Supergroup of NE Scotland hosts the classic Buchan low-pressure high-temperature metamorphic domain, as well as a suite of substantial ~470Myr syn-orogenic mafic intrusions (the 'Younger Basics') and a set of major, steeply-inclined shear zones which deform both the Dalradian country rocks and the Younger Basics. The Blackwater mafic intrusion is situated within one such shear zone, the Portsoy-Duchray Hill Lineament (PDHL), which runs SW inland from the coast at Portsoy and corresponds with the westernmost limit of Buchan metamorphism. Occupying a position between the Appin and Argyll Groups, the Blackwater Intrusion is emplaced at a deeper structural level than other more extensively studied Younger Basics to the East towards Aberdeen (such as the Insch Intrusion) and North along the PDHL (such as the Portsoy Gabbro). Uniquely for a Younger Basic mass, it is also in contact with older Dalradian meta-basic rocks, the somewhat enigmatic Blackwater Formation. A well as examining the Blackwater Intrusion, this study presents new evidence pertaining to the history of the Younger Basics and the PDHL, and their place within the Grampian Orogeny. The Blackwater Intrusion has an elongate shape roughly parallel to the strike of the surrounding Dalradian rocks, covers ~9km2 and mainly comprises blue-grey gabbro with scattered serpentinised ultramafic zones. Both the gabbro and serpentinite generally have massive texture, although some evidence of cm-scale modal layering (interpreted as cumulate texture) is present the north of the intrusion. It is in contact to the east with psammites, schists and meta-basic extrusives of the Argyll Group Blackwater Formation, and to the west with the Appin Group Glenfiddich Pelite Formation. Evidence for shearing is widespread, with sheared microstructures in pelites and meta-basites, mylonitised meta-sediments adjacent and parallel to the NW contact of the gabbro and vertical/sub-vertical NE-SW trending shear zones within

  18. Origin of peak and retrograde assemblages during Grenvillian orogeny from garnet-staurolite bearing mica schist of Bhilwara Supergroup, NW India: constraints from pseudosection modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Abhishek; Saha, Lopamudra; Sarkar, Saheli

    2016-04-01

    bulk compositions of the three different textural domains with distinct mineral assemblages. In each case, effective bulk compositions have been determined from the volume proportions of different mineral phases and their chemical compositions. P-T pseudosection (NCKFMASH) constructed from the bulk composition of the muscovite-biotite-quartz bearing domainin matrix helps to constrain the garnet-in and staurolite-in isograds. Intersections of compositional isopleths of garnet cores and rims with that of prograde biotite grains in textural equilibrium constrains the peak P-T condition (9kbar and 600°C) and the prograde P-T path. In order to constrain chemical fractionation during prograde metamorphism, T-X pseudosections (NCKFMASH) at reference pressures varying from 4 kbar to 8 kbar have been constructed with bulk compositions varying from that of the matrix and garnet core compositions. The pseudosections help to determine fractionation of elements into the garnet porphyroblasts along the prograde P-T path constrained earlier. P-T pseudosection constructed from the bulk composition of the pesudomorph domains indicate stability of staurolite-sillimanite-quartz-albite-paragonite bearing assemblage (P-T ranges of 4-6 kbar, 550-575°C), formed by breakdown of garnet, biotite and muscovite along a near-isothermal decompression path, post to peak metamorphism. Thus a clockwise P-T path indicative of collisional tectonics can be constrained for the Grenvillian orogeny in the study area. The study hence indicates that in order to constrain stability of mineral assemblages from distinct textural domains in complex metamorphic rocks pseudosection analyses with microdomain bulk compositions are most apposite.

  19. Dynamics of an actin spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera, Christophe; Mahadevan, L.; Shin, Jennifer; Matsudaira, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The acrosome of the sperm of the horseshoe crab (Limulus Polyphemus) is an unusual actin based system that shows a spectacular dynamical transition in the presence of Ca++ that is present in abundance in the neighborhood of the egg. During this process, the bundle, which is initially bent and twisted uncoils and becomes straight in a matter of a few seconds. Based on microstructural data, we propose a model for the dynamics of uncoiling that is best represented by a triple-well potential corresponding to the different structural arrangements of the supertwisted filaments. Each of the false, true and coiled states corresponds to a local minimum of the energy, with the true state being the one with the lowest energy. Using an evolution equation derived by balancing torques, we investigate the nucleation and propagation of the phase transition and compare the results with those of experiments. Our model quantifies the hypothesis that the acrosomal bundle behaves like a mechano-chemical spring.

  20. Second memorandum on the flow of Aqua Caliente Spring after road construction at Palm Springs, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, J.F.; Dutcher, L.C.

    1953-01-01

    This memorandum was prepared at the request of Henry Harris, Acting Area Director, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Sacramento, Calif., to report on recent conditions at the Agua Caliente Spring, Palm Springs, Calif., and to suggest further possibilities for restoring the spring discharge to its pre-road-construction condition.

  1. Efficient Time Frame Building for Online Data Reconstruction in ALICE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybalchenko, A.; Al-Turany, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Winckler, N.

    2015-12-01

    After the Long Shutdown 2 period, the upgraded ALICE detector at the LHC will produce more than a terabyte of data per second. The data, constituted from a continuous un-triggered stream data, have to be distributed from about 250 First Level Processor nodes (FLPs) to about 1500 Event Processing Nodes (EPNs). Each FLP receives a small subset of the detector data that is chopped in sub-time frames. One EPN needs all the fragments from the 250 FLPs to build a full time frame. An algorithm has been implemented on the FLPs with the aim of optimizing the usage of the network connecting the FLPs and EPNs. The algorithm minimizes contention when several FLPs are sending to the same EPN. An adequate traffic shaping is implemented by delaying the sending time of each FLP by a unique offset. The payloads are stored in a buffer large enough to accommodate the delay provoked by the maximum number of FLPs. As the buffers are queued for sending, the FLPs can operate with the highest efficiency. Using the time information embedded in the data any further FLP synchronization can be avoided. Moreover, zero-copy and multipart messages of ZeroMQ are used to create full time frames on the EPNs without the overhead of copying the payloads. The concept and the performance measurement of the implementation on a reference computing cluster are presented.

  2. 1989 Alice Hamilton lecture. Lead and human health: background and recent findings.

    PubMed

    Lippmann, M

    1990-02-01

    This paper, prepared in tribute to Dr. Alice Hamilton on her 120th birthday, reviews her pioneering studies of occupational lead poisoning and its control, her largely unheeded warnings about the possible consequences of widespread lead exposure to the general public through the use of leaded fuel, and the results of recent studies of human exposure to and health effects of lead in the general environment. Evidence is presented for dose-related non-threshold effects for children with blood lead concentrations below 25 micrograms/dl for a variety of effects including verbal IQ; mental development; physical size; and age at physical milestones such as first steps, hearing thresholds, and postural sway. For adults, various studies have produced associations between blood pressure and blood lead concentrations below 35 micrograms/dl, suggesting possible effects on cardiovascular health. While the biological mechanisms responsible for these effects remain poorly understood, recent and current efforts to reduce exposure to lead by the virtual elimination of lead in gasoline and food packaging show that we have learned one of Dr. Hamilton's important lessons, i.e., that the most effective means of reducing excessive exposures are through control of the environmental sources. PMID:2404752

  3. Comissioning and calibration of the Zero Degree Calorimeters for the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMarco, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicald, C.; Cortese, P.; DeFalco, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Ferretti, A.; Floris, M.; Gagliardi, M.; Gallio, M.; Gemme, R.; Luparello, G.; Masoni, A.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Puddu, G.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Stocco, D.; Usai, G.; Vercellin, E.; ALICE Collaboration

    2009-04-01

    The Zero Degree Calorimeters (ZDCs) for the ALICE experiment will measure the energy of the spectator nucleons in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC. Since all the spectator nucleons have the same energy, the calorimeter reponse is proportional to their umber providing a direct information on the centrality of the collision. Two sets of ZDCs are located at opposite sides with respect to the interaction point (I), 116 m away from it Each set consists of a neutron (ZN) calorimeter, placed between the two beam pipes, an a proton (ZP) calorimeter, posioned externally to the outgoing beam pipe. The ZDCs spaghetti calorimeters, which detect the Cherenkov light produced by the shower particle in silica optical fibers embedded in a dense absorber. In summer 2007 the ZN and ZP calorimeters have been placed on a movable platform and then installed in the LHC tunnel. The results of the commissioning studies and in particular the solutions adopted to control the stability of the PMTs response will be shown: light injection with a larser diode and cosmic rays. The foreseen calibration with e.m. dissociation event in Pb-Pb collisions will also be disussed. Finally the it meaurements carried out during the commissining in the LHC tunnel will be presentend.

  4. ALICE HLT TPC Tracking of Pb-Pb Events on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohr, David; Gorbunov, Sergey; Szostak, Artur; Kretz, Matthias; Kollegger, Thorsten; Breitner, Timo; Alt, Torsten

    2012-12-01

    The online event reconstruction for the ALICE experiment at CERN requires processing capabilities to process central Pb-Pb collisions at a rate of more than 200 Hz, corresponding to an input data rate of about 25 GB/s. The reconstruction of particle trajectories in the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the most compute intensive step. The TPC online tracker implementation combines the principle of the cellular automaton and the Kalman filter. It has been accelerated by the usage of graphics cards (GPUs). A pipelined processing allows to perform the tracking on the GPU, the data transfer, and the preprocessing on the CPU in parallel. In order for CPU pre- and postprocessing to keep step with the GPU the pipeline uses multiple threads. A splitting of the tracking in multiple phases searching for short local track segments first improves data locality and makes the algorithm suited to run on a GPU. Due to special optimizations this course of action is not second to a global approach. Because of non-associative floating-point arithmetic a binary comparison of GPU and CPU tracker is infeasible. A track by track and cluster by cluster comparison shows a concordance of 99.999%. With current hardware, the GPU tracker outperforms the CPU version by about a factor of three leaving the processor still available for other tasks.

  5. PROOF on the Cloud for ALICE using PoD and OpenNebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzano, D.; Bagnasco, S.; Brunetti, R.; Lusso, S.

    2012-06-01

    In order to optimize the use and management of computing centres, their conversion to cloud facilities is becoming increasingly popular. In a medium to large cloud facility, many different virtual clusters may concur for the same resources: unused resources can be freed either by turning off idle virtual machines, or by lowering resources assigned to a virtual machine at runtime. PROOF, a ROOT-based parallel and interactive analysis framework, is officially endorsed in the computing model of the ALICE experiment as complementary to the Grid, and it has become very popular over the last three years. The locality of PROOF-based analysis facilities forces system administrators to scavenge resources, yet the chaotic nature of user analysis tasks deems them unstable and inconstantly used, making PROOF a typical use-case for HPC cloud computing. Currently, PoD dynamically and easily provides a PROOF-enabled cluster by submitting agents to a job scheduler. Unfortunately, a Tier-2 does not comfortably share the same queue between interactive and batch jobs, due to the very large average time to completion of the latter: an elastic cloud approach would enable interactive virtual machines to temporarily subtract resources to the batch ones, without a noticeable impact on them. In this work we describe our setup of a dynamic PROOF-based cloud analysis facility based on PoD and OpenNebula, orchestrated by a simple and lightweight control daemon that makes virtualization transparent for the user.

  6. The new ALICE DQM client: a web access to ROOT-based objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Haller, B.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chapeland, S.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Delort, C.; Dénes, E.; Diviá, R.; Fuchs, U.; Niedziela, J.; Simonetti, G.; Soós, C.; Telesca, A.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Wegrzynek, A.

    2015-12-01

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The online Data Quality Monitoring (DQM) plays an essential role in the experiment operation by providing shifters with immediate feedback on the data being recorded in order to quickly identify and overcome problems. An immediate access to the DQM results is needed not only by shifters in the control room but also by detector experts worldwide. As a consequence, a new web application has been developed to dynamically display and manipulate the ROOT-based objects produced by the DQM system in a flexible and user friendly interface. The architecture and design of the tool, its main features and the technologies that were used, both on the server and the client side, are described. In particular, we detail how we took advantage of the most recent ROOT JavaScript I/O and web server library to give interactive access to ROOT objects stored in a database. We describe as well the use of modern web techniques and packages such as AJAX, DHTMLX and jQuery, which has been instrumental in the successful implementation of a reactive and efficient application. We finally present the resulting application and how code quality was ensured. We conclude with a roadmap for future technical and functional developments.

  7. Test beam results on the Proton Zero Degree Calorimeter for the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicalò, C.; Cortese, P.; De Falco, A.; Dellacasa, G.; De Marco, N.; Ferretti, A.; Floris, M.; Gagliardi, M.; Gallio, M.; Gemme, R.; Masoni, A.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Poggio, F.; Puddu, G.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Stocco, D.; Usai, G.; Vercellin, E.; Yermia, F.

    2006-10-01

    The proton Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZP) for the ALICE experiment will measure the energy of the spectator protons in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC. Since all the spectator protons have the same energy, the calorimeter's response is proportional to their number, providing a direct information on the centrality of the collision. The ZP is a spaghetti calorimeter, which collects and measures the Cherenkov light produced by the shower particles in silica optical fibers embedded in a brass absorber. The details of its construction will be shown. The calorimeter was tested at the CERN SPS using pion and electron beams with momenta ranging from 50 to 200 GeV/c. The response of the calorimeter and its energy resolution have been studied as a function of the beam energy. Also, the signal uniformity and a comparison between the transverse profile of the hadronic and electromagnetic shower are presented. Moreover, the differences between the calorimeter's responses to protons and pions of the same energy have been investigated, exploiting the proton contamination in the positive pion beams.

  8. Test beam results on the Proton Zero Degree Calorimeter for the ALICE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; De Marco, N.; Ferretti, A.; Gagliardi, M.; Gallio, M.; Gemme, R.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Poggio, F.; Scomparin, E.; Stocco, D.; Vercellin, E.; Yermia, F.; Cicalo, C.; De Falco, A.; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.

    2006-10-27

    The proton Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZP) for the ALICE experiment will measure the energy of the spectator protons in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC. Since all the spectator protons have the same energy, the calorimeter's response is proportional to their number, providing a direct information on the centrality of the collision. The ZP is a spaghetti calorimeter, which collects and measures the Cherenkov light produced by the shower particles in silica optical fibers embedded in a brass absorber. The details of its construction will be shown. The calorimeter was tested at the CERN SPS using pion and electron beams with momenta ranging from 50 to 200 GeV/c. The response of the calorimeter and its energy resolution have been studied as a function of the beam energy. Also, the signal uniformity and a comparison between the transverse profile of the hadronic and electromagnetic shower are presented. Moreover, the differences between the calorimeter's responses to protons and pions of the same energy have been investigated, exploiting the proton contamination in the positive pion beams.

  9. Inclusive photon production at forward rapidities in pp collisions at LHC energies with the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudipan De for the ALICE collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of particles produced in pp collisions are important for the study of particle production mechanisms and to obtain baseline distributions to be compared with those from heavy-ion collisions. The inclusive photon measurements (dominated by π0 decays) are complementary to the charged particle measurements. The present work focuses on the forward rapidity region with comparisons to different models such as PYTHIA and PHOJET. We report the measurements of multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of inclusive photons using the ALICE Photon Multiplicity Detector (PMD) at forward rapidities (2.3 < η < 3.9) in pp collisions at = 0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV. It is observed that the photon multiplicity distributions are well described by negative binomial distributions (NBD). Multiplicity distributions are studied in terms of KNO variables for each energy. It is shown that the increase in the average photon multiplicity as a function of beam energy is compatible with both a logarithmic and power law dependence. The results are compared to different model predictions. These models reproduce experimental results at lower energy while they are not accurate at higher energies.

  10. Exploiting the ALICE HLT for PROOF by scheduling of Virtual Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meoni, Marco; Boettger, Stefan; Zelnicek, Pierre; Lindenstruth, Volker; Kebschull, Udo

    2011-12-01

    The HLT (High-Level Trigger) group of the ALICE experiment at the LHC has prepared a virtual Parallel ROOT Facility (PROOF) enabled cluster (HAF - HLT Analysis Facility) for fast physics analysis, detector calibration and reconstruction of data samples. The HLT-Cluster currently consists of 2860 CPU cores and 175TB of storage. Its purpose is the online filtering of the relevant part of data produced by the particle detector. However, data taking is not running continuously and exploiting unused cluster resources for other applications is highly desirable and improves the usage-cost ratio of the HLT cluster. As such, unused computing resources are dedicated to a PROOF-enabled virtual cluster available to the entire collaboration. This setup is especially aimed at the prototyping phase of analyses that need a high number of development iterations and a short response time, e.g. tuning of analysis cuts, calibration and alignment. HAF machines are enabled and disabled upon user request to start or complete analysis tasks. This is achieved by a virtual machine scheduling framework which dynamically assigns and migrates virtual machines running PROOF workers to unused physical resources. Using this approach we extend the HLT usage scheme to running both online and offline computing, thereby optimizing the resource usage.

  11. Evaluation of the deflections in the radiator vessel of the ALICE RICH array using numerical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demelio, G.; Galantucci, L. M.; Grimaldi, A.; Nappi, E.; Posa, F.; Valentino, V.

    1996-02-01

    The RICH array in ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) at CERN-LHC is being designed following the basic criterion to optimize the detector performances in terms of Cherenkov angle resolution and the minimisation of the total material traversed by the incoming particles. Due to the physics requirements, low deformation of the liquid freon container is mandatory, therefore a careful engineering design to predict the deflection of the radiator structure when filled with freon is needed. The aim of this study is the design of the liquid freon container under different static load conditions since the RICH array is placed in a barrel frame structure of about 4 m radius and 8 m length. Because of its high stiffness and low weight, a honeycomb sandwich with NOMEX ® core and carbon fiber skins is used for the vessel structure. Different solutions are analyzed using numerical techniques, based on Navier double series expansion and finite element method. They show good agreement and highlight the possibility of obtaining negligible stresses and strains.

  12. Regression and new beginnings: Michael, Alice and Enid Balint and the circulation of ideas.

    PubMed

    Sklar, Jonathan

    2012-08-01

    This article offers a new evaluation of Michael Balint's history. It starts with his growing up in Hungary and examines the central concepts of his writing: the analytic pair, regression and the basic fault and creativity, up to and including his renowned work on the eponymous Balint groups (which forged a unique link between psychoanalysis and medicine). While his name is, of course, well known, this article aims to bring his ideas to the attention of a modern analytic audience. Having trained in the 1920s with Ferenczi, Balint brought Ferenczi's literary inheritance to England where he lived until his death in 1970. His connections to Klein, Winnicott and Lacan, all of whom respected his analytic stance, are also examined. Furthermore, this article argues that his ideas were filtered through the theoretical lens of his first wife Alice Balint and later through Enid Balint, both of whom played a key - and rarely recognised - role in the development of his thought. It ends with a brief discussion of his ideas on analytic training and his quest, successful only after his death, to publish the complete Freud-Ferenczi correspondence, together with Ferenczi's diary. PMID:22900562

  13. ULTRAVIOLET DISCOVERIES AT ASTEROID (21) LUTETIA BY THE ROSETTA ALICE ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, S. A.; Parker, J. Wm.; Steffl, A.; Birath, E.; Graps, A.; Feldman, P. D.; Weaver, H. A.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Feaga, L.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Cunningham, N.

    2011-06-15

    The NASA Alice ultraviolet (UV) imaging spectrograph on board the ESA Rosetta comet orbiter successfully conducted a series of flyby observations of the large asteroid (21) Lutetia in the days surrounding Rosetta's closest approach on 2010 July 10. Observations included a search for emission lines from gas, and spectral observations of the Lutetia's surface reflectance. No emissions from gas around Lutetia were observed. Regarding the surface reflectance, we found that Lutetia has a distinctly different albedo and slope than both the asteroid (2867) Steins and Earth's moon, the two most analogous objects studied in the far ultraviolet (FUV). Further, Lutetia's {approx}10% geometric albedo near 1800 A is significantly lower than its 16%-19% albedo near 5500 A. Moreover, the FUV albedo shows a precipitous drop (to {approx}4%) between 1800 A and 1600 A, representing the strongest spectral absorption feature observed in Lutetia's spectrum at any observed wavelength. Our surface reflectance fits are not unique but are consistent with a surface dominated by an EH5 chondrite, combined with multiple other possible surface constituents, including anorthite, water frost, and SO{sub 2} frost or a similar mid-UV absorber. The water frost identification is consistent with some data sets but inconsistent with others. The anorthite (feldspar) identification suggests that Lutetia is a differentiated body.

  14. Automated agents for management and control of the ALICE Computing Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoras, C.; Betev, L.; Carminati, F.; Legrand, I.; Voicu, R.

    2010-04-01

    A complex software environment such as the ALICE Computing Grid infrastructure requires permanent control and management for the large set of services involved. Automating control procedures reduces the human interaction with the various components of the system and yields better availability of the overall system. In this paper we will present how we used the MonALISA framework to gather, store and display the relevant metrics in the entire system from central and remote site services. We will also show the automatic local and global procedures that are triggered by the monitored values. Decision-taking agents are used to restart remote services, alert the operators in case of problems that cannot be automatically solved, submit production jobs, replicate and analyze raw data, resource load-balance and other control mechanisms that optimize the overall work flow and simplify day-to-day operations. Synthetic graphical views for all operational parameters, correlations, state of services and applications as well as the full history of all monitoring metrics are available for the ent ire system that now encompasses 85 sites all over the world, mo re than 14000 CPU cores and 10PB of storage.

  15. Nonlinear Vibration of a Magnetic Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhong, Juhua; Cheng, Zhongqi; Ge, Ziming; Zhang, Yuelan; Lu, Wenqiang; Song, Feng; Li, Chuanyong

    2012-01-01

    To demonstrate the different vibration characteristics of a magnetic spring compared with those of a metal one, a magnetic spring apparatus was constructed from a pair of circular magnets of the same size with an inside diameter of 2.07 cm and an outside diameter of 4.50 cm. To keep the upper magnet in a suspension state, the two magnets were…

  16. Rooster Springs Elementary Teams Up for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    For many schools, membership in PTA can become "expected," instead of being a positive, fun opportunity to involve parents and support students and teachers. With more than 800 students each year, Rooster Springs Elementary PTA (RSE PTA) in Dripping Springs, Texas, never worried about membership recruitment. The PTA often assumed that parents…

  17. Anomalously soft non-Euclidean spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Ido; Sharon, Eran

    In this work we study the mechanical properties of a frustrated elastic ribbon spring - the non-Euclidean minimal spring. This spring belongs to the family of non-Euclidean plates: it has no spontaneous curvature, but its lateral intrinsic geometry is described by a non-Euclidean reference metric. The reference metric of the minimal spring is hyperbolic, and can be embedded as a minimal surface. We argue that the existence of a continuous set of such isometric minimal surfaces with different extensions leads to a complete degeneracy of the bulk elastic energy of the minimal spring under elongation. This degeneracy is removed only by boundary layer effects. As a result, the mechanical properties of the minimal spring are unusual: the spring is ultra-soft with rigidity that depends on the thickness, t , as t raise 0 . 7 ex 7 7 2 lower 0 . 7 ex 2, and does not explicitly depend on the ribbon's width. These predictions are confirmed by a numerical study of a constrained spring. This work is the first to address the unusual mechanical properties of constrained non-Euclidean elastic objects. We also present a novel experimental system that is capable of constructing such objects, along with many other non-Euclidean plates.

  18. 1988 Hanford riverbank springs characterization report

    SciTech Connect

    Dirkes, R.L.

    1990-12-01

    This reports presents the results of a special study undertaken to characterize the riverbank springs (i.e., ground-water seepage) entering the Columbia River along the Hanford Site. Radiological and nonradiological analyses were performed. River water samples were also analyzed from upstream and downstream of the Site as well as from the immediate vicinity of the springs. In addition, irrigation return water and spring water entering the river along the shoreline opposite Hanford were analyzed. Hanford-origin contaminants were detected in spring water entering the Columbia River along the Hanford Site. The type and concentrations of contaminants in the spring water were similar to those known to exist in the ground water near the river. The location and extent of the contaminated discharges compared favorably with recent ground-water reports and predictions. Spring discharge volumes remain very small relative to the flow of the Columbia. Downstream river sampling demonstrates the impact of ground-water discharges to be minimal, and negligible in most cases. Radionuclide concentrations were below US Department of Energy Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs) with the exception {sup 90}Sr near the 100-N Area. Tritium, while below the DCG, was detected at concentrations above the US Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standards in several springs. All other radionuclide concentrations were below drinking water standards. Nonradiological contaminants were generally undetectable in the spring water. River water contaminant concentrations, outside of the immediate discharge zones, were below drinking water standards in all cases. 19 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs.

  19. Spring Flowers: Harvest of a Sensitive Eye

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Eloise; Levin, Ted

    1978-01-01

    Defining and describing a number of spring flowers, this article includes illustrations and explanations that demonstrate "art and science are born of the same parents". The flowers discussed are skunk cabbage, bellwort, spring beauty, jack-in-the-pulpit, Solomon's seal, wild geranium, showy orchids, moccasin flower, bluets, apple, and Indian…

  20. Hard Spring Wheat Technical Committee 2009 Crop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirteen hard spring wheat lines that were developed by breeders throughout the spring wheat region of the U. S. were grown at up to five locations in 2009 and evaluated for kernel, milling, and bread baking quality against the check variety Glenn. Samples of wheat were milled at the USDA Hard Red ...

  1. Hard Spring Wheat Technical Committee, 2008 Crop.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eleven hard spring wheat lines that were developed by breeders throughout the spring wheat region of the U. S. were grown at up to five locations in 2008 and evaluated for kernel, milling, and bread baking quality against the check variety Glenn. Samples of wheat were milled at the USDA Hard Red Sp...

  2. Joystick With Cable Springs Offers Better Feel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James; Ecklund, Wayne

    1992-01-01

    Improved joystick allows motion in 6 degrees of freedom, biased toward central position and orientation by 16 segments of cable serving as springs. Improvement in feel and control results from nonlinear compliance of cable-spring assembly. Nonlinear variations accommodate natural reactions of hand and brain. Operator functions as part of feedback control loop. More comfortable, increases ability to exert control and reduces fatigue.

  3. Spring Showers’ Japanese Snowbell

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Japanese snowbell (Styrax japonicus) cultivar was released in 2011 by the U.S. National Arboretum. ‘Spring Showers’ was selected from a group of open-pollinated seedlings for its delayed bud break, which allows it to escape damage from late spring freezes. It has grown to 12 ft tall and 8 ft wid...

  4. Rocky Mountain Carbonate Spring Deposit development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainey, Dustin Kyle

    Relict Holocene carbonate spring deposits containing diverse biotic and abiotic depositional textures are present at Fall Creek cold sulphur springs, Alberta, Fairmont Hot Springs, British Columbia, and Hot Creek cold springs, British Columbia. The relict deposits are formed mainly of low-magnesium crystalline calcite contained in laterally continuous strata. Paleo-flow regimes were characterized by extensive sheet flow that increased the surface area of spring water exposed to the atmosphere. Calcite precipitated inorganically from spring water that attained CaCO3 supersaturation through agitation-induced CO2 degassing that was facilitated by elevated flow rates and a large surface area as spring water flowed down-slope. Thus, the deposits contain only minor amounts of detrital, mechanically deposited, and biogenic carbonate. Evaporation was only a minor contributor to CaCO3 supersaturation, mainly in quiescent environments. Photosynthetic CO2 removal did not measurably contribute to CaCO3 supersaturation. Calcite crystals precipitated in biotic facies formed from low to moderately supersaturated spring water, whereas abiotic dendrite crystals formed rapidly from highly supersaturated spring water. Calcite passively nucleated on cyanobacteria, bryophytes and macrophytes, and was probably facilitated by cyanobacterial extracellular polymeric substances. Cyanobacterial filaments and stromatolites are integral parts of all three deposits, whereas bryophytes were restricted to the Fall Creek and Hot Creek deposits. Diagenetic microbial degradation of crystalline calcite was common to all three deposits, but recrystallization was limited to the Fall Creek deposit. The amount and location of calcite precipitation relative to the vents was controlled by the concentrations of Ca2+ and HCO3- in solution, and discharge volume fluctuations. Spring water with high [Ca2+] and [HCO 3-] precipitated large amounts of calcite proximal to the vents (e.g. Fairmont), whereas spring

  5. Juvenile Spring Eruption: A Variant of Perniosis?

    PubMed

    Nabatian, Adam S; Rosman, Ilana S; Sturza, Jeffrey; Jacobson, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Juvenile spring eruption (JSE) is a unique condition that typically affects the helices of the ears of boys and young men. The classical clinical picture of JSE includes the abrupt onset of lesions after spending time outdoors in the early spring. Because of the papulovesicular nature of the rash and the history of sun exposure, JSE is considered a variant of polymorphous light eruption. In addition to the term "juvenile spring eruption," this entity has also been described under other less common terms such as "perniosis juvenilis vernalis aurium" or "spring perniosis," which emphasizes the onset in the spring and the possible pathogenic role of cold weather. We present a case of likely JSE with histopathologic features more consistent with perniosis than polymorphous light eruption and present a review the literature. PMID:26291421

  6. 1. Photocopy of map (from The Virginia Springs, and the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of map (from The Virginia Springs, and the Springs of the South and West by Moorman) No date 'MAP OF ROUTES AND DISTANCES TO THE VIRGINIA SPRINGS' - White Sulphur Springs, U.S. Route 60, White Sulphur Springs, Greenbrier County, WV

  7. Database of historically documented springs and spring flow measurements in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Reece, Brian D.

    2003-01-01

    Springs are naturally occurring features that convey excess ground water to the land surface; they represent a transition from ground water to surface water. Water issues through one opening, multiple openings, or numerous seeps in the rock or soil. The database of this report provides information about springs and spring flow in Texas including spring names, identification numbers, location, and, if available, water source and use. This database does not include every spring in Texas, but is limited to an aggregation of selected digital and hard-copy data of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB), and Capitol Environmental Services.

  8. Spring plant phenology and false springs in the conterminous US during the 21st century

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allstadt, Andrew J.; Vavrus, Stephen J.; Heglund, Patricia J.; Pidgeon, Anna M.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Radeloff, Volker C.

    2015-01-01

    The onset of spring plant growth has shifted earlier in the year over the past several decades due to rising global temperatures. Earlier spring onset may cause phenological mismatches between the availability of plant resources and dependent animals, and potentially lead to more false springs, when subsequent freezing temperatures damage new plant growth. We used the extended spring indices to project changes in spring onset, defined by leaf out and by first bloom, and predicted false springs until 2100 in the conterminous United States (US) using statistically-downscaled climate projections from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 ensemble. Averaged over our study region, the median shift in spring onset was 23 days earlier in the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 scenario with particularly large shifts in the Western US and the Great Plains. Spatial variation in phenology was due to the influence of short-term temperature changes around the time of spring onset versus season long accumulation of warm temperatures. False spring risk increased in the Great Plains and portions of the Midwest, but remained constant or decreased elsewhere. We conclude that global climate change may have complex and spatially variable effects on spring onset and false springs, making local predictions of change difficult.

  9. The source, discharge, and chemical characteristics of water from Agua Caliente Spring, Palm Springs, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    : Martin, Peter, (Edited By); Contributors: Brandt, Justin; Catchings, Rufus D.; Christensen, Allen H.; Flint, Alan L.; Gandhok, Gini; Goldman, Mark R.; Halford, Keith J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Martin, Peter; Rymer, Michael J.; Schroeder, Roy A.; Smith, Gregory A.; Sneed, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Numerical models of fluid and temperature flow were developed for the Agua Caliente Spring to (1) test the validity of the conceptual model that the Agua Caliente Spring enters the valley-fill deposits from fractures in the underlying basement complex and rises through more than 800 feet of valley-fill deposits by way of a washed-sand conduit and surrounding low-permeability deposits (spring chimney) of its own making, (2) evaluate whether water-level declines in the regional aquifer will influence the temperature of discharging water, and (3) determine the source of thermal water in the perched aquifer. A radial-flow model was used to test the conceptual model and the effect of water-level declines. The observed spring discharge and temperature could be simulated if the vertical hydraulic conductivity of the spring orifice was about 200 feet per day and the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the orifice (spring chimney) was about 0.00002 feet per day. The simulated vertical hydraulic conductivity is within the range of values reported for sand; however, the low value simulated for the horizontal hydraulic conductivity suggests that the spring chimney is cemented with increasing depth. Chemical data collected for this study indicate that the water at Agua Caliente Spring is at saturation with respect to both calcite and chalcedony, which provides a possible mechanism for cementation of the spring chimney. A simulated decline of about 100 feet in the regional aquifer had no effect on the simulated discharge of Agua Caliente Spring and resulted in a slight increase in the temperature of the spring discharge. Results from the radial-flow- and three-dimensional models of the Agua Caliente Spring area demonstrate that the distribution and temperature of thermal water in the perched water table can be explained by flow from a secondary shallow-subsurface spring orifice of the Agua Caliente Spring not contained by the steel collector tank, not by leakage from the

  10. Hysteresis in layered spring magnets.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J. S.; Kaper, H. G.; Leaf, G. K.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2001-01-01

    This article addresses a problem of micromagnetics: the reversal of magnetic moments in layered spring magnets. A one-dimensional model is used of a film consisting of several atomic layers of a soft material on top of several atomic layers of a hard material. Each atomic layer is taken to be uniformly magnetized, and spatial inhomogeneities within an atomic layer are neglected. The state of such a system is described by a chain of magnetic spin vectors. Each spin vector behaves like a spinning top driven locally by the effective magnetic field and subject to damping (Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation). A numerical integration scheme for the LLG equation is presented that is unconditionally stable and preserves the magnitude of the magnetization vector at all times. The results of numerical investigations for a bilayer in a rotating in-plane magnetic field show hysteresis with a basic period of 2{pi} at moderate fields and hysteresis with a basic period of {pi} at strong fields.

  11. Spring Dust Storm Smothers Beijing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A few days earlier than usual, a large, dense plume of dust blew southward and eastward from the desert plains of Mongolia-quite smothering to the residents of Beijing. Citizens of northeastern China call this annual event the 'shachenbao,' or 'dust cloud tempest.' However, the tempest normally occurs during the spring time. The dust storm hit Beijing on Friday night, March 15, and began coating everything with a fine, pale brown layer of grit. The region is quite dry; a problem some believe has been exacerbated by decades of deforestation. According to Chinese government estimates, roughly 1 million tons of desert dust and sand blow into Beijing each year. This true-color image was made using two adjacent swaths (click to see the full image) of data from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the OrbView-2 satellite, on March 17, 2002. The massive dust storm (brownish pixels) can easily be distinguished from clouds (bright white pixels) as it blows across northern Japan and eastward toward the open Pacific Ocean. The black regions are gaps between SeaWiFS' viewing swaths and represent areas where no data were collected. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  12. SPring-8 beamline control system.

    PubMed

    Ohata, T; Konishi, H; Kimura, H; Furukawa, Y; Tamasaku, K; Nakatani, T; Tanabe, T; Matsumoto, N; Ishii, M; Ishikawa, T

    1998-05-01

    The SPring-8 beamline control system is now taking part in the control of the insertion device (ID), front end, beam transportation channel and all interlock systems of the beamline: it will supply a highly standardized environment of apparatus control for collaborative researchers. In particular, ID operation is very important in a third-generation synchrotron light source facility. It is also very important to consider the security system because the ID is part of the storage ring and is therefore governed by the synchrotron ring control system. The progress of computer networking systems and the technology of security control require the development of a highly flexible control system. An interlock system that is independent of the control system has increased the reliability. For the beamline control system the so-called standard model concept has been adopted. VME-bus (VME) is used as the front-end control system and a UNIX workstation as the operator console. CPU boards of the VME-bus are RISC processor-based board computers operated by a LynxOS-based HP-RT real-time operating system. The workstation and the VME are linked to each other by a network, and form the distributed system. The HP 9000/700 series with HP-UX and the HP 9000/743rt series with HP-RT are used. All the controllable apparatus may be operated from any workstation. PMID:15263588

  13. Weldon Spring historical dose estimate

    SciTech Connect

    Meshkov, N.; Benioff, P.; Wang, J.; Yuan, Y.

    1986-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the estimated radiation doses that individuals in five nearby population groups and the general population in the surrounding area may have received as a consequence of activities at a uranium processing plant in Weldon Spring, Missouri. The study is retrospective and encompasses plant operations (1957-1966), cleanup (1967-1969), and maintenance (1969-1982). The dose estimates for members of the nearby population groups are as follows. Of the three periods considered, the largest doses to the general population in the surrounding area would have occurred during the plant operations period (1957-1966). Dose estimates for the cleanup (1967-1969) and maintenance (1969-1982) periods are negligible in comparison. Based on the monitoring data, if there was a person residing continually in a dwelling 1.2 km (0.75 mi) north of the plant, this person is estimated to have received an average of about 96 mrem/yr (ranging from 50 to 160 mrem/yr) above background during plant operations, whereas the dose to a nearby resident during later years is estimated to have been about 0.4 mrem/yr during cleanup and about 0.2 mrem/yr during the maintenance period. These values may be compared with the background dose in Missouri of 120 mrem/yr.

  14. Cross-shaped torsional spring

    DOEpatents

    Williamson, M.M.; Pratt, G.A.

    1999-06-08

    The invention provides an elastic actuator consisting of a motor and a motor drive transmission connected at an output of the motor. An elastic element is connected in series with the motor drive transmission, and this elastic element is positioned to alone support the full weight of any load connected at an output of the actuator. A single force transducer is positioned at a point between a mount for the motor and an output of the actuator. This force transducer generates a force signal, based on deflection of the elastic element, that indicates force applied by the elastic element to an output of the actuator. An active feedback force control loop is connected between the force transducer and the motor for controlling the motor. This motor control is based on the force signal to deflect the elastic element an amount that produces a desired actuator output force. The produced output force is substantially independent of load motion. The invention also provides a torsional spring consisting of a flexible structure having at least three flat sections each connected integrally with and extending radially from a central section. Each flat section extends axially along the central section from a distal end of the central section to a proximal end of the central section. 30 figs.

  15. Cross-shaped torsional spring

    DOEpatents

    Williamson, Matthew M.; Pratt, Gill A.

    1999-06-08

    The invention provides an elastic actuator consisting of a motor and a motor drive transmission connected at an output of the motor. An elastic element is connected in series with the motor drive transmission, and this elastic element is positioned to alone support the full weight of any load connected at an output of the actuator. A single force transducer is positioned at a point between a mount for the motor and an output of the actuator. This force transducer generates a force signal, based on deflection of the elastic element, that indicates force applied by the elastic element to an output of the actuator. An active feedback force control loop is connected between the force transducer and the motor for controlling the motor. This motor control is based on the force signal to deflect the elastic element an amount that produces a desired actuator output force. The produced output force is substantially independent of load motion. The invention also provides a torsional spring consisting of a flexible structure having at least three flat sections each connected integrally with and extending radially from a central section. Each flat section extends axially along the central section from a distal end of the central section to a proximal end of the central section.

  16. Elevation view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking east. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking east. - Spring Creek Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek at Milepoint 253.98 on Oregon to California Highway (US Route 97), Chiloquin, Klamath County, OR

  17. Approach view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking south. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Approach view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking south. - Spring Creek Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek at Milepoint 253.98 on Oregon to California Highway (US Route 97), Chiloquin, Klamath County, OR

  18. General perspective view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General perspective view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking east. - Spring Creek Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek at Milepoint 253.98 on Oregon to California Highway (US Route 97), Chiloquin, Klamath County, OR

  19. General perspective view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General perspective view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking southeast. - Spring Creek Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek at Milepoint 253.98 on Oregon to California Highway (US Route 97), Chiloquin, Klamath County, OR

  20. Topographic view of the Spring Creek Bridge and Collier State ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Topographic view of the Spring Creek Bridge and Collier State Park, view looking east. - Spring Creek Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek at Milepoint 253.98 on Oregon to California Highway (US Route 97), Chiloquin, Klamath County, OR

  1. General perspective view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General perspective view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking northwest. - Spring Creek Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek at Milepoint 253.98 on Oregon to California Highway (US Route 97), Chiloquin, Klamath County, OR

  2. 2. SHOWING (LEFT TO RIGHT) CHAPEL, STORE BUILDING, SPRING HOUSE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SHOWING (LEFT TO RIGHT) CHAPEL, STORE BUILDING, SPRING HOUSE, AND BATH HOUSE, SOUTHEAST FACADES (4 x 5 negative; 5 x 7 print) - Salt Sulpher Springs, U.S. Route 219, Salt Sulphur Springs, Monroe County, WV

  3. 1. photocopy of postcard (from Glenwood Springs Lodge & Pool, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. photocopy of postcard (from Glenwood Springs Lodge & Pool, Inc., Date unknown) Photographer unknown, Date unknown GENERAL VIEW OF LODGE, HOT SPRINGS POOL AND ENVIRONS - Hot Springs Lodge, Garfield County, CO

  4. Approach view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking north. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Approach view of the Spring Creek Bridge, view looking north. - Spring Creek Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek at Milepoint 253.98 on Oregon to California Highway (US Route 97), Chiloquin, Klamath County, OR

  5. New package for Belleville spring permits rate change, easy disassembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Glashan, W. F.

    1964-01-01

    A spring package, with grooves to hold the spring washers at the inner and outer edges, reduces hysteresis to a minimum. Three-segment retainers permit easy disassembly so that the spring rate can be changed.

  6. Anomalously Soft Non-Euclidean Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Ido; Sharon, Eran

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study the mechanical properties of a frustrated elastic ribbon spring—the non-Euclidean minimal spring. This spring belongs to the family of non-Euclidean plates: it has no spontaneous curvature, but its lateral intrinsic geometry is described by a non-Euclidean reference metric. The reference metric of the minimal spring is hyperbolic, and can be embedded as a minimal surface. We argue that the existence of a continuous set of such isometric minimal surfaces with different extensions leads to a complete degeneracy of the bulk elastic energy of the minimal spring under elongation. This degeneracy is removed only by boundary layer effects. As a result, the mechanical properties of the minimal spring are unusual: the spring is ultrasoft with a rigidity that depends on the thickness t as t7 /2 and does not explicitly depend on the ribbon's width. Moreover, we show that as the ribbon is widened, the rigidity may even decrease. These predictions are confirmed by a numerical study of a constrained spring. This work is the first to address the unusual mechanical properties of constrained non-Euclidean elastic objects.

  7. Spring/dimple instrument tube restraint

    DOEpatents

    DeMario, E.E.; Lawson, C.N.

    1993-11-23

    A nuclear fuel assembly for a pressurized water nuclear reactor has a spring and dimple structure formed in a non-radioactive insert tube placed in the top of a sensor receiving instrumentation tube thimble disposed in the fuel assembly and attached at a top nozzle, a bottom nozzle, and intermediate grids. The instrumentation tube thimble is open at the top, where the sensor or its connection extends through the cooling water for coupling to a sensor signal processor. The spring and dimple insert tube is mounted within the instrumentation tube thimble and extends downwardly adjacent the top. The springs and dimples restrain the sensor and its connections against lateral displacement causing impact with the instrumentation tube thimble due to the strong axial flow of cooling water. The instrumentation tube has a stainless steel outer sleeve and a zirconium alloy inner sleeve below the insert tube adjacent the top. The insert tube is relatively non-radioactivated inconel alloy. The opposed springs and dimples are formed on diametrically opposite inner walls of the insert tube, the springs being formed as spaced axial cuts in the insert tube, with a web of the insert tube between the cuts bowed radially inwardly for forming the spring, and the dimples being formed as radially inward protrusions opposed to the springs. 7 figures.

  8. Spring/dimple instrument tube restraint

    DOEpatents

    DeMario, Edmund E.; Lawson, Charles N.

    1993-01-01

    A nuclear fuel assembly for a pressurized water nuclear reactor has a spring and dimple structure formed in a non-radioactive insert tube placed in the top of a sensor receiving instrumentation tube thimble disposed in the fuel assembly and attached at a top nozzle, a bottom nozzle, and intermediate grids. The instrumentation tube thimble is open at the top, where the sensor or its connection extends through the cooling water for coupling to a sensor signal processor. The spring and dimple insert tube is mounted within the instrumentation tube thimble and extends downwardly adjacent the top. The springs and dimples restrain the sensor and its connections against lateral displacement causing impact with the instrumentation tube thimble due to the strong axial flow of cooling water. The instrumentation tube has a stainless steel outer sleeve and a zirconium alloy inner sleeve below the insert tube adjacent the top. The insert tube is relatively non-radioactivated inconel alloy. The opposed springs and dimples are formed on diametrically opposite inner walls of the insert tube, the springs being formed as spaced axial cuts in the insert tube, with a web of the insert tube between the cuts bowed radially inwardly for forming the spring, and the dimples being formed as radially inward protrusions opposed to the springs.

  9. Thermal springs of Malaysia and their potentialdevelopment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahim Samsudin, Abdul; Hamzah, Umar; Rahman, Rakmi Ab.; Siwar, Chamhuri; Fauzi Mohd. Jani, Mohd; Othman, Redzuan

    The study on the potential development of hot springs for the tourism industry in Malaysiawas conducted. Out of the 40 hot springs covered, the study identified 9 hot springs having a high potential for development, 14 having medium potential and the remaining 17 having low or least potential for development. This conclusion was arrived at after considering the technical and economic feasibility of the various hot springs. Technical feasibility criteria includes geological factors, water quality, temperature and flow rate. The economic feasibility criteria considers measures such as accessibility, current and market potentials in terms of visitors, surrounding attractions and existing inventory and facilities available. A geological input indicates that high potential hot springs are located close to or within the granite body and associated with major permeable fault zones. They normally occur at low elevation adjacent to topographic highs. High potential hot springs are also characterised by high water temperature, substantial flowrate and very good water quality which is important for water-body contact activities such as soaking. Economic criteria for high potential hot springs are associated with good accessibility, good market, good surrounding attractions like rural and village setting and well developed facilities and infrastructures.

  10. Microbial Source Tracking in Adjacent Karst Springs

    PubMed Central

    Vaizel-Ohayon, Dalit; Rom, Meir; Guttman, Joseph; Berger, Diego; Kravitz, Valeria; Pilo, Shlomo; Huberman, Zohar; Kashi, Yechezkel; Rorman, Efrat

    2015-01-01

    Modern man-made environments, including urban, agricultural, and industrial environments, have complex ecological interactions among themselves and with the natural surroundings. Microbial source tracking (MST) offers advanced tools to resolve the host source of fecal contamination beyond indicator monitoring. This study was intended to assess karst spring susceptibilities to different fecal sources using MST quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays targeting human, bovine, and swine markers. It involved a dual-time monitoring frame: (i) monthly throughout the calendar year and (ii) daily during a rainfall event. Data integration was taken from both monthly and daily MST profile monitoring and improved identification of spring susceptibility to host fecal contamination; three springs located in close geographic proximity revealed different MST profiles. The Giach spring showed moderate fluctuations of MST marker quantities amid wet and dry samplings, while the Zuf spring had the highest rise of the GenBac3 marker during the wet event, which was mirrored in other markers as well. The revelation of human fecal contamination during the dry season not connected to incidents of raining leachates suggests a continuous and direct exposure to septic systems. Pigpens were identified in the watersheds of Zuf, Shefa, and Giach springs and on the border of the Gaaton spring watershed. Their impact was correlated with partial detection of the Pig-2-Bac marker in Gaaton spring, which was lower than detection levels in all three of the other springs. Ruminant and swine markers were detected intermittently, and their contamination potential during the wet samplings was exposed. These results emphasized the importance of sampling design to utilize the MST approach to delineate subtleties of fecal contamination in the environment. PMID:26002893

  11. Lengthening Spring Season in Southwestern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutzler, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    Climate is changing rapidly in southwestern North America during the Spring season, a critically important transition season in terms of hydrology, ecosystem dynamics, and water resource management. Major rivers are snow-fed in mountainous headwaters but then flow through a monsoonal region with a Summer precipitation maximum; Spring is the dry season in between snowmelt and monsoon onset and is the principal wildfire season in the Southwest. Evaporation during the warm, dry Spring represents a major hydrologic loss in the surface water budget and is a principal cause of projections of significant decreases in post-snowmelt streamflow, during the first half of the growing season when demand for surface water for irrigated agriculture is highest. As temperatures increase, snowpack is expected to decrease and melt earlier, leading to a smaller and earlier peak in snowmelt runoff. Recent climate model projections suggest that monsoon onset should occur later in the year, delaying the summer rainy season. Each of these effects contributes to projections of a lengthening Spring season, at both the beginning and end of Spring. A longer, warmer Spring season is associated with significant surface drying and increased wildfire risk in the 21st Century across the Southwest. So far changes are observed at the beginning of spring in terms of temperature (increasing) and snowpack (decreasing). Detection of other changes, including metrics of the end of spring, has not been easy, in part due to the huge natural variability of precipitation that affects hydrologic variables in conjunction with temperature. This presentation describes efforts to diagnose and document observed changes in the transitions into and out of the Spring dry season in the Southwest, in variables such as temperature, snowmelt date, timing and magnitude of streamflow, and monsoon onset date.

  12. Microbial Source Tracking in Adjacent Karst Springs.

    PubMed

    Ohad, Shoshanit; Vaizel-Ohayon, Dalit; Rom, Meir; Guttman, Joseph; Berger, Diego; Kravitz, Valeria; Pilo, Shlomo; Huberman, Zohar; Kashi, Yechezkel; Rorman, Efrat

    2015-08-01

    Modern man-made environments, including urban, agricultural, and industrial environments, have complex ecological interactions among themselves and with the natural surroundings. Microbial source tracking (MST) offers advanced tools to resolve the host source of fecal contamination beyond indicator monitoring. This study was intended to assess karst spring susceptibilities to different fecal sources using MST quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays targeting human, bovine, and swine markers. It involved a dual-time monitoring frame: (i) monthly throughout the calendar year and (ii) daily during a rainfall event. Data integration was taken from both monthly and daily MST profile monitoring and improved identification of spring susceptibility to host fecal contamination; three springs located in close geographic proximity revealed different MST profiles. The Giach spring showed moderate fluctuations of MST marker quantities amid wet and dry samplings, while the Zuf spring had the highest rise of the GenBac3 marker during the wet event, which was mirrored in other markers as well. The revelation of human fecal contamination during the dry season not connected to incidents of raining leachates suggests a continuous and direct exposure to septic systems. Pigpens were identified in the watersheds of Zuf, Shefa, and Giach springs and on the border of the Gaaton spring watershed. Their impact was correlated with partial detection of the Pig-2-Bac marker in Gaaton spring, which was lower than detection levels in all three of the other springs. Ruminant and swine markers were detected intermittently, and their contamination potential during the wet samplings was exposed. These results emphasized the importance of sampling design to utilize the MST approach to delineate subtleties of fecal contamination in the environment. PMID:26002893

  13. INHALANT ALLERGENS IN PALM SPRINGS, CALIFORNIA

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Hugh

    1954-01-01

    Although Palm Springs, California, offers a pleasant desert climate that is often advantageous in treatment of respiratory allergies, physicians should be made aware in referring their patients that definite pollen factors must be taken into consideration in recommending a visit to Palm Springs, and should try to determine the compatibility of their patient's allergic sensitivity pattern and the particular seasonal incidence of pollen concentration in Palm Springs. It is believed that the most important pollens there are those of Bermuda grass, olive tree, mesquite, dicoria, false ragweed, scales, and hymenoclea salsola. A favorable climate alone does not permit a patient to disregard good allergic management. PMID:13160819

  14. Application of spring tabs to elevator controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, William H

    1944-01-01

    Equations are presented for calculating the stick-force characteristics obtained with a spring-tab type of elevator control. The main problems encountered in the design of a satisfactory elevator spring tab are to provide stick forces in the desired range, to maintain the force per g sufficiently constant throughout the speed range, to avoid undesirable "feel" of the control in ground handling or in flight at low airspeeds, and to prevent flutter. Examples are presented to show the design features of spring tabs required to solve these problems for airplanes of various sizes.

  15. Assessment of Preoperative Liver Function in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma – The Albumin-Indocyanine Green Evaluation (ALICE) Grade

    PubMed Central

    Kokudo, Takashi; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Amikura, Katsumi; Uldry, Emilie; Shirata, Chikara; Yamaguchi, Takamune; Arita, Junichi; Kaneko, Junichi; Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Amane; Sakamoto, Hirohiko; Makuuchi, Masatoshi; Matsuyama, Yutaka; Demartines, Nicolas; Malagó, Massimo; Kokudo, Norihiro; Halkic, Nermin

    2016-01-01

    Background Most patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have underlying liver disease, therefore, precise preoperative evaluation of the patient’s liver function is essential for surgical decision making. Methods We developed a grading system incorporating only two variables, namely, the serum albumin level and the indocyanine green retention rate at 15 minutes (ICG R15), to assess the preoperative liver function, based on the overall survival of 1868 patients with HCC who underwent liver resection. We then tested the model in a European cohort (n = 70) and analyzed the predictive power for the postoperative short-term outcome. Results The Albumin-Indocyanine Green Evaluation (ALICE) grading system was developed in a randomly assigned training cohort: linear predictor = 0.663 × log10ICG R15 (%)−0.0718 × albumin (g/L) (cut-off value: -2.20 and -1.39). This new grading system showed a predictive power for the overall survival similar to the Child-Pugh grading system in the validation cohort. Determination of the ALICE grade in Child-Pugh A patients allowed further stratification of the postoperative prognosis. This result was reproducible in the European cohort. Determination of the ALICE grade allowed better prediction of the risk of postoperative liver failure and mortality (ascites: grade 1, 2.1%; grade 2, 6.5%; grade 3, 16.0%; mortality: grade 1, 0%; grade 2, 1.3%; grade 3, 5.3%) than the previously reported model based on the presence/absence of portal hypertension. Conclusions This new grading system is a simple method for prediction of the postoperative long-term and short-term outcomes. PMID:27434062

  16. New Horizons Alice sky Lyman-α at Pluto encounter: Importance for photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retherford, K. D.; Gladstone, R.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Young, L. A.; Olkin, C.; Cheng, A. F.; Greathouse, T.; Kammer, J.; Linscott, I.; Parker, A. H.; Parker, J. W.; Schindhelm, E.; Singer, K. N.; Steffl, A.; Strobel, D. F.; Summers, M. E.; Tsang, C.; Tyler, G. L.; Versteeg, M.; Woods, W. W.; Ennico Smith, K.; Hinson, D. P.; Pryor, W. R.; Cunningham, N. J.; Curdt, W.

    2015-12-01

    The third zone of our solar system, including the Pluto system, has a unique illumination environment at UV wavelengths. While direct solar Lyman-α emissions dominate the signal at 121.6 nm at classical solar system distances, the contribution of illumination by Interplanetary Medium (IPM) Lyman-α sky-glow is roughly on par at Pluto (Gladstone et al. 2015). The Pluto-Alice UV imaging spectrograph on New Horizons conducted several dedicated sky scans to measure the IPM Lyman-α both en route to and while at Pluto. These scans provide 6° by 360° great-circle swaths while spinning the spacecraft. Three sets of scans conducted en route are reported in Gladstone et al. (2012). During the Pluto encounter, sets of scans with six such swaths evenly spaced ~30° apart for all-sky coverage were obtained just before closest approach and again just after. These measurements agree well with brightness variations expected for IPM brightnesses peaking in the sunward direction and interspersed with detections of UV bright stars and other sky features. Previous studies estimated contributions of ~2/3rds direct solar Lyα and 1/3rd IPM Lyα. Our early results suggest that these model predictions need revision. These findings have important implications for determining the rates of photochemical reactions within Pluto's atmosphere that are driven by UV photons at 121.6 nm. Similarly, new constraints are provided to the rates of photolysis on Charon's polar winter nightside. These constraints are useful for understanding the volatile transport and long-term stability of the dark red region near Charon's pole discovered by New Horizons.

  17. First calibration of a Cherenkov beam loss sensor at ALICE using SiPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intermite, A.; Putignano, M.; Wolski, A.

    2012-06-01

    The need for real-time monitoring of beam losses, including evaluation of their intensity and localization of their exact position, together with the possibility to overcome the limitations due to the reduced space for the diagnostics, makes exploitation of the Cherenkov effect in optical fibres, one of the most suitable candidates for beam loss monitoring. In this article, we report on the first tests of an optical fibre beam loss monitor based on large numerical aperture pure silica fibres and silicon photomultipliers. The tests were carried out at the ALICE accelerator research and development facility, Daresbury Laboratories, UK. In contrast to the results already published where the fibres are longitudinally placed with respect to the accelerator beam path and the losses are multidirectional charged particle showers, for the first time a dedicated set-up with an incident accelerator beam impinging directly on the optical fibre was used for optimizing the collection efficiency of the Cherenkov effect as a function of the incident angle by changing the fibre direction. For this purpose large core fibres were used together with the latest generation silicon detector instead of the standard photomultiplier tubes commonly used for Cherenkov beam loss monitoring. The experiments described in this contribution aim to demonstrate the suitability of the optical fibre sensor for loss monitoring, to optimize the Collection Efficiency (CE) of the Cherenkov photons inside the fibre as a function of the particle incident angle, to calibrate the sensor and calculate its sensitivity, and to understand the limits of temporal resolution of losses from different bunches in the accelerator.

  18. Bose-Einstein correlations in pp and PbPb collisions with ALICE at the LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    We report on the results of identical pion femtoscopy at the LHC. The Bose-Einstein correlation analysis was performed on the large-statistics ALICE p+p at sqrt{s}= 0.9 TeV and 7 TeV datasets collected during 2010 LHC running and the first Pb+Pb dataset at sqrt{s_NN}= 2.76 TeV. Detailed pion femtoscopy studies in heavy-ion collisions have shown that emission region sizes ("HBT radii") decrease with increasing pair momentum, which is understood as a manifestation of the collective behavior of matter. 3D radii were also found to universally scale with event multiplicity. In p+p collisions at 7 TeV one measures multiplicities which are comparable with those registered in peripheral AuAu and CuCu collisions at RHIC, so direct comparisons and tests of scaling laws are now possible. We show the results of double-differential 3D pion HBT analysis, as a function of multiplicity and pair momentum. The results for two collision energies are compared to results obtained in the heavy-ion collisions at similar multiplicity and p+p collisions at lower energy. We identify the relevant scaling variables for the femtoscopic radii and discuss the similarities and differences to results from heavy-ions. The observed trends give insight into the soft particle production mechanism in p+p collisions and suggest that a self-interacting collective system may be created in sufficiently high multiplicity events. First results for the central Pb+Pb collisions are also shown. A significant increase of the reaction zone volume and lifetime in comparison to RHIC is observed. Signatures of collective hydrodynamics-like behavior of the system are also apparent, and are compared to model predictions.

  19. Commissioning and calibration of the Zero Degree Calorimeters for the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemme, R.; Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicalò, C.; Cortese, P.; De Falco, A.; Dellacasa, G.; De Marco, N.; Ferretti, A.; Floris, M.; Gagliardi, M.; Gallio, M.; Luparello, G.; Masoni, A.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Poggio, F.; Puddu, G.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Stocco, D.; Usai, G.; Vercellin, E.

    2009-12-01

    The ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC will study the properties of matter at the extreme temperature and energy density conditions produced in heavy ion collisions. The impact parameter of the collision will be estimated by means of the Zero Degree Calorimeters (ZDC), that measure the energy carried away by the non-interacting (spectator) nucleons. All the spectator nucleons have the same energy, therefore the calorimeter response is proportional to their number, providing a direct information on the centrality of the collision. Two identical sets of hadronic calorimeters are located at opposite sides with respect to the interaction point, 116 m away from it, where the two LHC beams circulate in two different pipes. Each set of detectors consists of a neutron (ZN) calorimeter, placed between the two beam pipes and a proton (ZP) calorimeter, positioned externally to the outgoing beam pipe. The ZDC are spaghetti calorimeters, which detect the Cherenkov light produced by the charged particles of the shower in the quartz fibers, acting as the active material embedded in a dense absorber matrix. In summer 2007 the ZN and ZP calorimeters have been placed on a movable platform and then installed in the LHC tunnel. The results of the commissioning studies are shown. The monitoring systems adopted to control the stability of the PMT responses, i.e. light injection with a laser diode and cosmic rays, are described in detail. The foreseen calibration with e.m. dissociation events in Pb-Pb collisions will also be discussed. Finally the first measurements carried out during the commissioning in the LHC tunnel will be presented.

  20. Characterizing Hot Spring Connectivity Using Aqueous Geochemistry in the River Group Springs, Yellowstone NP, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aunan, M. M.; Lindsey, C.; Price, A. N.; Fairley, J. P., Jr.; Larson, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract We analyzed the aqueous geochemical components of 11 springs in the River Group, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. For the springs sampled, we found pHs ranging from a low of ˜4.8 to a high of ˜9.6; TDS (as inferred from electrical conductivity measurements) was roughly correlated to pH, with the lowest pH spring being the most dilute (373 µS) and the highest pH spring having the second highest conductivity (1384 µS). In combination with a shallow ground temperature survey and visual observations of the relative water levels in the springs, the spring chemistries support a conceptual model of fracture-controlled fluid flow in which individual springs demonstrate a surprising level of flowpath isolation. We hypothesize that variations in flowpath permeability lead to steam-heating of low-pH springs, while nearby circumneutral springs are heated by upwelling liquid hydrothermal fluids, high in chlorid and other dissolved components. If our hypothesis is correct, it implies that vaporand liquid-dominated zones of Model III hydrothermal systems can coexist in close proximity, resulting in a complex surface expression of acid-sulfate and chloride-rich circum-neutral springs.

  1. Biogeochemistry of Hypersaline Springs Supporting a Mid-Continent Marine Ecosystem: An Analogue for Martian Springs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasby, Stephen E.; Londry, Kathleen L.

    2007-08-01

    Hypersaline springs that host unique mid-continent marine ecosystems were examined in central Manitoba, Canada. The springs originate from a reflux of glacial meltwater that intrudes into underlying bedrock and dissolved buried salt beds. Two spring types were distinguished based both on flow rate and geochemistry. High flow springs (greater than 10 L/s) hosted extensive marine microbial mats, which were dominated by algae but also included diverse microbes. These varied somewhat between springs as indicated by changes in profiles of fatty acid methyl esters. Culture studies confirmed the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria in sediments at the high flow sites. In contrast, low flow springs were affected by solar evaporation, increasing salinity, and temperature. These low flow springs behaved more like closed nutrient-limited systems and did not support microbial mats. Direct comparison of the high and low flow springs revealed interesting implications for the potential to record biosignatures in the rock record. High flow springs have abundant, well-developed microbial mats, which desiccate and are cemented along the edges of the spring pools; however, the high mass flux overwhelms any geochemical signature of microbial activity. In contrast, the nutrient-limited low flow sites develop strong geochemical signatures of sulfate reduction, even in the absence of microbial mats, due to less dilution with the lower flows. Geochemical and physical evidence for life did not correlate with the abundance of microbial life but, rather, with the extent to which the biological system formed a closed ecosystem.

  2. Evolution of the Mazatzal province and the timing of the Mazatzal orogeny: Insights from U-Pb geochronology and geochemistry of igneous and metasedimentary rocks in southern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amato, J.M.; Boullion, A.O.; Serna, A.M.; Sanders, A.E.; Farmer, G.L.; Gehrels, G.E.; Wooden, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    New U-Pb zircon ages, geochemistry, and Nd isotopic data are presented from three localities in the Paleoproterozoic Mazatzal province of southern New Mexico, United States. These data help in understanding the source regions and tectonic setting of magmatism from 1680 to 1620 Ma, the timing of the Mazatzal orogeny, the nature of postorogenic maginatism, Proterozoic plate tectonics, and provide a link between Mazatzal subblocks in Arizona and northern New Mexico. The data indicate a period from 1680 to 1650 Ma in which juvenile felsic granitoids were formed, and a later event between 1646 and 1633 Ma, when these rocks were deformed together with sedimentary rocks. No evidence of pre-1680 Ma rocks or inherited zircons was observed. The igneous rocks have ENd(t) from -1.2 to +4.3 with most between +2 and +4, suggesting a mantle source or derivation from similar-aged crust. Nd isotope and trace element concentrations are consistent with models for typical are magmatism. Detrital zircon ages from metasedimentary rocks indicate that sedimentation occurred until at least 1646 Ma. Both local and Yavapai province sources contributed to the detritus. All of the samples older than ca. 1650 Ma are deformed, whereas undeformed porphyroblasts were found in the contact aureole of a previously dated 1633 Ma gabbro. Regionally, the Mlazatzal orogeny occurred mainly between 1654 and 1643 Ma, during final accretion of a series of island arcs and intervening basins that may have amalgamated offshore. Rhyolite magmatism in the southern Mazatzal province was coeval with gabbro intrusions at 1633 Ma and this bimodal magmatism may have been related to extensional processes following arc accretion. ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  3. MISTRAL & ASTRAL: two CMOS Pixel Sensor architectures suited to the Inner Tracking System of the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, F.; Hu-Guo, C.; Bertolone, G.; Claus, G.; Colledani, C.; Dorokhov, A.; Dozière, G.; Dulinski, W.; Fang, X.; Goffe, M.; Himmi, A.; Jaaskelainen, K.; Senyukov, S.; Specht, M.; Szelezniak, M.; Pham, H.; Valin, I.; Wang, T.; Winter, M.

    2014-01-01

    A detector, equipped with 50 μm thin CMOS Pixel Sensors (CPS), is being designed for the upgrade of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE experiment at LHC. Two CPS flavours, MISTRAL and ASTRAL, are being developed at IPHC aiming to meet the requirements of the ITS upgrade. The first is derived from the MIMOSA28 sensor designed for the STAR-PXL detector. The second integrates a discriminator in each pixel to improve the readout speed and power consumption. This paper will describe in details the sensor development and show some preliminary test results.

  4. Performance of the ALICE muon trigger system in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fronzé, G. G.

    2016-06-01

    The ALICE muon spectrometer studies the production of quarkonia and open heavy-flavour particles. It is equipped with a trigger system composed of Resistive Plate Chambers which, by applying a transverse-momentum-based muon selection, minimises the background from light-hadron decays. The system has been continuously taking data throughout the LHC Run I; it has undergone maintenance and consolidation operations during the LHC shutdown period 1. In the first year of the LHC Run II, the system, fully recommissioned, has participated in data taking in pp and Pb-Pb collisions. The performance of the system throughout the last data-taking period is presented.

  5. Executive summary: Weldon Spring Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1992. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report has been prepared to provide information about the public safety and environmental protection programs conducted by the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project. The Weldon Spring site is located in southern St. Charles County, Missouri, approximately 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The site consists of two main areas, the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant and raffinate pits and the Weldon Spring Quarry. The objectives of the Site Environmental Report are to present a summary of data from the environmental monitoring program, to characterize trends and environmental conditions at the site, and to confirm compliance with environmental and health protection standards and requirements. The report also presents the status of remedial activities and the results of monitoring these activities to assess their impacts on the public and environment. The scope of the environmental monitoring program at the Weldon Spring site has changed since it was initiated. Previously, the program focused on investigations of the extent and level of contaminants in the groundwater, surface waters, buildings, and air at the site. In 1992, the level of remedial activities required monitoring for potential impacts of those activities, particularly on surface water runoff and airborne effluents. This report includes monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological sampling activities. These data include estimates of dose to the public from the Weldon Spring site; estimates of effluent releases; and trends in groundwater contaminant levels. Also, applicable compliance requirements, quality assurance programs, and special studies conducted in 1992 to support environmental protection programs are reviewed.

  6. Exploring virtualisation tools with a new virtualisation provisioning method to test dynamic grid environments for ALICE grid jobs over ARC grid middleware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, B.; Kileng, B.; Alice Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The Nordic Tier-1 centre for LHC is distributed over several computing centres. It uses ARC as the internal computing grid middleware. ALICE uses its own grid middleware AliEn to distribute jobs and the necessary software application stack. To make use of most of the AliEn infrastructure and software deployment methods for running ALICE grid jobs on ARC, we are investigating different possible virtualisation technologies. For this a testbed and possible framework for bridging different middleware systems is under development. It allows us to test a variety of virtualisation methods and software deployment technologies in the form of different virtual machines.

  7. Diffraction dissociation in proton-proton collisions at \\sqrt{s} = 0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poghosyan, M. G.; ALICE Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The relative rates of single- and double-diffractive processes were measured with the ALICE detector by studying properties of gaps in the pseudorapidity distribution of particles produced in proton-proton collisions at \\sqrt{s} = 0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV. ALICE triggering efficiencies are determined for various classes of events using a detector simulation validated with data on inclusive particle production. Cross-sections are determined using the van der Meer scans to measure beam properties and obtain a measurement of the luminosity.

  8. Measurement of electrons from heavy-flavour decays in p-Pb collisions at √(S{sub NN}) = 5.02 TeV with ALICE

    SciTech Connect

    ALICE collaboration, Cristiane Jahnke for the

    2014-11-11

    Electrons from the decay of hadrons containing charm or beauty quarks have been measured in p-Pb collisions at √(S{sub NN}) = 5.02 TeV with ALICE. Electrons from heavy-flavour hadron decays were identified using the Time Projection Chamber and the Electromagnetic Calorimeter of ALICE. The nuclear modification factor R{sub pPb} was calculated using a pp reference obtained from a perturbative QCD-based √(s)-extrapolation of the cross section measured at 7 TeV and from a FONLL prediction.

  9. Coffee Cravings May Spring from Your DNA

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160628.html Coffee Cravings May Spring From Your DNA Genes appear ... research suggests that your genes influence how much coffee you drink. Researchers analyzed genetic data from more ...

  10. Optical spring effect in nanoelectromechanical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Feng; Zhou, Guangya Du, Yu; Chau, Fook Siong; Deng, Jie

    2014-08-11

    In this Letter, we report a hybrid system consisting of nano-optical and nano-mechanical springs, in which the optical spring effect works to adjust the mechanical frequency of a nanoelectromechanical systems resonator. Nano-scale folded beams are fabricated as the mechanical springs and double-coupled one-dimensional photonic crystal cavities are used to pump the “optical spring.” The dynamic characteristics of this hybrid system are measured and analyzed at both low and high input optical powers. This study leads the physical phenomenon of optomechanics in complex nano-opto-electro-mechanical systems (NOEMS) and could benefit the future applications of NOEMS in chip-level communication and sensing.

  11. Spring and Baby Poultry are Here!

    MedlinePlus

    ... Button Past Emails CDC Features Spring and Baby Poultry are Here! Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... do people get Salmonella infections from live baby poultry? Live poultry may have Salmonella germs in their ...

  12. The Nonlinear Spring and Energy Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherfinski, John

    1989-01-01

    Describes an air track experiment demonstrating the transfer of mechanical energy from elastic potential to kinetic. Discusses four methods for calculating energy stored in the spring. Included are pictures, typical data, and graphs. (YP)

  13. Diagenetic Changes in Common Hot Spring Microfacies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinman, N. W.; Kendall, T. A.; MacKenzie, L. A.; Cady, S. D.

    2016-05-01

    The friable nature of silica hot spring deposits makes them susceptible to mechanical weathering. Rapid diagenesis must take place for these rocks to persist in the geologic record. The properties of two microfacies at two deposits were compared.

  14. Pagosa Springs geothermal project. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-19

    This booklet discusses some ideas and methods for using Colorado geothermal energy. A project installed in Pagosa Springs, which consists of a pipeline laid down 8th street with service to residences retrofitted to geothermal space heating, is described. (ACR)

  15. Evaporation study at Warm Springs Reservoir, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, D.D.

    1968-01-01

    The mass transfer-water budget method of computing reservoir evaporation was tested on Warm Springs Reservoir, whose contents and surface area change greatly from early spring to late summer. The mass-transfer coefficient computed for the reservoir is two to three times greater than expected and results in a computed evaporation much greater than that from a land pan. Because of the remoteness of the area, the recommended study technique was modified, which could have reduced the accuracy of the results.

  16. Bacterial community analysis of Indonesian hot springs.

    PubMed

    Baker, G C; Gaffar, S; Cowan, D A; Suharto, A R

    2001-06-12

    We report the first attempts to describe thermophilic bacterial communities in Indonesia's thermal springs using molecular phylogenetic analyses. 16S rRNA genes from laboratory cultures and DNA directly amplified from three hot springs in West Java were sequenced. The 22 sequences obtained were assignable to the taxa Proteobacteria, Bacillus and Flavobacterium, including a number of clades not normally associated with thermophily. PMID:11410357

  17. Warming spring air temperatures, but delayed spring streamflow in an Arctic headwater basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaogang; Marsh, Philip; Yang, Daqing

    2015-06-01

    This study will use the Mann-Kendall (MK) non-parametric trend test to examine timing changes in spring (early May to the end of June) streamflow records observed by the Water Survey of Canada during 1985-2011 in an Arctic headwater basin in the Western Canadian Arctic. The MK test shows a general delay in the five timing measures of springtime streamflow, which are based on the 5 percentile (Q5), 10 percentile (Q10), 50 percentile (Q50), 90 percentile (Q90), and 95 percentile (Q95) dates of spring runoff, respectively. However, much stronger trend signals were clearly noted for the high percentiles than that for the low and middle percentiles, indicating different effects of hydroclimate processes working on the timing of springtime streamflow. In contrast, the earlier snowmelt onset derived from daily mean temperatures was found over the 27-year study period. In addition, multiple relationships were correlated between these five timing measures of spring runoff and five hydroclimate indicators (total snowfall, snowmelt onset, spring temperature fluctuation, spring rainfall, and spring rainfall timing) in order to identify possible causes on the changes of springtime streamflow timing. The results indicate that the differences are due to the contradictory effects of winter-spring air temperature changes, temperature fluctuation during the melting period, and spring rainfall to spring runoff. The earlier snowmelt onset, which is attributed to the winter-spring warming, and spring temperature fluctuation that works in the opposite way, result in the minor timing changes of Q5, Q10, and Q50. The increase in spring rainfall and its delayed timing have a significant impact on the dates of Q90 and Q95. Moreover, the decreased total snow accumulation over the winter season only has a minor influence on the timing of springtime streamflow.

  18. Travertine Hot Springs, Mono County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Chesterman, C.W.; Kleinhampl, F.J.

    1991-08-01

    This article is an abridgement of Special Report 172, Travertine Hot Springs at Bridgeport, Mono County, California, in preparation at the California Division of Mines and Geology. The Travertine Hot Springs area is on the northern edge of what many consider to be one of the most tectonically active areas in the United States. There is abundant geothermal and seismic activity. The landscape is dotted with volcanic features- cones, craters, domes, flows, fumaroles and hot springs-indicators of unrest in the present as well as reminders of activity in the past. Travertine, also known as calcareous sinter, is limestone formed by chemical precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) from ground or surface waters. It forms stalactites and stalagmites in caves, fills some veins and spring conduits and can also be found at the mouths of springs, especially hot springs. The less compact variety is called tufa and the dense, banded variety is known as Mexican onyx, or onyx marble. True onyx, however, is a banded silicate.

  19. Preparation of biomimetic photoresponsive polymer springs.

    PubMed

    Iamsaard, Supitchaya; Villemin, Elise; Lancia, Federico; Aβhoff, Sarah-Jane; Fletcher, Stephen P; Katsonis, Nathalie

    2016-10-01

    Polymer springs that twist under irradiation with light, in a manner that mimics how plant tendrils twist and turn under the effect of differential expansion in different sections of the plant, show potential for soft robotics and the development of artificial muscles. The soft springs prepared using this protocol are typically 1 mm wide, 50 μm thick and up to 10 cm long. They are made from liquid crystal polymer networks in which an azobenzene derivative is introduced covalently as a molecular photo-switch. The polymer network is prepared by irradiation of a twist cell filled with a mixture of shape-persistent liquid crystals, liquid crystals having reactive end groups, molecular photo-switches, some chiral dopant and a small amount of photoinitiator. After postcuring, the soft polymer film is removed and cut into springs, the geometry of which is determined by the angle of cut. The material composing the springs is characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and tensile strength measurements. The springs operate at ambient temperature, by mimicking the orthogonal contraction mechanism that is at the origin of plant coiling. They shape-shift under irradiation with UV light and can be pre-programmed to either wind or unwind, as encoded in their geometry. Once illumination is stopped, the springs return to their initial shape. Irradiation with visible light accelerates the shape reversion. PMID:27583641

  20. Noble gas geochemistry in thermal springs

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B.M.; Reynolds, J.H. ); Smith, S.P. )

    1988-07-01

    The composition of noble gases in both gas and water samples collected from Horseshoe Spring, Yellowstone National Park, was found to be depth dependent. The deeper the sample collection within the spring, the greater the enrichment in Kr, Xe, radiogenic {sup 4}He, and {sup 40}Ar and the greater the depletion in Ne relative to {sup 36}Ar. The compositional variations are consistent with multi-component mixing. The dominant component consists of dissolved atmospheric gases acquired by the pool at the surface in contact with air. This component is mixed in varying degree with two other components, one each for gas and water entering the bottom of the pool. The two bottom components are not in equilibrium. In Horseshoe Spring, the bubbles entering at the bottom strip the atmospheric-derived pool gases from the surrounding water while en route to the surface. If the original bottom bubbles are noble gas, as in the case of Horseshoe, the acquired pool gases can then quickly obliterate the original bubble composition. These results are used to demonstrate that Yellowstone spring surface gas samples, and perhaps similarity sampled thermal springs from other hydrothermal systems, have gas abundances that depend more on spring morphology than processes occurring deeper in the hydrothermal system.

  1. Spring Flooding on the Mississippi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The mighty Mississippi River, from its source at Lake Itasca, Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico, is approximately 3780 kilometers long and has flooded many times during its history. In April 2001, residents of Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Illinois once again battled near-record water levels. These Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) images, acquired one month apart, illustrate the effects of snowmelt and heavy rainfall on areas traversed by the upper Mississippi River.

    Each image in this pair covers an identical 195-kilometer x 339-kilometer area. The one on the left was acquired March 26, 2001 (Terra orbit 6762), and the one on the right is from April 27 (Terra orbit 7228). Both are false-color composites, displaying data from the near-infrared band of the instrument's nadir (vertical-viewing) camera as red; the green band of the nadir camera as green; and the red band of the 26-degree forward camera as blue. Data from the forward-viewing camera is included to enhance the reflectivity of water. The near-infrared data provide a good indicator of the abundance of vegetation since plants are highly reflective in this spectral region. The redder color of the right-hand image is due to increased vegetation cover brought about by wet conditions and the onset of spring.

    Locations of major cities are marked on the left-hand image; major rivers are marked on the right. The portion of the Mississippi River captured in these views extends from just north of La Crosse, Wisconsin to south of Davenport, Iowa. The Wisconsin River joins the Mississippi just below Prairie du Chien. On March 26, snow can clearly be seen over much of the northern portions of the left-hand image. At this point in time, the snow had already begun to melt and the Wapsipinicon River was 52 centimeters above flood stage at De Witt, Iowa (between Clinton and Davenport). By mid-April heavy rainfall swelled the Mississippi and Wisconsin rivers. In the early morning of April 25, two days

  2. Southern Spring in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The Odyssey spacecraft has completed a full Mars year of observations of the red planet. For the next several weeks the Image of the Day will look back over this first mars year. It will focus on four themes: 1) the poles - with the seasonal changes seen in the retreat and expansion of the caps; 2) craters - with a variety of morphologies relating to impact materials and later alteration, both infilling and exhumation; 3) channels - the clues to liquid surface flow; and 4) volcanic flow features. While some images have helped answer questions about the history of Mars, many have raised new questions that are still being investigated as Odyssey continues collecting data as it orbits Mars.

    This image was collected June 25, 2003 during the southern spring season. This false color image shows both the layered ice cap and darker 'spots' that are seen only when the sun first lights the polar surface.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -82.3, Longitude 306 East (54 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the

  3. In Search of Lost Springs: A Protocol for Locating Active and Inactive Springs.

    PubMed

    Fensham, R J; Silcock, J L; Powell, O; Habermehl, M A

    2016-05-01

    Groundwater springs are significant landscape features for humans and the biota that occupies their habitat. Many springs become inactive where groundwater exploitation by humans has lowered the water table or artesian pressure. In order to assess this impact, it is important to identify and locate active, and with more difficulty, inactive springs. Using a variety of archival, environmental and field-based data, this study presents a protocol for the determination of the location and status of springs across the Great Artesian Basin of Australia. This protocol underpins a database of springs, which is not only important for the assessment of spring ecosystems, but also contributes to understand groundwater extraction impacts and hydrogeological processes. The database indicates that 30.0% of discharge (artesian) springs in the Great Artesian Basin are entirely inactive and another 11.8% are partially inactive. For the outcrop (gravity) springs of the Basin, only 1.9% are entirely inactive and 7.4% partially inactive, and for the outcrop springs in the Tertiary sandstone overlying the Basin 30.9% are inactive and 18.2% are partially inactive. PMID:26436535

  4. The Grenville orogeny in the Llano Uplift, Texas: A record of collision and contraction along the southern margin of North America

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, J.F. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-02-01

    Precambrian metamorphic rocks in the SE Llano Uplift record NE-directed ductile thrusting and regional-scale polyphase folding. This deformation is in response to Grenville-age shortening and crustal thickening associated with the collision of a south-lying tectonic block with the southern margin of North America. In the SE Llano Uplift, the most intense and pervasive deformational event, D2, is characterized in the Packsaddle Schist (PS) and Valley Spring Gneiss (VSG) by SSE-plunging, NE-verging isoclinal folds (F2) with an associated SW-dipping axial planar metamorphic layering (S2), and SW-dipping mylonite zones with kinematic indicators showing top-to-the-NE motion. In the Red Mountain and augen-bearing Big Branch gneisses, D2 structures are SW-dipping mylonite zones parallel to S2, and a SW-plunging stretching lineation. Taken together, this suite of structures indicates tectonic transport was to the NE, perpendicular to the NW trending regional structural and metamorphic grain. D2 structures were reoriented by at least two later phases of folding. Timing of all ductile deformation in the SE Llano Uplift is constrained from post-1,215 Ma (deformed PS) to pre-1,098 Ma (undeformed melarhyolite dike). From south to north, metatonalitic, arc-derived Big Branch Gneiss ([approximately] 1,303 Ma) and older mafic schist country rock, previously interpreted as possible ophiolitic melange, structurally overlie much younger, lithologically heterogeneous PS units (1,248-1,215 Ma), previously considered as arc flank deposits. In turn, the PS has been tectonically emplaced above the predominantly felsic VSG (1,270-1,232 Ma). The presence of older zircons in the VSG, of similar age ([approximately]1360 Ma) to Western Granite-Rhyolite Terrane rocks to the north, suggests that the VSG formed in a settling proximal to North America.

  5. Front-end electronics for PWO-based PHOS calorimeter of ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Hans; Budnikov, Dmitry; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Li, Qingxia; Manko, Vladislav; Pimenta, Rui; Rohrich, Dieter; Sibiryak, Iouri; Skaali, Bernhard; Vinogradov, Alexandre

    2006-11-01

    The electromagnetic Photon Spectrometer (PHOS) of ALICE consists of five modules with 56×64 PWO crystals, operated at -25 °C. Glued to each crystal are APD diodes which amplify a lightyield of 4.4 photoelectrons/MeV, followed by charge-sensitive pre-amplifiers with a charge conversion gain of ca. 1 V/pC. We describe our new 32-channel shaper/digitizer and readout electronics for gain-programmable photodiodes. These Front-End Electronics (FEE) cards are installed below the crystals in an isolated warm volume in geometrical correspondence to 2×16 crystal rows per card. With a total detector capacitance of 100 pF and a noise level of 3 MeV, the FEEs cover a 14 bit dynamic range from 5 MeV to 80 GeV. The low noise level is achieved by operating the APDs and preamplifiers at low temperature and by applying a relatively long shaping time of 1 μs. The offline timing resolution, obtained via a Gamma-2 fit is less than 2 ns. The second-order, dual-gain shapers produce semi-Gaussian output for 10 bit ADCs with embedded multi-event buffers. A Readout Control Unit (RCU) masters data readout with address-mapped access to the event-buffers and controls registers via a custom bus which interconnects up to 14 FEE cards. Programmable bias voltage controllers on the FEE cards allow for very precise gain adjustment of each individual APD. Being co-designed with the TRU trigger cards, each FEE card generates eight fast signal sums (2×2 crystals) as input to the TRU. FPGA-based algorithms generate level-0 and level-1 trigger decisions at 40 MHz and allow PHOS also to operate in self-triggered mode. Inside each PHOS module there are 112 FEE and 8 TRU cards which dissipate ca. 1 kW heat which is extracted via a water cooling system.

  6. Nonpersisting Student Analysis for Fall 1977-Spring 1978. Research Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratta, Mary Kathryne

    This research note reviews an analysis of Moraine Valley Community College nonpersisting students for fall 1977 and spring 1978. Information is provided on trends in transfer and occupational student retention by semester from spring 1970 through fall/spring 1977-78, and on fall 1977 and spring 1978 persister and nonpersister characteristics. Of…

  7. 78 FR 3877 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Peach Springs, AZ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Peach Springs, AZ AGENCY: Federal Communications... Springs, Arizona, as a Tribal Allotment. Channel 265A would constitute a first tribal allotment and a second potential service at Peach Springs. Channel 265A can be allotted at Peach Springs, Arizona,...

  8. Radioactive mineral springs in Delta County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cadigan, Robert A.; Rosholt, John N.; Felmlee, J. Karen

    1976-01-01

    The system of springs in Delta County, Colo., contains geochemical clues to the nature and location of buried uranium-mineralized rock. The springs, which occur along the Gunnison River and a principal tributary between Delta and Paonia, are regarded as evidence of a still-functioning hydrothermal system. Associated with the springs are hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide gas seeps, carbon dioxide gas-powered geysers, thick travertine deposits including radioactive travertine, and a flowing warm-water (41?C) radioactive well. Geochemical study of the springs is based on surface observations, on-site water-property measurements, and sampling of water, travertine, soft precipitates, and mud. The spring deposits are mostly carbonates, sulfates, sulfides, and chlorides that locally contain notable amounts of some elements, such as arsenic, barium, lithium, and radium. Samples from five localities have somewhat different trace element assemblages even though they are related to the same hydrothermal system. All the spring waters but one are dominated by sodium chloride or sodium bicarbonate. The exception is an acid sulfate water with a pH of 2.9, which contains high concentrations of aluminum and iron. Most of the detectable radioactivity is due to the presence of radium-226, a uranium daughter product, but at least one spring precipitate contains abundant radium-228, a thorium daughter product. The 5:1 ratio of radium-228 to radium-226 suggests the proximity of a vein-type deposit as a source for the radium. The proposed locus of a thorium-uranium mineral deposit is believed to lie in the vicinity of Paonia, Colo. Exact direction and depth are not determinable from data now available.

  9. Measurement of reference cross sections in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC in van der Meer scans with the ALICE detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, M.; Alice Collaboration

    2012-03-01

    Reference cross sections have been measured with the ALICE detector in both pp and Pb-Pb collisions, in dedicated luminosity calibration experiments (van der Meer scans) at the LHC. The results and their uncertainties are discussed, together with a few selected applications.

  10. Ultrasound assessment of the spring ligament complex.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Ramy; Teh, James; Sharp, Robert J; Ostlere, Simon

    2008-11-01

    This study was conducted to document the normal ultrasound anatomy of the spring ligament in asymptomatic subjects and to prospectively determine the frequency of ultrasound abnormality of the spring ligament in patients with suspected posterior tibial tendinopathy. The superomedial calcaneonavicular ligament (CNL) of 10 healthy volunteers was examined by ultrasound. Nineteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of suspected posterior tibial tendinopathy and/or chronic pain along the course of the tendon were examined by ultrasound. The superomedial CNL thickness was measured. Normal anatomy of the superomedial CNL could be demonstrated in all the volunteers. The mean of the combined proximal measurements was 4 mm and of the distal measurements 3.6 mm. Sixteen patients with posterior tibial tendinopathy had increased thickness of the spring ligament, which was more evident on its distal portion over the talar head. One patient had superomedial CNL insufficiency with normal posterior tibial tendon. The mean proximal measurement in the study group was 5.1 mm and the distal measurement 6.1 mm. The differences between the measurements in the study group and controls were highly significant (proximal site P < 0.01, distal site P < 0.001). Spring-ligament laxity or tear is characterised by thickening. There is a strong association between posterior tibial tendinopathy and abnormality of the spring ligament. PMID:18523776

  11. Geophysical Investigation of Neal Hot Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, C.; Van Wijk, K.; Liberty, L. M.

    2011-12-01

    We present newly acquired geophysical data that characterizes a geothermal system at Neal Hot Springs in eastern Oregon. The hot springs are in a region of complex and intersecting fault trends associated with two major extensional events, the Oregon-Idaho Graben and the western Snake River Plain. From surface observations and several boreholes in the area, it appears that a steeply dipping normal fault forms a half-graben basin and serves as a conduit for heated water at depth to migrate to the surface at Neal Hot Springs. We identify and characterize this fault with seismic reflection, gravity, magnetic, and electrical resistivity surveys. A self-potential survey indicates that water is upwelling over the fault plane, and suggests that the fault does provide the means for heated water to migrate to the surface. Smaller scale structure is also evident in both the gravity and seismic surveys, and could interact with the migration of water, and how the hot springs recharge. These preliminary results will be built upon in the upcoming years and a solid structural understanding of Neal Hot Springs and the surrounding area will be gained through the use of geophysics.

  12. Sample Return from Ancient Hydrothermal Springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Oehler, Dorothy Z.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrothermal spring deposits on Mars would make excellent candidates for sample return. Molecular phylogeny suggests that that life on Earth may have arisen in hydrothermal settings [1-3], and on Mars, such settings not only would have supplied energy-rich waters in which martian life may have evolved [4-7] but also would have provided warm, liquid water to martian life forms as the climate became colder and drier [8]. Since silica, sulfates, and clays associated with hydrothermal settings are known to preserve geochemical and morphological remains of ancient terrestrial life [9-11], such settings on Mars might similarly preserve evidence of martian life. Finally, because formation of hydrothermal springs includes surface and subsurface processes, martian spring deposits would offer the potential to assess astrobiological potential and hydrological history in a variety of settings, including surface mineralized terraces, associated stream deposits, and subsurface environments where organic remains may have been well protected from oxidation. Previous attempts to identify martian spring deposits from orbit have been general or limited by resolution of available data [12-14]. However, new satellite imagery from HiRISE has a resolution of 28 cm/pixel, and based on these new data, we have interpreted several features in Vernal Crater, Arabia Terra as ancient hydrothermal springs [15, 16].

  13. Quarry geotechnical report for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    This report has been prepared for the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) by the Project Management Contractor (PMC), which is MK-Ferguson Company (MK-Ferguson) with Jacobs Engineering Group (JEG) as its designated subcontractor. The Weldon Spring site (WSS) comprises the Weldon Spring quarry area and the Weldon Spring chemical plant and raffinate pit areas. This report presents the results of geotechnical investigations conducted during 1989--1990 at the proposed Weldon Spring quarry staging and water treatment facilities in the quarry area. The facilities are intended for treatment of water removed from the quarry area. An access road and a decontamination pad will be necessary for handling and transportation of bulk waste. Results of previous geotechnical investigations performed by other geoscience and environmental engineering firms in the quarry area, were reviewed, summarized and incorporated into this report. Well logging, stratigraphy data, piezometer data, elevations, and soil characteristics are also included.

  14. Evaluation of acoustic doppler velocity meters to quantify flow from Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gary, Marcus O.; Gary, Robin H.; Asquith, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs are the two largest springs in Texas, are major discharge points for the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer, and provide habitat for several Federally listed endangered species that depend on adequate springflows for survival. It is therefore imperative that the Edwards Aquifer Authority have accurate and timely springflow data to guide resource management. Discharge points for Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs are submerged in Landa Lake and in Spring Lake, respectively. Flows from the springs currently (2008) are estimated by the U.S Geological Survey in real time as surface-water discharge from conventional stage-discharge ratings at sites downstream from each spring. Recent technological advances and availability of acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs) now provide tools to collect data (stream velocity) related to springflow that could increase accuracy of real-time estimates of the springflows. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Edwards Aquifer Authority, did a study during May 2006 through September 2007 to evaluate ADVMs to quantify flow from Comal and San Marcos Springs. The evaluation was based on two monitoring approaches: (1) placement of ADVMs in important spring orifices - spring run 3 and spring 7 at Comal Springs, and diversion spring at San Marcos Springs; and (2) placement of ADVMs at the nearest flowing streams - Comal River new and old channels for Comal Springs, Spring Lake west and east outflow channels and current (2008) San Marcos River streamflow-gaging site for San Marcos Springs. For Comal Springs, ADVM application at spring run 3 and spring 7 was intended to indicate whether the flows of spring run 3 and spring 7 can be related to total springflow. The findings indicate that velocity data from both discharge features, while reflecting changes in flow, do not reliably show a direct relation to measured streamflow and thus to total Comal Springs flow. ADVMs at the Comal

  15. Environmental conditions of boreal springs explained by capture zone characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Pekka M.; Marttila, Hannu; Jyväsjärvi, Jussi; Ala-aho, Pertti; Isokangas, Elina; Muotka, Timo; Kløve, Bjørn

    2015-12-01

    Springs are unique ecosystems, but in many cases they are severely threatened and there is an urgent need for better spring management and conservation. To this end, we studied water quality and quantity in springs in Oulanka National Park, north-east Finland. Multivariate statistical methods were employed to relate spring water quality and quantity to hydrogeology and land use of the spring capture zone. This revealed that most springs studied were affected by locally atypical dolostone-limestone bedrock, resulting in high calcium, pH, and alkalinity values. Using Ward's hierarchical clustering, the springs were grouped into four clusters based on their water chemistry. One cluster consisted of springs affected by past small-scale agriculture, whereas other clusters were affected by the variable bedrock, e.g., springs only 1 km from the dolostone-limestone bedrock area were beyond its calcium-rich impact zone. According to a random forest model, the best predictors of spring water chemistry were spring altitude and the stable hydrogen isotope ratio of the water (δ2H). Thus stable water isotopes could be widely applicable for boreal spring management. They may also provide a rough estimate of groundwater flow route (i.e., whether it is mainly local or regional), which largely determines the chemical characteristics of spring water. Our approach could be applied in other boreal regions and at larger spatial scales for improved classification of springs and for better targeted spring management.

  16. Town of Pagosa Springs geothermal heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.B.

    1997-08-01

    The Town of Pagosa Springs has owned and operated a geothermal heating system since December 1982 to provide geothermal heating during the fall, winter and spring to customers in this small mountain town. Pagosa Springs is located in Archuleta County, Colorado in the southwestern corner of the State. The Town, nestled in majestic mountains, including the Continental Divide to the north and east, has an elevation of 7,150 feet. The use of geothermal water in the immediate area, however, dates back to the 1800`s, with the use of Ute Bands and the Navajo Nation and later by the U.S. Calvery in the 1880`s (Lieutenant McCauley, 1878). The Pagosa area geothermal water has been reported to have healing and therapeutic qualities.

  17. Structural and lithological controls of gold-bearing veins associated with the Brasiliano-Pan African Orogeny: An example from the Buracão Area, Araí Group (Brasília Fold Belt, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Gustavo Luiz Campos; Bongiolo, Everton Marques; Renac, Christophe; Nascimento, Débora Barros; Prado, Maurício

    2016-03-01

    The Buracão area, Central Brazil, comprises a group of structurally-controlled vein-type gold prospects, hosted in the metasedimentary Traíras Fm. of the Araí Group. This group records all tectonic stages of the Statherian taphrogenesis in Central Brazil and represents part of the Brasília Fold Belt (BFB) developed during the Neoproterozoic Brasiliano Orogeny. Three lithostratigraphic units were identified at the study area: two phyllitic and one composed of intercalation of quartzite and carbonaceous/sericite phyllites that hosted the Au mineralized vein systems. These units were metamorphosed to the biotite zone, greenschist facies. The high-grade mineralization (up to 31 g/t) occurs as subvertical zoned or massive veins with quartz, white mica, Fe-sulfides and Fe-oxides oriented in four main directions (i.e. N50°E; N°20E; N-S and E-W). Two deformational phases, each subdivided in two stages (D1a, D1b, D2a and D2b) were recognized in the study area. These deformational phases comprise different sets of structures, such as foliations, folds, faults, fractures and veins that represent regional deformational events on subordinated scale. The D1a and D1b stages represent the regional N-S trending thrust fronts and propagation folding developed during the evolution of W-E shortening, respectively. The D2a and D2b were correlated to the development and reactivation of regional-scale N- and NE-trending transpressive shear systems at different crustal levels, respectively. The gold-bearing quartz veins were developed during D2a stage as a complex shear fracture set according to a Riedel system, representing subordinated structures of the regional transpressive system. The structurally-controlled gold occurrences of the Buracão area is an example of orogenic vein-type gold mineralization developed during the Brasiliano-Pan African Orogeny at the BFB in Central Brazil. Our work suggests that this poorly studied part of BFB has good potential for additional high

  18. Animal evolution and atmospheric pO2: is there a link between gradual animal adaptation to terrain elevation due to Ural orogeny and survival of subsequent hypoxic periods?

    PubMed

    Kurbel, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Considering evolution of terrestrial animals as something happening only on flat continental plains seems wrong. Many mountains have arisen and disappeared over the geologic time scale, so in all periods some areas of high altitude existed, with reduced oxygen pressure (pO2) and increased aridity. During orogeny, animal species of the raising terrain can slowly adapt to reduced oxygen levels.This review proposes that animal evolution was often driven by atmospheric oxygen availability. Transitions of insect ancestors and amphibians out of water are here interpreted as events forced by the lack of oxygen in shallow and warm water during Devonian. Hyperoxia during early Carboniferous allowed giant insects to be predators of lowlands, forcing small amphibians to move to higher terrains, unsuitable to large insects due to reduced pO2. In arid mountainous habitats, ascended animals evolved in early reptiles with more efficient lungs and improved circulation. Animals with alveolar lungs became the mammalian ancestors, while those with respiratory duct lungs developed in archosaurs. In this interpretation, limb precursors of wings and pneumatised bones might have been adaptations for moving on steep slopes.Ural mountains have risen to an estimated height of 3000 m between 318 and 251 Mya. The earliest archosaurs have been found on the European Ural side, estimated 275 Myr old. It is proposed that Ural orogeny slowly elevated several highland habitats within the modern Ural region to heights above 2500 m. Since this process took near 60 Myr, animals in these habitats fully to adapted to hypoxia.The protracted P-Tr hypoxic extinction event killed many aquatic and terrestrial animals. Devastated lowland areas were repopulated by mammaliaformes that came down from mountainous areas. Archosaurs were better adapted to very low pO2, so they were forced to descend to the sea level later when the lack of oxygen became severe. During the Triassic period, when the relative content

  19. Rapid River Hatchery - Spring Chinook, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, M.

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Rapid River Hatchery (Spring Chinook). The hatchery is located in the lower Snake River basin near Riggins Idaho. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of spring chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  20. Peatland Structural Controls on Spring Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, D. K.; Boutt, D. F.; Hackman, A. M.; Davenport, G.

    2013-12-01

    The species richness of wetland ecosystems' are sustained by the presence of discrete groundwater discharge, or springs. Springs provide thermal refugia and a source of fresh water inflow crucial for survival of many wetland species. The subsurface drivers that control the spatial distribution of surficial springs throughout peatland complexes are poorly understood due to the many challenges peatlands pose for hydrologic characterization, such as the internal heterogeneities, soft, dynamic substrate, and low gradient of peat drainage. This has previously made it difficult to collect spatial data required for restoration projects that seek to support spring obligate and thermally stressed species such as trout. Tidmarsh Farms is a 577-acre site in Southeastern Massachusetts where 100+ years of cranberry farming has significantly altered the original peatland hydrodynamics and ecology. Farming practices such as the regular application of sand, straightening of the main channel, and addition of drainage ditches has strongly degraded this peatland ecosystem. Our research has overlain non-invasive geophysical, thermal, and water isotopic data from the Tidmarsh Farms peatland to provide a detailed visualization of how subsurface peat structure and spring patterns correlate. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) has proven particularly useful in characterizing internal peat structure and the mineral soil interface beneath peatlands, we interpolate the peatland basin at a large scale (1 km2) and compare this 3-D surface to the locations of springs on the peat platform. Springs, expressed as cold anomalies in summer and warm anomalies in winter, were specifically located by combining fiber-optic and infrared thermal surveys, utilizing the numerous relic agricultural drainage ditches as a sampling advantage. Isotopic signatures of the spring locations are used to distinguish local and regional discharge, differences that can be explained in part by the peat basin structure