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Sample records for aligned biaxial tungsten

  1. Texture evolution of vertically aligned biaxial tungsten nanorods using RHEED surface pole figure technique.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, R; Liu, Y; Gaire, C; Chen, L; Wang, G-C; Lu, T-M

    2010-08-13

    Vertically aligned biaxial tungsten nanorods with cubic A15 crystal structure were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on native oxide covered Si(100) substrates with glancing angle flux incidence (theta approximately 85 degrees) and a two-step substrate rotation mode at room temperature. These vertical nanorods were grown to different thicknesses (10, 25, 50 and 100 nm) and analyzed for biaxial texture evolution using a highly surface sensitive reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) pole figure technique. The initial polycrystalline film begins to show the inception of biaxial texture with a fiber background between 10 and 25 nm. Biaxial texture development is eventually completed between 50 and 100 nm thicknesses of the film. The out-of-plane crystallographic direction is [002] and the in-plane texture is selected so as to obtain maximum capture area. In a comparison with 100 nm thick inclined tungsten nanorods deposited at 85 degrees without substrate rotation, it is found that the selection of in-plane texture does not maintain maximum in-plane capture area. This anomalous behavior is observed when the [002] texture axis is tilted approximately 17 degrees from the substrate normal in the direction towards the glancing incident flux.

  2. The formation of vertically aligned biaxial tungsten nanorods using a novel shadowing growth technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, R.; Parker, T.; Lee, S.; Lu, T.-M.

    2009-11-01

    Biaxially textured tungsten nanorods (A15 crystal structure) have been grown by oblique angle DC magnetron sputtering using a novel rotation mode called 'two-step rotation'. In this mode, the substrate is given a fast rotation through 180° at 90 rpm and this is followed by a rest period of 30 s. These nanorods are vertically aligned and have a [100] texture normal to the substrate along with preferential in-plane texture as shown by x-ray pole figure analysis. In contrast, the tungsten nanorods obtained without substrate rotation are slanted at an angle of ~45° and have a [100] texture tilted 16° with respect to the substrate normal. The flux is incident from two diametrically opposite points on the sample at an oblique angle, averaging out the growth into vertical columns that retain the in-plane texture. Scanning electron microscopy shows that the tungsten nanorods have a mixture of {211} and {421} crystal habits; these planes are both minimum surface energy planes for a cubic A15 crystal structure.

  3. Self-aligning biaxial load frame

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael B.; Epstein, Jonathan S.; Lloyd, W. Randolph

    1994-01-01

    An self-aligning biaxial loading apparatus for use in testing the strength of specimens while maintaining a constant specimen centroid during the loading operation. The self-aligning biaxial loading apparatus consists of a load frame and two load assemblies for imparting two independent perpendicular forces upon a test specimen. The constant test specimen centroid is maintained by providing elements for linear motion of the load frame relative to a fixed crosshead, and by alignment and linear motion elements of one load assembly relative to the load frame.

  4. Self-aligning biaxial load frame

    DOEpatents

    Ward, M.B.; Epstein, J.S.; Lloyd, W.R.

    1994-01-18

    An self-aligning biaxial loading apparatus for use in testing the strength of specimens while maintaining a constant specimen centroid during the loading operation. The self-aligning biaxial loading apparatus consists of a load frame and two load assemblies for imparting two independent perpendicular forces upon a test specimen. The constant test specimen centroid is maintained by providing elements for linear motion of the load frame relative to a fixed cross head, and by alignment and linear motion elements of one load assembly relative to the load frame. 3 figures.

  5. Vertically aligned biaxially textured molybdenum thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Rahul; Riley, Michael; Lee, Sabrina; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2011-09-15

    Vertically aligned, biaxially textured molybdenum nanorods were deposited using dc magnetron sputtering with glancing flux incidence (alpha = 85 degrees with respect to the substrate normal) and a two-step substrate-rotation mode. These nanorods were identified with a body-centered cubic crystal structure. The formation of a vertically aligned biaxial texture with a [110] out-of-plane orientation was combined with a [-110] in-plane orientation. The kinetics of the growth process was found to be highly sensitive to an optimum rest time of 35 seconds for the two-step substrate rotation mode. At all other rest times, the nanorods possessed two separate biaxial textures each tilted toward one flux direction. While the in-plane texture for the vertical nanorods maintains maximum flux capture area, inclined Mo nanorods deposited at alpha = 85 degrees without substrate rotation display a [-1-1-4] in-plane texture that does not comply with the maximum flux capture area argument. Finally, an in situ capping film was deposited with normal flux incidence over the biaxially textured vertical nanorods resulting in a thin film over the porous nanorods. This capping film possessed the same biaxial texture as the nanorods and could serve as an effective substrate for the epitaxial growth of other functional materials.

  6. Double in-plane alignment in biaxially textured thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elofsson, V.; Saraiva, M.; Boyd, R. D.; Sarakinos, K.

    2014-12-01

    The scientific interest and technological relevance of biaxially textured polycrystalline thin films stem from their microstructure that resembles that of single crystals. To explain the origin and predict the type of biaxial texture in off-normally deposited films, Mahieu et al. have developed an analytical model [S. Mahieu et al., Thin Solid Films 515, 1229 (2006)]. For certain materials, this model predicts the occurrence of a double in-plane alignment, however, experimentally only a single in-plane alignment has been observed and the reason for this discrepancy is still unknown. The model calculates the resulting in-plane alignment by considering the growth of faceted grains with an out-of-plane orientation that corresponds to the predominant film out-of-plane texture. This approach overlooks the fact that in vapor condensation experiments where growth kinetics is limited and only surface diffusion is active, out-of-plane orientation selection is random during grain nucleation and happens only upon grain impingement. Here, we compile and implement an experiment that is consistent with the key assumptions set forth by the in-plane orientation selection model by Mahieu et al.; a Cr film is grown off-normally on a fiber textured Ti epilayer to pre-determine the out-of-plane orientation and only allow for competitive growth with respect to the in-plane alignment. Our results show unambiguously a biaxially textured Cr (110) film that possesses a double in-plane alignment, in agreement with predictions of the in-plane selection model. Thus, a long standing discrepancy in the literature is resolved, paving the way towards more accurate theoretical descriptions and hence knowledge-based control of microstructure evolution in biaxially textured thin films.

  7. YSZ buffer layers and YBCO superconducting tapes with enhanced biaxial alignment and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savvides, N.; Gnanarajan, S.

    2003-05-01

    Commercial applications of YBa 2Cu 3O 7 (YBCO) superconducting cables require viable and scalable manufacturing processes. We have investigated the evolution of the biaxial alignment of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) buffer layers with increasing film thickness (50-900 nm) and report on a method of fabricating highly aligned YBCO tapes using a thin epitaxial YSZ buffer layer as template. The method employs magnetron and ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) techniques followed by epitaxial growth to produce the buffer architectures IBAD-YSZ and epi-YSZ/IBAD-YSZ onto optically polished hastelloy metal substrates. Subsequent in situ deposition of YBCO films is used to determine the biaxial alignment at the surface of the buffer architecture, and to show that 100-200 nm thick epi-YSZ layers suffice to yield YBCO tapes that have enhanced biaxial alignment (Δ φ=9-10°) and high critical current densities: J c(77 K)=(1-2)×10 6 A cm -2 and J c(5 K,1 T)=8×10 6 A cm -2. Atomic force microscopy of the surface microstructure of the YSZ buffer layers and YBCO films reveals some grain coarsening in the epi-YSZ layers compared to the IBAD-YSZ layers while the YBCO tapes show significant outgrowths (∼200 nm) and large grains (800-1200 nm) that are similar to high- Jc YBCO films grown on single crystal MgO(1 0 0) substrates.

  8. Biaxial magnetic alignment in twinned REBa2Cu3Oy superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horii, S.; Nishioka, T.; Arimoto, I.; Fujioka, S.; Doi, T.

    2016-12-01

    Biaxial magnetic alignment of REBa2Cu3O y (RE123, RE = Y, Nd, Sm, Dy, and Er) superconductor powders containing twin microstructures was demonstrated. Appropriate choice of RE effectively improved the degrees of in-plane and c-axis orientation in RE123 powder samples aligned under modulated rotating magnetic fields at room temperature. From the relationship between the magnetic field strength and the degrees of orientation, it is concluded that heavy RE ions induced the improvement of the in-plane magnetic anisotropies in RE123 grains with twin microstructures.

  9. Biaxial shear of confined colloidal hard spheres: the structure and rheology of the vorticity-aligned string phase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Neil Y C; Cheng, Xiang; Cohen, Itai

    2014-03-28

    Using a novel biaxial confocal rheoscope, we investigate the flow of the shear induced vorticity aligned string phase [X. Cheng et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2011, 109, 63], which has a highly anisotropic microstructure. Using biaxial shear protocols we show that we have excellent control of the string phase anisotropic morphology. We choose a shear protocol that drives the system into the string phase. Subsequently, a biaxial force measurement device is used to determine the suspension rheology along both the flow and vorticity directions. We find no measurable dependence of the suspension stress response along the shear and vorticity directions due to the hydrodynamically induced string morphology. In particular, we find that the suspension's high frequency stress response is nearly identical along the two orthogonal directions. While we do observe an anisotropic stress response at lower shear frequencies associated with shear thinning, we show that this anisotropy is independent of the shear induced string structure. These results suggest that for the range of flows explored, Brownian and hydrodynamic contributions to the stress arising from the anisotropic suspension microstructure are sufficiently weak that they do not significantly contribute to the rheology. Collectively, this study presents a general and powerful approach for using biaxial confocal rheometry to elucidate the relationship between microstructure and rheology in complex fluids driven far-from-equilibrium.

  10. Tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The name tungsten, derived from the Swedish words {open_quotes}tung{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}sten{close_quotes}, meaning heavy stone, was first applied to a tungsten-containing mineral in 1755. The mineral, itself, was subsequently identified by C.W. Scheele in 1781, and named scheelite. Metallic tungsten was first isolated from the mineral wolframite in 1783, and given the German name {open_quotes}wolfram,{close_quotes} which remains an alternative name for the element. Ultimately, the English word, tungsten, became the official name, while W remains the element`s chemical symbol. This article discusses the geology, exploitation, applications, and market overview of tungsten.

  11. Ion-beam-assisted deposition of biaxially aligned yttria-stabilized zirconia template films on metallic substrates for YBCO-coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, B.; Li, M.; Fisher, B. L.; Balachandran, U.

    2002-07-01

    Biaxially textured yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) films were grown on mechanically polished Hastelloy C276 (HC) substrates by ion-beam-assisted deposition and electron-beam evaporation. The surface root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the polished HC substrates was ≈3 nm, as measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). A water-cooled sample stage was used to hold the substrate temperature below 100 °C during deposition. RMS roughness of ≈3.3 nm was measured on the deposited YSZ films by AFM. X-ray pole figures were conducted for texture analysis; in-plane texture measured from YSZ (111) φ-scan FWHM was 13.2° and out-of-plane texture from the YSZ (002) ω-scan FWHM was 7.7°. An ≈10 nm thick CeO2 buffer layer was deposited on the YSZ film at 800 °C before YBCO films were ablated by pulsed laser deposition at 780 °C in a 250 mTorr flowing oxygen environment. Good in-plane texture with FWHM ≈ 7° was observed in YBCO films. Tc = 90 K, with sharp transition, and transport Jc of ≈2.2 × 106 A cm-2 were observed in a 0.5 μm thick, 5 mm wide, and 1 cm long sample at 77 K in self-field.

  12. Selective formation of tungsten nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We report on a process for fabricating self-aligned tungsten (W) nanowires with polycrystalline silicon core. Tungsten nanowires as thin as 10 nm were formed by utilizing polysilicon sidewall transfer technology followed by selective deposition of tungsten by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using WF6 as the precursor. With selective CVD, the process is self-limiting whereby the tungsten formation is confined to the polysilicon regions; hence, the nanowires are formed without the need for lithography or for additional processing. The fabricated tungsten nanowires were observed to be perfectly aligned, showing 100% selectivity to polysilicon and can be made to be electrically isolated from one another. The electrical conductivity of the nanowires was characterized to determine the effect of its physical dimensions. The conductivity for the tungsten nanowires were found to be 40% higher when compared to doped polysilicon nanowires of similar dimensions. PMID:21970543

  13. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-02-09

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments.

  14. Tungsten toxicity.

    PubMed

    Witten, Mark L; Sheppard, Paul R; Witten, Brandon L

    2012-04-05

    There is emerging evidence that tungsten has toxic health effects. We summarize the recent tungsten toxicity research in this short review. Tungsten is widely used in many commercial and military applications because it has the second highest melting temperature of any element. Consequently, it is important to elucidate the potential health effects of tungsten.

  15. High Tc YBCO superconductor deposited on biaxially textured Ni substrate

    DOEpatents

    Budai, John D.; Christen, David K.; Goyal, Amit; He, Qing; Kroeger, Donald M.; Lee, Dominic F.; List, III, Frederick A.; Norton, David P.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Sales, Brian C.; Specht, Eliot D.

    1999-01-01

    A superconducting article includes a biaxially-textured Ni substrate, and epitaxial buffer layers of Pd (optional), CeO.sub.2 and YSZ, and a top layer of in-plane aligned, c-axis oriented YBCO having a critical current density (J.sub.c) in the range of at least 100,000 A/cm.sup.2 at 77 K.

  16. Fragmentation in Biaxial Tension

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, G H; Archbold, G C; Hurricane, O A; Miller, P L

    2006-06-13

    We have carried out an experiment that places a ductile stainless steel in a state of biaxial tension at a high rate of strain. The loading of the ductile metal spherical cap is performed by the detonation of a high explosive layer with a conforming geometry to expand the metal radially outwards. Simulations of the loading and expansion of the metal predict strain rates that compare well with experimental observations. A high percentage of the HE loaded material was recovered through a soft capture process and characterization of the recovered fragments provided high quality data, including uniform strain prior to failure and fragment size. These data were used with a modified fragmentation model to determine a fragmentation energy.

  17. Elevated temperature biaxial fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.

    1984-01-01

    A three year experimental program for studying elevated temperature biaxial fatigue of a nickel based alloy Hastelloy-X has been completed. A new high temperature fatigue test facility with unique capabilities has been developed. Effort was directed toward understanding multiaxial fatigue and correlating the experimental data to the existing theories of fatigue failure. The difficult task of predicting fatigue lives for non-proportional loading was used as an ultimate test for various life prediction methods being considered. The primary means of reaching improved undertanding were through several critical non-proportional loading experiments. It was discovered that the cracking mode switched from primarily cracking on the maximum shear planes at room temperature to cracking on the maximum normal strain planes at 649 C.

  18. Biaxial Fatigue Cracking from Notch

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-04

    Leevers (reference 11) noticed that the variation in  from 0 to 2 has little effect on the da/dN in PVC ( polyvinyl - chloride ), but reduces the da/dN...under biaxial rotating and bending. Ahmad (reference 2) formulated a model for the biaxial fatigue crack growth in aggressive environment, outlined by...1962, Vol. 90, pp. 238-239. 20. ASM Handbook , Vol. 12 Fractography: 1992, p. 430, 438. 21. Metals Handbook , Vol. 9 Fractography and Atlas of

  19. Elevated temperature biaxial fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.

    1985-01-01

    A 3 year experimental program for studying elevated temperature biaxial fatigue of a nickel based alloy Hastelloy-X has been completed. A new high temperature fatigue test facility with unique capabilities has been developed. Effort was directed toward understanding multiaxial fatigue and correlating the experimental data to the existing theories of fatigue failure. The difficult task of predicting fatigue lives for nonproportional loading was used as an ultimate test for various life prediction methods being considered. The primary means of reaching improved understanding were through several critical nonproportional loading experiments. The direction of cracking observed on failed specimens was also recorded and used to guide the development of the theory. Cyclic deformation responses were permanently recorded digitally during each test. It was discovered that the cracking mode switched from primarily cracking on the maximum shear planes at room temperature to cracking on the maximum normal strain planes at 649 C. In contrast to some other metals, loading path in nonproportional loading had little effect on fatigue lives. Strain rate had a small effect on fatigue lives at 649 C. Of the various correlating parameters the modified plastic work and octahedral shear stress were the most successful.

  20. Theory and Simulation of Extensional Flow-Induced Biaxiality in Discotic Mesophases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Arvinder P.; Rey, Alejandro D.

    1995-09-01

    Flow-induced biaxiality is simulated for a uniaxial discotic nematic liquid crystal subjected to a constant uniaxial, isothermal, incompressible, irrotational, extensional, three dimensional flow, using a previously presented model [Singh A.P. and Rey A.D., J. Phys. II France 4 (1994) 645]. Numerical and analytical solutions of the director triad (n, m, l), and uniaxial (S) and biaxial (P) alignments are given. The unit sphere description of the director triad is used to discuss and analyze the sensitivity of the director triad trajectories and the coupled alignment (uniaxial and biaxial) relaxations to the initial orientation, nematic potential (U), and to the alignment Deborah number (dimensionless extension rate). The evolution of the director triad is given by the rotation of a moving diad (n, l) around a fixed director (m). When the poles of the orientation unit sphere are along the extension axis, and the equator lies in the compression plane of the flow, it is found that the director diad (n, l) dynamics follow geodesic flow and the trajectories belong to the same meridians (great circles through the poles). The space of stable steady state orientation of the uniaxial director n and the biaxial director m is the whole compression plane (the equator of the unit sphere), while that of the biaxial director l is the extension direction (poles). A high degree extension flow-induced biaxiality is found when the uniaxial director is away from the extension axis and when S is relatively low. The scalar order parameter couplings are captured by analyzing the trajectories in the alignment triangle. Computed scientific visualizations of biaxial molecular orientation distributions are used to correlate the director triad dynamics and the alignment's dynamics. The tensor order parameter is used to calculate the main flow-birefringences, thus providing a direct way to verify the theoretical predictions of this paper.

  1. Transparency Film for Demonstration of Biaxial Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Paul R.

    1994-01-01

    Explains why transparency film demonstrates biaxial optical properties. Provides detailed descriptions of the procedure and equipment needed for large-scale optics demonstrations of the polarization interference pattern produced by biaxial crystals. (DDR)

  2. Process for ion-assisted laser deposition of biaxially textured layer on substrate

    DOEpatents

    Russo, Richard E.; Reade, Ronald P.; Garrison, Stephen M.; Berdahl, Paul

    1995-01-01

    A process for depositing a biaxially aligned intermediate layer over a non-single crystal substrate is disclosed which permits the subsequent deposition thereon of a biaxially oriented superconducting film. The process comprises depositing on a substrate by laser ablation a material capable of being biaxially oriented and also capable of inhibiting the migration of substrate materials through the intermediate layer into such a superconducting film, while simultaneously bombarding the substrate with an ion beam. In a preferred embodiment, the deposition is carried out in the same chamber used to subsequently deposit a superconducting film over the intermediate layer. In a further aspect of the invention, the deposition of the superconducting layer over the biaxially oriented intermediate layer is also carried out by laser ablation with optional additional bombardment of the coated substrate with an ion beam during the deposition of the superconducting film.

  3. Process for ion-assisted laser deposition of biaxially textured layer on substrate

    DOEpatents

    Russo, R.E.; Reade, R.P.; Garrison, S.M.; Berdahl, P.

    1995-07-11

    A process for depositing a biaxially aligned intermediate layer over a non-single crystal substrate is disclosed which permits the subsequent deposition thereon of a biaxially oriented superconducting film. The process comprises depositing on a substrate by laser ablation a material capable of being biaxially oriented and also capable of inhibiting the migration of substrate materials through the intermediate layer into such a superconducting film, while simultaneously bombarding the substrate with an ion beam. In a preferred embodiment, the deposition is carried out in the same chamber used to subsequently deposit a superconducting film over the intermediate layer. In a further aspect of the invention, the deposition of the superconducting layer over the biaxially oriented intermediate layer is also carried out by laser ablation with optional additional bombardment of the coated substrate with an ion beam during the deposition of the superconducting film. 8 figs.

  4. Biaxial prestressing of brittle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greszczuk, L.; Miller, R.; Netter, W.

    1970-01-01

    Strengthening of chemically consolidated zirconia with tungsten fibers, graphite fibers, sapphire whiskers, and silicon carbide whiskers is investigated. Addition of silicon carbide whiskers gives the highest increase in strength of zirconia at room and elevated temperatures. Prestressing with tungsten cables increases tensile strength and ductility

  5. Chirality and biaxiality in cholesteric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Subas; Selinger, Jonathan V

    2011-02-01

    We investigate the statistical mechanics of chirality and biaxiality in liquid crystals through a variety of theoretical approaches, including Monte Carlo simulations, lattice mean-field theory, and Landau theory. All of these calculations show that there is an important interaction between cholesteric twist and biaxial order: The twist acts as a field on the biaxial order, and conversely, the biaxial order increases the twist, that is, reduces the pitch. We model the behavior of chiral biaxial liquid crystals as a function of temperature and discuss how the predictions can be tested in experiments.

  6. Optical properties of biaxial nanopatterned gold plasmonic nanowired grid polarizer.

    PubMed

    Aas, Lars Martin Sandvik; Kildemo, Morten; Martella, Christian; Giordano, Maria Caterina; Chiappe, Daniele; Buatier de Mongeot, Francesco

    2013-12-16

    Gold nanoparticles deposited on self-organized nano-ripple quartz substrates have been studied by spectroscopic Mueller matrix ellipsometry. The surface was found to have biaxial anisotropic optical properties. For electric field components normal to the ripples the periodic and disconnected nature of the in plane nanowires gives rise to an optical response dominated by the localized plasmon resonance. In the direction parallel to the ripples the gold nanoparticles are aligned closely leading to localized plasmon resonances in the infrared. As Au was deposited at an angle oblique to the surface normal, the gold nanoparticles were formed on the side of the ripples facing the incoming evaporation flux. This makes the gold particles slightly inclined, correspondingly the principal coordinate system of the biaxial dielectric tensor results tilted. The anisotropic plasmonic optical response results in a strong polarizing effect, making it suitable as a plasmonic nanowired grid polarizer.

  7. Optical tweezers on biaxial crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelsky, Oleg V.; Maksimyak, Andrew P.; Maksimyak, Peter P.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we propose optical tweezers based on a biaxial crystal. To control the movement of opaque particles, we use the shift polarization interferometer. The results of experimental study of laser tweezers are shown. We demonstrates movement of a microparticle of toner using singular-optical trap, rotate a particle due to orbital momentum, conversion of two traps when changing the plane of polarizer transmission and converging of two traps.

  8. Biaxially textured articles formed by plastic deformation

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit

    2001-01-01

    A method of preparing a biaxially textured article comprises the steps of providing a metal preform, coating or laminating the preform with a metal layer, deforming the layer to a sufficient degree, and rapidly recrystallizing the layer to produce a biaxial texture. A superconducting epitaxial layer may then be deposited on the biaxial texture. In some embodiments the article further comprises buffer layers, electromagnetic devices or electro-optical devices.

  9. Biaxially oriented film on flexible polymeric substrate

    DOEpatents

    Finkikoglu, Alp T.; Matias, Vladimir

    2009-10-13

    A flexible polymer-based template having a biaxially oriented film grown on the surface of a polymeric substrate. The template having the biaxially oriented film can be used for further epitaxial growth of films of interest for applications such as photovoltaic cells, light emitting diodes, and the like. Methods of forming such a flexible template and providing the polymeric substrate with a biaxially oriented film deposited thereon are also described.

  10. Buffer layers on biaxially textured metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Shoup, Shara S.; Paranthamam, Mariappan; Beach, David B.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Goyal, Amit

    2001-01-01

    A method is disclosed for forming a biaxially textured buffer layer on a biaxially oriented metal substrate by using a sol-gel coating technique followed by pyrolyzing/annealing in a reducing atmosphere. This method is advantageous for providing substrates for depositing electronically active materials thereon.

  11. Search for microscopic and macroscopic biaxiality in the cybotactic nematic phase of new oxadiazole bent-core mesogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Ki; Cukrov, Greta; Vita, Francesco; Scharrer, Eric; Samulski, Edward T.; Francescangeli, Oriano; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2016-06-01

    The possibility of biaxial orientational order in nematic liquid crystals is a subject of intense current interest. We explore the tendencies toward local and global biaxial ordering in the recently synthesized trimethylated oxadiazole-based bent-core mesogens with a pronounced asymmetric (bow-type) shape of molecules. The combination of x-ray diffraction and optical studies suggests that the biaxial order is expressed differently at the short- and long-range scales. Locally, at the scale of a few molecules, x-ray-diffraction data demonstrate biaxial packing. However, above the mesoscopic scale, the global orientational order in all three compounds is uniaxial, as evidenced by uniform homeotropic alignment of the nematic phase which is optically tested over the entire temperature range and by the observations of topological defects induced by individual and aggregated colloidal spheres in the nematic bulk.

  12. Failure mechanisms in laminated carbon/carbon composites under biaxial compression

    SciTech Connect

    Grape, J.A.; Gupta, V.

    1995-07-01

    The failure mechanisms of 2D carbon/carbon (C/C) woven laminates have been determined under inplane biaxial compression loads, and the associated failure envelopes that account for the effect of matrix-type and loading directions were also obtained. The failure was in the form of micro-kinking of fiber bundles, interspersed with localized interply delaminations to form an overall shear fault. The shear fault was aligned with the major axis of loading except at above 75% of balanced biaxial compressive stress where failure occurred along both axes. Although the biaxial strength varied significantly with the ratio of in-plane principal stresses, R, there was no variation in the local failure mechanisms. Accordingly, it was found that the samples fail upon achieving a critical strain along the primary axis of loading.

  13. Biaxial tensile testing and constitutive modeling of human supraspinatus tendon.

    PubMed

    Szczesny, Spencer E; Peloquin, John M; Cortes, Daniel H; Kadlowec, Jennifer A; Soslowsky, Louis J; Elliott, Dawn M

    2012-02-01

    The heterogeneous composition and mechanical properties of the supraspinatus tendon offer an opportunity for studying the structure-function relationships of fibrous musculoskeletal connective tissues. Previous uniaxial testing has demonstrated a correlation between the collagen fiber angle distribution and tendon mechanics in response to tensile loading both parallel and transverse to the tendon longitudinal axis. However, the planar mechanics of the supraspinatus tendon may be more appropriately characterized through biaxial tensile testing, which avoids the limitation of nonphysiologic traction-free boundary conditions present during uniaxial testing. Combined with a structural constitutive model, biaxial testing can help identify the specific structural mechanisms underlying the tendon's two-dimensional mechanical behavior. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the contribution of collagen fiber organization to the planar tensile mechanics of the human supraspinatus tendon by fitting biaxial tensile data with a structural constitutive model that incorporates a sample-specific angular distribution of nonlinear fibers. Regional samples were tested under several biaxial boundary conditions while simultaneously measuring the collagen fiber orientations via polarized light imaging. The histograms of fiber angles were fit with a von Mises probability distribution and input into a hyperelastic constitutive model incorporating the contributions of the uncrimped fibers. Samples with a wide fiber angle distribution produced greater transverse stresses than more highly aligned samples. The structural model fit the longitudinal stresses well (median R(2) ≥ 0.96) and was validated by successfully predicting the stress response to a mechanical protocol not used for parameter estimation. The transverse stresses were fit less well with greater errors observed for less aligned samples. Sensitivity analyses and relatively affine fiber kinematics suggest that

  14. Biaxial ferromagnetic liquid crystal colloids

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingkun; Ackerman, Paul J.; Lubensky, Tom C.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-01-01

    The design and practical realization of composite materials that combine fluidity and different forms of ordering at the mesoscopic scale are among the grand fundamental science challenges. These composites also hold a great potential for technological applications, ranging from information displays to metamaterials. Here we introduce a fluid with coexisting polar and biaxial ordering of organic molecular and magnetic colloidal building blocks exhibiting the lowest symmetry orientational order. Guided by interactions at different length scales, rod-like organic molecules of this fluid spontaneously orient along a direction dubbed “director,” whereas magnetic colloidal nanoplates order with their dipole moments parallel to each other but pointing at an angle to the director, yielding macroscopic magnetization at no external fields. Facile magnetic switching of such fluids is consistent with predictions of a model based on competing actions of elastic and magnetic torques, enabling previously inaccessible control of light. PMID:27601668

  15. Stabilisation problem in biaxial platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Tymoteusz; Rybarczyk, Dominik; Wyrwał, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    The article describes investigation of rolling ball stabilization problem on a biaxial platform. The aim of the control system proposed here is to stabilize ball moving on a plane in equilibrium point. The authors proposed a control algorithm based on cascade PID and they compared it with another control method. The article shows the results of the accuracy of ball stabilization and influence of applied filter on the signal waveform. The application used to detect the ball position measured by digital camera has been written using a cross platform .Net wrapper to the OpenCV image processing library - EmguCV. The authors used the bipolar stepper motor with dedicated electronic controller. The data between the computer and the designed controller are sent with use of the RS232 standard. The control stand is based on ATmega series microcontroller.

  16. High-strain-rate, high-temperature biaxial testing of DOP-26 iridium

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.G.

    1988-05-01

    High-strain-rate biaxial punch tests were performed on DOP-26 (Ir-0.3 wt.% tungsten) iridium-alloy disc given annealing and aging heat treatments. Test temperatures ranged between 600 and 1440/degree/C, and punch velocity was held constant at 45 m/s. Three types of samples were evaluated: Z-batch old-process discs, B-batch old-process discs, and B-batch new-process discs. The results indicate that batch-to-batch variations in ductility are significant and that new-process iridium is slightly more ductile than old-process material. 12 refs., 43 figs., 26 tabs.

  17. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.

    2001-01-01

    A biaxially textured alloy article comprises Ni powder and at least one powder selected from the group consisting of Cr, W, V, Mo, Cu, Al, Ce, YSZ, Y, Rare Earths, (RE), MgO, CeO.sub.2, and Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 ; compacted and heat treated, then rapidly recrystallized to produce a biaxial texture on the article. In some embodiments the alloy article further comprises electromagnetic or electro-optical devices and possesses superconducting properties.

  18. Biaxial deformation of collagen and elastin fibers in coronary adventitia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Xuefeng; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Lanir, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    The microstructural deformation-mechanical loading relation of the blood vessel wall is essential for understanding the overall mechanical behavior of vascular tissue in health and disease. We employed simultaneous mechanical loading-imaging to quantify in situ deformation of individual collagen and elastin fibers on unstained fresh porcine coronary adventitia under a combination of vessel inflation and axial extension loading. Specifically, the specimens were imaged under biaxial loads to study microscopic deformation-loading behavior of fibers in conjunction with morphometric measurements at the zero-stress state. Collagen fibers largely orientate in the longitudinal direction, while elastin fibers have major orientation parallel to collagen, but with additional orientation angles in each sublayer of the adventitia. With an increase of biaxial load, collagen fibers were uniformly stretched to the loading direction, while elastin fibers gradually formed a network in sublayers, which strongly depended on the initial arrangement. The waviness of collagen decreased more rapidly at a circumferential stretch ratio of λθ = 1.0 than at λθ = 1.5, while most collagen became straightened at λθ = 1.8. These microscopic deformations imply that the longitudinally stiffer adventitia is a direct result of initial fiber alignment, and the overall mechanical behavior of the tissue is highly dependent on the corresponding microscopic deformation of fibers. The microstructural deformation-loading relation will serve as a foundation for micromechanical models of the vessel wall. PMID:24092692

  19. Biaxial texturing of inorganic photovoltaic thin films using low energy ion beam irradiation during growth

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, James R; De Paula, Raymond F; Hayes, Garrett H; Li, Joel B; Hammond, Robert H; Salleo, Alberto; Clemens, Bruce M

    2010-05-07

    We describe our efforts to control the grain boundary alignment in polycrystalline thin films of silicon by using a biaxially textured template layer of CaF{sub 2} for photovoltaic device applications. We have chosen CaF{sub 2} as a candidate material due to its close lattice match with silicon and its suitability as an ion beam assisted deposition (mAD) material. We show that the CaF{sub 2} aligns biaxially at a thickness of {approx}10 nm and, with the addition of an epitaxial CaF{sub 2} layer, has an in-plane texture of {approx}15{sup o}. Deposition of a subsequent layer of Si aligns on the template layer with an in-plane texture of 10.8{sup o}. The additional improvement of in-plane texture is similar to the behavior observed in more fully characterized IBAD materials systems. A germanium buffer layer is used to assist in the epitaxial deposition of Si on CaF{sub 2} template layers and single crystal substrates. These experiments confirm that an mAD template can be used to biaxially orient polycrystalline Si.

  20. Biaxial tension on polymer in thermoforming range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, S.; Combeaud, C.; Fournier, F.; Rodriguez, J.; Billon, N.

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental characterization of mechanical properties of a polyethylene terephtalate (PET) resin classically used in stretch blow moulding process. We have applied on such a material a well established experimental protocol at CEMEF, including new and relevant biaxial tensile tests. The experimental set-up relative to biaxial tension will be presented and described in a first part of the paper. Furthermore, we will focus on the experimental DMTA preliminary tests which are required to estimate the resin sensibility to temperature and strain rate in linear viscoelasticity domain. Finally, we will be interested in the material large strain behaviour: biaxial tensile results are presented and discussed. Finally, such an experimental approach should allow a relevant modelling of polymer physics and mechanics; this point will not be discussed here because of a lack of time.

  1. Biaxial load effects in fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.; Lee, J. D.; Eftis, J.

    1977-01-01

    It is found that the standard expressions for elastic stress and displacement in the crack-tip region (i.e., the so-called singular solution) cannot be considered to be approximations that are acceptable in a completely general sense. This conclusion is best illustrated by the instance of a biaxially loaded infinite sheet with a flat horizontal central crack, where the effect of load applied parallel to the plane of the crack appears entirely in the second terms of the series representations for local stresses and displacements. An elastoplastic finite-element analysis of the same biaxially loaded finite specimen geometry shows that the global energy release rate, the J-integral, the plastic stress and strain intensity factors (in the sense of Hilton and Hutchinson), and the size of the crack border region plastic yield, all have pronounced biaxial load dependence.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of ultrahigh-volume- fraction aligned carbon nanotube-polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Wardle, Brian L; Saito, Diego S; García, Enrique J; Hart, A John; de Villoria, Roberto Guzmán; Verploegen, Eric A

    2008-07-17

    Aligned CNT nanocomposites with variable volume fraction, up to 20%, are demonstrated. Biaxial mechanical densification of aligned CNT forests, followed by capillarity-driven wetting using unmodified aerospace-grade polymers, creates centimeter-scale specimens. Characterizations confirm CNT alignment and dispersion in the thermosets, providing a useful platform for controlled nanoscale interaction and nanocomposite property studies that emphasize anisotropy.

  3. Electrodeposition of biaxially textured layers on a substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N; Phok, Sovannary; Spagnol, Priscila; Chaudhuri, Tapas

    2013-11-19

    Methods of producing one or more biaxially textured layer on a substrate, and articles produced by the methods, are disclosed. An exemplary method may comprise electrodepositing on the substrate a precursor material selected from the group consisting of rare earths, transition metals, actinide, lanthanides, and oxides thereof. An exemplary article (150) may comprise a biaxially textured base material (130), and at least one biaxially textured layer (110) selected from the group consisting of rare earths, transition metals, actinides, lanthanides, and oxides thereof. The at least one biaxially textured layer (110) is formed by electrodeposition on the biaxially textured base material (130).

  4. Biaxially textured metal substrate with palladium layer

    DOEpatents

    Robbins, William B [Maplewood, MN

    2002-12-31

    Described is an article comprising a biaxially textured metal substrate and a layer of palladium deposited on at least one major surface of the metal substrate; wherein the palladium layer has desired in-plane and out-of-plane crystallographic orientations, which allow subsequent layers that are applied on the article to also have the desired orientations.

  5. Optimal design of biaxial tensile cruciform specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demmerle, S.; Boehler, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    F OR EXPERIMENTAL investigations concerning the mechanical behaviour under biaxial stress states of rolled sheet metals, mostly cruciform flat specimens are used. By means of empirical methods, different specimen geometries have been proposed in the literature. In order to evaluate the suitability of a specimen design, a mathematically well defined criterion is developed, based on the standard deviations of the values of the stresses in the test section. Applied to the finite element method, the criterion is employed to realize the shape optimization of biaxial cruciform specimens for isotropic elastic materials. Furthermore, the performance of the obtained optimized specimen design is investigated in the case of off-axes tests on anisotropic materials. Therefore, for the first time, an original testing device, consisting of hinged fixtures with knife edges at each arm of the specimen, is applied to the biaxial test. The obtained results indicate the decisive superiority of the optimized specimens for the proper performance on isotropic materials, as well as the paramount importance of the proposed off-axes testing technique for biaxial tests on anisotropic materials.

  6. Method for making biaxially textured articles by plastic deformation

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit

    2002-01-01

    A method of preparing a biaxially textured article comprises the steps of providing a metal preform, coating or laminating the preform with a metal layer, deforming the layer to a sufficient degree, and rapidly recrystallizing the layer to produce a biaxial texture. A superconducting epitaxial layer may then be deposited on the biaxial texture. In some embodiments the article further comprises buffer layers, electromagnetic devices or electro-optical devices.

  7. Tungsten Filament Fire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent…

  8. Tungsten filament fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-05-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent light bulb is being replaced by compact fluorescent and LED lamps.

  9. Role of Molecular Structure on X-ray Diffraction in Uniaxial and Biaxial Phases of Thermotropic Liquid Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Bharat R.; Kang, Shin-Woong; Prasad, Veena; Kumar, Satyendra

    2009-04-29

    X-ray diffraction is one of the most definitive methods to determine the structure of condensed matter phases, and it has been applied to unequivocally infer the structures of conventional calamitic and lyotropic liquid crystals. With the advent of bent-core and tetrapodic mesogens and the discovery of the biaxial nematic phase in them, the experimental results require more careful interpretation and analysis. Here, we present ab-initio calculations of X-ray diffraction patterns in the isotropic, uniaxial nematic, and biaxial nematic phases of bent-core mesogens. A simple Meier-Saupe-like molecular distribution function is employed to describe both aligned and unaligned mesophases. The distribution function is decomposed into two, polar and azimuthal, distribution functions to calculate the effect of the evolution of uniaxial and biaxial nematic orientational order. The calculations provide satisfactory semiquantitative interpretations of experimental results. The calculations presented here should provide a pathway to more refined and quantitative analysis of X-ray diffraction data from the biaxial nematic phase.

  10. Role of Molecular Structure on X-ray Diffraction in Thermotropic Uniaxial and Biaxial Nematic Liquid Crystal Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Bharat R.; Kang, Shin-Woong; Prasad, Veena; Kumar, Satyendra

    2009-08-27

    X-ray diffraction is one of the most definitive methods to determine the structure of condensed matter phases, and it has been applied to unequivocally infer the structures of conventional calamitic and lyotropic liquid crystals. With the advent of bent-core and tetrapodic mesogens and the discovery of the biaxial nematic phase in them, the experimental results require more careful interpretation and analysis. Here, we present ab-initio calculations of X-ray diffraction patterns in the isotropic, uniaxial nematic, and biaxial nematic phases of bent-core mesogens. A simple Meier-Saupe-like molecular distribution function is employed to describe both aligned and unaligned mesophases. The distribution function is decomposed into two, polar and azimuthal, distribution functions to calculate the effect of the evolution of uniaxial and biaxial nematic orientational order. The calculations provide satisfactory semiquantitative interpretations of experimental results. The calculations presented here should provide a pathway to more refined and quantitative analysis of X-ray diffraction data from the biaxial nematic phase.

  11. First principles calculations of La2O3/GaAs interface properties under biaxial strain and hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Li-Bin; Li, Ming-Biao; Xiu, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Xu-Yang; Zhang, Kai-Cheng; Li, Chun-Ran; Dong, Hai-Kuan

    2017-04-01

    La2O3 is a potential dielectric material with high permittivity (high-κ) for metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices. However, band offsets and oxide defects should still be concerned. Smaller band offsets and carrier traps increase leakage current, and degenerate performance of the devices. In this paper, the interface behaviors of La2O3/GaAs under biaxial strain and hydrostatic pressure are investigated, which is performed by first principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). Strain engineering is attempted to improve performance of the metal/La2O3/GaAs devices. First of all, we creatively realize band alignment of La2O3/GaAs interface under biaxial strain and hydrostatic pressure. The proper biaxial tensile strain can effectively increase valence band offsets (VBO) and conduction band offsets (CBO), which can be used to suppress leakage current. However, the VBO will decrease with the increase of hydrostatic pressure, indicating that performance of the devices is degenerated. Then, a direct tunneling leakage current model is used to investigate current and voltage characteristics of the metal/La2O3/GaAs. The impact of biaxial strain and hydrostatic pressure on leakage current is discussed. At last, formation energies and transition levels of oxygen interstitial (Oi) and oxygen vacancy (VO) in La2O3 are assessed. We investigate how they will affect performance of the devices.

  12. Biaxially textured articles formed by power metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-26

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  13. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-19

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  14. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-14

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  15. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-07-29

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  16. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goval, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-06-07

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  17. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-05

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of ternary mixtures consisting of: Ni powder, Cu powder, and Al powder, Ni powder, Cr powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, W powder and Al powder; Ni powder, V powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, Mo powder, and Al powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  18. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-26

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  19. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-05-10

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  20. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-28

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  1. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-01-25

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  2. Structures having enhanced biaxial texture and method of fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, A.; Budai, J.D.; Kroeger, D.M.; Norton, D.P.; Specht, E.D.; Christen, D.K.

    1998-04-21

    A biaxially textured article includes a rolled and annealed, biaxially textured substrate of a metal having a face-centered cubic, body-centered cubic, or hexagonal close-packed crystalline structure; and an epitaxial superconductor or other device epitaxially deposited thereon. 11 figs.

  3. Structures having enhanced biaxial texture and method of fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, A.; Budai, J.D.; Kroeger, D.M.; Norton, D.P.; Specht, E.D.; Christen, D.K.

    1998-04-14

    A biaxially textured article includes a rolled and annealed, biaxially textured substrate of a metal having a face-centered cubic, body-centered cubic, or hexagonal close-packed crystalline structure; and an epitaxial superconductor or other device epitaxially deposited thereon. 11 figs.

  4. Structures having enhanced biaxial texture and method of fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Budai, John D.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Norton, David P.; Specht, Eliot D.; Christen, David K.

    1999-01-01

    A biaxially textured article includes a rolled and annealed, biaxially textured substrate of a metal having a face-centered cubic, body-centered cubic, or hexagonal close-packed crystalline structure; and an epitaxial superconductor or other device epitaxially deposited thereon.

  5. Structures having enhanced biaxial texture and method of fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, A.; Budai, J.D.; Kroeger, D.M.; Norton, D.P.; Specht, E.D.; Christen, D.K.

    1999-04-27

    A biaxially textured article includes a rolled and annealed, biaxially textured substrate of a metal having a face-centered cubic, body-centered cubic, or hexagonal close-packed crystalline structure; and an epitaxial superconductor or other device epitaxially deposited thereon. 11 figs.

  6. Biaxial tests of flat graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.; Jones, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of biaxially applied loads on the strength of composite materials containing holes was analyzed. The analysis was performed through the development of a three dimensional, finite element computer program that is capable of evaluating fiber breakage, delamination, and matrix failure. Realistic failure criteria were established for each of the failure modes, and the influence of biaxial loading on damage accumulation under monotonically increasing loading was examined in detail. Both static and fatigue testing of specially designed biaxial specimens containing central holes were performed. Static tests were performed to obtain an understanding of the influence of biaxial loads on the fracture strength of composite materials and to provide correlation with the analytical predictions. The predicted distributions and types of damage are in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. A number of fatigue tests were performed to determine the influence of cyclic biaxial loads on the fatigue life and residual strength of several composite laminates.

  7. Effects of uniaxial and biaxial orientation on fiber percolation in conductive polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Eunse; Ameli, Amir; Mark, Lun Howe; Park, Chul B.

    2015-12-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation was built to estimate the percolation threshold of fibers in a system under different fiber orientations. A 3-D model was built. The orientation effect was modeled by introducing a degree of alignment in the randomly generated fibers via appropriate mathematical relationships and various degrees of uniaxial strain were applied. The critical volume fraction was then analyzed in both normal direction (through-plane) and parallel direction (in-plane) to that of the cross-section plane. The effect of uniaxial orientation was modeled by measuring the through-plane percolation threshold under tensile strain. The effect of biaxial orientation was modeled by measuring the in-plane percolation threshold under compressive strain. The results indicated that the introduction of fiber alignment changed both through-plane and in-plane threshold values, albeit with different trends. With the introduction of slight uniaxial orientation, the through-plane percolation threshold reached a minimum value and further uniaxial orientation gave it a rise, while the in-plane threshold continuously increased with an increase in uniaxial orientation. On the other hand, under compression, an increase in biaxial orientation resulted in a monotonic increase in the through-plane threshold, whereas the in-plane threshold showed a minimal behavior before its rise. The results of this study indicate that the percolation threshold is minimized when fibers are slightly oriented (both uniaxial and biaxial) rather than being completely isotropic, and therefore, generation of conductive paths in a particular direction of interest can be induced via a proper choice of applied orientation with a lower critical concentration, thereby potentially reducing the filler loading. One particular implication of this work is modeling the percolation threshold in cellular polymer composites where local stresses are applied on the fillers around the cell walls during bubble growth.

  8. Laminate articles on biaxially textured metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Beach, David B.; Morrell, Jonathan S.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chirayil, Thomas; Specht, Eliot D.; Goyal, Amit

    2003-12-16

    A laminate article comprises a substrate and a biaxially textured (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer over the substrate, wherein 0biaxially textured metal, such as nickel. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  9. KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wohletz, K.; Kunkle, T.; Hawkins, W.

    1996-12-01

    Results of the KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment indicate a relatively small degree of wall-rock contamination caused by this underground explosive experiment. Designed as an add-on to the KISMET test, which was performed in the U-1a.02 drift of the LYNER facility at Nevada Test Site on 1 March 1995, this experiment involved recovery and analysis of wall-rock samples affected by the high- explosive test. The chemical, high-explosive blast drove tungsten powder, placed around the test package as a plutonium analog, into the surrounding wall- rock alluvium. Sample analyses by an analytical digital electron microscope (ADEM) show tungsten dispersed in the rock as tiny (<10 {mu}m) particles, agglomerates, and coatings on alluvial clasts. Tungsten concentrations, measured by energy dispersive spectral analysis on the ADEM, indicate penetration depths less than 0.1 m and maximum concentrations of 1.5 wt % in the alluvium.

  10. Nanoengineering Applied to Tungsten

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    and R. Z. Valiev ARL-RP- 123 May 2006 A reprint from the Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tungsten, Refractory...Ground, MD 21005-5066 ARL-RP- 123 May 2006 Nanoengineering Applied to Tungsten Q. Wei University of North Carolina-Charlotte B. E...ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER ARL-RP- 123 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 11. SPONSOR

  11. A comparative study of deformation in carbon/carbon and carbon/polyimide laminates under bi-axial compression

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, V.; Grape, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    The failure mechanisms of laminated 2-D carbon/carbon (C/C) and carbon/polyimide (C/P) composites have been determined under inplane biaxial compression loads, and the associated failure envelopes that account for the effect of matrix-type and loading directions, are also obtained. For the C/C laminates, the failure was in the form of micro-kinking of fiber-bundles, interspersed by localized interply delaminations to form the overall shear-fault. The shear fault was aligned with the major use of loading, except at above 75% of balanced biaxial stress, where failure occurred alone both axes. For the C/P laminates, however, the overall failure was primarily in the form of axial interply delaminations aligned with the principal axis of loading, with only secondary events of kinking in few bundles. Although the biaxial strength for both C/C and C/P samples varied significantly with the ratio of in-plane principal stresses, R, there was no variation in the local failure mechanisms. Accordingly, it was found that both materials fail upon achieving a maximum strain along the primary axis of loading.

  12. Carbon nanotubes and tungsten oxide nanorods: Synthesis and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bing

    Synthesis and applications of two types of one-dimensional nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and tungsten oxide nanorods, are investigated in this dissertation. Multi-walled CNTs have been successfully synthesized using two types of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods: microwave plasma enhanced CVD and atmospheric pressure thermal CVD. CNTs and their synthesis processes are characterized with various analysis techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, and optical emission spectroscopy. Ultra-thin and high quality multi-walled CNTs are discovered in CNT films produced by MPCVD, which exhibit good field emission performance that is found to be dependent on the synthesis conditions, like the growth time and CH4/H2 flow ratio. CNTs grown by thermal CVD have similar field emission performance. Based on silicon surface micromachining techniques and thermal CVD method, a self-aligned method has been developed to fabricate CNT based gated field emitter arrays (FEAs) which demonstrate low turn-on voltage and good emission current. Tungsten oxide nanorods have been synthesized on various tungsten substrates via thermal annealing in argon at atmospheric pressure. Nanorod growth mechanism is proposed based on thermal oxidation of tungsten in gas ambient with a very low partial pressure of oxygen as well as the self-catalytic effect on tungsten surface. The lattice structure and composition of the tungsten oxide nanorods are observed and analyzed using high resolution TEM, selected area electron diffraction (SAD), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). The analysis results reveal that the lattice structure of the tungsten oxide nanorods is closest to that of the monoclinic WO3 crystal. Tungsten oxide nanorods have been successfully grown on tungsten tips for use in scanning tunneling microscope (STM) as probes which readily produce atomic resolution images on sample surface. Nanorod

  13. Conductive and robust nitride buffer layers on biaxially textured substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sankar, Sambasivan [Chicago, IL; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Barnett, Scott A [Evanston, IL; Kim, Ilwon [Skokie, IL; Kroeger, Donald M [Knoxville, TN

    2009-03-31

    The present invention relates to epitaxial, electrically conducting and mechanically robust, cubic nitride buffer layers deposited epitaxially on biaxially textured substrates such as metals and alloys. The invention comprises of a biaxially textured substrate with epitaxial layers of nitrides. The invention also discloses a method to form such epitaxial layers using a high rate deposition method as well as without the use of forming gases. The invention further comprises epitaxial layers of oxides on the biaxially textured nitride layer. In some embodiments the article further comprises electromagnetic devices which may have superconducting properties.

  14. Conductive and robust nitride buffer layers on biaxially textured substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sankar, Sambasivan; Goyal, Amit; Barnett, Scott A.; Kim, Ilwon; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-08-31

    The present invention relates to epitaxial, electrically conducting and mechanically robust, cubic nitride buffer layers deposited epitaxially on biaxially textured substrates such as metal and alloys. The invention comprises of a biaxially textured substrate with epitaxial layers of nitrides. The invention also discloses a method to form such epitaxial layers using a high rate deposition method as well as without the use of forming gases. The invention further comprises epitaxial layers of oxides on the biaxially textured nitride layers. In some embodiments the article further comprises electromagnetic devices which may be super conducting properties.

  15. Biaxial Nematic Phase in Model Bent-Core Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzybowski, Piotr; Longa, Lech

    2011-07-01

    We determine the bifurcation phase diagrams with isotropic (I), uniaxial (NU) and biaxial (NB) nematic phases for model bent-core mesogens using Onsager-type theory. The molecules comprise two or three Gay-Berne interacting ellipsoids of uniaxial and biaxial shape and a transverse central dipole. The Landau point is found to turn into an I-NB line for the three-center model with a large dipole moment. For the biaxial ellipsoids, a line of Landau points is observed even in the absence of the dipoles.

  16. Structure-based constitutive model can accurately predict planar biaxial properties of aortic wall tissue.

    PubMed

    Polzer, S; Gasser, T C; Novak, K; Man, V; Tichy, M; Skacel, P; Bursa, J

    2015-03-01

    Structure-based constitutive models might help in exploring mechanisms by which arterial wall histology is linked to wall mechanics. This study aims to validate a recently proposed structure-based constitutive model. Specifically, the model's ability to predict mechanical biaxial response of porcine aortic tissue with predefined collagen structure was tested. Histological slices from porcine thoracic aorta wall (n=9) were automatically processed to quantify the collagen fiber organization, and mechanical testing identified the non-linear properties of the wall samples (n=18) over a wide range of biaxial stretches. Histological and mechanical experimental data were used to identify the model parameters of a recently proposed multi-scale constitutive description for arterial layers. The model predictive capability was tested with respect to interpolation and extrapolation. Collagen in the media was predominantly aligned in circumferential direction (planar von Mises distribution with concentration parameter bM=1.03 ± 0.23), and its coherence decreased gradually from the luminal to the abluminal tissue layers (inner media, b=1.54 ± 0.40; outer media, b=0.72 ± 0.20). In contrast, the collagen in the adventitia was aligned almost isotropically (bA=0.27 ± 0.11), and no features, such as families of coherent fibers, were identified. The applied constitutive model captured the aorta biaxial properties accurately (coefficient of determination R(2)=0.95 ± 0.03) over the entire range of biaxial deformations and with physically meaningful model parameters. Good predictive properties, well outside the parameter identification space, were observed (R(2)=0.92 ± 0.04). Multi-scale constitutive models equipped with realistic micro-histological data can predict macroscopic non-linear aorta wall properties. Collagen largely defines already low strain properties of media, which explains the origin of wall anisotropy seen at this strain level. The structure and mechanical

  17. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-10-21

    A strengthened, biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed, compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: Ni, Ag, Ag--Cu, Ag--Pd, Ni--Cu, Ni--V, Ni--Mo, Ni--Al, Ni--Cr--Al, Ni--W--Al, Ni--V--Al, Ni--Mo--Al, Ni--Cu--Al; and at least one fine metal oxide powder; the article having a grain size which is fine and homogeneous; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  18. Biaxial and antiferroelectric structure of the orthogonal smectic phase of a bent-shaped molecule and helical structure in a chiral mixture system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sungmin; Nguyen, Ha; Nakajima, Shunpei; Tokita, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Junji

    2013-05-01

    We examined the biaxial and antiferroelectric properties in the Smectic-APA (Sm-APA) phase of bent-shaped DC-S-8. The biaxiality, which results from the existence of a secondary director, was well established from birefringence observations in the homeotropically aligned Sm-APA. By entering into Sm-APA phase, the birefringence (Δn, difference between two refractive indices of short axes) continuously increased from 0 to 0.02 with decreasing temperature. The antiferroelectric switching and second harmonic generation (SHG) activity on the field-on state were also observed in the Sm-APA phase, and the evaluated spontaneous polarization (PS) value strongly depended on temperature. The temperature dependence of Δn and PS resembles each other and follows Haller's approximation, showing that the biaxiality is due to polar packing in which the molecules are preferentially packed with their bent direction arranged in the same direction, and that the phase transition of Sm-APA to Sm-A is second order. The biaxiality was further examined in chiral Sm-APA*. Doping with chiral components induced the helical twisting of the secondary director in the Sm-APA* phase, which was confirmed by observing the reflection of the circular dichroism (CD) bands in the homeotropically aligned cell. The helical pitch of Sm-APA* is tunable in the range of 300-700 nm wavelength with a variation in the chiral content of 5 to 10 weight (wt)%.

  19. Alternative processing methods for tungsten-base composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.; Sikka, V.K.

    1996-06-01

    Tungsten composite materials contain large amounts of tungsten distributed in a continuous matrix phase. Current commercial materials include the tungsten-nickel-iron with cobalt replacing some or all of the iron, and also tungsten-copper materials. Typically, these are fabricated by liquid-phase sintering of blended powders. Liquid-phase sintering offers the advantages of low processing costs, established technology, and generally attractive mechanical properties. However, liquid-phase sintering is restricted to a very limited number of matrix alloying elements and a limited range of tungsten and alloying compositions. In the past few years, there has been interest in a wider range of matrix materials that offer the potential for superior composite properties. These must be processed by solid-state processes and at sufficiently low temperatures to avoid undesired reactions between the tungsten and the matrix phase. These processes, in order of decreasing process temperature requirements, include hot isostatic pressing (HEPing), hot extrusion, and dynamic compaction. The HIPing and hot extrusion processes have also been used to improve mechanical properties of conventional liquid-phase-sintered materials. The results of laboratory-scale investigations of solid-state consolidation of a variety of matrix materials, including titanium, hafnium, nickel aluminide, and steels are reviewed. The potential advantages and disadvantages of each of the possible alternative consolidation processes are identified. Post consolidation processing to control microstructure and macrostructure is discussed, including novel methods of controlling microstructure alignment.

  20. Alternative processing methods for tungsten-base composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.; Sikka, V.K.

    1995-12-31

    Tungsten composite materials contain large amounts of tungsten distributed in a continuous matrix phase. Current commercial materials include the tungsten-nickel-iron with cobalt replacing some or all of the iron, and also tungsten-copper materials. Typically, these are fabricated by liquid-phase sintering of blended powders. Liquid-phase sintering offers the advantages of low processing costs, established technology, and generally attractive mechanical properties. However, liquid-phase sintering is restricted to a very limited number of matrix alloying elements and a limited range of tungsten and alloying compositions. In the past few years, there has been interest in a wider range of matrix materials that offer the potential for superior composite properties. These must be processed by solid-state processes and at sufficiently low temperatures to avoid undesired reactions between the tungsten and the matrix phase. These processes, in order of decreasing process temperature requirements, include hot-isostatic pressing (HIPing), hot extrusion, and dynamic compaction. The HIPing and hot extrusion processes have also been used to improve mechanical properties of conventional liquid-phase-sintered materials. Results of laboratory-scale investigations of solid-state consolidation of a variety of matrix materials, including titanium, hafnium, nickel aluminide, and steels are reviewed. The potential advantages and disadvantages of each of the possible alternative consolidation processes are identified. Postconsolidation processing to control microstructure and macrostructure is discussed, including novel methods of controlling microstructure alignment.

  1. Biaxial Yield Surface Investigation of Polymer-Matrix Composites

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Junjie; Qiu, Yuanying; Zhai, Zhi; He, Zhengjia

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a numerical technique for computing the biaxial yield surface of polymer-matrix composites with a given microstructure. Generalized Method of Cells in combination with an Improved Bodner-Partom Viscoplastic model is used to compute the inelastic deformation. The validation of presented model is proved by a fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) strain test system through uniaxial testing under two different strain rate conditions. On this basis, the manufacturing process thermal residual stress and strain rate effect on the biaxial yield surface of composites are considered. The results show that the effect of thermal residual stress on the biaxial yield response is closely dependent on loading conditions. Moreover, biaxial yield strength tends to increase with the increasing strain rate. PMID:23529150

  2. Double phase conjugation in tungsten bronze crystals.

    PubMed

    Sharp, E J; Clark Iii, W W; Miller, M J; Wood, G L; Monson, B; Salamo, G J; Neurgaonkar, R R

    1990-02-20

    In this paper we report a new method for double phase conjugation particularly suited to the tungsten bronze crystal strontium barium niobate. It has also been observed to produce conjugate waves in BaTiO(3) and BSKNN. This new arrangement is called the bridge conjugator because the two beams enter opposing [100] crystal faces and fan together to form a bridge without reflection off a crystal face. Our measurements indicate that the bridge conjugator is competitive with previously reported double phase conjugate mirrors in reflectivity, response time, ease of alignment, and fidelity.

  3. Plasma deposition of tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, K.E.

    1986-12-01

    Tungsten films were plasma-deposited using an abnormal glow discharge through a mixture of tungsten hexafluoride, hydrogen, and argon. The films adhered well to silicon, silicon dioxide, gallium arsenide, and aluminum substrates placed directly on the discharge cathode. Typical deposition rates were on the order of 160 Angstroms/minute with as-deposited film resistivities of 40 to 70 microohm-cm. The tungsten was analyzed using a number of techniques including x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and Auger spectroscopy. Low-resistivity (<10 microohm-cm) films that adhered well to silicon dioxide were obtained with a two-step process utilizing plasma deposition and conventional chemical vapor deposition.

  4. Chemical downstream etching of tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, M.G.; Jarecki, R.L.; Simonson, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    The downstream etching of tungsten and tungsten oxide has been investigated. Etching of chemical vapor deposited tungsten and e-beam deposited tungsten oxide samples was performed using atomic fluorine generated by a microwave discharge of argon and NF{sub 3}. Etching was found to be highly activated with activation energies approximated to be 6.0{plus_minus}0.5thinspkcal/mol and 5.4{plus_minus}0.4thinspkcal/mol for W and WO{sub 3}, respectively. In the case of F etching of tungsten, the addition of undischarged nitric oxide (NO) directly into the reaction chamber results in the competing effects of catalytic etch rate enhancement and the formation of a nearly stoichiometric WO{sub 3} passivating tungsten oxide film, which ultimately stops the etching process. For F etching of tungsten oxide, the introduction of downstream NO reduces the etch rate. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Vacuum Society.}

  5. Diffusion of tungsten hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of tungsten hexafluoride

  6. Gas tungsten arc welder

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  7. High purity tungsten targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    High purity tungsten, which is used for targets in X-ray tubes was considered for space processing. The demand for X-ray tubes was calculated using the growth rates for dental and medical X-ray machines. It is concluded that the cost benefits are uncertain.

  8. Direct Growth of Crystalline Tungsten Oxide Nanorod Arrays by a Hydrothermal Process and Their Electrochromic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chih-Hao; Hon, Min Hsiung; Leu, Ing-Chi

    2016-12-01

    Transparent crystalline tungsten oxide nanorod arrays for use as an electrochromic layer have been directly prepared on fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass via a facile tungsten film-assisted hydrothermal process using aqueous tungsten hexachloride solution. X-ray diffraction analysis and field-emission scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the phase and morphology of the grown nanostructures. Arrays of tungsten oxide nanorods with diameter of ˜22 nm and length of ˜240 nm were obtained at 200°C after 8 h of hydrothermal reaction. We propose a growth mechanism for the deposition of the monoclinic tungsten oxide phase in the hydrothermal environment. The tungsten film was first oxidized to tungsten oxide to provide seed sites for crystal growth and address the poor connection between the growing tungsten oxide and substrate. Aligned tungsten oxide nanorod arrays can be grown by a W thin film-assisted heterogeneous nucleation process with NaCl as a structure-directing agent. The fabricated electrochromic device demonstrated optical modulation (coloration/bleaching) at 632.8 nm of ˜41.2% after applying a low voltage of 0.1 V for 10 s, indicating the potential of such nanorod array films for use in energy-saving smart windows.

  9. Direct Growth of Crystalline Tungsten Oxide Nanorod Arrays by a Hydrothermal Process and Their Electrochromic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chih-Hao; Hon, Min Hsiung; Leu, Ing-Chi

    2017-04-01

    Transparent crystalline tungsten oxide nanorod arrays for use as an electrochromic layer have been directly prepared on fluorine-doped tin oxide-coated glass via a facile tungsten film-assisted hydrothermal process using aqueous tungsten hexachloride solution. X-ray diffraction analysis and field-emission scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the phase and morphology of the grown nanostructures. Arrays of tungsten oxide nanorods with diameter of ˜22 nm and length of ˜240 nm were obtained at 200°C after 8 h of hydrothermal reaction. We propose a growth mechanism for the deposition of the monoclinic tungsten oxide phase in the hydrothermal environment. The tungsten film was first oxidized to tungsten oxide to provide seed sites for crystal growth and address the poor connection between the growing tungsten oxide and substrate. Aligned tungsten oxide nanorod arrays can be grown by a W thin film-assisted heterogeneous nucleation process with NaCl as a structure-directing agent. The fabricated electrochromic device demonstrated optical modulation (coloration/bleaching) at 632.8 nm of ˜41.2% after applying a low voltage of 0.1 V for 10 s, indicating the potential of such nanorod array films for use in energy-saving smart windows.

  10. Graphene flakes under controlled biaxial deformation

    PubMed Central

    Androulidakis, Charalampos; Koukaras, Emmanuel N.; Parthenios, John; Kalosakas, George; Papagelis, Konstantinos; Galiotis, Costas

    2015-01-01

    Thin membranes, such as monolayer graphene of monoatomic thickness, are bound to exhibit lateral buckling under uniaxial tensile loading that impairs its mechanical behaviour. In this work, we have developed an experimental device to subject 2D materials to controlled equibiaxial strain on supported beams that can be flexed up or down to subject the material to either compression or tension, respectively. Using strain gauges in tandem with Raman spectroscopy measurements, we monitor the G and 2D phonon properties of graphene under biaxial strain and thus extract important information about the uptake of stress under these conditions. The experimental shift over strain for the G and 2D Raman peaks were found to be in the range of 62.3 ± 5 cm–1/%, and 148.2 ± 6 cm–1/%, respectively, for monolayer but also bilayer graphenes. The corresponding Grüneisen parameters for the G and 2D peaks were found to be between 1.97 ± 0.15 and 2.86 ± 0.12, respectively. These values agree reasonably well with those obtained from small-strain bubble-type experiments. The results presented are also backed up by classical and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and excellent agreement of Γ-E2g shifts with strains and the Grüneisen parameter was observed. PMID:26666692

  11. Biaxial deformation in high purity aluminum

    DOE PAGES

    Livescu, V.; Bingert, J. F.; Liu, C.; ...

    2015-09-25

    The convergence of multiple characterization tools has been applied to investigate the relationship of microstructure on damage evolution in high purity aluminum. The extremely coarse grain size of the disc-shaped sample provided a quasi-two dimensional structure from which the location of surface-measured features could be inferred. In particular, the role of pre-existing defects on damage growth was accessible due to the presence of casting porosity in the aluminum. Micro tomography, electron backscatter diffraction, and digital image correlation were applied to interrogate the sample in three dimensions. Recently micro-bulge testing apparatus was used to deform the pre-characterized disc of aluminum inmore » biaxial tension, and related analysis techniques were applied to map local strain fields. Subsequent post-mortem characterization of the failed sample was performed to correlate structure to damaged regions. We determined that strain localization and associated damage was most strongly correlated with grain boundary intersections and plastic anisotropy gradients between grains. Pre-existing voids played less of an apparent role than was perhaps initially expected. Finally, these combined techniques provide insight to the mechanism of damage initiation, propagation, and failure, along with a test bed for predictive damage models incorporating anisotropic microstructural effects.« less

  12. Biaxial deformation in high purity aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Livescu, V.; Bingert, J. F.; Liu, C.; Lovato, M. L.; Patterson, B. M.

    2015-09-25

    The convergence of multiple characterization tools has been applied to investigate the relationship of microstructure on damage evolution in high purity aluminum. The extremely coarse grain size of the disc-shaped sample provided a quasi-two dimensional structure from which the location of surface-measured features could be inferred. In particular, the role of pre-existing defects on damage growth was accessible due to the presence of casting porosity in the aluminum. Micro tomography, electron backscatter diffraction, and digital image correlation were applied to interrogate the sample in three dimensions. Recently micro-bulge testing apparatus was used to deform the pre-characterized disc of aluminum in biaxial tension, and related analysis techniques were applied to map local strain fields. Subsequent post-mortem characterization of the failed sample was performed to correlate structure to damaged regions. We determined that strain localization and associated damage was most strongly correlated with grain boundary intersections and plastic anisotropy gradients between grains. Pre-existing voids played less of an apparent role than was perhaps initially expected. Finally, these combined techniques provide insight to the mechanism of damage initiation, propagation, and failure, along with a test bed for predictive damage models incorporating anisotropic microstructural effects.

  13. Domain walls and anchoring transitions mimicking nematic biaxiality in the oxadiazole bent-core liquid crystal C7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Ki; Cukrov, Greta; Xiang, Jie; Shin, Sung-Tae; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    We investigate the origin of secondary disclinations that were recently described as a new evidence of a biaxial nematic phase in an oxadiazole bent-core thermotropic liquid crystal C7. With an assortment of optical techniques such as polarizing optical microscopy, LC PolScope, and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, we demonstrate that the secondary disclinations represent non-singular domain walls formed in an uniaxial nematic during the surface anchoring transition, in which surface orientation of the director changes from tangential (parallel to the bounding plates) to tilted. Each domain wall separates two regions with the director tilted in opposite azimuthal directions. At the centre of the wall, the director remains parallel to the bonding plates. The domain walls can be easily removed by applying a modest electric field. The anchoring transition is explained by the balance of (a) the intrinsic perpendicular surface anchoring produced by the polyimide aligning layer and (b) tangential alignment caused by ionic impurities forming electric double layers. The model is supported by the fact that the temperature of the tangential-tilted anchoring transition decreases as the cell thickness increases and as the concentration of ionic species (added salt) increases. We also demonstrate that the surface alignment is strongly affected by thermal degradation of the samples. The study shows that C7 exhibits only a uniaxial nematic phase and demonstrate yet another mechanism (formation of secondary disclinations) by which a uniaxial nematic can mimic a biaxial nematic behaviour.

  14. Biaxial nematic phase stability and demixing behaviour in monolayers of rod-plate mixtures.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ratón, Yuri; González-Pinto, Miguel; Velasco, Enrique

    2016-09-21

    We theoretically study the phase behaviour of monolayers of hard rod-plate mixtures using a fundamental-measure density functional in the restricted-orientation (Zwanzig) approximation. Particles can rotate in 3D but their centres of mass are constrained to be on a flat surface. In addition, we consider both species to be subject to an attractive potential proportional to the particle contact area on the surface and with adsorption strengths that depend on the species type. Particles have board-like shape, with sizes chosen using a symmetry criterion: same volume and same aspect ratio κ. Phase diagrams were calculated for κ = 10, 20 and 40 and different values of adsorption strengths. For small adsorption strengths the mixtures exhibit a second-order uniaxial nematic-biaxial nematic transition for molar fraction of rods 0 ≤x≲ 0.9. In the uniaxial nematic phase the particle axes of rods and plates are aligned perpendicular and parallel to the monolayer, respectively. At the transition, the orientational symmetry of the plate axes is broken, and they orient parallel to a director lying on the surface. For large and equal adsorption strengths the mixture demixes at low pressures into a uniaxial nematic phase, rich in plates, and a biaxial nematic phase, rich in rods. The demixing transition is located between two tricritical points. Also, at higher pressures and in the plate-rich part of the phase diagram, the system exhibits a strong first-order uniaxial nematic-biaxial nematic phase transition with a large density coexistence gap. When rod adsorption is considerably large while that of plates is small, the transition to the biaxial nematic phase is always of second order, and its region of stability in the phase diagram considerably widens. At very high pressures the mixture can effectively be identified as a two-dimensional mixture of squares and rectangles which again demixes above a certain critical point. We also studied the relative stability of uniform

  15. Servo-controlled biaxial test system

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, W.L.

    1983-02-11

    A large test program requiring axial torsion tests was submitted to the Materials Test and Evaluation Section of the Engineering Sciences Division by the Chemistry Department. The objective of these tests was to provide insight with regard to the fundamental aspects of plastic deformation and hardening of nickel. Thes tests will also provide the constants necessary for a constitutive equation for use in weld modeling. The weld models will attempt to predict residual stresses in nickel welds. The test program consisted of approximately 70 specimens of high purity nickel to be tested in torsion over a large temperature range (RT - 900/sup 0/C) at a strain rate of about 1 x 10/sup -4/ in./in./sec to steady state at each temperature. After having attained steady state, the strain-rate-reversal (Bauschinger test) and incremental-changes-in-strain-rate tests (10/sup -4/ to 2 x 10/sup -3/ in./in./sec) at constant structure will be conducted. Additional tests such as transient backstress and yield surface distortion (using multi-axial stress states) will be carried out. This particular request required a biaxial test machine capable of more than 360/sup 0/ rotation in torsion. Temperature capabilities, atmosphere control, and a control system were also needed whereby the machine could be operated in torsion using strain control. Such a machine did not commercially exist so it was necessary to build one. The basic unit chosen was a 20K Servo-Electric Hydraulic Test Machine to which we added a simple anti-rotation fixture for the ram. This constituted the axial portion of the system.

  16. Method of forming biaxially textured alloy substrates and devices thereon

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Specht, Eliot D.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan

    2000-01-01

    Specific alloys, in particular Ni-based alloys, that can be biaxially textured, with a well-developed, single component texture are disclosed. These alloys have a significantly reduced Curie point, which is very desirable from the point of view of superconductivity applications. The biaxially textured alloy substrates also possess greatly enhanced mechanical properties (yield strength, ultimate tensile strength) which are essential for most applications, in particular, superconductors. A method is disclosed for producing complex multicomponent alloys which have the ideal physical properties for specific applications, such as lattice parameter, degree of magnetism and mechanical strength, and which cannot be in textured form. In addition, a method for making ultra thin biaxially textured substrates with complex compositions is disclosed.

  17. Method of forming biaxially textured alloy substrates and devices thereon

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Specht, Eliot D.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan

    1999-01-01

    Specific alloys, in particular Ni-based alloys, that can be biaxially textured, with a well-developed, single component texture are disclosed. These alloys have a significantly reduced Curie point, which is very desirable from the point of view of superconductivity applications. The biaxially textured alloy substrates also possess greatly enhanced mechanical properties (yield strength, ultimate tensile strength) which are essential for most applications, in particular, superconductors. A method is disclosed for producing complex multicomponent alloys which have the ideal physical properties for specific applications, such as lattice parameter, degree of magnetism and mechanical strength, and which cannot be fabricated in textured form. In addition, a method for making ultra thin biaxially textured substrates with complex compositions is disclosed.

  18. Failure of composite plates under static biaxial planar loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waas, Anthony M.; Khamseh, Amir R.

    1992-01-01

    The project involved detailed investigations into the failure mechanisms in composite plates as a function of hole size (holes centrally located in the plates) under static loading. There were two phases to the project, the first dealing with uniaxial loads along the fiber direction, and the second dealing with coplanar biaxial loading. Results for the uniaxial tests have been reported and published previously, thus this report will place emphasis on the second phase of the project, namely the biaxial tests. The composite plates used in the biaxial loading experiments, as well as the uniaxial, were composed of a single ply unidirectional graphite/epoxy prepreg sandwiched between two layers of transparent thermoplastic. This setup enabled us to examine the failure initiation and propagation modes nondestructively, during the test. Currently, similar tests and analysis of results are in progress for graphite/epoxy cruciform shaped flat laminates. The results obtained from these tests will be available at a later time.

  19. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-12-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz.

  20. Mineral resource of the month: tungsten

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2012-01-01

    The article offers information on tungsten. It says that tungsten is a metal found in chemical compounds such as in the scheelite and ore minerals wolframite. It states that tungsten has the highest melting point and it forms a compound as hard as diamond when combined with carbon. It states that tungsten can be used as a substitute for lead in fishing weights, ammunition, and hunting shot. Moreover, China started to export tungsten materials and products instead of tungsten raw materials.

  1. Polycrystalline ferroelectric or multiferroic oxide articles on biaxially textured substrates and methods for making same

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Shin, Junsoo

    2015-03-31

    A polycrystalline ferroelectric and/or multiferroic oxide article includes a substrate having a biaxially textured surface; at least one biaxially textured buffer layer supported by the substrate; and a biaxially textured ferroelectric or multiferroic oxide layer supported by the buffer layer. Methods for making polycrystalline ferroelectric and/or multiferroic oxide articles are also disclosed.

  2. Method for forming biaxially textured articles by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2002-01-01

    A method of preparing a biaxially textured alloy article comprises the steps of preparing a mixture comprising Ni powder and at least one powder selected from the group consisting of Cr, W, V, Mo, Cu, Al, Ce, YSZ, Y, Rare Earths, (RE), MgO, CeO.sub.2, and Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 ; compacting the mixture, followed by heat treating and rapidly recrystallizing to produce a biaxial texture on the article. In some embodiments the alloy article further comprises electromagnetic or electro-optical devices and possesses superconducting properties.

  3. Limit loads for centrally cracked square plates under biaxial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graba, Marcin

    2016-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the determination of limit loads for centrally cracked square plates subjected to biaxial tension. It briefly discusses the concept of limit loads and some aspects of numerical modelling. It presents results of numerical calculations conducted for two-dimensional (plane strain state and plane stress state) and three-dimensional cases. It also considers the relationship between the limit load and the crack length, the specimen thickness, the yield strength and the biaxial load factor, defined for the purpose of this work. The paper includes approximation formulae to calculate the limit load.

  4. Alignment validation

    SciTech Connect

    ALICE; ATLAS; CMS; LHCb; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-06

    The four experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb are currently under constructionat CERN. They will study the products of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. All experiments are equipped with sophisticated tracking systems, unprecedented in size and complexity. Full exploitation of both the inner detector andthe muon system requires an accurate alignment of all detector elements. Alignmentinformation is deduced from dedicated hardware alignment systems and the reconstruction of charged particles. However, the system is degenerate which means the data is insufficient to constrain all alignment degrees of freedom, so the techniques are prone to converging on wrong geometries. This deficiency necessitates validation and monitoring of the alignment. An exhaustive discussion of means to validate is subject to this document, including examples and plans from all four LHC experiments, as well as other high energy experiments.

  5. Gleeble Testing of Tungsten Samples

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    close off porosity left after manufacturing and create a fully dense part. In order to alleviate this problem, rhenium was added to sintered nano...with and without rhenium , to determine a set of processing parameters that could be used during post-processing steps to create fully dense nano...4.2 Tungsten With Rhenium .................................................................................................9 4.3 Commercial Tungsten

  6. TUNGSTEN BASE ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schell, D.H.; Sheinberg, H.

    1959-12-15

    A high-density quaternary tungsten-base alloy having high mechanical strength and good machinability composed of about 2 wt.% Ni, 3 wt.% Cu, 5 wt.% Pb, and 90wt.% W is described. This alloy can be formed by the powder metallurgy technique of hot pressing in a graphite die without causing a reaction between charge and the die and without formation of a carbide case on the final compact, thereby enabling re-use of the graphite die. The alloy is formable at hot- pressing temperatures of from about 1200 to about 1350 deg C. In addition, there is little component shrinkage, thereby eliminating the necessity of subsequent extensive surface machining.

  7. Preparation of tungsten oxide

    DOEpatents

    Bulian, Christopher J.; Dye, Robert C.; Son, Steven F.; Jorgensen, Betty S.; Perry, W. Lee

    2009-09-22

    Tungsten trioxide hydrate (WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O) was prepared from a precursor solution of ammonium paratungstate in concentrated aqueous hydrochloric acid. The precursor solution was rapidly added to water, resulting in the crash precipitation of a yellow white powder identified as WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O nanosized platelets by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Annealing of the powder at 200.degree. C. provided cubic phase WO.sub.3 nanopowder, and at 400.degree. C. provided WO.sub.3 nanopowder as a mixture of monoclinic and orthorhombic phases.

  8. Static strength and failure mechanism of CFRP under biaxial loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. S.; Hwang, W.; Park, H. C.; Han, K. S.

    1998-01-01

    Tests of cross-ply composite tubes were performed under combined axial and torsional loading up to failure. Strength properties and failure mechanisms were evaluated with reference to the biaxiality ratio of the loading. The scattering of the biaxial strength data was analyzed using the Weibull distribution. The axial contraction of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) tubes under biaxial loading was investigated theoretically and experimentally. Artificial neural networks were introduced to predict the failure strength using the algorithm of the error back-propagation. The prediction was also made by the Tsai-Wu theory using the experimental data and by the combined optimized tensor-polynomial theory. A comparison shows that the artificial neural network has the smallest root-mean square (RMS) error of the three prediction methods. The prediction of the axial contraction of the tubes correlates well with the results of a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) of the testing machine. From the phenomenological analysis of the failure and the fractographic observations of the fracture surface, three types of failure modes and microscopic failure were investigated, depending on the biaxiality ratio, and the corresponding failure mechanisms are suggested.

  9. Testing device subjects elastic materials to biaxial deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, G. W.

    1965-01-01

    Testing device stretches elastic materials biaxially over large deformation ranges and varies strain ratios in two perpendicular directions. The device is used in conjunction with a tensile testing machine, which holds the specimen and permits control over the direction and magnitude of the stresses applied.

  10. High-performance poly-Si thin film transistors with highly biaxially oriented poly-Si thin films using double line beam continuous-wave laser lateral crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamano, Masayuki; Kuroki, Shin-Ichiro; Sato, Tadashi; Kotani, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Highly biaxially oriented poly-Si thin films were formed by double-line beam continuous-wave laser lateral crystallization (DLB-CLC). The crystallinities of the DLB-CLC poly-Si thin films were (110), (111), and (211) for the laser scan, transverse, and surface directions, respectively, and an energetically stable Σ3 grain boundary was observed to be dominant. All silicon grains were elongated in the laser scan direction and one-dimensionally very large silicon grains with lengths of more than 100 µm were fabricated. Using these biaxially oriented polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) films, low-temperature poly-Si TFTs (LTPS-TFTs) were fabricated at low temperatures (≦550 °C) by a metal gate self-aligned process. As a result, a TFT with a high electron field effect mobility of μFE = 450 cm2 V-1 s-1 in a linear region was realized.

  11. 49 CFR 173.338 - Tungsten hexafluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tungsten hexafluoride. 173.338 Section 173.338... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.338 Tungsten hexafluoride. (a) Tungsten... expansion test, must be condemned if removed from tungsten hexafluoride service....

  12. 49 CFR 173.338 - Tungsten hexafluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tungsten hexafluoride. 173.338 Section 173.338... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.338 Tungsten hexafluoride. (a) Tungsten... expansion test, must be condemned if removed from tungsten hexafluoride service....

  13. 49 CFR 173.338 - Tungsten hexafluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tungsten hexafluoride. 173.338 Section 173.338... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.338 Tungsten hexafluoride. (a) Tungsten... expansion test, must be condemned if removed from tungsten hexafluoride service. [ 74 FR 16143, Apr. 9,...

  14. 49 CFR 173.338 - Tungsten hexafluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tungsten hexafluoride. 173.338 Section 173.338... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.338 Tungsten hexafluoride. (a) Tungsten... expansion test, must be condemned if removed from tungsten hexafluoride service....

  15. High strength uranium-tungsten alloy process

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Paul S.; Sheinberg, Haskell; Hogan, Billy M.; Lewis, Homer D.; Dickinson, James M.

    1990-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  16. 49 CFR 173.338 - Tungsten hexafluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tungsten hexafluoride. 173.338 Section 173.338... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.338 Tungsten hexafluoride. (a) Tungsten... expansion test, must be condemned if removed from tungsten hexafluoride service....

  17. High strength uranium-tungsten alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Paul S.; Sheinberg, Haskell; Hogan, Billy M.; Lewis, Homer D.; Dickinson, James M.

    1991-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  18. Synthesis of Nanostructured Tungsten and Tungsten - Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angastiniotis, Nicos Costa

    Reductive decomposition of spray dried ammonium metatungstate gives rise to nanocrystalline alpha -W (bcc structure) or nanocrystalline beta -W (A15 structure), depending on the specifics of the processing conditions. By controlling the reaction rate of the high surface area alpha-W and beta -W phases with oxygen at low temperatures ( <=300^circC) it is possible to transform both phases to an amorphous tungsten oxide. Furthermore, reduction of the amorphous oxide in hydrogen at <=400 ^circC yields gamma -W (amorphous structure), in which all or nearly all of the oxygen atoms are removed. The high surface area alpha -W and beta-W phases show striking differences in susceptibility to gas-solid reactions. Reaction of beta-W with ammonia at low temperatures (100^circ-300^ circC) results in the formation of an intermediate amorphous delta-WN_ {rm x} phase, which decomposes at higher temperatures (>=650 ^circC) into nanocrystalline rm W_2N_{x} phase. On the other hand, if nitridation is initiated at room temperature and continues as the temperature gradually increases to 300^circC, another amorphous phase (gamma-WN_{ rm x}) is formed. A similar behavior occurs when beta -W is reacted with carbon monoxide at low temperatures, starting at room temperature and continuing as the temperature gradually increases to 300^circC. The resulting amorphous phase delta- rm WC_{x}O_{y } is exceptionally stable. Only upon heating to 800^circC in carbon monoxide does it decompose to rm WC_{x }.. The unusual chemical activity of high surface area beta-W led to speculation concerning its susceptibility to solid-solid reactions, in addition to the gas-solid reactions noted above. Tests on the W -Cu system, in which both elements are mutually insoluble in the solid state, clearly showed that Cu can be diffused into beta-W to form a metastable solid solution. Some diffusional disordering evidently occurs because of the disappearance of the high order peaks of beta-W. However, the disordering

  19. METHOD OF MAKING TUNGSTEN FILAMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Frazer, J.W.

    1962-12-18

    A method of making tungsten filaments is described in which the tungsten is completely free of isotope impurities in the range of masses 234 to 245 for use in mass spectrometers. The filament comprises a tantalum core generally less than 1 mil in diameter having a coating of potassium-free tantalum-diffused tungsten molecularly bonded thereto. In the preferred process of manufacture a short, thin tantalum filament is first mounted between terminal posts mounted in insulated relation through a backing plate. The tungsten is most conveniently vapor plated onto the tantalum by a tungsten carbonyl vapor decomposition method having a critical step because of the tendency of the tantalum to volatilize at the temperature of operntion of the filament. The preferred recipe comprises volatilizing tantalum by resistance henting until the current drops by about 40%, cutting the voltage back to build up the tungsten, and then gradually building the temperature back up to balance the rate of tungsten deposition with the rate of tantalum volatilization. (AEC)

  20. Effects of biaxial oscillatory shear stress on endothelial cell proliferation and morphology.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Amlan; Chakraborty, Sutirtha; Jala, Venkatakrishna R; Haribabu, Bodduluri; Sharp, M Keith; Berson, R Eric

    2012-03-01

    Wall shear stress (WSS) on anchored cells affects their responses, including cell proliferation and morphology. In this study, the effects of the directionality of pulsatile WSS on endothelial cell proliferation and morphology were investigated for cells grown in a Petri dish orbiting on a shaker platform. Time and location dependent WSS was determined by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). At low orbital speed (50 rpm), WSS was shown to be uniform (0-1 dyne/cm(2)) across the bottom of the dish, while at higher orbital speed (100 and 150 rpm), WSS remained fairly uniform near the center and fluctuated significantly (0-9 dyne/cm(2)) near the side walls of the dish. Since WSS on the bottom of the dish is two-dimensional, a new directional oscillatory shear index (DOSI) was developed to quantify the directionality of oscillating shear. DOSI approached zero for biaxial oscillatory shear of equal magnitudes near the center and approached one for uniaxial pulsatile shear near the wall, where large tangential WSS dominated a much smaller radial component. Near the center (low DOSI), more, smaller and less elongated cells grew, whereas larger cells with greater elongation were observed in the more uniaxial oscillatory shear (high DOSI) near the periphery of the dish. Further, cells aligned with the direction of the largest component of shear but were randomly oriented in low magnitude biaxial shear. Statistical analyses of the individual and interacting effects of multiple factors (DOSI, shear magnitudes and orbital speeds) showed that DOSI significantly affected all the responses, indicating that directionality is an important determinant of cellular responses.

  1. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM TUNGSTEN

    DOEpatents

    Newnam, K.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for the rccovery of uranium which has adhered to tungsten parts in electromagnetic isotope separation apparatus. Such a tungsten article is dissolved electrolytically in 20% NaOH by using the tungsten article as the anode. The resulting solution, containing soluble sodium lungstate and an insoluble slime, is then filtered. The slime residue is ignited successively with sodium nitrate and sodium pyrosulfate and leashed, and the resulting filtrates are combined with the original filtrate. Uranium is then recovered from the combined flltrates by diuranate precipitation.

  2. Composite biaxially textured substrates using ultrasonic consolidation

    DOEpatents

    Blue, Craig A; Goyal, Amit

    2013-04-23

    A method of forming a composite sheet includes disposing an untextured metal or alloy first sheet in contact with a second sheet in an aligned opposing position; bonding the first sheet to the second sheet by applying an oscillating ultrasonic force to at least one of the first sheet and the second sheet to form an untextured intermediate composite sheet; and annealing the untextured intermediate composite sheet at a temperature lower than a primary re-crystallization temperature of the second sheet and higher than a primary re-crystallization temperature of the first sheet to convert the untextured first sheet into a cube textured sheet, wherein the cube texture is characterized by a .phi.-scan having a FWHM of no more than 15.degree. in all directions, the second sheet remaining untextured, to form a composite sheet.

  3. Biaxial casting apparatus for isolating radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Manchale, F. Jr.; Manchak, F. III.

    1992-10-20

    This patent describes apparatus for isolating hazardous radioactive waste for disposal. It comprises: a bifurcated centrifugal casting mold having at least two separable mold parts, the mold being supported for rotation about a first axis; means for supporting a completed monolith in the apparatus with the mold parts removed therefrom; powered drive means for rotating the mold and the monolith about the first axis; mold removal means aligned along a second axis substantially perpendicular to the first axis for removing the separate parts of the bifurcated casting mold from a monolith while leaving the monolith supported in the apparatus for rotation about the first axis; means for injecting a charge of radiation shielding material into a pre-formed shell placed in the mold; and means for heating the interior of the shell during rotation of the mold about the first axis.

  4. Tungsten Toxicity in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S.; Panteris, Emmanuel; Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P.

    2012-01-01

    Tungsten (W) is a rare heavy metal, widely used in a range of industrial, military and household applications due to its unique physical properties. These activities inevitably have accounted for local W accumulation at high concentrations, raising concerns about its effects for living organisms. In plants, W has primarily been used as an inhibitor of the molybdoenzymes, since it antagonizes molybdenum (Mo) for the Mo-cofactor (MoCo) of these enzymes. However, recent advances indicate that, beyond Mo-enzyme inhibition, W has toxic attributes similar with those of other heavy metals. These include hindering of seedling growth, reduction of root and shoot biomass, ultrastructural malformations of cell components, aberration of cell cycle, disruption of the cytoskeleton and deregulation of gene expression related with programmed cell death (PCD). In this article, the recent available information on W toxicity in plants and plant cells is reviewed, and the knowledge gaps and the most pertinent research directions are outlined. PMID:27137642

  5. Tungsten resources of Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Max Gregg

    1974-01-01

    Brazilian tungsten production, 85 percent of which is exported, comes almost entirely from scheelite-bearing tactites in northeast Brazil, and has reached an annual rate of about 2,000 metric tons (2,200 short tons) of scheelite concentrate with 70 percent WO3. Scheelite ore reserves, located principally in the State of Rio Grande do Norte, are estimated to be as high as 8,300,000 tons (9,100,000 short tons) containing 0.7 percent WO3. Minor deposits (or those about which only minimal information is available) of wolframite, with which some cassiterite is associated, are located in Sao Paulo, Santa Catarina, and Rio Grande do Sul. Both the scheelite and the wolframite deposits are considered . to be late Precambrian A (620 to 900 m.y.) or early Cambrian in age.

  6. Heated die facilitates tungsten forming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattin, J. H.; Haystrick, J. E.; Laughlin, J. C.; Leidy, R. A.

    1966-01-01

    Tungsten forming in a press brake employs a bottom die assembly with a heating manifold between two water-cooled die sections. The manifold has hydrogen-oxygen burners spaced along its length for even heat during forming.

  7. ALIGNING JIG

    DOEpatents

    Culver, J.S.; Tunnell, W.C.

    1958-08-01

    A jig or device is described for setting or aligning an opening in one member relative to another member or structure, with a predetermined offset, or it may be used for measuring the amount of offset with which the parts have previously been sct. This jig comprises two blocks rabbeted to each other, with means for securing thc upper block to the lower block. The upper block has fingers for contacting one of the members to be a1igmed, the lower block is designed to ride in grooves within the reference member, and calibration marks are provided to determine the amount of offset. This jig is specially designed to align the collimating slits of a mass spectrometer.

  8. Image alignment

    DOEpatents

    Dowell, Larry Jonathan

    2014-04-22

    Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

  9. Strain Measurement System Developed for Biaxially Loaded Cruciform Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, David L.

    2000-01-01

    A new extensometer system developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field measures test area strains along two orthogonal axes in flat cruciform specimens. This system incorporates standard axial contact extensometers to provide a cost-effective high-precision instrument. The device was validated for use by extensive testing of a stainless steel specimen, with specimen temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1100 F. In-plane loading conditions included several static biaxial load ratios, plus cyclic loadings of various waveform shapes, frequencies, magnitudes, and durations. The extensometer system measurements were compared with strain gauge data at room temperature and with calculated strain values for elevated-temperature measurements. All testing was performed in house in Glenn's Benchmark Test Facility in-plane biaxial load frame.

  10. Band alignments at strained Ge1‑x Sn x /relaxed Ge1‑y Sn y heterointerfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, H.-S.; Liu, C. W.

    2017-04-01

    Type-I, type-II, reverse type-I, and reverse type-II band alignments are found theoretically in strained Ge1‑x Sn x (0  ⩽  x  ⩽  0.3) grown on relaxed Ge1‑y Sn y substrates (0  ⩽  y  ⩽  0.3) using the model-solid theory. The prerequisite bandgaps, and energy difference between the top valence band edge and the average valence band position of GeSn are obtained by the nonlocal empirical pseudopotential method. For the indirect-gap (L valleys) Ge1‑x Sn x on relaxed Ge1‑y Sn y , the band alignments are type-I and reverse type-I under biaxial compressive strain (x  >  y) and biaxial tensile strain (x  <  y), respectively. For the direct-gap (Γ valley) Ge1‑x Sn x on relaxed Ge1‑y Sn y , the biaxial compressive strain yields type-I and type-II alignment, while the biaxial tensile strain yields reverse type-I and reverse type-II alignments.

  11. The yield behavior of polyethylene tubes subjected to biaxial loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semeliss, M.; Wong, R.; Tuttle, M.

    1990-01-01

    High-density polyethylene is subjected to biaxial states of stress to examine the yield behavior of the semicrystalline thermoplastic under constant octahedral shear-stress rates. Combinations of internal pressures and axial loads are applied to thin-walled tubes of polyethylene, and the strain response in the axial and hoop directions are measured. The polyethylene specimens are found to be anisotropic, and the experimental measurements are compared to yield criteria that are applicable to isotropic and anisotropic materials.

  12. Design of a biaxial mechanical loading bioreactor for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Bilgen, Bahar; Chu, Danielle; Stefani, Robert; Aaron, Roy K

    2013-04-25

    We designed a loading device that is capable of applying uniaxial or biaxial mechanical strain to a tissue engineered biocomposites fabricated for transplantation. While the device primarily functions as a bioreactor that mimics the native mechanical strains, it is also outfitted with a load cell for providing force feedback or mechanical testing of the constructs. The device subjects engineered cartilage constructs to biaxial mechanical loading with great precision of loading dose (amplitude and frequency) and is compact enough to fit inside a standard tissue culture incubator. It loads samples directly in a tissue culture plate, and multiple plate sizes are compatible with the system. The device has been designed using components manufactured for precision-guided laser applications. Bi-axial loading is accomplished by two orthogonal stages. The stages have a 50 mm travel range and are driven independently by stepper motor actuators, controlled by a closed-loop stepper motor driver that features micro-stepping capabilities, enabling step sizes of less than 50 nm. A polysulfone loading platen is coupled to the bi-axial moving platform. Movements of the stages are controlled by Thor-labs Advanced Positioning Technology (APT) software. The stepper motor driver is used with the software to adjust load parameters of frequency and amplitude of both shear and compression independently and simultaneously. Positional feedback is provided by linear optical encoders that have a bidirectional repeatability of 0.1 μm and a resolution of 20 nm, translating to a positional accuracy of less than 3 μm over the full 50 mm of travel. These encoders provide the necessary position feedback to the drive electronics to ensure true nanopositioning capabilities. In order to provide the force feedback to detect contact and evaluate loading responses, a precision miniature load cell is positioned between the loading platen and the moving platform. The load cell has high accuracies of 0

  13. Design of a Biaxial Mechanical Loading Bioreactor for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Bilgen, Bahar; Chu, Danielle; Stefani, Robert; Aaron, Roy K.

    2013-01-01

    We designed a loading device that is capable of applying uniaxial or biaxial mechanical strain to a tissue engineered biocomposites fabricated for transplantation. While the device primarily functions as a bioreactor that mimics the native mechanical strains, it is also outfitted with a load cell for providing force feedback or mechanical testing of the constructs. The device subjects engineered cartilage constructs to biaxial mechanical loading with great precision of loading dose (amplitude and frequency) and is compact enough to fit inside a standard tissue culture incubator. It loads samples directly in a tissue culture plate, and multiple plate sizes are compatible with the system. The device has been designed using components manufactured for precision-guided laser applications. Bi-axial loading is accomplished by two orthogonal stages. The stages have a 50 mm travel range and are driven independently by stepper motor actuators, controlled by a closed-loop stepper motor driver that features micro-stepping capabilities, enabling step sizes of less than 50 nm. A polysulfone loading platen is coupled to the bi-axial moving platform. Movements of the stages are controlled by Thor-labs Advanced Positioning Technology (APT) software. The stepper motor driver is used with the software to adjust load parameters of frequency and amplitude of both shear and compression independently and simultaneously. Positional feedback is provided by linear optical encoders that have a bidirectional repeatability of 0.1 μm and a resolution of 20 nm, translating to a positional accuracy of less than 3 μm over the full 50 mm of travel. These encoders provide the necessary position feedback to the drive electronics to ensure true nanopositioning capabilities. In order to provide the force feedback to detect contact and evaluate loading responses, a precision miniature load cell is positioned between the loading platen and the moving platform. The load cell has high accuracies of 0

  14. Mechanic and electromechanic effects in biaxially stretched liquid crystal elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Calleja, Ricardo; Llovera-Segovia, Pedro; Riande, Evaristo; Quijano López, Alfredo

    2013-02-01

    The effect of combined electromechanic force fields in nematic side chain liquid crystal elastomers will be analyzed. A biaxially stretched plate in the x- and y-directions under an electric field applied in the perpendicular direction to the plate will be considered. A neo-Hookean model is chosen, which implies Gaussian behaviour. Results are obtained for both a soft and semisoft case showing the effect of the electric field on the rotation of the director and the free energy density function.

  15. Measured Biaxial Residual Stress Maps in a Stainless Steel Weld

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Mitchell D.; Hill, Michael R.; Patel, Vipul I.; Muransky, Ondrej; Sisneros, Thomas A.

    2015-09-16

    Here, this paper describes a sequence of residual stress measurements made to determine a two-dimensional map of biaxial residual stress in a stainless steel weld. A long stainless steel (316L) plate with an eight-pass groove weld (308L filler) was used. The biaxial stress measurements follow a recently developed approach, comprising a combination of contour method and slitting measurements, with a computation to determine the effects of out-of-plane stress on a thin slice. The measured longitudinal stress is highly tensile in the weld- and heat-affected zone, with a maximum around 450 MPa, and compressive stress toward the transverse edges around ₋250 MPa. The total transverse stress has a banded profile in the weld with highly tensile stress at the bottom of the plate (y = 0) of 400 MPa, rapidly changing to compressive stress (at y = 5 mm) of ₋200 MPa, then tensile stress at the weld root (y = 17 mm) and in the weld around 200 MPa, followed by compressive stress at the top of the weld at around ₋150 MPa. Finally, the results of the biaxial map compare well with the results of neutron diffraction measurements and output from a computational weld simulation.

  16. Efficient Driving of Piezoelectric Transducers Using a Biaxial Driving Technique.

    PubMed

    Pichardo, Samuel; Silva, Rafael R C; Rubel, Oleg; Curiel, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Efficient driving of piezoelectric materials is desirable when operating transducers for biomedical applications such as high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) or ultrasound imaging. More efficient operation reduces the electric power required to produce the desired bioeffect or contrast. Our preliminary work [Cole et al. Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. 2014;26(13):135901.] suggested that driving transducers by applying orthogonal electric fields can significantly reduce the coercivity that opposes ferroelectric switching. We present here the experimental validation of this biaxial driving technique using piezoelectric ceramics typically used in HIFU. A set of narrow-band transducers was fabricated with two sets of electrodes placed in an orthogonal configuration (following the propagation and the lateral mode). The geometry of the ceramic was chosen to have a resonance frequency similar for the propagation and the lateral mode. The average (± s.d.) resonance frequency of the samples was 465.1 (± 1.5) kHz. Experiments were conducted in which each pair of electrodes was driven independently and measurements of effective acoustic power were obtained using the radiation force method. The efficiency (acoustic/electric power) of the biaxial driving method was compared to the results obtained when driving the ceramic using electrodes placed only in the pole direction. Our results indicate that the biaxial method increases efficiency from 50% to 125% relative to the using a single electric field.

  17. Design of Bioprosthetic Aortic Valves using biaxial test data.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, Y; Paulson, K; Tyberg, J; Ronsky, J; Ali, I; Di Martino, E; Narine, K

    2015-01-01

    Bioprosthetic Aortic Valves (BAVs) do not have the serious limitations of mechanical aortic valves in terms of thrombosis. However, the lifetime of BAVs is too short, often requiring repeated surgeries. The lifetime of BAVs might be improved by using computer simulations of the structural behavior of the leaflets. The goal of this study was to develop a numerical model applicable to the optimization of durability of BAVs. The constitutive equations were derived using biaxial tensile tests. Using a Fung model, stress and strain data were computed from biaxial test data. SolidWorks was used to develop the geometry of the leaflets, and ABAQUS finite element software package was used for finite element calculations. Results showed the model is consistent with experimental observations. Reaction forces computed by the model corresponded with experimental measurements when the biaxial test was simulated. As well, the location of maximum stresses corresponded to the locations of frequent tearing of BAV leaflets. Results suggest that BAV design can be optimized with respect to durability.

  18. Measured Biaxial Residual Stress Maps in a Stainless Steel Weld

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Mitchell D.; Hill, Michael R.; Patel, Vipul I.; ...

    2015-09-16

    Here, this paper describes a sequence of residual stress measurements made to determine a two-dimensional map of biaxial residual stress in a stainless steel weld. A long stainless steel (316L) plate with an eight-pass groove weld (308L filler) was used. The biaxial stress measurements follow a recently developed approach, comprising a combination of contour method and slitting measurements, with a computation to determine the effects of out-of-plane stress on a thin slice. The measured longitudinal stress is highly tensile in the weld- and heat-affected zone, with a maximum around 450 MPa, and compressive stress toward the transverse edges around ₋250more » MPa. The total transverse stress has a banded profile in the weld with highly tensile stress at the bottom of the plate (y = 0) of 400 MPa, rapidly changing to compressive stress (at y = 5 mm) of ₋200 MPa, then tensile stress at the weld root (y = 17 mm) and in the weld around 200 MPa, followed by compressive stress at the top of the weld at around ₋150 MPa. Finally, the results of the biaxial map compare well with the results of neutron diffraction measurements and output from a computational weld simulation.« less

  19. Efficient Driving of Piezoelectric Transducers Using a Biaxial Driving Technique

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Efficient driving of piezoelectric materials is desirable when operating transducers for biomedical applications such as high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) or ultrasound imaging. More efficient operation reduces the electric power required to produce the desired bioeffect or contrast. Our preliminary work [Cole et al. Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. 2014;26(13):135901.] suggested that driving transducers by applying orthogonal electric fields can significantly reduce the coercivity that opposes ferroelectric switching. We present here the experimental validation of this biaxial driving technique using piezoelectric ceramics typically used in HIFU. A set of narrow-band transducers was fabricated with two sets of electrodes placed in an orthogonal configuration (following the propagation and the lateral mode). The geometry of the ceramic was chosen to have a resonance frequency similar for the propagation and the lateral mode. The average (± s.d.) resonance frequency of the samples was 465.1 (± 1.5) kHz. Experiments were conducted in which each pair of electrodes was driven independently and measurements of effective acoustic power were obtained using the radiation force method. The efficiency (acoustic/electric power) of the biaxial driving method was compared to the results obtained when driving the ceramic using electrodes placed only in the pole direction. Our results indicate that the biaxial method increases efficiency from 50% to 125% relative to the using a single electric field. PMID:26418550

  20. Absence of rippling in graphene under biaxial tensile strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, Bipul; Mahadevan, Priya

    2010-10-01

    Recent experiments [C. H. Lui, L. Liu, K. F. Mak, G. W. Flynn, and T. F. Heinz, Nature (London) 462, 339 (2009)10.1038/nature08569] on graphene grown on ultraflat substrates have found no rippling in graphene when subject to temperature cycling. Unsupported/unstrained films of graphene as well as films grown on various substrates on the other hand have been found to show rippling effects. As graphene grown on a substrate is invariably strained, we examine the behavior of the out-of-plane acoustic-phonon mode with biaxial tensile strain. This mode is generally associated with the rippling of graphene. We find that it can be fit to a relation of the form w2=Ak4+Bk2 , where w and k are the frequency and wave vector, respectively. The coefficient A is found to show a weak dependence on strain while B is found to increase linearly with strain. The strain-induced hardening explains the absence of rippling in graphene subject to biaxial strain. In addition, we find that graphene when subject to a biaxial tensile strain is found to undergo a structural transition with the mode at K going soft at a strain percentage of 15%.

  1. Communications; On the formation of potassium bubbles in tungsten rod

    SciTech Connect

    Briant, C.L. . Corporate Research and Development Center)

    1989-01-01

    The microstructure of tungsten wire that is manufactured for use as lamp filaments has been studied by a number of researchers. The author demonstrates that one of the most important features of the microstructure is the potassium bubbles, approximately 500 A in diameter, that are aligned in rows in the direction of wire drawing. These bubbles pin the grain boundaries as they migrate down the length of the wire, giving rise to an interlocking grain structure in the recrystallized wire. If these bubbles were not present, a bamboo structure would form which would then rapidly fail during operation of the lamp as a result of grain boundary sliding. The potassium which forms these bubbles is incorporated into the tungsten during sintering of the powder metallurgy ingot.

  2. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Frye, Lowell D.

    1984-01-01

    A gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to provide a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surfaces are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy contiguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  3. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Frye, L.D.

    1982-03-25

    The present invention is directed to a gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to profice a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surface are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy continguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  4. Polarographic determination of tungsten in rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichen, L.E.

    1954-01-01

    This work was undertaken to develop a simpler and faster method than the classical gravimetric procedure for the determination of tungsten in rocks and ores. A new polarographic wave of tungsten is obtained in a supporting electrolyte of dilute hydrochloric acid containing tartrate ion. This permits the determination of tungsten both rapidly and accurately. No precipitation of the tungsten is necessary, and only the iron need be separated from the tungsten. The accuracy is within the limits of a polarographic procedure; comparison of polarographic and gravimetric results is given. The method reduces appreciably the amount of time ordinarily consumed in determination of tungsten.

  5. Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten

    DOEpatents

    Slattery, Kevin T.; Driemeyer, Daniel E.; Davis, John W.

    2000-07-18

    Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by sintering a stack of individual copper and tungsten powder blend layers having progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in successive powder blend layers in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

  6. Fatigue flaw growth behavior in stiffened and unstiffened panels loaded in biaxial tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The effect was investigated of biaxial loading on the flaw growth rate of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy that would be typical of Space Shuttle cryogenic tankage design. The stress distribution and stress concentration factors for several integrally stiffened panels under various loading conditions were obtained. The flaw growth behavior of both stiffened and unstiffened panels under biaxial loading conditions was determined. The effect of a complex stress state was studied by introducing flaws in fillet areas of biaxially loaded stiffened panels.

  7. Investigation of a Relationship between Uniaxial and Biaxial Chemical Stress Crazing of Cast Acrylic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Craze Initiation Chemical Craze Testing Uniaxial Stress Cast Acrylic Biaxial Stress Isopropyl Alcohol 19. ABSTRACT...cast acrylic with isopropyl alcohol . ASTM Standard Test Methods F484 and F1164 were used as guidelines for the uniaxial craze testing and biaxial...uniaxial and biaxial craze tests was conducted at various stress levels in conjunction with isopropyl alcohol . Isopropyl alcohol was the chosen chemical

  8. Application of magnetomechanical hysteresis modeling of magnetic techniques for monitoring neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sablik, M.J.; Kwun, H.; Burkhardt, G.L.

    1993-01-31

    Research was done on the biaxial stress problem accomplished in the first half of the second year. All of the work done was preparatory to magnetic measurements. Issues addressed were: construction of a model for extracting changes in the magnetic properties of a specimen from the readings of an indirect sensor; initial development of a model for how biaxial stress alters the intrinsic magnetic properties of thespecimen; use of finite element stress analysis modeling to determine a detailed shape for the cruciform biaxial stress specimen; and construction of the biaxial stress loading apparatus.

  9. Tungsten diffusion in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, A.; Texier, M.; Burle, N.; Oison, V.; Pichaud, B.; Portavoce, A.; Grosjean, C.

    2014-01-07

    Two doses (10{sup 13} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}) of tungsten (W) atoms were implanted in different Si(001) wafers in order to study W diffusion in Si. The samples were annealed or oxidized at temperatures between 776 and 960 °C. The diffusion profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and defect formation was studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. W is shown to reduce Si recrystallization after implantation and to exhibit, in the temperature range investigated, a solubility limit close to 0.15%–0.2%, which is higher than the solubility limit of usual metallic impurities in Si. W diffusion exhibits unusual linear diffusion profiles with a maximum concentration always located at the Si surface, slower kinetics than other metals in Si, and promotes vacancy accumulation close to the Si surface, with the formation of hollow cavities in the case of the higher W dose. In addition, Si self-interstitial injection during oxidation is shown to promote W-Si clustering. Taking into account these observations, a diffusion model based on the simultaneous diffusion of interstitial W atoms and W-Si atomic pairs is proposed since usual models used to model diffusion of metallic impurities and dopants in Si cannot reproduce experimental observations.

  10. Fabrication techniques developed for small- diameter, thin-wall tungsten and tungsten alloy tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brillhart, D. C.; Burt, W. R.; Karasek, F. J.; Mayfield, R. M.

    1968-01-01

    Report describes methods for the fabrication of tungsten and tungsten alloys into small-diameter, thin-wall tubing of nuclear quality. The tungsten, or tungsten alloy tube blanks are produced by double extrusion. Plug-drawing has emerged as an excellent secondary fabrication technique for the reduction of the overall tube dimensions.

  11. Accurate pointing of tungsten welding electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegelmeier, P.

    1971-01-01

    Thoriated-tungsten is pointed accurately and quickly by using sodium nitrite. Point produced is smooth and no effort is necessary to hold the tungsten rod concentric. The chemically produced point can be used several times longer than ground points. This method reduces time and cost of preparing tungsten electrodes.

  12. The role of biaxial stresses in discriminating between meaningful and illusory composite failure theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    The irrelevance of most composite failure criteria to conventional fiber-polymer composites is claimed to have remained undetected primarily because the experiments that can either validate or disprove them are difficult to perform. Uniaxial tests are considered inherently incapable of validating or refuting any composite failure theory because so much of the total load is carried by the fibers aligned in the direction of the load. The Ten-Percent Rule, a simple rule-of-mixtures analysis method, is said to work well only because of this phenomenon. It is stated that failure criteria can be verified for fibrous composites only by biaxial tests, with orthogonal in-plane stresses of the same as well as different signs, because these particular states of combined stress reveal substantial differences between the predictions of laminate strength made by various theories. Three scientifically plausible failure models for fibrous composites are compared, and it is shown that only the in-plane shear test (orthogonal tension and compression) is capable of distinguishing between them. This is because most theories are 'calibrated' against the measured uniaxial tension and compression tests and any cross-plied laminate tests dominated by those same states of stress must inevitably 'confirm' the theory.

  13. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  14. Mean stress effects in biaxial fatigue of Inconel 718

    SciTech Connect

    Socie, D.F.; Shield, T.W.

    1984-07-01

    Biaxial fatigue tests were conducted on Inconel 718 thin-walled tubular specimens to quantify the effect of mean stress. The specimens were loaded in combined tension and torsion in strain control at room temperature. Fatigue lives ranged from 3000 to 15,000 cycles depending on the mean stress. These data were correlated with a parameter based on the maximum plastic shear strain amplitude, normal strain amplitude and mean normal stress on the plane of maximum shear strain amplitude. This parameter was combined with the Coffin-Manson equation for estimating fatigue lives. Observations of the cracking behavior show that mean stress affects the rate of crack growth and distribution of cracks.

  15. Vacancy-mediated diffusion in biaxially strained Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliste, Damien; Rushchanskii, Konstantin Z.; Pochet, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of stress-enhanced vacancy-mediated diffusion in biaxially deformed Si (100) films as measured by the strain derivative (Q') of the activation energy. The strain dependence of Q' is demonstrated by means of a reanalysis of previously published experimental data, which both take into account the temperature dependence of and highlight the differences between tensile and compressive stress. Based on ab initio calculations, we predict that Q' in pure silicon is higher under compressive conditions due to a broken degeneracy of the split-vacancy configuration.

  16. Enlargement of measurable strain range in biaxial cruciform test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiwatari, Akinobu; Sumikawa, Satoshi; Hiramoto, Jiro; Kitani, Yasushi; Kuwabara, Toshihiro

    2016-10-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of FEA in the assessment of crack and wrinkle risk, and in the amount of springback, the plastic anisotropy of a material should be measured over a wide strain range by a biaxial test, especially by a cruciform test. In this study, slit arm strengthening of a cruciform test specimen was investigated: its slit arms were melted by laser irradiation, and then mertensitized by quenching. One and a half times or larger measureable strain range was obtained by one laser irradiated line in a slit arm of a cruciform specimen compared with a specimen without laser irradiation.

  17. Sol-gel deposition of buffer layers on biaxially textured metal substances

    DOEpatents

    Shoup, Shara S.; Paranthamam, Mariappan; Beach, David B.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Goyal, Amit

    2000-01-01

    A method is disclosed for forming a biaxially textured buffer layer on a biaxially oriented metal substrate by using a sol-gel coating technique followed by pyrolyzing/annealing in a reducing atmosphere. This method is advantageous for providing substrates for depositing electronically active materials thereon.

  18. Sol-gel deposition of buffer layers on biaxially textured metal substances

    SciTech Connect

    Shoup, S.S.; Paranthamam, M.; Beach, D.B.; Kroeger, D.M.; Goyal, A.

    2000-06-20

    A method is disclosed for forming a biaxially textured buffer layer on a biaxially oriented metal substrate by using a sol-gel coating technique followed by pyrolyzing/annealing in a reducing atmosphere. This method is advantageous for providing substrates for depositing electronically active materials thereon.

  19. Synthesis and real-time magnetic manipulation of a biaxial superparamagnetic colloid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Osterloh, Frank E; Hiramatsu, Hiroki; Dumas, R K; Liu, Kai

    2005-06-09

    Superparamagnetic colloidal plates were synthesized from tetrabutylammonium stabilized Ca(2)Nb(3)O(10) nanosheets and oleic acid-stabilized Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles. Modification with 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane produces amine-terminated Ca(2)Nb(3)O(10) with an amine concentration of 0.43 +/- 0.06 groups per Ca(2)Nb(3)O(10) unit as follows from spectroscopic quantification with trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid as a dye. Treatment of the modified sheets in THF/ethanol with 5.3 nm oleic acid-stabilized magnetite nanoparticles yields pseudo-2D assemblies that consist of 2 nm thick nanosheets decorated on both sides with a dense collection (9.3 +/- 0.5 x 10(3) particles per square micrometer per side) of magnetite particles. In noncoordinating or weakly coordinating solvents, these composite particles further aggregate into stacked aggregates with a mean edge length of 1.6 +/- 0.7 microm and a thickness of 79 +/- 30 nm. The colloidal plates were characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray powder diffraction, and infrared and UV/vis spectroscopy. SQUID measurements show that films of the aligned particles are superparamagnetic at room temperature. The magnetic hysteresis that is observed at 5 K reveals that the plates have a magnetic anisotropy with the easy axis in the plane of the plates and the hard axis perpendicular to it. Calculations show that the magnetic anisotropy is a direct consequence of the two-dimensional distribution of the magnetic nanoparticles on the sheets. Optical microscopy reveals that when suspended in ethanol or THF, the colloidal plates can be rotated in real time with a variable external magnetic field (200 Oe). Magnetic alignment of the particles in suspensions also produces asymmetric light scattering patterns and magnetic birefringence. These effects and the observed magneto-orientational properties make the biaxial colloids interesting as components in displays and as magnetic actuators.

  20. Implementation of a Biaxial Resonant Fatigue Test Method on a Large Wind Turbine Blade

    SciTech Connect

    Snowberg, D.; Dana, S.; Hughes, S.; Berling, P.

    2014-09-01

    A biaxial resonant test method was utilized to simultaneously fatigue test a wind turbine blade in the flap and edge (lead-lag) direction. Biaxial resonant blade fatigue testing is an accelerated life test method utilizing oscillating masses on the blade; each mass is independently oscillated at the respective flap and edge blade resonant frequency. The flap and edge resonant frequency were not controlled, nor were they constant for this demonstrated test method. This biaxial resonant test method presented surmountable challenges in test setup simulation, control and data processing. Biaxial resonant testing has the potential to complete test projects faster than single-axis testing. The load modulation during a biaxial resonant test may necessitate periodic load application above targets or higher applied test cycles.

  1. The influence of uniaxial prestrain on biaxial r-values in 7075-O aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, N.; Brown, D.; McMurray, R. J.; Leacock, A. G.

    2011-05-01

    Biaxial test methods have been used to determine, not only yield behaviour under biaxial conditions, but also the strain response. This paper examines the influence of uniaxial prestrain upon the biaxial r-value by extending the disc compression test procedure proposed by Barlat et al. [1]. The extension involved the use of digital image measurements of in-plane strains. The material examined was a 7075-O condition aluminium alloy. The results of the experimental programme indicated that the biaxial r-value is unaffected by uniaxial prestrain. When using the disc compression test, the mode of deformation and therefore the biaxial r-value were found to be very sensitive to the prevailing friction conditions.

  2. The influence of uniaxial prestrain on biaxial r-values in 7075-O aluminium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, N.; Brown, D.; McMurray, R. J.; Leacock, A. G.

    2011-05-04

    Biaxial test methods have been used to determine, not only yield behaviour under biaxial conditions, but also the strain response. This paper examines the influence of uniaxial prestrain upon the biaxial r-value by extending the disc compression test procedure proposed by Barlat et al. The extension involved the use of digital image measurements of in-plane strains. The material examined was a 7075-O condition aluminium alloy. The results of the experimental programme indicated that the biaxial r-value is unaffected by uniaxial prestrain. When using the disc compression test, the mode of deformation and therefore the biaxial r-value were found to be very sensitive to the prevailing friction conditions.

  3. Competition between capillarity, layering and biaxiality in a confined liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Varga, S; Martinez-Ratón, Y; Velasco, E

    2010-05-01

    The effect of confinement on the phase behaviour and structure of fluids made of biaxial hard particles (cuboids) is examined theoretically by means of Onsager second-order virial theory in the limit where the long particle axes are frozen in a mutually parallel configuration. Confinement is induced by two parallel planar hard walls (slit-pore geometry), with particle long axes perpendicular to the walls (perfect homeotropic anchoring). In bulk, a continuous nematic-to-smectic transition takes place, while shape anisotropy in the (rectangular) particle cross-section induces biaxial ordering. As a consequence, four bulk phases, uniaxial and biaxial nematic and smectic phases, can be stabilised as the cross-sectional aspect ratio is varied. On confining the fluid, the nematic-to-smectic transition is suppressed, and either uniaxial or biaxial phases, separated by a continuous transition, can be present. Smectic ordering develops continuously from the walls for increasing particle concentration (in agreement with the supression of nematic-smectic second-order transition at confinement), but first-order layering transitions, involving structures with n and n + 1 layers, arise in the confined fluid at high concentration. Competition between layering and uniaxial-biaxial ordering leads to three different types of layering transitions, at which the two coexisting structures can be both uniaxial, one uniaxial and another biaxial, or both biaxial. Also, the interplay between molecular biaxiality and wall interactions is very subtle: while the hard wall disfavours the formation of the biaxial phase, biaxiality is against the layering transitions, as we have shown by comparing the confined phase behaviour of cylinders and cuboids. The predictive power of Onsager theory is checked and confirmed by performing some calculations based on fundamental-measure theory.

  4. Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten

    DOEpatents

    Slattery, Kevin T.; Driemeyer, Daniel E.

    1999-11-23

    Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by thermal plasma spraying mixtures of copper powder and tungsten powder in a varied blending ratio such that the blending ratio of the copper powder and the tungsten powder that is fed to a plasma torch is intermittently adjusted to provide progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in the interlayer in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

  5. Process development for cladding APT tungsten targets

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, M H; Barber, R; Dalder, E

    2000-11-27

    This report describes development of processes for cladding APT Target tungsten components with a thin layer (0.127-mm) of Alloy 718, Alloy 600 or 316L stainless steel alloy. The application requires that the cladding be thermally bonded to the tungsten in order to transfer heat generated in the tungsten volume to a surrounding coolant. High temperature diffusion bonding using the hot isostatic processing (HIP) technique was selected as the method for creating a metallurgical bond between pure tungsten tubes and rods and the cladding materials. Bonding studies using a uniaxially loaded vacuum hot press were conducted in preliminary experiments to determine acceptable time-temperature conditions for diffusion bonding. The results were successfully applied in cladding tungsten rods and tubes with these alloys. Temperatures 800-810 C were suitable for cladding tungsten with Alloy 600 and 316L stainless steel alloy, whereas tungsten was clad with Alloy 718 at 1020 C.

  6. Fabrication of tungsten wire needles

    SciTech Connect

    Roder, A.

    1983-02-01

    Fine point needles for field emissoin are conventionally produced by electrolytically or chemically etching tungsten wire. Points formed in this manner have a typical tip radius of about 0.5 microns and a cone angle of some 30 degrees. The construction of needle matrix detector chambers has created a need for tungsten needles whose specifications are: 20 mil tungsten wire, 1.5 inch total length, 3 mm-long taper (resulting in a cone angle of about 5 degrees), and 25 micron-radius point (similar to that found on sewing needles). In the process described here for producing such needles, tungsten wire, immersed in a NaOH solution and in the presence of an electrode, is connected first to an ac voltage and then to a dc supply, to form a taper and a point on the end of the wire immersed in the solution. The process parameters described here are for needles that will meet the above specifications. Possible variations will be discussed under each approprite heading.

  7. Mineral of the month: tungsten

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2006-01-01

    Tungsten has the highest melting point of all metals, one of the highest densities and, when combined with carbon, is almost as hard as diamond. These and other properties make it useful in a wide variety of important commercial, industrial and military applications.

  8. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  9. Energy Storage and Dissipation in Random Copolymers during Biaxial Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hansohl; Boyce, Mary

    2012-02-01

    Random copolymers composed of hard and soft segments in a glassy and rubbery state at the ambient conditions exhibit phase-separated morphologies which can be tailored to provide hybrid mechanical behaviors of the constituents. Here, phase-separated copolymers with hard and soft contents which form co-continuous structures are explored through experiments and modeling. The mechanics of the highly dissipative yet resilient behavior of an exemplar polyurea are studied under biaxial loading. The hard phase governs the initially stiff response followed by a highly dissipative viscoplasticity where dissipation arises from viscous relaxation as well as structural breakdown in the network structure that still provides energy storage resulting in the shape recovery. The soft phase provides additional energy storage that drives the resilience in high strain rate events. Biaxial experiments reveal the anisotropy and loading history dependence of energy storage and dissipation, validating the three-dimensional predictive capabilities of the microstructurally-based constitutive model. The combination of a highly dissipative and resilient behavior provides a versatile material for a myriad of applications ranging from self-healing microcapsules to ballistic protective coatings.

  10. PLASTIC DEFORMATION AND FRACTURE OF STEELS UNDER DYNAMIC BIAXIAL LOADING

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C; Moreno, J; Goto, D M; Belak, J; Grady, D

    2004-07-08

    Dynamic equi-biaxial bulging of thin AerMet 100 alloy plates was studied. The plates were deformed using a gas-gun driven flyer plate test set-up at impact velocities between 1.0 and 2.0 km/sec. The results indicate that in addition to biaxial stretching (and thinning) of the plate, internal cavitation (spallation fracture) results from the complex wave interactions within the plate. No outward evidence of damage was observed at the lower velocities, in the range of 1.0-1.2 km/sec. Fine scale cracking of the plates was observed at impact velocity above approximately 1.4 km/sec. Complete specimen fracture, in the form of multiple petals and pie-shaped fragments, was observed at impact velocity above 1.6 km/sec. Hydrodynamic computer code simulations were performed, prior to and in conjunction with the experiments, to aid in experiment design and interpretation of the experimental data.

  11. Multiband left handed biaxial meta atom at microwave frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehedi Hasan, Md; Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Tariqul Islam, Mohammad

    2017-03-01

    Left handed meta atoms are special class materials that characterized by the negative refractive index. In this paper, a left handed biaxial meta-atom is reported that has 5.81 GHz wide bandwidth and applicable for C-, X- and Ku-band applications. The meta atom is developed by an outer and the inner split ring resonator with inverse E-shape metal strips of copper, which are connected with the outer ring resonator that look like a mirror-shape structure. A finite integration technique based CST Microwave Studio is utilized to design, simulation and analysis purposes, where the Agilent N5227A vector network analyzer is utilized for measurement purpose. Measurements show that, the measured and simulated results are well complied together and negative index bandwidth from 3.27 to 6.55 GHz (bandwidth of 3.28 GHz) and 7 to 12.81 GHz (bandwidth of 5.81 GHz) along the z-axis wave propagation. The total dimensions of the designed structure are 0.2λ  ×  0.2λ  ×  0.035λ and the effective medium ratio 5, makes the proposed biaxial meta-atom is suitable for practical applications.

  12. In situ estimation of applied biaxial loads with Lamb waves.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fan; Michaels, Jennifer E; Lee, Sang Jun

    2013-02-01

    Spatially distributed arrays of piezoelectric disks are being applied to monitor structural integrity using Lamb waves. Applied loads directly affect waves propagating between array elements because of dimensional changes and the acoustoelastic effect. Resulting changes in phase velocity depend upon the propagation direction as well as the Lamb wave mode and frequency. This paper shows from numerical solutions of the acoustoelastic wave equation for an isotropic plate that it is possible to decouple the effects of a homogeneous biaxial stress into its two principal components. As a consequence of both this decoupling and material isotropy, the acoustoelastic response of a specific mode and frequency is described by only two constants, which can be determined from a uniaxial loading experiment. Using this formulation, a method is developed and verified via simulations to estimate an arbitrary biaxial load from phase velocity changes measured along multiple directions of propagation. Results from uniaxial loading experiments on two different plates further demonstrate the efficacy of the method. It is also shown that opening fatigue cracks may significantly degrade results by interfering with Lamb wave direct arrivals, but that this degradation can be mitigated by using a reduced set of data from unaffected paths of propagation.

  13. The biaxial biomechanical behavior of abdominal aortic aneurysm tissue.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Siobhan A; Healey, Donagh A; Kavanagh, Eamon G; Walsh, Michael T; McGloughlin, Tim M; Doyle, Barry J

    2014-12-01

    Rupture of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when the local wall stress exceeds the local wall strength. Knowledge of AAA wall mechanics plays a fundamental role in the development and advancement of AAA rupture risk assessment tools. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate the biaxial mechanical properties of AAA tissue. Multiple biaxial test protocols were performed on AAA samples harvested from 28 patients undergoing open surgical repair. Both the Tangential Modulus (TM) and stretch ratio (λ) were recorded and compared in both the circumferential (ϴ) and longitudinal (L) directions at physiologically relevant stress levels, the influence of patient specific factors such as sex, age AAA diameter and status were examined. The biomechanical response was also fit to a hyperplastic material model. The AAA tissue was found to be anisotropic with a greater tendency to stiffen in the circumferential direction compared to the longitudinal direction. An anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model represented the data well and the properties were not influenced by the investigated patient specific factors however, a future study utilizing a larger cohort of patients is warranted to confirm these findings. This work provides further insights on the biomechanical behavior of AAA and may be useful in the development of more reliable rupture risk assessment tools.

  14. Method of depositing buffer layers on biaxially textured metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Beach, David B.; Morrell, Jonathan S.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chirayil, Thomas; Specht, Eliot D.; Goyal, Amit

    2002-08-27

    A laminate article comprises a substrate and a biaxially textured (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer over the substrate, wherein 0biaxially textured metal, such as nickel. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  15. Resonant biaxial 7-mm MEMS mirror for omnidirectional scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, U.; Aikio, M.; Janes, J.; Senger, F.; Stenchly, V.; Weiss, M.; Quenzer, H.-J.; Wagner, B.; Benecke, W.

    2013-03-01

    Low-cost automotive laser scanners for environment perception are needed to enable the integration of advanced driver assistant systems (ADAS) into all automotive vehicle segments, a key to reducing the number of traffic accidents on roads. An omnidirectional 360 degree laser scanning concept has been developed based on combination of an omnidirectional lens and a biaxial large aperture MEMS mirror. This omnidirectional scanning concept is the core of a small sized low-cost time-of-flight based range sensor development. This paper describes concept, design, fabrication and first measurement results of a resonant biaxial 7mm gimbal-less MEMS mirror that is electrostatically actuated by stacked vertical comb drives. Identical frequencies of the two resonant axes are necessary to enable the required circle scanning capability. A tripod suspension was chosen since it allows minimizing the frequency splitting of the two resonant axes. Low mirror curvature is achieved by a thickness of the mirror of more than 500 μm. Hermetic wafer level vacuum packaging of such large mirrors based on multiple wafer bonding has been developed to enable to achieve a large mechanical tilt angle of +/- 6.5 degrees in each axis. The 7mm-MEMS mirror demonstrates large angle circular scanning at 1.5kHz.

  16. An ultrasonic guided wave method to estimate applied biaxial loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fan; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Lee, Sang Jun

    2012-05-01

    Guided waves propagating in a homogeneous plate are known to be sensitive to both temperature changes and applied stress variations. Here we consider the inverse problem of recovering homogeneous biaxial stresses from measured changes in phase velocity at multiple propagation directions using a single mode at a specific frequency. Although there is no closed form solution relating phase velocity changes to applied stresses, prior results indicate that phase velocity changes can be closely approximated by a sinusoidal function with respect to angle of propagation. Here it is shown that all sinusoidal coefficients can be estimated from a single uniaxial loading experiment. The general biaxial inverse problem can thus be solved by fitting an appropriate sinusoid to measured phase velocity changes versus propagation angle, and relating the coefficients to the unknown stresses. The phase velocity data are obtained from direct arrivals between guided wave transducers whose direct paths of propagation are oriented at different angles. This method is applied and verified using sparse array data recorded during a fatigue test. The additional complication of the resulting fatigue cracks interfering with some of the direct arrivals is addressed via proper selection of transducer pairs. Results show that applied stresses can be successfully recovered from the measured changes in guided wave signals.

  17. Powder-in-tube and thick-film methods of fabricating high temperature superconductors having enhanced biaxial texture

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-11-11

    A method for forming an electronically active biaxially textured article includes the steps of providing a substrate having a single crystal metal or metal alloy surface, deforming the substrate to form an elongated substrate surface having biaxial texture and depositing an epitaxial electronically active layer on the biaxially textured surface. The method can include at least one annealing step after the deforming step to produce the biaxially textured substrate surface. The invention can be used to form improved biaxially textured articles, such as superconducting wire and tape articles having improved J.sub.c values.

  18. Characterization and modeling of tungsten source during DIII-D tungsten ring experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guterl, J.; Abrams, T.; Elder, D.; Guo, H. Y.

    2016-10-01

    Two tungsten toroidal rings in the DIII-D divertor region were recently exposed to H-mode plasmas. During these experiments, the gross erosion rate of tungsten was spectroscopically monitored for various ELMy H-mode conditions to characterize the tungsten source in the divertor region (see e.g.). However, only a small fraction of tungsten eroded particles eventually exits the divertor region because of the large tungsten local redeposition. Tungsten local redeposition and migration in the vicinity of the tungsten tiles are simulated using the ERO-OEDGE code package to link the effective tungsten source to the measured gross erosion rates between and during ELMs. It is shown that the energy and angular distributions of sputtered tungsten particles strongly affect the ratio of locally redeposited particles and thus the effective tungsten source. Effects of carbon deposition on tungsten tiles between ELMs on the tungsten erosion rate are also discussed. Preliminary studies of divertor screening on long-range tungsten transport in the SOL between ELMs are also presented. Work supported in part by the US Department of Energy under DE-AC05-06OR23100 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  19. Recent Advances in Modeling Stress Distributions in Multilayers Subjected to Biaxial Flexure Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, Chun-Hway; Luttrell, Claire Roberta

    2007-01-01

    Although biaxial flexure tests have been used extensively to measure the strength of brittle materials, the tests and analyses have been limited to materials of uniform properties. Despite the increasing applications of multilayered structures, characterization of their strengths using biaxial flexure tests has been difficult because the analytical description of the strength-fracture load relation for multilayers subjected to biaxial flexure tests is unavailable. The newly derived closed-form solutions for the elastic stress distributions in multilayered discs subjected to ring-on-ring tests are summarized here. These solutions are obtained by (i) finding the correlation between monolayered and multilayered discs subjected to biaxial bending moment and (ii) conversion from the existing solutions for monolayers. Using this methodology, the closed-form solutions for multilayers subjected to other biaxial flexure tests can also be obtained. Finite element results for ring-on-rings tests performed on (i) porcelain/zirconia bilayered discs and (ii) solid oxide fuel cells trilayered discs are also presented to validate the closed-form solutions. The closed-form solutions hence provide a basis for evaluating biaxial strength of multilayers using biaxial flexure tests.

  20. Design and Use of a Novel Bioreactor for Regeneration of Biaxially Stretched Tissue-Engineered Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Angela Hai; Lee, Yong-Ung; Calle, Elizabeth A.; Boyle, Michael; Starcher, Barry C.; Humphrey, Jay D.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional bioreactors are used to enhance extracellular matrix (ECM) production and mechanical strength of tissue-engineered vessels (TEVs) by applying circumferential strain, which is uniaxial stretching. However, the resulting TEVs still suffer from inadequate mechanical properties, where rupture strengths and compliance values are still very different from native arteries. The biomechanical milieu of native arteries consists of both circumferential and axial loading. Therefore, to better simulate the physiological stresses acting on native arteries, we built a novel bioreactor system to enable biaxial stretching of engineered arteries during culture. This new bioreactor system allows for independent control of circumferential and axial stretching parameters, such as displacement and beat rate. The assembly and setup processes for this biaxial bioreactor system are reliable with a success rate greater than 75% for completion of long-term sterile culture. This bioreactor also supports side-by-side assessments of TEVs that are cultured under three types of mechanical conditions (static, uniaxial, and biaxial), all within the same biochemical environment. Using this bioreactor, we examined the impact of biaxial stretching on arterial wall remodeling of TEVs. Biaxial TEVs developed the greatest wall thickness compared with static and uniaxial TEVs. Unlike uniaxial loading, biaxial loading led to undulated collagen fibers that are commonly found in native arteries. More importantly, the biaxial TEVs developed the most mature elastin in the ECM, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The presence of mature extracellular elastin along with the undulated collagen fibers may contribute to the observed vascular compliance in the biaxial TEVs. The current work shows that biaxial stretching is a novel and promising means to improve TEV generation. Furthermore, this novel system allows us to optimize biomechanical conditioning by unraveling the interrelationships among the

  1. Tungsten foil laminate for structural divertor applications - Joining of tungsten foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiser, Jens; Rieth, Michael; Möslang, Anton; Dafferner, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Jan; Mrotzek, Tobias; Hoffmann, Andreas; Armstrong, D. E. J.; Yi, Xiaoou

    2013-05-01

    This paper is the fourth in our series on tungsten laminates. The aim of this paper is to discuss laminate synthesis, meaning the joining of tungsten foils. It is obvious that the properties of the tungsten laminate strongly depend on the combination of (i) interlayer and (ii) joining technology, as this combination defines (i) the condition of the tungsten foil after joining (as-received or recrystallised) as well as (ii) the characteristics of the interface between the tungsten foil and the interlayer (wettability or diffusion leading to a solid solution or the formation of intermetallics). From the example of tungsten laminates joined by brazing with (i) an eutectic silver copper brazing filler, (ii) copper, (iii) titanium, and (iv) zirconium, the microstructure will be discussed, with special focus on the interface. Based on our assumptions of the mechanism of the extraordinary ductility of tungsten foil we present three syntheses strategies and make recommendations for the synthesis of high temperature tungsten laminates.

  2. Non-destructive testing of biaxial stress state in ferromagnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vengrinovich, V. L.; Vintov, D. A.; Dmitrovich, D. V.

    2014-02-01

    The technique for biaxial stress state quantitative non destructive testing using magnetic, namely Barkhausen Noise, measurements is developed and checked experimentally. The main elaboration concerns the application of uni-axial calibration data for bi-axial stress measurement in the material which treatment pre-history is not definitely known. The article is aimed to get over difficulties, accompanying factual nondestructive stress evaluation, implied from its tensor nature. The developed technique of stress calibration and measurement assumes the bi-axial stress components recovery from uni-axial magnetic and Barkhausen noise measurement results. The complete technology, based on new calibration procedure with grid diagrams is considered in the article.

  3. Laser cleaning of tungsten ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Aniruddha; Sonar, V. R.; Das, D. K.; Bhatt, R. B.; Behere, P. G.; Afzal, Mohd.; Kumar, Arun; Nilaya, J. P.; Biswas, D. J.

    2014-07-01

    Removal of a thin oxide layer from a tungsten ribbon was achieved using the fundamental, second and third harmonic radiation from a Q- switched Nd-YAG laser. It was found that beyond the threshold, oxide removal was achieved at all wavelengths for a wide range of fluence values. The removal mechanism of the oxide layer was found to be critically dependent on both wavelength and fluence of the incident radiation and has been identified as ejection or sublimation. The un-cleaned and cleaned surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Laser cleaned tungsten ribbons were used in a thermal ionization mass spectrometer (TIMS) to determine isotopic composition of Neodymium atoms.

  4. Does speciation matter for tungsten ecotoxicology?

    PubMed

    Strigul, Nikolay

    2010-09-01

    Tungsten is a widely used transition metal that has not been thoroughly investigated with regards to its ecotoxicological effects. Tungsten anions polymerize in environmental systems as well as under physiological conditions in living organisms. These polymerization/condensation reactions result in the development of several types of stable polyoxoanions. Certain chemical properties (in particular redox and acidic properties) differentiate these polyanions from monotungstates. However, our current state of knowledge on tungsten toxicology, biological and environmental effects is based entirely on experiments where monotungstates were used and assumed by the authors to be the form of tungsten that was present and that produced the observed effect. Recent discoveries indicate that tungsten speciation may be important to ecotoxicology. New results obtained by different research groups demonstrate that polytungstates develop and persist in environmental systems, and that polyoxotungstates are much more toxic than monotungstates. This paper reviews the available toxicological information from the standpoint of tungsten speciation and identifies knowledge gaps and pertinent future research directions.

  5. Analytical and experimental evaluation of biaxial contact stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richerson, D. W.; Finger, D. G.; Wimmer, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Contact stress analysis was conducted for ceramic-metal and ceramic-ceramic interfaces using a finite element model. Ceramics investigated included NC-132 hot-pressed silicon nitride, NC-350 reaction-bonded silicon nitride, Hexaloy SA SiC, and RBN104 reaction-bonded silicon nitride. The results are shown to be well correlated with closed-form solution both for normal and normal-tangential loading. The latter load condition is found to be especially critical for ceramic materials due to the presence of a high tensile stress at the trailing edge of the ceramic surface contact zone. It is shown that during sliding contact or biaxial loading, the magnitude of this tensile stress increases with the coefficient of friction.

  6. Biaxial compressive strain engineering in graphene/boron nitride heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wei; Xiao, Jianliang; Zhu, Junwei; Yu, Chenxi; Zhang, Gang; Ni, Zhenhua; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Shi, Yi; Wang, Xinran

    2012-01-01

    Strain engineered graphene has been predicted to show many interesting physics and device applications. Here we study biaxial compressive strain in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures after thermal cycling to high temperatures likely due to their thermal expansion coefficient mismatch. The appearance of sub-micron self-supporting bubbles indicates that the strain is spatially inhomogeneous. Finite element modeling suggests that the strain is concentrated on the edges with regular nano-scale wrinkles, which could be a playground for strain engineering in graphene. Raman spectroscopy and mapping is employed to quantitatively probe the magnitude and distribution of strain. From the temperature-dependent shifts of Raman G and 2D peaks, we estimate the TEC of graphene from room temperature to above 1000K for the first time.

  7. A resonant biaxial Helmholtz coil employing a fractal capacitor bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James E.

    2013-09-01

    The design and construction of a series resonant biaxial Helmholtz coil for the production of magnetic fields as large as 500 G in the range of 100-2500 Hz is described. Important aspects of ac coil design are discussed, including: minimizing power losses due to the expected Joule heating, self-induced eddy currents, and skin resistance; controlling the stray capacitance; maximizing field homogeneity; and keeping peak voltages at acceptable levels. The design and construction of a computer-controlled, optically isolated fractal capacitor bank is then treated, and various aspects of capacitor selection and characterization were discussed. The system performance is demonstrated, including stability and the possibility of field component dephasing with typical magnetic samples.

  8. A resonant biaxial Helmholtz coil employing a fractal capacitor bank.

    PubMed

    Martin, James E

    2013-09-01

    The design and construction of a series resonant biaxial Helmholtz coil for the production of magnetic fields as large as 500 G in the range of 100-2500 Hz is described. Important aspects of ac coil design are discussed, including: minimizing power losses due to the expected Joule heating, self-induced eddy currents, and skin resistance; controlling the stray capacitance; maximizing field homogeneity; and keeping peak voltages at acceptable levels. The design and construction of a computer-controlled, optically isolated fractal capacitor bank is then treated, and various aspects of capacitor selection and characterization were discussed. The system performance is demonstrated, including stability and the possibility of field component dephasing with typical magnetic samples.

  9. Spatial filtering efficiency of monostatic biaxial lidar: analysis and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agishev, Ravil R.; Comeron, Adolfo

    2002-12-01

    Results of lidar modeling based on spatial-angular filtering efficiency criteria are presented. Their analysis shows that the low spatial-angular filtering efficiency of traditional visible and near-infrared systems is an important cause of low signal/background-radiation ratio (SBR) at the photodetector input. The low SBR may be responsible for considerable measurement errors and ensuing the low accuracy of the retrieval of atmospheric optical parameters. As shown, the most effective protection against sky background radiation for groundbased biaxial lidars is the modifying of their angular field according to a spatial-angular filtering efficiency criterion. Some effective approaches to achieve a high filtering efficiency for the receiving system optimization are discussed.

  10. Spatial-angular modeling of ground-based biaxial lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agishev, Ravil R.

    1997-10-01

    Results of spatial-angular LIDAR modeling based on an efficiency criterion introduced are represented. Their analysis shows that a low spatial-angular efficiency of traditional VIS and NIR systems is a main cause of a low S/BR ratio at the photodetector input. It determines the considerable measurements errors and the following low accuracy of atmospheric optical parameters retrieval. As we have shown, the most effective protection against intensive sky background radiation for ground-based biaxial LIDAR's consist in forming of their angular field according to spatial-angular efficiency criterion G. Some effective approaches to high G-parameter value achievement to achieve the receiving system optimization are discussed.

  11. Spatial filtering efficiency of monostatic biaxial lidar: analysis and applications.

    PubMed

    Agishev, Ravil R; Comeron, Adolfo

    2002-12-20

    Results of lidar modeling based on spatial-angular filtering efficiency criteria are presented. Their analysis shows that the low spatial-angular filtering efficiency of traditional visible and near-infrared systems is an important cause of low signal/background-radiation ratio (SBR) at the photodetector input The low SBR may be responsible for considerable measurement errors and ensuing the low accuracy of the retrieval of atmospheric optical parameters. As shown, the most effective protection against sky background radiation for groundbased biaxial lidars is the modifying of their angular field according to a spatial-angular filtering efficiency criterion. Some effective approaches to achieve a high filtering efficiency for the receiving system optimization are discussed.

  12. Failure analysis of composite laminates including biaxial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Elliott, W. G.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes a continued effort on the development and application of the tensor polynomial failure criterion for composite laminate analysis. In particular, emphasis is given to the design, construction and testing of a cross-beam laminate configuration to obtain "pure' biaxial compression failure. The purpose of this test case was to provide to permit "closure' of the cubic form of the failure surface in the 1-2 compression-compression quadrant. This resulted in a revised set of interaction strength parameters and the construction of a failure surface which can be used with confidence for strength predictions, assuming a plane stress state exists. Furthermore, the problem of complex conjugate roots which can occur in some failure regions is addressed and an "engineering' interpretation is provided. Results are presented illustrating this behavior and the methodology for overcoming this problem is discussed.

  13. Conductive layer for biaxially oriented semiconductor film growth

    DOEpatents

    Findikoglu, Alp T.; Matias, Vladimir

    2007-10-30

    A conductive layer for biaxially oriented semiconductor film growth and a thin film semiconductor structure such as, for example, a photodetector, a photovoltaic cell, or a light emitting diode (LED) that includes a crystallographically oriented semiconducting film disposed on the conductive layer. The thin film semiconductor structure includes: a substrate; a first electrode deposited on the substrate; and a semiconducting layer epitaxially deposited on the first electrode. The first electrode includes a template layer deposited on the substrate and a buffer layer epitaxially deposited on the template layer. The template layer includes a first metal nitride that is electrically conductive and has a rock salt crystal structure, and the buffer layer includes a second metal nitride that is electrically conductive. The semiconducting layer is epitaxially deposited on the buffer layer. A method of making such a thin film semiconductor structure is also described.

  14. Biaxial Compressive Strain Engineering in Graphene/Boron Nitride Heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wei; Xiao, Jianliang; Zhu, Junwei; Yu, Chenxi; Zhang, Gang; Ni, Zhenhua; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Shi, Yi; Wang, Xinran

    2012-01-01

    Strain engineered graphene has been predicted to show many interesting physics and device applications. Here we study biaxial compressive strain in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures after thermal cycling to high temperatures likely due to their thermal expansion coefficient mismatch. The appearance of sub-micron self-supporting bubbles indicates that the strain is spatially inhomogeneous. Finite element modeling suggests that the strain is concentrated on the edges with regular nano-scale wrinkles, which could be a playground for strain engineering in graphene. Raman spectroscopy and mapping is employed to quantitatively probe the magnitude and distribution of strain. From the temperature-dependent shifts of Raman G and 2D peaks, we estimate the TEC of graphene from room temperature to above 1000K for the first time. PMID:23189242

  15. Biaxial mechanical properties of the human thoracic and abdominal aorta, common carotid, subclavian, renal and common iliac arteries.

    PubMed

    Kamenskiy, Alexey V; Dzenis, Yuris A; Kazmi, Syed A Jaffar; Pemberton, Mark A; Pipinos, Iraklis I; Phillips, Nick Y; Herber, Kyle; Woodford, Thomas; Bowen, Robert E; Lomneth, Carol S; MacTaggart, Jason N

    2014-11-01

    The biomechanics of large- and medium-sized arteries influence the pathophysiology of arterial disease and the response to therapeutic interventions. However, a comprehensive comparative analysis of human arterial biaxial mechanical properties has not yet been reported. Planar biaxial extension was used to establish the passive mechanical properties of human thoracic (TA, [Formula: see text]) and abdominal (AA, [Formula: see text]) aorta, common carotid (CCA, [Formula: see text]), subclavian (SA, [Formula: see text]), renal (RA, [Formula: see text]) and common iliac (CIA, [Formula: see text]) arteries from 11 deceased subjects ([Formula: see text] years old). Histological evaluation determined the structure of each specimen. Experimental data were used to determine constitutive parameters for a structurally motivated nonlinear anisotropic constitutive model. All arteries demonstrated appreciable anisotropy and large nonlinear deformations. Most CCA, SA, TA, AA and CIA specimens were stiffer longitudinally, while most RAs were stiffer circumferentially. A switch in anisotropy was occasionally demonstrated for all arteries. The CCA was the most compliant, least anisotropic and least frequently diseased of all arteries, while the CIA and AA were the stiffest and the most diseased. The severity of atherosclerosis correlated with age, but was not affected by laterality. Elastin fibers in the aorta, SA and CCA were uniformly and mostly circumferentially distributed throughout the media, while in the RA and CIA, elastin was primarily axially aligned and concentrated in the external elastic lamina. Constitutive modeling provided good fits to the experimental data for most arteries. Biomechanical and architectural features of major arteries differ depending on location and functional environment. A better understanding of localized arterial mechanical properties may support the development of site-specific treatment modalities for arterial disease.

  16. Adaptation of a Planar Microbiaxial Optomechanical Device for the Tubular Biaxial Microstructural and Macroscopic Characterization of Small Vascular Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Joseph T.; Haskett, Darren G.; Utzinger, Urs; Azhar, Mohamad

    2012-01-01

    Murine models of disease are a powerful tool for researchers to gain insight into disease formation, progression, and therapies. The biomechanical indicators of diseased tissue provide a unique insight into some of these murine models, since the biomechanical properties in scenarios such as aneurysm and Marfan syndrome can dictate tissue failure and mortality. Understanding the properties of the tissue on the macroscopic scale has been shown to be important, as one can then understand the tissue’s ability to withstand the high stresses seen in the cardiac pulsatile cycle. Alterations in the biomechanical response can foreshadow prospective mechanical failure of the tissue. These alterations are often seen on the microstructural level, and obtaining detailed information on such changes can offer a better understanding of the phenomena seen on the macroscopic level. Unfortunately, mouse models present problems due to the size and delicate features in the mechanical testing of such tissues. In addition, some smaller arteries in large-animal studies (e.g., coronary and cerebral arteries) can present the same issues, and are sometimes unsuitable for planar biaxial testing. The purpose of this paper is to present a robust method for the investigation of the mechanical properties of small arteries and the classification of the microstructural orientation and degree of fiber alignment. This occurs through the cost-efficient modification of a planar biaxial tester that works in conjunction with a two-photon nonlinear microscope. This system provides a means to further investigate how microstructure and mechanical properties are modified in diseased transgenic animals where the tissue is in small tube form. Several other hard-to-test tubular specimens such as cerebral aneurysm arteries and atherosclerotic coronary arteries can also be tested using the described modular device. PMID:21823753

  17. Tin-tungsten mineralizing processes in tungsten vein deposits: Panasqueira, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecumberri-Sanchez, P.; Pinto, F.; Vieira, R.; Wälle, M.; Heinrich, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Tungsten has a high heat resistance, density and hardness, which makes it widely applied in industry (e.g. steel, tungsten carbides). Tungsten deposits are typically magmatic-hydrothermal systems. Despite the economic significance of tungsten, there are no modern quantitative analytical studies of the fluids responsible for the formation of its highest-grade deposit type (tungsten vein deposits). Panasqueira (Portugal) is a tungsten vein deposit, one of the leading tungsten producers in Europe and one of the best geologically characterized tungsten vein deposits. In this study, compositions of the mineralizing fluids at Panasqueira have been determined through combination of detailed petrography, microthermometric measurements and LA-ICPMS analyses, and geochemical modeling has been used to determine the processes that lead to tungsten mineralization. We characterized the fluids related to the various mineralizing stages in the system: the oxide stage (tin and tungsten mineralization), the sulfide stage (chalcopyrite and sphalerite mineralization) and the carbonate stage. Thus, our results provide information on the properties of fluids related with specific paragenetic stages. Furthermore we used those fluid compositions in combination with host rock mineralogy and chemistry to evaluate which are the controlling factors in the mineralizing process. This study provides the first quantitative analytical data on fluid composition for tungsten vein deposits and evaluates the controlling mineralization processes helping to determine the mechanisms of formation of the Panasqueira tin-tungsten deposit and providing additional geochemical constraints on the local distribution of mineralization.

  18. 40 CFR 421.100 - Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary tungsten subcategory. 421.100 Section 421.100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Primary Tungsten Subcategory § 421.100 Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten... tungsten at primary tungsten facilities....

  19. 40 CFR 421.100 - Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary tungsten subcategory. 421.100 Section 421.100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Primary Tungsten Subcategory § 421.100 Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten... tungsten at primary tungsten facilities....

  20. 40 CFR 421.100 - Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary tungsten subcategory. 421.100 Section 421.100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Primary Tungsten Subcategory § 421.100 Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten... tungsten at primary tungsten facilities....

  1. 40 CFR 421.100 - Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary tungsten subcategory. 421.100 Section 421.100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Primary Tungsten Subcategory § 421.100 Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten... tungsten at primary tungsten facilities....

  2. 40 CFR 421.100 - Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary tungsten subcategory. 421.100 Section 421.100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Primary Tungsten Subcategory § 421.100 Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten... tungsten at primary tungsten facilities....

  3. The effect of zirconia thickness on the biaxial flexural strength of zirconiaceramic bilayered discs.

    PubMed

    Sinmazisik, Gulden; Tarcin, Bilge; Demirbas, Bulent; Gulmez, Turgut; Bor, Emire; Ozer, Fusun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of zirconia core thickness on the biaxial flexural strength values of zirconia-porcelain bilayered discs. A total of 60 discs with 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5 mm thickness were obtained from a fully sintered zirconia block. A 1.5-mm thick layer of veneer porcelain was fired on the zirconia specimens and biaxial flexural strength tests were performed on the bilayered discs. In each group, the loading surface was the veneer porcelain in half of the specimens (core in tension) and the zirconia core surface in the other half (core in compression). The zirconia core thickness had no effect on the biaxial flexural strength of zirconiaporcelain bilayered discs when the core was in tension (p>0.05). Whereas, when the core was in compression, an increase in the zirconia core thickness resulted in an increase in the biaxial flexural strength (p<0.05).

  4. Method of deforming a biaxially textured buffer layer on a textured metallic substrate and articles therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Dominic F.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Goyal, Amit

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and biaxially textured articles having a deformed epitaxial layer formed therefrom for use with high temperature superconductors, photovoltaic, ferroelectric, or optical devices. A buffer layer is epitaxially deposited onto biaxially-textured substrates and then mechanically deformed. The deformation process minimizes or eliminates grooves, or other irregularities, formed on the buffer layer while maintaining the biaxial texture of the buffer layer. Advantageously, the biaxial texture of the buffer layer is not altered during subsequent heat treatments of the deformed buffer. The present invention provides mechanical densification procedures which can be incorporated into the processing of superconducting films through the powder deposit or precursor approaches without incurring unfavorable high-angle grain boundaries.

  5. Maier-Saupe model for a mixture of uniaxial and biaxial molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, E. S.; Henriques, E. F.; Vieira, A. P.; Salinas, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    We introduce shape variations in a liquid-crystalline system by considering an elementary Maier-Saupe lattice model for a mixture of uniaxial and biaxial molecules. Shape variables are treated in the annealed (thermalized) limit. We analyze the thermodynamic properties of this system in terms of temperature T , concentration c of intrinsically biaxial molecules, and a parameter Δ associated with the degree of biaxiality of the molecules. At the mean-field level, we use standard techniques of statistical mechanics to draw global phase diagrams, which are shown to display a rich structure, including uniaxial and biaxial nematic phases, a reentrant ordered region, and many distinct multicritical points. Also, we use the formalism to write an expansion of the free energy in order to make contact with the Landau-de Gennes theory of nematic phase transitions.

  6. Maier-Saupe model for a mixture of uniaxial and biaxial molecules.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, E S; Henriques, E F; Vieira, A P; Salinas, S R

    2015-12-01

    We introduce shape variations in a liquid-crystalline system by considering an elementary Maier-Saupe lattice model for a mixture of uniaxial and biaxial molecules. Shape variables are treated in the annealed (thermalized) limit. We analyze the thermodynamic properties of this system in terms of temperature T, concentration c of intrinsically biaxial molecules, and a parameter Δ associated with the degree of biaxiality of the molecules. At the mean-field level, we use standard techniques of statistical mechanics to draw global phase diagrams, which are shown to display a rich structure, including uniaxial and biaxial nematic phases, a reentrant ordered region, and many distinct multicritical points. Also, we use the formalism to write an expansion of the free energy in order to make contact with the Landau-de Gennes theory of nematic phase transitions.

  7. A parameter study on the biaxial behavior of flexible fabric composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, A.; Luo, S.Y.

    1994-12-31

    The nonlinear behavior of flexible fabric composite under large bi-axial deformation is attributed by many factors, including the ratio of biaxial loads, the crimps of the yarns, the thickness of the composite, and the properties of the yarn and the matrix. A parameter study has been conducted to evaluate the significance of these factors on the stress-strain relations of flexible fabric composites.

  8. An Ultrasonic Guided Wave Method to Estimate Applied Biaxial Loads (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    orientation are estimated from a sinusoidal fit of ultrasonic data collected from the same spatially distributed array that is being used to detect and...AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2011-4361 AN ULTRASONIC GUIDED WAVE METHOD TO ESTIMATE APPLIED BIAXIAL LOADS (PREPRINT) Fan, Shi, Jennifer E. Michaels, and...Technical Paper 1 November 2011 – 1 November 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE AN ULTRASONIC GUIDED WAVE METHOD TO ESTIMATE APPLIED BIAXIAL LOADS (PREPRINT

  9. Fatigue Test Design: Scenarios for Biaxial Fatigue Testing of a 60-Meter Wind Turbine Blade

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Nathan

    2016-07-01

    Current practice in commercial certification of wind turbine blades is to perform separate flap and lead-lag fatigue tests. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has been researching and evaluating biaxial fatigue testing techniques and demonstrating various options, typically on smaller-scale test articles at the National Wind Technology Center. This report evaluates some of these biaxial fatigue options in the context of application to a multimegawatt blade certification test program at the Wind Technology Testing Center in Charlestown, Massachusetts.

  10. {sup 52}Cr Spinor Condensate: A Biaxial or Uniaxial Spin Nematic

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, Roberto B.; Ho, T.-L.

    2006-05-19

    We show that the newly discovered {sup 52}Cr Bose condensate in zero magnetic field can be a spin nematic of the following kind: a 'maximum' polar state, a 'colinear' polar state, or a biaxial nematic ferromagnetic state. We also present the phase diagram with a magnetic field in the interaction subspace containing the chromium condensate. It contains many uniaxial and biaxial spin nematic phases, which often but not always break time reversal symmetry, and can exist with or without spontaneous magnetization.

  11. Biaxial loading effects on fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steel

    SciTech Connect

    McAfee, W.J.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W. Jr.; Pennell, W.E.

    1995-03-01

    The preliminary phases of a program to develop and evaluate fracture methodologies for assessing crack-tip constraint effects on fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels have been completed by the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program. Objectives were to investigate effect of biaxial loading on fracture toughness, quantify this effect through existing stress-based, dual-parameter, fracture-toughness correlations, or propose and verify alternate correlations. A cruciform beam specimen with 2-D, shallow, through-thickness flaw and a special loading fixture was designed and fabricated. Tests were performed using biaxial loading ratios of 0:1 (uniaxial), 0.6:1, and 1:1 (equi-biaxial). Critical fracture-toughness values were calculated for each test. Biaxial loading of 0.6:1 resulted in a reduction in the lower bound fracture toughness of {approximately}12% as compared to that from the uniaxial tests. The biaxial loading of 1:1 yielded two subsets of toughness values; one agreed well with the uniaxial data, while one was reduced by {approximately}43% when compared to the uniaxial data. Results were evaluated using J-Q theory and Dodds-Anderson (D-A) micromechanical scaling model. The D-A model predicted no biaxial effect, while the J-Q method gave inconclusive results. When applied to the 1:1 biaxial data, these constraint methodologies failed to predict the observed reduction in fracture toughness obtained in one experiment. A strain-based constraint methodology that considers the relationship between applied biaxial load, the plastic zone width in the crack plane, and fracture toughness was formulated and applied successfully to the data. Evaluation of this dual-parameter strain-based model led to the conclusion that it has the capability of representing fracture behavior of RPV steels in the transition region, including the effects of out-of-plane loading on fracture toughness. This report is designated as HSST Report No. 150.

  12. T-1018 UCLA Spacordion Tungsten Powder Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Trentalange, Stephen; Tsai, Oleg; Igo, George; Huang, Huan; Pan, Yu Xi; Dunkelberger, Jay; Xu, Wen Qin; Soha, Aria; Heppelmann, Steven; Gagliardi, Carl; /Texas A-M

    2011-11-16

    The present experiments at the BNL-RHIC facility are evolving towards physics goals which require the detection of medium energy electromagnetic particles (photons, electrons, neutral pions, eta mesons, etc.), especially at forward angles. New detectors will place increasing demands on energy resolution, hadron rejection and two-photon resolution and will require large area, high performance electromagnetic calorimeters in a variety of geometries. In the immediate future, either RHIC or JLAB will propose a facility upgrade (Electron-Ion Collider, or EIC) with physics goals such as electron-heavy ion collisions (or p-A collisions) with a wide range of calorimeter requirements. An R and D program based at Brookhaven National Laboratory has awarded the group funding of approximately $110,000 to develop new types of calorimeters for EIC experiments. The UCLA group is developing a method to manufacture very flexible and cost-effective, yet high quality calorimeters based on scintillating fibers and tungsten powder. The design and features of the calorimeter can be briefly stated as follows: an arbitrarily large number of small diameter fibers (< 0.5 mm) are assembled as a matrix and held rigidly in place by a set of precision screens inside an empty container. The container is then back-filled with tungsten powder, compacted on a vibrating table and infused with epoxy under vacuum. The container is then removed. The resulting sub-modules are extremely uniform and achieve roughly the density of pure Lead. The sub-modules are stacked together to achieve a final detector of the desired shape. There is no dead space between sub-modules and the fibers can be in an accordion geometry bent to prevent 'channeling' of the particles due to accidental alignment of their track with the module axis. This technology has the advantage of being modular and inexpensive to the point where the construction work may be divided among groups the size of typical university physics departments

  13. Phase biaxiality in nematic liquid crystalline side-chain polymers of various chemical constitutions.

    PubMed

    Severing, Kirsten; Stibal-Fischer, Elke; Hasenhindl, Alfred; Finkelmann, Heino; Saalwächter, Kay

    2006-08-17

    In a previous deuterium NMR study conducted on a liquid crystalline (LC) polymer with laterally attached book-shaped molecules as the mesogenic moiety, we have revealed a biaxial nematic phase below the conventional uniaxial nematic phase (Phys. Rev. Lett. 2004, 92, 125501). To elucidate details of its formation, we here report on deuterium NMR experiments that have been conducted on different types of LC side-chain polymers as well as on mixtures with low-molar-mass mesogens. Different parameters that affect the formation of a biaxial nematic phase, such as the geometry of the attachment, the spacer length between the polymer backbone and the mesogenic unit, as well as the polymer dynamics, were investigated. Surprisingly, also polymers with terminally attached mesogens (end-on polymers) are capable of forming biaxial nematic phases if the flexible spacer is short and thus retains a coupling between the polymer backbone and the LC phase. Furthermore, the most important parameter for the formation of a biaxial nematic phase is the dynamics of the polymer backbone, as the addition of a small percentage of low molar mass LC to the biaxial nematic polymer from the original study served to shift both the glass transition and the appearance of detectable biaxiality in a very similar fashion. Plotting different parameters for the investigated systems as a function of T/Tg also reveals the crucial role of the dynamics of the polymer backbone and hence the glass transition.

  14. Phase diagram of the uniaxial and biaxial soft-core Gay-Berne model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berardi, Roberto; Lintuvuori, Juho S.; Wilson, Mark R.; Zannoni, Claudio

    2011-10-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been used to explore the phase diagrams for a family of attractive-repulsive soft-core Gay-Berne models [R. Berardi, C. Zannoni, J. S. Lintuvuori, and M. R. Wilson, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 174107 (2009)] and determine the effect of particle softness, i.e., of a moderately repulsive short-range interaction, on the order parameters and phase behaviour of model systems of uniaxial and biaxial ellipsoidal particles. We have found that isotropic, uniaxial, and biaxial nematic and smectic phases are obtained for the model. Extensive calculations of the nematic region of the phase diagram show that endowing mesogenic particles with such soft repulsive interactions affect the stability range of the nematic phases, and in the case of phase biaxiality it also shifts it to lower temperatures. For colloidal particles, stabilised by surface functionalisation, (e.g., with polymer chains), we suggest that it should be possible to tune liquid crystal behaviour to increase the range of stability of uniaxial and biaxial phases (by varying solvent quality). We calculate second virial coefficients and show that they are a useful means of characterising the change in effective softness for such systems. For thermotropic liquid crystals, the introduction of softness in the interactions between mesogens with overall biaxial shape (e.g., through appropriate conformational flexibility) could provide a pathway for the actual chemical synthesis of stable room-temperature biaxial nematics.

  15. Investigation of the Leak Response of a Carbon-Fiber Laminate Loaded in Biaxial Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Ratcliffe, James G.

    2013-01-01

    Designers of pressurized structures have been reluctant to use composite materials because of concerns over leakage. Biaxial stress states are expected to be the worst-case loading condition for allowing leakage to occur through microcracks. To investigate the leakage behavior under in-plane biaxial loading, a cruciform composite specimen was designed that would have a relatively large test section with a uniform 1:1 biaxial loading ratio. A 7.6-cm-square test section was desired for future investigations of the leakage response as a result of impact damage. Many iterations of the cruciform specimen were evaluated using finite element analysis to reduce stress concentrations and maximize the size of the uniform biaxial strain field. The final design allowed the specimen to go to relatively high biaxial strain levels without incurring damage away from the test section. The specimen was designed and manufactured using carbon/epoxy fabric with a four-ply-thick, quasi-isotropic, central test section. Initial validation and testing were performed on a specimen without impact damage. The specimen was tested to maximum biaxial strains of approximately 4500micro epsilon without apparent damage. A leak measurement system containing a pressurized cavity was clamped to the test section and used to measure the flow rate through the specimen. The leakage behavior of the specimen was investigated for pressure differences up to 172 kPa

  16. Tungsten deposition by hydrogen-atom reaction with tungsten hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.W.

    1991-01-01

    Using gaseous hydrogen atoms with WF[sub 6], tungsten atoms can be produced in a gas-phase reaction. The atoms then deposit in a near-room temperature process, which results in the formation of tungsten films. The W atoms (10[sup 10]-10[sup 11]/cm[sup 3]) were measured in situ by atomic absorption spectroscopy during the CVD process. Deposited W films were characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, and X-ray diffraction. The surface morphology of the deposited films and filled holes was studied using scanning electron microscopy. The deposited films were highly adherent to different substrates, such as Si, SiO[sub 2], Ti/Si, TiN/Si and Teflon. The reaction mechanism and kinetics were studied. The experimental results indicated that this method has three advantages compared to conventional CVD or PECVD: (1) film growth occurs at low temperatures; (2) deposition takes place in a plasma-free environment; and (3) a low level of impurities results in high-quality adherent films.

  17. Electronic and optical properties of silicene under uni-axial and bi-axial mechanical strains: A first principle study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Brij; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2014-07-01

    The uni-axial and bi-axial mechanical strain mediated electronic band structures and dielectric properties of silicene have been investigated. It is found that on applying uni- and bi-axial strains, the band gap opens for smaller strain in silicene. However, on further increase of strain beyond 8% silicene changed into metal. The ultimate tensile strength estimated is 3.4 GPa. Imaginary part of dielectric function shows that the inter-band transitions are red-shifted for uni- and bi-axial tensile strains and are blue shifted for uni- and bi-axial compressive strains. Electron energy loss (EEL) function shows that the π+σ plasmon energies are red-shifted for uni- and bi-axial strains and blue-shifted for compressive strains. The π plasmons disappears for tensile and asymmetric strains. Bi-axial asymmetric strain is found to have no influence on inter-band transitions and π+σ plasmon energies.

  18. Development of Tungsten Based Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    Rise, 0 C L 4 / /2’ C) r, 1 / 1 1 00 /Pressure in /’ Stress Wave, SPa L 6. 44 // © , " / 1000 10,000 Impact Velocity, Ft/Sec - 4- be phase...and it is not desirable to make the steel and tungsten segments quite so long. Accordingly, it is necessary to make stress wave analyses of bar...stresses, because of wave superposition and bar segment lengths. Wave analyses similar to those presented above may result in higher stresses delivered to

  19. Novel properties of Tungsten ditelluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huimei; National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Cent Collaboration

    Tungsten ditelluride has attracted intense research interest due to the recent discovery of its large unsaturated magnetoresistance up to 60 Tesla. By using density functional theory calculations, we qualitatively reproduced the observed spin texture. Since the spin texture would forbid back scatterings that are directly involved in the resistivity, we suggest that the SOC and the related spin and orbital angular momentum textures may play an important role in the anomalously large magnetoresistance of WTe2. Motivated by the presence of a small, sensitive Fermi surface of 5d electronic orbitals, we also boost the electronic properties by applying a high pressure, and introduce superconductivity successfully.

  20. Strengthening mechanisms of tungsten powder reinforced uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.A.K.; Hill, M.A.; Rollett, A.D.; Dunn, P.S.; Mortensen, A.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA )

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten powder reinforced uranium exhibits a three-fold increase in yield strength due to precipitation hardening. The tungsten-rich interphase precipitates form at moving phase boundaries during slow cooling. Further increases in yield strength, attained with increasing tungsten content, are due to composite strengthening; this is verified by increasing elastic modulus with increasing tungsten content. Age hardening behavior is observed, with strengthening occurring at aging temperatures low in the alpha phase. Aging higher in alpha gives initial strengthening followed by rapid overaging. Beta phase aging results in a very soft structure with precipitates visible optically. Wrought material exhibits significant strain hardening as well as composite strengthening due to elongation of the tungsten particles. 7 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Corrosion Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior at Notched Hole in 7075-T6 Under Biaxial and Uniaxial Fatigue with Different Phases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-17

    CORROSION FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH BEHAVIOR AT NOTCHED HOLE IN 7075-T6 UNDER BIAXIAL AND UNIAXIAL FATIGUE WITH DIFFERENT PHASES...CORROSION FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH BEHAVIOR AT NOTCHED HOLE IN 7075-T6 UNDER BIAXIAL AND UNIAXIAL FATIGUE WITH DIFFERENT PHASES THESIS...UNLIMITED AFIT-ENY-MS-15-S-065 CORROSION FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH BEHAVIOR AT NOTCHED HOLE IN 7075-T6 UNDER BIAXIAL AND UNIAXIAL FATIGUE WITH

  2. Effect of light sources and curing mode techniques on sorption, solubility and biaxial flexural strength of a composite resin

    PubMed Central

    CARVALHO, Andreia Assis; MOREIRA, Francine do Couto Lima; FONSECA, Rodrigo Borges; SOARES, Carlos José; FRANCO, Eduardo Batista; de SOUZA, João Batista; LOPES, Lawrence Gonzaga

    2012-01-01

    Adequate polymerization plays an important role on the longevity of the composite resin restorations. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of light-curing units, curing mode techniques and storage media on sorption, solubility and biaxial flexural strength (BFS) of a composite resin. Material and Methods Two hundred and forty specimens were made of one composite resin (Esthet-X) in a stainless steel mold (2 mm x 8 mm Ø), and divided into 24 groups (n=10) established according to the 4 study factors: light-curing units: quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) lamp and light-emitting diodes (LED); energy densities: 16 J/cm2 and 20 J/cm2; curing modes: conventional (CM) and pulse-delay (PD); and permeants: deionized water and 75% ethanol for 28 days. Sorption and solubility tests were performed according to ISO 4049:2000 specifications. All specimens were then tested for BFS according to ASTM F394-78 specification. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA followed by Tukey, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). Results In general, no significant differences were found regarding sorption, solubility or BFS means for the light-curing units and curing modes (p>0.05). Only LED unit using 16 J/cm2 and PD using 10 s produced higher sorption and solubility values than QTH. Otherwise, using CM (16 J/cm2), LED produced lower values of BFS than QTH (p<0.05). 75% ethanol permeant produced higher values of sorption and solubility and lower values of BFS than water (p<0.05). Conclusion Ethanol storage media produced more damage on composite resin than water. In general the LED and QTH curing units using 16 and 20 J/cm2 by CM and PD curing modes produced no influence on the sorption, solubility or BFS of the tested resin. PMID:22666845

  3. Development of tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites towards their use in DEMO—potassium doped tungsten wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesch, J.; Han, Y.; Almanstötter, J.; Coenen, J. W.; Höschen, T.; Jasper, B.; Zhao, P.; Linsmeier, Ch; Neu, R.

    2016-02-01

    For the next step fusion reactor the use of tungsten is inevitable to suppress erosion and allow operation at elevated temperature and high heat loads. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten and its susceptibility to operation embrittlement and thus allow its use as a structural as well as an armour material. That this concept works in principle has been shown in recent years. In this contribution we present a development approach towards its use in a future fusion reactor. A multilayer approach is needed addressing all composite constituents and manufacturing steps. A huge potential lies in the optimization of the tungsten wire used as fibre. We discuss this aspect and present studies on potassium doped tungsten wire in detail. This wire, utilized in the illumination industry, could be a replacement for the so far used pure tungsten wire due to its superior high temperature properties. In tensile tests the wire showed high strength and ductility up to an annealing temperature of 2200 K. The results show that the use of doped tungsten wire could increase the allowed fabrication temperature and the overall working temperature of the composite itself.

  4. Temperature-induced sign reversal of biaxiality observed by conoscopy in some ferroelectric Sm-C* liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jang-Kun; Chandani, A. D. L.; Fukuda, Atsuo; Vij, J. K.; Kobayashi, Ichiro; Emelyanenko, A. V.

    2007-07-01

    We have studied various ferroelectric liquid crystals to find the average molecular direction of the shortest axis in the perfectly unwound state by using tilted conoscopic measurements. We find that there exist two types of temperature dependencies of the biaxiality. Some materials exhibit increasing biaxiality while others show decreasing biaxiality with increasing temperature. The former shows a temperature-induced sign reversal of biaxiality. Three different physical mechanisms are identified as responsible for the emergence of biaxiality: (i) anisotropic fluctuations of the long molecular axis, (ii) a biased rotation around the long axis, and (iii) the local field effect. By means of a simple theoretical investigation, we conclude that these two types of trends are due mainly to the opposite signs of the biaxial order parameter C , which represents the second mechanism: the biased rotation around the long axis. This means that the central phenyl planes of molecules belonging to materials having biaxiality that increases with temperature are oriented on the average parallel to the tilt plane (the shortest index of refraction axis normal to the tilt plane), and, on the contrary, in those of the others molecules are oriented perpendicular to the tilt plane (the shortest index of refraction axis lying in the tilt plane). Thus, the direction of the phenyl ring plane of the liquid crystal molecules determines the different temperature dependencies of the biaxiality. It is also shown that the phenomenon of sign reversal of the biaxiality is due to the competitive contributions of the first and second physical mechanisms.

  5. Polycrystalline silicon on tungsten substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevolo, A. J.; Schmidt, F. A.; Shanks, H. R.; Campisi, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    Thin films of electron-beam-vaporized silicon were deposited on fine-grained tungsten substrates under a pressure of about 1 x 10 to the -10th torr. Mass spectra from a quadrupole residual-gas analyzer were used to determine the partial pressure of 13 residual gases during each processing step. During separate silicon depositions, the atomically clean substrates were maintained at various temperatures between 400 and 780 C, and deposition rates were between 20 and 630 A min. Surface contamination and interdiffusion were monitored by in situ Auger electron spectrometry before and after cleaning, deposition, and annealing. Auger depth profiling, X-ray analysis, and SEM in the topographic and channeling modes were utilized to characterize the samples with respect to silicon-metal interface, interdiffusion, silicide formation, and grain size of silicon. The onset of silicide formation was found to occur at approximately 625 C. Above this temperature tungsten silicides were formed at a rate faster than the silicon deposition. Fine-grain silicon films were obtained at lower temperatures.

  6. Fracture behaviour of polycrystalline tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaganidze, Ermile; Rupp, Daniel; Aktaa, Jarir

    2014-03-01

    Fracture behaviour of round blank polycrystalline tungsten was studied by means of three point bending Fracture-Mechanical (FM) tests at temperatures between RT and 1000 °C and under high vacuum. To study the influence of the anisotropic microstructure on the fracture toughness (FT) and ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) the specimens were extracted in three different, i.e. longitudinal, radial and circumferential orientations. The FM tests yielded distinctive fracture behaviour for each specimen orientation. The crack propagation was predominantly intergranular for longitudinal orientation up to 600 °C, whereas transgranular cleavage was observed at low test temperatures for radial and circumferentially oriented specimens. At intermediate test temperatures the change of the fracture mode took place for radial and circumferential orientations. Above 800 °C all three specimen types showed large ductile deformation without noticeable crack advancement. For longitudinal specimens the influence of the loading rate on the FT and DBT was studied in the loading rate range between 0.06 and 18 MPa m1/2/s. Though an increase of the FT was observed for the lowest loading rate, no resolvable dependence of the DBT on the loading rate was found partly due to loss of FT validity. A Master Curve approach is proposed to describe FT vs. test temperature data on polycrystalline tungsten. Fracture safe design space was identified by analysis compiled FT data.

  7. Viscoelasticity of brain corpus callosum in biaxial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labus, Kevin M.; Puttlitz, Christian M.

    2016-11-01

    Computational models of the brain rely on accurate constitutive relationships to model the viscoelastic behavior of brain tissue. Current viscoelastic models have been derived from experiments conducted in a single direction at a time and therefore lack information on the effects of multiaxial loading. It is also unclear if the time-dependent behavior of brain tissue is dependent on either strain magnitude or the direction of loading when subjected to tensile stresses. Therefore, biaxial stress relaxation and cyclic experiments were conducted on corpus callosum tissue isolated from fresh ovine brains. Results demonstrated the relaxation behavior to be independent of strain magnitude, and a quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) model was able to accurately fit the experimental data. Also, an isotropic reduced relaxation tensor was sufficient to model the stress-relaxation in both the axonal and transverse directions. The QLV model was fitted to the averaged stress relaxation tests at five strain magnitudes while using the measured strain history from the experiments. The resulting model was able to accurately predict the stresses from cyclic tests at two strain magnitudes. In addition to deriving a constitutive model from the averaged experimental data, each specimen was fitted separately and the resulting distributions of the model parameters were reported and used in a probabilistic analysis to determine the probability distribution of model predictions and the sensitivity of the model to the variance of the parameters. These results can be used to improve the viscoelastic constitutive models used in computational studies of the brain.

  8. Endothelial cell alignment as a result of anisotropic strain and flow induced shear stress combinations.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Ravi; Le Gac, Séverine; Verdonschot, Nico; van den Berg, Albert; Koopman, Bart; Rouwkema, Jeroen

    2016-07-12

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are continuously exposed in vivo to cyclic strain and shear stress from pulsatile blood flow. When these stimuli are applied in vitro, ECs adopt an appearance resembling their in vivo state, most apparent in their alignment (perpendicular to uniaxial strain and along the flow). Uniaxial strain and flow perpendicular to the strain, used in most in vitro studies, only represent the in vivo conditions in straight parts of vessels. The conditions present over large fractions of the vasculature can be better represented by anisotropic biaxial strains at various orientations to flow. To emulate these biological complexities in vitro, we have developed a medium-throughput device to screen for the effects on cells of variously oriented anisotropic biaxial strains and flow combinations. Upon the application of only strains for 24 h, ECs (HUVECs) aligned perpendicular to the maximum principal strain and the alignment was stronger for a higher maximum:minimum principal strain ratio. A 0.55 Pa shear stress, when applied alone or with strain for 24 h, caused cells to align along the flow. Studying EC response to such combined physiological mechanical stimuli was not possible with existing platforms and to our best knowledge, has not been reported before.

  9. Endothelial cell alignment as a result of anisotropic strain and flow induced shear stress combinations

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Ravi; Le Gac, Séverine; Verdonschot, Nico; van den Berg, Albert; Koopman, Bart; Rouwkema, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are continuously exposed in vivo to cyclic strain and shear stress from pulsatile blood flow. When these stimuli are applied in vitro, ECs adopt an appearance resembling their in vivo state, most apparent in their alignment (perpendicular to uniaxial strain and along the flow). Uniaxial strain and flow perpendicular to the strain, used in most in vitro studies, only represent the in vivo conditions in straight parts of vessels. The conditions present over large fractions of the vasculature can be better represented by anisotropic biaxial strains at various orientations to flow. To emulate these biological complexities in vitro, we have developed a medium-throughput device to screen for the effects on cells of variously oriented anisotropic biaxial strains and flow combinations. Upon the application of only strains for 24 h, ECs (HUVECs) aligned perpendicular to the maximum principal strain and the alignment was stronger for a higher maximum:minimum principal strain ratio. A 0.55 Pa shear stress, when applied alone or with strain for 24 h, caused cells to align along the flow. Studying EC response to such combined physiological mechanical stimuli was not possible with existing platforms and to our best knowledge, has not been reported before. PMID:27404382

  10. The evolution of growth stresses in chemical vapor deposited tungsten films studied by in situ wafer curvature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leusink, G. J.; Oosterlaken, T. G. M.; Janssen, G. C. A. M.; Radelaar, S.

    1993-09-01

    An in situ study of the evolution of the biaxial state of intrinsic stress during nucleation and growth of polycrystalline tungsten chemical vapor deposition films deposited by the hydrogen reduction of tungsten hexafluoride is presented. The evolution of biaxial stress was determined from in situ wafer curvature measurements. It is shown that the intrinsic stress is a growth stress, i.e., a stress developing in close vicinity to the advancing surface of the film due to metastable film growth processes. The stress developing depends strongly on the thickness of the film. High tensile stress (≊4 GPa) is observed during the initial stage of growth, compressive stress (up to -1 GPa) is observed in an intermediate thickness regime after film closure and tensile stress (0.1-1 GPa) is observed in the thick film regime. The associated stress gradients in the film are preserved during and after growth. The development of growth stress is determined by deposition temperature and growth rate. The tensile stress in the thick film regime is larger at a higher growth rate or a lower deposition temperature, while the compressive stress in the intermediate thickness regime showed the opposite dependency. Film properties as the evolution of grain size, impurity content, and resistivity are found not to vary significantly with the growth conditions. Therefore, the development of growth stress is ascribed to kinetical processes. The development of tensile stress in the thick film regime is described with a (kinetic) grain boundary formation and relaxation model. The compressive stress in the intermediate thickness regime is tentatively ascribed to compressive coherency strains induced by interfacial tensions of the grains in the stage of island growth.

  11. Properties of tungsten-rhenium and tungsten-rhenium with hafnium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Todd

    2009-07-01

    Historically, tungsten-25wt.% rhenium alloy has been manufactured into wire for the thermocouple market, but recent demands for high-temperature structural components have forced the development of novel processing techniques for tungsten-rhenium and tungsten-rhenium with hafnium carbide. With a melting temperature of 3,050°C, and a recrystallization temperature near 1,900°C, tungsten-rhenium alloys are being used in aerospace, temperature measuring, and friction stir welding applications. The mechanical properties and microstructures of tungsten-25wt.% rhenium and tungsten-25wt.% rhenium with hafnium carbide are reported at ambient temperature, 1,371°C, and 1,926°C, after processing by three methods: hot isostatic pressing, swaging, and extrusion.

  12. Fabrication and properties of tungsten heavy metal alloys containing 30% to 90% tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Gurwell, W.E.; Nelson, R.G.; Dudder, G.B.; Davis, N.C.

    1984-09-01

    In 1983, Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a survey of tungsten heavy metal alloys having lower-than-normal (<90%) tungsten content. The purpose of the work was to develop tougher, more impact-resistant high-density alloys for applications benefitting from improved mechanical properties. Tungsten heavy metal alloys of 30 to 90% tungsten content were fabricated and their mechanical properties measured. Although ultimate strength was essentially independent of tungsten content, lower tungsten-content alloys had lower yield stress, hardness, and density, and decidedly higher elongations and impact energies. Cold work was effective in raising strength and hardness but detrimental to elongation and impact energies. Precipitation hardening and strain aging raised hardness effectively but had less influence on other mechanical properties. 34 figures, 7 tables.

  13. High strength and density tungsten-uranium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell

    1993-01-01

    Alloys of tungsten and uranium and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 55 vol % to about 85 vol %. A porous preform is made by sintering consolidated tungsten powder. The preform is impregnated with molten uranium such that (1) uranium fills the pores of the preform to form uranium in a tungsten matrix or (2) uranium dissolves portions of the preform to form a continuous uranium phase containing tungsten particles.

  14. MP-Align: alignment of metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Comparing the metabolic pathways of different species is useful for understanding metabolic functions and can help in studying diseases and engineering drugs. Several comparison techniques for metabolic pathways have been introduced in the literature as a first attempt in this direction. The approaches are based on some simplified representation of metabolic pathways and on a related definition of a similarity score (or distance measure) between two pathways. More recent comparative research focuses on alignment techniques that can identify similar parts between pathways. Results We propose a methodology for the pairwise comparison and alignment of metabolic pathways that aims at providing the largest conserved substructure of the pathways under consideration. The proposed methodology has been implemented in a tool called MP-Align, which has been used to perform several validation tests. The results showed that our similarity score makes it possible to discriminate between different domains and to reconstruct a meaningful phylogeny from metabolic data. The results further demonstrate that our alignment algorithm correctly identifies subpathways sharing a common biological function. Conclusion The results of the validation tests performed with MP-Align are encouraging. A comparison with another proposal in the literature showed that our alignment algorithm is particularly well-suited to finding the largest conserved subpathway of the pathways under examination. PMID:24886436

  15. Girder Alignment Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zackary; Ruland, Robert; LeCocq, Catherine; Lundahl, Eric; Levashov, Yurii; Reese, Ed; Rago, Carl; Poling, Ben; Schafer, Donald; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Wienands, Uli; /SLAC

    2010-11-18

    The girders for the LCLS undulator system contain components which must be aligned with high accuracy relative to each other. The alignment is one of the last steps before the girders go into the tunnel, so the alignment must be done efficiently, on a tight schedule. This note documents the alignment plan which includes efficiency and high accuracy. The motivation for girder alignment involves the following considerations. Using beam based alignment, the girder position will be adjusted until the beam goes through the center of the quadrupole and beam finder wire. For the machine to work properly, the undulator axis must be on this line and the center of the undulator beam pipe must be on this line. The physics reasons for the undulator axis and undulator beam pipe axis to be centered on the beam are different, but the alignment tolerance for both are similar. In addition, the beam position monitor must be centered on the beam to preserve its calibration. Thus, the undulator, undulator beam pipe, quadrupole, beam finder wire, and beam position monitor axes must all be aligned to a common line. All relative alignments are equally important, not just, for example, between quadrupole and undulator. We begin by making the common axis the nominal beam axis in the girder coordinate system. All components will be initially aligned to this axis. A more accurate alignment will then position the components relative to each other, without incorporating the girder itself.

  16. Fatigue degradation and life prediction of glass fabric polymer composites under tension/torsion biaxial loadings

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, H.; Fujii, T.J.; Morita, Y.

    1995-10-01

    Fatigue degradation and life prediction for a plain woven glass fabric reinforced polyester under tension/torsion biaxial loadings were investigated. Typical S-N diagrams were given at several biaxial ratios when the biaxial cyclic loads were proportionally applied to the specimens. A fatigue damage accumulation model based on the continuum damage mechanics theory was developed, where modulus decay ratios in tension and shear were used as indicators for damage variables (D). In the model, the damage variables are considered to be second-order tensors. Then, the maximum principal damage variable, D* is introduced. According to the similarity to the principal stress, D* is obtained as the maximum eigen value of damage tensor [D{prime}]. Under proportional tension/torsion loadings, fatigue lives were satisfactorily predicted at any biaxial stress ratios using the present model in which the fatigue characteristics only under uniaxial tension and pure torsion loadings were needed. For a certain biaxial stress ratio, the effect of loading path on the fatigue strength was examined. The experimental result does not show a strong effect of loading path on the fatigue life.

  17. Biaxial order parameter in the homologous series of orthogonal bent-core smectic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenilayam, S.; Panarin, Y. P.; Vij, J. K.; Osipov, M.; Lehmann, A.; Tschierske, C.

    2013-07-01

    The fundamental parameter of the uniaxial liquid crystalline state that governs nearly all of its physical properties is the primary orientational order parameter (S) for the long axes of molecules with respect to the director. The biaxial liquid crystals (LCs) possess biaxial order parameters depending on the phase symmetry of the system. In this paper we show that in the first approximation a biaxial orthogonal smectic phase can be described by two primary order parameters: S for the long axes and C for the ordering of the short axes of molecules. The temperature dependencies of S and C are obtained by the Haller's extrapolation technique through measurements of the optical birefringence and biaxiality on a nontilted polar antiferroelectric (Sm-APA) phase of a homologous series of LCs built from the bent-core achiral molecules. For such a biaxial smectic phase both S and C, particularly the temperature dependency of the latter, are being experimentally determined. Results show that S in the orthogonal smectic phase composed of bent cores is higher than in Sm-A calamatic LCs and C is also significantly large.

  18. Direct Electrochemical Preparation of Cobalt, Tungsten, and Tungsten Carbide from Cemented Carbide Scrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xiangjun; Xi, Xiaoli; Nie, Zuoren; Zhang, Liwen; Ma, Liwen

    2017-02-01

    A novel process of preparing cobalt, tungsten, and tungsten carbide powders from cemented carbide scrap by molten salt electrolysis has been investigated in this paper. In this experiment, WC-6Co and NaCl-KCl salt were used as sacrificial anode and electrolyte, respectively. The dissolution potential of cobalt and WC was determined by linear sweep voltammetry to be 0 and 0.6 V ( vs Ag/AgCl), respectively. Furthermore, the electrochemical behavior of cobalt and tungsten ions was investigated by a variety of electrochemical techniques. Results of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square-wave voltammetry show that the cobalt and tungsten ions existed as Co2+ and W2+ on melts, respectively. The effect of applied voltage, electrolysis current, and electrolysis times on the composition of the product was studied. Results showed that pure cobalt powder can be obtained when the electrolysis potential is lower than 0.6 V or during low current and short times. Double-cathode and two-stage electrolysis was utilized for the preparation of cobalt, tungsten carbide, and tungsten powders. Additionally, X-ray diffraction results confirm that the product collected at cathodes 1 and 2 is pure Co and WC, respectively. Pure tungsten powder was obtained after electrolysis of the second part. Scanning electron microscope results show that the diameters of tungsten, tungsten carbide, and cobalt powder are smaller than 100, 200, and 200 nm, respectively.

  19. Properties of tungsten and tungsten disilicide layers on Si(100) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cros, A.; Pierrisnard, R.; Pierre, F.; Layet, J. M.; Meyer, F.

    1989-09-01

    Tungsten layers have been evaporated on Si(100) surfaces under ultra high vacuum conditions. The tungsten is in the α phase. Before the disilicide formation (at ˜ 700°C), a low temperature (400°C) reaction has been observed. Si atoms segregate at the surface and do not form crystalline WSI 2 while the tungsten layer stays in the α phase. It is suggested that this low temperature reaction plays an important role in the roughness and the adhesion properties of the tungsten disilicide subsequently grown.

  20. Tungsten wire for incandescent lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, J.L.; Briant, C.L. )

    1990-09-01

    Tungsten wire for incandescent lamp filaments must operate at high temperatures and for long times. To meet these requirements, the grain morphology of the wire must be controlled to reduce the propensity for grain boundary sliding. The morphology is a function of the distribution of very small pockets of potassium in the wire and the mechanical processing from ingot to wire. The behavior of the filament is directly related to the grain morphology. This paper describes the mechanism by which the potassium is incorporated into and distributed in the ingot. The elongation and spheroidization of the bubbles during hot rolling and swaging is also examined and related to the grain morphology of wire. Some indications of the relationship between grain morphology and filament behavior are also given.

  1. Composition of CVD tungsten silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, T.; Takahashi, H.; Ishizawa, Y.

    1987-05-01

    The composition of tungsten silicide (WSi/sub x/) deposited by chemical vapor deposition on silicon and silicon dioxide substrates was studied. The composition x changed from 2.7 to 2.2 with varying WF/sub 6/ flow rate from 6 to 20 cm/sup 3//min in the deposition on silicon. When annealing was performed at 1000C, the dissociation of excess silicon occurred from the nonstoichiometric silicide in the layer on the silicon. As a result, the composition of each layer, which was different when deposited, tended toward the same composition of around 2.1. This result indicated the formation of near-stoichiometric silicide as a result of annealing.

  2. Dielectronic recombination of tungsten ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bowen; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Dong, Chenzhong; Chen, Ximeng

    2016-08-01

    Ab initio calculations of dielectronic recombination rate coefficients of Ne-, Pd- and Ag-like tungsten have been performed. Energy levels, radiative transition probabilities and autoionization rates were calculated using the Flexible Atomic Code. The contributions from different channels to the total rate coefficients are discussed. The present calculated rate coefficients are compared with other calculations where available. Excellent agreement has been found for Ne-like W while a large discrepancy was found for Pd-like W, which implies that more ab initio calculations and experimental measurements are badly needed. Further calculations demonstrated that the influence of configuration interaction is small while nonresonant radiative stabilizing (NRS) contribution to doubly excited non-autoionizing states are vital. The data obtained are expected to be useful for modeling plasmas for fusion applications, especially for the ITER community, which makes experimental verification even more essential.

  3. Modeling of biaxial gimbal-less MEMS scanning mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Wantoch, Thomas; Gu-Stoppel, Shanshan; Senger, Frank; Mallas, Christian; Hofmann, Ulrich; Meurer, Thomas; Benecke, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    One- and two-dimensional MEMS scanning mirrors for resonant or quasi-stationary beam deflection are primarily known as tiny micromirror devices with aperture sizes up to a few Millimeters and usually address low power applications in high volume markets, e.g. laser beam scanning pico-projectors or gesture recognition systems. In contrast, recently reported vacuum packaged MEMS scanners feature mirror diameters up to 20 mm and integrated high-reflectivity dielectric coatings. These mirrors enable MEMS based scanning for applications that require large apertures due to optical constraints like 3D sensing or microscopy as well as for high power laser applications like laser phosphor displays, automotive lighting and displays, 3D printing and general laser material processing. This work presents modelling, control design and experimental characterization of gimbal-less MEMS mirrors with large aperture size. As an example a resonant biaxial Quadpod scanner with 7 mm mirror diameter and four integrated PZT (lead zirconate titanate) actuators is analyzed. The finite element method (FEM) model developed and computed in COMSOL Multiphysics is used for calculating the eigenmodes of the mirror as well as for extracting a high order (n < 10000) state space representation of the mirror dynamics with actuation voltages as system inputs and scanner displacement as system output. By applying model order reduction techniques using MATLABR a compact state space system approximation of order n = 6 is computed. Based on this reduced order model feedforward control inputs for different, properly chosen scanner displacement trajectories are derived and tested using the original FEM model as well as the micromirror.

  4. Tuning magnetism by biaxial strain in native ZnO.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chengxiao; Wang, Yuanxu; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Zhang, Guangbiao; Wang, Chao; Yang, Gui

    2015-07-07

    Magnetic ZnO, one of the most important diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS), has attracted great scientific interest because of its possible technological applications in optomagnetic devices. Magnetism in this material is usually delicately tuned by the doping level, dislocations, and local structures. The rational control of magnetism in ZnO is a highly attractive approach for practical applications. Here, the tuning effect of biaxial strain on the d(0) magnetism of native imperfect ZnO is demonstrated through first-principles calculations. Our calculation results show that strain conditions have little effect on the defect formation energy of Zn and O vacancies in ZnO, but they do affect the magnetism significantly. For a cation vacancy, increasing the compressive strain will obviously decrease its magnetic moment, while tensile strain cannot change the moment, which remains constant at 2 μB. For a singly charged anion vacancy, however, the dependence of the magnetic moment on strain is opposite to that of the Zn vacancy. Furthermore, the ferromagnetic state is always present, irrespective of the strain type, for ZnO with two zinc vacancies, 2VZns. A large tensile strain is favorable for improving the Curie temperature and realizing room temperature ferromagnetism for ZnO-based native semiconductors. For ZnO with two singly charged oxygen vacancies, 2Vs, no ferromagnetic ordering can be observed. Our work points the way to the rational design of materials beyond ZnO with novel non-intrinsic functionality by simply tuning the strain in a thin film form.

  5. Nondestructive measurement of esophageal biaxial mechanical properties utilizing sonometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aho, Johnathon M.; Qiang, Bo; Wigle, Dennis A.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Urban, Matthew W.

    2016-07-01

    Malignant esophageal pathology typically requires resection of the esophagus and reconstruction to restore foregut continuity. Reconstruction options are limited and morbid. The esophagus represents a useful target for tissue engineering strategies based on relative simplicity in comparison to other organs. The ideal tissue engineered conduit would have sufficient and ideally matched mechanical tolerances to native esophageal tissue. Current methods for mechanical testing of esophageal tissues both in vivo and ex vivo are typically destructive, alter tissue conformation, ignore anisotropy, or are not able to be performed in fluid media. The aim of this study was to investigate biomechanical properties of swine esophageal tissues through nondestructive testing utilizing sonometry ex vivo. This method allows for biomechanical determination of tissue properties, particularly longitudinal and circumferential moduli and strain energy functions. The relative contribution of mucosal-submucosal layers and muscular layers are compared to composite esophagi. Swine thoracic esophageal tissues (n  =  15) were tested by pressure loading using a continuous pressure pump system to generate stress. Preconditioning of tissue was performed by pressure loading with the pump system and pre-straining the tissue to in vivo length before data was recorded. Sonometry using piezocrystals was utilized to determine longitudinal and circumferential strain on five composite esophagi. Similarly, five mucosa-submucosal and five muscular layers from thoracic esophagi were tested independently. This work on esophageal tissues is consistent with reported uniaxial and biaxial mechanical testing and reported results using strain energy theory and also provides high resolution displacements, preserves native architectural structure and allows assessment of biomechanical properties in fluid media. This method may be of use to characterize mechanical properties of tissue engineered esophageal

  6. Biaxial flexural strength of bilayered zirconia using various veneering ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Chantranikul, Natravee

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) of one zirconia-based ceramic used with various veneering ceramics. MATERIALS AND METHODS Zirconia core material (Katana) and five veneering ceramics (Cerabien ZR; CZR, Lava Ceram; LV, Cercon Ceram Kiss; CC, IPS e.max Ceram; EM and VITA VM9; VT) were selected. Using the powder/liquid layering technique, bilayered disk specimens (diameter: 12.50 mm, thickness: 1.50 mm) were prepared to follow ISO standard 6872:2008 into five groups according to veneering ceramics as follows; Katana zirconia veneering with CZR (K/CZR), Katana zirconia veneering with LV (K/LV), Katana zirconia veneering with CC (K/CC), Katana zirconia veneering with EM (K/EM) and Katana zirconia veneering with VT (K/VT). After 20,000 thermocycling, load tests were conducted using a universal testing machine (Instron). The BFS were calculated and analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD (α=0.05). The Weibull analysis was performed for reliability of strength. The mode of fracture and fractured surface were observed by SEM. RESULTS It showed that K/CC had significantly the highest BFS, followed by K/LV. BFS of K/CZR, K/EM and K/VT were not significantly different from each other, but were significantly lower than the other two groups. Weibull distribution reported the same trend of reliability as the BFS results. CONCLUSION From the result of this study, the BFS of the bilayered zirconia/veneer composite did not only depend on the Young's modulus value of the materials. Further studies regarding interfacial strength and sintering factors are necessary to achieve the optimal strength. PMID:26576251

  7. Characterisation of the mechanical properties of infarcted myocardium in the rat under biaxial tension and uniaxial compression.

    PubMed

    Sirry, Mazin S; Butler, J Ryan; Patnaik, Sourav S; Brazile, Bryn; Bertucci, Robbin; Claude, Andrew; McLaughlin, Ron; Davies, Neil H; Liao, Jun; Franz, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the passive mechanical properties of infarcted tissue at different healing stages is essential to explore the emerging biomaterial injection-based therapy for myocardial infarction (MI). Although rats have been widely used as animal models in such investigations, the data in literature that quantify the passive mechanical properties of rat heart infarcts is very limited. MI was induced in rats and hearts were harvested immediately (0 day), 7, 14 and 28 days after infarction onset. Left ventricle anterioapical samples were cut and underwent equibiaxial and non equibiaxial tension followed by uniaxial compression mechanical tests. Histological analysis was conducted to confirm MI and to quantify the size of the induced infarcts. Infarcts maintained anisotropy and the nonlinear biaxial and compressive mechanical behaviour throughout the healing phases with the circumferential direction being stiffer than the longitudinal direction. Mechanical coupling was observed between the two axes in all infarct groups. The 0, 7, 14 and 28 days infarcts showed 438, 693, 1048 and 1218kPa circumferential tensile moduli. The 28 day infarct group showed a significantly higher compressive modulus compared to the other infarct groups (p=0.0060, 0.0293, and 0.0268 for 0, 7 and 14 days groups). Collagen fibres were found to align in a preferred direction for all infarct groups supporting the observed mechanical anisotropy. The presented data are useful for developing material models for healing infarcts and for setting a baseline for future assessment of emerging mechanical-based MI therapies.

  8. Biaxially stretchable silver nanowire conductive film embedded in a taro leaf-templated PDMS surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chunhui; Jiu, Jinting; Araki, Teppei; Koga, Hirotaka; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Wang, Hao; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2017-01-01

    A biaxially wave-shaped polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface was developed simply by using a taro leaf as the template. The resulting leaf-templated PDMS (L-PDMS) possesses a micro-sized curved interface structure, which is greatly beneficial for the exact embedding of a silver nanowire (AgNW) network conductive film covering the L-PDMS surface. The intrinsically curved AgNW/L-PDMS film surface, without any dangling nanowire, could prevent the fracture of AgNWs due to stretching stress even after cyclic stretching. More importantly, it also exhibited a biaxial stretchability, which showed ultra-stable resistance after continuous stretching for 100 cycles each in X- and Y-directions. This biaxially stretchable AgNW/L-PDMS film could extend the application fields in stretchable electronics.

  9. Strain distribution and Raman spectroscopy in individual Ge/CdSe biaxial nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Wang, Chunrui; Xu, Jing; Wu, Binhe; Ouyang, Lizhi; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Chen, Xiaoshuang

    2015-02-01

    The interface property modulated by strain is one of the key factors that determine the performance of heterostructure nanowire devices. In this study, the strain distribution in a Ge/CdSe biaxial nanowire was calculated by a finite element method using boundary conditions. The components of the strain tensor of the biaxial nanowire show different characteristics from those of core-shell nanowires. The relationship between the strain and Raman mode of a Ge sub-nanowire is then revealed. The calculated and measured Raman modes of a Ge sub-nanowire in a Ge/CdSe biaxial nanowire have the same variation in redshift and wide peak as those of unstrained Ge nanowires.

  10. Prediction of failure envelopes of composite tubes subjected to biaxial loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargiulo, C.; Marchetti, M.; Rizzo, A.

    1996-09-01

    Practical cylindrical structures including pressure vessels, pipes, drive shafts and rochet motors are usually subjected to complex loads involving biaxial or triaxial stress systems. In particular, filamentary composite vessels are used in applications of Space Shuttle tankage, as well as for the storage of fluids in various commercial applications. The object of this work is to provide numerical and experiment data on the strength of filament wound carbon fibre reinforced epoxy resin thin tubes under biaxial loading conditions. Internal or external pressure and axial loads are applied simultaneously to produce a variety of biaxial stress conditions. The effects of the winding angle of the fibre reinforcements on the failure loads of the pipes have been examined. Finite elements and thin shell analysis have been applied to the problem using different failure criteria in order to predict the specimen's failure for a comparison with experimental results.

  11. The Relationship Between Microstructure and Toughness of Biaxially Oriented Semicrytalline Polyester Films

    SciTech Connect

    Rao,Y.; Greener, J.; Avila-Orta, C.; Hsiao, B.; Blanton, T.

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between microstructure and toughness of biaxially stretched semicrystalline polyester films was investigated. Optically transparent films were prepared by simultaneous biaxial stretching of melt-cast sheets near the glass transition temperature. Copolyesters of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) with different compositions of two diols: ethylene glycol (EG) and cyclohexane dimethanol (CHDM), and stoichiometrically matched terephthalic acid were used to produce films with different degrees of crystallinity. In addition, the PET films with different crystalline morphologies were produced by constrained high temperature annealing of biaxially oriented films. The toughness, degree of crystallinity and crystalline morphology/molecular ordering were studied using mechanical testing, synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) techniques, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicate that the toughness of a semicrystalline polymeric film is determined by the interconnectivity of the crystalline phase within the amorphous phase and is greatly influenced by the degree of crystallinity and the underlying crystalline morphology.

  12. Strain aging in tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dowding, R.J.; Tauer, K.J. . Materials Technology Lab.)

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on tungsten heavy alloys which are two-phase mixtures of body center cubic (BCC) tungsten surrounded by a face center cubic (FCC) matrix. The matrix is most often composed of nickel and iron in a ratio of 70:30 but, occasionally, the matrix may also contain cobalt or copper. Nickel, however, is always the primary matrix component. The tungsten heavy alloy is fabricated through powder metallurgy techniques. Elemental powders are blended, pressed to shape, and sintered. Depending upon the tungsten content, the sintering temperatures are usually in the range of 1450{degrees}C to 1525{degrees}C. These temperatures are high enough that, as a result, the matrix is at the liquid phase and the process is known as liquid phase sintering. At the liquid phase temperature, the matrix becomes saturated with tungsten, but this does not change the FCC character of the matrix. The sintering is usually done in a hydrogen atmosphere furnace in order to reduce the oxides on the tungsten powder surfaces and create clean, active surfaces which will enhance the adherence between the tungsten and the matrix. The hydrogen atmosphere also creates the presence of excess dissolved hydrogen in the alloy. It has been shown that the hydrogen degrades the toughness and ductility of the heavy alloy. A post-sintering vacuum heat treatment is generally required to insure that there is no residual hydrogen present. The as-sintered tensile strength of a 90% tungsten, 7% nickel, 3% iron alloy (90W) is in the range of 800 to 940 MPa and can be increased significantly by cold working, usually rolling or swaging. Swaging to reductions in area of 20% can result in tensile strengths of 1250 MPa or more. As the strength increases, the elongation, which may have been 30% or more, decreases to less than 5%.

  13. Tungsten Speciation in Firing Range Soils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    32 Figure 8. Microprobe XRF images of normalized iron, tungsten, and calcium fluorescence intensities for a soil collected...measuring the XRF spectrum for 250 μs at each point (2 s at NSLS). Regions of interest were defined for a number of elements, includ- ing tungsten, calcium ...K-range. Nevertheless, iron K-edge XANES is highly effective at identify- ing and quantifying crystalline iron oxides, ferrihydrite, iron silicates

  14. Speciation and Geochemistry of Tungsten in Soil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    sodium tungstate dihydrate was purchased from Sigma Aldrich (St. Louis, MO) and Alfa Aesar (Ward Hill, MA), respectively. Single element and mixed...yielding an amorphous tungsten oxide (WO3) coating. This coating rapidly dissolves to yield the tungstate anion (WO42-), which can migrate in...well characterized. Tungsten exists in most environmental matrices as the soluble and mobile tungstate anion, which can polymerize with itself and

  15. Visualization of Gas Tungsten Arc Weld Pools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    flow visualization of Gas Tungsten Arc weld pools for HY-80 steel is presented using a pulsed laser light source and a conventional night~vision...visualization of Gas Tungsten Arc weld pools for HY-80 steel is presented using a pulsed laser light source and a conventional night-vision image-intensifier...effects of electromagnetic stirring on GTA welds in austenitic stainless steel . Changes in shape and solidification structure of welds observed

  16. International strategic mineral issues summary report: tungsten

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner, Antony B.T.; Sinclair, W. David; Amey, Earle B.

    1998-01-01

    In 1995, China and the former Soviet Union accounted for over three-fourths of the world's mine production of tungsten. China alone produced about two-thirds of world output. Given its vast resources, China will likely maintain its prominent role in world tungsten supply. By the year 2020, changes in supply patterns are likely to result from declining output from individual deposits in Australia, Austria, and Portugal and the opening of new mines in Canada, China, and the United Kingdom.

  17. Biaxial Stretch Improves Elastic Fiber Maturation, Collagen Arrangement, and Mechanical Properties in Engineered Arteries.

    PubMed

    Huang, Angela H; Balestrini, Jenna L; Udelsman, Brooks V; Zhou, Kevin C; Zhao, Liping; Ferruzzi, Jacopo; Starcher, Barry C; Levene, Michael J; Humphrey, Jay D; Niklason, Laura E

    2016-06-01

    Tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEVs) are typically produced using the pulsatile, uniaxial circumferential stretch to mechanically condition and strengthen the arterial grafts. Despite improvements in the mechanical integrity of TEVs after uniaxial conditioning, these tissues fail to achieve critical properties of native arteries such as matrix content, collagen fiber orientation, and mechanical strength. As a result, uniaxially loaded TEVs can result in mechanical failure, thrombus, or stenosis on implantation. In planar tissue equivalents such as artificial skin, biaxial loading has been shown to improve matrix production and mechanical properties. To date however, multiaxial loading has not been examined as a means to improve mechanical and biochemical properties of TEVs during culture. Therefore, we developed a novel bioreactor that utilizes both circumferential and axial stretch that more closely simulates loading conditions in native arteries, and we examined the suture strength, matrix production, fiber orientation, and cell proliferation. After 3 months of biaxial loading, TEVs developed a formation of mature elastic fibers that consisted of elastin cores and microfibril sheaths. Furthermore, the distinctive features of collagen undulation and crimp in the biaxial TEVs were absent in both uniaxial and static TEVs. Relative to the uniaxially loaded TEVs, tissues that underwent biaxial loading remodeled and realigned collagen fibers toward a more physiologic, native-like organization. The biaxial TEVs also showed increased mechanical strength (suture retention load of 303 ± 14.53 g, with a wall thickness of 0.76 ± 0.028 mm) and increased compliance. The increase in compliance was due to combinatorial effects of mature elastic fibers, undulated collagen fibers, and collagen matrix orientation. In conclusion, biaxial stretching is a potential means to regenerate TEVs with improved matrix production, collagen organization, and mechanical

  18. Tungsten targets the tumor microenvironment to enhance breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Alicia M; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients' years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery = 1.76 ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans.

  19. Tungsten Targets the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bolt, Alicia M.; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M.; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K.

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients’ years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery = 1.76 ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans. PMID:25324207

  20. Production and transformation of ring light beams by means of biaxial crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhevich, Anatol A.; Katranji, Evgeni G.; Mashchenko, Aleksander G.

    2001-03-01

    Universal method, permitting to form multi-ring light beams with a required quantity of rings from the circularly polarized Gaussian light beam, is proposed. This method permits to increase or decrease by 1 the order of an input beam wavefront screw dislocation, if beam has it. The method was realized by means of the optical scheme containing a biaxial crystal. Using biaxial KTP and (alpha) -HIO3 (iodic acid) crystals Bessel and multi-ring light beams with the first and the second order dislocations are obtained experimentally. The second harmonic generation by mono-, two- and four-ring light beams possessing WFSD1 in a nonlinear KTP crystal is studied experimentally.

  1. An anisotropic constitutive model with biaxial-tension coupling for woven composite reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuan; Huang, Xiaoshuang; Peng, Xiongqi; Gong, Youkun

    2016-10-01

    Based on fiber reinforced continuum mechanics theory, an anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model with biaxial tension coupling for woven composite reinforcements is developed. Experimental data from literature are used to identify material parameters in the constitutive model for a specific balanced plain woven fabric. The developed model is validated by comparing numerical results with experimental biaxial tension data under different stretch ratios and picture-frame shear data, demonstrating that the developed constitutive model is highly suitable to characterize the highly non-linear and strongly anisotropic mechanical behaviors of woven composite reinforcements under large deformation.

  2. Small angle grain boundary Ge films on biaxial CaF 2/glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaire, C.; Clemmer, P. C.; Li, H.-F.; Parker, T. C.; Snow, P.; Bhat, I.; Lee, S.; Wang, G.-C.; Lu, T.-M.

    2010-02-01

    We demonstrated that it is possible to grow single crystal-like Ge films on a glass substrate using a biaxially textured CaF 2 buffer layer at a low temperature of ˜400 °C. The CaF 2 buffer layer with the (1 1 1)<1 2 1> biaxial orientation was grown by the oblique angle deposition technique and characterized by X-ray pole figure analysis. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the Ge(1 1 1) heteroepitaxial films possess a single crystal-like structure with small angle grain boundaries of ≤2° misorientation.

  3. Behavior of reinforced concrete slabs subjected to combined punching shear and biaxial tension

    SciTech Connect

    Jau, W.C.; White, R.N.; Gergely, P.

    1982-09-01

    This investigation was a continuing study of peripheral (punching) shear strength of precracked, biaxially tensioned, orthogonally reinforced concrete slabs. This research was motivated by the need to determie the strength of a reinforced concrete containment vessel wall when subjected to combined internal pressure and punching shear loads normal to the wall. The study served to determine the effect of three major variables (shear span, size of loaded area, and reinforcing steel ratio) on punching shear strength of slabs that were precracked in biaxial tension and then held at one of the two tension levels (0 or 0.8f/sub y/) during shear load application.

  4. Tidal alignment of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, Jonathan; Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš

    2015-08-01

    We develop an analytic model for galaxy intrinsic alignments (IA) based on the theory of tidal alignment. We calculate all relevant nonlinear corrections at one-loop order, including effects from nonlinear density evolution, galaxy biasing, and source density weighting. Contributions from density weighting are found to be particularly important and lead to bias dependence of the IA amplitude, even on large scales. This effect may be responsible for much of the luminosity dependence in IA observations. The increase in IA amplitude for more highly biased galaxies reflects their locations in regions with large tidal fields. We also consider the impact of smoothing the tidal field on halo scales. We compare the performance of this consistent nonlinear model in describing the observed alignment of luminous red galaxies with the linear model as well as the frequently used "nonlinear alignment model," finding a significant improvement on small and intermediate scales. We also show that the cross-correlation between density and IA (the "GI" term) can be effectively separated into source alignment and source clustering, and we accurately model the observed alignment down to the one-halo regime using the tidal field from the fully nonlinear halo-matter cross correlation. Inside the one-halo regime, the average alignment of galaxies with density tracers no longer follows the tidal alignment prediction, likely reflecting nonlinear processes that must be considered when modeling IA on these scales. Finally, we discuss tidal alignment in the context of cosmic shear measurements.

  5. Tidal alignment of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, Jonathan; Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš E-mail: zvlah@stanford.edu

    2015-08-01

    We develop an analytic model for galaxy intrinsic alignments (IA) based on the theory of tidal alignment. We calculate all relevant nonlinear corrections at one-loop order, including effects from nonlinear density evolution, galaxy biasing, and source density weighting. Contributions from density weighting are found to be particularly important and lead to bias dependence of the IA amplitude, even on large scales. This effect may be responsible for much of the luminosity dependence in IA observations. The increase in IA amplitude for more highly biased galaxies reflects their locations in regions with large tidal fields. We also consider the impact of smoothing the tidal field on halo scales. We compare the performance of this consistent nonlinear model in describing the observed alignment of luminous red galaxies with the linear model as well as the frequently used 'nonlinear alignment model,' finding a significant improvement on small and intermediate scales. We also show that the cross-correlation between density and IA (the 'GI' term) can be effectively separated into source alignment and source clustering, and we accurately model the observed alignment down to the one-halo regime using the tidal field from the fully nonlinear halo-matter cross correlation. Inside the one-halo regime, the average alignment of galaxies with density tracers no longer follows the tidal alignment prediction, likely reflecting nonlinear processes that must be considered when modeling IA on these scales. Finally, we discuss tidal alignment in the context of cosmic shear measurements.

  6. Passive biaxial mechanical response of aged human iliac arteries.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Bauer, Christian A J; Mörth, Christian; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2003-06-01

    Inflation and extension tests of arteries are essential for the understanding of arterial wall mechanics. Data for such tests of human arteries are rare. At autopsy we harvested 10 non-diseased external iliac arteries of aged subjects (52-87 yrs). Structural homogeneity was ensured by means of ultrasound imaging, and anamneses of patients were recorded. We measured the axial in situ stretches, load-free geometries and opening angles. Passive biaxial mechanical responses of preconditioned cylindrical specimens were studied in 37 degrees C calcium-free Tyrode solution under quasistatic loading conditions. Specimens were subjected to pressure cycles varying from 0 to 33.3 kPa (250 mmHg) at nine fixed axial loads, varying from 0 to 9.90N. For the description of the load-deformation behavior we employed five "two-dimensional" orthotropic strain-energy functions frequently used in arterial wall mechanics. The associated constitutive models were compared in regard to their ability of representing the experimental data. Histology showed that the arteries were of the muscular type. In contrast to animal arteries they exhibited intimal layers of considerable thickness. The average ratio of wall thickness to outer diameter was 7.7, which is much less than observed for common animal arteries. We found a clear correlation between age and the axial in situ stretch lambda is (r = -0.72, P = 0.03), and between age and distensibility of specimens, i.e. aged specimens are less distensible. Axial in situ stretches were clearly smaller (1.07 +/- 0.09, mean +/- SD) than in animal arteries. For one specimen lambda is was even smaller than 1.0, i.e. the vessel elongated axially upon excision. The nonlinear and anisotropic load-deformation behavior showed small hystereses. For the majority of specimens we observed axial stretches smaller than 1.3 and circumferential stretches smaller than 1.1 for the investigated loading range. Data from in situ inflation tests showed a significant

  7. Atomic scale calculations of tungsten surface binding energy and beryllium-induced tungsten sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-02-01

    Tungsten surface binding energy is calculated using classical molecular dynamic simulations with three many-body potentials. We present the consistency in tungsten sputtering yield by beryllium bombardment between molecular dynamic LAMMPS code and binary collision approximation ITMC code using the new surface binding energy (11.75 eV). The commonly used heat of sublimation value (8.68 eV) could lead to overestimated sputtering yield results. The analysis of the sputtered tungsten angular distributions show that molecular dynamic accurately reproduced the [1 1 1] most prominent preferential ejection directions in bcc tungsten, while the distinct shapes by typical MC codes such as ITMC code is caused by the treatment of amorphous target. The ITMC calculated emitted tungsten energy profile matches the Thompson energy spectrum, while the molecular dynamic results generally follow the Falcone energy spectrum.

  8. A mechanism for selectivity loss during tungsten CVD

    SciTech Connect

    Creighton, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have investigated possible mechanisms for the loss of selectivity (i.e., deposition on silicon dioxide) during tungsten CVD by reduction of tungsten hexafluoride and found strong evidence that selectivity loss is initiated by desorption of tungsten subfluorides formed by the reaction of WF/sub 6/ with metallic tungsten surfaces. Adsorption and disproportionation of the tungsten subfluorides on the silicon dioxide surface produces a reactive state of tungsten that can lead directly to selectivity loss. The key feature of the experimental setup is the ability to independently heat a tungsten foil and a nearby oxide-covered silicon sample in the presence of tungsten hexafluoride. With the tungsten foil at 600/sup 0/C and the SiO/sub 2//Si sample at --30/sup 0/C under a WF/sub 6/ ambient, a tungsten subfluoride was found to deposit on the SiO/sub 2/ surface. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to measure a F/W ratio of 3.7 +- 0.5. Heating this tungsten subfluoride overlayer resulted in disporportionation to yield gas-phase WF/sub 6/ and metallic tungsten which remained on the surface. With the tungsten foil at 600/sup 0/C and the SiO/sub 2//Si sample at 300/sup 0/C in the presence of WF/sub 6/, metallic tungsten deposited directly on the SiO/sub 2/ without stopping at the subfluoride adsorption step. The net effect of this tungsten subfluoride desorption-disproportionation mechanism is the transport of tungsten from tungsten surfaces to silicon dioxide surfaces as well as other regions in the deposition chamber. Extrapolated rates for this process are high enough to explain the magnitude of the selectivity loss seen at normal CVD temperatures.

  9. Failure Investigation for QP Steel Sheets under uniaxial and Equal-Biaxial Tension Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Danqing; Li, Shuhui; He, Ji; Cui, Ronggao

    2016-08-01

    The Quenching and Partitioning (QP) steel sheet is new generation material to induce phase transformation for plasticity in forming vehicle parts. The phase transformation is strongly stress state dependent behavior in experiments, which should affect the failure timing and limit strain in forming processes. In this paper, Nakajima test with QP980 and DP1000 steel sheets under equal-biaxial loading condition is performed for failure behavior. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is adopted to obtain the volume fraction of retained austenite (fA). Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is used to record the surface strain field and its evolution during equal-biaxial tension deformation. The same level Dual Phase (DP) steel is also employed for the purpose of comparison. The results show that phase transformation in QP steel gives small impact on failure strain under equal biaxial tension condition which is contradicted with our understanding. It suggests that failure behavior under uniaxial tension of QP980 is strongly phase transformation dependent. But it shows almost independent under equal biaxial tension condition.

  10. Ultrasonic drawing of tungsten wire for incandescent lamps production.

    PubMed

    Mordyuk, B N; Mordyuk, V S; Buryak, V V

    2004-04-01

    An influence of ultrasonic treatment (drawing) on structure, high temperature durability, evaporation and creep behaviours of tungsten single crystal and wires were investigated. A relation of tungsten wires properties with dislocation distribution was determined.

  11. Some Tungsten Oxidation-Reduction Chemistry: A Paint Pot Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Miles; Monts, David L.

    1982-01-01

    Reports an oxidation-reduction experiment using tungsten, somewhat analogous to the classical student experiment involving oxidation-reduction of vanadium. Includes experimental procedures, results, and toxicity/cost of tungsten compounds. (Author/JN)

  12. Growth of tungsten oxide on carbon nanowalls templates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hua; Su, Yan; Chen, Shuo; Quan, Xie

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Tungsten oxide deposited on carbon nanowalls by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique. ► This composite has two-dimensional uniform morphology with a crystalline structure of monoclinic tungsten trioxide. ► Surface photoelectric voltage measurements show that this product has photoresponse properties. - Abstract: In the present work we present a simple approach for coupling tungsten oxide with carbon nanowalls. The two-dimensional carbon nanowalls with open boundaries were grown using plasma enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition, and the subsequent tungsten oxide growth was performed in the same equipment by direct heating of a tungsten filament. The tungsten oxide coating is found to have uniform morphology with a crystalline structure of monoclinic tungsten trioxide. Surface photoelectric voltage measurements show that this product has photoresponse properties. The method of synthesis described here provides an operable route to the production of two-dimensional tungsten oxide nanocomposites.

  13. Evaporites and strata-bound tungsten mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Ririe, G.T. )

    1989-02-01

    Discoidal gypsum crystal cavities occur in quartzites that host varying amounts of strata-bound scheelite mineralization near Halls Creek in Western Australia. The host quartzites have been regionally metamorphosed to greenschist facies and are contained within a Middle Proterozoic sequence that includes pelites, mafic and felsic volcanics, and volcaniclastic rocks. Textural, fluid inclusion, and oxygen isotope data indicate that scheelite was present in the host quartzites prior to regional metamorphism. The presence of crystal cavities after gypsum in the quartzites implies an evaporitic origin for this sequence. The continental-sabkha playa basins of the Mojave Desert, California, are suggested to be possible modern analogs-e.g., Searles Lake, where the tungsten content is up to 70 ppm WO{sub 3} in brines and 118 ppm in muds, and exceeds the amount of tungsten in all known deposits in the United States. Metamorphism of a continental evaporitic sequence containing tungsten could produce an assemblage of rocks very similar to those reported from several stratabound tungsten deposits. Some of these, such as at Halls Creek, may be related to original accumulations of tungsten in nonmarine evaporitic environments.

  14. Fabrication and evaluation of chemically vapor deposited tungsten heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacigalupi, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    A network of lithium-filled tungsten heat pipes is considered as a method of heat extraction from high temperature nuclear reactors. The need for material purity and shape versatility in these applications dictates the use of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten. Adaptability of CVD tungsten to complex heat pipe designs is shown. Deposition and welding techniques are described. Operation of two lithium-filled CVD tungsten heat pipes above 1800 K is discussed.

  15. Process for the recovery of tungsten in a pure form from tungsten-containing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchter, M.; Moscovici, A.

    1986-12-16

    A process is described for the recovery of tungsten from tungsten-containing materials which comprises the steps of (i) admixing the tungsten-containing material with a melt at a temperature of between 680/sup 0/C and 750/sup 0/C. The melt consists of a salt selected from the group consisting of sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite and mixtures thereof in a substantially stoichiometrical amount to the tungsten constituent of the tungsten-containing material. This is done to disintegrate the tungsten-containing material and to form sodium tungstate, cooling the melt, and leaching the cooled melt with water to obtain an aqueous solution of sodium tungstate; (ii) admixing a solution of calcium chloride with the aqueous solution of sodium tungstate at a temperature of between 40/sup 0/C and 95/sup 0/C to form a calcium tungstate precipitate and separating the calcium tungstate; (iii) admixing the calcium tungstate with a preheated concentrated hydrochloric acid solution to form a tungstic acid precipitate and a CaCl/sub 2/ solution having a concentration of between 80 g/l and 180 g/l free HCl and separating the tungstic acid precipitate and obtaining tungstic acid which is substantially free of calcium ions, and (iv) calcining the tungstic acid to convert it to tungstic oxide and reducing the tungstic oxide to form metallic tungsten.

  16. Gas-driven permeation of deuterium through tungsten and tungsten alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Ren, Chai; Oya, Yasuhisa; Otsuka, Teppei; Yamauchi, Yuji; Whaley, Josh A.

    2016-03-25

    Here, to address the transport and trapping of hydrogen isotopes, several permeation experiments are being pursued at both Sandia National Laboratories (deuterium gas-driven permeation) and Idaho National Laboratories (tritium gas- and plasma-driven tritium permeation). These experiments are in part a collaboration between the US and Japan to study the performance of tungsten at divertor relevant temperatures (PHENIX). Here we report on the development of a high temperature (≤1150 °C) gas-driven permeation cell and initial measurements of deuterium permeation in several types of tungsten: high purity tungsten foil, ITER-grade tungsten (grains oriented through the membrane), and dispersoid-strengthened ultra-fine grain (UFG) tungsten being developed in the US. Experiments were performed at 500–1000 °C and 0.1–1.0 atm D2 pressure. Permeation through ITER-grade tungsten was similar to earlier W experiments by Frauenfelder (1968–69) and Zaharakov (1973). Data from the UFG alloy indicates marginally higher permeability (< 10×) at lower temperatures, but the permeability converges to that of the ITER tungsten at 1000 °C. The permeation cell uses only ceramic and graphite materials in the hot zone to reduce the possibility for oxidation of the sample membrane. Sealing pressure is applied externally, thereby allowing for elevation of the temperature for brittle membranes above the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature.

  17. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, N.E.

    1988-03-10

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam. 5 figs.

  18. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Nelson E.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam.

  19. Hybrid vehicle motor alignment

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Michael Benjamin

    2001-07-03

    A rotor of an electric motor for a motor vehicle is aligned to an axis of rotation for a crankshaft of an internal combustion engine having an internal combustion engine and an electric motor. A locator is provided on the crankshaft, a piloting tool is located radially by the first locator to the crankshaft. A stator of the electric motor is aligned to a second locator provided on the piloting tool. The stator is secured to the engine block. The rotor is aligned to the crankshaft and secured thereto.

  20. Raman scattering from rapid thermally annealed tungsten silicide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dasgupta, Samhita; Jackson, Howard E.; Boyd, Joseph T.

    1987-01-01

    Raman scattering as a technique for studying the formation of tungsten silicide is presented. The tungsten silicide films have been formed by rapid thermal annealing of thin tungsten films sputter deposited on silicon substrates. The Raman data are interpreted by using data from resistivity measurements, Auger and Rutherford backscattering measurements, and scanning electron microscopy.

  1. 40 CFR 721.10168 - Cesium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cesium tungsten oxide. 721.10168... Substances § 721.10168 Cesium tungsten oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cesium tungsten oxide (PMN P-08-275; CAS No....

  2. 40 CFR 721.10168 - Cesium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cesium tungsten oxide. 721.10168... Substances § 721.10168 Cesium tungsten oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cesium tungsten oxide (PMN P-08-275; CAS No....

  3. 40 CFR 721.10168 - Cesium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cesium tungsten oxide. 721.10168... Substances § 721.10168 Cesium tungsten oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cesium tungsten oxide (PMN P-08-275; CAS No....

  4. 40 CFR 721.10168 - Cesium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cesium tungsten oxide. 721.10168... Substances § 721.10168 Cesium tungsten oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cesium tungsten oxide (PMN P-08-275; CAS No....

  5. 40 CFR 721.10168 - Cesium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cesium tungsten oxide. 721.10168... Substances § 721.10168 Cesium tungsten oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cesium tungsten oxide (PMN P-08-275; CAS No....

  6. TPV Systems with Solar Powered Tungsten Emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, A. S.; Khvostikov, V. P.; Khvostikova, O. A.; Gazaryan, P. Y.; Sorokina, S. V.; Andreev, V. M.

    2007-02-22

    A solar TPV generator development and characterization are presented. A double stage sunlight concentrator ensures 4600x concentration ratio. TPV modules based on tungsten emitters and GaSb cells were designed, fabricated and tested at indoor and outdoor conditions. The performance of tungsten emitter under concentrated solar radiation was analyzed. Emitter temperatures in the range of 1400-2000 K were measured, depending on the emitter size. The light distribution in the module has been characterized, 1x1 cm GaSb TPV cells were fabricated with the use of the Zn-diffusion and LPE technologies. The cell efficiency of 19% under illumination by a tungsten emitter (27% under spectra cut-off at {lambda} > 1820 nm) heated up to 1900-2000 K had been derived from experimentally measured PV parameters. The series connection of PV cells was ensured by the use of BeO ceramics. The possibilities of system performance improvement are discussed.

  7. Element 74, the Wolfram Versus Tungsten Controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Holden,N.E.

    2008-08-11

    Two and a quarter centuries ago, a heavy mineral ore was found which was thought to contain a new chemical element called heavy stone (or tungsten in Swedish). A few years later, the metal was separated from its oxide and the new element (Z=74) was called wolfram. Over the years since that time, both the names wolfram and tungsten were attached to this element in various countries. Sixty years ago, IUPAC chose wolfram as the official name for the element. A few years later, under pressure from the press in the USA, the alternative name tungsten was also allowed by IUPAC. Now the original, official name 'wolfram' has been deleted by IUPAC as one of the two alternate names for the element. The history of this controversy is described here.

  8. Superhard Diamond/tungsten Carbide Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Z Lin; J Zhang; B Li; L Wang; H Mao; R Hemley; Y Zhao

    2011-12-31

    We investigated the processing conditions of diamond/tungsten carbide (WC) composites using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction (XRD) and reactive sintering techniques at high pressure and high temperatures. The as-synthesized composites were characterized by synchrotron XRD, scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and indentation hardness measurements. Through tuning of the reaction temperature and time, we produced fully reacted, well-sintered, and nanostructured diamond composites with Vickers hardness of about 55 GPa and the grain size of WC binding matrix smaller than 50 nm. A specific set of orientation relationships between WC and tungsten is identified to gain microstructural insight into the reaction mechanism between diamond and tungsten.

  9. Characterization of plasma coated tungsten heavy alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, A.; Kapoor, D.; Lankford, J. Jr.; Nicholls, A.E.

    1996-06-01

    The detrimental environmental impact of Depleted Uranium-based penetrators have led to tremendous development efforts in the area of tungsten heavy alloy based penetrators. One line of investigation involves the coating of tungsten heavy alloys with materials that are prone to shear localization. Plasma spraying of Inconel 718 and 4340 steel have been used to deposit dense coatings on tungsten heavy alloy substrates. The aim of the investigation was to characterize the coating primarily in terms of its microstructure and a special push-out test. The paper describes the results of the push-out tests and analyzes some of the possible failure mechanisms by carrying out microstructural characterization of the failed rings obtained from the push out tests.

  10. Equipment simulation of selective tungsten deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, C.; Ulacia, J.I.; Hopfmann, C.; Flynn, P. )

    1992-02-01

    This paper presents the numerical modeling of a cold wall reactor for selective tungsten chemical vapor deposition. In a two dimensional simulation the mass and heat transfer equations were solved considering the five chemical species H{sub 2}, WF{sub 6}, HF, WF{sub x}, and SiF{sub y}. Detailed models for multicomponent diffusion and for the autocatalytic tungsten nucleation process were implemented. Model results are in good agreement with experimental findings. The simulations are used to study the impact of reactor design on selectivity.

  11. Measured emissivities of uranium and tungsten plasmas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.

    1971-01-01

    Uranium and tungsten absorption coefficients between 2,500-8500 A were measured as functions of thermodynamic variables. A gas-driven shock tube was used to obtain plasma temperatures, heavy metal partial pressures, and total pressures in the ranges 7,000-12,000 K, 0.02-1.0 atm, and 3.0-48 atm, respectively. Emission and absorption data were recorded both photographically and photoelectrically. The spectral distributions, thermal dependence and line-to-continuum ratios of the uranium and tungsten radiation differ distinctly. The uranium data are compared with theoretical predictions and with results from other experiments.

  12. Alignment of CEBAF cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, W.J.; Bisognano, J.J.; Fischer, J.

    1993-06-01

    CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, when completed, will house a 4 GeV recirculating accelerator. Each of the accelerator`s two linacs contains 160 superconducting radio frequency (SRF) 1497 MHz niobium cavities in 20 cryomodules. Alignments of the cavities within the cryomodule with respect to beam axis is critical to achieving the optimum accelerator performance. This paper discusses the rationale for the current specification on cavity mechanical alignment: 2 mrad (rms) applied to the 0.5 m active length cavities. We describe the tooling that was developed to achieve the tolerance at the time of cavity pair assembly, to preserve and integrate alignment during cryomodule assembly, and to translate alignment to appropriate installation in the beam line.

  13. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Daily, PNNL

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprint that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.

  14. Influence of tungsten content, swaging, and grain size on the viscoplastic response of tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, K.T.

    1992-12-31

    The response of tungsten-nickel-iron (W-Ni-Fe) alloys to high rates of deformation has been investigated using compression and torsional Kolsky bars. The influence of tungsten content, swaging, and grain size on the dynamic behavior of commercially available alloys has been examined, The results indicate that the flow stresses sustained by these materials have a distinct dependence on strain rate, over a range from 10(exp {minus}4)/sec to 7 x 10(exp 3)/sec. The rate sensitivity itself appears to be influenced by tungsten content and degree of prior swaging, but appears to be almost independent of tungsten grain size. Metallographic analyses and microhardness measurements were performed to study the microstructural evolution with increasing strain at high rates. Adiabatic shear localization has been observed in high-rate shearing tests; relatively narrow shear bands are formed, followed immediately by catastrophic fracture.

  15. Visible emission spectroscopy of highly charged tungsten ions in LHD: II. Evaluation of tungsten ion temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Nakai, Y.; Kato, D.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.; Hasuo, M.; Experiment Group2, LHD

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrated a polarization-resolved high resolution spectroscopy of a visible emission line of highly charged tungsten ions (λ0 = 668.899 nm, Shinohara et al Phys. Scr. 90 125402) for the large helical device (LHD) plasma, where the tungsten ions were introduced by a pellet injection. Its spectral profile shows broadening and polarization dependence, which are attributed to the Doppler and Zeeman effects, respectively. The tungsten ion temperature was evaluated for the first time from the broadening of visible the emission line, with its emission location determined by the Abel inversion of the chord-integrated emission intensities observed with multiple chords. The tungsten ion temperature was found to be close to the helium-like argon ion temperature, which is used as an ion temperature monitor in LHD.

  16. Surface alignment, anchoring transitions, optical properties, and topological defects in the nematic phase of thermotropic bent-core liquid crystal A131

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senyuk, B.; Wonderly, H.; Mathews, M.; Li, Q.; Shiyanovskii, S. V.; Lavrentovich, O. D.

    2010-10-01

    We study optical, structural, and surface anchoring properties of thermotropic nematic bent-core material A131. The focus is on the features associated with orientational order as the material has been reported to exhibit not only the usual uniaxial nematic but also the biaxial nematic phase. We demonstrate that A131 experiences a surface anchoring transition from a perpendicular to tilted alignment when the temperature decreases. The features of the tilted state are consistent with surface-induced birefringence associated with smectic layering near the surface and a molecular tilt that changes along the normal to the substrates. The surface-induced birefringence is reduced to zero by a modest electric field that establishes a uniform uniaxial nematic state. Both refractive and absorptive optical properties of A131 are consistent with the uniaxial order. We found no evidence of the “polycrystalline” biaxial behavior in the cells placed in crossed electric and magnetic fields. We observe stable topological point defects (boojums and hedgehogs) and nonsingular “escaped” disclinations pertinent only to the uniaxial order. Finally, freely suspended films of A131 show uniaxial nematic and smectic textures; a decrease in the film thickness expands the temperature range of stability of smectic textures, supporting the idea of surface-induced smectic layering. Our conclusion is that A131 features only a uniaxial nematic phase and that the apparent biaxiality is caused by subtle surface effects rather than by the bulk biaxial phase.

  17. Quantification of Shear Deformations and Corresponding Stresses in the Biaxially Tested Human Myocardium.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Gerhard; Haspinger, Daniel Ch; Andrä, Michaela; Sacherer, Michael; Viertler, Christian; Regitnig, Peter; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2015-10-01

    One goal of cardiac research is to perform numerical simulations to describe/reproduce the mechanoelectrical function of the human myocardium in health and disease. Such simulations are based on a complex combination of mathematical models describing the passive mechanical behavior of the myocardium and its electrophysiology, i.e., the activation of cardiac muscle cells. The problem in developing adequate constitutive models is the shortage of experimental data suitable for detailed parameter estimation in specific functional forms. A combination of shear and biaxial extension tests with different loading protocols on different specimen orientations is necessary to capture adequately the direction-dependent (orthotropic) response of the myocardium. In most experimental animal studies, where planar biaxial extension tests on the myocardium have been conducted, the generated shear stresses were neither considered nor discussed. Hence, in this study a method is presented which allows the quantification of shear deformations and related stresses. It demonstrates an approach for experimenters as to how the generation of these shear stresses can be minimized during mechanical testing. Experimental results on 14 passive human myocardial specimens, obtained from nine human hearts, show the efficiency of this newly developed method. Moreover, the influence of the clamping technique of the specimen, i.e., the load transmission between the testing device and the tissue, on the stress response is determined by testing an isotropic material (Latex). We identified that the force transmission between the testing device and the specimen by means of hooks and cords does not influence the performed experiments. We further showed that in-plane shear stresses definitely exist in biaxially tested human ventricular myocardium, but can be reduced to a minimum by preparing the specimens in an appropriate manner. Moreover, we showed whether shear stresses can be neglected when performing

  18. Comparing the effects of uniaxial and biaxial strains on the structural stability and electronic structure in wurtzite ZnS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Dong; Duan, Yifeng; Zhao, Botao; Qin, Lixia; Shi, Liwei; Tang, Gang; Shi, Hongliang

    2013-07-01

    Structural stability and electronic structure of wurtzite ZnS under uniaxial and biaxial strains are systematically studied using the HSE hybrid functional. The two types of strain display the markedly different influences on the structural and electronic properties: (I) The newly predicted graphite-like phase is observed at large compressive uniaxial strains, not at large tensile biaxial strains, which is attributed to the different elastic responses to uniaxial and biaxial strains. (II) The direct band structures are obtained in wurtzite ZnS under uniaxial and biaxial strains, whereas the indirect band gaps are only observed in graphite-like ZnS under large uniaxial strain. Our results are different from the widely accepted conclusion but are in good agreement with the available experimental data.

  19. Effect of phase symmetry on the NMR spectrum of acetonitrile oriented in a uniaxial-biaxial-uniaxial phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepak, H. S. Vinay; Yelamaggad, C. V.; Khetrapal, C. L.; Ramanathan, K. V.

    2016-09-01

    We report here the measurement of the Csbnd H and the Hsbnd H dipolar couplings of the methyl group of acetonitrile oriented in the biaxial liquid crystal potassium laurate/1-decanol/water system. These parameters show large variations when measured as a function of temperature. The variations follow the symmetry of the phase as the liquid crystal goes through the sequence of uniaxial - biaxial - uniaxial phases and show a close correspondence to the phase changes that occur in the liquid crystalline solvent coinciding with the onset of biaxiality. The Hsbnd Csbnd H bond angle calculated after incorporating vibrational corrections to the dipolar couplings is discussed in terms of contributions in the case of the biaxial liquid crystal arising from vibration-rotation interaction effects.

  20. Penetration depth at various Raman excitation wavelengths and stress model for Raman spectrum in biaxially-strained Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, JianJun; Yang, Chao; Hu, HuiYong; Dai, XianYing; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, HeMing

    2013-11-01

    The carrier mobility of Si material can be enhanced under strain, and the stress magnitude can be measured by the Raman spectrum. In this paper, we aim to study the penetration depths into biaxially-strained Si materials at various Raman excitation wavelengths and the stress model corresponding to Raman spectrum in biaxially-strained Si. The experimental results show that it is best to use 325 nm excitation to measure the material stress in the top strained Si layer, and that one must pay attention to the distortion of the buffer layers on measuring results while 514 nm excitation is also measurable. Moreover, we established the stress model for Raman spectrum of biaxially-strained Si based on the Secular equation. One can obtain the stress magnitude in biaxially-strained Si by the model, as long as the results of the Raman spectrum are given. Our quantitative results can provide valuable references for stress analysis on strained materials.

  1. Electrical Properties of Tungsten Filaments and Films Fabricated by the Reduction of Tungsten Hexafluoride by Silicon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinerman, Alan Dov

    1987-12-01

    A novel method of photolithography has been developed for fabricating ultrathin tungsten filaments and films. It is based on the selective deposition of tungsten via low pressure chemical vapor deposition on undoped polycrystalline silicon. Tungsten filaments have been fabricated with heights from 93nm down to 5nm, and with lengths from 10 to 350mu. Tungsten films from 3 to 49nm were simultaneously fabricated on the same silicon wafer. The self-limiting thickness of the deposited tungsten layer, and the amount of encroachment of tungsten into the silicon/silicon dioxide interface is affected by the surface treatment used immediately prior to the tungsten deposition. Various plasma and wet chemical treatments have been studied. A quick etch of the polycrystalline silicon in a dilute mixture of HF in HNO_ {3} acid minimizes encroachment. Encroachment is maximized by etching in CF_{4} /O_{2} plasma. Both treatments are isotropic etches of silicon. The resistance of the filaments and films has been measured from.05 to 400K and in magnetic fields up to 5 tesla. The filaments and films have a superconducting transition temperature (T_{rm c}) between.7 and 4.1K, and a critical field larger than 5 tesla. The superconducting transitions are very broad, possibly due to a distribution of grain sizes and strain. The high values obtained for T_ {rm c} and the x-ray diffraction studies suggest that the tungsten deposits in both alpha and beta phases. The broad superconducting transition suppresses localization and electron-electron interactions effects. The temperature dependence of the resistance between 30 and 400K is different for films and filaments. The filaments and films were deposited simultaneously and there should be no dimensionality effects in this temperature range.

  2. Thermal cycling and high power density hydrogen ion beam irradiation of tungsten layers on tungsten substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Gretskaya, I. Yu; Grunin, A. V.; Dyachenko, M. Yu; Puntakov, N. A.; Sadovskiy, Ya A.

    2016-09-01

    Tungsten layers with iron impurity were deposited on tungsten substrates modeling re-deposited layers in a fusion device. The samples were tested by thermocycling and hydrogen ion beam tests. Thermocycling revealed globule formation on the surface. The size of the globules depended on iron impurity content in the coating deposited. Pore formation was observed which in some cases lead to exfoliation of the coatings. Hydrogen ion irradiation lead to formation of blisters on the coating and finally its exfoliation.

  3. Curriculum Alignment Research Suggests that Alignment Can Improve Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squires, David

    2012-01-01

    Curriculum alignment research has developed showing the relationship among three alignment categories: the taught curriculum, the tested curriculum and the written curriculum. Each pair (for example, the taught and the written curriculum) shows a positive impact for aligning those results. Following this, alignment results from the Third…

  4. Visible light photoinactivation of bacteria by tungsten oxide nanostructures formed on a tungsten foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasempour, Fariba; Azimirad, Rouhollah; Amini, Abbas; Akhavan, Omid

    2015-05-01

    Antibacterial activity of tungsten oxide nanorods/microrods were studied against Escherichia coli bacteria under visible light irradiation and in dark. A two-step annealing process at temperatures up to 390 °C and 400-800 °C was applied to synthesize the tungsten oxide nanorods/microrods on tungsten foils using KOH as a catalyst. Annealing the foils at 400 °C in the presence of catalyst resulted in formation of tungsten oxide nanorods (with diameters of 50-90 nm and crystalline phase of WO3) on surface of tungsten foils. By increasing the annealing temperature up to 800 °C, tungsten oxide microrods with K2W6O19 crystalline phase were formed on the foils. The WO3 nanorods showed a strong antibacterial property under visible light irradiation, corresponding to >92% bacterial inactivation within 24 h irradiation at room temperature, while the K2W6O19 microrods formed at 800 °C could inactivate only ∼45% of the bacteria at the same conditions.

  5. Plasma-enhanced etching of tungsten, tungsten silicide, and molybdenum in chlorine-containing discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Fischl, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    Thin films of tungsten, tungsten silicide, and molybdenum were etched both within and downstream from Cl{sub 2} discharges. Without a discharge, molecular chlorine did not etch the films. Experimental conditions ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 Torr pressure, 30 to 180{degree}C electrode temperature, 0.2 to 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} power density, and 3 to 200 sccm flow rate. In-discharge etch rates varied from 10 to 90 nm/min for tungsten (W), 10 to 450 nm/min for tungsten silicide (WSi{sub x}), and 1 to 8 nm/min for molybdenum (Mo). Small additions of BCl{sub 3}, during W and WSi{sub x} etching, significantly increased the etch rates and improved the reproducibility. When samples were positioned downstream from a Cl{sub 2} discharge, etching proceeded solely by chemical reaction of the film with chlorine atoms. Downstream and in-plasma tungsten etch rates were approximately equal at 110{degree}C, but the chlorine atom etch rate dropped more rapidly than the in-plasma etch rate as temperature decreased. In contrast, molybdenum etched faster by atoms alone than in the plasma, although atom etching was not observed below 100{degree}C. Reactions of tungsten with a modulated beam of chlorine atoms and molecules were also studied.

  6. Gas-driven permeation of deuterium through tungsten and tungsten alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Fang, Zhigang Zak; ...

    2016-03-25

    Here, to address the transport and trapping of hydrogen isotopes, several permeation experiments are being pursued at both Sandia National Laboratories (deuterium gas-driven permeation) and Idaho National Laboratories (tritium gas- and plasma-driven tritium permeation). These experiments are in part a collaboration between the US and Japan to study the performance of tungsten at divertor relevant temperatures (PHENIX). Here we report on the development of a high temperature (≤1150 °C) gas-driven permeation cell and initial measurements of deuterium permeation in several types of tungsten: high purity tungsten foil, ITER-grade tungsten (grains oriented through the membrane), and dispersoid-strengthened ultra-fine grain (UFG) tungstenmore » being developed in the US. Experiments were performed at 500–1000 °C and 0.1–1.0 atm D2 pressure. Permeation through ITER-grade tungsten was similar to earlier W experiments by Frauenfelder (1968–69) and Zaharakov (1973). Data from the UFG alloy indicates marginally higher permeability (< 10×) at lower temperatures, but the permeability converges to that of the ITER tungsten at 1000 °C. The permeation cell uses only ceramic and graphite materials in the hot zone to reduce the possibility for oxidation of the sample membrane. Sealing pressure is applied externally, thereby allowing for elevation of the temperature for brittle membranes above the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature.« less

  7. Electrospark doping of steel with tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Denisova, Yulia Shugurov, Vladimir; Seksenalina, Malika; Ivanova, Olga Ikonnikova, Irina; Kunitsyna, Tatyana Vlasov, Victor; Klopotov, Anatoliy; Ivanov, Yuriy

    2016-01-15

    The paper is devoted to the numerical modeling of thermal processes and the analysis of the structure and properties of the surface layer of carbon steel subjected to electrospark doping with tungsten. The problem of finding the temperature field in the system film (tungsten) / substrate (iron) is reduced to the solution of the heat conductivity equation. A one-dimensional case of heating and cooling of a plate with the thickness d has been considered. Calculations of temperature fields formed in the system film / substrate synthesized using methods of electrospark doping have been carried out as a part of one-dimensional approximation. Calculations have been performed to select the mode of the subsequent treatment of the system film / substrate with a high-intensity pulsed electron beam. Authors revealed the conditions of irradiation allowing implementing processes of steel doping with tungsten. A thermodynamic analysis of phase transformations taking place during doping of iron with tungsten in equilibrium conditions has been performed. The studies have been carried out on the surface layer of the substrate modified using the method of electrospark doping. The results showed the formation in the surface layer of a structure with a highly developed relief and increased strength properties.

  8. Gas tungsten arc welder with electrode grinder

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Brown, William F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  9. Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients

    SciTech Connect

    John Scott O'Dell

    2006-12-31

    The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

  10. Fracture assessment of HSST Plate 14 shallow-flaw cruciform bend specimens tested under biaxial loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Williams, P.T.; Pennell, W.E.

    1998-06-01

    A technology to determine shallow-flaw fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is being developed for application to the safety assessment of RPVs containing postulated shallow surface flaws. Matrices of cruciform beam tests were developed to investigate and quantify the effects of temperature, biaxial loading, and specimen size on fracture initiation toughness of two-dimensional (constant depth), shallow, surface flaws. The cruciform beam specimens were developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to introduce a far-field, out-of-plane biaxial stress component in the test section that approximates the nonlinear stresses resulting from pressurized-thermal-shock or pressure-temperature loading of an RPV. Tests were conducted under biaxial load ratios ranging from uniaxial to equibiaxial. These tests demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower transition temperature region for an RPV material. The cruciform fracture toughness data were used to evaluate fracture methodologies for predicting the observed effects of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness. Initial emphasis was placed on assessment of stress-based methodologies, namely, the J-Q formulation, the Dodds-Anderson toughness scaling model, and the Weibull approach. Applications of these methodologies based on the hydrostatic stress fracture criterion indicated an effect of loading-biaxiality on fracture toughness; the conventional maximum principal stress criterion indicated no effect. A three-parameter Weibull model based on the hydrostatic stress criterion is shown to correlate the experimentally observed biaxial effect on cleavage fracture toughness by providing a scaling mechanism between uniaxial and biaxial loading states.

  11. High Temperature Slow Crack Growth of Si3N4 Specimens Subjected to Uniaxial and Biaxial Dynamic Fatigue Loading Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Nemeth, Noel N.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Powers, Lynn M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1995-01-01

    The slow crack growth of a hot-pressed silicon nitride was determined at 1300 C in air using dynamic fatigue testing under both uniaxial and biaxial stress states. Good agreement in fatigue parameter exists between the data obtained from uniaxial and biaxial loading conditions. A reasonable prediction of dynamic fatigue from one stress state to another was made using the recently developed CARES/LIFE computer code.

  12. Biaxial Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior in Aluminum Alloy 5083-H116 Under Ambient Laboratory and Saltwater Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perel, V. Y.; Misak, H. E.; Mall, S.; Jain, V. K.

    2015-04-01

    Crack growth of aluminum alloy 5083 was investigated when subjected to the in-plane biaxial tension-tension fatigue with stress ratio of 0.5 under ambient laboratory and saltwater environments. Cruciform specimens with a center hole, containing a notch and precrack at 45° to the specimen's arms, were tested in a biaxial fatigue test machine. Two biaxiality ratios, λ = 1 and λ = 1.5, were studied. For λ = 1, crack propagated along a straight line collinearly with the precrack, while for λ = 1.5 case, the crack path was curved and non-collinear with the precrack. Uniaxial fatigue tests were also conducted. Crack growth rates were faster under the biaxiality fatigue in comparison to uniaxial fatigue at a given crack driving force (Δ K I or Δ G) in both environments. Further, an increase in biaxiality ratio increased the crack growth rate, i.e., faster for λ = 1.5 case than λ = 1 case. Both biaxial fatigue and saltwater environment showed detrimental effects on the fatigue crack growth resistance of 5083, and its combination is highly detrimental when compared to uniaxial fatigue.

  13. Evaluation of constraint methodologies applied to a shallow-flaw cruciform bend specimen tested under biaxial loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Williams, P.T.; Pennell, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    A technology to determine shallow-flaw fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is being developed for application to the safety assessment of RPVs containing postulated shallow surface flaws. Matrices of cruciform beam tests were developed to investigate and quantify the effects of temperature, biaxial loading, and specimen size on fracture initiation toughness of two-dimensional (constant depth), shallow surface flaws. The cruciform beam specimens were developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to introduce a prototypic, far-field. out-of-plane biaxial stress component in the test section that approximates the nonlinear stresses resulting from pressurized-thermal-shock or pressure-temperature loading of an RPV. Tests were conducted under biaxial load ratios ranging from uniaxial to equibiaxial. These tests demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower transition temperature region for RPV materials. The cruciform fracture toughness data were used to evaluate fracture methodologies for predicting the observed effects of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness. Initial emphasis was placed on assessment of stress-based methodologies. namely, the J-Q formulation, the Dodds-Anderson toughness scaling model, and the Weibull approach. Applications of these methodologies based on the hydrostatic stress fracture criterion indicated an effect of loading-biaxiality on fracture toughness, the conventional maximum principal stress criterion indicated no effect.

  14. Processing and alloying of tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, A.; Dowding, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    Tungsten heavy alloys are two-phase metal matrix composites with a unique combination of density, strength, and ductility. They are processed by liquid-phase sintering of mixed elemental powders. The final microstructure consists of a contiguous network of nearly pure tungsten grains embedded in a matrix of a ductile W-Ni-Fe alloy. Due to the unique property combination of the material, they are used extensively as kinetic energy penetrators, radiation shields. counterbalances, and a number of other applications in the defense industry. The properties of these alloys are extremely sensitive to the processing conditions. Porosity levels as low as 1% can drastically degrade the properties of these alloys. During processing, care must be taken to reduce or prevent incomplete densification, hydrogen embrittlement, impurity segregation to the grain boundaries, solidification shrinkage induced porosity, and in situ formation of pores due to the sintering atmosphere. This paper will discuss some of the key processing issues for obtaining tungsten heavy alloys with good properties. High strength tungsten heavy alloys are usually fabricated by swaging and aging the conventional as-sintered material. The influence of this on the shear localization tendency of a W-Ni-Co alloy will also be demonstrated. Recent developments have shown that the addition of certain refractory metals partially replacing tungsten can significantly improve the strength of the conventional heavy alloys. This development becomes significant due to the recent interest in near net shaping techniques such as powder injection moldings. The role of suitable alloying additions to the classic W-Ni-Fe based heavy alloys and their processing techniques will also be discussed in this paper.

  15. Electronic Level Alignment in Multicomponent CdSe/CdTe Nanostructures from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shenyuan; Prendergast, David; Neaton, Jeffrey

    2010-03-01

    Inorganic CdSe/CdTe nanorod heterojunctions, with type-II level alignment and band gaps in the solar spectrum, comprise ideal model components of nanostructure-based solar cells. Here we perform density functional theory calculations on CdSe/CdTe nanowire heterojunctions, exploring how the electronic properties of their nanoscale interfaces are affected by quantum confinement, and mechanical and electrical boundary conditions. Many-body perturbation theory within the GW approximation is used to predict quantitative bulk band gaps and infer bulk level alignment. We find that band offsets at bulk epitaxial interfaces are quite sensitive to biaxial strain due to lattice mismatch. The computed band gaps of small linear nanorod heterojunctions increase with decreasing diameter due to quantum confinement, but band offsets are seen to be largely unaffected. In the core/shell nanorod heterojunctions, band offsets are strongly dependent on strain and confinement, both of which can be tuned by the core size and shell thickness.

  16. Numerical simulation and experimental results of filament wound CFRP tubes tested under biaxial load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaldi, A.; Giannuzzi, M.; Marchetti, M.; Miliozzi, A.

    1992-10-01

    The analysis of angle ply carbon/epoxy laminated composites when subjected to uniaxial and biaxial stresses is presented. Three classes of interwoven pattern filament wound cylindrical specimens are studied in order to compare the influence of angle on the mechanical behavior of the laminate. Three dimensional finite element and thin shell analyses were first applied to the problem in order to predict global elastic behavior of specimens subjected to uniaxial loads. Different failure criteria were then adopted to investigate specimens' failure and experimental tests were carried out for a comparison with numerical results. Biaxial stress conditions were produced by applying combinations of internal pressure and axial tensile and compressive loads to the specimens.

  17. Fracture stresses of filament wound tubes under uniaxial and biaxial loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaldi, A.; Marchetti, M.

    In this paper are presented the experimental and numerical results obtained by investigating the behavior of angle-ply carbon/epoxy laminated composites when subjected to uniaxial and biaxial loads. Specimens are filament-wound cylindrical tubes with different angles of fiber deposition with respect to the tube's longitudinal axis. About forty specimens are tested. Both uniaxial and biaxial loads are carried out up to specimens' failure using an hydraulic circuit and an axial testing machine to apply internal pressure and tensile or compressive loads in order to investigate the effect of winding angle on the failure strength of the specimens. Three dimensional finite-element and thin-shell analyses are applied to the problem using different failure criteria in order to predict specimens' failure for a comparison with experimental results.

  18. New classes of bi-axially symmetric solutions to four-dimensional Vasiliev higher spin gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundell, Per; Yin, Yihao

    2017-01-01

    We present new infinite-dimensional spaces of bi-axially symmetric asymptotically anti-de Sitter solutions to four-dimensional Vasiliev higher spin gravity, obtained by modifications of the Ansatz used in arXiv:1107.1217, which gave rise to a Type-D solution space. The current Ansatz is based on internal semigroup algebras (without identity) generated by exponentials formed out of the bi-axial symmetry generators. After having switched on the vacuum gauge function, the resulting generalized Weyl tensor is given by a sum of generalized Petrov type-D tensors that are Kerr-like or 2-brane-like in the asymptotic AdS4 region, and the twistor space connection is smooth in twistor space over finite regions of spacetime. We provide evidence for that the linearized twistor space connection can be brought to Vasiliev gauge.

  19. Computer simulation of crack propagation in ductile materials under biaxial dynamic loads

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.M.

    1980-07-29

    The finite-difference computer program HEMP is used to simulate the crack-propagation phenomenon in two-dimensional ductile materials under truly dynamic biaxial loads. A comulative strain-damage criterion for the initiation of ductile fracture is used. To simulate crack propagation numerically, the method of equivalent free-surface boundary conditions and the method of artifical velocity are used in the computation. Centrally cracked rectangular aluminum bars subjected to constant-velocity biaxial loads at the edges are considered. Tensile and compressive loads in the direction of crack length are found, respectively, to increase and decrease directional instability in crack propagation, where the directional instability is characterized by branching or bifurcation.

  20. Insertion Testing of Polyethylene Glycol Microneedle Array into Cultured Human Skin with Biaxial Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Naoki; Tachikawa, Hiroto; Miyano, Takaya; Nishiyabu, Kazuaki

    Aiming at the practical use of polyethylene glycol (PEG) microneedles for transdermal drug delivery system (DDS), a testing apparatus for their insertion into cultured human skin has been developed. To simulate the variety of conditions of human skin, biaxial tension can be applied to the cultured human skin. An adopted testing scheme to apply and control the biaxial tension is similar to the deep-draw forming technique. An attention was also paid to the short-time setup of small, thin and wet cultured skin. One dimensional array with four needles was inserted and influence of tension was discussed. It was found that tension, deflection of skin during insertion and original curvature of skin are the important parameters for microneedles array design.

  1. Biaxial ratcheting and cyclic plasticity for Bree-type loading. Part 1: Finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, H.W.; Nadarajah, C.

    1996-05-01

    The Bree diagram has been incorporated in the ASME B and PV Code in the elevated temperature Code Case N47 as a design approach for limiting strain accumulation in cylinders subjected to cyclic thermal loadings under sustained primary stress. Since the Bree diagram is based upon uniaxial-stress model, it is pertinent to examine the influence of biaxial stresses on strain growth and cyclic stress-strain hysteresis response. The results of inelastic analyses presented in this paper showed that ratcheting and hysteresis behavior may also occur in the axial direction in addition to the hoop direction. Results of almost 100 load cases were presented to clarify the influence of biaxial membrane and thermal bending stresses on the structural behavior. A design approach for the assessment of this type of problem was suggested which utilizes these results.

  2. Biaxial load effects on the crack border elastic strain energy and strain energy rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eftis, J.; Subramonian, N.; Liebowitz, H.

    1977-01-01

    The validity of the singular solution (first term of a series representation) is investigated for the crack tip stress and displacement field in an infinite sheet with a flat line crack with biaxial loads applied to the outer boundaries. It is shown that if one retains the second contribution to the series approximations for stress and displacement in the calculation of the local elastic strain energy density and elastic strain energy rate in the crack border region, both these quantities have significant biaxial load dependency. The value of the J-integral does not depend on the presence of the second term of the series expansion for stress and displacement. Thus J(I) is insensitive to the presence of loads applied parallel to the plane of the crack.

  3. Mechanical properties of stanene under uniaxial and biaxial loading: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Mojumder, Satyajit; Amin, Abdullah Al; Islam, Md Mahbubul

    2015-09-28

    Stanene, a graphene like two dimensional honeycomb structure of tin has attractive features in electronics application. In this study, we performed molecular dynamics simulations using modified embedded atom method potential to investigate mechanical properties of stanene. We studied the effect of temperature and strain rate on mechanical properties of α-stanene for both uniaxial and biaxial loading conditions. Our study suggests that with the increasing temperature, both the fracture strength and strain of the stanene decrease. Uniaxial loading in zigzag direction shows higher fracture strength and strain compared to the armchair direction, while no noticeable variation in the mechanical properties is observed for biaxial loading. We also found at a higher loading rate, material exhibits higher fracture strength and strain. These results will aid further investigation of stanene as a potential nano-electronics substitute.

  4. Tunable biaxial in-plane compressive strain in a Si nanomembrane transferred on a polyimide film

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Munho; Mi, Hongyi; Cho, Minkyu; Seo, Jung-Hun; Ma, Zhenqiang; Zhou, Weidong; Gong, Shaoqin

    2015-05-25

    A method of creating tunable and programmable biaxial compressive strain in silicon nanomembranes (Si NMs) transferred onto a Kapton{sup ®} HN polyimide film has been demonstrated. The programmable biaxial compressive strain (up to 0.54%) was generated utilizing a unique thermal property exhibited by the Kapton HN film, namely, it shrinks from its original size when exposed to elevated temperatures. The correlation between the strain and the annealing temperature was carefully investigated using Raman spectroscopy and high resolution X-ray diffraction. It was found that various amounts of compressive strains can be obtained by controlling the thermal annealing temperatures. In addition, a numerical model was used to evaluate the strain distribution in the Si NM. This technique provides a viable approach to forming in-plane compressive strain in NMs and offers a practical platform for further studies in strain engineering.

  5. Lasing with conical diffraction feature in the KGd(WO4)2:Nd biaxial crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenier, Alain

    2016-09-01

    With an experimental set-up designed to record simultaneously the far-field and the near-field patterns, we got lasing with feature of conical diffraction in the biaxial Nd3+-doped KGd(WO4)2 crystal. The key-point is that the lasing direction is not single and is constituted by an angular distribution including the optical axis. Very slight changes of crystal orientation leads to crescent shape 1068-nm light distributions in the near-field. The beam launched towards the biaxial crystal is mainly linear polarized with its intensity in agreement with the Nd fluorescence angular distribution. A theoretical background is provided, including the monoclinic and triclinic symmetries and laser amplification including elliptical modes and cavity round trip.

  6. Mechanical properties of stanene under uniaxial and biaxial loading: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojumder, Satyajit; Amin, Abdullah Al; Islam, Md Mahbubul

    2015-09-01

    Stanene, a graphene like two dimensional honeycomb structure of tin has attractive features in electronics application. In this study, we performed molecular dynamics simulations using modified embedded atom method potential to investigate mechanical properties of stanene. We studied the effect of temperature and strain rate on mechanical properties of α-stanene for both uniaxial and biaxial loading conditions. Our study suggests that with the increasing temperature, both the fracture strength and strain of the stanene decrease. Uniaxial loading in zigzag direction shows higher fracture strength and strain compared to the armchair direction, while no noticeable variation in the mechanical properties is observed for biaxial loading. We also found at a higher loading rate, material exhibits higher fracture strength and strain. These results will aid further investigation of stanene as a potential nano-electronics substitute.

  7. Magnetically Aligned Supramolecular Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Matthew; Cardoso, Andre Zamith; Frith, William J; Iggo, Jonathan A; Adams, Dave J

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic-field-induced alignment of the fibrillar structures present in an aqueous solution of a dipeptide gelator, and the subsequent retention of this alignment upon transformation to a hydrogel upon the addition of CaCl2 or upon a reduction in solution pH is reported. Utilising the switchable nature of the magnetic field coupled with the slow diffusion of CaCl2, it is possible to precisely control the extent of anisotropy across a hydrogel, something that is generally very difficult to do using alternative methods. The approach is readily extended to other compounds that form viscous solutions at high pH. It is expected that this work will greatly expand the utility of such low-molecular-weight gelators (LMWG) in areas where alignment is key. PMID:25345918

  8. Improved docking alignment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, Leo G. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Improved techniques are provided for the alignment of two objects. The present invention is particularly suited for 3-D translation and 3-D rotational alignment of objects in outer space. A camera is affixed to one object, such as a remote manipulator arm of the spacecraft, while the planar reflective surface is affixed to the other object, such as a grapple fixture. A monitor displays in real-time images from the camera such that the monitor displays both the reflected image of the camera and visible marking on the planar reflective surface when the objects are in proper alignment. The monitor may thus be viewed by the operator and the arm manipulated so that the reflective surface is perpendicular to the optical axis of the camera, the roll of the reflective surface is at a selected angle with respect to the camera, and the camera is spaced a pre-selected distance from the reflective surface.

  9. Raman spectroscopy of graphene and bilayer under biaxial strain: bubbles and balloons.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Jakob; Nair, Rahul R; Ott, Anna; Georgiou, Thanasis; Geim, Andre K; Novoselov, Kostya S; Casiraghi, Cinzia

    2012-02-08

    We use graphene bubbles to study the Raman spectrum of graphene under biaxial (e.g., isotropic) strain. Our Gruneisen parameters are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values. Discrepancy in the previously reported values is attributed to the interaction of graphene with the substrate. Bilayer balloons (intentionally pressurized membranes) have been used to avoid the effect of the substrate and to study the dependence of strain on the interlayer interactions.

  10. Surface contour of a biaxially strained, doubly curved antenna reflective mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saylor, A. V.

    1982-01-01

    The elastic membrane equations which describe the deflection of a biaxially tensioned reflective mesh from an idealized surface were developed and solved. The conditions of equilibrium of the forces acting on a membrane element furnish equations which may be used to solve a variety of problems. Configurations considered include continuous, as well as incremental mesh attachment to structural members to form shapes which are approximately parabolic or spherical.

  11. Universal mean-field phase diagram for biaxial nematics obtained from a minimax principle.

    PubMed

    Bisi, Fulvio; Virga, Epifanio G; Gartland, Eugene C; De Matteis, Giovanni; Sonnet, André M; Durand, Georges E

    2006-05-01

    We study a class of quadratic Hamiltonians which describe both fully attractive and partly repulsive molecular interactions, characteristic of biaxial liquid crystal molecules. To treat the partly repulsive interactions we establish a minimax principle for the associated mean-field free energy. We show that the phase diagram described by Sonnet [Phys. Rev. E 67, 061701 (2003)] is universal. Our predictions are in good agreement with the recent observations on both V-shaped and tetrapodal molecules.

  12. MUSE optical alignment procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Loupias, Magali; Kosmalski, Johan; Anwand, Heiko; Bacon, Roland; Boudon, Didier; Caillier, Patrick; Daguisé, Eric; Dubois, Jean-Pierre; Dupuy, Christophe; Kelz, Andreas; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Nicklas, Harald; Parès, Laurent; Remillieux, Alban; Seifert, Walter; Valentin, Hervé; Xu, Wenli

    2012-09-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation VLT integral field spectrograph (1x1arcmin² Field of View) developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO), operating in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently assembling and testing MUSE in the Integration Hall of the Observatoire de Lyon for the Preliminary Acceptance in Europe, scheduled for 2013. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic instrument mechanical structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2011, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested independently in each institute. After validations, the systems were shipped to the P.I. institute at Lyon and were assembled in the Integration Hall This paper describes the end-to-end optical alignment procedure of the MUSE instrument. The design strategy, mixing an optical alignment by manufacturing (plug and play approach) and few adjustments on key components, is presented. We depict the alignment method for identifying the optical axis using several references located in pupil and image planes. All tools required to perform the global alignment between each subsystem are described. The success of this alignment approach is demonstrated by the good results for the MUSE image quality. MUSE commissioning at the VLT (Very Large Telescope) is planned for 2013.

  13. PILOT optical alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longval, Y.; Mot, B.; Ade, P.; André, Y.; Aumont, J.; Baustista, L.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Bray, N.; de Bernardis, P.; Boulade, O.; Bousquet, F.; Bouzit, M.; Buttice, V.; Caillat, A.; Charra, M.; Chaigneau, M.; Crane, B.; Crussaire, J.-P.; Douchin, F.; Doumayrou, E.; Dubois, J.-P.; Engel, C.; Etcheto, P.; Gélot, P.; Griffin, M.; Foenard, G.; Grabarnik, S.; Hargrave, P..; Hughes, A.; Laureijs, R.; Lepennec, Y.; Leriche, B.; Maestre, S.; Maffei, B.; Martignac, J.; Marty, C.; Marty, W.; Masi, S.; Mirc, F.; Misawa, R.; Montel, J.; Montier, L.; Narbonne, J.; Nicot, J.-M.; Pajot, F.; Parot, G.; Pérot, E.; Pimentao, J.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rodriguez, L.; Roudil, G.; Salatino, M.; Savini, G.; Simonella, O.; Saccoccio, M.; Tapie, P.; Tauber, J.; Torre, J.-P.; Tucker, C.

    2016-07-01

    PILOT is a balloon-borne astronomy experiment designed to study the polarization of dust emission in the diffuse interstellar medium in our Galaxy at wavelengths 240 μm with an angular resolution about two arcminutes. Pilot optics is composed an off-axis Gregorian type telescope and a refractive re-imager system. All optical elements, except the primary mirror, are in a cryostat cooled to 3K. We combined the optical, 3D dimensional measurement methods and thermo-elastic modeling to perform the optical alignment. The talk describes the system analysis, the alignment procedure, and finally the performances obtained during the first flight in September 2015.

  14. Online estimation algorithm for a biaxial ankle kinematic model with configuration dependent joint axes.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Y H; Xie, S Q

    2011-02-01

    The kinematics of the human ankle is commonly modeled as a biaxial hinge joint model. However, significant variations in axis orientations have been found between different individuals and also between different foot configurations. For ankle rehabilitation robots, information regarding the ankle kinematic parameters can be used to estimate the ankle and subtalar joint displacements. This can in turn be used as auxiliary variables in adaptive control schemes to allow modification of the robot stiffness and damping parameters to reduce the forces applied at stiffer foot configurations. Due to the large variations observed in the ankle kinematic parameters, an online identification algorithm is required to provide estimates of the model parameters. An online parameter estimation routine based on the recursive least-squares (RLS) algorithm was therefore developed in this research. An extension of the conventional biaxial ankle kinematic model, which allows variation in axis orientations with different foot configurations had also been developed and utilized in the estimation algorithm. Simulation results showed that use of the extended model in the online algorithm is effective in capturing the foot orientation of a biaxial ankle model with variable joint axis orientations. Experimental results had also shown that a modified RLS algorithm that penalizes a deviation of model parameters from their nominal values can be used to obtain more realistic parameter estimates while maintaining a level of estimation accuracy comparable to that of the conventional RLS routine.

  15. On the Use of Biaxial Properties in Modeling Annulus as a Holzapfel-Gasser-Ogden Material.

    PubMed

    Momeni Shahraki, Narjes; Fatemi, Ali; Goel, Vijay K; Agarwal, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Besides the biology, stresses and strains within the tissue greatly influence the location of damage initiation and mode of failure in an intervertebral disk. Finite element models of a functional spinal unit (FSU) that incorporate reasonably accurate geometry and appropriate material properties are suitable to investigate such issues. Different material models and techniques have been used to model the anisotropic annulus fibrosus, but the abilities of these models to predict damage initiation in the annulus and to explain clinically observed phenomena are unclear. In this study, a hyperelastic anisotropic material model for the annulus with two different sets of material constants, experimentally determined using uniaxial and biaxial loading conditions, were incorporated in a 3D finite element model of a ligamentous FSU. The purpose of the study was to highlight the biomechanical differences (e.g., intradiscal pressure, motion, forces, stresses, strains, etc.) due to the dissimilarity between the two sets of material properties (uniaxial and biaxial). Based on the analyses, the biaxial constants simulations resulted in better agreements with the in vitro and in vivo data, and thus are more suitable for future damage analysis and failure prediction of the annulus under complex multiaxial loading conditions.

  16. On the correct interpretation of measured force and calculation of material stress in biaxial tests.

    PubMed

    Nolan, D R; McGarry, J P

    2016-01-01

    Biaxial tests are commonly used to investigate the mechanical behaviour of soft biological tissues and polymers. In the current paper we uncover a fundamental problem associated with the calculation of material stress from measured force in standard biaxial tests. In addition to measured forces, localised unmeasured shear forces also occur at the clamps and the inability to quantify such forces has significant implications for the calculation of material stress from simplified force-equilibrium relationships. Unmeasured shear forces are shown to arise due to two distinct competing contributions: (1) negative shear force due to stretching of the orthogonal clamp, and (2) positive shear force as a result of material Poisson-effect. The clamp shear force is highly dependent on the specimen geometry and the clamp displacement ratio, as consequently, is the measured force-stress relationship. Additionally in this study we demonstrate that commonly accepted formulae for the estimation of material stress in the central region of a cruciform specimen are highly inaccurate. A reliable empirical correction factor for the general case of isotropic materials must be a function of specimen geometry and the biaxial clamp displacement ratio. Finally we demonstrate that a correction factor for the general case of non-linear anisotropic materials is not feasible and we suggest the use of inverse finite element analysis as a practical means of interpreting experimental data for such complex materials.

  17. Effect of sample geometry on the apparent biaxial mechanical behaviour of planar connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Stephen D; Lee, J Michael

    2005-12-01

    Mechanical testing methodologies developed for engineering materials may result in artifactual material properties if applied to soft planar connective tissues. The use of uniaxial tissue samples with high aspect ratios or biaxial samples with slender cruciform arms could lead to preferential loading of only the discrete subset of extracellular fibres that fully extend between the grips. To test this hypothesis, cruciform biaxial connective tissue samples that display distinctly different material properties (bovine pericardium, fish skin), as well as model textile laminates with predefined fibrous orientations, were repeatedly tested with decreasing sample arm lengths. With mechanical properties determined at the sample centre, results demonstrated that the materials appeared to become stiffer and less extensible with less slender sample geometries, suggesting that fibre recruitment increases with decreasing sample arm length. Alterations in the observed shear behaviour and rigid body rotation were also noted. The only truly reliable method to determine material properties is through in vivo testing, but this is not always convenient and is typically experimentally demanding. For the in vitro determination of the biaxial material properties, appropriate sample geometry should be employed in which all of the fibres contribute to the mechanical response.

  18. Directional differences in the biaxial material properties of fascia lata and the implications for fascia function.

    PubMed

    Eng, Carolyn M; Pancheri, Francesco Q; Lieberman, Daniel E; Biewener, Andrew A; Dorfmann, Luis

    2014-06-01

    Fascia is a highly organized collagenous tissue that is ubiquitous in the body, but whose function is not well understood. Because fascia has a sheet-like structure attaching to muscles and bones at multiple sites, it is exposed to different states of multi- or biaxial strain. In order to measure how biaxial strain affects fascia material behavior, planar biaxial tests with strain control were performed on longitudinal and transversely oriented samples of goat fascia lata (FL). Cruciform samples were cycled to multiple strain levels while the perpendicular direction was held at a constant strain. Structural differences among FL layers were examined using histology and SEM. Results show that FL stiffness, hysteresis, and strain energy density are greater in the longitudinal vs. transverse direction. Increased stiffness in the longitudinal layer is likely due to its greater thickness and greater average fibril diameter compared to the transverse layer(s). Perpendicular strain did not affect FL material behavior. Differential loading in the longitudinal vs. transverse directions may lead to structural changes, enhancing the ability of the longitudinal FL to transmit force, store energy, or stabilize the limb during locomotion. The relative compliance of the transverse fibers may allow expansion of underlying muscles when they contract.

  19. A strain device imposing dynamic and uniform equi-biaxial strain to cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Sotoudeh, M; Jalali, S; Usami, S; Shyy, J Y; Chien, S

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study is to design a new apparatus to allow the control of the magnitude and frequency of dynamic stretch applied uniformly to cells cultured on a silicon elastic membrane. The apparatus is designed to produce equi-biaxial dynamic stretches with area changes ranging from 0% to 55% and frequencies ranging from 0 to 2 Hz. Homogeneous finite strain analysis using triangles of markers was performed to compute the symmetric two-dimensional Lagrangian strain tensor on the membrane. Measurements of strain in both static and dynamic conditions showed that the shear component of the strain tensor (Erc) was near zero, and that there was no significant difference between radial (Err) and circumferential (Ecc) components, indicating the attainment of equi-biaxial strain. Bovine aortic endothelial cells were transiently transfected with a chimeric construct in which the luciferase reporter is driven by TPA-responsive elements (TRE). The transfected cells cultured on the membrane were stretched. The luciferase activity increased significantly only when the cells were stretched by 15% or more in area. Cells in different locations of the membrane showed similar induction of luciferase activities, confirming that strain is uniform and equi-biaxial across the membrane.

  20. Effect of metal chloride solutions on coloration and biaxial flexural strength of yttria-stabilized zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Gye-Jeong; Lee, Kwangmin; Lee, Doh-Jae; Lim, Hyun-Pil; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Ban, Jae-Sam; Lee, Kyung-Ku; Fisher, John G.; Park, Sang-Won

    2012-10-01

    The effect of three kinds of transition metal dopants on the color and biaxial flexural strength of zirconia ceramics for dental applications was evaluated. Presintered zirconia discs were colored through immersion in aqueous chromium, molybdenum and vanadium chloride solutions and then sintered at 1450 °C. The color of the doped specimens was measured using a digital spectrophotometer. For biaxial flexural strength measurements, specimens infiltrated with 0.3 wt% of each aqueous chloride solution were used. Uncolored discs were used as a control. Zirconia specimens infiltrated with chromium, molybdenum and vanadium chloride solutions were dark brown, light yellow and dark yellow, respectively. CIE L*, a*, and b* values of all the chromium-doped specimens and the specimens infiltrated with 0.1 wt% molybdenum chloride solution were in the range of values for natural teeth. The biaxial flexural strengths of the three kinds of metal chloride groups were similar to the uncolored group. These results suggest that chromium and molybdenum dopants can be used as colorants to fabricate tooth colored zirconia ceramic restorations.

  1. Effect of uni- and biaxial strain on phase transformations in Fe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sak-Saracino, Emilia; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2016-01-01

    Using molecular-dynamics simulation, we study the phase transformations in Fe thin films induced by uni- and biaxial strain. Both the austenitic transformation of a body-centered cubic (bcc) film at the equilibrium temperature of the face-centered cubic (fcc)-bcc transformation and the martensitic transformation of an undercooled fcc film are studied. We demonstrate that different strain states (uni- or biaxial) induce different nucleation kinetics of the new phase and hence different microstructures evolve. For the case of the austenitic transformation, the direction of the applied strain selects the orientation of the nucleated grains of the new phase; the application of biaxial strain leads to a symmetric twinned structure. For the martensitic transformation, the influence of the strain state is even more pronounced, in that it can either inhibit the transformation, induce the homogeneous nucleation of a fine-dispersed array of the new phase resulting in a single-crystalline final state, or lead to the more conventional mechanism of heterogeneous nucleation of grains at the free surfaces, which grow and result in a poly-crystalline microstructure of the transformed material.

  2. Effect of peroxide bleaching on the biaxial flexural strength and modulus of bovine dentin

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Adriana Oliveira; Ayres, Ana Paula Almeida; de Almeida, Letícia Cunha Amaral Gonzaga; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Rueggeberg, Frederick Allen; Giannini, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effects of carbamide peroxide and hydrogen peroxide on the biaxial flexural strength and flexural modulus of bovine dentin. Materials and Methods: Thirty coronal dentin disks (0.5 mm thick × 6.0 mm diameter) were prepared from bovine teeth. The disks were randomly divided into three groups (n=10): A control group (unbleached), a group bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide (8 h at 37°C), and a group bleached with 38% hydrogen peroxide (three 10 min applications at 37°C). The specimens were tested in a biaxial flexural apparatus held in a universal testing machine at 1.27 mm/min until failure occurred, and the biaxial mechanical properties were calculated. For each test parameter, the data were statistically analyzed by Fisher's PLSD test (predetermined α = 0.05). Results: The group bleached with 38% hydrogen peroxide demonstrated significantly lower flexural strength than the unbleached control group. Hydrogen peroxide treatment resulted in a significantly lower flexural modulus compared with the control group and with carbamide peroxide bleaching. Conclusion: Exposure of dentin to hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced both the flexural strength and the flexural modulus compared with the no-treatment control, whereas exposure to carbamide peroxide did not significantly affect either parameter. PMID:26038658

  3. Biaxial Texture Evolution in MgO Films Fabricated Using Ion Beam-Assisted Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yan; Zhang, Ya-Hui; Zhao, Rui-Peng; Zhang, Fei; Lu, Yu-Ming; Cai, Chuan-Bing; Xiong, Jie; Tao, Bo-Wan

    2016-07-01

    The growth of multifunctional thin films on flexible substrates is important technologically, because flexible electronics require such a platform. In this study, we examined the evolution of biaxial texture in MgO films prepared using ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) on a Hastelloy substrate. Texture and microstructure developments were characterized through in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction monitoring, x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy, which demonstrated that biaxial texture was developed during the nucleation stage (~2.2 nm). The best biaxial texture was obtained with a thickness of approximately 12 nm. As MgO continued to grow, the influence of surface energy was reduced, and film growth was driven by the attempt to minimize volume free-energy density. Thus the MgO grains were subsequently rotated at the (002) direction toward the ion beam. In addition, an approach was developed for accelerating in-plane texture evolution by pre-depositing an amorphous MgO layer before IBAD.

  4. On the Use of Biaxial Properties in Modeling Annulus as a Holzapfel–Gasser–Ogden Material

    PubMed Central

    Momeni Shahraki, Narjes; Fatemi, Ali; Goel, Vijay K.; Agarwal, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Besides the biology, stresses and strains within the tissue greatly influence the location of damage initiation and mode of failure in an intervertebral disk. Finite element models of a functional spinal unit (FSU) that incorporate reasonably accurate geometry and appropriate material properties are suitable to investigate such issues. Different material models and techniques have been used to model the anisotropic annulus fibrosus, but the abilities of these models to predict damage initiation in the annulus and to explain clinically observed phenomena are unclear. In this study, a hyperelastic anisotropic material model for the annulus with two different sets of material constants, experimentally determined using uniaxial and biaxial loading conditions, were incorporated in a 3D finite element model of a ligamentous FSU. The purpose of the study was to highlight the biomechanical differences (e.g., intradiscal pressure, motion, forces, stresses, strains, etc.) due to the dissimilarity between the two sets of material properties (uniaxial and biaxial). Based on the analyses, the biaxial constants simulations resulted in better agreements with the in vitro and in vivo data, and thus are more suitable for future damage analysis and failure prediction of the annulus under complex multiaxial loading conditions. PMID:26090359

  5. Development of Advanced Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Tungsten Heavy Alloy for Penetrator Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-30

    preparation, sintering, cyclic heat-treatment, swaging , and annealing processes, on microstructures and static/dynamic mechanical properties of ODS tungsten ... tungsten / tungsten contiguity. The swaging and annealing processes of ODS tungsten heavy alloy increase the tensile strength with decreasing the...Final Report for 2nd Year Contract of AOARD 034032 Development of Advanced Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Tungsten Heavy Alloy for

  6. Investigation of the compatibility of tungsten and high temperature sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong-Li; Long, Bin; Xu, Yuan-Chao; Li, Hua-Qing

    2005-08-01

    The compatibility of rotary swaged tungsten and sodium was investigated at 500, 600, 700 °C, and also at 600 °C of polished tungsten. The weight loss curves for the two kinds of W-specimens appear significantly different, however their weight losses approach constant values after testing for 400 h. The asymptotic change in sodium containing 30 μg/g oxygen at 600 °C are about 2.3 and 0.8 mg/cm 2 from 400 to 1500 h, respectively for the rotary swaging tungsten and the polishing tungsten. The corrosion products at the surfaces of two kinds of W-specimens after testing in high temperature sodium are different. The grains show significant growth after testing of both kinds of tungsten. The fracture stress of the rotary swaged tungsten at room temperature decreases considerably after testing with the effect slightly increasing with temperature from 500, 600 to 700 °C. A much smaller decrease of fracture stress is observed for polished tungsten at 600 °C, which already before testing has much smaller value. The micro-morphologies of the fracture surface indicate brittle inter-granular fracture in both kinds of tungsten. Embrittlement becomes much more notable for rotary swaged tungsten, while inter- and trans-granular fracture modes appear after corrosion tests in high temperature sodium for both kinds of tungsten.

  7. Aligned-or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseman, Jo Ellen; Koppal, Mary

    2015-01-01

    When state leaders and national partners in the development of the Next Generation Science Standards met to consider implementation strategies, states and school districts wanted to know which materials were aligned to the new standards. The answer from the developers was short but not sweet: You won't find much now, and it's going to…

  8. Optically Aligned Drill Press

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adderholdt, Bruce M.

    1994-01-01

    Precise drill press equipped with rotary-indexing microscope. Microscope and drill exchange places when turret rotated. Microscope axis first aligned over future hole, then rotated out of way so drill axis assumes its precise position. New procedure takes less time to locate drilling positions and produces more accurate results. Apparatus adapted to such other machine tools as milling and measuring machines.

  9. Curriculum Alignment: Establishing Coherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagné, Philippe; Dumont, Laurence; Brunet, Sabine; Boucher, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a step-by-step guide to implement a curricular alignment project, directed at professional development and student support, and developed in a higher education French as a second language department. We outline best practices and preliminary results from our experience and provide ways to adapt our experience to other…

  10. Application of magnetomechanical hysteresis modeling of magnetic techniques for monitoring neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress. Second year interim report, June 1992--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sablik, M.J.; Kwun, H.; Burkhardt, G.L.

    1993-01-31

    Research was done on the biaxial stress problem accomplished in the first half of the second year. All of the work done was preparatory to magnetic measurements. Issues addressed were: construction of a model for extracting changes in the magnetic properties of a specimen from the readings of an indirect sensor; initial development of a model for how biaxial stress alters the intrinsic magnetic properties of thespecimen; use of finite element stress analysis modeling to determine a detailed shape for the cruciform biaxial stress specimen; and construction of the biaxial stress loading apparatus.

  11. High-performance transparent and stretchable all-solid supercapacitors based on highly aligned carbon nanotube sheets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Peng, Huisheng; Durstock, Michael; Dai, Liming

    2014-01-01

    By using highly aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) sheets of excellent optical transmittance and mechanical stretchability as both the current collector and active electrode, high-performance transparent and stretchable all-solid supercapacitors with a good stability were developed. A transmittance up to 75% at the wavelength of 550 nm was achieved for a supercapacitor made from a cross-over assembly of two single-layer CNT sheets. The transparent supercapacitor has a specific capacitance of 7.3 F g−1 and can be biaxially stretched up to 30% strain without any obvious change in electrochemical performance even over hundreds stretching cycles. PMID:24402400

  12. Femtosecond fiber laser additive manufacturing of tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian; Yang, Pei; Zhai, Meiyu; Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is promising to produce complex shaped components, including metals and alloys, to meet requirements from different industries such as aerospace, defense and biomedicines. Current laser AM uses CW lasers and very few publications have been reported for using pulsed lasers (esp. ultrafast lasers). In this paper, additive manufacturing of Tungsten materials is investigated by using femtosecond (fs) fiber lasers. Various processing conditions are studied, which leads to desired characteristics in terms of morphology, porosity, hardness, microstructural and mechanical properties of the processed components. Fully dense Tungsten part with refined grain and increased hardness was obtained and compared with parts made with different pulse widths and CW laser. The results are evidenced that the fs laser based AM provides more dimensions to modify mechanical properties with controlled heating, rapid melting and cooling rates compared with a CW or long pulsed laser. This can greatly benefit to the make of complicated structures and materials that could not be achieved before.

  13. Bend ductility of tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gurwell, W.E.; Garnich, M.R.; Dudder, G.B.; Lavender, C.A.

    1992-11-01

    A bend ductility test is used to indicate the formability of tungsten heavy alloys sheet. The primary test bends a notchless Charpy impact specimen to a bend angle of approximately 100C. This can be augmented by a bend-completion test. Finite element modeling as well as strain-gaged bend specimens elucidate the strain distribution in the specimen as a function of material thickness and bend angle. The bend ductilities of 70%W, 807.W and 90%W alloys are characterized. As expected, decreasing thickness or tungsten content enhances bend ductility. Oxidation is not detrimental; therefore, controlled atmosphere is not required for cooling. The potentially detrimental effects of mechanical working (e.g., rolling, roller-leveling, grit blasting, and peening) and machining (e.g., cutting and sanding) are illustrated.

  14. Ultrasonic ranking of toughness of tungsten carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasonic attenuation measurements to rank tungsten carbide alloys according to their fracture toughness was demonstrated. Six samples of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) were examined. These varied in cobalt content from approximately 2 to 16 weight percent. The toughness generally increased with increasing cobalt content. Toughness was first determined by the Palmqvist and short rod fracture toughness tests. Subsequently, ultrasonic attenuation measurements were correlated with both these mechanical test methods. It is shown that there is a strong increase in ultrasonic attenuation corresponding to increased toughness of the WC-Co alloys. A correlation between attenuation and toughness exists for a wide range of ultrasonic frequencies. However, the best correlation for the WC-Co alloys occurs when the attenuation coefficient measured in the vicinity of 100 megahertz is compared with toughness as determined by the Palmqvist technique.

  15. Modeling of Nano-Tungsten Sintering Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    penetration as that of depleted uranium -3/4% titanium penetrators. This type of behavior produces superior penetration performance (3). For the...Depleted Uranium Replacement Program (DURP), the source of tungsten powder feed stock with a low (~1%) concentration of oxygen was the Chongyi Zhangyuan...then spray dried to remove the solvent . A compact of the powder is formed either by cold iso-static pressing or die pressing. Next, the compact is

  16. Thermal positron interactions with alkali covered tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Takashi; Iida, Shimpei; Terabe, Hiroki; Nagashima, Yasuyuki

    2016-11-01

    The branching ratios of positron reemission, positronium emission, positronium negative ion emission and capture to the surface state for thermalized positrons at polycrystalline tungsten surfaces coated with Na, K and Cs have been measured. The data shows that the ratios depend on the coverage of the alkali-metal coating. The fraction of the emitted positronium increases with the coverage of the coating up to 90%.

  17. Mobility, Geochemistry, and Speciation of Tungsten

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    deionized water used had a resistivity of 18.3 MΩ . cm. Sodium carbonate, sodium polytungstate, and sodium tungstate dihydrate was purchased from Sigma... tungstate anion, although polymerization to form poly- and heteropoly- tungstates has been shown to occur. The current study investigates tungsten...are found in a variety of minerals, which can dissolve to yield the tungstate in most common environmental matrices (Seiler, Stollenwerk, and

  18. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of tungsten films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, J. K.; Tang, C. C.; Hess, D. W.

    1982-07-01

    High-purity films of tungsten are deposited from tungsten hexafluoride and hydrogen using plasma-enhanced deposition (PED). At 400 °C deposition temperature, resistivities of ˜40 μΩ cm are attained. After annealing at 1100 °C, the resistivity falls to ˜7 μΩ cm. Below 400 °C, the as-deposited film stress is <6×109 dynes/cm2. Tensile, unlike tungsten, molybdenum films deposited by PED displayed high resistivities.

  19. Ballistic performance of oriented columnar-grained tungsten polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, W.; Magness, L.S.; Dowding, R.J.; Trogolo, J.; Chung, M.; Kapoor, D.

    1996-06-01

    Prior ballistic tests have demonstrated that the crystallographic orientation of a single crystal tungsten penetrator with respect to the penetrator axis influences penetration performance. The difference in penetration performance is attributed to anisotropy of the flow and failure of the monocrystalline tungsten penetrators during the penetration of the armor target. In preliminary ballistic experiments, the performance and deformation behaviors of polycrystalline tungsten penetrators having columnar grains oriented in the [100], [110], or [111] crystallographic directions were explored.

  20. Growth rate modeling for selective tungsten LPCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, H.; Streiter, R.; Schulz, S. E.; Gessner, T.

    1995-10-01

    Selective chemical vapor deposition of tungsten plugs on sputtered tungsten was performed in a single-wafer cold-wall reactor using silane (SiH 4) and tungsten hexafluoride (WF 6). Extensive SEM measurements of film thickness were carried out to study the dependence of growth rates on various process conditions, wafer loading, and via dimensions. The results have been interpreted by numerical calculations based on a simulation model which is also presented. Both continuum fluid dynamics and the ballistic line-of-sight approach are used for transport modeling. The reaction rate is described by an empirical rate expression using coefficients fitted from experimental data. In the range 0.2 < p( SiH 4) /p( WF 6) < 0.75 , the reaction order was determined as 1.55 and -0.55 with respect to SiH 4 and WF 6, respectively. For higher partial pressure ratios the second-order rate dependence on p(SiH 4) and the minus first-order dependence on p(WF 6) were confirmed.

  1. Controlled nanostructuration of polycrystalline tungsten thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Girault, B.; Eyidi, D.; Goudeau, P.; Guerin, P.; Bourhis, E. Le; Renault, P.-O.; Sauvage, T.

    2013-05-07

    Nanostructured tungsten thin films have been obtained by ion beam sputtering technique stopping periodically the growing. The total thickness was maintained constant while nanostructure control was obtained using different stopping periods in order to induce film stratification. The effect of tungsten sublayers' thicknesses on film composition, residual stresses, and crystalline texture evolution has been established. Our study reveals that tungsten crystallizes in both stable {alpha}- and metastable {beta}-phases and that volume proportions evolve with deposited sublayers' thicknesses. {alpha}-W phase shows original fiber texture development with two major preferential crystallographic orientations, namely, {alpha}-W<110> and unexpectedly {alpha}-W<111> texture components. The partial pressure of oxygen and presence of carbon have been identified as critical parameters for the growth of metastable {beta}-W phase. Moreover, the texture development of {alpha}-W phase with two texture components is shown to be the result of a competition between crystallographic planes energy minimization and crystallographic orientation channeling effect maximization. Controlled grain size can be achieved for the {alpha}-W phase structure over 3 nm stratification step. Below, the {beta}-W phase structure becomes predominant.

  2. The tungsten divertor experiment at ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neu, R.; Asmussen, K.; Krieger, K.; Thoma, A.; Bosch, H.-S.; Deschka, S.; Dux, R.; Engelhardt, W.; García-Rosales, C.; Gruber, O.; Herrmann, A.; Kallenbach, A.; Kaufmann, M.; Mertens, V.; Ryter, F.; Rohde, V.; Roth, J.; Sokoll, M.; Stäbler, A.; Suttrop, W.; Weinlich, M.; Zohm, H.; Alexander, M.; Becker, G.; Behler, K.; Behringer, K.; Behrisch, R.; Bergmann, A.; Bessenrodt-Weberpals, M.; Brambilla, M.; Brinkschulte, H.; Büchl, K.; Carlson, A.; Chodura, R.; Coster, D.; Cupido, L.; de Blank, H. J.; de Peña Hempel, S.; Drube, R.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Feist, J.-H.; Feneberg, W.; Fiedler, S.; Franzen, P.; Fuchs, J. C.; Fußmann, G.; Gafert, J.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; Haas, G.; Herppich, G.; Herrmann, W.; Hirsch, S.; Hoek, M.; Hoenen, F.; Hofmeister, F.; Hohenöcker, H.; Jacobi, D.; Junker, W.; Kardaun, O.; Kass, T.; Kollotzek, H.; Köppendörfer, W.; Kurzan, B.; Lackner, K.; Lang, P. T.; Lang, R. S.; Laux, M.; Lengyel, L. L.; Leuterer, F.; Manso, M. E.; Maraschek, M.; Mast, K.-F.; McCarthy, P.; Meisel, D.; Merkel, R.; Müller, H. W.; Münich, M.; Murmann, H.; Napiontek, B.; Neu, G.; Neuhauser, J.; Niethammer, M.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Pasch, E.; Pautasso, G.; Peeters, A. G.; Pereverzev, G.; Pitcher, C. S.; Poschenrieder, W.; Raupp, G.; Reinmüller, K.; Riedl, R.; Röhr, H.; Salzmann, H.; Sandmann, W.; Schilling, H.-B.; Schlögl, D.; Schneider, H.; Schneider, R.; Schneider, W.; Schramm, G.; Schweinzer, J.; Scott, B. D.; Seidel, U.; Serra, F.; Speth, E.; Silva, A.; Steuer, K.-H.; Stober, J.; Streibl, B.; Treutterer, W.; Troppmann, M.; Tsois, N.; Ulrich, M.; Varela, P.; Verbeek, H.; Verplancke, Ph; Vollmer, O.; Wedler, H.; Wenzel, U.; Wesner, F.; Wolf, R.; Wunderlich, R.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.; Zehrfeld, H.-P.

    1996-12-01

    Tungsten-coated tiles, manufactured by plasma spray on graphite, were mounted in the divertor of the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak and cover almost 90% of the surface facing the plasma in the strike zone. Over 600 plasma discharges have been performed to date, around 300 of which were auxiliary heated with heating powers up to 10 MW. The production of tungsten in the divertor was monitored by a W I line at 400.8 nm. In the plasma centre an array of spectral lines at 5 nm emitted by ionization states around W XXX was measured. From the intensity of these lines the W content was derived. Under normal discharge conditions W-concentrations around 0741-3335/38/12A/013/img12 or even lower were found. The influence on the main plasma parameters was found to be negligible. The maximum concentrations observed decrease with increasing heating power. In several low power discharges accumulation of tungsten occurred and the temperature profile was flattened. The concentrations of the intrinsic impurities carbon and oxygen were comparable to the discharges with the graphite divertor. Furthermore, the density and the 0741-3335/38/12A/013/img13 limits remained unchanged and no negative influence on the energy confinement or on the H-mode threshold was found. Discharges with neon radiative cooling showed the same behaviour as in the graphite divertor case.

  3. MUSE alignment onto VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Boudon, Didier; Caillier, Patrick; Daguisé, Eric; Dupuy, Christophe; Jarno, Aurélien; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Migniau, Jean-Emmanuel; Nicklas, Harald; Piqueras, Laure

    2014-07-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation Very Large Telescope (VLT) integral field spectrograph developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO). It combines a 1' x 1' field of view sampled at 0.2 arcsec for its Wide Field Mode (WFM) and a 7.5"x7.5" field of view for its Narrow Field Mode (NFM). Both modes will operate with the improved spatial resolution provided by GALACSI (Ground Atmospheric Layer Adaptive Optics for Spectroscopic Imaging), that will use the VLT deformable secondary mirror and 4 Laser Guide Stars (LGS) foreseen in 2015. MUSE operates in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently commissioning MUSE in the Very Large Telescope for the Preliminary Acceptance in Chile, scheduled for September, 2014. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2012 and 2013, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested to the P.I. institute at Lyon. After successful PAE in September 2013, MUSE instrument was shipped to the Very Large Telescope in Chile where that was aligned and tested in ESO integration hall at Paranal. After, MUSE was directly transported, fully aligned and without any optomechanical dismounting, onto VLT telescope where the first light was overcame the 7th of February, 2014. This paper describes the alignment procedure of the whole MUSE instrument with respect to the Very Large Telescope (VLT). It describes how 6 tons could be move with accuracy better than 0.025mm and less than 0.25 arcmin in order to reach alignment requirements. The success

  4. Microstructure and properties of CVD tungsten carbide from tungsten hexafluoride and dimethyl ether

    SciTech Connect

    Skaf, D.W.; Warner, A.W.; Dollahon, N.R.; Fargo, G.H. )

    1994-12-01

    Tungsten carbide was deposited from tungsten hexafluoride, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen using a horizontal, cold-wall reactor. The effects of substrate temperature, reactor pressure, and reagent ratio on the coating growth rate, morphology, composition, and microhardness were studied. Under most conditions, the solid deposit was primarily W[sub 3]C with minor amounts of W. The tungsten carbide growth rate data fit an Arrhenius rate expression for temperatures from 425 to 550 C and had an activation energy of 24 kcal/mol at 70 mmHg total pressure and a WF[sub 6]/DME ratio of 6.3. A variety of surface morphologies and microstructures were observed. The microhardness of the coated substrates increased with coating thickness to a maximum value of 2,400 kg/mm[sup 2].

  5. Secondary electron emission from plasma-generated nanostructured tungsten fuzz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patino, M.; Raitses, Y.; Wirz, R.

    2016-11-01

    Recently, several researchers [e.g., Yang et al., Sci. Rep. 5, 10959 (2015)] have shown that tungsten fuzz can grow on a hot tungsten surface under bombardment by energetic helium ions in different plasma discharges and applications, including magnetic fusion devices with plasma facing tungsten components. This work reports the direct measurements of the total effective secondary electron emission (SEE) from tungsten fuzz. Using dedicated material surface diagnostics and in-situ characterization, we find two important results: (1) SEE values for tungsten fuzz are 40%-63% lower than for smooth tungsten and (2) the SEE values for tungsten fuzz are independent of the angle of the incident electron. The reduction in SEE from tungsten fuzz is most pronounced at high incident angles, which has important implications for many plasma devices since in a negative-going sheath the potential structure leads to relatively high incident angles for the electrons at the plasma confining walls. Overall, low SEE will create a relatively higher sheath potential difference that reduces plasma electron energy loss to the confining wall. Thus, the presence or self-generation in a plasma of a low SEE surface such as tungsten fuzz can be desirable for improved performance of many plasma devices.

  6. Reactive deposition of tungsten and titanium carbides by induction plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X. L.; Gitzhofer, F.; Boulos, M. I.; Tiwari, R.

    1995-05-01

    A study is reported on the use of induction plasma technology for the preparation of dense free-standing deposits of tungsten carbide and titanium carbide from metallic powders and methane. Phase analysis by X-ray diffraction indicates that primary carburization of the particles takes place in-flight giving rise to the formation of W2C and TiC(1 - x). Secondary carburization occurs in the deposits resulting in the formation of tungsten and titanium carbides. Microstructures revealed by optical and scanning electron microscopy show uniform small grains of the carbides. The reactive plasma spray-formed tungsten carbide shows transgranular fracture, while pure tungsten deposits show intergranular fracture.

  7. Tungsten-induced carcinogenesis in human bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Laulicht, Freda; Brocato, Jason; Cartularo, Laura; Vaughan, Joshua; Wu, Feng; Kluz, Thomas; Sun, Hong; Oksuz, Betul Akgol; Shen, Steven; Paena, Massimilano; Medici, Serenella; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Costa, Max

    2015-01-01

    Metals such as arsenic, cadmium, beryllium, and nickel are known human carcinogens; however, other transition metals, such as tungsten (W), remain relatively uninvestigated with regard to their potential carcinogenic activity. Tungsten production for industrial and military applications has almost doubled over the past decade and continues to increase. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate tungsten’s ability to induce carcinogenic related endpoints including cell transformation, increased migration, xenograft growth in nude mice, and the activation of multiple cancer related pathways in transformed clones as determined by RNA seq. Human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) exposed to tungsten developed carcinogenic properties. In a soft agar assay, tungsten-treated cells formed more colonies than controls and the tungsten-transformed clones formed tumors in nude mice. RNA-sequencing data revealed that the tungsten-transformed clones altered the expression of many cancer-associated genes when compared to control clones. Genes involved in lung cancer, leukemia, and general cancer genes were deregulated by tungsten. Taken together, our data shows the carcinogenic potential of tungsten. Further tests are needed, including in vivo and human studies, in order to validate tungsten as a carcinogen to humans. PMID:26164860

  8. Recovery of tungsten and molybdenum from sulfur--bearing material

    SciTech Connect

    Ritsko, J. E.; Acia, H. L.

    1984-11-13

    Tungsten and molybdenum are recovered from sulfur bearing material such as sulfide sludges by a pollution free process in which the sulfur bearing material is heated with agitation in an aqueous solution of sodium carbonate to form water soluble molybdenum and tungsten compounds without forming any appreciable amount of water soluble sulfur compounds. The reaction mixture is oxidized to convert partially reduced tungsten values or molybdenum values to sodium tungstate and sodium molybdate respectively. The liquid phase containing tungsten and molybdenum is separated from the solid phase containing free sulfur.

  9. Secondary electron emission from plasma-generated nanostructured tungsten fuzz

    SciTech Connect

    Patino, M.; Raitses, Y.; Wirz, R.

    2016-11-14

    Recently, several researchers (e.g., Q. Yang, Y.-W. You, L. Liu, H. Fan, W. Ni, D. Liu, C. S. Liu, G. Benstetter, and Y. Wang, Scientific Reports 5, 10959 (2015)) have shown that tungsten fuzz can grow on a hot tungsten surface under bombardment by energetic helium ions in different plasma discharges and applications, including magnetic fusion devices with plasma facing tungsten components. This work reports direct measurements of the total effective secondary electron emission (SEE) from tungsten fuzz. Using dedicated material surface diagnostics and in-situ characterization, we find two important results: (1) SEE values for tungsten fuzz are 40-63% lower than for smooth tungsten and (2) the SEE values for tungsten fuzz are independent of the angle of the incident electron. The reduction in SEE from tungsten fuzz is most pronounced at high incident angles, which has important implications for many plasma devices since in a negative-going sheath the potential structure leads to relatively high incident angles for the electrons at the plasma confining walls. Overall, low SEE will create a relatively higher sheath potential difference that reduces plasma electron energy loss to the confining wall. Thus the presence or self-generation in a plasma of a low SEE surface such as tungsten fuzz can be desirable for improved performance of many plasma devices.:7px

  10. Secondary electron emission from plasma-generated nanostructured tungsten fuzz

    DOE PAGES

    Patino, M.; Raitses, Y.; Wirz, R.

    2016-11-14

    Recently, several researchers (e.g., Q. Yang, Y.-W. You, L. Liu, H. Fan, W. Ni, D. Liu, C. S. Liu, G. Benstetter, and Y. Wang, Scientific Reports 5, 10959 (2015)) have shown that tungsten fuzz can grow on a hot tungsten surface under bombardment by energetic helium ions in different plasma discharges and applications, including magnetic fusion devices with plasma facing tungsten components. This work reports direct measurements of the total effective secondary electron emission (SEE) from tungsten fuzz. Using dedicated material surface diagnostics and in-situ characterization, we find two important results: (1) SEE values for tungsten fuzz are 40-63% lowermore » than for smooth tungsten and (2) the SEE values for tungsten fuzz are independent of the angle of the incident electron. The reduction in SEE from tungsten fuzz is most pronounced at high incident angles, which has important implications for many plasma devices since in a negative-going sheath the potential structure leads to relatively high incident angles for the electrons at the plasma confining walls. Overall, low SEE will create a relatively higher sheath potential difference that reduces plasma electron energy loss to the confining wall. Thus the presence or self-generation in a plasma of a low SEE surface such as tungsten fuzz can be desirable for improved performance of many plasma devices.:7px« less

  11. Prediction of flow-aligning and tumbling in a bent-core nematic liquid crystal using measurements of orienation order parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Min Sang; Park, Beom-Jin; Park, Jung Ok; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    2010-03-01

    The flow behavior of bent-core nematic liquid crystal (A131), which has been known to exhibit a biaxial nematic phase, is predicted by measurements of 2^nd and 4^th rank orientation order parameters. Using experimentally determined uniaxial, and , and biaxial orientation order parameters, , and from polarized micro-Raman spectroscopy, we compute the tumbling parameter, λ. The relationships between the order parameters and tumbling parameter derived by 2 different groups are used and the results are computed: a molecular theory by Archer and Larson (1995), that by Kroger and Seller (1995) for uniaxial system, and Leslie's theory for 2-director continuum. Temperature evolution of tumbling parameter shows the transition from a flow alignment regime to a tumbling instability. The results of the temperature evolution of tumbling parameter of bent-core nematic LC are compared to those of pure nematic LC (5CB) and LC mixture (E7).

  12. Toxicologic evaluation of tungsten: 28-day inhalation study of tungsten blue oxide in rats.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Narayanan; Hu, Shu-Chieh; Sullivan, Dennis; Muzzio, Miguel; Detrisac, Carol J; Venezia, Carmen

    2012-12-01

    The toxicity and toxicokinetics of tungsten blue oxide (TBO) were examined. TBO is an intermediate in the production of tungsten powder, and has shown the potential to cause cellular damage in in vitro studies. However, in vivo evidence seems to indicate a lack of adverse effects. The present study was undertaken to address the dearth of longer-term inhalation toxicity studies of tungsten oxides by investigating the biological responses induced by TBO when administered via nose-only inhalation to rats at levels of 0.08, 0.325, and 0.65 mg TBO/L of air for 6 h/day for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day recovery period. Inhaled TBO was absorbed systemically and blood levels of tungsten increased as inhaled concentration increased. Among the tissues analyzed for tungsten levels, lung, femur and kidney showed increased levels, with lung at least an order of magnitude greater than kidney or femur. By exposure day 14, tungsten concentration in tissues had reached steady-state. Increased lung weight was noted for both terminal and recovery animals and was attributed to deposition of TBO in the lungs, inducing a macrophage influx. Microscopic evaluation of tissues revealed a dose-related increase in alveolar pigmented macrophages, alveolar foreign material and individual alveolar foamy macrophages in lung. After a recovery period there was a slight reduction in the incidence and severity of histopathological findings. Based on the absence of other adverse effects, the increased lung weights and the microscopic findings were interpreted as nonadverse response to exposure and were not considered a specific reaction to TBO.

  13. Inflation by alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, C.P.; Roest, Diederik

    2015-06-08

    Pseudo-Goldstone bosons (pGBs) can provide technically natural inflatons, as has been comparatively well-explored in the simplest axion examples. Although inflationary success requires trans-Planckian decay constants, f≳M{sub p}, several mechanisms have been proposed to obtain this, relying on (mis-)alignments between potential and kinetic energies in multiple-field models. We extend these mechanisms to a broader class of inflationary models, including in particular the exponential potentials that arise for pGB potentials based on noncompact groups (and so which might apply to moduli in an extra-dimensional setting). The resulting potentials provide natural large-field inflationary models and can predict a larger primordial tensor signal than is true for simpler single-field versions of these models. In so doing we provide a unified treatment of several alignment mechanisms, showing how each emerges as a limit of the more general setup.

  14. A visible light-sensitive tungsten carbide/tungsten trioxde composite photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-ho; Irie, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito

    2008-05-05

    A photocatalyst composed of tungsten carbide (WC) and tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) has been prepared by the mechanical mixing of each powder. Its photocatalytic activity was evaluated by the gaseous isopropyl alcohol decomposition process. The photocatalyst showed high visible light photocatalytic activity with a quantum efficiency of 3.2% for 400-530 nm light. The photocatalytic mechanism was explained by means of enhanced oxygen reduction reaction due to WC, which may serve as a multielectron reduction catalyst, as well as the photogeneration of holes in the valence band of WO{sub 3}.

  15. Automatic Word Alignment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-18

    strategy was evalu­ ated in the context of English -to-Pashto (E2P) and Pashto-to- English (P2E), a low-resource language pair. For E2P, the training and...improves the quality of automatic word alignment, for example for resource poor language pairs, thus improving Statistical Machine Translation (SMT...example for resource poor language pairs, thus improving Statistical Machine Translation (SMT) performance. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY

  16. Orbit IMU alignment: Error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive accuracy analysis of orbit inertial measurement unit (IMU) alignments using the shuttle star trackers was completed and the results are presented. Monte Carlo techniques were used in a computer simulation of the IMU alignment hardware and software systems to: (1) determine the expected Space Transportation System 1 Flight (STS-1) manual mode IMU alignment accuracy; (2) investigate the accuracy of alignments in later shuttle flights when the automatic mode of star acquisition may be used; and (3) verify that an analytical model previously used for estimating the alignment error is a valid model. The analysis results do not differ significantly from expectations. The standard deviation in the IMU alignment error for STS-1 alignments was determined to the 68 arc seconds per axis. This corresponds to a 99.7% probability that the magnitude of the total alignment error is less than 258 arc seconds.

  17. Nuclear reactor alignment plate configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, David A; Forsyth, David R; Smith, Richard E; Singleton, Norman R

    2014-01-28

    An alignment plate that is attached to a core barrel of a pressurized water reactor and fits within slots within a top plate of a lower core shroud and upper core plate to maintain lateral alignment of the reactor internals. The alignment plate is connected to the core barrel through two vertically-spaced dowel pins that extend from the outside surface of the core barrel through a reinforcement pad and into corresponding holes in the alignment plate. Additionally, threaded fasteners are inserted around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad and into the alignment plate to further secure the alignment plate to the core barrel. A fillet weld also is deposited around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad. To accomodate thermal growth between the alignment plate and the core barrel, a gap is left above, below and at both sides of one of the dowel pins in the alignment plate holes through with the dowel pins pass.

  18. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    SciTech Connect

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Buzhinskiy, O. I.; Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A.

    2015-12-15

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400–1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  19. Multiple protein structure alignment.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, W. R.; Flores, T. P.; Orengo, C. A.

    1994-01-01

    A method was developed to compare protein structures and to combine them into a multiple structure consensus. Previous methods of multiple structure comparison have only concatenated pairwise alignments or produced a consensus structure by averaging coordinate sets. The current method is a fusion of the fast structure comparison program SSAP and the multiple sequence alignment program MULTAL. As in MULTAL, structures are progressively combined, producing intermediate consensus structures that are compared directly to each other and all remaining single structures. This leads to a hierarchic "condensation," continually evaluated in the light of the emerging conserved core regions. Following the SSAP approach, all interatomic vectors were retained with well-conserved regions distinguished by coherent vector bundles (the structural equivalent of a conserved sequence position). Each bundle of vectors is summarized by a resultant, whereas vector coherence is captured in an error term, which is the only distinction between conserved and variable positions. Resultant vectors are used directly in the comparison, which is weighted by their error values, giving greater importance to the matching of conserved positions. The resultant vectors and their errors can also be used directly in molecular modeling. Applications of the method were assessed by the quality of the resulting sequence alignments, phylogenetic tree construction, and databank scanning with the consensus. Visual assessment of the structural superpositions and consensus structure for various well-characterized families confirmed that the consensus had identified a reasonable core. PMID:7849601

  20. Dynamic Alignment at SLS

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, Robert E.

    2003-04-23

    The relative alignment of components in the storage ring of the Swiss Light Source (SLS) is guaranteed by mechanical means. The magnets are rigidly fixed to 48 girders by means of alignment rails with tolerances of less than {+-}15 {micro}m. The bending magnets, supported by 3 point ball bearings, overlap adjacent girders and thus establish virtual train links between the girders, located near the bending magnet centres. Keeping the distortion of the storage ring geometry within a tolerance of {+-}100 {micro}m in order to guarantee sufficient dynamic apertures, requires continuous monitoring and correction of the girder locations. Two monitoring systems for the horizontal and the vertical direction will be installed to measure displacements of the train link between girders, which are due to ground settings and temperature effects: The hydrostatic levelling system (HLS) gives an absolute vertical reference, while the horizontal positioning system (HPS), which employs low cost linear encoders with sub-micron resolution, measures relative horizontal movements. The girder mover system based on five DC motors per girder allows a dynamic realignment of the storage ring within a working window of more than {+-}1 mm for girder translations and {+-}1 mrad for rotations. We will describe both monitoring systems (HLS and HPS) as well as the applied correction scheme based on the girder movers. We also show simulations indicating that beam based girder alignment takes care of most of the static closed orbit correction.

  1. Method for alignment of microwires

    DOEpatents

    Beardslee, Joseph A.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Sadtler, Bryce

    2017-01-24

    A method of aligning microwires includes modifying the microwires so they are more responsive to a magnetic field. The method also includes using a magnetic field so as to magnetically align the microwires. The method can further include capturing the microwires in a solid support structure that retains the longitudinal alignment of the microwires when the magnetic field is not applied to the microwires.

  2. Alignment as a Teacher Variable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Andrew C.; Smithson, John; Blank, Rolf; Zeidner, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    With the exception of the procedures developed by Porter and colleagues (Porter, 2002), other methods of defining and measuring alignment are essentially limited to alignment between tests and standards. Porter's procedures have been generalized to investigating the alignment between content standards, tests, textbooks, and even classroom…

  3. Regional and depth variability of porcine meniscal mechanical properties through biaxial testing.

    PubMed

    Kahlon, A; Hurtig, M B; Gordon, K D

    2015-01-01

    The menisci in the knee joint undergo complex loading in-vivo resulting in a multidirectional stress distribution. Extensive mechanical testing has been conducted to investigate the tissue properties of the knee meniscus, but the testing conditions do not replicate this complex loading regime. Biaxial testing involves loading tissue along two different directions simultaneously, which more accurately simulates physiologic loading conditions. The purpose of this study was to report mechanical properties of meniscal tissue resulting from biaxial testing, while simultaneously investigating regional variations in properties. Ten left, fresh porcine joints were obtained, and the medial and lateral menisci were harvested from each joint (twenty menisci total). Each menisci was divided into an anterior, middle and posterior region; and three slices (femoral, deep and tibial layers) were obtained from each region. Biaxial and constrained uniaxial testing was performed on each specimen, and Young's moduli were calculated from the resulting stress strain curves. Results illustrated significant differences in regional mechanical properties, with the medial anterior (Young's modulus (E)=11.14 ± 1.10 MPa), lateral anterior (E=11.54 ± 1.10 MPa) and lateral posterior (E=9.0 ± 1.2 MPa) regions exhibiting the highest properties compared to the medial central (E=5.0 ± 1.22 MPa), medial posterior (E=4.16 ± 1.13 MPa) and lateral central (E=5.6 ± 1.20 MPa) regions. Differences with depth were also significant on the lateral meniscus, with the femoral (E=12.7 ± 1.22 MPa) and tibial (E=8.6 ± 1.22 MPa) layers exhibiting the highest Young's moduli. This data may form the basis for future modeling of meniscal tissue, or may aid in the design of synthetic replacement alternatives.

  4. Theory of biaxial graded-index optical fiber. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawalko, Stephen F.

    1990-01-01

    A biaxial graded-index fiber with a homogeneous cladding is studied. Two methods, wave equation and matrix differential equation, of formulating the problem and their respective solutions are discussed. For the wave equation formulation of the problem it is shown that for the case of a diagonal permittivity tensor the longitudinal electric and magnetic fields satisfy a pair of coupled second-order differential equations. Also, a generalized dispersion relation is derived in terms of the solutions for the longitudinal electric and magnetic fields. For the case of a step-index fiber, either isotropic or uniaxial, these differential equations can be solved exactly in terms of Bessel functions. For the cases of an istropic graded-index and a uniaxial graded-index fiber, a solution using the Wentzel, Krammers and Brillouin (WKB) approximation technique is shown. Results for some particular permittivity profiles are presented. Also the WKB solutions is compared with the vector solution found by Kurtz and Streifer. For the matrix formulation it is shown that the tangential components of the electric and magnetic fields satisfy a system of four first-order differential equations which can be conveniently written in matrix form. For the special case of meridional modes, the system of equations splits into two systems of two equations. A general iterative technique, asymptotic partitioning of systems of equations, for solving systems of differential equations is presented. As a simple example, Bessel's differential equation is written in matrix form and is solved using this asymptotic technique. Low order solutions for particular examples of a biaxial and uniaxial graded-index fiber are presented. Finally numerical results obtained using the asymptotic technique are presented for particular examples of isotropic and uniaxial step-index fibers and isotropic, uniaxial and biaxial graded-index fibers.

  5. Results of uniaxial and biaxial tests on riveted fuselage lap joint specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlieger, H.

    1994-01-01

    As part of an FAA-NLR collaborative program on structural integrity of aging aircraft, NLR carried out uniaxial and biaxial fatigue tests on riveted lap joint specimens being representative for application in a fuselage. All tests were constant amplitude tests with maximum stresses being representative for fuselage pressurization cycles and R-values of 0.1. The parameters selected in the testing program were the stress level (sigma(sub max) = 14 and 16 ksi) and the rivet spacing (0.75 and 1.0 inch). All specimens contained 3 rows of countersunk rivets, the rivet row spacing was 1 inch and the rivet orientation continuous.

  6. A model for predicting crack growth rate for mixed mode fracture under biaxial loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shliannikov, V. N.; Braude, N. Z.

    1992-09-01

    A model for predicting the crack growth rate of an initially angled crack under biaxial loads of arbitrary direction is suggested. The model is based on a combination of both the Manson-Coffin equation for low cycle fatigue and the Paris equation for fatigue crack propagation. The model takes into consideration the change in material plastic properties in the region around the crack tip due to the stress state, together with the initial orientation of the crack and also its trajectory of growth. Predictions of crack growth rate for any mixed mode fracture is based on the results of uniaxial tension experiments.

  7. Improving directivity of laser beams by employing the effect of conical refraction in biaxial crystals.

    PubMed

    Peet, V

    2010-09-13

    The far-field pattern of Gaussian beams transformed by conical refraction in biaxial crystal is analyzed. It is shown that one of the two outgoing beam components acquires, under certain conditions, a profile with a dominating central peak. The width of this peak can be made significantly smaller than the width of the parent diffraction-limited Gaussian beam at the same propagation distance. The formation of such structurally-stable sub-diffraction beam core improves the beam directivity. Another component is a charge-one optical vortex, that forms the annular shell of the beam and carries the rest of the beam power.

  8. Biaxial Texture Evolution of Nanostructured Films under Dynamic Shadowing Effect and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang

    Texture formation and evolution in polycrystalline films are quite complicated, and they still remain as challenging subjects. Oblique angle deposition is an effective way to control the texture due to the shadowing effect introduced by oblique incident flux. A new dynamic oblique angle sputter deposition technique, called flipping rotation, was developed. In this rotation mode, the substrate is arranged to rotate continuously at a fixed speed around an axis lying within and parallel to the substrate. The incident flux is always perpendicular to the rotational axis and the flux incident angle relative to the substrate normal changes continuously. To study the texture formation and evolution of Mo and W films grown by DC magnetron sputter depositions, three film categories were prepared: (1) normal incidence deposition without the shadowing effect, (2) stationary oblique angle deposition at various fixed flux incident angles with static shadowing effect, and (3) convention rotation and flipping rotation deposition with dynamic shadowing effect. Under the normal incidence deposition, ultrathin (2.5 nm) to thin (100 nm) Mo films have been deposited on SO2 membranes on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids. These samples can be directly compared with the films grown on glass or native oxide covered Si substrates. The result of a fiber texture with the [110] out-of-plane direction implies that the growth has gone through a recrystallization process that selects the minimum surface energy plane parallel to the substrate. This is in contrast to the conventional understanding of the selection of out-of-plane orientation, which is the fastest growth direction [100] at room temperature based on the low Mo homologous temperature (room temperature/melting temperature) of ~0.1. Under stationary oblique angle deposition, Mo thin films in the range of 175 nm to 1300 nm were observed to undergo a dramatic change in crystal texture orientation from a (110)[11¯¯0] biaxial

  9. Behavior of a High Strength Concrete Model Subjected to Biaxial Compression.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    research project reported herein was to determine the stress-strain behavior, ultimate strength, and failure mechanism of high-strength concrete subjected to...Triaxial Stress," U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Structural Research Lab. Report SP-23, October 1949, pp. 1-26. 7. Akroyd, T.N.W., " Concrete Under Triaxial...MODEL SUBJECTED TO BIAXIAL COMPRESSION 1-,4 BY [ JON C. HERRIN 𔃻 RAMON L. CARRASQUILLO 1DAVID W. FOWLER Ii RESEARCH REPORT AF- FOR UNITED STATES AIR

  10. Biaxially stretchable supercapacitors based on the buckled hybrid fiber electrode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nan; Zhou, Weiya; Zhang, Qiang; Luan, Pingshan; Cai, Le; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Xiao; Fan, Qingxia; Zhou, Wenbin; Xiao, Zhuojian; Gu, Xiaogang; Chen, Huiliang; Li, Kewei; Xiao, Shiqi; Wang, Yanchun; Liu, Huaping; Xie, Sishen

    2015-07-01

    In order to meet the growing need for smart bionic devices and epidermal electronic systems, biaxial stretchability is essential for energy storage units. Based on porous single-walled carbon nanotube/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (SWCNT/PEDOT) hybrid fiber, we designed and fabricated a biaxially stretchable supercapacitor, which possesses a unique configuration of the parallel buckled hybrid fiber array. Owing to the reticulate SWCNT film and the improved fabrication technique, the hybrid fiber retained its porous architecture both outwardly and inwardly, manifesting a superior capacity of 215 F g-1. H3PO4-polyvinyl alcohol gel with an optimized component ratio was introduced as both binder and stretchable electrolyte, which contributed to the regularity and stability of the buckled fiber array. The buckled structure and the quasi one-dimensional character of the fibers endow the supercapacitor with 100% stretchability along all directions. In addition, the supercapacitor exhibited good transparency, as well as excellent electrochemical properties and stability after being stretched 5000 times.In order to meet the growing need for smart bionic devices and epidermal electronic systems, biaxial stretchability is essential for energy storage units. Based on porous single-walled carbon nanotube/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (SWCNT/PEDOT) hybrid fiber, we designed and fabricated a biaxially stretchable supercapacitor, which possesses a unique configuration of the parallel buckled hybrid fiber array. Owing to the reticulate SWCNT film and the improved fabrication technique, the hybrid fiber retained its porous architecture both outwardly and inwardly, manifesting a superior capacity of 215 F g-1. H3PO4-polyvinyl alcohol gel with an optimized component ratio was introduced as both binder and stretchable electrolyte, which contributed to the regularity and stability of the buckled fiber array. The buckled structure and the quasi one-dimensional character of the

  11. Void nucleation in biaxially strained ultrathin films of face-centered cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolluri, Kedarnath; Gungor, M. Rauf; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2007-05-01

    We report an analysis of void nucleation as a relaxation mechanism in freestanding biaxially strained ultrathin films of face-centered cubic metals based on large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations. Above a critical strain level, multiple threading dislocations are emitted from the film surface. The surface step traces formed by gliding dislocations on intersecting and on adjacent parallel glide planes lead to formation and growth of surface pits and grooves, while vacancies form due to gliding of jogged dislocations and dislocation intersections. Coalescence of the surface pits with vacancy clusters is the precursor to the formation of a larger void extending across the film.

  12. Dynamic monitoring of a mobile telecommunications tower with a bi-axial optical FBG accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, Paulo; Travanca, Rui; Varum, Humberto; André, Paulo

    2011-05-01

    In this work, the structural health monitoring of a self-supported steel tower with 50 meters high used for mobile communications are presented. For this test, a fiber Bragg grating based biaxial horizontal accelerometer was used to obtain the structure frequencies. The frequencies for the first resonant modes were obtained from the acceleration data recorded over time, resulting from the application of mechanical horizontal impulses on the tower. The results shown that the frequencies measured in both directions are within the values expected for this type of structure and can be used to calibrate numerical models that represent their structural behavior.

  13. Precision alignment and mounting apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An alignment and mounting apparatus for mounting two modules (10,12) includes a first portion having a cylindrical alignment pin (16) projecting normal to a module surface, a second portion having a three-stage alignment guide (18) including a shoehorn flange (34), a Y-slot (42) and a V-block (22) which sequentially guide the alignment pin (16) with successively finer precision and a third portion in the form of a spring-loaded captive fastener (20) for connecting the two modules after alignment is achieved.

  14. Solid-state chemistry route for supported tungsten and tungsten carbide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Hugot, N.; Desforges, A.; Fontana, S.; Mareche, J.F.; Herold, C.; Albiniak, A.

    2012-10-15

    Nanoparticles of tungsten and tungsten carbide have been prepared using solid-state chemistry methods. After the vapor phase impregnation of a tungsten hexachloride precursor on a carbon support, a temperature-programmed reduction/carburization was performed. Several parameters were investigated and the evolution of obtained samples was followed by XRD and TEM. The optimization of the reaction parameters led to the preparation of W, W{sub 2}C and WC particles well dispersed on the support. WC phase however could not be obtained alone with less than 10 nm mean size. This could be explained by the carburization mechanism and the carbon diffusion on the support. - Graphical abstract: Bright field picture of carbon-supported WC nanoparticles dispersed on the surface of the sample 1223 K in 10% CH{sub 4}/90% H{sub 2}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We aimed at the preparation of supported nanoparticulate tungsten derivatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Several parameters were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The evolution of obtained samples was followed by XRD and TEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimal preparation led to W, W{sub 2}C and WC particles dispersed on the support.

  15. Presence of Tungsten-Containing Fibers in Tungsten Refining and Manufacturing Processes

    PubMed Central

    Mckernan, John L.; Toraason, Mark A.; Fernback, Joseph E.; Petersen, Martin R.

    2009-01-01

    In tungsten refining and manufacturing processes, a series of tungsten oxides are typically formed as intermediates in the production of tungsten powder. The present study was conducted to characterize airborne tungsten-containing fiber dimensions, elemental composition and concentrations in the US tungsten refining and manufacturing industry. During the course of normal employee work activities, seven personal breathing zone and 62 area air samples were collected and analyzed using National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) fiber sampling and counting methods to determine dimensions, composition and airborne concentrations of fibers. Mixed models were used to identify relationships between potential determinants and airborne fiber concentrations. Results from transmission electron microscopy analyses indicated that airborne fibers with length >0.5 μm, diameter >0.01 μm and aspect ratios ≥3:1 were present on 35 of the 69 air samples collected. Overall, the airborne fibers detected had a geometric mean length ≈3 μm and diameter ≈0.3 μm. Ninety-seven percent of the airborne fibers identified were in the thoracic fraction (i.e. aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm). Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry results indicated that airborne fibers prior to the carburization process consisted primarily of tungsten and oxygen, with other elements being detected in trace quantities. Based on NIOSH fiber counting ‘B’ rules (length > 5 μm, diameter < 3 μm and aspect ratio ≥ 5:1), airborne fiber concentrations ranged from below the limit of detection to 0.085 fibers cm−3, with calcining being associated with the highest airborne concentrations. The mixed model procedure indicated that process temperature had a marginally significant relationship to airborne fiber concentration. This finding was expected since heated processes such as calcining created the highest airborne fiber concentrations. The finding of airborne tungsten-containing fibers in

  16. Engineering cell alignment in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhui; Huang, Guoyou; Zhang, Xiaohui; Wang, Lin; Du, Yanan; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Cell alignment plays a critical role in various cell behaviors including cytoskeleton reorganization, membrane protein relocation, nucleus gene expression, and ECM remodeling. Cell alignment is also known to exert significant effects on tissue regeneration (e.g., neuron) and modulate mechanical properties of tissues including skeleton, cardiac muscle and tendon. Therefore, it is essential to engineer cell alignment in vitro for biomechanics, cell biology, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. With advances in nano- and micro-scale technologies, a variety of approaches have been developed to engineer cell alignment in vitro, including mechanical loading, topographical patterning, and surface chemical treatment. In this review, we first present alignments of various cell types and their functionality in different tissues in vivo including muscle and nerve tissues. Then, we provide an overview of recent approaches for engineering cell alignment in vitro. Finally, concluding remarks and perspectives are addressed for future improvement of engineering cell alignment.

  17. Calibration and Temperature Profile of a Tungsten Filament Lamp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Izarra, Charles; Gitton, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work proposed for undergraduate students and teachers is the calibration of a tungsten filament lamp from electric measurements that are both simple and precise, allowing to determine the temperature of tungsten filament as a function of the current intensity. This calibration procedure was first applied to a conventional filament…

  18. Fabrication of large tungsten structures by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, V. E.; Lewis, W. J.; Stubbs, V. R.

    1971-01-01

    Process is accomplished by reducing tungsten hexafluoride with hydrogen. Metallic tungsten of essentially 100 percent purity and density is produced and built up as dense deposit on heated mandrel assembly. Process variations are building up, sealing or bonding refractory metals at temperatures below transition temperatures of base metal substrates.

  19. Processing of tungsten scrap into powders by electroerosion disintegration

    SciTech Connect

    Fominskii, L.P.; Leuchuk, M.V.; Myuller, A.S.; Tarabrina, V.P.

    1985-04-01

    Utilization of tungsten and tungsten alloy swarf and other waste and also of rejected and worn parts is a matter of great importance in view of the shortage of this metal. The authors examine the electroerosion (EE) disintegration of tungsten in water as a means of utilizing swarf and other loose waste. Unlike chemical methods, EE disintegration ensures ecological purity since there are no effluent waters or toxic discharges. Swarf and trimmings of rods of diameters up to 20 mm obtained after the lathe-turning of tungsten bars sintered from PVN and PVV tungsten powders were disintegrated in water at room temperature between tungsten electrodes. The phase composition of the powder was studied using FeK /SUB alpha/ radiation, by x-ray diffraction methods in a DRON-2 diffractometer with a graphite monochromator on the secondary beam. When tungsten is heated to boiling during EE disintegration, the impurities present in it can evaporate and burn out. Thus, tungsten powder produced by EE disintegration can be purer than the starting metal.

  20. Tungsten Deposition on Graphite using Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Uttam; Chauhan, Sachin S.; Sharma, Jayshree; Sanyasi, A. K.; Ghosh, J.; Choudhary, K. K.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2016-10-01

    The tokamak concept is the frontrunner for achieving controlled thermonuclear reaction on earth, an environment friendly way to solve future energy crisis. Although much progress has been made in controlling the heated fusion plasmas (temperature ∼ 150 million degrees) in tokamaks, technological issues related to plasma wall interaction topic still need focused attention. In future, reactor grade tokamak operational scenarios, the reactor wall and target plates are expected to experience a heat load of 10 MW/m2 and even more during the unfortunate events of ELM's and disruptions. Tungsten remains a suitable choice for the wall and target plates. It can withstand high temperatures, its ductile to brittle temperature is fairly low and it has low sputtering yield and low fuel retention capabilities. However, it is difficult to machine tungsten and hence usages of tungsten coated surfaces are mostly desirable. To produce tungsten coated graphite tiles for the above-mentioned purpose, a coating reactor has been designed, developed and made operational at the SVITS, Indore. Tungsten coating on graphite has been attempted and successfully carried out by using radio frequency induced plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (rf -PECVD) for the first time in India. Tungsten hexa-fluoride has been used as a pre-cursor gas. Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) clearly showed the presence of tungsten coating on the graphite samples. This paper presents the details of successful operation and achievement of tungsten coating in the reactor at SVITS.

  1. Microstructure and tensile properties of tungsten at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tielong; Dai, Yong; Lee, Yongjoong

    2016-01-01

    In order to support the development of the 5 MW spallation target for the European Spallation Source, the effect of fabrication process on microstructure, ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), tensile and fracture behaviour of powder-metallurgy pure tungsten materials has been investigated. A hot-rolled (HR) tungsten piece of 12 mm thickness and a hot-forged (HF) piece of about 80 mm thickness were used to simulate the thin and thick blocks in the target. The two tungsten pieces were characterized with metallography analysis, hardness measurement and tensile testing. The HR piece exhibits an anisotropic grain structure with an average size of about 330 × 140 × 40 μm in rolling, long transverse and short transverse (thickness) directions. The HF piece possesses a bimodal grain structure with about 310 × 170 × 70 μm grain size in deformed part and about 25 μm sized grains remained from sintering process. Hardness (HV0.2) of the HR piece is slightly greater than that of the HF one. The ductility of the HR tungsten specimens is greater than that of the HF tungsten. For the HF tungsten piece, specimens with small grains in gauge section manifest lower ductility but higher strength. The DBTT evaluated from the tensile results is 250-300 °C for the HR tungsten and about 350 °C for the HF tungsten.

  2. Measurement of the Properties of Tungsten at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margrave, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The thermophysical properties of tungsten and other materials were measured using containerless techniques. Levitation of liquid silver, gallium and tungsten were studied. The studies of liquid aluminum are almost complete and are expected to derive new, reliable properties for liquid aluminum.

  3. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. Welding Module 6. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in gas tungsten arc welding. The module has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles involved in gas tungsten arc welding, supplies, and applications are covered. The materials included…

  4. Solar sensor subsystems alignment check using solar scans for the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurczyk, S. G.; Moore, A. S.

    1989-01-01

    The alignment of a dual-axes sun sensor subsystem to a telescope having a multiple sensor subsystem is described. The sun sensor consists of two analog and one digital silicon detectors. The analog detectors are shadow mask type operating in the visible spectrum. The detectors are mounted for azimuth and elevation positioning of biaxial gimbals. The digital detector is a linear diode array that operates at a spectral position of 0.7 micron and is used for elevation positioning. The position signals correspond to relative angles between the sun sensor and the solar disk. These three detectors are aligned on an Invar structure which is mounted to a Cassegrain telescope. This telescope relays solar radiance to an eight channel detector subsystem operating in the infrared range from 2 to 10 microns. The test technique and results to check the boresight alignment of these two subsystems by scanning the solar disk will be reported. The boresight alignment for both the azimuth and elevation axes of the two detector subsystems is verified using this technique.

  5. TSGC and JSC Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Humberto

    2013-01-01

    NASA and the SGCs are, by design, intended to work closely together and have synergistic Vision, Mission, and Goals. The TSGC affiliates and JSC have been working together, but not always in a concise, coordinated, nor strategic manner. Today we have a couple of simple ideas to present about how TSGC and JSC have started to work together in a more concise, coordinated, and strategic manner, and how JSC and non-TSG Jurisdiction members have started to collaborate: Idea I: TSGC and JSC Technical Alignment Idea II: Concept of Clusters.

  6. Strains distribution in biaxial Ge/CdSe nanowire analyzed by a new finite element method based on boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Wang, Chunrui; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Shasha; Xu, Xiaofeng; Yang, Qinyu

    2013-12-01

    A new finite element method based on boundary conditions is proposed here to obtain the complete strains distribution in Ge/CdSe biaxial nanowires. The results show that the strains in nanowire is essentially uniform along the nanowire axis, whereas turn to be complex in cross-section. Additionally, Raman spectrum of Ge subnanowire was calculated on base of those strain data. Raman frequency shifts in Ge subnanowire in Ge/CdSe biaxial nanowires is a good agreement with that of Raman spectrum, which confirms the validity of this model.

  7. Tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys: A status review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.; Signorelli, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Improved performance of heat engines is largely dependent upon maximum cycle temperatures. Tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys (TFRS) are the first of a family of high temperature composites that offer the potential for significantly raising hot component operating temperatures and thus leading to improved heat engine performance. This status review of TFRS research emphasizes the promising property data developed to date, the status of TFRS composite airfoil fabrication technology, and the areas requiring more attention to assure their applicability to hot section components of aircraft gas turbine engines.

  8. Electrical properties of complex tungsten bronze ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padhee, R.; Das, Piyush R.

    2014-09-01

    This paper highlights the electrical properties of two new complex tungsten bronze ceramics (K2Pb2Eu2W2Ti4Nb4O30 and K2Pb2Pr2W2Ti4Nb4O30) which were prepared by high temperature mixed oxide method. Variation of impedance parameters with temperature (27-500 °C) and frequency (1 kHz to 5 MHz) shows the grain and grain boundary effects in the samples. The variation of dielectric parameters with frequency is also studied. The ac conductivity variation with temperature clearly exhibits that the materials have thermally activated transport properties of Arrhenius type.

  9. Xenon-Ion Drilling of Tungsten Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    High-velocity xenon ions used to drill holes of controlled size and distribution through tungsten layer that sheaths surface of controlled-porosity dispenser cathode of traveling wave-tube electron emitter. Controlled-porosity dispenser cathode employs barium/calcium/ aluminum oxide mixture that migrates through pores in cathode surface, thus coating it and reducing its work function. Rapid, precise drilling technique applied to films of other metals and used in other applications where micron-scale holes required. Method requires only few hours, as opposed to tens of hours by prior methods.

  10. Low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Bingchen; Shen, Xiaonan; Shang, Jingzhi; Cong, Chunxiao; Yang, Weihuang; Eginligil, Mustafa E-mail: meginligil@ntu.edu.sg; Yu, Ting E-mail: meginligil@ntu.edu.sg

    2014-11-01

    High photoresponse can be achieved in monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides. However, the response times are inconveniently limited by defects. Here, we report low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide prepared by exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method. The exfoliated device exhibits n-type behaviour; while the CVD device exhibits intrinsic behaviour. In off state, the CVD device has four times larger ratio of photoresponse for laser on/off and photoresponse decay–rise times are 0.1 s (limited by our setup), while the exfoliated device has few seconds. These findings are discussed in terms of charge trapping and localization.

  11. Atomic tungsten for ultrafast hard X-ray generation.

    PubMed

    Shan, Fang; Couch, Vernon A; Guo, Ting

    2005-05-19

    High-resolution X-ray absorption measurements (with an accuracy of +/-0.3 eV) of ZnSO(4) (aq) were performed with ultrafast selected energy X-ray absorption spectroscopy (USEXAS) using a laser-driven tungsten target X-ray source. The results were used to determine the absolute spectral positions of characteristic emission lines. By comparing these positions to those predicted for the line emission from tungsten of different oxidation states using the Dirac-Fock formula, the tungsten species responsible for ultrafast hard X-ray generation were found to be tungsten atoms. This finding provides the first direct evidence to support the mechanism of X-ray generation via high-energy electrons interacting with tungsten atoms in the solid target.

  12. Dynamics of small mobile helium clusters near tungsten surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lin; Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D.; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2014-08-01

    We report the results of a systematic atomic-scale analysis of the dynamics of small mobile helium clusters in tungsten, near tungsten surfaces. These helium clusters are attracted to tungsten surfaces due to an elastic interaction force that drives surface segregation. As the clusters migrate toward the surface, trap mutation and cluster dissociation are activated at rates higher than in the bulk. These kinetic processes are responsible for important structural, morphological, and compositional features in plasma-exposed tungsten, including surface adatoms, near-surface immobile helium-vacancy complexes, and retained helium content. Detailed results are presented for di-helium and tri-helium clusters near low-Miller-index tungsten surfaces.

  13. Tungsten recycling in the United States in 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2011-01-01

    This report, which is one of a series of reports on metals recycling, defines and quantifies the flow of tungsten-bearing materials in the United States from imports and stock releases through consumption and disposition in 2000, with particular emphasis on the recycling of industrial scrap (new scrap) and used products (old scrap). Because of tungsten's many diverse uses, numerous types of scrap were available for recycling by a wide variety of processes. In 2000, an estimated 46 percent of U.S. tungsten supply was derived from scrap. The ratio of tungsten consumed from new scrap to that consumed from old scrap was estimated to be 20:80. Of all the tungsten in old scrap available for recycling, an estimated 66 percent was either consumed in the United States or exported to be recycled.

  14. An experimental study of the influence of oxygen on silicide formation with tungsten deposited from tungsten hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.-L.; Smith, U.; Buchta, R.; Östling, M.

    1991-01-01

    Tungsten disilicide (WSi2) was formed by annealing tungsten films deposited by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition on <100>-silicon substrates. The influence of oxygen on the silicidation rate was studied. Si wafers with different oxygen content in the form of Czochralski, float-zone, and epitaxial wafers were used. Oxygen was also ion implanted into either the silicon substrate or the as-deposited tungsten film. The Rutherford backscattering technique was used to follow the progress of the silicidation. The silicidation rate was found to be dependent on the oxygen content of the Si substrates. The rate was lowest for Czochralski substrates and highest for float-zone substrates. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy was used to study the oxygen and fluorine profiles in the films prior to and after silicidation. Growth of WSi2 was found to be retarded concurrently with a pile-up of fluorine at the tungsten side of the W/WSi2 interface and a gettering of oxygen from the annealing atmosphere at the interface. Growth of WSi2 was then transferred to the tungsten surface. Oxygen implantation into silicon and tungsten, respectively, reduced the rate of silicide formation. Oxygen implantation into tungsten altered the distribution of fluorine and suppressed WSi2 growth at the tungsten surface. The observations led to a conceptual model, which ascribes the retardation in the growth of the inner WSi2 to a``poisoning'' effect caused by the increase of oxygen and fluorine levels at the interface.

  15. Biaxial testing of canine annulus fibrosus tissue under changing salt concentrations.

    PubMed

    Huyghe, Jacques M

    2010-03-01

    The in vivo mechanics of the annulus fibrosus of the intervertebral disc is one of biaxial rather than uniaxial loading. The material properties of the annulus are intimately linked to the osmolarity in the tissue. This paper presents biaxial relaxation experiments of canine annulus fibrosus tissue under stepwise changes of external salt concentration. The force tracings show that stresses are strongly dependent on time, salt concentration and orientation. The force tracing signature of a response to a change in strain, is one of a jump in stress that relaxes partly as the new strain is maintained. The force tracing signature of a stepwise change in salt concentration is a progressive monotonous change in stress towards a new equilibrium value. Although the number of samples does not allow any definitive quantitative conclusions, the trends may shed light on the complex interaction among the directionality of forces, strains and fiber orientation on one hand, and on the other hand, the osmolarity of the tissue. The dual response to a change in strain is understood as an immediate response before fluid flows in or out of the tissue, followed by a progressive readjustment of the fluid content in time because of the gradient in fluid chemical potential between the tissue and the surrounding solution.

  16. Application of magnetomechanical hysteresis modeling of magnetic techniques for monitoring neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sablik, M.J.; Kwun, H.; Burkhardt, G.L.; Rollwitz, W.L.; Cadena, D.G.

    1993-01-31

    Objective of this project is to investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress on magnetic properties in steels, using various magnetic measurement techniques. If neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress can be measured via changes in magnetic properties, this should ultimately assist in safety monitoring of nuclear power plants and of gas and oil pipelines. This first-year report addresses the issue of using magnetic property changes to detect neutron embrittlement. The magnetic measurements were all done on irradiated specimens previously broken in two in a Charpy test to determine their embrittlement. The magnetic properties of the broken charpy specimens from D.C. Cook did not correlate well with fluence or embrittlement parameters, possible due to metallurgical reasons. correlation was better with Indian Point 2 specimens, with the nonlinear harmonic amplitudes showing the best correlation (R[sup 2][approximately]0.7). However, correlation was not good enough. It is recommended that tests be done on unbroken irradiated Charpy specimens, for which magnetic characterization data prior to irradiation is available, if possible.

  17. Time-evolving collagen-like structural fibers in soft tissues: biaxial loading and spherical inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topol, Heiko; Demirkoparan, Hasan; Pence, Thomas J.; Wineman, Alan

    2017-02-01

    This work considers a previously developed constitutive theory for the time dependent mechanical response of fibrous soft tissue resulting from the time dependent remodeling of a collagen fiber network that is embedded in a ground substance matrix. The matrix is taken to be an incompressible nonlinear elastic solid. The remodeling process consists of the continual dissolution of existing fibers and the creation of new fibers. Motivated by experimental reports on the enzyme degradation of collagen fibers, the remodeling is governed by first order chemical kinetics such that the dissolution rate is dependent upon the fiber stretch. The resulting time dependent mechanical response is sensitive to the natural configuration of the fibers when they are created, and different assumptions on the nature of the fiber's stress free state are considered here. The response under biaxial loading, a type of loading that has particular significance for the characterization of biological materials, is studied. The inflation of a spherical membrane is then analyzed in terms of the equal biaxial stretch that occurs in the membrane approximation. Different assumptions on the natural configuration of the fibers, combined with their time dependent dissolution and reforming, are shown to emulate alternative forms of creep and relaxation response. This formal similarity to viscoelastic phenomena occurs even though the underlying mechanisms are fundamentally different from the mechanism of macromolecular reconfiguration that one typically associates with viscoelastic response.

  18. Characterization of biaxial mechanical behavior of porcine aorta under gradual elastin degradation.

    PubMed

    Zeinali-Davarani, Shahrokh; Chow, Ming-Jay; Turcotte, Raphaël; Zhang, Yanhang

    2013-07-01

    Arteries are composed of multiple constituents that endow the wall with proper structure and function. Many vascular diseases are associated with prominent mechanical and biological alterations in the wall constituents. In this study, planar biaxial tensile test data of elastase-treated porcine aortic tissue (Chow et al. in Biomech Model Mechanobiol 2013) is re-examined to characterize the altered mechanical behavior at multiple stages of digestion through constitutive modeling. Exponential-based as well as recruitment-based strain energy functions are employed and the associated constitutive parameters for individual digestion stages are identified using nonlinear parameter estimation. It is shown that when the major portion of elastin is degraded from a cut-open artery in the load-free state, the embedded collagen fibers are recruited at lower stretch levels under biaxial loads, leading to a rapid stiffening behavior of the tissue. Multiphoton microscopy illustrates that the collagen waviness decreases significantly with the degradation time, resulting in a rapid recruitment when the tissue is loaded. It is concluded that even when residual stresses are released, there exists an intrinsic mechanical interaction between arterial elastin and collagen that determines the mechanics of arteries and carries important implications to vascular mechanobiology.

  19. Evaluation of the plastic yield locus for embossed sheet using biaxial tensile tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Suk; Oh, Seok-Hwan; Do, Van-Cuong; Lee, Bong-Hyun

    2016-11-01

    3D-structured (embossed) aluminium sheets have been used as heat insulation materials in automotive exhaust parts because the embossments on the sheets increase the surface area and reinforce the stiffness of exhaust components. Unlike the press-forming process for flat (non-embossed) sheets, however, that for embossed aluminium sheets is constrained by many restrictions given the distinct mechanical properties and geometric 3D shape of the latter. In designing sheet-stamping tools, manufacturers have recently used CAE technologies based on finite element analysis. Guaranteeing the effectiveness of CAE technologies necessitates information about the plastic yield criterion, which is determined primarily by performing a biaxial tensile test on cruciform-shaped specimens. We measured the yield locus of an embossed aluminium 3004-P sheet by using the camera vision method instead of strain gauge measurement because of the difficulty in attaching a strain gauge to the central region of the aluminium body. The measured yield locus of the studied sheet shows that its yield stress in equi-biaxial stress is smaller than the flat sheet yield locus measured by the strain gauge method. The shape of the yield locus of the embossed aluminium sheet also adequately corresponds with Logan-Hosford anisotropic yield function.

  20. Fracture analysis of stiffened panels under biaxial loading with widespread cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An elastic-plastic finite-element analysis with a critical crack-tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion was used to model stable crack growth and fracture of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy (bare and clad) panels for several thicknesses. The panels had either single or multiple-site damage (MSD) cracks subjected to uniaxial or biaxial loading. Analyses were also conducted on cracked stiffened panels with single or MSD cracks. The critical CTOA value for each thickness was determined by matching the failure load on a middle-crack tension specimen. Comparisons were made between the critical angles determined from the finite-element analyses and those measured with photographic methods. Predicted load-against-crack extension and failure loads for panels under biaxial loading, panels with MSD cracks, and panels with various numbers of stiffeners were compared with test data whenever possible. The predicted results agreed well with the test data even for large-scale plastic deformations. The analyses were also able to predict stable tearing behavior of a large lead crack in the presence of MSD cracks. The analyses were then used to study the influence of stiffeners on residual strength in the presence of widespread fatigue cracking. Small MSD cracks were found to greatly reduce the residual strength for large lead cracks even for stiffened panels.

  1. Method of depositing a protective layer over a biaxially textured alloy substrate and composition therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Kroeger, Donald M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Lee, Dominic F.; Feenstra, Roeland; Norton, David P.

    2002-01-01

    A laminate article consists of a substrate and a biaxially textured protective layer over the substrate. The substrate can be biaxially textured and also have reduced magnetism over the magnetism of Ni. The substrate can be selected from the group consisting of nickel, copper, iron, aluminum, silver and alloys containing any of the foregoing. The protective layer can be selected from the group consisting of gold, silver, platinum, palladium, and nickel and alloys containing any of the foregoing. The protective layer is also non-oxidizable under conditions employed to deposit a desired, subsequent oxide buffer layer. Layers of YBCO, CeO.sub.2, YSZ, LaAlO.sub.3, SrTiO.sub.3, Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, RE.sub.2 O.sub.3, SrRuO.sub.3, LaNiO.sub.3 and La.sub.2 ZrO.sub.3 can be deposited over the protective layer. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  2. Direct Observation of Biaxial Confinement of a Semi-flexible Filament in a Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. C.

    2006-03-01

    We have studied the biaxial confinement of a semi-flexible filament in a channel by in situ video fluorescence microscopy*. As the channel width decreases, F-actin undergoes a transition from a 2D random regime to a 1D biaxially confined regime, leading to an increased effective persistence length. A theoretical calculation shows that the tangent-tangent correlation function in the confined regime shows a minimum, then reaches to a constant at long distances, indicating that confinement induces long-range order in a semi-flexible filament. The location of the minimum of the experimental correlation function is consistent with our theoretical calculation. This work was supported by KISTEP I-03-064, KISTEP IMT-2000-B3-2, MOHW 0405-MN01-0604-0007, NSF DMR 00-80034, 05-03347, 02-03755, 01-29804, NSF CTS-0404444, ONR N00014-05-1-0540, and DOE W-7405-ENG-36. M.C.Choi acknowledges partial support from the Korea Research Foundation Grant KRF-2005-214-C00202. *M.C.Choi et al., Macromolecules, 38, 9882 (2005)

  3. Design of a novel MEMS platform for the biaxial stimulation of living cells.

    PubMed

    Scuor, N; Gallina, P; Panchawagh, H V; Mahajan, R L; Sbaizero, O; Sergo, V

    2006-09-01

    Micromechanical systems are increasingly being used as tools in biological applications, since their characteristic dimensions permit to operate at the same length scale of the structures under investigation. Here, we present a methodology for the design, fabrication and operation of a tool for the assessment of mechanical properties of single cells. In particular, we describe a microsystems platform to study bio-mechanical response of single living cells to in-plane biaxial stretching. The proposed device employs a new linkage design in order to obtain the displacement of the quadrants of a sliced circular plate in mutually-orthogonal directions using just one linear actuator. With this linkage geometry, the whole device has only one degree of freedom. This results in a very predictable and reliable mechanical behaviour, thereby allowing use a simple and easily available control electronics. Results of this study have relevance for the design of a powerful yet simple BioMEMS platform for the characterization of living cells as in-plane bi-axial loading simulated the conditions experienced by cells in vivo more realistically than a uniaxial stretching.

  4. Multi-Scale Modeling the Mechanical Properties of Biaxial Weft Knitted Fabrics for Composite Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abghary, Mohammad Javad; Nedoushan, Reza Jafari; Hasani, Hossein

    2016-11-01

    In this paper a multi-scale numerical model for simulating the mechanical behavior of biaxial weft knitted fabrics produced based on 1×1 rib structure is presented. Fabrics were produced on a modern flat knitting machine using polyester as stitch yarns and nylon as straight yarns. A macro constitutive equation was presented to model the fabric mechanical behavior as a continuum material. User defined material subroutines were provided to implement the constitutive behavior in Abaqus software. The constitutive equation needs remarkable tensile tests on the fabric as the inputs. To solve this drawbacks meso scale modeling of the fabric was used to predict stress-strain curves of the fabric in three different directions (course, wale and 45°). In these simulations only the yarn properties are needed. To evaluate the accuracy of the proposed macro and meso models, fabric tensile behavior in 22.5 and 67.5° directions were simulated by the calibrated macro model and compared with experimental results. Spherical deformation was also simulated by the multi scale model and compared with experimental results. The results showed that the multi-scale modeling can successfully predict the tensile and spherical deformation of the biaxial weft knitted fabric with least required experiments. This model will be useful for composite applications.

  5. Time-evolving collagen-like structural fibers in soft tissues: biaxial loading and spherical inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topol, Heiko; Demirkoparan, Hasan; Pence, Thomas J.; Wineman, Alan

    2016-05-01

    This work considers a previously developed constitutive theory for the time dependent mechanical response of fibrous soft tissue resulting from the time dependent remodeling of a collagen fiber network that is embedded in a ground substance matrix. The matrix is taken to be an incompressible nonlinear elastic solid. The remodeling process consists of the continual dissolution of existing fibers and the creation of new fibers. Motivated by experimental reports on the enzyme degradation of collagen fibers, the remodeling is governed by first order chemical kinetics such that the dissolution rate is dependent upon the fiber stretch. The resulting time dependent mechanical response is sensitive to the natural configuration of the fibers when they are created, and different assumptions on the nature of the fiber's stress free state are considered here. The response under biaxial loading, a type of loading that has particular significance for the characterization of biological materials, is studied. The inflation of a spherical membrane is then analyzed in terms of the equal biaxial stretch that occurs in the membrane approximation. Different assumptions on the natural configuration of the fibers, combined with their time dependent dissolution and reforming, are shown to emulate alternative forms of creep and relaxation response. This formal similarity to viscoelastic phenomena occurs even though the underlying mechanisms are fundamentally different from the mechanism of macromolecular reconfiguration that one typically associates with viscoelastic response.

  6. Critical points and symmetries of a free energy function for biaxial nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chillingworth, D. R. J.

    2015-05-01

    We describe a general mean field model for the free energy function for a homogeneous medium of mutually interacting molecules, based on the formalism for a biaxial nematic liquid crystal set out by Katriel et al (1986) in an influential paper in Liquid Crystals 1 and subsequently called the KKLS formalism. The free energy is expressed as the sum of an entropy term and an interaction (Hamiltonian) term. Using the language of group representation theory we identify the order parameters as averaged components of a linear transformation, and characterize the full symmetry group of the entropy term in the liquid crystal context as a wreath product SO(3) ≀ Z2. The symmetry-breaking role of the Hamiltonian, pointed out by Katriel et al, is here made explicit in terms of centre manifold reduction at bifurcation from isotropy. We use tools and methods of equivariant singularity theory to reduce the bifurcation study to that of a D3-invariant function on R2, ubiquitous in liquid crystal theory, and to describe the ‘universal’ bifurcation geometry in terms of the superposition of a familiar swallowtail surface controlling uniaxial equilibria and another less familiar surface controlling biaxial equilibria. In principle this provides a template for all nematic liquid crystal phase transitions close to isotropy, although further work is needed to identify the absolute minima that are the critical points representing stable phases.

  7. Specimen Designs for Testing Advanced Aeropropulsion Materials Under In-Plane Biaxial Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, John R.; Abul-Aziz, Ali

    2003-01-01

    A design study was undertaken to develop specimen designs for testing advanced aeropropulsion materials under in-plane biaxial loading. The focus of initial work was on developing a specimen design suitable for deformation and strength tests to be conducted under monotonic loading. The type of loading initially assumed in this study was the special case of equibiaxial, tensile loading. A specimen design was successfully developed after a lengthy design and optimization process with overall dimensions of 12 by 12 by 0.625 in., and a gage area of 3.875 by 3.875 by 0.080 in. Subsequently, the scope of the work was extended to include the development of a second design tailored for tests involving cyclic loading. A specimen design suitably tailored to meet these requirements was successfully developed with overall dimensions of 12 by 12 by 0.500 in. and a gage area of 2.375 by 2.375 by 0.050 in. Finally, an investigation was made to determine whether the specimen designs developed in this study for equibiaxial, tensile loading could be used without modification to investigate general forms of biaxial loading. For best results, it was concluded that specimen designs need to be optimized and tailored to meet the specific loading requirements of individual research programs.

  8. Impact of Bi-Axial Shear on Atherogenic Gene Expression by Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Amlan; Chakraborty, Sutirtha; Jala, Venkatakrishna R; Thomas, Jonathan M; Sharp, M Keith; Berson, R Eric; Haribabu, Bodduluri

    2016-10-01

    This study demonstrated the effects of the directionality of oscillatory wall shear stress (WSS) on proliferation and proatherogenic gene expression (I-CAM, E-Selectin, and IL-6) in the presence of inflammatory mediators leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from endothelial cells grown in an orbiting culture dish. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was applied to quantify the flow in the dish, while an analytical solution representing an extension of Stokes second problem was used for validation. Results indicated that WSS magnitude was relatively constant near the center of the dish and oscillated significantly (0-0.9 Pa) near the side walls. Experiments showed that LTB4 dominated the shear effects on cell proliferation and area. Addition of LPS didn't change proliferation, but significantly affected cell area. The expression of I-CAM1, E-Selectin and IL-6 were altered by directional oscillatory shear index (DOSI, a measure of the biaxiality of oscillatory shear), but not shear magnitude. The significance of DOSI was further reinforced by the strength of its interactions with other atherogenic factors. Hence, directionality of shear appears to be an important factor in regulating gene expression and provides a potential explanation of the propensity for increased vascular lesions in regions in the arteries with oscillating biaxial flow.

  9. Robust control for a biaxial servo with time delay system based on adaptive tuning technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tien-Chi; Yu, Chih-Hsien

    2009-07-01

    A robust control method for synchronizing a biaxial servo system motion is proposed in this paper. A new network based cross-coupled control and adaptive tuning techniques are used together to cancel out the skew error. The conventional fixed gain PID cross-coupled controller (CCC) is replaced with the adaptive cross-coupled controller (ACCC) in the proposed control scheme to maintain biaxial servo system synchronization motion. Adaptive-tuning PID (APID) position and velocity controllers provide the necessary control actions to maintain synchronization while following a variable command trajectory. A delay-time compensator (DTC) with an adaptive controller was augmented to set the time delay element, effectively moving it outside the closed loop, enhancing the stability of the robust controlled system. This scheme provides strong robustness with respect to uncertain dynamics and disturbances. The simulation and experimental results reveal that the proposed control structure adapts to a wide range of operating conditions and provides promising results under parameter variations and load changes.

  10. Modeling of Tungsten Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byunghoon; Akiyama, Yasunobu; Imaishi, Nobuyuki; Park, Heung-Chul

    1999-05-01

    Low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of tungsten (W)film on silicon (Si) substrate was performed by reducting hexafluoride(WF6) with hydrogen. This CVD system is known for its nonlineardependence of growth rate on WF6 concentration. This study adopted asimple surface-reaction model which assumes that the precursor, i.e.,WF6, in the gas phase adsorbs on solid surfaces and then the adsorbedWF6 molecule is converted into tungsten solid film. The two kineticparameters involved in the model are derived from the experimentalresults. The solidification rate constant (ks) is equal to the growthrate at very high WF6 concentrations. The adsorption rate constant(ka) is derived from profile analyses of films grown in microtrenchesunder very low WF6 concentrations by applying the conventional MonteCarlo simulation code, which is valid for linear surface-reactionsystems. In the temperature range of 623 to 823 K, ka and ks haveactivation energies of 82 kJmol-1, 66.1 kJmol-1, respectively. A newlyproposed Monte Carlo simulation for nonlinear reaction systems, incombination with the two kinetic parameters, can quantitativelypredict the shape of film in microtrenches for a wide range oftemperatures and WF6 concentrations.

  11. Concentration dependent hydrogen diffusion in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlgren, T.; Bukonte, L.

    2016-10-01

    The diffusion of hydrogen in tungsten is studied as a function of temperature, hydrogen concentration and pressure using Molecular Dynamics technique. A new analysis method to determine diffusion coefficients that accounts for the random oscillation of atoms around the equilibrium position is presented. The results indicate that the hydrogen migration barrier of 0.25 eV should be used instead of the presently recommended value of 0.39 eV. This conclusion is supported by both experiments and density functional theory calculations. Moreover, the migration volume at the saddle point for H in W is found to be positive: ΔVm ≈ 0.488 Å3, leading to a decrease in the diffusivity at high pressures. At high H concentrations, a dramatic reduction in the diffusion coefficient is observed, due to site blocking and the repulsive H-H interaction. The results of this study indicates that high flux hydrogen irradiation leads to much higher H concentrations in tungsten than expected.

  12. Transport analysis of tungsten impurity in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Y.; Amano, T.; Shimizu, K.; Shimada, M.

    2003-03-01

    The radial distribution of tungsten impurity in ITER is calculated by using the 1.5D transport code TOTAL coupled with NCLASS, which can solve the neo-classical impurity flux considering arbitrary aspect ratio and collisionality. An impurity screening effect is observed when the density profile is flat and the line radiation power is smaller than in the case without impurity transport by a factor of 2. It is shown that 90 MW of line radiation power is possible without significant degradation of plasma performance ( HH98( y,2) ˜1) when the fusion power is 700 MW (fusion gain Q=10). The allowable tungsten density is about 7×10 15/m 3, which is 0.01% of the electron density and the increase of the effective ionic charge Zeff is about 0.39. In this case, the total radiation power is more than half of the total heating power 210 MW, and power to the divertor region is less than 100 MW. This operation regime gives an opportunity for high fusion power operation in ITER with acceptable divertor conditions. Simulations for the case with an internal transport barrier (ITB) are also performed and it is found that impurity shielding by an ITB is possible with density profile control.

  13. Tungsten - Yttrium Based Nuclear Structural Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramana, Chintalapalle; Chessa, Jack; Martinenz, Gustavo

    2013-04-01

    The challenging problem currently facing the nuclear science community in this 21st century is design and development of novel structural materials, which will have an impact on the next-generation nuclear reactors. The materials available at present include reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels, dispersion strengthened reduced activation ferritic steels, and vanadium- or tungsten-based alloys. These materials exhibit one or more specific problems, which are either intrinsic or caused by reactors. This work is focussed towards tungsten-yttrium (W-Y) based alloys and oxide ceramics, which can be utilized in nuclear applications. The goal is to derive a fundamental scientific understanding of W-Y-based materials. In collaboration with University of Califonia -- Davis, the project is designated to demonstrate the W-Y based alloys, ceramics and composites with enhanced physical, mechanical, thermo-chemical properties and higher radiation resistance. Efforts are focussed on understanding the microstructure, manipulating materials behavior under charged-particle and neutron irradiation, and create a knowledge database of defects, elemental diffusion/segregation, and defect trapping along grain boundaries and interfaces. Preliminary results will be discussed.

  14. High temperature annealing of ion irradiated tungsten

    DOE PAGES

    Ferroni, Francesco; Yi, Xiaoou; Arakawa, Kazuto; ...

    2015-03-21

    In this study, transmission electron microscopy of high temperature annealing of pure tungsten irradiated by self-ions was conducted to elucidate microstructural and defect evolution in temperature ranges relevant to fusion reactor applications (500–1200°C). Bulk isochronal and isothermal annealing of ion irradiated pure tungsten (2 MeV W+ ions, 500°C, 1014 W+/cm2) with temperatures of 800, 950, 1100 and 1400°C, from 0.5 to 8 h, was followed by ex situ characterization of defect size, number density, Burgers vector and nature. Loops with diameters larger than 2–3 nm were considered for detailed analysis, among which all loops had View the MathML source andmore » were predominantly of interstitial nature. In situ annealing experiments from 300 up to 1200°C were also carried out, including dynamic temperature ramp-ups. These confirmed an acceleration of loop loss above 900°C. At different temperatures within this range, dislocations exhibited behaviour such as initial isolated loop hopping followed by large-scale rearrangements into loop chains, coalescence and finally line–loop interactions and widespread absorption by free-surfaces at increasing temperatures. An activation energy for the annealing of dislocation length was obtained, finding Ea=1.34±0.2 eV for the 700–1100°C range.« less

  15. Vaccum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Krotz, P. D.; Todd, D. T.; Liaw, Y. K.

    1995-01-01

    This two year program will investigate Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. VGTAW appears to offer a significant improvement in weldability because of the clean environment and lower heat input needed. The overall objective of the program is to develop the VGTAW technology and implement it into a manufacturing environment that will result in lower cost, better quality and higher reliability aerospace components for the space shuttle and other NASA space systems. Phase 1 of this program was aimed at demonstrating the process's ability to weld normally difficult-to-weld materials. Phase 2 will focus on further evaluation, a hardware demonstration and a plan to implement VGTAW technology into a manufacturing environment. During Phase 1, the following tasks were performed: (1) Task 11000 Facility Modification - an existing vacuum chamber was modified and adapted to a GTAW power supply; (2) Task 12000 Materials Selection - four difficult-to-weld materials typically used in the construction of aerospace hardware were chosen for study; (3) Task 13000 VGTAW Experiments - welding experiments were conducted under vacuum using the hollow tungsten electrode and evaluation. As a result of this effort, two materials, NARloy Z and Incoloy 903, were downselected for further characterization in Phase 2; and (4) Task 13100 Aluminum-Lithium Weld Studies - this task was added to the original work statement to investigate the effects of vacuum welding and weld pool vibration on aluminum-lithium alloys.

  16. High temperature annealing of ion irradiated tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Ferroni, Francesco; Yi, Xiaoou; Fitzgerald, Steven P.; Edmondson, Philip D.; Roberts, Steve G.

    2015-03-21

    In this study, transmission electron microscopy of high temperature annealing of pure tungsten irradiated by self-ions was conducted to elucidate microstructural and defect evolution in temperature ranges relevant to fusion reactor applications (500–1200°C). Bulk isochronal and isothermal annealing of ion irradiated pure tungsten (2 MeV W+ ions, 500°C, 1014 W+/cm2) with temperatures of 800, 950, 1100 and 1400°C, from 0.5 to 8 h, was followed by ex situ characterization of defect size, number density, Burgers vector and nature. Loops with diameters larger than 2–3 nm were considered for detailed analysis, among which all loops had View the MathML source and were predominantly of interstitial nature. In situ annealing experiments from 300 up to 1200°C were also carried out, including dynamic temperature ramp-ups. These confirmed an acceleration of loop loss above 900°C. At different temperatures within this range, dislocations exhibited behaviour such as initial isolated loop hopping followed by large-scale rearrangements into loop chains, coalescence and finally line–loop interactions and widespread absorption by free-surfaces at increasing temperatures. An activation energy for the annealing of dislocation length was obtained, finding Ea=1.34±0.2 eV for the 700–1100°C range.

  17. Fuzzy tungsten in a magnetron sputtering device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, T. J.; Khan, A.; Heil, T.; Bradley, J. W.

    2016-11-01

    Helium ion induced tungsten nanostructure (tungsten fuzz) has been studied in a magnetron sputtering device. Three parameters were varied, the fluence from 3.4 × 1023-3.0 × 1024 m-2, the He ion energy from 25 to 70 eV, and the surface temperature from 900 to 1200 K. For each sample, SEM images were captured, and measurements of the fuzz layer thickness, surface roughness, reflectivity, and average structure widths are provided. A cross-over point from pre-fuzz to fully formed fuzz is found at 2.4 ± 0.4 × 1024 m-2, and a temperature of 1080 ± 60 K. No significant change was observed in the energy sweep. The fuzz is compared to low fluence fuzz created in the PISCES-A linear plasma device. Magnetron fuzz is less uniform than fuzz created by PISCES-A and with generally larger structure widths. The thicknesses of the magnetron samples follow the original Φ1/2 relation as opposed to the incubation fluence fit.

  18. 40 CFR 440.60 - Applicability; description of the tungsten ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... tungsten ore subcategory. 440.60 Section 440.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Tungsten Ore Subcategory § 440.60 Applicability; description of the tungsten ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart F are applicable to discharges from (a) mines that produce tungsten ore and...

  19. 40 CFR 440.60 - Applicability; description of the tungsten ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... tungsten ore subcategory. 440.60 Section 440.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Tungsten Ore Subcategory § 440.60 Applicability; description of the tungsten ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart F are applicable to discharges from (a) mines that produce tungsten ore and...

  20. 40 CFR 440.60 - Applicability; description of the tungsten ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... tungsten ore subcategory. 440.60 Section 440.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Tungsten Ore Subcategory § 440.60 Applicability; description of the tungsten ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart F are applicable to discharges from (a) mines that produce tungsten ore and...

  1. Onorbit IMU alignment error budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The Star Tracker, Crew Optical Alignment Sight (COAS), and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) from a complex navigation system with a multitude of error sources were combined. A complete list of the system errors is presented. The errors were combined in a rational way to yield an estimate of the IMU alignment accuracy for STS-1. The expected standard deviation in the IMU alignment error for STS-1 type alignments was determined to be 72 arc seconds per axis for star tracker alignments and 188 arc seconds per axis for COAS alignments. These estimates are based on current knowledge of the star tracker, COAS, IMU, and navigation base error specifications, and were partially verified by preliminary Monte Carlo analysis.

  2. Nova laser alignment control system

    SciTech Connect

    Van Arsdall, P.J.; Holloway, F.W.; McGuigan, D.L.; Shelton, R.T.

    1984-03-29

    Alignment of the Nova laser requires control of hundreds of optical components in the ten beam paths. Extensive application of computer technology makes daily alignment practical. The control system is designed in a manner which provides both centralized and local manual operator controls integrated with automatic closed loop alignment. Menudriven operator consoles using high resolution color graphics displays overlaid with transport touch panels allow laser personnel to interact efficiently with the computer system. Automatic alignment is accomplished by using image analysis techniques to determine beam references points from video images acquired along the laser chain. A major goal of the design is to contribute substantially to rapid experimental turnaround and consistent alignment results. This paper describes the computer-based control structure and the software methods developed for aligning this large laser system.

  3. Nuclear reactor internals alignment configuration

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Singleton, Norman R.

    2009-11-10

    An alignment system that employs jacking block assemblies and alignment posts around the periphery of the top plate of a nuclear reactor lower internals core shroud to align an upper core plate with the lower internals and the core shroud with the core barrel. The distal ends of the alignment posts are chamfered and are closely received within notches machined in the upper core plate at spaced locations around the outer circumference of the upper core plate. The jacking block assemblies are used to center the core shroud in the core barrel and the alignment posts assure the proper orientation of the upper core plate. The alignment posts may alternately be formed in the upper core plate and the notches may be formed in top plate.

  4. Aligned Defrosting Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    17 August 2004 This July 2004 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a group of aligned barchan sand dunes in the martian north polar region. At the time, the dunes were covered with seasonal frost, but the frost had begun to sublime away, leaving dark spots and dark outlines around the dunes. The surrounding plains exhibit small, diffuse spots that are also the result of subliming seasonal frost. This northern spring image, acquired on a descending ground track (as MGS was moving north to south on the 'night' side of Mars) is located near 78.8oN, 34.8oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across and sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  5. Surface morphology of tungsten exposed to helium plasma at temperatures below fuzz formation threshold 1073 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Bernard, Elodie; Kreter, Arkadi; Yoshida, Naoaki

    2017-01-01

    Impact of crystal orientation on the surface morphology of the helium plasma exposed tungsten has been investigated on the linear device PSI-2. A nanoscale undulating surface structure having a periodic arrangement is formed for temperatures below 1073 K, in contrast to the fuzz nanostructure formation in a higher temperature range. The crests of undulation align with the < 1 0 0> direction. The interval of the undulation is narrowest at the crystal grain of {1 1 0} surface. The interval becomes wider as the crystal grain surface tilts away from the {1 1 0} surface, and the undulating surface structure is not formed near the {1 0 0} surface. The height of undulations is ∼ 8 nm, independently of the interval of the undulations, and it corresponds to the depth of the layer heavily damaged due to helium plasma exposure.

  6. Lunar Alignments - Identification and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, A. César

    Lunar alignments are difficult to establish given the apparent lack of written accounts clearly pointing toward lunar alignments for individual temples. While some individual cases are reviewed and highlighted, the weight of the proof must fall on statistical sampling. Some definitions for the lunar alignments are provided in order to clarify the targets, and thus, some new tools are provided to try to test the lunar hypothesis in several cases, especially in megalithic astronomy.

  7. The alignment strategy of HADES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechenova, O.; Pechenov, V.; Galatyuk, T.; Hennino, T.; Holzmann, R.; Kornakov, G.; Markert, J.; Müntz, C.; Salabura, P.; Schmah, A.; Schwab, E.; Stroth, J.

    2015-06-01

    The global as well as intrinsic alignment of any spectrometer impacts directly on its performance and the quality of the achievable physics results. An overview of the current alignment procedure of the DiElectron Spectrometer HADES is presented with an emphasis on its main features and its accuracy. The sequence of all steps and procedures is given, including details on photogrammetric and track-based alignment.

  8. Alignment of Helical Membrane Protein Sequences Using AlignMe

    PubMed Central

    Khafizov, Kamil; Forrest, Lucy R.

    2013-01-01

    Few sequence alignment methods have been designed specifically for integral membrane proteins, even though these important proteins have distinct evolutionary and structural properties that might affect their alignments. Existing approaches typically consider membrane-related information either by using membrane-specific substitution matrices or by assigning distinct penalties for gap creation in transmembrane and non-transmembrane regions. Here, we ask whether favoring matching of predicted transmembrane segments within a standard dynamic programming algorithm can improve the accuracy of pairwise membrane protein sequence alignments. We tested various strategies using a specifically designed program called AlignMe. An updated set of homologous membrane protein structures, called HOMEP2, was used as a reference for optimizing the gap penalties. The best of the membrane-protein optimized approaches were then tested on an independent reference set of membrane protein sequence alignments from the BAliBASE collection. When secondary structure (S) matching was combined with evolutionary information (using a position-specific substitution matrix (P)), in an approach we called AlignMePS, the resultant pairwise alignments were typically among the most accurate over a broad range of sequence similarities when compared to available methods. Matching transmembrane predictions (T), in addition to evolutionary information, and secondary-structure predictions, in an approach called AlignMePST, generally reduces the accuracy of the alignments of closely-related proteins in the BAliBASE set relative to AlignMePS, but may be useful in cases of extremely distantly related proteins for which sequence information is less informative. The open source AlignMe code is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/alignme/, and at http://www.forrestlab.org, along with an online server and the HOMEP2 data set. PMID:23469223

  9. Measurement of uptake and release of tritium by tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, M.; Torikai, Y.; Saito, M.; Penzhorn, R.D.; Isobe, K.; Yamanishi, T.; Kurishita, H.

    2015-03-15

    Tungsten is currently contemplated as plasma facing material for the divertor of future fusion machines. In this paper the uptake of tritium by tungsten and its release behavior have been investigated. Tungsten samples have been annealed at various temperatures and loaded at also different temperatures with deuterium containing 7.2 % tritium at a pressure of 1.2 kPa. A specific system was designed to assess the release of tritiated water and molecular tritium by the samples. Due to the rather low solubility of hydrogen isotopes in tungsten it is particularly important to be aware of the presence of hydrogen traps or thin oxide films. As shown in this work, traps or oxide films may affect the retention capability of tungsten and lead to significantly modified release properties. It became clear that there were capture sites that had different thermal stability and different capture intensity in tungsten after polishing, or oxide films that were grown on the surface of tungsten and had barrier effects.

  10. Microstructural influences on the dynamic response of tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, K.T.; Coates, R.S.

    1992-09-01

    The influence of tungsten content, swaging, and grain size on the dynamic behavior of commercially available tungsten-nickel-iron (W-Ni-Fe) alloys has been examined using the compression Kolsky bar. The observed flow stresses increase with increasing tungsten content and with degree of swaging but are essentially independent of grain size for these compressive deformations. Further, the flow stresses sustained by these materials have a distinct dependence on strain rate, in that the flow stress increases by at least 20 pct over a range from 10(exp {minus}4)/s to 7 x 10(exp 3)/s. The rate sensitivity itself increases with increasing tungsten content. The rate sensitivity of the alloy with the highest tungsten content (97 pct W) appears to be essentially the same as that of pure polycrystalline tungsten. In addition to showing greater strain hardening, the unswaged alloy also shows a much higher rate dependence than the swaged alloys, with the flow stress almost doubling when the rate of deformation increases from quasistatic to 5 x 1O(exp 3)/s. The rate-hardening mechanism within the composite appears to be essentially that associated with the tungsten grains; however, the matrix contribution is significant in the case of an unswaged alloy.

  11. Effects of shear stress component and loading path on fatigue strength under tension/torsion biaxial cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Y.; Fujii, T.

    1994-12-31

    The material degradation and its mechanism of a plain woven glass fabric under tension/torsion biaxial cyclic loading were investigated. Thin-walled tubular specimens were used. Different types of loading sequence were applied to the specimens in order to estimate the effect of shear stress component on fatigue degradation of the composite under biaxial cyclic loading. All biaxial loads were proportionally applied to the specimens, but the number of torsion loading cycles and its direction (pulsating or alternate) were changed. Various wave forms were also used to estimate the effect of loading path. Loading path was changed but the final stress state (tensile and shear stresses) was the same. Stress-strain relation and stiffness reduction were observed to evaluate the degree of fatigue damage. The experimental results show that the role of shear stress is important when the material degradation is dominated by the shear stress component although the effect of shear stress component on fatigue strength decreases with an increase of tensile stress component under tension/torsion biaxial loading. Loading sequence also affects more or less on the fatigue life. On the other hand, it is well estimated that the fatigue life is little dependent on loading path in the case of high cycle fatigue.

  12. Ultra-wide-view patterned polarizer type stereoscopic LCDs using patterned alignment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chao-Te; Lin, Hoang Yan

    2012-01-16

    The proposed patterned polarizer rather than the conventional ±λ/4 polarizer can further reduce the crosstalk through its corresponding glass for stereoscopic LCDs and can be fabricated by using the same patterned alignment technique. The patterned polarizer comprises a linear polarizer, a patterned retarder and a biaxial film. The maximum crosstalk ratio of the optimal design is reduced from 0.1 (for the conventional circular polarizer using ±λ/4 retarder and positive C film) to 0.016 (for the proposed structure) at ±60° viewing cone for the light obliquely passing through both the glasses and the LCD at the same angle. As to the light normally passing through both the LCD and glasses, the maximum crosstalk ratio can be reduced from 0.0167 to 0.0126 with rotated glasses.

  13. GS-align for glycan structure alignment and similarity measurement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hui Sun; Jo, Sunhwan; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Park, Sang-Jun; Skolnick, Jeffrey; Lee, Jooyoung; Im, Wonpil

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Glycans play critical roles in many biological processes, and their structural diversity is key for specific protein-glycan recognition. Comparative structural studies of biological molecules provide useful insight into their biological relationships. However, most computational tools are designed for protein structure, and despite their importance, there is no currently available tool for comparing glycan structures in a sequence order- and size-independent manner. Results: A novel method, GS-align, is developed for glycan structure alignment and similarity measurement. GS-align generates possible alignments between two glycan structures through iterative maximum clique search and fragment superposition. The optimal alignment is then determined by the maximum structural similarity score, GS-score, which is size-independent. Benchmark tests against the Protein Data Bank (PDB) N-linked glycan library and PDB homologous/non-homologous N-glycoprotein sets indicate that GS-align is a robust computational tool to align glycan structures and quantify their structural similarity. GS-align is also applied to template-based glycan structure prediction and monosaccharide substitution matrix generation to illustrate its utility. Availability and implementation: http://www.glycanstructure.org/gsalign. Contact: wonpil@ku.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25857669

  14. Temporal Variability of Tungsten and Cobalt in Fallon, Nevada

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Paul R.; Speakman, Robert J.; Ridenour, Gary; Witten, Mark L.

    2007-01-01

    Background Since 1997, Fallon, Nevada, has experienced a cluster of childhood leukemia that has been declared “one of the most unique clusters of childhood cancer ever reported.” Multiple environmental studies have shown airborne tungsten and cobalt to be elevated within Fallon, but the question remains: Have these metals changed through time in correspondence with the onset of the leukemia cluster? Methods We used dendrochemistry, the study of element concentrations through time in tree rings, in Fallon to assess temporal variability of airborne tungsten and cobalt since the late 1980s. The techniques used in Fallon were also tested in a different town (Sweet Home, OR) that has airborne tungsten from a known source. Results The Sweet Home test case confirms the accuracy of dendrochemistry for showing temporal variability of environmental tungsten. Given that dendrochemistry works for tungsten, tree-ring chemistry shows that tungsten increased in Fallon relative to nearby comparison towns beginning by the mid-1990s, slightly before the onset of the cluster, and cobalt has been high throughout the last ~ 15 years. Other metals do not show trends through time in Fallon. Discussion Results in Fallon suggest a temporal correspondence between the onset of excessive childhood leukemia and elevated levels of tungsten and cobalt. Although environmental data alone cannot directly link childhood leukemia with exposure to metals, research by others has shown that combined exposure to tungsten and cobalt can be carcinogenic to humans. Conclusion Continued biomedical research is warranted to directly test for linkage between childhood leukemia and tungsten and cobalt. PMID:17520058

  15. Preparation and electrocatalytic activity of tungsten carbide and titania nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Sujuan; Shi, Binbin; Yao, Guoxing; Li, Guohua; Ma, Chunan

    2011-10-15

    Graphical abstract: The electrocatalytic activity of tungsten carbide and titania nanocomposite is related to the structure, crystal phase and chemical components of the nanocomposite, and is also affected by the property of electrolyte. A synergistic effect exists between tungsten carbide and titania of the composite. Highlights: {yields} Electrocatalytic activity of tungsten carbide and titania nanocomposite with core-shell structure. {yields} Activity is related to the structure, crystal phase and chemical component of the nanocomposite. {yields} The property of electrolyte affects the electrocatalytic activity. {yields} A synergistic effect exists between tungsten carbide and titania of the composite. -- Abstract: Tungsten carbide and titania nanocomposite was prepared by combining a reduced-carbonized approach with a mechanochemical approach. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope under scanning mode and X-ray energy dispersion spectrum. The results show that the crystal phases of the samples are composed of anatase, rutile, nonstoichiometry titanium oxide, monotungsten carbide, bitungsten carbide and nonstoichiometry tungsten carbide, and they can be controlled by adjusting the parameters of the reduced-carbonized approach; tungsten carbide particles decorate on the surface of titania support, the diameter of tungsten carbide particle is smaller than 20 nm and that of titania is around 100 nm; the chemical components of the samples are Ti, O, W and C. The electrocatalytic activity of the samples was measured by a cyclic voltammetry with three electrodes. The results indicate that the electrocatalytic activities of the samples are related to their crystal phases and the property of electrolyte in aqueous solution. A synergistic effect between titania and tungsten carbide is reported for the first time.

  16. Mechanism for chemical-vapor deposition of tungsten on silicon from tungsten hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Yarmoff, J.A.; McFeely, F.R.

    1988-06-01

    The mechanism for the growth of tungsten films on silicon substrates with the use of low-pressure chemical-vapor deposition from WF/sub 6/ was studied with soft-x-ray photoemission by growing films in situ. The dissociative chemisorption of WF/sub 6/ on Si(111) was found to be complete, even at room temperature. The reaction is self-poisoning at room temperature, however, as the fluorine liberated from WF/sub 6/ ties up the active Si sites responsible for the dissociation. The mechanism for continued growth of tungsten films at elevated temperature was determined to proceed via Si diffusion through the layer towards the surface. Post-fluorination of these films via XeF/sub 2/ was employed as a means for illustrating their morphology.

  17. Mechanism for chemical-vapor deposition of tungsten on silicon from tungsten hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmoff, Jory A.; McFeely, F. Read

    1988-06-01

    The mechanism for the growth of tungsten films on silicon substrates with the use of low-pressure chemical-vapor deposition from WF6 was studied with soft-x-ray photoemission by growing films in situ. The dissociative chemisorption of WF6 on Si(111) was found to be complete, even at room temperature. The reaction is self-poisoning at room temperature, however, as the fluorine liberated from WF6 ties up the active Si sites responsible for the dissociation. The mechanism for continued growth of tungsten films at elevated temperature was determined to proceed via Si diffusion through the layer towards the surface. Post-fluorination of these films via XeF2 was employed as a means for illustrating their morphology.

  18. Thermal expansion method for lining tantalum alloy tubing with tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, G. K.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Mattson, W. F.

    1973-01-01

    A differential-thermal expansion method was developed to line T-111 (tantalum - 8 percent tungsten - 2 percent hafnium) tubing with a tungsten diffusion barrier as part of a fuel element fabrication study for a space power nuclear reactor concept. This method uses a steel mandrel, which has a larger thermal expansion than T-111, to force the tungsten against the inside of the T-111 tube. Variables investigated include lining temperature, initial assembly gas size, and tube length. Linear integrity increased with increasing lining temperature and decreasing gap size. The method should have more general applicability where cylinders must be lined with a thin layer of a second material.

  19. Mechanisms of selectivity loss during tungsten CVD (chemical vapor deposition)

    SciTech Connect

    Creighton, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The tungsten subfluoride mechanism as well as other proposed mechanisms of selectivity loss are reviewed. To further demonstrate the viability of the tungsten subfluoride mechanism, we have extended the measurement of the tungsten subfluoride production rate down to 450{degree}C. We also report results from some preliminary experiments designed to identify the selectivity loss mechanism when elemental silicon is available for reaction. Comments regarding the origins of the insulator effect and selectivity loss for silane reduction are offered. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Electrode potentials of tungsten in fused alkali chlorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. B.; Volkovich, V. A.; Poskryakov, D. A.; Vasin, B. D.; Griffiths, T. R.

    2016-09-01

    Anodic dissolution of tungsten was studied at 823-1173 K in the melts based on NaCl-CsCl, NaCl-KCl-CsCl and LiCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic mixtures. The process results in the formation of W(IV) ions. Prolonged contact with silica results in oxidation W(IV) ions and decreasing tungsten concentration in the electrolyte due to formation of volatile higher oxidation state chloro- and oxychloro-species. Tungsten electrode potentials were measured in NaCl-CsCl and NaCl-KCl-CsCl based melts using potentiometry.

  1. Chemically assisted ion beam etching of polycrystalline and (100)tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Charles

    1987-01-01

    A chemically assisted ion-beam etching technique is described which employs an ion beam from an electron-bombardment ion source and a directed flux of ClF3 neutrals. This technique enables the etching of tungsten foils and films in excess of 40 microns thick with good anisotropy and pattern definition over areas of 30 sq mm, and with a high degree of selectivity. (100) tungsten foils etched with this process exhibit preferred-orientation etching, while polycrystalline tungsten films exhibit high etch rates. This technique can be used to pattern the dispenser cathode surfaces serving as electron emitters in traveling-wave tubes to a controlled porosity.

  2. The mechanical response of the ovine lumbar anulus fibrosus to uniaxial, biaxial and shear loads.

    PubMed

    Little, J P; Pearcy, M J; Tevelen, G; Evans, J H; Pettet, G; Adam, C J

    2010-02-01

    Analytical and computational models of the intervertebral disc (IVD) are commonly employed to enhance understanding of the biomechanics of the human spine and spinal motion segments. The accuracy of these models in predicting physiological behaviour of the spine is intrinsically reliant on the accuracy of the material constitutive representations employed to represent the spinal tissues. There is a paucity of detailed mechanical data describing the material response of the reinforced-ground matrix in the anulus fibrosus of the IVD. In the present study, the 'reinforced-ground matrix' was defined as the matrix with the collagen fibres embedded but not actively bearing axial load, thus incorporating the contribution of the fibre-fibre and fibre-matrix interactions. To determine mechanical parameters for the anulus ground matrix, mechanical tests were carried out on specimens of ovine anulus, under unconfined uniaxial compression, simple shear and biaxial compression. Test specimens of ovine anulus fibrosus were obtained with an adjacent layer of vertebral bone/cartilage on the superior and inferior specimen surface. Specimen geometry was such that there were no continuous collagen fibres coupling the two endplates. Samples were subdivided according to disc region - anterior, lateral and posterior - to determine the regional inhomogeneity in the anulus mechanical response. Specimens were loaded at a strain rate sufficient to avoid fluid outflow from the tissue and typical stress-strain responses under the initial load application and under repeated loading were determined for each of the three loading types. The response of the anulus tissue to the initial and repeated load cycles was significantly different for all load types, except biaxial compression in the anterior anulus. Since the maximum applied strain exceeded the damage strain for the tissue, experimental results for repeated loading reflected the mechanical ability of the tissue to carry load, subsequent to

  3. Mask alignment system for semiconductor processing

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Aaron P.; Carlson, Charles T.; Weaver, William T.; Grant, Christopher N.

    2017-02-14

    A mask alignment system for providing precise and repeatable alignment between ion implantation masks and workpieces. The system includes a mask frame having a plurality of ion implantation masks loosely connected thereto. The mask frame is provided with a plurality of frame alignment cavities, and each mask is provided with a plurality of mask alignment cavities. The system further includes a platen for holding workpieces. The platen may be provided with a plurality of mask alignment pins and frame alignment pins configured to engage the mask alignment cavities and frame alignment cavities, respectively. The mask frame can be lowered onto the platen, with the frame alignment cavities moving into registration with the frame alignment pins to provide rough alignment between the masks and workpieces. The mask alignment cavities are then moved into registration with the mask alignment pins, thereby shifting each individual mask into precise alignment with a respective workpiece.

  4. Density-functional studies of tungsten trioxide, tungsten bronzes, and related systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingham, B.; Hendy, S. C.; Chong, S. V.; Tallon, J. L.

    2005-08-01

    Tungsten trioxide adopts a variety of structures which can be intercalated with charged species to alter the electronic properties, thus forming “tungsten bronzes.” Similar effects are observed upon removing oxygen from WO3 . We present a computational study of cubic and hexagonal alkali bronzes and examine the effects on cell size and band structure as the size of the intercalated ion is increased. With the exception of hydrogen (which is predicted to be unstable as an intercalate), the behavior of the bronzes are relatively consistent. NaWO3 is the most stable of the cubic systems, although in the hexagonal system the larger ions are more stable. The band structures are identical, with the intercalated atom donating its single electron to the tungsten 5d valence band. A study of fractional doping in the NaxWO3 system (0⩽x⩽1) showed a linear variation in cell parameter and a systematic shift in the Fermi level into the conduction band. In the oxygen-deficient WO3-x system the Fermi level undergoes a sudden jump into the conduction band at around x=0.2 . Lastly, three compounds of a layered WO4•α,ω -diaminoalkane hybrid series were studied and found to be insulating, with features in the band structure similar to those of the parent WO3 compound that relate well to experimental UV-visible spectroscopy results.

  5. An effective approach to synthesize monolayer tungsten disulphide crystals using tungsten halide precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaraja, Amutha; Shinde, Sachin M.; Kalita, Golap Tanemura, Masaki

    2016-02-01

    The synthesis of large-area monolayer tungsten disulphide (WS{sub 2}) single crystal is critical for realistic application in electronic and optical devices. Here, we demonstrate an effective approach to synthesize monolayer WS{sub 2} crystals using tungsten hexachloride (WCl{sub 6}) as a solid precursor in atmospheric chemical vapor deposition process. In this technique, 0.05M solution of WCl{sub 6} in ethanol was drop-casted on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate to create an even distribution of the precursor, which was reduced and sulfurized at 750 °C in Ar atmosphere. We observed growth of triangular, star-shaped, as well as dendritic WS{sub 2} crystals on the substrate. The crystal geometry evolves with the shape and size of the nuclei as observed from the dendritic structures. These results show that controlling the initial nucleation and growth process, large WS{sub 2} single crystalline monolayer can be grown using the WCl{sub 6} precursor. Our finding shows an easier and effective approach to grow WS{sub 2} monolayer using tungsten halide solution-casting, rather than evaporating the precursor for gas phase reaction.

  6. Tensile behavior of tungsten and tungsten-alloy wires from 1300 to 1600 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hee, Man Yun

    1988-01-01

    The tensile behavior of a 200-micrometer-diameter tungsten lamp (218CS-W), tungsten + 1.0 atomic percent (a/o) thoria (ST300-W), and tungsten + 0.4 a/o hafnium carbide (WHfC) wires was determined over the temperature range 1300 t0 1600 K at strain rates of 3.3 X 10 to the -2 to 3.3 X 10 to the -5/sec. Although most tests were conducted on as-drawn materials, one series of tests was undertaken on ST300-W wires in four different conditions: as-drawn and vacuum-annealed at 1535 K for 1 hr, with and without electroplating. Whereas heat treatment had no effect on tensile properties, electropolishing significantly increased both the proportional limit and ductility, but not the ultimate tensile strength. Comparison of the behavior of the three alloys indicates that the HfC-dispersed material possesses superior tensile properties. Theoretical calculations indicate that the strength/ductility advantage of WHfC is due to the resistance to recrystallization imparted by the dispersoid.

  7. Unit-cell intergrowth of pyrochlore and hexagonal tungsten bronze structures in secondary tungsten minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Grey, Ian E. . E-mail: ian.grey@csiro.au; Birch, William D.; Bougerol, Catherine

    2006-12-15

    Structural relations between secondary tungsten minerals with general composition A{sub x}[(W,Fe)(O,OH){sub 3}]{sub .y}H{sub 2}O are described. Phyllotungstite (A=predominantly Ca) is hexagonal, a=7.31(3)A, c=19.55(1)A, space group P6{sub 3}/mmc. Pittongite, a new secondary tungsten mineral from a wolframite deposit near Pittong in Victoria, southeastern Australia (A=predominantly Na) is hexagonal, a=7.286(1)A, c=50.49(1)A, space group P-6m2. The structures of both minerals can be described as unit-cell scale intergrowths of (111){sub py} pyrochlore slabs with pairs of hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB) layers. In phyllotungstite, the (111){sub py} blocks have the same thickness, 6A, whereas pittongite contains pyrochlore blocks of two different thicknesses, 6 and 12A. The structures can alternatively be described in terms of chemical twinning of the pyrochlore structure on (111){sub py} oxygen planes. At the chemical twin planes, pairs of HTB layers are corner connected as in hexagonal WO{sub 3}.

  8. Numerical development of a new correlation between biaxial fracture strain and material fracture toughness for small punch test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Dutta, B. K.; Chattopadhyay, J.

    2017-04-01

    The miniaturized specimens are used to determine mechanical properties of the materials, such as yield stress, ultimate stress, fracture toughness etc. Use of such specimens is essential whenever limited quantity of material is available for testing, such as aged/irradiated materials. The miniaturized small punch test (SPT) is a technique which is widely used to determine change in mechanical properties of the materials. Various empirical correlations are proposed in the literature to determine the value of fracture toughness (JIC) using this technique. bi-axial fracture strain is determined using SPT tests. This parameter is then used to determine JIC using available empirical correlations. The correlations between JIC and biaxial fracture strain quoted in the literature are based on experimental data acquired for large number of materials. There are number of such correlations available in the literature, which are generally not in agreement with each other. In the present work, an attempt has been made to determine the correlation between biaxial fracture strain (εqf) and crack initiation toughness (Ji) numerically. About one hundred materials are digitally generated by varying yield stress, ultimate stress, hardening coefficient and Gurson parameters. Such set of each material is then used to analyze a SPT specimen and a standard TPB specimen. Analysis of SPT specimen generated biaxial fracture strain (εqf) and analysis of TPB specimen generated value of Ji. A graph is then plotted between these two parameters for all the digitally generated materials. The best fit straight line determines the correlation. It has been also observed that it is possible to have variation in Ji for the same value of biaxial fracture strain (εqf) within a limit. Such variation in the value of Ji has been also ascertained using the graph. Experimental SPT data acquired earlier for three materials were then used to get Ji by using newly developed correlation. A reasonable

  9. Lexical alignment in triadic communication

    PubMed Central

    Foltz, Anouschka; Gaspers, Judith; Thiele, Kristina; Stenneken, Prisca; Cimiano, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Lexical alignment refers to the adoption of one’s interlocutor’s lexical items. Accounts of the mechanisms underlying such lexical alignment differ (among other aspects) in the role assigned to addressee-centered behavior. In this study, we used a triadic communicative situation to test which factors may modulate the extent to which participants’ lexical alignment reflects addressee-centered behavior. Pairs of naïve participants played a picture matching game and received information about the order in which pictures were to be matched from a voice over headphones. On critical trials, participants did or did not hear a name for the picture to be matched next over headphones. Importantly, when the voice over headphones provided a name, it did not match the name that the interlocutor had previously used to describe the object. Participants overwhelmingly used the word that the voice over headphones provided. This result points to non-addressee-centered behavior and is discussed in terms of disrupting alignment with the interlocutor as well as in terms of establishing alignment with the voice over headphones. In addition, the type of picture (line drawing vs. tangram shape) independently modulated lexical alignment, such that participants showed more lexical alignment to their interlocutor for (more ambiguous) tangram shapes compared to line drawings. Overall, the results point to a rather large role for non-addressee-centered behavior during lexical alignment. PMID:25762955

  10. Well-pump alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1998-01-01

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping.

  11. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool.

    PubMed

    Henstock, Peter V; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow.

  12. Drive alignment pays maintenance dividends

    SciTech Connect

    Fedder, R.

    2008-12-15

    Proper alignment of the motor and gear drive on conveying and processing equipment will result in longer bearing and coupling life, along with lower maintenance costs. Selecting an alignment free drive package instead of a traditional foot mounted drive and motor is a major advancement toward these goals. 4 photos.

  13. Rhenium alloying of tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    German, R.M.; Bose, A.; Jerman, G.

    1989-01-01

    Alloying experiments were performed using rhenium additions to a classic 90 mass % tungsten heavy alloy. The mixed-powder system was liquid phase sintered to full density at 1500 C in 60 min The rhenium-modified alloys exhibited a smaller grain size, higher hardness, higher strength, and lower ductility than the unalloyed system. For an alloy with a composition of 84W-6Re-8Ni-2Fe, the sintered density was 17, 4 Mg/m{sup 3} with a yield strength of 815 MPa, tensile strength of 1180 MPa, and elongation to failure of 13%. This property combination results from the aggregate effects of grain size reduction and solid solution hardening due to rhenium. In the unalloyed system these properties require post-sintering swaging and aging; thus, alloying with rhenium is most attractive for applications where net shaping is desired, such as by powder injection molding.

  14. A Study of Tungsten-Technetium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maltz, J. W.

    1965-01-01

    Technetium is a sister element to rhenium and has many properties that are similar to rhenium. It is predicted that technetium will have about the same effects on tungsten as rhenium in regard to increase in workability, lowered ductile to brittle transition temperature, and improved ductility. The objectives of the current work are to recover technetium from fission product wastes at Hanford Atomic Products Operation and reduce to purified metal; prepare W-Tc alloys containing up to 50 atomic% Tc; fabricate the alloy ingots to sheet stock, assessing the effect of technetium on workability; and perform metallurgical and mechanical properties evaluation of the fabricated alloys. Previous reports have described the separation and purification of 800 g of technetium metal powder, melting of technetium and W-Tc alloys, and some initial observation of the alloy material.

  15. Laser irradiation of carbon-tungsten materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, A.; Avotina, L.; Marin, A.; Lungu, C. P.; Grigorescu, C. E. A.; Demitri, N.; Ursescu, D.; Porosnicu, C.; Osiceanu, P.; Kizane, G.; Grigoriu, C.

    2014-09-01

    Carbon-tungsten layers deposited on graphite by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) were directly irradiated with a femtosecond terawatt laser. The morphological and structural changes produced in the irradiated area by different numbers of pulses were systematically explored, both along the spots and in their depths. Although micro-Raman and Synchrotron-x-ray diffraction investigations have shown no carbide formation, they have shown the unexpected presence of embedded nano-diamonds in the areas irradiated with high fluencies. Scanning electron microscopy images show a cumulative effect of the laser pulses on the morphology through the ablation process. The micro-Raman spatial mapping signalled an increased percentage of sp3 carbon bonding in the areas irradiated with laser fluencies around the ablation threshold. In-depth x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations suggested a weak cumulative effect on the percentage increase of the sp2-sp3 transitions with the number of laser pulses just for nanometric layer thicknesses.

  16. Magneto photoluminescence measurements of tungsten disulphide monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhnert, Jan; Rahimi-Iman, Arash; Heimbrodt, Wolfram

    2017-03-01

    Layered transition-metal dichalcogenides have attracted great interest in the last few years. Thinned down to the monolayer limit they change from an indirect band structure to a direct band gap in the visible region. Due to the monolayer thickness the inversion symmetry of the crystal is broken and spin and valley are coupled to each other. The degeneracy between the two equivalent valleys, K and K‧, respectively, can be lifted by applying an external magnetic field. Here, we present photoluminescence measurements of CVD-grown tungsten disulphide (WS2) monolayers at temperatures of 2 K. By applying magnetic fields up to 7 T in Faraday geometry, a splitting of the photoluminescence peaks can be observed. The magnetic field dependence of the A-exciton, the trion and three bound exciton states is discussed and the corresponding g-factors are determined.

  17. Tungsten-doped thin film materials

    DOEpatents

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Chang, Hauyee; Gao, Chen; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Schultz, Peter G.

    2003-12-09

    A dielectric thin film material for high frequency use, including use as a capacitor, and having a low dielectric loss factor is provided, the film comprising a composition of tungsten-doped barium strontium titanate of the general formula (Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.1-x)TiO.sub.3, where X is between about 0.5 and about 1.0. Also provided is a method for making a dielectric thin film of the general formula (Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.1-x)TiO.sub.3 and doped with W, where X is between about 0.5 and about 1.0, a substrate is provided, TiO.sub.2, the W dopant, Ba, and optionally Sr are deposited on the substrate, and the substrate containing TiO.sub.2, the W dopant, Ba, and optionally Sr is heated to form a low loss dielectric thin film.

  18. Thermomechanical processing of tungsten-copper composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.; Bryskin, B.

    1996-05-01

    A tungsten-40 wt% Cu composite was consolidated by liquid-phase sintering and further processed to full density by a number of deformation methods. Fully dense materials were obtained by hot extrusion or cold rolling of the W-Cu composite. Subsequent processing by cold rolling, cold swaging, or hot swaging did not produce large changes in the aspect ratio of the W particles. The materials develop high hardness with small grain sizes of 5 {mu}m or less. The work-hardening, recrystallization, and grain growth of the material are characterized, and the hardness and tensile properties are related to processing parameters. Wire with tensile strengths up to 1120 MPa were produced. Further improvements in properties are anticipated with optimized processing parameters.

  19. Alignment of the MINOS FD

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, B.; Boehnlein, D.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    The results and procedure of the alignment of the MINOS Far Detector are presented. The far detector has independent alignments of SM1 and SM2. The misalignments have an estimated uncertainty of {approx}850 {micro}m for SM1 and {approx}750 {micro}m for SM2. The alignment has as inputs the average rotations of U and V as determined by optical survey and strip positions within modules measured from the module mapper. The output of this is a module-module correction for transverse mis-alignments. These results were verified by examining an independent set of data. These alignment constants on average contribute much less then 1% to the total uncertainty in the transverse strip position.

  20. Enhanced toughness and stable crack propagation in a novel tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composite produced by chemical vapour infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesch, J.; Höschen, T.; Linsmeier, Ch; Wurster, S.; You, J.-H.

    2014-04-01

    Tungsten is a promising candidate for the plasma-facing components of a future fusion reactor, but its use is strongly restricted by its inherent brittleness. An innovative concept to overcome this problem is tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composite. In this paper we present the first mechanical test of such a composite material using a sample containing multiple fibres. The in situ fracture experiment was performed in a scanning electron microscope for close observation of the propagating crack. Stable crack propagation accompanied with rising load bearing capacity is observed. The fracture toughness is estimated using the test results and the surface observation.

  1. Powder metallurgy for the fabrication of bi-axially textured Ni tapes for YBCO coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Ki Ji, Bong; Hyung Lim, Jun; Jung, Choong-Hwan; Joo, Jinho; Park, Soon-Dong; Jun, Byung-Hyuk; Hong, Gye-Won; Kim, Chan-Joong

    2003-04-01

    Bi-axially textured Ni tapes for YBCO coated conductors were fabricated by forming, sintering, cold rolling and heat treatment of Ni powder compacts. The powder metallurgy process consists of filling of fine Ni powders in a rubber mold, cold isostatical pressing in a water chamber and sintering of the powder compacts. The sintered compacts were cold-rolled and made into tapes with a thickness of 100 micron and then heat-treated at 1000 °C for various time periods for the development of the (2 0 0) texture. The (2 0 0) texture of Ni tape was successfully formed through the optimization of the recrystallization heat treatment condition for the cold rolled Ni tapes. The full width half maximum of the Ni tapes was 8-10° and the atomic force microscopy surface roughness was 3-5 nm.

  2. Biaxial deformations of rubber: a comparison between entanglement theory and elastic fluctuation theory.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiangjun

    2011-08-01

    The classical theory of rubber elasticity fails in the regime of large deformation. The underlying physical mechanism has been under debate for a long time. In this work, we test the recently proposed mechanism of thermal elastic fluctuations by Xing, Goldbart, and Radzihovsky (XGR) against the biaxial stress-strain data of three distinct polymer networks with very different network structures, synthesized by Urayama and Kawabata, respectively. We find that both the two-parameter version and the one-parameter version of the XGR theory provide a satisfactory description of the elasticity in whole deformation range. For comparison, we also fit the same sets of data using the slip-link model by Edwards and Vilgis with four parameters. The fitting qualities of two theories are found to be comparable.

  3. Magnetic thermal stability of permalloy microstructures with shape-induced bi-axial anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telepinsky, Yevgeniy; Sinwani, Omer; Mor, Vladislav; Schultz, Moty; Klein, Lior

    2016-02-01

    We study the thermal stability of the magnetization states in permalloy microstructures in the form of two crossing elongated ellipses, a shape which yields effective bi-axial magnetic anisotropy in the overlap area. We prepare the structure with the magnetization along one of the easy axes of magnetization and measure the waiting time for switching when a magnetic field favoring the other easy axis is applied. The waiting time for switching is measured as a function of the applied magnetic field and temperature. We determine the energy barrier for switching and estimate the thermal stability of the structures. The experimental results are compared with numerical simulations. The results indicate exceptional stability which makes such structures appealing for a variety of applications including magnetic random access memory based on the planar Hall effect.

  4. Biaxial lidar efficiency increase based on improving spatial selectivity and stability against background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agishev, Ravil R.; Bajazitov, Ravil A.; Galeyev, Marat M.

    1996-11-01

    A criterion of spatial-angular efficiency (SAE) of remote electro-optical systems for atmosphere monitoring is formulated. The dependencies of the SAE from normalized range and minimal operating range for different optical receiving schemes of ground-based biaxial LIDAR are analyzed. It is shown that low SAE of traditional VIS & NIR systems is a main cause of a low signal-to-background-noise ratio at the photodetector input, the considerably measurements errors, and the following low accuracy of atmospheric optical parameters reconstruction. The most effective protection against sky background radiation in such systems consists in forming an angular field according to the introduced SAE criterion. Some approaches to achieve high value of the SAE-parameter for receiving system optimization are discussed.

  5. Voigt wave investigation in the KGd(WO4)2:Nd biaxial laser crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenier, Alain

    2015-07-01

    We have investigated the Nd3+-doped KGd(WO4)2 biaxial laser crystal for wave propagation directions in the vicinity of the optical axis at wavelengths tunable around 800 nm. The angular absorption distribution was found to be strongly anisotropic. Increasing absorption, the optical axis splits in two new ones able to propagate unchanged a left or a right circularly polarized light and able to propagate a circularly polarized Voigt wave with a linear spatial dependence. The intensities of the transmitted light in different configurations of polarizations were investigated. The angular displacement of the two optical axes versus the absorbed wavelengths was measured and explained with a single oscillator model. The light energy propagation was found distributed inside a crescent-shaped area.

  6. STRENGTH PROPERTIES OF POLED PZT SUBJECTED TO BIAXIAL FLEXURAL LOADING IN HIGH ELECTRIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Lin, Hua-Tay; Wereszczak, Andrew A

    2010-01-01

    Failure of poled PZT has been experimentally studied using ball-on-ring (BoR) biaxial flexure strength tests with an electric field concurrently applied. The as-received and aged PZTs were tested in high electric fields of -3 to 4 times the coercive field. Both the sign and the magnitude of electric field had a significant effect on the strength of poled PZT. A surface flaw type with a depth of around 18 m was identified as the strength limiter and responsible for the failure of the tested PZT. With a value of 0.76 MPa m1/2 in the open circle condition, the fracture toughness of the poled PZT was affected by an applied electric field just as the strength was affected. These results and observations have the potential to serve probabilistic reliability analysis and design optimization of multilayer PZT piezo actuators.

  7. Piezoresistive Properties of Suspended Graphene Membranes under Uniaxial and Biaxial Strain in Nanoelectromechanical Pressure Sensors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Graphene membranes act as highly sensitive transducers in nanoelectromechanical devices due to their ultimate thinness. Previously, the piezoresistive effect has been experimentally verified in graphene using uniaxial strain in graphene. Here, we report experimental and theoretical data on the uni- and biaxial piezoresistive properties of suspended graphene membranes applied to piezoresistive pressure sensors. A detailed model that utilizes a linearized Boltzman transport equation describes accurately the charge-carrier density and mobility in strained graphene and, hence, the gauge factor. The gauge factor is found to be practically independent of the doping concentration and crystallographic orientation of the graphene films. These investigations provide deeper insight into the piezoresistive behavior of graphene membranes. PMID:27797484

  8. Numerical simulations of biaxial experiments on damage and fracture in sheet metal forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Steffen; Schmidt, Marco; Brünig, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The damage and failure process of ductile metals is characterized by different mechanisms acting on the micro-scale as well as on the macro-level. These deterioration processes essentially depend on the material type and on the loading conditions. To describe these phenomena in an appropriate way a phenomenological continuum damage and fracture model has been proposed. To detect the effects of stress-state-dependent damage mechanisms, numerical simulations of tests with new biaxial specimen geometries for sheet metals have been performed. The experimental results including digital image correlation (DIC) show good agreement with the corresponding numerical analysis. The presented approach based on both experiments and numerical simulation provides several new aspects in the simulation of sheet metal forming processes.

  9. Development of a synchrotron biaxial tensile device for in situ characterization of thin films mechanical response

    SciTech Connect

    Geandier, G.; Thiaudiere, D.; Bouaffad, A.; Randriamazaoro, R. N.; Chiron, R.; Castelnau, O.; Faurie, D.; Djaziri, S.; Lamongie, B.; Diot, Y.; Le Bourhis, E.; Renault, P. O.; Goudeau, P.; Hild, F.

    2010-10-15

    We have developed on the DIFFABS-SOLEIL beamline a biaxial tensile machine working in the synchrotron environment for in situ diffraction characterization of thin polycrystalline films mechanical response. The machine has been designed to test compliant substrates coated by the studied films under controlled, applied strain field. Technological challenges comprise the sample design including fixation of the substrate ends, the related generation of a uniform strain field in the studied (central) volume, and the operations from the beamline pilot. Preliminary tests on 150 nm thick W films deposited onto polyimide cruciform substrates are presented. The obtained results for applied strains using x-ray diffraction and digital image correlation methods clearly show the full potentialities of this new setup.

  10. Facet-mediated growth of silver nanoparticles on biaxial calcium fluoride nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Mathias; Ye, Dexian

    2017-01-01

    The surface orientation of metal nanoparticles is critical to their physical and chemical properties. This study aims on the understanding of the effect of surface orientation as well as heterogeneous epitaxy of metal nanoparticles at an interface between two materials with a large lattice mismatch. Silver nanoparticles of different diameters were grown on arrays of calcium fluoride (CaF2) nanorods using oblique angle deposition as a model system for this study. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging were used to verify that the nanoparticles were selectively grown on the desired {111} facets of the nanorod tips. Using selected area diffraction and dark field imaging in TEM, it was shown that the nanoparticles were grown at a (111) orientation at the CaF2 interface with large lattice strains. Thus biaxially textured CaF2 nanorod arrays can be used as a catalytic support.

  11. Biaxial extrusion of polyimide LARC-TPI and LARC-TPI blends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haghighat, R. Ross; Elandjian, Lucy; Lusignea, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Biaxial films of polyimide LARC-TPI and LARC-TPI/liquid crystal polymer Xydar were extruded directly from the melt for the first time via an innovative extrusion technique. Three types of films, neat LARC-TPI, LARC-TPI/10 wt pct and 30 wt pct blends were processed as a part of this NASA-funded program. Processability was greatly enhanced by incorporating Xydar. The coefficient of thermal expansion was reduced from 34 ppm/C for the neat LARC-TPI to 15 ppm/C for the 10 wt pct Xydar blend and ultimately down to 1 to 3 ppm/C for the 30 wt pct blend films in the direction of extrusion. The maximum improvement in stiffness was realized by incorporating 10 wt pct Xydar (2.8 GPa up to 4.9 GPa). Tensile strength, however, experienced a drop as a result of Xydar addition, probably caused by inefficient mixing of the two phases.

  12. Spherical tensor analysis of polar liquid crystals with biaxial and chiral molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Mitsumasa; Zhong-can, Ou-Yang

    2012-11-01

    With the help of spherical tensor expression, an irreducible calculus of a Lth-rank macroscopic susceptibility χ for a polar liquid crystal (PLC) of biaxial and chiral molecules written as the average of molecular hyperpolarizability tensor β associated with their spherical orientational order parameters (0⩽l⩽L) is presented. Comprehensive formulas of L=1,2 have been obtained and the latter explains the optical activity and spontaneous splay texture observed in bent-core PLC. The expression of L=3 specifies for the molecules with D2 symmetry which can be applied to analyze the nonlinear optical second harmonic generation (SHG) observed in proteins, peptides, and double-stranded DNA at interfaces.

  13. Comment on "Refractive indices of biaxial crystals evaluated from the refractive indices ellipsoid equation"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Cecilio; Fragoso-López, Ana Belén

    2014-02-01

    In 2007 Yin, Zhang and Tian [1] [Yin et al., 2007] derived the expressions of the refractive indices of biaxial crystals evaluated from the refractive indices ellipsoid equation. In the past we have researched about the simultaneous measurement of birefringence and optical activity in different crystals [2] [Hernández-Rodríguez et al., 2000], [3] [Hernández-Rodríguez and Gómez-Garrido, 2000], [4] [Herreros-Cedrés et al., 2003], [5] [Herreros-Cedrés et al., 2005] and [6] [Herreros-Cedrés et al., 2007], and recently, when we used their methods for the study of nonlinear crystals such as KTiOAsO4 (KTA) and KTiOPO4 (KTP), we found some errors in some expressions in their paper which were used by other authors [7] [Gao et al., 2003].

  14. Low-κ' dielectric properties of UV-treated bi-axially oriented polypropylene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dervos, C. T.; Tarantili, P. A.; Athanassopoulou, M. D.

    2009-07-01

    A 40 µm multilayer bi-axially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) film, was fabricated by the tenter process and its dielectric response was investigated after applying combined action of UV, humidity and heat. Dissipation factor (tan δ) and relative dielectric constant measurements were performed via the capacitance method for frequencies 20Hz-1 GHz. These results show that the relative dielectric constant (κ') reduces towards ultra low values (1.8) with an increasing number of applied UV-condensation cycles without any subsequent increase in the dielectric loss. Having no added physical porosity and absence of fluorine atoms, the irradiated BOPP structures offer significant advantages over poly(tetrafluoroethylene) PTFE due to reduced polarization effects, lower dielectric constant values and chemical stability to the adjacent copper or aluminium conductors. Possible application fields are dry type high-voltage capacitors and insulation within electronic components.

  15. Magnetic alignment and the Poisson alignment reference system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, L. V.; Schenz, R. F.; Sommargren, G. E.

    1990-08-01

    Three distinct metrological operations are necessary to align a free-electron laser (FEL): the magnetic axis must be located, a straight line reference (SLR) must be generated, and the magnetic axis must be related to the SLR. This article begins with a review of the motivation for developing an alignment system that will assure better than 100-μm accuracy in the alignment of the magnetic axis throughout an FEL. The 100-μm accuracy is an error circle about an ideal axis for 300 m or more. The article describes techniques for identifying the magnetic axes of solenoids, quadrupoles, and wiggler poles. Propagation of a laser beam is described to the extent of revealing sources of nonlinearity in the beam. Development of a straight-line reference based on the Poisson line, a diffraction effect, is described in detail. Spheres in a large-diameter laser beam create Poisson lines and thus provide a necessary mechanism for gauging between the magnetic axis and the SLR. Procedures for installing FEL components and calibrating alignment fiducials to the magnetic axes of the components are also described. The Poisson alignment reference system should be accurate to 25 μm over 300 m, which is believed to be a factor-of-4 improvement over earlier techniques. An error budget shows that only 25% of the total budgeted tolerance is used for the alignment reference system, so the remaining tolerances should fall within the allowable range for FEL alignment.

  16. Application of magnetomechanical hysteresis modeling to magnetic techniques for monitoring neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sablik, M.J.; Kwun, H.; Rollwitz, W.L.; Cadena, D.

    1992-01-01

    The objective is to investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress on magnetic properties in steels, using various magnetic measurement techniques. Interaction between experiment and modeling should suggest efficient magnetic measurement procedures for determining neutron embrittlement biaxial stress. This should ultimately assist in safety monitoring of nuclear power plants and of gas and oil pipelines. In the first six months of this first year study, magnetic measurements were made on steel surveillance specimens from the Indian Point 2 and D.C. Cook 2 reactors. The specimens previously had been characterized by Charpy tests after specified neutron fluences. Measurements now included: (1) hysteresis loop measurement of coercive force, permeability and remanence, (2) Barkhausen noise amplitude; and (3) higher order nonlinear harmonic analysis of a 1 Hz magnetic excitation. Very good correlation of magnetic parameters with fluence and embrittlement was found for specimens from the Indian Point 2 reactor. The D.C. Cook 2 specimens, however showed poor correlation. Possible contributing factors to this are: (1) metallurgical differences between D.C. Cook 2 and Indian Point 2 specimens; (2) statistical variations in embrittlement parameters for individual samples away from the stated men values; and (3) conversion of the D.C. Cook 2 reactor to a low leakage core configuration in the middle of the period of surveillance. Modeling using a magnetomechanical hysteresis model has begun. The modeling will first focus on why Barkhausen noise and nonlinear harmonic amplitudes appear to be better indicators of embrittlement than the hysteresis loop parameters.

  17. Histology and Biaxial Mechanical Behavior of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Pancheri, Francesco Q; Peattie, Robert A; Reddy, Nithin D; Ahamed, Touhid; Lin, Wenjian; Ouellette, Timothy D; Iafrati, Mark D; Luis Dorfmann, A

    2017-03-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) represent permanent, localized dilations of the abdominal aorta that can be life-threatening if progressing to rupture. Evaluation of risk of rupture depends on understanding the mechanical behavior of patient AAA walls. In this project, a series of patient AAA wall tissue samples have been evaluated through a combined anamnestic, mechanical, and histopathologic approach. Mechanical properties of the samples have been characterized using a novel, strain-controlled, planar biaxial testing protocol emulating the in vivo deformation of the aorta. Histologically, the tissue ultrastructure was highly disrupted. All samples showed pronounced mechanical stiffening with stretch and were notably anisotropic, with greater stiffness in the circumferential than the axial direction. However, there were significant intrapatient variations in wall stiffness and stress. In biaxial tests in which the longitudinal stretch was held constant at 1.1 as the circumferential stretch was extended to 1.1, the maximum average circumferential stress was 330 ± 70 kPa, while the maximum average axial stress was 190 ± 30 kPa. A constitutive model considering the wall as anisotropic with two preferred directions fit the measured data well. No statistically significant differences in tissue mechanical properties were found based on patient gender, age, maximum bulge diameter, height, weight, body mass index, or smoking history. Although a larger patient cohort is merited to confirm these conclusions, the project provides new insight into the relationships between patient natural history, histopathology, and mechanical behavior that may be useful in the development of accurate methods for rupture risk evaluation.

  18. Quantification of the passive and active biaxial mechanical behaviour and microstructural organization of rat thoracic ducts.

    PubMed

    Caulk, Alexander W; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna V; Shaw, Ryan; Dixon, J Brandon; Gleason, Rudolph L

    2015-07-06

    Mechanical loading conditions are likely to play a key role in passive and active (contractile) behaviour of lymphatic vessels. The development of a microstructurally motivated model of lymphatic tissue is necessary for quantification of mechanically mediated maladaptive remodelling in the lymphatic vasculature. Towards this end, we performed cylindrical biaxial testing of Sprague-Dawley rat thoracic ducts (n = 6) and constitutive modelling to characterize their mechanical behaviour. Spontaneous contraction was quantified at transmural pressures of 3, 6 and 9 cmH2O. Cyclic inflation in calcium-free saline was performed at fixed axial stretches between 1.30 and 1.60, while recording pressure, outer diameter and axial force. A microstructurally motivated four-fibre family constitutive model originally proposed by Holzapfel et al. (Holzapfel et al. 2000 J. Elast. 61, 1-48. (doi:10.1023/A:1010835316564)) was used to quantify the passive mechanical response, and the model of Rachev and Hayashi was used to quantify the active (contractile) mechanical response. The average error between data and theory was 8.9 ± 0.8% for passive data and 6.6 ± 2.6% and 6.8 ± 3.4% for the systolic and basal conditions, respectively, for active data. Multi-photon microscopy was performed to quantify vessel wall thickness (32.2 ± 1.60 µm) and elastin and collagen organization for three loading conditions. Elastin exhibited structural 'fibre families' oriented nearly circumferentially and axially. Sample-to-sample variation was observed in collagen fibre distributions, which were often non-axisymmetric, suggesting material asymmetry. In closure, this paper presents a microstructurally motivated model that accurately captures the biaxial active and passive mechanical behaviour in lymphatics and offers potential for future research to identify parameters contributing to mechanically mediated disease development.

  19. Biaxial Tensile Test of Cold Rolled IF Steel Sheet for Large Plastic Strain Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enatsu, Ryotaro; Kuwabara, Toshihiko

    2011-08-01

    Deformation behavior of cold rolled IF steel sheet (SPCE) under biaxial tension has been investigated for large plastic strain range over 15%. The test material was bent and TIG welded to form a tubular specimen with an outer diameter of 46.2 mm and wall thickness of 0.8 mm. The tubular specimens have been subjected to linear stress paths in the first quadrant of stress space with the use of a servo-controlled tension-internal pressure testing machine developed by one of the authors [T. Kuwabara, K. Yoshida, K. Narihara, S. Takahashi, Anisotropic plastic deformation of extruded aluminum alloy tube under axial forces and internal pressure, Int. J. Plasticity 21, 101-117 (2005)]. Moreover, biaxial tensile tests using a cruciform specimen have also been carried out to more precisely measure the deformation behavior for a small strain range following initial yielding. True stress-true plastic strain curves, contours of plastic work in stress space and the directions of plastic strain rates have been measured and compared with those calculated using selected yield functions: the von Mises, Hill's quadratic and Yld2000-2d [Barlat, F., Brem, J.C., Yoon, J.W., Chung, K., Dick, R.E., Lege, D.J., Pourboghrat, F., Choi, S.H., Chu, E., Plane stress yield function for aluminum alloy sheets—Part 1: Theory. Int. J. Plasticity 19, 1297-1319 (2003)]. The plastic deformation behavior up to a work equivalent plastic strain of ɛ0p = 0.19 has been successfully measured. It is found that the test material exhibits differential hardening and that the Yld2000-2d yield function with an exponent of six most closely predicts the contours of plastic work and the directions of plastic strain rates.

  20. Testing the tidal alignment model of galaxy intrinsic alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, Jonathan; Seljak, Uroš; McQuinn, Matthew E-mail: mmcquinn@berkeley.edu

    2011-05-01

    Weak gravitational lensing has become a powerful probe of large-scale structure and cosmological parameters. Precision weak lensing measurements require an understanding of the intrinsic alignment of galaxy ellipticities, which can in turn inform models of galaxy formation. It is hypothesized that elliptical galaxies align with the background tidal field and that this alignment mechanism dominates the correlation between ellipticities on cosmological scales (in the absence of lensing). We use recent large-scale structure measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to test this picture with several statistics: (1) the correlation between ellipticity and galaxy overdensity, w{sub g+}; (2) the intrinsic alignment auto-correlation functions; (3) the correlation functions of curl-free, E, and divergence-free, B, modes, the latter of which is zero in the linear tidal alignment theory; (4) the alignment correlation function, w{sub g}(r{sub p},θ), a recently developed statistic that generalizes the galaxy correlation function to account for the angle between the galaxy separation vector and the principle axis of ellipticity. We show that recent measurements are largely consistent with the tidal alignment model and discuss dependence on galaxy luminosity. In addition, we show that at linear order the tidal alignment model predicts that the angular dependence of w{sub g}(r{sub p},θ) is simply w{sub g+}(r{sub p})cos (2θ) and that this dependence is consistent with recent measurements. We also study how stochastic nonlinear contributions to galaxy ellipticity impact these statistics. We find that a significant fraction of the observed LRG ellipticity can be explained by alignment with the tidal field on scales ∼> 10 \\hMpc. These considerations are relevant to galaxy formation and evolution.