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Sample records for alid volcanic center

  1. Geology and geothermal potential of Alid volcanic center, Eritrea, Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clynne, Michael A.; Duffield, Wendell A.; Fournier, Robert O.; Giorgis, Leake W.; Janik, Cathy J.; Kahsai, Gabreab; Lowenstern, Jacob; Mariam, Kidane W.; Smith, James G.; Tesfai, Theoderos; ,

    1996-01-01

    Alid volcanic center, a 700-meter-tall mountain in Eritrea, northeast Africa, straddles the axis of an active crustal-spreading center called the Danakil Depression. Boiling-temperature fumaroles are common on Alid, and their gas compositions indicate a reservoir temperature of at least 250 ??C. The history of volcanism and the high reservoir temperature indicated by the Alid fumarole gases suggest that a geothermal resource of electrical grade lies beneath the mountain. Though drilling is needed to determine subsurface conditions, the process of dome formation and the ongoing crustal spreading can create and maintain fracture permeability in the hydrothermal system that feeds the Alid fumaroles.

  2. Geology and geothermal potential of Alid Volcanic Center, Eritrea, Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Clynne, M.A.; Duffield, W.A.; Fournier, R.O.; Janik, C.J.

    1996-12-31

    Alid volcanic center is a 700-meter-tall mountain in Eritrea, northeast Africa. This mountain straddles the axis of an active crustal-spreading center called the Danakil Depression. Though volcanism associated with this crustal spreading is predominantly basaltic, centers of silicic volcanism, including Alid, are present locally. Silicic centers imply a magma reservoir in the crust and thus a possible potent shallow heat source for a hydrothermal-convection system. Boiling-temperature fumaroles are common on Alid, and their gas compositions indicate a reservoir temperature of at least 250{degrees}C. Alid is a 7-km x 5-km structural dome. The domed rocks, in decreasing age, are Precambrian schist and granite, a sequence of intercalated sedimentary rocks and basaltic lavas, and a sequence of basaltic and rhyolitic lava flows. Though isotopic ages are not yet determined, the domed volcanic rocks of Alid appear to be late Tertiary and/or Quaternary. Doming was likely caused by intrusion of relatively low density silicic magma into the upper crust. Subsequent to dome formation, a substantial volume of this magma was erupted from a vent near the west end of the summit area of the dome. This eruption produced a blanket of plinian rhyolite pumice over most, if not all, of the dome and fed pyroclastic flows that covered the part of the Danakil Depression around the base of the dome. The pumice deposits contain abundant inclusions of granophyric, miarolitic pyroxene granite, chemically indistinguishable from the pumice. This granite likely represents the uppermost part of the magma reservoir, which crystallized just prior to the pumice eruption.

  3. A geochemical reconnaissance of the Alid volcanic center and geothermal system, Danakil depression, Eritrea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Janik, C.J.; Fournier, R.O.; Tesfai, T.; Duffield, W.A.; Clynne, M.A.; Smith, James G.; Woldegiorgis, L.; Weldemariam, K.; Kahsai, G.

    1999-01-01

    Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermal system underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea. Alid is a very late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma, some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows. Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widely over an area of ~10 km2 on the northern half of Alid suggest that an active hydrothermal system underlies much of that part of the mountain. Geothermometers indicate that the fumarolic gases are derived from a geothermal system with temperatures >225??C. The isotopic composition of condensed fumarolic steam is consistent with these temperatures and implies that the source water is derived primarily from either lowland meteoric waters or fossil Red Sea water, or both. Some gases vented from the system (CO2, H2S and He) are largely magmatic in origin. Permeability beneath the volcanic center may be high, given the amount of intrusion-related deformation and the active normal faulting within the Danakil depression.Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermal system underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea. Alid is a very late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma, some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows. Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widely over an area of approx. 10 km2 on the northern half of Alid suggest that an active hydrothermal system underlies much of that part of the mountain. Geothermometers indicate that the fumarolic gases are derived from a geothermal system with temperatures >225??C. The isotopic composition of condensed fumarolic steam is consistent with these temperatures and implies that the source water is derived primarily from either lowland meteoric waters or fossil Red Sea water, or both. Some gases vented from the system (CO2, H2S and He) are largely

  4. Rifting, volcanism, and magma genesis at the northern end of the Danakil Depression: The Alid volcanic center of Eritrea (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Clynne, M. A.; Duffield, W. A.; Smith, J. G.; Woldegiorgis, L.

    2009-12-01

    The Alid volcanic center, Eritrea, is a structural dome formed by subvolcanic intrusion of pyroxene-bearing rhyolite, subsequently erupted as pumice and lava, during the period 40,000 to 15,000 years ago. The northern Danakil Depression is thought to be the most recently developed part of the Afar, and represents an active continental rift subparallel to the Red Sea spreading center. The location of Alid may be controlled by the intersection of the structural grain of the NE trending Senafe-Alid lineament with the NW trending Danakil Depression. Our work began as a geothermal assessment (Duffield et al., 1997, USGS Open-file 97-291) that found evidence for 300 meters of vertical offset of early Pleistocene basalt flows over the past 1.1 million years. Structural uplift at Alid reveals Proterozoic metamorphic basement rocks overlain by Quaternary marine sediments including siltstone, and sandstones interbedded with pillow lavas and hyaloclastites. These units are overlain by subaerial amphibole-bearing rhyolites (dated at ~200 ka), basalts, and andesites that were deposited on a relatively flat surface and before significant growth of a large volcanic edifice. About 1 km of structural uplift of the marine sediments began 40 ka when pyroxene-bearing rhyolitic magma intruded close to the surface. Uplift was accompanied by contemporaneous eruptions of pumice falls and more common obsidian domes and lava flows over the next 20,000 years. Uplift apparently ceased after eruption of pyroclastic flows and vent-clogging lava about 15 ka. The pumice deposits contain cognate xenoliths of granophyric pyroxene-granite (Lowenstern et al., 1997, J. Petrol. 38:1707). Our geochronology of the uplift is consistent with the idea that growth of the Alid volcanic center played a role in isolating the southern Danakil Depression from the Red Sea, helping to initiate dessication of the rift and producing the young evaporites found today at Baddha and further south at Dallol. U

  5. Extreme U-Th disequilibrium in rift-related basalts, rhyolites and granophyric granite and the timescale of rhyolite generation, intrusion and crystallization at Alid volcanic center, Eritrea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Charlier, B.L.A.; Clynne, M.A.; Wooden, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Rhyolite pumices and co-erupted granophyric (granite) xenoliths yield evidence for rapid magma generation and crystallization prior to their eruption at 15·2 ± 2·9 ka at the Alid volcanic center in the Danikil Depression, Eritrea. Whole-rock U and Th isotopic analyses show 230Th excesses up to 50% in basalts <10 000 years old from the surrounding Oss lava fields. The 15 ka rhyolites also have 30–40% 230Th excesses. Similarity in U–Th disequilibrium, and in Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic values, implies that the rhyolites are mostly differentiated from the local basaltic magma. Given the (230Th/232Th) ratio of the young basalts, and presumably the underlying mantle, the (230Th/232Th) ratio of the rhyolites upon eruption could be generated by in situ decay in about 50 000 years. Limited (∼5%) assimilation of old crust would hasten the lowering of (230Th/232Th) and allow the process to take place in as little as 30 000 years. Final crystallization of the Alid granophyre occurred rapidly and at shallow depths at ∼20–25 ka, as confirmed by analyses of mineral separates and ion microprobe data on individual zircons. Evidently, 30 000–50 000 years were required for extraction of basalt from its mantle source region, subsequent crystallization and melt extraction to form silicic magmas, and final crystallization of the shallow intrusion. The granophyre was then ejected during eruption of the comagmatic rhyolites.

  6. Geochemistry of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, F.V.; Straub, K.T.

    1996-03-01

    Over 100 samples have been gathered from the Lathrop Wells volcanic center to assess different models of basalt petrogenesis and constrain the physical mechanisms of magma ascent in the Yucca Mountain region. Samples have been analyzed for major and trace-element chemistry, Nd, Sr and Ph isotopes, and mineral chemistry. All eruptive units contain olivine phenocrysts, but only the oldest eruptive units contain plagioclase phenocrysts. Compositions of minerals vary little between eruptive units. Geochemical data show that most of the eruptive units at Lathrop Wells defined by field criteria can be distinguished by major and trace-element chemistry. Normative compositions of basalts at Lathrop Wells correlate with stratigraphic position. The oldest basalts are primarily nepheline normative and the youngest basalts are exclusively hypersthene normative, indicating increasing silica saturation with time. Trace-element and major-element variations among eruptive units are statistically significant and support the conclusion that eruptive units at Lathrop Wells represent separate and independent magma batches. This conclusion indicates that magmas in the Yucca Mountain region ascend at preferred eruption sites rather than randomly.

  7. Fluid-magmatic systems and volcanic centers in Northern Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobisevich, Alexey L.; Masurenkov, Yuri P.; Pouzich, Irina N.; Laverova, Ninel I.

    2013-04-01

    The central segment of Alpine mobile folded system and the Greater Caucasus is considered with respect to fluid-magmatic activity within modern and Holocene volcanic centers. A volcanic center is a combination of volcanoes, intrusions, and hydrothermal features supported by endogenous flow of matter and energy localised in space and steady in time; responsible for magma generation and characterized by structural representation in the form of circular dome and caldera associations. Results of complimentary geological and geophysical studies carried out in the Elbrus volcanic area and the Pyatogorsk volcanic center are presented. The deep magmatic source and the peripheral magmatic chamber of the Elbrus volcano are outlined via comparative analysis of geological and experimental geophysical data (microgravity studies, magneto-telluric profiling, temperature of carbonaceous mineral waters). It has been determined that the peripheral magmatic chamber and the deep magmatic source of the volcano are located at depths of 0-7 and 20-30 km below sea level, respectively, and the geothermal gradient beneath the volcano is 100°C/km. In this study, analysis of processes of modern heat outflux produced by carbonaceous springs in the Elbrus volcanic center is carried out with respect to updated information about spatial configuration of deep fluid-magmatic structures of the Elbrus volcano. It has been shown, that degradation of the Elbrus glaciers throughout the historical time is related both to climatic variations and endogenic heat. The stable fast rate of melting for the glaciers on the volcano's eastern slope is of theoretical and practical interest as factors of eruption prognosis. The system approach to studying volcanism implies that events that seem to be outside the studied process should not be ignored. This concerns glaciers located in the vicinity of volcanoes. The crustal rocks contacting with the volcanism products exchange matter and energy between each other

  8. Fluid-magmatic systems and volcanic centers in Northern Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobisevich, A. L.; Masurenkov, Yu. P.; Pouzich, I. N.; Laverova, N. I.

    2012-04-01

    The central segment of Alpine mobile folded system and the Greater Caucasus is considered with respect to fluid-magmatic activity within modern and Holocene volcanic centers. A volcanic center is a combination of volcanoes, intrusions, and hydrothermal features supported by endogenous flow of matter and energy localised in space and steady in time; responsible for magma generation and characterized by structural representation in the form of circular dome and caldera associations. Results of complimentary geological and geophysical studies carried out in the Elbrus volcanic area and the Pyatogorsk volcanic center are presented. The deep magmatic source and the peripheral magmatic chamber of the Elbrus volcano are outlined via comparative analysis of geological and experimental geophysical data (microgravity studies, magneto-telluric profiling, temperature of carbonaceous mineral waters). It has been determined that the peripheral magmatic chamber and the deep magmatic source of the volcano are located at depths of 0-7 and 20-30 km below sea level, respectively, and the geothermal gradient beneath the volcano is 100°C/km. In this study, analysis of processes of modern heat outflux produced by carbonaceous springs in the Elbrus volcanic center is carried out with respect to updated information about spatial configuration of deep fluid-magmatic structures of the Elbrus volcano. It has been shown, that degradation of the Elbrus glaciers throughout the historical time is related both to climatic variations and endogenic heat. The stable fast rate of melting for the glaciers on the volcano's eastern slope is of theoretical and practical interest as factors of eruption prognosis. The system approach to studying volcanism implies that events that seem to be outside the studied process should not be ignored. This concerns glaciers located in the vicinity of volcanoes. The crustal rocks contacting with the volcanism products exchange matter and energy between each other

  9. Validation of Volcanic Ash Forecasting Performed by the Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salemi, A.; Hanna, J.

    2009-12-01

    In support of NOAA’s mission to protect life and property, the Satellite Analysis Branch (SAB) uses satellite imagery to monitor volcanic eruptions and track volcanic ash. The Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) was established in late 1997 through an agreement with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). A volcanic ash advisory (VAA) is issued every 6 hours while an eruption is occurring. Information about the current location and height of the volcanic ash as well as any pertinent meteorological information is contained within the VAA. In addition, when ash is detected in satellite imagery, 6-, 12- and 18-hour forecasts of ash height and location are provided. This information is garnered from many sources including Meteorological Watch Offices (MWOs), pilot reports (PIREPs), model forecast winds, radiosondes and volcano observatories. The Washington VAAC has performed a validation of their 6, 12 and 18 hour airborne volcanic ash forecasts issued since October, 2007. The volcanic ash forecasts are viewed dichotomously (yes/no) with the frequency of yes and no events placed into a contingency table. A large variety of categorical statistics useful in describing forecast performance are then computed from the resulting contingency table.

  10. Preliminary geologic map of the Sleeping Butte volcanic centers

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.M.; Perry, F.V.

    1991-07-01

    The Sleeping Butte volcanic centers comprise two, spatially separate, small-volume (<0.1 km{sup 3}) basaltic centers. The centers were formed by mildly explosive Strombolian eruptions. The Little Black Peak cone consists of a main scoria cone, two small satellitic scoria mounds, and associated lobate lava flows that vented from sites at the base of the scoria cone. The Hidden Cone center consists of a main scoria cone that developed on the north-facing slope of Sleeping Butte. The center formed during two episodes. The first included the formation of the main scoria cone, and venting of aa lava flows from radial dikes at the northeast base of the cone. The second included eruption of scoria-fall deposits from the summit crater. The ages of the Little Black Peak and the Hidden Cone are estimated to be between 200 to 400 ka based on the whole-rock K-Ar age determinations with large analytical undertainty. This age assignment is consistent with qualitative observations of the degree of soil development and geomorphic degradation of volcanic landforms. The younger episode of the Hidden Cone is inferred to be significantly younger and probably of Late Pleistocene or Holocene age. This is based on the absence of cone slope rilling, the absence of cone-slope apron deposits, and erosional unconformity between the two episodes, the poor horizon- development of soils, and the presence of fall deposits on modern alluvial surfaces. Paleomagnetic data show that the centers record similar but not identical directions of remanent magnetization. Paleomagnetic data have not been obtained for the youngest deposits of the Hidden Cone center. Further geochronology, soils, geomorphic, and petrology studies are planned of the Sleeping Butte volcanic centers 20 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Geology of the Ugashik-Mount Peulik Volcanic Center, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Thomas P.

    2004-01-01

    The Ugashik-Mount Peulik volcanic center, 550 km southwest of Anchorage on the Alaska Peninsula, consists of the late Quaternary 5-km-wide Ugashik caldera and the stratovolcano Mount Peulik built on the north flank of Ugashik. The center has been the site of explosive volcanism including a caldera-forming eruption and post-caldera dome-destructive activity. Mount Peulik has been formed entirely in Holocene time and erupted in 1814 and 1845. A large lava dome occupies the summit crater, which is breached to the west. A smaller dome is perched high on the southeast flank of the cone. Pyroclastic-flow deposits form aprons below both domes. One or more sector-collapse events occurred early in the formation of Mount Peulik volcano resulting in a large area of debris-avalanche deposits on the volcano's northwest flank. The Ugashik-Mount Peulik center is a calcalkaline suite of basalt, andesite, dacite, and rhyolite, ranging in SiO2 content from 51 to 72 percent. The Ugashik-Mount Peulik magmas appear to be co-genetic in a broad sense and their compositional variation has probably resulted from a combination of fractional crystallization and magma-mixing. The most likely scenario for a future eruption is that one or more of the summit domes on Mount Peulik are destroyed as new magma rises to the surface. Debris avalanches and pyroclastic flows may then move down the west and, less likely, east flanks of the volcano for distances of 10 km or more. A new lava dome or series of domes would be expected to form either during or within some few years after the explosive disruption of the previous dome. This cycle of dome disruption, pyroclastic flow generation, and new dome formation could be repeated several times in a single eruption. The volcano poses little direct threat to human population as the area is sparsely populated. The most serious hazard is the effect of airborne volcanic ash on aircraft since Mount Peulik sits astride heavily traveled air routes connecting the U

  12. Seismic monitoring at Cascade Volcanic Centers, 2004?status and recommendations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, Seth C.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to assess the current (May, 2004) status of seismic monitoring networks at the 13 major Cascade volcanic centers. Included in this assessment are descriptions of each network, analyses of the ability of each network to detect and to locate seismic activity, identification of specific weaknesses in each network, and a prioritized list of those networks that are most in need of additional seismic stations. At the outset it should be recognized that no Cascade volcanic center currently has an adequate seismic network relative to modern-day networks at Usu Volcano (Japan) or Etna and Stromboli volcanoes (Italy). For a system the size of Three Sisters, for example, a modern-day, cutting-edge seismic network would ideally consist of a minimum of 10 to 12 short-period three-component seismometers (for determining particle motions, reliable S-wave picks, moment tensor inversions, fault-plane solutions, and other important seismic parameters) and 7 to 10 broadband sensors (which, amongst other considerations, enable detection and location of very long period (VLP) and other low-frequency events, moment tensor inversions, and, because of their wide dynamic range, on-scale recording of large-amplitude events). Such a dense, multi component seismic network would give the ability to, for example, detect in near-real-time earthquake migrations over a distance of ~0.5km or less, locate tremor sources, determine the nature of a seismic source (that is, pure shear, implosive, explosive), provide on-scale recordings of very small and very large-amplitude seismic signals, and detect localized changes in seismic stress tensor orientations caused by movement of magma bodies. However, given that programmatic resources are currently limited, installation of such networks at this time is unrealistic. Instead, this report focuses on identifying what additional stations are needed to guarantee that anomalous seismicity associated with volcanic unrest will be

  13. Hydrothermal Solute Flux from Ebeko Volcanic Center, Paramushir, Kuril Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Y.; Kalacheva, E.; Kotenko, T.; Chaplygin, I.

    2014-12-01

    Ebeko volcano on the northern part of Paramushir Island, Northern Kurils, is characterized by frequent phreatic eruptions, a strong low-temperature fumarolic activity at the summit and was the object of comprehensive volcanological and geochemical studies during the last half a century. The volcanic center is composed of several Pleistocene volcanic structures aadjacent to Ebeko and hosts a hydrothermal system with a high outflow rate of hot SO4-Cl acidic water (Upper Yurieva springs) with the current maximum temperature of ~85oC, pH 1.3 and TDS ~ 10 g/L. All discharging thermal waters are drained by the Yurieva River to the Sea of Okhotsk. The hot springs have been changing in time, generally decreasing their activity from near boiling in 1960s, with TDS ~ 20 g/L and the presence of a small steaming field at the upper part of the ~ 700 m long discharging area, to a much lower discharge rate of main vents, lower temperature and the absence of the steaming ground. The spring chemistry did not react to the Ebeko volcanic activity (14 strong phreato-magmatic events during the last 60 years).The total measured outputs of chloride and sulfur from the system last time (2006-2010) were estimated on average as 730 g/s and 980 g/s, respectively, which corresponds to the equivalent fluxes of 64 t/d of HCl and 169 t/d of SO2. These values are higher than the fumarolic volatile output from Ebeko. The estimated discharge rate of hot (85oC) water from the system with ~ 3500 ppm of chloride is about 0.3 m3/s which is much higher than the thermal water discharge from El Chichon or Copahue volcano-hydrothermal systems and among the highest hot water natural outputs ever measured for a volcano-hydrothermal system. We also report the chemical composition (major and ~ 60 trace elements including REE) of water from the main hot spring vents and the Yurieva river mouth.

  14. Geochemistry of high-potassium rocks from the mid-Tertiary Guffey volcanic center, Thirtynine Mile volcanic field, central Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wobus, Reinhard A.; Mochel, David W.; Mertzman, Stanley A.; Eide, Elizabeth A.; Rothwarf, Miriam T.; Loeffler, Bruce M.; Johnson, David A.; Keating, Gordon N.; Sultze, Kimberly; Benjamin, Anne E.; Venzke, Edward A.; Filson, Tammy

    1990-07-01

    The Guffey volcanic center is the largest within the 2000 km2 mid-Tertiary Thirtynine Mile volcanic field of central Colorado. This study is the first to provide extensive chemical data for these alkalic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, which represent the eroded remnants of a large stratovolcano of Oligocene age. Formation of early domes and flows of latite and trachyte within the Guffey center was followed by extrusion of a thick series of basalt, trachybasalt, and shoshonite flows and lahars. Plugs, dikes, and vents ranging from basalt to rhyolite cut the thick mafic deposits, and felsic tuffs and tuff breccias chemically identical to the small rhyolitic plutons are locally preserved. Whole-rock major and trace element analyses of 80 samples, ranging almost continuously from 47% to 78%SiO2, indicate that the rocks of the Guffey center are among the most highly enriched in K2O (up to 6%) and rare earth elements (typically 200-300 ppm) of any volcanic rocks in Colorado. These observations, along with the relatively high concentrations of Ba and Rb and the depletion of Cr and Ni, suggest an appreciable contribution of lower crustal material to the magmas that produced the Thirtynine Mile volcanic rocks.

  15. Geochemistry of high-potassium rocks from the mid-Tertiary Guffey volcanic center, Thirtynine Mile volcanic field, central Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Wobus, R.A.; Mochel, D.W. ); Mertzman, S.A.; Eide, E.A.; Rothwarf, M.T. ); Loeffler, B.M.; Johnson, D.A. ); Keating, G.N.; Sultz, K. ); Benjamin, A.E. ); Venzke, E.A. ); Filson, T. )

    1990-07-01

    The Guffey volcanic center is the largest within the 2000 km{sup 2} mid-Tertiary Thirtynine Mile volcanic field of central Colorado. This study is the first to provide extensive chemical data for these alkalic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, which present the eroded remnants of a large stratovolcano of Oligocene age. Formation of early domes and flows of latite and trachyte within the Guffey center was followed by extrusion of a thick series of basalt, trachybasalt, and shoshonite flows and lahars. Plugs, dikes, and vents ranging from basalt to rhyolite cut the thick mafic deposits, and felsic tuffs breccias chemically identical to the small rhyolitic plutons are locally preserved. Whole-rack major and trace element analyses of 80 samples, ranging almost continuously from 47% to 78% SiO{sub 2}, indicate that the rocks of the Guffey center are among the most highly enriched in K{sub 2}O (up to 6%) and rare earth elements (typically 200-300 ppm) of any volcanic rocks in Colorado. These observations, along with the relatively high concentrations of Ba and Rb and the depletion of Cr and Ni, suggest an appreciable contribution of lower crustal material to the magmas that produced the Thirtynine Mile volcanic rocks.

  16. Stratigraphy and major element geochemistry of the Lassen Volcanic Center, California

    SciTech Connect

    Clynne, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Detailed geologic mapping of 200 km/sup 2/ in and near Lassen Volcanic National Park, California and reconnaissance of the surrounding area, combined with reinterpretation of data in the literature, allow definition of the Lassen Volcano Center and provide the stratigraphic framework necessary for interpretation of major-element chemical data. The Lassen Volcanic Center developed in three stages. Stage I and II produced Brokeoff Volcanic, an andesitic composite cone that erupted mafic andesite to dacite 0.6 to 0.35 my ago. Volcanism then shifted in character and locale. Domes and flows of dacite and rhyodacite, and flows of hybrid andesite were erupted on the northern flank of Brokeoff Volcano during the period from 0.25 my ago to the present; these rocks comprise Stage III of the Lassen Volcanic Center. Rocks of the Lassen Volcanic Center are typical of subduction-related calc-alkaline volcanic rocks emplaced on a continental margin overlying sialic crust. Porphyritic andestic and dacite with high Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, low TiO/sub 2/, medium K/sub 2/O, and FeO/MgO 1.5-2.0 are the most abundant rock types. Major-element chemical trends of rock sequences indicate a mafic to silicic evolution for magmas of the Lassen Volcanic Center, probably owing to crystal fractionation of calc-alkaline basalt. 23 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Nature and origin of secondary mineral coatings on volcanic rocks of the Black Mountain, Stonewall Mountain, and Kane Springs Wash volcanic centers, southern, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taranik, James V.; Hsu, Liang C.; Spatz, David M.; Chenevey, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) genetic, spectral, and LANDSAT Thematic Mapper imagery relationship between desert varnish and tertiary volcanic host rocks, southern Nevada; (2) reconnaissance geologic mapping of the Kane Springs Wash Volcanic Center, Lincoln County, Nevada, using multispectral thermal infrared imagery; (3) interregional comparisons of desert varnish; and (4) airborne scanner (GERIS) imagery of the Kane Springs Wash Volcanic Center, Lincoln County, Nevada.

  18. Major-element geochemistry of the Silent Canyon-Black Mountain peralkaline volcanic centers, northwestern Nevada Test Site: applications to an assessment of renewed volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowe, Bruce M.; Sargent, Kenneth A.

    1979-01-01

    The Silent Canyon and Black Mountain volcanic centers are located in the northern part of the Nevada Test Site. The Silent Canyon volcanic center is a buried cauldron complex of Miocene age (13-15 m.y.). Black Mountain volcanic center is an elliptical-shaped cauldron complex of late Miocene age. The lavas and tuffs of the two centers comprise a subalkaline-peralkaline association. Rock types range from quartz normative subalkaline trachyte and rhyolite to peralkaline comendite. The Gold Flat Member of the Thirsty Canyon Tuff (Black Mountain) is a pantellerite. The major-element geochemistry of the Black Mountain-Silent Canyon volcanic centers differs in the total range and distribution of Si02, contents, the degree of peralkalinity (molecular Na2O+K2O>Al2O3) and in the values of total iron and alumina through the range of rock types. These differences indicate that the suites were unrelated and evolved from differing magma bodies. The Black Mountain volcanic cycle represents a renewed phase of volcanism following cessation of the Timber Mountain-Silent Canyon volcanic cycles. Consequently, there is a small but numerically incalculable probability of recurrence of Black Mountain-type volcanism within the Nevada Test Site region. This represents a potential risk with respect to deep geologic storage of high-level radioactive waste at the Nevada Test Site.

  19. Geology of Volcan Las Navajas, a pleistocene trachyte/peralkaline rhyolite volcanic center in Nayarit, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hegre, J.A.; Nelson, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Volcan Las Navajas, located in the northwestern portion of the Mexican Volcanic Belt has produced a sequence of volcanic rocks with compositions in marked contrast to the predominantly calc-alkaline volcanoes which predominate in this part of Mexico. The oldest exposed lavas consist of trachytes with 63% SiO/sub 2/, 6% FeO*, and 500 ppm Zr along with comenditic rhyolites with 68% SiO/sub 2/, 5% FeO*, 800 ppm Zr, and an agpaitic index of 1.0. These lavas were followed by the eruption of a comenditic ash-flow tuff and the formation of a caldera 2.7 km in diameter. This caldera was subsequently filled by eruptions of pantelleritic rhyolite obsidian lava flows with 72% SiO/sub 2/, 8% FeO*, 1100 ppm Zr, and an agpaitic index of 1.5 to 1.9. A second caldera was then formed which is offset to the south of the main eruptive vents for previous eruptions. This younger caldera has a diameter of about 4.8 km and its southern walls have been covered by calc-alkaline andesitic lavas erupted from nearby Sanganguey volcano. Volcanoclastic sediments in the floor of the younger caldera have been tilted and faulted in a manner suggestive of late stage resurgence. Subsequent eruptions within the caldera, however, have been restricted to calc-alkaline andesites. Tectonically, the area in which this volcano occurs appears to have been undergoing a crustal rifting event since the Pliocene. The occurrence of these peralkaline rocks lends further support to such a hypothesis.

  20. Silicic Volcanics in the South Mountain Region: A Volcanic Center with the Breakup of Rodinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, C. W.; Rooney, T. O.; Sinha, A.

    2008-12-01

    Commonly, large igneous provinces are associated with the break-up of continents. The waning stages of large igneous provinces prior to continental rifting and breakup are characterized by volumetrically less significant felsic volcanics. The origin of these felsic volcanics remains a source of significant debate - do they represent additions of new crust derived from the mantle, or the melting and recycling of continental crust? We examine the South Mountain felsic volcanicism in Pennsylvania, part of a sequence of metabasalts and metarhyolites of the Catoctin Formation. These Late Neoproterozoic magmas are associated with the breakup of Rodinia and the formation of the Iapetus Ocean. The South Mountain felsic volcanics are predominantly rhyolitic and can be subdivided into high Al2O3 (>11.8 wt.%) and low Al2O3 (<11.8 wt.%) groups. Each group forms distinctive trends against differentiation indices. Cl Chondrite normalized spider diagrams show that both groups are parallel to each other, the low-Al group having higher REE concentrations. The low-Al group forms REE trends that decrease at a greater magnitude than the high-Al group with increasing SiO2, excluding Eu. A Eu anomaly is present in both groups but is more pronounced in the low-Al group. Models of REE variations in felsic liquids [Brophy, 2008] indicate that amphibolite melting yields magmas with decreasing La and Yb with increasing SiO2. In both groups, La and Yb indicate amphibolite partial melting trends. Decreasing Dy/Yb with increasing SiO2 is an indicator of a hornblende rich source for the South Mountain rhyolites. To explain these geochemical trends, we propose that the South Mountain rhyolites were produced by the partial melting of a plagioclase-bearing amphibolite source. The difference in magnitude of the Eu anomaly between the two groups may be produced by variable concentrations of plagioclase in the source amphibolite. Comparison of the South Mountain rhyolites with other large igneous

  1. Characteristics of Mineralized Volcanic Centers in Javanese Sunda Island Arc, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setijadji, L. D.; Imai, A.; Watanabe, K.

    2007-05-01

    The subduction-related arc magmatism in Java island, Sunda Arc, Indonesia might have started in earliest Tertiary period, but the distinctively recognizable volcanic belts related with Java trench subduction occurred since the Oligocene. We compiled geoinformation on volcanic centers of different epochs, distribution of metallic mineral deposits, petrochemistry of volcanic rocks, geologic structures, and regional gravity image in order to elucidate characteristics of the known mineralized volcanic centers. Metallic deposits are present in various styles from porphyry-related, high-sulfidation, and low-sulfidation epithermal systems; all related with subaerial volcanism and subvolcanic plutonism. Only few and small occurrences of volcanigenic massive sulfides deposits suggest that some mineralization also occurred in a submarine environment. Most locations of mineral deposits can be related with location of Tertiary volcanic centers along the volcanic arcs (i.e. volcanoes whose genetic link with subduction is clear). On the other side there is no mineralization has been identified to occur associated with backarc magmatism whose genetic link with subduction is under debate. There is strong evidence that major metallic deposit districts are located within compressive tectonic regime and bound by coupling major, deep, and old crustal structures (strike-slip faults) that are recognizable from regional gravity anomaly map. So far the most economical deposits and the only existing mines at major industry scale are high-grade epithermal gold deposits which are young (Upper Miocene to Upper Pliocene), concentrated in Bayah dome complex in west Java, and are associated with alkalic magmatism-volcanism. On the other hand, known porphyry Cu-Au deposits are associated with old (Oligocene to Upper Miocene) stocks, and except for one case, all deposits are located in east Java. Petrochemical data suggest a genetic relationship between porphyry mineralization with low- to

  2. Center for Volcanic and Tectonic Studies: 1992--1993 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The annual report of the Center for Volcanic Studies (CVTS) contains a series of papers, reprints and a Master of Science thesis that review the progress made by the CVTS between October 1, 1992 and February 1, 1994. During this period CVTS staff focused on several topics that have direct relevance to volcanic hazards related to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These topics include: (1) polygenetic/polycyclic volcanism in Crater Flat, Nevada; (2) the role of the mantle during crustal extension; (3) the detailed geology of Crater Flat, Nevada; (4) Pliocene volcanoes in the Reveille Range, south-central Nevada; (5) estimating the probability of disruption of the proposed repository by volcanic eruptions. This topic is being studied by Dr. C.H. Ho at UNLV. The report contains copies of these individual papers as they were presented in various conference proceedings.

  3. Geophysical investigations of buried volcanic centers near Yucca Mountain, Southwest Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Kirchoff-Stein, K. S.; Oliver, H.W.

    1993-01-01

    Several aeromagnetic dipolar anomalies occur over flat, alluvial areas near Yucca Mountain that resemble anomalies typically associated with subaerial basaltic volcanic centers. Detailed gravity and ground magnetic data were collected along a surveyed traverse across an aeromagnetic anomaly in Amargosa Valley, south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Modeling of the ground magnetic data collected over the largest of these anomalies, the Lathrop Wells aeromagnetic anomaly, indicates that the top of the causative body, most likely basalt, is less than 250 m below the surface. Gravity data indicate an apparent lack of an associated gravity anomaly and suggest that either the causative body may be tuff rather than basalt, or the volume of the body is small. Both drilling and collection of more magnetic and gravity data are necessary because ages and volumes of buried volcanic centers are important constraints for estimating the probability of potential volcanism near the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain.

  4. Seasonal seismicity at western United States volcanic centers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christiansen, L.B.; Hurwitz, S.; Saar, M.O.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Hsieh, P.A.

    2005-01-01

    We examine 20-yr data sets of seismic activity from 10 volcanic areas in the western United States for annual periodic signals (seasonality), focusing on large calderas (Long Valley caldera and Yellowstone) and stratovolcanoes (Cascade Range). We apply several statistical methods to test for seasonality in the seismic catalogs. In 4 of the 10 regions, statistically significant seasonal modulation of seismicity (> 90% probability) occurs, such that there is an increase in the monthly seismicity during a given portion of the year. In five regions, seasonal seismicity is significant in the upper 3 km of the crust. Peak seismicity occurs in the summer and autumn in Mt. St. Helens, Hebgen Lake/Madison Valley, Yellowstone Lake, and Mammoth Mountain. In the eastern south moat of Long Valley caldera (LVC) peak seismicity occurs in the winter and spring. We quantify the possible external forcing mechanisms that could modulate seasonal seismicity. Both snow unloading and groundwater recharge can generate large stress changes of > 5 kPa at seismogenic depths and may thus contribute to seasonality. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Chemical evolution of a high-level magma system: the Black Mountain volcanic center, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, T.A.; Noble, D.C.; Younker, L.W.

    1983-09-01

    A comprehensive study of stratigraphically controlled samples of both lavas and ash-flow tuffs from the Black Mountain volcanic center enables us to evaluate magmatic processes. The results of this study are used to: (1) determine how this high-level magma system developed; (2) compare this system with other similar systems; and (3) correlate ash-flow sheets using their chemical characteristics.

  6. Pliocene to Recent alkalic volcanic centers in southeast Alaska: western component of the Northern Cordilleran Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, S.; Baichtal, J.; Calvert, A. T.; Layer, P.

    2011-12-01

    More than 25 volcanic centers, including 11 newly identified flows, ranging in age from 6 Ma to 110 years old and scattered throughout southeast (SE) Alaska, constitute a previously unrecognized western component of the Northern Cordilleran Volcanic Province (NCVP). The volcanic rocks are dominantly mafic, locally bimodal, high-Na alkalic rocks that have "within plate" element ratios and primitive 87/86Sri ratios at 0.703. Mafic rocks have average MgO/SiO2 ratios of 0.13, TiO2/MnO ratios of 13.86, Nb/Zr ratios of 0.13, and La/Nb ratios of 0.93 (n=43). Trace element chemistry for obsidian from Suemez Island is indistinguishable from that of obsidian from Mount Edziza in British Columbia. These volcanic rocks have similar compositions, ages, isotopic signatures, and chemistry to rocks of the NCVP and are underlain by the same Northern Cordilleran (Pacific-Juan de Fuca) slab window. Some volcanic fields have associated warm springs. The volcanoes and warm springs are located along structures, commonly N-S and NW-SE striking faults, indicating that their plumbing systems are controlled by extension along the Pacific-North America transform margin in the vicinity of SE Alaska. Widely distributed thermal springs in SE Alaska reflect an elevated geothermal gradient under SE Alaska related to the slab window. Volcanic flows and tephra overlie and underlie glacial and marine deposits. Flows have subaerial, subaqueous, and ice contact features. Pollen, foraminifer, tree ring, C14, and 40Ar/39Ar ages bracket the timing of volcanic flows, glacial advances and retreats, and subsidence and uplift of marine terraces. Basalts in Behm Canal yielded K-Ar ages of 6.1±0.18 Ma and 5.0±2 Ma. On Suemez Island, 2 rhyolite domes that yielded 40Ar/39Ar ages of 842±11 ka and 851±17 ka lie between glacial deposits and have ice contact features. A basalt flow that yielded a 40Ar/39Ar age of 367.7± 8.7 ka fills a deeply incised pre-existing fiord in Rudyerd Bay and has been carved by

  7. Significant Volcanic Eruptions Database at NOAA’s National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroker, K. J.; Dunbar, P. K.

    2009-12-01

    NOAA’s National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) maintains a historical natural hazards event database that includes historic tsunami events, significant earthquakes, and significant volcanic eruptions. Currently, the database holds over 2200 tsunami source events, 13000 tsunami runup locations, 5500 earthquakes, and over 480 significant volcanic eruptions. NOAA is the lead agency for tsunami forecast and warning in the U.S. and has maintained the tsunami event database for several decades. Since the majority of tsunamis are caused by earthquakes, the database was expanded to include a significant earthquake database that describes earthquakes which generated tsunamis. However, seismic events are not the only mechanism for generating tsunamis, volcanic eruptions account for 6% of all tsunamis globally. In fact, one of the most devastating tsunamis was generated by a volcanic eruption when Krakatau erupted in 1883 killing over 36,000 people up to 800 km from the source. Due to the importance in the Department of Commerce of understanding the socioeconomic effects of natural hazards, in 2003 the database was expanded to contain all significant volcanic eruptions. We have defined a significant volcanic eruption as one that meets at least one of the following criteria: caused fatalities, caused moderate damage (approximately $1 million or more), caused a tsunami, or was associated with a major earthquake. The database is focused on describing socioeconomic effects such as deaths, damage, injuries, houses destroyed, and number of people missing. The database gives us an estimate of over 300,000 deaths from volcanic eruptions since 79 AD. However, for some earlier eruptions we know that there were likely many fatalities, but estimates are not given. In addition to the significant volcanic eruptions, NGDC also maintains a volcanic ash advisory database. The Volcanic Ash Advisory Database contains VAA messages, VAFTAD model output, and substantiating information from 1983

  8. Changes in magma storage conditions following caldera collapse at Okataina Volcanic Center, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Allison; Cooper, Kari M.; Leever, Marissa; Wimpenny, Josh; Deering, Chad; Rooney, Tyrone; Gravley, Darren; Yin, Qing-zhu

    2015-12-15

    Large silicic volcanic centers produce both small rhyolitic eruptions and catastrophic caldera-forming eruptions. Although changes in trace element and isotopic compositions within eruptions following caldera collapse have been observed at rhyolitic volcanic centers such as Yellowstone and Long Valley, much still remains unknown about the ways in which magma reservoirs are affected by caldera collapse. We present 238U–230Th age, trace element, and Hf isotopic data from individual zircon crystals from four eruptions from the Okataina Volcanic Center, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, in order to assess changes in trace element and isotopic composition of the reservoir following the 45-ka caldera-forming Rotoiti eruption. Our data indicate that (1) mixing of magmas derived from crustal melts and mantle melts takes place within the shallow reservoir; (2) while the basic processes of melt generation likely did not change significantly between pre- and post-caldera rhyolites, post-caldera zircons show increased trace element and isotopic heterogeneity that suggests a decrease in the degree of interconnectedness of the liquid within the reservoir following collapse; and (3) post-caldera eruptions from different vents indicate different storage times of the amalgamated melt prior to eruption. Furthermore, these data further suggest that the timescales needed to generate large volumes of eruptible melt may depend on the timescales needed to increase interconnectedness and achieve widespread homogenization throughout the reservoir.

  9. Changes in magma storage conditions following caldera collapse at Okataina Volcanic Center, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Allison; Cooper, Kari M.; Leever, Marissa; Wimpenny, Josh; Deering, Chad; Rooney, Tyrone; Gravley, Darren; Yin, Qing-zhu

    2016-01-01

    Large silicic volcanic centers produce both small rhyolitic eruptions and catastrophic caldera-forming eruptions. Although changes in trace element and isotopic compositions within eruptions following caldera collapse have been observed at rhyolitic volcanic centers such as Yellowstone and Long Valley, much still remains unknown about the ways in which magma reservoirs are affected by caldera collapse. We present 238U-230Th age, trace element, and Hf isotopic data from individual zircon crystals from four eruptions from the Okataina Volcanic Center, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, in order to assess changes in trace element and isotopic composition of the reservoir following the 45-ka caldera-forming Rotoiti eruption. Our data indicate that (1) mixing of magmas derived from crustal melts and mantle melts takes place within the shallow reservoir; (2) while the basic processes of melt generation likely did not change significantly between pre- and post-caldera rhyolites, post-caldera zircons show increased trace element and isotopic heterogeneity that suggests a decrease in the degree of interconnectedness of the liquid within the reservoir following collapse; and (3) post-caldera eruptions from different vents indicate different storage times of the amalgamated melt prior to eruption. These data further suggest that the timescales needed to generate large volumes of eruptible melt may depend on the timescales needed to increase interconnectedness and achieve widespread homogenization throughout the reservoir.

  10. Changes in magma storage conditions following caldera collapse at Okataina Volcanic Center, New Zealand

    DOE PAGES

    Rubin, Allison; Cooper, Kari M.; Leever, Marissa; ...

    2015-12-15

    Large silicic volcanic centers produce both small rhyolitic eruptions and catastrophic caldera-forming eruptions. Although changes in trace element and isotopic compositions within eruptions following caldera collapse have been observed at rhyolitic volcanic centers such as Yellowstone and Long Valley, much still remains unknown about the ways in which magma reservoirs are affected by caldera collapse. We present 238U–230Th age, trace element, and Hf isotopic data from individual zircon crystals from four eruptions from the Okataina Volcanic Center, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, in order to assess changes in trace element and isotopic composition of the reservoir following the 45-ka caldera-formingmore » Rotoiti eruption. Our data indicate that (1) mixing of magmas derived from crustal melts and mantle melts takes place within the shallow reservoir; (2) while the basic processes of melt generation likely did not change significantly between pre- and post-caldera rhyolites, post-caldera zircons show increased trace element and isotopic heterogeneity that suggests a decrease in the degree of interconnectedness of the liquid within the reservoir following collapse; and (3) post-caldera eruptions from different vents indicate different storage times of the amalgamated melt prior to eruption. Furthermore, these data further suggest that the timescales needed to generate large volumes of eruptible melt may depend on the timescales needed to increase interconnectedness and achieve widespread homogenization throughout the reservoir.« less

  11. FIERCE: FInding volcanic ERuptive CEnters by a grid-searching algorithm in R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniel, Roberto; Guzmán, Silvina; Neri, Marco

    2017-02-01

    Most eruptions are fed by dikes whose spatial distribution can provide important insights into the positions of possible old eruptive centers that are no longer clearly identifiable in the field. Locating these centers can in turn have further applications, e.g., in hazard assessment. We propose a purely geometrical algorithm—implemented as an R open-source script—named FIERCE (FInding volcanic ERuptive CEnters) based on the number of intersections of dikes identified within a grid of rectangular cells overlain onto a given search region. The algorithm recognizes radial distributions, tangential distributions, or combinations of both. We applied FIERCE to both well-known and less-studied volcanic edifices, in different tectonic settings and having different evolution histories, ages, and compositions. At Summer Coon volcano, FIERCE demonstrated that a radial dike distribution clearly indicates the position of the central vent. On Etna, it confirmed the position of the most important ancient eruptive centers and allowed us to study effects of the structural alignments and topography. On Stromboli, FIERCE not only enabled confirmation of some published locations of older vents but also identified possible vent areas not previously suggested. It also highlighted the influence of the regional structural trend and the collapse scars. FIERCE demonstrated that the dikes at the Somma-Vesuvius were emplaced before formation of Mt. Somma's caldera and indicated a plausible location for the old volcanic crater of Mt. Somma which is compatible with previous studies. At the Vicuña Pampa Volcanic Complex, FIERCE highlights the position of two different vents of a highly degraded volcano.

  12. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center: Status of field and geochronology studies

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.; Morley, R.; Wells, S.; Geissman, J.; McDonald, E.; McFadden, L.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Forman, S.

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of field and geochronology studies of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Our perspective is that it is critical to assess all possible methods for obtaining cross-checking data to resolve chronology and field problems. It is equally important to consider application of the range of chronology methods available in Quaternary geologic research. Such an approach seeks to increase the confidence in data interpretations through obtaining convergence among separate isotopic, radiogenic, and age-correlated methods. Finally, the assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses of each dating method need to be carefully described to facilitate an impartial evaluation of results. The paper is divided into two parts. The first part describes the status of continuing field studies for the volcanic center for this area south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The second part presents an overview of the preliminary results of ongoing chronology studies and their constraints on the age and stratigraphy of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Along with the chronology data, the assumptions, strengths, and limitations of each methods are discussed.

  13. Spherical Harmonic Analysis of Mountain and Volcanic Center Distributions on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchoff, M. R.; McKinnon, W. B.; Schenk, P.

    2003-12-01

    Mountains and volcanic centers on Io are broadly zonally concentrated and the two distributions are anticorrelated (e.g., Schenk et al. 2001, JGR 106, 33,201-33,222). The mountains are tectonic in origin and the interplay between volcanism and tectonism is key to understanding their origin (McKinnon et al. 2001, Geology 29, 103-106; McEwen et al. 2003, in press in Jupiter - The Planet, Satellites and Magnetosphere). Here we extend previous analyses of these distributions beyond simple (but informative!) smoothing by means of counting circles. We initially assign equal weighting to each mountain (n = 115) and volcanic center (n = 541) in the global data sets. Spectral power analysis for the mountains shows a strong peak at l = 2 and a smaller one at l = 1, little power at l = 3, and the rest of the spectrum is "white" (flat). The volcanic center distribution shows an even stronger l = 2 peak, a modest peak at l = 1, and low spectral power for l >3. The result is that two concentrations of mountains are located at ˜ 30° N, 80° W and 30° S, 260° W, with the first being substantially larger. The two volcanic center concentrations are more nearly equatorial and quite close to the sub- and antijovian points, at ˜ 5° N, 170° W and 15° S, 345° W, again with the first being larger. We also weighted the mountains by mountain length, length x width, polygonal area (footprint), and area x height (a proxy for volume). For weighting by length, the peak at l = 1 increased slightly and the peak at l = 2 decreased, but both remained statistically significant compared with a random distribution. Power spectra of the distributions weighted by length x width or polygonal area lose much of their statistical significance at l = 1 and 2, however, due to several mountains of large areal extent outside the regions of concentration above. Nevertheless, mountain concentration positions (summing low degree terms) remain virtually the same for all weightings. Volume weighting is

  14. Trace element and isotopic constraints on magmatic evolution at Lassen volcanic center

    SciTech Connect

    Bullen, T.D.; Clynne, M.A. )

    1990-11-10

    Magmatic evolution at the Lassen volcanic center (LVC) is characterized by a transition from predominantly andesitic to predominantly silicic volcanism with time. Magmas of the adesitic, or Brokeoff phase of volcanism range in composition from basaltic andesite to dacite, whereas those of silicic, or Lassen phase range in composition from basaltic andesite to rhyolite. The distinctive mixing-dominated arrays for each volcanic phase manifest the generation and evolution of two physically distinct, but genetically related magma systems. The LVC magmas have Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope characteristics that approximate two-component mixing arrays. One isotopic component is similar in composition to that of NE Pacific Ocean ridge and seamount basalts (MORB component), the other to mafic Mesozoic granitoids sampled from the neighboring Klamath and Sierra Nevada provinces (KSN component). The lack of a correlation between the major element and isotopic compositions of LVC magmas seriously limits any model for magmatic evolution that relies on assimilation of old middle to upper crust by isotopically homogeneous mafic magmas during their ascent through the crust. Alternatively, the isotopic and geochemical uniformity of the most silicic magmas of the Brokeoff and Lassen phases suggests that they are well-homogenized partial melts. The likely source region for these silicic melts is the lower crust, which the authors envision to consist primarily of mafic igneous rocks that are similar in geochemical and isotopic diversity to the regional mafic lavas.

  15. Preliminary volcano hazard assessment for the Emmons Lake volcanic center, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher; Miller, Thomas P.; Mangan, Margaret T.

    2006-01-01

    The Emmons Lake volcanic center is a large stratovolcano complex on the Alaska Peninsula near Cold Bay, Alaska. The volcanic center includes several ice- and snow-clad volcanoes within a nested caldera structure that hosts Emmons Lake and truncates a shield-like ancestral Mount Emmons edifice. From northeast to southwest, the main stratovolcanoes of the center are: Pavlof Sister, Pavlof, Little Pavlof, Double Crater, Mount Hague, and Mount Emmons. Several small cinder cones and vents are located on the floor of the caldera and on the south flank of Pavlof Volcano. Pavlof Volcano, in the northeastern part of the center, is the most historically active volcano in Alaska (Miller and others, 1998) and eruptions of Pavlof pose the greatest hazards to the region. Historical eruptions of Pavlof Volcano have been small to moderate Strombolian eruptions that produced moderate amounts of near vent lapilli tephra fallout, and diffuse ash plumes that drifted several hundreds of kilometers from the vent. Cold Bay, King Cove, Nelson Lagoon, and Sand Point have reported ash fallout from Pavlof eruptions. Drifting clouds of volcanic ash produced by eruptions of Pavlof would be a major hazard to local aircraft and could interfere with trans-Pacific air travel if the ash plume achieved flight levels. During most historical eruptions of Pavlof, pyroclastic material erupted from the volcano has interacted with the snow and ice on the volcano producing volcanic mudflows or lahars. Lahars have inundated most of the drainages heading on the volcano and filled stream valleys with variable amounts of coarse sand, gravel, and boulders. The lahars are often hot and would alter or destroy stream habitat for many years following the eruption. Other stratocones and vents within the Emmons Lake volcanic center are not known to have erupted in the past 300 years. However, young appearing deposits and lava flows suggest there may have been small explosions and minor effusive eruptive activity

  16. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center: Status of field and geochronology studies

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.; Morley, R.; Wells, S.; Geissman, J.; McDonald, E.; McFadden, L.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Forman, S.

    1993-03-01

    The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is located 20 km south of the potential Yucca Mountain site, at the south end of the Yucca Mountain range. It has long been recognized as the youngest basalt center in the region. However, determination of the age and eruptive history of the center has proven problematic. The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of field and geochronology studies of the Lathrop Wells center. Our perspective is that it is critical to assess all possible methods for obtaining cross-checking data to resolve chronology and field problems. It is equally important to consider application of the range of chronology methods available in Quaternary geologic research. Such an approach seeks to increase the confidence in data interpretations through obtaining convergence among separate isotopic, radiogenic, and age-correlated methods. Finally, the assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses of each dating method need to be carefully described to facilitate an impartial evaluation of results.

  17. Gravity and thermal models for the twin peaks silicic volcanic center, Southwestern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Carrier, D.L.; Chapman, D.S.

    1981-11-10

    Gravity, heat flow, and surface geology observations have been used as constraints for a thermal model of a late Tertiary silicic volcanic center at Twin Peaks, Utah. Silicic Volcanism began in the area with the extrusion of the Coyote Hills rhyolite 2.74 +- 0.1 m.y. ago, followed by the Cudahy Mine obsidian, felsite, and volcanoclastics, and finally by a complex sequence of domes and flows that lasted until 2.3 +- 0.1 m.y. ago. Basalt sequence span the time 2.5 to 0.9 m.y. Terrain-corrected Bouguer gravity anomalies at Twin Peaks are shaped by three features of varying characteristic dimensions: (1) a major north-northeast trending --30 mGal gravity trough roughly 40 km wide caused by a thick sequence of Cenozoic sediments in the Black Rock Desert Valley, (2) a local roughly circular -7 mGal gravity low, 26 km across, probably related to an intrusive body in the basement, and (3) a series of narrow positive anomalies up to + 10 mGal produced by the major Twin Peaks volcanic domes. The intrusive bodies have been modeled as three-dimensional vertical cylinders; the total volume of intrusive material is estimated to be about 500 km/sup 3/. Simple models, assuming conductive heat transfer and using geometrical constraints from the gravity results, predict that a negligible thermal anomaly should exist 1 m.y. after emplacement of the intrusion. This prediction is consistent with an average heat flow of 96 mW m/sup -2/ for the area, not significantly different from eastern Basin and Range values elsewhere. Magmatic longevity of this system 2.7 to 2.3 m.y. for silicic volcanism of 2.5 to 0.9 m.y. for basaltic volcanism, does not seem to prolong the cooling of the system substantially beyond that predicted by conductive cooling.

  18. Nature and origin of mineral coatings on volcanic rocks of the Black Mountain, Stonewall Mountain and Kane Springs Wash volcanic centers, southern Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taranik, J. V.; Noble, D. C.; Hsu, L. C.; Hutsinpiller, A.; Spatz, D.

    1986-01-01

    Surface coatings on volcanic rock assemblages that occur at select tertiary volcanic centers in southern Nevada were investigated using LANDSAT 5 Thematic Mapper imagery. Three project sites comprise the subject of this study: the Kane Springs Wash, Black Mountain, and Stonewall Mountain volcanic centers. LANDSAT 5 TM work scenes selected for each area are outlined along with local area geology. The nature and composition of surface coatings on the rock types within the subproject areas are determined, along with the origin of the coatings and their genetic link to host rocks, geologic interpretations are related to remote sensing units discriminated on TM imagery. Image processing was done using an ESL VAX/IDIMS image processing system, field sampling, and observation. Aerial photographs were acquired to facilitate location on the ground and to aid stratigraphic differentiation.

  19. Global correlation of volcanic centers on Venus with uplands and with extension: Influence of mantle convection and altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crumpler, L. S.; Head, James W., III; Aubele, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    The observed distribution of volcanism on Venus and its associations with geologic and tectonic characteristics are examined for significant global-scale tectonic, mantle, and volcanic influences. We find that volcanic centers are correlated geologically with zones of extension, infrequent in lowland regions, and infrequent in regions with evidence for tectonic shortening. In addition, volcanic centers are significantly concentrated in a broad region at least 10,000 km in diameter between Beta, Alta, and Themis Regiones. This area is nearly hemispheric in scale and coincides spatially with the area of greatest concentration of extensional characteristics. Our analysis suggests that the observed distribution patterns of volcanic centers reflect the regional patterns of extension, the origin of the extension and volcanism are closely related, and the hemispheric scale of both patterns implies a deep-seated origin such as large-scale interior mantle dynamic patterns. However, altitude-dependent effects on both the formation and preservation of volcanic centers could also strongly influence the observed distribution pattern.

  20. Application of remote sensing techniques to the geology of the bonanza volcanic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrs, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    A program is reported for evaluating remote sensing as an aid to geologic mapping for the past four years. Data tested in this evaluation include color and color infrared photography, multiband photography, low sun-angle photography, thermal infrared scanner imagery, and side-looking airborne radar. The relative utility of color and color infrared photography was tested as it was used to refine geologic maps in previously mapped areas, as field photos while mapping in the field, and in making photogeologic maps prior to field mapping. The latter technique served as a test of the maximum utility of the photography. In this application the photography was used successfully to locate 75% of all faults in a portion of the geologically complex Bonanza volcanic center and to map and correctly identify 93% of all Quaternary deposits and 62% of all areas of Tertiary volcanic outcrop in the area.

  1. Petrology of the Woods Mountains volcanic center, San Bernardino County, California

    SciTech Connect

    McCurry, M.O.

    1985-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to investigate magma chamber processes through a petrological study of a large, newly examined silicic volcanic center. A characterization of the volcanic center was obtained through a combination of detailed mapping, petrography, analyses of bulk major and trace elements, and microprobe analyses of phenocryst phases. Cooperative studies were undertaken which included geophysical surveys of the center, Nd-Sm and Rb-Sr isotopic systematics and K-Ar dating of the rocks. The volcanic center began at 16.4 mybp with the incremental extrusion of ca 10 km/sup 3/ of dominantly mildly peraluminous dacitic and rhyolitic magma. At 15.5 mybp 870 km/sup 3/ of metaluminous to mildly peraluminous, dominantly rhyolitic pyroclastic flows were extruded, causing the formation of a 10 km diameter caldera. This was followed from 15.5 my to 14.8 my by the incremental, intracaldera extrusion of ca 10 km/sup 3/ of metaluminous to mildly peralkaline, high silica rhyolite magma. A model of magma chamber evolution is presented as follows: (1) a thermal pulse into the base of the crust initiated partial melting of a garnet-biotite gneiss at ca 17 mybp; (2) anatectic pockets of melt of dacitic composition intruded into the upper crust; (3) an increased flux of magma at 16 mybp resulted in the formation of a large magma chamber that evolved a cap of rhyolitic magma by a fractional crystallization within counter buoyant boundary layers; (4) a decay of input into the chamber occurred soon afterward, however chemical potential gradients induced by the rapid extrusion of a large part of the rhyolitic cupola resulted in strong volatile-complex diffusion, forming a thin cap of mildly peralkaline rhyolitic magma.

  2. Stratigraphic, lithologic, and major element geochemical constraints on magmatic evolution at Lassen volcanic center, California

    SciTech Connect

    Clynne, M.A. )

    1990-11-10

    The evolution of the Lassen volcanic center is described in three stages. Stages 1 and 2 comprise the Brokeoff volcano, and 80 km{sup 3} andesitic stratocone, active from 600 to 400 ka. Brokeoff volcano is compositionally equivalent to the regional basaltic andesite to andesite volcanism in the Lassen region and is the result of structurally controlled focusing of the diffuse regional magic magmatism. Stage 3 comprises a silicic dome field and adjacent area of hybrid andesites and has a total volume of about 100 km{sup 3}. Volcanism during stage III was episodic and is subdivided into four sequences of lithologically and temporarily distinct lavas. Stage 3 began at 400 ka with a rhyolitic, caldera-forming pyroclastic eruption and chemically related lavas. Additional sequences of dacite erupted between 250-200 ka and 100-0 ka. Hybrid andesites erupted adjacent to the silicic dome field between 300 and 0 ka. Porphyritic andesite and dacite with high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, low TiO{sub 2}, medium K{sub 2}O and FeO/MgO ratios of 1.5-2.0 are the most abundant rock types in the Lassen volcanic center. However, the single most voluminous unit is sparsely phyric rhyolite pumice. Although major element variation can be modeled by fractional crystallization, petrographic and stratigraphic evidence indicates that magma mixing is an important but subtle process in Brokeoff lavas and suggests that lavas evolved in small independent batches. Disequilibrium mineral assemblages in the stage 3 lavas indicate that they are not directly derived from Brokeoff andesite by fractional crystallization. Mixing of silicic magma with regional mafic magma and disaggregation of andesite quenched magmatic inclusions play dominant roles in the compositional diversity of stage 3 lavas.

  3. Sr and Nd isotopic and trace element compositions of Quaternary volcanic centers of the Southern Andes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Futa, K.; Stern, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of samples from six Quaternary volcanoes located in the northern and southern extremities of the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ, 33-46??S) of the Andes and from four centers in the Austral Volcanic Zone (AVZ, 49-54??S) range for 87Sr 86Sr from 0.70280 to 0.70591 and for 143Nd 144Nd from 0.51314 to 0.51255. The ranges are significantly greater than previously reported from the southern Andes but are different from the isotopic compositions of volcanoes in the central and northern Andes. Basalts and basaltic andesites from three centers just north of the Chile Rise-Trench triple junction have 87Sr 86Sr, 143Nd 144Nd, La Yb, Ba La, and Hf Lu that lie within the relatively restricted ranges of the basic magmas erupted from the volcanic centers as far north as 35??S in the SVZ of the Andes. The trace element and Sr and Nd isotopic characteristics of these magmas may be explained by source region contamination of subarc asthenosphere, with contaminants derived from subducted pelagic sediments and seawater-altered basalts by dehydration of subducted oceanic lithosphere. In the northern extremity of the SVZ between 33?? and 34??S, basaltic andesites and andesites have higher 87Sr 86Sr, Rb Cs, and Hf Lu, and lower 143Nd 144Nd than basalts and basaltic andesites erupted farther south in the SVZ, which suggests involvement of components derived from the continental crust. In the AVZ, the most primitive sample, high-Mg andesite from the southernmost volcanic center in the Andes (54??S) has Sr and Nd isotopic compositions and K Rb and Ba La similar to MORB. The high La Yb of this sample suggests formation by small degrees of partial melting of subducted MORB with garnet as a residue. Samples from centers farther north in the AVZ show a regionally regular northward increase in SiO2, K2O, Rb, Ba, Ba La, and 87Sr 86Sr and decrease in MgO, Sr, K Rb, Rb Cs, and 143Nd 144Nd, suggesting increasingly greater degrees of fractional crystallization and associated intra

  4. Los Humeros Volcanic Center, Puebla, Mexico: geology, petrology, geothermal system, and geoarchaeology

    SciTech Connect

    Ferriz-Dominguez, H.G.

    1985-01-01

    Los Humeros volcanic center located 180 km east of Mexico City, is the surface manifestation of a magma chamber zoned from rhyolitic uppermost levels to andesitic and perhaps basaltic lower levels. Compositional zonation of major and most trace elements seems to have been controlled largely by crystal-liquid equilibria. Partial melting of young crustal lithologies accounts best for volume relations, but must be complemented by fractional crystallization coupled with assimilation to explain compositional and isotopic variations. Systematic trends in Cr, Ni, Rb, and Ba, however, further suggest episodic magma mixing.

  5. Constraining timescales of pre-eruptive events within large silicic volcanic centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, A. E.; Cooper, K. M.; Kent, A. J.; Costa Rodriguez, F.; Till, C. B.

    2015-12-01

    Large silicic volcanic centers produce catastrophic supervolcanic eruptions. As a result it is necessary to understand what's happening within these centers, and on what timescales, in order to anticipate and prepare for such eruptions. A widely accepted model for many rhyolitic volcanic systems is that of a long-lived mush from which melt is periodically extracted and erupted. However, what remains unclear are 1) the specific processes by which melt is amalgamated and extracted from this mush and 2) the timescales over which these occur. Processes occurring close to eruption likely include amalgamation (and potentially homogenization) of melt, melt extraction, crystallization of major phases, and final magma ascent. Numerical and geochemical models have been used to constrain timescales of mush rejuvenation, and contrast between short timescales for mush reactivation (e.g., <<1000 years, depending on the reservoir) and others demonstrating much longer timescales at super-solidus conditions (e.g., 100s of kyrs). Timescales calculated from intra-crystalline diffusion profiles suggest that many crystals spend very short amounts of time (decades to centuries) at near-solidus temperatures prior to eruption. At the Okataina Volcanic Center (OVC) in New Zealand, geochemical and isotopic data suggest that melts are extracted from a long-lived, heterogeneous mush prior to eruption. Despite this protracted existence, combined U-series ages and diffusion profiles in OVC zircon and plagioclase crystals suggest that crystallization often occurs within the final hundreds to thousands of years prior to eruption, and at most, a few percent of a crystal's total history is spent at above-solidus conditions. Within these brief amounts of time, diffusion techniques can be linked to specific pre-eruptive processes in order to constrain timescales of melt extraction from a mush (likely decades to centuries), intrusions of new melt and/or magma mixing (likely years to decades), and

  6. Time-scale and mechanism of subsidence at Lassen Volcanic Center, CA, from InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Amy L.; Biggs, Juliet; Lu, Zhong

    2016-06-01

    Observations of volcanic subsidence have contributed to our understanding of the eruption cycle, hydrothermal systems and the formation of continental crust. Lassen Volcanic Center is one of two volcanoes in the southern Cascades known to have subsided in recent decades, but the onset, temporal evolution, and cause of subsidence remain unconstrained. Here we use multiple sets of InSAR data, each corrected using the North American Regional Reanalysis atmospheric model, to determine the temporal and spatial characteristics of deformation between 1992 and 2010. Throughout this period all datasets reveal subsidence of a broad, 30-40 km wide region at rates of 10 mm/yr. Evaluating past geodetic studies we suggest that subsidence may have been ongoing since the 1980s, before which it is unlikely that significant ground deformation occurred. By combining multiple tracks of InSAR data we find that the ratio of horizontal to vertical displacements is high (up to 3:1), and source inversions favour a point source located at 8 km depth. Time-series analysis suggests that the rate of volume change of this source may have varied over time. The source geometry and the temporal evolution of deformation contrasts to subsidence observed at nearby Medicine Lake Volcano since the 1950s. We evaluate possible causes of subsidence at Lassen Volcanic Center in light of tectonic setting and hydrothermal activity, and suggest that regional GPS measurements will be key to understanding the role of crustal extension plus other hydrothermal/magmatic processes in deformation during recent decades.

  7. Nature of differentiation trends in some volcanic rocks from the Galapagos spreading center

    SciTech Connect

    Byerly, G.

    1980-07-10

    The Galapagos spreading center has produced a suite of volcanic rocks which include (1) typical ocean floor tholeiites, (2) iron- and tianium-enriched tholeiites, (3) andesites, and (4) rhyodacites. Interpretation of major element compositions determined for these rocks, associated glassy selvedges, and mineral phases suggests that the entire suite can be produced by fractional crystallization of the observed low-pressure phenocrysts.The unusual extent of fractionation for this region may be related to the size, morphology, and eruption and resupply rates of the magma chambers associated with the Galapagos spreading center. This and the regional distribution of these highly fractionated rocks suggest and important, though indirect, influence of the Galapagos hot spot.

  8. Determination of ancient volcanic eruption center based on gravity methods (3D) in Gunungkidul area Yogyakarta, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoso, Agus; Sismanto, Setiawan, Ary; Pramumijoyo, Subagyo

    2016-05-01

    Ancient eruption centers can be determined by detecting the position of the ancient volcanic material, it is important to understand the elements of ancient volcanic material by studying the area geologically and prove the existence of an ancient volcanic eruption centers using geophysics gravity method. The measuring instrument is Lacoste & Romberg gravimeter type 1115, the number of data are 900 points. The area 60×40 kilometers, the modeling 3D software is reaching depth of 15 km at the south of the island of Java subduction zone. It is suported by geological data in the field that are found as the following: 1. Pyroclastic Fall which is a product of volcanic eruptions, and lapilli tuff with felsic mineral. 2. Pyroclastic flow with Breccia, tuffaceous sandstone and tuff breccia. 3. Hot springs near Parangwedang Parangtritis. 4. Igneous rock with scoria structure in Parang Kusumo, structured amigdaloida which is the result of the eruption of lava/volcanic eruptions, and Pillow lava in the shows the flowing lava into the sea. Base on gravity anomaly shows that there are strong correlationship between those geological data to the gravity anomaly. The gravblox modeling (3D) shows the position of ancient of volcanic eruption in this area clearly.

  9. International collaboration between Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers: Geospatially enabled tools to ensure forecast harmonization across global air routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osiensky, J. M.; Moore, D.; Kibler, J.; Bensimon, D.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic plumes and drifting ash clouds pose a risk to flight operations somewhere across the globe every day. Airborne ash plumes pose a significant hazard to aircraft and timely and accurate forecasts greatly help mitigate the risk of an encounter. The world's nine (9) Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs) provide products and services to address the volcanic ash hazard to aviation. These nine centers are operated by the meteorological authority within the state in which they are located. Each VAAC has its unique set of tools and procedures on how the data will be captured, displayed, analyzed and turned into a suite of products. The end products (e.g. Volcanic Ash Advisories (VAA) and Volcanic Ash Graphic (VAG)) are standardized through the International Civil Aviation Organization's International Airways Volcano Watch Operations Group (ICAO IAVWOPSG). Improvements in methods of collaboration between the VAACs are needed to allow for a seamless global harmonization of volcanic ash products. A geospatially enabled tool would allow for a common operating platform, data sharing, and situational awareness. The North American VAACs have been testing a capability to provide this environment to make forecast collaboration simple across the globe. This presentation highlights work that has been done to demonstrate this capability.

  10. Evolution of the Taupo Volcanic Center, New Zealand: petrological and thermal constraints from the Omega dacite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, Sarah E.; Deering, Chad D.; Gutierrez, Francisco J.; Bachmann, Olivier

    2013-11-01

    assimilation history. On the basis of petrological, thermal, and geophysical considerations, upper-crustal reservoirs, which feed large-scale rhyolitic volcanism in the TVZ, most likely take the form of large, long-lived crystal mush zones. Following large eruptions, such as the Oruanui event, this mush is expected to crystallize significantly (up to 70-80 vol% crystals) due to syn-eruptive decompression. Hence, the Omega dacite, immediately post-dating the Oruanui event, potentially represents incoming deeper recharge of less-evolved magma that was able to penetrate the nearly solidified upper-crustal mush. Over the past 20,000 years, similar intermediate recharge magmas have incrementally reheated, reconstructed, and reactivated the upper-crustal mush zone, allowing a gradual return to rhyolitic volcanism at the Taupo Volcanic Center.

  11. Eruption probabilities for the Lassen Volcanic Center and regional volcanism, northern California, and probabilities for large explosive eruptions in the Cascade Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, Manuel; Clynne, Michael A.; Muffler, L.J. Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Chronologies for eruptive activity of the Lassen Volcanic Center and for eruptions from the regional mafic vents in the surrounding area of the Lassen segment of the Cascade Range are here used to estimate probabilities of future eruptions. For the regional mafic volcanism, the ages of many vents are known only within broad ranges, and two models are developed that should bracket the actual eruptive ages. These chronologies are used with exponential, Weibull, and mixed-exponential probability distributions to match the data for time intervals between eruptions. For the Lassen Volcanic Center, the probability of an eruption in the next year is 1.4x10-4 for the exponential distribution and 2.3x10-4 for the mixed exponential distribution. For the regional mafic vents, the exponential distribution gives a probability of an eruption in the next year of 6.5x10-4, but the mixed exponential distribution indicates that the current probability, 12,000 years after the last event, could be significantly lower. For the exponential distribution, the highest probability is for an eruption from a regional mafic vent. Data on areas and volumes of lava flows and domes of the Lassen Volcanic Center and of eruptions from the regional mafic vents provide constraints on the probable sizes of future eruptions. Probabilities of lava-flow coverage are similar for the Lassen Volcanic Center and for regional mafic vents, whereas the probable eruptive volumes for the mafic vents are generally smaller. Data have been compiled for large explosive eruptions (>≈ 5 km3 in deposit volume) in the Cascade Range during the past 1.2 m.y. in order to estimate probabilities of eruption. For erupted volumes >≈5 km3, the rate of occurrence since 13.6 ka is much higher than for the entire period, and we use these data to calculate the annual probability of a large eruption at 4.6x10-4. For erupted volumes ≥10 km3, the rate of occurrence has been reasonably constant from 630 ka to the present, giving

  12. δ13C Degassing Dynamics of a Young Volcanic Center, Cerro Negro, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucic, G.; Stix, J.; Wing, B. A.; Muñoz, A.; Ibarra, M.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Lacrampe-Couloume, G.

    2011-12-01

    Measurement of gas-phase δ13C values above active volcanic centers has the potential for monitoring magma dynamics associated with degassing and recharge events above subduction zones. The strong isotopic partitioning between C in the gas and melt, and C isotopic differences among magmas enables degassed CO2 to give insight into processes happening deep underground. Cerro Negro volcano in Nicaragua is an ideal center for detecting such magma interactions due to its rich history of volcanic activity and unusual eruption style. It is a subduction-driven, basaltic cinder cone that erupts on average once every 20 years with light to moderate intensity explosive eruptions (Volcanic Explosivity Index: 1-3) commonly accompanied by lava flows. Amid these eruptions are periods of extreme quiescence with very little seismic activity and gas emissions, suggesting rapid magmatic changes beneath the volcano. The brief lag time (on average 30 min). separating precursors and eruption supports this interpretation. In this study, we compare the isotopic composition of gas samples collected from fumaroles, fractures and other thermal areas on the volcano over a period of nearly 2 decades (1992-2011) in order to constrain the magmatic evolution beneath Cerro Negro. While the general systematics of the entire dataset are broadly consistent with degassing models for the natural evolution of CO2 and δ13C values, recent sampling campaigns suggest that new magma may be entering the system. Gases collected in January 2011 after 12 years of quiescence reveal CO2 concentrations ranging from 1-100%, with δ13C values varying from -1.5% to -10.4% with a mean of -3.3±0.28 % for 32 samples. Only limited spatial variability is present in this dataset: inner crater mean δ13C = -4.0±0.12 %, outer crater (-2.4±0.46 %), flanks (-4.4±0.26 %), and thermal areas to the N (-3.5±0.24 %) and SE (-2.5±0.25 %). Based on previous work, a lack of substantial spatial variation in δ values is

  13. Structure and petrology of newly discovered volcanic centers in the northern Kermadec-southern Tofua arc, South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Ian J.; Reyes, Agnes G.; Wright, Ian C.; Peckett, Kimberley M.; Smith, Ian E. M.; Arculus, Richard J.

    2008-08-01

    The NZAPLUME III expedition of September-October 2004 to the northern Kermadec-southern Tofua (NKST) arc, between 28°52'S and 25°07'S, resulted in the discovery of at least seven new submarine volcanic centers and a substantial caldera complex adjacent to the previously known Monowai Seamount. The volcanic centers form a sublinear chain that coincides with the Kermadec Ridge crest in the south (Hinetapeka) and diverges ˜45 km westward of the ridge crest in the north ("V") just to the south of where the Louisville Ridge intersects with the arc. All of the centers contain calderas or caldera-like structures, as well as multiple cones, domes, fissure ridges, and vent fields. All show signs of recent eruptive and current hydrothermal activity. There are strong structural controls on edifice location, with cones and fissure ridges typically associated with faulting parallel to the regional ˜12° strike of the arc front. Several of the calderas are ellipsoidal, orientated northwest-southeast in the general direction of least compressive stress. Sampled volcanic rocks, representing the most recently erupted lavas, are all low-K tholeiites. Two of the centers, Gamble and Rakahore, yielded only high-silica dacite to rhyolite (69-74 wt% silica), whereas two others, Monowai and "V," yielded only basalt to andesite (48-63 wt% silica). Mineral assemblages are plagioclase-pyroxene dominated, with accessory Fe-Ti oxides, apatite, olivine, and quartz/tridymite/cristobalite, typical of dry volcanic arc systems. Hornblende occurs only in a felsitic rhyolite from Hinepuia volcanic center, and zircon is absent. Glass contents range to 57% in basalts-andesites (mean 20%), and 97% in andesites-rhyolites (mean 59%) and other quench textures, including swallow-tailed, plumose, or dendritic crystal forms and crystallites, are common. Most lavas are highly vesicular (≤63%; mean 28%) and have low volatile contents (mostly <2 wt%) which, together with the occurrence of tridymite or

  14. Emmons Lake Volcanic Center, Alaska Peninsula: Source of the Late Wisconsin Dawson tephra, Yukon Territory, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangan, M.T.; Waythomas, C.F.; Miller, T.P.; Trusdell, F.A.

    2003-01-01

    The Emmons Lake Volcanic Center on the Alaska Peninsula of southwestern Alaska is the site of at least two rhyolitic caldera-forming eruptions (C1 and C2) of late Quaternary age that are possibly the largest of the numerous caldera-forming eruptions known in the Aleutian arc. The deposits produced by these eruptions are widespread (eruptive volumes of >50 km3 each), and their association with Quaternary glacial and eolian deposits on the Alaska Peninsula and elsewhere in Alaska and northwestern Canada enhances the likelihood of establishing geochronological control on Quaternary stratigraphic records in this region. The pyroclastic deposits associated with the second caldera-forming eruption (C2) consist of loose, granular, airfall and pumice-flow deposits that extend for tens of kilometres beyond Emmons Lake caldera, reaching both the Bering Sea and Pacific Ocean coastlines north and south of the caldera. Geochronological and compositional data on C2 deposits indicate a correlation with the Dawson tephra, a 24 000 14C BP (27 000 calibrated years BP), widespread bed of silicic ash found in loess deposits in west-central Yukon Territory, Canada. The correlation clearly establishes the Dawson tephra as the time-stratigraphic marker of the last glacial maximum.

  15. Ore-bearing hydrothermal metasomatic processes in the Elbrus volcanic center, the northern Caucasus, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurbanov, A. G.; Bogatikov, O. A.; Dokuchaev, A. Ya.; Gazeev, V. M.; Abramov, S. S.; Groznova, E. O.; Shevchenko, A. V.

    2008-06-01

    Precaldera, caldera, and postcaldera cycles are recognized in the geological evolution of the Pleistocene-Holocene Elbrus volcanic center (EVC). During the caldera cycle, the magmatic activity was not intense, whereas hydrothermal metasomatic alteration of rocks was vigorous and extensive. The Kyukyurtli and Irik ore-magmatic systems have been revealed in the EVC, with the former being regarded as the more promising one. The ore mineralization in rocks of the caldera cycle comprises occurrences of magnetite, ilmenite, pyrite and pyrrhotite (including Ni-Co varieties), arsenopyrite, chalcopyrite, millerite, galena, and finely dispersed particles of native copper. Pyrite and pyrrhotite from volcanics of the caldera cycle and dacite of the Kyukyurtli extrusion are similar in composition and differ from these minerals of the postcaldera cycle, where pyrite and pyrrhotite are often enriched in Cu, Co, and Ni and millerite is noted as well. The composition of ore minerals indicates that the hydrothermal metasomatic alteration related to the evolution of the Kyukyurtli hydrothermal system was superimposed on rocks of the caldera cycle, whereas the late mineralization in rocks of the postcaldera cycle developed autonomously. The homogenization temperature of fluid inclusions in quartz and carbonate from crosscutting veinlets in the apical portion of the Kyukyurtli extrusion is 140-170°C and in quartz from geyserite, 120-150°C. The temperature of formation of the chalcopyrite-pyrite-pyrrhotite assemblage calculated using mineral geothermometers is 156 and 275°C in dacite from the middle and lower portions of the Malka lava flow and 190°C in dacite of the Kyukyurtli extrusion. The hydrothermal solutions that participated in metasomatic alteration of rocks pertaining to the Kyukyurtli ore-magmatic system (KOMS) and formed both secondary quartzite and geyserite were enriched in fluorine, as evidenced from the occurrence of F-bearing minerals-zharchikhite, ralstonite,

  16. Formation stages and ore matter sources of the Devdoraki copper deposit, Kazbek volcanic center, the Greater Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, V. A.; Chugaev, A. V.; Vashakidze, G. T.; Parfenov, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    Comprehensive petrological-mineralogical, geochronological, and isotope-geochemical studies have been carried out at the Devdoraki copper deposit situated in the Kazbek neovolcanic center, the frontier territory between Georgia and Russia. The formation history of this deposit has been deciphered on the basis of K-Ar isotopic geochronological data, and the multistage evolution of ore-magmatic system has been established. The subeconomic disseminated and less abundant stringer pyrite mineralization formed at the first stage in the Early Cretaceous back to 130-120 Ma at the retrograde stage of regional metamorphism. The second productive stage was related to intense Quaternary volcanism of the Kazbek center. The late stringer base-metal mineralization formed about 400 ka ago in connection with the activity of minor volcanoes in the eastern part of deposit. In its western part adjoining the Kazbek volcanic cone, ore formation apparently continued over the entire period of recent magmatic activity from 400 to 100 ka ago. It is quite probable that this process is currently proceeding at deep levels of the Devdoraki deposit. Pb-Pb isotope-geochemical data show that Jurassic metasedimentary rocks that host sulfide mineralization could have been a main source of matter for early pyrite. At the second stage of base-metal mineralization formation, the source of ore matter was earlier metamorphic pyrite combined with hydrothermal solutions related to Quaternary endogenic activity within the Kazbek volcanic center. Gangue mineral matter (quartz, carbonates) was supplied simultaneously from the postmagmatic hydrothermal solution and host shale.

  17. Geology and geochemistry of volcanic centers within the eastern half of the Sonoma volcanic field, northern San Francisco Bay region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Rytuba, James J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Fleck, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    The volcanic fields in the California Coast Ranges north of San Francisco Bay are temporally and spatially associated with the northward migration of the Mendocino triple junction and the transition from subduction and associated arc volcanism to a slab window tectonic environment. Our geochemical analyses from the Sonoma volcanic field highlight the geochemical diversity of these volcanic rocks, allowing us to clearly distinguish these volcanic rocks from those of the roughly coeval ancestral Cascades magmatic arc to the west, and also to compare rocks of the Sonoma volcanic field to rocks from other slab window settings.

  18. Hydrogen isotope investigation of amphibole and biotite phenocrysts in silicic magmas erupted at Lassen Volcanic Center, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Underwood, S.J.; Feeley, T.C.; Clynne, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratio, water content and Fe3 +/Fe2 + in coexisting amphibole and biotite phenocrysts in volcanic rocks can provide insight into shallow pre- and syn-eruptive magmatic processes such as vesiculation, and lava drainback with mixing into less devolatilized magma that erupts later in a volcanic sequence. We studied four ~ 35 ka and younger eruption sequences (i.e. Kings Creek, Lassen Peak, Chaos Crags, and 1915) at the Lassen Volcanic Center (LVC), California, where intrusion of crystal-rich silicic magma mushes by mafic magmas is inferred from the varying abundances of mafic magmatic inclusions (MMIs) in the silicic volcanic rocks. Types and relative proportions of reacted and unreacted hydrous phenocryst populations are evaluated with accompanying chemical and H isotope changes. Biotite phenocrysts were more susceptible to rehydration in older vesicular glassy volcanic rocks than coexisting amphibole phenocrysts. Biotite and magnesiohornblende phenocrysts toward the core of the Lassen Peak dome are extensively dehydroxylated and reacted from prolonged exposure to high temperature, low pressure, and higher fO2 conditions from post-emplacement cooling. In silicic volcanic rocks not affected by alteration, biotite phenocrysts are often relatively more dehydroxylated than are magnesiohornblende phenocrysts of similar size; this is likely due to the ca 10 times larger overall bulk H diffusion coefficient in biotite. A simplified model of dehydrogenation in hydrous phenocrysts above reaction closure temperature suggests that eruption and quench of magma ascended to the surface in a few hours is too short a time for substantial H loss from amphibole. In contrast, slowly ascended magma can have extremely dehydrogenated and possibly dehydrated biotite, relatively less dehydrogenated magnesiohornblende and reaction rims on both phases. Eruptive products containing the highest proportions of mottled dehydrogenated crystals could indicate that within a few days

  19. Application of K-Ar Dating to the Chronology of Young Volcanic Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanphere, M. A.

    2003-12-01

    K-Ar dating and a derivative technique, 40Ar/39Ar dating, are methods of high-precision chronology applicable to young volcanic centers. Cascade volcanoes studied in detail by several USGS volcanologists, Duane Champion paleomagetist, and me include Mt. Baker, WA; Mt. Rainier, WA; Mt. Adams, WA; Mt. Hood, OR; Crater Lake, OR; and Medicine Lake, CA. For Mt. Adams using detailed geologic mapping by Hildreth and Fierstein and 74 K-Ar ages for 63 mapped units, Hildreth and Lanphere established a detailed chronology for the stratovolcano. Good agreement has been achieved for K-Ar ages and 40Ar/39Ar ages of rocks from Mt. Adams as young as 36 ka. A similar detailed chronology has been established for other Cascade volcanoes using andesites, in particular. These chronologies often take 10 years or more to develop. Major advantages of the 40Ar/39Ar technique are the ability to work with small sample sizes and the possibility to push the technique to very young ages. The Campanian Ignimbrite erupted from the Campi Flegrei crater near Naples, Italy is an example of the use of small samples. Nine incremental-heating ages were determined on samples of sanidine ranging in size from 47 mg to 67 mg. These samples yielded ages for the Campanian Ignimbrite ranging from 37.1 +/- 0.75 ka to 39.5 +/- 0.62 ka and averaging 38.1 +/- 0.8 ka. Other workers have proposed 40Ar/39Ar ages for the Campanian Ignimbrite of 37.1 +/- 0.4 ka and 39.3 +/- 0.1 ka. An example of the use of 40Ar/39Ar dating of very young samples is the Christian Era (CE) age of the Vesuvius eruption of year 79. Eight packets of sanidine weighing 213-296 mg from two localities, Casti Amanti in Pompeii and Villa Poppea in nearby Oplontis, yielded a weighted-mean incremental-heating age of 1924 +/- 66 years. The known age for the CE 79 eruption of Vesuvius is 1924 years. Earlier studies of Vesuvius by other workers yielded an 40Ar/39Ar age for the Villa Poppea locality of 1922 +/- 72 years.

  20. The Geology of Mt. Hope, a Silicic Volcanic Center in West Central Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, A. M.; King, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose was to establish a detailed history of the sequence of geologic events which occurred at Mt. Hope and an area 6.8 miles in diameter surrounding it. The final result will be comprised of information collected during field mapping, with data from petrographic studies and wet chemical analyses. From this it should be possible to suggest relationships to other volcanic regions, particularly bimodal suites in the transition zone, and gain a clearer picture of the petrologic nature of this area. Field work conducted this past summer confirmed the bimodal nature of volcanism at Mt. Hope. The symmetrical, radial cone is comprised of several rhyolites with numerous intrusions of intermediate-composition dikes and two breccia pipes near the summit.

  1. Age of Volcanism of the Wolverine Volcanic Center, West-Central Yukon Territory, Canada and its Implications for the History of Yukon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, L. E.; Huscroft, C. A.; Ward, B. C.; Villeneuve, M.

    2008-12-01

    New Ar-Ar ages determined on the Wolverine Creek volcanic center (WC) establishes a middle Pliocene initiation of volcanism for the Fort Selkirk Volcanic Group (FSVG), Fort Selkirk area, west-central Yukon, Canada. WC was active between 4.34±0.06 and 2.98±0.05 Ma. Lava flows repeatedly descended Wolverine Creek valley and flowed into the Yukon River Valley (YRV) during the eruptive life of WC. The total thickness of WC lava flows in YRV decreases in a northward direction and the overall elevation of the surface of the highest flow at any point descends northward as well. Total thickness is up to 100 m in the canyon of Wolverine Creek with a surface elevation of approximately 550 m a.s.l. WC lava flows extend to the confluence of Yukon River with Pelly River 7 km north of the Wolverine Creek confluence with YRV. The lava fill has a total thickness of about 80 m at this northern limit with a surface elevation of 520 m a.s.l. The youngest flow there is dated at 3.05±0.07 Ma. The flows in this area show a general upward compositional change from basanite to alkali olivine basalt which is characteristic of WC. The thinning of the flows and decrease in elevation in a northward direction in YRV is consistent with the contemporary flow direction of Yukon River. Furthermore, the WC flows presumably extended farther down YRV (north and west) prior to erosional truncation. In contrast, lava flows are absent south (up contemporary flow of Yukon River) from the confluence of Wolverine Creek with YRV. This is consistent with the pattern of quenching that would be expected for any lava flow that enters YRV from Wolverine Creek and encounters a north-flowing Yukon River. This pattern is similar to those of lava flows from the younger Pelly and Black Creek FSVG eruptive centers immediately downstream of the Yukon River-Pelly River confluence. Similar asymmetries in lava flows that entered river canyons have been reported by others in the western Grand Canyon and for the 200 year

  2. Nature and origin of mineral coatings on volcanic rocks of the Black Mountain, Stonewall Mountain, and Kane Springs, Wash volcanic centers, Southern Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taranik, James V.; Noble, Donald C.; Hsu, Liang C.; Spatz, David M.

    1987-01-01

    LANDSAT Thematic Mapper imagery was evaluated over 3 Tertiary calderas in southern Nevada. Each volcanic center derived from a highly evolved silici magmatic system represented today by well exposed diverse lithologies. Distinctive imagery contrast between some of the late ash flows and earlier units follows from the high relative reflectance in longer wavelength bands (bands 5 and 7) of the former. Enhancement techniques provide color composite images which highlight some of the units in remarkable color contrast. Inasmuch as coatings on the tuffs are incompletely developed and apparently largely dependent spectrally on rock properties independent of petrochemistry, it is felt that the distinctive imagery characteristics are more a function of primary lithologic or petrochemical properties. Any given outcrop is backdrop for a variety of cover types, of which coatings, at various stages of maturity, are one. Petrographic and X-ray diffraction analysis of the outer air-interface zone of coatings reveal they are composed chiefly of amorphous compounds, probably with varying proportions of iron and manganese. Observations support an origin for some outer (air-interface) coating constituents exogenous to the underlying host.

  3. Vapor Saturation as The Cause of Volcanic Eruptions at the Lassen Volcanic Center, California, as Inferred from Crystallization Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Los Reyes, A. M. A.; Putirka, K. D.; Clynne, M. A.; Scruggs, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The last three silicic eruptions at the Lassen Volcanic Center occurred at Lassen Peak (27 ka and 1915-17) and Chaos Crags (1103 yrs BP). Klemetti and Clynne (2014) showed that felsic eruptions at Lassen reflect remobilization of resident rhyodacitic crystal mush by intrusion of mafic magma. To better understand the rejuvenation and eruption triggering process, we calculate crystallization temperatures and pressures from clinopyroxene-liquid equilibria on mafic enclaves that provide our closest approach to the composition of mafic magmas delivered to the shallow system. Our goal is to examine whether and to what extent cooling and crystallization occur after recharge, which bears on whether recharge, mixing, or partial crystallization (and consequent vapor saturation) provide the trigger for eruption. We use results from the cpx-liq barometer (1.7 kbar) as input to calculate T for other phases (plagioclase, olivine and amphibole) found in mafic enclave samples. Cpx crystallizes at 1100-1150 oC and olivine precipitates at similar to slightly higher temperatures. Cpx and ol are followed by plagioclase (1000-1050 oC), amphibole (875-1000 oC), and Fe-Ti oxides (1030-1050 oC). These temperatures indicate that recharge magmas are incompletely crystallized as they enter the shallow reservoir of cooler (~725-750 oC, Quinn et al., 2013) felsic crystal mush, and that significant cooling of the mafic magma occurs during mixing and prior to eruption. Such cooling intervals indicate that recharge is not the proximal cause of eruption, but rather that vapor saturation, following a period of mixing and cooling, leads to increased magma overpressure that causes eruption. Interestingly, the Lassen Peak 27 ka volcanics (at 2.09 km3), have a greater volume than either of Chaos Crags (1.2 km3) and the 1915 (0.03 km3) eruption, but our results indicate that their thermal histories are similar. This suggests that while volumes of mafic recharge may control the degree of interaction with

  4. Recognizing subtle evidence for silicic magma derivation from petrochemically-similar arc crust: Isotopic and chemical evidence for the bimodal volcanic series of Gorely Volcanic Center, Kamchatka, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seligman, A. N.; Bindeman, I. N.; Ellis, B. S.; Ponomareva, V.; Leonov, V.

    2012-12-01

    The Kamchatka Peninsula is home to some of the most prolific subduction related volcanic activity in the world. Gorely caldera and its central volcano are located in the rear of its currently active Eastern Volcanic Front. Recent work determined the presence of explosive ignimbrite eruptions sourced from Gorely volcano during the Pleistocene. We studied 32 eruptive units, including tephrochronologically-dated Holocene tephra, stratigraphically-arranged ignimbrites, as well as pre- and post-caldera lavas. We analyzed oxygen isotope ratios of pyroxene and plagioclase grains by laser fluorination, and major and trace element compositions of whole rocks. In addition, we determined 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ratios of caldera-forming ignimbrite eruptions. Chemical compositions show that Gorely eruptive units range from basalt to basaltic andesite in the "Pra-Gorely" stages prior to caldera formation and the modern Gorely stages forming its current edifice. In contrast, eruptive material from earlier ignimbrites exposed at Opasny Ravine consists primarily of dacite. Whole rock analyses for Gorely indicate that silicic rocks and ignimbrites volumetrically dominate all other products, forming separate bimodal peaks in our SiO2-frequency diagram. In addition, trace element concentrations and ratios define two trends, one for more silicic and another for more mafic material. δ18Omelt values range from a low of 4.85 up to 6.22‰, where the lowest value was found in the last caldera forming eruption, suggesting incorporation of hydrothermally-altered material from earlier eruptions. 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ratios range from 0.70328 to 0.70351 and from 0.51303 to 0.51309 respectively, with higher and more diverse values being characteristic of earlier ignimbrite units; again suggesting incorporation of surrounding crustal material. In contrast to these results, MELTS modeling using a variety of likely primitive basalts from Gorely shows it is possible to obtain silicic

  5. Three dimensional modeling of mantle melt underneath the Lau Back-Arc spreading center and Tofua Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarlow, Scott

    Valu Fa and Eastern Lau's (two regions along Lau's back-arc spreading center) observed axial morphology suggest that Valu Fa is more magmatically robust than Eastern Lau despite Eastern Lau's spreading rate nearly doubling Valu Fa's. Early geochemical [Pearce et al., 1994] and geophysical [Martinez and Taylor, 2002] studies predict a gradational decrease in melting moving north from Valu Fa to Eastern Lau, but more recent geochemical and seismic observations ([Escrig, .et al 2009]; [Dunn and Martinez, 2011]; [Dunn et al., 2011]) show a sharper stepwise decrease in melting as the spreading center's ridge axis sweeps away from the Tofua Volcanic-Arc. As the ridge sweeps away from the volcanic-arc, the influence of the slab hydrated mantle in the melting structure of the ridge decreases. Furthermore, Eastern Lau produces a thinner crust than expected for a robust spreading center. 2-D numerical studies [Harmon and Blackmon, 2010] show a gradational decrease in melting from Valu Fa to Eastern Lau but with no corresponding thinning of Eastern Lau's crust. To understand the melting dynamics underneath Lau's back-arc spreading center and the Tofua Volcanic-Arc implementing the effects of 3-D mantle flow and slab hydration appears to be required. To explain the observed geochemical and seismic observations, three 3-D numerical were performed, using a community developed mantle convection solver (CitcomS). The first model shows that observed geometric and surface kinematic boundary conditions cause a steep gradational increase in relative melting area (anhydrous) moving northward with increasing spreading rate along the ridge axis from Valu Fa to Eastern Lau caused by a northwestern along axis mantle flow. A peak in the relative melting area appears particularly close to Eastern Lau where crust is thinnest. These predictions run in opposition to the observations. The second model shows including a viscosity reduction in the mantle wedge due to slab hydration causes a more

  6. Response of hydrothermal system to stress transients at Lassen Volcanic Center, California, inferred from seismic interferometry with ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Taka'aki; Brenguier, Florent

    2016-10-01

    Time-lapse monitoring of seismic velocity at volcanic areas can provide unique insight into the property of hydrothermal and magmatic fluids and their temporal variability. We established a quasi real-time velocity monitoring system by using seismic interferometry with ambient noise to explore the temporal evolution of velocity in the Lassen Volcanic Center, Northern California. Our monitoring system finds temporal variability of seismic velocity in response to stress changes imparted by an earthquake and by seasonal environmental changes. Dynamic stress changes from a magnitude 5.7 local earthquake induced a 0.1 % velocity reduction at a depth of about 1 km. The seismic velocity susceptibility defined as ratio of seismic velocity change to dynamic stress change is estimated to be about 0.006 MPa-1, which suggests the Lassen hydrothermal system is marked by high-pressurized hydrothermal fluid. By combining geodetic measurements, our observation shows that the long-term seismic velocity fluctuation closely tracks snow-induced vertical deformation without time delay, which is most consistent with an hydrological load model (either elastic or poroelastic response) in which surface loading drives hydrothermal fluid diffusion that leads to an increase of opening of cracks and subsequently reductions of seismic velocity. We infer that heated-hydrothermal fluid in a vapor-dominated zone at a depth of 2-4 km range is responsible for the long-term variation in seismic velocity[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Volcanic centers of southwestern Nevada: Evolution of understanding, 1960-1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, F. M., Jr.; Carr, W. J.; Orkild, Paul P.

    1989-05-01

    Since about 1960, geologists of the U.S. Geological Survey and, more recently, those of Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories, supported largely by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors, have been unraveling a complex series of ash flow sheets, lavas, and related calderas in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field in and near the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Extensive detailed geologic mapping aided in delineation of four major calderas: Silent Canyon (˜14 Ma), Timber Mountain-Oasis Valley (˜11.5 Ma), Black Mountain (˜7.5 Ma), and Stonewall Mountain (˜6 Ma). In the 1960s, key concepts that contributed to the understanding of volcanology were the recognition of vertical compositional zonation within ash flow sheets, the significance of caldera rim and moat lavas, the relation between caldera collapse and intracaldera breccias and ash flow facies, and the correlation of intracaldera and outflow-sheet facies. Deep drill holes within Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain calderas provided vital information on caldera geometry and intracaldera facies. Radiometric dating has produced nearly 100 dates that define the age of the field between about 16 and 6 Ma. During the middle part of that period a major ash flow eruption occurred once in about every half million years. Continuing support by the DOE for earth science at the NTS during the 1970s and 1980s has permitted a unique longevity of studies and provided opportunities to restudy mapped areas, revise some incorrect relationships, and work out important details of caldera history and structure that otherwise would not have come to light. Petrochemical and isotopic studies contributed to the understanding of the PT environment of the magma bodies that generated the major ash flow sheets. In the last decade, specialized work has continued on stratigraphic and petrologic problems, resulting in understanding of petrochemical cycles, in wider and more accurate correlation of certain units

  8. The nature and origin of mineral coatings on volcanic rocks of the Black Mountain, Stonewall Mountain and Kane Springs Wash volcanic centers in southern Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taranik, J. V.; Noble, D. D.; Hsu, L. C.; Hutsinpiller, A.

    1986-01-01

    Four LANDSAT thematic mapping scenes in southern Nevada were requested at two different acquisition times in order to assess the effect of vegetation on the signature of the volcanic units. The remote sensing data acquisition and analysis portion are nearly completed. The LANDSAT thematic mapping data is of good quality, and image analysis techniques are so far successful in delineating areas with distinct spectral characteristics. Spectrally distinct areas were correlated with variations in surface coating and lithologies of the volcanic rocks.

  9. Modeling crustal deformation near active faults and volcanic centers: a catalog of deformation models and modeling approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, Maurizio; ,; Peter, F.; Murray, Jessica R.

    2013-01-01

    This manual provides the physical and mathematical concepts for selected models used to interpret deformation measurements near active faults and volcanic centers. The emphasis is on analytical models of deformation that can be compared with data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), leveling surveys, tiltmeters and strainmeters. Source models include pressurized spherical, ellipsoidal, and horizontal penny-shaped geometries in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. Vertical dikes and faults are described following the mathematical notation for rectangular dislocations in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. All the analytical expressions were verified against numerical models developed by use of COMSOL Multyphics, a Finite Element Analysis software (http://www.comsol.com). In this way, typographical errors present were identified and corrected. Matlab scripts are also provided to facilitate the application of these models.

  10. Geothermal Potential of the Cascade and Aleutian Arcs, with Ranking of Individual Volcanic Centers for their Potential to Host Electricity-Grade Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Shevenell, Lisa; Coolbaugh, Mark; Hinz, Nick; Stelling, Pete; Melosh, Glenn; Cumming, William

    2015-10-16

    This project brings a global perspective to volcanic arc geothermal play fairway analysis by developing statistics for the occurrence of geothermal reservoirs and their geoscience context worldwide in order to rank U.S. prospects. The focus of the work was to develop play fairways for the Cascade and Aleutian arcs to rank the individual volcanic centers in these arcs by their potential to host electricity grade geothermal systems. The Fairway models were developed by describing key geologic factors expected to be indicative of productive geothermal systems in a global training set, which includes 74 volcanic centers world-wide with current power production. To our knowledge, this is the most robust geothermal benchmark training set for magmatic systems to date that will be made public.

  11. Oxygen isotope geochemistry of the lassen volcanic center, California: Resolving crustal and mantle contributions to continental Arc magmatism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feeley, T.C.; Clynne, M.A.; Winer, G.S.; Grice, W.C.

    2008-01-01

    This study reports oxygen isotope ratios determined by laser fluorination of mineral separates (mainly plagioclase) from basaltic andesitic to rhyolitic composition volcanic rocks erupted from the Lassen Volcanic Center (LVC), northern California. Plagioclase separates from nearly all rocks have ??18O values (6.1-8.4%) higher than expected for production of the magmas by partial melting of little evolved basaltic lavas erupted in the arc front and back-arc regions of the southernmost Cascades during the late Cenozoic. Most LVC magmas must therefore contain high 18O crustal material. In this regard, the ??18O values of the volcanic rocks show strong spatial patterns, particularly for young rhyodacitic rocks that best represent unmodified partial melts of the continental crust. Rhyodacitic magmas erupted from vents located within 3.5 km of the inferred center of the LVC have consistently lower ??18 O values (average 6.3% ?? 0.1%) at given SiO2 contents relative to rocks erupted from distal vents (>7.0 km; average 7.1% ?? 0.1%). Further, magmas erupted from vents situated at transitional distances have intermediate values and span a larger range (average 6.8% ?? 0.2%). Basaltic andesitic to andesitic composition rocks show similar spatial variations, although as a group the ??18O values of these rocks are more variable and extend to higher values than the rhyodacitic rocks. These features are interpreted to reflect assimilation of heterogeneous lower continental crust by mafic magmas, followed by mixing or mingling with silicic magmas formed by partial melting of initially high 18O continental crust (??? 9.0%) increasingly hybridized by lower ??18O (???6.0%) mantle-derived basaltic magmas toward the center of the system. Mixing calculations using estimated endmember source ??18O values imply that LVC magmas contain on a molar oxygen basis approximately 42 to 4% isotopically heavy continental crust, with proportions declining in a broadly regular fashion toward the

  12. Seismicity and active tectonics at Coloumbo Reef (Aegean Sea, Greece): Monitoring an active volcano at Santorini Volcanic Center using a temporary seismic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriadis, I.; Karagianni, E.; Panagiotopoulos, D.; Papazachos, C.; Hatzidimitriou, P.; Bohnhoff, M.; Rische, M.; Meier, T.

    2009-02-01

    The volcanic center of Santorini Island is the most active volcano of the southern Aegean volcanic arc. Α dense seismic array consisting of fourteen portable broadband seismological stations has been deployed in order to monitor and study the seismo-volcanic activity at the broader area of the Santorini volcanic center between March 2003 and September 2003. Additional recordings from a neighbouring larger scale temporary network (CYCNET) were also used for the relocation of more than 240 earthquakes recorded by both arrays. A double-difference relocation technique was used, in order to obtain optimal focal parameters for the best-constrained earthquakes. The results indicate that the seismic activity of the Santorini volcanic center is strongly associated with the tectonic regime of the broader Southern Aegean Sea area as well as with the volcanic processes. The main cluster of the epicenters is located at the Coloumbo Reef, a submarine volcano of the volcanic system of Santorini Islands. A smaller cluster of events is located near the Anydros Islet, aligned in a NE-SW direction, running almost along the main tectonic feature of the area under study, the Santorini-Amorgos Fault Zone. In contrast, the main Santorini Island caldera is characterized by the almost complete absence of seismicity. This contrast is in very good agreement with recent volcanological and marine studies, with the Coloumbo volcanic center showing an intense high-temperature hydrothermal activity, in comparison to the corresponding low-level activity of the Santorini caldera. The high-resolution hypocentral relocations present a clear view of the volcanic submarine structure at the Coloumbo Reef, showing that the main seismic activity is located within a very narrow vertical column, mainly at depths between 6 and 9 km. The focal mechanisms of the best-located events show that the cluster at the Coloumbo Reef is associated with the "Kameni-Coloumbo Fracture Zone", which corresponds to the

  13. The degassing character of a young volcanic center: Cerro Negro, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucic, Gregor; Stix, John; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Muñoz, Angélica; Carcache, Martha Ibarra

    2014-09-01

    Cerro Negro volcano is a young basaltic cinder cone which is part of the Nicaraguan volcanic arc. Eruptive activity at Cerro Negro is characterized by explosive strombolian to subplinian eruptions driven by volatile-rich basaltic magma ascending rapidly from various crustal depths (>15 to 6 km) resulting in the onset of precursory activity only ˜30 min before an eruption. In this paper, we present a comprehensive degassing characterization of the volcano over a 4-year period aimed at improving our understanding of the magmatic plumbing network and its relationship with regional tectonics. A total of 124 individual soil gas samples were collected between 2010 and 2013 and analyzed for stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) from CO2. High temperature fumaroles were sampled for δ18O, δD, and 3He/4He isotope analysis, and major degassing zones were mapped using soil CO2 flux measurements. Gases at Cerro Negro are characterized by a strong 3He/4He mantle signature (6.3 to 7.3 RA), magmatic δ13C ratios (-2.3 to -3.0 ‰), meteoric δ18O and δD ratios, and stable CO2 fluxes (31 t d-1). The lack of δ13C fractionation and an increase in the relative mantle component from 2002 to 2012 suggest that the volatile flux at Cerro Negro originates from the mantle and ascends to the surface via a series of crustal fractures that act as permeable conduits. Despite the lack of new eruptions, the hydrothermal system of Cerro Negro continues to evolve due to seasonal inputs of meteoric water, slope failures that expose and bury sites of active degassing, and bursts of regional seismicity that have the potential to open up new conduits for gas release as well as magma. Continuing geophysical and geochemical monitoring of the main edifice and the recently formed south zone is essential, as the volcano remains overdue to erupt.

  14. Magmatic interactions as recorded in plagioclase phenocrysts of Chaos Crags, Lassen Volcanic Center, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepley, F. J.; Davidson, J.P.; Clynne, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    The silicic lava domes of Chaos Crags in Lassen Volcanic National Park contain a suite of variably quenched, hybrid basaltic andesite magmatic inclusions. The inclusions represent thorough mixing between rhyodacite and basalt recharge liquids accompanied by some mechanical disaggregation of the inclusions resulting in crystals mixing into the rhyodacite host preserved by quenching on dome emplacement. 87Sr/86Sr ratios (~0.7037-0.7038) of the inclusions are distinctly lower than those of the host rhyodacite (~0.704-0.7041), which are used to fingerprint the origin of mineral components and to monitor the mixing and mingling process. Chemical, isotopic, and textural characteristics indicate that the inclusions are hybrid magmas formed from the mixing and undercooling of recharge basaltic magma with rhyodacitic magma. All the host magma phenocrysts (biotite, plagioclase, hornblende and quartz crystals) also occur in the inclusions, where they are rimmed by reaction products. Compositional and strontium isotopic data from cores of unresorbed plagioclase crystals in the host rhyodacite, partially resorbed plagioclase crystals enclosed within basaltic andesite inclusions, and partially resorbed plagioclase crystals in the rhyodacitic host are all similar. Rim 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the partially resorbed plagioclase crystals in both inclusions and host are lower and close to those of the whole-rock hybrid basaltic andesite values. This observation indicates that some crystals originally crystallized in the silicic host, were partially resorbed and subsequently overgrown in the hybrid basaltic andesite magma, and then some of these partially resorbed plagioclase crystals were recycled back into the host rhyodacite. Textural evidence, in the form of sieve zones and major dissolution boundaries of the resorbed plagioclase crystals, indicates immersion of crystals into a hotter, more calcic magma. The occurrence of partially resorbed plagioclase together with plagioclase

  15. Assessing Magmatic Processes and Hazards at two Basaltic Monogenetic Centers: Volcan Jorullo, Mexico, and Blue Lake Maar, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E. R.; Cashman, K.; Wallace, P.; Delgado Granados, H.

    2007-05-01

    Although monogenetic basaltic volcanoes exhibit a wide variety of eruption styles, the origin of this diversity is poorly understood and often ignored when assessing volcanic hazards. To better understand magmatic processes and hazards associated with these eruptions, we have studied two monogenetic centers with differing behavior: Volcan Jorullo, a cinder cone in Mexico, and Blue Lake, a maar in the Oregon High Cascades. Although compositionally similar (medium-K basalt to basaltic andesite), their eruptive styles and products are quite different. Jorullo had violent strombolian eruptions that deposited alternating beds of ash and tephra, as well as lava flows. In contrast, Blue Lake exhibited initial phreatomagmatism that formed a 100m deep crater and produced surge deposits. This activity was followed by magmatic eruptions that produced deposits of tephra and bombs, but no lava flows. The diversity in eruptive style at these two centers reflects different magma ascent and crystallization processes, deduced using olivine-hosted melt inclusions. Jorullo melt inclusions trap variably degassed melts (0.5-5 wt% H2O; 0-1000 ppm CO2), with associated crystallization pressures that decrease from early (<4 kbars) to late (<100 bars) in the eruption. These data support the formation of a shallow storage region beneath the volcano that facilitated both crystallization and magma degassing, which is consistent with effusion of degassed lavas from the base of the cone throughout the eruption. In contrast, Blue Lake inclusions trap melts with a restricted range of volatiles (2.6-4 wt% H2O; 677-870 ppm CO2) corresponding to crystallization pressures of 2.2-3.2 kbars. This suggests that the magma feeding Blue Lake stalled in the upper crust and crystallized before ascending rapidly to the surface, without further crystallization of olivine or shallow storage. This is consistent with both the observed unstratified tephra deposits (indicating single rather than pulsatory eruptions

  16. Diverse lavas from closely spaced volcanoes drawing from a common parent: Emmons Lake Volcanic Center, Eastern Aleutian Arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangan, M.; Miller, T.; Waythomas, C.; Trusdell, F.; Calvert, A.; Layer, P.

    2009-01-01

    Emmons Lake Volcanic Center (ELVC) on the lower Alaskan Peninsula is one of the largest and most diverse volcanic centers in the Aleutian Arc. Since the Middle Pleistocene, eruption of ~ 350 km3 of basalt through rhyolite has produced a 30 km, arc front chain of nested calderas and overlapping stratovolcanoes. ELVC has experienced as many as five major caldera-forming eruptions, the most recent, at ~ 27 ka, produced ~ 50 km3 of rhyolitic ignimbrite and ash fall. These violent silicic events were interspersed with less energetic, but prodigious, outpourings of basalt through dacite. Holocene eruptions are mostly basaltic andesite to andesite and historically recorded activity includes over 40 eruptions within the last 200 yr, all from Pavlof volcano, the most active site in the Aleutian Arc. Geochemical and geophysical observations suggest that although all ELVC eruptions derive from a common clinopyroxene + spinel + plagioclase fractionating high-aluminum basalt parent in the lower crust, magma follows one of two closely spaced, but distinct paths to the surface. Under the eastern end of the chain, magma moves rapidly and cleanly through a relatively young (~ 28 ka), hydraulically connected dike plexus. Steady supply, short magma residence times, and limited interaction with crustal rocks preserve the geochemistry of deep crustal processes. Below the western part of the chain, magma moves haltingly through a long-lived (~ 500 ka) and complex intrusive column in which many generations of basaltic to andesitic melts have mingled and fractionated. Buoyant, silicic melts periodically separate from the lower parts of the column to feed voluminous eruptions of dacite and rhyolite. Mafic lavas record a complicated passage through cumulate zones and hydrous silicic residues as manifested by disequilibrium phenocryst textures, incompatible element enrichments, and decoupling of REEs and HFSEs ratios. Such features are absent in mafic lavas from the younger part of the chain

  17. Evolution of silicic magmas in the Kos-Nisyros volcanic center, Greece: a petrological cycle associated with caldera collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Olivier; Deering, Chad D.; Ruprecht, Janina S.; Huber, Christian; Skopelitis, Alexandra; Schnyder, Cedric

    2012-01-01

    Multiple eruptions of silicic magma (dacite and rhyolites) occurred over the last ~3 My in the Kos-Nisyros volcanic center (eastern Aegean sea). During this period, magmas have changed from hornblende-biotite-rich units with low eruption temperatures (≤750-800°C; Kefalos and Kos dacites and rhyolites) to hotter, pyroxene-bearing units (>800-850°C; Nisyros rhyodacites) and are transitioning back to cooler magmas (Yali rhyolites). New whole-rock compositions, mineral chemistry, and zircon Hf isotopes show that these three types of silicic magmas followed the same differentiation trend: they all evolved by crystal fractionation and minor crustal assimilation (AFC) from parents with intermediate compositions characterized by high Sr/Y and low Nb content, following a wet, high oxygen fugacity liquid line of descent typical of subduction zones. As the transition between the Kos-Kefalos and Nisyros-type magmas occurred immediately and abruptly after the major caldera collapse in the area (the 161 ka Kos Plateau Tuff; KPT), we suggest that the efficient emptying of the magma chamber during the KPT drew out most of the eruptible, volatile-charged magma and partly solidified the unerupted mush zone in the upper crust due to rapid unloading, decompression, and coincident crystallization. Subsequently, the system reestablished a shallow silicic production zone from more mafic parents, recharged from the mid to lower crust. The first silicic eruptions evolving from these parents after the caldera collapse (Nisyros units) were hotter (up to >100°C) than the caldera-forming event and erupted from reservoirs characterized by different mineral proportions (more plagioclase and less amphibole). We interpret such a change as a reflection of slightly drier conditions in the magmatic column after the caldera collapse due to the decompression event. With time, the upper crustal intermediate mush progressively transitioned into the cold-wet state that prevailed during the Kefalos

  18. Lahar hazard zones for eruption-generated lahars in the Lassen Volcanic Center, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Joel E.; Clynne, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    lahar generation, we assume that the maximum historical water equivalent, 3.90 m, covers the entire basin area inside the H/L cone. The product of planimetric area of each basin inside the H/L and the maximum historical water equivalent yields the maximum water volume available to generate a lahar. We then double the water volumes to approximate maximum lahar volumes. The maximum lahar volumes and an understanding of the statistical uncertainties inherent to the LAHARZ calculations guided our selection of six hypothetical volumes, 1, 3, 10, 30, 60, and 90x106 m3, to delineate concentric lahar inundation zones. The lahar inundation zones extend, in general, tens of kilometers away from Lassen Peak. The small, more-frequent lahar inundation zones (1 and 3x106 m3) are, on average, 10 km long. The exceptions are the zones in Warner Creek and Mill Creek, which extend much further. All but one of the small, more-frequent lahar inundation zones reach outside of the Lassen Volcanic National Park boundary, and the zone in Mill Creek extends well past the park boundary. All of the medium, moderately frequent lahar inundation zones (10 and 30x106 m3) extend past the park boundary and could potentially impact the communities of Viola and Old Station and State Highways 36 and 44, both north and west of Lassen Peak. The approximately 27-km-long on average, large, less-frequent lahar inundation zones (60 and 90x106 m3) represent worst-case lahar scenarios that are unlikely to occur. Flood hazards continue downstream from the toes of the lahars, potentially affecting communities in the Sacramento River Valley.

  19. dMODELS: A MATLAB software package for modeling crustal deformation near active faults and volcanic centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Cervelli, Peter F.; Murray, Jessica R.

    2013-03-01

    We have developed a MATLAB software package for the most common models used to interpret deformation measurements near faults and active volcanic centers. The emphasis is on analytical models of deformation that can be compared with data from the Global Positioning System (GPS), InSAR, tiltmeters and strainmeters. Source models include pressurized spherical, ellipsoidal and sill-like magma chambers in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. Dikes and faults are described following the mathematical notation for rectangular dislocations in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. All the expressions have been checked for typographical errors that might have been present in the original literature, extended to include deformation and strain within the Earth's crust (as opposed to only the Earth's surface) and verified against finite element models. A set of GPS measurements from the 2006 eruption at Augustine Volcano (Alaska) is used to test the software package. The results show that the best fit source to the GPS data is a spherical intrusion (ΔV=5×10 km3), about 880 m beneath the volcano's summit.

  20. Origin of Volcanic Seamounts Offshore California Related to Interaction of Abandoned Spreading Centers with the Continental Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. S.; Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Cousens, B. L.; Huard, J.

    2007-12-01

    The numerous NE-SW trending volcanic seamounts at the continental margin offshore central to Southern California owe their existence to the complex tectonics that resulted when small spreading ridge segments intersected and partly subducted beneath the continental margin during the Miocene plate reorganization. A limited number of dredged samples had indicated multiple episodes of coeval, alkalic volcanism at geographically widely separated sites (Davis et al., 2002, GSA Bull. 114, 316-333). 450 new samples were collected from 8 seamounts from 37. 5°N to 32.3°N with MBARI's ROV Tiburon. Ar-Ar ages for 50 of these samples extend the ages of volcanism from 18 Ma to 2.8 Ma. The dominant whole rock compositions are differentiated alkalic basalt, hawaiite, and mugearite, but include minor benmoreite, trachyte, and rare tholeiitic basalt. This entire range of compositions is also present in glassy margins or in volcaniclastic breccias, except for the trachyte, which had no glassy margins. Trace element abundances and ratios (e.g. REE, Zr, Nb, Ta, Th, Ba, etc.) are typical for ocean island basalt, whether the seamount is located on the Pacific plate (e.g. Pioneer, Gumdrop, Guide, Davidson, San Juan, San Marcos) or on the continental slope (Rodriguez) or within the Southern Continental Borderland (Northeast Bank). Nine samples, predominantly from Rodriguez Seamount, show a calc-alkaline trend with lower Nb, Ta, and higher Th. These samples may be erratics (Paduan et al., 2007, Marine Geology, in press). Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions plot within the Pacific N-MORB field for the northern seamounts (Pioneer, Gumdrop, Guide) but suggest progressively more radiogenic sources southward. There is considerable scatter at each site, especially with regard to 87Sr/86Sr, despite severe acid-leaching of the samples. Isotopic and trace element compositions indicate sources that are heterogeneous at a small scale. Chondrite-normalized Ce/Yb suggest smaller degree of melting and

  1. Rhyolite, dacite, andesite, basaltic andesite, and basalt volcanism on the Alarcon Rise spreading-center, Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, B. M.; Portner, R. A.; Clague, D. A.; Castillo, P. R.; Paduan, J. B.; Martin, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    The Alarcon Rise is a ~50 km long intermediate-rate (~50mm/a) spreading segment at the southern end of the Gulf of California. The Rise is bounded by the Tamayo and Pescadero transforms to the south and north. In Spring 2012, an MBARI-led expedition mapped a ~1.5- 3km wide swath of the ridge axis at 1-m resolution and completed 9 ROV dives (Clague et al., this session). Sampling during the ROV dives was supplemented by use of a wax-tip corer to recover volcanic glass: 194 glassy lava samples were recovered from the Rise. The vast majority of lava flows along the axis are basalt and rare basaltic andesite. More than half the basalts are plagioclase-phyric to ultraphyric (Martin et al., this session), and the rest are aphyric. Rare samples also include olivine or olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts. Analyses of half of the recovered glass basalt rinds range in MgO from 4.3 to 8.5 wt.% and those with MgO > 6 wt % have K2O/TiO2 = 0.07-0.11. The basalts are broadly characterized as normal mid-ocean ridge basalts (N-MORB). E-MORB is also present near the center of the ridge segment, but has been found only as pyroclasts in sediment cores. A much greater range in lava composition is associated with an unusual volcanic dome-like edifice that lies ~9 km south of the Pescadero transform. Two dives in the vicinity of the dome collected lava and volcaniclastic samples consisting of moderately to sparsely phyric light brown to colorless volcanic glass. Feldspar is the dominant phase, but magnetite, fayalitic olivine, light tan and light green clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, zircon, and rare pyrite blebs also occur. Melt-inclusions are common in many phenocrysts, especially of plagioclase. Hydrous mineral phases are not observed. These samples have rhyolitic glass compositions (75.8- 77.4 SiO2 wt %), but their whole-rock compositions will be somewhat less silicic. Pillow flows to the immediate west have dacitic glass compositions (67.4- 68.8 wt % SiO2). Basaltic andesitic

  2. Nature and origin of mineral coatings on volcanic rocks of the Black Mountain, Stonewall Mountain, and Kane Springs Wash volcanic centers, Southern Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taranik, James V.; Hsu, Liang C.; Spatz, David

    1988-01-01

    Comparative lab spectra and Thematic Mapper imagery investigations at 3 Tertiary calderas in southern Nevada indicate that desert varnish is absorbant relative to underlying host rocks below about 0.7 to 1.3 microns, depending on mafic affinity of the sample, but less absorbant than mafic host rocks at higher wavelengths. Desert varnish occurs chiefly as thin impregnating films. Distribution of significant varnish accumulations is sparse and localized, occurring chiefly in surface recesses. These relationships result in the longer wavelength bands and high 5/2 values over felsic units with extensive desert varnish coatings. These lithologic, petrochemical, and desert varnish controlled spectral responses lead to characteristic TM band relationships which tend to correlate with conventionally mappable geologic formations. The concept of a Rock-Varnish Index (RVI) is introduced to help distinguish rocks with a potentially detectable varnish. Felsic rocks have a high RVI, and those with extensive desert varnish behave differently, spectrally, from those without extensive varnish. The spectrally distinctive volcanic formations at Stonewall Mountain provide excellent statistical class segregation on supervised classification images. A binary decision rule flow-diagram is presented to aid TM imagery analysis over volcanic terrane in semi-arid environments.

  3. Localized rejuvenation of a crystal mush recorded in zircon temporal and compositional variation at the Lassen Volcanic Center, northern California.

    PubMed

    Klemetti, Erik W; Clynne, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Zircon ages and trace element compositions from recent silicic eruptions in the Lassen Volcanic Center (LVC) allow for an evaluation of the timing and conditions of rejuvenation (reheating and mobilization of crystals) within the LVC magmatic system. The LVC is the southernmost active Cascade volcano and, prior to the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, was the site of the only eruption in the Cascade arc during the last century. The three most recent silicic eruptions from the LVC were very small to moderate-sized lava flows and domes of dacite (1915 and 27 ka eruptions of Lassen Peak) and rhyodacite (1.1 ka eruption of Chaos Crags). These eruptions produced mixed and mingled lavas that contain a diverse crystal cargo, including zircon. 238U-230Th model ages from interior and surface analyses of zircon reveal ages from ∼17 ka to secular equilibrium (>350 ka), with most zircon crystallizing during a period between ∼60-200 ka. These data support a model for localized rejuvenation of crystal mush beneath the LVC. This crystal mush evidently is the remnant of magmatism that ended ∼190 ka. Most zircon are thought to have been captured from "cold storage" in the crystal mush (670-725°C, Hf >10,000 ppm, Eu/Eu* 0.25-0.4) locally remobilized by intrusion of mafic magma. A smaller population of zircon (>730°C, Hf <10,000 ppm, Eu/Eu* >0.4) grew in, and are captured from, rejuvenation zones. These data suggest the dominant method to produce eruptible melt within the LVC is small-scale, local rejuvenation of the crystal mush accompanied by magma mixing and mingling. Based on zircon stability, the time required to heat, erupt and then cool to background conditions is relatively short, lasting a maximum of 10 s-1000 s years. Rejuvenation events in the LVC are ephemeral and permit eruption within an otherwise waning and cooling magmatic body.

  4. Partial record of a Miocene geomagnetic field excursion: Paleomagnetic data from the Paiute Ridge volcanic center, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliff, C.D.; Geissman, J.W.; Perry, F.V. ); Crowe, B.M. )

    1993-04-01

    In the Palute Ridge area, northern Halfpint Range, a complex system of late Miocene (about 8.5 Ma) intrusive and extrusive alkaline mafic rocks crops out over an area of about 25km[sup 2]. Post-magmatic faulting and erosion have resulted in excellent exposure of this sub-volcanic center, allowing for a detailed study of mechanisms and timing of magma emplacement. Paleomagnetic data have been obtained from over 50 sites in mafic rocks, and host ash-flow tuffs and carbonate strata, to better understand the duration of magmatic activity. Magnetizations, isolated in progressive alternating field and thermal demagnetization, for most of the sites at Palute Ridge deviate significantly from expected directions for a time-averaged late Miocene field. Demagnetization data show that there are two types of sample behavior. First, samples with close to expected reverse polarity directions (e.g., the chilled margin of a sill, D=209.2, l=[minus]36.4, [alpha]95=13.2, N=5, k=34.8). Second, and far more common, are samples giving magnetizations of southwest to northwest declination, with both shallow to moderate positive and negative inclination. Within this second grouping are several sites, including syenite pods which differentiated in situ from a large lopolith, having mean declinations that are due west and of shallow inclination. Contact tests performed at several sites are positive and show a clear correlation between sample position and isolated remanence direction. The authors preferred interpretation of the anomalously directed magnetization is that these rocks acquired a TRM during either a high amplitude excursion, or the transitional portion of a field reversal. Thermal models based on larger intrusions [+-] 10m thick at Paiute Ridge indicate that the magmas could cool through estimated magnetization blocking temperatures within weeks or months of emplacement.

  5. Nature and origin of mineral coatings on volcanic rocks of the Black Mountain, Stonewall Mountain and Kane Springs wash volcanic centers, southern Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taranik, James V.; Noble, Donald C.; Hsu, Liang C.; Spatz, David M.

    1987-01-01

    Mineral coatings, including desert varnish on volcanic rocks of the semi-arid Basin and Range province are composted of amorphous, translucent films of Fe, Mn, Si, and Al rich compounds. Coatings are chiefly thin films that impregnate intergranularly to depths of about 0.1 to 0.3 mm, rarely deeper. Sixteen coating sections and subsurface interiors were probed by SEM; 20 samples were scanned by infrated spectrometry; 10 samples were scanned for visible-near IR spectra; inductin coupling plasma analyses were collected on 34 samples; 2 desert varnish surgaces were investigated by optical density slice imagery; a few XRD analyses were conducted in addition to the 50 reported in the last period; thin section observation continued; and imagery processing focused on classification techniques. In late May, approximately 10 field days were spent at the Stonewall and Black Mountain study sited conducting more detailed mapping and observation base on imagery results and collecting spectra with the Collins Field Spectrometer. Approximately 100 spectral analyses were collected and are currently being processed.

  6. Nature and origin of mineral coatings on volcanic rocks of the Black Mountain, Stonewall Mountain and Kane Springs wash volcanic centers, southern Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranik, James V.; Noble, Donald C.; Hsu, Liang C.; Spatz, David M.

    1987-07-01

    Mineral coatings, including desert varnish on volcanic rocks of the semi-arid Basin and Range province are composted of amorphous, translucent films of Fe, Mn, Si, and Al rich compounds. Coatings are chiefly thin films that impregnate intergranularly to depths of about 0.1 to 0.3 mm, rarely deeper. Sixteen coating sections and subsurface interiors were probed by SEM; 20 samples were scanned by infrated spectrometry; 10 samples were scanned for visible-near IR spectra; inductin coupling plasma analyses were collected on 34 samples; 2 desert varnish surgaces were investigated by optical density slice imagery; a few XRD analyses were conducted in addition to the 50 reported in the last period; thin section observation continued; and imagery processing focused on classification techniques. In late May, approximately 10 field days were spent at the Stonewall and Black Mountain study sited conducting more detailed mapping and observation base on imagery results and collecting spectra with the Collins Field Spectrometer. Approximately 100 spectral analyses were collected and are currently being processed.

  7. Localized Rejuvenation of a Crystal Mush Recorded in Zircon Temporal and Compositional Variation at the Lassen Volcanic Center, Northern California

    PubMed Central

    Klemetti, Erik W.; Clynne, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Zircon ages and trace element compositions from recent silicic eruptions in the Lassen Volcanic Center (LVC) allow for an evaluation of the timing and conditions of rejuvenation (reheating and mobilization of crystals) within the LVC magmatic system. The LVC is the southernmost active Cascade volcano and, prior to the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, was the site of the only eruption in the Cascade arc during the last century. The three most recent silicic eruptions from the LVC were very small to moderate-sized lava flows and domes of dacite (1915 and 27 ka eruptions of Lassen Peak) and rhyodacite (1.1 ka eruption of Chaos Crags). These eruptions produced mixed and mingled lavas that contain a diverse crystal cargo, including zircon. 238U-230Th model ages from interior and surface analyses of zircon reveal ages from ∼17 ka to secular equilibrium (>350 ka), with most zircon crystallizing during a period between ∼60–200 ka. These data support a model for localized rejuvenation of crystal mush beneath the LVC. This crystal mush evidently is the remnant of magmatism that ended ∼190 ka. Most zircon are thought to have been captured from “cold storage” in the crystal mush (670–725°C, Hf >10,000 ppm, Eu/Eu* 0.25–0.4) locally remobilized by intrusion of mafic magma. A smaller population of zircon (>730°C, Hf <10,000 ppm, Eu/Eu* >0.4) grew in, and are captured from, rejuvenation zones. These data suggest the dominant method to produce eruptible melt within the LVC is small-scale, local rejuvenation of the crystal mush accompanied by magma mixing and mingling. Based on zircon stability, the time required to heat, erupt and then cool to background conditions is relatively short, lasting a maximum of 10 s–1000 s years. Rejuvenation events in the LVC are ephemeral and permit eruption within an otherwise waning and cooling magmatic body. PMID:25470726

  8. Localized rejuvenation of a crystal mush recorded in zircon temporal and compositional variation at the Lassen Volcanic Center, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klemetti, Erik W.; Clynne, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Zircon ages and trace element compositions from recent silicic eruptions in the Lassen Volcanic Center (LVC) allow for an evaluation of the timing and conditions of rejuvenation (reheating and mobilization of crystals) within the LVC magmatic system. The LVC is the southernmost active Cascade volcano and, prior to the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, was the site of the only eruption in the Cascade arc during the last century. The three most recent silicic eruptions from the LVC were very small to moderate-sized lava flows and domes of dacite (1915 and 27 ka eruptions of Lassen Peak) and rhyodacite (1.1 ka eruption of Chaos Crags). These eruptions produced mixed and mingled lavas that contain a diverse crystal cargo, including zircon. 238U-230Th model ages from interior and surface analyses of zircon reveal ages from ~17 ka to secular equilibrium (>350 ka), with most zircon crystallizing during a period between ~60–200 ka. These data support a model for localized rejuvenation of crystal mush beneath the LVC. This crystal mush evidently is the remnant of magmatism that ended ~190 ka. Most zircon are thought to have been captured from “cold storage” in the crystal mush (670–725°C, Hf >10,000 ppm, Eu/Eu* 0.25–0.4) locally remobilized by intrusion of mafic magma. A smaller population of zircon (>730°C, Hf <10,000 ppm, Eu/Eu* >0.4) grew in, and are captured from, rejuvenation zones. These data suggest the dominant method to produce eruptible melt within the LVC is small-scale, local rejuvenation of the crystal mush accompanied by magma mixing and mingling. Based on zircon stability, the time required to heat, erupt and then cool to background conditions is relatively short, lasting a maximum of 10 s–1000 s years. Rejuvenation events in the LVC are ephemeral and permit eruption within an otherwise waning and cooling magmatic body.

  9. Geodetic observations and modeling of magmatic inflation at the Three Sisters volcanic center, central Oregon Cascade Range, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Lisowski, Michael; Wicks, Charles W.; Poland, Michael P.; Endo, Elliot T.

    2006-01-01

    Tumescence at the Three Sisters volcanic center began sometime between summer 1996 and summer 1998 and was discovered in April 2001 using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Swelling is centered about 5 km west of the summit of South Sister, a composite basaltic-andesite to rhyolite volcano that last erupted between 2200 and 2000 yr ago, and it affects an area ∼20 km in diameter within the Three Sisters Wilderness. Yearly InSAR observations show that the average maximum displacement rate was 3–5 cm/yr through summer 2001, and the velocity of a continuous GPS station within the deforming area was essentially constant from June 2001 to June 2004. The background level of seismic activity has been low, suggesting that temperatures in the source region are high enough or the strain rate has been low enough to favor plastic deformation over brittle failure. A swarm of about 300 small earthquakes (Mmax = 1.9) in the northeast quadrant of the deforming area on March 23–26, 2004, was the first notable seismicity in the area for at least two decades. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) established tilt-leveling and EDM networks at South Sister in 1985–1986, resurveyed them in 2001, the latter with GPS, and extended them to cover more of the deforming area. The 2001 tilt-leveling results are consistent with the inference drawn from InSAR that the current deformation episode did not start before 1996, i.e., the amount of deformation during 1995–2001 from InSAR fully accounts for the net tilt at South Sister during 1985–2001 from tilt-leveling. Subsequent InSAR, GPS, and leveling observations constrain the source location, geometry, and inflation rate as a function of time. A best-fit source model derived from simultaneous inversion of all three datasets is a dipping sill located 6.5 ± 2.5 km below the surface with a volume increase of 5.0 × 106 ± 1.5 × 106m3/yr (95% confidence limits). The most likely cause of tumescence is a pulse of

  10. Geodetic observations and modeling of magmatic inflation at the Three Sisters volcanic center, central Oregon Cascade Range, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Lisowski, Michael; Wicks, Charles W.; Poland, Michael P.; Endo, Elliot T.

    2006-02-01

    Tumescence at the Three Sisters volcanic center began sometime between summer 1996 and summer 1998 and was discovered in April 2001 using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Swelling is centered about 5 km west of the summit of South Sister, a composite basaltic-andesite to rhyolite volcano that last erupted between 2200 and 2000 yr ago, and it affects an area ˜20 km in diameter within the Three Sisters Wilderness. Yearly InSAR observations show that the average maximum displacement rate was 3-5 cm/yr through summer 2001, and the velocity of a continuous GPS station within the deforming area was essentially constant from June 2001 to June 2004. The background level of seismic activity has been low, suggesting that temperatures in the source region are high enough or the strain rate has been low enough to favor plastic deformation over brittle failure. A swarm of about 300 small earthquakes ( Mmax = 1.9) in the northeast quadrant of the deforming area on March 23-26, 2004, was the first notable seismicity in the area for at least two decades. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) established tilt-leveling and EDM networks at South Sister in 1985-1986, resurveyed them in 2001, the latter with GPS, and extended them to cover more of the deforming area. The 2001 tilt-leveling results are consistent with the inference drawn from InSAR that the current deformation episode did not start before 1996, i.e., the amount of deformation during 1995-2001 from InSAR fully accounts for the net tilt at South Sister during 1985-2001 from tilt-leveling. Subsequent InSAR, GPS, and leveling observations constrain the source location, geometry, and inflation rate as a function of time. A best-fit source model derived from simultaneous inversion of all three datasets is a dipping sill located 6.5 ± 2.5 km below the surface with a volume increase of 5.0 × 10 6 ± 1.5 × 10 6 m 3/yr (95% confidence limits). The most likely cause of tumescence is a pulse of basaltic magma

  11. Volcanic Hazards Survey in the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Michael; Siebe, Claus; Macias, Jose Luis

    1996-01-01

    We have assembled a digital mosaic of 11 Landsat Thematic images to serve as a mapping base for reconnaissance activities within the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt. This will aid us in interpretation and in the evaluation of potential activity of all the volcanic centers there. One result is a volcanic hazards map of the area.

  12. Volcanic Gas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hazards Tephra/Ash Lava Flows Lahars Volcanic Gas Climate Change Pyroclastic Flows Volcanic Landslides Preparedness Volcano Hazard Zones ... Please see our discussion of volcanic gases and climate change for additional information. Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is ...

  13. Rhyolite genesis at the Picabo Volcanic Center of the Snake River Plain: Progressive recycling of hydrothermally altered rhyolites revealed by high resolution analysis of individual zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drew, D.; Bindeman, I. N.; Watts, K. E.; Schmitt, A. K.; McCurry, M. O.

    2012-12-01

    The Picabo eruptive center of the Snake River Plain (SRP) produced a series of normal and low δ18O rhyolites from 10.44 Ma to 6.62 Ma, providing the first evidence of progressive recycling of hydrothermally altered rhyolites during the formation of a caldera complex. In this study we present a characterization of ignimbrites and associated lavas based on U-Pb ages and δ18O compositions of individual zircon cores measured by ion microprobe, phenocryst δ18O values measured by laser fluorination, whole rock 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd compositions, and whole rock geochemistry. Our data define rhyolite genesis at the Picabo volcanic center through time and have implications for the transition between volcanic centers. Caldera complex evolution at Picabo began with eruption of the 10.44 ± 0.27 Ma Tuff of Arbon Valley (TAV), a chemically zoned unit with a normal δ18Omelt value (8.15‰), very high 87Sr/86Sr (up to 0.734430) and very low ɛNd (-18). Eruptions continued with the ~9.1 Ma Two-and-a-Half-Mile Rhyolite (Kellogg et al., 1988), a unit significant in that it has an even lower ɛNd than the TAV and a normal δ18Omelt value (8.10‰). This low ɛNd of -23, of the Two-and-a-Half-Mile Rhyolite, reveals that greater than 40% of Archean crust was assimilated. These normal δ18O eruptions were followed by a series of lower δ18O eruptions distinguishable by Sr and Nd isotopes and whole rock chemistry. The 8.25 ± 0.26 Ma Rhyolite of West Pocatello has the lowest δ18Omelt value (3.34‰) of these eruptions, and based on nearly identical age, 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, and whole rock chemistry, we correlate it to a 1,000 m thick intracaldera tuff (present in the INEL drillcore). Along with a distinct decrease in δ18O, from the TAV to the Rhyolite of West Pocatello, there is a corresponding increase in δ18Ozircon heterogeneity from the TAV (1‰ variation) to the low δ18O units with the greatest δ18Ozircon diversity (up to 5‰). Although morphological evidence for

  14. Eruptive stratigraphy of the Tatara-San Pedro complex, 36°S, sourthern volcanic zone, Chilean Andes: reconstruction method and implications for magma evolution at long-lived arc volcanic centers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dungan, M.A.; Wulff, A.; Thompson, R.

    2001-01-01

    The Quaternary Tatara-San Pedro volcanic complex (36°S, Chilean Andes) comprises eight or more unconformity-bound volcanic sequences, representing variably preserved erosional remnants of volcanic centers generated during 930 ky of activity. The internal eruptive histories of several dominantly mafic to intermediate sequences have been reconstructed, on the basis of correlations of whole-rock major and trace element chemistry of flows between multiple sampled sections, but with critical contributions from photogrammetric, geochronologic, and paleomagnetic data. Many groups of flows representing discrete eruptive events define internal variation trends that reflect extrusion of heterogeneous or rapidly evolving magna batches from conduit-reservoir systems in which open-system processes typically played a large role. Long-term progressive evolution trends are extremely rare and the magma compositions of successive eruptive events rarely lie on precisely the same differentiation trend, even where they have evolved from similar parent magmas by similar processes. These observations are not consistent with magma differentiation in large long-lived reservoirs, but they may be accommodated by diverse interactions between newly arrived magma inputs and multiple resident pockets of evolved magma and / or crystal mush residing in conduit-dominated subvolcanic reservoirs. Without constraints provided by the reconstructed stratigraphic relations, the framework for petrologic modeling would be far different. A well-established eruptive stratigraphy may provide independent constraints on the petrologic processes involved in magma evolution-simply on the basis of the specific order in which diverse, broadly cogenetic magmas have been erupted. The Tatara-San Pedro complex includes lavas ranging from primitive basalt to high-SiO2 rhyolite, and although the dominant erupted magma type was basaltic andesite ( 52-55 wt % SiO2) each sequence is characterized by unique proportions of

  15. The Cerro Bitiche Andesitic Field: petrological diversity and implications for magmatic evolution of mafic volcanic centers from the northern Puna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maro, Guadalupe; Caffe, Pablo J.

    2016-07-01

    The Cerro Bitiche Andesitic Field (CBAF) is one of the two largest mafic volcanic fields in northern Puna (22-24° S) and is spatially and temporally associated with ignimbrites erupted from some central Andean Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex calderas. The CBAF comprises seven scoria cones and widespread high-K calcalkaline lava flows that cover an area of 200 km2. Although all erupted rocks have a relatively narrow chemical range (56-62 % SiO2, 3-6 % MgO), there is a broad diversity of mineral compositions and textures. The least evolved lavas (˜58-61 % SiO2) are high-Mg andesites with scarce (<10 %) microphenocrysts of either olivine or orthopyroxene. The small compositional range and low phenocryst content indicate evolution controlled by low percentages (<10 %) of fractional crystallization of olivine and clinopyroxene of magmas similar to the least evolved rocks from the field, accompanied by assimilation during rapid ascent through the crust. Evolved andesites (˜62 wt% SiO2), on the other hand, are porphyritic rocks with plagioclase + orthopyroxene + biotite and ubiquitous phenocryst disequilibrium textures. These magmas were likely stored in crustal reservoirs, where they experienced convection caused by mafic magma underplating, magma mixing, and/or assimilation. Trace element and mineral compositions of CBAF lavas provide evidence for complex evolution of distinct magma batches.

  16. Sill to surface: Linking young off-axis volcanism with subsurface melt at the overlapping spreading center at 9°03‧N East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Christopher L.; Sims, Kenneth W. W.; Klein, Emily M.; White, Scott M.; Reagan, Mark K.; Girard, Guillaume

    2013-05-01

    No young, off-axis, mid-ocean ridge lavas have yet been directly linked to underlying off-axis melt bodies. In this study, we present new measurements of 238U-230Th-226Ra-210Pb isotope compositions for a suite of lavas from the overlapping spreading center (OSC) at 9°03'N on the East Pacific Rise (EPR). These lavas span a large range of compositions, from basalt to dacite, and include both axial and off-axis samples recovered from a prominent, axis-parallel pillow ridge and a flat-topped seamount that overlie the westernmost extent of a 4-km-wide melt lens (Kent et al., 2000). We report 210Pb excesses in axial basalts and basaltic andesites, which we suggest results from gas-magma fractionation of 222Rn from 226Ra beneath dacite magmas. In addition, our U-series ages agree with visual observations, indicating that while most recent volcanic activity occurs at the spreading axis, active volcanism also occurs away from the axis. Specifically, the off-axis pillow ridge and seamount samples overlying the off-axis subsurface melt body have eruption ages of less than 8 ka, and likely as young as 1 ka, despite being located on crust that has a spreading age of ~75 ka. The young ages of these lavas, combined with existing geological, geochemical and geophysical constraints, provide evidence for a genetic link between the pillow ridge and seamount lavas and the seismically imaged, underlying off-axis melt lens. This link demonstrates that off-axis volcanism does not necessarily come from a sub-axial magma body and can be sourced directly from off-axis magma bodies.

  17. Center for Volcanic and Tectonic Studies, Department of Geoscience annual report, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.I.

    1990-11-01

    This report summarizes our activities during the period October 1, 1989 to September 30, 1990. Our goal was to develop an understanding of late-Miocene and Pliocene volcanism in the Great Basin by studying Pliocene volcanoes in the vicinity of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Field studies during this period concentrated on the Quaternary volcanoes in Crater Flat, Yucca Mountain, Fortification Hill, at Buckboard Mesa and Sleeping Butte, and in the Reveille Range. Also, a study was initiated on structurally disrupted basaltic rocks in the northern White Hills of Mohave County, Arizona. As well as progress reports of our work in Crater Flat, Fortification Hill and the Reveille Range, this paper also includes a summary of model that relates changing styles of Tertiary extension to changing magmatic compositions, and a summary of work being done in the White Hills, Arizona. In the Appendix, we include copies of published papers not previously incorporated in our monthly reports.

  18. Catastrophic volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipman, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    Since primitive times, catastrophes due to volcanic activity have been vivid in the mind of man, who knew that his activities in many parts of the world were threatened by lava flows, mudflows, and ash falls. Within the present century, increasingly complex interactions between volcanism and the environment, on scales not previously experienced historically, have been detected or suspected from geologic observations. These include enormous hot pyroclastic flows associated with collapse at source calderas and fed by eruption columns that reached the stratosphere, relations between huge flood basalt eruptions at hotspots and the rifting of continents, devastating laterally-directed volcanic blasts and pyroclastic surges, great volcanic-generated tsunamis, climate modification from volcanic release of ash and sulfur aerosols into the upper atmosphere, modification of ocean circulation by volcanic constructs and attendent climatic implications, global pulsations in intensity of volcanic activity, and perhaps triggering of some intense terrestrial volcanism by planetary impacts. Complex feedback between volcanic activity and additional seemingly unrelated terrestrial processes likely remains unrecognized. Only recently has it become possible to begin to evaluate the degree to which such large-scale volcanic processes may have been important in triggering or modulating the tempo of faunal extinctions and other evolutionary events. In this overview, such processes are examined from the viewpoint of a field volcanologist, rather than as a previous participant in controversies concerning the interrelations between extinctions, impacts, and volcanism.

  19. Tracking the Tristan-Gough Mantle Plume Using Discrete Chains of Intraplate Volcanic Centers Buried in the Walvis Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. M.; Jokat, W.; Wijbrans, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Explanations for hotspot trails range from deep mantle plumes rising from the core-mantle boundary (CMB) to shallow plate cracking. Such mechanisms cannot explain uniquely the scattered hotspot trails distributed across a 2,000-km-wide swell in the sea floor of the southeast Atlantic Ocean. While these hotspot trails formed synchronously, in a pattern consistent with movement of the African Plate over plumes rising from the edge of the African LLSVP, their distribution is controlled by the interplay between plumes and the motion and structure of the African Plate (O'Connor et al., 2012). A significant challenge is to establish how the vigor and flow of hotspot material to the mid-ocean ridge constructed the Walvis Ridge. 40Ar/39Ar ages for three sites across the central Walvis Ridge sampled by Ocean Drilling (DSDP Leg 74) (Rohde et al., 2013; O'Connor and Jokat, 2015a) indicate an apparent inverse relation between the volume flux of hotspot volcanism and the distance between the mid-ocean ridge and the Tristan-Gough hotspot. Moreover, since ca. 93 Ma the geometry and motion of the mid-ocean ridge determined where hotspot material was channeled to the plate surface to build the Walvis Ridge. Interplay between hotspot flow, and the changing geometry of the mid-ocean ridge as it migrated relative to the Tristan-Gough hotspot, might explain much of the age and morphology of the Walvis Ridge. Thus, tracking the location of the Tristan-Gough plume might not be practicable if most of the complex morphology of the massive Walvis Ridge is related to the proximity of the South Atlantic mid-ocean ridge. But 40Ar/39Ar basement ages for the Tristan-Gough hotspot track (Rohde et al., 2013; O'Connor and Jokat, 2015b), together with information about morphology and crustal structure from new swath maps and seismic profiles, suggest that separated age-progressive intraplate segments track the location of the Tristan-Gough mantle plume. The apparent continuity of the inferred age

  20. Tracking the Tristan-Gough Mantle Plume Using Discrete Chains of Intraplate Volcanic Centers Buried in the Walvis Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, John; Jokat, Wilfried; Wijbrans, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Explanations for hotspot trails range from deep mantle plumes rising from the core-mantle boundary (CMB) to shallow plate cracking. Such mechanisms cannot explain uniquely the scattered hotspot trails distributed across a 2,000-km-wide swell in the sea floor of the southeast Atlantic Ocean. While these hotspot trails formed synchronously, in a pattern consistent with movement of the African Plate over plumes rising from the edge of the African LLSVP, their distribution is controlled by the interplay between plumes and the motion and structure of the African Plate (O'Connor et al. 2012). A significant challenge is to establish how the vigor and flow of hotspot material to the mid-ocean ridge constructed the Walvis Ridge. 40Ar/39Ar stratigraphy for three sites across the central Walvis Ridge sampled by Ocean Drilling (DSDP Leg 74) (Rohde et al., 2013; O'Connor & Jokat 2015a) indicates an apparent inverse relation between the volume flux of hotspot volcanism and the distance between the mid-ocean ridge and the Tristan-Gough hotspot. Moreover, since ˜93 Ma the geometry and motion of the mid-ocean ridge determined where hotspot material was channeled to the plate surface to build the Walvis Ridge. Interplay between hotspot flow, and the changing geometry of the mid-ocean ridge as it migrated relative to the Tristan-Gough hotspot, might explain much of the age and morphology of the Walvis Ridge. Thus, tracking the location of the Tristan-Gough plume might not be practicable if most of the complex morphology of the massive Walvis Ridge is related to the proximity of the South Atlantic mid-ocean ridge. But 40Ar/39Ar basement ages for the Tristan-Gough hotspot track (Rohde et al., 2013; O'Connor & Jokat 2015b), together with information about morphology and crustal structure from new swath maps and seismic profiles, suggest that separated age-progressive intraplate segments track the location of the Tristan-Gough mantle plume. The apparent continuity of the inferred age

  1. Temperatures of rhyolite lavas related to the third cycle of ash-flow volcanism at the Bruneau-Jarbidge eruptive center, S. W. Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Hirt, W.H. . Dept. of Natural and Applied Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The Bruneau-Jarbridge eruptive center is a bimodal volcanic system that formed 11--12 Ma along the Yellowstone hot spot track. Eruption of a series of rhyolite ash-flows formed the nine-member Cougar Point Tuff (CPT) and led to subsidence of the 50 x 100 km depression that now marks the site of the center. Deposition of the tuff was followed closely by extrusion of several large (8--12 km long) rhyolite lave flows and, later, by widespread basaltic volcanism. Chemical analyses of the CPT ash-flows and the two youngest rhyolite flows define a sequence of three compositional cycles within which members are successively more mafic. Rhyolites from the third cycle (CPT units XIII and XV are the Triguero Homestead(TH) and Indian Batt(IB) flows) are characterized by decreases in whole-rock SiO[sub 2] from 75 to 70 wt% and by roughly two-fold increases in the abundances of mafic oxides. As part of a larger study of the third-cycle rhyolites, the compositions of coexisting pyroxenes from the TH and IB flows were analyzed to learn if these lavas continue the trend of increasing eruption temperatures reported by Honjo et al. (1992) for CPT units XIII (750 C) and XV (910 C). Compositions of coexisting augites (Wo[sub 35]En[sub 31]Fs[sub 34]) and pigeonites (Wo[sub 10]En[sub 36]Fs[sub 54]) indicate that the TH rhyolite erupted at [approximately]975 C, based on the solution model of Davidson and Lindsley (1985) and an assumed pressure of 5 Kb. Because the third-cycle rhyolites are separated from one another by apparent hiatuses and few isotopic data are yet available, trends in their chemistry and temperature are attributed to repeated fusions of a lower-crustal source region that was gradually depleted of hydrous phases and enriched in refractory ones rather than to eruption of a single zoned chamber or progressive increases in the extent of basalt/crustal melt hybridization.

  2. Volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1986-01-01

    Volcanoes have contributed significantly to the formation of the surface of our planet. Volcanism produced the crust we live on and most of the air we breathe. Often the remnants of an eruption are as revealing as the eruption itself, for they tell us many things about the eruption. Included here are examples of several volcanic products and other magmatic features, with descriptions of how they were formed and what they tell us about volcanism.

  3. Question of Ages of Cenozoic Volcanic Centers Inferred Beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) in the West Antarctic Rift System (WR) from Coincident Aeromagnetic and Radar Ice Sounding Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.; Finn, C. A.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2007-12-01

    The recently acquired radar ice sounding surveys (Holt, et al., 2006) extending the 1990s Central West Antarctica (CWA) aerogeophysical survey to the Amundsen and Bellingshausen sea coasts allows us to revise a thought experiment reported by Behrendt et al., 1991 from very limited bed elevation data. Were the ice of the WAIS flowing through the WR to be compressed to the density of crustal rock, almost all of the area beneath the WAIS would be at or above sea level, much >1 km elevation. There are only about 10-20% of the very deep areas (such as the Bentley subglacial trench and the Byrd Subglacial Basin) filled with 3-4-km thick ice that would be well below sea level. The age of the 5-7-km high rift shoulder bounding the asymmetric WR from northern Victoria Land through the Horlick Mountains (where it diverges from the Transantarctic Mountains) to the Ellsworth Mountains has been reported as old as Cretaceous. Volcanic exposures associated with the West Antarctic rift system in the present WAIS area extend at least to 34 Ma and the West Antarctic ice sheet has flowed through the rift possibly as far back in time as 25 Ma. Active volcanism has been reported for the WR at only a few widely scattered locations, so speculations about present volcanic activity beneath the WAIS are quite uncertain, and it is probably quite rare. The Central West Antarctic aeromagnetic and radar ice sounding survey carried out in the 1990s revealed about 1000 "volcanic centers" characterized by 100-1000 nT shallow source magnetic anomalies, at least 400 of which have associated bed topography. About 80% of these show relief <200 m and have been interpreted as smoothed off as they were erupted (injected) into the moving WAIS. Several kilometer-thick highly magnetic sources are required to fit these anomalies requiring high remanent magnetizations in the present field direction. We interpreted these sources as subvolcanic intrusions which must be younger than about 100 Ma because the

  4. Volcanic mesocyclones.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Pinaki; Gioia, Gustavo; Kieffer, Susan W

    2009-03-26

    A strong volcanic plume consists of a vertical column of hot gases and dust topped with a horizontal 'umbrella'. The column rises, buoyed by entrained and heated ambient air, reaches the neutral-buoyancy level, then spreads radially to form the umbrella. In classical models of strong volcanic plumes, the plume is assumed to remain always axisymmetric and non-rotating. Here we show that the updraught of the rising column induces a hydrodynamic effect not addressed to date-a 'volcanic mesocyclone'. This volcanic mesocyclone sets the entire plume rotating about its axis, as confirmed by an unprecedented analysis of satellite images from the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo. Destabilized by the rotation, the umbrella loses axial symmetry and becomes lobate in plan view, in accord with satellite records of recent eruptions on Mounts Pinatubo, Manam, Reventador, Okmok, Chaiten and Ruang. The volcanic mesocyclone spawns waterspouts or dust devils, as seen in numerous eruptions, and groups the electric charges about the plume to form the 'lightning sheath' that was so prominent in the recent eruption of Mount Chaiten. The concept of a volcanic mesocyclone provides a unified explanation for a disparate set of poorly understood phenomena in strong volcanic plumes.

  5. Planetary Volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonenko, I.; Head, J. W.; Pieters, C. W.

    1998-01-01

    The final report consists of 10 journal articles concerning Planetary Volcanism. The articles discuss the following topics: (1) lunar stratigraphy; (2) cryptomare thickness measurements; (3) spherical harmonic spectra; (4) late stage activity of volcanoes on Venus; (5) stresses and calderas on Mars; (6) magma reservoir failure; (7) lunar mare basalt volcanism; (8) impact and volcanic glasses in the 79001/2 Core; (9) geology of the lunar regional dark mantle deposits; and (10) factors controlling the depths and sizes of magma reservoirs in Martian volcanoes.

  6. Paleomagnetic and cooling constraints on the duration of the Pahute Mesa-Trail Ridge Eruptive event and associated magmatic evolution, Black Mountain Volcanic Center, southwestern Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Steven I.; Noble, Donald C.; McKee, Edwin H.

    1989-05-01

    Two successive ash-flow cooling units of the Black Mountain volcanic center, the Pahute Mesa and Trail Ridge members of the late Miocene Thirsty Canyon Tuff, possess nearly indistinguishable reverse polarity remanent magnetization directions of about 178° declination and -10° inclination. These are interpreted to reflect thermoremanent magnetization either during a single geomagnetic field excursion or polarity transition, or possibly from a field oriented near the limit of secular variation. Regardless of the type of geomagnetic field behavior, the Pahute Mesa Member was apparently overlain by the Trail Ridge Member before appreciable shift of the anomalous geomagnetic field. This strongly suggests that the time between eruption of the two ash-flow sheets was very short, perhaps less than 100 years, a conclusion that is independently supported by the local absence of a complete cooling break between the two units. The interval between eruption of the Pahute Mesa and Trail Ridge members was too brief for reestablishment of chemical stratification in the Black Mountain magma system. Nevertheless, a small volume of highly evolved comendite magma developed and was erupted as lava within the Black Mountain caldera and as a component of the Trail Ridge Member. The short repose interval and rapid development of the comendite, together with evidence for mixing of magmas of silicic to near-mafic composition (Vogel et al., this issue), and the presence of air-fall tuff at the base of the Trail Ridge, lead us to conclude that eruption of the Trail Ridge Member was probably triggered by injection of hot, relatively unevolved magma into the Black Mountain magma body.

  7. Mantle Heterogeneities and Crustal Processes of the Cascade Arc Represented by Basalts of the Poison Lake Chain, Lassen Volcanic Center, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenner, J. M.; Teasdale, R.; Hiebing, M. S.; Lenz, Q. A.; Kroeninger, K.

    2013-12-01

    Basalts in the Poison Lake chain (PLC) include eight chemically distinct groups of primitive calc-alkaline basalts (defined by major element geochemistry and mineralogy). Located east of the Lassen Volcanic Center, PLC primitive basalts span the range of basalt compositions exposed throughout the entire Cascade arc (e.g. Ba: 100-1000 ppm; (Sr/P)n: 1.3 - 3.8; La/Yb: 4-26). PLC groups have trace-element and isotope ratios that show little evidence of direct genetic relationships among groups or a common source. Major, trace element and isotope ratios show evidence of contributions from multiple mantle sources including MORB, fluid rich subduction component and subduction-related sediment. Some groups record compositional variations from multiple mantle sources with minimal crustal processing. Similarly, preliminary probe data for olivine-spinel pairs suggest that some PLC groups are derived from heterogeneous mantle sources. Geochemical evidence indicates that other groups have petrogenetic histories that include crustal processes such as fractional crystallization, mixing or crustal contamination. Isotope ratios, major and trace element compositions and crystal compositions provide insights into the extent of source heterogeneities versus the degree of crustal processing. The broad range of compositional variations in basalts of PLC provides the opportunity to examine the extent of mantle heterogeneities and crustal processing in a small geographic area (50km2) for rocks that are nearly the same age (100-110 ka). The diverse primitive compositions erupted in the constrained time and space of the Poison Lake chain and the lack of genetic relationship among groups make it the ideal place to investigate the small scale nature of mantle domains and the roles of subduction and modification processes in the generation of basaltic compositions in arcs such as the Cascades, Mexico, Japan.

  8. Contrasting records from mantle to surface of Holocene lavas of two nearby arc volcanic complexes: Caburgua-Huelemolle Small Eruptive Centers and Villarrica Volcano, Southern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgado, E.; Parada, M. A.; Contreras, C.; Castruccio, A.; Gutiérrez, F.; McGee, L. E.

    2015-11-01

    Most of the small eruptive centers of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone are built over the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ), a NS strike-slip (> 1000 km length) major structure, and close to large stratovolcanoes. This contribution compares textural features, compositional parameters, and pre- and syn-eruptive P,T conditions, between basaltic lavas of the Caburgua-Huelemolle Small Eruptive Centers (CHSEC) and the 1971 basaltic andesite lava of the Villarrica Volcano located 10 km south of the CHSEC. Olivines and clinopyroxenes occur as phenocrysts and forming crystal clots of the studied lavas. They do not markedly show compositional differences, except for the more scattered composition of the CHSEC clinopyroxenes. Plagioclase in CHSEC lavas mainly occur as phenocrysts or as microlites in a glass-free matrix. Two groups of plagioclase phenocrysts were identified in the 1971 Villarrica lava based on crystal size, disequilibrium features and zonation patterns. Most of the CHSEC samples exhibit higher LaN/YbN and more scattered Sr-Nd values than 1971 Villarrica lava samples, which are clustered at higher 143Nd/144Nd values. Pre-eruptive temperatures of the CHSEC-type reservoir between 1162 and 1165 ± 6 °C and pressures between 10.8 and 11.4 ± 1.7 kb consistent with a deep-seated reservoir were obtained from olivine-augite phenocrysts. Conversely, olivine-augite phenocrysts of 1971 Villarrica lava samples record pre-eruptive conditions of two stages or pauses in the magma ascent to the surface: 1208 ± 6 °C and 6.3-8.1 kb ± 1.7 kb (deep-seated reservoir) and 1164-1175 ± 6 °C and ≤ 1.4 kb (shallow reservoir). At shallow reservoir conditions a magma heating prior to the 1971 Villarrica eruption is recorded in plagioclase phenocrysts. Syn-eruptive temperatures of 1081-1133 ± 6 °C and 1123-1148 ± 6 °C were obtained in CHSEC and 1971 Villarrica lava, respectively using equilibrium olivine-augite microlite pairs. The LOFZ could facilitate a direct transport to

  9. An Ongoing Episode of Magmatic Inflation at the Three Sisters Volcanic Center, Central Oregon Cascade Range: Inferences from Recent Geodetic and Seismic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzurisin, D.; Lisowski, M.; Moran, S. C.; Wicks, C. W.; Poland, M. P.; Endo, E. T.

    2004-12-01

    Tumescence at the Three Sisters volcanic center began between summer 1996 and summer 1998 and was discovered in April 2001 using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Vertical surface displacement at a maximum rate of 3-4 cm/yr is centered about 5 km west of the summit of South Sister, a composite basaltic-andesite to rhyolite volcano that last erupted between 2,200 and 2,000 years ago. The deforming area is about 20 km in diameter and extends across much of the western part of the Three Sisters Wilderness. The background level of seismic activity is low, suggesting that temperatures in the source region are high enough or the strain rate is low enough to favor plastic deformation over brittle failure. A swarm of over 300 small, shallow (6-10 km) volcano-tectonic earthquakes (Mmax = 1.9) in the northeast quadrant of the deforming area on March 23-25, 2004, was the first notable seismicity in the area for at least two decades. Tilt-leveling and EDM networks were established at South Sister in 1985-1986 and resurveyed in 2001, the latter with GPS. Both networks have since been extended to cover more of the deforming area and 3 continuous GPS stations have been installed. In addition, 1 broadband seismometer and 4 short-period seismometers have been installed since 2001 to improve real-time seismic monitoring and earthquake-location capabilities. InSAR results together with annual GPS and leveling surveys constrain the location, geometry, and inflation rate of the deformation source as a function of time. A best-fit source model derived from simultaneous inversion of all three datasets through 2003 is a shallowly dipping tabular body located 6.5 ± 2.5 km below the surface with a volume increase of 0.0050 ± 0.0015 km3/yr. GPS and leveling data acquired in August 2004 will be used to update the model. The most likely cause of tumescence is a pulse of basaltic magma intruding the upper crust along the brittle-ductile interface - a process that must occur

  10. Io volcanism

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    Io is the most volcanically active body in the Solar System. The Voyage spacecraft observed nine active eruption plumes in 1979, and detected numerous thermal anomalies. Loki the most active volcanic region has been emitting 1.5 x 10/sup 13/ W over the last few years. Many of the volcanic features have been interpreted as the result of sulfur volcanism because 1) the spectral reflectance of the surface resembles sulfur, 2) SO/sub 2/ has been positively identified, 3) the satellite leaves a trail of sulfur atoms in its wake; and 4) many of the hot spots have surfaces temperatures less than 400/sup 0/K, compatible with low-temperature melts. The evidence for sulfur has led to suggestions of sulfur lava flows hundreds of kilometers long, and sulfur lava lakes as large as Lake Erie. The observations are, however, equally compatible with basaltic volcanism. Modeling of the cooling of basaltic lava flows indicates that regions of basaltic volcanism on Io should have temperatures similar to those detected by the Voyager spacecraft. High eruption rates are required. High rates of fumarolic activity accompanying the eruptions and expulsion of volatiles by the plumes give the surface its sulfur-like spectral reflectance.

  11. Activity remotely triggered in volcanic and geothermal centers in California and Washington by the 3 November 2002 Mw=7.9 Alaska earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. P.; Prejean, S.; Oppenheimer, D.; Pitt, A. M.; S. D. Malone; Richards-Dinger, K.

    2002-12-01

    The M=7.9 Alaska earthquake of 3 November 2002 was followed by bursts of remotely triggered earthquakes at several volcanic and geothermal areas across the western United States at epicentral distances of 2,500 to 3,660 km. Husen et al. (this session) describe the triggered response for Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming. Here we highlight the triggered response for the Geysers geothermal field in northern California, Mammoth Mountain and Long Valley caldera in eastern California, the Coso geothermal field in southeastern California, and Mount Rainier in central Washington. The onset of triggered seismicity at each of these areas began 15 to 17 minutes after the Alaska earthquake during the S-wave coda and the early phases of the Love and Raleigh waves with periods of 5 to 40 seconds and dynamic strains of a few microstrain. In each case, the seismicity was characterized by spasmodic bursts of small (M<2 ), brittle-failure earthquakes. The activity persisted for just a few minutes at Mount Rainier and Mammoth Mountain and roughly 30 minutes at the Geysers and Coso geothermal fields. Many of the triggered earthquakes at all three sites were too small for reliable locations (magnitudes M<1), although their small S-P times indicate hypocentral locations within a few km of the nearest seismic station. Borehole dilatometers in vicinity of Mammoth Mountain recorded strain offsets on the order of 0.1 microstrain coincident in time with the triggered seismicity (Johnston et al. this session), and water level in the 3-km-deep LVEW well in the center of Long Valley caldera dropped by ~13 cm during passage of the seismic wave train from the Alaska earthquake followed by a gradual recovery. The Geysers, Coso, and Mount Rainier have no continuous, high-resolution strain instrumentation. A larger earthquake swarm that began 23.5 hours later (21:38 UT on the 4th) in the south moat of Long Valley caldera and included nine M>2 and one M=3.0 earthquake may represent a delayed response to

  12. The Influence of Crystal Mush on Magmatism Under Arc Volcanoes Recorded in Zircon from the Lassen Volcanic Center, California and Mount Hood, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemetti, E. W.; Clynne, M. A.; Kent, A. J.; Bertolett, E. M.; Hernandez, L. D.; Coble, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Many arc volcanoes are constructed by repeated tapping of complex subvolcanic magmatic plumbing containing new and inherited crystals and liquids that interact in the hours to millennia prior to an eruption. This process is often modulated by long-lived (10-100 k.y.) shallow (<5 km) silicic crystal mush. Constraining the development and growth of mush zones is therefore essential in predicting a volcano's future behavior. The Lassen Volcanic Center (LVC) in California and Mount Hood (MH) in Oregon are two of the most recently active Cascade volcanoes, with last major eruptions in 1915 and ~1780-81 respectively. We performed U-Th/U-Pb dating of LVC and MH zircon from lavas and tephras erupted between 0.1-825 ka. In the LVC, the Rockland Tephra (611 ka; Ar/Ar) contains zircon from 800-520 ka, spanning the age of the Rockland caldera complex (825-611 ka eruption ages). During the Lassen Domefield (315-0.1 ka eruption ages), zircon ages vary from secular equilibrium to 15 ka, overlapping with the Bumpass Sequence (315-190 ka eruption ages) and an eruptive hiatus (190-90 ka eruption ages). Nine of 116 Lassen Domefield zircon are in secular equilibrium (>350 ka). These data support a model of long-lived zircon-saturated silicic mushes existing under the LVC during the Rockland caldera complex stage and since the end of the Brokeoff Volcano stage (590-385 ka eruption ages). Preliminary zircon data from the Old Maid stage (~0.2 ka eruption age) at MH indicate two broad age groups. Younger zircon (<10 ka) suggest reactivation and/or expansion of mush following Polallie phase (20-12 ka eruption ages), Timberline (~1.5 ka eruption age), and Old Maid eruptions. Older zircon (>100 ka) are generally consistent with U-Th ages from plagioclase (~120 ka U-Th), indicating a long-lived zircon-saturated crystal mush tapped by Timberline and Old Maid lavas. At both of these volcanoes, silicic crystal mushes interact with intruding mafic magma, producing monotonous mixed andesite

  13. Volcanic gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Gerlach, Terrance M.

    1995-01-01

    In Roman mythology, Vulcan, the god of fire, was said to have made tools and weapons for the other gods in his workshop at Olympus. Throughout history, volcanoes have frequently been identified with Vulcan and other mythological figures. Scientists now know that the “smoke" from volcanoes, once attributed by poets to be from Vulcan’s forge, is actually volcanic gas naturally released from both active and many inactive volcanoes. The molten rock, or magma, that lies beneath volcanoes and fuels eruptions, contains abundant gases that are released to the surface before, during, and after eruptions. These gases range from relatively benign low-temperature steam to thick hot clouds of choking sulfurous fume jetting from the earth. Water vapor is typically the most abundant volcanic gas, followed by carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Other volcanic gases are hydrogen sulfide, hydrochloric acid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrofluoric acid, and other trace gases and volatile metals. The concentrations of these gas species can vary considerably from one volcano to the next.

  14. Volcanic Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Stephen R.

    2005-01-01

    Recent developments in volcanic seismology include new techniques to improve earthquake locations that have changed clouds of earthquakes to lines (faults) for high-frequency events and small volumes for low-frequency (LF) events. Spatial mapping of the b-value shows regions of normal b and high b anomalies at depths of 3-4 and 7-10 km. Increases in b precede some eruptions. LF events and very-long-period (VLP) events have been recorded at many volcanoes, and models are becoming increasingly sophisticated. Deep long-period (LP) events are fairly common, but may represent several processes. Acoustic sensors have greatly improved the study of volcanic explosions. Volcanic tremor is stronger for fissure eruptions, phreatic eruptions, and higher gas contents. Path and site effects can be extreme at volcanoes. Seismicity at volcanoes is triggered by large earthquakes, although mechanisms are still uncertain. A number of volcanoes have significant deformation with very little seismicity. Tomography has benefited from improved techniques and better instrumental arrays.

  15. H, O, Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope geochemistry of the Latir volcanic field and cogenetic intrusions, New Mexico, and relations between evolution of a continental magmatic center and modifications of the lithosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.M.; Lipman, P.W.; Czamanske, G.K.

    1990-01-01

    Over 200 H, O, Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope analyses, in addition to geologic and petrologic constraints, document the magmatic evolution of the 28.5-19 Ma Latir volcanic field and associated intrusive rocks, which includes multiple stages of crustal assimilation, magma mixing, protracted crystallization, and open- and closed-system evolution in the upper crust. In contrast to data from younger volcanic centers in northern New Mexico, relatively low and restricted primary ??18O values (+6.4 to +7.4) rule out assimilation of supracrustal rocks enriched in 18O. Initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.705 to 0.708), ??18O values (-2 to-7), and 206Pb/204Pb ratios (17.5 to 18.4) of metaluminous precaldera volcanic rocks and postcaldera plutonic rocks suggest that most Latir rocks were generated by fractional crystallization of substantial volumes of mantle-derived basaltic magma that had near-chondritic Nd isotope ratios, accompanied by assimilation of crustal material in two main stages: 1) assimilation of non-radiogenic lower crust, followed by 2) assimilation of middle and upper crust by inter-mediate-composition magmas that had been contaminated during the first stage. Magmatic evolution in the upper crust peaked with eruption of the peralkaline Amalia Tuff (???26 Ma), which evolved from metaluminous parental magmas. A third stage of late, roofward assimilation of Proterozoic rocks in the Amalia Tuff magma is indicated by trends in initial 87Sr/86Sr and 206Pb/204Pb ratios from 0.7057 to 0.7098 and 19.5 to 18.8, respectively, toward the top of the pre-eruptive magma chamber. Highly evolved postcaldera plutons are generally fine grained and are zoned in initial 87Sr/86Sr and 206Pb/204Pb ratios, varying from 0.705 to 0.709 and 17.8 to 18.6, respectively. In contrast, the coarser-grained Cabresto Lake (???25 Ma) and Rio Hondo (???21 Ma) plutons have relatively homogeneous initial 87Sr/86Sr and 206Pb/204Pb ratios of approximately 0.7053 and 17.94 and 17.55, respectively. ??18O values for

  16. Volcanic Catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    The big news from 20th century geophysics may not be plate tectonics but rather the surprise return of catastrophism, following its apparent 19th century defeat to uniformitarianism. Divine miracles and plagues had yielded to the logic of integrating observations of everyday change over time. Yet the brilliant interpretation of the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary iridium anomaly introduced an empirically based catastrophism. Undoubtedly, decades of contemplating our own nuclear self-destruction played a role in this. Concepts of nuclear winter, volcanic winter, and meteor impact winter are closely allied. And once the veil of threat of all-out nuclear exchange began to lift, we could begin to imagine slower routes to destruction as "global change". As a way to end our world, fire is a good one. Three-dimensional magma chambers do not have as severe a magnitude limitation as essentially two-dimensional faults. Thus, while we have experienced earthquakes that are as big as they get, we have not experienced volcanic eruptions nearly as great as those preserved in the geologic record. The range extends to events almost three orders of magnitude greater than any eruptions of the 20th century. Such a calamity now would at the very least bring society to a temporary halt globally, and cause death and destruction on a continental scale. At maximum, there is the possibility of hindering photosynthesis and threatening life more generally. It has even been speculated that the relative genetic homogeneity of humankind derives from an evolutionary "bottleneck" from near-extinction in a volcanic cataclysm. This is somewhat more palatable to contemplate than a return to a form of Original Sin, in which we arrived at homogeneity by a sort of "ethnic cleansing". Lacking a written record of truly great eruptions, our sense of human impact must necessarily be aided by archeological and anthropological investigations. For example, there is much to be learned about the influence of

  17. Volcanic features of Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.; Masursky, H.; Strom, R.G.; Terrile, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Volcanic activity is apparently higher on Io than on any other body in the Solar System. Its volcanic landforms can be compared with features on Earth to indicate the type of volcanism present on Io. ?? 1979 Nature Publishing Group.

  18. Age and progression of volcanism, Wrangell volcanic field, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richter, D.H.; Smith, James G.; Lanphere, M.A.; Dalrymple, G.B.; Reed, B.L.; Shew, N.

    1990-01-01

    The Wrangell volcanic field covers more than 10 000 km2 in southern Alaska and extends uninterrupted into northwest. Yukon Territory. Lavas in the field exhibit medium-K, calc-alkaline affinities, typical of continental volcanic arcs along convergent plate margins. Eleven major eruptive centers are recognized in the Alaskan part of the field. More than 90 K-Ar age determinations in the field show a northwesterly progression of eruptive activity from 26 Ma, near the Alaska-Yukon border, to about 0.2 Ma at the northwest end of the field. A few age determinations in the southeast extension of the field in Yukon Territory, Canada, range from 11 to 25 Ma. The ages indicate that the progression of volcanism in the Alaska part of the field increased from about 0.8 km/Ma, at 25 Ma, to more than 20 km/MA during the past 2 Ma. The progression of volcanic activity and its increased rate of migration with time is attributed to changes in the rate and angle of Pacific plate convergence and the progressive decoupling of the Yakutat terrane from North America. Subduction of Yakutat terrane-Pacific plate and Wrangell volcanic activity ceased about 200 000 years age when Pacific plate motion was taken up by strike-slip faulting and thrusting. ?? 1990 Springer-Verlag.

  19. Paleoproterozoic volcanic centers of the São Félix do Xingu region, Amazonian craton, Brazil: Hydrothermal alteration and metallogenetic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Cruz, Raquel Souza; Fernandes, Carlos Marcello Dias; Villas, Raimundo Netuno Nobre; Juliani, Caetano; Monteiro, Lena Virgínia Soares; Lagler, Bruno; Misas, Carlos Mario Echeverri

    2016-06-01

    Geological, petrographic, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction studies revealed hydrothermalized lithotypes evidenced by overprinted zones of potassic, propylitic, sericitic, and intermediate argillic alterations types, with pervasive and fracture-controlled styles, in Paleoproterozoic volcano-plutonic units of the São Félix do Xingu region, Amazonian craton, northern Brazil. The Sobreiro Formation presents propylitic (epidote + chlorite + carbonate + clinozoisite + sericite + quartz ± albite ± hematite ± pyrite), sericitic (sericite + quartz + carbonate), and potassic (potassic feldspar + hematite) alterations. The prehnite-pumpellyite pair that is common in geothermal fields also occurs in this unit. The Santa Rosa Formation shows mainly potassic (biotite + microcline ± magnetite), sericitic (sericite + quartz + carbonate ± chlorite ± gold), and intermediate argillic (montmorillonite + kaolinite/halloysite + illite) alterations. These findings strongly suggest the involvement of magma-sourced and meteoric fluids and draw attention to the metallogenetic potential of these volcanic units for Paleoproterozoic epithermal and rare and base metal porphyry-type mineralizations, similar to those already identified in other portions of the Amazonian craton.

  20. Volcanic hazard management in dispersed volcanism areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, Jose Manuel; Garcia, Alicia; Ortiz, Ramon

    2014-05-01

    Traditional volcanic hazard methodologies were developed mainly to deal with the big stratovolcanoes. In such type of volcanoes, the hazard map is an important tool for decision-makers not only during a volcanic crisis but also for territorial planning. According to the past and recent eruptions of a volcano, all possible volcanic hazards are modelled and included in the hazard map. Combining the hazard map with the Event Tree the impact area can be zoned and defining the likely eruptive scenarios that will be used during a real volcanic crisis. But in areas of disperse volcanism is very complex to apply the same volcanic hazard methodologies. The event tree do not take into account unknown vents, because the spatial concepts included in it are only related with the distance reached by volcanic hazards. The volcanic hazard simulation is also difficult because the vent scatter modifies the results. The volcanic susceptibility try to solve this problem, calculating the most likely areas to have an eruption, but the differences between low and large values obtained are often very small. In these conditions the traditional hazard map effectiveness could be questioned, making necessary a change in the concept of hazard map. Instead to delimit the potential impact areas, the hazard map should show the expected behaviour of the volcanic activity and how the differences in the landscape and internal geo-structures could condition such behaviour. This approach has been carried out in La Palma (Canary Islands), combining the concept of long-term hazard map with the short-term volcanic scenario to show the expected volcanic activity behaviour. The objective is the decision-makers understand how a volcanic crisis could be and what kind of mitigation measurement and strategy could be used.

  1. Coupled Uranium-Series and (U-Th)/He Zircon Geochronology of the Emmons Lake Volcanic Center (ELVC): Dating the Record of Voluminous Tephra Production in Quaternary Eastern-Beringia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, S. D.; Vazquez, J. A.; Grove, M. J.; Coble, M. A.; Hourigan, J. K.; Waythomas, C. F.; Coombs, M. L.; Wallace, K.

    2015-12-01

    Tephrochronology is an invaluable tool used to date, link, and reconstruct paleo-environments, climates, and landscapes. Single tephra layers represent isochronous markers across broad regions, thus accurate and precise temporal constraints on the timing of eruption are critical to their utility. If a U-bearing accessory phase such as zircon is present, U/Pb, U-series, and (U-Th)/He geochronometers may be selectively applied. Application of multiple geochronometers to the same sample corroborates accuracy, can potentially resolve mineral crystallization and volcano eruption dates, and can define an eruption age from inherited crystals, assuming complete thermal resetting of the (U-Th)/He system upon crystal incorporation into magma prior to eruption. The Emmons Lake Volcanic Center is one of the largest Quaternary volcanic systems in the Aleutian volcanic arc, and is characterized by at least two major caldera-forming eruptions. C1 has been dated by 40Ar/39Ar at ~238 ka, and was originally proposed as the source for the Old Crow tephra, the largest and most widespread Quaternary tephra in eastern Beringia, and a critical time horizon for reconstruction of Pleistocene paleo-environment and climate. C2 produced the widespread Dawson tephra, and has been dated indirectly by radiocarbon at ~27 ka. We present in-situ grain-surface ion microprobe (SHRIMP-RG) 238U-230Th and/or U/Pb data on a suite of autocrysitc zircon grains from a C1 sample, the Old Crow, and from the Dawson. On these same zircon crystals, we utilize a noble gas sector mass spectrometer to make sensitive, low blank, single crystal 4He measurements. With these datasets, we investigate the temporal and potential genetic relationship between C1 and Old Crow, and place absolute radiogenic time constraints on the C2 eruption. Coupled 238U-230Th and sector field (U-Th)/He application shows significant promise for generating accurate, precise dates for Quaternary tephra bearing a U-rich accessory mineral phase.

  2. Remote sensing of volcanic clouds shows promise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, William I.

    An international workshop on the Remote Sensing of Volcanic Clouds was held July 29-August 3, 2001, at Michigan Technological University The workshop's goal was to improve and expand the use of satellite-based remote sensing data for hazard mitigation and other research purposes, such as volcano-atmosphere interactions and chemical and meteorological effects on the troposphere and stratosphere. Forty-six researchers attended, representing 11 countries, 9 universities, and several government meteorological and volcanological organizations, as well as the Volcanic Ash Aviation Centers in Washington, D.C., Anchorage, Montreal, Darwin, London, and Toulouse. (The Volcanic Ash Aviation Centers monitor volcanic ash plumes within their assigned airspace. There are 9 in all and they were created at the request of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and other aviation concerns.)

  3. The Martian highland paterae: Evidence for explosive volcanism on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crown, David A.; Greeley, Ronald

    1988-01-01

    The Martian surface exhibits numerous volcanic landforms displaying great diversity in size, age, and morphology. Most research regarding Martian volcanology has centered around effusive basaltic volcanism, including analyses of individual lava flows, extensive lava plains, and large shield volcanoes. These studies were hindered by a lack of definitive morphologic criteria for the remote identification of ash deposits. Knowledge of the abundances, ages, and geologic settings of explosive volcanic deposits on Mars is essential to a comprehensive understanding of the evolution of the Martian surface, with implications for the evolution of the lithosphere and atmosphere as well as the histories of specific volcanic centers and provinces.

  4. Minor and trace element geochemistry of volcanic rocks dredged from the Galapagos spreading center: role of crystal fractionation and mantle heterogeneity.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Frey, F.A.; Thompson, G.; Rindge, S.

    1981-01-01

    A wide range of rock types (abyssal tholeiite, Fe-Ti-rich basalt, andesite, and rhyodacite) were dredged from near 95oW and 85oW on the Galapagos spreading center. Computer modeling of major element compositions has shown that these rocks could be derived from common parental magmas by successive degrees of fractional crystallization. However, the P2O5/K2O ratio implies distinct mantle source compositions for the two areas. These source regions also have different rare earth element (REE) abundance patterns. The sequence of fractionated lavas differs for the two areas and indicates earlier fractionation of apatite and titanomagnetite in the lavas from 95oW. The mantle source regions for these two areas are interpreted to be depleted in incompatible (and volatile?) elements, although the source region beneath 95oW is less severely depleted in La and K. -Authors

  5. Stonewall Mountain Volcanic Center, southern Nevada: Stratigraphic, structural, and facies relations of outflow sheets, near-vent tuffs, and intracaldera units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Steven I.; Noble, Donald C.

    1989-05-01

    Directly south and southeast of Stonewall Mountain, Nevada, a depression and north facing caldera scarp were formed during and(or) after eruption of the Spearhead Member of the late Miocene Stonewall Flat Tuff. Abundant large lithic and juvenile blocks are present in the Spearhead Member within 0.5 km of this topographic margin but absent elsewhere in the ash-flow sheet, consistent with eruption from vents in the Stonewall Mountain area. Within about 100,000 years, comendite tuff of the overlying Civet Cat Canyon Member of the Stonewall Flat Tuff buried the depression and associated scarp. The Civet Cat Canyon Member is traceable continuously to the north from an outflow sheet capping northwestern Pahute Mesa, into near-vent tuff on the southeastern flank of Stonewall Mountain. Proximal outflow-sheet tuff locally exhibits strong rheomorphic disruption and is overlain without a cooling break by surge, flow, and fall deposits of trachytic composition. Much of Stonewall Mountain is composed of welded tuff and megabreccia interpreted as intracaldera tuff of the Civet Cat Canyon Member, strongly suggesting that the vent area of the member was largely within Stonewall Mountain. Welded tuff of trachytic composition comprises an important part of the intracaldera Civet Cat Canyon Member, which was intruded by dikes and plugs of trachyte and rhyolite. Juvenile inclusions of basalt dispersed in near-vent facies trachyte tuff provide direct evidence for the high-level involvement of basaltic magma in the evolution of the highly potassic Stonewall Mountain center. Complex discordant compaction foliations and the widespread presence of megabreccia within the intracaldera tuff suggest, following Foley (1978), cauldron subsidence by piecemeal collapse during eruption of the Civet Cat Canyon Member. The elevation of intracaldera tuff and intrusions in Stonewall Mountain above the surrounding ashflow sheet suggests a significant amount of magmatic uplift, perhaps involving the

  6. Volcanic hazard studies for the Yucca Mountain project

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.; Turrin, B.; Wells, S.; Perry, F.; McFadden, L.; Renault, C.E.; Champion, D.; Harrington, C.

    1989-05-01

    Volcanic hazard studies are ongoing to evaluate the risk of future volcanism with respect to siting of a repository for disposal of high-level radioactive waste at the Yucca Mountain site. Seven Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers are located a minimum distance of 12 km and a maximum distance of 47 km from the outer boundary of the exploration block. The conditional probability of disruption of a repository by future basaltic volcanism is bounded by the range of 10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}10} yr{sup {minus}1}. These values are currently being reexamined based on new developments in the understanding of the evaluation of small volume, basaltic volcanic centers including: (1) Many, perhaps most, of the volcanic centers exhibit brief periods of eruptive activity separated by longer periods of inactivity. (2) The centers may be active for time spans exceeding 10{sup 5} yrs, (3) There is a decline in the volume of eruptions of the centers through time, and (4) Small volume eruptions occurred at two of the Quaternary centers during latest Pleistocene or Holocene time. We classify the basalt centers as polycyclic, and distinguish them from polygenetic volcanoes. Polycyclic volcanism is characterized by small volume, episodic eruptions of magma of uniform composition over time spans of 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 5} yrs. Magma eruption rates are low and the time between eruptions exceeds the cooling time of the magma volumes. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  7. California's potential volcanic hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgenson, P. )

    1989-01-01

    Although volcanic eruptions have occurred infrequently in California during the last few thousand years, the potential danger to life and property from volcanoes in the state is great enough to be of concern, according to a recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publication. The 17-page bulletin, Potential Hazards from Future Volcanic Eruptions in California, gives a brief history of volcanic activity in California during the past 100,000 years, descriptions of the types of volcanoes in the state, the types of potentially hazardous volcanic events that could occur, and hazard-zonation maps and tables depicting six areas of the state where volcanic eruptions might occur. The six areas and brief descriptions of their past volcanic history and potential for future volcanic hazards are briefly summarized here.

  8. (abstract) Survey of Volcanic Hazards in the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M.; Siebe, C.; Macias, J.

    1997-01-01

    A substantial percentage of the world's population lives in areas vulnerable to the negative effects of future volcanic activity. This is especially true in Mexico, where within the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) one half of the country's 90 million inhabitants live. The TMVB is a 1 000 by 200 km area, dotted with hundreds of volcanoes and volcanic centers. Most of the area has been poorly studied, and the volcanic history is largely unknown. Our approach is to combine interpretations of satellite images, field work and mapping, laboratory analysis, and age dating to elucidate the volcanic history and evaluate the potential eruptive hazards. Hazards evaluations are done in the form of risk maps.

  9. Minor and trace element geochemistry of volcanic rocks dredged from the Galapagos spreading center: Role of crystal fractionation and mantle heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Clague, D.A.; Frey, F.A.; Thompson, G.; Rindge, S.

    1981-10-10

    A wide range of rock types (abyssal tholeiite, Fe-Ti-rich basalt, andesite, and rhyodacite) were dredged from near 95/sup 0/ W and 85/sup 0/ W on the Galapagos spreading center. Computer modeling of major element compositions has shown that these rocks could be derived from common parental magmas by successive degrees of fractional crystallization. However, the P/sub 2/O/sub 5//K/sub 2/O ratio averages 0.83 at 95/sup 0/W and 1.66 at 85/sup 0/W and implies distinct mantle source compositions for the two areas. These source regions also have different rare earth element (REE) abundance patterns, with (La/Sm)/sub EF/ = 0.67 at 95/sup 0/W and 0.46 at 85/sup 0/W. The sequence of fractional lavas differs for the two areas and indicates earlier fractionation of apatite and titanomagnetite in the lavas from 95/sup 0/W. Incompatible trace element abundances in 26 samples are used to infer that the range of Fe-Ti-rich basalt from 85/sup 0/W represents 19 to 35% residual liquid following crystal fractionation of a mineral assemblage of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and lesser olivine. Most samples from 85/sup 0/W can be related to a common parental magma that contained approximately 9 wt %FeO*, 1 wt % TiO/sub 2/, and had an Mg number (Mg/sup 3/ = 100 Mg/(Mg+Fe/sup 2 +/)) of about 65. Although the samples from 95/sup 0/W cannot all be derived from a common parental magma, the inferred parental magmas may have been derived by varying degrees of partial melting of a common source. The fractionation sequence consists of two parts: an initial iron enrichment trend followed by a silica enrichment trend. The most iron rich lavas represent about 32% residual liquid derived by crystal fractionation of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and lesser olivine from a parental magma with an Mg number of about 66. The silicic enrichment trend results from crystallization of titanomagnetite and some apatite.

  10. First satellite identification of volcanic carbon monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Alonso, Sara; Deeter, Merritt N.; Worden, Helen M.; Clerbaux, Cathy; Mao, Debbie; Gille, John C.

    2012-11-01

    Volcanic degassing produces abundant H2O and CO2, as well as SO2, HCl, H2S, S2, H2, HF, CO, and SiF4. Volcanic SO2, HCl, and H2S have been detected from satellites in the past; the remaining species are analyzed in situ or using airborne instruments, with all the consequent limitations in safety and sampling, and at elevated costs. We report identification of high CO concentrations consistent with a volcanic origin (the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull and 2011 Grímsvötn eruptions in Iceland) in data from the Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere instrument (MOPITT) onboard EOS/Terra. The high CO values coincide spatially and temporally with ash plumes emanating from the eruptive centers, with elevated SO2 and aerosol optical thickness, as well as with high CO values in data from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), onboard MetOp-A. CO has a positive indirect radiative forcing; climate models currently do not account for volcanic CO emissions. Given global volcanic CO2 emissions between 130 and 440 Tg/year and volcanic CO:CO2 ratios from the literature, we estimate that average global volcanic CO emissions may be on the order of ∼5.5 Tg/year, equivalent to the CO emissions caused by combined fossil fuel and biofuel combustion in Australia.

  11. Structure and evolution of the Rockeskyllerkopf Volcanic Complex, West Eifel Volcanic Field, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Cliff S. J.; Woodland, Alan B.; Hopp, Jens; Trenholm, Nesha D.

    2010-10-01

    The Rockeskyllerkopf Volcanic Complex (RVC) comprises three overlapping monogenetic volcanic centers: Southeast Lammersdorf (SEL), Mäuseberg (M) and Rockeskyllerkopf (RKK). Each volcanic center comprises proximal wall deposits with a well defined crater wall unconformity and crater fill deposits that partially to completely cover the outer crater wall. The SEL Center is a phreatomagmatic tuff ring composed of lithic rich tephra deposited by pyroclastic falls and surges. The second center, Mäuseberg, with its crater to the northwest of the SEL Center is predominantly magmatic. Topographic and outcrop patterns suggest that this center may have formed a series of overlapping scoria cones along a N-S trending fissure. The youngest center, RKK, which lies on a poorly developed palaeosol within the earlier Mäuseberg deposits, comprises a well developed proximal crater wall sequence. This sequence of magmatic, likely Strombolian, fall and grain avalanche deposits passes upward into a crater fill sequence that comprises variably welded bombs. The final eruptions in the center were massive lava flows that were ponded within the RKK crater. Ar-Ar age dating of reequilibrated fragments of phlogopite megacrysts in the SEL lavas indicates volcanic activity began at 474 ± 39 ka. Literature K-Ar dates for the youngest lava flows in the RKK Center give ages of 360 ± 60 to 470 ka. Our interpretation of the age data and the presence of the poorly developed palaeosol between the Mäuseberg and RKK centers indicates that volcanism in the RVC began around 470 ka with the eruption of the SEL and Mäuseberg centers followed a few thousand years later by the eruption of the RKK Center.

  12. Advancing remote sensing of volcanic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, William I.

    A second international workshop on the remote sensing of volcanic clouds was recently held to improve and expand the use of satellite-based remote sensing data for hazard mitigation and other research purposes, such as volcano-atmosphere interactions and chemical and meteorological effects on the troposphere and stratosphere. Forty-six researchers attended, representing 11 countries, 10 universities, and several government meteorological and volcanological organizations. Also represented were the Volcanic Ash Aviation Centers in Washington, D.C.; Anchorage; Montreal; Darwin; London; and Tokyo, which monitor volcanic ash plumes and predict their displacement within their areas of responsibility The nine VAACs were established by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) to address various aviation concerns related to volcanic ash.

  13. Integrating Multiple Space Ground Sensors to Track Volcanic Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Davies, Ashley; Doubleday, Joshua; Tran, Daniel; Jones, Samuel; Kjartansson, Einar; Thorsteinsson, Hrobjartur; Vogfjord, Kristin; Guomundsson, Magnus; Thordarson, Thor; Mandl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Volcanic activity can occur with little or no warning. Increasing numbers of space borne assets can enable coordinated measurements of volcanic events to enhance both scientific study and hazard response. We describe the use of space and ground measurements to target further measurements as part of a worldwide volcano monitoring system. We utilize a number of alert systems including the MODVOLC, GOESVOLC, US Air Force Weather Advisory, and Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) alert systems. Additionally we use in-situ data from ground instrumentation at a number of volcanic sites, including Iceland.

  14. Composition of Syrtis Major volcanic plateau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mustard, John F.; Erard, S.; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Langevin, Yves; Head, James W.; Pieters, Carle M.

    1991-01-01

    Syrtis Major, a low-relief volcanic shield centered near 295 degrees 10 degrees N, is an old, well-preserved and exposed volcanic region on Mars which formed at the end of the heavy bombardment period. The composition of these volcanic materials has importance for understanding the thermal and chemical history of Mars. Imaging spectrometer data of the Syrtis Major volcanic plateau are used in this analysis to identify major compositional components. First and second order even channel reflectance spectra between 0.77 and 2.55 microns from four broad classes of materials on Syrtis Major are given. For the volcanic materials, there are three primary classes characterized by albedo, slope, and shape of the 10 micron band. To emphasize the latter, straight line continua were removed from each spectral segment and replotted in another figure. Each spectrum shows a band minima near 0.96 microns and 2.15 microns indicative of pyroxene mineral absorptions. Comparison of these band minima with studies of pyroxene reflectance spectra suggests that the pyroxenes in the volcanics of Syrtis Major are high calcium pyroxene with a Ca/(Mg+Fe+Ca) ratio of 0.2 to 0.3. The most likely pyroxene is an augite.

  15. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

    1998-12-01

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is

  16. Volcanism on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard

    2014-03-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Io, 1610 to 1995: Galileo to Galileo: 1. Io, 1610-1979; 2. Between Voyager and Galileo: 1979-95; 3. Galileo at Io; Part II. Planetary Volcanism: Evolution and Composition: 4. Io and Earth: formation, evolution, and interior structure; 5. Magmas and volatiles; Part III. Observing and Modeling Volcanic Activity: 6. Observations: thermal remote sensing of volcanic activity; 7. Models of effusive eruption processes; 8. Thermal evolution of volcanic eruptions; Part IV. Galileo at Io: the Volcanic Bestiary: 9. The view from Galileo; 10. The lava lake at Pele; 11. Pillan and Tvashtar: lava fountains and flows; 12. Prometheus and Amirani: Effusive activity and insulated flows; 13. Loki Patera: Io's powerhouse; 14. Other volcanoes and eruptions; Part V. Volcanism on Io: The Global View: 15. Geomorphology: paterae, shields, flows and mountains; 16. Volcanic plumes; 17. Hot spots; Part VI. Io after Galileo: 18. Volcanism on Io: a post-Galileo view; 19. The future of Io observations; Appendix 1; Appendix 2; References; Index.

  17. Volcanism on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard

    2007-08-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Io, 1610 to 1995: Galileo to Galileo: 1. Io, 1610-1979; 2. Between Voyager and Galileo: 1979-1995; 3. Galileo at Io; Part II. Planetary Volcanism: Evolution and Composition: 4. Io and Earth: formation, evolution, and interior structure; 5. Magmas and volatiles; Part III. Observing and Modeling Volcanic Activity: 6. Observations: thermal remote sensing of volcanic activity; 7. Models of effusive eruption processes; 8. Thermal evolution of volcanic eruptions; Part IV. Galileo at Io: the Volcanic Bestiary: 9. The view from Galileo; 10. The lava lake at Pele; 11. Pillan and Tvashtar: lava fountains and flows; 12. Prometheus and Amirani: Effusive activity and insulated flows; 13. Loki Patera: Io's powerhouse; 14. Other volcanoes and eruptions; Part V. Volcanism on Io: The Global View: 15. Geomorphology: paterae, shields, flows and mountains; 16. Volcanic plumes; 17. Hot spots; Part VI. Io after Galileo: 18. Volcanism on Io: a post-Galileo view; 19. The future of Io observations; Appendix 1; Appendix 2; References; Index.

  18. The Volcanic History of Mars and Influences on Carbon Outgassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Whelley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Exploration of Mars has revealed some of the most impressive volcanic landforms found throughout the solar system. Volatiles outgassed from volcanoes were likely to have strongly influenced atmospheric chemistry and affected the martian climate. On Earth the role of carbon involved in volcanic outgassing is strongly influenced by tectonic setting, with the greatest weight percent contributions coming from partial mantle melts associated with hot spot volcanism. Most martian volcanic centers appear to represent this style of volcanism. Thus, one important factor in understanding the martian carbon cycle through time is understanding this volatile's link to the planet's volcanic history. The identified volcanic constructs on Mars are not unlike those of the Earth suggesting similar magmatic and eruptive processes. However, the dimensions of many martian volcanic features are significantly larger. The distribution of volcanoes and volcanic deposits on Mars are not spatially or temporally uniform. Large volcanoes (> 100 km diameter) are spatially concentrated in volcanic provinces that likely represent focused upwellings or zones of crustal weakness that enabled magma ascension. Smaller (10s km diameters) volcanoes such as cones, low shields and fissures are often grouped into fields and their lava flows coalesce to produce low slope plains. In some cases plains lava fields are quite extensive with little to no evidence for the volcanic constructs. Although martian volcanism appears to have been dominated by effusive eruptions with likely contributions from passive degassing from the interior, explosive volcanic centers and deposits are known to exist. After the development of a martian crust the planet's volcanic style appears to have evolved from early explosive activity to effusive activity centered at major volcanoes to effusive distributed activity in fields. However, questions remain as to whether or not these styles significantly overlapped in time and if so

  19. Geothermal systems in volcanic arcs: Volcanic characteristics and surface manifestations as indicators of geothermal potential and favorability worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelling, P.; Shevenell, L.; Hinz, N.; Coolbaugh, M.; Melosh, G.; Cumming, W.

    2016-09-01

    This paper brings a global perspective to volcanic arc geothermal assessments by evaluating trends and correlations of volcanic characteristic and surface manifestation data from world power production sites in subduction zone volcanic settings. The focus of the work was to evaluate volcanic centers individually and as a group in these arcs by correlating various geologic characteristics with known potential to host electricity grade geothermal systems at the volcanic centers. A database was developed that describes key geologic factors expected to be indicative of productive geothermal systems in a global training set, which includes all 74 subduction zone volcanic centers world-wide with current or proven power production capability. Importantly, this data set only contains data from subduction zone volcanoes and contains no negative cases, limiting the populations of any statistical groups. Regardless, this is the most robust geothermal benchmark training set for magmatic-heated systems to date that has been made public. The work reported here is part of a larger project that included data collection, evaluation, correlations and weightings, fairway and favorability modeling and mapping, prediction of blind systems, and uncertainty analysis to estimate errors associated with model predictions. This first paper describes volcano characteristics, compositions and eruption ages and trends along with surface manifestation observations and temperatures as they relate to known power producing systems. Our findings show a strong correlation between the presence and size of active flank fumarole areas and installed power production. Additionally, the majority of volcanic characteristics, including long-held anecdotal correlations related to magmatic composition or size, have limited to no correlation with power production potential. Notable exceptions are correlations between greater power yield from geothermal systems associated with older (Pleistocene) caldera systems

  20. 1996 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    During 1996, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity, anomalous seismicity, or suspected volcanic activity at 10 of the approximately 40 active volcanic centers in the state of Alaska. As part of a formal role in KVERT (the Kamchatkan Volcano Eruption Response Team), AVO staff also disseminated information about eruptions and other volcanic unrest at six volcanic centers on the Kamchatka Peninsula and in the Kurile Islands, Russia.

  1. 1992-93 Results of geomorphological and field studies Volcanic Studies Program, Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, S.G.

    1993-10-01

    Field mapping and stratigraphic studies were completed of the Black Tank volcanic center, which represents the southwestern most eruptive center in the Cima volcanic field of California. The results of this mapping are presented. Contacts between volcanic units and geomorphic features were field checked, incorporating data from eight field trenches as well as several exposures along Black Tank Wash. Within each of the eight trenches, logs were measured and stratigraphic sections were described. These data indicate that three, temporally separate volcanic eruptions occurred at the Black Tank center. The field evidence for significant time breaks between each stratigraphic unit is the presence of soil and pavement-bounded unconformities.

  2. Volcanic Aerosol Radiative Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Large sporadic volcanic eruptions inject large amounts of sulfur bearing gases into the stratosphere which then get photochemically converted to sulfuric acid aerosol droplets that exert a radiative cooling effect on the global climate system lasting for several years.

  3. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-22

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  4. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  5. Negative Magnetic Anomalies Observed in the Central West Antarctica (CWA) Aerogeophysical Survey Over the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), Whose Sources are Volcanic Centers (e.g. Mt Resnik) at the Base of the ice >780 Ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.; Finn, C. A.; Morse, D. L.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2005-12-01

    Analysis of a block of coincident aeromagnetic and radar ice-sounding data (from the CWA aerogeophysical survey) over the WAIS reveals ~1000 50->1000-nT, shallow -source, ``volcanic" magnetic anomalies, interpreted as caused by late Cenozoic alkaline magmatism associated with the West Antarctic rift system (WR). About 400 of these anomalies (conservatively selected) have topographic expression at the bed of the WAIS; >80% of these topographic features have <200 m bed relief. There are ~100 short-wavelength, steep-gradient, negative magnetic anomalies observed in the CWA survey, or ~10% of the ~1000 ``volcanic" anomalies. These negative anomalies indicate volcanic activity during a time of magnetic field reversal from normal to reversed polarity at least as old as 780 Ka (the Brunes-Matuyama reversal). The sources of ~18 of the anomalies, half concentrated in the area of the WAIS divide, have high bed-elevation (above sea level after ice removal and glacial rebound), very magnetic topography of high bed relief, up to 2 km. Five of these peaks have associated negative magnetic anomalies. One of the high topographic features, Mt. Resnik, marked by a complex negative anomaly, is a conical peak 300 m below the surface of the WAIS, and has ~2 km topographic relief. We interpret a magnetic model fit to this anomaly as comprising reversely magnetized (in the present field direction), 0.5-2.5-km thick volcanic flows at the summit overlying normally magnetized flows. Published models (1996) reported for the Hut Point anomaly, at Ross Island, Antarctica, a similar anomaly to Mt. Resnik, also required both normal and reversed magnetizations correlated with drill holes into dated volcanic flows (also part of the late Cenozoic WR) crossing the Brunhes-Matuyama boundary (780 Ka). Because of their form similar to exposed volcanoes in the WAIS area with edifices primarily comprising subaerially-erupted, very magnetic volcanic flows, which have resisted glacial erosion, Behrendt et

  6. Initiation and Impact of Siberian Traps Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planke, S.; Svensen, H.; Polozov, A. G.; Jerram, D.; Faleide, J. I.

    2011-12-01

    tuffs are virtually absent along a 125 km long transect along the Dyupkun lake, even though tuff is shown on available geological maps. The cross section represents about 1000 meters of lava stratigraphy measured from the base of the flood basalts. Towards the south and west, the transition between the end-Permian sediments and the flood basalts is either characterized by minor (<2 meters) to no tephra deposits (Khantaika area), hyaloclastites and associated lake-deposited tephra (Kureika area), or massive tephra deposits from local eruptive centers (Severnaya area). The new results questions the notion of province-scale explosive volcanism in Siberia during the onset of flood volcanism, its continuation up into the stratigraphy as many maps suggest, and stress that local eruptive centers dominated, likely triggered by the presence of surface water.

  7. Volcanic hazards to airports

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guffanti, M.; Mayberry, G.C.; Casadevall, T.J.; Wunderman, R.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic activity has caused significant hazards to numerous airports worldwide, with local to far-ranging effects on travelers and commerce. Analysis of a new compilation of incidents of airports impacted by volcanic activity from 1944 through 2006 reveals that, at a minimum, 101 airports in 28 countries were affected on 171 occasions by eruptions at 46 volcanoes. Since 1980, five airports per year on average have been affected by volcanic activity, which indicates that volcanic hazards to airports are not rare on a worldwide basis. The main hazard to airports is ashfall, with accumulations of only a few millimeters sufficient to force temporary closures of some airports. A substantial portion of incidents has been caused by ash in airspace in the vicinity of airports, without accumulation of ash on the ground. On a few occasions, airports have been impacted by hazards other than ash (pyroclastic flow, lava flow, gas emission, and phreatic explosion). Several airports have been affected repeatedly by volcanic hazards. Four airports have been affected the most often and likely will continue to be among the most vulnerable owing to continued nearby volcanic activity: Fontanarossa International Airport in Catania, Italy; Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in Alaska, USA; Mariscal Sucre International Airport in Quito, Ecuador; and Tokua Airport in Kokopo, Papua New Guinea. The USA has the most airports affected by volcanic activity (17) on the most occasions (33) and hosts the second highest number of volcanoes that have caused the disruptions (5, after Indonesia with 7). One-fifth of the affected airports are within 30 km of the source volcanoes, approximately half are located within 150 km of the source volcanoes, and about three-quarters are within 300 km; nearly one-fifth are located more than 500 km away from the source volcanoes. The volcanoes that have caused the most impacts are Soufriere Hills on the island of Montserrat in the British West Indies

  8. Volcanism in Eastern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauthen, Clay; Coombs, Cassandra R.

    1996-01-01

    In 1891, the Virunga Mountains of Eastern Zaire were first acknowledged as volcanoes, and since then, the Virunga Mountain chain has demonstrated its potentially violent volcanic nature. The Virunga Mountains lie across the Eastern African Rift in an E-W direction located north of Lake Kivu. Mt. Nyamuragira and Mt. Nyiragongo present the most hazard of the eight mountains making up Virunga volcanic field, with the most recent activity during the 1970-90's. In 1977, after almost eighty years of moderate activity and periods of quiescence, Mt. Nyamuragira became highly active with lava flows that extruded from fissures on flanks circumscribing the volcano. The flows destroyed vast areas of vegetation and Zairian National Park areas, but no casualties were reported. Mt. Nyiragongo exhibited the same type volcanic activity, in association with regional tectonics that effected Mt. Nyamuragira, with variations of lava lake levels, lava fountains, and lava flows that resided in Lake Kivu. Mt. Nyiragongo, recently named a Decade volcano, presents both a direct and an indirect hazard to the inhabitants and properties located near the volcano. The Virunga volcanoes pose four major threats: volcanic eruptions, lava flows, toxic gas emission (CH4 and CO2), and earthquakes. Thus, the volcanoes of the Eastern African volcanic field emanate harm to the surrounding area by the forecast of volcanic eruptions. During the JSC Summer Fellowship program, we will acquire and collate remote sensing, photographic (Space Shuttle images), topographic and field data. In addition, maps of the extent and morphology(ies) of the features will be constructed using digital image information. The database generated will serve to create a Geographic Information System for easy access of information of the Eastem African volcanic field. The analysis of volcanism in Eastern Africa will permit a comparison for those areas from which we have field data. Results from this summer's work will permit

  9. Seasonality of Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B.; Pyle, D. M.; Dade, W. B.; Jupp, T.

    2001-12-01

    An analysis of volcanic activity in the last three hundred years reveals that the frequency of onset of volcanic eruptions varies systematically with the time of year. We analysed the Smithsonian catalogue of more than 3200 subaerial eruptions recorded during the last 300 years. We also investigated continuous records, which are not part of the general catalogue, of individual explosions at Sakurajima volcano (Japan, 150 events per year since 1955) and Semeru (Indonesia, 100,000 events during the period 1997-2000). A higher proportion (as much as 18 percent of the average monthly rate) of eruptions occur worldwide between December and March. This observation is statistically significant at above the 99 percent level. This pattern is independent of the time interval considered, and emerges whether individual eruptions are counted with equal weight or with weights proportional to event explosivity. Elevated rates of eruption onset in boreal winter months are observed in northern and southern hemispheres alike, as well as in most volcanically-active regions including, most prominently, the 'Ring of Fire' surrounding the Pacific basin. Key contributors to this regional pattern include volcanoes in Central and South America, the volcanic provinces of the northwest Pacific rim, Indonesia and the southwest Pacific basin. On the smallest spatial scales, some individual volcanoes for which detailed histories exist exhibit peak levels in eruption activity during November-January. Seasonality is attributed to one or more mechanisms associated with the annual hydrological cycle, and may correspond to the smallest time-scale over which fluctuations in stress due to the redistribution of water-masses are felt by the Earth's crust. Our findings have important ramifications for volcanic risk assessment, and offer new insight into possible changes in volcanic activity during periods of long-term changes in global sea level.

  10. Seasonality of volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B.; Pyle, D.; Dade, B.; Jupp, T.

    2003-04-01

    An analysis of volcanic activity in the last three hundred years reveals that the frequency of onset of volcanic eruptions varies systematically with the time of year. We analysed the Smithsonian catalogue of more than 3200 subaerial eruptions recorded during the last 300 years. We also investigated continuous records, which are not part of the general catalogue, of individual explosions at Sakurajima volcano (Japan, 150 events per year since 1955) and Semeru (Indonesia, 100,000 events during the period 1997-2000). A higher proportion (as much as 18 percent of the average monthly rate) of eruptions occur worldwide between December and March. This observation is statistically significant at above the 99 percent level. This pattern is independent of the time interval considered, and emerges whether individual eruptions are counted with equal weight or with weights proportional to event explosivity. Elevated rates of eruption onset in boreal winter months are observed in northern and southern hemispheres alike, as well as in most volcanically-active regions including, most prominently, the 'Ring of Fire' surrounding the Pacific basin. Key contributors to this regional pattern include volcanoes in Central and South America, the volcanic provinces of the northwest Pacific rim, Indonesia and the southwest Pacific basin. On the smallest spatial scales, some individual volcanoes for which detailed histories exist exhibit peak levels in eruption activity during November-January. Seasonality is attributed to one or more mechanisms associated with the annual hydrological cycle, and may correspond to the smallest time-scale over which fluctuations in stress due to the redistribution of water-masses are felt by the Earth's crust. Our findings have important ramifications for volcanic risk assessment, and offer new insight into possible changes in volcanic activity during periods of long-term changes in global sea level.

  11. Tectonic implications of space-time patterns of Cenozoic volcanism in the Palo Verde Mountain volcanic field, southeastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, K.S.

    1981-01-01

    Variations in Cenozoic volcanism in the western United States are believed to correlate closely with changes in tectonic setting. A transition in volcanic association from calc-alkaline to fundamentally basaltic volcanism and subsequent crustal extension, appears to have coincided temporally with the initial collision of the East Pacific Rise with the continental margin trench off western North America, between 28 and 25 Ma. The volcanic stratigraphy of the Palo Verde Mountain volcanic field is broadly similar to other volcanic centers in southeastern California and can be divided into tripartite regional stratigraphy. A basal sequence of andesitic to rhyolitic lava flows, plugs, domes, and extensive pyroclastic deposits rests unconformably on pre-Cenozoic basement rocks. The basal sequence is intruded by cogenetic Cenozoic plutonic rocks and overlain by basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows, dikes, and a second widespread assemblage of pyroclastic deposits, cumulatively referred to as the silicic sequence. The youngest volcanic rocks of the field include olivine basalt flows and breccia which occur at scattered localities in the Palo Verde Mountains. The age, stratigraphy, and chemistry of the intermediate and basaltic composition volcanic rocks broadly supports previously cited volcanic-tectonic models, if modified to incorporate modern plate reconstruction theory. This modification results in a southeast migration of the transition to basaltic volcanism to southeastern California occurring significantly later in time than the previously cited ages of transition. Moreover, this southeast migration of the volcanic transition is coincident with the inception of Basin and Range faulting and the initiation of movement on the San Andreas fault south of the Transverse Ranges, corresponding to the southward migration of the Pacific-Cocos Ridge.

  12. Precambrian Lunar Volcanic Protolife

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Five representative terrestrial analogs of lunar craters are detailed relevant to Precambrian fumarolic activity. Fumarolic fluids contain the ingredients for protolife. Energy sources to derive formaldehyde, amino acids and related compounds could be by flow charging, charge separation and volcanic shock. With no photodecomposition in shadow, most fumarolic fluids at 40 K would persist over geologically long time periods. Relatively abundant tungsten would permit creation of critical enzymes, Fischer-Tropsch reactions could form polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soluble volcanic polyphosphates would enable assembly of nucleic acids. Fumarolic stimuli factors are described. Orbital and lander sensors specific to protolife exploration including combined Raman/laser-induced breakdown spectrocsopy are evaluated. PMID:19582224

  13. Precambrian lunar volcanic protolife.

    PubMed

    Green, Jack

    2009-06-11

    Five representative terrestrial analogs of lunar craters are detailed relevant to Precambrian fumarolic activity. Fumarolic fluids contain the ingredients for protolife. Energy sources to derive formaldehyde, amino acids and related compounds could be by flow charging, charge separation and volcanic shock. With no photodecomposition in shadow, most fumarolic fluids at 40 K would persist over geologically long time periods. Relatively abundant tungsten would permit creation of critical enzymes, Fischer-Tropsch reactions could form polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soluble volcanic polyphosphates would enable assembly of nucleic acids. Fumarolic stimuli factors are described. Orbital and lander sensors specific to protolife exploration including combined Raman/laser-induced breakdown spectrocsopy are evaluated.

  14. Mercurian volcanism questioned

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilhelms, D.E.

    1976-01-01

    The Mariner 10 television team has argued that extensive plains on Mercury were formed by volcanism and compared them with the demonstrably lunar maria. I believe, however, that in stratigraphic relations, surface morphology, and albedo contrast, the Mercurian plains more closely resemble the lunar light plains. These lunar plains were interpreted as volcanic on the basis of data comparable to that available to the Mariner 10 investigators but have been shown by the Apollo missions to be of impact origin. The plains on Mercury might also be formed of impact materials, perhaps of impact melt or other basin ejecta that behaved more like a fluid when emplaced that did lunar basin ejecta. ?? 1976.

  15. The Boring Volcanic Field of the Portland-Vancouver area, Oregon and Washington: tectonically anomalous forearc volcanism in an urban setting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evarts, Russell C.; Conrey, Richard M.; Fleck, Robert J.; Hagstrum, Jonathan T.; O'Connor, Jim; Dorsey, Rebecca; Madin, Ian P.

    2009-01-01

    More than 80 small volcanoes are scattered throughout the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area of northwestern Oregon and southwestern Washington. These volcanoes constitute the Boring Volcanic Field, which is centered in the Neogene Portland Basin and merges to the east with coeval volcanic centers of the High Cascade volcanic arc. Although the character of volcanic activity is typical of many monogenetic volcanic fields, its tectonic setting is not, being located in the forearc of the Cascadia subduction system well trenchward of the volcanic-arc axis. The history and petrology of this anomalous volcanic field have been elucidated by a comprehensive program of geologic mapping, geochemistry, 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, and paleomag-netic studies. Volcanism began at 2.6 Ma with eruption of low-K tholeiite and related lavas in the southern part of the Portland Basin. At 1.6 Ma, following a hiatus of ~0.8 m.y., similar lavas erupted a few kilometers to the north, after which volcanism became widely dispersed, compositionally variable, and more or less continuous, with an average recurrence interval of 15,000 yr. The youngest centers, 50–130 ka, are found in the northern part of the field. Boring centers are generally monogenetic and mafic but a few larger edifices, ranging from basalt to low-SiO2 andesite, were also constructed. Low-K to high-K calc-alkaline compositions similar to those of the nearby volcanic arc dominate the field, but many centers erupted magmas that exhibit little influence of fluids derived from the subducting slab. The timing and compositional characteristics of Boring volcanism suggest a genetic relationship with late Neogene intra-arc rifting.

  16. National volcanic ash operations plan for aviation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; ,

    2007-01-01

    International Civil Aviation Organization’s (ICAO) International Airways Volcano Watch. This plan defines agency responsibilities, provides a comprehensive description of an interagency standard for volcanic ash products and their formats, describes the agency backup procedures for operational products, and outlines the actions to be taken by each agency following an occurrence of a volcanic eruption that subsequently affects and impacts aviation services. Since our most recent International Conference on Volcanic Ash and Aviation Safety, volcanic ash-related product and service activities have grown considerably along with partnerships and alliances throughout the aviation community. In January 2005, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Centers for Environment Prediction began running the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model in place of the Volcanic Ash Forecast Transport and Dispersion (VAFTAD) model, upgrading support to the volcanic ash advisory community. Today, improvements to the HYSPLIT model are ongoing based on recommendations by the OFCM-sponsored Joint Action Group for the Selection and Evaluation of Atmospheric Transport and Diffusion Models and the Joint Action Group for Atmospheric Transport and Diffusion Modeling (Research and Development Plan). Two international workshops on volcanic ash have already taken place, noticeable improvements and innovations in education, training, and outreach have been made, and federal and public education and training programs on volcanic ash-related products, services, and procedures iv continue to evolve. For example, in partnership with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and other academic institutions, volcanic ash hazard and mitigation training has been incorporated into aviation meteorology courses. As an essential next step, our volcanic ash-related efforts in the near term will be centered on the development of an interagency implementation plan to

  17. 2010 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Herrick, Julie; Girina, O.A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at 12 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2010. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash emissions from long-active Cleveland volcano in the Aleutian Islands. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of an ongoing collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  18. Volcanism at Rifts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Robert S.; McKenzie, Dan P.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates the nature of catastrophic volcanism and the rifting process. Describes two kinds of evidence: quantitative descriptions of rock melting and a wide range of observations. Discusses examples of continent growth in the North Atlantic, India and the Seychelles islands, and the South Atlantic. (YP)

  19. Volcanism in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albin, Edward F.

    1993-01-01

    Presents activities to familiarize junior high school students with the processes behind and reasons for volcanism, which is generally a planet's way of releasing excessive internal heat and pressure. Students participate in the creation of four important volcano-related simulations: a lava flow, a shield volcano, a cinder-cone volcano, and a…

  20. Total electron content anomalies associated with global VEI4 + volcanic eruptions during 2002-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wang; Guo, Jinyun; Yue, Jianping; Shen, Yi; Yang, Yang

    2016-10-01

    In previous studies, little attention has been paid to the total electron content (TEC) anomalies preceding the volcanic eruption. We analyze the coupling relationship between volcanic eruption and TEC anomalies, and discuss the spatial distribution of TEC anomalies associated with volcanic geographical location. We utilize the global ionosphere map (GIM) data from the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) to analyze TEC variations before the global volcanic eruptions indicated by VEI (Volcanic Explosivity Index) 4 + from 2002 to 2015 with the sliding interquartile range method. The results indicate the occurrence rate of TEC anomalies before great volcanic eruptions is related with the volcanic type and geographical position. The occurrence rate of TEC anomalies before stratovolcano and caldera eruptions is higher than that before shield and pyroclastic shield eruptions, and the occurrence rate of TEC anomalies has a descending trend from low latitudes to high latitudes. The TEC anomalies before the volcanic eruptions in low-mid latitudes are within the volcanic affected areas, but do not coincide with the volcanic foci. The corresponding TEC anomalies could be observed in the conjugated region, and all the TEC anomalies in the volcanic affected areas are usually close to bounds of equatorial anomaly zones. However, the TEC anomalies preceding these eruptions in high latitudes usually surround the volcano, and no TEC anomalies appear in the conjugated region. These conclusions have potential applications to the prediction of great volcanic eruptions in the future.

  1. Neogene rhyolites of the northern Jemez volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, B.M.; Vaniman, D.T.; Baldridge, W.S.; Shafiqullah, M.

    1988-06-10

    Volcanic centers previously mapped as the 20 Ma El Rechuelos Rhyolite in the northern Jemez volcanic field, New Mexico, include three distinct episodes of rhyolitic volcanism. An early (7.5 Ma) extrusive dome of flow-banded biotite rhyolite and an intermediate (5.8 Ma) rhyolite, possibly a volcanic neck, correspond in age to rhyolites of the Keres Group in the southern Jemez volcanic field. Three other extrusive domes of aphyric, pumiceous rhyolite and obsidian comprise a late volcanic episode, dated at 2.0 Ma. We retain the name El Rechuelos Rhyolite only for these late centers. Another center, farther north than the others but previously mapped with the El Rechuelos Rhyolite, is a dacite pumice ring whose age (5.2 Ma), petrography, major- and trace-element chemistry, and Sr initial ratio all suggest it should be included with rocks of the Tschicoma Formation. Nd and Sr isotopic ratios of the Neogene rhyolites of the northern Jemez volcanic field suggest that these rhyolites were not produced by partial melting of either upper or lower crust. Rather, they may have been generated from a mantle-derived mafic magma, such as the nearby Lobato Basalt, by fractional crystallization with concomitant assimilation of small amounts (<6%) of lower crust. If the El Rechuelos is derived from a lower crust magma chamber, as seems likely, then it is not related to the bandelier magma system, even though it is part of a continuum of rhyolite volcanism ranging from 3.6 Ma to 130,000 years ago that includes the Bandelier and precursor rhyolitic units. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  2. Status of volcanism studies for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Valentine, G.A.; Wells, S.; Bowker, L.; Finnegan, K.; Geissman, J.; McFadden, L.

    1995-02-01

    Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. The long time of activity and characteristic small volume of the Postcaldera basalt of the YMR result in one of the lowest eruptive rates in a volcanic field in the southwest United States. Chapter 5 summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 summarizes the history of volcanism studies (1979 through early 1994), including work for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and overview studies by the state of Nevada and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Chapter 7 summarizes probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment using a three-part conditional probability model. Chapter 8 describes remaining volcanism work judged to be needed to complete characterization studies for the YMR. Chapter 9 summarizes the conclusions of this volcanism status report.

  3. Aurorae and Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-06-01

    bears witness to the important role of the zonal winds in the Jovian atmosphere (blowing along the same latitude) in transporting the haze material, much stronger than that of the meridional winds (along the same longitude), even at the high latitudes of the auroral region. Jupiter's rapid rotation (about 10 hours per revolution) obviously plays an important role in this. A volcanic eruption on Io ESO PR Photo 21f/01 ESO PR Photo 21f/01 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 322 pix - 50k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 643 pix - 160k] Caption : ESO PR Photo 21f/01 shows a small area of an image obtained through a narrow-band filter centered at 4.07 µm. The bright object is the Jovian moon Io ; its image is further enlarged to the left. A strong asymmetry is evident, with the Tvashtar hot spot well visible in the upper right quadrant. Io , the innermost major satellite of Jupiter is one of the most remarkable bodies in the solar system. Volcanic activity on its surface was first discovered by the NASA Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft during fly-by's in 1979. This is attributed to internal heating caused by tidal effects between Jupiter, Io and the other Galilean satellites. Apart from the Earth, Io is the only other body in the solar system that is currently volcanically active. The volcanism on this moon is the main source of electrically charged particles (plasma) in the magnetosphere of Jupiter. A bright polar feature is visible on several ISAAC images of Io , obtained through a narrow-band filter at 4.07 µm, cf. PR Photo 21f/01 . In this waveband, the effect of reflected sunlight is negligible and the image resolution is the best. Applying a basic filtering algorithm, the sharpness of this image was further enhanced. The recorded emission is found to correspond to the Tvashtar hot spot that was discovered by NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) in November 1999 and observed simultaneously by the Galileo spacecraft during its I25 flyby. Such outbursts normally have a short lifetime, less than

  4. Exploring Hawaiian Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, Michael P.; Okubo, Paul G.; Hon, Ken

    2013-02-01

    In 1912 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Thomas A. Jaggar Jr. on the island of Hawaii. Driven by the devastation he observed while investigating the volcanic disasters of 1902 at Montagne Pelée in the Caribbean, Jaggar conducted a worldwide search and decided that Hawai`i provided an excellent natural laboratory for systematic study of earthquake and volcano processes toward better understanding of seismic and volcanic hazards. In the 100 years since HVO's founding, surveillance and investigation of Hawaiian volcanoes have spurred advances in volcano and seismic monitoring techniques, extended scientists' understanding of eruptive activity and processes, and contributed to development of global theories about hot spots and mantle plumes.

  5. Exploring Hawaiian volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.; Okubo, Paul G.; Hon, Ken

    2013-01-01

    In 1912 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Thomas A. Jaggar Jr. on the island of Hawaii. Driven by the devastation he observed while investigating the volcanic disasters of 1902 at Montagne Pelée in the Caribbean, Jaggar conducted a worldwide search and decided that Hawai‘i provided an excellent natural laboratory for systematic study of earthquake and volcano processes toward better understanding of seismic and volcanic hazards. In the 100 years since HVO’s founding, surveillance and investigation of Hawaiian volcanoes have spurred advances in volcano and seismic monitoring techniques, extended scientists’ understanding of eruptive activity and processes, and contributed to development of global theories about hot spots and mantle plumes.

  6. Volcanism-Climate Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Louis S. (Editor); Desilva, Shanaka (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The range of disciplines in the study of volcanism-climate interactions includes paleoclimate, volcanology, petrology, tectonics, cloud physics and chemistry, and climate and radiation modeling. Questions encountered in understanding the interactions include: the source and evolution of sulfur and sulfur-gaseous species in magmas; their entrainment in volcanic plumes and injection into the stratosphere; their dissipation rates; and their radiative effects. Other issues include modeling and measuring regional and global effects of such large, dense clouds. A broad-range plan of research designed to answer these questions was defined. The plan includes observations of volcanoes, rocks, trees, and ice cores, as well as satellite and aircraft observations of erupting volcanoes and resulting lumes and clouds.

  7. Volcanic hotspots on io: stability and longitudinal distribution.

    PubMed

    Johnson, T V; Morrison, D; Matson, D L; Veeder, G J; Brown, R H; Nelson, R M

    1984-10-12

    We report the first results of a program to determine the longitudinal distribution of volcanic activity on Jupiter's satellite Io. Infrared measurements at 8.7, 10, and 20 micrometers have been taken at a variety of orbital longitudes: strong variation in the 8.7- and 10-micrometer flux with longitude demonstrates that infrared emission arising from volcanic hotspots on Io is strongly concentrated in a few locations. Analysis of these data suggests that the active volcanic regions observed by the Voyager experimenters are still active, particularly the region around the feature known as Loki. Another source of flux, although of somewhat smaller magnitude, is indicated on the opposite hemisphere. If these sources are the only major volcanic centers on Io, then current global heat flow estimates must be revised downward. However, heat flow from as yet unobserved longitudes, hotspots at high latitudes, and conducted heat flow must still be measured.

  8. California's potential volcanic hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorgenson, P.

    1989-01-01

    This is a summary of "Potential Hazards from Future Volcanic Eruptions in California' (USGS Bulletin No. 1847: price $4.75). The chief areas of danger are Lassen Peak, Mount Shasta and Medicine Lake Highland in the north; Clear Lake, Mono Lake and Long Valley in the centre; and Owen's River-Death Valley, Amboy Crater and the Saltan Butter in the south of the State. -A.Scarth

  9. Volcanic effects on climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robock, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions which inject large amounts of sulfur-rich gas into the stratosphere produce dust veils which last years and cool the earth's surface. At the same time, these dust veils absorb enough solar radiation to warm the stratosphere. Since these temperature changes at the earth's surface and in the stratosphere are both in the opposite direction of hypothesized effects from greenhouse gases, they act to delay and mask the detection of greenhouse effects on the climate system. Tantalizing recent research results have suggested regional effects of volcanic eruptions, including effects on El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In addition, a large portion of the global climate change of the past 100 years may be due to the effects of volcanoes, but a definite answer is not yet clear. While effects of several years were demonstrated with both data studies and numerical models, long-term effects, while found in climate model calculations, await confirmation with more realistic models. Extremely large explosive prehistoric eruptions may have produced severe weather and climate effects, sometimes called a 'volcanic winter'. Complete understanding of the above effects of volcanoes is hampered by inadequacies of data sets on volcanic dust veils and on climate change. Space observations can play an increasingly important role in an observing program in the future. The effects of volcanoes are not adequately separated from ENSO events, and climate modeling of the effects of volcanoes is in its infancy. Specific suggestions are made for future work to improve the knowledge of this important component of the climate system.

  10. Volcanic alert in antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan

    1992-01-01

    On January 14, members of the Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programs (COMNAP) were alerted to possible volcanic activity on Deception Island, Antarctica. The island, located at latitude 62%57‧S, longitude 60'40‧W, attracts many tourists.COMNAP is a group of national program managers of 25 countries that have government programs in the Antarctic. Its function is to implement measures adopted by the Antarctic Treaty parties, including fostering international cooperation in scientific research.

  11. Timeline of Martian Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L. M. V.

    2011-05-01

    A recent study of Martian volcanism presents a timeline of the last major eruptions from 20 large volcanoes, based on the relative ages of caldera surfaces determined by crater counting. Stuart Robbins, Gaetano Di Achille, and Brian Hynek (University of Colorado) counted craters on high-resolution images from the the Context Camera (CTX) on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to date individual calderas, or terraces within calderas, on the 20 major Martian volcanoes. Based on their timeline and mapping, rates and durations of eruptions and transitions from explosive to effusive activity varied from volcano to volcano. The work confirms previous findings by others that volcanism was continuous throughout Martian geologic history until about one to two hundred million years ago, the final volcanic events were not synchronous across the planet, and the latest large-scale caldera activity ended about 150 million years ago in the Tharsis province. This timing correlates well with the crystallization ages (~165-170 million years) determined for the youngest basaltic Martian meteorites.

  12. Volcanic Ash Transport and Dispersion Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servranckx, R.; Stunder, B.

    2006-12-01

    Volcanic ash transport and dispersion models (VATDM) have been used operationally since the mid 1990's by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) designated Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC) to provide ash forecast guidance. Over the years, significant improvements in the detection and prediction of airborne volcanic ash have been realized thanks to improved models, increases in computing power, 24-hr real time monitoring by VAACs / Meteorological Watch Offices and close coordination with Volcano Observatories around the world. Yet, predicting accurately the spatial and temporal structures of airborne volcanic ash and the deposition at the earth's surface remains a difficult and challenging problem. The forecasting problem is influenced by 3 main components. The first one (ERUPTION SOURCE PARAMETERS) comprises all non-meteorological parameters that characterize a specific eruption or volcanic ash cloud. For example, the volume / mass of ash released in the atmosphere, the duration of the eruption, the altitude and distribution of the ash cloud, the particle size distribution, etc. The second component (METEOROLOGY) includes all meteorological parameters (wind, moisture, stability, etc.) that are calculated by Numerical Weather Prediction models and that serve as input to the VATDM. The third component (TRANSPORT AND DISPERSION) combines input from the other 2 components through the use of VATDM to transport and disperse airborne volcanic ash in the atmosphere as well as depositing it at the surface though various removal mechanisms. Any weakness in one of the components may adversely affect the accuracy of the forecast. In a real-time, operational response context such as exists at the VAACs, the rapid delivery of the modeling results puts some constraints on model resolution and computing time. Efforts are ongoing to evaluate the reliability of VATDM forecasts though the use of various methods, including ensemble techniques. Remote sensing data

  13. Geochemical evidence for waning magmatism and polycyclic volcanism at Crater Flat, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, F.V.; Crowe, B.M.

    1991-12-31

    Petrologic and geochemical studies of basaltic rocks in the Yucca Mountain region are currently focused on understanding the evolution of volcanism in the Crater Flat volcanic field and the mechanisms of polycyclic volcanism at the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, the youngest center in the Crater Flat volcanic field. Geochemical and petrologic data indicate that the magma chambers which supplied the volcanic centers in Crater Flat became situated at greater crustal depths as the field evolved. Deep magma chambers may be related to a waning magma flux that was unable to sustain upper crystal magma conduits and chambers. Geochemical data from the Lathrop Wells volcanic center indicate that eruptive units identified from field and geomorphic relationships are geochemically distinct. The geochemical variations cannot be explained by fractional crystallization of a single magma batch, indicating that several magma batches were involved in the formation of the Lathrop Wells center. Considering the low magma flux in the Yucca Mountain region in the Quaternary, the probability of several magma batches erupting essentially simultaneously at Lathrop Wells in considered remote. It is more likely that the Lathrop Wells center was formed by a series of eruptions that took place over many thousands of years. The geochemical data from Lathrop Wells is consistent with the concept of a complex, polycyclic volcano, which was originally proposed based on geomorphic and soil-development data.

  14. California's Vulnerability to Volcanic Hazards: What's at Risk?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangan, M.; Wood, N. J.; Dinitz, L.

    2015-12-01

    California is a leader in comprehensive planning for devastating earthquakes, landslides, floods, and tsunamis. Far less attention, however, has focused on the potentially devastating impact of volcanic eruptions, despite the fact that they occur in the State about as frequently as the largest earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault Zone. At least 10 eruptions have occurred in the past 1,000 years—most recently in northern California (Lassen Peak 1914 to 1917)—and future volcanic eruptions are inevitable. The likelihood of renewed volcanism in California is about one in a few hundred to one in a few thousand annually. Eight young volcanoes, ranked as Moderate to Very High Threat [1] are dispersed throughout the State. Partially molten rock (magma) resides beneath at least seven of these—Medicine Lake Volcano, Mount Shasta, Lassen Volcanic Center, Clear Lake Volcanic Field, Long Valley Volcanic Region, Coso Volcanic Field, and Salton Buttes— causing earthquakes, toxic gas emissions, hydrothermal activity, and (or) ground deformation. Understanding the hazards and identifying what is at risk are the first steps in building community resilience to volcanic disasters. This study, prepared in collaboration with the State of California Governor's Office of Emergency Management and the California Geological Survey, provides a broad perspective on the State's exposure to volcano hazards by integrating mapped volcano hazard zones with geospatial data on at-risk populations, infrastructure, and resources. The study reveals that ~ 16 million acres fall within California's volcano hazard zones, along with ~ 190 thousand permanent and 22 million transitory populations. Additionally, far-field disruption to key water delivery systems, agriculture, utilities, and air traffic is likely. Further site- and sector-specific analyses will lead to improved hazard mitigation efforts and more effective disaster response and recovery. [1] "Volcanic Threat and Monitoring Capabilities

  15. 2011 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Maharrey, J. Zebulon; Neal, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near three separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2011. The year was highlighted by the unrest and eruption of Cleveland Volcano in the central Aleutian Islands. AVO annual summaries no longer report on activity at Russian volcanoes.

  16. The Satah Mountain and Baldface Mountain volcanic fields: Pleistocene hot spot volcanism in the Anahim Volcanic Belt, west-central British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, Christian; Guest, Bernard; Russell, James K.; Benowitz, Jeff A.

    2015-03-01

    The Satah Mountain and Baldface Mountain volcanic fields (SMVF, BMVF) comprise more than three dozen small volcanic centers and erosional remnants thereof. These fields are located in the Chilcotin Highland of west-central British Columbia, Canada, and are spatially associated with the Anahim Volcanic Belt (AVB), a linear feature of alkaline to peralkaline plutonic and volcanic centers of Miocene to Holocene ages. The AVB has been postulated to be the track of a hot spot passing beneath the westward moving Cordilleran lithosphere. We test the AVB hot spot model by applying whole-rock 40Ar/39Ar geochronology ( n = 24) and geochemistry. Whole-rock chemical compositions of volcanic rock samples ( n = 59) from these two fields suggest a strong geochemical affinity with the nearby Itcha Range shield volcano; however, SMVF and BMVF centers are mostly small in volume (<1 km3) and differ in composition from one another, even where they are in close spatial proximity. Trace element and REE patterns of mafic AVB lavas are similar to ocean island basalts (OIB), suggesting a mantle source for these lavas. The age ranges for the SMVF ( n = 11; ~2.21 to ~1.43 Ma) and BMVF ( n = 7; ~3.91 to ~0.91 Ma) are largely coeval with the Itcha Range. The distribution of volcanoes in these two volcanic fields is potentially consistent with the postulated AVB hot spot track. Eruption rates in the SMVF were high enough to build an elongated ridge that deviates from the E-W trend of the AVB by almost 90°. This deviation might reflect the mechanisms and processes facilitating magma generation and ascent through the lithosphere in this tectonically complex region and may also indicate interaction of the potential hot spot with (pre)existing fracture systems in vicinity of the Itcha Range.

  17. Laboratory studies of volcanic jets.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, S.W.; Sturtevant, B.

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory experiments to study the fluid dynamics of violent volcanic eruptions employed pure gases erupted from small reservoirs. The gases used were Freon 12 and Freon 22, both of high molecular weight and high density, to model heavy, particulate- laden volcanic gases; nitrogen, a moderate molecular weight and density gas with well known thermodynamic properties; and He, a low molecular weight and density gas used as an analogue of steam, the dominant gas of most volcanic eruptions.-W.H.B.

  18. Volcanism on Mars. Chapter 41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Garry, W. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Crown, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration has revealed abundant evidence that Mars possesses some of the most dramatic volcanic landforms found anywhere within the solar system. How did a planet half the size of Earth produce volcanoes like Olympus Mons, which is several times the size of the largest volcanoes on Earth? This question is an example of the kinds of issues currently being investigated as part of the space-age scientific endeavor called "comparative planetology." This chapter summarizes the basic information currently known about volcanism on Mars. The volcanoes on Mars appear to be broadly similar in overall morphology (although, often quite different in scale) to volcanic features on Earth, which suggests that Martian eruptive processes are not significantly different from the volcanic styles and processes on Earth. Martian volcanoes are found on terrains of different age, and Martian volcanic rocks are estimated to comprise more than 50% of the Martian surface. This is in contrast to volcanism on smaller bodies such as Earth's Moon, where volcanic activity was mainly confined to the first half of lunar history (see "Volcanism on the Moon"). Comparative planetology supports the concept that volcanism is the primary mechanism for a planetary body to get rid of its internal heat; smaller bodies tend to lose their internal heat more rapidly than larger bodies (although, Jupiter's moon Io appears to contradict this trend; Io's intense volcanic activity is powered by unique gravitational tidal forces within the Jovian system; see "Volcanism on Io"), so that volcanic activity on Mars would be expected to differ considerably from that found on Earth and the Moon.

  19. Quantitative Studies in Planetary Volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baloga, Stephen M.

    2004-01-01

    Proxemy Research has a research grant to perform scientific investigations of volcanism and volcanic-related process on other planets. Part of this research involves mathematical modeling of specific volcanic transport processes and the use of terrestrial analogs. This report contains a summary of activities conducted over the time period indicated. In addition, a synopsis of science research conducted during the period is given. A complete listing of publications and scientific abstracts that were presented at scientific conferences is contained in the report.

  20. Monitoring volcanic threats using ASTER satellite data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duda, K.A.; Wessels, R.; Ramsey, M.; Dehn, J.

    2008-01-01

    This document summarizes ongoing activities associated with a research project funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) focusing on volcanic change detection through the use of satellite imagery. This work includes systems development as well as improvements in data analysis methods. Participating organizations include the NASA Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS), the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Science Team, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) at the USGS Alaska Science Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology (JPL/CalTech), the University of Pittsburgh, and the University of Alaska Fairbanks. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  1. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, A.

    2012-12-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of these aerosol clouds produce responses in the climate system. Observations and numerical models of the climate system show that volcanic eruptions produce global cooling and were the dominant natural cause of climate change for the past millennium, on timescales from annual to century. Major tropical eruptions produce winter warming of Northern Hemisphere continents for one or two years, while high latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere weaken the Asian and African summer monsoon. The Toba supereruption 74,000 years ago caused very large climate changes, affecting human evolution. However, the effects did not last long enough to produce widespread glaciation. An episode of four large decadally-spaced eruptions at the end of the 13th century C.E. started the Little Ice Age. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade had a small effect on global temperature trends. The June 13, 2011 Nabro eruption in Eritrea produced the largest stratospheric aerosol cloud since Pinatubo, and the most of the sulfur entered the stratosphere not by direct injection, but by slow lofting in the Asian summer monsoon circulation. Volcanic eruptions warn us that while stratospheric geoengineering could cool the surface, reducing ice melt and sea level rise, producing pretty sunsets, and increasing the CO2 sink, it could also reduce summer monsoon precipitation, destroy ozone, allowing more harmful UV at the surface, produce rapid warming when stopped, make the sky white, reduce solar power, perturb the ecology with more diffuse radiation, damage airplanes flying in the stratosphere, degrade astronomical observations, affect remote sensing, and affect

  2. Volcanism at rifts

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.S.; McKenzie, D.P.

    1989-07-01

    The earth's outer shell rifts continuously, stretching and splitting both on the ocean's floor and on continents. Every 30 million years or so the rifting becomes cataclysmic, releasing continent-size floods of magma. This paper explains that the same mechanism is at work in both cases, the difference being in the slightly hotter temperature of the parent mantle for spectacular volcanic outbursts. Two kinds of evidence are described: quantitative descriptions of rock melting and a wide range of observations made on the rifted edges of continents and in the oceans that have opened between them.

  3. Petrogenesis of Challis Volcanic Group, east-central Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleiffarth, W. K.; Larson, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    The Eocene Challis-Kamloops volcanic belt (CKVB) extends south and east from northern British Columbia to central Idaho and is related to the paleotectonic plate interaction between the Farallon and North American plates. Numerous volcanic fields are scattered throughout the CKVB and show a wide range of eruption styles, tectonic environments, and geochemical compositions. Several volcanic fields produced calc-alkaline rocks, while others produced moderately to strongly alkaline rocks. Some volcanic fields have a significant slab component, while others show no direct evidence of subduction-related magmatism. Proposed models for tectonic controls on the CKVB include continental volcanic arc delamination of subducted slab, rifted arc, slab window, and extensional continental tectonism. However, there is no generally accepted explanation for the petrogenesis of the CKVB. The Challis Volcanic Group (CVG) of central Idaho, located in the southern portion of the belt, is the largest of the Eocene volcanic fields (25,000 km2). The CVG is of interest because it exhibits very diverse volcanic deposits and compositions and may accurately represent the CKVB. Challis volcanism was synchronous with extension along the NE-SW-trending trans-Challis fault system and resulted in similarly oriented normal faults, dikes, calderas, and exhumation of the Pioneer core complex. The CVG covers much of central Idaho with exposures extending from the Sawtooth Mountains in the west to the Lemhi and Beaverhead ranges to the east. The CVG has high alkaline contents relative to calc-alkaline subduction-related volcanic rocks, varying isotopic signatures, and prevalent extensional features. These facts, coupled with the lack of obvious orientation of volcanic fields throughout the CKVB, explain why the petrogenesis of Eocene volcanism of the inland Pacific Northwest is controversial. Rare earth element concentrations and Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope ratios show that the CVG represents a mixture of

  4. The Ngorongoro Volcanic Highland and its relationships to volcanic deposits at Olduvai Gorge and East African Rift volcanism.

    PubMed

    Mollel, Godwin F; Swisher, Carl C

    2012-08-01

    The Ngorongoro Volcanic Highland (NVH), situated adjacent and to the east of Olduvai Gorge in northern Tanzania, is the source of the immense quantities of lava, ignimbrite, air fall ash, and volcaniclastic debris that occur interbedded in the Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary deposits in the Laetoli and Olduvai areas. These volcanics have proven crucial to unraveling stratigraphic correlations, the age of these successions, the archaeological and paleontological remains, as well as the source materials from which the bulk of the stone tools were manufactured. The NVH towers some 2,000 m above the Olduvai and Laetoli landscapes, affecting local climate, run-off, and providing varying elevation - climate controlled ecosystem, habitats, and riparian corridors extending into the Olduvai and Laetoli lowlands. The NVH also plays a crucial role in addressing the genesis and history of East African Rift (EAR) magmatism in northern Tanzania. In this contribution, we provide age and petrochemical compositions of the major NVH centers: Lemagurut, basalt to benmorite, 2.4-2.2 Ma; Satiman, tephrite to phonolite, 4.6-3.5 Ma; Oldeani, basalt to trachyandesite, 1.6-1.5 Ma; Ngorongoro, basalt to rhyolite, 2.3-2.0 Ma; Olmoti, basalt to trachyte, 2.0-1.8 Ma; Embagai, nephelinite to phonolite, 1.2-0.6 Ma; and Engelosin, phonolite, 3-2.7 Ma. We then discuss how these correlate in time and composition with volcanics preserved at Olduvai Gorge. Finally, we place this into context with our current understanding as to the eruptive history of the NVH and relationship to East African Rift volcanism.

  5. Sensitivity to volcanic field boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Melody; Bebbington, Mark; Cronin, Shane; Lindsay, Jan; Rashad Moufti, Mohammed

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic hazard analyses are desirable where there is potential for future volcanic activity to affect a proximal population. This is frequently the case for volcanic fields (regions of distributed volcanism) where low eruption rates, fertile soil, and attractive landscapes draw populations to live close by. Forecasting future activity in volcanic fields almost invariably uses spatial or spatio-temporal point processes with model selection and development based on exploratory analyses of previous eruption data. For identifiability reasons, spatio-temporal processes, and practically also spatial processes, the definition of a spatial region is required to which volcanism is confined. However, due to the complex and predominantly unknown sub-surface processes driving volcanic eruptions, definition of a region based solely on geological information is currently impossible. Thus, the current approach is to fit a shape to the known previous eruption sites. The class of boundary shape is an unavoidable subjective decision taken by the forecaster that is often overlooked during subsequent analysis of results. This study shows the substantial effect that this choice may have on even the simplest exploratory methods for hazard forecasting, illustrated using four commonly used exploratory statistical methods and two very different regions: the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand, and Harrat Rahat, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. For Harrat Rahat, sensitivity of results to boundary definition is substantial. For the Auckland Volcanic Field, the range of options resulted in similar shapes, nevertheless, some of the statistical tests still showed substantial variation in results. This work highlights the fact that when carrying out any hazard analysis on volcanic fields, it is vital to specify how the volcanic field boundary has been defined, assess the sensitivity of boundary choice, and to carry these assumptions and related uncertainties through to estimates of future activity and

  6. Crustal deformation and volcanic earthquakes associated with the recent volcanic activity of Iwojima Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, H.; Fujita, E.; Tanada, T.

    2013-12-01

    Iwojima is an active volcanic island located within a 10 km wide submarine caldera about 1250 km to the south of Tokyo, Japan. The seismometer and GPS network of National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) in Iwojima has observed a repeating island wide uplift more than 1 m associated with large number of volcanic earthquakes every several years. During 2006-2012, we observed more than 20000 volcanic earthquakes and an uplift of about 3 m, and precursory volcanic earthquakes and rapid crustal deformation just before the small submarine eruption near the northern coast of Iwojima in April 2012. In a restless volcano such as Iwojima, it is important issue to distinguish whether rapid crustal deformation and intense earthquake activity lead to an eruption or not. According to a long period geodetic observation by Ukawa et al. (2006), the crustal deformation of Iwojima can be classify into 2 phases. The first is an island wide large uplift centering on Motoyama area (the eastern part of the island, the center of the caldera), and the second is contraction and subsidence at local area centering on Motoyama and uplift around that area. They are interpreted by superposition of crustal deformations by a shallow contraction source and a deep seated inflation source beneath Motoyama. The earthquake activity of Iwojima highly correlates with the island wide large uplift, suggesting the earthquakes are almost controlled by a magma accumulation into a deep seated magma chamber. In contrast to the activity, the precursory activity of the eruption in 2012 is deviated from the correlation. The rapid crustal deformation just before and after the eruption in 2012 can be interpreted by rapid inflation and deflation of a shallow sill source about 1km deep, respectively, suggesting that it was caused by a shallow hydrothermal activity. The result shows that we can probably distinguish an abnormal activity related with a volcanic eruption when we observe

  7. Geochemistry of volcanic rocks from the Wawa greenstone belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, K. J.; Sylvester, P. J.; Attoh, K.

    1983-01-01

    The Wawa greenstone belt is located in the District of Algoma and extends east-northeast from Lake Superior to the western part of the Sudbury District in Ontario, Canada. Recent mapping by Attoh has shown that an unconformity at the base of the Dore' Formation and equivalent sedimentary rocks marks a significant stratigraphic break which can be traced throughout the volcanic belt. This break has been used to subdivide the volcanic-sedimentary into pre- and post-Dore' sequences. The pre-Dore' sequence includes at least two cycles of mafic-to-felsic volcanism, each capped by an iron-formation unit. The post-Dore' sequence includes an older mafic-to-felsic unit, which directly overlies sedimentary rocks correlated with the Dore' Formation, and a younger felsic breccia unit interpreted to have formed as debris flows from a felsic volcanic center. In the present study, samples of both the pre-and post-Dore' volcanic sequences were analyzed for major and trace elements, incuding rare earths (REE). This preliminary study is part of an ongoing program to assess the petrogenesis of the volcanic rocks of the Wawa greenstone belt.

  8. Uranium series, volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Application of U-series dating to volcanic rocks provides unique and valuable information about the absolute timing of crystallization and differentiation of magmas prior to eruption. The 238U–230Th and 230Th-226Ra methods are the most commonly employed for dating the crystallization of mafic to silicic magmas that erupt at volcanoes. Dates derived from the U–Th and Ra–Th methods reflect crystallization because diffusion of these elements at magmatic temperatures is sluggish (Cherniak 2010) and diffusive re-equilibration is insignificant over the timescales (less than or equal to 10^5 years) typically associated with pre-eruptive storage of nearly all magma compositions (Cooper and Reid 2008). Other dating methods based on elements that diffuse rapidly at magmatic temperatures, such as the 40Ar/39Ar and (U–Th)/He methods, yield dates for the cooling of magma at the time of eruption. Disequilibrium of some short-lived daughters of the uranium series such as 210Po may be fractionated by saturation of a volatile phase and can be employed to date magmatic gas loss that is synchronous with volcanic eruption (e.g., Rubin et al. 1994).

  9. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeGrande, Allegra N.; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions represent some of the most climatically important and societally disruptive short-term events in human history. Large eruptions inject ash, dust, sulfurous gases (e.g. SO2, H2S), halogens (e.g. Hcl and Hbr), and water vapor into the Earth's atmosphere. Sulfurous emissions principally interact with the climate by converting into sulfate aerosols that reduce incoming solar radiation, warming the stratosphere and altering ozone creation, reducing global mean surface temperature, and suppressing the hydrological cycle. In this issue, we focus on the history, processes, and consequences of these large eruptions that inject enough material into the stratosphere to significantly affect the climate system. In terms of the changes wrought on the energy balance of the Earth System, these transient events can temporarily have a radiative forcing magnitude larger than the range of solar, greenhouse gas, and land use variability over the last millennium. In simulations as well as modern and paleoclimate observations, volcanic eruptions cause large inter-annual to decadal-scale changes in climate. Active debates persist concerning their role in longer-term (multi-decadal to centennial) modification of the Earth System, however.

  10. Mantle Heterogeneity and Off Axis Volcanism on Young Pacific Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, N.; Forsyth, D. W.; Weeraratne, D. S.; Webb, S. C.; Yang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Plate tectonics and mantle plumes explain most volcanism on earth, but there are numerous actively forming linear volcanic chains in the middle of tectonic plates that are not explained by these theories. Using the multidisciplinary geophysical dataset of the MELT and GLIMPSE experiments, we show that associated with 3 volcanic chains west of the East Pacific Rise there are low seismic velocities and densities in the asthenosphere that extend to the East Pacific Rise spreading center. Analogous to the Hawaiian swell, the low-density anomalies produce swells beneath the volcanoes on young seafloor. The associated gravity anomalies are part of a set of gravity lineaments that have been previously interpreted as being due to thermo-elastic cracking of the lithosphere or small-scale convection. The correlation between the surface volcanism and subsurface density and velocity anomalies and their extension to the spreading center suggest that pre-existing, buoyant or fertile asthenospheric mantle heterogeneities are stretched in the direction of plate motion by shear between the plate and the underlying mantle. These heterogeneities seed small-scale convection, producing upwelling and pressure release melting, forming volcanic chains that extend nearly to the ridge axis.

  11. Mantle heterogeneity and off axis volcanism on young Pacific lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Nicholas; Forsyth, Donald W.; Weeraratne, Dayanthie S.; Yang, Yingjie; Webb, Spahr C.

    2011-11-01

    Plate tectonics and mantle plumes explain most volcanism on earth, but there are numerous actively forming linear volcanic chains in the middle of tectonic plates that are not explained by these theories. Using the multidisciplinary geophysical dataset of the MELT and GLIMPSE experiments, we show that associated with 3 volcanic chains west of the East Pacific Rise there are low seismic velocities and densities in the asthenosphere that extend to the East Pacific Rise spreading center. Analogous to the Hawaiian swell, the low-density anomalies produce swells beneath the volcanoes on young seafloor. The associated gravity anomalies are part of a set of gravity lineaments that have been previously interpreted as being due to thermo-elastic cracking of the lithosphere or small-scale convection. The correlation between the surface volcanism and subsurface density and velocity anomalies and their extension to the spreading center suggest that pre-existing, buoyant or fertile asthenospheric mantle heterogeneities are stretched in the direction of plate motion by shear between the plate and the underlying mantle. These heterogeneities seed small-scale convection, producing upwelling and pressure release melting, forming volcanic chains that extend nearly to the ridge axis.

  12. Gish Bar Patera, Io: Geology and Volcanic Activity, 1996-2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jason; Radebaugh, Jani; Lopes, Rosaly; McEwen, Alfred; Keszthelyi, Laszlo

    2003-01-01

    Since the two Voyagers passed by Jupiter in 1979, it has been known that volcanic activity is ubiquitous on the surface of Io. With over 400 volcanic centers, Io is even more volcanically active than the earth with massive flood basalt-style eruptions and komatitite lavas a common occurrence. Additionally, some volcanoes appear to be giant lava lakes, with violent activity churning the crust of the lake for periods of 20 years or more. Finally, sulfur is believed to play a large role in Io's volcanism, be it as a primary lava or as a secondary product of large, high-temperature eruptions. By studying one volcano in particular, Gish Bar Patera, one can observe many of these characteristics in one volcanic center.

  13. Active Volcanic Plumes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This color image, acquired during Galileo's ninth orbit around Jupiter, shows two volcanic plumes on Io. One plume was captured on the bright limb or edge of the moon (see inset at upper right), erupting over a caldera (volcanic depression) named Pillan Patera after a South American god of thunder, fire and volcanoes. The plume seen by Galileo is 140 kilometers (86 miles) high and was also detected by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Galileo spacecraft will pass almost directly over Pillan Patera in 1999 at a range of only 600 kilometers (373 miles).

    The second plume, seen near the terminator (boundary between day and night), is called Prometheus after the Greek fire god (see inset at lower right). The shadow of the 75-kilometer (45- mile) high airborne plume can be seen extending to the right of the eruption vent. The vent is near the center of the bright and dark rings. Plumes on Io have a blue color, so the plume shadow is reddish. The Prometheus plume can be seen in every Galileo image with the appropriate geometry, as well as every such Voyager image acquired in 1979. It is possible that this plume has been continuously active for more than 18 years. In contrast, a plume has never been seen at Pillan Patera prior to the recent Galileo and Hubble Space Telescope images.

    North is toward the top of the picture. The resolution is about 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) per picture element. This composite uses images taken with the green, violet and near infrared filters of the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The images were obtained on June 28, 1997, at a range of more than 600,000 kilometers (372,000 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page

  14. Electrical Charging of Volcanic Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Wilson, L.; Lane, S. J.; Gilbert, J. S.; Mather, T. A.; Harrison, R. G.; Martin, R. S.

    2008-06-01

    Many explosive terrestrial volcanic eruptions are accompanied by lightning and other atmospheric electrical phenomena. The plumes produced generate large perturbations in the surface atmospheric electric potential gradient and high charge densities have been measured on falling volcanic ash particles. The complex nature of volcanic plumes (which contain gases, solid particles, and liquid drops) provides several possible charging mechanisms. For plumes rich in solid silicate particles, fractoemission (the ejection of ions and atomic particles during fracture events) is probably the dominant source of charge generation. In other plumes, such as those created when lava enters the sea, different mechanisms, such as boiling, may be important. Further charging mechanisms may also subsequently operate, downwind of the vent. Other solar system bodies also show evidence for volcanism, with activity ongoing on Io. Consequently, volcanic electrification under different planetary scenarios (on Venus, Mars, Io, Moon, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione and Triton) is also discussed.

  15. Electrical Charging of Volcanic Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Wilson, L.; Lane, S. J.; Gilbert, J. S.; Mather, T. A.; Harrison, R. G.; Martin, R. S.

    Many explosive terrestrial volcanic eruptions are accompanied by lightning and other atmospheric electrical phenomena. The plumes produced generate large perturbations in the surface atmospheric electric potential gradient and high charge densities have been measured on falling volcanic ash particles. The complex nature of volcanic plumes (which contain gases, solid particles, and liquid drops) provides several possible charging mechanisms. For plumes rich in solid silicate particles, fractoemission (the ejection of ions and atomic particles during fracture events) is probably the dominant source of charge generation. In other plumes, such as those created when lava enters the sea, different mechanisms, such as boiling, may be important. Further charging mechanisms may also subsequently operate, downwind of the vent. Other solar system bodies also show evidence for volcanism, with activity ongoing on Io. Consequently, volcanic electrification under different planetary scenarios (on Venus, Mars, Io, Moon, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione and Triton) is also discussed.

  16. Friction in volcanic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic landscapes are amongst the most dynamic on Earth and, as such, are particularly susceptible to failure and frictional processes. In rocks, damage accumulation is frequently accompanied by the release of seismic energy, which has been shown to accelerate in the approach to failure on both a field and laboratory scale. The point at which failure occurs is highly dependent upon strain-rate, which also dictates the slip-zone properties that pertain beyond failure, in scenarios such as sector collapse and pyroclastic flows as well as the ascent of viscous magma. High-velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments have provided new opportunities to overcome the grand challenge of understanding faulting processes during volcanic phenomena. Work on granular ash material demonstrates that at ambient temperatures, ash gouge behaves according to Byerlee's rule at low slip velocities, but is slip-weakening, becoming increasingly lubricating as slip ensues. In absence of ash along a slip plane, rock-rock friction induces cataclasis and heating which, if sufficient, may induce melting (producing pseudotachylyte) and importantly, vesiculation. The viscosity of the melt, so generated, controls the subsequent lubrication or resistance to slip along the fault plane thanks to non-Newtonian suspension rheology. The shear-thinning behaviour and viscoelasticity of frictional melts yield a tendency for extremely unstable slip, and occurrence of frictional melt fragmentation. This velocity-dependence acts as an important feedback mechanism on the slip plane, in addition to the bulk composition, mineralogy and glass content of the magma, that all influence frictional behaviour. During sector collapse events and in pyroclastic density currents it is the frictional properties of the rocks and ash that, in-part, control the run-out distance and associated risk. In addition, friction plays an important role in the eruption of viscous magmas: In the conduit, the rheology of magma is integral

  17. Active Volcanism on Io: Global Distribution and Variations in Activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes-Gautier, R.; McEwen, A.S.; Smythe, W.B.; Geissler, P.E.; Kamp, L.; Davies, A.G.; Spencer, J.R.; Keszthelyi, L.; Carlson, R.; Leader, F.E.; Mehlman, R.; Soderblom, L.

    1999-01-01

    Io's volcanic activity has been monitored by instruments aboard the Galileo spacecraft since June 28, 1996. We present results from observations by the near-infrared mapping spectrometer (NIMS) for the first 10 orbits of Galileo, correlate them with results from the Solid State Imaging System (SSI) and from groundbased observations, and compare them to what was known about Io's volcanic activity from observations made during the two Voyager flybys in 1979. A total of 61 active volcanic centers have been identified from Voyager, groundbased, and Galileo observations. Of these, 41 are hot spots detected by NIMS and/or SSI. Another 25 locations were identified as possible active volcanic centers, mostly on the basis of observed surface changes. Hot spots are correlated with surface colors, particularly dark and red deposits, and generally anti-correlated with white, SO2-rich areas. Surface features corresponding to the hot spots, mostly calderas or flows, were identified from Galileo and Voyager images. Hot spot temperatures obtained from both NIMS and SSI are consistent with silicate volcanism, which appears to be widespread on Io. Two types of hot spot activity are present: persistent-type activity, lasting from months to years, and sporadic events, which may represent either short-lived activity or low-level activity that occasionally flares up. Sporadic events are not often detected, but may make an important contribution to Io's heat flow and resurfacing. The distribution of active volcanic centers on the surface does not show any clear correlation with latitude, longitude, Voyager-derived global topography, or heat flow patterns predicted by the asthenosphere and deep mantle tidal dissipation models. However, persistent hot spots and active plumes are concentrated toward lower latitudes, and this distribution favors the asthenosphere rather than the deep mantle tidal dissipation model. ?? 1999 Academic Press.

  18. Volcanic studies at Katmai

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    The Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) is a national effort supported by the Department of Energy, the US Geological Survey, and the National Science Foundation. One of the projects proposed for the CSDP consists of drilling a series of holes in Katmai National Park in Alaska to give a third dimension to the model of the 1912 eruption of Novarupta, and to investigate the processes of explosive volcanism and hydrothermal transport of metals (Eichelberger et al., 1988). The proposal for research drilling at Katmai states that ``the size, youth, elevated temperature, and simplicity of the Novarupta vent make it a truly unique scientific target.`` The National Park Service (NPS), which has jurisdiction, is sympathetic to aims of the study. However, NPS wishes to know whether Katmai is indeed uniquely suited to the research, and has asked the Interagency Coordinating Group to support an independent assessment of this claim. NPS suggested the National Academy of Sciences as an appropriate organization to conduct the assessment. In response, the National Research Council -- the working arm of the Academy -- established, under the aegis of its US Geodynamics Committee, a panel whose specific charge states: ``The proposed investigation at Katmai has been extensively reviewed for scientific merit by the three sponsoring and participating agencies. Thus, the scientific merit of the proposed drilling at Katmai is not at issue. The panel will review the proposal for scientific drilling at Katmai and prepare a short report addressing the specific question of the degree to which it is essential that the drilling be conducted at Katmai as opposed to volcanic areas elsewhere in the world.``

  19. Altiplano-Puna volcanic complex of the central Andes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Silva, S. L.

    1989-01-01

    A model is presented accounting for many features of the Altiplano-Puna volcanic complex situated in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes which contains 50 recently active volcanoes. The dominant elements of the complex are several large nested caldera complexes which are the source structures for the major regionally distributed ignimbrite sheets that characterize the complex. The study of the complex reveals the importance of the intersection of subsidiary axis-oblique tectonic trends related to regional stress fields peculiar to individual oceanic ridge sections with the axis-parallel trends predominant at all spreading centers in localizing hydrothermal discharge zones.

  20. A new comprehensive database of global volcanic gas analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clor, L. E.; Fischer, T. P.; Lehnert, K. A.; McCormick, B.; Hauri, E. H.

    2013-12-01

    source magma. Eventually our goal is to have a seamless gas database that allows the user to easily access all gas data ever collected at volcanoes. This database will be useful in a variety of science applications: 1) correlating volcanic gas composition to volcanic activity; 2) establishing a characteristic gas composition or total volatile budget for a volcano or region in studies of global chemical cycles; 3) better quantifying the flux and source of volcanic carbon to the atmosphere. The World Organization of Volcano Observatories is populating a volcano monitoring database, WOVOdat, which centers on data collected during times of volcanic unrest for monitoring and hazard purposes. The focus of our database is to gain insight into volcanic degassing specifically, during both eruptive and quiescent times. Coordination of the new database with WOVOdat will allow comparison studies of gas compositions with seismic and other monitoring data during times of unrest, as well as promote comprehensive and cross-disciplinary questions about volcanic degassing.

  1. SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, F. V.; Crowe, G. A.; Valentine, G. A.; Bowker, L. M.

    1997-09-23

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin

  2. Quantitative Studies in Planetary Volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baloga, Stephen M.

    2001-01-01

    Scientific research was conducted on volcanic processes on Mars, Venus, Io, the moon, and the Earth. The achievements led to scientific advances in the understanding of volcanic plumes, lava flow emplacements, coronae, and regoliths on the solid surfaces. This research led to multiple publications on each of the main topics of the proposal. Research was also presented at the annual Lunar and Planetary Science Conference at Houston. Typically, this grant contributed to 3-4 presentations each year. This grant demonstrated, numerous times, the usefulness of NASA mission data for advancing the understanding of volcanic processes on other planetary surfaces and the Earth.

  3. Closer look at lunar volcanism

    SciTech Connect

    Vaniman, D.T.; Heiken, G.; Taylor, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    Although the American Apollo and Soviet Luna missions concentrated on mare basalt samples, major questions remain about lunar volcanism. Lunar field work will be indispensable for resolving the scientific questions about ages, compositions, and eruption processes of lunar volcanism. From a utilitarian standpoint, a better knowledge of lunar volcanism will also yield profitable returns in lunar base construction (e.g., exploitation of rille or lava-tube structures) and in access to materials such as volatile elements, pure glass, or ilmenite for lunar industry.

  4. Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, R.G.; Gregory, R.T.; Brown, G.F.

    2016-01-01

    The historical record of volcanic activity in Saudi Arabia suggests that volcanism is dormant. The harrats should be evaluated for their potential as volcanic hazards and as sources of geothermal energy. The volcanic rocks are natural traps for groundwater; thus water resources for agriculture may be significant and should be investigated.

  5. Chronic exposure to volcanic environments and chronic bronchitis incidence in the Azores, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Amaral, André Filipe Santos; Rodrigues, Armindo Santos

    2007-03-01

    The village of Furnas, like other active volcanic areas in the world, exhibits high levels of hazardous gases. We aimed to investigate the existence of a possible association between chronic exposure to volcanic sulfur gases and chronic bronchitis. To investigate this, we used two populations, one exposed to active manifestations of volcanism (Furnas) and another from an area where no volcanic activity took place for over three million years (Santa Maria), both in the Azores. We used data on the incidence of chronic bronchitis among both populations (1991-2001), obtained from the records of each local health center, and population denominators from censuses carried out in 1991 and 2001, using five age-groups. We also estimated relative risks and mean annual age-standardized rates of chronic bronchitis incidence. Incidence rates were extremely higher in the volcanically active area for both sexes, and especially in the youngest groups. Accordingly, the risk of chronic bronchitis for the people living in the volcanically active area was extremely higher (males RR=3.99; females RR=10.74) when compared to those living in the volcanically inactive area. Comparison of chronic bronchitis incidence rates between both populations suggests an association between this disease and the chronic exposure to the volcanically active environment, with all its hazardous gases like hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide. These findings may help health officials to better advice people inhabiting volcanic areas, or others with high levels of sulfur gases, on how to prevent and minimize the risks of chronic bronchitis.

  6. Venus - False Color of Volcanic Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This Magellan full-resolution mosaic of Venus, centered at 10 degrees north latitude, 301 degrees east longitude, shows an area replete with diverse volcanic features. The image, of an area 489 kilometers long by 311 kilometers wide (303 by 193 miles), is dominated by volcanic plains which appear mottled because of varying roughnesses of each solidified lava flow. The rougher the terrain the brighter it appears in the radar image. The small, bright bumps clustered in the left portion of the image are a grouping of small volcanoes called a shield field. Each shield volcano is approximately 2 to 5 kilometers (1.2 to 3.1 miles) in diameter and has very subdued relief. It is believed that the lava flows that make up each shield originates from a common source. To the right of the shield field is another type of volcano, called a scalloped dome. It is 25 kilometers (16 miles) in diameter and has a central pit. Some of the indistinct lobe-shaped pattern around the dome may either be lava flows or rocky debris which has fallen from the scalloped cliffs surrounding the domes. The small radial ridges characteristic of scalloped domes are remnants of catastrophic landslides. To the right of that feature is a large depression called a volcanic caldera. The caldera was formed when lava was expelled from an underground chamber, which when emptied, subsequently collapsed forming the depression. The feature furthermost to the east (right) is another scalloped dome, 35 kilometers (22 miles) in diameter. That feature is unusual in that lava came out through the southeastern margin, rafting a large portion of the dome for 20 kilometers (12 miles). The lava continues into the lower right portion of the area in the image. Its steep rounded boundaries suggest it was a very sticky, oozing lava. That same type of lava is what scientists propose formed the steep-sided domes such as the bright, round feature, slightly northeast of center. It is highly likely that the features are all part

  7. Lung problems and volcanic smog

    MedlinePlus

    ... smog forms. This smog is a type of air pollution. Volcanic smog also contains highly acidic aerosols (tiny ... References Balmes JR, Eisner MD. Indoor and outdoor air pollution. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  8. Volcanology: Volcanic bipolar disorder explained

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jellinek, Mark

    2014-02-01

    Eruptions come in a range of magnitudes. Numerical simulations and laboratory experiments show that rare, giant super-eruptions and smaller, more frequent events reflect a transition in the essential driving forces for volcanism.

  9. Monogenetic volcanic hazards and assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, C.; Connor, L. J.; Richardson, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Many of the Earth's major cities are build on the products of monogenetic volcanic eruptions and within geologically active basaltic volcanic fields. These cities include Mexico City (Mexico), Auckland (New Zealand), Melbourne (Australia), and Portland (USA) to name a few. Volcanic hazards in these areas are complex, and involve the potential formation of new volcanic vents and associated hazards, such as lava flows, tephra fallout, and ballistic hazards. Hazard assessment is complicated by the low recurrence rate of volcanism in most volcanic fields. We have developed a two-stage process for probabilistic modeling monogenetic volcanic hazards. The first step is an estimation of the possible locations of future eruptive vents based on kernel density estimation and recurrence rate of volcanism using Monte Carlo simulation and accounting for uncertainties in age determinations. The second step is convolution of this spatial density / recurrence rate model with hazard codes for modeling lava inundation, tephra fallout, and ballistic impacts. A methodology is presented using this two-stage approach to estimate lava flow hazard in several monogenetic volcanic fields, including at a nuclear power plant site near the Shamiram Plateau, a Quaternary volcanic field in Armenia. The location of possible future vents is determined by estimating spatial density from a distribution of 18 mapped vents using a 2-D elliptical Gaussian kernel function. The SAMSE method, a modified asymptotic mean squared error approach, uses the distribution of known eruptive vents to optimally determine a smoothing bandwidth for the Gaussian kernel function. The result is a probability map of vent density. A large random sample (N=10000) of vent locations is drawn from this probability map. For each randomly sampled vent location, a lava flow inundation model is executed. Lava flow input parameters (volume and average thickness) are determined from distributions fit to field observations of the low

  10. Spatial and Temporal Evolution of the Rockeskyllerkopf Volcanic Centre, West Eifel Volcanic Field, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, C.; Woodland, A. B.; Hopp, J.; Trenholm, N.

    2009-04-01

    The Rockeskyllerkopf volcanic center in the Quaternary West Eifel volcanic field, Germany was active between 474 ± 39 ka and 360 ± 40 ka during which time phreatomagmatic to magmatic eruptions occurred sequentially at three distinct centers: SE Lammersdorf (SEL), Rockeskyllerkopf (RKK) and Franzosenbuche (FB). Eruptions at the SEL center were predominantly phreatomagmatic which resulted in deposition of lithic-rich pyroclastic flow deposits with minor juvenile-lapilli dominated, magmatic eruptions in the middle of the sequence. These deposits have their source in an elongate crater to the north east of the present outcrop. The N-S trending RKK center is dominated by lithic-poor, magmatic, coarse grained partially welded deposits with a distinct horizon of fine-grained airfall deposits. The RKK deposits fill a small valley and likely form the main mass of the current topographic high at Rockeskyllerkopf. The deposits of the FB center locally overlie a palaeosol and plant fossil rich horizon that indicate a significant hiatus in eruptive activity prior to this last eruptive phase. The FB deposits are magmatic and comprise an elongate scoria cone with a deep crater that has been filled by airfall deposits and later lava flows. The geochemical signatures of the lavas at each center are distinct, indicating that the mantle source region is heterogeneous on the scale of 100's of m to ~ 1 km. All the lavas have incompatible trace element characteristics indicative of derivation from depths corresponding to the garnet - spinel transition zone in the presence of hydrous phases: phlogopite in the source of the SEL magma, amphibole in the FB source and both amphibole and phlogopite in the RKK source region.

  11. Volcanic hazards and aviation safety

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casadevall, Thomas J.; Thompson, Theodore B.; Ewert, John W.; ,

    1996-01-01

    An aeronautical chart was developed to determine the relative proximity of volcanoes or ash clouds to the airports and flight corridors that may be affected by volcanic debris. The map aims to inform and increase awareness about the close spatial relationship between volcanoes and aviation operations. It shows the locations of the active volcanoes together with selected aeronautical navigation aids and great-circle routes. The map mitigates the threat that volcanic hazards pose to aircraft and improves aviation safety.

  12. The large volcanic eruptions at different latitude bands and patterns of winter temperature changes over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zhixin; Sun, Di

    2016-04-01

    Based on the chronology of 29 large volcanic eruptions events (Volcanic Explosivity Index≥4) since 1951 and gridded temperature dataset from China Meteorological Data Sharing Service System, we identified the patterns of winter temperature changes over China after the large volcanic eruptions, comparing with the mean temperature within the five years before, then we analyzed the related dynamic mechanisms of different patterns by NCEP reanalysis data and model output data from Community Earth System Model (CESM). The results showed that the winter temperature decreased more than 1°C in East China after volcanic eruptions on middle-lower latitudes and equatorial bands. After volcanic eruptions on different latitudes, the temperature spatial patterns were summarized as two types, which included that temperature was cooling centered on Northeast and warming in Tibets, and its opposite pattern. The first pattern was usually detected after tropical volcanic eruptions in spring/summer and it also appeared after volcanic eruptions on high latitudes in spring/autumn. After middle-lower latitude volcanic eruptions, the variation of geopotential height on 500hPa showed that the positive anomaly was existed at the East of Ural mountain, which caused the temperature decreased in Northwest , Central East and Southeast when east asian trough was intensified. After high latitudes volcanic eruptions, the zonal circulation was more obvious at middle latitudes, the cold air was not easy to transport,therefore winter temperature increased in China except for the Yangtze River Basin. The result of full forcing experiments by CESM showed that temperature decreased at most regions after large volcanic eruptions on equatorial /high bands, and troughs and wedges were developed on 500 hPa. The variation of geopotential height was nearly reversed after volcanic eruptions on high latitudes, only the temperature of Tibetan Plateau decreased. But how the variation of geopotential height

  13. The large volcanic eruptions at different latitude bands and patterns of winter temperature changes over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D.; Hao, Z.; Zheng, J.

    2015-12-01

    Based on the chronology of 29 large volcanic eruptions events (Volcanic Explosivity Index≥4) since 1951 and gridded temperature dataset from China Meteorological Data Sharing Service System, we identified the patterns of winter temperature changes over China after the large volcanic eruptions, comparing with the mean temperature within the five years before, then we analyzed the related dynamic mechanisms of different patterns by NCEP reanalysis data and model output data from Community Earth System Model (CESM). The results showed that the winter temperature decreased more than 1°C in East China after volcanic eruptions on middle-lower latitudes and equatorial bands. After volcanic eruptions on different latitudes, the temperature spatial patterns were summarized as two types, which included that temperature was cooling centered on Northeast and warming in Tibets, and its opposite pattern. The first pattern was usually detected after equatorial volcanic eruptions in spring/summer and it also appeared after volcanic eruptions on high latitudes in spring/autumn. After middle-lower latitude volcanic eruptions, the variation of geopotential height on 500hPa showed that the positive anomaly was existed at the East of Ural mountain, which caused the temperature decreased in Northwest , Central East and Southeast when east asian trough was intensified. After high latitudes volcanic eruptions, the zonal circulation was more obvious at middle latitudes, the cold air was not easy to transport therefore winter temperature increased in China except for the Yangtze River Basin. The result of full forcing experiments by CESM showed that temperature decreased at most regions after large volcanic eruptions on equatorial /high bands, and troughs and wedges were developed on 500 hPa. The variation of geopotential height was nearly reversed after volcanic eruptions on high latitudes, only the temperature of Tibetan Plateau decreased. But how the variation of geopotential height

  14. Volcanic Clouds in the Tropical Upper Troposphere Observed by CALIOP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, T.; Kinoshita, T.

    2013-12-01

    An aerosol layer in Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) was observed at Biak (1.17°S, 136.15°E), Indonesia in January 2011 by the observations using ground based lidar and balloon borne optical particle counters. It was indicated that the aerosol particles were composed of liquid phase sulfuric acid and water, and the sulfur was probably originated from some volcanic eruption. The authors suggested that the volcano is Merapi (7.54°S, 110.44°E) near the center of Java Island erupted at the beginning of November 2010. But this suggestion was not with enough evidence, but by reported date and height of volcanic cloud soon after the eruption. We will show another evidence that the suggested eruption of Merapi is the source of the observed aerosol layer by using the data by space borne Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). It will be shown how the volcanic cloud from Merapi dispersed throughout the TTL, and there was no change in the cirrus cloud appearance frequency in TTL when the volcanic clouds were in the region. The latter is suggesting that the ice particle formation with volcanic aqueous aerosols is probably inefficient as was suggested by ground based observations.

  15. Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Russia: preventing the danger of volcanic eruptions to aviation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girina, O.; Neal, Ch.

    2012-04-01

    The Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) has been a collaborative project of scientists from the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, the Kamchatka Branch of Geophysical Surveys, and the Alaska Volcano Observatory (IVS, KB GS and AVO). The purpose of KVERT is to reduce the risk of costly, damaging, and possibly deadly encounters of aircraft with volcanic ash clouds. To reduce this risk, KVERT collects all possible volcanic information and issues eruption alerts to aviation and other emergency officials. KVERT was founded by Institute of Volcanic Geology and Geochemistry FED RAS in 1993 (in 2004, IVGG merged with the Institute of Volcanology to become IVS). KVERT analyzes volcano monitoring data (seismic, satellite, visual and video, and pilot reports), assigns the Aviation Color Code, and issues reports on eruptive activity and unrest at Kamchatkan (since 1993) and Northern Kurile (since 2003) volcanoes. KVERT receives seismic monitoring data from KB GS (the Laboratory for Seismic and Volcanic Activity). KB GS maintains telemetered seismic stations to investigate 11 of the most active volcanoes in Kamchatka. Data are received around the clock and analysts evaluate data each day for every monitored volcano. Satellite data are provided from several sources to KVERT. AVO conducts satellite analysis of the Kuriles, Kamchatka, and Alaska as part of it daily monitoring and sends the interpretation to KVERT staff. KVERT interprets MODIS and MTSAT images and processes AVHRR data to look for evidence of volcanic ash and thermal anomalies. KVERT obtains visual volcanic information from volcanologist's field trips, web-cameras that monitor Klyuchevskoy (established in 2000), Sheveluch (2002), Bezymianny (2003), Koryaksky (2009), Avachinsky (2009), Kizimen (2011), and Gorely (2011) volcanoes, and pilots. KVERT staff work closely with staff of AVO, AMC (Airport Meteorological Center) at Yelizovo Airport and the Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), the

  16. Automatic landslides detection on Stromboli volcanic Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silengo, Maria Cristina; Delle Donne, Dario; Ulivieri, Giacomo; Cigolini, Corrado; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Landslides occurring in active volcanic islands play a key role in triggering tsunami and other related risks. Therefore, it becomes vital for a correct and prompt risk assessment to monitor landslides activity and to have an automatic system for a robust early-warning. We then developed a system based on a multi-frequency analysis of seismic signals for automatic landslides detection occurring at Stromboli volcano. We used a network of 4 seismic 3 components stations located along the unstable flank of the Sciara del Fuoco. Our method is able to recognize and separate the different sources of seismic signals related to volcanic and tectonic activity (e.g. tremor, explosions, earthquake) from landslides. This is done using a multi-frequency analysis combined with a waveform patter recognition. We applied the method to one year of seismic activity of Stromboli volcano centered during the last 2007 effusive eruption. This eruption was characterized by a pre-eruptive landslide activity reflecting the slow deformation of the volcano edifice. The algorithm is at the moment running off-line but has proved to be robust and efficient in picking automatically landslide. The method provides also real-time statistics on the landslide occurrence, which could be used as a proxy for the volcano deformation during the pre-eruptive phases. This method is very promising since the number of false detections is quite small (<5%) and is reducing when the size of the landslide increases. The final aim will be to apply this method on-line and for a real-time automatic detection as an improving tool for early warnings of tsunami-genic landslide activity. We suggest that a similar approach could be also applied to other unstable non-volcanic also slopes.

  17. Are Axial Volcanic Ridges where all the (volcanic) action is?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Although axial volcanic ridges (AVRs) are generally recognised as the main loci for lithospheric generation at slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges, various recent studies have suggested that axial volcanism is not confined to them. Here I present evidence from three studies for significant amounts of off-AVR volcanism at three slow-spreading ridges. 1) Near-bottom side-scan sonar (TOBI) images of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 13°N show a complex pattern of closely-spaced, active oceanic core complexes (OCCs) where plate separation is largely a-volcanic, separated by short segments of vigorous volcanic spreading. In one such volcanic segment, the brightest sea floor and therefore inferred youngest volcanism occurs not on the topographic axis (an apparently 'old' AVR) but at the edge of a broad axial valley. 2) A similar TOBI survey of the Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre reveals AVRs in the north and south flanking an OCC (Mt. Dent) and a non-volcanic ridge interpreted as tectonically extruded peridotite ('smooth' sea floor). In both AVR segments there are clear, young lava flows that have erupted from perched sources part way up the median valley walls and have partly flowed down into the valley. 3) The third case is from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 45°N, where we conducted a detailed geophysical and geological study of an AVR and surrounding median valley floor. The AVR is largely surrounded by flat sea floor composed mainly of lobate and sheet flows, whereas the AVR comprises predominantly pillow lavas. Although we have no firm dates, various indicators suggest most lavas on the AVR are around 10ka old or somewhat less. The apparently youngest (brightest acoustic returns, thinnest sediment cover) of the flat-lying lava flows appears to have a similar age from its degree of sediment cover. Contact relations between these lavas and the AVR flanks show no evidence of a clear age difference between the two, and we think both types of eruption may have occurred roughly

  18. Geochemical Interpretation of Collision Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Julian

    2014-05-01

    Collision volcanism can be defined as volcanism that takes place during an orogeny from the moment that continental subduction starts to the end of orogenic collapse. Its importance in the Geological Record is greatly underestimated as collision volcanics are easily misinterpreted as being of volcanic arc, extensional or mantle plume origin. There are many types of collision volcanic province: continent-island arc collision (e.g. Banda arc); continent-active margin collision (e.g. Tibet, Turkey-Iran); continent-rear-arc collision (e.g. Bolivia); continent-continent collision (e.g. Tuscany); and island arc-island arc collision (e.g. Taiwan). Superimposed on this variability is the fact that every orogeny is different in detail. Nonetheless, there is a general theme of cyclicity on different time scales. This starts with syn-collision volcanism resulting from the subduction of an ocean-continent transition and continental lithosphere, and continues through post-collision volcanism. The latter can be subdivided into orogenic volcanism, which is related to thickened crust, and post-orogenic, which is related to orogenic collapse. Typically, but not always, collision volcanism is preceded by normal arc volcanism and followed by normal intraplate volcanism. Identification and interpretation of collision volcanism in the Geologic Record is greatly facilitated if a dated stratigraphic sequence is present so that the petrogenic evolution can be traced. In any case, the basis of fingerprinting collision terranes is to use geochemical proxies for mantle and subduction fluxes, slab temperatures, and depths and degrees of melting. For example, syn-collision volcanism is characterized by a high subduction flux relative to mantle flux because of the high input flux of fusible sediment and crust coupled with limited mantle flow, and because of high slab temperatures resulting from the decrease in subduction rate. The resulting geochemical patterns are similar regardless of

  19. Volcanoes and volcanic provinces - Martian western hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The recognition of some Martian landforms as volcanoes is based on their morphology and geologic setting. Other structures, however, may exhibit classic identifying features to a varying or a less degree; these may be only considered provisionally as having a volcanic origin. Regional geologic mapping of the western hemisphere of Mars from Viking images has revealed many more probable volcanoes and volcanotectonic features than were recognized on Mariner 9 pictures. These abundant volcanoes have been assigned to several distinct provinces on the basis of their areal distribution. Although the Olympus-Tharsis region remains as the principle center of volcanism on Mars, four other important provinces are now also recognized: the lowland plains, Tempe Terra plateau, southern highlands (in the Phaethontis and Thaumasia quadrangles), and a probable ignimbrite province, situated along the highland-lowland boundary in Amazonis Planitia. Volcanoes in any one province vary in morphlogy, size, and age, but volcanoes in each province tend to have common characteristics that distinguish that particular group.

  20. Geology, geochronology, and paleogeography of the southern Sonoma volcanic field and adjacent areas, northern San Francisco Bay region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, D.L.; Saucedo, G.J.; Clahan, K.B.; Fleck, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.; McLaughlin, R.J.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Allen, J.R.; Deino, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent geologic mapping in the northern San Francisco Bay region (California, USA) supported by radiometric dating and tephrochronologic correlations, provides insights into the framework geology, stratigraphy, tectonic evolution, and geologic history of this part of the San Andreas transform plate boundary. There are 25 new and existing radiometric dates that define three temporally distinct volcanic packages along the north margin of San Pablo Bay, i.e., the Burdell Mountain Volcanics (11.1 Ma), the Tolay Volcanics (ca. 10-8 Ma), and the Sonoma Volcanics (ca. 8-2.5 Ma). The Burdell Mountain and the Tolay Volcanics are allochthonous, having been displaced from the Quien Sabe Volcanics and the Berkeley Hills Volcanics, respectively. Two samples from a core of the Tolay Volcanics taken from the Murphy #1 well in the Petaluma oilfield yielded ages of 8.99 ?? 0.06 and 9.13 ?? 0.06 Ma, demonstrating that volcanic rocks exposed along Tolay Creek near Sears Point previously thought to be a separate unit, the Donnell Ranch volcanics, are part of the Tolay Volcanics. Other new dates reported herein show that volcanic rocks in the Meacham Hill area and extending southwest to the Burdell Mountain fault are also part of the Tolay Volcanics. In the Sonoma volcanic field, strongly bimodal volcanic sequences are intercalated with sediments. In the Mayacmas Mountains a belt of eruptive centers youngs to the north. The youngest of these volcanic centers at Sugarloaf Ridge, which lithologically, chemically, and temporally matches the Napa Valley eruptive center, was apparently displaced 30 km to the northwest by movement along the Carneros and West Napa faults. The older parts of the Sonoma Volcanics have been displaced at least 28 km along the RodgersCreek fault since ca. 7 Ma. The Petaluma Formation also youngs to the north along the Rodgers Creek-Hayward fault and the Bennett Valley fault. The Petaluma basin formed as part of the Contra Costa basin in the Late Miocene and was

  1. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes.

    PubMed

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-04-13

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis.

  2. Climatic impact of volcanic eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampino, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    Studies have attempted to 'isolate' the volcanic signal in noisy temperature data. This assumes that it is possible to isolate a distinct volcanic signal in a record that may have a combination of forcings (ENSO, solar variability, random fluctuations, volcanism) that all interact. The key to discovering the greatest effects of volcanoes on short-term climate may be to concentrate on temperatures in regions where the effects of aerosol clouds may be amplified by perturbed atmospheric circulation patterns. This is especially true in subpolar and midlatitude areas affected by changes in the position of the polar front. Such climatic perturbation can be detected in proxy evidence such as decrease in tree-ring widths and frost rings, changes in the treeline, weather anomalies, severity of sea-ice in polar and subpolar regions, and poor grain yields and crop failures. In low latitudes, sudden temperature drops were correlated with the passage overhead of the volcanic dust cloud (Stothers, 1984). For some eruptions, such as Tambora, 1815, these kinds of proxy and anectdotal information were summarized in great detail in a number of papers and books (e.g., Post, 1978; Stothers, 1984; Stommel and Stommel, 1986; C. R. Harrington, in press). These studies lead to the general conclusion that regional effects on climate, sometimes quite severe, may be the major impact of large historical volcanic aerosol clouds.

  3. Cryogenic Origin for Mars Analog Carbonates in the Bockfjord Volcanic Complex Svalbard (Norway)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, H. E. F.; Benning, L.; Blake, D. F.; Fogel, M.; Ming, D.; Skidmore, M.; Steele, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Sverrefjell and Sigurdfjell eruptive centers in the Bockfjord Volcanic Complex (BVC) on Svalbard (Norway) formed by subglacial eruptions ca. 1 Ma ago. These eruptive centers carry ubiquitous magnesian carbonate deposits including dolomitemagnesite globules similar to those in the Martian meteorite ALH84001. Carbonates in mantle xenoliths are dominated by ALH84001 type carbonate globules that formed during quenching of CO2-rich mantle fluids. Lava hosted carbonates include ALH84001 type carbonate globules occurring throughout lava vesicles and microfractures and massive carbonate deposits associated with vertical volcanic vents. Massive carbonates include < or equal 5 cm thick magnesite deposits protruding downwards into clear blue ice within volcanic vents and carbonate cemented lava breccias associated with volcanic vents. Carbonate cements comprise layered deposits of calcite, dolomite, huntite, magnesite and aragonite associated with ALH84001 type carbonate globules lining lava vesicles. Combined Mossbauer, XRD and VNIR data show that breccia carbonate cements at Sverrefjell are analog to Comanche carbonates at Gusev crater.

  4. Atla Regio, Venus: Geology and origin of a major equatorial volcanic rise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senske, D. A.; Head, James W., III

    1992-01-01

    Regional volcanic rises form a major part of the highlands in the equatorial region of Venus. These broad domical uplands, 1000 to 3000 km across, contain centers of volcanism forming large edifices and are associated with extension and rifting. Two classes of rises are observed: (1) those that are dominated by tectonism, acting as major centers for converging rifts such as Beta Regio and Alta Regio, and are termed tectonic junctions; and (2) those forming uplands characterized primarily by large-scale volcanism forming edifices. Western Eistla Regio and Bell Regio, where zones of extension and rifting are less developed. Within this second class of features the edifices are typically found at the end of a single rift, or are associated with a linear belt of deformation. We examine the geologic characteristics of the tectonic junction at Alta Regio, concentrating on documenting the styles of volcanism and assessing mechanisms for the formation of regional topography.

  5. NRL Satellite Volcanic Ash Plume Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, J.; Kuciauskas, A. P.; Richardson, K.; Solbrig, J.; Miller, S. D.; Pavolonis, M. J.; Bankert, R.; Lee, T.; Kent, J.; Tsui, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory’s (NRL) Marine Meteorology Division (NRL-MRY) is assembling a unique suite of near real-time digital satellite products geared towards monitoring volcanic ash plumes which can create hazardous aviation conditions. Ash plume detection, areal extent, plume top height and mass loading will be extracted via automated algorithms from a combination of geostationary (GEO) and low earth orbiting (LEO) data sets that take advantage of their complimentary strengths since no one sensor has the required spectral, spatial and temporal attributes needed. This product suite would then be available to the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC) and other interested users via web distribution. Initially, GOES-West and the Japanese MTSAT data will be incorporated to view volcanic plumes within the north Pacific region. Although GEO sensor spectral channels are not optimized for ash detection, temporal changes over limited timeframes can assist in plume extraction, but not for those at the highest latitudes. Examples with multi-channel techniques will be highlighted via animations. LEO sensors provide a suite of spectral channels unmatched on GEO platforms and permit enhanced ash plume monitoring. NRL has exploited the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and SeaWiFS via a “dust enhancement technique” that has demonstrated positive plume monitoring results. Multi-channel methods using the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) will be highlighted to take advantage of the numerous NOAA LEO satellites carrying this wide swath sensor with frequent volcano overpasses at the higher latitudes. The DMSP Operational Linescan System (OLS) provides daytime visible/infrared, as well as night time visible data which has shown value in spotting ash plumes when sufficient lunar illumination is present. The following suite of products is potentially available for over twenty (20) volcano sites world-wide via our NexSat web site: http

  6. Volcanic Eruptions in Kamchatka

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Sheveluch Stratovolcano Click on the image for full resolution TIFF Klyuchevskoy Stratovolcano Click on the image for full resolution TIFF

    One of the most volcanically active regions of the world is the Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Siberia, Russia. It is not uncommon for several volcanoes to be erupting at the same time. On April 26, 2007, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radioneter (ASTER) on NASA's Terra spacecraft captured these images of the Klyuchevskoy and Sheveluch stratovolcanoes, erupting simultaneously, and 80 kilometers (50 miles) apart. Over Klyuchevskoy, the thermal infrared data (overlaid in red) indicates that two open-channel lava flows are descending the northwest flank of the volcano. Also visible is an ash-and-water plume extending to the east. Sheveluch volcano is partially cloud-covered. The hot flows highlighted in red come from a lava dome at the summit. They are avalanches of material from the dome, and pyroclastic flows.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra spacecraft. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining

  7. Widespread Synchronous Volcanism Reveals a Broad Galapagos Hotspot Melting Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. M.; Stoffers, P.; Wijbrans, J. R.; Worthington, T. J.

    2004-12-01

    The massive aseismic ridges and associated seamounts dominating the morphology of the Panama Basin, eastern Central Pacific, have long been attributed to a Galapagos hotspot melting anomaly linked to a deep-seated mantle plume. Although these structures can provide information about the origin of hotspots and existence, or otherwise, of mantle plumes very little is known about their volcanic histories due to a lack of direct age and geochemical information. We report here 74 whole rock and 2 plagioclase 40Ar/39Ar ages for rocks dredged from 53 locations during the first systematic sampling of the Cocos, Carnegie, Coiba and Malpelo aseismic ridges and associated seamounts (F.S. SONNE PAGANINI expedition). In addition we also report ages for DSDP drill sites on Cocos, Carnegie and Coiba ridges and 7 Cocos Island subaerial samples. The distribution of new, and published ages for the Galapagos Archipelago-platform and NE end of the Cocos Ridge, show a general trend of increasing age with distance from the Galapagos Archipelago. A more dominant trend however is one of aseismic ridge-seamount formation in a progression of broad zones of synchronous, often overlapping volcanism created at discrete intervals. Broad zones of coeval Cocos and Carnegie volcanism once formed much larger regions of synchronous volcanism that have been split apart by the complex history of seafloor spreading associated with the Cocos-Nazca spreading center. We link these broad regions of synchronous volcanism to a correspondingly large hotspot melting anomaly. The present day, as yet unfragmented, zone of synchronous volcanism associated with this proposed broad hotspot is marked by the extensive region of recent volcanism extending across the Nazca and Cocos plates encompassing the Galapagos Archipelago-Platform and the Cocos Ridge as far north as Cocos Island. The complex tectonic history of the Cocos-Nazca spreading-center has controlled how the broad zones of synchronous, often overlapping

  8. Morphological Analysis of Apo Volcanic Complex in Southern Mindanao, Philippines: implications on volcano-tectonic evolution of different volcanic units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, T. M. L.; van Wyk de Vries, B.; Lagmay, A. M. A.; Eco, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Apo Volcanic Complex (AVC) is one of the largest volcanic centers in the Philippines, located in the southern island of Mindanao. It is composed of four edifices and several smaller cones. The youngest volcanic unit, the Apo Dome, is the highest elevation in the Philippines. This unit is classified as potentially active, whereas other units, Talomo, Sibulan and Kitubod, are inactive. The study gives insight to the construction and deformation history of the volcanic units and imparts foresight to subsequent events that can affect populated areas. A morphological analysis integrating high-resolution digital terrain models and public domain satellite data and images was done to recognize and discriminate volcanic units and characterize volcano-tectonic features and processes. Morphological domains were defined based on surface textures, slope variation, degrees and controls of erosion, and lineament density and direction. This establishes the relative ages and extent of volcanic units as well as the volcano-tectonic evolution of the complex. Six edifice building events were recognized, two of which form the elevated base of Apo dome. The geodynamic setting of the region is imprinted in the volcanic units as five morphostructural lineaments. They reveal the changes in maximum regional stress through time such as the N-S extension found across the whole volcanic complex displaying the current stress regime. This has implications on the locality and propagation of geothermal activity, magma ascent, and edifice collapses. One main result of the compounded effects of inherited structures and current stress regime is the Sandawa Collapse Zone. This is a large valley formed by several collapses where NE-SW fractures propagate and the increasing lateral spreading by debuttressing continue to eat away the highest peak. The AVC is surrounded by the major metropolitan area of Davao City to the east and the cities of Kidapawan and Digos to the west and south, respectively

  9. Impact of subduction geometry on high-productivity arc volcanism of the Klyuchevskoy volcanic group (Kamchatka, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, B.; Levin, V. L.; Droznina, S.; Gavrilenko, M.

    2013-12-01

    Klyuchevskoy volcanic group is located at the northern termination of the Kamchatka volcanic arc. It is a typical island-arc volcanic center, its lava chemistry is consistent with the subduction fluid induced melting in the mantle wedge. It is however significantly larger than any other arc volcano or volcanic group. With a volume of~7500 km3 it is similar to shield volcanoes associated with rifts and hot spots. The causes of such high rates of volcanism are not clear, and likely reflect the unusual geodynamic setting of the Klyuchevskoy volcanic group. Subduction of the Pacific plate forms a convergent margin along the eastern coast of Kamchatka that terminates at the junction with the Aleutian Arc. Along most of its strike the subducting slab descends at ~45 degrees, is nearly planar, and reaches transition zone depths, with its deepest earthquakes at ~400 km. Near its northern termination the geometry of the subducting slab changes, seismicity is limited to 200 km, and the angle of subduction is likely more shallow. Determining the exact configuration of the Pacific slab beneath Kamchatka is complicated by the lack of large earthquakes within it in the last 30 years. Consequently, all global compilations of slab depth based on seismicity above M~5.5 do not extend into the region of the northern termination of the Kamchatka subduction zone. A study of the slab geometry using regional seismicity carried out by Gorbatov et al. (1997) was based on a regional earthquake catalog compiled by the seismic monitoring network of Kamchatka prior to its conversion to modern digital data acquisition. It suggests an abrupt change in slab dip close to the location of the Klyuchevskoy volcanic group. In this study we use a new digital catalog compiled over years 2000 - 2013. The new catalog contains data for over 28,000 earthquakes, most of which are below M~5. With the new catalog, we created a contour map and 3-D image of the slab surface using 2-D profiles of the earthquakes

  10. Io's volcanism influences Jupiter's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-02-01

    Volcanic emissions from Jupiter's moon Io supply plasma to the planet's magnetosphere and lead to its main auroral emissions. New observations show that the main auroral oval expanded and outer emissions brightened in spring 2007. Some studies have suggested that magnetospheric changes such as these could be caused by changes in the incoming solar wind. Bonfond et al. present several lines of evidence—including images from the Hubble Space Telescope and observations of a volcanic plume on Io from the New Horizons probe along with measurements of increased emissions from Jupiter's sodium cloud—that indicate that Io's volcanism controls changes in Jupiter's magnetosphere. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2011GL050253, 2012)

  11. Models of volcanic eruption hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Wohletz, K.H.

    1992-06-01

    Volcanic eruptions pose an ever present but poorly constrained hazard to life and property for geothermal installations in volcanic areas. Because eruptions occur sporadically and may limit field access, quantitative and systematic field studies of eruptions are difficult to complete. Circumventing this difficulty, laboratory models and numerical simulations are pivotal in building our understanding of eruptions. For example, the results of fuel-coolant interaction experiments show that magma-water interaction controls many eruption styles. Applying these results, increasing numbers of field studies now document and interpret the role of external water eruptions. Similarly, numerical simulations solve the fundamental physics of high-speed fluid flow and give quantitative predictions that elucidate the complexities of pyroclastic flows and surges. A primary goal of these models is to guide geologists in searching for critical field relationships and making their interpretations. Coupled with field work, modeling is beginning to allow more quantitative and predictive volcanic hazard assessments.

  12. Volcanic eruptions and solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    The historical record of large volcanic eruptions from 1500 to 1980 is subjected to detailed time series analysis. In two weak but probably statistically significant periodicities of about 11 and 80 yr, the frequency of volcanic eruptions increases (decreases) slightly around the times of solar minimum (maximum). Time series analysis of the volcanogenic acidities in a deep ice core from Greenland reveals several very long periods ranging from about 80 to about 350 yr which are similar to the very slow solar cycles previously detected in auroral and C-14 records. Solar flares may cause changes in atmospheric circulation patterns that abruptly alter the earth's spin. The resulting jolt probably triggers small earthquakes which affect volcanism.

  13. Models of volcanic eruption hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Wohletz, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions pose an ever present but poorly constrained hazard to life and property for geothermal installations in volcanic areas. Because eruptions occur sporadically and may limit field access, quantitative and systematic field studies of eruptions are difficult to complete. Circumventing this difficulty, laboratory models and numerical simulations are pivotal in building our understanding of eruptions. For example, the results of fuel-coolant interaction experiments show that magma-water interaction controls many eruption styles. Applying these results, increasing numbers of field studies now document and interpret the role of external water eruptions. Similarly, numerical simulations solve the fundamental physics of high-speed fluid flow and give quantitative predictions that elucidate the complexities of pyroclastic flows and surges. A primary goal of these models is to guide geologists in searching for critical field relationships and making their interpretations. Coupled with field work, modeling is beginning to allow more quantitative and predictive volcanic hazard assessments.

  14. Late Cenozoic volcanism in the Lassen area, southernmost Cascade Range, California

    SciTech Connect

    Clynne, M.A.; Muffler, L.J.P.; Dalrymple, G.B. )

    1993-04-01

    Volcanism in the southernmost Cascade Range can be characterized on two scales. Regional volcanism is predominantly basaltic to andesitic, and hundreds of coalescing volcanoes of small volume (10[sup [minus]3] to 10[sup 1] km[sup 3]) with short lifetimes have built a broad platform. Superimposed on the regional volcanism are a few long-lived ([approximately]10[sup 6] years) much larger (>10 [sup 2] km[sup 3]) volcanic centers. Each of these larger centers consists of a basaltic-andesite to andesite composite cone and flanking silicic domes and flows. The evolution of these volcanic centers conforms to a generalized three-stage model during which a conspicuous edifice is constructed. Stages 1 and 2 comprise a dominantly andesitic composite cone; Stage 3 marks a change to dominantly silicic volcanism and is accompanied by development of a hydrothermal system in the permeable core of the andesitic composite cone. Subsequent fluvial and glacial erosion produces a caldera-like depression with a topographically high resistant rim of Stage 2 lavas surrounding the deeply eroded, hydrothermally altered core of the composite cone. Two types of basalt are recognized in the southernmost Cascades; medium-K calc-alkaline (CAB) and low-K olivine tholeiite (LKOT). CAB exhibits considerable geochemical diversity and is the parent magma for the volcanic-center lavas and the majority of the evolved regional lavas. LKOT is chemically homogeneous, and outcrops sporadically in association with extensional tectonics of the Basin and Range Province, and is related to Pleistocene encroachment of Basin-and-Range tectonics on the subduction-related volcanism of the Cascade Range.

  15. Chemically diverse, episodic volcanism offshore southern and peninsular California

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.S.; Gunn, S.H. ); Bohrson, W.A. . Dept. Earth and Space Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Volcanic rocks recovered from eight seamounts offshore southern and peninsular California are chemically diverse. Compositions of lavas from seven small to moderately sized seamounts between 30.5[degree] and 34.0 N latitudes include low-K[sub 2]O tholeiitic, transitional, and mildly to moderately alkalic basalt. Volcanic rocks from the upper part of the much larger and morphologically complex edifice of Rocas Alijos, offshore central Baja California at about 25.0 N latitude, are highly differentiated trachyandesite and trachyte. The low-K[sub 2]O basalts are MORB-like with low abundances of incompatible elements and lower [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr and higher [sup 143]Nd/[sup 144]Nd ratios than MORB from the East Pacific Rise. The alkalic compositions have higher abundances of incompatible elements and isotopic data indicate more variably enriched mantle sources than those of seamounts near the East Pacific Rise, but the compositions of all samples are within the mantle array defined by other ocean-island basalts. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar laser fusion ages for the seamounts span a large range. MORB-like lava from one of the northern edifices is as old as the underlying oceanic crust ([approximately]23 Ma), indicating that it originated at a spreading center. Other seamount lava ages are much younger (16.6--9.1 Ma) than the underlying oceanic crust. The trachytes from Rocas Alijos are less than 300,000 years old, indicating that the last volcanism on this large edifice occurred recently. The region offshore southern and peninsular California is tectonically complex and has many volcanic edifices of varying sizes, shapes, and orientations. The data available for volcanic rocks from this region suggest that the seamounts formed from multiple episodes of chemically diverse volcanism occurring sporadically from early Miocene to Recent.

  16. Geologic Map of Lassen Volcanic National Park and Vicinity, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clynne, Michael A.; Muffler, L.J. Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The geologic map of Lassen Volcanic National Park (LVNP) and vicinity encompasses 1,905 km2 at the south end of the Cascade Range in Shasta, Lassen, Tehama, and Plumas Counties, northeastern California (fig. 1, sheet 3). The park includes 430 km2 of scenic volcanic features, glacially sculpted terrain, and the most spectacular array of thermal features in the Cascade Range. Interest in preserving the scenic wonders of the Lassen area as a national park arose in the early 1900s to protect it from commercial development and led to the establishment in 1907 of two small national monuments centered on Lassen Peak and Cinder Cone. The eruptions of Lassen Peak in 1914-15 were the first in the Cascade Range since widespread settling of the West in the late 1800s. Through the printed media, the eruptions aroused considerable public interest and inspired renewed efforts, which had languished since 1907, to establish a national park. In 1916, Lassen Volcanic National Park was established by combining the areas of the previously established national monuments and adjacent lands. The southernmost Cascade Range is bounded on the west by the Sacramento Valley and the Klamath Mountains, on the south by the Sierra Nevada, and on the east by the Basin and Range geologic provinces. Most of the map area is underlain by middle to late Pleistocene volcanic rocks; Holocene, early Pleistocene, and late Pliocene volcanic rocks (<3.5 m.y.) are less common. Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks are inferred to underlie the volcanic deposits (Jachens and Saltus, 1983), but the nearest exposures of pre-Tertiary rocks are 15 km to the south, 9 km to the southwest, and 12 km to the west. Diller (1895) recognized the young volcanic geology and produced the first geologic map of the Lassen area. The map (sheet 1) builds on and extends geologic mapping by Williams (1932), Macdonald (1963, 1964, 1965), and Wilson (1961). The Lassen Peak area mapped by Christiansen and others (2002) and published in greater

  17. Distribution of Late Cenozoic volcanic vents in the Cascade range: Volcanic arc segmentation and regional tectonic considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guffanti, Marianne; Weaver, Craig S.

    1988-06-01

    Spatial, temporal, and compositional distributions of approximately 4000 volcanic vents formed since 16 Ma in Washington, Oregon, northern California, and northwestern Nevada illustrate the evolution of volcanism related to subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate system and extension of the Basin and Range province. Vent data were obtained from published map compilations and include monogenetic and small polygenetic volcanoes in addition to major composite centers. On the basis of the distribution of 2821 vents formed since 5 Ma, the Cascade Range is divided into five segments, with vents of the High Lava Plains along the northern margin of the Basin and Range province in Oregon forming a sixth segment. Some aspects of the Cascade Range segmentation can be related to gross structural features of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. The orientation of the volcanic front of segments one and two changes from NW in northern Washington to NE in southern Washington, paralleling the strike of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. Segments one and two are separated by a 90-km volcanic gap between Mount Rainier and Glacier Peak that is landward of the portion of the subducting plate having the least average dip to a depth of 60 km. A narrow, N-S trending belt of predominantly andesitic vents in Oregon constitutes a third segment, which is landward of the seismically quiet portion of the subduction zone. The narrowness of this segment may indicate steep dip of the subducting plate beneath the Cascade arc in Oregon. Vents are sparse between segment four (containing the Mount Shasta and Medicine Lake centers) and segment five (containing Lassen Peak), where the Juan de Fuca and Gorda North plates are characterized by differing age, amounts of subcrustal seismicity, and probably geometry. From the relation between seismicity at depth of 60 km and the position of the volcanic front of vents formed since 5 Ma, transitions between subducting-plate segments of varying geometry likely occur

  18. Orbital search for lunar volcanism.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Hoffman, J. H.; Yeh, T. T. J.; Chang, G. K.

    1972-01-01

    The total rate of volcanic release of gases into the lunar atmosphere is estimated to be less than 60 g/sec. One of the implications of this degassing is that, if it occurs as sporadic releases of large quantities of gas, these events can be detected by an orbiting mass spectrometer, such as that carried on the flight of Apollo 15 and one that will operate during the Apollo 16 mission. The nature of a volcanic perturbation of the lunar atmosphere is discussed, and a lower bound is derived for the expected time between detected events.

  19. Recurrence models of volcanic events: Applications to volcanic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.M.; Picard, R.; Valentine, G.; Perry, F.V.

    1992-03-01

    An assessment of the risk of future volcanism has been conducted for isolation of high-level radioactive waste at the potential Yucca Mountain site in southern Nevada. Risk used in this context refers to a combined assessment of the probability and consequences of future volcanic activity. Past studies established bounds on the probability of magmatic disruption of a repository. These bounds were revised as additional data were gathered from site characterization studies. The probability of direct intersection of a potential repository located in an eight km{sup 2} area of Yucca Mountain by ascending basalt magma was bounded by the range of 10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}10} yr{sup {minus}1 2}. The consequences of magmatic disruption of a repository were estimated in previous studies to be limited. The exact releases from such an event are dependent on the strike of an intruding basalt dike relative to the repository geometry, the timing of the basaltic event relative to the age of the radioactive waste and the mechanisms of release and dispersal of the waste radionuclides in the accessible environment. The combined low probability of repository disruption and the limited releases associated with this event established the basis for the judgement that the risk of future volcanism was relatively low. It was reasoned that that risk of future volcanism was not likely to result in disqualification of the potential Yucca Mountain site.

  20. Controls on volcanism at intraplate basaltic volcanic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Hove, Jackson C.; Van Otterloo, Jozua; Betts, Peter G.; Ailleres, Laurent; Cas, Ray A. F.

    2017-02-01

    A broad range of controlling mechanisms is described for intraplate basaltic volcanic fields (IBVFs) in the literature. These correspond with those relating to shallow tectonic processes and to deep mantle plumes. Accurate measurement of the physical parameters of intraplate volcanism is fundamental to gain an understanding of the controlling factors that influence the scale and location of a specific IBVF. Detailed volume and geochronology data are required for this; however, these are not available for many IBVFs. In this study the primary controls on magma genesis and transportation are established for the Pliocene-Recent Newer Volcanics Province (NVP) of south-eastern Australia as a case-study for one of such IBVF. The NVP is a large and spatio-temporally complex IBVF that has been described as either being related to a deep mantle plume, or upper mantle and crustal processes. We use innovative high resolution aeromagnetic and 3D modelling analysis, constrained by well-log data, to calculate its dimensions, volume and long-term eruptive flux. Our estimates suggest volcanic deposits cover an area of 23,100 ± 530 km2 and have a preserved dense rock equivalent of erupted volcanics of least 680 km3, and may have been as large as 900 km3. The long-term mean eruptive flux of the NVP is estimated between 0.15 and 0.20 km3/ka, which is relatively high compared with other IBVFs. Our comparison with other IBVFs shows eruptive fluxes vary up to two orders of magnitude within individual fields. Most examples where a range of eruptive flux is available for an IBVF show a correlation between eruptive flux and the rate of local tectonic processes, suggesting tectonic control. Limited age dating of the NVP has been used to suggest there were pulses in its eruptive flux, which are not resolvable using current data. These changes in eruptive flux are not directly relatable to the rate of any interpreted tectonic driver such as edge-driven convection. However, the NVP and other

  1. 2009 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Girina, Olga A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, and reports of unusual activity at or near eight separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2009. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Redoubt Volcano, one of three active volcanoes on the western side of Cook Inlet and near south-central Alaska's population and commerce centers, which comprise about 62 percent of the State's population of 710,213 (2010 census). AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at ten volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  2. Volcanic ash - Terrestrial versus extraterrestrial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    A principal difference between terrestrial and extraterrestrial lavas may consist in the greater ability of terrestrial lavas to form thin films (like those of soap bubbles) and hence foams. It would follow that, in place of the pumice and spiny shards found in terrestrial volcanic ash, an extraterrestrial ash should contain minute spherules. This hypothesis may help to explain lunar microspherules.

  3. DETECTING VOLCANISM ON EXTRASOLAR PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Kaltenegger, L.; Sasselov, D. D.; Henning, W. G.

    2010-11-15

    The search for extrasolar rocky planets has already found the first transiting rocky super-Earth, Corot 7b, with a surface temperature that allows for magma oceans. Here, we investigate whether we could distinguish rocky planets with recent major volcanism by remote observation. We develop a model for volcanic eruptions on an Earth-like exoplanet based on the present-day Earth and derive the observable features in emergent and transmission spectra for multiple scenarios of gas distribution and cloud cover. We calculate the observation time needed to detect explosive volcanism on exoplanets in primary as well as secondary eclipse and discuss the likelihood of observing volcanism on transiting Earth-sized to super-Earth-sized exoplanets. We find that sulfur dioxide from large explosive eruptions does present a spectral signal that is remotely detectable especially for secondary eclipse measurements around the closest stars and ground-based telescopes, and report the frequency and magnitude of the expected signatures. The transit probability of a planet in the habitable zone decreases with distance from the host star, making small, nearby host stars the best targets.

  4. Infrasound research of volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Emanuele; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions are efficient sources of infrasound produced by the rapid perturbation of the atmosphere by the explosive source. Being able to propagate up to large distances from the source, infrasonic waves from major (VEI 4 or larger) volcanic eruptions have been recorded for many decades with analogue micro-barometers at large regional distances. In late 1980s, near-field observations became progressively more common and started to have direct impact on the understanding and modeling of explosive source dynamics, to eventually play a primary role in volcano research. Nowadays, infrasound observation from a large variety of volcanic eruptions, spanning from VEI 0 to VEI 5 events, has shown a dramatic variability in terms of signature, excess pressure and frequency content of radiated infrasound and has been used to infer complex eruptive source mechanisms for the different kinds of events. Improved processing capability and sensors has allowed unprecedented precise locations of the explosive source and is progressively increasing the possibility to monitor volcanoes from distant records. Very broadband infrasound observations is also showing the relation between volcanic eruptions and the atmosphere, with the eruptive mass injection in the atmosphere triggering acoustic-gravity waves which eventually might control the ash dispersal and fallout.

  5. Putative volcanic landforms on Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platz, T.; Nathues, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Schäfer, M.; Williams, D. A.; Mest, S. C.; Crown, D. A.; Sykes, M. V.; Li, J.-Y.; Kneissl, T.; Schmedemann, N.; Ruesch, O.; Hiesinger, H.; Sizemore, H.; Büttner, I.; Gutierrez-Marques, P.; Ripken, J.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.; Schäfer, T.

    2015-10-01

    In the first RC2 and OpNav7 images of Dawn's approach at Ceres a number of intriguing landforms are observed, which potentially have formed by volcanic activity. These and subsequently discovered features will be monitored and validated on higher resolution datasets as acquired later in 2015.

  6. Timing and sources of neogene and quaternary volcanism in South-Central Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, James H.

    1987-08-01

    Five new and six existing radiometric age dates place constraints on the timing of volcanic episodes in a 1400-km 2 area east of Guatemala City. The source of the voluminous Miocene rhyolitic welded tuffs was the newly discovered Santa Rosa de Lima caldera, in the northern part of the area, not fissure eruptions as was previously believed. Resurgence during the Pliocene included the eruption of more silicic tuffs, followed by post-collapse volcanism around the perimeter. Volcanism in the southern part of the area occurred along the Neogene volcanic front. The sources for these Late Miocene and Pliocene andesitic lavas were not fissure eruptions, as was once believed, but were four large volcanic centers, Cerro Pinula, Ixhuatán, Teanzul, and Cerro La Gabia. The Santa Rosa de Lima caldera structure deflects the Jalpatagua Fault forming tensional fractures along which eruptions in the Quaternary Cuilapa-Barbarena cinder cone field took place. Pleistocene ash flows were erupted from Ixhuatán and Tecuamburro volcanoes in the southern part of the area. Tephras from Ayarza, Amatitlán, and Atitlán blanket the northern and central portions. Present-day activity is restricted to hot springs around the northern and eastern base of Tecuamburro volcano. Based on the work in this area it is proposed that rocks of the Miocene Chalatenango Formation throughout northern Central America were erupted from calderas behind the Neogene volcanic front. Rocks of the Mio-Pliocene Bálsamo Formation in Guatemala and El Salvador were erupted from discrete volcanic centers along the Neogene volcanic front. Pliocene rocks of the Cuscatlán Formation probably represent post-collapse volcanism around earlier caldera structures.

  7. Experimental generation of volcanic lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimarelli, Corrado; Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, Miguel; Kueppers, Ulrich; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2014-05-01

    Ash-rich volcanic plumes that are responsible for injecting large quantities of aerosols into the atmosphere are often associated with intense electrical activity. Direct measurement of the electric potential at the crater, where the electric activity in the volcanic plume is first observed, is severely impeded, limiting progress in its investigation. We have achieved volcanic lightning in the laboratory during rapid decompression experiments of gas-particle mixtures under controlled conditions. Upon decompression (from ~100 bar argon pressure to atmospheric pressure), loose particles are vertically accelerated and ejected through a nozzle of 2.8 cm diameter into a large tank filled with air at atmospheric conditions. Because of their impulsive character, our experiments most closely represent the conditions encountered in the gas-thrust region of the plume, when ash is first ejected from the crater. We used sieved natural ash with different grain sizes from Popocatépetl (Mexico), Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland), and Soufrière Hills (Montserrat) volcanoes, as well as micrometric glass beads to constrain the influence of material properties on lightning. We monitored the dynamics of the particle-laden jets with a high-speed camera and the pressure and electric potential at the nozzle using a pressure transducer and two copper ring antennas connected to a high-impedance data acquisition system, respectively. We find that lightning is controlled by the dynamics of the particle-laden jet and by the abundance of fine particles. Two main conditions are required to generate lightning: 1) self-electrification of the particles and 2) clustering of the particles driven by the jet fluid dynamics. The relative movement of clusters of charged particles within the plume generates the gradient in electrical potential, which is necessary for lightning. In this manner it is the gas-particle dynamics together with the evolving particle-density distribution within different regions of

  8. A Volcanic Hydrogen Habitable Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Ramses M.; Kaltenegger, Lisa

    2017-03-01

    The classical habitable zone (HZ) is the circular region around a star in which liquid water could exist on the surface of a rocky planet. The outer edge of the traditional N2–CO2–H2O HZ extends out to nearly ∼1.7 au in our solar system, beyond which condensation and scattering by CO2 outstrips its greenhouse capacity. Here, we show that volcanic outgassing of atmospheric H2 can extend the outer edge of the HZ to ∼2.4 au in our solar system. This wider volcanic-hydrogen HZ (N2–CO2–H2O–H2) can be sustained as long as volcanic H2 output offsets its escape from the top of the atmosphere. We use a single-column radiative-convective climate model to compute the HZ limits of this volcanic hydrogen HZ for hydrogen concentrations between 1% and 50%, assuming diffusion-limited atmospheric escape. At a hydrogen concentration of 50%, the effective stellar flux required to support the outer edge decreases by ∼35%–60% for M–A stars. The corresponding orbital distances increase by ∼30%–60%. The inner edge of this HZ only moves out ∼0.1%–4% relative to the classical HZ because H2 warming is reduced in dense H2O atmospheres. The atmospheric scale heights of such volcanic H2 atmospheres near the outer edge of the HZ also increase, facilitating remote detection of atmospheric signatures.

  9. Investigating the role of small vent volcanism during the development of Tharsis Province, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. A.; Bleacher, J. E.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Glaze, L. S.

    2014-12-01

    Clusters of tens to hundreds of small volcanic vents have recently been recognized as a major component of Tharsis Province volcanism. These volcanic fields are formed from distributed-style, possibly monogenetic, volcanism and are composed of low sloped edifices with diameters of tens of kilometers and heights of tens to hundreds of meters. We report a new catalog of these small volcanic vents, now available through the USGS Astrogeology Science Center. This catalog was created with the use of gridded topographic data from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) and images from the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) and the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC). We are now investigating isolated clusters of distributed volcanism in Tharsis with this dataset. We hypothesize that these clusters are formed from significant magmatic events that played a large role in the development of Tharsis. Currently, the catalog contains 1075 unique volcanic vents in the Tharsis Province. With the catalog, potentially isolated volcano clusters are identified with vent density estimation. Vent intensity for clusters is found to be 1 vent per 1000 sq km or less. Crater retention rates for one such cluster, Syria Planum, indicates that these distributed volcanic systems might continue as long as 700 Ma, or that monogenetic volcanic systems overprint older systems. Using a modified basal outlining algorithm with MOLA gridded data, shield volumes are found to be between 1-20 cubic km. Current results show distributed-style volcanism occuring in Tharsis orders of magnitude more dispersed than analogous volcano clusers on Earth, while individual edifices are found to be an order of magnitude larger than volcanoes in Earth clusters. Proof of concept results are reported for three identified clusters: Arsia Mons Caldera, Syria Planum, and Southern Pavonis Mons.

  10. Volcanic Stratigraphy and Geochemistry of the Soufrière Volcanic Centre, Saint Lucia with Implications for Volcanic Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, J. M.; Schmitt, A. K.; Trumbull, R. B.; Stockli, D. F.; Shane, P. A.; Howe, T. M.; Kislitsyn, R.; Robertson, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    Extensive pyroclastic flow deposits, lava flows, domes and block-and-ash-flow deposits from the Soufriere Volcanic Complex (SVC), Saint Lucia, collectively represent one of the largest silicic centers in the Lesser Antilles arc. They occur within and around the Qualibou Depression, a ~10 km diameter ampitheater-shaped sector collapse structure that formed sometime 250-100 ka ago. Vent locations for SVC pyroclastic flow deposits and their relationship to the sector collapse remain unclear because stratigraphic correlation is difficult and there are only sparse radiometric ages for SVC domes and pyroclastic rocks. Compositionally, SVC rocks are uniformly medium-K, calc-alkaline rocks with 61.6 to 67.7 wt.% SiO2. Whole-rock trace element abundances are equally uniform whereas mineral chemistry only subtly differs between units. Combined U-Th and (U-Th)/He zircon together with 14C dating and mineral fingerprinting reveals significant explosive eruptions at ~300, 265, 104, 60 and 40 ka (producing deposits previously grouped together as the "Choisuel" unit) and at ~20 ka (Belfond unit). Dacitic lava domes similar in geochemical composition to the pyroclastic flow deposits yield (U-Th)/He eruption ages for zircon ranging from 273 ka (Morne Bonin) to 14 ka (Belfond dome). Zircon crystal rim ages in the most recently erupted volcanic rocks, including the domes, match those of co-erupted plutonic inclusions, whereas crystal interiors are equivalent to the cumulative distribution of zircon ages from older eruptions. This, together with their geochemical characteristics, suggests that the silicic lava domes and pyroclastic flows of the SVC share a common source beneath the Qualibou depression, which we consider the most likely location for future activity.

  11. How Volcanism Controls Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, P. L.

    2013-12-01

    Large explosive volcanoes eject megatons of sulfur dioxide into the lower stratosphere where it spreads around the world within months and is oxidized slowly to form a sulfuric-acid aerosol with particle sizes that grow large enough to reflect and scatter solar radiation, cooling Earth ~0.5C for up to 3 years. Explosive eruptions also deplete total column ozone ~6% causing up to 3C winter warming at mid-latitudes over continents. Global cooling predominates. Extrusive, basaltic volcanoes deplete ozone ~6% but do not eject much sulfur dioxide into the lower stratosphere, causing net global warming. Anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) deplete ozone ~3% for up to a century while each volcanic eruption, even small ones, depletes ozone twice as much but for less than a decade through eruption of halogens and ensuing photochemical processes. The 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, the 2011 eruption of Grímsvötn, plus anthropogenic CFCs depleted ozone over Toronto Canada 14% in 2012, causing an unusually warm winter and drought. Total column ozone determines how much solar ultraviolet energy with wavelengths between 290 and 340 nanometers reaches Earth where it is absorbed most efficiently by the ocean. A 25% depletion of ozone increases the amount of this radiation reaching Earth by 1 W m-2 for overhead sun and 0.25 W m-2 for a solar zenith angle of 70 degrees. The tropopause is the boundary between the troposphere heated from below by a sun-warmed Earth and the stratosphere heated from above by the Sun through photodissociation primarily of oxygen and ozone. The mean annual height of the tropopause increased ~160 m between 1980 and 2004 at the same time that northern mid-latitude total column ozone was depleted by ~4%, the lower stratosphere cooled ~2C, the upper troposphere warmed ~0.1C, and mean surface temperatures in the northern hemisphere rose ~0.5C. Regional total ozone columns are observed to increase as rapidly as 20% within 5 hours with an associated 5

  12. Optimal likelihood-based matching of volcanic sources and deposits in the Auckland Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Emily; Bebbington, Mark S.; Cronin, Shane J.; Wang, Ting

    2016-09-01

    In monogenetic volcanic fields, where each eruption forms a new volcano, focusing and migration of activity over time is a very real possibility. In order for hazard estimates to reflect future, rather than past, behavior, it is vital to assemble as much reliable age data as possible on past eruptions. Multiple swamp/lake records have been extracted from the Auckland Volcanic Field, underlying the 1.4 million-population city of Auckland. We examine here the problem of matching these dated deposits to the volcanoes that produced them. The simplest issue is separation in time, which is handled by simulating prior volcano age sequences from direct dates where known, thinned via ordering constraints between the volcanoes. The subproblem of varying deposition thicknesses (which may be zero) at five locations of known distance and azimuth is quantified using a statistical attenuation model for the volcanic ash thickness. These elements are combined with other constraints, from widespread fingerprinted ash layers that separate eruptions and time-censoring of the records, into a likelihood that was optimized via linear programming. A second linear program was used to optimize over the Monte-Carlo simulated set of prior age profiles to determine the best overall match and consequent volcano age assignments. Considering all 20 matches, and the multiple factors of age, direction, and size/distance simultaneously, results in some non-intuitive assignments which would not be produced by single factor analyses. Compared with earlier work, the results provide better age control on a number of smaller centers such as Little Rangitoto, Otuataua, Taylors Hill, Wiri Mountain, Green Hill, Otara Hill, Hampton Park and Mt Cambria. Spatio-temporal hazard estimates are updated on the basis of the new ordering, which suggest that the scale of the 'flare-up' around 30 ka, while still highly significant, was less than previously thought.

  13. Origin of steep-pointed and flat-topped volcanic cones in Southwest volcanic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, U.; Hirota, F.; Yokose, H.

    2002-12-01

    KR01-12 cruise of Japan Marine Science and Technology Center using ROV KAIKO and its mother ship R/V KAIREI were carried out around Hawaii islands in the early fall of 2001. During this cruise, two dives of ROV KAIKO were made on southwest Oahu volcanic field (K203 and K206).The new Seabeam bathymetry revealed that there are remarkable topographic features: flat-topped volcanic cone, ca.2.5 in diameter and 200m in height; steep pointed cone, ellipsoidal in plain: major axis 2km, minor axis 0.5km; 200-400 m in height. This volcanic topographies are similar to those described in elsewhere e.g., Clague et al., 2001. Flat-topped cones distributed in this area are different from other area in their occurrence. They are accompanied with steep-pointed cone. In order to study the geological and petrological relationship between flat-topped cone and steep-pointed cone, both K203 and K206 have been analyzed by video image, thin sections and bulk rock chemistry. The rocks recovered from K206 and K203 are trachybasalt and basanite respectibly. There is no critical differences between FTVC and SPVCin their bulk chemistry. For example rocks from FTCV are almost identical to the SPCV in SiO2 contents in the same site. Total AK concentration of rocks from FTCV is lower than those of SPVC in K203, but FTVC is higher than SPCV in K206. This result implies that topographical characters are not correlated with bulk chemistry. Both in K206 or K203, rocks collected from SPVC have higher vesicularity, ranging from 20 to 40%, and higher crystallinity in groundmass than those from FTCV. It is suggest that differences in topographical characteristics between FTVC and SPVC are controlled by physical property of the groundmass. That is, the viscosity of magma lead to rise due to exsolution of gas phase from melt.

  14. Initial development of the Banda Volcanic Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Hartono, H.M.S. )

    1990-06-01

    The initial development of the Banda Volcanic Arc can be determined by obtaining absolute ages of granites or volcanics, stratigraphy of the Eocene Metan Volcanics of Timor as the oldest formation containing Banda Volcanic Arc extrusives, and tectonic analysis. Banda Arc volcanism is the result of subduction of oceanic crust under the volcanic arc. The time of initial subduction is related to initial seafloor spreading between Australia and Antarctica, which is identical to geomagnetic polarity time 34 (82 mybp). Therefore, 82 mybp can be used as one of the criteria to determine the birth of the Banda Volcanic Arc. With present available time data for determining the birth of the Banda Volcanic Arc, the minimum age coincides with the age of the Metan Volcanics (Eocene, 39-56 mybp) and the maximum age coincides with initial seafloor spreading between Australia and Antarctica (82 mybp). This time span is too long. With the assumption that it needs some time to develop from transcurrent faulting to subduction and volcanism, it is proposed that the initial development of Banda Arc volcanism was during early Tertiary.

  15. Disruptive event analysis: Volcanism and igneous intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, B. M.

    1980-08-01

    An evaluation was made of the disruptive effects of volcanic activity with respect to long term isolation of radioactive waste through deep geologic storage. Three major questions were considered. First, what is the range of disruption effects of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity. Second, is it possible, by selective siting of a repository to reduce the risk of disruption by future volcanic activity. And third, can the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity be quantified. The main variables involved in the evaluation of the consequences of repository disruption by volcanic activity were the geometry of the magma repository intersection (partly controlled by depth of burial) and the nature of volcanism. Simplified probability calculations were attempted for areas of past volcanic activity.

  16. Future Developments in Modeling and Monitoring of Volcanic Ash Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonadonna, Costanza; Folch, Arnau; Loughlin, Sue

    2011-03-01

    IAVCEI-WMO Workshop on Ash Dispersal Forecast and Civil Aviation; Geneva, Switzerland, 18-20 October 2010; The April-May 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption brought to light the harmful effects of volcanic ash on civil aviation and the importance of robust ash forecasting based on the combination of numerical weather prediction (NWP), volcanic ash transport and dispersal models (VATDMs), and data acquisition. The Workshop on Ash Dispersal Forecast and Civil Aviation has produced a consensual document describing the characteristics and range of application of different VATDMs, identifying the needs of the modeling community, investigating new data acquisition strategies, and discussing how to improve communication between the volcanology community and operational agencies. The workshop was held at the World Meteorological Organization's (WMO) Geneva headquarters under the sponsorship of the Faculty of Sciences of the University of Geneva, the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior (IAVCEI), and the canton of Geneva and was organized by scientists from the University of Geneva (Switzerland), the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (Spain), the Aeronautical Meteorology Division of the WMO, and the British Geological Survey (United Kingdom). Fifty-two volcanologists, meteorologists, atmospheric dispersion modelers, and space- and ground-based monitoring specialists from 12 different countries were gathered (attendance was by invitation only), including representatives from six Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs) and related institutions.

  17. {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar laser fusion and K-Ar ages from Lathrop Wells, Nevada, and Cima, California: The age of the latest volcanic activity in the Yucca Mountain area

    SciTech Connect

    Turrin, B.D. |; Champion, D.E.

    1991-05-01

    K-Ar and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages from the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, Nevada, and from the Cima volcanic field, California, indicate that the recently reported 20-ka age estimate for the Lathrop Wells volcanic center is incorrect. Instead, an age of 119 {plus_minus} 11 to 141 {plus_minus} 10 ka is indicated for the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. This age corrected is concordant with the ages determined by two independent isotopic geochronometric techniques and with the stratigraphy of surficial deposits in the Yucca Mountain region. In addition, paleomagnetic data and radiometric age data indicate only two volcanic events at the Lathrop Wells volcanic center that are probably closely linked in time, not as many as five as recently reported. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. 40Ar/39Ar laser fusion and K-Ar ages from Lathrop Wells, Nevada, and Cima, California. The age of the latest volcanic activity in the Yucca Mountain area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turrin, Brent D.; Champion, Duane E.; ,

    1991-01-01

    K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages from the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, Nevada, and from the Cima volcanic field, California, indicate that the recently reported 20-ka age estimate for the Lathrop Wells volcanic center is incorrect. Instead an age of 119??11 to 141??10 ka is indicated for the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. This age corrected is concordant with the ages determined by two independent isotopic geochronometric techniques and with the stratigraphy of surficial deposits in the Yucca Mountain region. In addition, paleomagnetic data and radiometric age data indicate only two volcanic events at the Lathrop Wells volcanic center that are probably closely linked in time, not as many as five as recently reported.

  19. Volcanic hazards at Atitlan volcano, Guatemala

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haapala, J.M.; Escobar Wolf, R.; Vallance, James W.; Rose, William I.; Griswold, J.P.; Schilling, S.P.; Ewert, J.W.; Mota, M.

    2006-01-01

    Atitlan Volcano is in the Guatemalan Highlands, along a west-northwest trending chain of volcanoes parallel to the mid-American trench. The volcano perches on the southern rim of the Atitlan caldera, which contains Lake Atitlan. Since the major caldera-forming eruption 85 thousand years ago (ka), three stratovolcanoes--San Pedro, Toliman, and Atitlan--have formed in and around the caldera. Atitlan is the youngest and most active of the three volcanoes. Atitlan Volcano is a composite volcano, with a steep-sided, symmetrical cone comprising alternating layers of lava flows, volcanic ash, cinders, blocks, and bombs. Eruptions of Atitlan began more than 10 ka [1] and, since the arrival of the Spanish in the mid-1400's, eruptions have occurred in six eruptive clusters (1469, 1505, 1579, 1663, 1717, 1826-1856). Owing to its distance from population centers and the limited written record from 200 to 500 years ago, only an incomplete sample of the volcano's behavior is documented prior to the 1800's. The geologic record provides a more complete sample of the volcano's behavior since the 19th century. Geologic and historical data suggest that the intensity and pattern of activity at Atitlan Volcano is similar to that of Fuego Volcano, 44 km to the east, where active eruptions have been observed throughout the historical period. Because of Atitlan's moderately explosive nature and frequency of eruptions, there is a need for local and regional hazard planning and mitigation efforts. Tourism has flourished in the area; economic pressure has pushed agricultural activity higher up the slopes of Atitlan and closer to the source of possible future volcanic activity. This report summarizes the hazards posed by Atitlan Volcano in the event of renewed activity but does not imply that an eruption is imminent. However, the recognition of potential activity will facilitate hazard and emergency preparedness.

  20. Calderas and mineralization: volcanic geology and mineralization in the Chianti caldera complex, Trans-Pecos Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Duex, T.W.; Henry, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes preliminary results of an ongoing study of the volcanic stratigraphy, caldera activity, and known and potential mineralization of the Chinati Mountains area of Trans-Pecos Texas. Many ore deposits are spatially associated with calderas and other volcanic centers. A genetic relationship between calderas and base and precious metal mineralization has been proposed by some and denied by others. Steven and others have demonstrated that calderas provide an important setting for mineralization in the San Juan volcanic field of Colorado. Mineralization is not found in all calderas but is apparently restricted to calderas that had complex, postsubsidence igneous activity. A comparison of volcanic setting, volcanic history, caldera evolution, and evidence of mineralization in Trans-Pecos to those of the San Juan volcanic field, a major mineral producer, indicates that Trans-Pecos Texas also could be an important mineralized region. The Chianti caldera complex in Trans-Pecos Texas contains at least two calderas that have had considerable postsubsidence activity and that display large areas of hydrothermal alteration and mineralization. Abundant prospects in Trans-Pecos and numerous producing mines immediately south of the Trans-Pecos volcanic field in Mexico are additional evidence that ore-grade deposits could occur in Texas.

  1. Evaluation of quantitative satellite-based retrievals of volcanic ash clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D. J.; Pavolonis, M. J.; Bojinski, S.; Siddans, R.; Thomas, G.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic ash clouds are a serious hazard to aviation, and mitigation requires a robust system of volcano monitoring, eruption detection, characterization of cloud properties, forecast of cloud movement, and communication of warnings. Several research groups have developed quantitative satellite-based volcanic ash products and some of these are in operational use by Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers around the world to aid in characterizing cloud properties and forecasting regions of ash hazard. The algorithms applied to the satellite data utilize a variety of techniques, and thus produce results that differ. The World Meteorological Organization has recently sponsored an intercomparison study of satellite-based retrievals with four goals: 1) to establish a validation protocol for satellite-based volcanic ash products, 2) to quantify and understand differences in products, 3) to develop best practices, and 4) to standardize volcanic cloud geophysical parameters. Six volcanic eruption cases were considered in the intercomparison: Eyjafallajökull, Grimsvötn, Kelut, Kirishimayama, Puyehue-Cordón Caulle, and Sarychev Peak. Twenty-four algorithms were utilized, which retrieved parameters including: ash cloud top height, ash column mass loading, ash effective radius, and ash optical depth at visible and thermal-infrared wavelengths. Results were compared to space-based, airborne, and ground-based lidars; complementary satellite retrievals; and manual "expert evaluation" of ash extent. The intercomparison results will feed into the International Civil Aviation Organization "Roadmap for International Airways Volcano Watch", which integrates volcanic meteorological information into decision support systems for aircraft operations.

  2. Online-coupled modeling of volcanic ash and SO2 dispersion with WRF-Chem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuefer, Martin; Egan, Sean; Webley, Peter; Grell, Georg; Freitas, Saulo; Pavolonis, Mike; Dehn, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    We included a volcanic emission and plume model into the Weather Research Forecast Model with inline Chemistry (WRF-Chem). The volcanic emission model with WRF-Chem has been tested and evaluated with historic eruptions, and the volcanic application was included into the official release of WRF-Chem beginning with WRF version 3.3 in 2011. Operational volcanic WRF-Chem runs have been developed using different domains centered on main volcanoes of the Aleutian chain and Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico. The Global Forecast System (GFS) is used for the meteorological initialization of WRF-Chem, and default eruption source parameters serve as initial source data for the runs. We report on the model setup, and the advantages to treat the volcanic ash and sulphur dioxide emissions inline within the numerical weather prediction model. In addition we outline possibilities to initialize WRF-Chem with a fully automated algorithm to retrieve volcanic ash cloud properties from satellite data. WRF-Chem runs from recent volcanic eruptions resulted in atmospheric ash loadings, which compared well with the satellite data taking into account that satellite retrieval data represent only a limited amount of the actually emitted source due to detection thresholds. In addition particle aggregative effects are not included in the WRF-Chem model to date.

  3. Spatial Compilation of Holocene Volcanic Vents in the Western Conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, D. W.; Siebert, L.

    2015-12-01

    A spatial compilation of all known Holocene volcanic vents in the western conterminous United States has been assembled. This compilation records volcanic vent location (latitude/longitude coordinates), vent type (cinder cone, dome, etc.), geologic map unit description, rock type, age, numeric age and reference (if dated), geographic feature name, mapping source, and, where available, spatial database source. Primary data sources include: USGS geologic maps, USGS Data Series, the Smithsonian Global Volcanism Program (GVP) catalog, and published journal articles. A total of 726 volcanic vents have been identified from 45 volcanoes or volcanic fields spanning ten states. These vents are found along the length of the Cascade arc in the Pacific Northwest, widely around the Basin and Range province, and at the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau into New Mexico. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Volcano Early Warning System (NVEWS) identifies 28 volcanoes and volcanic centers in the western conterminous U.S. that pose moderate, high, or very high threats to surrounding communities based on their recent eruptive histories and their proximity to vulnerable people, property, and infrastructure. This compilation enhances the understanding of volcano hazards that could threaten people and property by providing the context of where Holocene eruptions have occurred and where future eruptions may occur. Locations in this compilation can be spatially compared to located earthquakes, used as generation points for numerical hazard models or hazard zonation buffering, and analyzed for recent trends in regional volcanism and localized eruptive activity.

  4. Off-axis volcanism in the Gregory rift, east Africa: implications for models of continental rifting

    SciTech Connect

    Bosworth, W.

    1987-05-01

    The largest volcanic centers of the Gregory rift occur in two belts located 100 to 150 km east and west of the axis of the rift valley. These off-axis volcanic belts include the highest peaks on the continent of Africa and are interpreted to lie above the intersection of low-angle detachment systems with the base of a regionally thinned lithosphere. These detachment systems are manifested at the surface as a series of breakaway zones and regional bounding faults that produce subbasins with half-graben form. The asymmetry of subbasins alternates along the rift axis, indicating that the polarity of the underlying active detachment systems also reverses. The detachments are separated laterally by regional oblique-slip accommodation zones typified by wrench-style tectonism. Off-axis from the rift, the detachments are inferred to merge along strike as they cut to the base of the lithosphere. This results in irregular but persistent paired zones of volcanism and lithospheric thinning off-axis from the rift proper. The development of major volcanic cones such as Mount Kilimanjaro may be controlled by the interaction of leaky accommodation zones with the regions of structurally thinned lithosphere. The central Kenya hot spot has produced the anomalous quantities of volcanic material that fills the Gregory rift and probably enhances the off-axis volcanism but does not directly control its location. The model proposed here for tectonic controls of volcanism in the Gregory rift may be applicable to Phanerozoic continental rifts in general.

  5. Aeromagnetic Study of Tke Huichapan Caldera; Central Volcanic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, T.; Martin, A.; Alfaro, G.; Oyarzabal, E.

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of the aeromagnetic anomalies over the central sector of the Mexican Volcanic Belt sheds new light on the structure of the Huichapan Caldera. This volcanic center located 100 Km to the north- northwest of Mexico City is approximately 10 km in diameter and related to an ignimbrite sequence. Milan et al, (1993) and. Aguirre-Diaz and Lopez-Martinez (2009) mapped Huichapan area and described the geology and petrology of the erupted products in the region. Aguirre-Diaz and Lopez-Martinez (2009) suggest the idea of two overlapping calderas related to an ignimbrite sequence. The analyzed region is a rectangular area, approximately from 20.25 N to 20.42 N and between 99.42 W and 99.6 W. The total field aeromagnetic data was obtained with a Geometrics G-803 proton magnetometer at a flight altitude of 300 m above ground level. For the analysis of the anomalies, the data was further smoothed to construct a 1 km regularly spaced grid. The anomaly map was compared with the surface geology and larger anomalies were correlated with major volcanic features. Since our main interest was in mapping the subsurface intrusive and volcanic bodies, the total field magnetic anomalies were reduced to the pole by using the double integral Fourier method. The reduced to the pole anomaly map results in a simplified pattern of isolated positive and negative anomalies, which show an improved correlation with all major volcanic structures. For the analysis and interpretation of the anomalies, the reduced to the pole anomalies were continued upward at various reference levels. These operations result in smoothing of the anomaly field by the filtering of high frequency anomalies that may be related to shallow sources. Two profiles were selected that cross the major anomalies on the Huichapan Caldera. The Talwani algorithm for 2-D polygonal bodies has been used for calculating the theoretical anomalies.

  6. Can rain cause volcanic eruptions?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, Larry G.

    1993-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions are renowned for their violence and destructive power. This power comes ultimately from the heat and pressure of molten rock and its contained gases. Therefore we rarely consider the possibility that meteoric phenomena, like rainfall, could promote or inhibit their occurrence. Yet from time to time observers have suggested that weather may affect volcanic activity. In the late 1800's, for example, one of the first geologists to visit the island of Hawaii, J.D. Dana, speculated that rainfall influenced the occurrence of eruptions there. In the early 1900's, volcanologists suggested that some eruptions from Mount Lassen, Calif., were caused by the infiltration of snowmelt into the volcano's hot summit. Most such associations have not been provable because of lack of information; others have been dismissed after careful evaluation of the evidence.

  7. Venus volcanism and El Chichon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Reinterpretations of telemetry data returned to earth from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter suggest that the surface of Venus may be characterized by violent immense volcanic activity. L.W. Esposito has made an interactive analysis of Pioneer ultraviolet spectral data and similar data from the earth's atmosphere [Science, 223, 1072-1074, 1984]. Spacecraft analysis of sulfur dioxide in the earth's upper atmosphere, apparently released by El Chich[acu]on, Mexico, in March 1982 (EOS, June 14, 1983, p. 411, and August 16, 1983, p. 506) prompted reanalysis of accumulated Pioneer ultraviolet data. Massive injections of sulfur dioxide into the Venus atmosphere could be the result of volcanic eruptions about the size of the Krakatoa explosive eruption that took place between Java and Summatra in 1883.

  8. Recent volcanism and the stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Cronin, J F

    1971-05-21

    In the quiet years after the 1956 eruption of the Bezymianny volcano in central Kamchatka, it is doubtful that any volcano vented into the stratosphere until the 1963 eruptions of Agung (Bali), Trident (Alaska), and Surtsey (Iceland). From 1963 to the Hekla (Iceland) event in May 1970, two latitudinal belts of volcanoes have ejected ash and gases into the stratosphere. One belt is equatorial and the other is just below the Arctic Circle. The latter, where the tropopause is considerably lower, may have been the principal source of replenishment of volcanic dust and gases to the stratosphere. Submarine and phreatic volcanic eruptions may have been the sources of reported increase of water vapor in the stratosphere.

  9. 2012 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herrick, Julie A.; Neal, Christina A.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Dixon, James P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, or suspected unrest at 11 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2012. Of the two verified eruptions, one (Cleveland) was clearly magmatic and the other (Kanaga) was most likely a single phreatic explosion. Two other volcanoes had notable seismic swarms that probably were caused by magmatic intrusions (Iliamna and Little Sitkin). For each period of clear volcanic unrest, AVO staff increased monitoring vigilance as needed, reviewed eruptive histories of the volcanoes in question to help evaluate likely outcomes, and shared observations and interpretations with the public. 2012 also was the 100th anniversary of Alaska’s Katmai-Novarupta eruption of 1912, the largest eruption on Earth in the 20th century and one of the most important volcanic eruptions in modern times. AVO marked this occasion with several public events.

  10. Chronology and dynamics of a large silicic magmatic system. Central Taupo volcanic zone, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, B.F.; Wilson, C.J.N. ); McWilliams, M.O. ); Lanphere, M.A.; Pringle, M.S. ); Weaver, S.D. ); Briggs, R.M. )

    1995-01-01

    The central Taupo Volcanic Zone in New Zealand is a region of intense Quaternary silicic volcanism accompanying rapid extension of continental crust. At least 34 caldera-forming ignimbrite eruptions have produced a complex sequence of relatively short-lived, nested, and/or overlapping volcanic centers over 1.6 m.y. Silicic volcanism at Taupo is similar to the Yellowstone system in size, longevity, thermal flux, and magma output rate. However, Taupo contrasts with Yellowstone in the exceptionally high frequency, but small size, of caldera-forming eruptions. This contrast reflects the thin, rifted nature of the crust, which precludes the development of long-term magmatic cycles at Taupo. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Satellite observation of effusive volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.S.; Friedman, J.D.

    1970-01-01

    Infrared emission from an active effusive volcanic eruption on Surtsey, Vestmannaeyjar, Iceland, was recorded by airborne and satellite infrared systems at irregular intervals between 19 August and 3 October 1966. Ground and lava temperature measurements and volumetric lava outflow data permitted a comparison to be made between total thermal-energy yield and radiant emission recorded by the satellite system. The Nimbus HRIR recorded radiant emission at a level of about 3% of the estimated total thermal yield.

  12. Volcanic hazards in Central America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, William I.; Bluth, Gregg J.S.; Carr, Michael J.; Ewert, John W.; Patino, Lina C.; Vallance, James W.

    2006-01-01

    This volume is a sampling of current scientific work about volcanoes in Central America with specific application to hazards. The papers reflect a variety of international and interdisciplinary collaborations and employ new methods. The book will be of interest to a broad cross section of scientists, especially volcanologists. The volume also will interest students who aspire to work in the field of volcano hazards mitigation or who may want to work in one of Earth’s most volcanically active areas.

  13. Scaled experiments of volcanic spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, Olivier; Borgia, Andrea

    1996-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the spreading of volcanic constructs. Volcanoes are simulated by a sand cone, and the volcanic substratum is simulated by a sand layer (brittle substratum) overlying a silicone layer (ductile substratum). Similarity conditions between natural volcanoes and experimental prototypes led to the definition of dimensionless π numbers. Experiments determine π values which predict whether or not spreading takes place. Of particular importance are the ratio between the thickness of the brittle substratum and the height of the volcano (π2) and the brittle/ductile ratio of the substratum (π3). π2 indicates that the volcano must be large enough to "break" the substratum before spreading occurs, whereas π3 controls the style of deformation. During spreading, these dimensionless numbers change with time, reaching values that tend toward those observed for stable configurations. Experimental values are compared with those from well-constrained natural examples. It is found that an essential requirement for volcanic spreading is the presence of a low-viscosity layer within the substratum. Flow of the weak layer away from the excess load is responsible for the spreading. The overlying edifice displays radial intersecting grabens, due to concentric stretching, dissected summit areas; concentric zones of thrusts and folds form in the substratum around the edifice, and diapirs of the ductile substratum rise within the fault zones.

  14. Volcanic mercury in Pinus canariensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Martín, José Antonio; Nanos, Nikos; Miranda, José Carlos; Carbonell, Gregoria; Gil, Luis

    2013-08-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that is emitted to the atmosphere by both human activities and natural processes. Volcanic emissions are considered a natural source of mercury in the environment. In some cases, tree ring records taken close to volcanoes and their relation to volcanic activity over time are contradictory. In 1949, the Hoyo Negro volcano (La Palma-Canary Islands) produced significant pyroclastic flows that damaged the nearby stand of Pinus canariensis. Recently, 60 years after the eruption, we assessed mercury concentrations in the stem of a pine which survived volcano formation, located at a distance of 50 m from the crater. We show that Hg content in a wound caused by pyroclastic impacts (22.3 μg kg-1) is an order of magnitude higher than the Hg concentrations measured in the xylem before and after the eruption (2.3 μg kg-1). Thus, mercury emissions originating from the eruption remained only as a mark—in pyroclastic wounds—and can be considered a sporadic and very high mercury input that did not affect the overall Hg input in the xylem. In addition, mercury contents recorded in the phloem (9.5 μg kg-1) and bark (6.0 μg kg-1) suggest that mercury shifts towards non-living tissues of the pine, an aspect that can be related to detoxification in volcanism-adapted species.

  15. Source mechanism of volcanic tremor

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrick, M.G.; Qamar, A.; St. Lawrence, W.F.

    1982-10-10

    Low-frequency (<10 Hz) volcanic earthquakes originate at a wide range of depths and occur before, during, and after magmatic eruptions. The characteristics of these earthquakes suggest that they are not typical tectonic events. Physically analogous processes occur in hydraulic fracturing of rock formations, low-frequency icequakes in temperate glaciers, and autoresonance in hydroelectric power stations. We propose that unsteady fluid flow in volcanic conduits is the common source mechanism of low-frequency volcanic earthquakes (tremor). The fluid dynamic source mechanism explains low-frequency earthquakes of arbitrary duration, magnitude, and depth of origin, as unsteady flow is independent of physical properties of the fluid and conduit. Fluid transients occur in both low-viscosity gases and high-viscosity liquids. A fluid transient analysis can be formulated as generally as is warranted by knowledge of the composition and physical properties of the fluid, material properties, geometry and roughness of the conduit, and boundary conditions. To demonstrate the analytical potential of the fluid dynamic theory, we consider a single-phase fluid, a melt of Mount Hood andesite at 1250/sup 0/C, in which significant pressure and velocity variations occur only in the longitudinal direction. Further simplification of the conservation of mass and momentum equations presents an eigenvalue problem that is solved to determine the natural frequencies and associated damping of flow and pressure oscillations.

  16. Aeromagnetic Study of the Amealco Caldera, Central Mexican Volcanic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, T.; Salas, J.; Yamamoto, J.

    2008-12-01

    Analysis of the aeromagnetic anomalies over the central sector of the Mexican Volcanic Belt sheds new light on the structure of Amealco Caldera. This volcanic center located NW of Mexico City is approximately 10 km in diameter,is partially cut by a regional fault (Epitafio Huerta fault). Aguirre-Diaz (1993, 1996) has mapping the Amealco area and described the geology and petrology of the erupted products. This Caldera was formed by a large eruption which produced an ignimbrite which covers the area. The Amealco tuff is the most important volcanic unit because of its volume and distribution. After the emplacement of the central lava dome, volcanism persisted for more than a million years in the periphery and in the Caldera rim. This activity forms the Garabato dome and the Comal Scoria cone. The analyzed region is a rectangular area, approximately from 20o N to 20o 15´ N and between 100o W and 100o 20' W. The total field aeromagnetic data was obtained with a Geometrics G-803 proton magnetometer at a flight altitude of 300 m above ground level. For the analysis of the anomalies, the data was further smoothed to construct a 2 km regularly spaced grid. The anomaly map was compared with the surface geology and larger anomalies were correlated with major volcanic features. Since our main interest was in mapping the subsurface intrusive and volcanic bodies, the total field magnetic anomalies were reduced to the pole by using the double integral Fourier method. The reduced to the pole anomaly map results in a simplified pattern of isolated positive and negative anomalies, which show an improved correlation with all major volcanic structures. For the analysis and interpretation of the anomalies, the reduced to the pole anomalies were continued upward at various reference levels. These operations result in smoothing of the anomaly field by the filtering of high frequency anomalies that may be related to shallow sources. Two profiles were selected that cross the major

  17. Pliocene Basaltic Volcanism in The East Anatolia Region (EAR), Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyan, Vural; Özdemir, Yavuz; Keskin, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    East Anatolia Region (EAR) is one of the high Plateau which is occurred with north-south compressional regime formed depending on continent-continent collision between Eurasia and Arabia plates (Şengör and Kidd, 1979). Recent studies have revealed that last oceanic lithosphere in the EAR have completely depleted to 20 million years ago based on fission track ages (Okay et al. 2010). Our initial studies suggest that extensively volcanic activity in the EAR peaked in the Pliocene and continued in the same productivity throughout Quaternary. Voluminous basaltic lava plateaus and basaltic lavas from local eruption centers occurred as a result of high production level of volcanism during the Pliocene time interval. In order to better understand the spatial and temporal variations in Pliocene basaltic volcanism and to reveal isotopic composition, age and petrologic evolution of the basaltic volcanism, we have started to study basaltic volcanism in the East Anatolia within the framework of a TUBITAK project (project number:113Y406). Petrologic and geochemical studies carried out on the Pliocene basaltic lavas indicate the presence of subduction component in the mantle source, changing the character of basaltic volcanism from alkaline to subalkaline and increasing the amount of spinel peridotitic melts (contributions of lithospheric mantle?) in the mantle source between 5.5-3.5 Ma. FC, AFC and EC-AFC modelings reveal that the while basaltic lavas were no or slightly influenced by crustal contamination and fractional crystallization, to more evolved lavas such as bazaltictrachyandesite, basalticandesite, trachybasalt might have been important processes. Results of our melting models and isotopic analysis data (Sr, Nd, Pb, Hf, 18O) indicate that the Pliocene basaltic rocks were derived from both shallow and deep mantle sources with different melting degrees ranging between 0.1 - 4 %. The percentage of spinel seems to have increased in the mantle source of the basaltic

  18. Disruptive event analysis: volcanism and igneous intrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.M.

    1980-08-01

    An evaluation is made of the disruptive effects of volcanic activity with respect to long term isolation of radioactive waste through deep geologic storage. Three major questions are considered. First, what is the range of disruption effects of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity. Second, is it possible, by selective siting of a repository, to reduce the risk of disruption by future volcanic activity. And third, can the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity be quantified. The main variables involved in the evaluation of the consequences of repository disruption by volcanic activity are the geometry of the magma-repository intersection (partly controlled by depth of burial) and the nature of volcanism. Potential radionuclide dispersal by volcanic transport within the biosphere ranges in distance from several kilometers to global. Risk from the most catastrophic types of eruptions can be reduced by careful site selection to maximize lag time prior to the onset of activity. Certain areas or volcanic provinces within the western United States have been sites of significant volcanism and should be avoided as potential sites for a radioactive waste repository. Examples of projection of future sites of active volcanism are discussed for three areas of the western United States. Probability calculations require two types of data: a numerical rate or frequency of volcanic activity and a numerical evaluation of the areal extent of volcanic disruption for a designated region. The former is clearly beyond the current state of art in volcanology. The latter can be approximated with a reasonable degree of satisfaction. In this report, simplified probability calculations are attempted for areas of past volcanic activity.

  19. Distribution of late Cenozoic volcanic vents in the Cascade Range: volcanic arc segmentation and regional tectonic considerations ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guffanti, M.; Weaver, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    Spatial, temporal, and compositional distributions of c4000 volcanic vents formed since 16 Ma in Washington, Oregon, N California, and NW Nevada illustrate the evolution of volcanism related to subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate system and extension of the Basin and Range province. Vent data were obtained from published map compilations and include monogenetic and small polygenetic volcanoes in addition to major composite centers. On the basis of the distribution of 2821 vents formed since 5 Ma, the Cascade Range is divided into 5 segments, with vents of the High Lava Plains along the northern margin of the Basin and Range province in Oregon forming a sixth segment. Some aspects of the Cascade Range segmentation can be related to gross structural features of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate.-from Authors

  20. Spatial density analysis of volcanic vents in the Concepción volcanic complex, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saballos, J. A.; Kiyosugi, K.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.

    2011-12-01

    We have applied a bivariate Gaussian kernel function to estimate spatial density of volcanic vents associated to the Concepción Volcanic Complex, CVC. Our dataset consists of 36 known vents distributed on an area 11.0 km (N-S) by 11.3 km (E-W), and whose age of formation is unknown. There are 3 known vents on the western side of the CVC, 21 in the central area, and 12 in the eastern side. All these three regions describe preferentially N-S elongate zones. Concepción is the most active composite volcano in Nicaragua and forms the northwestern side of the Ometepe Island with a total population estimated to be ~33,000, and with the vast majority living very near the volcano. Thus there is an immediate need for estimating the probabilistic hazard associated with areas more prone to the formation of new volcanic vents and how they compare to the location of population centers. We computed the spatial density using the sum of the asymptotic mean squared error (SAMSE), and the least-square cross validation (LSCV) algorithms, both available in the freely-distributed R statistical software library. Both algorithms produce grossly similar spatial density, but with significantly different emphasis on the three elongate vent zones. The SAMSE algorithm yields a spatial vent density of 3x10-2 - 4x10-4 event/km2 between the 1st and 99th percentiles, and an elliptical bandwidth of 2.6 km in the N-S direction and 2.2 km in the E-W. The LSCV algorithm produces a spatial vent density of 5x10-2 - 5x10-4 event/km2 between the 1st and 99th percentiles, and a highly eccentric bandwidth with axis of 2.8 km in the N-S direction and 0.8 km in the E-W. The vent spatial density map produced by the SAMSE algorithm embraces all the vents below the 95th percentile with a spatial density > 2x10-3 event/km2, and the shape of the map is quite homogeneous and not particularly sensitive to local geology or tectonic setting. The spatial density produced by the LSCV algorithm shows three parallel

  1. Status of volcanic hazard studies for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.M.; Vaniman, D.T.; Carr, W.J.

    1983-03-01

    Volcanism studies of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) region are concerned with hazards of future volcanism with respect to underground disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The hazards of silicic volcanism are judged to be negligible; hazards of basaltic volcanism are judged through research approaches combining hazard appraisal and risk assessment. The NTS region is cut obliquely by a N-NE trending belt of volcanism. This belt developed about 8 Myr ago following cessation of silicic volcanism and contemporaneous with migration of basaltic activity toward the southwest margin of the Great Basin. Two types of fields are present in the belt: (1) large-volume, long-lived basalt and local rhyolite fields with numerous eruptive centers and (2) small-volume fields formed by scattered basaltic scoria cones. Late Cenozoic basalts of the NTS region belong to the second field type. Monogenetic basalt centers of this region were formed mostly by Strombolian eruptions; Surtseyean activity has been recognized at three centers. Geochemically, the basalts of the NTS region are classified as straddle A-type basalts of the alkalic suite. Petrological studies indicate a volumetric dominance of evolved hawaiite magmas. Trace- and rare-earth-element abundances of younger basalt (<4 Myr) of the NTS region and southern Death Valley area, California, indicate an enrichment in incompatible elements, with the exception of rubidium. The conditional probability of recurring basaltic volcanism and disruption of a repository by that event is bounded by the range of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -10} as calculated for a 1-yr period. Potential disruptive and dispersal effects of magmatic penetration of a repository are controlled primarily by the geometry of basalt feeder systems, the mechanism of waste incorporation in magma, and Strombolian eruption processes.

  2. Widespread Secondary Volcanism Near Northern Hawaiian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Michael; Ito, Garrett; Weis, Dominique; Geist, Dennis; Swinnard, Lisa; Bianco, Todd; Flinders, Ashton; Taylor, Brian; Appelgate, Bruce; Blay, Chuck; Hanano, Diane; Nobre Silva, Inês; Naumann, Terry; Maerschalk, Claude; Harpp, Karen; Christensen, Branden; Sciaroni, Linda; Tagami, Taka; Yamasaki, Seiko

    2008-12-01

    Hot spot theory provides a key framework for understanding the motion of the tectonic plates, mantle convection and composition, and magma genesis. The age-progressive volcanism that constructs many chains of islands throughout the world's ocean basins is essential to hot spot theory. In contrast, secondary volcanism, which follows the main edifice-building stage of volcanism in many chains including the Hawaii, Samoa, Canary, Mauritius, and Kerguelen islands, is not predicted by hot spot theory. Hawaiian secondary volcanism occurs hundreds of kilometers away from, and more than 1 million years after, the end of the main shield volcanism, which has generated more than 99% of the volume of the volcano's mass [Macdonald et al., 1983; Ozawa et al., 2005]. Diamond Head, in Honolulu, is the first and classic example of secondary volcanism.

  3. Volcanic processes in the Solar System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    This article stresses that terrestrial volcanism represents only part of the range of volcanism in the solar system. Earth processes of volcanicity are dominated by plate tectonics, which does not seem to operate on other planets, except possibly on Venus. Lunar volcanicity is dominated by lava effusion at enormous rates. Mars is similar, with the addition to huge shield volcanoes developed over fixed hotspots. Io, the moon closest to Jupiter, is the most active body in the Solar System and, for example, much sulphur and silicates are emitted. The eruptions of Io are generated by heating caused by tides induced by Jupiter. Europa nearby seems to emit water from fractures and Ganymede is similar. The satellites of Saturn and Uranus are also marked by volcanic craters, but they are of very low temperature melts, possibly of ammonia and water. The volcanism of the solar system is generally more exotic, the greater the distance from Earth. -A.Scarth

  4. Evidence of recent deep magmatic activity at Cerro Bravo-Cerro Machín volcanic complex, central Colombia. Implications for future volcanic activity at Nevado del Ruiz, Cerro Machín and other volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londono, John Makario

    2016-09-01

    In the last nine years (2007-2015), the Cerro Bravo-Cerro Machín volcanic complex (CBCMVC), located in central Colombia, has experienced many changes in volcanic activity. In particular at Nevado del Ruiz volcano (NRV), Cerro Machin volcano (CMV) and Cerro Bravo (CBV) volcano. The recent activity of NRV, as well as increasing seismic activity at other volcanic centers of the CBCMVC, were preceded by notable changes in various geophysical and geochemical parameters, that suggests renewed magmatic activity is occurring at the volcanic complex. The onset of this activity started with seismicity located west of the volcanic complex, followed by seismicity at CBV and CMV. Later in 2010, strong seismicity was observed at NRV, with two small eruptions in 2012. After that, seismicity has been observed intermittently at other volcanic centers such as Santa Isabel, Cerro España, Paramillo de Santa Rosa, Quindío and Tolima volcanoes, which persists until today. Local deformation was observed from 2007 at NRV, followed by possible regional deformation at various volcanic centers between 2011 and 2013. In 2008, an increase in CO2 and Radon in soil was observed at CBV, followed by a change in helium isotopes at CMV between 2009 and 2011. Moreover, SO2 showed an increase from 2010 at NRV, with values remaining high until the present. These observations suggest that renewed magmatic activity is currently occurring at CBCMVC. NRV shows changes in its activity that may be related to this new magmatic activity. NRV is currently exhibiting the most activity of any volcano in the CBCMVC, which may be due to it being the only open volcanic system at this time. This suggests that over the coming years, there is a high probability of new unrest or an increase in volcanic activity of other volcanoes of the CBCMVC.

  5. 2013 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl; McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Waythomas, Chris

    2015-08-14

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 18 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2013. Beginning with the 2013 AVO Summary of Events, the annual description of the AVO seismograph network and activity, once a stand-alone publication, is now part of this report. Because of this change, the annual summary now contains an expanded description of seismic activity at Alaskan volcanoes. Eruptions occurred at three volcanic centers in 2013: Pavlof Volcano in May and June, Mount Veniaminof Volcano in June through December, and Cleveland Volcano throughout the year. None of these three eruptive events resulted in 24-hour staffing at AVO facilities in Anchorage or Fairbanks.

  6. Chlorine-36 alidation Study at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J. Paces

    2006-08-28

    The amount, spatial distribution, and velocity of water percolating through the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, are important issues for assessing the performance of the proposed deep geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To help characterize the nature and history of UZ flow, isotopic studies were initiated in 1995, using rock samples collected from the Miocene ash-flow tuffs in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), an 8-km-long tunnel constructed along the north-south extent of the repository block, and the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift, a 2.5-km-long tunnel constructed across the repository block (Figure 1-1, Sources: Modified from DOE 2002 [Figure 1-14] and USBR 1996). Scientists from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) analyzed for chlorine-36 ({sup 36}Cl) in salts leached from whole-rock samples collected from tunnel walls and subsurface boreholes, and scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) analyzed for isotopes of oxygen, carbon, uranium, lead, thorium, and strontium in secondary minerals collected from subsurface fractures and lithophysal cavities. Elevated values for ratios of {sup 36}Cl to total chloride ({sup 36}Cl/CL) at the level of the proposed repository indicated that small amounts of water carrying bomb-pulse {sup 36}Cl (i.e., {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios greater than 1250 x 10{sup -15} resulting from {sup 36}Cl produced by atmospheric testing of nuclear devices during the 1950s and early 1960s) had percolated through welded and nonwelded tuffs to depths of 200 to 300 meters (m) beneath the land surface over the past 50 years. Because of the implications of short travel times to the performance of the proposed repository, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), Office of Repository Development (ORD), decided to verify the {sup 36}Cl/Cl data with an independent validation study. DOE asked the USGS to design and implement a validation study that would include {sup 36}Cl and tritium ({sup 3}H) analyses. Core samples were taken from 50 new boreholes drilled across two zones in the ESF where a substantial number of samples with elevated {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios had been identified previously. Also, core intervals from the Sample Management Facility (SMF) were acquired for water extraction and {sup 3H} analyses. This report documents the background and history of the validation study and presents the results of the {sup 36}Cl to total chloride ({sup 36}Cl/Cl) and {sup 3}H analyses.

  7. Volcanic deposits in Antarctic snow and ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmas, Robert J.; Legrand, Michel; Aristarain, Alberto J.; Zanolini, FrançOise

    1985-12-01

    Major volcanic eruptions are able to spread large amounts of sulfuric acid all over the world. Acid layers of volcanic origin were detected for the first time a few years ago by Hammer in Greenland ice. The present paper deals with volcanic deposits in the Antarctic. The different methods that can be used to find volcanic acid deposits in snow and ice cores are compared: electrical conductivity, sulfate, and acidity measurements. Numerous snow and ice samples collected at several Antarctic locations were analyzed. The results reveal that the two major volcanic events recorded by H2SO4, fallout in Antarctic ice over the last century are the eruptions of Krakatoa (1883) and Agung (1963), both located at equatorial latitudes in the southern hemisphere. The volcanic signals are found to be particularly well defined at central Antarctic locations apparently in relation to the low snow accumulation rates in these areas. It is demonstrated that volcanic sulfuric acid in snow is not even partially neutralized by ammonia. The possible influence of Antarctic volcanic activity on snow chemistry is also discussed, using the three recent eruptions of the Deception Island volcano as examples. Only one of them seems to have had a significant effect on the chemistry of snow at a location 200 km from this volcano. It is concluded that Antarctic volcanic ice records are less complicated than Greenland records because of the limited number of volcanos in the southern hemisphere and the apparently higher signal to background ratio for acidity in Antarctica than in Greenland.

  8. The intensities and magnitudes of volcanic eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sigurdsson, H.

    1991-01-01

    Ever since 1935, when C.F Richter devised the earthquake magnitude scale that bears his name, seismologists have been able to view energy release from earthquakes in a systematic and quantitative manner. The benefits have been obvious in terms of assessing seismic gaps and the spatial and temporal trends of earthquake energy release. A similar quantitative treatment of volcanic activity is of course equally desirable, both for gaining a further understanding of the physical principles of volcanic eruptions and for volcanic-hazard assessment. A systematic volcanologic data base would be of great value in evaluating such features as volcanic gaps, and regional and temporal trends in energy release.  

  9. Laboratory studies of volcanic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieffer, Susan Werner; Sturtevant, Bradford

    1984-09-01

    The study of the fluid dynamics of violent volcanic eruptions by laboratory experiment is described, and the important fluid-dynamic processes that can be examined in laboratory models are discussed in detail. In preliminary experiments, pure gases are erupted from small reservoirs. The gases used are Freon 12 and Freon 22, two gases of high molecular weight and high density that are good analogs of heavy and particulate-laden volcanic gases; nitrogen, a moderate molecular weight, moderate density gas for which the thermodynamic properties are well known; and helium, a low molecular weight, lowdensity gas that is used as a basis for comparison with the behavior of the heavier gases and as an analog of steam, the gas that dominates many volcanic eruptions. Transient jets erupt from the reservoir into the laboratory upon rupture of a thin diaphragm at the exit of a convergent nozzle. The gas accelerates from rest in the reservoir to high velocity in the jet. Reservoir pressures and geometries are such that the fluid velocity in the jets is initially supersonic and later decays to subsonic. The measured reservoir pressure decreases as the fluid expands through repetitively reflecting rarefaction waves, but for the conditions of these experiments, a simple steady-discharge model is sufficient to explain the pressure decay and to predict the duration of the flow. Density variations in the flow field have been visualized with schlieren and shadowgraph photography. The observed structure of the jet is correlated with the measured pressure history. The starting vortex generated when the diaphragm ruptures becomes the head of the jet. Though the exit velocity is sonic, the flow head in the helium jet decelerates to about one-third of sonic velocity in the first few nozzle diameters, the nitrogen head decelerates to about three-fourths of sonic velocity, while Freon maintains nearly sonic velocity. The impulsive acceleration of reservoir fluid into the surrounding atmosphere

  10. Felsic Volcanics on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolliff, B. L.; Lawrence, S. J.; Stopar, J.; Braden, S.; Hawke, B. R.; Robinson, M. S.; Glotch, T. D.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Seddio, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) imaging and thermal data provide new morphologic and compositional evidence for features that appear to be expressions of nonmare silicic volcanism. Examples reflecting a range of sizes and volcanic styles include the Gruithuisen and Mairan Domes, and the Hansteen Alpha (H-A) and Compton-Belkovich (C-B) volcanic complexes. In this work we combine new observations with existing compositional remote sensing and Apollo sample data to assess possible origins. Images and digital topographic data at 100 m scale (Wide Angle Camera) and ~0.5 to 2 m (Narrow Angle Camera) reveal (1) slopes on volcanic constructs of ~12° to 27°, (2) potential endogenic summit depressions, (3) small domical features with dense boulder populations, and (4) irregular collapse features. Morphologies in plan view range from the circular to elliptical Gruithuisen γ and δ domes (~340 km2 each), to smaller cumulodomes such as Mairan T and C-B α (~30 km2, each), to the H-A (~375 km2) and C-B (~680 km2) volcanic complexes. Heights range from ~800-1800 m, and most domes are relatively flat-topped or have a central depression. Positions of the Christiansen Feature in LRO Diviner data reflect silicic compositions [1]. Clementine UVVIS-derived FeO varies from ~5 to 10 wt%. Lunar Prospector Th data indicate model values of 20-55 ppm [2,3], which are consistent with compositions ranging from KREEP basalt to lunar granite. The Apollo collection contains small rocks and breccia clasts of felsic/granitic lithologies. Apollo 12 samples include small, pristine and brecciated granitic rock fragments and a large, polymict breccia (12013) consisting of felsic material (quartz & K-feldspar-rich) and mafic phases (similar to KREEP basalt). Many of the evolved lunar rocks have geochemically complementary compositions. The lithologic associations and the lack of samples with intermediate composition suggest a form of magmatic differentiation that produced mafic and felsic

  11. The Procellarum volcanic complexes - Contrasting styles of volcanism. [lunar morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitford-Stark, J. L.; Head, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Three major volcanic complexes have long been recognized in the Oceanus Procellarum region. Detailed study shows that the complexes share some characteristics and also display major differences which provide clues to eruption style. The Rumker Hills occupy 5000 sq km in northern Procellarum and are apparently Imbrian-Eratosthenian in age; they are dominated by domes, suggesting relatively low effusion rates. The Aristarchus Plateau-Prinz/Harbinger region occupies 40,000 sq km in central Procellarum and is predominantly Imbrian in age; it is dominated by large sinuous rilles and associated dark mantling deposits of probable pyroclastic origin, suggesting relatively high eruption rates. The Marius Hills occupy 35,000 sq km in south-central Procellarum and appear to be predominantly Eratosthenian in age; they are dominated by low domes, steep domes, cones, and sinuous rilles, suggesting variable eruption rates and possible different volatile contents associated with eruption conditions that produced each type of feature. The volcanic complexes, particularly Aristarchus and Marius, appear to be the sources for much of the central Procellarum mare fill.

  12. Thermal vesiculation during volcanic eruptions.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B; Johnson, Jeffrey B; Cimarelli, Corrado; Hornby, Adrian J; Kendrick, Jackie E; von Aulock, Felix W; Kennedy, Ben M; Andrews, Benjamin J; Wadsworth, Fabian B; Rhodes, Emma; Chigna, Gustavo

    2015-12-24

    Terrestrial volcanic eruptions are the consequence of magmas ascending to the surface of the Earth. This ascent is driven by buoyancy forces, which are enhanced by bubble nucleation and growth (vesiculation) that reduce the density of magma. The development of vesicularity also greatly reduces the 'strength' of magma, a material parameter controlling fragmentation and thus the explosive potential of the liquid rock. The development of vesicularity in magmas has until now been viewed (both thermodynamically and kinetically) in terms of the pressure dependence of the solubility of water in the magma, and its role in driving gas saturation, exsolution and expansion during decompression. In contrast, the possible effects of the well documented negative temperature dependence of solubility of water in magma has largely been ignored. Recently, petrological constraints have demonstrated that considerable heating of magma may indeed be a common result of the latent heat of crystallization as well as viscous and frictional heating in areas of strain localization. Here we present field and experimental observations of magma vesiculation and fragmentation resulting from heating (rather than decompression). Textural analysis of volcanic ash from Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala reveals the presence of chemically heterogeneous filaments hosting micrometre-scale vesicles. The textures mirror those developed by disequilibrium melting induced via rapid heating during fault friction experiments, demonstrating that friction can generate sufficient heat to induce melting and vesiculation of hydrated silicic magma. Consideration of the experimentally determined temperature and pressure dependence of water solubility in magma reveals that, for many ascent paths, exsolution may be more efficiently achieved by heating than by decompression. We conclude that the thermal path experienced by magma during ascent strongly controls degassing, vesiculation, magma strength and the effusive

  13. Isotopic heterogeneity in volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, J. A.; Ramos, F. C.; Tollstrup, D. L.

    2003-04-01

    The growing microsample database on volcanic rocks is showing that isotopic disequilibrium between and among phenocryst phases, their melt inclusions, and groundmass is the rule rather than the exception. This applies even in cases of little or no petrographic evidence for disequilibrium. Erupted magmas must therefore be regarded, to some extent, as mechanical mixtures of isotopically distinct components assembled from different sources. The preservation of isotopic disequilibrium requires that the assembly takes place before diffusion can eradicate evidence of disequilibrium. For a wide range of magmas (mafic, intermediate and felsic, silica under- and oversaturated) from different volcano types (flood basalts, monogenetic cones, stratocones, silicic calderas) this timescale ranges from thousands of years down to one year or less, with no consistent pattern of mixing-to-eruption time vs. volcano or magma type. Among many issues arising from these findings, we note that estimation of magmatic temperatures from application of equilibrium thermodynamics to phenocryst assemblages in volcanic rocks should be approached with extreme caution. The isotope ratio variations observed among the components of a single volcanic rock sample, in most cases, indicate interaction between magma and the local wall-rock. This is consistent with the view that the vast majority of magmas undergo modification during transport through and residence within the crust. Three physical origins of heterogeneity have been proposed: melting of wallrock, magmatic recharge, and mixing of components within a magma chamber initially segregated into melt-rich and crystal-rich portions. Time constraints on preservation of disequilibrium imply either a causal link with eruption, or that these processes occur through the lifetime of a chamber.

  14. Thermal vesiculation during volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B.; Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Cimarelli, Corrado; Hornby, Adrian J.; Kendrick, Jackie E.; von Aulock, Felix W.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Andrews, Benjamin J.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Rhodes, Emma; Chigna, Gustavo

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial volcanic eruptions are the consequence of magmas ascending to the surface of the Earth. This ascent is driven by buoyancy forces, which are enhanced by bubble nucleation and growth (vesiculation) that reduce the density of magma. The development of vesicularity also greatly reduces the ‘strength’ of magma, a material parameter controlling fragmentation and thus the explosive potential of the liquid rock. The development of vesicularity in magmas has until now been viewed (both thermodynamically and kinetically) in terms of the pressure dependence of the solubility of water in the magma, and its role in driving gas saturation, exsolution and expansion during decompression. In contrast, the possible effects of the well documented negative temperature dependence of solubility of water in magma has largely been ignored. Recently, petrological constraints have demonstrated that considerable heating of magma may indeed be a common result of the latent heat of crystallization as well as viscous and frictional heating in areas of strain localization. Here we present field and experimental observations of magma vesiculation and fragmentation resulting from heating (rather than decompression). Textural analysis of volcanic ash from Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala reveals the presence of chemically heterogeneous filaments hosting micrometre-scale vesicles. The textures mirror those developed by disequilibrium melting induced via rapid heating during fault friction experiments, demonstrating that friction can generate sufficient heat to induce melting and vesiculation of hydrated silicic magma. Consideration of the experimentally determined temperature and pressure dependence of water solubility in magma reveals that, for many ascent paths, exsolution may be more efficiently achieved by heating than by decompression. We conclude that the thermal path experienced by magma during ascent strongly controls degassing, vesiculation, magma strength and the effusive

  15. Water in volcanic glass: From volcanic degassing to secondary hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seligman, Angela N.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Watkins, James M.; Ross, Abigail M.

    2016-10-01

    Volcanic glass is deposited with trace amounts (0.1-0.6 wt.%) of undegassed magmatic water dissolved in the glass. After deposition, meteoric water penetrates into the glass structure mostly as molecular H2O. Due to the lower δD (‰) values of non-tropical meteoric waters and the ∼30‰ offset between volcanic glass and environmental water during hydration, secondary water imparts lighter hydrogen isotopic values during secondary hydration up to a saturation concentration of 3-4 wt.% H2O. We analyzed compositionally and globally diverse volcanic glass from 0 to 10 ka for their δD and H2Ot across different climatic zones, and thus different δD of precipitation, on a thermal conversion elemental analyzer (TCEA) furnace attached to a mass spectrometer. We find that tephrachronologically coeval rhyolite glass is hydrated faster than basaltic glass, and in the majority of glasses an increase in age and total water content leads to a decrease in δD (‰), while a few equatorial glasses have little change in δD (‰). We compute a magmatic water correction based on our non-hydrated glasses, and calculate an average 103lnαglass-water for our hydrated felsic glasses of -33‰, which is similar to the 103lnαglass-water determined by Friedman et al. (1993a) of -34‰. We also determine a smaller average 103lnαglass-water for all our mafic glasses of -23‰. We compare the δD values of water extracted from our glasses to local meteoric waters following the inclusion of a -33‰ 103lnαglass-water. We find that, following a correction for residual magmatic water based on an average δD and wt.% H2Ot of recently erupted ashes from our study, the δD value of water extracted from hydrated volcanic glass is, on average, within 4‰ of local meteoric water. To better understand the difference in hydration rates of mafic and felsic glasses, we imaged 6 tephra clasts ranging in age and chemical composition with BSE (by FEI SEM) down to a submicron resolution. Mafic tephra

  16. Sub-glacial volcanic eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Donald Edward

    1956-01-01

    The literature on sub-glacial volcanic eruptions and the related flood phenomena has been reviewed as a minor part of the larger problem of convective and conductive heat transfer from intrusive magma. (See Lovering, 1955, for a review of the extensive literature on this subject.) This summary of data on sub-glacial eruptions is part of a program that the U.S. Geological Survey is conducting in connection with its Investigations of Geologic Processes project on behalf of the Division of Research, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  17. 2006 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Manevich, Alexander; Rybin, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near nine separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2006. A significant explosive eruption at Augustine Volcano in Cook Inlet marked the first eruption within several hundred kilometers of principal population centers in Alaska since 1992. Glaciated Fourpeaked Mountain, a volcano thought to have been inactive in the Holocene, produced a phreatic eruption in the fall of 2006 and continued to emit copious amounts of volcanic gas into 2007. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  18. Holocene volcanic influence on climate-forced vegetation changes on Kamchatka, based on pollen data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirksen, V.; Dirksen, O.

    2009-04-01

    Pollen data from volcanic-affected areas on Kamchatka (Northern Volcanic Group, Eastern Volcanic Zone and Southern Kamchatka) have been overviewed, and compared with pollen records from the sites with negligible volcanic influence that allowed some asynchronous trends in vegetation dynamics during the Holocene to be found. Pollen data from sites within Central Kamchatka Depression (Esso, Kirganik etc.), far from recently active volcanoes, show that shrub pine (Pinus pumila), which started to spread from ca. 5.5 ka (all ages are given as14C kyr BP) in response to climate warming and weakening of maritime influence, had the highest rates of advance during last 3 ka that agrees well with the late Holocene coniferous forest expansion overall the Central Kamchatka Depression. Meanwhile, shrub pine spreading around the Tolbachik volcano (Northern Volcanic Group) decelerated after ca. 1.8 ka and ceased completely by ca. 1.5 ka while other coniferous, spruce (Picea ajanensis) and larch (Larix cajanderi), were in progress. Such a local degradation of shrub pine, which is rather sensitive species to ashfalls, is likely caused by volcanic impact: since ca. 2 ka there was a pulse of volcanic activity of numerous monogenetic eruptive centers at the Tolbachinsky Dol lava field. Asynchronous shift of stone birch (Betula ermanii) forest along the Pacific coast of Kamchatka could be also regarded as volcanic-forced phenomenon. First appearance of stone birch forest at the eastern coast of the peninsula occurred between 8-6 ka under warmer conditions and strengthened climate continentality. However, birch advance in particular areas along the Pacific coast appears to have been not caused by spatial heterogeneity of climatic patterns: the earliest (ca. 8 ka) evidences of stone birch forest establishment are recorded near Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky city and at the Uzon-Geizernaya Depression, while the latest (ca. 6 ka) - nearby the Maly Semyachik and Karymsky volcanoes; northern records

  19. Center Size and Center Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helburn, Suzanne; Morris, John

    1996-01-01

    Examined the impact of child care center size on cost, quality, and profits per child. Examined centers ranging from 40 to 80 children and found total cost and revenue per child were similar for small, medium, and large centers. Found profits per child were highest in large centers and that there was no relationship between center quality and…

  20. Volcanic impact on stratospheric aerosol chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoller, W. H.

    1984-01-01

    Samples collected by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) using the multiple-filter sampler on the U-2 were analyzed. The sampler is capable of exposing a number of 110 mm filters in sequence to ram air flow. Two types of filters, IPC cellulose and polystrene, were used, both of which have high blank levels for the trace elements determined. The levels of most trace elements in the stratosphere are so low under normal circumstances that none can be seen. Results from the eruption of Mt. St. Helens, a mystery cloud (probably volcanic in origin) in 1982, and the El Chichonal eruption in 1983 are discussed. To improve the collection of particles for chemical analysis, a new sampling system was developed for use on the U-2. The sampler consisted of an electrostatic collection of particles between 1 and 0.001 micron diameter dierectly onto electron microscopic grids, followed by a thermal precipitation for the smaller particles. The system was built and tested in the laboratory, but never flown on the U-2.

  1. Volcanic ash forecast transport and dispersion (VAFTAD) model

    SciTech Connect

    Heffter, J.L.; Stunder, B.J.B.

    1993-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) has developed a Volcanic Ash Forecast Transport And Dispersion (VAFTAD) model for emergency response use focusing on hazards to aircraft flight operations. The model is run on a workstation at ARL. Meteorological input for the model is automatically downloaded from the NOAA National Meteorological Center (NMC) twice-daily forecast model runs to ARL. Additional input for VAFTAD ragarding the volcanic eruption is supplied by the user guided by monitor prompts. The model calculates transport and dispersion of volcanic ash from an initial ash cloud that has reached its maximum height within 3 h of eruption time. The model assumes that spherical ash particles of diameters ranging from 0.3 to 30 micrometers are distributed throughout the initial cloud with a particle number distribution based on Mount St. Helens and Redoubt Volcano eruptions. Particles are advected horizontally and vertically by the winds and fall according to Stoke`s law with a slip correction. A bivariate-normal distribution is used for horizontally diffusing the cloud and determining ash concentrations. Model output gives maps with symbols representing relative concentrations in three flight layers, and throughout the entire ash cloud, for sequential 6- and 12-h time intervals. A verification program for VAFTAD has been started. Results subjectively comparing model ash cloud forecasts with satellite imagery for three separate 1992 eruptions of Mount Spurr in Alaska have been most encouraging.

  2. Pulmonary response to Mount St. Helens' volcanic ash.

    PubMed

    Vallyathan, V; Mentnech, M S; Tucker, J H; Green, F H

    1983-04-01

    The pulmonary response to a sedimented sample of Mount St. Helens' volcanic ash from the first eruption was studied at 1, 7, 28, 90, and 180 days postintratracheal administration of 1 or 10 mg of ash in specific-pathogen-free rats. One day administration of volcanic ash all animals exhibited a marked inflammatory cell response centered on respiratory bronchioles in which polymorphonuclear leukocytes predominated. At 7 days the reaction was characterized by mononuclear cellular infiltrates. The macrophages within the respiratory bronchioles and alveoli contained intracytoplasmic ash particles. At 28 days the intraalveolar aggregates of mononuclear cells had condensed to form granulomas. Most of the granulomas contained foreign body-type giant cells and some showed central necrosis. The granulomas enlarged in size from 28 days until the termination of the experiment at 180 days with progressive increase in the amount of collagenous tissue. The results of these studies suggest that the volcanic ash may pose a risk for pneumoconiosis in heavily exposed human populations.

  3. Volcanic Plume Above Mount St. Helens Detected with GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlié, N.; Briole, P.; Nercessian, A.; Murakami, M.

    2005-07-01

    Eruptions can produce not only flows of incandescent material along the slopes of a volcano but also ash plumes in the troposphere [Sparks et al., 1997] that can threaten aircraft flying in the vicinity [Fisher et al., 1997]. To protect aircraft, passengers, and crews, the International Civil Aviation Organization and the World Meteorological Organization created eight Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC, http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/VAAC/vaac.html) around the globe with the goal of tracking volcanic plumes and releasing eruption alerts to airports, pilots, and companies. Currently, the VAAC monitoring system is based mostly on the monitoring systems of any local volcano observatories and on real-time monitoring of data acquired by meteorological satellites. In the case of the 18 August 2000 eruption of the Miyakejima volcano in Japan, Houlié et al. [2005] showed that the Global Positioning System(GPS) might be used as an additional tool for monitoring volcanic plumes. The present article indicates that the 9 March 2005 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, also produced detectable anomalies in GPS data.>

  4. Estimation of Volcanic Ash Plume Top Height using AATSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, Timo; Kolmonen, Pekka; Sogacheva, Larisa; Sundström, Anu-Maija; Rodriguez, Edith; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    The AATSR Correlation Method (ACM) height estimation algorithm is presented. The algorithm uses Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) satellite data to detect volcanic ash plumes and to estimate the plume top height. The height estimate is based on the stereo-viewing capability of the AATSR instrument, which allows to determine the parallax between the satellite's 55° forward and nadir views, and thus the corresponding height. Besides the stereo view, AATSR provides another advantage compared to other satellite based instruments. With AATSR it is possible to detect ash plumes using brightness temperature difference between thermal infrared (TIR) channels centered at 11 and 12 µm. The automatic ash detection makes the algorithm efficient in processing large quantities of data: the height estimate is calculated only for the ash-flagged pixels. In addition, it is possible to study the effect of using different wavelengths in the height estimate, ranging from visible (555 nm) to thermal infrared (12 µm). The ACM algorithm can be applied to the Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR), scheduled for launch at the end of 2015. Accurate information on the volcanic ash position is important for air traffic safety. The ACM algorithm can provide valuable data of both horizontal and vertical ash dispersion. These data may be useful for comparisons with existing volcanic ash dispersion models and retrieval methods. We present ACM plume top height estimate results for the Eyjafjallajökull eruption, and comparisons against available ground based and satellite observations.

  5. Steam treatment of volcanic cinder media for the eradication of Rotylenchulus reniformis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volcanic cinder has historically been free of plant parasitic nematodes. The recent contamination of cinder media by Rotylenchulus reniformis in Hawaii necessitates growers to steam sterilize cinder used in potted plant exports. Certification requirements call for the center of the media to reach ...

  6. Volcanism and associated hazards: the Andean perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilling, R. I.

    2009-12-01

    Andean volcanism occurs within the Andean Volcanic Arc (AVA), which is the product of subduction of the Nazca Plate and Antarctica Plates beneath the South America Plate. The AVA is Earth's longest but discontinuous continental-margin volcanic arc, which consists of four distinct segments: Northern Volcanic Zone, Central Volcanic Zone, Southern Volcanic Zone, and Austral Volcanic Zone. These segments are separated by volcanically inactive gaps that are inferred to indicate regions where the dips of the subducting plates are too shallow to favor the magma generation needed to sustain volcanism. The Andes host more volcanoes that have been active during the Holocene (past 10 000 years) than any other volcanic region in the world, as well as giant caldera systems that have produced 6 of the 47 largest explosive eruptions (so-called "super eruptions") recognized worldwide that have occurred from the Ordovician to the Pleistocene. The Andean region's most powerful historical explosive eruption occurred in 1600 at Huaynaputina Volcano (Peru). The impacts of this event, whose eruptive volume exceeded 11 km3, were widespread, with distal ashfall reported at distances >1000 km away. Despite the huge size of the Huaynaputina eruption, human fatalities from hazardous processes (pyroclastic flows, ashfalls, volcanogenic earthquakes, and lahars) were comparatively small owing to the low population density at the time. In contrast, lahars generated by a much smaller eruption (<0.05 km3) in 1985 of Nevado del Ruiz (Colombia) killed about 25 000 people - the worst volcanic disaster in the Andean region as well as the second worst in the world in the 20th century. The Ruiz tragedy has been attributed largely to ineffective communications of hazards information and indecisiveness by government officials, rather than any major deficiencies in scientific data. Ruiz's disastrous outcome, however, together with responses to subsequent hazardous eruptions in Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and

  7. Volcanism and associated hazards: The Andean perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, R.I.

    2009-01-01

    Andean volcanism occurs within the Andean Volcanic Arc (AVA), which is the product of subduction of the Nazca Plate and Antarctica Plates beneath the South America Plate. The AVA is Earth's longest but discontinuous continental-margin volcanic arc, which consists of four distinct segments: Northern Volcanic Zone, Central Volcanic Zone, Southern Volcanic Zone, and Austral Volcanic Zone. These segments are separated by volcanically inactive gaps that are inferred to indicate regions where the dips of the subducting plates are too shallow to favor the magma generation needed to sustain volcanism. The Andes host more volcanoes that have been active during the Holocene (past 10 000 years) than any other volcanic region in the world, as well as giant caldera systems that have produced 6 of the 47 largest explosive eruptions (so-called "super eruptions") recognized worldwide that have occurred from the Ordovician to the Pleistocene.

    The Andean region's most powerful historical explosive eruption occurred in 1600 at Huaynaputina Volcano (Peru). The impacts of this event, whose eruptive volume exceeded 11 km3, were widespread, with distal ashfall reported at distances >1000 km away. Despite the huge size of the Huaynaputina eruption, human fatalities from hazardous processes (pyroclastic flows, ashfalls, volcanogenic earthquakes, and lahars) were comparatively small owing to the low population density at the time. In contrast, lahars generated by a much smaller eruption (<0.05 km 3) in 1985 of Nevado del Ruiz (Colombia) killed about 25 000 people - the worst volcanic disaster in the Andean region as well as the second worst in the world in the 20th century. The Ruiz tragedy has been attributed largely to ineffective communications of hazards information and indecisiveness by government officials, rather than any major deficiencies in scientific data. Ruiz's disastrous outcome, however, together with responses to subsequent hazardous eruptions in Chile, Colombia

  8. Dating of the late Quaternary volcanic events using Uranium-series technique on travertine deposit: A case study in Ihlara, Central Anatolia Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Volkan; Tonguç Uysal, İ.; Ünal-İmer, Ezgi

    2016-04-01

    Dating of late Quaternary volcanism is crucial to understanding of the recent mechanism of crustal deformation and future volcanic explosivity risk of the region. However, radiometric dating of volcanic products has been a major challenge because of high methodological error rate. In most cases, there are difficulties on discrimination of the volcanic lava flow relations in the field. Furthermore, there would be unrecorded and unpreserved volcanoclastic layers by depositional and erosional processes. We present a new method that allows precise dating of late Quaternary volcanic events (in the time range of 0-500,000 years before present) using the Uranium-series technique on travertine mass, which is thought to be controlled by the young volcanism. Since the high pressure CO2 in the spring waters are mobilized during crustal strain cycles and the carbonates are precipitated in the fissures act as conduit for hot springs, thus, travertine deposits provide important information about crustal deformation. In this study we studied Ihlara fissure ridge travertines in the Central Anatolia Volcanic Province. This region is surrounded by many eruption centers (i.e. Hasandaǧı, Acıgöl and Göllüdaǧı) known as the late Quaternary and their widespread volcanoclastic products. Recent studies have suggested at least 11 events at around Acıgöl Caldera for the last 180 ka and 2 events at Hasandaǧı Stratovolcano for the last 30 ka. Active travertine masses around Ihlara deposited from hotwaters, which rise up through deep-penetrated fissures in volcanoclastic products of surrounding volcanoes. Analyses of the joint systems indicate that these vein structures are controlled by the crustal deformation due to young volcanism in the vicinity. Thus, the geological history of Ihlara travertine mass is regarded as a record of surrounding young volcanism. We dated 9 samples from 5 ridge-type travertine masses around Ihlara region. The age distribution indicates that the crustal

  9. Geologic evolution of the Jemez Mountains and their potential for future volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, B.W.

    1982-01-01

    Geophysical and geochemical data and the geologic history of the Rio Grande rift and the vicinity of the Jemez Mountains are summarized to determine the probability of future volcanic activity in the Los Alamos, New Mexico area. The apparent cyclic nature of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains may be related to intermittent thermal inputs into the volcanic system beneath the region. The Jemez lineament, an alignment of late Cenozoic volcanic centers that crosses the rift near Los Alamos, has played an important role in the volcanic evolution of the Jemez Mountains. Geophysical data suggest that there is no active shallow magma body beneath the Valles caldera, though magma probably exists at about 15 km beneath this portion of the rift. The rate of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains during the last 10 million years has been 5 x 10/sup -9//km/sup 2//y. Lava or ash flows overriding Laboratory radioactive waste disposal sites would have little potential to release radionuclides to the environment. The probability of a new volcano intruding close enough to a radioactive waste disposal site to effect radionuclide release is 2 x 10/sup -7//y.

  10. Re-processing TOMS UV Measurements to Retrieve SO2 Emissions From Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, B. L.; Krotkov, N. A.; Bhartia, P. K.; Li, C.; Haffner, D. P.; Leonard, P.; Carn, S. A.; Telling, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The SO2 Monitoring Group at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is producing a new multi-satellite long term data set of volcanic SO2 column amounts and heights (MSVOLSO2L4) as part of the NASA MEaSUREs Program. Here we present re-analysis of the UV measurements (BUV) from the NASA Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (N7 TOMS: 1978-1993). Ozone is the dominant atmospheric absorber in the BUV spectrum, but volcanic eruptions can produce enough SO2 to be distinguished from ozone background. Quantitative retrieval of volcanic SO2 requires:1) Separation of the O3 and SO2 absorption in BUV radiances;2) Close to zero mean SO2 background;3) RT forward model that accounts for the presence of volcanic ash in the plume; 4) A priori knowledge of the ozone and SO2 vertical profiles.Our iterative retrieval algorithm returns O3 and SO2 column amounts, effective reflectivity and its spectral slope. The retrieval model also generates a 4 x 4 gain matrix for the SO2 free regions that is used to soft calibrate the measured 340 nm BUV radiance. The spectral slope implicitly accounts for the interference of volcanic ash, but more explicit ash treatment is required to better quantify SO2 errors in volcanic plumes heavily loaded with ash. This presentation will discuss the methods used to characterize the error sources and assess the quality of this unique long-term SO2 data set.

  11. Volcanic eruptions; energy and size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    de la Cruz-Reyna, S.

    1991-01-01

    The Earth is a dynamic planet. Many different processes are continuously developing, creating a delicate balance between the energy stored and generated in its interior and the heat lost into space. The heat in continuously transferred through complex self-regulating convection mechanisms on a planetary scale. The distribution of terrestrial heat flow reveals some of the fine structure of the energy transport mechanisms in the outer layers of the Earth. Of these mechanisms in the outer layers of the Earth. Of these mechanisms, volcanism is indeed the most remarkable, for it allows energy to be transported in rapid bursts to the surface. In order to maintain the subtle balance of the terrestrial heat machine, one may expect that some law or principle restricts the ways in which these volcanic bursts affect the overall energy transfer of the Earth. For instance, we know that the geothermal flux of the planet amounts to 1028 erg/year. On the other hand, a single large event like the Lava Creek Tuff eruption that formed Yellowstone caldera over half a million years ago may release the same amount of energy in a very small area, over a short period of time. 

  12. Bromine oxidation in volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrowski, N.; Vogel, L.; Kern, C.; Giuffrida, G. B.; Delgado-Granados, H.; Platt, U.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanoes are very strong sources of hydrogen, carbon, sulphur and halogen compounds, as well as of particles. Some gases only behave as passive tracers; others interact and affect the formation, growth or chemical characteristics of aerosol particles in a complex system. Recent measurements of halogen radicals in volcanic plumes showed that volcanic plumes are chemically very active. Kinetic considerations (Oppenheimer et al., 2006) and detailed calculations with an atmospheric chemistry model (Bobrowski et al., 2007) explain the halogen chemistry mainly with photochemical reactions involving both, the gas and particle phase. They reproduce the measured gas-phase concentrations quite well. However, temporal evolution of BrO in the early plume is not well described in the models. The understanding of chemical kinetics of BrO formation is still not complete. Recent measurement results (Vogel et al., 2008) do not fit with initial model calculation. The new data lead to the suggestion that the BrO formation could be much faster during the first few minutes after emission than initially suggested. Old and recent data sets will be confronted, compared and possible causes of their differences discussed. The measurements considered were taken at Mt. Etna (Italy), Villarica (Chile), and Popocatépetl (Mexico) volcanoes. Additionally, at Mt Etna the emission consists of up to four individual plumes from four summit craters. The differences between the individual plumes have been investigated during the last years and will be presented.

  13. Observations of volcanic Lightning (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Behnke, S. A.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Edens, H. E.; McNutt, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    We have made detailed observations of lightning during four volcanic eruptions using lightning mapping array (LMA) stations. In January 2006 we observed several explosive eruptions from Augustine Volcano in Alaska with two LMA stations. While two stations only gave us the direction to the lightning it gave a detailed time history of the lightning in relationship to the eruption as measured by seismic and acoustic instruments. We inferred that there were two phases (explosive and plume) and three types of lightning (small discharges near the vent, larger discharges in the volcanic column, thunderstorm like lightning in the plume). In May 2008 we mapped lightning in the plume of Chaitan (Chile) three weeks after the initial eruption. In 2009 we observed the entire sequence of explosive eruptions of Redoubt Volcano in Alaska with 4 distant stations. This provided good 2-D locations of the electrical activity. In 2010 we mapped much of the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull using 6 LMA stations that provided 3-D locations. All the observations have reinforced the basic conclusions that we found at the Augustine eruption, and let us expand and refine the these ideas.

  14. Unraveling the volcanic and post-volcanic history at Upsal Hogback, Fallon, Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, E.; Cousens, B.

    2013-12-01

    Upsal Hogback is a < 25 ka phreatomagmatic volcanic center situated near Fallon, Nevada. The volcano neighbors two other young volcanic complexes: the Holocene Soda Lakes maars and Rattlesnake Hill, a ~ 1 Ma volcanic neck (Shevenell et al., 2005). These volcanoes lie on the transition between the Sierra Nevada and the Basin and Range province, as well as on the edge of the Walker Lane. Upsal Hogback includes two to four vents, fewer than mapped by Morrison (1964), and can be divided into north (one vent) and south (three potential vents) complexes. The vents all produced phreatomagmatic eruptions resulting in tuff rings composed primarily of coarse, indurated lapilli tuffs with abundant volcanic bombs. Ash tuffs are infrequent, as are structures such as crossbedding. The bombs and lapilli include olivine and plagioclase phenocrysts. The basalts are alkaline and have intraplate-type normalized incompatible element patterns. Both complexes are enriched in LREE compared to HREE, though the north complex overall has lower concentrations of the REE. The flat HREE pattern is indicative of spinel peridotite mantle source. Epsilon Nd values for the north complex are +2.50+/-0.02 and for the south complex are +2.83+/-0.02. The magmas appear to have an enriched asthenospheric mantle source. Bomb samples show that eruptions from the two complexes are geochemically distinguishable both in major and trace elements, suggesting that the two complexes tapped different magma types during eruptions that likely occurred at slightly different times. The proximity of Upsal Hogback to Fallon makes constraining its age important to characterize the hazard to the city. It lies above the Wono ash bed, dated at 25,000 years (Fultz et al., 1983), and tufa deposited over the edifice is dated at 11,100 +/- 100 and 8,600 +/- 200 years (Benson et al., 1992; Broecker and Kaufman, 1965). 40Ar/39Ar total gas age by Shevenell et al. (2005) dated the volcano at 0.60 +/- 0.09 Ma, but with no plateau

  15. A quaternary monogenetic volcanic field in the Xalapa region, eastern Trans-Mexican volcanic belt: Geology, distribution and morphology of the volcanic vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, S. R.; Morales-Barrera, W.; Layer, P.; González-Mercado, E.

    2010-11-01

    The most abundant volcanic manifestations along the east-west trending Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) are the scoria cones. These have been grouped by other authors in extended monogenetic volcanic fields such as Michoacán-Guanajuato, Chichinautzin, Apan and Los Tuxtlas. Here we present geological and morphological data of a relatively unknown group of monogenetic volcanoes located on the east flank of the Cofre de Perote volcano (CP), around the city of Xalapa in the state of Veracruz, Mexico. Within an area of about 2400 km 2, the "Xalapa Monogenetic Volcanic Field" (XMVF) contains over 50 late Quaternary volcanoes. Most of them are scoria cones, but small shield volcanoes and tuff rings also occur. The lava flows produced by these volcanoes are constrained by an abrupt topography and cover a great percentage of the surface on the eastern and northeastern flanks of CP, between 3000 and 500 m a.s.l. The representative rocks of the different volcanic centers include olivine basalt, basaltic andesite with phenocrysts of plagioclase, pyroxene and minor olivine, and andesite with phenocrysts of plagioclase and pyroxene. SiO 2 and Al 2O 3 contents of the rocks vary between 45 and 62 wt% and 15 to 18 wt%, respectively. Most of the basaltic rocks have MgO contents between 4.2 and 9 wt%, Ni and Cr concentrations between 23 and 180 and 10 to 380 ppm, respectively, with a typical calc-alkaline behavior. Trace elements suggest two types of magmas; the most abundant are characterized by an enrichment of LILE and LREE with negative anomalies of Nb and Ti, which denote a calc-alkaline affinity. Others are LILE depleted and show high concentrations of MgO, Cr, and Ni, which is typical of primary calc-alkaline magmas. The mean scoria cone morphological values are: cone height (Hco) = 90.8 m, cone diameter (Wco) = 686.38 m, crater diameter (Wcr) = 208.49 m and 0.12 km 3 for the cone volume. We dated twelve different scoria cones using the 40Ar/ 39Ar method; for the other

  16. Structure of the Volcanic Vent Distribution of the Cascades Arc from a New Database of Holocene and Pleistocene Volcanism, with Focus on Pre-Caldera Monogenetic Volcanism at Mount Mazana, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, L.; Karlstrom, L.; Ramsey, D. W.; Wright, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of volcanoes in the Cascades Arc, USA,reflects modulation of time-varying mantle melt influx by crustal magmatic plumbing and tectonic forces. The relative contribution of spatio-temporal source variations versus crustal focusing in generating the observed distribution of vents is poorly constrained. To identify patterns in preserved eruptive products and validate models for crustal magma transport we have assembled the most complete database of Cascades volcanism to date. Our database contains >2900 volcanic vent locations from the Holocene and Pleistocene, and includes vent types, ages, and major element geochemistry of eruptive products from the Holocene and Pleistocene. Bulk geochemistry is obtained from USGS Professional Papers and the American Volcanic and Intrusive Rock Database (NAVDAT). We also include arc-wide heat flow data, modeled ambient noise crustal seismic tomography and crust thickness interpolated to each vent. We perform spectral clustering on vent locations to define volcanic centers for the Holocene and Pleistocene. Centers found through Spectral Clustering reproduce the major loci of volcanism in the Cascades, and show time-varying structure in the number, type and distribution eruptions. There is significant North-South variation in vent type and distribution that correlates with variations in heat flow, bulk silica content and average crustal shear velocity. Although precise eruption ages for the complete dataset are not yet available, Mount Mazama, OR, has a well-resolved time/composition/volume/location history of eruptions <400 ka that allow for further analysis. The spatial distribution of Mazamaeruptive units does not follow a Poisson distribution when well resolved in time, but rather clusters around an evolved center that exhibits progressively more evolved eruptive products in time. Monogenetic eruptions preceding the 7.8 ka Crater Lake eruption define a spatial and temporal pattern that is

  17. Active Volcanism on Io as Seen by Galileo SSI

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, A.S.; Keszthelyi, L.; Geissler, P.; Simonelli, D.P.; Carr, M.H.; Johnson, T.V.; Klaasen, K.P.; Breneman, H.H.; Jones, T.J.; Kaufman, J.M.; Magee, K.P.; Senske, D.A.; Belton, M.J.S.; Schubert, G.

    1998-01-01

    -150 km high, long-lived, associated with high-temperature hot spots) may result from silicate lava flows or shallow intrusions interacting with near-surface SO2. A major and surprising result is that ~30 of Io's volcanic vents glow in the dark at the short wavelengths of SSI. These are probably due to thermal emission from surfaces hotter than 700 K (with most hotter than 1000 K), well above the temperature of pure sulfur volcanism. Active silicate volcanism appears ubiquitous. There are also widespread diffuse glows seen in eclipse, related to the interaction of energetic particles with the atmosphere. These diffuse glows are closely associated with the most active volcanic vents, supporting suggestions that Io's atmopshere is dominated by volcanic outgassing. Globally, volcanic centers are rather evenly distributed. However, 14 of the 15 active plumes seen by Voyager and/or Galileo are within 30?? of the equator, and there are concentrations of glows seen in eclipse at both the sub- and antijovian points. These patterns might be related to asthenospheric tidal heating or tidal stresses. Io will continue to be observed during the Galileo Europa Mission, which will climax with two close flybys of Io in late 1999. ?? 1998 Academic Press.

  18. Pattern of geochemical variations within the volcanic system of Mt Etna, Italy, from 1995 to 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsaro, Rosa Anna; Falsaperla, Susanna; Langer, Horst

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic and evolution of magma in the plumbing system are key aspects in the evaluation of volcanic hazard. Eruptive phenomena involve indeed processes of magma upraise and storage, which may change in time and space, and mirror in the composition of volcanic products. In this study, we analyze the pattern of geochemical variations at Etna, Italy, from 1995 to 2013. In this time span, volcanic activity affected all the four craters close to the summit of the volcano (located at about 3300 m above the sea level), and fed eruptive fissures along its upper flanks. In addition, a new crater formed and rapidly built up, giving rise to spectacular lava fountains from 2011 on. Based on a dataset containing the geochemical composition of volcanic products collected over 18 years, we explored the application of data mining methods in the framework of the European MEDiterrranean Supersite Volcanoes (MED­-SUV) project. In the present application, we discuss the relationships among the composition of volcanic products sampled from all the afore-mentioned eruptive centers. Our results highlight differences in magma evolution, dynamic and eruptive style even within a single eruptive center.

  19. The NASA Applied Sciences Program: Volcanic Ash Observations and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, John J.; Fairlie, Duncan; Green, David; Haynes, John; Krotkov, Nickolai; Meyer, Franz; Pavolonis, Mike; Trepte, Charles; Vernier, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Since 2000, the NASA Applied Sciences Program has been actively transitioning observations and research to operations. Particular success has been achieved in developing applications for NASA Earth Observing Satellite (EOS) sensors, integrated observing systems, and operational models for volcanic ash detection, characterization, and transport. These include imager applications for sensors such as the MODerate resolution Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MODIS) on NASA Terra and Aqua satellites, and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the NASA/NOAA Suomi NPP satellite; sounder applications for sensors such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on Aqua, and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on Suomi NPP; UV applications for the Ozone Mapping Instrument (OMI) on the NASA Aura Satellite and the Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite (OMPS) on Suomi NPP including Direct readout capabilities from OMI and OMPS in Alaska (GINA) and Finland (FMI):; and lidar applications from the Caliop instrument coupled with the imaging IR sensor on the NASA/CNES CALIPSO satellite. Many of these applications are in the process of being transferred to the Washington and Alaska Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC) where they support operational monitoring and advisory services. Some have also been accepted, transitioned and adapted for direct, onboard, automated product production in future U.S. operational satellite systems including GOES-R, and in automated volcanic cloud detection, characterization and alerting tools at the VAACs. While other observations and applications remain to be developed for the current constellation of NASA EOS sensors and integrated with observing and forecast systems, future requirements and capabilities for volcanic ash observations and applications are also being developed. Many of these are based on technologies currently being tested on NASA aircraft, Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) and balloons. All of these efforts and the potential advances

  20. Slope Stability in the Choco Volcanics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The rocks comprising the Choco volcanics, a formation crossed by the proposed Route 25 sea-level canal through northwestern Colombia, have been...found to slake in ethylene glycol. It is concluded that the factors of intermediate unconfined compressive strength and slaking will not cause massive slope failures of crater slopes formed in the Choco volcanic rocks.

  1. Long-term risk in a recently active volcanic system: Evaluation of doses and indoor radiological risk in the quaternary Vulsini Volcanic District (Central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaccioni, B.; Cinelli, G.; Mostacci, D.; Tositti, L.

    2012-12-01

    Volcanic rocks in the Vulsini Volcanic District (Central Italy) contain high concentrations of 238U, 232Th and 40K due to subduction-related metasomatic enrichment of incompatible elements in the mantle source coupled with magma differentiation within the upper crust. Due to their favorable mechanical properties they have been extensively used for construction since the Etruscan age. In the old buildings of the Bolsena village, one of the most populated ancient village in the area, the major source of indoor radioactivity is 222Rn, a radioactive noble gas descendant of 238U. Direct 222Rn indoor measurements have detected extremely high values in the old center due to the combined effect of building materials, radon fluxes from the volcanic basement and low air exchange rates. In these cases the evaluated risk of developing lung cancer within a 75 year lifetime reaches up to 40% for ever smokers. Simulations of "standard rooms" built with different tuffs and lavas collected from the Vulsini Volcanic District have also provided estimations of the effective doses and lifetime risk for radiogenic cancer. Other than by the method adopted for calculation, the total evaluated risk for each volcanic rock depends on different parameters, such as: radionuclide content, radon emanation power, occupancy factor and air exchange rate. Occupancy factor and air exchange rate appear as the only controlling parameters able to mitigate the indoor radiological risk.

  2. Geologic Map of Lassen Volcanic National Park and Vicinity, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clynne, M. A.; Muffler, L. J.

    2010-12-01

    We display a new geologic map of the Lassen area in the southern Cascade Range. The map is in press and will soon be available as U.S. Geological Survey SIM 2899. The 1:50,000 scale mapping is compiled from field mapping at 1:24,000. The 1:24,000 GIS dasebase will be included in electronic format on disk accompanying the printed map and has already proven of great use in a wide range of derivative products (Muffler and Clynne, this session). The map area, which includes 1,900 km2 centered on Lassen Volcanic National Park, is dominated by volcanic rocks ranging in age from about 3.5 Ma to Holocene. The map displays nearly 300 volcanic units, which were defined as individual or related groups of eruptive deposits. Stratigraphy is constrained by traditional mapping methods, but nearly 100 new K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar radiometric ages provide absolute age control for the relative stratigraphy. Additionally, some Holocene and latest Pleistocene deposits were dated by radiocarbon. Major-element chemical analyses used to characterize rock units were published separately. Glacial deposits are extensive, and the deposits of 5 recent glacial advances are mapped. Normal faults are common in the Lassen area, where the Cascade arc is intersected by the western margin of the extending Basin and Range province and the northward propagating Walker Lane belt. Products of two modes of volcanism are present in the Lassen area: rocks of mafic to intermediate composition related to distributed regional volcanism, and rocks of intermediate to felsic composition where focused volcanism has generated large volcanic centers. Two types of primitive basaltic magmas are present in the regional suite: a diverse array of low- to high-K calc-alkaline basalts generated by subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate system, and low-potassium olivine tholeiite related to the Basin and Range extensional province. Regional volcanoes range from small volume (<1 to a few km3) monogenetic cinder cones and lava flows

  3. Io: Heat flow from dark volcanic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeder, Glenn J.; Davies, Ashley Gerard; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.

    2009-11-01

    Dark flow fields on the jovian satellite Io are evidence of current or recent volcanic activity. We have examined the darkest volcanic fields and quantified their thermal emission in order to assess their contribution to Io's total heat flow. Loki Patera, the largest single source of heat flow on Io, is a convenient point of reference. We find that dark volcanic fields are more common in the hemisphere opposite Loki Patera and this large scale concentration is manifested as a maximum in the longitudinal distribution (near ˜200 °W), consistent with USGS global geologic mapping results. In spite of their relatively cool temperatures, dark volcanic fields contribute almost as much to Io's heat flow as Loki Patera itself because of their larger areal extent. As a group, dark volcanic fields provide an asymmetric component of ˜5% of Io's global heat flow or ˜5 × 10 12 W.

  4. Large Volume 18O-depleted Rhyolitic Volcanism: the Bruneau-Jarbidge Volcanic Field, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroughs, S.; Wolff, J.; Bonnichsen, B.; Godchaux, M. M.; Larson, P. B.

    2003-12-01

    The Bruneau-Jarbidge (BJ) volcanic field is located in southern Idaho at the intersection of the western and eastern arms of the Snake River Plain. The BJ region is an oval structural basin of about 6000 km2, and is likely a system of nested caldera and collapse structures similar to, though larger than, the Yellowstone Volcanic Plateau. BJ rocks are high-temperature rhyolite tuffs, high-temperature rhyolite lavas, and volumetrically minor basalts. Exposed volumes of individual rhyolite units range up to greater than 500 km3. We have analyzed feldspar and, where present, quartz from 30 rhyolite units emplaced throughout the history of the BJ center. All, including the Cougar Point Tuff, are 18O depleted (δ 18OFSP = -1.3 to 3.7‰ ), while petrographically, temporally, and chemically similar lavas erupted along the nearby Owyhee Front have "normal" rhyolite magmatic δ 18O values of 7 - 9‰ . There is no evidence for significant modification of δ 18O values by post-eruptive alteration. No correlation exists between δ 18O and age, magmatic temperature, major element composition or trace element abundances among depleted BJ rhyolites. The BJ and WSRP rhyolites possess the geochemical characteristics (depressed Al, Ca, Eu, and Sr contents, high Ga/Al and K/Na) expected of liquids derived from shallow melting of calc-alkaline granitoids with residual plagioclase and orthopyroxene (Patino-Douce, Geology v.25 p.743-746, 1997). The classic Yellowstone low δ 18O rhyolites are post-caldera collapse lavas, but at BJ, both lavas and caldera-forming ignimbrites are strongly 18O-depleted. The total volume of low δ 18O rhyolite may be as high as 10,000 km3, requiring massive involvement of meteoric-hydrothermally altered crust in rhyolite petrogenesis. Regional hydrothermal modification of the crust under the thermal influence of the Yellowstone hotspot apparently preceded voluminous rhyolite generation at Bruneau-Jarbidge.

  5. Volcanic Ash on Slopes of Karymsky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A volcanic eruption can produce gases, lava, bombs of rock, volcanic ash, or any combination of these elements. Of the volcanic products that linger on the land, most of us think of hardened lava flows, but volcanic ash can also persist on the landscape. One example of that persistence appeared on Siberia's Kamchatka Peninsula in spring 2007. On March 25, 2007, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of the area around the Karymsky Volcano. In this image, volcanic ash from earlier eruptions has settled onto the snowy landscape, leaving dark gray swaths. The ash stains are confined to the south of the volcano's summit, one large stain fanning out toward the southwest, and another toward the east. At first glance, the ash stain toward the east appears to form a semicircle north of the volcano and sweep back east. Only part of this dark shape, however, is actually volcanic ash. Near the coast, the darker color may result from thicker vegetation. Similar darker coloring appears to the south. Volcanic ash is not really ash at all, but tiny, jagged bits of rock and glass. These jagged particles pose serious health risks to humans and animals who might inhale them. Likewise, the ash poses hazards to animals eating plants that have been coated with ash. Because wind can carry volcanic ash thousands of kilometers, it poses a more far-reaching hazard than other volcanic ejecta. Substantial amounts of ash can even affect climate by blocking sunlight. Karymsky is a stratovolcano composed of alternating layers of solidified ash, hardened lava, and volcanic rocks. It is one of many active volcanoes on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, which is part of the 'Ring of Fire' around the Pacific Rim. NASA image created by Jesse Allen, using data provided courtesy of the NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team.

  6. Large Volcanic Rises on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smrekar, Suzanne E.; Kiefer, Walter S.; Stofan, Ellen R.

    1997-01-01

    Large volcanic rises on Venus have been interpreted as hotspots, or the surface manifestation of mantle upwelling, on the basis of their broad topographic rises, abundant volcanism, and large positive gravity anomalies. Hotspots offer an important opportunity to study the behavior of the lithosphere in response to mantle forces. In addition to the four previously known hotspots, Atla, Bell, Beta, and western Eistla Regiones, five new probable hotspots, Dione, central Eistla, eastern Eistla, Imdr, and Themis, have been identified in the Magellan radar, gravity and topography data. These nine regions exhibit a wider range of volcano-tectonic characteristics than previously recognized for venusian hotspots, and have been classified as rift-dominated (Atla, Beta), coronae-dominated (central and eastern Eistla, Themis), or volcano-dominated (Bell, Dione, western Eistla, Imdr). The apparent depths of compensation for these regions ranges from 65 to 260 km. New estimates of the elastic thickness, using the 90 deg and order spherical harmonic field, are 15-40 km at Bell Regio, and 25 km at western Eistla Regio. Phillips et al. find a value of 30 km at Atla Regio. Numerous models of lithospheric and mantle behavior have been proposed to interpret the gravity and topography signature of the hotspots, with most studies focusing on Atla or Beta Regiones. Convective models with Earth-like parameters result in estimates of the thickness of the thermal lithosphere of approximately 100 km. Models of stagnant lid convection or thermal thinning infer the thickness of the thermal lithosphere to be 300 km or more. Without additional constraints, any of the model fits are equally valid. The thinner thermal lithosphere estimates are most consistent with the volcanic and tectonic characteristics of the hotspots. Estimates of the thermal gradient based on estimates of the elastic thickness also support a relatively thin lithosphere (Phillips et al.). The advantage of larger estimates of

  7. Assessing volcanic hazards with Vhub

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, J. L.; Charbonnier, S.; Courtland, L.; Valentine, G.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.

    2012-04-01

    Vhub (online at vhub.org) is a virtual organization and community cyberinfrastructure designed for collaboration in volcanology research, education, and outreach. One of the core objectives of this project is to accelerate the transfer of research tools to organizations and stakeholders charged with volcano hazard and risk mitigation (such as volcano observatories). Vhub offers a clearinghouse for computational models of volcanic processes and data analysis, documentation of those models, and capabilities for online collaborative groups focused on issues such as code development, configuration management, benchmarking, and validation. Vhub supports computer simulations and numerical modeling at two levels: (1) some models can be executed online via Vhub, without needing to download code and compile on the user's local machine; (2) other models are not available for online execution but for offline use in the user's computer. VHub also has wikis, blogs and group functions around specific topics to encourage collaboration, communication and discussion. Some of the simulation tools currently available to Vhub users are: Energy Cone (rapid delineation of the impact zone by pyroclastic density currents), Tephra2 (tephra dispersion forecast tool), Bent (atmospheric plume analysis), Hazmap (simulate sedimentation of volcanic particles) and TITAN2D (mass flow simulation tool). The list of online simulations available on Vhub is expected to expand considerably as the volcanological community becomes more involved in the project. This presentation focuses on the implementation of online simulation tools, and other Vhub's features, for assessing volcanic hazards following approaches similar to those reported in the literature. Attention is drawn to the minimum computational resources needed by the user to carry out such analyses, and to the tools and media provided to facilitate the effective use of Vhub's infrastructure for hazard and risk assessment. Currently the project

  8. Volcanoes of México: An Interactive CD-ROM From the Smithsonian's Global Volcanism Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, L.; Kimberly, P.; Calvin, C.; Luhr, J. F.; Kysar, G.

    2002-12-01

    The Smithsonian Institution's Global Volcanism Program is nearing completion of an interactive CD-ROM, the Volcanoes of México. This CD is the second in a series sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Geothermal Technologies to collate Smithsonian data on Quaternary volcanism as a resource for the geothermal community. It also has utility for those concerned with volcanic hazard and risk mitgation as well as an educational tool for those interested in Mexican volcanism. We acknowledge the significant contributions of many Mexican volcanologists to the eruption reports, data, and images contained in this CD, in particular those contributions of the Centro Nacional de Prevencion de Desastres (CENAPRED), the Colima Volcano Observatory of the University of Colima, and the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). The Volcanoes of México CD has a format similar to that of an earlier Smithsonian CD, the Volcanoes of Indonesia, but also shows Pleistocene volcanic centers and additional data on geothermal sites. A clickable map of México shows both Holocene and Pleistocene volcanic centers and provides access to individual pages on 67 volcanoes ranging from Cerro Prieto in Baja California to Tacaná on the Guatemalan border. These include geographic and geologic data on individual volcanoes (as well as a brief paragraph summarizing the geologic history) along with tabular eruption chronologies, eruptive characteristics, and eruptive volumes, when known. Volcano data are accessible from both geographical and alphabetical searches. A major component of the CD is more than 400 digitized images illustrating the morphology of volcanic centers and eruption processes and deposits, providing a dramatic visual primer to the country's volcanoes. Images of specific eruptions can be directly linked to from the eruption chronology tables. The Volcanoes of México CD includes monthly reports and associated figures and tables cataloging volcanic activity in M

  9. An atlas of volcanic ash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiken, G.

    1974-01-01

    Volcanic ash samples collected from a variety of recent eruptions were studied, using petrography, chemical analyses, and scanning electron microscopy to characterize each ash type and to relate ash morphology to magma composition and eruption type. The ashes are best placed into two broad genetic categories: magnetic and hydrovolcanic (phreatomagmatic). Ashes from magmatic eruptions are formed when expanding gases in the magma form a froth that loses its coherence as it approaches the ground surface. During hydrovolcanic eruptions, the magma is chilled on contact with ground or surface waters, resulting in violent steam eruptions. Within these two genetic categories, ashes from different magma types can be characterized. The pigeon hole classification used here is for convenience; there are eruptions which are driven by both phreatic and magmatic gases.

  10. Feedback Between Volcanism and Milankovitch Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langmuir, C. H.; Huybers, P.

    2008-12-01

    Deglaciation is known to induce volcanism in many regions, notably Iceland. Since volcanism contributes CO2 to the atmosphere, we have investigated the global extent of glacially induced magmatism, and whether such volcanism may contribute to the co-variation between atmospheric CO2 and glacial cycles over the course of the late Pleistocene. Investigation of two combined global data sets on dated eruptions shows that global frequency of subaerial volcanic events increases substantially between 12Ka and 7Ka. An important aspect of the data is the temporal bias. While the record extends to 40,000 years, 80% of dated eruptions occur in the last 1000 years. The observation appears robust despite the temporal bias because it is apparent when comparing the 12-7Ka data with both older and younger time intervals. Application of a correction for the temporal bias indicates that global volcanic activity increases by a factor of 3-5 during this time interval. Increased volcanism can be confidently linked to deglaciation both in terms of location and mechanism. All of the increase occurs in regions thought to have experienced significant deglaciation, that is, predominantly high latitude or high elevation regions with significant precipitation. We show that two possible mechanisms may be important. As previously known from Iceland, deglaciation leads to decompression melting of the underlying mantle, yielding more magmatic input to volcanoes beneath ablating ice. In addition, pacing of volcanic eruptions reflects a balance between the forces generated by melt production and degassing, and the confining pressure and integrity of the surrounding rocks. A simple pacing model based on an eruption threshold and observed power law behavior of eruption frequency with number of volcanoes shows that ice volumes changes (estimated from oceanic δ18O) could also cluster the timing of volcanic eruptions near times of deglaciation. The influence of deglaciation upon volcanism is thus

  11. Volcanism on Venus: Large shields and major accumulations of small domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaber, Gerald G.; Kozak, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    The outer layers of the Venusian lithosphere appear to dissipate heat from the interior through mantle-driven thermal anomalies (hot spots, swells). As a result, Venus exhibits diverse forms of thin-skin tectonism and magmatic transfer to and extrusion from countless numbers of volcanic centers (e.g., shields, paterae, domes) and volcano-tectonic complexes (e.g., coronae, arachnoids). What is known about the distribution and morphologies of major Venusian shields is summarized, and the evidence for possible structural control of major accumulations as long as 5000 km of small volcanic domes is described.

  12. Stages of recent volcanism and problems of their correlation with landscape formation in the central Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koronovskii, N. V.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents a first comparison of the isotopic ages of Pliocene-Quaternary volcanic rocks of the Greater Caucasus with the time of creation of various forms of the modern relief. The latter are associated with lava flows and volcanic centers identified from the study of neotectonic movements, geomorphology, and glacial stages. It is demonstrated that the results of chronological subdivision of lava flows using geomorphological and neotectonic methods, in comparison with the isotopic data, generally agree with each other in this area and ensure more reliable dating of glaciation epochs in the Greater Caucasus. Despite the overall similarity of the data, some contradictions have been revealed and possible causes are considered.

  13. The geology of Picacho Butte, a silicic volcanic dome in northwest Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kisiel, Andrew P.; King, John S.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the geologic history of Picacho Butte and vicinity through careful mapping of a 38 square kilometer area surrounding the peak. A detailed analysis of the geochemistry and petrology will aid in the development of a petrogenetic model for the area. The relationship of Picacho Butte to regional volcanism in Arizona, and more specifically to nearby volcanic centers can thus be established. Furthermore, in conjunction with this study a search will be made for possible planetary analogs exhibiting photogeologic characteristics similar to those in northern Arizona.

  14. The Relationship Between the Signature of Subducted Sediments in Volcanic Gases and Volatile Flux along the Central American Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, T. P.; Zimmer, M. M.; Hilton, D. R.; Shaw, A. M.; Cameron, B. I.; Walker, J. A.; Molina C., E.

    2002-05-01

    Volcanic arcs are locations where elements are recycled from the Earth's surface into the mantle. Fluxes of volcanic volatile emissions can vary significantly along a single arc and a fundamental aim of arc-related studies is to quantify these variations and compare them to subduction zone parameters. As part of the Central American arc study, we report N2, He and Ar abundance relationships and N-isotope ratios for 7 volcanic centers in Guatemala to complement on-going studies in Costa Rica. In Guatemala, the arc crust is thicker and older than in Costa Rica and the entire sediment sequence on the down-going plate is likely to contribute to the slab flux. Sulfur dioxide fluxes vary significantly along the arc (2001 measurements): in the Guatemala segment, Fuego and Pacaya emit a total of ~1500 t/day whereas in Costa Rica, Arenal and Poas are emitting only ~190 t/day. The Guatemalan volcanic centers of Amatitlan-Pacaya, Fuego, Moyuta, Tecuamburro, Amatitlan, Zunil and San Marcos have N2/He ratios ranging from 2200 - 8100, typical for arc-related fluids. N2/Ar ratios (40-500) and the high N2/He indicate addition of N2 from subducted sediments or arc crust to a mantle derived component (N2/He < 200). The high N2/He ratios of Guatemala are in contrast to typical mantle-derived N2/He ratios (160 - 600) measured at Poas and Turialba, Costa Rica. Nitrogen isotope ratios for the Guatemalan volcanic centers range from δ 15N = + 1.0‰ for San Marcos to + 5.8‰ for Fuego (δ 15N air = 0.0‰ ), indicating a sedimentary nitrogen component. The mantle-derived N2/He ratios for Poas (- 3.0‰ ) are consistent with a more mantle-like δ 15N. In Guatemala, the highest 3He/4He ratios (7.6 for Pacaya and 7.3 Ra for Fuego) correlate with the lowest N2/He ratios (1500 and 2100) and high δ 15N values (+3.8‰ and +5.8‰ ). Mixing relationships (3He/4He and δ 15N) suggest that at Fuego and Pacaya up to 20% of the nitrogen is of subducted sedimentary origin, contrary to Poas and

  15. Biotic effects of impacts and volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Gerta

    2003-10-01

    The biotic effects of late Maastrichtian mantle plume volcanism on Ninetyeast Ridge and Deccan volcanism mirror those of the Cretaceous-Tertiary (KT) mass extinction and impact event. Planktonic foraminifera responded to high stress conditions with the same impoverished and small-sized species assemblages dominated by the disaster/opportunists Guembelitria cretacea, which characterize the KT mass extinction worldwide. Similar high stress late Maastrichtian assemblages have recently been documented from Madagascar, Israel and Egypt. Biotic effects of volcanism cannot be differentiated from those of impacts, though every period of intense volcanism is associated with high stress assemblages, this is not the case with every impact. The most catastrophic biotic effects occurred at the KT boundary (65.0 Ma) when intense Deccan volcanism coincided with a major impact and caused the mass extinction of all tropical and subtropical species. The Chicxulub impact, which now appears to have predated the KT boundary by about 300 kyr, coincided with intense Deccan volcanism that resulted in high biotic stress and greenhouse warming, but no major extinctions. The unequivocal connection between intense volcanism and high stress assemblages during the late Maastrichtian to early Danian, and the evidence of multiple impacts, necessitates revision of current impact and mass extinction theories.

  16. Explosive volcanism: Inception, evolution, and hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    One purpose of the studies is to provide assessments from the scientific community to aid policymakers in decisions on societal problems that involve geophysics. An important part of such an assessment is an evaluation of the adequacy of present geophysical knowledge and the appropriateness of present research programs to provide information required for those decisions. Some of the studies place more emphasis on assessing the present status of a field of geophysics and identifying the most promising directions for future research. This study on explosive volcanism was begun soon after the cataclysmic eruptions of Mount St. Helens. It readily became apparent to the committee that an assessment of the explosive nature of volcanoes must cover all types of volcanic activity; any volcano can be explosive. Improved understanding of the physics of volcanic eruptions is an exciting goal that is vital to progress in hazard evaluation. The study of explosive volcanism must include an appreciation of the severe social problems that are caused by erupting volcanoes. None is of greater urgency than planning for a crisis. This report considers the progress in research on these aspects of explosive volcanism and the need for additional research efforts. This volume contains 13 papers. Topics include tectonism, volcanism, volcanic periodicity, eruptive mechanics, emergency planning and recommendations. Individual papers are indexed separately on the energy data base.

  17. Attracting structures in volcanic ash transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jifeng

    2009-11-01

    Volcanic eruptions and ash clouds are a natural hazard that poses direct threats to aviation safety. They may also affect human and ecosystem health. Many transport and dispersion models have been developed to forecast trajectories of volcanic ash clouds, as well as to plan safety measures. Predictions based on these models are heavily dependent on initial parameters of ash clouds, e.g., location, height, particle size and density distribution, water vs. ash content, etc. However, these initial parameters are usually difficult to determine, leading to possible inaccurate predictions of ash clouds trajectories. In this study, a dynamical systems approach is combined with volcanic ash transport models to help improve prediction. A type of attracting structures in volcanic ash transport is identified. These structures act as attractors in volcanic ash transport, and they are independent of initial parameters of specific volcanic eruptions. The attracting structures are associated with hazard zones with high concentrations of volcanic ash. And the prediction in hazard maps can be used to plan flight route diversions and ground evacuations.

  18. Attracting structures in volcanic ash transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, J.; Peterson, R.

    2009-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions and ash clouds are a natural hazard that poses direct threats to aviation safety. They may also affect human and ecosystem health. Many transport and dispersion models have been developed to forecast trajectories of volcanic ash clouds, as well as to plan safety measures. Predictions based on these models are heavily dependent on initial parameters of ash clouds, e.g., location, height, particle size and density distribution, water vs. ash content, etc. However, these initial parameters are usually difficult to determine, leading to possible inaccurate predictions of ash clouds trajectories. In this study, a dynamical systems approach is combined with volcanic ash transport models to help improve prediction. A type of attracting structures in volcanic ash transport is identified. These structures act as attractors in volcanic ash transport, and are largely independent of initial parameters of specific volcanic eruptions. The attracting structures are associated with hazard zones with high concentrations of volcanic ash. The prediction in hazard maps can be used to plan flight route diversions and ground evacuations.

  19. Mapping the topography and cone morphology of the Dalinor volcanic swarm in Inner Mongolia with remote sensing and DEM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Liwen; Li, Ni; Fan, Qicheng; Zhao, Yongwei; Zhang, Liuyi; Zhang, Chuanjie

    2016-09-01

    The Dalinor volcanic swarm, located south of Xilinhot, Inner Mongolia of China, was a result of multistage eruptions that occurred since the Neogene period. This swarm is mainly composed of volcanic cones and lava tablelands. The objective of this study is to map the topography and morphology of this volcanic swarm. It is based on a variety of data collected from various sources, such as the digital elevation model (DEM), Landsat images, and a 1:50,000 topographic map, in addition to various software platforms, including ArcGIS, Envi4.8, Global Mapper, and Google Earth for data processing and interpretation. The results show that the overall topography of the volcanic swarm is a platform with a central swell having great undulation, sizable gradient variations, a rough surface, and small terrain relief. According to the undulating characteristics of the line profile, the volcanic swarm can be divided into four stairs with heights of 1,280 m, 1,360 m, 1,440 m, and 1,500 m. The analysis of the swath profile characterizes the two clusters of volcanoes with different height ranges and evolution. The lava tablelands and volcanic cones are distributed in nearly EW-trending belts, where tableland coverage was delineated with superposed layers of gradients and degrees of relief. According to the morphology, the volcanic cones were classified into four types: conical, composite, dome, and shield. The formation causes and classification basis for each type of volcanic cone were analyzed and their parameters were extracted. The H/D ratios of all types of volcanic cones were then statistically determined and projected to create a map of volcanic density distribution. Based on the relationship between distribution and time sequence of the formation of different volcanic cones, it can be inferred that the volcanic eruptions migrated from the margins to the center of the lava plateau. The central area was formed through superposition of multi-stage eruptive materials. In addition

  20. MISR Observations of Etna Volcanic Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scollo, S.; Kahn, R. A.; Nelson, D. L.; Coltelli, M.; Diner, D. J.; Garay, M. J.; Realmuto, V. J.

    2012-01-01

    In the last twelve years, Mt. Etna, located in eastern Sicily, has produced a great number of explosive eruptions. Volcanic plumes have risen to several km above sea level and created problems for aviation and the communities living near the volcano. A reduction of hazards may be accomplished using remote sensing techniques to evaluate important features of volcanic plumes. Since 2000, the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) on board NASA s Terra spacecraft has been extensively used to study aerosol dispersal and to extract the three-dimensional structure of plumes coming from anthropogenic or natural sources, including volcanoes. In the present work, MISR data from several explosive events occurring at Etna are analyzed using a program named MINX (MISR INteractive eXplorer). MINX uses stereo matching techniques to evaluate the height of the volcanic aerosol with a precision of a few hundred meters, and extracts aerosol properties from the MISR Standard products. We analyzed twenty volcanic plumes produced during the 2000, 2001, 2002-03, 2006 and 2008 Etna eruptions, finding that volcanic aerosol dispersal and column height obtained by this analysis is in good agreement with ground-based observations. MISR aerosol type retrievals: (1) clearly distinguish volcanic plumes that are sulphate and/or water vapor dominated from ash-dominated ones; (2) detect even low concentrations of volcanic ash in the atmosphere; (3) demonstrate that sulphate and/or water vapor dominated plumes consist of smaller-sized particles compared to ash plumes. This work highlights the potential of MISR to detect important volcanic plume characteristics that can be used to constrain the eruption source parameters in volcanic ash dispersion models. Further, the possibility of discriminating sulphate and/or water vapor dominated plumes from ash-dominated ones is important to better understand the atmospheric impact of these plumes.

  1. Volcanic sulfate aerosol formation in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Erwan; Bekki, Slimane; Ninin, Charlotte; Bindeman, Ilya

    2014-11-01

    The isotopic composition of volcanic sulfate provides insights into the atmospheric chemical processing of volcanic plumes. First, mass-independent isotopic anomalies quantified by Δ17O and to a lesser extent Δ33S and Δ36S in sulfate depend on the relative importance of different oxidation mechanisms that generate sulfate aerosols. Second, the isotopic composition of sulfate (δ34S and δ18O) could be an indicator of fractionation (distillation/condensation) processes occurring in volcanic plumes. Here we present analyses of O- and S isotopic compositions of volcanic sulfate absorbed on very fresh volcanic ash from nine moderate historical eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere. Most of our volcanic sulfate samples, which are thought to have been generated in the troposphere or in the tropopause region, do not exhibit any significant mass-independent fractionation (MIF) isotopic anomalies, apart from those from an eruption of a Mexican volcano. Coupled to simple chemistry model calculations representative of the background atmosphere, our data set suggests that although H2O2 (a MIF-carrying oxidant) is thought to be by far the most efficient sulfur oxidant in the background atmosphere, it is probably quickly consumed in large dense tropospheric volcanic plumes. We estimate that in the troposphere, at least, more than 90% of volcanic secondary sulfate is not generated by MIF processes. Volcanic S-bearing gases, mostly SO2, appear to be oxidized through channels that do not generate significant isotopically mass-independent sulfate, possibly via OH in the gas phase and/or transition metal ion catalysis in the aqueous phase. It is also likely that some of the sulfates sampled were not entirely produced by atmospheric oxidation processes but came out directly from volcanoes without any MIF anomalies.

  2. Two classes of volcanic plumes on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, A.S.; Soderblom, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    Comparison of Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 images of the south polar region of Io has revealed that a major volcanic eruption occured there during the period between the two spacecraft encounters. An annular deposit ???1400 km in diameter formed around the Aten Patera caldera (311??W, 48??S), the floor of which changed from orange to red-black. The characteristics of this eruption are remarkably similar to those described earlier for an eruption centered on Surt caldera (338??W, 45??N) that occured during the same period, also at high latitude, but in the north. Both volcanic centers were evidently inactive during the Voyager 1 and 2 encounters but were active sometime between the two. The geometric and colorimetric characteristics, as well as scale of the two annular deposits, are virtually identical; both resemble the surface features formed by the eruption of Pele (255??W, 18??S). These three very large plume eruptions suggest a class of eruption distinct from that of six smaller plumes observed to be continously active by both Voyagers 1 and 2. The smaller plumes, of which Prometheus is the type example, are longer-lived, deposit bright, whitish material, erupt at velocities of ???0.5 km sec-1, and are concentrated at low latitudes in an equatorial belt around the satellite. The very large Pele-type plumes, on the other hand, are relatively short-lived, deposit darker red materials, erupt at ???1.0 km sec-1, and (rather than restricted to a latitudinal band) are restricted in longitude from 240?? to 360??W. Both direct thermal infrared temperature measurements and the implied color temperatures for quenched liquid sulfur suggest that hot spot temperatures of ???650??K are associated with the large plumes and temperatures 650??K), sulfur is a low-viscosity fluid (orange and black, respectively); at other temperatures it is either solid or has a high viscosity. As a result, there will be two zones in Io's crust in which liquid sulfur will flow freely: a shallow zone

  3. Numerical modeling of volcanic arc development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, T.; Gorczyk, W.; Nikolaeva, K.

    2007-05-01

    We have created a new coupled geochemical-petrological-thermomechanical numerical model of subduction associated with volcanic arc development. The model includes spontaneous slab bending, subducted crust dehydration, aqueous fluid transport, mantle wedge melting and melt extraction resulting in crustal growth. Two major volcanic arc settings are modeled so far: active continental margins, and intraoceanic subduction. In case of Pacific-type continental margin two fundamentally different regimes of melt productivity are observed in numerical experiments which are in line with natural observations: (1) During continuous convergence with coupled plates highest amounts of melts are formed immediately after the initiation of subduction and then decrease rapidly with time due to the steepening of the slab inclination angle precluding formation of partially molten mantle wedge plumes; (2) During subduction associated with slab delamination and trench retreat resulting in the formation of a pronounced back arc basin with a spreading center in the middle melt production increases with time due to shallowing/stabilization of slab inclination associated with upward asthenospheric mantle flow toward the extension region facilitating propagation of hydrous partially molten plumes from the slab. In case of spontaneous nucleation of retreating oceanic subduction two scenarios of tecono-magmatic evolution are distinguished: (1) decay and, ultimately, the cessation of subduction and related magmatic activity, (2) increase in subduction rate (to up to ~12 cm/yr) and stabilization of subduction and magmatic arc growth. In the first case the duration of subduction correlates positively with the intensity of melt extraction: the period of continued subduction increases from 15,4 Myrs to 47,6 Myrs with the increase of melt extraction threshold from 1% to 9%. In scenario (1) the magmatic arc crust includes large amounts of rocks formed by melting of subducted crust atop the thermally

  4. Using high-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronology to understand volcanic hazards within the Rio Grande rift and along the Jemez lineament, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerer, M. J.; McIntosh, W. C.; Heizler, M. T.; Lafferty, J.

    2014-12-01

    High-precision Ar/Ar ages were generated for late Quaternary volcanic fields in the Rio Grande rift and along the Jemez Lineament, New Mexico, to assess the time-space patterns of volcanism and begin quantifying volcanic hazards for the region. The published chronology of most late Quaternary volcanic centers in the region is not sufficiently precise, accurate, or complete for a comprehensive volcanic hazard assessment. Ar/Ar ages generated as part of this study were determined using the high-sensitivity, multi-collector ARGUS VI mass spectrometer, which provides about an order of magnitude more precise isotopic measurements compared to older generation, single-detector mass spectrometers. Ar/Ar ages suggest an apparent increase in eruption frequency during the late Quaternary within the Raton-Clayton volcanic field, northeastern NM. Only four volcanoes erupted between 426±8 and 97±3 ka. Contrastingly, four volcanoes erupted between 55±2 and 32±5 ka. This last eruptive phase displays a west to east migration of volcanism, has repose periods of 0 to 17 ka, and an average recurrence rate of 1 eruption per 5750 ka. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, west-central NM, is composed of the ~100 late Quaternary basaltic vents. Preliminary results suggest that most of the Chain of Craters, the largest and oldest part of the Zuni-Bandera field, erupted between ~100 and 250 ka. Volcanism then migrated to the east, where published ages indicate at least seven eruptions between 50 and 3 ka. Both volcanic fields display a west to east migration of volcanism during the last ~500 ka, although the pattern is more pronounced in the Zuni-Bandera field. A reassessment of low-precision published ages for other late Quaternary volcanic fields in region indicates that most fields display a similar west to east migration of volcanism during the last ~500 ka. One possible mechanism to explain the observed patterns of volcanism is the westward migration of the North American plate relative

  5. Optical Properties of Volcanic Ash: Improving Remote Sensing Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelley, P.; Colarco, P. R.; Aquila, V.; Krotkov, N. A.; Bleacher, J. E.; Garry, W. B.; Young, K. E.; Lima, A. R.; Martins, J. V.; Carn, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Many times each year explosive volcanic eruptions loft ash into the atmosphere. Global travel and trade rely on aircraft vulnerable to encounters with airborne ash. Volcanic ash advisory centers (VAACs) rely on dispersion forecasts and satellite data to issue timely warnings. To improve ash forecasts model developers and satellite data providers need realistic information about volcanic ash microphysical and optical properties. In anticipation of future large eruptions we can study smaller events to improve our remote sensing and modeling skills so when the next Pinatubo 1991 or larger eruption occurs, ash can confidently be tracked in a quantitative way. At distances >100km from their sources, drifting ash plumes, often above meteorological clouds, are not easily detected from conventional remote sensing platforms, save deriving their quantitative characteristics, such as mass density. Quantitative interpretation of these observations depends on a priori knowledge of the spectral optical properties of the ash in UV (>0.3μm) and TIR wavelengths (>10μm). Incorrect assumptions about the optical properties result in large errors in inferred column mass loading and size distribution, which misguide operational ash forecasts. Similarly, simulating ash properties in global climate models also requires some knowledge of optical properties to improve aerosol speciation. Recent research has identified a wide range in volcanic ash optical properties among samples collected from the ground after different eruptions. The database of samples investigated remains relatively small, and measurements of optical properties at the relevant particle sizes and spectral channels are far from complete. Generalizing optical properties remains elusive, as does establishing relationships between ash composition and optical properties, which are essential for satellite retrievals. We are building a library of volcanic ash optical and microphysical properties. In this presentation we show

  6. Volcanic Plume Measurements with UAV (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, H.; Kaneko, T.; Ohminato, T.

    2013-12-01

    Volatiles in magmas are the driving force of volcanic eruptions and quantification of volcanic gas flux and composition is important for the volcano monitoring. Recently we developed a portable gas sensor system (Multi-GAS) to quantify the volcanic gas composition by measuring volcanic plumes and obtained volcanic gas compositions of actively degassing volcanoes. As the Multi-GAS measures variation of volcanic gas component concentrations in the pumped air (volcanic plume), we need to bring the apparatus into the volcanic plume. Commonly the observer brings the apparatus to the summit crater by himself but such measurements are not possible under conditions of high risk of volcanic eruption or difficulty to approach the summit due to topography etc. In order to overcome these difficulties, volcanic plume measurements were performed by using manned and unmanned aerial vehicles. The volcanic plume measurements by manned aerial vehicles, however, are also not possible under high risk of eruption. The strict regulation against the modification of the aircraft, such as installing sampling pipes, also causes difficulty due to the high cost. Application of the UAVs for the volcanic plume measurements has a big advantage to avoid these problems. The Multi-GAS consists of IR-CO2 and H2O gas analyzer, SO2-H2O chemical sensors and H2 semiconductor sensor and the total weight ranges 3-6 kg including batteries. The necessary conditions of the UAV for the volcanic plumes measurements with the Multi-GAS are the payloads larger than 3 kg, maximum altitude larger than the plume height and installation of the sampling pipe without contamination of the exhaust gases, as the exhaust gases contain high concentrations of H2, SO2 and CO2. Up to now, three different types of UAVs were applied for the measurements; Kite-plane (Sky Remote) at Miyakejima operated by JMA, Unmanned airplane (Air Photo Service) at Shinomoedake, Kirishima volcano, and Unmanned helicopter (Yamaha) at Sakurajima

  7. Gravity and magnetic signatures of volcanic plugs related to Deccan volcanism in Saurashtra, India and their physical and geochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekhar, D. V.; Mishra, D. C.; Poornachandra Rao, G. V. S.; Mallikharjuna Rao, J.

    2002-07-01

    The Bouguer anomaly and the total intensity magnetic maps of Saurashtra have delineated six circular gravity highs and magnetic anomalies of 40-60 mGal (10 -5m/s 2) and 800-1000 nT, respectively. Three of them in western Saurashtra coincide with known volcanic plugs associated with Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP), while the other three in SE Saurashtra coincide with rather concealed plugs exposed partially. The DVP represents different phases of eruption during 65.5±2.5 Ma from the Reunion plume. The geochemical data of the exposed rock samples from these plugs exhibit a wide variation in source composition, which varies from ultramafic/mafic to felsic composition of volcanic plugs in western Saurashtra and an alkaline composition for those in SE Saurashtra. Detailed studies of granophyres and alkaline rocks from these volcanic plugs reveal a calc-alkaline differentiation trend and a continental tectonic setting of emplacement. The alkaline plugs of SE Saurashtra are associated with NE-SW oriented structural trends, related to the Gulf of Cambay and the Cambay rift basin along the track of the Reunion plume. This indicates a deeper source for these plugs compared to those in the western part and may represent the primary source magma. The Junagadh plug with well differentiated ring complexes in western Saurashtra shows well defined centers of magnetic anomaly while the magnetic anomalies due to other plugs are diffused though of the same amplitude. This implies that other plugs are also associated with mafic/ultramafic components, which may not be differentiated and may be present at subsurface levels. Paleomagnetic measurements on surface rock samples from DVP in Saurashtra suggest a susceptibility of 5.5×10 -2 SI units with an average Koenigsberger ratio ( Qn) of almost one and average direction of remanent magnetization of D=147.4° and I=+56.1°. The virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) position computed from the mean direction of magnetization for the volcanic

  8. Observations of volcanic hotspots with TET-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakšek, Klemen; Hort, Matthias; Lorenz, Eckehard

    2016-04-01

    The most important source of uncertainties in thermal monitoring of active volcanoes from space stems from the lack of dedicated satellite instruments. Considering the currently available technology, we usually have to make a compromises between spatial and temporal resolution - if the data is available at high temporal resolution (from geostationary instruments), it is impossible to provide high spatial resolution data. The most promising solution seems to be a constellation of small satellites, for they can provide data at high spatial resolution and provide a short revisit time as there is a high number of satellites in the constellation. It is also difficult to provide narrow spectral channels at high radiometric accuracy for monitoring high and low temperatures at the same time. Instruments designed for meteorological applications are usually used in remote sensing of volcanic thermal anomalies. These instruments contain a mid-infrared channel, which provides crucial data for monitoring active volcanoes. However, the settings of meteorological instruments are optimized for monitoring low temperatures, which results in often saturated data over active volcanoes. The volcanological community can partially overcome the gap between the available meteorological satellites and its requirements with the small satellite TET-1 German abbreviation for "Technologie-Erprobungsträger 1" meaning Technology Experiment Carrier). TET-1 is the first satellite within the FireBird constellation. This consists of two small satellites which are predominantly dedicated to investigating high temperature events. They were built and are operated by the German Aerospace Center. TET-1 was launched in June 2012. Here we present the first results obtained from TET-1 data. The data were retrieved over several volcanoes: Etna, Stromboli, Bárdarbunga, etc. We show that using TET-1 data, it is possible to better constrain the time averaged lava discharge from other satellite data sources.

  9. Volcanic hazard assessment in the Phlegraean Fields: a contribution based on stratigraphic and historical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosi, M.; Santacroce, R.

    1984-06-01

    Phenomena occurring since 1982 in the Phlegraean Fields, interpreted as precursors of a potential renewal of volcanic activity, have forced us to anticipate some conclusions of a volcanic-hazard study based on the reconstruction of past eruptions in the area, to serve as basis for civil defense preparedness plans. The eruptive history of the Phlegraean Fields suggests a progressive decrease with time in the strength of eruptive phenomena paralleling a migration of vents towards the center of the Phlegraean caldera. Studies concerning the volcanic risk zonation were therefore concentrated on activities during the last 4,500 years and two eruptions (Monte Nuovo and Agnano Monte Spina), that occurred in 1538 and 4,400 years B.P., respectively were selected as the «reference eruptions» from which possible eruption scenarios were drawn.

  10. Volcanic accretion, tectonic extension and the second-order segmentation of slow and ultraslow-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannat, M.; Sauter, D.; Escartin, J.

    2011-12-01

    In this presentation we compare the segmentation and seafloor geology record of slow and ultraslow ridges with variable volcanic input. The easternmost Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR), where long stretches of the axis lack volcanism is our volcanism-poor end-member, which we contrast with volcanically more active parts of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Keeping the differences of spreading rates in perspective, we use this comparison to analyze and discuss the respective roles of tectonic extension, which ultimately leads to the exhumation of deeply-derived rocks (ultramafics and gabbros), and of volcanic accretion, in shaping the geometry of the plate boundary. Second-order segments at slow and ultraslow ridges are typically 30 to 100 km-long, and separated by transform, or so-called "non-transform" discontinuities. Segment centers typically have a thicker crust, and in most cases have a thinner axial lithosphere, than segment ends. Although we do not resolve the controversy of whether these characteristics are produced by discrete melt and/or mantle diapirs in the subaxial asthenosphere (eg Lin et al. 1990), or by melt channeling toward regions of thinner axial lithosphere (eg Magde and Sparks, 1997), we show that melt supply and volcanism are needed to initiate second-order ridge segmentation. Axial valley bounding faults in our SWIR volcanism-poor end-member go un-segmented for up to 170 km along-axis.

  11. Application of actualistic models to unravel primary volcanic control on sedimentation (Taveyanne Sandstones, Oligocene Northalpine Foreland Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Capua, Andrea; Groppelli, Gianluca

    2016-05-01

    This work is focused on the Taveyanne Sandstones (Grés de Taveyanne), an Oligocene volcaniclastic turbidite sequence cropping out in the Northern Alpine Molassa between SE France and Central Switzerland, with the aim to investigate the temporal relationship between volcanic activity and sediment supply. Detailed stratigraphic, sedimentological, and petrographic (XRD analyses on mudstones and point counts on sandstones) studies conducted on three sections (Col de l'Oulette and Flaine in SE France, Taveyanne in SW Switzerland) allow a discrimination of three main facies, among which only one is extremely enriched in volcaniclastic detritus and characterized by features similar to those of disaggregated pyroclastic density current deposits. The other two facies are characterized by variable to no volcanic detritus but supplied by crystalline and sedimentary detritus. Such sediment trends are similar to those of modern, volcanically controlled source-to-sink systems. This allows a reinterpretation of the Taveyanne Sandstones as a syn-volcanic turbidite system, episodically supplied by large amounts of volcanic detritus, which periodically modified the drainage paths. Moreover, the well-known temporal and spatial persistence of such modifications in modern settings leads to conciliate the syn-volcanic supply with the location of the volcanic centers in the internal part of the Alps, without invoking particular climatic and tectonic conditions controlling foreland sedimentation.

  12. Subglacial Volcanism in West-Antarctica - A Geologic and Ice Dynamical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, S. W.; Tulaczyk, S.; Carter, S.; Renne, P.; Turrin, B. D.; Joughin, I.

    2004-12-01

    Subglacial volcanic eruptions may increase the contribution of the West-Antarctic Ice-Sheet (WAIS) to global sea-level rise in the near-future by enhancing basal melt water production and ice flow lubrication. Geophysical data have led scientists to believe that the ice sheet may be located over an extensive, young volcanic province containing ~1 million cubic kilometers of basalts (Behrendt, 1964; Behrendt et. al., 1991; 1995; 1998). While not all scientists may recognize this theory of widespread subglacial volcanism, so far no scientific paper has challenged its existence. Here we present the first geologic constraints on the presence/absence of widespread Late Cenozoic subglacial volcanism beneath the WAIS and investigate the potential influence of an individual subglacial volcano (Blankenship et. al., 1993) on the flow dynamic of WAIS. Properties of subglacial sediments indicate limited presence of subglacial volcanic rocks. Moreover, the only two basaltic pebbles, recovered from the region, are of Mesozoic-Paleozoic age (~100 to ~500 million years). While these findings reduce the potential for widespread near-future increases in ice discharge from WAIS due to eruptions of subglacial volcanoes, they do not rule out the presence of individual hot spots associated with volcanic centers beneath the WAIS. Fuel for the existence of a proposed volcano (Mt. Casertz) on the Whitmore Mountain Ross Sea Transitional Crust (WRT; Blankenship et. al., 1993), in the southern part of the WAIS, comes from thermo-dynamical modeling in comparison with observed ice velocities. Ice velocities (Joughin et. al., 1999; 2002) downstream of Mt. Casertz indicate significant basal sliding, where thermo-dynamical models suggest that the ice sheet is frozen to its base. Routing of basal melt water, produced in the vicinity of Mt. Casertz, may lubricate the ice base in parts of the WRT, thus enabling basal sliding and enhancing the discharge of ice in this sector of the WAIS. The only

  13. UPDATE TO THE PROBABILISTIC VOLCANIC HAZARD ANALYSIS, YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    K.J. Coppersmith

    2005-09-14

    A probabilistic volcanic hazard analysis (PVHA) was conducted in 1996 for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Based on data gathered by the Yucca Mountain Project over the course of about 15 years, the analysis integrated the judgments of a panel of ten volcanic experts using methods of formal expert elicitation. PVHA resulted in a probability distribution of the annual frequency of a dike intersecting the repository, which ranges from 10E-7 to 10E-10 (mean 1.6 x 10E-8). The analysis incorporates assessments of the future locations, rates, and types of volcanic dikes that could intersect the repository, which lies about 300 m below the surface. A particular focus of the analysis is the quantification of uncertainties. Since the 1996 PVHA, additional aeromagnetic data have been collected in the Yucca Mountain region, including a high-resolution low-altitude survey. A number of anomalies have been identified within alluvial areas and modeling suggests that some of these may represent buried eruptive centers (basaltic cinder cones). A program is currently underway to drill several of the anomalies to gain information on their origin and, if basalt, their age and composition. To update the PVHA in light of the new aeromagnetic and drilling data as well as other advancements in volcanic hazard modeling over the past decade, the expert panel has been reconvened and the expert elicitation process has been fully restarted. The analysis requires assessments of the spatial distribution of igneous events, temporal distributions, and geometries and characteristics of future events (both intrusive and extrusive). The assessments are for future time periods of 10,000 years and 1,000,000 years. Uncertainties are being quantified in both the conceptual models that define these elements as well as in the parameters for the models. The expert elicitation process is centered around a series of workshops that focus on the available data; alternative approaches to

  14. Age systematics of two young en echelon Samoan volcanic trails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, Anthony A. P.; Russell, Jamie A.; Roberts, Jed; Jackson, Matthew G.; Konter, Jasper G.; Wright, Dawn J.; Staudigel, Hubert; Hart, Stanley R.

    2011-07-01

    The volcanic origin of the Samoan archipelago can be explained by one of three models, specifically, by a hot spot forming over a mantle plume, by lithospheric extension resulting from complex subduction tectonics in the region, or by a combination of these two processes, either acting sequentially or synchronously. In this paper, we present results of 36 high-resolution 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating age analyses for the initial (submarine) phase of Samoan volcanoes, ranging from 13.2 Ma for the westernmost Samoan seamounts to 0.27 Ma in the eastern Samoan volcanic province. Taken as a whole, our new age data point to a hot spot origin for the shield-building volcanism in the Samoan lineament, whereby seamounts younger than 5 Ma are consistent with a model of constant 7.1 cm/yr plate motion, analogous to GPS measurements for the Pacific Plate in this region. This makes our new 40Ar/39Ar ages of the submarine basalts all older compared to recent absolute plate motion (APM) models by Wessel et al. (2008), which are based on the inversion of twelve independent seamount trails in the Pacific relative to a fixed reference frame of hot spots and which predict faster plate motions of around 9.3 cm/yr in the vicinity of Samoa. The Samoan ages are also older than APM models by Steinberger et al. (2004) taking into account the motion of hot spots in the Pacific alone or globally. The age systematics become more complicated toward the younger end of the Samoan seamount trail, where its morphology bifurcates into two en echelon subtracks, termed the VAI and MALU trends, as they emanate from two eruptive centers at Vailulu'u and Malumalu seamount, respectively. Spaced ˜50 km apart, the VAI and MALU trends have distinct geochemical characters and independent but overlapping linear 40Ar/39Ar age progressions since 1.5 Ma. These phenomena are not unique to Samoa, as they have been observed at the Hawaiian hot spot, and can be attributed to a geochemical zoning in its underlying

  15. Use of MODIS for volcanic eruption cloud detection, tracking, and measurement: Examples from the 2001 eruption of Cleveland volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D. J.; Prata, F. J.; Gu, Y.; Watson, M.; Rose, W. I.

    2001-12-01

    The Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), launched in December 1999 aboard the Terra satellite, has new capabilities that will improve the detection, tracking, and measurement of volcanic clouds. Volcanic clouds containing silicate ash, volcanic gases, aerosols, and water are potentially hazardous to aircraft. More than 100 aircraft have sustained documented damage over the past 20 years as a result of encountering volcanic clouds. This paper reports analytical results and interpretations of data from the MODIS instrument obtained for volcanic clouds generated during the 2001 eruption of Cleveland volcano. Cleveland volcano, located in the east-central Aleutian Islands 1500 km southwest of Anchorage, had explosive ash-producing eruptions on February 19, March 11, and March 19, 2001 that erupted material to altitudes of 4.5 to 10.6 km above sea level. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) does not seismically monitor Cleveland volcano; however, the eruptions were detected and the volcanic clouds were tracked by AVO using near real-time AVHRR and GOES satellite data. Contemporaneous MODIS, AVHRR, and GOES data of the eruption clouds from all three events were analyzed retrospectively and preliminary results demonstrate: 1) Improved sensitivity for ash detection using MODIS versus AVHRR and GOES. The magnitude of the brightness temperature differences utilizing MODIS bands centered at 8.5 and 12.0 microns is 2-3 times greater than the magnitude of the brightness temperature differences calculated using AVHRR and GOES bands centered at 10.7 and 12.0 microns; 2) The ability to detect the sulfur dioxide component of volcanic clouds using the brightness temperature difference between MODIS bands centered at 7.3 and 12.0 microns. Separation of volcanic ash and sulfur dioxide was observed in the volcanic cloud generated by the February 19 eruption using this technique; 3) Volcanic ash mass retrievals from GOES and MODIS data (utilizing similar wavelengths

  16. Rapid uplift during 2007-2012 at Laguna del Maule volcanic field, Andean Southern Volcanic Zone, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mevel, H.; Feigl, K.; Ali, T.; Cordova V., M. L.; DeMets, C.; Singer, B. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field includes an unusual concentration of post-glacial rhyolitic lava coulees and domes, dated between 24 to 2 thousand years old that cover more than 100 square kilometers and erupted from 24 vents that encircle a 20-km-diameter lake basin on the range crest. The recent concentration of rhyolite is unparalleled in the Southern Volcanic Zone of the Andes. Moreover, the western portion of the LdM volcanic field has experienced rapid uplift since 2007, leading to questions about the current configuration of the magmatic system and processes that drive the ongoing inflation. We aim to quantify the active deformation of the LdM volcanic field and its evolution with time. To do so, we use interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data acquired by three satellite missions: Envisat in 2003 and 2004, ALOS between 2007 and 2010, and TerraSAR-X in 2012. An interferogram spanning March 2003 to February 2004 "shows no deformation" (Fournier et al., 2010). From 2007 through 2012, however, the shortening of the satellite-to-ground distance revealed a range change rate of greater than 200 mm/yr along the radar line of sight. The deformation includes a circular area 20 km in diameter centered on the western portion of the circle of young rhyolite domes. To analyze the InSAR results, we employ the General Inversion for Phase Technique (GIPhT; Feigl and Thurber, 2009; Ali and Feigl, 2012). We have considered several hypotheses to interpret this deformation. Artefacts such as orbital errors, atmospheric perturbations or topographic contribution cannot account for the observed signal. We also reject the hypothesis of uplift due to gravitational unloading of the crust based on our modeling of independently measured lake level variations over the observed time interval. We thus attribute the deformation to the intrusion of magma into the upper crust below the southwest region of the LdM volcanic field. The best fit to the InSAR data is

  17. A Proposed Community Network For Monitoring Volcanic Emissions In Saint Lucia, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, E. P.; Beckles, D. M.; Robertson, R. E.; Latchman, J. L.; Edwards, S.

    2013-12-01

    impact of volcanic emissions on health have been almost exclusively focused on acute responses, or the effects of one-off eruptions (Horwell and Baxter, 2006). However, little attention has been paid to any long-term impacts on human health in the population centers around volcanoes as a result of exposure to passive emissions from active geothermal systems. The role of volcano tourism is also recognized as an important contributor to the economy of volcanic islands in the Lesser Antilles. However, if it is to be promoted as a sustainable sector of the tourism industry tourists, tour guides, and vendors must be made aware of the potential health hazards facing them in volcanic environments.

  18. Satellite Derived Volcanic Ash Product Inter-Comparison in Support to SCOPE-Nowcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddans, Richard; Thomas, Gareth; Pavolonis, Mike; Bojinski, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    In support of aeronautical meteorological services, WMO organized a satellite-based volcanic ash retrieval algorithm inter-comparison activity, to improve the consistency of quantitative volcanic ash products from satellites, under the Sustained, Coordinated Processing of Environmental Satellite Data for Nowcasting (SCOPEe Nowcasting) initiative (http:/ jwww.wmo.int/pagesjprogjsatjscopee nowcasting_en.php). The aims of the intercomparison were as follows: 1. Select cases (Sarychev Peak 2009, Eyjafyallajökull 2010, Grimsvötn 2011, Puyehue-Cordón Caulle 2011, Kirishimayama 2011, Kelut 2014), and quantify the differences between satellite-derived volcanic ash cloud properties derived from different techniques and sensors; 2. Establish a basic validation protocol for satellite-derived volcanic ash cloud properties; 3. Document the strengths and weaknesses of different remote sensing approaches as a function of satellite sensor; 4. Standardize the units and quality flags associated with volcanic cloud geophysical parameters; 5. Provide recommendations to Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAACs) and other users on how to best to utilize quantitative satellite products in operations; 6. Create a "road map" for future volcanic ash related scientific developments and inter-comparison/validation activities that can also be applied to SO2 clouds and emergent volcanic clouds. Volcanic ash satellite remote sensing experts from operational and research organizations were encouraged to participate in the inter-comparison activity, to establish the plans for the inter-comparison and to submit data sets. RAL was contracted by EUMETSAT to perform a systematic inter-comparison of all submitted datasets and results were reported at the WMO International Volcanic Ash Inter-comparison Meeting to held on 29 June - 2 July 2015 in Madison, WI, USA (http:/ /cimss.ssec.wisc.edujmeetings/vol_ash14). 26 different data sets were submitted, from a range of passive imagers and spectrometers and

  19. Io: Heat Flow from Dark Volcanic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D. L.; Davies, A. G.; Johnson, T. V.

    2008-03-01

    We focus on the heat flow contribution from dark volcanic fields on Io. These are concentrated in the anti-Loki hemisphere. We use the areas and estimated effective temperatures of dark flucti to derive their total power.

  20. Mount St. Helens' volcanic ash: hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Vallyathan, V; Mentnech, M S; Stettler, L E; Dollberg, D D; Green, F H

    1983-04-01

    Volcanic ash samples from four Mount St. Helens' volcanic eruptions were subjected to mineralogical, analytical, and hemolytic studies in order to evaluate their potential for cytotoxicity and fibrogenicity. Plagioclase minerals constituted the major component of the ash with free crystalline silica concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 7.2%. The in vitro hemolytic activity of the volcanic ash was compared to similar concentrations of cytotoxic and inert minerals. The ash was markedly hemolytic, exhibiting an activity similar to chrysotile asbestos, a known fibrogenic agent. The hemolysis of the different ash samples varied with particle size but not with crystalline silica concentration. The results of these studies taken in conjunction with the results of our animal studies indicate a fibrogenic potential of volcanic ash in heavily exposed humans.

  1. Probabilistic Volcanic Hazard and Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzocchi, W.; Neri, A.; Newhall, C. G.; Papale, P.

    2007-08-01

    Quantifying Long- and Short-Term Volcanic Hazard: Building Up a Common Strategy for Italian Volcanoes, Erice Italy, 8 November 2006 The term ``hazard'' can lead to some misunderstanding. In English, hazard has the generic meaning ``potential source of danger,'' but for more than 30 years [e.g., Fournier d'Albe, 1979], hazard has been also used in a more quantitative way, that reads, ``the probability of a certain hazardous event in a specific time-space window.'' However, many volcanologists still use ``hazard'' and ``volcanic hazard'' in purely descriptive and subjective ways. A recent meeting held in November 2006 at Erice, Italy, entitled ``Quantifying Long- and Short-Term Volcanic Hazard: Building up a Common Strategy for Italian Volcanoes'' (http://www.bo.ingv.it/erice2006) concluded that a more suitable term for the estimation of quantitative hazard is ``probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment'' (PVHA).

  2. Constructing event trees for volcanic crises

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newhall, C.; Hoblitt, R.

    2002-01-01

    Event trees are useful frameworks for discussing probabilities of possible outcomes of volcanic unrest. Each branch of the tree leads from a necessary prior event to a more specific outcome, e.g., from an eruption to a pyroclastic flow. Where volcanic processes are poorly understood, probability estimates might be purely empirical - utilizing observations of past and current activity and an assumption that the future will mimic the past or follow a present trend. If processes are better understood, probabilities might be estimated from a theoritical model, either subjectively or by numerical simulations. Use of Bayes' theorem aids in the estimation of how fresh unrest raises (or lowers) the probabilities of eruptions. Use of event trees during volcanic crises can help volcanologists to critically review their analysis of hazard, and help officials and individuals to compare volcanic risks with more familiar risks. Trees also emphasize the inherently probabilistic nature of volcano forecasts, with multiple possible outcomes.

  3. The interplay between tectonics and volcanism: a key to unravel the nature of Andean geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cembrano, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    Field mapping combined with seismic data document the interplay between tectonics and volcanism in the Andes. In the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ) of northern Chile (22-24°S), Pleistocene east-west shortening and a thick crust (50-70 km) are associated with major composite dacitic-andesitic volcanoes and a few monogenetic basaltic eruptive centers. CVZ stratovolcanoes are devoided of flank vents; clusters of minor eruptive centers are uncommon. Composite volcanoes and minor eruptive centers are coeval with a NS-striking system of reverse faults and fault-propagation folds. Although dextral strike-slip crustal seismicity is recorded between 18 and 21°S, evidence for long-term, margin-parallel strike-slip deformation is absent. In contrast, volcanoes of the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ), between 38 and 46°S are built on a much thinner crust (30-40 km) during intra-arc dextral transpression. Crustal seismicity shows dextral strike-slip focal mechanisms. There, a wide variety of volcanic forms and compositions coexist along the same volcanic arc. Volcanoes range from single monogenetic cones lying on master faults to major composite volcanoes organized into either NE- or NW-trending chains, oblique to the continental margin. Flank vents and elongated clusters of minor eruptive centers are common. Compositions range from primitive basalts at minor eruptive centers, to highly evolved magmas at mature stratovolcanoes. I hypothesize that the kinematics of fault-fracture networks under which magma is transported through the crust is one fundamental factor controlling the wide variety of volcanic forms, volcanic alignment patterns and rock compositions along a single volcanic arc. As a first approximation, a thicker crust favors magma differentiation processes whereas a thinner crust prevents it. Likewise, whereas bulk intra-arc compression (vertical σ3) enhances longer residence times of magmas in the CVZ, strike-slip deformation (horizontal σ3) in SVZ provides

  4. 1995 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.

    1996-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity (SVA) at 6 volcanic centers in 1995: Mount Martin (Katmai Group), Mount Veniaminof, Shishaldin, Makushin, Kliuchef/Korovin, and Kanaga. In addition to responding to eruptive activity at Alaska volcanoes, AVO also disseminated information for the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) on the 1995 eruptions of 2 Russian volcanoes: Bezymianny and Karymsky. This report summarizes volcanic activity in Alaska during 1995 and the AVO response, as well as information on the 2 Kamchatkan eruptions. Only those reports or inquiries that resulted in a "significant" investment of staff time and energy (here defined as several hours or more for reaction, tracking, and follow-up) are included. AVO typically receives dozens of phone calls throughout the year reporting steaming, unusual cloud sightings, or eruption rumors. Most of these are resolved quickly and are not tabulated here as part of the 1995 response record.

  5. 2008 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Nuzhdaev, Anton A.; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at seven separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2008. Significant explosive eruptions at Okmok and Kasatochi Volcanoes in July and August dominated Observatory operations in the summer and autumn. AVO maintained 24-hour staffing at the Anchorage facility from July 12 through August 28. Minor eruptive activity continued at Veniaminof and Cleveland Volcanoes. Observed volcanic unrest at Cook Inlet's Redoubt Volcano presaged a significant eruption in the spring of 2009. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at nine volcanoes in Russia as part of a collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  6. 2007 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Dixon, James P.; Malik, Nataliya; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near nine separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2007. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Pavlof, one of Alaska's most frequently active volcanoes. Glaciated Fourpeaked Mountain, a volcano thought to have been inactive in the Holocene, produced a phreatic eruption in the autumn of 2006 and continued to emit copious amounts of steam and volcanic gas into 2007. Redoubt Volcano showed the first signs of the unrest that would unfold in 2008-09. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  7. Ice Nuclei Production in Volcanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Few, A. A.

    2012-12-01

    The paper [Durant et al., 2008] includes a review of research on ice nucleation in explosive volcanic clouds in addition to reporting their own research on laboratory measurements focused on single-particle ice nucleation. Their research as well as the research they reviewed were concerned with the freezing of supercooled water drops (250 to 260 K) by volcanic ash particles acting as ice freezing nuclei. Among their conclusions are: Fine volcanic ash particles are very efficient ice freezing nuclei. Volcanic clouds likely contain fine ash concentrations 104 to 105 times greater than found in meteorological clouds. This overabundance of ice nuclei will produce a cloud with many small ice crystals that will not grow larger as they do in meteorological clouds because the cloud water content is widely distributed among the numerous small ice crystals. The small ice crystals have a small fall velocity, thus volcanic clouds are very stable. The small ice crystals are easily lofted into the stratosphere transporting water and adsorbed trace gasses. In this paper we examine the mechanism for the production of the small ice nuclei and develop a simple model for calculating the size of the ice nuclei based upon the distribution of magma around imbedded bubbles. We also have acquired a volcanic bomb that exhibits bubble remnants on its entire surface. The naturally occurring fragments from the volcanic bomb reveal a size distribution consistent with that predicted by the simple model. Durant, A. J., R. A. Shaw, W. I. Rose, Y. Mi, and G. G. J. Ernst (2008), Ice nucleation and overseeding of ice in volcanic clouds, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D09206, doi:10.1029/2007JD009064.

  8. Episodic Volcanism and Geochemistry in Western Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saginor, I.; Carr, M. J.; Gazel, E.; Swisher, C.; Turrin, B.

    2007-12-01

    The active volcanic arc in western Nicaragua is separated from the Miocene arc by a temporal gap in the volcanic record, during which little volcanic material was erupted. Previous work suggested that this gap lasted from 7 to 1.6 Ma, during which volcanic production in Nicaragua was limited or nonexistent. Because the precise timing and duration of this gap has been poorly constrained, recent fieldwork has focused on locating samples that may have erupted close to or even during this apparent hiatus in activity. Recent 40Ar/39Ar dates reveal pulses of low- level episodic volcanism at 7 Ma and 1 Ma between the active and Miocene arcs with current volcanism beginning ~350 ka. In addition, sampling from an inactive area between Coseguina and San Cristobal yielded two distinct groupings of ages; one of Tamarindo age (13 Ma) and the other around 3.5 Ma-the only samples of that age collected on-strike with the active arc. This raises the possibility the bases of the other active volcanoes contain lavas that are older than expected, but have been covered by subsequent eruptions. The Miocene arc differs from the active arc in Central America in several ways, with the latter having higher Ba/La and U/Th values due to increased slab input and changes in subducted sediment composition. Analysis of sample C-51 and others taken from the same area may shed light on the timing of this shift from high to low Ba/La and U/Th values. More importantly, it may help explain why the arc experienced such a dramatic downturn in volcanic production during this time. We also report 25 new major and trace element analyses that shed some light on the origins of these minor episodes of Nicaraguan volcanism. These samples are currently awaiting Sr and Nd isotopic analyses.

  9. Volcanic hazards at Mount Shasta, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crandell, Dwight R.; Nichols, Donald R.

    1989-01-01

    The eruptions of Mount St. Helens, Washington, in 1980 served as a reminder that long-dormant volcanoes can come to life again. Those eruptions, and their effects on people and property, also showed the value of having information about volcanic hazards well in advance of possible volcanic activity. This pamphlet about Mount Shasta provides such information for the public, even though the next eruption may still be far in the future.

  10. Volcanism and aseismic slip in subduction zones

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, H.

    1981-01-10

    The spatial and temporal relationship of volcanism to the occurrence of large earthquakes and convergent plate motion is examined. The number of volcanic eruptions per year in a convergent zone is found to be linearly related to the aseismic slip component of plate motion. If the aseismic slip rate is low (coupling between converging plates is strong), then the primary manifestation of tectonic activity is the occurrence of large earthquakes with only infrequent volcanic activity. If, however, the aseismic slip rate is high (coupling is weak), then there are few large earthquakes, and volcanism is the principal manifestation of tectonic activity. This model is consistent with the spatial distribution of large earthquakes and active volcanoes in the circum-Pacific area. It is tested by examining the extent of volcanic activity in the rupture zones of the 1952--1973 sequence of earthquakes in the Japan--Kurile Islands area. The number of volcanic euptions along these zones during the interval between large earthquakes is used to compute the aseismic slip rates for these segments, based on the relationship developed in this study. The aseismic slip rates so computed agree with those determined from the earthquake history of the area and rates of plate motion. The agreement suggests that in the interval between large earthquakes, the aseismic plate motion is manifested in a specific number of volcanic eruptions. Therefore in areas with adequate historial data it should be possible to use the model developed in this study to monitor volcanic eruptions for long-term prediction of large earthquakes.

  11. Visualizing Volcanic Clouds in the Atmosphere and Their Impact on Air Traffic.

    PubMed

    Gunther, Tobias; Schulze, Maik; Friederici, Anke; Theisel, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions are not only hazardous in the direct vicinity of a volcano, but they also affect the climate and air travel for great distances. This article sheds light on the Grímsvötn, Puyehue-Cordón Caulle, and Nabro eruptions in 2011. The authors study the agreement of the complementary satellite data, reconstruct sulfate aerosol and volcanic ash clouds, visualize endangered flight routes, minimize occlusion in particle trajectory visualizations, and focus on the main pathways of Nabro's sulfate aerosol into the stratosphere. The results here were developed for the 2014 IEEE Scientific Visualization Contest, which centers around the fusion of multiple satellite data modalities to reconstruct and assess the movement of volcanic ash and sulfate aerosol emissions. Using data from three volcanic eruptions that occurred in the span of approximately three weeks, the authors study the agreement of the complementary satellite data, reconstruct sulfate aerosol and volcanic ash clouds, visualize endangered flight routes, minimize occlusion in particle trajectory visualizations, and focus on the main pathways of sulfate aerosol into the stratosphere. This video provides animations of the reconstructed ash clouds. https://youtu.be/D9DvJ5AvZAs.

  12. Dispersion of the Volcanic Sulfate Cloud from the Mount Pinatubo Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aquila, Valentina; Oman, Luke D.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Colarco, Peter R.; Newman, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    We simulate the transport of the volcanic cloud from the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo with the GEOS-5 general circulation model. Our simulations are in good agreement with observational data. We tested the importance of initial condition corresponding to the specific meteorological situation at the time of the eruption by employing reanalysis from MERRA. We found no significant difference in the transport of the cloud. We show how the inclusion of the interaction between volcanic sulfate aerosol and radiation is essential for a reliable simulation of the transport of the volcanic cloud. The absorption of long wave radiation by the volcanic sulfate induces a rising of the volcanic cloud up to the middle stratosphere, combined with divergent motion from the latitude of the eruption to the tropics. Our simulations indicate that the cloud diffuses to the northern hemisphere through a lower stratospheric pathway, and to mid- and high latitudes of the southern hemisphere through a middle stratospheric pathway, centered at about 30 hPa. The direction of the middle stratospheric pathway depends on the season. We did not detect any significant change of the mixing between tropics and mid- and high latitudes in the southern hemisphere.

  13. The impact of a volcanic edifice on intrusive and eruptive activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Alberto; Jaupart, Claude

    2014-12-01

    In a volcanic area, the orientation and composition of dikes record the development of the magmatic system that feeds intrusive and eruptive activity. At Spanish Peaks, Colorado, curved dike trajectories issuing from a single focal area have been attributed to horizontal propagation from a pressurized central reservoir in a deviatoric tectonic stress field. These dikes, however, are nowhere in contact with the central intrusion, are younger than it by about 1 My and are not filled with the same magma. They were emplaced at shallow depths (≈ 1 km), where the local stress field is very sensitive to surface loads. Here, we show that their trajectories can be set by the load of a volcanic edifice in a tectonic stress field. The orientation and distribution of the Spanish Peaks dikes have changed in the course of two million years as magmas were evolving chemically. Early dikes that were parallel to each another and filled with primitive melts document ascent in the regional tectonic stress field. They were replaced by curved dikes carrying evolved melts, which record the influence of a sizable volcanic edifice. Beneath this edifice, the induced compression prevented dense primitive magmas from erupting in the focal area and diverted intermediate magmas sideways. The growth of this large volcanic cone was probably responsible for the formation of a magma reservoir. The mechanisms that have shaped the Spanish Peaks dike swarm may control the spatial distribution and migration of eruptive centers in many active volcanic areas.

  14. Tectonic evolution and volcanism of Okinawa Trough

    SciTech Connect

    Sibuet, J.C.; Letouzey, J.; Marsset, B.; Davagnier, M.; Foucher, J.P.; Bougault, H.; Dosso, L.; Maury, R.; Joron, J.L.

    1986-07-01

    The Okinawa Trough is a back-arc basin formed by extension of the east China continental lithosphere behind the Ryukyu Trench system. The age of marine deposits drilled in the northern Okinawa Trough indicates a Miocene age for the splitting of the volcanic arc and the first tensional movements. The POP 1 cruise of the R/V Jean-Charcot (September-October 1984) provided new evidence concerning the two main periods of extension as recognized by Kimura (Marine and Petroleum Geology, 1985). Tilted fault blocks in the northern Okinawa Trough trend north 40/sup 0/-60/sup 0/ and belong to the early Pleistocene phase (2-0.5 Ma). The present-day phase is characterized over the entire basin by normal faults oriented 80/sup 0/N in the north and 90/sup 0/N in the south. In the southern Okinawa Trough, most of the deformation occurs along linear, subparallel, en echelon depressions intruded by volcanic ridges associated with positive magnetic anomalies. The system of volcanic ridges ends northeast of Okinawa Island in a series of parallel volcanic ridges named the VAMP (Volcanic arc-rift migration processes) area, which merges into an active volcanic chain extending north to Japan. Chemical analyses of the vesicular basalts dredged on the back-arc basin display flat to enriched rare-earth patterns. The niobium-tantalum negative anomalies reflect a subduction signature. A good positive correlation between strontium isotopic compositions and concentrations suggests a contamination effect.

  15. Volcanic loading: The dust veil index

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, H.H.

    1985-09-01

    Dust ejected into the high atmosphere during explosive volcanic eruptions has been considered as a possible cause for climatic change. Dust veils created by volcanic eruptions can reduce the amount of light reaching the Earth`s surface and can cause reductions in surface temperatures. These climatic effects can be seen for several years following some eruptions and the magnitude and duration of the effects depend largely on the density or amount of tephra (i.e. dust) ejected, the latitude of injection, and atmospheric circulation patterns. Lamb (1970) formulated the Dust Veil Index (DVI) in an attempt to quantify the impact on the Earth`s energy balance of changes in atmospheric composition due to explosive volcanic eruptions. The DVI is a numerical index that quantifies the impact on the Earth`s energy balance of changes in atmospheric composition due to explosive volcanic eruptions. The DVI is a numerical index that quantifies the impact of a particular volcanic eruptions release of dust and aerosols over the years following the event. The DVI for any volcanic eruptions are available and have been used in estimating Lamb`s dust veil indices.

  16. California’s potential volcanic hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorgenson, P.

    1989-01-01

    Although volcanic eruptions have occurred infrequently in California during the last few thousand years, the potential danger to life and property from volcanoes in the state is great enough to be of concern, according to a recent U.S Geological Survey (USGS) publication. the 17-page bulletin, "Potential Hazards from Future Volcanic Eruptions in California," gives a brief history of volcanic activity in California during the past 100,000 years, descriptions of the types of volcanoes in the state, the types of potentially hazardous volcanic events that could occur, and hazard-zonation maps and tables depicting six areas of the state where volcanic eruptions might occur. Although no quantitative probabilities are attached to any of the potential volcanic hazards, the USGS bulletin warns that "sooner or later a volcano in California will erupt again and the ever-expanding use of area near volcnoes increases the potential impact of an eruption on the state's economy and on the health and safety of its citizens. 

  17. A frictional law for volcanic ash gouge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallée, Y.; Hirose, T.; Kendrick, J. E.; De Angelis, S.; Petrakova, L.; Hornby, A. J.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-08-01

    Volcanic provinces are structurally active regions - undergoing continual deformation along faults. Within such fault structures, volcanic ash gouge, containing both crystalline and glassy material, may act as a potential fault plane lubricant. Here, we investigate the frictional properties of volcanic ash gouges with varying glass fractions using a rotary shear apparatus at a range of slip rates (1.3-1300 mm/s) and axial stresses (0.5-2.5 MPa). We show that the frictional behaviour of volcanic ash is in agreement with Byerlee's friction law at low slip velocities, irrespective of glass content. The results reveal a common non-linear reduction of the friction coefficient with slip velocity and yield a frictional law for fault zones containing volcanic ash gouge. Textural analysis reveals that strain localisation and the development of shear bands are more prominent at higher slip velocities (>10 mm/s). The textures observed here are similar to those recorded in ash gouge at the surface of extrusive spines at Mount St. Helens (USA). We use the rate-weakening component of the frictional law to estimate shear-stress-resistance reductions associated with episodic seismogenic slip events that accompany magma ascent pulses. We conclude that the internal structure of volcanic ash gouge may act as a kinematic marker of exogenic dome growth.

  18. Local and remote infrasound from explosive volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoza, R. S.; Fee, D.; LE Pichon, A.

    2014-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions can inject large volumes of ash into heavily travelled air corridors and thus pose a significant societal and economic hazard. In remote volcanic regions, satellite data are sometimes the only technology available to observe volcanic eruptions and constrain ash-release parameters for aviation safety. Infrasound (acoustic waves ~0.01-20 Hz) data fill this critical observational gap, providing ground-based data for remote volcanic eruptions. Explosive volcanic eruptions are among the most powerful sources of infrasound observed on earth, with recordings routinely made at ranges of hundreds to thousands of kilometers. Advances in infrasound technology and the efficient propagation of infrasound in the atmosphere therefore greatly enhance our ability to monitor volcanoes in remote regions such as the North Pacific Ocean. Infrasound data can be exploited to detect, locate, and provide detailed chronologies of the timing of explosive volcanic eruptions for use in ash transport and dispersal models. We highlight results from case studies of multiple eruptions recorded by the International Monitoring System and dedicated regional infrasound networks (2008 Kasatochi, Alaska, USA; 2008 Okmok, Alaska, USA; 2009 Sarychev Peak, Kuriles, Russian Federation; 2010 Eyjafjallajökull, Icleand) and show how infrasound is currently used in volcano monitoring. We also present progress towards characterizing and modeling the variability in source mechanisms of infrasound from explosive eruptions using dedicated local infrasound field deployments at volcanoes Karymsky, Russian Federation and Sakurajima, Japan.

  19. Arc-rift transition volcanism in the Volcanic Hills, Jacumba and Coyote Mountains, San Diego and Imperial Counties, california

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisch, Gregory Zane

    Neogene volcanism associated with the subduction of the Farallon-Pacific spreading center and the transition from a subduction zone to a rift zone has been studied extensively in Baja, California, Mexico. One of the main goals of these studies was to find a geochemical correlation with slab windows that may have formed during that complicated transition. While workers have been able to find distinct geochemical signatures in samples from Baja California, none have shown statistically significant correlation with samples from southern California that are thought to be related to the same arc-rift transition events. All of the basaltic samples from this study of southern California rocks have prominent Nb depletions typical of island-arc subduction-related volcanism, in contrast to the chemistry of Baja California volcanics that have trace element patterns typical of synrift related volcanism. The work done by previous investigators has been additionally complicated due to each investigator's choice of important ratios or patterns, which bears little, if any, correlation with work done by others working in the same area. For example, Martin-Barajas et al. (1995) use K/Rb ratios in their study of the Puertocitos Volcanic Province, while Castillo (2008) argues that Sr/Y vs. Y is a better indicator of petrogenetic processes. Little petrologic work has been done on Neogene volcanic rocks in the Imperial Valley and eastern San Diego County region of Southern California. This thesis combines new research with that of previous workers and attempts to establish a better understanding of the processes involved with the transition volcanism. Prior work documents significant differences in the geochemistry between some of these areas, especially those in close proximity to each other (e.g. the Volcanic Hills and Coyote Mountains). These differences were thought to be largely the result different magmatic sources. The potential of finding two differing magma types in close

  20. The Origin of Widespread Long-lived Volcanism Across the Galapagos Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. M.; Stoffers, P.; Wijbrans, J. R.; Worthington, T. J.

    2005-12-01

    40Ar/39Ar ages for rocks dredged (SO144 PAGANINI expedition) and drilled (DSDP) from the Galapagos Volcanic Province (Cocos, Carnegie, Coiba and Malpelo aseismic ridges and associated seamounts) show evidence of 1) increasing age with distance from the Galapagos Archipelago, 2) long-lived episodic volcanism at many locations, and 3) broad overlapping regions of coeval volcanism. The widespread nature of synchronous volcanism across the Galapagos Volcanic Province (GVP) suggests a correspondingly large Galapagos hotspot melting anomaly (O'Connor et al., 2004). Development of the GVP via Cocos and Nazca plate migration and divergence over this broad melting anomaly would explain continued multiple phases of volcanism over millions of years following the initial onset of hotspot volcanism. The question arising from these observations is whether long-lived GVP episodic volcanism is equivalent to `rejuvenescent' or a `post-erosional' phase of volcanism that occurs hundreds of thousands or million years after the main shield-building phase documented on many mid-plate seamount chains, most notably along the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Chain? Thus, investigating the process responsible for long-lived episodic GVP volcanism provides the opportunity to evaluate this little understood process of rejuvenation in a physical setting very different to the Hawaiian-Emperor Chain (i.e. on/near spreading axis versus mid-plate). We consider here timing and geochemical information to test the various geodynamic models proposed to explain the origin of GVP hotspot volcanism, especially the possibility of rejuvenated phases that erupt long after initial shield-building.

  1. Late Pleistocene-Holocene Volcanism of the Mexico Basin and Assessment of Volcanic Hazards in One of the World’s Largest Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layer, P. W.; Macías, J.; Arce, J.; García, F.

    2009-12-01

    The Mexico City metropolitan area is home to more than 22 million people living in sight of, or living on, several volcanoes that either are currently active or show evidence of Late Pleistocene-Holocene activity (e.g., pyroclastic flows, debris avalanches and lahars). The volcanic rocks are located in five main belts or ranges: Sierra Nevada, Sierra de las Cruces, Sierra Guadalupe, Sierra de Santa Catarina, and the Chichinautzin Volcanic Field which surround the Mexico Basin and belong to the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, preserving approx. 14 Ma of geologic history. Much attention has been devoted to the youngest of the volcanoes such as Popocatépetl in the Sierra Nevada which resumed activity in 1994-present and Chichinautzin which includes the 1600 year bp Xitle volcano. Surprisingly, the pre-Holocene history is not well constrained in the Mexico City area, due of the lack of detailed mapping coupled with high precision geochronology. Our new 40Ar/39Ar and petrologic data and detailed mapping focus on the earliest history of these volcanic systems and their temporal, spatial and geochemical evolution. For example, data from Tlaloc and Telapón volcanoes in the Sierra Nevada show at least two significant periods of edifice building (1.0 to 1.5 Ma and 0 to 400 ka) with an apparent long period of quiescence that clearly suggests that volcanism in the region did not migrate from north to south but that it has a more complex evolution that continues to pose a serious threat to the population of Mexico City. In addition, a 450 ka age, based on dome and pumice dating, constrains the timing of a major sector collapse of Iztaccíhuatl volcano that produced a Mt. St. Helens - sized debris avalanche deposit towards the present metropolitan area of the City of Puebla. In the Sierra de las Cruces Range, volcanic centers do show a north-south age progression from ~5 Ma, cumulating with the Zempoala edifice collapse approximately 900 ka, producing lahars and block and ash

  2. Seismic Activity at tres Virgenes Volcanic and Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antayhua, Y. T.; Lermo, J.; Quintanar, L.; Campos-Enriquez, J. O.

    2013-05-01

    The volcanic and geothermal field Tres Virgenes is in the NE portion of Baja California Sur State, Mexico, between -112°20'and -112°40' longitudes, and 27°25' to 27°36' latitudes. Since 2003 Power Federal Commission and the Engineering Institute of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) initiated a seismic monitoring program. The seismograph network installed inside and around the geothermal field consisted, at the beginning, of Kinemetrics K2 accelerometers; since 2009 the network is composed by Guralp CMG-6TD broadband seismometers. The seismic data used in this study covered the period from September 2003 - November 2011. We relocated 118 earthquakes with epicenter in the zone of study recorded in most of the seismic stations. The events analysed have shallow depths (≤10 km), coda Magnitude Mc≤2.4, with epicentral and hypocentral location errors <2 km. These events concentrated mainly below Tres Virgenes volcanoes, and the geothermal explotation zone where there is a system NW-SE, N-S and W-E of extensional faults. Also we obtained focal mechanisms for 38 events using the Focmec, Hash, and FPFIT methods. The results show normal mechanisms which correlate with La Virgen, El Azufre, El Cimarron and Bonfil fault systems, whereas inverse and strike-slip solutions correlate with Las Viboras fault. Additionally, the Qc value was obtained for 118 events. This value was calculated using the Single Back Scattering model, taking the coda-waves train with window lengths of 5 sec. Seismograms were filtered at 4 frequency bands centered at 2, 4, 8 and 16 Hz respectively. The estimates of Qc vary from 62 at 2 Hz, up to 220 at 16 Hz. The frequency-Qc relationship obtained is Qc=40±2f(0.62±0.02), representing the average attenuation characteristics of seismic waves at Tres Virgenes volcanic and geothermal field. This value correlated with those observed at other geothermal and volcanic fields.

  3. Deep seismic imaging across the Cameroon Volcanic Line

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, J.B.; Rosendahl, B.R. )

    1991-03-01

    The Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) is a southwest-trending line of volcanic centers that extends from near Lake Chad to at least the island of Pagalu. The Sao Tome and Principe Islands along the CVL have intrigued explorationists for decades because oil seeps and windows of sediments occur on them. Recently the 'PROBE Study' acquired a grid of deep-imagining multifold seismic data cross submarine portions of the CVL. Profiles crossing the CVL show upward flexure of oceanic crust and Moho reflections of more than 3 km locally. Upper Cretaceous/lower Tertiary drift sequence reflectors are concordant to crustal uplift, and shoal toward the islands where they are enmeshed with volcanics. These sediments are apparently the source of oil seeps on Sao Tome and Principe. On the flanks of CVL islands and seamounts, regionally continuous sequence boundaries are observed onlapping rotated older sediment reflectors. These sequence boundaries display either base-discordant onlap patterns or divergent onlap patterns, both indicative of uplift, not eustatic fluctuation. The 'uplift sequence boundaries' probably result from uplift associated with pulses of colcanism in the Miocene. It is likely this arching is the equivalent of the Miocene Adamawa uplift that occurs on land. The authors hypothesize crustal uplift was produced by upwelling of the asthenosphere and upward percolation of light mantle fluids. Features which may be the tops of magma bodies 2-20 km wide are imaged in some of the reflection profiles, and possible shear zones and fluid conduits are observed as sub-Moho dipping reflector events.

  4. A multidisciplinary study on the crustal nature of volcanic conduits and magma reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flinders, Ashton F.

    Volcanic settings vary widely not only in their eruptive style and products, but in the manner magma travels from deep sources to individual eruptive centers. Imaging these pathways, and their associated crustal reservoirs, provides unique and unprecedented views into these environments. Imaging techniques are varied with the strength of the technique often based on data availability. As such, we focus on two methods---gravity and seismic---in two different settings, each with its own unique volcanic environments, crustal structures, and associated data resources. The first, the Hawaiian Islands, are the most geologically studied hot-spot islands in the world, yet the only large-scale compilation of marine and land gravity data is more than 45 years old. We present a new chain-wide gravity compilation allowing us to locate current and former volcanic centers, major rift zones, a previously suggested volcano, and show that volcanoes along the chain are composed of a small proportion of intrusive material (<30% by volume). At the second area, the arc-volcanism of southern Washington, we used ambient seismic noise methods to constrain the crustal pathways of deep-sourced melt to the surface. We image two zones of reduced velocity, one of which correlates with a proposed extensive zone of mid-crustal partial melt which likely supplies evolved magmas to the surrounding volcanoes and vents, including Mounts St. Helens and Adams.

  5. Age Constraints on the Eruptive History of the Northern Galapagos Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinton, C. W.; Harpp, K. S.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Soule, S. A.; Mv1007 Flamingo Science Team

    2011-12-01

    The Northern Galápagos Volcanic Province, located north of the Galápagos Archipelago and centered near the 90° 50'W Galápagos transform fault (GTF), is represented by a complex set of islands, seamount chains and ridges. To better understand the dynamics of ridge-hotspot interaction in this unique region, we collected bathymetry, sidescan sonar, magnetic, sub-bottom seismic, and gravity data during the 2010 FLAMINGO (MV1007) cruise of the R/V Melville. In addition to the geophysical studies, lava samples were recovered by dredge at 43 locations on both the Nazca Plate and Cocos Plate. The bathymetric mapping shows that region on the Nazca Plate west of the GTF is dominated by numerous seamounts aligned in three volcanic lineaments, the largest of which is the Wolf-Darwin Lineament. Faulting patterns and seamount morphology suggest that the locations and orientations of the lineaments may be partly controlled by the lithospheric stress field associated with the GTF. In contrast, east of the GTF on the Cocos Plate, there is little evidence of constructional volcanism - instead, there are several linear, nearly ridge-parallel, faulted features with up to 1km of relief. In this paper, we present new 40Ar/39Ar ages from the lavas collected in this region. These data allow us to constrain the age and duration of volcanism, thereby testing different models for interactions between the Galápagos plume and the Galápagos Spreading Center.

  6. Large and small volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, Agust; Mohajeri, Nahid

    2013-04-01

    Despite great progress in volcanology in the past decades, we still cannot make reliable forecasts as to the likely size (volume, mass) of an eruption once it has started. Empirical data collected from volcanoes worldwide indicates that the volumes (or masses) of eruptive materials in volcanic eruptions are heavy-tailed. This means that most of the volumes erupted from a given magma chamber are comparatively small. Yet, the same magma chamber can, under certain conditions, squeeze out large volumes of magma. To know these conditions is of fundamental importance for forecasting the likely size of an eruption. Thermodynamics provides the basis for understanding the elastic energy available to (i) propagate an injected dyke from the chamber and to the surface to feed an eruption, and (ii) squeeze magma out of the chamber during the eruption. The elastic energy consists of two main parts: first, the strain energy stored in the volcano before magma-chamber rupture and dyke injection, and, second, the work done through displacement of the flanks of the volcano (or the margins of a rift zone) and the expansion and shrinkage of the magma chamber itself. Other forms of energy in volcanoes - thermal, seismic, kinetic - are generally important but less so for squeezing magma out of a chamber during an eruption. Here we suggest that for (basaltic) eruptions in rift zones the strain energy is partly related to minor doming above the reservoir, and partly to stretching of the rift zone before rupture. The larger the reservoir, the larger is the stored strain energy before eruption. However, for the eruption to be really large, the strain energy has to accumulate in the entire crustal segment above the reservoir and there will be additional energy input into the system during the eruption which relates to the displacements of the boundary of the rift-zone segment. This is presumably why feeder dykes commonly propagate laterally at the surface following the initial fissure

  7. Can tides influence volcanic eruptions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girona, T.; Huber, C.

    2015-12-01

    The possibility that the Moon-Sun gravitational force can affect terrestrial volcanoes and trigger eruptions is a controversial issue that has been proposed since ancient times, and that has been widely debated during the last century. The controversy arises mainly from two reasons. First, the days of initiation of eruptions are not well known for many volcanoes, and thus a robust statistical comparison with tidal cycles cannot be performed for many of them. Second, the stress changes induced by tides in the upper crust are very small (10-3 MPa) compared to the tensile strength of rocks (~ 10-1-10 MPa), and hence the mechanism by which tidal stresses might trigger eruptions is unclear. In this study, we address these issues for persistently degassing volcanoes, as they erupt frequently and thus the initiation time of a significant number of eruptions (>30) is well known in several cases (9). In particular, we find that the occurrence of eruptions within ±2 days from neap tides (first and third quarter moon) is lower than 34% (e.g., 29% for Etna, Italy; 28% for Merapi, Indonesia), which is the value expected if eruptions occur randomly with no external influence. To understand this preference for erupting far away from neap tides, we have developed a new lumped-parameter model that accounts for the deformation of magma reservoirs, a partially open conduit, and a gas layer where bubbles accumulate beneath volcanic craters before being released. We demonstrate that this system reservoir-conduit-gas layer acts as an amplifier of the tidal stresses, such that, when a volcano approaches to a critical state, the gas overpressure beneath the crater can reach up to several MPa more during a spring tide (full and new moon) than during a neap tide. This amplification mechanism can explain why active volcanoes are sensitive to the moon cycles.

  8. Volcanic Development of the Rockeskyller Kopf Complex, West Eifel, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodland, A. B.; Shaw, C. S.; Trenholm, N. D.

    2006-05-01

    The West Eifel volcanic field comprises at least 240 volcanic edifices that formed over the last 700 ka. Although the most recent eruption is dated at 10,000 years BP, geophysical evidence suggests the field is not yet extinct. Assessing the hazard potential for the region requires understanding of the time scales of volcanism in the field, particularly since many centers exhibit a multi-stage history. We are undertaking a detailed study of Rockeskyller Kopf, one of the best exposed and most complete volcanic complex in the West Eifel. To date, about 200m of tephra stratigraphy have been logged and sampled. This composite volcano, dated at 500±100 ka, consists of 6 distinct centers separated in both space and time. Each center reveals a history ranging from 1 to more than 100 individual eruptive events. Tephra deposits of the earliest eruptive phase are distinct from all others as expressed by a large country rock component and a significant quantity of clinopyroxenite and mantle-derived xenoliths. This package is strongly eroded with numerous local cut-and-fill channels and has a distinct angular unconformity with the overlying units. Phase 2 deposits are generally more scoriaceous and less phreatomagmatic. These deposits are also truncated by erosional surfaces. Phase 3 units are preserved only locally in a paleotopographic low and have a renewed phreatomagmatic character, containing a high crustal xenolith component. One thin layer even contains rounded quartz pebbles. Deposits of the fourth eruptive phase unconformably overlie those of phase 3. One massive layer is distinctive in containing glass-coated crustal xenoliths. The fifth phase produced a small cinder cone containing discrete lapilli layers that records changes from strombolian to phreatomagmatic activity, reflecting waxing and waning of the water table. The last (6th) eruptive phase was more passive, yielding locally thick (>20m) degassed lava flows. A basal welded ash horizon is locally preserved

  9. Volcanic Lightning in Eruptions of Sakurajima Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edens, Harald; Thomas, Ronald; Behnke, Sonja; McNutt, Stephen; Smith, Cassandra; Farrell, Alexandra; Van Eaton, Alexa; Cimarelli, Corrado; Cigala, Valeria; Eack, Ken; Aulich, Graydon; Michel, Christopher; Miki, Daisuke; Iguchi, Masato

    2016-04-01

    In May 2015 a field program was undertaken to study volcanic lightning at the Sakurajima volcano in southern Japan. One of the main goals of the study was to gain a better understanding of small electrical discharges in volcanic eruptions, expanding on our earlier studies of volcanic lightning at Augustine and Redoubt volcanoes in Alaska, USA, and Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland. In typical volcanic eruptions, electrical activity occurs at the onset of an eruption as a near-continual production of VHF emissions at or near to the volcanic vent. These emissions can occur at rates of up to tens of thousands of emissions per second, and are referred to as continuous RF. As the ash cloud expands, small-scale lightning flashes of several hundred meters length begin to occur while the continuous RF ceases. Later on during the eruption larger-scale lightning flashes may occur within the ash cloud that are reminiscent of regular atmospheric lightning. Whereas volcanic lightning flashes are readily observed and reasonably well understood, the nature and morphology of the events producing continuous RF are unknown. During the 2015 field program we deployed a comprehensive set of instrumentation, including a 10-station 3-D Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) that operated in 10 μs high time resolution mode, slow and fast ΔE antennas, a VHF flat-plate antenna operating in the 20-80 MHz band, log-RF waveforms within the 60-66 MHz band, an infra-red video camera, a high-sensitivity Watec video camera, two high-speed video cameras, and still cameras. We give an overview of the Sakurajima field program and present preliminary results using correlated LMA, waveforms, photographs and video recordings of volcanic lightning at Sakurajima volcano.

  10. New geochemical insights into volcanic degassing.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Marie

    2008-12-28

    Magma degassing plays a fundamental role in controlling the style of volcanic eruptions. Whether a volcanic eruption is explosive, or effusive, is of crucial importance to approximately 500 million people living in the shadow of hazardous volcanoes worldwide. Studies of how gases exsolve and separate from magma prior to and during eruptions have been given new impetus by the emergence of more accurate and automated methods to measure volatile species both as volcanic gases and dissolved in the glasses of erupted products. The composition of volcanic gases is dependent on a number of factors, the most important being magma composition and the depth of gas-melt segregation prior to eruption; this latter parameter has proved difficult to constrain in the past, yet is arguably the most critical for controlling eruptive style. Spectroscopic techniques operating in the infrared have proved to be of great value in measuring the composition of gases at high temporal resolution. Such methods, when used in tandem with microanalytical geochemical investigations of erupted products, are leading to better constraints on the depth at which gases are generated and separated from magma. A number of recent studies have focused on transitions between explosive and effusive activity and have led to a better understanding of gas-melt segregation at basaltic volcanoes. Other studies have focused on degassing during intermediate and silicic eruptions. Important new results include the recognition of fluxing by deep-derived gases, which buffer the amount of dissolved volatiles in the melt at shallow depths, and the observation of gas flow up permeable conduit wall shear zones, which may be the primary mechanism for gas loss at the cusp of the most explosive and unpredictable volcanic eruptions. In this paper, I review current and future directions in the field of geochemical studies of volcanic degassing processes and illustrate how the new insights are beginning to change the way in

  11. Volcanic Alert System (VAS) developed during the (2011-2013) El Hierro (Canary Islands) volcanic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Ramon; Berrocoso, Manuel; Marrero, Jose Manuel; Fernandez-Ros, Alberto; Prates, Gonçalo; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Garcia, Alicia

    2014-05-01

    In volcanic areas with long repose periods (as El Hierro), recently installed monitoring networks offer no instrumental record of past eruptions nor experience in handling a volcanic crisis. Both conditions, uncertainty and inexperience, contribute to make the communication of hazard more difficult. In fact, in the initial phases of the unrest at El Hierro, the perception of volcanic risk was somewhat distorted, as even relatively low volcanic hazards caused a high political impact. The need of a Volcanic Alert System became then evident. In general, the Volcanic Alert System is comprised of the monitoring network, the software tools for the analysis of the observables, the management of the Volcanic Activity Level, and the assessment of the threat. The Volcanic Alert System presented here places special emphasis on phenomena associated to moderate eruptions, as well as on volcano-tectonic earthquakes and landslides, which in some cases, as in El Hierro, may be more destructive than an eruption itself. As part of the Volcanic Alert System, we introduce here the Volcanic Activity Level which continuously applies a routine analysis of monitoring data (particularly seismic and deformation data) to detect data trend changes or monitoring network failures. The data trend changes are quantified according to the Failure Forecast Method (FFM). When data changes and/or malfunctions are detected, by an automated watchdog, warnings are automatically issued to the Monitoring Scientific Team. Changes in the data patterns are then translated by the Monitoring Scientific Team into a simple Volcanic Activity Level, that is easy to use and understand by the scientists and technicians in charge for the technical management of the unrest. The main feature of the Volcanic Activity Level is its objectivity, as it does not depend on expert opinions, which are left to the Scientific Committee, and its capabilities for early detection of precursors. As a consequence of the El Hierro

  12. Imaging of volcanic activity on Jupiter's moon Io by Galileo during the Galileo Europa Mission and the Galileo Millennium Mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keszthelyi, L.; McEwen, A.S.; Phillips, C.B.; Milazzo, M.; Geissler, P.; Turtle, E.P.; Radebaugh, J.; Williams, D.A.; Simonelli, D.P.; Breneman, H.H.; Klaasen, K.P.; Levanas, G.; Denk, T.; Alexander, D.D.A.; Capraro, K.; Chang, S.-H.; Chen, A.C.; Clark, J.; Conner, D.L.; Culver, A.; Handley, T.H.; Jensen, D.N.; Knight, D.D.; LaVoie, S.K.; McAuley, M.; Mego, V.; Montoya, O.; Mortensen, H.B.; Noland, S.J.; Patel, R.R.; Pauro, T.M.; Stanley, C.L.; Steinwand, D.J.; Thaller, T.F.; Woncik, P.J.; Yagi, G.M.; Yoshimizu, J.R.; Alvarez, Del; Castillo, E.M.; Belton, M.J.S.; Beyer, R.; Branston, D.; Fishburn, M.B.; Mueller, B.; Ragan, R.; Samarasinha, N.; Anger, C.D.; Cunningham, C.; Little, B.; Arriola, S.; Carr, M.H.; Asphaug, E.; Moore, J.; Morrison, D.; Rages, K.; Banfield, D.; Bell, M.; Burns, J.A.; Carcich, B.; Clark, B.; Currier, N.; Dauber, I.; Gierasch, P.J.; Helfenstein, P.; Mann, M.; Othman, O.; Rossier, L.; Solomon, N.; Sullivan, R.; Thomas, P.C.; Veverka, J.; Becker, T.; Edwards, K.; Gaddis, L.; Kirk, R.; Lee, E.; Rosanova, T.; Sucharski, R.M.; Beebe, R.F.; Simon, A.; Bender, K.; Chuang, F.; Fagents, S.; Figueredo, P.; Greeley, R.; Homan, K.; Kadel, S.; Kerr, J.; Klemaszewski, J.; Lo, E.; Schwarz, W.; Williams, K.; Bierhaus, E.; Brooks, S.; Chapman, C.R.; Merline, B.; Keller, J.; Schenk, P.; Tamblyn, P.; Bouchez, A.; Dyundian, U.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Showman, A.; Spitale, J.; Stewart, S.; Vasavada, A.; Cunningham, W.F.; Johnson, T.V.; Jones, T.J.; Kaufman, J.M.; Magee, K.P.; Meredith, M.K.; Orton, G.S.; Senske, D.A.; West, A.; Winther, D.; Collins, G.; Fripp, W.J.; Head, J. W.; Pappalardo, R.; Pratt, S.; Procter, L.; Spaun, N.; Colvin, T.; Davies, M.; DeJong, E.M.; Hall, J.; Suzuki, S.; Gorjian, Z.; Giese, B.; Koehler, U.; Neukum, G.; Oberst, J.; Roatsch, T.; Tost, W.; Schuster, P.; Wagner, R.; Dieter, N.; Durda, D.; Greenberg, R.J.; Hoppa, G.; Jaeger, W.; Plassman, J.; Tufts, R.; Fanale, F.P.; Gran,

    2001-01-01

    The Solid-State Imaging (SSI) instrument provided the first high- and medium-resolution views of Io as the Galileo spacecraft closed in on the volcanic body in late 1999 and early 2000. While each volcanic center has many unique features, the majority can be placed into one of two broad categories. The "Promethean" eruptions, typified by the volcanic center Prometheus, are characterized by long-lived steady eruptions producing a compound flow field emplaced in an insulating manner over a period of years to decades. In contrast, "Pillanian" eruptions are characterized by large pyroclastic deposits and short-lived but high effusion rate eruptions from fissures feeding open-channel or open-sheet flows. Both types of eruptions commonly have ???100-km-tall, bright, SO2-rich plumes forming near the flow fronts and smaller deposits of red material that mark the vent for the silicate lavas. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Venus' center of figure-center of mass offset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, Duane L.; Schubert, Gerald; Ford, Peter G.

    1994-01-01

    Magellan altimetry data reveal that the center of figure (CF) of Venus is displaced approximately 280 m from its center of mass (CM) toward 4.4 deg S, 135.8 deg E, a location in Aphrodite Terra. This offset is smaller than those of other terrestrial planets but larger than the estimated error, which is no more than a few tens of meters. We examine the possibility that the CF-CM offset is related to specific geologic provinces on Venus by deriving three simple models for the offset: a thick-crust model, a hotspot model, and a thick-lithosphere model. The offset caused by a region of thick crust depends upon the region's extent, the crust-mantle density contrast, and the thickness of excess crust. A hotspot-related offset depends on the extent of the thermally anomalous region and the magnitude of the thermal anomaly. Offset due to a region of thick lithosphere depends upon the extent of the region, the average temperature contrast across the lithosphere, and the amount of excess lithosphere. We apply the three models to Venus plateau-shaped highlands, volcanic rises, and lowlands, respectively, in an attempt to match the observed CF-CM offset location and magnitude. The influence of most volcanic rises and of Ishtar Terra on the CF-CM offset must be quite small if we are to explain the direction of the observed offset. The lack of influence of volcanic rises can be explained if the related thermal anomalies are limited to a few hundred degrees or less and are plume-shaped (i.e., characterized by a flattened sublithospheric `head' with a narrow cylindrical feeder `tail'). The unimportance of Ishtar Terra is most easily explained if it lies atop a significant mantle downwelling.

  14. Tornillos and Other Volcanic Tremors in Tatun Volcanoes, Northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.; Konstantinou, K.; Pu, S.; Huang, Y.; Lin, Y.; You, S.

    2004-12-01

    This is the first time to report several types of volcanic signals such as Tornillos (screws), harmonic signals (drops) and continuously short-period volcanic tremors at the Tatun volcanic group (Taiwan), which was usually considered as extinct because there was no any historical eruption. These volcanic signals are often reported in the active volcanoes in the earth. In particular, the tornillos have been considered as the potential precursor for volcanic eruption at Galeras volcano, Colombia. Combining all of these volcanic signals with the presviously geochemical analyses from the Helium isotop ratio, we strongly suggest that volcanic activities in the Tatun volcanic area might not be totally extinct yet and further investigations have to been done for evaluation of potential volcanic activities because the Tatun volcano group is not only just nearby two nuclear power plants but also about 15 km north to Taipei, the capital of Taiwan, in which more than seven million people live on.

  15. Latest quaternary volcanism in the St. George Basin, southwestern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Millings, V.T. III; Green, J.D.; Nusbaum, R.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The St. George Basin was the site of mafic volcanism from about 6 Ma to 1 ka. The nature of latest Quaternary volcanism is of interest because the Basin is recognized as a low temperature (< 90C) geothermal resource area and it is part of the transition zone between the Basin and Range Province and the Colorado Plateau. The authors have studied the geochemistry, mineralogy, and aerial distribution of two of the youngest eruptions centers: (1) Veyo Volcano; and (2) the Diamond Valley scoria cones (DVSC). Veyo Volcano erupted basaltic andesite, beginning with an explosive stage marked by a 0.5 m basal Plinian layer. Later eruptions alternated between quiescent and Strombolian-styles. Phenocrysts include clear plagioclase, sieve-texture plagioclase, olivine and rare augite. The DVSC and associated Santa Clara lava flow are tholeiitic basalt, consisting of olivine phenocrysts, and rare plagioclase phenocrysts. Based on preliminary geochemical data, Diamond Valley rocks exhibit lower incompatible element ratios compared to mafic rocks on the Markagunt Plateau and transition zone rocks. In contrast, Veyo Volcano rocks are similar to transition zone mafic rocks with regard to incompatible element abundances.

  16. Insights into volcanic processes using seismic data techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patlan Almeida, Ezer

    The country of Kenya, lying within the East African Rift System (EARS), has been continuously studied for geothermal energy production. EARS, an active continental rift zone, has a number of active and inactive volcanoes throughout its extent that represent potential sources for geothermal energy. The University of Texas at El Paso and the Kenyan Geothermal Development Company (GDC) collaborated to monitor several volcanic centers by deploying 14 passive seismic instruments around Menengai caldera. The temporary seismic network is located close to Nakuru city and it is southeast from the main capital of Nairobi city. Using this local seismic network, we located 198 earthquake hypocenters, which help to identify the margin of the volcano and caldera and faults that could form conduits for fluid flow. In particular, we performed double-difference location and a b-value analysis to define the behavior of magma systems feeding the caldera. Focal mechanisms delineate a normal and low-angle thrust fault striking NE-SW of the caldera floor. We compare our seismicity to InSAR results from different timelines in order to better understand the volcanic process. We suggest that the seismicity is related to magma passing through conduits of the magma chamber and/or fluid being transported as a function of magma movement or hydrothermal activity.

  17. Surface-based observations of volcanic emissions to the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Dave; Barnes, John; Dutton, Ellsworth; Deshler, Terry; Jäger, Horst; Keen, Richard; Osborn, Mary

    Long-term, surface-based observations of the stratospheric aerosol layer are presented and compared. These include three LIDAR aerosol backscatter measurements, at Mauna Loa Observatory (Hawaii), Langley Research Center (Virginia), and Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany); balloonborne in situ particle concentration measurements at Laramie, Wyoming, solar visible transmission measurements at Mauna Loa Observatory; aerosol optical depth measurements at South Pole Station and Mauna Loa Observatory; and lunar eclipse optical depth determinations, which is a globally integrating technique. Surface-based measurements have provided a useful historical record of volcanic effects on the stratospheric aerosol and the agreement between the various techniques is very good. However, some uncertainties exist when the stratosphere is relatively free of volcanic aerosol and some of the techniques are not able to easily resolve the very small amount of aerosol from natural and/or anthropogenic sources. The lunar eclipse data, which go back to the late 1800s, suggest that the Pinatubo eruption in 1991 probably perturbed the stratospheric aerosol layer at least as much as that of Krakatau in 1883. This is an important observation as it is one of the few ways to accurately compare the stratospheric effects of eruptions prior to modern measurements that began in the late 1950s. At the time of this writing (September 2002) the stratosphere appears to be at background with the lowest level of aerosol observed since the layer was discovered in 1959.

  18. Role of volcanism in climate and evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Axelrod, D.I.

    1981-01-01

    Several major episodes of Tertiary explosive volcanism coincided with sharply lowered temperature as inferred from oxygen-isotope composition of foraminiferal tests in deep-sea cores. At these times, fossil floras in the western interior recorded significant changes. Reductions in taxa that required warmth occurred early in the Paleogene. Later, taxa that demand ample summer rain were reduced during a progressive change reflecting growth of the subtropic high. Other ecosystem changes that appear to have responded to volcanically induced climatic modifications include tachytely in Equidae (12 to 10 m.y. B.P.), rapid evolution of grasses (7 to 5 m.y. B.P.), evolution of marine mammals, and plankton flucuations. Although Lake Cretaceous extinctions commenced as epeiric seas retreated, the pulses of sharply lowered temperature induced by explosive volcanism, together with widespread falls of volcanic ash, may have led to extinction of dinosaurs, ammonites, cycadeoids, and other Cretaceous taxa. earlier, as Pangaea was assembled, Permian extinctions resulted not only from the elimination of oceans, epeiric seas, and shorelines, and the spread of more-continental climates, bu also from the climatic effects of major pulses of global volcanism and Gondwana glaciation.

  19. Volcanic activity: a review for health professionals.

    PubMed Central

    Newhall, C G; Fruchter, J S

    1986-01-01

    Volcanoes erupt magma (molten rock containing variable amounts of solid crystals, dissolved volatiles, and gas bubbles) along with pulverized pre-existing rock (ripped from the walls of the vent and conduit). The resulting volcanic rocks vary in their physical and chemical characteristics, e.g., degree of fragmentation, sizes and shapes of fragments, minerals present, ratio of crystals to glass, and major and trace elements composition. Variability in the properties of magma, and in the relative roles of magmatic volatiles and groundwater in driving an eruption, determine to a great extent the type of an eruption; variability in the type of an eruption in turn influences the physical characteristics and distribution of the eruption products. The principal volcanic hazards are: ash and larger fragments that rain down from an explosion cloud (airfall tephra and ballistic fragments); flows of hot ash, blocks, and gases down the slopes of a volcano (pyroclastic flows); "mudflows" (debris flows); lava flows; and concentrations of volcanic gases in topographic depressions. Progress in volcanology is bringing improved long- and short-range forecasts of volcanic activity, and thus more options for mitigation of hazards. Collaboration between health professionals and volcanologists helps to mitigate health hazards of volcanic activity. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 6a-6e FIGURE 6a-6e FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:3946726

  20. Volcanic iodine monoxide observed from satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönhardt, Anja; Richter, Andreas; Theys, Nicolas; Burrows, John P.

    2016-04-01

    Halogen species are injected into the atmosphere by volcanic eruptions. Previous studies have reported observations of chlorine and bromine oxides in volcanic plumes. These emissions have a significant impact on the chemistry within the plume as well as on upper troposphere and lower stratosphere composition, e.g. through ozone depletion. Volcanic halogen oxides have been observed from different platforms, from ground, aircraft and from satellite. The present study reports on satellite observations of iodine monoxide, IO, following the eruption of the Kasatochi volcano, Alaska, in August 2008. Satellite measurements from the SCIAMACHY sensor onboard ENVISAT are used. In addition, the volcanic IO plume is also retrieved from GOME-2 / MetOP-A measurements. Largest IO column amounts reach up to more than 4×1013 molec/cm2, the results from both instruments being consistent. The IO plume has a very similar shape as the BrO plume and is observed for several days following the eruption. The present observations are the first evidence that besides chlorine and bromine oxides also iodine oxides can be emitted by volcanic eruptions. This has important implications for atmospheric composition and background iodine levels. Together with the simultaneous observations of BrO and SO2, iodine monoxide columns can possibly provide insights into the composition of the magma.

  1. Volcanic activity: a review for health professionals.

    PubMed

    Newhall, C G; Fruchter, J S

    1986-03-01

    Volcanoes erupt magma (molten rock containing variable amounts of solid crystals, dissolved volatiles, and gas bubbles) along with pulverized pre-existing rock (ripped from the walls of the vent and conduit). The resulting volcanic rocks vary in their physical and chemical characteristics, e.g., degree of fragmentation, sizes and shapes of fragments, minerals present, ratio of crystals to glass, and major and trace elements composition. Variability in the properties of magma, and in the relative roles of magmatic volatiles and groundwater in driving an eruption, determine to a great extent the type of an eruption; variability in the type of an eruption in turn influences the physical characteristics and distribution of the eruption products. The principal volcanic hazards are: ash and larger fragments that rain down from an explosion cloud (airfall tephra and ballistic fragments); flows of hot ash, blocks, and gases down the slopes of a volcano (pyroclastic flows); "mudflows" (debris flows); lava flows; and concentrations of volcanic gases in topographic depressions. Progress in volcanology is bringing improved long- and short-range forecasts of volcanic activity, and thus more options for mitigation of hazards. Collaboration between health professionals and volcanologists helps to mitigate health hazards of volcanic activity.

  2. Improving volcanic ash predictions with the HYSPLIT dispersion model by assimilating MODIS satellite retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Tianfeng; Crawford, Alice; Stunder, Barbara; Pavolonis, Michael J.; Draxler, Roland; Stein, Ariel

    2017-02-01

    Currently, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) runs the HYSPLIT dispersion model with a unit mass release rate to predict the transport and dispersion of volcanic ash. The model predictions provide information for the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC) to issue advisories to meteorological watch offices, area control centers, flight information centers, and others. This research aims to provide quantitative forecasts of ash distributions generated by objectively and optimally estimating the volcanic ash source strengths, vertical distribution, and temporal variations using an observation-modeling inversion technique. In this top-down approach, a cost functional is defined to quantify the differences between the model predictions and the satellite measurements of column-integrated ash concentrations weighted by the model and observation uncertainties. Minimizing this cost functional by adjusting the sources provides the volcanic ash emission estimates. As an example, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite retrievals of the 2008 Kasatochi volcanic ash clouds are used to test the HYSPLIT volcanic ash inverse system. Because the satellite retrievals include the ash cloud top height but not the bottom height, there are different model diagnostic choices for comparing the model results with the observed mass loadings. Three options are presented and tested. Although the emission estimates vary significantly with different options, the subsequent model predictions with the different release estimates all show decent skill when evaluated against the unassimilated satellite observations at later times. Among the three options, integrating over three model layers yields slightly better results than integrating from the surface up to the observed volcanic ash cloud top or using a single model layer. Inverse tests also show that including the ash-free region to constrain the model is not

  3. Paleomagnetic behavior of volcanic rocks from Isla Socorro, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbarbori, E.; Tauxe, L.; Fucugauchi, J. U.; Gogichaishvili, A.; Bohrson, W. A.

    2007-05-01

    Isla Socorro, Mexico is located in the eastern Pacific Ocean on the Mathematician Ridge, an abandoned spreading center that ceased activity ~3.5 Ma when activity shifted to the East Pacific Rise. Silicic volcanism continues to the present day. A lack of vegetation in the southeastern portion of the island has resulted in extensive erosion, exposing in steep-sided canyons a sequence of volcanic units the oldest of which are ~540ka. We carried out a joint expedition between the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Universidad Nacional Autonoma Mexico to Isla Socorro in January of 2005. We collected oriented paleomagnetic samples from 21 sites from as many as 10 different volcanic units. We subjected over 100 specimens to an "IZZI" type (Tauxe and Staudigel, 2004) paleointensity experiment in which in-field and zero-field first steps were alternated to detect high-temperature tails. We also included the standard pTRM checks. Although some specimens worked extremely well, we observed non-ideal behavior in many specimens. We categorized this `misbehavior' into four general groups reflecting contamination by non-single-domain magnetic carriers and alteration during the experiment. In an earlier study, Bohrson et al. (1996) proposed a series of widespread eruptive events, based on similarities of argon/argon dates. Paleointensity from specimens that conform to the strictest acceptance criteria are available from both the (unoriented) original sample collection and our fully oriented (but as yet undated) new collection. Comparison of the two sample sets allows us to tie dates unambiguously from the dated collection to the new fully oriented data set. Bohrson, W. A., M. R. Reid, et al. (1996). "Prolonged History of Silicic Peralkaline Volcanism in the Eastern Pacific Ocean." Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth 101(B5): 11457-11474. Tauxe, L. and H. Staudigel (2004). "Strength of the geomagnetic field in the Cretaceous Normal Superchron: New data from

  4. Active Volcanic Eruptions on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Six views of the volcanic plume named Prometheus, as seen against Io's disk and near the bright limb (edge) of the satellite by the SSI camera on the Galileo spacecraft during its second (G2) orbit of Jupiter. North is to the top of each frame. To the south-southeast of Prometheus is another bright spot that appears to be an active plume erupting from a feature named Culann Patera. Prometheus was active 17 years ago during both Voyager flybys, but no activity was detected by Voyager at Culann. Both of these plumes were seen to glow in the dark in an eclipse image acquired by the imaging camera during Galileo's first (G1) orbit, and hot spots at these locations were detected by Galileo's Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer.

    The plumes are thought to be driven by heating sulfur dioxide in Io's subsurface into an expanding fluid or 'geyser'. The long-lived nature of these eruptions requires that a substantial supply of sulfur dioxide must be available in Io's subsurface, similar to groundwater. Sulfur dioxide gas condenses into small particles of 'snow' in the expanding plume, and the small particles scatter light and appear bright at short wavelengths. The images shown here were acquired through the shortest-wavelength filter (violet) of the Galileo camera. Prometheus is about 300 km wide and 75 km high and Culann is about 150 km wide and less than 50 km high. The images were acquired on September 4, 1996 at a range of 2,000,000 km (20 km/pixel resolution). Prometheus is named after the Greek fire god and Culann is named after the Celtic smith god.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the

  5. Dynamical constraints on kimberlite volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, R. S. J.; Baker, L.; Brown, R. J.; Field, M.; Schumacher, J.; Stripp, G.; Walters, A.

    2006-07-01

    Kimberlite volcanism involves the ascent of low viscosity (0.1 to 1 Pa s) and volatile-rich (CO 2 and H 2O) ultrabasic magmas from depths of 150 km or greater. Theoretical models and empirical evidence suggest ascent along narrow (˜1 m) dykes at speeds in the range > 4 to 20 m/s. With typical dyke breadths of 1 to 10 km, magma supply rates are estimated in the range 10 2 to 10 5 m 3/s with eruption durations of many hours to months. Based on observations, theory and experiments we propose a four-stage model for kimberlite eruptions to explain the main geological relationships of kimberlites. In stage I magma reaches the Earth's surface along fissures and erupts explosively due to their high volatile content. The early flow exit conditions are overpressured with choked flow conditions; an exit velocity of ˜200 m/s is estimated as representative. Explosive expansion and near surface overpressures initiate crater and pipe formation from the top downwards. In stage II under-pressures (the difference between the lithostatic pressure and pressure of the erupting mixture) develop within the evolving pipe causing rock bursting at depth, undermining overlying rocks and causing down-faulting and crater rim slumping. Rocks falling into the pipe interior are ejected by the strong explosive flows. Stage II is the erosive stage of pipe formation. As the pipe widens and deepens larger under-pressures develop enhancing pipe wall instability. A critical threshold is reached when the exit pressure falls to one atmosphere. As the pipe widens and deepens further the gas exit velocity declines and ejecta becomes trapped within the pipe, initiating stage III. A fluidised bed of pyroclasts develops within the pipe as the eruption wanes to form typical massive volcaniclastic kimberlite. Marginal breccias represent the transition between stages II and III. After the eruption stage IV is a period of hydrothermal metamorphism (principally serpentinisation) and alteration as the pipe cools

  6. Basaltic Volcanism of the Snake River Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shervais, J. W.; Hanan, B. B.; Vetter, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Yellowstone-Snake River Plain (YSRP) volcanic province is the world's best modern example of a time-transgressive hotspot track beneath continental crust. Tomographic images document a thermal anomaly which pierces the Farallon plate at depth and appears to extend to depths of over 1000 km. Many investigators attribute this anomaly to a deep mantle plume, while others recognize the sheet-like aspect of the velocity anomaly and attribute it to lower mantle flow around a fragmented remnant of the Farallon plate. Tholeiitic basalts of the SRP have major element compositions similar to ocean island basalts (OIB), with higher FeO, TiO2, P2O5 and K2O than mid-ocean ridge basalts over a similar range in MgO. Their trace element concentrations also mimic OIB tholeiites, with moderately enriched LREE/HREE ratios, OIB-like HFSE ratios and Nb-Y-Zr systematics. Most SRP basalts show little evidence of crustal assimilation: oxygen isotope compositions are mantle-like, K2O is low and does not increase relative to other incompatible elements during fractionation (e.g., P2O5), and silica contents are consistently low. In contrast, evidence suggests that these basalts evolve primarily through fractional crystallization in relatively shallow magma chambers with episodic magma recharge. Trace element concentration patterns are nearly identical to OIB tholeiites, with somewhat lower slopes on multi-element variations diagrams, consistent with 7-12% partial melting of spinel-facies peridotite (9-18 kb, 40-65 km) with a composition similar to the source of OIB or EMORB. Models show that depleted MORB asthenosphere or primitive mantle peridotite composition sources cannot yield SRP tholeiites, even with residual garnet in the source region to raise LREE/HREE ratios in the melt. There is no indication of residual garnet in the source - which requires that either the lithosphere was relatively thin during formation of the SRP, or that the melts originated within the lithosphere itself

  7. Napoli and Volcanism - Vesuvius and Mt. Etna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    For more than 240 million years the region now known as Italy has been the scene of episodic volcanic activity. East-southeast of Napoli (Naples) stands the imposing cone of Vesuvius, which erupted explosively in 79 A.D. to bury Pompeii and Herculaneum. More recently, when the crew of Space Shuttle mission STS-104 captured this view, Mt. Etna (Sicily, not seen in this image, but photographed the day before) was spewing ash and gas thousands of meters into the air, some of which can be seen as a brownish smear over Isola d' Ischia and the Tyrrhenian Sea. The Appenine ranges extend from northern Italy, down the boot of the peninsula and westward into Sicily. This photograph of the Appenino Napoletano is part of an 18-frame stereophoto mapping strip that spans the entire mountain chain. The almost 1200-km-long belt of volcanoes and folded/faulted mountains is a result of the ongoing collision of Africa and Eurasia, accompanied by the progressive closing of the Mediterranean Sea. Using overlapping pairs of stereophotos, and a special viewer, scientists can get a three-dimensional perspective on the ranges that surpasses any image viewed alone. For more information, see another image of Mt. Vesuvius, taken by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). References: Behncke, Boris, 2000, Vesuvio - The eruption of A.D. 79: Italy's Volcanoes - The Cradle of Volcanology [http://www.geo.mtu.edu/boris/VESUVIO_79.html (accessed 10/18/01)] Doglioni, C., and Flores, G., 1997, Italy, in Moores, E. M., and Fairbridge, R. W., editors, Encyclopedia of European and Asian Regional Geology: London, Chapman and Hall, p. 414-435 Shuttle photograph STS104-710-60 was taken 23 July 2001 from the orbiter Atlantis using a Hasselblad camera with 250-mm lens. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. The entire mapping series (of frames numbered in sequence from 50 through 68) can also be downloaded from the

  8. Multiple episodes of hydrothermal activity and epithermal mineralization in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and their relations to magmatic activity, volcanism and regional extension

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, S.I.; Noble, D.C.; Jackson, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    Volcanic rocks of middle Miocene age and underlying pre-Mesozoic sedimentary rocks host widely distributed zones of hydrothermal alteration and epithermal precious metal, fluorite and mercury deposits within and peripheral to major volcanic and intrusive centers of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field (SWNVF) in southern Nevada, near the southwestern margin of the Great Basin of the western United States. Radiometric ages indicate that episodes of hydrothermal activity mainly coincided with and closely followed major magmatic pulses during the development of the field and together spanned more than 4.5 m.y. Rocks of the SWNVF consist largely of rhyolitic ash-flow sheets and intercalated silicic lava domes, flows and near-vent pyroclastic deposits erupted between 15.2 and 10 Ma from vent areas in the vicinity of the Timber Mountain calderas, and between about 9.5 and 7 Ma from the outlying Black Mountain and Stonewall Mountain centers. Three magmatic stages can be recognized: the main magmatic stage, Mountain magmatic stage (11.7 to 10.0 Ma), and the late magmatic stage (9.4 to 7.5 Ma).

  9. Huygens Crater: Insights into Noachian Volcanism, Stratigraphy, and Aqueous Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackiss, S. E.; Wray, J. J.; Seelos, K. D.; Niles, P. B.

    2015-01-01

    Huygens crater is a well preserved peak ring structure on Mars centered at 13.5 deg S, 55.5 deg E in the Noachian highlands between Terras Tyrrhena and Sabaea near the NW rim of Hellas basin. With a diameter of approximately 470 km, it uplifted and exhumed pre-Noachian crustal materials from depths greater than 25 km, penetrating below the thick, ubiquitous layer of Hellas ejecta. In addition, Huygens served as a basin for subsequent aqueous activity, including erosion/deposition by fluvial valley networks and subsurface alteration that is now exposed by smaller impacts. Younger mafic-bearing plains that partially cover the basin floor and surrounding intercrater areas were likely emplaced by later volcanism.

  10. Tectonics and Volcanism of East Africa as Seen Using Remote Sensing Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutt, Duncan John

    1996-01-01

    The East African Rift is the largest area of active continental geology. The tectonics of this area has been studied with remote sensing data, including AVHRR, Landsat MSS and TM, SPOT, and electronic still camera from Shuttle. Lineation trends have been compared to centers of volcanic and earthquake activity as well as the trends shown on existing geologic maps. Remote sensing data can be used effectively to reveal and analyze significant tectonic features in this area.

  11. Explosive volcanic deposits on Mars: Preliminary investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crown, D. A.; Leshin, L. A.; Greeley, Ronald

    1987-01-01

    Two investigations were undertaken to examine possible large scale explosive volcanic deposits on Mars. The first includes an analysis of Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) data covering the vast deposits in the Amazonis, Memnonia, and Aeolis regions. These postulated ignimbrites have been previously mapped, and at least five high resolution nighttime IRTM data tracks cross the deposits. Preliminary analysis of the data covering Amazonis Planitia show that local features have anomalous thermal inertias but the ignimbrites as a whole do not consistently have significantly different thermal inertias from their surroundings. Preliminary photogeologic and IRTM studies of the large and small highland paterae have also begun. The purpose of IRTM studies of postulated Martian explosive volcanic deposits is to determine the physical properties of the proposed ignimbrites. If volcanic deposits are exposed at the surface, high thermal inertias, as are observed for Apollinaris Patera, should be present.

  12. The Latest on Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, Alan

    2013-08-01

    What was the largest volcanic eruption on Earth since the historic Mount Pinatubo eruption on 15 June 1991? Was the Toba super­eruption 74,000 years ago—the largest in the past 100,000 years—responsible for a human genetic bottleneck or a 1000-year-long glacial advance? What role did small volcanic eruptions play in the reduced global warming of the past decade? What caused the Little Ice Age? Was the April 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption in Iceland important for climate change? What do volcanic eruptions teach us about new ideas on geoengineering and nuclear winter? These are some of the questions that have been answered since the review article by Robock [2000]. Reviews by Forster et al. [2007] and Timmreck [2012] go into some of these topics in much greater detail.

  13. Yucca Mountain could face greater volcanic threat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Eugene I.; Keenan, Deborah L.

    Locating a radioactive waste repository in the United States has been the subject of over 20 years of scientific research, political wrangling, and court decisions. If a nuclear waste repository is constructed at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, 70,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel will be buried 300 m below the surface.Because eight Quaternary basalt volcanoes erupted within 50 km of the proposed repository in the past million years, future volcanism is an important issue. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently using an expert panel to evaluate current models [Perry et al., 1998] and consider alternative models. This article presents an alternative model, developed independently of DOE and the expert panel, and reviews new information pertinent to volcanic hazard studies. Additionally, this article suggests that the size of the Yucca Mountain volcanic field is not presently well known.

  14. Combining Geological and Geophysical Data in Volcanic Hazard Estimation for Dominica, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, O.; Latchman, J. L.; Connor, C.; Malservisi, R.; Connor, L.

    2014-12-01

    Risk posed by volcanic eruptions are generally quantified in a few ways; in the short term geophysical data such as seismic activity or ground deformation are used to assess the state of volcanic unrest while statistical approaches such as spatial density estimates are used for long term hazard assessment. Spatial density estimates have been used in a number of monogenetic volcanic fields for hazard map generation and utilize the age, location and volumes of previous eruptions to calculate the probability of a new event occurring at a given location within this field. In a previously unpublished study, spatial density estimates of the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc showed the island of Dominica to have the highest likelihood of future vent formation. In this current study, this technique was used in combination with relocated seismic events occurring beneath Dominica within the last ~ 20 years as well as InSAR images of ground deformation to generate a hazard map which not only takes into consideration the past events but also the current state of unrest. Here, geophysical data serve as a weighting factor in the estimates with those centers showing more vigorous activity receiving stronger favorability in the assessment for future activity. In addition to this weighting, the bandwidth utilized in the 2D-radially symmetric kernel density function was optimized using the SAMSE method so as to find the value which best minimizes the error in the estimate. The end results of this study are dynamic volcanic hazards maps which will be readily updatable as changes in volcanic unrest occurs within the system.

  15. The Global Framework for Providing Information about Volcanic-Ash Hazards to International Air Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, R. W.; Guffanti, M.

    2009-12-01

    The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) created the International Airways Volcano Watch (IAVW) in 1987 to establish a requirement for international dissemination of information about airborne ash hazards to safe air navigation. The IAVW is a set of operational protocols and guidelines that member countries agree to follow in order to implement a global, multi-faceted program to support the strategy of ash-cloud avoidance. Under the IAVW, the elements of eruption reporting, ash-cloud detecting, and forecasting expected cloud dispersion are coordinated to culminate in warnings sent to air traffic controllers, dispatchers, and pilots about the whereabouts of ash clouds. Nine worldwide Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC) established under the IAVW have the responsibility for detecting the presence of ash in the atmosphere, primarily by looking at imagery from civilian meteorological satellites, and providing advisories about the location and movement of ash clouds to aviation meteorological offices and other aviation users. Volcano Observatories also are a vital part of the IAVW, as evidenced by the recent introduction of a universal message format for reporting the status of volcanic activity, including precursory unrest, to aviation users. Since 2003, the IAVW has been overseen by a standing group of scientific, technical, and regulatory experts that assists ICAO in the development of standards and other regulatory material related to volcanic ash. Some specific problems related to the implementation of the IAVW include: the lack of implementation of SIGMET (warning to aircraft in flight) provisions and delayed notifications of volcanic eruptions. Expected future challenges and developments involve the improvement in early notifications of volcanic eruptions, the consolidation of the issuance of SIGMETs, and the possibility of determining a “safe” concentration of volcanic ash.

  16. Magma source transition of lunar mare volcanism at 2.3 Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, S.; Morota, T.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Watanabe, S.; Otake, H.; Ohtake, M.

    2015-12-01

    Lunar mare basalts, the most common volcanic feature on the Moon, provide insights into compositions and thermal history of lunar mantle. According to the model ages of mare basalt units determined by crater counting with remote sensing data indicate that magma activity has a second peak at the end of mare volcanism (~2 Ga), and the latest eruptions were limited in the Procellarum KREEP Terrane (PKT), which is characterized by high abundances of heat-producing elements. In order to understand the magma source of the latest volcanism and mechanism for causing the second peak, we examined the correlation between the titanium contents and eruption ages of mare basalt units using compositional and chronological data updated by SELENE/Kaguya. Although the systematic relationship is not observed globally, a rapid increase in mean titanium (Ti) content occurred at 2.3 Ga in the PKT, suggesting that the magma source of mare basalts changed at that time. The high-Ti basaltic eruptions can be correlated with the second peak of volcanic activity at ~2 Ga. The latest volcanic activity can be induced by a high-Ti hot plume originated from the core-mantle boundary. If the hot plume was occurred, the topographic features formed by the hot plume may be remained. Then, we calculated the difference between topography and selenoid and found the circular feature like a plateau in the center of the PKT, which scale is ~1000 km horizontal and ~500 m vertical. Moreover, mare ridges in this region seem to connect with the plateau. Using detailed models of the flexural response of the lunar elastic lithosphere, we estimated the elastic thickness at the time of occurrence of the hot plume. From our results, the effective elastic thickness at the period of latest volcanism is estimated 20-30 km, which is thinner than that of the period before ~2 Ga. These results may suggest that the up lift of lithosphere caused by the hot plume.

  17. A Multistage Volcanic and Tectonic Evolution History on the High Plateau, Part of the Manihiki Plateau, Central Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, R.; Uenzelmann-Neben, G.

    2014-12-01

    For the Manihiki Plateau, a Large Igneous Province (LIP), a multistage volcanic emplacement history is revealed in new, multi channel high resolution seismic reflection data. Gathered during cruise So224 the profiles are distributed to study the initial emplacement of the High Plateau (HP), part of the Manihiki Plateau, as well as tectonic related processes at its margins. Extension of a previously defined seismostratigraphic model has allowed an identification of an intra-basalt reflector which has been formed by volcanism prior to the major emplacement during the early Cretaceous. We suggest that it represents the nucleus of the HP's formation and conclude that the Manihiki Plateau is older than the proposed ~120 Ma. We have identified evidence that the plateau extended to the east and broke-up along the Manihiki Scarp prior to the second volcanic active phase. The south-western margin shows a stretched and rifted structure, which could be related to the separation of the Manihiki and Hikurangi Plateaus. Identification of extrusion centers associated with a third volcanic active period ending ~65 Ma ago and their spatial distribution hint on a shift of the emplacement mechanism from sources related to initial emplacement to tectonic induced volcanism at the margins. Later stage tectonic and volcanic reactivations occurred, which were concentrated in the south-western part of the HP.

  18. 2005 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, R.G.; Neal, C.A.; Dixon, J.P.; Ushakov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity at or near 16 volcanoes in Alaska during 2005, including the high profile precursory activity associated with the 2005?06 eruption of Augustine Volcano. AVO continues to participate in distributing information about eruptive activity on the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia, and in the Kurile Islands of the Russian Far East, in conjunction with the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and the Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT), respectively. In 2005, AVO helped broadcast alerts about activity at 8 Russian volcanoes. The most serious hazard posed from volcanic eruptions in Alaska, Kamchatka, or the Kurile Islands is the placement of ash into the atmosphere at altitudes traversed by jet aircraft along the North Pacific and Russian Trans East air routes. AVO, KVERT, and SVERT work collaboratively with the National Weather Service, Federal Aviation Administration, and the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers to provide timely warnings of volcanic eruptions and the production and movement of ash clouds.

  19. Probing Volcanic Eruption Clouds With the Airs Spectrometer on Aqua: A New Tool for Quantifying Sulfur Dioxide and Ash Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, Y.; Strow, L. L.; Carn, S.; Machado, S. D.; Hannon, S.

    2003-12-01

    Since its launch on EOS/Aqua in May 2002, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) has successfully detected SO2 and ash clouds emitted during a number of volcanic eruptions. Detection of SO2 is achieved using the strong infrared absorption band of the gas centered around 7.3 μ m. For upper tropospheric volcanic clouds, preliminary AIRS SO2 retrievals performed using a version of the AIRS radiative transfer algorithm that includes variable SO2 indicate good agreement with SO2 amounts detected by the ultraviolet Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) where coincident data are available. However, the higher spatial, spectral and temporal resolution of AIRS provides much improved coverage of volcanic emissions at lower altitudes, such as the October 2002 eruption of Mt.Etna (Italy). AIRS retrievals of SO2 and ash optical depths and effective particle radii in volcanic clouds from several eruptions will be presented, including Etna, Ruang (Indonesia, September 2002), Reventador (Ecuador, November 2002), Anatahan (Mariana Islands, May 2003) and Soufriere Hills (Montserrat, July 2003). These examples demonstrate the potential of AIRS data to improve measurements of volcanic SO2 and ash loading following eruptions, and to refine our understanding of volcanic cloud composition,structure and evolution.

  20. Volcanic inflation of Axial Seamount since the 1998 eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooner, S. L.; Chadwick, W.

    2010-12-01

    Since 2000, ambient seawater pressure has been precisely measured at five seafloor benchmarks inside the summit caldera at Axial Seamount in order to measure their relative depth and monitor volcanic inflation that has been occurring since an eruption in 1998. A remotely operated vehicle has been used to deploy a mobile pressure recorder (MPR) in campaign-style surveys, with additional seawater pressure data collected at the caldera center with multiyear deployments of continuously recording bottom pressure recorders (BPRs). Our previous measurements at Axial Seamount have shown steady inflation of the caldera center through 2007 and the spatial pattern of uplift has been consistent with magma storage in a shallow reservoir underlying the caldera at a depth of 3.5 km. This is the only location in the world where long-term monitoring of volcanic inflation has been accomplished at a submarine volcano. Here we present the results of new pressure data (both MPR and BPR) collected during a cruise on board the R/V Thomas Thompson in August-September 2010 and using the Jason ROV. Three years have passed since the previous survey, providing enough time to distinguish between two alternative models of inflation and magma recharge for the volcano. This allows us to refine our forecast for the next eruption at Axial and estimate total uplift that has occurred since the 1998 eruption. During the 2010 survey we also deployed new concrete benchmarks to replace our original galvanized steel benchmarks. The new benchmarks are larger and much heavier, and we expect them to be much more durable and stable over long time periods and help keep measurement errors as small as possible. We installed a sixth benchmark at a new site within the caldera, near the Ashes vent field, which will help constrain our modeling of the inflation signal in future years.

  1. Surface Coatings on Lunar Volcanic Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, D. S.; Thomas,-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    We are undertaking a detailed study of surface deposits on lunar volcanic glass beads. These tiny deposits formed by vapor condensation during cooling of the gases that drove the fire fountain eruptions responsible for the formation of the beads. Volcanic glass beads are present in most lunar soil samples in the returned lunar collection. The mare-composition beads formed as a result of fire-fountaining approx.3.4-3.7 Ga ago, within the age range of large-scale mare volcanism. Some samples from the Apollo 15 and Apollo 17 landing sites are enriched in volcanic spherules. Three major types of volcanic glass bead have been identified: Apollo 15 green glass, Apollo 17 orange glass, and Apollo 17 "black" glass. The Apollo 15 green glass has a primitive composition with low Ti. The high-Ti compositions of the orange and black glasses are essentially identical to each other but the black glasses are opaque because of quench crystallization. A poorly understood feature common to the Apollo 15 and 17 volcanic glasses is the presence of small deposits of unusual materials on their exterior surfaces. For example, early studies indicated that the Apollo 17 orange glasses had surface enrichments of In, Cd, Zn, Ga, Ge, Au, and Na, and possible Pb- and Zn-sulfides, but it was not possible to characterize the surface features in detail. Technological advances now permit us to examine such features in detail. Preliminary FE-TEM/X-ray studies of ultramicrotome sections of Apollo 15 green glass indicate that the surface deposits are heterogeneous and layered, with an inner layer consisting of Fe with minor S and an outer layer of Fe and no S, and scattered Zn enrichments. Layering in surface deposits has not been identified previously; it will be key to defining the history of lunar fire fountaining.

  2. Marine mesocosm bacterial colonisation of volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Verena; Cimarelli, Corrado; Ayris, Paul; Kueppers, Ulrich; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Dingwell, Donald; Woerheide, Gert

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions regularly eject large quantities of ash particles into the atmosphere, which can be deposited via fallout into oceanic environments. Such fallout has the potential to alter pH, light and nutrient availability at local scales. Shallow-water coral reef ecosystems - "rainforests of the sea" - are highly sensitive to disturbances, such as ocean acidification, sedimentation and eutrophication. Therefore, wind-delivered volcanic ash may lead to burial and mortality of such reefs. Coral reef ecosystem resilience may depend on pioneer bacterial colonisation of the ash layer, supporting subsequent establishment of the micro- and ultimately the macro-community. However, which bacteria are involved in pioneer colonisation remain unknown. We hypothesize that physico-chemical properties (i.e., morphology, mineralogy) of the ash may dictate bacterial colonisation. The effect of substrate properties on bacterial colonisation was tested by exposing five substrates: i) quartz sand ii) crystalline ash (Sakurajima, Japan) iii) volcanic glass iv) carbonate reef sand and v) calcite sand of similar grain size, in controlled marine coral reef aquaria under low light conditions for six months. Bacterial communities were screened every month by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA Internal Transcribed Spacer region. Multivariate statistics revealed discrete groupings of bacterial communities on substrates of volcanic origin (ash and glass) and reef origin (three sands). Analysis of Similarity supported significantly different communities associated with all substrates (p=0.0001), only quartz did not differ from both carbonate and calcite sands. The ash substrate exhibited the most diverse bacterial community with the most substrate-specific bacterial operational taxonomic units. Our findings suggest that bacterial diversity and community composition during colonisation of volcanic ash in a coral reef-like environment is controlled by the

  3. A compound power-law model for volcanic eruptions: Implications for risk assessment of volcanism at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Chih-Hsiang

    1994-10-17

    Much of the ongoing debate on the use of nuclear power plants in U.S.A. centers on the safe disposal of the radioactive waste. Congress, aware of the importance of the waste issue, passed the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, requiring the federal government to develop a geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high level radioactive wastes from civilian nuclear power plants. The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) in 1983 to identify potential sites. When OCRWM had selected three potential sites to study, Congress enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, which directed the DOE to characterize only one of those sites, Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada. For a site to be acceptable, theses studies must demonstrate that the site could comply with regulations and guidelines established by the federal agencies that will be responsible for licensing, regulating, and managing the waste facility. Advocates and critics disagree on the significance and interpretation of critical geological features which bear on the safety and suitability of Yucca Mountain as a site for the construction of a high-level radioactive waste repository. Recent volcanism in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain is readily recognized as an important factor in determining future public and environmental safety because of the possibility of direct disruption of a repository site by volcanism. In particular, basaltic volcanism is regarded as direct and unequivocal evidence of deep-seated geologic instability. In this paper, statistical analysis of volcanic hazard assessment at the Yucca Mountain site is discussed, taking into account some significant geological factors raised by experts. Three types of models are considered in the data analysis. The first model assumes that both past and future volcanic activities follow a homogeneous Poisson process (HPP).

  4. Fossil hot spot-ridge interaction in the Musicians Seamount Province: Geophysical investigations of hot spot volcanism at volcanic elongated ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, H.; Kopp, C.; Phipps Morgan, J.; Flueh, E. R.; Weinrebe, W.; Morgan, W. J.

    2003-03-01

    The Musicians Seamount Province is a group of volcanic elongated ridges (VERs) and single seamounts located north of the Hawaiian Chain. A 327° trending seamount chain defines the western part of the province and has been interpreted as the expression of a Cretaceous hot spot beneath the northward moving Pacific Plate. To the east, elongated E-W striking ridges dominate the morphology. In 1999, wide-angle seismic data were collected across two 400 km long VERs. We present tomographic images of the volcanic edifices, which indicate that crustal thickening occurs in oceanic layer 2 rather than in layer 3. This extrusive style of volcanism appears to strongly contrast with the formation processes of aseismic ridges, where crustal thickening is mostly accommodated by intrusive underplating. High-resolution bathymetry was also collected, which yields a detailed image of the morphology of the VERs. From the occurrence of flat-top guyots and from the unique geomorphologic setting, two independent age constraints for the Pacific crust during the Cretaceous "quiet" zone are obtained, allowing a tectonic reconstruction for the formation of the Musicians VERs. Hot spot-ridge interaction leads to asthenosphere channeling from the plume to the nearby spreading center over a maximum distance of 400 km. The Musicians VERs were formed by mainly extrusive volcanism on top of this melt-generating channel. The proposed formation model may be applicable to a number of observed volcanic ridges in the Pacific, including the Tuamotu Isles, the eastern portion of the Foundation chain, and the western termination of the Salas y Gomez seamount chain.

  5. U.S. Interagency Response Plans for Volcanic Ash and Other Volcanic Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osiensky, J. M.; Birch, S.; Carpenter, D.

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. federal agencies, under the Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology (OFCM), have partnered to provide guidance and support for regional response plans dealing with volcanic hazards. The OFCM working group for volcanic ash (WG/VA) has produced a national framework document entitled National Volcanic Ash Operations Plan for Aviation (NVOPA) in support of the International Airways Volcano Watch, August 2007. This document provides a high level look at the federal agency roles and responsibilities, products and services pertaining to volcanic ash. There are several regional plans that sit under the "national" plan framework specifically, Alaska Interagency Operating Plan for Volcanic Ash Episodes, July 2011; Interagency Operating Plan for Volcanic Ash Hazards to Aviation in the Pacific Region of the Northern Marianas Islands (draft framework), June 2009; Pacific Northwest (Washington/Oregon) Interagency Operating Plan for Volcanic Ash Events, May 2011. In addition to the plans listed above, there is a Hawaii volcano hazards and a California volcanic ash plan under development. Work on a Puerto Rico/Eastern Caribbean plan will commence in 2011. The purpose of these regional plans is to dovetail off of the NVOPA and provide more granularity with respect to agency roles and responsibilities. These regional plans often times will include agency call down lists and volcano specific information for the area of concern. The intent of these plans is not to act as an agency/office SOP but rather provide a more regional perspective. A side benefit to these plans is that they act as a focus around the development of table top exercises between the agencies. Areas in the continental U.S. that have relatively low frequency of volcanic events must practice through table top and communications exercises to remain proficient and ensure the messaging is communicated and appropriate action is taken in a timely fashion.

  6. Volcanic Perspective on Plutonism based on Patterns in Evolution in Long-Lived Continental Volcanic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunder, A. L.; Harris, R. N.; Walker, B. A.; Giles, D.; Klemetti, E. W.

    2008-12-01

    Volcanic rocks represent a biased view of magmatism, but provide critical quenched samples and temporal constraints of magmatic evolution obscured in the plutonic record. We here draw on the records from the Aucanquilcha Volcanic Cluster (AVC; 10 to 0 Ma) in northern Chile and from the mid-Tertiary volcanic field in east-central Nevada (ECNVF; ~40-32 Ma) to consider how evolutionary patterns of intermediate composition volcanic systems bear on the magmatic reworking of the continental crust by plutons and batholiths. Despite disparate tectonic setting (subduction vs extension) and volumes (70 km crust for the ~300 km 3 AVC versus and ~40 km crust for the ~3000 km 3 ECNVF) both volcanic systems share a history of early compositionally diverse volcanism, followed by a stage of more centralized and voluminous dacitic volcanism, which in turn is followed by waning of volcanism. The compositional change and the rapid increase in magma output rate after about half the lifetime of the system is a characteristic pattern of long- lived continental volcanic systems based on a compilation of volume-composition data. The middle, voluminous stage corresponds to the hottest upper crustal conditions, deduced from Al-in-amphibole geothermobarometry and Ti-in-zircon thermometry of the AVC. The middle stage rocks also have textures indicating hybridization of mixed magmas. Simple thermal models of heat input via intraplating readily allow for generation of partially molten crust above the sill, but they do not emulate the rapid increase of magma after some incubation time. We propose that there is a feedback in which a critical thickness of partially molten crust, consisting in part of magmatic precursors, can be readily convectively stirred and mixed with magma of the underplating sill, rapidly creating a large, hybrid and relatively hot body of magma. Stirring facilitates separation of a liquid-enriched extract. The volume of liquid extracted may be small relative to residual

  7. Constraining the onset of flood volcanism in Isle of Skye Lava Field, British Paleogene Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angkasa, Syahreza; Jerram, Dougal. A.; Svensen, Henrik; Millet, John M.; Taylor, Ross; Planke, Sverre

    2016-04-01

    In order to constrain eruption styles at the onset of flood volcanism, field observations were undertaken on basal sections of the Isle of Skye Lava Field, British Paleogene Volcanic Province. This study investigates three specific sections; Camus Ban, Neist Point and Soay Sound which sample a large area about 1500 km2 and can be used to help explain the variability in palaeo-environments at the onset of flood volcanism. Petrological analysis is coupled with petrophysical lab data and photogrammetry data to create detailed facies models for the different styles of initiating flood basalt volcanism. Photogrammetry is used to create Ortho-rectified 3D models which, along with photomontage images, allow detailed geological observations to be mapped spatially. Petrographic analyses are combined with petrophysical lab data to identify key textural variation, mineral compositions and physical properties of the volcanic rocks emplaced during the initial eruptions. Volcanism initiated with effusive eruptions in either subaerial or subaqueous environments resulting in tuff/hyaloclastite materials or lava flow facies lying directly on the older Mesozoic strata. Volcanic facies indicative of lava-water interactions vary significantly in thickness between different sections suggesting a strong accommodation space control on the style of volcanism. Camus Ban shows hyaloclastite deposits with a thickness of 25m, whereas the Soay Sound area has tuffaceous sediments of under 0.1m in thickness. Subaerial lavas overly these variable deposits in all studied areas. The flood basalt eruptions took place in mixed wet and dry environments with some significant locally developed water bodies (e.g. Camus Ban). More explosive eruptions were promoted in some cases by interaction of lavas with these water bodies and possibly by local interaction with water - saturated sediments. We record key examples of how palaeotopography imparts a primary control on the style of volcanism during the

  8. New Map of Io's Volcanic Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. G.; Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D.; Johnson, T. V.

    2014-12-01

    We have created a global map of Io's volcanic heat flow from 245 thermal sources indicative of ongoing or recent volcanic activity, and 8 additional outbursts [1,2]. We incorporate data from both spacecraft and ground-based instruments that have observed Io primarily at infrared wavelengths. This map provides a snapshot of Io's volcanic activity and distribution during the Galileo epoch. Io's volcanic activity, in terms of thermal emission from individual eruptive centres, spans nearly six orders of magnitude, from Surt in 2001 (78 TW) [3] to a faint hot spot in patera P197 (0.2 GW) [1]. We account for ≈54% of Io's yearly volcanic heat flow, which emanates from ≈2% of Io's surface [1]. Averaged heat flow from the non-active surface is 1 ± 0.2 W m2. This quantification of volcanic heat flow map provides constraints for modelling the magnitude and location of the internal heating of Io by tidal dissipation. The observed heat flow distribution is the result of interior heating and volcanic advection, the delivery of magma to the surface regardless of its depth of origin. As noted previously [1, 2] the distribution of heat flow is not uniform, which is not unexpected. The volcanic heat flow does not match the expected distributions from end-member models for both the deep-seated (mantle) heating model (which predicts enhanced polar heating) and the shallow (aesthenospheric) heating model, which predicts enhanced thermal emission at sub-jovian and anti-jovian longitudes. Intriguingly, heat flow curves using a bin size of 30 degrees show a longitudinal offset from the shallow heating model prediction of some tens of degrees [2], suggesting a more complex mixture of deep and shallow heating. Future work includes refinement of thermal emission by including temporal variability of thermal emission at individual volcanoes, and comparing the heat flow map with the Io Geological Map [4] and global topography [5]. We thank the NASA OPR Program for support. Part of this

  9. Emplacement Scenarios for Volcanic Domes on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Steve M.; Stofan, Ellen R.

    2012-01-01

    One key to understanding the history of resurfacing on Venus is better constraints on the emplacement timescales for the range of volcanic features visible on the surface. A figure shows a Magellan radar image and topography for a putative lava dome on Venus. 175 such domes have been identified with diameters ranging from 19 - 94 km, and estimated thicknesses as great as 4 km. These domes are thought to be volcanic in origin and to have formed by the flow of viscous fluid (i.e., lava) on the surface.

  10. Winter warming from large volcanic eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Robock, A.; Mao, J.

    1992-01-01

    An examination of the Northern Hemisphere winter surface temperature patterns after the 12 largest volcanic eruptions from 1883-1992 shows warming over Eurasia and North America and cooling over the Middle East which are significant at the 95 percent level. This pattern is found in the first winter after tropical eruptions, in the first or second winter after midlatitude eruptions, and in the second winter after high latitude eruptions. The effects are independent of the hemisphere of the volcanoes. An enhanced zonal wind driven by heating of the tropical stratosphere by the volcanic aerosols is responsible for the regions of warming, while the cooling is caused by blocking of incoming sunlight.

  11. Winter warming from large volcanic eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robock, Alan; Mao, Jianping

    1992-01-01

    An examination of the Northern Hemisphere winter surface temperature patterns after the 12 largest volcanic eruptions from 1883-1992 shows warming over Eurasia and North America and cooling over the Middle East which are significant at the 95-percent level. This pattern is found in the first winter after tropical eruptions, in the first or second winter after midlatitude eruptions, and in the second winter after high latitude eruptions. The effects are independent of the hemisphere of the volcanoes. An enhanced zonal wind driven by heating of the tropical stratosphere by the volcanic aerosols is responsible for the regions of warming, while the cooling is caused by blocking of incoming sunlight.

  12. The influence of oceans on Martian volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter

    1993-01-01

    Geomorphological evidence for episodic oceans on Mars has recently been identified. This idea of large bodies of water on Mars is innovative and controversial compared to the more generally accepted view of a 'dry Mars', but also enables some of the more enigmatic volcanic landforms to be reinterpreted in a self-consistent model. This hypothesis can be used to develop new models for the mode of formation of several volcanic landforms in the W. Tharsis and S.E. Elysium Planitia regions of Mars.

  13. The Environmental Impact of Siberian Traps Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, A. D.; Reichow, M. K.

    2008-12-01

    New high-precision 40Ar/39Ar data confirm that the Siberian Traps extend as far west as the Ural Mountains, and from the Kuznetsk Basin in the south to the Taimyr Peninsula in the north; an area encompassing some 5 million km2. The bulk of this volcanism occurred at about 250 Ma (Ar-Ar time). These data, plus new and published Ar/Ar data from the P-Tr section at Meishan, China, confirm that volcanism and the mass extinction were synchronous. Here, we explore the causal link between volcanism and extinction. The volcanism is associated with global super-greenhouse conditions and widespread shallow oceanic anoxia - perhaps the sine qua non of the marine mass extinctions. Injection of isotopically 'light' carbon is required to explain the characteristic and dramatic negative carbon isotope excursion preserved in ocean water proxies, but because the CIE occurs after the mass extinction, this suggests that the carbon pulse (from breakdown of methane hydrates, or magmatic burning of coal or other hydrocarbons) was not the fundamental cause of the extinction. Rather, we suggest that magmatic CO2 released during the eruptions (complemented by pyrogenetic CO2 and methane) led to progressive CO2 accumulation in the atmosphere-ocean system (rates of long-term removal of carbon by geological processes are significantly lower than volcanic injection). Atmospheric accumulation may have been amplified by short-term sulphate-induced volcanic winters that caused collapse of photosynthetic cycles by atmospheric temperature fluctuations and sunlight attenuation, thus inhibiting carbon draw-down. Subsequent warming of the deep ocean may have triggered the methane pulse, leading to the main CIE. What lessons can we take away for present climate change? Unlike in the Cenozoic, when atmospheric CO2 progressively decreased to low pre-industrial levels, throughout the Permian atmospheric CO2 levels fluctuated strongly, and may have been as much as 10x present-day by the time that Siberian

  14. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate: Outstanding Research Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of this aerosol cloud produce responses in the climate system. Based on observations after major eruptions of the past and experiments with numerical models of the climate system, we understand much about their climatic impact, but there are also a number of unanswered questions. Volcanic eruptions produce global cooling, and are an important natural cause of interannual, interdecadal, and even centennial-scale climate change. One of the most interesting volcanic effects is the "winter warming" of Northern Hemisphere continents following major tropical eruptions. During the winter in the Northern Hemisphere following every large tropical eruption of the past century, surface air temperatures over North America, Europe, and East Asia were warmer than normal, while they were colder over Greenland and the Middle East. This pattern and the coincident atmospheric circulation correspond to the positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation. While this response is observed after recent major eruptions, most state-of-the-art climate models have trouble simulating winter warming. Why? High latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere, while also producing global cooling, do not have the same impact on atmospheric dynamics. Both tropical and high latitude eruptions can weaken the Indian and African summer monsoon, and the effects can be seen in past records of flow in the Nile and Niger Rivers. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade have had a small effect on global temperature trends. Some important outstanding research questions include: How much seasonal, annual, and decadal predictability is possible following a large volcanic eruption? Do

  15. Tellurium in active volcanic environments: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milazzo, Silvia; Calabrese, Sergio; D'Alessandro, Walter; Brusca, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Sergio; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Tellurium is a toxic metalloid and, according to the Goldschmidt classification, a chalcophile element. In the last years its commercial importance has considerably increased because of its wide use in solar cells, thermoelectric and electronic devices of the last generation. Despite such large use, scientific knowledge about volcanogenic tellurium is very poor. Few previous authors report result of tellurium concentrations in volcanic plume, among with other trace metals. They recognize this element as volatile, concluding that volcanic gases and sulfur deposits are usually enriched with tellurium. Here, we present some results on tellurium concentrations in volcanic emissions (plume, fumaroles, ash leachates) and in environmental matrices (soils and plants) affected by volcanic emissions and/or deposition. Samples were collected at Etna and Vulcano (Italy), Turrialba (Costa Rica), Miyakejima, Aso, Asama (Japan), Mutnovsky (Kamchatka) at the crater rims by using common filtration techniques for aerosols (polytetrafluoroethylene filters). Filters were both eluted with Millipore water and acid microwave digested, and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Volcanic ashes emitted during explosive events on Etna and Copahue (Argentina) were analyzed for tellurium bulk composition and after leaching experiments to evaluate the soluble fraction of tellurium. Soils and leaves of vegetation were also sampled close to active volcanic vents (Etna, Vulcano, Nisyros, Nyiragongo, Turrialba, Gorely and Masaya) and investigated for tellurium contents. Preliminary results showed very high enrichments of tellurium in volcanic emissions comparing with other volatile elements like mercury, arsenic, thallium and bismuth. This suggests a primary transport in the volatile phase, probably in gaseous form (as also suggested by recent studies) and/or as soluble salts (halides and/or sulfates) adsorbed on the surface of particulate particles and ashes. First

  16. Space Radar Image of Pinacate Volcanic Field, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This spaceborne radar image shows the Pinacate Volcanic Field in the state of Sonora, Mexico, about 150 kilometers (93 miles) southeast of Yuma, Arizona. The United States/Mexico border runs across the upper right corner of the image. More than 300 volcanic vents occur in the Pinacate field, including cinder cones that experienced small eruptions as recently as 1934. The larger circular craters seen in the image are a type of volcano known as a 'maar', which erupts violently when rising magma encounters groundwater, producing highly pressurized steam that powers explosive eruptions. The highest elevations in the volcanic field, about 1200 meters (4000 feet), occur in the 'shield volcano' structure shown in bright white, occupying most of the left half of the image. Numerous cinder cones dot the flanks of the shield. The yellow patches to the right of center are newer, rough-textured lava flows that strongly reflect the long wavelength radar signals. Along the left edge of the image are sand dunes of the Gran Desierto. The dark areas are smooth sand and the brighter brown and purple areas have vegetation on the surface. Radar data provide a unique means to study the different types of lava flows and wind-blown sands. This image was acquired by Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 18, 1994. The image is 57 kilometers by 48 kilometers (35 miles by 30 miles) and is centered at 31.7 degrees north latitude, 113.4 degrees West longitude. North is toward the upper right. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received; and blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian, and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  17. Geochemical and 40Ar/39Ar constraints on the evolution of volcanism in the Woodlark Rift, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, Joseph P.

    The tectonic mechanisms producing Pliocene to active volcanism in eastern Papua New Guinea (PNG) have been debated for decades. In order to assess mechanisms that produce volcanism in the Woodlark Rift, we evaluate the evolution of volcanism in eastern PNG using 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology and whole rock geochemistry. Active volcanism in southeastern Papua New Guinea occurs on the Papuan Peninsula (Mt. Lamington, Mt. Victory and Waiwa), in the Woodlark Rift (Dobu Island, SE Goodenough Island, and Western Fergusson Island), and in the Woodlark Basin. In the Woodlark Basin, seafloor spreading is active and decompression melting of the upper mantle is producing basaltic magmatism. However, the cause of Pliocene and younger volcanism in the Woodlark Rift is controversial. Two hypotheses for the tectonic setting have been proposed to explain Pliocene and younger volcanism in the Woodlark Rift: (1) southward subduction of Solomon Sea lithosphere beneath eastern PNG at the Trobriand Tough and (2) decompression melting of mantle, previously modified by subduction, as the lithosphere undergoes extension associated with the opening of the Woodlark Basin. A comparison of 40Ar/39Ar ages with high field strength element (HFSE) concentrations in primary magmas indicates that HFSE concentrations correlate with age in the Woodlark rift. These data support the hypothesis that Pliocene to active volcanism in the Woodlark Rise and D'Entrecasteaux Islands results from decompression melting of a relict mantle wedge. The subduction zone geochemical signatures (negative HFSE anomalies) in Woodlark Rift lavas younger than 4 m.y. are a relict from older subduction beneath eastern Papua, likely in the middle Miocene. As the lithosphere is extended ahead of the tip of the westward propagating seafloor spreading center in the Woodlark Basin, the composition of volcanism is inherited from prior arc magmatism (via flux melting) and through time evolves toward magmatism associated with a rifting

  18. Geomagnetic imprint of the Persani volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besutiu, Lucian; Seghedi, Ioan; Zlagnean, Luminita; Atanasiu, Ligia; Popa, Razvan-Gabriel; Pomeran, Mihai; Visan, Madalina

    2016-04-01

    The Persani small volume volcanism is located in the SE corner of the Transylvanian Depression, at the north-western edge of the intra-mountainous Brasov basin. It represents the south-easternmost segment of the Neogene-Quaternary volcanic chain of the East Carpathians. The alkaline basalt monogenetic volcanic field is partly coeval with the high-K calc-alkaline magmatism south of Harghita Mountains (1-1.6 Ma). Its eruptions post-dated the calc-alkaline volcanism in the Harghita Mountains (5.3-1.6 Ma), but pre-dated the high-K calc-alkaline emissions of Ciomadul volcano (1.0-0.03 Ma). The major volcanic forms have been mapped in previous geological surveys. Still, due to the small size of the volcanoes and large extent of tephra deposits and recent sediments, the location of some vents or other volcanic structures has been incompletely revealed. To overcome this problem, the area was subject to several near-surface geophysical investigations, including paleomagnetic research. However, due to their large-scale features, the previous geophysical surveys proved to be an inappropriate approach to the volcanological issues. Therefore, during the summers of 2014 and 2015, based on the high magnetic contrast between the volcanic rocks and the hosting sedimentary formations, a detailed ground geomagnetic survey has been designed and conducted, within central Persani volcanism area, in order to