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Sample records for alicia baturoni cortez

  1. Gold geochemical anomaly in the Cortez district, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, Ralph Leroy; Van Sickle, G.H.; Nakagawa, H.M.; McCarthy, J.H.; Leong, K.W.

    1966-01-01

    An area in the Cortez district, Nevada, previously established to be anomalous in arsenic, antimony, and tungsten has been found to be anomalous also in mercury and gold. Samples from narrow quartz veins, calcite veins, and shear zones in partially silicified limestone in the lower plate of the Roberts thrust fault (Cortez window) contain as much as 3.4 ounces gold per ton. The richest samples are from an outcrop, about 100 feet long, surrounded by gravels. Their economic significance is yet to be established.

  2. 75 FR 51478 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Cortez...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... Cortez Gold Mines (CGM) Cortez Hills Expansion Project, which is an expansion of an existing open-pit gold mining and processing operations in northeastern Nevada. The project entails new surface... FR 57647). On December 3, 2009, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit partially...

  3. 76 FR 2705 - Notice of Availability of the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Cortez...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... a Record of Decision and Plan of Operations approval on November 12, 2008, for the Cortez Gold Mines (CGM) Cortez Hills Expansion Project, which is an expansion of existing open-pit gold mining and processing operations in northeastern Nevada. The project entails new surface disturbance of approximately...

  4. 75 FR 41516 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Cortez Hills...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... INFORMATION: The BLM signed a Record of Decision on November 12, 2008, for the Cortez Gold Mines (CGM) Cortez Hills Expansion Project, which is an expansion of existing open-pit gold mining and processing operations in northeastern Nevada. The project entails new surface disturbance of approximately 6,633...

  5. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Cortez quadrangle, Colorado and Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J A

    1982-09-01

    Six stratigraphic units are recognized as favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits that meet the minimum size and grade requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy in the Cortez 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, Utah and Colorado. These units include the Jurassic Salt Wash, Recapture, and Brushy Basin Members of the Morrison Formation and the Entrada Sandstone, the Late Triassic Chinle Formation, and the Permian Cutler Formation. Four areas are judged favorable for the Morrison members which include the Slick Rock, Montezuma Canyon, Cottonwood Wash and Hatch districts. The criteria used to determine favorability include the presence of the following (1) fluvial sandstone beds deposited by low-energy streams; (2) actively moving major and minor structures such as the Paradox Basin and the many folds within it; (3) paleostream transport directions approximately perpendicular to the trend of many of the paleofolds; (4) presence of favorable gray lacustrine mudstone beds; and (5) known uranium occurrences associated with the favorable gray mudstones. Two areas of favorability are recognized for the Chinle Formation. These areas include the Abajo Mountain and Aneth-Ute Mountain areas. The criteria used to determine favorability include the sandstone-to-mudstone ratio for the Chinle Formation and the geographic distribution of the Petrified Forest Member of the Chinle Formation. Two favorable areas are recognized for the Cutler Formation. Both of these areas are along the northern border of the quadrangle between the Abajo Mountains and the Dolores River Canyon area. Two areas are judged favorable for the Entrada Sandstone. One area is in the northeast corner of the quadrangle in the Placerville district and the second is along the eastern border of the quadrangle on the southeast flank of the La Plata Mountains.

  6. 76 FR 80926 - Cortez Pumped Storage Project; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Cortez Pumped Storage Project; Notice of Preliminary Permit... Pumped Storage Project to be located on Plateau Creek, near the town of Dolores, Montezuma County... a total storage capacity of 8,000 acre-feet and a water surface area of 275 acres at full...

  7. Anomalous concentrations of gold, silver, and other metals in the Mill Canyon area, Cortez quadrangle, Eureka and Lander Counties, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, James E.; Wells, John David

    1968-01-01

    The Mill Canyon area is in the eastern part of the Cortez window of the Roberts Mountains thrust belt in the Cortez quadrangle, north-central Nevada. Gold and silver ores have been mined from fissure veins in Jurassic quartz monzonite and in the bordering Wenban Limestone of Devonian age. Geochemical data show anomalies of gold, silver, lead, zinc, copper, arsenic, antimony, mercury, and tellurium. Geologic and geochemical studies indicate that a formation favorable for gold deposition, the Roberts Mountains Limestone of Silurian age, may be found at depth near the mouth of Mill Canyon.

  8. Fin whales and microplastics: The Mediterranean Sea and the Sea of Cortez scenarios.

    PubMed

    Fossi, Maria Cristina; Marsili, Letizia; Baini, Matteo; Giannetti, Matteo; Coppola, Daniele; Guerranti, Cristiana; Caliani, Ilaria; Minutoli, Roberta; Lauriano, Giancarlo; Finoia, Maria Grazia; Rubegni, Fabrizio; Panigada, Simone; Bérubé, Martine; Urbán Ramírez, Jorge; Panti, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    The impact that microplastics have on baleen whales is a question that remains largely unexplored. This study examined the interaction between free-ranging fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) and microplastics by comparing populations living in two semi-enclosed basins, the Mediterranean Sea and the Sea of Cortez (Gulf of California, Mexico). The results indicate that a considerable abundance of microplastics and plastic additives exists in the neustonic samples from Pelagos Sanctuary of the Mediterranean Sea, and that pelagic areas containing high densities of microplastics overlap with whale feeding grounds, suggesting that whales are exposed to microplastics during foraging; this was confirmed by the observation of a temporal increase in toxicological stress in whales. Given the abundance of microplastics in the Mediterranean environment, along with the high concentrations of Persistent Bioaccumulative and Toxic (PBT) chemicals, plastic additives and biomarker responses detected in the biopsies of Mediterranean whales as compared to those in whales inhabiting the Sea of Cortez, we believe that exposure to microplastics because of direct ingestion and consumption of contaminated prey poses a major threat to the health of fin whales in the Mediterranean Sea. PMID:26637933

  9. In vitro cultures of Drosera aliciae as a source of a cytotoxic naphthoquinone: ramentaceone.

    PubMed

    Kawiak, Anna; Królicka, Aleksandra; Łojkowska, Ewa

    2011-11-01

    A protocol for the in vitro propagation of Drosera aliciae to increase the yield of the naphthoquinone, ramentaceone, was developed. The highest micropropagation coefficient was obtained using half-strength Murashige-Skoog medium supplemented with 0.4 μM 6-benzyladenine (BA). The genetic fidelity and stability of the regenerated plants was confirmed with RAPD markers. The activity of the isolated ramentaceone was determined against four human tumor cell lines: U937, HeLa, MCF-7, HCT-116 with the highest cytotoxic activity towards the leukemic U937 cell line with an IC(50) value of 3.2 μM. PMID:21761256

  10. Antibacterial and antioxidant activity of the secondary metabolites from in vitro cultures of the Alice sundew (Drosera aliciae).

    PubMed

    Krolicka, Aleksandra; Szpitter, Anna; Maciag, Monika; Biskup, Edyta; Gilgenast, Ewelina; Wegrzyn, Grazyna; Lojkowska, Ewa

    2009-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant as well as the antibacterial properties of secondary metabolites obtained from Drosera aliciae (Alice sundew) plants grown in vitro and to examine the mechanism of their antimicrobial action. Bactericidal activity of extracts from D. aliciae, as well as pure ramentaceone (naphthoquinone), which is present in this plant, were examined against human pathogenic strains of micro-organisms that are both resistant and susceptible to antibiotics. A chloroform extract proved to be more effective than a methanol preparation against all of the tested strains, except for Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. The lowest minimal-bactericidal-concentration value was in the case of Staphylococcus aureus (25-50 mg fresh weight·ml(-1)). The influence of D. aliciae extracts and ramentaceone on the synthesis of DNA, RNA or proteins in cultures of Enterococcus faecalis was estimated by measurement of the incorporation of the radioactively labelled precursors [3H]thymidine, [3H]uridine or [3H]leucine respectively. The methanol extract of D. aliciae, except for a moderate effect on DNA synthesis, had no influence on RNA and protein synthesis. The chloroform preparation caused about a 75% decrease in [3H]uridine incorporation in comparison with the control after 60 min and a significant diminution in DNA and protein synthesis (44 and 30% respectively). Ramentaceone also decreased DNA and RNA synthesis, but less efficiently than did the chloroform extract, and it caused no changes in [3H]leucine incorporation. The methanol extract from D. aliciae proved to be an effective antioxidant in both the DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-10-picrylhydrazyl free radical) and the FRAP (ferric reducing antioxidant power) assay, with the activities exceeding those of well-known antioxidants, namely the flavonoids. The chloroform extract and ramentaceone showed no antioxidative properties. PMID:18782083

  11. Induction of apoptosis in HL-60 cells through the ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway by ramentaceone from Drosera aliciae.

    PubMed

    Kawiak, Anna; Zawacka-Pankau, Joanna; Wasilewska, Aleksandra; Stasilojc, Grzegorz; Bigda, Jacek; Lojkowska, Ewa

    2012-01-27

    Ramentaceone (1) is a naphthoquinone constituent of Drosera aliciae that exhibits potent cytotoxic activity against various tumor cell lines. However, its molecular mechanism of cell death induction has still not been determined. The present study demonstrates that 1 induces apoptosis in human leukemia HL-60 cells. Typical morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis were observed in 1-treated cells. Compound 1 induced a concentration-dependent increase in the sub-G1 fraction of the cell cycle. A decrease in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) was also observed. Furthermore, 1 reduced the ratio of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 to pro-apoptotic Bax and Bak, induced cytochrome c release, and increased the activity of caspase 3. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected in 1-treated HL-60 cells, which was attenuated by the pretreatment of cells with a free radical scavenger, N-acetylcysteine (NAC). NAC also prevented the increase of the sub-G1 fraction induced by 1. These results indicate that ramentaceone induces cell death through the ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway. PMID:22250825

  12. Performance of Angus and Brangus cow-calf pairs grazing Alicia bermudagrass and common bermudagrass-dallisgrass pastures.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, W E; Gates, R N; Blouin, D C; Saxton, A M; Nelson, B D

    1997-07-01

    This research was designed to examine genotype x environment interactions in cow-calf growth performance of grazing animals. Angus and Brangus cow-calf pairs (minimum of six per breed) were allowed to rotationally graze (14-d intervals) treatment pastures from approximately May through early October in each of 2 yr. Treatment pastures contained relatively pure stands of Alicia bermudagrass (AP) or a mixed stand of common bermudagrass and dallisgrass (CDP). Forage allowance was equalized, using "put-and-take" cow-calf pairs, among forage and breed types at the initiation of each 14-d grazing interval. Forage samples were obtained in each paddock at the initiation of each grazing interval. Forage CP concentration was greater (P < .05; 13.5 vs 11.6%) and NDF concentration was less (P < .05; 63.8 vs 70.6%) for CDP than for AP. Daily weight loss was similar for Angus and Brangus cows, but it was greater (P < .05) for cows grazing AP than for cows grazing CDP. Calf ADG during the grazing season was 35% greater (P < .05) for CDP than for AP pastures and was 23% greater (P < .01) for Brangus than for Angus calves. Relative performance of Angus and Brangus cow-calf pairs was consistent between forages; no breed x forage interactions were observed. PMID:9222851

  13. Policy. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This newsletter includes five articles about educational and school policies, primarily related to equality of educational opportunity. "Texas Legislature Considers Much for Education, Accomplishes Little" (Albert Cortez, Anna Alicia Romero) summarizes educational legislation considered by the Texas legislature in the session ending in June 1997.…

  14. Altered phenotypic expression of immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable-region (VH) genes in Alicia rabbits probably reflects a small deletion in the VH genes closest to the joining region.

    PubMed Central

    Allegrucci, M; Newman, B A; Young-Cooper, G O; Alexander, C B; Meier, D; Kelus, A S; Mage, R G

    1990-01-01

    Rabbits of the Alicia strain have a mutation (ali) that segregates with the immunoglobulin heavy-chain (lgh) locus and has a cis effect upon the expression of heavy-chain variable-region (VH) genes encoding the a2 allotype. In heterozygous a1/ali or a3/ali rabbits, serum immunoglobulins are almost entirely the products of the normal a1 or a3 allele and only traces of a2 immunoglobulin are detectable. Adult homozygous ali/ali rabbits likewise have normal immunoglobulin levels resulting from increased production of a-negative immunoglobulins and some residual ability to produce the a2 allotype. By contrast, the majority of the immunoglobulins of wild-type a2 rabbits are a2-positive and only a small percentage are a-negative. Genomic DNAs from homozygous mutant and wild-type animals were indistinguishable by Southern analyses using a variety of restriction enzyme digests and lgh probes. However, when digests with infrequently cutting enzymes were analyzed by transverse alternating-field electrophoresis, the ali DNA fragments were 10-15 kilobases smaller than the wild type. These fragments hybridized to probes both for VH and for a region of DNA a few kilobases downstream of the VH genes nearest the joining region. We suggest that this relatively small deletion affects a segment containing 3' VH genes with important regulatory functions, the loss of which leads to the ali phenotype. These results, and the fact that the 3' VH genes rearrange early in B-cell development, indicate that the 3' end of the VH locus probably plays a key role in regulation of VH gene expression. Images PMID:2115171

  15. Alicia Dawn Koehl Respect for National Cemeteries Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Brooks, Susan W. [R-IN-5

    2013-09-17

    11/06/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Military Personnel. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see S.1471, which became Public Law 113-65 on 12/20/2013. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. 77 FR 16219 - Cortez Pumped Storage Project; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ...-diameter steel consisting of a surface penstock, a vertical shaft and an inclined tunnel; (4) two 27-foot-diameter tailrace tunnels that would be 850-feet-long; (5) an underground powerhouse containing...

  17. Spring ``bleaching'' among Pocillopora in the Sea of Cortez, Eastern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajeunesse, T. C.; Reyes-Bonilla, H.; Warner, M. E.

    2007-06-01

    A mild bleaching event was observed among Pocillopora spp. in the southern Gulf of California in the spring of 2006. Uniform bleaching occurred in numerous colonies on the upper portions of their branches. Most (˜90%) colonies that exhibited bleaching contained a species of endosymbiotic dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium C1b-c, which differed from the Symbiodinium D1 found inhabiting most unbleached colonies. Analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence, indicated a decline in photosystem II photochemical activity, especially among colonies populated with C1b-c. By early August, most affected colonies had recovered their normal pigmentation and fluorescence values were once again high for all colonies. No mortality was observed among tagged bleached colonies nor did symbiont species composition change during recovery. This unusual episode of bleaching did not appear to be a response to thermal stress, but may have been triggered by high levels of solar radiation during a period of unseasonally high water clarity in the early spring.

  18. A bill for the relief of Alicia Aranda De Buendia and Ana Laura Buendia Aranda.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Feinstein, Dianne [D-CA

    2013-03-18

    03/18/2013 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S1901) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. A bill for the relief of Jose Buendia Balderas, Alicia Aranda De Buendia, and Ana Laura Buendia Aranda.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Feinstein, Dianne [D-CA

    2011-03-02

    03/02/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S1130) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. Detection and mapping of mineralized areas in the Cortez-Uinta Belt, Utah-Nevada using computer-enhanced ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, L. C. (Principal Investigator); Goetz, A. F. H.; Ashley, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The reflectance spectra of most hydrothermally altered rocks were characterized by broad ferric iron absorption bands short of 1.1 microns and a sharper hydroxyl band near 2.2 microns; maximum reflectance occurred near 1.6 microns. Their features became more prominent as albedo increased. The MSS color ratio composite images were the most effective and practical means for detecting and mapping limonitic rocks in areas having less than about 50 percent desert brush cover and less than 25-35 percent coniferous tree cover. Limonitic altered and unaltered rocks could not be distinguished in MSS color ratio composite images.

  1. Detection and mapping of mineralized areas in the Cortez-Uinta Belt, Utah-Nevada, using computer-enhanced ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, L. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Preliminary analysis indicates that mineralogical differences between altered rocks and most unaltered rocks in south-central Nevada cause visible and near infrared spectral reflectance differences, which can be used to discriminate these broad categories of rocks in multispectral images. The most important mineralogical differences are the increased abundance of goethite, hematite, and jarosite, and the presence of alunite, montmorillonite, and kaolinite in the altered rock. The technique to enhance subtle spectral differences combines ratioing of the MSS bands and contrast stretching. The stretched ratio values are used to produce black and white images that depict materials according to spectral reflectance; rationing minimizes the influence of topography and overall albedo on the grouping of spectrally similar materials. Field evaluation of color-ratio composite shows that, excluding alluvial areas, approximately 80 percent of the green and brown color patterns are related to hydrothermal alternation. The remaining 20 percent consists mainly of pink hematitic crystallized tuff, a result of vapor phase crystallization, and of tan and red ferruginous shale and siltstone.

  2. Detection and mapping of mineralized areas in the Cortez-Uinta Belt, Utah-Nevada, using computer-enhanced ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, L. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Mineralogical differences between hydrothermally altered rocks and most unaltered rocks in south central Nevada cause visible and near infrared (0.45-2.4 micron) spectral reflectance differences which can be used to discriminate broad categories of rocks in multispectral images. The most important mineralogical differences are the increased abundance of goethite, hematite, jarosite, alunite, montmorillonite, and kaolinite in the altered zones. Because of the wavelength positions and widths of the LANDSAT MSS bands, these spectral differences are not apparent in individual or color infrared composite MSS images. The technique developed to enhance these subtle spectral differences combines ratioing of the MSS bands and contrast stretching. Field evaluation of color-ratio composite shows that, after exclusion of alluvial areas, approximately 80% of the green and brown color patterns are related to hydrothermal alteration. The remaining 20% consists mainly of pink hematitic crystallized tuff and tan or red ferruginous shale and siltstone.

  3. Detection and mapping of mineralized areas in the Cortez-Uinta Belt, Utah-Nevada, using computer-enhanced ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, L. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An approach to obtain spatial precision utilizes large scale black and white ratio images with high geometric precision. These images have a precision of .005 inch across the diagonals. Evaluation of a color ratio composite image of south central Nevada using ratio images recorded at this scale shows that the respective pixels are registered throughout the scene. Thus reconnaissance mapping can be carried out for the entire scene at 1:300,000 scale and then at larger scales by analyzing photographic enlargements of the original color ratio composite image. The advantages to this approach are elimination of repetitive computer processing and considerable flexibility as to specific scales.

  4. 75 FR 5230 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a...) RWY 13, Orig-A. Effective 8 APR 2010 Elim, AK, Elim, ELIM ONE Graphic Obstacle DP. Elim, AK, Elim..., Cortez Muni, LEDVE ONE Graphic Obstacle DP. Cortez, CO, Cortez Muni, Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle...

  5. 75 FR 79440 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ..., Colombia; DOB 17 Sep 1968; Cedula No. 51918595 (Colombia) (individual) 5. GALINDO MARTINEZ, Fernando...; Cedula No. 8281272 (Colombia) (individual) 9. MARTINEZ, Alicia (a.k.a. MARTINEZ GALINDO, Alicia), c/o...

  6. "Mestiza" Consciousness: An Examination of Two Plays with Chicana Protagonists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aragon, Cecilia

    2001-01-01

    Examines the representation of gender and ethnicity in two female protagonists, Maria in "Simply Maria" and Alicia in "Alicia in Wonder Tierra." Demonstrates the cultural politics that direct how the protagonists negotiate gender identity within Mexican-American cultures. (SG)

  7. Station Crew Training Integrator Talks With Students

    NASA Video Gallery

    From NASA's International Space Station Mission Control Center, Expedition 34/35 Training Integrator Alicia Simpson participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students from Christ ...

  8. ISS Update: Integrating International Training for the Crew

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries interviews Alicia Simpson, Expedition 34/35 Training Integrator, about organizing the international training required for station crew members. Station c...

  9. 76 FR 59396 - Farm, Ranch, and Rural Communities Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ...: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, EPA gives notice... to the public, with limited seating on a first-come, first-served basis. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION... individuals with disabilities, please contact Alicia Kaiser at 202-564- 7273 or kaiser.alicia@epa.gov ....

  10. 35. PRATER GRADE ROAD VIEW, FACING NW. NOTE WEATHERING STEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. PRATER GRADE ROAD VIEW, FACING NW. NOTE WEATHERING STEEL RAIL AND ROAD CUT IN DISTANCE. MONTEZUMA VALLEY OVERLOOK IS JUST TO RIGHT OF DISTANT ROAD CUT. - Mesa Verde National Park Main Entrance Road, Cortez, Montezuma County, CO

  11. Typical Window, Interior Wall Paint Sequence, Wall Section, and Foundation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Typical Window, Interior Wall Paint Sequence, Wall Section, and Foundation Sections - Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Camp NP-5-C, Barracks No. 5, CCC Camp Historic District at Chapin Mesa, Cortez, Montezuma County, CO

  12. 37. PRATER CANYON AND CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS CAMP SITE FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. PRATER CANYON AND CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS CAMP SITE FROM PRATER GRADE, FACING E. SAME CAMERA LOCATION AS No. 35 AND No. 36. - Mesa Verde National Park Main Entrance Road, Cortez, Montezuma County, CO

  13. 2. Photocopy of photograph (original print located at Prescott National ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of photograph (original print located at Prescott National Forest, 344 South Cortez Street, Prescott, Arizona). Photograph is an enlargement of the negative. Photographer unknown, 1926 'TONTO RANGER STATION PRESCOTT N.F. 1926.' VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: HOUSE, WINDMILL, WATER STORAGE TANK, GARAGE, BARN. - Tonto Ranger Station, Forest Service Road 65 at Tonto Wash, Skull Valley, Yavapai County, AZ

  14. 1. Photocopy of photograph (original print located at Prescott National ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of photograph (original print located at Prescott National Forest, 344 South Cortez Street, Prescott, Arizona). Photograph is an enlargement of the negative. Photographer unknown, 1946 'TONTO SPRINGS CABIN PRESCOTT N.F. - 1946.' VIEW LOOKING NORTH. - Tonto Ranger Station, Forest Service Road 65 at Tonto Wash, Skull Valley, Yavapai County, AZ

  15. Tectonic and igneous geology of the northern Shoshone Range, Nevada, with sections on gravity in Crescent Valley and economic geology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilluly, James; Gates, Olcott; Plouff, Donald; Ketner, K.B.

    1965-01-01

    Part of the northern Shoshone Range and its bordering valleys are shown in the Mount Lewis and Crescent Valley quadrangles of the U.S. Geological Survey's Topographic Atlas. A very small part of the Cortez Mountains extends into the Crescent Valley quadrangle and is also described.

  16. IDRA Newsletter. Volume 36, No. 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Christie L., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Each edition of the IDRA Newsletter strives to provide many different perspectives on the issues in education topics discussed and to define its significance in the state and national dialogue. This issue focuses on Student Engagement and includes: (1) Engaging Ourselves to Engage Our Students (Josie Danini Cortez); (2) The Family Friendly…

  17. Mexico: Neighbor in Transition. Foreign Policy Association Headline Series, No. 267.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter H.

    One of a series of booklets on world issues, this five-part document presents information about Mexico. Part one examines Mexican history from Cortez to Madero. Emphasis is placed on the revolution era (1910-1920) and the creation of two political parties: the Partido de la Revolucion Mexicana (Mexican Revolutionary Party or PRM) and the Partido…

  18. IDRA Newsletter. Volume 37, No.5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Christie L., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Each edition of the IDRA Newsletter strives to provide many different perspectives on the issues in education topics discussed and to define its significance in the state and national dialogue. This issue focuses on Fair Funding and includes: (1) Fair Funding of Texas Schools is Even More Critical in Tough Economic Times (Albert Cortez); (2)…

  19. Creating Safe and Drug-Free Schools. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on programs and strategies aimed at developing crime-free, nonviolent, drug-free schools. "Alternative Education Programs: Resolution or Exclusion?" (Albert Cortez) describes alternative education programs mandated by Texas state legislation for serious student offenders, and related issues of assessment, due process,…

  20. IDRA Newsletter. Volume 35, No. 10, November-December 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Christie L., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Each edition of the IDRA Newsletter strives to provide many different perspectives on the issues in education topics discussed and to define its significance in the state and national dialogue. This issue focuses on Enlightened Public Policy and includes: (1) Texas Education Policy: Prospects for 2009 (Albert Cortez); (2) Bilingual Education in…

  1. Policy Update. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on the drastic revision of the Texas education code undertaken during the 1995 state legislative session. "Education Policy Reform: Key Points for Districts" (Albert Cortez, Mikki Symonds) outlines critical issues in the legislation that have an impact on educational quality: charter schools exempt from state regulations;…

  2. Infant Mental Health and the Treatment of Early Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Alicia F.; Harris, William W.; Osofsky, Joy D.; Osofsky, Howard J.

    2010-01-01

    This article is excerpted and reprinted by permission of the publisher, Wiley-Blackwell, from the book "Nurturing Children and Families: Building on the Legacy of T. Berry Brazelton", edited by Barry M. Lester and Joshua D. Sparrow. In the first excerpt, Alicia F. Lieberman and William W. Harris explore the impact of violence and describe a…

  3. We Are Familia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almendariz, Abe Lujan; Villarreal, Micha; Rodriquez, Roy C.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the family-based administrative structure of the Alicia Chacon International School, a magnet elementary school in El Paso, Texas. Students are motivated to learn within the school's family environment through involvement in cultural activities, multilingual instruction, and family participation. (PKP)

  4. Civil Rights in Education, Revisiting the Lau Decision. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter contains seven articles related to the educational rights of culturally diverse language-minority students. "20 Years after Lau: In Pursuit of Equity Not Just a Language Response Program," by Alicia Salinas Sosa, points out that educational responses to Lau vs. Nichols have been minimum-compliance programmatic responses rather than…

  5. 78 FR 44594 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission, Olympia, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ..., Olympia, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Washington State Parks..., 2013. ADDRESSES: Alicia Woods, Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission, PO Box 42650, Olympia... Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission, Olympia, WA. The human remains were removed from Birch...

  6. 78 FR 13887 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission, Olympia, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-01

    ..., Olympia, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Washington State Parks... 42650, Olympia, WA 98504-2650, telephone (360) 902- 0939. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here... contact Alicia Woods, Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission, PO Box 42650, Olympia, WA...

  7. The Physical, Psychological, and Spiritual Assault.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boccellari, Alicia; And Others

    This document consists of the third section of a book written to educate and inform those in the helping professions on how to deal with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The four chapters in section 3 examine special issues for people with AIDS. "Caring for People With AIDS Dementia Complex" (Alicia Boccellari, Craig Kain, and Michael…

  8. Therapeutic Uses of Music with Older Adults. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clair, Alicia Ann; Memmott, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    In this comprehensively updated second edition, written by Alicia Ann Clair and Jenny Memmott the extraordinary benefits of music therapy for older adults are detailed. "Therapeutic Uses of Music with Older Adults" not only examines these benefits but also clarifies the reasons that music is beneficial. This important book shows both informal and…

  9. VLA radio upper limit on Type IIn Supernova 2008S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Poonam; Soderberg, Alicia

    2008-02-01

    Poonam Chandra and Alicia Soderberg report on behalf of a larger collaboration: We observed type IIn supernova SN 2008S (CBET 1234) with the Very Large Array (VLA) on 2008, February 10.62 UT. We do not detect any radio emission at the supernova position (CBET 1234). The flux density at the supernova position is -62 +/- 36 uJy.

  10. Winter Cornucopia | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Guest Writer Display Cases, Movies, and Raffles—Oh My! In December, Alicia Gussio (SAIC-Frederick) and Robert Koogle (NCI) were the lucky winners of free movie tickets to Regal theaters. They each correctly answered questions about Employee Diversity Team’s (EDT’s) November display case featuring the fall harvest.

  11. Epistolary and Emotional Education: The Letters of an Irish Father to His Daughter, 1747-1752

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruberg, Willemijn

    2008-01-01

    The letters Bishop Edward Synge (1691-1762) wrote to his daughter Alicia (1733-1807) in 1747-1752 are discussed to show how correspondence from a father to a daughter could be used to teach a teenage girl how to spell and write letters. Moreover, these letters are an excellent source to show how emotional behaviour was taught. Instructions on…

  12. 75 FR 55578 - Farm, Ranch, and Rural Communities Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ...: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, EPA gives notice.... The meeting is open to the public, with limited seating on a first-come, first-served basis. FOR... on access or services for individuals with disabilities, please contact Alicia Kaiser at...

  13. Getting Ideas into Action: Building Networked Improvement Communities in Education. Carnegie Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryk, Anthony S.; Gomez, Louis M.; Grunow, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    In this Carnegie essay by Anthony Bryk, Louis Gomez and Alicia Grunow, the authors argue that the social organization of the research enterprise is badly broken and a very different alternative is needed. They instead support a science of improvement research and introduce the idea of a networked improvement community that creates the purposeful…

  14. Las Mujeres: Mexican American/Chicana Women. Photographs and Biographies of Seventeen Women from the Spanish Colonial Period to the Present. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruthsdotter, Mary

    This booklet presents the lives of 17 Mexican American women and institutions that have made significant contributions to Mexican society from past to present day culture. The biographies cover the following women and institutions: Eulalia Arrila de Perez, Dona Maria del Carmen Calvillo, Jovita Idar, Maria Hernandez, Alicia Dickerson Montemayor,…

  15. 78 FR 13872 - Proposed Information Collection Request; Comment Request; EPA's WaterSense Program (Renewal); EPA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-01

    ... AGENCY Proposed Information Collection Request; Comment Request; EPA's WaterSense Program (Renewal); EPA... request (ICR), ``EPA's WaterSense Program (Renewal)'' (EPA ICR No. 2233.06, OMB Control No. 2040-0272), to... INFORMATION CONTACT: Alicia Marrs, WaterSense Branch, Municipal Support Division, Office of...

  16. Midwest Research-to-Practice Conference. An Annual Conference in Adult, Continuing, and Community Education (9th, DE Kalb, Illinois, October 18-19, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb. Coll. of Continuing Education.

    This document contains 24 research presentations: "Adult Continuing Education: Whence Came Our Roots" (Judith Gwinn Adrian); "Faculty Receptivity to Participation in Continuing Education as Instructors, Facilitators, or Group Leaders" (Mary G. Bruning); "A Sound Mind in a Sound Body: The Potential to Enhance Learning in Later Life" (Alicia C.…

  17. Papers in Semantics. Working Papers in Linguistics No. 49.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Jae-Hak, Ed.; Kathol, Andreas, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    Papers on semantic theory and research include: "Presupposition, Congruence, and Adverbs of Quantification" (Mike Calcagno); "A Unified Account of '(Ta)myen'-Conditionals in Korean" (Chan Chung); "Spanish 'imperfecto' and 'preterito': Truth Conditions and Aktionsart Effects in a Situation Semantics" (Alicia Cipria, Craige Roberts); "Remarks on…

  18. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY VIA OPTIMIZED CHARGE MOTION AND SLURRY FLOW IN PLANT SCALE SAG MILLS

    SciTech Connect

    Raj K. Rajamani; Sanjeeva Latchireddi; Sravan K. Prathy; Trilokyanath Patra

    2005-12-01

    The U.S. mining industry operates approximately 80 semi-autogenesis grinding mills (SAG) throughout the United States. Depending on the mill size the SAG mills draws between 2 MW and 17 MW. The product from the SAG mill is further reduced in size using pebble crushers and ball mills. Hence, typical gold or copper ore requires between 2.0 and 7.5 kWh per ton of energy to reduce the particle size. Considering a typical mining operation processes 10,000 to 100,000 tons per day the energy expenditure in grinding is 50 percent of the cost of production of the metal. A research team from the University of Utah is working to make inroads into saving energy in these SAG mills. In 2003, Industries of the Future Program of the Department of Energy tasked the University of Utah team to build a partnership between the University and the mining industry for the specific purpose of reducing energy consumption in SAG mills. A partnership was formed with Cortez Gold Mines, Kennecott Utah Copper Corporation, Process Engineering Resources Inc. and others. In the current project, Cortez Gold Mines played a key role in facilitating the 26-ft SAG mill at Cortez as a test mill for this study. According to plant personnel, there were a number of unscheduled shut downs to repair broken liners and the mill throughput fluctuated depending on ore type. The University team had two softwares, Millsoft and FlowMod to tackle the problem. Millsoft is capable of simulating the motion of charge in the mill. FlowMod calculates the slurry flow through the grate and pulp lifters. Based on this data the two models were fine-tuned to fit the Cortez SAG will. In the summer of 2004 a new design of shell lifters were presented to Cortez and in September 2004 these lifters were installed in the SAG mill. By December 2004 Cortez Mines realized that the SAG mill is drawing approximately 236-kW less power than before while maintaining the same level of production. In the first month there was extreme cycling

  19. Improving Energy Efficiency Via Optimized Charge Motion and Slurry Flow in Plant Scale Sag Mills

    SciTech Connect

    Raj K. Rajamani

    2006-07-21

    A research team from the University of Utah is working to make inroads into saving energy in these SAG mills. In 2003, Industries of the Future Program of the Department of Energy tasked the University of Utah team to build a partnership between the University and the mining industry for the specific purpose of reducing energy consumption in SAG mills. A partnership was formed with Cortez Gold Mines, Outokumpu Technology, Kennecott Utah Copper Corporation, and Process Engineering Resources Inc. At Cortez Gold Operations the shell and pulp lifters of the semiautogenous grinding mill was redesigned. The redesigned shell lifter has been in operation for over three years and the redesigned pulp lifter has been in operation for over nine months now. This report summarizes the dramatic reductions in energy consumption. Even though the energy reductions are very large, it is safe to say that a 20% minimum reduction would be achieved in any future installations of this technology.

  20. Accuracy of Projection Methods for the Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D L

    2001-06-12

    Numerous papers have appeared in the literature over the past thirty years discussing projection-type methods for solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. A recurring difficulty encountered is the choice of boundary conditions for the intermediate or predicted velocity in order to obtain at least second order convergence. A further issue is the formula for the pressure correction at each timestep. A simple overview is presented here based on recently published results by Brown, Cortez and Minion [2].

  1. Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Sunglint on the surface of the Sea of Cortez near the island of Tiburon (28.5 N, 112.5W) reveals intricate patterns of internal waves under the placid surface. Mexico's state of Sonora and the Sonora Desert is on the mainland and the state of Baja California consists of the entire peninsula. The large bay on the Pacific side of Baja is Laguna Ojo de Libre (Bay of Whales) which is a breeding area for the Pacific Grey Whales.

  2. Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    An interesting view down the axis of Baja California, Mexico (26.5N, 113.0W). At the center of the Scene is Laguna Ojo de Liebre (Bay of Whales) which is a breeding area for the Pacific Grey Whale. The Sea of Cortez, also known as the Gulf of California, is to the left and the Pacific Ocean is to the right.

  3. Comparison of satellite IR rain estimates with radar rain observations in hurricanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, K. Robert; Negri, Andrew J.; Adler, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    Radar-observed rainrates and rain areas obtained for the Hurricanes Frederic (1979), Alicia (1983), and Diana (1984) were used in conjunction with GOES IR data to examine the validity of three satellite IR rain estimation techniques: the Arkin (1983) method, the Negri-Adler-Wetzel (1984) technique, and the convective-stratiform technique of Adler and Negri (1987). The Alicia hurricane was also monitored using the subjective manual technique of Spayd and Scofield (1984). It is shown that the success of IR techniques in identifying areas of rainfall depends on the hurricane feature being addressed. Thus, the three objective IR techniques were unable to identify the locations of radar-observed eyewall and inner band precipitation areas because of strong vertical wind shear in the eyewall and the lack of the vertical extent of stratiform precipitation beneath the central dense overcast.

  4. VLA radio upper limit on Type IIn Supernova 2007pk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Poonam; Soderberg, Alicia

    2007-11-01

    Poonam Chandra and Alicia Soderberg report on behalf of a larger collaboration: We observed Type IIn supernova SN 2007pk (CBET 1129) with the VLA in 8.46 GHz band on 2007, November 12.20 UT, 1.89 days since discovery (CBET 1129). We do not detect radio emission from the SN position (CBET 1129). The flux density at the SN position is 11 +/-26 uJy.

  5. Real-time simulation of combined short-wave and long-wave infrared vision on a head-up display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peinecke, Niklas; Schmerwitz, Sven

    2014-05-01

    Landing under adverse weather conditions can be challenging, even if the airfields are well known to the pilots. This is true for civil as well as military aviation. Within the scope of this paper we concentrate especially on fog conditions. The work has been conducted within the project ALICIA. ALICIA is a research and development project co-funded by European Commission under the Seventh Framework Programme. ALICIA aims at developing new and scalable cockpit applications which can extend operations of aircraft in degraded conditions: All Conditions Operations. One of the systems developed is a head-up display that can display a generated symbology together with a raster-mode infrared image. We will detail how we implemented a real-time enabled simulation of a combined short-wave and long-wave infrared image for landing. A major challenge was to integrate several already existing simulation solutions, e.g., for visual simulation and sensors with the required data-bases. For the simulations DLRs in-house sensor simulation framework F3S was used, together with a commercially available airport model that had to be heavily modified in order to provide realistic infrared data. Special effort was invested for a realistic impression of runway lighting under foggy conditions. We will present results and sketch further improvements for future simulations.

  6. Improving Energy Efficiency Via Optimized Charge Motion and Slurry Flow in Plant Scale Sag Mills

    SciTech Connect

    Raj K. Rajamani; Jose Angel Delgadillo

    2006-07-21

    A research team from the University of Utah is working to make inroads into saving energy in these SAG mills. In 2003, Industries of the Future Program of the Department of Energy tasked the University of Utah team to build a partnership between the University and the mining industry for the specific purpose of reducing energy consumption in SAG mills. A partnership was formed with Cortez Gold Mines, Kennecott Utah Copper Corporation, Process Engineering Resources Inc. and Outokumpu Technology. In the current project, Cortez Gold Mines played a key role in facilitating the 26-ft SAG mill at Cortez as a test mill for this study. According to plant personnel, there were a number of unscheduled shut downs to repair broken liners and the mill throughput fluctuated depending on ore type. The University team had two softwares, Millsoft and FlowMod to tackle the problem. Millsoft is capable of simulating the motion of charge in the mill. FlowMod calculates the slurry flow through the grate and pulp lifters. Based on this data the two models were fine-tuned to fit the Cortez SAG will. In the summer of 2004 a new design of shell lifters were presented to Cortez and in September 2004 these lifters were installed in the SAG mill. By December 2004 Cortez Mines realized that the SAG mill is drawing approximately 236-kW less power than before while maintaining the same level of production. In the first month there was extreme cycling and operators had to learn more. Now the power consumption is 0.3-1.3 kWh/ton lower than before. The actual SAG mill power draw is 230-370 kW lower. Mill runs 1 rpm lesser in speed on the average. The recirculation to the cone crusher is reduced by 1-10%, which means more efficient grinding of critical size material is taking place in the mill. All of the savings have resulted in reduction of operating cost be about $0.023-$0.048/ ton. After completing the shell lifter design, the pulp lifter design was taken up. Through a series of mill surveys and

  7. Favorable areas for prospecting adjacent to the Roberts Mountains thrust in southern Lander County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, John Harris; McKee, Edwin H.

    1968-01-01

    Recent geologic mapping by the U.S. Geological Survey of more than 2,500 square miles of a relatively little-studied part of central Nevada has outlined four areas favorable for the discovery of metallic mineral deposits. In these areas, lower Paleozoic carbonate rocks crop out below the Roberts Mountains thrust, a widespread fault in central and north-central Nevada. These areas have a stratigraphic and structural setting similar to that of the areas where large, open-pit gold deposits have been discovered recently at Carlin and Cortez in north-central Nevada.

  8. A study of the trace 39Ar content in argon from deep underground sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Guray, G.; Hohman, T.; Holtz, D.; Ianni, An.; Laubenstein, M.; Loer, B.; Love, C.; Martoff, C. J.; Montanari, D.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nelson, A.; Rountree, S. D.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Wright, A.

    2015-06-01

    The discovery of argon from deep underground sources with significantly less 39Ar than atmospheric argon was an important step in the development of direct dark matter detection experiments using argon as the active target. We report on the design and operation of a low-background single-phase liquid argon detector that was built to study the 39Ar content of this underground argon. Underground argon from the Kinder Morgan CO2 plant in Cortez, Colorado was determined to have less than 0.65% of the 39Ar activity in atmospheric argon, or 6.6 mBq/kg specific 39Ar activity.

  9. Oil exploration in Pine Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, C.H.; Chamberlain, A.K.

    1989-03-01

    Three oil fields have already been established in Pine Valley, which is located in north-central Nevada along the late Mesozoic thrust trend. The potential exists for much more future exploration because of excellent reservoir potential, favorable hydrocarbon generating system, and trapping mechanisms. The Devonian is one of the main target reservoirs of Pine Valley. Pine Valley lies near the Devonian shelf edge, and carbonate facies from that period undergo abrupt changes in the Pine Valley region. The Guilmette/Devil's Gate apparently develops into a reefal system along the Uinta-Cortez arch in this area. Fore-reef and basinal facies are found at Cortez Mountain on the west side of Pine Valley. Mississippian sandstones and Tertiary tuffs are two other reservoirs which produce oil. At Blackburn field, upper plate rocks are overmature. Produced oil has been identified as Mississippian. Regional studies show Mississippian source rocks of Pine Valley to be slightly immature to mature oil in the lower plate. Gravity of the oil is approximately 26-30/degree/ API. Oil from the Tomara Ranch and North Willow Creek fields is most probably also from the Mississippian. Its API gravity is similar to the oil produced from Blackburn field. Blackburn field is a Tertiary trap probably generated by shear faulting. Tertiary traps throughout Nevada, including Blackburn, are generally small and hydrocarbon potential is limited. Larger traps associated with the late Mesozoic compressional event have much more potential and hold hundreds of millions of barrels of oil.

  10. Ion microprobe study of Au and Carlin-type trace metals in rhyolite melt inclusions from Eocene dikes and ash-flow tuff in northern Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, K. E.; Colgan, J. P.; John, D. A.; Henry, C.; Coble, M. A.; Hervig, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Vigorous Eocene magmatism was coincident in space and time with the formation of large Carlin-type gold deposits in the Great Basin of the western U.S.A. However, it is not known if Eocene magmas were a potential source of metals for these economically valuable deposits. To investigate this possibility, we experimented with measurements of trace metals in quartz-hosted rhyolite melt inclusions from the 34 Ma Caetano caldera, source of the >1,100 km3 Caetano Tuff, and nearby 35.7 Ma rhyolite dikes temporally and spatially associated with the Cortez Hills Carlin-type gold deposit. We targeted a suite of trace elements (Au, Cu, Sb, Te, As) characteristic of Carlin-type gold deposits, using novel secondary-ion-mass-spectrometry (SIMS) techniques. Our experiments show that ppb levels of Au, and ppm to sub-ppm levels of Cu, Sb, Te and As, can be detected using a ~10 nA Cs+ primary beam focused to a ~30 μm spot size, calibrated with NIST-610-614 series glasses. Melt inclusion data obtained with a Cameca IMS 6f were compared with analyses of the same melt inclusions using a SHRIMP-RG to evaluate the reproducibility of the measurements, and the efficacy of high mass resolving power to remove isobaric interferences on the elements of interest. For Au, the higher mass resolving power of the SHRIMP-RG (~10,500 ΔM/M) was required to distinguish <10-20 ppb 'background' Au counts obtained with the 6f (~5,500 ΔM/M), possibly due to a 181Ta16O interference on 197Au from the Ta immersion lens. With the SHRIMP-RG, Au concentrations were reduced to zero in both the Caetano and Cortez melt inclusion datasets. However, we did detect numerous Cu-rich sulfide inclusions, including one with elevated Au counts in one of the Cortez melt inclusions. Given the rarity of this occurrence, it seems that Au was either very scarce in the host magma chambers, or lost to a vapor or sulfide phase prior to the time of melt inclusion entrapment. Concentrations of other Carlin-type elements (Cu, Sb

  11. Depleted Argon from Underground Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H. O.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A.; Rogers, H.; Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S.

    2011-04-27

    Argon is a strong scintillator and an ideal target for Dark Matter detection; however {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon from cosmic ray interactions limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar due to the cosmic ray shielding of the earth. In Cortez, Colorado, a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 600 ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. We first concentrate the argon locally to 3% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation, and then the N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous distillation to purify the argon. We have collected 26 kg of argon from the CO{sub 2} facility and a cryogenic distillation column is under construction at Fermilab to further purify the argon.

  12. Mercury in soil gas and air--A potential tool in mineral exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Joseph Howard; Vaughn, W.W.; Learned, R.E.; Meuschke, J.L.

    1969-01-01

    The mercury content in soil gas and in the atmosphere was measured in several mining districts to test the possibility that the mercury content in the atmosphere is higher over ore deposits than over barren ground. At Cortez, Nev., the distribution of anorhalous amounts of mercury in the air collected at ground level (soil gas) correlates well with the distribution of gold-bearing rocks that are covered by as much as 100 feet of gravel. The mercury content in the atmosphere collected at an altitude of 200 feet by an aircraft was 20 times background over a mercury posit and 10 times background over two porphyry copper deposits. Measurement of mercury in soil gas and air may prove to be a valuable exploration tool.

  13. The Model Organism Hermissenda crassicornis (Gastropoda: Heterobranchia) Is a Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Tabitha

    2016-01-01

    Hermissenda crassicornis is a model organism used in various fields of research including neurology, ecology, pharmacology, and toxicology. In order to investigate the systematics of this species and the presence of cryptic species in H. crassicornis, we conducted a comprehensive molecular and morphological analysis of this species covering its entire range across the North Pacific Ocean. We determined that H. crassicornis constitutes a species complex of three distinct species. The name Hermissensa crassicornis is retained for the northeast Pacific species, occurring from Alaska to Northern California. The name H. opalescens is reinstated for a species occurring from the Sea of Cortez to Northern California. Finally, the name H. emurai is maintained for the northwestern species, found in Japan and in the Russian Far East. These three species have consistent morphological and color pattern differences that can be used for identification in the field. PMID:27105319

  14. A multi-trial diagnostic tool in fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) skin biopsies of the Pelagos Sanctuary (Mediterranean Sea) and the Gulf of California (Mexico).

    PubMed

    Fossi, Maria Cristina; Urban, Jorge; Casini, Silvia; Maltese, Silvia; Spinsanti, Giacomo; Panti, Cristina; Porcelloni, Serena; Panigada, Simone; Lauriano, Giancarlo; Niño-Torres, Carlos; Rojas-Bracho, Lorenzo; Jimenez, Begoña; Muñoz-Arnanz, Juan; Marsili, Letizia

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to apply a set of sensitive non-lethal biomarkers in skin biopsies of fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) to evaluate the toxicological status of this mysticete in the Pelagos Sanctuary (Mediterranean Sea) and in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez-Mexico). We developed a "multi-trial diagnostic tool" (based on field and in vitro studies), combining molecular biomarkers (western blot of CYP1A1, CYP2B) and gene expression (qRT-PCR of HSP70, ERα, AHR, E2F-1) with the analysis of OCs, PAHs and PBDEs. The study revealed a higher level of toxicological stress in the Mediterranean fin whales. PMID:19913904

  15. Hearing loss: terminology and classification. Joint Committee of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the Council on Education of the Deaf.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    The following position statement and technical report were developed by the Joint Committee of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) and the Council on Education of the Deaf (CED) and approved as Association policy by the ASHA Legislative Council in November 1997 (LC 6-97). CED member organizations are reviewing the document for approval in 1998. Joint Committee members responsible for the development of this document include (from ASHA) Joan Marttila, chair 1996-97; Linda Seestedt-Stanford, chair 1994-95; Evelyn Cherow, ex official; Donald Goldberg; Dawna Lewis; Leslie Ann McMillian; Jane Seaton; Alicia Stewart; and Larry Higdon, vice president for professional practices in audiology and monitoring vice president; and (from CED) Kathee Christensen; Steve Nover; Marilyn Sass-Lehrer; and Patrick Stone. This document supersedes ASHA policy: Definitions of Communication Disorders and Variations: Hearing Disorders section. PMID:9567446

  16. Sea surface temperature - Observations from geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, J. J.; Smith, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Multispectral image data acquired from the VISSR atmospheric sounder (VAS) on the geostationary GOES satellites were used to estimate sea surface temperatures (SST). A procedure was developed to screen VAS visible and infrared data for cloud-free regions for estimation of SST from the clear infrared radiances. A data set of matches between the VAS radiances and high quality buoy estimates of SST was produced. A linear regression analysis of these matches was performed to generate an empirical algorithm relating the VAS window channel brightness temperatures to the estimates of SST recorded by NOAA fixed environment buoys. Daily maps of SST during Hurricanes Alicia (1983) and Debbie (1982) demonstrated the ability of VAS to monitor air-sea interactions at high temporal and spatial scales.

  17. Nash: genius with schizophrenia or vice versa?

    PubMed

    Funaki, Tevita

    2009-11-01

    Schizophrenia has many negative impacts on the wellbeing of individuals (sufferers). I will critically analyse Nash's experience with his illness of schizophrenia and his concept of wellness based on themes, his journey with schizophrenia and the support of this wife and friends. Ron Howard directed the movie, A Beautiful Mind based on Nash's biography about his mathematical genius and his struggle with schizophrenia. Nash only had one sister, Martha Nash who was born on November 16th, 1930. In terms of his mental health and wellness, Nash began to show signs of schizophrenia in 1958, on the threshold of his career. After 1970, by his choice, he never took antipsychotic medication again. In 1978, Nash was awarded the John von Neumann Theory Prize for his discovery of non-cooperative equilibria, now called Nash equilibria. As a result of Nash's illness, he adopted unhealthy practices that did not help him cope with schizophrenia. Recovery from mental illness has emphasised the importance of hope for the people experiencing mental illness. Nash's self-determinations enabled him to overcome the stigmatisation suffering due to schizophrenia. Nash experienced the five stages of coping with mental illness. The support of Nash's wife Alicia and the few close friends he had were paramount to his recovery and living with schizophrenia. Alicia had used cognitive coping strategies with her caring for Nash by having positive thinking in attempting to accept Nash's illness rather than denying that it existed and to understand the life experiences of a person with schizophrenia. Howard (2001) stated that it's about a 25% chance, that survivors of schizophrenia can regain clarity as Nash did within a certain time period. PMID:20443526

  18. Mineral potential modelling of gold and silver mineralization in the Nevada Great Basin - a GIS-based analysis using weights of evidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mihalasky, Mark J.

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of 2,690 gold-silver-bearing occurrences in the Nevada Great Basin was examined in terms of spatial association with various geological phenomena. Analysis of these relationships, using GIS and weights of evidence modelling techniques, has predicted areas of high mineral potential where little or no mining activity exists. Mineral potential maps for sedimentary (?disseminated?) and volcanic (?epithermal?) rock-hosted gold-silver mineralization revealed two distinct patterns that highlight two sets of crustal-scale geologic features that likely control the regional distribution of these deposit types. The weights of evidence method is a probability-based technique for mapping mineral potential using the spatial distribution of known mineral occurrences. Mineral potential maps predicting the distribution of gold-silver-bearing occurrences were generated from structural, geochemical, geomagnetic, gravimetric, lithologic, and lithotectonic-related deposit-indicator factors. The maps successfully predicted nearly 70% of the total number of known occurrences, including ~83% of sedimentary and ~60% of volcanic rock-hosted types. Sedimentary and volcanic rockhosted mineral potential maps showed high spatial correlation (an area cross-tabulation agreement of 85% and 73%, respectively) with expert-delineated mineral permissive tracts. In blind tests, the sedimentary and volcanic rock-hosted mineral potential maps predicted 10 out of 12 and 5 out of 5 occurrences, respectively. The key mineral predictor factors, in order of importance, were determined to be: geology (including lithology, structure, and lithotectonic terrane), geochemistry (indication of alteration), and geophysics. Areas of elevated sedimentary rock-hosted mineral potential are generally confined to central, north-central, and north-eastern Nevada. These areas form a conspicuous ?V?-shape pattern that is coincident with the Battle Mountain-Eureka (Cortez) and Carlin mineral trends and a

  19. An Energy-Aware Trajectory Optimization Layer for sUAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, William A.

    The focus of this work is the implementation of an energy-aware trajectory optimization algorithm that enables small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) to operate in unknown, dynamic severe weather environments. The software is designed as a component of an Energy-Aware Dynamic Data Driven Application System (EA-DDDAS) for sUAS. This work addresses the challenges of integrating and executing an online trajectory optimization algorithm during mission operations in the field. Using simplified aircraft kinematics, the energy-aware algorithm enables extraction of kinetic energy from measured winds to optimize thrust use and endurance during flight. The optimization layer, based upon a nonlinear program formulation, extracts energy by exploiting strong wind velocity gradients in the wind field, a process known as dynamic soaring. The trajectory optimization layer extends the energy-aware path planner developed by Wenceslao Shaw-Cortez te{Shaw-cortez2013} to include additional mission configurations, simulations with a 6-DOF model, and validation of the system with flight testing in June 2015 in Lubbock, Texas. The trajectory optimization layer interfaces with several components within the EA-DDDAS to provide an sUAS with optimal flight trajectories in real-time during severe weather. As a result, execution timing, data transfer, and scalability are considered in the design of the software. Severe weather also poses a measure of unpredictability to the system with respect to communication between systems and available data resources during mission operations. A heuristic mission tree with different cost functions and constraints is implemented to provide a level of adaptability to the optimization layer. Simulations and flight experiments are performed to assess the efficacy of the trajectory optimization layer. The results are used to assess the feasibility of flying dynamic soaring trajectories with existing controllers as well as to verify the interconnections between

  20. Vicariance and dispersal across Baja California in disjunct marine fish populations.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Giacomo; Findley, Lloyd; Rocha-Olivares, Axayacatl

    2003-07-01

    Population disjunctions, as a first step toward complete allopatry, present an interesting situation to study incipient speciation. The geological formation of the Baja California Peninsula currently divides 19 species of fish into disjunct populations that are found on its Pacific Coast and in the northern part of the Gulf of California (also called the Sea of Cortez), but are absent from the Cape (Cabo San Lucas) region. We studied the genetic makeup of disjunct populations for 12 of these 19 fish species. Phylogeographic patterns for the 12 species can be separated into two major classes: a first group (eight species) showed reciprocal monophyly and high genetic divergence between disjunct populations. A second group (four species) displayed what appeared to be panmictic populations. Population structure between Pacific Coast populations, across the Punta Eugenia biogeographic boundary, was also evaluated. While dispersal potential (inferred by pelagic larval duration) was a poor predictor of population structure between Gulf of California and Pacific populations, we found that population genetic subdivision along the Pacific Coast at Punta Eugenia was always positively correlated with differentiation between Pacific and Gulf of California populations. Vicariant events, ongoing gene flow, and ecological characteristics played essential roles in shaping the population structures observed in this study. PMID:12940364

  1. Depleted argon from underground sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H.O.; Alton, A.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Kendziora, C.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Pordes, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Argon is a powerful scintillator and an excellent medium for detection of ionization. Its high discrimination power against minimum ionization tracks, in favor of selection of nuclear recoils, makes it an attractive medium for direct detection of WIMP dark matter. However, cosmogenic {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. The cosmic ray shielding by the earth means that Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar. In Cortez Colorado a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 500ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. In order to produce argon for dark matter detectors we first concentrate the argon locally to 3-5% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation. The N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous cryogenic distillation in the Cryogenic Distillation Column recently built at Fermilab. In this talk we will discuss the entire extraction and purification process; with emphasis on the recent commissioning and initial performance of the cryogenic distillation column purification.

  2. The R/V EL PUMA and JUSTO SIERRA impact on the development of oceanography in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracia, A.

    2007-05-01

    The acquisition of the two research vessels (R/V EL PUMA AND R/V JUSTO SIERRA) of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México represented a milestone for the development of oceanography and capacity building in Mexico. These boats were designed to conduct multi and interdisciplinary research in the Economic Exclusive Zone of Mexico in the main areas of oceanography (Physics, Geology, Chemistry and Biology). Its use, by different institutions, resulted in a substantial advancement of the knowledge of Marine ecosystems of Mexico. About 460 oceanographic campaigns, with more than 8700 participants, have been conducted since the boats arrived. These covered a wide array of topics of the marine ecosystem from the inner shelf to deep sea. Extensive research was done on current patterns, primary productivity and pollution monitoring of the Mexican Pacific, Sea of Cortez, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean sea. Marine biodiversity studies were also carried which discovered more than 180 new species in Mexican seas. Ecological characterization and paleo-oceanographic research from continental shelf to deep sea also registered a substantial advance. The vessels are now renewed with hi-tech equipment for sea bottom, water column and navigation that increased their research capacity, representing again a new milestone in the history of oceanography in Mexico. This improved capacity is very promising and opens new and sound opportunities for carrying modern oceanographic in order to improve knowledge of the Mexican Economic Exclusive Zone.

  3. Long-Range Dispersal and High-Latitude Environments Influence the Population Structure of a “Stress-Tolerant” Dinoflagellate Endosymbiont

    PubMed Central

    Pettay, D. Tye; LaJeunesse, Todd C.

    2013-01-01

    The migration and dispersal of stress-tolerant symbiotic dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium) may influence the response of symbiotic reef-building corals to a warming climate. We analyzed the genetic structure of the stress-tolerant endosymbiont, Symbiodinium glynni nomen nudum (ITS2 - D1), obtained from Pocillopora colonies that dominate eastern Pacific coral communities. Eleven microsatellite loci identified genotypically diverse populations with minimal genetic subdivision throughout the Eastern Tropical Pacific, encompassing 1000’s of square kilometers from mainland Mexico to the Galapagos Islands. The lack of population differentiation over these distances corresponds with extensive regional host connectivity and indicates that Pocillopora larvae, which maternally inherit their symbionts, aid in the dispersal of this symbiont. In contrast to its host, however, subtropical populations of S. glynni in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) were strongly differentiated from populations in tropical eastern Pacific. Selection pressures related to large seasonal fluctuations in temperature and irradiance likely explain this abrupt genetic discontinuity. We infer that S. glynni genotypes harbored by host larvae arriving from more southern locations are rapidly replaced by genotypes adapted to more temperate environments. The strong population structure of S. glynni corresponds with fluctuating environmental conditions and suggests that these genetically diverse populations have the potential to evolve rapidly to changing environments and reveals the importance of environmental extremes in driving microbial eukaryote (e.g., plankton) speciation in marine ecosystems. PMID:24223906

  4. The Cuenca de Oro, a Pull-Apart Basin Hosting Precious Metal Deposits Along the Re- Activated Seri-Tahue Terrane Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinstein, M. N.; Goodell, P. C.

    2007-05-01

    At the intersection of Chihuahua, Sonora, and Sinaloa a boundary between the Seri and Tahue terranes has been hypothesized, and further refined as the Sinforosa Lineament. Near the western termination of the Sinforosa Lineament lies a topographic basin. Part of this study will be to better define this pull-apart basin, informally named the Cuenca de Oro due to its numerous precious metal deposits. The intention of this study is to test that the Seri-Tahue terrane boundary was re-energized during the beginning of extension related to the opening of the Sea of Cortez (~30ma). It is probable that the precious metal occurrences are related to the initiation of extension(alunite at El Sauzal has been dated at ~30ma). Five field excursions totaling sixty days of field work have been completed and a first draft of a regional geologic map has been made. Large shear zones support the hypothesis of a pull-apart basin. A study of the alteration and lineament intersections determine the location of many known precious metal deposits. By creating multiple cross-sections the basin can be modeled in three dimensions and a tectonic history can be interpreted. This study will present a structural analysis of the Cuenca de Oro and develop a tectonic history related temporally with the epithermal mineralization events.

  5. Cactodera salina n. sp. from the Estuary Plant, Salicornia bigelovii, in Sonora, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, J. G.; Mundo-Ocampo, M.; McClure, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    Cactodera salina n. sp. (Heteroderinae) is described from roots of the estuary plant Salicornia bigelovii (Chenopodiaceae), in Puerto Pefiasco, Sonora, Mexico, at the northern tip of the Sea of Cortez. The halophyte host is grown experimentally for oilseed in plots flooded daily with seawater. Infected plants appear to be adversely affected by C. salina relative to plants in noninfested plots. Cactodera salina extends the morphological limits of the genus. Females and cysts have a very small or absent terminal cone and deep cuticular folds in a zigzag pattern more typical of Heterodera and Globodera than of Cactodera spp. Many Cactodera spp. have a tuberculate egg surface, whereas C. salina shares the character of a smooth egg with C. amaranthi, C. weissi, and C. acnidae. Only C. milleri and C. acnidae have larger cysts than C. salina. Face patterns of males and second-stage juveniles, as viewed with scanning electron microscopy, reveal the full complement of six lip sectors as in other Cactodera spp. Circumfenestrae of C. salina are typical for the genus. PMID:19274182

  6. Evolution of basin and range structure in the Ruby Mountains and vicinity, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, D. D.; Reese, N. M.; Kelley, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    Results from various age dating techniques, seismic reflection profiling hydrocarbon maturation studies, and structural analysis were used to evaluate the Cenozoic deformation in the Ruby Mountains and adjoining ranges (pinyon Range and Cortez Range) in Elko and Eureka Counties, Nevada. Age dating techniques used include potassium-argon ages of biotites from granites published by Kistler et al. (1981) and fission track ages from apatite and zircon. Fission track ages from apatite reflect a closing temperature of 100 plus or minus 20 deg C. Zircon fission track ages reflect a closing temperature of 175 plus or minus 25 deg C and potassium-argon ages from brotite reflect a closing temperature of 250 plus or minus 30 deg C. Thus these results allow a reasonably precise tracking of the evolution of the ranges during the Cenozoic. Seismic reflection data are available from Huntington Valley. Access to seismic reflection data directly to the west of the Harrison Pass Pluton in the central Ruby Mountains was obtained. In addition results are available from several deep exploration holes in Huntington Valley.

  7. Respiratory disease in cork workers (`suberosis') 1

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, J. Cortez; Avila, Ramiro

    1973-01-01

    Pimentel, J. Cortez, and Avila, Ramiro (1973).Thorax, 28, 409-423. Respiratory disease in cork workers (`suberosis'). A clinical, immunological, and histological study of 63 workers in the cork industry with bronchopulmonary manifestations is described. From this study, it was possible to recognize three types of reaction to the inhalation of cork dust: asthma-like syndromes, extrinsic allergic alveolitis, and chronic bronchitis with bronchiectasis. The place of histological (lung biopsy and scalene node biopsy) and immunological methods in the diagnosis of these different forms of the disease is evaluated. The high incidence of precipitins to Penicillium frequentans is stressed because the antigens produced by this fungus seem to be more pathogenic than those produced by the mouldy cork itself. The histological studies have demonstrated extrapulmonary foci of disease and have also revealed for the first time, abnormalities in the lungs of symptomless subjects. Pathological changes present in the lungs of patients with the chronic form of extrinsic allergic alveolitis, long after removal from exposure to cork dust, are also described. The experimental material of Horta and Cancella (1956) is reviewed in the light of present knowledge, and the similarity between the lesions produced in animals and those found in cork workers is noted. Finally, especial importance is attached to the finding of cork dust within the lesions, the technique for its identification and staining being described. Images PMID:4200382

  8. Soil Characterization and Site Response of Marine and Continental Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras-Porras, R. S.; Huerta-Lopez, C. I.; Martinez-Cruzado, J. A.; Gaherty, J. B.; Collins, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    An in situ soil properties study was conducted to characterize both site and shallow layer sediments under marine and continental environments. Data from the SCoOBA (Sea of Cortez Ocean Bottom Array) seismic experiment and in land ambient vibration measurements on the urban areas of Tijuana, B. C., and Ensenada, B. C., Mexico were used in the analysis. The goal of this investigation is to identify and to analyze the effect of the physical/geotechnical properties of the ground on the site response upon seismic excitations in both marine and continental environments. The time series were earthquakes and background noise recorded within interval of 10/2005 to 10/2006 in the Gulf of California (GoC) with very-broadband Ocean Bottom Seismographs (OBS), and ambient vibration measurements collected during different time periods on Tijuana and Ensenada urban areas. The data processing and analysis was conducted by means of the H/V Spectral Ratios (HVSPR) of multi component data, the Random Decrement Method (RDM), and Blind Deconvolution (BD). This study presents ongoing results of a long term project to characterize the local site response of soil layers upon dynamic excitations using digital signal processing algorithms on time series, as well as the comparison between the results these methodologies are providing.

  9. Contrasting population genetic patterns and evolutionary histories among sympatric Sonoran Desert cactophilic Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, L A; Erez, T; Castrezana, S; Markow, T A

    2004-06-01

    We studied population genetic differentiation in the sympatric Sonoran Desert cactophilic flies Drosophila pachea, D. mettleri and D. nigrospiracula across their continental and peninsular ranges. These flies show marked differences in ecology and behaviour including dispersal distances and host cactus specialization. Examination of a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene (mtCOI) reveals that the Sea of Cortez has constituted an effective dispersal barrier for D. pachea, leading to significant genetic differentiation between the continental and peninsular ranges of this species. No genetic differentiation was detected, however, within its continental and peninsular ranges. In contrast, our mtCOI-based results for D. mettleri and D. nigrospiracula are consistent with a previous allozyme-based study that showed no significant genetic differentiation between continental and peninsular ranges of these two species. For D. mettleri, we also found that the insular population from Santa Catalina Island, California, is genetically differentiated with respect to continental and peninsular localities. We discuss how differences in the genetic structure patterns of D. pachea, D. mettleri and D. nigrospiracula may correspond to differences in their dispersal abilities, host preferences and behaviour. PMID:15140083

  10. Phylogeography of the California sheephead, Semicossyphus pulcher: the role of deep reefs as stepping stones and pathways to antitropicality

    PubMed Central

    Poortvliet, Marloes; Longo, Gary C; Selkoe, Kimberly; Barber, Paul H; White, Crow; Caselle, Jennifer E; Perez-Matus, Alejandro; Gaines, Steven D; Bernardi, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, the study of dispersal of marine organisms has shifted from focusing predominantly on the larval stage to a recent interest in adult movement. Antitropical distributions provide a unique system to assess vagility and dispersal. In this study, we have focused on an antitropical wrasse genus, Semicossyphus, which includes the California sheephead, S. pulcher, and Darwin's sheephead, S. darwini. Using a phylogenetic approach based on mitochondrial and nuclear markers, and a population genetic approach based on mitochondrial control region sequences and 10 microsatellite loci, we compared the phylogenetic relationships of these two species, as well as the population genetic characteristics within S. pulcher. While S. pulcher and S. darwini are found in the temperate eastern Pacific regions of the northern and southern hemispheres, respectively, their genetic divergence was very small (estimated to have occurred between 200 and 600 kya). Within S. pulcher, genetic structuring was generally weak, especially along mainland California, but showed weak differentiation between Sea of Cortez and California, and between mainland California and Channel Islands. We highlight the congruence of weak genetic differentiation both within and between species and discuss possible causes for maintenance of high gene flow. In particular, we argue that deep and cooler water refugia are used as stepping stones to connect distant populations, resulting in low levels of genetic differentiation. PMID:24340195

  11. Multiplexed pyrosequencing of nine sea anemone (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Hexacorallia: Actiniaria) mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Foox, Jonathan; Brugler, Mercer; Siddall, Mark Edward; Rodríguez, Estefanía

    2016-07-01

    Six complete and three partial actiniarian mitochondrial genomes were amplified in two semi-circles using long-range PCR and pyrosequenced in a single run on a 454 GS Junior, doubling the number of complete mitogenomes available within the order. Typical metazoan mtDNA features included circularity, 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and length ranging from 17,498 to 19,727 bp. Several typical anthozoan mitochondrial genome features were also observed including the presence of only two transfer RNA genes, elevated A + T richness ranging from 54.9 to 62.4%, large intergenic regions, and group 1 introns interrupting NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, the latter of which possesses a homing endonuclease gene. Within the sea anemone Alicia sansibarensis, we report the first mitochondrial gene order rearrangement within the Actiniaria, as well as putative novel non-canonical protein-coding genes. Phylogenetic analyses of all 13 protein-coding and 2 ribosomal genes largely corroborated current hypotheses of sea anemone interrelatedness, with a few lower-level differences. PMID:26104159

  12. Flavonoids as chemotaxonomic markers in the genus Drosera.

    PubMed

    Braunberger, Christina; Zehl, Martin; Conrad, Jürgen; Wawrosch, Christoph; Strohbach, Jaqueline; Beifuss, Uwe; Krenn, Liselotte

    2015-10-01

    The botanical classification of the huge genus Drosera remains controversial since long. In the present study, the pattern of major phenolic compounds in ten Drosera species belonging to seven different subgenera and/or sections of the genus was investigated for chemotaxonomic allocation. The composition of flavonoids and ellagic acid derivatives in Drosera adelae, Drosera burmannii, Drosera dielsiana, Drosera hilaris, Drosera montana, Drosera petiolaris, and Drosera pygmaea was elucidated for the first time. The scarce data on these compounds in Drosera binata, Drosera aliciae, and Drosera spatulata were complemented significantly. Detailed LC-DAD-MS, LC-NMR, and offline 1D and 2D NMR analyses resulted in the unambiguous identification of around 40 different substances, three of them (8-hydroxy-luteolin-8-O-arabinopyranoside, tricetin-7-O-xylopyranoside and 8-hydroxytricetin-8-O-arabinopyranoside) being natural products described for the first time. The distribution of the compounds characterized underlines their potential to serve as chemotaxonomic markers in this genus. PMID:26342620

  13. Chemical-abrasion SIMS dating of zircon from the Eocene Caetano caldera, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, J.; Watts, K. E.; John, D. A.; Henry, C. D.; Coble, M. A.; Vazquez, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Eocene Caetano caldera in northern Nevada formed during eruption of ~1100 km3 of crystal-rich rhyolite. Miocene extension cut the caldera into a set of fault blocks that expose minor pre-caldera volcanic rocks, two units of intracaldera Caetano Tuff up to 4 km thick, ash-flow tuff feeder dikes and ring-fracture intrusions, caldera collapse breccias, and post-collapse resurgent intrusions. Single-crystal 40Ar/39Ar sanidine dates on all parts of the caldera system overlap, yielding a 34.01 ± 0.05 Ma (n=17, Fish Canyon sanidine = 28.201 Ma) age for the eruption. 40Ar/39Ar dating also documents several preceding episodes of magmatism: 35.69 ± 0.06 Ma (sanidine, n =13) rhyolite dikes in the nearby Cortez gold district, 35.21 ± 0.18 Ma (plagioclase, n=1) andesite lava underlying Caetano Tuff, and a 38.90 ± 0.11 Ma (biotite, n=1), dacite dike in the northeastern caldera wall. Extensive U-Pb SHRIMP dating of zircon from both the Cortez dikes and all phases of the Caetano system suggests continuous magmatism from 40-34 Ma. However, all samples contain at least some—sometimes many—zircons with U-Pb ages younger than the 34.0 Ma argon age. To determine if anomalously young zircon ages are due to Pb-loss, we analyzed representative samples of the upper Caetano Tuff and the Redrock Canyon resurgent pluton with and without chemical abrasion to mitigate Pb-loss. Bulk zircon separates were annealed at 850°C for 48 hours, then chemically abraded with 10:1 HF/HNO3 vapor in a Parr bomb at 225°C for 8 hours, based on protocols outlined by Mattinson (2005). Both treated and untreated zircons from the same sample were mounted in epoxy and polished to their midsections, then imaged on the SEM using BSE and CL. The SHRIMP-RG at Stanford University was used to determine U-Pb ages and trace element concentrations in single spots for ~25 to 30 individual zircons per sample, using a round-robin procedure and two zircon age standards (R33 and 080) to monitor external precision

  14. Evidence for large-magnitude, post-Eocene extension in the northern Shoshone Range, Nevada, and its implications for Carlin-type gold deposits in the lower plate of the Roberts Mountains allochthon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colgan, Joseph P.; Henry, Christopher D.; John, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The northern Shoshone and Toiyabe Ranges in north-central Nevada expose numerous areas of mineralized Paleozoic rock, including major Carlin-type gold deposits at Pipeline and Cortez. Paleozoic rocks in these areas were previously interpreted to have undergone negligible postmineralization extension and tilting, but here we present new data that suggest major post-Eocene extension along west-dipping normal faults. Tertiary rocks in the northern Shoshone Range crop out in two W-NW–trending belts that locally overlie and intrude highly deformed Lower Paleozoic rocks of the Roberts Mountains allochthon. Tertiary exposures in the more extensive, northern belt were interpreted as subvertical breccia pipes (intrusions), but new field data indicate that these “pipes” consist of a 35.8 Ma densely welded dacitic ash flow tuff (informally named the tuff of Mount Lewis) interbedded with sandstones and coarse volcaniclastic deposits. Both tuff and sedimentary rocks strike N-S and dip 30° to 70° E; the steeply dipping compaction foliation in the tuffs was interpreted as subvertical flow foliation in breccia pipes. The southern belt along Mill Creek, previously mapped as undivided welded tuff, includes the tuff of Cove mine (34.4 Ma) and unit B of the Bates Mountain Tuff (30.6 Ma). These tuffs dip 30° to 50° east, suggesting that their west-dipping contacts with underlying Paleozoic rocks (previously mapped as depositional) are normal faults. Tertiary rocks in both belts were deposited on Paleozoic basement and none appear to be breccia pipes. We infer that their present east tilt is due to extension on west-dipping normal faults. Some of these faults may be the northern strands of middle Miocene (ca. 16 Ma) faults that cut and tilted the 34.0 Ma Caetano caldera ~40° east in the central Shoshone Range (

  15. Comparison of the native antimony-bearing Paiting gold deposit, Guizhou Province, China, with Carlin-type gold deposits, Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhuo-Jun; Xia, Yong; Cline, Jean S.; Yan, Bao-Wen; Wang, Ze-Peng; Tan, Qin-Ping; Wei, Dong-Tian

    2016-03-01

    The Paiting gold deposit, Guizhou Province, China, has been regarded as a Carlin-type gold deposit by several researchers. Alteration and ore-related minerals from the Paiting deposit were examined, and results were compared with the Cortez Hills Carlin-type gold deposit, Nevada, USA. Similarities include the structural and stratigraphic controls on the orebodies in both deposits and the occurrence of invisible gold ionically bound in arsenian pyrite. Significant differences include the following: (1) The gold-bearing mineral in Nevada is arsenian pyrite. However, gold-bearing minerals in the Paiting deposit include arsenopyrite, arsenian pyrite, and trace pyrrhotite. Also, euhedral or subhedral gold-bearing arsenian pyrite at Paiting contains significantly less As, Cu, and Hg than gold-bearing pyrite from Nevada. (2) Alteration in the Paiting deposit displays significantly less decarbonatization. Instead, dolomite precipitation, which has not been described in Nevada deposits, is associated with deposition of gold-bearing sulfide minerals. (3) Stibnite and minor native antimony typify Paiting late-ore-stage minerals, whereas in Nevada, realgar, orpiment, and calcite are common late-ore-stage minerals. Precipitation of native antimony in the Paiting deposit reflects the evolution of a late-ore fluid with unusually low sulfur and oxygen fugacities. Some characteristics of the Paiting gold deposit, including formation of ore-stage dolomite and precipitation from CO2-rich ore fluids at temperatures in excess of 250 °C, are more typical of orogenic deposits than Nevada Carlin deposits. The presence of similarities in the Paiting deposit to both Carlin type and orogenic deposits is consistent with formation conditions intermediate to those typical of Carlin type and orogenic systems.

  16. Neodymium isotopic study of rare earth element sources and mobility in hydrothermal Fe oxide (Fe-P-REE) systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, J.D.; Marikos, M.A.; Barton, M.D.; Johnson, D.A.

    2000-03-01

    Rare earth element (REE)-enriched, igneous-related hydrothermal Fe-oxide hosted (Fe-P-REE) systems from four areas in North America have been analyzed for their neodymium iosotopic composition to constrain REE sources and mobility in these systems. The Nd isotopic results evidence a common pattern of REE concentration from igneous sources despite large differences in age (Proterozoic to Tertiary), tectonic setting (subduction vs. intraplate), and magmatic style (mafic vs. felsic). In the Middle Proterozoic St. Francois Mountains terrane of southeastern Missouri, {epsilon}{sub Nd} for Fe-P-REE (apatite, monazite, xenotime) deposits ranges from +3.5 to +5.1, similar to associated felsic to intermediate igneous rocks of the same age ({epsilon}{sub Nd} = +2.6 to +6.2). At the mid-Jurassic Humboldt mafic complex in western Nevada, {epsilon}{sub Nd} for Fe-P-REE (apatite) mineralization varies between +1.1 and +2.4, similar to associated mafic igneous rocks ({minus}1.0 to +3.5). In the nearby Cortez Mountains in central Nevada, mid-Jurassic felsic volcanic and plutonic rocks ({epsilon}{sub Nd} = {minus}2.0 to {minus}4.4) are associated with Fe-P-REE (apatite-monazite) mineralization having similar {epsilon}{sub Nd}({minus}1.7 to {minus}2.4). At Cerro de Mercado, Durango, Mexico, all assemblages analyzed in this Tertiary rhyolite-hosted Fe oxide deposit have identical isotopic compositions with {epsilon}{sub Nd} = {minus}2.5. These data are consistent with coeval igneous host rocks being the primary source of REE in all four regions, and are inconsistent with a significant contribution of REE from other sources. Interpretations of the origin of these hydrothermal systems and their concomitant REE mobility must account for nonspecialized igneous sources and varied tectonic settings.

  17. Geologic map of the Caetano caldera, Lander and Eureka counties, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colgan, Joseph P.; Henry, Christopher D.; John, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The Eocene (34 Ma) Caetano caldera in north-central Nevada offers an exceptional opportunity to study the physical and petrogenetic evolution of a large (20 km by 10–18 km pre-extensional dimensions) silicic magma chamber, from precursor magmatism to caldera collapse and intrusion of resurgent plutons. Caldera-related rocks shown on this map include two units of crystal-rich intracaldera tuff totaling over 4 km thickness, caldera collapse breccias, tuff dikes that fed the eruption, hydrothermally altered post-eruption rocks, and two generations of resurgent granitic intrusions (John et al., 2008). The map also depicts middle Miocene (about 16–12 Ma) normal faults and synextensional basins that accommodated >100 percent extension and tilted the caldera into a series of ~40° east-dipping blocks, producing exceptional 3-D exposures of the caldera interior (Colgan et al., 2008). This 1:75,000-scale map is a compilation of published maps and extensive new mapping by the authors (fig. 1), and supersedes a preliminary 1:100,000-scale map published by Colgan et al. (2008) and John et al. (2008). New mapping focused on the margins of the Caetano caldera, the distribution and lithology of rocks within the caldera, and on the Miocene normal faults and sedimentary basins that record Neogene extensional faulting. The definition of geologic units and their distribution within the caldera is based entirely on new mapping, except in the northern Toiyabe Range, where mapping by Gilluly and Gates (1965) was modified with new field observations. The distribution of pre-Cenozoic rocks outside the caldera was largely compiled from existing sources with minor modifications, with the exception of the northeastern caldera margin (west of the Cortez Hills Mine), which was remapped in the course of this work and published as a stand-alone 1:6000-scale map (Moore and Henry, 2010).

  18. Global assessment of cadmium concentrations in the skin of free-ranging sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus).

    PubMed

    Savery, Laura C; Chen, Tânia Li; Wise, James T F; Wise, Sandra S; Gianios, Christy; Buonagurio, John; Perkins, Christopher; Falank, Carolyne; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zhu, Cairong; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium is a non-essential, toxic metal found accumulated in the organs of stranded cetaceans. Currently, there is no baseline cadmium concentration reported in a free-ranging, pelagic cetacean. The aim was to determine cadmium concentrations in the skin of free-ranging sperm whales (n=340) collected from 16 regions around the world during the voyage of the Odyssey (2000-2005) considering region, gender, and age in males. Cadmium was detected in 81% of skin biopsies with a mean of 0.3±0.04μg/g ww (0.02 to 12.4μg/g ww). These concentrations were higher than reported in literature in toothed whale skin (0.002-0.1μg/g ww). Concentrations by region were significantly different (p<0.0001) with the highest mean in Maldives and the Sea of Cortez (0.8 and 0.6μg/g ww, respectively). There was no significant difference in cadmium concentration by gender (p=0.42). Cadmium is known to have a long biological half-life, and cadmium concentrations in males were significantly higher in adults with a mean of 0.3μg/g ww compared to subadults with 0.2μg/g ww (p=0.03). Selenium, an element that binds to cadmium inhibiting its toxicity, had a moderately positive correlation with cadmium (r=0.41). Mercury, a toxic metal that positively correlates with cadmium in cetacean tissue, had a weakly positive relationship (r=0.20). The regional baselines reported in this study may be used to develop residue criteria for prediction of toxicological risk in sperm whale skin. Additionally, this study shows the extent of cadmium exposure in a pelagic cetacean that has global distribution. PMID:26456815

  19. Phylogeography of Ophioblennius: the role of ocean currents and geography in reef fish evolution.

    PubMed

    Muss, A; Robertson, D R; Stepien, C A; Wirtz, P; Bowen, B W

    2001-03-01

    Many tropical reef fishes are divided into Atlantic and East Pacific taxa, placing similar species in two very different biogeographic regimes. The tropical Atlantic is a closed ocean basin with relatively stable currents, whereas the East Pacific is an open basin with unstable oceanic circulation. To assess how evolutionary processes are influenced by these differences in oceanography and geography, we analyze a 630-bp region of mitochondrial cytochrome b from 171 individuals in the blenniid genus Ophioblennius. Our results demonstrate deep genetic structuring in the Atlantic species, O. atlanticus, corresponding to recognized biogeographic provinces, with divergences of d = 5.2-12.7% among the Caribbean, Brazilian, St. Helena/Ascension Island, Gulf of Guinea, and Azores/Cape Verde regions. The Atlantic phylogeny is consistent with Pliocene dispersal from the western to eastern Atlantic, and the depth of these separations (along with prior morphological comparisons) may indicate previously unrecognized species. The eastern Pacific species, O. steindachneri, is characterized by markedly less structure than O. atlanticus, with shallow mitochondrial DNA lineages (dmax = 2.7%) and haplotype frequency shifts between locations in the Sea of Cortez, Pacific Panama, Clipperton Island, and the Galapagos Islands. No concordance between genetic structure and biogeographic provinces was found for O. steincdachneri. We attribute the phylogeographic pattern in O. atlanticus to dispersal during the reorganization of Atlantic circulation patterns that accompanied the shoaling of the Isthmus of Panama. The low degree of structure in the eastern Pacific is probably due to unstable circulation and linkage to the larger Pacific Ocean basin. The contrast in genetic signatures between Atlantic and eastern Pacific blennies demonstrates how differences in geology and oceanography have influenced evolutionary radiations within each region. PMID:11327163

  20. Information theory applied to econophysics: stock market behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eugenio E.; Saravia, Gonzalo

    2014-08-01

    The use of data compressor techniques has allowed to recognize magnetic transitions and their associated critical temperatures [E.E. Vogel, G. Saravia, V. Cortez, Physica A 391, 1591 (2012)]. In the present paper we introduce some new concepts associated to data recognition and extend the use of these techniques to econophysics to explore the variations of stock market indicators showing that information theory can help to recognize different regimes. Modifications and further developments to previously introduced data compressor wlzip are introduced yielding two measurements. Additionally, we introduce an algorithm that allows to tune the number of significant digits over which the data compression is due to act complementing, this with an appropriate method to round off the truncation. The application is done to IPSA, the main indicator of the Chilean Stock Market during the year 2010 due to availability of quality data and also to consider a rare effect: the earthquake of the 27th of February on that year which is as of now the sixth strongest earthquake ever recorded by instruments (8.8 Richter scale) according to United States Geological Survey. Along the year 2010 different regimes are recognized. Calm days show larger compression than agitated days allowing for classification and recognition. Then the focus turns onto selected days showing that it is possible to recognize different regimes with the data of the last hour (60 entries) allowing to determine actions in a safer way. The "day of the week" effect is weakly present but "the hour of the day" effect is clearly present; its causes and implications are discussed. This effect also establishes the influence of Asian, European and American stock markets over the smaller Chilean Stock Market. Then dynamical studies are conducted intended to search a system that can help to realize in real time about sudden variations of the market; it is found that information theory can be really helpful in this respect.

  1. Neodymium isotopic study of rare earth element sources and mobility in hydrothermal Fe-oxide (Fe-P-REE) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, James D.; Marikos, Mark A.; Barton, Mark D.; Johnson, David A.

    2000-03-01

    Rare earth element (REE)-enriched, igneous-related hydrothermal Fe-oxide hosted (Fe-P-REE) systems from four areas in North America have been analyzed for their neodymium isotopic composition to constrain REE sources and mobility in these systems. The Nd isotopic results evidence a common pattern of REE concentration from igneous sources despite large differences in age (Proterozoic to Tertiary), tectonic setting (subduction vs. intraplate), and magmatic style (mafic vs. felsic). In the Middle Proterozoic St. Francois Mountains terrane of southeastern Missouri, ɛ Nd for Fe-P-REE (apatite, monazite, xenotime) deposits ranges from +3.5 to +5.1, similar to associated felsic to intermediate igneous rocks of the same age (ɛ Nd = +2.6 to +6.2). At the mid-Jurassic Humboldt mafic complex in western Nevada, ɛ Nd for Fe-P-REE (apatite) mineralization varies between +1.1 and +2.4, similar to associated mafic igneous rocks (-1.0 to +3.5). In the nearby Cortez Mountains in central Nevada, mid-Jurassic felsic volcanic and plutonic rocks (ɛ Nd = -2.0 to -4.4) are associated with Fe-P-REE (apatite-monazite) mineralization having similar ɛ Nd (-1.7 to -2.4). At Cerro de Mercado, Durango, Mexico, all assemblages analyzed in this Tertiary rhyolite-hosted Fe oxide deposit have identical isotopic compositions with ɛ Nd = -2.5. These data are consistent with coeval igneous host rocks being the primary source of REE in all four regions, and are inconsistent with a significant contribution of REE from other sources. Interpretations of the origin of these hydrothermal systems and their concomitant REE mobility must account for nonspecialized igneous sources and varied tectonic settings.

  2. Tectonostratigraphic Terranes of the Circum-Pacific Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Voo, Rob

    Have you always wondered where the Tujunga, Baldy, and Cortez terranes might be located today, let alone during the Cretaceous or early Tertiary? This book may provide the answer, because in a little less than 600 pages for $32, which includes a marvelously produced color map of the entire Circum-Pacific region, one can read almost everything one wants to know about Earth's “ring of fire” and its displaced or suspect terranes. The printing, proofreading, illustrations, and references are all of the highest caliber, and the book is handsomely produced indeed. In page-by-page reading, I found maybe five typographical errors, but I will spare you the details.The contents of the book are divided into five parts, comprising principles or applications of terrane analysis and four unequally long parts on the four quadrants of the Pacific coasts. The northeast quadrant includes Alaska, the Canadian Cordillera, the U.S. coastal and Rocky Mountain belts, and Mexico; the northwest includes Kamchatka, northeast Asia, China, Japan, Taiwan, and the Philippines; the southwest section has articles on Australia, Malaya, Indonesia, New Zealand, and Antarctica; and the southeast comprises the Andes from Colombia to southern Chile. The book offers introductory text for beginning students of terrane analysis, as well as plenty of useful details and data for the expert who needs a handy reference volume. Subject matter or emphasis ranges from hydrocarbon generation in marginal basins, biogeography, paleomagnetism, geochronology, and structural and metamorphic aspects to stratigraphy and shows how the entire discipline of geological sciences is contributing to terrane analysis. There is literally something here for everyone in solid Earth science.

  3. UCP1 is an essential mediator of the effects of methionine restriction on energy balance but not insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wanders, Desiree; Burk, David H.; Cortez, Cory C.; Van, Nancy T.; Stone, Kirsten P.; Baker, Mollye; Mendoza, Tamra; Mynatt, Randall L.; Gettys, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary methionine restriction (MR) by 80% increases energy expenditure (EE), reduces adiposity, and improves insulin sensitivity. We propose that the MR-induced increase in EE limits fat deposition by increasing sympathetic nervous system–dependent remodeling of white adipose tissue and increasing uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) expression in both white and brown adipose tissue. In independent assessments of the role of UCP1 as a mediator of MR’s effects on EE and insulin sensitivity, EE did not differ between wild-type (WT) and Ucp1−/− mice on the control diet, but MR increased EE by 31% and reduced adiposity by 25% in WT mice. In contrast, MR failed to increase EE or reduce adiposity in Ucp1−/− mice. However, MR was able to increase overall insulin sensitivity by 2.2-fold in both genotypes. Housing temperatures used to minimize (28°C) or increase (23°C) sympathetic nervous system activity revealed temperature-independent effects of the diet on EE. Metabolomics analysis showed that genotypic and dietary effects on white adipose tissue remodeling resulted in profound increases in fatty acid metabolism within this tissue. These findings establish that UCP1 is required for the MR-induced increase in EE but not insulin sensitivity and suggest that diet-induced improvements in insulin sensitivity are not strictly derived from dietary effects on energy balance.—Wanders, D., Burk, D. H., Cortez, C. C., Van, N. T., Stone, K. P., Baker, M., Mendoza, T., Mynatt, R. L., Gettys, T. W. UCP1 is an essential mediator of the effects of methionine restriction on energy balance but not insulin sensitivity. PMID:25742717

  4. Ground-water potentialities in the Crescent Valley, Eureka and Lander Counties, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zones, Christie Paul

    1961-01-01

    The Crescent Valley is an intermontane basin in Eureka and Lander Counties, just south of the Humboldt River in north-central Nevada. The valley floor, with an area of about 150 square miles, has a shape that more nearly resembles a Y than a crescent, although the valley apparently was named after the arc described by its southern part and northeastern arm. The northwestern arm of the Y extends northward to the small railroad town of Beowawe on the Humboldt River; the northeastern arm lies east of the low Dry Hills. The leg of the Y extends southwestward toward a narrow gap which separates the Crescent Valley from the Carico Lake Valley. The total drainage area of the Crescent Valley-about 700 square miles--includes also the slopes of the bordering mountain ranges: the Shoshone Range to the west, the Cortez Mountains to the east, and the Toiyabe Range to the south. The early history of the Crescent Valley was dominated by mining of silver and gold, centered at Lander in the Shoshone Range and at Cortez and Mill Canyon in the Cortez Mountains, but in recent years the only major mining activity has been at Gold Acres; there open-pit mining of low-grade gold ore has supported a community of about 200. For many years the only agricultural enterprises in the valley were two cattle ranches, but recently addition lands have been developed for the raising of crops in the west-central part of the valley. The average annual precipitation upon the floor of the Crescent Valley is probably less than 7 inches, of which only a little more than 1 inch formally falls during the growing season (from June through September). This is far less than the requirement of any plants of economic value, and irrigation is essential to agricultural development. Small perennial streams rising in the mountains have long been utilized for domestic supply, mining and milling activities of the past, and irrigation, and recently some large wells have been developed for irrigation. In 1956 the total

  5. Insights on the 1990 Bohol Tsunamigenic Earthquake, Bohol Island, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besana, G. M.; Daligdig, J. A.; Abigania, M. T.; Talisic, J. E.; Evangelista, N.

    2004-12-01

    The February 8, 1990 earthquake at Bohol area is one of the few strong earthquakes that have affected central Philippines since the early 1900's. This M6.0 1990 Bohol event nonetheless wrought havoc to at least 16 municipalities, caused numerous casualties, injured about three hundred people, rendered several thousand homeless and evacuated from the coastal areas, and damaged at least P154 million worth of properties. The epicenter of this earthquake was initially placed onshore at 17km east of Tagbilaran City and was attributed to the movement along the Alicia Thrust Fault- a fault trending northeast-southwest. Noticeably, there was no surface rupture and the succeeding aftershocks clustered along a northeast-southwest trend off the eastern shore of Bohol island. In addition, the southeastern part of Bohol island experienced tsunami inundation particularly the municipalities of Jagna, Duero, Guindulman, Garcia Hernandez, and Valencia. In this study, several issues were resolved regarding this seismic event. First, the 1990 Bohol earthquake was generated along an offshore thrust fault based on the reviews of seismicity data from the NEIC. -Post-determined plots of the mainshock and aftershocks indicate offshore event with focal mechanism solutions that imply thrust fault activity. Intensity data likewise indicates that intense ground shaking was mainly felt in the southeastern part of the island. Second, recent field investigations undertaken clearly indicated a widespread tsunami inundation wherein the southeastern shorelines of Bohol likewise experienced a regional retreat in sea level several minutes after the strong ground shaking. Lastly, such tsunamigenic structure could somehow explain the anomalously large waves that impacted Camiguin island, an island more than 50km southeast of Bohol. A reconstruction of true tsunami heights and runup distances was also undertaken based from eyewitness accounts. Future works would involve relocation of aftershocks and

  6. Observations on the 2016 World Congress on Continuing Professional Development: Advancing Learning and Care in the Health Professions.

    PubMed

    Turco, Mary G; Baron, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 World Congress on Continuing Professional Development: Advancing Learning and Care in the Health Professions took place in San Diego, California, March 17-19, 2016. Hosts were the Association for Hospital Medical Education (AHME), Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professionals (ACEhp), and Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education (SACME). The target audience was the international community working to improve medical (CME), nursing (CNE), pharmacy (CPE), and interprofessional (CIPE) continuing education (CE) and continuing professional development (CPD). Goals included: addressing patients' concerns and needs; advancing global medical and interprofessional health sciences education; utilizing learning to address health disparities; and promoting international cooperation. The five keynote speakers were: patient advocate Alicia Cole ("Why What We Do Matters: The Patients Voice"); linguist Lorelei Lingard ("Myths about Healthcare Teamwork and Their Implications for How We Understand Competence"); futurist and philosopher Alex Jadad ("What Do We Need to Protect at All Costs in the 21st Century?"); ethicist and change agent Zeke Emanuel ("Learn to Change: Teaching Toward a Shifting Healthcare Horizon"); and technology innovator Stephen Downes ("From Individual to Community: The Learning Is in the Doing"). Organizers announced the new Dave Davis Distinguished Award for Excellence in Mentorship in Continuing Professional Development to honor the career of David Davis, MD, in CME/CPD scholarship in Canada, the United States, and beyond. Participants valued the emphasis on interprofessional education and practice, the importance of integrating the patient voice, the effectiveness of flipped classroom methods, and the power of collective competency theories. Attendee-respondents encouraged Congress planners to continue to strive for a broad global audience and themes of international interest. PMID:27584068

  7. Barefoot Running Reduces the Submaximal Oxygen Cost in Female Distance Runners.

    PubMed

    Berrones, Adam J; Kurti, Stephanie P; Kilsdonk, Korey M; Cortez, Delonyx J; Melo, Flavia F; Whitehurst, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Berrones, AJ, Kurti, SP, Kilsdonk, KM, Cortez, DJ, Melo, FF, and Whitehurst, M. Barefoot running reduces the submaximal oxygen cost in female distance runners. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2348-2353, 2016-Being a competitive distance runner is, in part, attributable to a high V[Combining Dot Above]O2max. However, running economy (RE) is a more robust indicator of distance running performance among endurance athletes of similar V[Combining Dot Above]O2max levels. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of unshod (barefoot) vs. shod (wearing shoes) running on RE (expressed as ml·kg·min) during three 5-minute submaximal running trials representing 65, 75, and 85% of V[Combining Dot Above]O2max. Other physiologic and perceptual variables such as respiratory exchange ratio, lactate, heart rate, and ratings of perceived exertion were also chosen as dependent variables. We measured V[Combining Dot Above]O2max in 14 recreationally active trained distance female runners (age = 27.6 ± 1.6 years; height = 163.3 ± 1.7 cm; weight = 57.8 ± 1.9 kg) who were completely inexperienced with unshod running. After initial testing, each subject was randomized to either unshod or shod for days 2 and 3. We analyzed the data with a 2-way (condition by intensity) repeated-measures analysis of variance. Submaximal oxygen consumption was significantly reduced at 85% of V[Combining Dot Above]O2max (p = 0.018), indicating an improvement in RE, but not during the 65% or 75% trials (p > 0.05, both). No other dependent measure was different between unshod and shod conditions. Our results indicate that the immediate improvement to RE while barefoot occurs at a relatively high fraction of maximal oxygen consumption. For the recreational or competitive distance runner, training or competing while barefoot may be a useful strategy to improve endurance performance. PMID:26808847

  8. Preserving reptiles for research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gotte, Steve W.; Jacobs, Jeremy F.; Zug, George R.

    2016-01-01

    unable to go into as much detail as we would like in this chapter. A number of publications give more details on some topics discussed in this chapter, such as Pisani (1973), Pisani and Villa (1974), Etheridge (1996), Karns (1986), McDiarmid (1994), Cortez et al. (2006), Foster (2012) (and subchapters therein), Reynolds and McDiarmid (2012), and Simmons (2015). Although some of these works focus on amphibians, they also apply to reptiles in many aspects.

  9. Monitoring the Lower Colorado River's Arid Delta in Mexico by Measuring the Response in Vegetation and Evapotranspiration Resulting from the 2014 Spring Pulse Flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, P. L.; Glenn, E. P.; Gomez-Sapiens, M.; Jarchow, C.; Milliken, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Lower Colorado River Spring 2014 pulse flood release of water to the delta in Mexico is a collaborative monitoring project funded by the Department of Interior, in part, with teams of scientists from governments, universities and non-profits on both sides of the border. Our goal was to provide measures of the vegetation response to this Minute 319 pulse flood and to document post-flooding changes in the vegetation along the lower Colorado River reaches 1-7, which include ca. 150 narrow miles of riparian habitat until it opens to the Sea of Cortez. We used Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite, which provides near-daily coverage at 250 m resolution, while the Landsat 8 satellite provides this data at 16 day intervals at 30 m resolution. We are combining the two sources of satellite data to obtain high spatial and temporal resolution. NDVI and EVI data for each river reach from 2000 to the present were collected, as well as VI for specific target areas. These include restoration sites, vegetation transect sites, and bird observation sites. Green vegetation has decreased steadily in all river reaches since the flood years of 1997-2000. This loss of vegetation vigor has been accompanied by a loss of habitat for riparian dependent birds from 2002 to the present. The loss of vegetation vigor resulted in a lowering of evapotranspiration (ET) in each river reach. ET has decreased approximately from 155 mcm/year in 2000 to 100 mcm/year in 2013. The pulse flood, at 130 mcm, is designed to restore some of the vegetation vigor and to germinate new cohorts of native trees throughout the river reaches. Early positive results are apparent in the zones of inundation. For example, an area of about 600 hectares has shown rapid green-up at the end of the pilot channel in Reach 5 and extending into Reach 7. This is a mixed vegetation zone containing native

  10. Efficacy of calcein and Coomassie Blue dyeing of shell growing-edges and micro growth-bands: ageing juvenile of Pinctada mazatlanica (Pterioida: Pteriidae).

    PubMed

    Loria, Patricia L McCoy; Huato-Soberanis, Leonardo

    2014-09-01

    Age validation is the first step to determine shellfish species age determination. This information is vital for different inferential models used in marine ecosystem management activities. In spite that various validation techniques are used for marking carbon calcium structures, the calcein marking technique for oysters had never been used for age validation in Pinctada mazatlanica. Thus the objectives of this study included: the evaluation of calcein to mark a shell growing-edge, and the efficacy of Coomassie Blue staining on posterior shell growth, to produce visible micro growth-bands that would enable age validation of juvenile mother-of-pearl oysters. Oysters were collected and cultivated at The Perlas del Cortez S. de R. L. MI. pearl-farming operation, in Pichilingue, La Paz Bay, Baja California Sur, Mexico; a total of 36 oysters (shell height 11.5-36.4 mm) were injected with calcein (0.125 g/L), and another 50 oysters (shell height 14.8-42.7 mm) were submersed in calcein (0.4 and 0.7 g/L). Shell slices of calcein-marked oysters were posteriourly stained with Coomassie Blue R-25 for micro growth-band recognition. Our results showed that Calcein marking only worked by submersion and produced a concise bright lime-green florescent band along the growing-edge with clear boundaries for both concentrations. However, marks resulted better at the lower calcein concentration (0.4 g/L) with more "perfect" and "good" marks on the growing-edge (p = 0.0012). Commassie Blue staining technique was successful, and allowed to conclude that one micro growth-band was laid down per day, similar to other oyster species. Mean 15-d increment of shell growth height was slightly greater at the lower calcein concentration (= 0.735 mm) than at the higher one (= 0.577 mm) (not significant difference, p = 0.198). Calcein marking of shell growing-edges and Commassie Blue staining of posterior shell growth, as a method for age validation is recommended for shellfish shell growth

  11. Characterizing Microbial Diversity and Function in Natural Subsurface CO2 Reservoir Systems for Applied Use in Geologic Carbon Sequestration Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, A. J.; Thompson, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    The injection of CO2 into geological formations at quantities necessary to significantly reduce CO2 emissions will represent an environmental perturbation on a continental scale. The extent to which biological processes may play a role in the fate and transport of CO2 injected into geological formations has remained an open question due to the fact that at temperatures and pressures associated with reservoirs targeted for sequestration CO2 exists as a supercritical fluid (scCO2), which has generally been regarded as a sterilizing agent. Natural subsurface accumulations of CO2 serve as an excellent analogue for studying the long-term effects, implications and benefits of CO2 capture and storage (CCS). While several geologic formations bearing significant volumes of nearly pure scCO2 phases have been identified in the western United States, no study has attempted to characterize the microbial community present in these systems. Because the CO2 in the region is thought to have first accumulated millions of years ago, it is reasonable to assume that native microbial populations have undergone extensive and unique physiological and behavioral adaptations to adjust to the exceedingly high scCO2 content. Our study focuses on the microbial communities associated with the dolomite limestone McElmo Dome scCO2 Field in the Colorado Plateau region, approximately 1,000 m below the surface. Fluid samples were collected from 10 wells at an industrial CO2 production facility outside Cortez, CO. Subsamples preserved on site in 3.7% formaldehyde were treated in the lab with Syto 9 green-fluorescent nucleic acid stain, revealing 3.2E6 to 1.4E8 microbial cells per liter of produced fluid and 8.0E9 cells per liter of local pond water used in well drilling fluids. Extracted DNAs from sterivex 0.22 um filters containing 20 L of sample biomass were used as templates for PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene. 16S rRNA amplicons from these samples were cloned, sequenced and subjected to microbial

  12. Body-wave Attenuation in the South-Central Region of the Gulf of California, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, R. R.; Vidales-Basurto, C. A.; Huerta, C. I.; Sumy, D. F.; Gaherty, J. B.; Collins, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from a recent study of seismic attenuation of body waves in the south-central region of the Gulf of California (GoC) obtained using records from the Network of Autonomously Recording Seismographs of Baja California (NARS-Baja), from the CICESE's Broadband Seismological Network of the GoC (RESBAN), and from the Ocean Bottom Seismographs (OBS) deployed as part of the Sea of Cortez Ocean Bottom Array experiment (SCOOBA). We examine 27 well-located earthquakes that occurred from October 2005 to October 2006 with magnitudes (Mw) between 3.5 and 4.8. We estimated S-wave site effects by calculating horizontal to vertical spectral ratios and determined attenuation functions with a nonparametric model by inverting the observed spectral amplitudes of 21 frequencies between 0.13 and 12.59 Hz for the SCOOBA (OBS) stations and 19 frequencies between 0.16 and 7.94 Hz for NARS-Baja and RESBAN stations. We calculated the geometrical spreading and the attenuation (1/Q) factors for two distance intervals (10-120 km and 120-220 km, respectively) for each frequency considered. The estimates of Q obtained with the SCOOBA (OBS) records for the interval 10-120 km indicate that the P waves attenuate more than S waves (QP=34 f 0.82, QS=59 f 0.90) for frequencies between 0.6 and 12.6 Hz; while for the 120-220 km interval, where ray-paths travel deeper, S waves attenuate more than P waves (QP=117 f 0.44, QS=51 f 1.12). The estimates of Q obtained using NARS-Baja and RESBAN records, within 10-120 km, indicate that P waves attenuate more than S waves (QP=69 f 0.87, QS=176 f 0.61) at frequencies between 0.3 and 6.3 Hz; while at the 120-220 km distance interval S waves attenuate slightly more than P waves (QP=39 f 0.64, QS=48 f 0.37) at high frequencies (f > 3 Hz). These results, based on a unique OBS dataset, provide an indirect mean to constrain future models of the thermal structure beneth the GoC.

  13. Declaring the Republic of the Moon - Some artistic strategies for re-imagining the Moon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Frenais., R.

    2014-04-01

    Sooner or later, humans are going back to the Moonwhether to mine it, to rehearse for a Mars mission or to just live there. But how will human activity there reflect what has happened on Earth since the last moon mission, to reflect the diversity and political and social changes that have happened since? Can artists imagine what it would be like to live on the Moon? Artists are already taking part in many scientific endeavours, becoming involved in emerging fields such as synthetic bioloogy, nanotechology, ecological remediation and enthusiastically participating in citizen science. There are already artists in Antarctica. It should be inevitable that artists will sooner or later accompany the next visit by humans to the Moon. But why wait? Artists are already imagining how it would be to live on the Moon, whether in their imaginations or though rehearsals in lunar analogues. In the recent exhibition 'Republic of the Moon' a number of visionary strategies were employed, from the use of earth-moon-earth 'moonbouncing' (Katie Paterson) to the breeding and imprinting of real geese as imagined astronauts. (Agnes Meyer-Brandis). The Outer Space Treaty and the (unsigned) Moon treaty were re-analysed and debates and even small demonstrations were organised protesting (or demanding) the industrial exploitation of the Moon. Fortuitously, China's Chang-e mission landed during the exhibition and the life and death of the rover Jade Rabbit brought a real life drama to the Republic of the Moon. There have been other artistic interventions into lunar exploration, including Aleksandra Mir's First Woman on the Moon, Alicia Framis's Moonlife project and of course the historic inclusion of two artistic artefacts into the Apollo missions, Monument to the Fallen Astronaut (still on the Moon) and the Moon Museum, reportedly inserted by an engineer into the leg of the Lunar Exploration Module. With the worldwide race by the Global Lunar X Prize teams to land a rover independently of any

  14. Assessment of Eating Habits and Physical Activity among Spanish Adolescents. The "Cooking and Active Leisure" TAS Program.

    PubMed

    Roura, Elena; Milà-Villarroel, Raimon; Lucía Pareja, Sara; Adot Caballero, Alba

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide obesity has more than doubled in the last forty years. Even more worrying is the fact that the number of overweight and obese children and adolescents has considerably increased. Socioeconomic development, as well as educational, agricultural and marketing policies have significantly changed dietary and physical activity habits among the youngest, who are thus susceptible to develop chronic and disabling diseases such as diabetes, some cancers and cardiovascular disorders. Adolescence is a critical age, in which the adoption of healthy habits may have dramatic effects on the health state in adulthood. For this reason, prompt interventions are urgently required to prevent the onset of obesity in this time of life. In this regard, the CAL-TAS program from Alicia Foundation was born to combat obesity and promote healthy lifestyles in Spanish adolescents. A total of 2519 students, aged 13-14 years, from 79 schools distributed all over the 17 autonomous communities in Spain were asked to report through the CAL-TAS platform their food intake and physical activity over one week. The body mass index, the consumption of food and beverages, the intake of macronutrients and micronutrients, and the values obtained from the PAQ-A questionnaire, which evaluated physical activity, were analyzed. Twenty percent of the participants were overweight or obese. In general, adolescents did not or poorly respected the recommendations provided by the Spanish Society of Community Nutrition. For example, in more than half of the subjects, the ingestion of fruits and beverages was less than recommended, whereas the consumption of meat, baked goods and fried foods was excessive. Moreover, adolescents with higher body mass index also presented worse eating habits and more inactivity. In conclusion, Spanish adolescents present low adherence to recommendations provided by the Spanish Society of Community Nutrition (SENC) and by the World Health Organization. In order to prevent obesity

  15. Assessment of Eating Habits and Physical Activity among Spanish Adolescents. The "Cooking and Active Leisure" TAS Program

    PubMed Central

    Roura, Elena; Milà-Villarroel, Raimon; Lucía Pareja, Sara; Adot Caballero, Alba

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide obesity has more than doubled in the last forty years. Even more worrying is the fact that the number of overweight and obese children and adolescents has considerably increased. Socioeconomic development, as well as educational, agricultural and marketing policies have significantly changed dietary and physical activity habits among the youngest, who are thus susceptible to develop chronic and disabling diseases such as diabetes, some cancers and cardiovascular disorders. Adolescence is a critical age, in which the adoption of healthy habits may have dramatic effects on the health state in adulthood. For this reason, prompt interventions are urgently required to prevent the onset of obesity in this time of life. In this regard, the CAL-TAS program from Alicia Foundation was born to combat obesity and promote healthy lifestyles in Spanish adolescents. A total of 2519 students, aged 13–14 years, from 79 schools distributed all over the 17 autonomous communities in Spain were asked to report through the CAL-TAS platform their food intake and physical activity over one week. The body mass index, the consumption of food and beverages, the intake of macronutrients and micronutrients, and the values obtained from the PAQ-A questionnaire, which evaluated physical activity, were analyzed. Twenty percent of the participants were overweight or obese. In general, adolescents did not or poorly respected the recommendations provided by the Spanish Society of Community Nutrition. For example, in more than half of the subjects, the ingestion of fruits and beverages was less than recommended, whereas the consumption of meat, baked goods and fried foods was excessive. Moreover, adolescents with higher body mass index also presented worse eating habits and more inactivity. In conclusion, Spanish adolescents present low adherence to recommendations provided by the Spanish Society of Community Nutrition (SENC) and by the World Health Organization. In order to prevent

  16. Post-storm beach and dune recovery: Implications for barrier island resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, Chris; Wernette, Phil; Rentschlar, Elizabeth; Jones, Hannah; Hammond, Brianna; Trimble, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    The ability of beaches and dunes to recover following an extreme storm is a primary control of barrier island response to sea-level rise and changes in the frequency and/or magnitude of storm surges. Whereas erosion of the beach and dune occurs over hours and days, it can be years to decades before the beach and dune are able to recover to their pre-storm state. As a consequence, there are numerous descriptions of near-instantaneous beach and dune erosion due to storms, the immediate onshore transport of sand, and the initial phases of beach and dune recovery following a storm, but a paucity of data on long-term beach and dune recovery. A combination of previously published data from Galveston Island, Texas and new remotely sensed data from Santa Rosa Island, Florida is used in the present study to quantify the rate of dune recovery for dissipative and intermediate beach types, respectively. Recovery of the dune height and volume on Galveston Island was observed within two years following Hurricane Alicia (1983) and was largely complete within six years of the storm, despite extensive washover. In contrast, the dunes on Santa Rosa Island in Northwest Florida began to recover four years after Hurricane Ivan (2004), and only after the profile approached its pre-storm level and the rate of vegetation recovery (regrowth) was at a maximum. Results show that complete recovery of the largest dunes (in height and volume) will take approximately 10 years on Santa Rosa Island, which suggests that these sections of the island are particularly vulnerable to significant change in island morphology if there is also a change in the frequency and magnitude of storm events. In contrast, the areas of the island with the smallest dunes before Hurricane Ivan exhibited a rapid recovery, but no further growth in profile volume and dune height beyond the pre-storm volume and height, despite continued recovery of the largest dunes to their pre-storm height. A change in storm magnitude and

  17. Evaluating Lignite-Derived Products (LDPs) for Agriculture - Does Research Inform Practice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patti, Antonio; Rose, Michael; Little, Karen; Jackson, Roy; Cavagnaro, Timothy

    2014-05-01

    . However, these growth benefits subsequently diminished over time. Insignificant growth benefits were observed for lucerne. The analysis of the literature and our own work indicates that it is difficult to account for all the possible variables where research is used to inform land management practices. Assisting farmers to conduct localised research in cooperative ventures is likely to bring about the best outcomes where site-specific research directly informs land management practices. 1. Michael T. Rose, Antonio F. Patti, Karen R. Little, Alicia L. Brown, W. Roy Jackson, Timothy R. Cavagnaro, A Meta-Analysis and Review of Plant-Growth Response to Humic Substances: Practical Implications for Agriculture, Advances in Agronomy, 2013, 124, 37-89

  18. Coral diseases and bleaching on Colombian Caribbean coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Navas-Camacho, Raúl; Gil-Agudelo, Diego Luis; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Alberto; Reyes-Nivia, María Catalina; Garzón-Ferreira, Jaime

    2010-05-01

    Since 1998 the National Monitoring System for the Coral Reefs of Colombia (SIMAC) has monitored the occurrence of coral bleaching and diseases in some Colombian coral reefs (permanent stations at San Andres Island, Rosario Islands, Tayrona, San Bernardo Islands and Urabá). The main purpose is to evaluate their health status and to understand the factors that have been contributing to their decline. To estimate these occurrences, annual surveys in 126 permanent belt transects (10 x 2m) with different depth intervals (3-6 meters, 9-12 meters and 15-18 meters) are performed at all reef sites. Data from the 1998-2004 period, revealed that San Andrés Island had many colonies with diseases (38.9 colonies/m2), and Urabá had high numbers with bleaching (54.4 colonies/m2). Of the seven reported coral diseases studied, Dark Spots Disease (DSD), and White Plague Disease (WPD) were noteworthy because they occurred in all Caribbean monitored sites, and because of their high interannual infection incidence. Thirty five species of scleractinian corals were affected by at least one disease and a high incidence of coral diseases on the main reef builders is documented. Bleaching was present in 34 species. During the whole monitoring period, Agaricia agaricites and Siderastrea siderea were the species most severely affected by DSD and bleaching, respectively. Diseases on species such as Agaricia fragilis, A. grahamae, A. humilis, Diploria clivosa, Eusmilia fastigiata, Millepora complanata, and Mycetophyllia aliciae are recorded for first time in Colombia. We present bleaching and disease incidences, kinds of diseases, coral species affected, reef localities studied, depth intervals of surveys, and temporal (years) variation for each geographic area. This variation makes difficult to clearly determine defined patterns or general trends for monitored reefs. This is the first long-term study of coral diseases and bleaching in the Southwestern Caribbean, and one of the few long

  19. Revision of the Neotropical species of the caddisfly genus Wormaldia McLachlan (Trichoptera: Philopotamidae).

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Quesada, Fernando J; Holzenthal, Ralph W

    2015-01-01

    Wormaldia McLachlan 1865 is the 2nd largest genus in the family Philopotamidae (Trichoptera) after Chimarra Stephens 1829 and is diverse and widely distributed, with ca. 175 extant species in all biogeographic regions except the Australasian. In this monograph, 14 previously described species are recognized for the Neotropical region: W. alicia Bueno-Soria, Santiago-Fragoso, & Barba-Alvarez 2005 [Mexico]; W. arizonensis (Ling 1938) [Mexico, USA]; W. cornuta Bueno-Soria & Holzenthal1986 [Mexico]; W. dampfi Ross & King 1956 [Mexico, Nicaragua]; W. dorsata Ross & King 1956 [Mexico]; W. endonima Ross & King 1956 [Mexico]; W. esperonis Ross & King 1956 [Mexico]; W. insignis (Martynov 1912) [Peru]; W. luma Bueno-Soria & Holzenthal 1986 [Mexico]; W. matagalpa Flint 1995 [Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua]; W. palma Flint 1991 [Colombia]; W. planae Ross & King 1956 [southwestern USA, Mexico, Caribbean, Central America, and northern South America]; W. prolixa Flint 1991[Colombia]; and W. tarasca Bueno-Soria & Holzenthal 1986 [Mexico]. Also, 36 additional Neotropical species are newly diagnosed, described, and illustrated: W. andrea [Ecuador]; W. anhelitus [Central America]; W. araujoi [Ecuador]; W. aymara [Bolivia]; W. barbai [Mexico]; W. bolivari [Venezuela]; W. boteroi [Colombia]; W. buenorum [Mexico]; W. calderonae [Mexico]; W. chrismark [Panama]; W. contrerasi [Panama]; W. dachiardiorum [Colombia]; W. eberhardi [Panama]; W. flinti [Bolivia, Panama]; W. francovilla [Panama]; W. fredycarol [Costa Rica, Panama]; W. gallardoi [Costa Rica, Panama]; W. gonzalezae [Venezuela]; W. hedamafera [Costa Rica, Nicaragua]; W. imberti [Costa Rica]; W. inca [Peru]; W. isela [Mexico]; W. juarox [Costa Rica]; W. lauglo [Panama]; W. machadorum [Costa Rica, Panama]; W. maesi [Nicaragua]; W. menchuae [Guatemala]; W. monsonorum [Costa Rica]; W. navarroae [Mexico]; W. paprockevi [Costa Rica]; W. saboriorum [Panama]; W. tocajoma [Costa Rica]; W. trondi [Costa Rica, Panama]; W. tupacamara

  20. Relation of NDVI obtained from different remote sensing at different space and resolutions sensors in Spanish Dehesas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escribano Rodríguez, Juan; Tarquis, Ana M.; Saa-Requejo, Antonio; Díaz-Ambrona, Carlos G. H.

    2015-04-01

    . Geophysical Research Abstracts, 15, EGU2013-14153, 2013. EGU General Assembly 2013 Juan Escribano, Carlos G.H. Díaz-Ambrona, Laura Recuero, Margarita Huesca, Victor Cicuendez, Alicia Palacios, and Ana M. Tarquis. Application of Vegetation Indices to Estimate Acorn Production at Iberian Peninsula. Geophysical Research Abstracts, 16, EGU2014-16428, 2014. EGU General Assembly 2014. Acknowledgements This work was partially supported by ENESA under project P10 0220C-823

  1. NCAR Contribution to A U.S. National Multi-Model Ensemble (NMME) ISI Prediction System

    SciTech Connect

    Tribbia, Joseph

    2015-11-25

    completion of the calibration hindcasts for Seasonal to Interannual (SI) predictions and the maintenance of the data archive associated with the NCAR portion of this effort has been the responsibility of the Project Scientist I (Alicia Karspeck) that was partially supported on this project.

  2. Field screening of water, soil, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Dolores Project and the Macos River basin, southwestern Colorado, 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, D.L.; Osmundson, B.C.; Krueger, R.P.

    1997-01-01

    A reconnaissance investigation for the National Irrigation Water Quality Program in 1990 indicated elevated selenium concentrations in some water and biota samples collected in the Dolores Project in southwestern Colorado. High selenium concentrations also were indicated in bird samples collected in the Mancos Project in 1989. In 1994, field screenings were done in parts of the Dolores Project and Mancos River Basin to collect additional selenium data associated with irrigation inthose areas. Selenium is mobilized from soils in newly irrigated areas of the Dolores Project called the Dove Creek area, which includes newly (since 1987) irrigated land north of Cortez and south of Dove Creek.Selenium was detected in 18 of 20stream samples, and the maximum concentration was 12micrograms per liter. The Dove Creek area is unique compared to other study areas of the National Irrigation Water Quality Program becauseselenium concentrations probably are indicative of initial leaching conditions in a newly irrigated area.Selenium concentrations in nine shallow soil samples from the Dove Creek area ranged from 0.13 to 0.20 micrograms per gram. Selenium concentrations in bottom sediment from six ponds were less than the level of concern for fish and wildlife of 4 micrograms per gram. Many biota samples collected in the Dove Creek area had elevated selenium concentrations when compared to various guidelines and effect levels,although selenium concentrations in water, soil, and bottom sediment were relatively low. Selenium concentrations in 12 of 14 aquatic-invertebratesamples from ponds exceeded 3 micrograms per gram dry weight, a dietary guideline for protection of fish and wildlife. The mean seleniumconcentration of 10.3 micrograms per gram dry weight in aquatic bird eggs exceeded the guideline for reduced hatchability of 8 micrograms per gramdry weight. Two ponds in the Dove Creek area had a high selenium hazard rating based on a new protocol for assessing selenium hazard in

  3. Insights into deposition and deformation of intra-caldera ignimbrites, central Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, William D.; Palmer, H. Currie; Deino, Alan L.; Shen, Po-Yu

    2012-11-01

    member. Correcting for E-W extension, the outflow ignimbrites reached approximately 20 km to the west and south of the caldera. North of the caldera, ignimbrites formerly assigned to the Caetano Tuff but now assigned to the tuff of Cove Mine, exhibit variable flow directions from an indeterminate source. Significantly however, the intracaldera AMS magnetic lineations, conventionally used as proxies for flow lines, trend mainly WNW parallel to a proposed major paleodrainage which stretches from the southern Cortez Range through 40 km to the Tobin Range. Caetano Tuff magnetic remanence is entirely reversed, and corresponds to magnetization acquired in the younger part of magnetochron 13R. The magnetic remanence directions of both the intra-caldera and outflow ignimbrites are similar, D = 151°, I = - 60°, significantly different from those predicted by a coeval reference pole for North America, raising the possibility of a regional counterclockwise rotation of the sampling area of 15 ± 6°. Presumably this began during faulting and major regional extension about 16 Ma ago, during the Middle Miocene, and possibly continued later.

  4. Characterizing Microbial Diversity and Function in Natural Subsurface CO2 Reservoir Systems for Applied Use in Geologic Carbon Sequestration Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, A.; Thompson, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    The injection of CO2 into geological formations at quantities necessary to significantly reduce CO2 emissions will represent an environmental perturbation on a continental scale. The extent to which biological processes may play a role in the fate and transport of CO2 injected into geological formations has remained an open question due to the fact that at temperatures and pressures associated with reservoirs targeted for sequestration CO2 exists as a supercritical fluid (scCO2), which has generally been regarded as a sterilizing agent. Natural subsurface accumulations of CO2 serve as an excellent analogue for studying the long-term effects, implications and benefits of CO2 capture and storage (CCS). While several geologic formations bearing significant volumes of nearly pure scCO2 phases have been identified in the western United States, no study has attempted to characterize the microbial community present in these systems. Because the CO2 in the region is thought to have first accumulated millions of years ago, it is reasonable to assume that native microbial populations have undergone extensive and unique physiological and behavioral adaptations to adjust to the exceedingly high scCO2 content. Our study focuses on the microbial communities associated with the dolomite limestone McElmo Dome scCO2 Field in the Colorado Plateau region, approximately 1,000 m below the surface. Fluid samples were collected from 10 wells at an industrial CO2 production facility outside Cortez, CO. Subsamples preserved on site in 3.7% formaldehyde were treated in the lab with Syto 9 green-fluorescent nucleic acid stain, revealing 3.2E6 to 1.4E8 microbial cells per liter of produced fluid and 8.0E9 cells per liter of local pond water used in well drilling fluids. Extracted DNAs from sterivex 0.22 um filters containing 20 L of sample biomass were used as templates for PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene. 16S rRNA amplicons from these samples were cloned, sequenced and subjected to microbial

  5. Online SAG Mill Pluse Measurement and Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Raj Rajamani; Jose Delgadillo; Vishal Duriseti

    2007-06-30

    their effect on the impact spectra. A good correlation was found between the process variables and the impact spectra. The load cell package was then used in a 16 inch pilot scale mill. The mill speed, ball size, and mill filling were varied here and a consistent trend between these variables and impact spectra was observed. With a better understanding developed from the initial tests, the design of the load cell package was significantly changed to eliminate noise. With the new design, the impact spectra were re-determined in the 16 inch pilot mill varying the process variables - ball size, mill speed, and mill filling. Finally, it is successfully shown that a change in the operating variables of a mill can be seen in the impact spectra and that this concept can be successfully developed to monitor the grinding operation of industrial mills. To adapt it to industrial level it is mandatory to make the load cell package wireless. A design of a wireless circuit that is capable of transferring data at the required speed of 1000 kbps was also developed and tested at Cortez Gold Mines (CGM), Nevada.

  6. Cosmic Blasts Much More Common, Astronomers Discover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-08-01

    A cosmic explosion seen last February may have been the "tip of an iceberg," showing that powerful, distant gamma ray bursts are outnumbered ten-to-one by less-energetic cousins, according to an international team of astronomers. A study of the explosion with X-ray and radio telescopes showed that it is "100 times less energetic than gamma ray bursts seen in the distant universe. We were able to see it because it's relatively nearby," said Alicia Soderberg, of Caltech, leader of the research team. The scientists reported their findings in the August 31 issue of the journal Nature. The explosion is called an X-ray flash, and was detected by the Swift satellite on February 18. The astronomers subsequently studied the object using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Ryle radio telescope in the UK. "This object tells us that there probably is a rich diversity of cosmic explosions in our local Universe that we only now are starting to detect. These explosions aren't playing by the rules that we thought we understood," said Dale Frail of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. Illustration of a Magnetar Illustration of a Magnetar The February blast seems to fill a gap between ordinary supernova explosions, which leave behind a dense neutron star, and gamma ray bursts, which leave behind a black hole, a concentration of mass so dense that not even light can escape it. Some X-ray flashes, the new research suggests, leave behind a magnetar, a neutron star with a magnetic field 100-1000 times stronger than that of an ordinary neutron star. "This explosion occurred in a galaxy about 470 million light-years away. If it had been at the distances of gamma ray bursts, as much as billions of light-years away, we would not have been able to see it," Frail said. "We think that the principal difference between gamma ray bursts and X-ray flashes and ordinary supernova explosions is that the blasts that

  7. Reconstructing Holocene sea surface salinity changes in the Northern Aegean Sea: evidence from morphological variations of Emiliania huxleyi-coccoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrle, Jens O.; Gebühr, Christina; Bollmann, Jörg; Giesenberg, Annika; Kranzdorf, Philip

    2013-04-01

    large-scale changes in the Northern Hemisphere climate system with effects similar to the decadal North Atlantic Oscillation. During times of a negative NAO the amount of precipitation and river runoff increases in the northern Aegean Sea (more fresh water input -> low salinity) whereas the amount of precipitation and river runoff decreases during a positive NAO (less fresh water input -> low salinity) (e.g., Tsimplis & Baker, 2000). The NAO-like SSS fluctuations may also have caused changes in the deep water formation in the northern Aegean Sea and thus affect the oxygenation of bottom water and the evolution of Holocene benthic ecosystem. References Bollmann, J., Herrle, J.O., 2007. Morphological variation of Emiliania huxleyi and sea surface salinity. EPSL 255, 273-288. Bollmann, J., Herrle, J.O., Cortez, M., Fielding, S.R., 2009. The effect of sea water salinity on the morphology of Emiliania huxleyi in plankton and sediment samples. EPSL 284, 320-328. Henderson, G., 2002. New oceanic proxies for paleoclimate. EPSL 203, 1-13. Kotthoff, U., Pross, J., Müller, U.C., Peyron, O., Schmiedl, G., Schulz, H. and Bordon, A. 2008: Climate dynamics in the borderlands of the Aegean Sea during formation of Sapropel S1 deduced from a marine pollen record. Quaternary Science Reviews 27, 832-45. Rohling, E.J., 2000. Paleosalinity: confidence limits and future applications. Mar. Geol. 163, 1-11. Rohling, E.J., Mayewski, P.A., Hayes, A., Abu-Zied, R.H., Casford, J.S.L., 2002. Holocene atmosphere-ocean interactions: records from Greenland and the Aegean Sea. Climate Dynamics 18, 587-593. Rohling, E.J., Palike, H., 2005. Centennial-scale climate cooling with a sudden cold event around 8,200 years ago. Nature 434, 975-979. Schulz, M., & Paul, A., 2002. Holocene Climate Variability on Centennial-to-Millennial Time Scales:1. Climate Records from the North-Atlantic Realm in Wefer et al. (eds.) Climate Development and History of the North Atlantic Realm. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

  8. 8th Argentinean Bioengineering Society Conference (SABI 2011) and 7th Clinical Engineering Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschino, Gustavo Javier; Ballarin, Virginia L.

    2011-12-01

    President Dr Gustavo Meschino Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Comittee Dr Gustavo Abraham Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Mg Rubén Acevedo Universidad Nacional de Entre Ríos Ing Pablo Agüero Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Ing Mariela Ambrustolo Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dr Ricardo Armentano Universidad Favaloro Dra Virginia L Ballarin Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dra Josefina Ballarre Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dr Eduardo Blotta Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Ing Marco Benalcázar Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Mg Freddy Geovanny Benalcázar Palacios Escuela Superior Politécnica de Chimborazo, Ecuador Dr Roberto Boeri Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET - INTEMA Dra Agustina Bouchet Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dr Ariel Braidot Universidad Nacional de Entre Ríos Dr Marcel Brun Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dra Silvia Ceré Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Ing Fernando Clara Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dr Raúl Correa Prado Universidad Nacional de San Juan Bioing Pablo Cortez Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dra Teresita R Cuadrado Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Ing Eduardo De Forteza Universidad Favaloro Dra Mariana Del Fresno Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires Dr Martín Diaz Informática Médica Hospital Aleman de Buenos Aires - GIBBA Ing Julio César Doumecq Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Mg Ana María Echenique Universidad Nacional de San Juan Bioing Pedro Escobar Universidad Nacional del Centro, Olavarría, Pcia de Buenos Aires Dr Fernando Daniel Farfán Universidad Nacional de Tucumán Dr Carmelo Felice Universidad Nacional de Tucumán - CONICET Dr Elmer Fernández Universidad Católica de Córdoba - CONICET Ing José Flores Universidad Nacional de Entre Ríos Dr Arturo Gayoso Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dra Bioing Agustina Garcés Universidad Nacional de San

  9. NASA's Swift Satellite Catches First Supernova in The Act of Exploding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    GREENBELT, Md.- Thanks to a fortuitous observation with NASA’s Swift satellite, astronomers for the first time have caught a star in the act of exploding. Astronomers have previously observed thousands of stellar explosions, known as supernovae, but they have always seen them after the fireworks were well underway. "For years we have dreamed of seeing a star just as it was exploding, but actually finding one is a once in a lifetime event," says team leader Alicia Soderberg, a Hubble and Carnegie-Princeton Fellow at Princeton University in Princeton, N.J. "This newly born supernova is going to be the Rosetta stone of supernova studies for years to come." A typical supernova occurs when the core of a massive star runs out of nuclear fuel and collapses under its own gravity to form an ultradense object known as a neutron star. The newborn neutron star compresses and then rebounds, triggering a shock wave that plows through the star’s gaseous outer layers and blows the star to smithereens. Astronomers thought for nearly four decades that this shock "break-out" will produce bright X-ray emission lasting a few minutes. X-ray Image X-ray Images But until this discovery, astronomers have never observed this signal. Instead, they have observed supernovae brightening days or weeks later, when the expanding shell of debris is energized by the decay of radioactive elements forged in the explosion. "Seeing the shock break-out in X-rays can give a direct view of the exploding star in the last minutes of its life and also provide a signpost to which astronomers can quickly point their telescopes to watch the explosion unfold," says Edo Berger, a Carnegie-Princeton Fellow at Princeton University. Soderberg's discovery of the first shock breakout can be attributed to luck and Swift's unique design. On January 9, 2008, Soderberg and Berger were using Swift to observe a supernova known as SN 2007uy in the spiral galaxy NGC 2770, located 90 million light-years from Earth in the

  10. Luck Reveals Stellar Explosion's First Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    Through a stroke of luck, astronomers have witnessed the first violent moments of a stellar explosion known as a supernova. Astronomers have seen thousands of these stellar explosions, but all previous supernovae were discovered days after the event had begun. This is the first time scientists have been able to study a supernova from its very beginning. Seeing one just moments after the event began is a major breakthrough that points the way to unraveling longstanding mysteries about how such explosions really work. Galaxy Before Supernova Explosion NASA's Swift satellite took these images of SN 2007uy in galaxy NGC 2770 before SN 2008D exploded. An X-ray image is on the left; image at right is in visible light. CREDIT: NASA/Swift Science Team/Stefan Immler. Large Image With Labels Large Image Without Labels Galaxy After Supernova Explosion On January 9, 2008, Swift caught a bright X-ray burst from an exploding star. A few days later, SN 2008D appeared in visible light. CREDIT: NASA/Swift Science Team/Stefan Immler. Large Image With Labels Large Image Without Labels "For years, we have dreamed of seeing a star just as it was exploding," said team leader Alicia Soderberg, a Hubble and Carnegie-Princeton Fellow at Princeton University. "This newly-born supernova is going to be the Rosetta Stone of supernova studies for years to come." Theorists had predicted for four decades that a bright burst of X-rays should be produced as the shock wave from a supernova blasts out of the star and through dense material surrounding the star. However, in order to see this burst, scientists faced the nearly-impossible challenge of knowing in advance where to point their telescopes to catch a supernova in the act of exploding. On January 9, luck intervened. Soderberg and her colleagues were making a scheduled observation of the galaxy NGC 2770, 88 million light-years from Earth, using the X-ray telescope on NASA's Swift satellite. During that observation, a bright burst of X

  11. Despite Appearances, Cosmic Explosions Have Common Origin, Astronomers Discover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    part encounters less resistance and thus can move outward at greater speeds. Frail pointed out that the radio observations alone had the ability to show the total energy output of the burst, thus providing the breakthrough in understanding the common thread among the different types of explosions. "The key fact is that the optical, X-Ray and gamma-ray telescopes missed 90 percent of the energy put out by this burst," Frail added. "As the VLA Expansion Project progresses and the sensitivity of the VLA improves in the coming years, it will become an even more important tool in unravelling this mystery," Frail said. "The exciting part of this new discovery is that explosions that we once thought were quite different now appear to all have a common origin," Frail concluded. "That insight, of course, gives us the new challenge of explaining how a single mechanism can make itself look so different," he added. In addition to Berger and Frail, the other authors of the paper are Professor Shri Kulkarni of Caltech; Guy Pooley of Cambridge University's Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory; Vince McIntyre and Robin Wark, both of the Australia Telescope National Facility; Re'em Sari, associate professor of astrophysics and planetary science at Caltech; Derek Fox, a postdoctoral scholar in astronomy at Caltech; Alicia Soderberg, a graduate student in astrophysics at Caltech; Sarah Yost, a graduate student in physics at Caltech; and Paul Price, a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Hawaii's Institute for Astronomy. Berger and Soderberg earlier worked on gamma-ray-burst studies as summer students at NRAO. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  12. Astronomers Find Rare Beast by New Means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    For the first time, astronomers have found a supernova explosion with properties similar to a gamma-ray burst, but without seeing any gamma rays from it. The discovery, using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope, promises, the scientists say, to point the way toward locating many more examples of these mysterious explosions. "We think that radio observations will soon be a more powerful tool for finding this kind of supernova in the nearby Universe than gamma-ray satellites," said Alicia Soderberg, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. The telltale clue came when the radio observations showed material expelled from the supernova explosion, dubbed SN2009bb, at speeds approaching that of light. This characterized the supernova, first seen last March, as the type thought to produce one kind of gamma-ray burst. "It is remarkable that very low-energy radiation, radio waves, can signal a very high-energy event," said Roger Chevalier of the University of Virginia. When the nuclear fusion reactions at the cores of very massive stars no longer can provide the energy needed to hold the core up against the weight of the rest of the star, the core collapses catastrophically into a superdense neutron star or black hole. The rest of the star's material is blasted into space in a supernova explosion. For the past decade or so, astronomers have identified one particular type of such a "core-collapse supernova" as the cause of one kind of gamma-ray burst. Not all supernovae of this type, however, produce gamma-ray bursts. "Only about one out of a hundred do this," according to Soderberg. In the more-common type of such a supernova, the explosion blasts the star's material outward in a roughly-spherical pattern at speeds that, while fast, are only about 3 percent of the speed of light. In the supernovae that produce gamma-ray bursts, some, but not all, of the ejected material is accelerated to nearly the speed of light. The superfast

  13. Chandra Contributes to ESA's Integral Detection of Closest Gamma-Ray Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-08-01

    had pinpointed the approximate position of GRB 031203 in the sky and sent the information to a network of observatories around the world. A few hours later one of them, ESA's XMM-Newton, determined a much more precise position for GRB 031203 and detected a rapidly fading X-ray source, which was subsequently seen by radio and optical telescopes on the ground. This wealth of data allowed astronomers to determine that GRB 031203 went off in a galaxy less than 1300 million light years away, making it the closest GRB ever observed. Even so, the way in which GRB 031203 dimmed with time and the distribution of its energy were not different from those of distant GRBs. Then, scientists started to realise that the concept of the 'standard candle' may not hold. "Being so close should make GRB 031203 appear very bright, but the amount of gamma-rays measured by Integral is about one thousand times less than what we would normally expect from a GRB," Sazonov said. A burst of gamma rays observed in 1998 in a closer galaxy appeared even fainter, about one hundred times less bright than GRB 031203. Astronomers, however, could not conclusively tell whether that was a genuine GRB because the bulk of its energy was emitted mostly as X-rays instead of gamma-rays. The work of Sazonov's team on GRB 031203 now suggests that intrinsically fainter GRBs can indeed exist. A team of US astronomers, coordinated by Alicia Soderberg from the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena (USA), studied the 'afterglow' of GRB 031203 and gave further support to this conclusion. The afterglow, emitted when a GRB's blastwave shocks the diffuse medium around it, can last weeks or months and progressively fades away. Using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, Soderberg and her team saw that the X-ray brightness of the afterglow was about one thousand times fainter than that of typical distant GRBs. The team's observations with the Very Large Array telescope of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in

  14. Cosmic Blasts Much More Common, Astronomers Discover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-08-01

    A cosmic explosion seen last February may have been the "tip of an iceberg," showing that powerful, distant gamma ray bursts are outnumbered ten-to-one by less-energetic cousins, according to an international team of astronomers. The VLA The Very Large Array CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for VLA gallery) A study of the explosion with X-ray and radio telescopes showed that it is "100 times less energetic than gamma ray bursts seen in the distant universe. We were able to see it because it's relatively nearby," said Alicia Soderberg, of Caltech, leader of the research team. The scientists reported their findings in the August 31 issue of the journal Nature. The explosion is called an X-ray flash, and was detected by the Swift satellite on February 18. The astronomers subsequently studied the object using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Ryle radio telescope in the UK. "This object tells us that there probably is a rich diversity of cosmic explosions in our local Universe that we only now are starting to detect. These explosions aren't playing by the rules that we thought we understood," said Dale Frail of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. The February blast seems to fill a gap between ordinary supernova explosions, which leave behind a dense neutron star, and gamma ray bursts, which leave behind a black hole, a concentration of mass so dense that not even light can escape it. Some X-ray flashes, the new research suggests, leave behind a magnetar, a neutron star with a magnetic field 100-1000 times stronger than that of an ordinary neutron star. "This explosion occurred in a galaxy about 470 million light-years away. If it had been at the distances of gamma ray bursts, as much as billions of light-years away, we would not have been able to see it," Frail said. "We think that the principal difference between gamma ray bursts and X-ray flashes and ordinary supernova

  15. Luck Reveals Stellar Explosion's First Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    Through a stroke of luck, astronomers have witnessed the first violent moments of a stellar explosion known as a supernova. Astronomers have seen thousands of these stellar explosions, but all previous supernovae were discovered days after the event had begun. This is the first time scientists have been able to study a supernova from its very beginning. Seeing one just moments after the event began is a major breakthrough that points the way to unraveling longstanding mysteries about how such explosions really work. Galaxy Before Supernova Explosion NASA's Swift satellite took these images of SN 2007uy in galaxy NGC 2770 before SN 2008D exploded. An X-ray image is on the left; image at right is in visible light. CREDIT: NASA/Swift Science Team/Stefan Immler. Large Image With Labels Large Image Without Labels Galaxy After Supernova Explosion On January 9, 2008, Swift caught a bright X-ray burst from an exploding star. A few days later, SN 2008D appeared in visible light. CREDIT: NASA/Swift Science Team/Stefan Immler. Large Image With Labels Large Image Without Labels "For years, we have dreamed of seeing a star just as it was exploding," said team leader Alicia Soderberg, a Hubble and Carnegie-Princeton Fellow at Princeton University. "This newly-born supernova is going to be the Rosetta Stone of supernova studies for years to come." Theorists had predicted for four decades that a bright burst of X-rays should be produced as the shock wave from a supernova blasts out of the star and through dense material surrounding the star. However, in order to see this burst, scientists faced the nearly-impossible challenge of knowing in advance where to point their telescopes to catch a supernova in the act of exploding. On January 9, luck intervened. Soderberg and her colleagues were making a scheduled observation of the galaxy NGC 2770, 88 million light-years from Earth, using the X-ray telescope on NASA's Swift satellite. During that observation, a bright burst of X

  16. 8th Argentinean Bioengineering Society Conference (SABI 2011) and 7th Clinical Engineering Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschino, Gustavo Javier; Ballarin, Virginia L.

    2011-12-01

    President Dr Gustavo Meschino Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Comittee Dr Gustavo Abraham Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Mg Rubén Acevedo Universidad Nacional de Entre Ríos Ing Pablo Agüero Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Ing Mariela Ambrustolo Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dr Ricardo Armentano Universidad Favaloro Dra Virginia L Ballarin Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dra Josefina Ballarre Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dr Eduardo Blotta Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Ing Marco Benalcázar Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Mg Freddy Geovanny Benalcázar Palacios Escuela Superior Politécnica de Chimborazo, Ecuador Dr Roberto Boeri Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET - INTEMA Dra Agustina Bouchet Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dr Ariel Braidot Universidad Nacional de Entre Ríos Dr Marcel Brun Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dra Silvia Ceré Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Ing Fernando Clara Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dr Raúl Correa Prado Universidad Nacional de San Juan Bioing Pablo Cortez Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dra Teresita R Cuadrado Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Ing Eduardo De Forteza Universidad Favaloro Dra Mariana Del Fresno Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires Dr Martín Diaz Informática Médica Hospital Aleman de Buenos Aires - GIBBA Ing Julio César Doumecq Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Mg Ana María Echenique Universidad Nacional de San Juan Bioing Pedro Escobar Universidad Nacional del Centro, Olavarría, Pcia de Buenos Aires Dr Fernando Daniel Farfán Universidad Nacional de Tucumán Dr Carmelo Felice Universidad Nacional de Tucumán - CONICET Dr Elmer Fernández Universidad Católica de Córdoba - CONICET Ing José Flores Universidad Nacional de Entre Ríos Dr Arturo Gayoso Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dra Bioing Agustina Garcés Universidad Nacional de San

  17. ESA's Integral detects closest cosmic gamma-ray burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-08-01

    we would normally expect from a GRB," Sazonov said. A burst of gamma rays observed in 1998 in a closer galaxy appeared even fainter, about one hundred times less bright than GRB 031203. Astronomers, however, could not conclusively tell whether that was a genuine GRB because the bulk of its energy was emitted mostly as X-rays instead of gamma-rays. The work of Sazonov's team on GRB 031203 now suggests that intrinsically fainter GRBs can indeed exist. A team of US astronomers, coordinated by Alicia Soderberg from the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena (USA), studied the 'afterglow' of GRB 031203 and gave further support to this conclusion. The afterglow, emitted when a GRB's blastwave shocks the diffuse medium around it, can last weeks or months and progressively fades away. Using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, Soderberg and her team saw that the X-ray brightness of the afterglow was about one thousand times fainter than that of typical distant GRBs. The team's observations with the Very Large Array telescope of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro (USA) also revealed a source dimmer than usual. Sazonov and Soderberg explain that their teams looked carefully for signs that GRB 031203 could be tilted in such a way that most of its energy would escape Integral's detection. However, as Sazonov said, "the fact that most of the energy that we see is emitted in the gamma-ray domain, rather than in the X-rays, means that we are seeing the beam nearly on axis." It is, therefore, unlikely that much of its energy output can go unnoticed. This discovery suggests the existence of a new population of GRBs much closer but also dimmer than the majority of those known so far, which are very energetic but distant. Objects of this type may also be very numerous and thus produce more frequent bursts. The bulk of this population has so far escaped our attention because it lies at the limit of detection with past and present instruments. Integral, however, may