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Sample records for aligned biaxial tungsten

  1. Texture evolution of vertically aligned biaxial tungsten nanorods using RHEED surface pole figure technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, R.; Liu, Y.; Gaire, C.; Chen, L.; Wang, G.-C.; Lu, T.-M.

    2010-08-01

    Vertically aligned biaxial tungsten nanorods with cubic A15 crystal structure were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on native oxide covered Si(100) substrates with glancing angle flux incidence (θ ~ 85°) and a two-step substrate rotation mode at room temperature. These vertical nanorods were grown to different thicknesses (10, 25, 50 and 100 nm) and analyzed for biaxial texture evolution using a highly surface sensitive reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) pole figure technique. The initial polycrystalline film begins to show the inception of biaxial texture with a fiber background between 10 and 25 nm. Biaxial texture development is eventually completed between 50 and 100 nm thicknesses of the film. The out-of-plane crystallographic direction is [002] and the in-plane texture is selected so as to obtain maximum capture area. In a comparison with 100 nm thick inclined tungsten nanorods deposited at 85° without substrate rotation, it is found that the selection of in-plane texture does not maintain maximum in-plane capture area. This anomalous behavior is observed when the [002] texture axis is tilted ~ 17° from the substrate normal in the direction towards the glancing incident flux.

  2. Texture evolution of vertically aligned biaxial tungsten nanorods using RHEED surface pole figure technique.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, R; Liu, Y; Gaire, C; Chen, L; Wang, G-C; Lu, T-M

    2010-08-13

    Vertically aligned biaxial tungsten nanorods with cubic A15 crystal structure were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on native oxide covered Si(100) substrates with glancing angle flux incidence (theta approximately 85 degrees) and a two-step substrate rotation mode at room temperature. These vertical nanorods were grown to different thicknesses (10, 25, 50 and 100 nm) and analyzed for biaxial texture evolution using a highly surface sensitive reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) pole figure technique. The initial polycrystalline film begins to show the inception of biaxial texture with a fiber background between 10 and 25 nm. Biaxial texture development is eventually completed between 50 and 100 nm thicknesses of the film. The out-of-plane crystallographic direction is [002] and the in-plane texture is selected so as to obtain maximum capture area. In a comparison with 100 nm thick inclined tungsten nanorods deposited at 85 degrees without substrate rotation, it is found that the selection of in-plane texture does not maintain maximum in-plane capture area. This anomalous behavior is observed when the [002] texture axis is tilted approximately 17 degrees from the substrate normal in the direction towards the glancing incident flux. PMID:20639581

  3. Self-aligning biaxial load frame

    DOEpatents

    Ward, M.B.; Epstein, J.S.; Lloyd, W.R.

    1994-01-18

    An self-aligning biaxial loading apparatus for use in testing the strength of specimens while maintaining a constant specimen centroid during the loading operation. The self-aligning biaxial loading apparatus consists of a load frame and two load assemblies for imparting two independent perpendicular forces upon a test specimen. The constant test specimen centroid is maintained by providing elements for linear motion of the load frame relative to a fixed cross head, and by alignment and linear motion elements of one load assembly relative to the load frame. 3 figures.

  4. Self-aligning biaxial load frame

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael B.; Epstein, Jonathan S.; Lloyd, W. Randolph

    1994-01-01

    An self-aligning biaxial loading apparatus for use in testing the strength of specimens while maintaining a constant specimen centroid during the loading operation. The self-aligning biaxial loading apparatus consists of a load frame and two load assemblies for imparting two independent perpendicular forces upon a test specimen. The constant test specimen centroid is maintained by providing elements for linear motion of the load frame relative to a fixed crosshead, and by alignment and linear motion elements of one load assembly relative to the load frame.

  5. Vertically aligned biaxially textured molybdenum thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Rahul; Riley, Michael; Lee, Sabrina; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2011-09-15

    Vertically aligned, biaxially textured molybdenum nanorods were deposited using dc magnetron sputtering with glancing flux incidence (alpha = 85 degrees with respect to the substrate normal) and a two-step substrate-rotation mode. These nanorods were identified with a body-centered cubic crystal structure. The formation of a vertically aligned biaxial texture with a [110] out-of-plane orientation was combined with a [-110] in-plane orientation. The kinetics of the growth process was found to be highly sensitive to an optimum rest time of 35 seconds for the two-step substrate rotation mode. At all other rest times, the nanorods possessed two separate biaxial textures each tilted toward one flux direction. While the in-plane texture for the vertical nanorods maintains maximum flux capture area, inclined Mo nanorods deposited at alpha = 85 degrees without substrate rotation display a [-1-1-4] in-plane texture that does not comply with the maximum flux capture area argument. Finally, an in situ capping film was deposited with normal flux incidence over the biaxially textured vertical nanorods resulting in a thin film over the porous nanorods. This capping film possessed the same biaxial texture as the nanorods and could serve as an effective substrate for the epitaxial growth of other functional materials.

  6. Biaxially aligned buffer layers of cerium oxide, yttria stabilized zirconia, and their bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanarajan, S.; Katsaros, A.; Savvides, N.

    1997-05-01

    Biaxially aligned cerium oxide (CeO2) and yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) films were deposited on Ni-based metal (Hastelloy C276) substrates held at room temperature using ion beam assisted (IBAD) magnetron deposition with the ion beam directed at 55° to the normal of the film plane. In addition, we achieved, room-temperature epitaxial growth of CeO2 by bias sputtering to form biaxially aligned CeO2/YSZ bilayers. The crystalline structure and in-plane orientation of films was investigated by x-ray diffraction techniques. Both the IBAD CeO2 and YSZ films, and the CeO2/YSZ bilayers have a (111) pole in the ion beam direction.

  7. Planar Biaxial Mechanical Behavior of Bioartificial Tissues Possessing Prescribed Fiber Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Jhun, Choon-Sik; Evans, Michael C.; Barocas, Victor H.; Tranquillo, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Though it is widely accepted that fiber alignment has a great influence on the mechanical anisotropy of tissues, a systematic study of the influence of fiber alignment on the macroscopic mechanical behavior by native tissues is precluded due to their predefined microstructure and heterogeneity. Such a study is possible using collagen-based bioartificial tissues that allow for alignment to be prescribed during their fabrication. To generate a systemic variation of strength of fiber alignment, we made cruciform tissue constructs in Teflon molds that had arms of different aspect ratios. We implemented our anisotropic biphasic theory of tissue-equivalent mechanics to simulate the compaction by finite element analysis. Prior to tensile testing, the construct geometry was standardized by cutting test samples with a 1:1 cruciform punch after releasing constructs from the molds. Planar biaxial testing was performed on these samples, after stretching them to their in-mold dimensions to recover in-mold alignment, to observe the macroscopic mechanical response with simultaneous fiber alignment imaging using a polarimetry system. We found that the strength of fiber alignment of the samples prior to release from the molds linearly increased with anisotropy of the mold, and the modulus ratio (modulus in fiber-direction) / (modulus in normal-direction) was greater as the initial strength of fiber alignment increased, that is, as the aspect ratio increased. We also found that the fiber alignment strength and modulus ratio increased in a hyperbolic fashion with stretching for a sample of given aspect ratio. PMID:19604018

  8. Biaxially aligned template films fabricated by inclined-substrate deposition for YBCO-coated conductor applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, B.; Li, M.; Koritala, R. E.; Fisher, B. L.; Erck, R. A.; Dorris, S. E.; Miller, D. J.; Balachandran, U.

    2002-08-12

    Inclined substrate deposition (ISD) has the potential for rapid production of high-quality biaxially textured buffer layers, which are important for YBCO-coated conductor applications. We have grown biaxially textured MgO films by ISD at deposition rates of 20-100 {angstrom}/sec. Columnar grains with a roof-tile surface structure were observed in the ISD-MgO films. X-ray pole figure analysis revealed that the (002) planes of the ISD-MgO films are tilted at an angle from the substrate normal. A small {phi}-scan full-width at half maximum (FWHM) of {approx}9{sup o} was observed on MgO films deposited at an inclination angle of 55{sup o}. In-plane texture in the ISD MgO films developed in the first 0.5 {micro}m from the interface, then stabilized with further increases in film thickness. YBCO films deposited by pulsed laser deposition on ISD-MgO buffered Hastelloy C276 substrates were biaxially aligned with the c-axis parallel to the substrate normal. T{sub c} of 91 K with a sharp transition and transport J{sub c} of 5.5 x 10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2} at 77 K in self-field were measured on a YBCO film that was 0.46-{micro}m thick, 4-mm wide, 10-mm long.

  9. Magnetic Alignment of Magnetically Biaxial Diamagnetic Rods under Rotating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukui, Shu; Kimura, Tsunehisa

    2012-05-01

    The alignment behavior of magnetically biaxial diamagnetic rods under rotating magnetic fields is studied to elucidate the effects of particle shape and rotation speed on alignment manner. Three types of rod (ca. 1.1 mmφ × 3 mm) are prepared: (i) rod axes parallel to χ1, (ii) parallel to χ2, and (iii) parallel to χ3, where χs are the principal axes of the diamagnetic susceptibility tensor and χ1 > χ2 > χ3. The motion of the rod is recorded on video and the angles required for the comparison with simulation are measured. Simulation is performed by numerically solving a torque equation including magnetic and hydrodynamic torques. The experimental results show a good agreement with simulation results. It is shown that the χ3-axis of rod sample (ii) does not align parallel to the axis of the rotating magnetic field under most experimental conditions; this is in marked contrast to the case with magnetically uniaxial particles (χ1 = χ2 > χ3), for which the χ3-axis aligns irrespective of particle shape and/or rotation speed. This observation is interpreted in terms of magnetic energy and orientation kinetics.

  10. Inclined-substrate deposition of biaxially aligned template films for YBCO-coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, B.; Li, M.; Fisher, B. L.; Koritala, R. E.; Balachandran, U.

    2002-10-01

    Inclined-substrate deposition (ISD) of magnesium oxide (MgO) produces biaxially textured template films at high deposition rates. This process is promising for the fabrication of the second-generation superconducting wires. Biaxially aligned MgO films (≈1.5 μm thick) were deposited on polished Hastelloy C276 (HC) substrates by ISD at deposition rates of 20-100 Å/s. Buffer films were subsequently deposited on these template films, and YBCO films were deposited epitaxially on the substrates by pulsed laser deposition. X-ray pole figure analysis and φ- and ω-scans were used for texture characterization. Good in- and out-of-plane textures were observed, with MgO(0 0 2) φ-scan full-width at half maximum (FWHM) of 9.2° and ω-scan FWHM of 5.4°, respectively. Tc of 90 K with a sharp transition, and Jc≈2×10 5 A/cm 2, were obtained on a 0.5 μm thick, 0.5 cm wide, and 1 cm long YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ (YBCO) film at 77 K in self-field.

  11. Biaxially aligned YBa 2Cu 3O 7-x thin film tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Yasuhiro; Tanabe, Nobuo; Ikeno, Yoshimitsu; Kohno, Osamu

    1991-12-01

    We report the formation of biaxially oriented films of yttorium-stabilized ZrO 2 (YSZ) on a polycrystalline, Ni-based alloy (Hastelloy c276) by Ion-Beam-Assisted Deposition (IBAD), and the subsequent a-b plane aligned YBa 2Cu 3O 7-x (YBCO) films deposited by laser ablation. Jc of 6.0×10 4 A/cm 2 (77 K, O T) and 1.4×10 4 A/cm 2 (77 K, 0.6 T) were obtained. A new method to prevent intergranular-weak-links has been developed for application of oxide superconducting thin films, for tape-shaped cables, magnets, magnetic shields, microwave devices, etc.

  12. Lattice Spin Simulations of Topological Defects in Biaxial Nematic Films with Homeotropic Surface Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preeti, Gouripeddi Sai; Zannoni, Claudio; Chiccoli, Cesare; Pasini, Paolo; Sastry, Vanka S. S.

    2013-05-01

    We present a detailed Monte Carlo study of the effects of biaxiality on the textures of nematic films with specific homeotropic boundary conditions. We have used the Straley generalized Hamiltonian for a wide range of biaxial parameters and the differences obtained in the polarized microscopy images are analyzed for the various cases.

  13. Self-field ac losses in biaxially aligned Y{endash}Ba{endash}Cu{endash}O tape conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Iijima, Y.; Hosaka, M.; Sadakata, N.; Saitoh, T.; Kohno, O.; Takeda, K.

    1997-11-01

    Self-field ac losses were measured by the conventional ac four-probe method in biaxially aligned Y{endash}Ba{endash}Cu{endash}O tapes using polycrystalline Hastelloy tapes with textured yttria-stabilized-zirconia buffer layers. The ac losses increased in proportion to the fourth power of transport current in the high J{sub c} sample, and agreed well with Norris{close_quote} equation for thin strip conductors. However, the low J{sub c} sample had rather higher losses than Norris{close_quote} prediction, suggesting excessive magnetic flux penetration caused by percolated current paths. The results confirmed Norris{close_quote} prediction of the low ac losses for thin strip conductors, and indicated the importance of removing percolated structures of current paths to avoid higher ac losses than the theoretical predictions based on uniform conductors. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The name tungsten, derived from the Swedish words {open_quotes}tung{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}sten{close_quotes}, meaning heavy stone, was first applied to a tungsten-containing mineral in 1755. The mineral, itself, was subsequently identified by C.W. Scheele in 1781, and named scheelite. Metallic tungsten was first isolated from the mineral wolframite in 1783, and given the German name {open_quotes}wolfram,{close_quotes} which remains an alternative name for the element. Ultimately, the English word, tungsten, became the official name, while W remains the element`s chemical symbol. This article discusses the geology, exploitation, applications, and market overview of tungsten.

  15. Twist viscosities and flow alignment of biaxial nematic liquid crystal phases of a soft ellipsoid-string fluid studied by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Sarman, Sten; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2012-09-14

    We have calculated the twist viscosity and the alignment angle between the director and the stream lines in shear flow of a liquid crystal model system, which forms biaxial nematic liquid crystals, as functions of the density, from the Green-Kubo relations by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation and by a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics algorithm, where a torque conjugate to the director angular velocity is applied to rotate the director. The model system consists of a soft ellipsoid-string fluid where the ellipsoids interact according a repulsive version of the Gay-Berne potential. Four different length-to-width-to-breadth ratios have been studied. On compression, this system forms discotic or calamitic uniaxial nematic phases depending on the dimensions of the molecules, and on further compression a biaxial nematic phase is formed. In the uniaxial nematic phase there is one twist viscosity and one alignment angle. In the biaxial nematic phase there are three twist viscosities and three alignment angles corresponding to the rotation around the various directors and the different alignments of the directors relative to the stream lines, respectively. It is found that the smallest twist viscosity arises by rotation around the director formed by the long axes, the second smallest one arises by rotation around the director formed by the normals of the broadsides, and the largest one by rotation around the remaining director. The first twist viscosity is rather independent of the density whereas the last two ones increase strongly with density. One finds that there is one stable director alignment relative to the streamlines, namely where the director formed by the long axes is almost parallel to the stream lines and where the director formed by the normals of the broadsides is almost parallel to the shear plane. The relative magnitudes of the components of the twist viscosities span a fairly wide interval so this model should be useful for parameterisation

  16. Large-area alignment of tungsten oxide nanowires over flat and patterned substrates for room-temperature gas sensing.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Ju, Yanrui; Payamyar, Payam; Primc, Darinka; Rao, Jingyi; Willa, Christoph; Koziej, Dorota; Niederberger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Alignment of nanowires over a large area of flat and patterned substrates is a prerequisite to use their collective properties in devices such as gas sensors. In this work, uniform single-crystalline ultrathin W18 O49 nanowires with diameters less than 2 nm and aspect ratios larger than 100 have been synthesized, and, despite their flexibility, assembled into thin films with high orientational order over a macroscopic area by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Alignment of the tungsten oxide nanowires was also possible on top of sensor substrates equipped with electrodes. Such sensor devices were found to exhibit outstanding sensitivity to H2 at room temperature. PMID:25412600

  17. Fabriacation and properties of high-J{sub c}, biaxially aligned YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-delta} thick films on metallic tape ...

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, D.K.; Norton, D.P.; Goyal, A.

    1997-03-01

    We report the synthesis and properties of high-J{sub c}, biaxially aligned YBCO films deposited on thermo-mechanically textured Ni tapes. Sharply cube-textured Ni tapes, 125 {mu}m thick, were produced by mechanical rolling followed by recrystallization anneal. Short segments were coated with epitaxial oxide buffer layers, followed by fully aligned YBCO films to thicknesses of 1 to 3 {mu}m. In-plane textures of 7-10{degree} FWHM are achieved, with c-perpendicular alignment to 1{degree} FWHM. Typical zero-field J{sub c} values are in the range 5-9x10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2} at 77 K, with strong behavior in magnetic fields comparable to that of epitaxial films on single crystal oxides. Assessment of properties necessary for a tape conductor technology are discussed.

  18. Miniature biaxial strain transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, I. S. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A reusable miniature strain transducer for use in the measurement of static or quasi-static, high level, biaxial strain on the surface of test specimens or structures was studied. Two cantilever arms, constructed by machining the material to appropriate flexibility, are self-aligning and constitute the transducing elements of the device. Used in conjunction with strain gages, the device enables testing beyond normal gage limits for high strains and number of load cycles. The device does not require conversion computations since the electrical output of the strain gages is directly proportional to the strain measured.

  19. Ion-beam-assisted deposition of biaxially aligned yttria-stabilized zirconia template films on metallic substrates for YBCO-coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, B.; Li, M.; Fisher, B. L.; Balachandran, U.

    2002-07-01

    Biaxially textured yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) films were grown on mechanically polished Hastelloy C276 (HC) substrates by ion-beam-assisted deposition and electron-beam evaporation. The surface root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the polished HC substrates was ≈3 nm, as measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). A water-cooled sample stage was used to hold the substrate temperature below 100 °C during deposition. RMS roughness of ≈3.3 nm was measured on the deposited YSZ films by AFM. X-ray pole figures were conducted for texture analysis; in-plane texture measured from YSZ (111) φ-scan FWHM was 13.2° and out-of-plane texture from the YSZ (002) ω-scan FWHM was 7.7°. An ≈10 nm thick CeO2 buffer layer was deposited on the YSZ film at 800 °C before YBCO films were ablated by pulsed laser deposition at 780 °C in a 250 mTorr flowing oxygen environment. Good in-plane texture with FWHM ≈ 7° was observed in YBCO films. Tc = 90 K, with sharp transition, and transport Jc of ≈2.2 × 106 A cm-2 were observed in a 0.5 μm thick, 5 mm wide, and 1 cm long sample at 77 K in self-field.

  20. Preparation of bi-axially aligned YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ film on CeO 2-buffered MgO by chemical solution deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagiwa, K.; Hiei, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Kim, S. B.; Matsumoto, K.; Ikuta, H.; Mizutani, U.; Hirabayashi, I.

    2000-06-01

    We have succeeded in preparing in-plane aligned YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ (Y123) film by chemical solution deposition (CSD) processing on CeO 2 (100)-buffered MgO (100) substrates. The CeO 2 buffer film was deposited on MgO (100) single crystalline substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). For CSD coating, a homogeneous coating solution having a molar ratio of Y:Ba:Cu=1:2:3, was prepared by dissolving metal naphthenates in toluene. This solution was spin-coated both on the YSZ (100) and on the CeO 2-buffered MgO (100) single crystalline substrates. The precursor films were calcined at 425°C and fired at various temperatures under low oxygen partial pressure ( pO 2). All Y123 films showed strong (00 n) peaks, which correspond to c-axis orientation perpendicular to the substrates and their a/ b-axes were in-plane aligned. We confirmed that CeO 2 buffer is usable for CSD processing. While the Y123 films on the YSZ reacted with the substrate forming BaZrO 3 phase and did not show sufficient superconducting properties. The Tc,zero value of the Y123 film prepared on CeO 2-buffered MgO substrate was 91.5 K and Jc was 1.2×10 5 A/cm 2 at 77 K, 0 T.

  1. Atomistic Simulations of a Thermotropic Biaxial Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peláez, Jorge; Wilson, Mark R.

    2006-12-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of a 2,5-bis-(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole mesogen (ODBP-Ph-C7) at a fully atomistic level for a range of temperatures within the region that has experimentally been assigned to a biaxial nematic phase. Analysis of the data shows that the simulated nematic phase is biaxial but that the degree of biaxiality is small. The simulations show also the formation of ferroelectric domains in the nematic where the molecular short axis is aligned with the oxadiazole dipoles parallel to each other. Removal of electrostatic interactions leads to destabilization of ferroelectric domains and destabilization of the biaxiality. An additional simulation shows the slow growth of a mesophase directly from the isotropic fluid over a period of approximately 50 ns. This is the first time this has been achieved within the framework of an all-atom model.

  2. Arbitrarily oriented biaxially anisotropic media: Wave behavior and microstrip antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Jennifer Warzala

    This dissertation explores the electromagnetic behavior of arbitrarily oriented biaxially anisotropic media. An overview of wave behavior in biaxially anisotropic (or simply biaxial) media is presented. The reflection and transmission behaviors of electromagnetic waves from half-space and two-layer isotropic-biaxial interfaces are studied. The reflection and transmission coefficients are used in the formulation of eigenvector dyadic Green's functions. These Green's functions are employed in full-wave analyses of rectangular microstrip antennas printed on biaxial substrates. The general characteristics of electrically biaxially anisotropic (biaxial) media are presented including permittivity tensors, optic axes, orientation of the medium, and birefringence. After a detailed discussion of wave propagation, wave behavior at isotropic-biaxial interfaces is investigated. The reflection and transmission of electromagnetic waves incident upon half-space and two-layer interfaces, at which the waves may be incident from either the isotropic region or the biaxial region, are investigated. The biaxial medium considered may be aligned with the principal coordinate system or may be arbitrarily oriented. Critical angle and Brewster angle effects are analyzed for the half-space case. Once the wave behavior is well understood, the eigenvector dyadic Green's function is presented for two-layer geometries involving isotropic and biaxially anisotropic media. The symmetrical property of the dyadic Green's function is derived and used to generate an unknown Green's function from a known Green's function for the two-layer geometry of interest. This new Green's function is used to model rectangular microstrip antennas. Following the investigation of reflection and transmission, rectangular microstrip antennas are analyzed using the eigenvector dyadic Green's function and the method of moments. Galerkin's method is used to evaluate current distributions on gap-fed dipole antennas and

  3. High Tc YBCO superconductor deposited on biaxially textured Ni substrate

    DOEpatents

    Budai, John D.; Christen, David K.; Goyal, Amit; He, Qing; Kroeger, Donald M.; Lee, Dominic F.; List, III, Frederick A.; Norton, David P.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Sales, Brian C.; Specht, Eliot D.

    1999-01-01

    A superconducting article includes a biaxially-textured Ni substrate, and epitaxial buffer layers of Pd (optional), CeO.sub.2 and YSZ, and a top layer of in-plane aligned, c-axis oriented YBCO having a critical current density (J.sub.c) in the range of at least 100,000 A/cm.sup.2 at 77 K.

  4. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-02-09

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments.

  5. Structures having enhanced biaxial texture

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Budai, John D.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Norton, David P.; Specht, Eliot D.; Christen, David K.

    1999-01-01

    A biaxially textured alloy article includes a rolled and annealed biaxially textured base metal substrate characterized by an x-ray diffraction phi scan peak of no more than 20.degree. FWHM; and a biaxially textured layer of an alloy or another material on a surface thereof. The article further includes at least one of an electromagnetic device or an electro-optical device epitaxially joined to the alloy.

  6. Elevated temperature biaxial fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.

    1984-01-01

    A three year experimental program for studying elevated temperature biaxial fatigue of a nickel based alloy Hastelloy-X has been completed. A new high temperature fatigue test facility with unique capabilities has been developed. Effort was directed toward understanding multiaxial fatigue and correlating the experimental data to the existing theories of fatigue failure. The difficult task of predicting fatigue lives for non-proportional loading was used as an ultimate test for various life prediction methods being considered. The primary means of reaching improved undertanding were through several critical non-proportional loading experiments. It was discovered that the cracking mode switched from primarily cracking on the maximum shear planes at room temperature to cracking on the maximum normal strain planes at 649 C.

  7. Elevated temperature biaxial fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.

    1985-01-01

    A 3 year experimental program for studying elevated temperature biaxial fatigue of a nickel based alloy Hastelloy-X has been completed. A new high temperature fatigue test facility with unique capabilities has been developed. Effort was directed toward understanding multiaxial fatigue and correlating the experimental data to the existing theories of fatigue failure. The difficult task of predicting fatigue lives for nonproportional loading was used as an ultimate test for various life prediction methods being considered. The primary means of reaching improved understanding were through several critical nonproportional loading experiments. The direction of cracking observed on failed specimens was also recorded and used to guide the development of the theory. Cyclic deformation responses were permanently recorded digitally during each test. It was discovered that the cracking mode switched from primarily cracking on the maximum shear planes at room temperature to cracking on the maximum normal strain planes at 649 C. In contrast to some other metals, loading path in nonproportional loading had little effect on fatigue lives. Strain rate had a small effect on fatigue lives at 649 C. Of the various correlating parameters the modified plastic work and octahedral shear stress were the most successful.

  8. Transparency Film for Demonstration of Biaxial Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Paul R.

    1994-01-01

    Explains why transparency film demonstrates biaxial optical properties. Provides detailed descriptions of the procedure and equipment needed for large-scale optics demonstrations of the polarization interference pattern produced by biaxial crystals. (DDR)

  9. Planar Biaxial Behavior of Fibrin-Based Tissue-Engineered Heart Valve Leaflets

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Paul S.

    2009-01-01

    To design more effective tissue-engineered heart valve replacements, the replacement tissue may need to mimic the biaxial stress–strain behavior of native heart valve tissue. This study characterized the planar biaxial properties of tissue-engineered valve leaflets and native aortic valve leaflets. Fibrin-based valve equivalent (VE) and porcine aortic valve (PAV) leaflets were subjected to incremental biaxial stress relaxation testing, during which fiber alignments were measured, over a range of strain ratios. Results showed that VE leaflets exhibited a modulus and fiber reorientation behavior that correlated with strain ratio. In contrast, PAV leaflets maintained their relaxed modulus and fiber alignment when exposed to nonequibiaxial strain, but exhibited changes in stress relaxation. In uniaxial and equi-biaxial tension, there were few observed differences in relaxation behavior between VE and PAV leaflets, despite differences in the modulus and fiber reorientation. Likewise, in both tissues there was similar relaxation response in the circumferential and radial directions in biaxial tension, despite different moduli in these two directions. This study presents some fundamental differences in the mechanical response to biaxial tension of fibrin-based tissue-engineered constructs and native valve tissue. It also highlights the importance of using a range of strain ratios when generating mechanical property data for valvular and engineered tissues. The data presented on the stress–strain, relaxation, and fiber reorientation of VE tissue will be useful in future efforts to mathematically model and improve fibrin-based tissue-engineered constructs. PMID:19368523

  10. Process for ion-assisted laser deposition of biaxially textured layer on substrate

    DOEpatents

    Russo, Richard E.; Reade, Ronald P.; Garrison, Stephen M.; Berdahl, Paul

    1995-01-01

    A process for depositing a biaxially aligned intermediate layer over a non-single crystal substrate is disclosed which permits the subsequent deposition thereon of a biaxially oriented superconducting film. The process comprises depositing on a substrate by laser ablation a material capable of being biaxially oriented and also capable of inhibiting the migration of substrate materials through the intermediate layer into such a superconducting film, while simultaneously bombarding the substrate with an ion beam. In a preferred embodiment, the deposition is carried out in the same chamber used to subsequently deposit a superconducting film over the intermediate layer. In a further aspect of the invention, the deposition of the superconducting layer over the biaxially oriented intermediate layer is also carried out by laser ablation with optional additional bombardment of the coated substrate with an ion beam during the deposition of the superconducting film.

  11. Process for ion-assisted laser deposition of biaxially textured layer on substrate

    DOEpatents

    Russo, R.E.; Reade, R.P.; Garrison, S.M.; Berdahl, P.

    1995-07-11

    A process for depositing a biaxially aligned intermediate layer over a non-single crystal substrate is disclosed which permits the subsequent deposition thereon of a biaxially oriented superconducting film. The process comprises depositing on a substrate by laser ablation a material capable of being biaxially oriented and also capable of inhibiting the migration of substrate materials through the intermediate layer into such a superconducting film, while simultaneously bombarding the substrate with an ion beam. In a preferred embodiment, the deposition is carried out in the same chamber used to subsequently deposit a superconducting film over the intermediate layer. In a further aspect of the invention, the deposition of the superconducting layer over the biaxially oriented intermediate layer is also carried out by laser ablation with optional additional bombardment of the coated substrate with an ion beam during the deposition of the superconducting film. 8 figs.

  12. Device and method of optically orienting biaxial crystals for sample preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Timothy; Rossman, George R.; Sandstrom, Mark

    2014-09-01

    An optical instrument we refer to as the "biaxial orientation device" has been developed for finding the optical plane, acute bisectrix, and obtuse bisectrix in biaxial crystals by means of optically aligning conoscopically formed melatopes and measuring the angular coordinates of the melatopes, where the angular values allow for determination of the optical plane containing the optical axes using a vector algebra approach. After determination of the optical plane, the instrument allows for the sample to be aligned in the acute bisectrix or obtuse bisectrix orientations and to be transferred to a simple mechanical component for subsequent grinding and polishing, while preserving the orientation of the polished faces relative to the optical plane, acute bisectrix, and obtuse bisectrix during the grinding and polishing process. Biaxial crystalline material samples prepared in the manner are suitable for accurate spectroscopic absorption measurements in the acute bisectrix and obtuse bisectrix directions as well as perpendicular to the optical plane.

  13. Optical tweezers on biaxial crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelsky, Oleg V.; Maksimyak, Andrew P.; Maksimyak, Peter P.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we propose optical tweezers based on a biaxial crystal. To control the movement of opaque particles, we use the shift polarization interferometer. The results of experimental study of laser tweezers are shown. We demonstrates movement of a microparticle of toner using singular-optical trap, rotate a particle due to orbital momentum, conversion of two traps when changing the plane of polarizer transmission and converging of two traps.

  14. Biaxially textured articles formed by plastic deformation

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit

    2001-01-01

    A method of preparing a biaxially textured article comprises the steps of providing a metal preform, coating or laminating the preform with a metal layer, deforming the layer to a sufficient degree, and rapidly recrystallizing the layer to produce a biaxial texture. A superconducting epitaxial layer may then be deposited on the biaxial texture. In some embodiments the article further comprises buffer layers, electromagnetic devices or electro-optical devices.

  15. Biaxially oriented film on flexible polymeric substrate

    DOEpatents

    Finkikoglu, Alp T.; Matias, Vladimir

    2009-10-13

    A flexible polymer-based template having a biaxially oriented film grown on the surface of a polymeric substrate. The template having the biaxially oriented film can be used for further epitaxial growth of films of interest for applications such as photovoltaic cells, light emitting diodes, and the like. Methods of forming such a flexible template and providing the polymeric substrate with a biaxially oriented film deposited thereon are also described.

  16. Rolling process for producing biaxially textured substrates

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit

    2004-05-25

    A method of preparing a biaxially textured article includes the steps of: rolling a metal preform while applying shear force thereto to form as-rolled biaxially textured substrate having an a rotated cube texture wherein a (100) cube face thereof is parallel to a surface of said substrate, and wherein a [100] direction thereof is at an angle of at least 30.degree. relative to the rolling direction; and depositing onto the surface of the biaxially textured substrate at least one epitaxial layer of another material to form a biaxially textured article.

  17. Proposed Route to Thin Film Crystal Si Using Biaxially Textured Foreign Template Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Teplin, C. W.; Ginley, D. S.; van Hest, M.F.A.M.; Perkins, J. D.; Young, D. L.; Stradins, P.; Wang, Q.; Al-Jassim, M.; Iwaniczko, E.; Leenheer, A.; Jones, K. M.; Branz, H. M.

    2005-11-01

    We have developed a new approach to growing photovoltaic-quality crystal silicon (c-Si) films on glass. Other approaches to film c-Si focus on increasing grain size in order to reduce the deleterious effects of grain boundaries. Instead, we have developed an approach to align the silicon grains biaxially (both in and out of plane) so that 1) grain boundaries are "low-angle" and have less effect on the electronic properties of the material and 2) subsequent epitaxial thickening is simplified. They key to our approach is the use of a foreign template layer that can be grown with biaxial texture directly on glass.

  18. Biaxially Stretched Polycarbonate Film For Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shaio-Ping S.; Lowry, Lynn E.; Bankston, Clyde P.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments on effects of biaxial stretching on crystal structures, dielectric properties, and sellected thermal and mechanical properties of biaxially stretched polycarbonate films. Highest stretch ratios produce highest degree of crystallinity, with single crystalline phase and distribution of crystallites more nearly isotropic than uniaxially oriented film. Electrical properties at high temperatures improved.

  19. Buffer layers on biaxially textured metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Shoup, Shara S.; Paranthamam, Mariappan; Beach, David B.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Goyal, Amit

    2001-01-01

    A method is disclosed for forming a biaxially textured buffer layer on a biaxially oriented metal substrate by using a sol-gel coating technique followed by pyrolyzing/annealing in a reducing atmosphere. This method is advantageous for providing substrates for depositing electronically active materials thereon.

  20. Biaxial stress effects on hysteresis and MIVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablik, M. J.; Kwun, H.; Burkhardt, G. L.

    1995-02-01

    Changes in the magnetic properties of a cruciform-shaped SAE-4130 steel specimen were measured under biaxial stress conditions. Compared to model predictions are the experimental remanence at various biaxial stresses and the magnetically induced velocity changes (MIVC) of ultrasonic shear and longitudinal waves propagated perpendicular to the stress plane.

  1. Biaxially corrugated flexible sheet material

    DOEpatents

    Schmertz, John C.

    1991-04-16

    A flexible biaxially corrugated sheet material is formed from a plurality of identical trapezium segments which are arranged in a plurality of long strips a single segment wide. Adjacent strips are mirror images of each other and connected along adjoining sides with the angles of the four corners of adjacent segments being alternately less than 360.degree. and greater than 360.degree. along the length of a strip such that the sheet material has an undulating configuration, and is inherently curved and cannot lie in a flat plane.

  2. Singular values, nematic disclinations, and emergent biaxiality.

    PubMed

    Čopar, Simon; Dennis, Mark R; Kamien, Randall D; Žumer, Slobodan

    2013-05-01

    Both uniaxial and biaxial nematic liquid crystals are defined by orientational ordering of their building blocks. While uniaxial nematics only orient the long molecular axis, biaxial order implies local order along three axes. As the natural degree of biaxiality and the associated frame that can be extracted from the tensorial description of the nematic order vanishes in the uniaxial phase, we extend the nematic director to a full biaxial frame by making use of a singular value decomposition of the gradient of the director field instead. The degrees of freedom are unveiled in the form of quasidefects and the similarities and differences between the uniaxial and biaxial phase are analyzed by applying the algebraic rules of the quaternion group to the uniaxial phase. PMID:23767474

  3. Search for microscopic and macroscopic biaxiality in the cybotactic nematic phase of new oxadiazole bent-core mesogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Ki; Cukrov, Greta; Vita, Francesco; Scharrer, Eric; Samulski, Edward T.; Francescangeli, Oriano; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2016-06-01

    The possibility of biaxial orientational order in nematic liquid crystals is a subject of intense current interest. We explore the tendencies toward local and global biaxial ordering in the recently synthesized trimethylated oxadiazole-based bent-core mesogens with a pronounced asymmetric (bow-type) shape of molecules. The combination of x-ray diffraction and optical studies suggests that the biaxial order is expressed differently at the short- and long-range scales. Locally, at the scale of a few molecules, x-ray-diffraction data demonstrate biaxial packing. However, above the mesoscopic scale, the global orientational order in all three compounds is uniaxial, as evidenced by uniform homeotropic alignment of the nematic phase which is optically tested over the entire temperature range and by the observations of topological defects induced by individual and aggregated colloidal spheres in the nematic bulk.

  4. Search for microscopic and macroscopic biaxiality in the cybotactic nematic phase of new oxadiazole bent-core mesogens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ki; Cukrov, Greta; Vita, Francesco; Scharrer, Eric; Samulski, Edward T; Francescangeli, Oriano; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2016-06-01

    The possibility of biaxial orientational order in nematic liquid crystals is a subject of intense current interest. We explore the tendencies toward local and global biaxial ordering in the recently synthesized trimethylated oxadiazole-based bent-core mesogens with a pronounced asymmetric (bow-type) shape of molecules. The combination of x-ray diffraction and optical studies suggests that the biaxial order is expressed differently at the short- and long-range scales. Locally, at the scale of a few molecules, x-ray-diffraction data demonstrate biaxial packing. However, above the mesoscopic scale, the global orientational order in all three compounds is uniaxial, as evidenced by uniform homeotropic alignment of the nematic phase which is optically tested over the entire temperature range and by the observations of topological defects induced by individual and aggregated colloidal spheres in the nematic bulk. PMID:27415328

  5. Failure mechanisms in laminated carbon/carbon composites under biaxial compression

    SciTech Connect

    Grape, J.A.; Gupta, V.

    1995-07-01

    The failure mechanisms of 2D carbon/carbon (C/C) woven laminates have been determined under inplane biaxial compression loads, and the associated failure envelopes that account for the effect of matrix-type and loading directions were also obtained. The failure was in the form of micro-kinking of fiber bundles, interspersed with localized interply delaminations to form an overall shear fault. The shear fault was aligned with the major axis of loading except at above 75% of balanced biaxial compressive stress where failure occurred along both axes. Although the biaxial strength varied significantly with the ratio of in-plane principal stresses, R, there was no variation in the local failure mechanisms. Accordingly, it was found that the samples fail upon achieving a critical strain along the primary axis of loading.

  6. Liquid crystal display modes in a nontilted bent-core biaxial smectic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, Mamatha; Panarin, Y. P.; Vij, J. K.; Keith, C.; Tschierske, C.

    2010-11-01

    Liquid crystal display (LCD) modes associated with the rotation of the secondary director in nontilted, biaxial smectic phase of an achiral bent-core compound are demonstrated. For LCDs, we find that at least four display modes are possible using SmAPA phase of the studied material, in which the minor directors in adjacent layers are aligned antiferroelectrically. The advantages of these modes include low driving field (1-2 V/μm), high contrast ratio 1000:1, relatively fast switching time of 0.5 ms and continuous gray scale. The molecular short axis or the polar axis in a negative dielectric, biaxial material is oriented by the in-plane electric field by a combination dielectric biaxiality and polarity at low electric fields and polarity at higher fields.

  7. Tungsten thermal neutron dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, L. L.; Richardson, P. J.; Sheibley, D. W.

    1969-01-01

    Tungsten-185 activity, which is produced by neutron activation of tungsten-184, determines thermal neutron flux. Radiochemical separation methods and counting techniques for irradiated tungsten provide accurate determination of the radiation exposure.

  8. High-strain-rate, high-temperature biaxial testing of DOP-26 iridium

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.G.

    1988-05-01

    High-strain-rate biaxial punch tests were performed on DOP-26 (Ir-0.3 wt.% tungsten) iridium-alloy disc given annealing and aging heat treatments. Test temperatures ranged between 600 and 1440/degree/C, and punch velocity was held constant at 45 m/s. Three types of samples were evaluated: Z-batch old-process discs, B-batch old-process discs, and B-batch new-process discs. The results indicate that batch-to-batch variations in ductility are significant and that new-process iridium is slightly more ductile than old-process material. 12 refs., 43 figs., 26 tabs.

  9. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.

    2001-01-01

    A biaxially textured alloy article comprises Ni powder and at least one powder selected from the group consisting of Cr, W, V, Mo, Cu, Al, Ce, YSZ, Y, Rare Earths, (RE), MgO, CeO.sub.2, and Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 ; compacted and heat treated, then rapidly recrystallized to produce a biaxial texture on the article. In some embodiments the alloy article further comprises electromagnetic or electro-optical devices and possesses superconducting properties.

  10. Biaxial deformation of collagen and elastin fibers in coronary adventitia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Xuefeng; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Lanir, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    The microstructural deformation-mechanical loading relation of the blood vessel wall is essential for understanding the overall mechanical behavior of vascular tissue in health and disease. We employed simultaneous mechanical loading-imaging to quantify in situ deformation of individual collagen and elastin fibers on unstained fresh porcine coronary adventitia under a combination of vessel inflation and axial extension loading. Specifically, the specimens were imaged under biaxial loads to study microscopic deformation-loading behavior of fibers in conjunction with morphometric measurements at the zero-stress state. Collagen fibers largely orientate in the longitudinal direction, while elastin fibers have major orientation parallel to collagen, but with additional orientation angles in each sublayer of the adventitia. With an increase of biaxial load, collagen fibers were uniformly stretched to the loading direction, while elastin fibers gradually formed a network in sublayers, which strongly depended on the initial arrangement. The waviness of collagen decreased more rapidly at a circumferential stretch ratio of λθ = 1.0 than at λθ = 1.5, while most collagen became straightened at λθ = 1.8. These microscopic deformations imply that the longitudinally stiffer adventitia is a direct result of initial fiber alignment, and the overall mechanical behavior of the tissue is highly dependent on the corresponding microscopic deformation of fibers. The microstructural deformation-loading relation will serve as a foundation for micromechanical models of the vessel wall. PMID:24092692

  11. Biaxial texturing of inorganic photovoltaic thin films using low energy ion beam irradiation during growth

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, James R; De Paula, Raymond F; Hayes, Garrett H; Li, Joel B; Hammond, Robert H; Salleo, Alberto; Clemens, Bruce M

    2010-05-07

    We describe our efforts to control the grain boundary alignment in polycrystalline thin films of silicon by using a biaxially textured template layer of CaF{sub 2} for photovoltaic device applications. We have chosen CaF{sub 2} as a candidate material due to its close lattice match with silicon and its suitability as an ion beam assisted deposition (mAD) material. We show that the CaF{sub 2} aligns biaxially at a thickness of {approx}10 nm and, with the addition of an epitaxial CaF{sub 2} layer, has an in-plane texture of {approx}15{sup o}. Deposition of a subsequent layer of Si aligns on the template layer with an in-plane texture of 10.8{sup o}. The additional improvement of in-plane texture is similar to the behavior observed in more fully characterized IBAD materials systems. A germanium buffer layer is used to assist in the epitaxial deposition of Si on CaF{sub 2} template layers and single crystal substrates. These experiments confirm that an mAD template can be used to biaxially orient polycrystalline Si.

  12. Biaxial load effects in fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.; Lee, J. D.; Eftis, J.

    1977-01-01

    It is found that the standard expressions for elastic stress and displacement in the crack-tip region (i.e., the so-called singular solution) cannot be considered to be approximations that are acceptable in a completely general sense. This conclusion is best illustrated by the instance of a biaxially loaded infinite sheet with a flat horizontal central crack, where the effect of load applied parallel to the plane of the crack appears entirely in the second terms of the series representations for local stresses and displacements. An elastoplastic finite-element analysis of the same biaxially loaded finite specimen geometry shows that the global energy release rate, the J-integral, the plastic stress and strain intensity factors (in the sense of Hilton and Hutchinson), and the size of the crack border region plastic yield, all have pronounced biaxial load dependence.

  13. Strength of composite laminates under biaxial loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinton, M. J.; Soden, P. D.; Kaddour, A. S.

    1996-05-01

    Five well known failure criteria and one simple progressive model have been used in conjunction with laminate theory, which allows for nonlinear lamina shear behaviour, to predict the initial and final failure strengths of filament wound composite tubes. The predictions have been compared with experimental leakage and fracture stresses for ±75°, ±55° and ±45° filament wound GRP tubes subjected to a wide range of biaxial stress systems including biaxial compression. In some cases the fracture strengths were a factor of 10 higher than the initial failure predictions. The simple progressive failure theory predictions gave the best agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Electrodeposition of biaxially textured layers on a substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N; Phok, Sovannary; Spagnol, Priscila; Chaudhuri, Tapas

    2013-11-19

    Methods of producing one or more biaxially textured layer on a substrate, and articles produced by the methods, are disclosed. An exemplary method may comprise electrodepositing on the substrate a precursor material selected from the group consisting of rare earths, transition metals, actinide, lanthanides, and oxides thereof. An exemplary article (150) may comprise a biaxially textured base material (130), and at least one biaxially textured layer (110) selected from the group consisting of rare earths, transition metals, actinides, lanthanides, and oxides thereof. The at least one biaxially textured layer (110) is formed by electrodeposition on the biaxially textured base material (130).

  15. Optimal design of biaxial tensile cruciform specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demmerle, S.; Boehler, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    F OR EXPERIMENTAL investigations concerning the mechanical behaviour under biaxial stress states of rolled sheet metals, mostly cruciform flat specimens are used. By means of empirical methods, different specimen geometries have been proposed in the literature. In order to evaluate the suitability of a specimen design, a mathematically well defined criterion is developed, based on the standard deviations of the values of the stresses in the test section. Applied to the finite element method, the criterion is employed to realize the shape optimization of biaxial cruciform specimens for isotropic elastic materials. Furthermore, the performance of the obtained optimized specimen design is investigated in the case of off-axes tests on anisotropic materials. Therefore, for the first time, an original testing device, consisting of hinged fixtures with knife edges at each arm of the specimen, is applied to the biaxial test. The obtained results indicate the decisive superiority of the optimized specimens for the proper performance on isotropic materials, as well as the paramount importance of the proposed off-axes testing technique for biaxial tests on anisotropic materials.

  16. Biaxially textured metal substrate with palladium layer

    DOEpatents

    Robbins, William B [Maplewood, MN

    2002-12-31

    Described is an article comprising a biaxially textured metal substrate and a layer of palladium deposited on at least one major surface of the metal substrate; wherein the palladium layer has desired in-plane and out-of-plane crystallographic orientations, which allow subsequent layers that are applied on the article to also have the desired orientations.

  17. Instability of a Biaxial Nematic Liquid Crystal Formed by Homeotropic Anchoring on Surface Grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Dong; Xuan, Li

    2011-10-01

    A method used to treat the elastic distortion of a uniaxial nematic liquid crystal induced by homogeneous anchoring on the surface grooves is generalized to biaxial nematic liquid crystals under the homeotropic anchoring condition. Employing some approximations for the elastic constants, we obtain an additional term in the elastic energy per unit area which depends on the angle between the minor director at infinity and the direction of the grooves, with a period of π/2. This leads to instability on the surface grooves so that two states with crossed minor directors are energetically indistinguishable. Our theoretical study explains why the homeotropic alignment method developed for uniaxial liquid crystals loses efficacy for biaxial nematics.

  18. Implantable biaxial piezoresistive accelerometer for sensorimotor control.

    PubMed

    Zou, Qiang; Tan, Wei; Sok Kim, Eun; Singh, Jasspreet; Loeb, Gerald E

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and test results of a novel biaxial piezoresistive accelerometer and its incorporation into a miniature neuromuscular stimulator called a BION. Because of its highly symmetric twin mass structure, the X and Z axis acceleration can be measured at the same time and the cross axis sensitivity can be minimized by proper piezoresistor design. The X and Z axis sensitivities of the biaxial accelerometer are 0.10 mV/g/V and 1.40 mV/g/V, respectively, which are further increased to 0.65 mV/g/V and 2.40 mV/g/V, respectively, with extra silicon mass added to the proof mass. The cross-axis sensitivity is less than 3.3% among X, Y and Z-axis. An orientation tracking method for human segments by measuring every joint angle is also discussed in this paper. Joint angles can be obtained by processing the outputs of a pair of biaxial accelerometers (placed very close to the joint axis on the adjacent limb links), without having to integrate acceleration or velocity signals, thereby avoiding errors due to offsets and drift. PMID:17271250

  19. Method for making biaxially textured articles by plastic deformation

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit

    2002-01-01

    A method of preparing a biaxially textured article comprises the steps of providing a metal preform, coating or laminating the preform with a metal layer, deforming the layer to a sufficient degree, and rapidly recrystallizing the layer to produce a biaxial texture. A superconducting epitaxial layer may then be deposited on the biaxial texture. In some embodiments the article further comprises buffer layers, electromagnetic devices or electro-optical devices.

  20. Biaxial Testing of 2195 Aluminum Lithium Alloy Using Cruciform Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, W. M.; Pollock, W. D.; Dawicke, D. S.; Wagner, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A cruciform biaxial test specimen was used to test the effect of biaxial load on the yield of aluminum-lithium alloy 2195. Fifteen cruciform specimens were tested from 2 thicknesses of 2195-T8 plate, 0.45 in. and 1.75 in. These results were compared to the results from uniaxial tensile tests of the same alloy, and cruciform biaxial tests of aluminum alloy 2219-T87.

  1. Tungsten filament fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-05-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent light bulb is being replaced by compact fluorescent and LED lamps.

  2. Biaxial tension of fibrous tissue: using finite element methods to address experimental challenges arising from boundary conditions and anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Nathan T; Cortes, Daniel H; Vresilovic, Edward J; Elliott, Dawn M

    2013-02-01

    Planar biaxial tension remains a critical loading modality for fibrous soft tissue and is widely used to characterize tissue mechanical response, evaluate treatments, develop constitutive formulas, and obtain material properties for use in finite element studies. Although the application of tension on all edges of the test specimen represents the in situ environment, there remains a need to address the interpretation of experimental results. Unlike uniaxial tension, in biaxial tension the applied forces at the loading clamps do not transmit fully to the region of interest (ROI), which may lead to improper material characterization if not accounted for. In this study, we reviewed the tensile biaxial literature over the last ten years, noting experimental and analysis challenges. In response to these challenges, we used finite element simulations to quantify load transmission from the clamps to the ROI in biaxial tension and to formulate a correction factor that can be used to determine ROI stresses. Additionally, the impact of sample geometry, material anisotropy, and tissue orientation on the correction factor were determined. Large stress concentrations were evident in both square and cruciform geometries and for all levels of anisotropy. In general, stress concentrations were greater for the square geometry than the cruciform geometry. For both square and cruciform geometries, materials with fibers aligned parallel to the loading axes reduced stress concentrations compared to the isotropic tissue, resulting in more of the applied load being transferred to the ROI. In contrast, fiber-reinforced specimens oriented such that the fibers aligned at an angle to the loading axes produced very large stress concentrations across the clamps and shielding in the ROI. A correction factor technique was introduced that can be used to calculate the stresses in the ROI from the measured experimental loads at the clamps. Application of a correction factor to experimental biaxial

  3. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Michael

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation. The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D2 molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  4. Simple solutions of multilayered discs subjected to biaxial moment loading.

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, Chun-Hway; Kelly, J R

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to derive a simple closed-form solution for the stress distribution through the thickness of multilayered discs subjected to biaxial moment loading, such that it can be used readily to evaluate the biaxial strength of multilayered dental ceramics using biaxial flexure tests. Methods A simple analytical model was developed to derive the stress distribution through the thickness of multilayered discs subjected to biaxial moment loading. The accuracy of the solution was verified by comparing with previous rigorous analytical solutions and finite element results. The results obtained from Roark's formulas for bilayered discs were also included for comparison.

  5. On the field-induced switching of molecular organization in a biaxial nematic cell and its relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Matteo; Berardi, Roberto; Zannoni, Claudio

    2015-08-28

    We investigate the switching of a biaxial nematic filling a flat cell with planar homogeneous anchoring using a coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation. We have found that an aligning field applied across the film, and acting on specific molecular axes, can drive the reorientation of the secondary biaxial director up to one order of magnitude faster than that for the principal director. While the π/2 switching of the secondary director does not affect the alignment of the long molecular axes, the field-driven reorientation of the principal director proceeds via a concerted rotation of the long and transversal molecular axes. More importantly, while upon switching off a (relatively) weak or intermediate field, the biaxial nematic liquid crystal is always able to relax to the initial surface aligned director state; this is not the case when using fields above a certain threshold. In that case, while the secondary director always recovers the initial state, the principal one remains, occasionally, trapped in a nonuniform director state due to the formation of domain walls. PMID:26328865

  6. Alignment Tool For Welding Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Steffins, Alfred P.

    1992-01-01

    Alignment tool enables accurate positioning of optoelectronic sensor measuring weld penetration. Designed for use on tungsten/inert-gas welding apparatus, used to adjust position of sensor so photodiode puts out maximum signal. Tangs of slotted cap bent slightly inward to provide spring force holding cap snugly on sensor mount. Tool installed and removed without aid of other tools. Length of pointer adjusted with set-screws. Used with variety of gas cup and electrode lengths.

  7. Role of Molecular Structure on X-ray Diffraction in Thermotropic Uniaxial and Biaxial Nematic Liquid Crystal Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Bharat R.; Kang, Shin-Woong; Prasad, Veena; Kumar, Satyendra

    2009-08-27

    X-ray diffraction is one of the most definitive methods to determine the structure of condensed matter phases, and it has been applied to unequivocally infer the structures of conventional calamitic and lyotropic liquid crystals. With the advent of bent-core and tetrapodic mesogens and the discovery of the biaxial nematic phase in them, the experimental results require more careful interpretation and analysis. Here, we present ab-initio calculations of X-ray diffraction patterns in the isotropic, uniaxial nematic, and biaxial nematic phases of bent-core mesogens. A simple Meier-Saupe-like molecular distribution function is employed to describe both aligned and unaligned mesophases. The distribution function is decomposed into two, polar and azimuthal, distribution functions to calculate the effect of the evolution of uniaxial and biaxial nematic orientational order. The calculations provide satisfactory semiquantitative interpretations of experimental results. The calculations presented here should provide a pathway to more refined and quantitative analysis of X-ray diffraction data from the biaxial nematic phase.

  8. Role of Molecular Structure on X-ray Diffraction in Uniaxial and Biaxial Phases of Thermotropic Liquid Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Bharat R.; Kang, Shin-Woong; Prasad, Veena; Kumar, Satyendra

    2009-04-29

    X-ray diffraction is one of the most definitive methods to determine the structure of condensed matter phases, and it has been applied to unequivocally infer the structures of conventional calamitic and lyotropic liquid crystals. With the advent of bent-core and tetrapodic mesogens and the discovery of the biaxial nematic phase in them, the experimental results require more careful interpretation and analysis. Here, we present ab-initio calculations of X-ray diffraction patterns in the isotropic, uniaxial nematic, and biaxial nematic phases of bent-core mesogens. A simple Meier-Saupe-like molecular distribution function is employed to describe both aligned and unaligned mesophases. The distribution function is decomposed into two, polar and azimuthal, distribution functions to calculate the effect of the evolution of uniaxial and biaxial nematic orientational order. The calculations provide satisfactory semiquantitative interpretations of experimental results. The calculations presented here should provide a pathway to more refined and quantitative analysis of X-ray diffraction data from the biaxial nematic phase.

  9. Equi-biaxial tension tests on magneto-rheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Gerlind; Harrison, Philip

    2016-01-01

    A bespoke test rig has been designed to facilitate testing of magneto-rheological (MR) elastomers (MREs) under equi-biaxial tension using a standard universal test machine. Tests were performed up to 10% strain on both isotropic and anisotropic MREs with and without the application of an external magnetic field. Assumptions regarding the material’s response were used to analyse stress-strain results in the two stretching directions. The assumptions have been verified previously by uniaxial tension tests and by simulations of the magnetic flux distribution performed using a commercial multi-physics finite element software. The MR effect, which is defined as the increase in tangent modulus at a given strain, has been studied versus engineering strain. The latter was measured optically in the experiments using a digital image correlation system. Relative MR effects up to 74% were found when the particle alignment of anisotropic MREs was oriented parallel to an applied magnetic induction of just 67.5 mT.

  10. Structures having enhanced biaxial texture and method of fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, A.; Budai, J.D.; Kroeger, D.M.; Norton, D.P.; Specht, E.D.; Christen, D.K.

    1998-04-14

    A biaxially textured article includes a rolled and annealed, biaxially textured substrate of a metal having a face-centered cubic, body-centered cubic, or hexagonal close-packed crystalline structure; and an epitaxial superconductor or other device epitaxially deposited thereon. 11 figs.

  11. Structures having enhanced biaxial texture and method of fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, A.; Budai, J.D.; Kroeger, D.M.; Norton, D.P.; Specht, E.D.; Christen, D.K.

    1998-04-21

    A biaxially textured article includes a rolled and annealed, biaxially textured substrate of a metal having a face-centered cubic, body-centered cubic, or hexagonal close-packed crystalline structure; and an epitaxial superconductor or other device epitaxially deposited thereon. 11 figs.

  12. Structures having enhanced biaxial texture and method of fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, A.; Budai, J.D.; Kroeger, D.M.; Norton, D.P.; Specht, E.D.; Christen, D.K.

    1999-04-27

    A biaxially textured article includes a rolled and annealed, biaxially textured substrate of a metal having a face-centered cubic, body-centered cubic, or hexagonal close-packed crystalline structure; and an epitaxial superconductor or other device epitaxially deposited thereon. 11 figs.

  13. Structures having enhanced biaxial texture and method of fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Budai, John D.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Norton, David P.; Specht, Eliot D.; Christen, David K.

    1998-01-01

    A biaxially textured article includes a rolled and annealed, biaxially textured substrate of a metal having a face-centered cubic, body-centered cubic, or hexagonal close-packed crystalline structure; and an epitaxial superconductor or other device epitaxially deposited thereon.

  14. Structures having enhanced biaxial texture and method of fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Budai, John D.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Norton, David P.; Specht, Eliot D.; Christen, David K.

    1999-01-01

    A biaxially textured article includes a rolled and annealed, biaxially textured substrate of a metal having a face-centered cubic, body-centered cubic, or hexagonal close-packed crystalline structure; and an epitaxial superconductor or other device epitaxially deposited thereon.

  15. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-19

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  16. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goval, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-06-07

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  17. Biaxially textured articles formed by power metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-26

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  18. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-07-29

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  19. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-14

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  20. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-05

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of ternary mixtures consisting of: Ni powder, Cu powder, and Al powder, Ni powder, Cr powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, W powder and Al powder; Ni powder, V powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, Mo powder, and Al powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  1. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-05-10

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  2. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-26

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  3. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-28

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  4. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-01-25

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  5. Micromagnetic model for biaxial stress effects on magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablik, M. J.; Riley, L. A.; Burkhardt, G. L.; Kwun, H.; Cannell, P. Y.; Watts, K. T.; Langman, R. A.

    1994-04-01

    A micromagnetic formulation has been developed for modeling the effect of biaxial stress on magnetoelastic processes in polycrystalline steels. The formulation uses a modified version of the Kashiwaya model for the effect of biaxial stress on magnetic properties and combines it with the Schneider-Cannell-Watts model for magnetoelastic processes in steels. In particular, the model involves use of an effective stress equal to one of the deviatoric (i.e. distortional) normal stress components, depending on whether the field is parallel to a tensile or compressive axis or to the third axis perpendicular to the plane of biaxial stress. Computer results are compared to experimental results on the effects of biaxial stress on magnetic properties in mild steel and in SAE-4130 steel. Good qualitative agreement is found in almost all cases, in that in going from one biaxial stress case to the next, the same kinds of changes are seen magnetically.

  6. KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wohletz, K.; Kunkle, T.; Hawkins, W.

    1996-12-01

    Results of the KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment indicate a relatively small degree of wall-rock contamination caused by this underground explosive experiment. Designed as an add-on to the KISMET test, which was performed in the U-1a.02 drift of the LYNER facility at Nevada Test Site on 1 March 1995, this experiment involved recovery and analysis of wall-rock samples affected by the high- explosive test. The chemical, high-explosive blast drove tungsten powder, placed around the test package as a plutonium analog, into the surrounding wall- rock alluvium. Sample analyses by an analytical digital electron microscope (ADEM) show tungsten dispersed in the rock as tiny (<10 {mu}m) particles, agglomerates, and coatings on alluvial clasts. Tungsten concentrations, measured by energy dispersive spectral analysis on the ADEM, indicate penetration depths less than 0.1 m and maximum concentrations of 1.5 wt % in the alluvium.

  7. Biaxial mechanical characterization of bat wing skin.

    PubMed

    Skulborstad, A J; Swartz, S M; Goulbourne, N C

    2015-06-01

    The highly flexible and stretchable wing skin of bats, together with the skeletal structure and musculature, enables large changes in wing shape during flight. Such compliance distinguishes bat wings from those of all other flying animals. Although several studies have investigated the aerodynamics and kinematics of bats, few have examined the complex histology and mechanical response of the wing skin. This work presents the first biaxial characterization of the local deformation, mechanical properties, and fiber kinematics of bat wing skin. Analysis of these data has provided insight into the relationships among the structural morphology, mechanical properties, and functionality of wing skin. Large spatial variations in tissue deformation and non-negligible fiber strains in the cross-fiber direction for both chordwise and spanwise fibers indicate fibers should be modeled as two-dimensional elements. The macroscopic constitutive behavior was anisotropic and nonlinear, with very low spanwise and chordwise stiffness (hundreds of kilopascals) in the toe region of the stress-strain curve. The structural arrangement of the fibers and matrix facilitates a low energy mechanism for wing deployment and extension, and we fabricate examples of skins capturing this mechanism. We propose a comprehensive deformation map for the entire loading regime. The results of this work underscore the importance of biaxial field approaches for soft heterogeneous tissue, and provide a foundation for development of bio-inspired skins to probe the effects of the wing skin properties on aerodynamic performance. PMID:25895436

  8. Laminate articles on biaxially textured metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Beach, David B.; Morrell, Jonathan S.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chirayil, Thomas; Specht, Eliot D.; Goyal, Amit

    2003-12-16

    A laminate article comprises a substrate and a biaxially textured (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer over the substrate, wherein 0biaxially textured metal, such as nickel. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  9. a Technique for Biaxial Damping Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, R. J.; Foster, C. G.

    1995-11-01

    A description is given of a novel technique by means of which experimental studies may be made of the energy dissipation behaviour of materials subjected to biaxial (i.e., combined stress) loading. A specimen in the form a thin cylinder is subjected to simultaneous but separately controlled fluctuating fluid pressures internally, externally and axially. Pressure control is achieved by electro-hydraulic servo-systems and strain response is measured by miniature electrical resistance strain gauges. The apparatus is believed to be unique in its ability to apply biaxial with uniform stress distribution and uniform ratio of principal stresses over the full range -1 ≤ σ 2/σ 1≤ 1 with adequate control and accuracy and absence of means tress. Hysteresis loops in the two principal directions are recorded. The principles of the apparatus and the special features of its design are discussed. Experimental results are presented. The errors associated with operation of the apparatus correspond to loss factors of the order of 0·001-0·002 and hence the apparatus may be considered satisfactory for studies of materials of loss factor 0·01 and higher.

  10. A comparative study of deformation in carbon/carbon and carbon/polyimide laminates under bi-axial compression

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, V.; Grape, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    The failure mechanisms of laminated 2-D carbon/carbon (C/C) and carbon/polyimide (C/P) composites have been determined under inplane biaxial compression loads, and the associated failure envelopes that account for the effect of matrix-type and loading directions, are also obtained. For the C/C laminates, the failure was in the form of micro-kinking of fiber-bundles, interspersed by localized interply delaminations to form the overall shear-fault. The shear fault was aligned with the major use of loading, except at above 75% of balanced biaxial stress, where failure occurred alone both axes. For the C/P laminates, however, the overall failure was primarily in the form of axial interply delaminations aligned with the principal axis of loading, with only secondary events of kinking in few bundles. Although the biaxial strength for both C/C and C/P samples varied significantly with the ratio of in-plane principal stresses, R, there was no variation in the local failure mechanisms. Accordingly, it was found that both materials fail upon achieving a maximum strain along the primary axis of loading.

  11. Reflection of electromagnetic waves at a biaxial-isotropic interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.

    1983-01-01

    The reflection of electromagnetic waves at a plane boundary between isotropic and biaxial media has been investigated using the kDB approach. The general case has been considered in which the principal dielectric axes of the biaxial medium are oriented at an arbitrary angle to the normal of the plane boundary. In general, two characteristic waves propagate in the biaxial medium, leading to coupling of vertical and horizontal polarizations in the reflected waves. Some special cases are illustrated. The results have applications to problems in remote sensing and integrated optics.

  12. Biaxial Nematic Phase in Model Bent-Core Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzybowski, Piotr; Longa, Lech

    2011-07-01

    We determine the bifurcation phase diagrams with isotropic (I), uniaxial (NU) and biaxial (NB) nematic phases for model bent-core mesogens using Onsager-type theory. The molecules comprise two or three Gay-Berne interacting ellipsoids of uniaxial and biaxial shape and a transverse central dipole. The Landau point is found to turn into an I-NB line for the three-center model with a large dipole moment. For the biaxial ellipsoids, a line of Landau points is observed even in the absence of the dipoles.

  13. Biaxial nematic phase in model bent-core systems.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Piotr; Longa, Lech

    2011-07-01

    We determine the bifurcation phase diagrams with isotropic (I), uniaxial (N(U)) and biaxial (N(B)) nematic phases for model bent-core mesogens using Onsager-type theory. The molecules comprise two or three Gay-Berne interacting ellipsoids of uniaxial and biaxial shape and a transverse central dipole. The Landau point is found to turn into an I-N(B) line for the three-center model with a large dipole moment. For the biaxial ellipsoids, a line of Landau points is observed even in the absence of the dipoles. PMID:21797641

  14. Conductive and robust nitride buffer layers on biaxially textured substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sankar, Sambasivan [Chicago, IL; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Barnett, Scott A [Evanston, IL; Kim, Ilwon [Skokie, IL; Kroeger, Donald M [Knoxville, TN

    2009-03-31

    The present invention relates to epitaxial, electrically conducting and mechanically robust, cubic nitride buffer layers deposited epitaxially on biaxially textured substrates such as metals and alloys. The invention comprises of a biaxially textured substrate with epitaxial layers of nitrides. The invention also discloses a method to form such epitaxial layers using a high rate deposition method as well as without the use of forming gases. The invention further comprises epitaxial layers of oxides on the biaxially textured nitride layer. In some embodiments the article further comprises electromagnetic devices which may have superconducting properties.

  15. Conductive and robust nitride buffer layers on biaxially textured substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sankar, Sambasivan; Goyal, Amit; Barnett, Scott A.; Kim, Ilwon; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-08-31

    The present invention relates to epitaxial, electrically conducting and mechanically robust, cubic nitride buffer layers deposited epitaxially on biaxially textured substrates such as metal and alloys. The invention comprises of a biaxially textured substrate with epitaxial layers of nitrides. The invention also discloses a method to form such epitaxial layers using a high rate deposition method as well as without the use of forming gases. The invention further comprises epitaxial layers of oxides on the biaxially textured nitride layers. In some embodiments the article further comprises electromagnetic devices which may be super conducting properties.

  16. Biaxial and antiferroelectric structure of the orthogonal smectic phase of a bent-shaped molecule and helical structure in a chiral mixture system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sungmin; Nguyen, Ha; Nakajima, Shunpei; Tokita, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Junji

    2013-05-01

    We examined the biaxial and antiferroelectric properties in the Smectic-APA (Sm-APA) phase of bent-shaped DC-S-8. The biaxiality, which results from the existence of a secondary director, was well established from birefringence observations in the homeotropically aligned Sm-APA. By entering into Sm-APA phase, the birefringence (Δn, difference between two refractive indices of short axes) continuously increased from 0 to 0.02 with decreasing temperature. The antiferroelectric switching and second harmonic generation (SHG) activity on the field-on state were also observed in the Sm-APA phase, and the evaluated spontaneous polarization (PS) value strongly depended on temperature. The temperature dependence of Δn and PS resembles each other and follows Haller's approximation, showing that the biaxiality is due to polar packing in which the molecules are preferentially packed with their bent direction arranged in the same direction, and that the phase transition of Sm-APA to Sm-A is second order. The biaxiality was further examined in chiral Sm-APA*. Doping with chiral components induced the helical twisting of the secondary director in the Sm-APA* phase, which was confirmed by observing the reflection of the circular dichroism (CD) bands in the homeotropically aligned cell. The helical pitch of Sm-APA* is tunable in the range of 300-700 nm wavelength with a variation in the chiral content of 5 to 10 weight (wt)%.

  17. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-10-21

    A strengthened, biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed, compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: Ni, Ag, Ag--Cu, Ag--Pd, Ni--Cu, Ni--V, Ni--Mo, Ni--Al, Ni--Cr--Al, Ni--W--Al, Ni--V--Al, Ni--Mo--Al, Ni--Cu--Al; and at least one fine metal oxide powder; the article having a grain size which is fine and homogeneous; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  18. Alternative processing methods for tungsten-base composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.; Sikka, V.K.

    1995-12-31

    Tungsten composite materials contain large amounts of tungsten distributed in a continuous matrix phase. Current commercial materials include the tungsten-nickel-iron with cobalt replacing some or all of the iron, and also tungsten-copper materials. Typically, these are fabricated by liquid-phase sintering of blended powders. Liquid-phase sintering offers the advantages of low processing costs, established technology, and generally attractive mechanical properties. However, liquid-phase sintering is restricted to a very limited number of matrix alloying elements and a limited range of tungsten and alloying compositions. In the past few years, there has been interest in a wider range of matrix materials that offer the potential for superior composite properties. These must be processed by solid-state processes and at sufficiently low temperatures to avoid undesired reactions between the tungsten and the matrix phase. These processes, in order of decreasing process temperature requirements, include hot-isostatic pressing (HIPing), hot extrusion, and dynamic compaction. The HIPing and hot extrusion processes have also been used to improve mechanical properties of conventional liquid-phase-sintered materials. Results of laboratory-scale investigations of solid-state consolidation of a variety of matrix materials, including titanium, hafnium, nickel aluminide, and steels are reviewed. The potential advantages and disadvantages of each of the possible alternative consolidation processes are identified. Postconsolidation processing to control microstructure and macrostructure is discussed, including novel methods of controlling microstructure alignment.

  19. Minerals yearbook, 1988. Tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    Only one U.S. tungsten mine was open during 1988 while prices for concentrates rose only modestly from the previous year. Consequently, the United States continued to be highly import-dependent for tungsten concentrate and intermediate materials. A significant portion of these materials came from China. The report discusses the following topics: Domestic data coverage; Legislation and government programs; Domestic production; Consumption and uses; Prices; Foreign trade; World capacity; World review--Australia, Austria, India, Republic of Korea, Mongolia, Rwanda, Spain; Technology.

  20. Biaxial Yield Surface Investigation of Polymer-Matrix Composites

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Junjie; Qiu, Yuanying; Zhai, Zhi; He, Zhengjia

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a numerical technique for computing the biaxial yield surface of polymer-matrix composites with a given microstructure. Generalized Method of Cells in combination with an Improved Bodner-Partom Viscoplastic model is used to compute the inelastic deformation. The validation of presented model is proved by a fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) strain test system through uniaxial testing under two different strain rate conditions. On this basis, the manufacturing process thermal residual stress and strain rate effect on the biaxial yield surface of composites are considered. The results show that the effect of thermal residual stress on the biaxial yield response is closely dependent on loading conditions. Moreover, biaxial yield strength tends to increase with the increasing strain rate. PMID:23529150

  1. Diffusion of tungsten on stepped tungsten surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, D. S.; Kim, S. K.; Gomer, R.

    1990-08-01

    Self-diffusion of thermally generated tungsten atoms near (123) and (257), on the zone (011)-(112) and on (023), on the zone (011)-(001) of a tungsten field emitter has been investigated by the field-emission fluctuation method, using a rectangular probe in order to investigate diffusion anisotropy. In agreement with earlier findings of Gong and Gomer [J. Chem. Phys. 88 (1988) 1359, 1370] diffusion of single W atoms along and across (011) terraces separated by (011) steps, i.e. step edges running along [111] is essentially isotropic with Ed = 16 kcal, D0 ≈ 10 -4 cm 2 s -1, while atoms can cross (001) oriented steps only with much activation energy: Ed ≈ 35 kcal, D0 = 10 -2 cm -2 s -1. Slow diffusion parallel to steps attributed previously by Gong Chem. Phys. 88 (1988) 1359, 1370] to kink motion was also seen along the zone (011)-(112) but seems more complicated than previously assumed, with several regimes, which may correspond to motions of different kink configurations. Distinct dips in the slow regime diffusion coefficients occurred at 910 K, somewhat higher than the previously seen onset of dips, 875 K, and may indicate roughening, as previously hypothesized. Slow diffusion perpendicular to steps was also seen in this zone and is not fully understood. It may arise from some step components always perpendicular to the short slit dimensions, or may correspond to more complicated surface configurations than the step and terrace pattern on an ideal emitter surface.

  2. High purity tungsten targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    High purity tungsten, which is used for targets in X-ray tubes was considered for space processing. The demand for X-ray tubes was calculated using the growth rates for dental and medical X-ray machines. It is concluded that the cost benefits are uncertain.

  3. Gas tungsten arc welder

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  4. Tungsten diffusion in olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Van Orman, J. A.

    2014-03-01

    Diffusion of tungsten has been characterized in synthetic forsterite and natural olivine (Fo90) under dry conditions. The source of diffusant was a mixture of magnesium tungstate and olivine powders. Experiments were prepared by sealing the source material and polished olivine under vacuum in silica glass ampoules with solid buffers to buffer at NNO or IW. Prepared capsules were annealed in 1 atm furnaces for times ranging from 45 min to several weeks, at temperatures from 1050 to 1450 °C. Tungsten distributions in the olivine were profiled by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The following Arrhenius relation is obtained for W diffusion in forsterite: D=1.0×10-8exp(-365±28 kJ mol/RT) m s Diffusivities for the synthetic forsterite and natural Fe-bearing olivine are similar, and tungsten diffusion in olivine shows little dependence on crystallographic orientation or oxygen fugacity. The slow diffusivities measured for W in olivine indicate that Hf-W ages in olivine-metal systems will close to diffusive exchange at higher temperatures than other chronometers commonly used in cosmochronology, and that tungsten isotopic signatures will be less likely to be reset by subsequent thermal events.

  5. Chemical downstream etching of tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, M.G.; Jarecki, R.L.; Simonson, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    The downstream etching of tungsten and tungsten oxide has been investigated. Etching of chemical vapor deposited tungsten and e-beam deposited tungsten oxide samples was performed using atomic fluorine generated by a microwave discharge of argon and NF{sub 3}. Etching was found to be highly activated with activation energies approximated to be 6.0{plus_minus}0.5thinspkcal/mol and 5.4{plus_minus}0.4thinspkcal/mol for W and WO{sub 3}, respectively. In the case of F etching of tungsten, the addition of undischarged nitric oxide (NO) directly into the reaction chamber results in the competing effects of catalytic etch rate enhancement and the formation of a nearly stoichiometric WO{sub 3} passivating tungsten oxide film, which ultimately stops the etching process. For F etching of tungsten oxide, the introduction of downstream NO reduces the etch rate. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Vacuum Society.}

  6. Domain walls and anchoring transitions mimicking nematic biaxiality in the oxadiazole bent-core liquid crystal C7.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ki; Cukrov, Greta; Xiang, Jie; Shin, Sung-Tae; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-05-28

    We investigate the origin of "secondary disclinations" that were recently described as new evidence of a biaxial nematic phase in an oxadiazole bent-core thermotropic liquid crystal C7. Using an assortment of optical techniques such as polarizing optical microscopy, LC PolScope, and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, we demonstrate that the secondary disclinations represent non-singular domain walls formed in a uniaxial nematic phase during the surface anchoring transition, in which surface orientation of the director changes from tangential (parallel to the bounding plates) to tilted. Each domain wall separates two regions with the director tilted in opposite azimuthal directions. At the centre of the wall, the director remains parallel to the bounding plates. The domain walls can be easily removed by applying a moderate electric field. The anchoring transition is explained by the balance of (a) the intrinsic perpendicular surface anchoring produced by the polyimide aligning layer and (b) tangential alignment caused by ionic impurities forming electric double layers. The model is supported by the fact that the temperature of the tangentially tilted anchoring transition decreases as the cell thickness increases and as the concentration of ionic species (added salt) increases. We also demonstrate that the surface alignment is strongly affected by thermal degradation of the samples. This study shows that C7 exhibits only a uniaxial nematic phase and demonstrates yet another mechanism (formation of "secondary disclinations") by which a uniaxial nematic phase can mimic a biaxial nematic behaviour. PMID:25820380

  7. “CLASPing” tungsten's effects on microtubules with “PINs”

    PubMed Central

    Adamakis, Ioannis Dimosthenis S; Panteris, Emmanuel; Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten, supplied as sodium tungstate, inhibits root elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana, which has been attributed to a diminishing of PIN2 and PIN3 auxin efflux carriers. In this work, we sought to analyze the effect of tungsten on cortical microtubules and CLASP (Cytoplasmic Linker Associated Protein), which are also involved in the anisotropic cell expansion of root cells. Seedlings grown in a tungsten-free substrate for 4 d and then transplanted into a tungsten-containing substrate exhibited randomly oriented microtubules in a time-dependent manner. While tungsten had no effect on roots treated for 3 h, microtubule alignment was obviously affected in the transition and elongation zones after a 6, 12, 24, 48 h tungsten treatment, at prolonged tungsten administrations and in seedlings grown directly in the presence of tungsten. This change in microtubule orientation may be associated with the reduction of CLASP protein expression induced by tungsten, as evidenced in experiments with plants expressing the CLASP-GFP protein. A possible mechanism, by which the coordinated functions of CLASP, PIN2 and microtubules are affected, as revealed by inhibited root growth, is discussed. PMID:26313814

  8. Novel biaxial nematic phases of side-chain liquid crystalline polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Akihiko

    2012-12-01

    We present a mean field theory to describe biaxial nematic phases of side-chain liquid crystalline polymers, in which rigid side-chains (mesogens) and rigid-backbone chains favor mutually perpendicular orientations. Taking into account both excluded volume and attractive interactions between rigid rods, novel biaxial nematic phases are theoretically predicted. We calculate uniaxial and biaxial orientational order parameters as a function of temperature and the length of backbone chains. We find a first-order biaxial-biaxial phase transition and a first (or second)-order uniaxial-biaxial one, depending on the length of mesogens and backbone chains.

  9. Biaxial nematic phase stability and demixing behaviour in monolayers of rod-plate mixtures.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ratón, Yuri; González-Pinto, Miguel; Velasco, Enrique

    2016-09-21

    We theoretically study the phase behaviour of monolayers of hard rod-plate mixtures using a fundamental-measure density functional in the restricted-orientation (Zwanzig) approximation. Particles can rotate in 3D but their centres of mass are constrained to be on a flat surface. In addition, we consider both species to be subject to an attractive potential proportional to the particle contact area on the surface and with adsorption strengths that depend on the species type. Particles have board-like shape, with sizes chosen using a symmetry criterion: same volume and same aspect ratio κ. Phase diagrams were calculated for κ = 10, 20 and 40 and different values of adsorption strengths. For small adsorption strengths the mixtures exhibit a second-order uniaxial nematic-biaxial nematic transition for molar fraction of rods 0 ≤x≲ 0.9. In the uniaxial nematic phase the particle axes of rods and plates are aligned perpendicular and parallel to the monolayer, respectively. At the transition, the orientational symmetry of the plate axes is broken, and they orient parallel to a director lying on the surface. For large and equal adsorption strengths the mixture demixes at low pressures into a uniaxial nematic phase, rich in plates, and a biaxial nematic phase, rich in rods. The demixing transition is located between two tricritical points. Also, at higher pressures and in the plate-rich part of the phase diagram, the system exhibits a strong first-order uniaxial nematic-biaxial nematic phase transition with a large density coexistence gap. When rod adsorption is considerably large while that of plates is small, the transition to the biaxial nematic phase is always of second order, and its region of stability in the phase diagram considerably widens. At very high pressures the mixture can effectively be identified as a two-dimensional mixture of squares and rectangles which again demixes above a certain critical point. We also studied the relative stability of uniform

  10. Graphene flakes under controlled biaxial deformation

    PubMed Central

    Androulidakis, Charalampos; Koukaras, Emmanuel N.; Parthenios, John; Kalosakas, George; Papagelis, Konstantinos; Galiotis, Costas

    2015-01-01

    Thin membranes, such as monolayer graphene of monoatomic thickness, are bound to exhibit lateral buckling under uniaxial tensile loading that impairs its mechanical behaviour. In this work, we have developed an experimental device to subject 2D materials to controlled equibiaxial strain on supported beams that can be flexed up or down to subject the material to either compression or tension, respectively. Using strain gauges in tandem with Raman spectroscopy measurements, we monitor the G and 2D phonon properties of graphene under biaxial strain and thus extract important information about the uptake of stress under these conditions. The experimental shift over strain for the G and 2D Raman peaks were found to be in the range of 62.3 ± 5 cm–1/%, and 148.2 ± 6 cm–1/%, respectively, for monolayer but also bilayer graphenes. The corresponding Grüneisen parameters for the G and 2D peaks were found to be between 1.97 ± 0.15 and 2.86 ± 0.12, respectively. These values agree reasonably well with those obtained from small-strain bubble-type experiments. The results presented are also backed up by classical and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and excellent agreement of Γ-E2g shifts with strains and the Grüneisen parameter was observed. PMID:26666692

  11. Biaxial deformation in high purity aluminum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Livescu, V.; Bingert, J. F.; Liu, C.; Lovato, M. L.; Patterson, B. M.

    2015-09-25

    The convergence of multiple characterization tools has been applied to investigate the relationship of microstructure on damage evolution in high purity aluminum. The extremely coarse grain size of the disc-shaped sample provided a quasi-two dimensional structure from which the location of surface-measured features could be inferred. In particular, the role of pre-existing defects on damage growth was accessible due to the presence of casting porosity in the aluminum. Micro tomography, electron backscatter diffraction, and digital image correlation were applied to interrogate the sample in three dimensions. Recently micro-bulge testing apparatus was used to deform the pre-characterized disc of aluminum inmore » biaxial tension, and related analysis techniques were applied to map local strain fields. Subsequent post-mortem characterization of the failed sample was performed to correlate structure to damaged regions. We determined that strain localization and associated damage was most strongly correlated with grain boundary intersections and plastic anisotropy gradients between grains. Pre-existing voids played less of an apparent role than was perhaps initially expected. Finally, these combined techniques provide insight to the mechanism of damage initiation, propagation, and failure, along with a test bed for predictive damage models incorporating anisotropic microstructural effects.« less

  12. Biaxial deformation in high purity aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Livescu, V.; Bingert, J. F.; Liu, C.; Lovato, M. L.; Patterson, B. M.

    2015-09-25

    The convergence of multiple characterization tools has been applied to investigate the relationship of microstructure on damage evolution in high purity aluminum. The extremely coarse grain size of the disc-shaped sample provided a quasi-two dimensional structure from which the location of surface-measured features could be inferred. In particular, the role of pre-existing defects on damage growth was accessible due to the presence of casting porosity in the aluminum. Micro tomography, electron backscatter diffraction, and digital image correlation were applied to interrogate the sample in three dimensions. Recently micro-bulge testing apparatus was used to deform the pre-characterized disc of aluminum in biaxial tension, and related analysis techniques were applied to map local strain fields. Subsequent post-mortem characterization of the failed sample was performed to correlate structure to damaged regions. We determined that strain localization and associated damage was most strongly correlated with grain boundary intersections and plastic anisotropy gradients between grains. Pre-existing voids played less of an apparent role than was perhaps initially expected. Finally, these combined techniques provide insight to the mechanism of damage initiation, propagation, and failure, along with a test bed for predictive damage models incorporating anisotropic microstructural effects.

  13. Graphene flakes under controlled biaxial deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Androulidakis, Charalampos; Koukaras, Emmanuel N.; Parthenios, John; Kalosakas, George; Papagelis, Konstantinos; Galiotis, Costas

    2015-12-01

    Thin membranes, such as monolayer graphene of monoatomic thickness, are bound to exhibit lateral buckling under uniaxial tensile loading that impairs its mechanical behaviour. In this work, we have developed an experimental device to subject 2D materials to controlled equibiaxial strain on supported beams that can be flexed up or down to subject the material to either compression or tension, respectively. Using strain gauges in tandem with Raman spectroscopy measurements, we monitor the G and 2D phonon properties of graphene under biaxial strain and thus extract important information about the uptake of stress under these conditions. The experimental shift over strain for the G and 2D Raman peaks were found to be in the range of 62.3 ± 5 cm-1/%, and 148.2 ± 6 cm-1/%, respectively, for monolayer but also bilayer graphenes. The corresponding Grüneisen parameters for the G and 2D peaks were found to be between 1.97 ± 0.15 and 2.86 ± 0.12, respectively. These values agree reasonably well with those obtained from small-strain bubble-type experiments. The results presented are also backed up by classical and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and excellent agreement of Γ-E2g shifts with strains and the Grüneisen parameter was observed.

  14. Graphene flakes under controlled biaxial deformation.

    PubMed

    Androulidakis, Charalampos; Koukaras, Emmanuel N; Parthenios, John; Kalosakas, George; Papagelis, Konstantinos; Galiotis, Costas

    2015-01-01

    Thin membranes, such as monolayer graphene of monoatomic thickness, are bound to exhibit lateral buckling under uniaxial tensile loading that impairs its mechanical behaviour. In this work, we have developed an experimental device to subject 2D materials to controlled equibiaxial strain on supported beams that can be flexed up or down to subject the material to either compression or tension, respectively. Using strain gauges in tandem with Raman spectroscopy measurements, we monitor the G and 2D phonon properties of graphene under biaxial strain and thus extract important information about the uptake of stress under these conditions. The experimental shift over strain for the G and 2D Raman peaks were found to be in the range of 62.3 ± 5 cm(-1)/%, and 148.2 ± 6 cm(-1)/%, respectively, for monolayer but also bilayer graphenes. The corresponding Grüneisen parameters for the G and 2D peaks were found to be between 1.97 ± 0.15 and 2.86 ± 0.12, respectively. These values agree reasonably well with those obtained from small-strain bubble-type experiments. The results presented are also backed up by classical and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and excellent agreement of Γ-E2g shifts with strains and the Grüneisen parameter was observed. PMID:26666692

  15. Alignment validation

    SciTech Connect

    ALICE; ATLAS; CMS; LHCb; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-06

    The four experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb are currently under constructionat CERN. They will study the products of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. All experiments are equipped with sophisticated tracking systems, unprecedented in size and complexity. Full exploitation of both the inner detector andthe muon system requires an accurate alignment of all detector elements. Alignmentinformation is deduced from dedicated hardware alignment systems and the reconstruction of charged particles. However, the system is degenerate which means the data is insufficient to constrain all alignment degrees of freedom, so the techniques are prone to converging on wrong geometries. This deficiency necessitates validation and monitoring of the alignment. An exhaustive discussion of means to validate is subject to this document, including examples and plans from all four LHC experiments, as well as other high energy experiments.

  16. Numerical exploration into the potential of tungsten reinforced CuCrZr matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohe, Jörg; Fliegener, Sascha; Findeisen, Claudio; Reiser, Jens; Widak, Verena; Rieth, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The present study provides a numerical investigation into the potential of tungsten reinforced CuCrZr materials in order to overcome their limited performance at higher temperatures. Metal matrix composites including (i) particle reinforced microstructures, (ii) short fiber reinforced microstructures with both randomly orientated and (iii) aligned fibers as well as (iv) laminates consisting of stacked tungsten and CuCrZr layers are considered. The numerical analysis is performed by means of an energy based homogenization procedure in conjunction with a finite element analysis of representative volume elements for the respective microstructures. The results of the screening analysis reveal a distinct improvement of the mechanical properties of CuCrZr materials by the tungsten reinforcements even for moderate tungsten volume fractions. In a comparison of the different microstructures, the ordered microstructures, i.e. laminates and the aligned short fiber reinforced composites in most cases outperform their disordered counterparts.

  17. Tungsten oxide nanowire synthesis from amorphous-like tungsten films.

    PubMed

    Seelaboyina, Raghunandan

    2016-03-18

    A synthesis technique which can lead to direct integration of tungsten oxide nanowires onto silicon chips is essential for preparing various devices. The conversion of amorphous tungsten films deposited on silicon chips by pulsed layer deposition to nanowires by annealing is an apt method in that direction. This perspective discusses the ingenious features of the technique reported by Dellasega et al on the various aspects of tungsten oxide nanowire synthesis. PMID:26871521

  18. Tungsten oxide nanowire synthesis from amorphous-like tungsten films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelaboyina, Raghunandan

    2016-03-01

    A synthesis technique which can lead to direct integration of tungsten oxide nanowires onto silicon chips is essential for preparing various devices. The conversion of amorphous tungsten films deposited on silicon chips by pulsed layer deposition to nanowires by annealing is an apt method in that direction. This perspective discusses the ingenious features of the technique reported by Dellasega et al on the various aspects of tungsten oxide nanowire synthesis.

  19. Factors associated with biaxial texturing of Cu tapes for YBCO coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. H.; Sung, T. H.; Han, S. C.; Han, Y. H.; Jeong, N. H.; Kim, C. J.; Jun, B. H.; Oh, S. S.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, T. H.; No, K. S.

    2007-10-01

    A biaxially textured Cu(2 0 0) tape was used as a substrate for YBCO coated conductors by cold rolling followed by recrystallization heat treatment. In this work, we studied the influence of annealing conditions and final tape thickness on the recrystallization process. Phi (ϕ) scan and omega (ω) scan XRD revealed that the best in-plane and out-of-plane alignment of the Cu tape (thickness 100 μm), measured in terms of full width half maximum (FWHM) values of 6.64° and 4.49°, were obtained by annealing at 800 °C for 30 min. The texture of CeO2 buffer layer thermally-evaporated on the Cu tape was also analyzed.

  20. Monolayer Tungsten Disulfide Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yu; Wong, Zi Jing; Lu, Xiufang; Ni, Xingjie; Zhu, Hanyu; Chen, Xianhui; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    Two-dimensional van der Waals materials have opened a new paradigm for fundamental physics exploration and device applications because of their emerging physical properties. Unlike gapless graphene, monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides are two-dimensional semiconductors that undergo an indirect-to-direct band gap transition, creating new optical functionalities for next-generation ultra-compact photonics and optoelectronics. Here, we report the realization of a two-dimensional excitonic laser by embedding monolayer tungsten disulfide in a microdisk resonator.

  1. Hypoelastic Soft Tissues: Part II: In-Plane Biaxial Experiments.

    PubMed

    Freed, Alan D; Einstein, Daniel R; Sacks, Michael S

    2010-08-01

    In Part I, a novel hypoelastic framework for soft-tissues was presented. One of the hallmarks of this new theory is that the well-known exponential behavior of soft-tissues arises consistently and spontaneously from the integration of a rate based formulation. In Part II, we examine the application of this framework to the problem of biaxial kinematics, which are common in experimental soft-tissue characterization. We confine our attention to an isotropic formulation in order to highlight the distinction between non-linearity and anisotropy. In order to provide a sound foundation for the membrane extension of our earlier hypoelastic framework, the kinematics and kinetics of in-plane biaxial extension are revisited, and some enhancements are provided. Specifically, the conventional stress-to-traction mapping for this boundary value problem is shown to violate the conservation of angular momentum. In response, we provide a corrected mapping. In addition, a novel means for applying loads to in-plane biaxial experiments is proposed. An isotropic, isochoric, hypoelastic, constitutive model is applied to an in-plane biaxial experiment done on glutaraldehyde treated bovine pericardium. The experiment is comprised of eight protocols that radially probe the biaxial plane. Considering its simplicity (two adjustable parameters) the model does a reasonably good job of describing the non-linear normal responses observed in these experimental data, which are more prevalent than are the anisotropic responses exhibited by this tissue. PMID:21394222

  2. Biaxial mechanical modeling of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Chiara; Glass, Paul; Sitti, Metin; Di Martino, Elena S

    2011-11-01

    Capsule endoscopes are pill-size devices provided with a camera that capture images of the small intestine from inside the body after being ingested by a patient. The interaction between intestinal tissue and capsule endoscopes needs to be investigated to optimize capsule design while preventing tissue damage. To that purpose, a constitutive model that can reliably predict the mechanical response of the intestinal tissue under complex mechanical loading is required. This paper describes the development and numerical validation of a phenomenological constitutive model for the porcine duodenum, jejunum and ileum. Parameters characterizing the mechanical behavior of the material were estimated from planar biaxial test data, where intestinal tissue specimens were simultaneously loaded along the circumferential and longitudinal directions. Specimen-specific Fung constitutive models were able to accurately predict the planar stress-strain behavior of the tested samples under a wide range of loading conditions. To increase model generality, average anisotropic constitutive relationships were also generated for each tissue region by fitting average stress-strain curves to the Fung potential. Due to the observed variability in the direction of maximum stiffness, the average Fung models were less anisotropic than the specimen-specific models. Hence, average isotropic models in the Neo-Hookean and Mooney-Rivlin forms were attempted, but they could not adequately describe the degree of nonlinearity in the tissue. Values of the R2 for the nonlinear regressions were 0.17, 0.44 and 0.93 for the average Neo-Hookean, Mooney-Rivlin and Fung models, respectively. Average models were successfully implemented into FORTRAN routines and used to simulate capsule deployment with a finite element method analysis. PMID:22098873

  3. Servo-controlled biaxial test system

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, W.L.

    1983-02-11

    A large test program requiring axial torsion tests was submitted to the Materials Test and Evaluation Section of the Engineering Sciences Division by the Chemistry Department. The objective of these tests was to provide insight with regard to the fundamental aspects of plastic deformation and hardening of nickel. Thes tests will also provide the constants necessary for a constitutive equation for use in weld modeling. The weld models will attempt to predict residual stresses in nickel welds. The test program consisted of approximately 70 specimens of high purity nickel to be tested in torsion over a large temperature range (RT - 900/sup 0/C) at a strain rate of about 1 x 10/sup -4/ in./in./sec to steady state at each temperature. After having attained steady state, the strain-rate-reversal (Bauschinger test) and incremental-changes-in-strain-rate tests (10/sup -4/ to 2 x 10/sup -3/ in./in./sec) at constant structure will be conducted. Additional tests such as transient backstress and yield surface distortion (using multi-axial stress states) will be carried out. This particular request required a biaxial test machine capable of more than 360/sup 0/ rotation in torsion. Temperature capabilities, atmosphere control, and a control system were also needed whereby the machine could be operated in torsion using strain control. Such a machine did not commercially exist so it was necessary to build one. The basic unit chosen was a 20K Servo-Electric Hydraulic Test Machine to which we added a simple anti-rotation fixture for the ram. This constituted the axial portion of the system.

  4. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-12-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz.

  5. Method of forming biaxially textured alloy substrates and devices thereon

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Specht, Eliot D.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan

    2000-01-01

    Specific alloys, in particular Ni-based alloys, that can be biaxially textured, with a well-developed, single component texture are disclosed. These alloys have a significantly reduced Curie point, which is very desirable from the point of view of superconductivity applications. The biaxially textured alloy substrates also possess greatly enhanced mechanical properties (yield strength, ultimate tensile strength) which are essential for most applications, in particular, superconductors. A method is disclosed for producing complex multicomponent alloys which have the ideal physical properties for specific applications, such as lattice parameter, degree of magnetism and mechanical strength, and which cannot be in textured form. In addition, a method for making ultra thin biaxially textured substrates with complex compositions is disclosed.

  6. Method of forming biaxially textured alloy substrates and devices thereon

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Specht, Eliot D.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan

    1999-01-01

    Specific alloys, in particular Ni-based alloys, that can be biaxially textured, with a well-developed, single component texture are disclosed. These alloys have a significantly reduced Curie point, which is very desirable from the point of view of superconductivity applications. The biaxially textured alloy substrates also possess greatly enhanced mechanical properties (yield strength, ultimate tensile strength) which are essential for most applications, in particular, superconductors. A method is disclosed for producing complex multicomponent alloys which have the ideal physical properties for specific applications, such as lattice parameter, degree of magnetism and mechanical strength, and which cannot be fabricated in textured form. In addition, a method for making ultra thin biaxially textured substrates with complex compositions is disclosed.

  7. On the Biaxial Mechanical Response of Porcine Tricuspid Valve Leaflets.

    PubMed

    Amini Khoiy, Keyvan; Amini, Rouzbeh

    2016-10-01

    Located on the right side of the heart, the tricuspid valve (TV) prevents blood backflow from the right ventricle to the right atrium. Similar to other cardiac valves, quantification of TV biaxial mechanical properties is essential in developing accurate computational models. In the current study, for the first time, the biaxial stress-strain behavior of porcine TV was measured ex vivo under different loading protocols using biaxial tensile testing equipment. The results showed a highly nonlinear response including a compliant region followed by a rapid transition to a stiff region for all of the TV leaflets both in the circumferential and in the radial directions. Based on the data analysis, all three leaflets were found to be anisotropic, and they were stiffer in the circumferential direction in comparison to the radial direction. It was also concluded that the posterior leaflet was the most anisotropic leaflet. PMID:27538260

  8. Field response and switching times in biaxial nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berardi, Roberto; Muccioli, Luca; Zannoni, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    We study by means of virtual molecular dynamics computer experiments the response of a bulk biaxial nematic to an applied external field and, in particular, the relative speed of reorientation of the principal director axis and of the secondary one, typical of these new materials, upon a π /2 field switch. We perform the simulations setting up and integrating the equations of motion for biaxial Gay-Berne particles using quaternions and a suitable time reversible symplectic integrator. We find that switching of the secondary axis is up to an order of magnitude faster than that of the principal axis, and that under fields above a certain strength a reorganization of local domains, temporarily disrupting the nematic and biaxial ordering, rather than a collective concerted reorientation occurs.

  9. Field response and switching times in biaxial nematics.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Roberto; Muccioli, Luca; Zannoni, Claudio

    2008-01-14

    We study by means of virtual molecular dynamics computer experiments the response of a bulk biaxial nematic to an applied external field and, in particular, the relative speed of reorientation of the principal director axis and of the secondary one, typical of these new materials, upon a pi2 field switch. We perform the simulations setting up and integrating the equations of motion for biaxial Gay-Berne particles using quaternions and a suitable time reversible symplectic integrator. We find that switching of the secondary axis is up to an order of magnitude faster than that of the principal axis, and that under fields above a certain strength a reorganization of local domains, temporarily disrupting the nematic and biaxial ordering, rather than a collective concerted reorientation occurs. PMID:18205473

  10. Mineral resource of the month: tungsten

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2012-01-01

    The article offers information on tungsten. It says that tungsten is a metal found in chemical compounds such as in the scheelite and ore minerals wolframite. It states that tungsten has the highest melting point and it forms a compound as hard as diamond when combined with carbon. It states that tungsten can be used as a substitute for lead in fishing weights, ammunition, and hunting shot. Moreover, China started to export tungsten materials and products instead of tungsten raw materials.

  11. Alignment of the diamond nitrogen vacancy center by strain engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Karin, Todd; Dunham, Scott; Fu, Kai-Mei

    2014-08-04

    The nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond is a sensitive probe of magnetic field and a promising qubit candidate for quantum information processing. The performance of many NV-based devices improves by aligning the NV(s) parallel to a single crystallographic direction. Using ab initio theoretical techniques, we show that NV orientation can be controlled by high-temperature annealing in the presence of strain under currently accessible experimental conditions. We find that (89 ± 7)% of NVs align along the [111] crystallographic direction under 2% compressive biaxial strain (perpendicular to [111]) and an annealing temperature of 970 °C.

  12. Polycrystalline ferroelectric or multiferroic oxide articles on biaxially textured substrates and methods for making same

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit; Shin, Junsoo

    2015-03-31

    A polycrystalline ferroelectric and/or multiferroic oxide article includes a substrate having a biaxially textured surface; at least one biaxially textured buffer layer supported by the substrate; and a biaxially textured ferroelectric or multiferroic oxide layer supported by the buffer layer. Methods for making polycrystalline ferroelectric and/or multiferroic oxide articles are also disclosed.

  13. Interaction of tungsten with tungsten carbide in a copper melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodrova, L. E.; Goida, E. Yu.; Pastukhov, E. A.; Marshuk, L. A.; Popova, E. A.

    2013-07-01

    The chemical interaction between tungsten and tungsten carbide in a copper melt with the formation of W2C at 1300°C is studied. It is shown that the mechanical activation of a composition consisting of copper melt + W and WC powders by low-temperature vibrations initiates not only the chemical interaction of its solid components but also their refinement.

  14. Method and apparatus for adjustably induced biaxial strain

    DOEpatents

    Vestel, Michael J.; Oshatz, Daryl Patrick

    2006-05-16

    An apparatus comprising a shape memory alloy is configured as a ring shaped sample holder for a transmission electron microscope and imparts uniform biaxial strain on a thin film mounted within. The sample holder responds to a change in temperature by changing the inner diameter, which imparts biaxial strain. In other embodiments, the sample holder is configured to change the inner diameter and change the strain on a thin film reversibly and repeatedly. In further embodiments, the sample holder is non circular. In still further embodiments, the apparatus is configured as a prime mover of a reversible radial actuator. Methods for making and using the apparatus are included in other embodiments.

  15. Controlling biaxial strain in an inflated elastomeric membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaedel, K. L.; Radewan, C. H.; Feng, W. W.

    1985-11-01

    An apparatus for the study of the viscoelastic and aging mechanical behavior of polymers under biaxial loading is described in which the inflation of a plane circular membrane is used to obtain a biaxial state of stress. The properties of polymers are determined using a relaxation test, with deformations of the membrane remaining unchanged while the inflating pressure is being measured. The height of the deformed membrane is controlled by using a phototransistor and an infrared emitting diode. A schematic of the apparatus and a block diagram of the electronics used to regulate the height of the membrane are presented along with some test results.

  16. Irreversible magnetic processes under biaxial and uniaxial magnetic anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokharel, S.; Akioya, O.; Alqhtany, N. H.; Dickens, C.; Morgan, W.; Wuttig, M.; Lisfi, A.

    2016-05-01

    Irreversible magnetic processes have been investigated in magnetic systems with two different anisotropy symmetries (uniaxial and biaxial) through angular measurement of the switching field, the irreversible susceptibility and the magnetic viscosity. These two systems consist of two-dimensional cobalt ferrite hetero-structures epitaxially grown on (100) and (110) MgO substrate. It is found that for uniaxial anisotropy the irreversible characteristics of the magnetization are large and display a strong angular dependence, which exhibits its maximum at the easy axis and drops quickly to vanish at the hard axis. However, for biaxial anisotropy the magnetization irreversible characteristics are considerably reduced and are less sensitive to the field angle.

  17. Method for forming biaxially textured articles by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2002-01-01

    A method of preparing a biaxially textured alloy article comprises the steps of preparing a mixture comprising Ni powder and at least one powder selected from the group consisting of Cr, W, V, Mo, Cu, Al, Ce, YSZ, Y, Rare Earths, (RE), MgO, CeO.sub.2, and Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 ; compacting the mixture, followed by heat treating and rapidly recrystallizing to produce a biaxial texture on the article. In some embodiments the alloy article further comprises electromagnetic or electro-optical devices and possesses superconducting properties.

  18. Alignment fixture

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Grover C.; Gibson, O. Theodore

    1980-01-01

    A part alignment fixture is provided which may be used for precise variable lateral and tilt alignment relative to the fixture base of various shaped parts. The fixture may be used as a part holder for machining or inspection of parts or alignment of parts during assembly and the like. The fixture includes a precisely machined diameter disc-shaped hub adapted to receive the part to be aligned. The hub is nested in a guide plate which is adapted to carry two oppositely disposed pairs of positioning wedges so that the wedges may be reciprocatively positioned by means of respective micrometer screws. The sloping faces of the wedges contact the hub at respective quadrants of the hub periphery. The lateral position of the hub relative to the guide plate is adjusted by positioning the wedges with the associated micrometer screws. The tilt of the part is adjusted relative to a base plate, to which the guide plate is pivotally connected by means of a holding plate. Two pairs of oppositely disposed wedges are mounted for reciprocative lateral positioning by means of separate micrometer screws between flanges of the guide plate and the base plate. Once the wedges are positioned to achieve the proper tilt of the part or hub on which the part is mounted relative to the base plate, the fixture may be bolted to a machining, inspection, or assembly device.

  19. Preparation of tungsten oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bulian, Christopher J.; Dye, Robert C.; Son, Steven F.; Jorgensen, Betty S.; Perry, W. Lee

    2009-09-22

    Tungsten trioxide hydrate (WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O) was prepared from a precursor solution of ammonium paratungstate in concentrated aqueous hydrochloric acid. The precursor solution was rapidly added to water, resulting in the crash precipitation of a yellow white powder identified as WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O nanosized platelets by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Annealing of the powder at 200.degree. C. provided cubic phase WO.sub.3 nanopowder, and at 400.degree. C. provided WO.sub.3 nanopowder as a mixture of monoclinic and orthorhombic phases.

  20. TUNGSTEN BASE ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schell, D.H.; Sheinberg, H.

    1959-12-15

    A high-density quaternary tungsten-base alloy having high mechanical strength and good machinability composed of about 2 wt.% Ni, 3 wt.% Cu, 5 wt.% Pb, and 90wt.% W is described. This alloy can be formed by the powder metallurgy technique of hot pressing in a graphite die without causing a reaction between charge and the die and without formation of a carbide case on the final compact, thereby enabling re-use of the graphite die. The alloy is formable at hot- pressing temperatures of from about 1200 to about 1350 deg C. In addition, there is little component shrinkage, thereby eliminating the necessity of subsequent extensive surface machining.

  1. Biaxial Deformation of the Magnesium Alloy AZ80

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlinson, P.; Azizi-Alizamini, H.; Poole, W. J.; Sinclair, C. W.; Gharghouri, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    The multiaxial deformation of magnesium alloys is important for developing reliable, robust models for both the forming of components and also analysis of in-service performance of structures, for example, in the case of crash worthiness. The current study presents a combination of unique biaxial experimental tests and biaxial crystal plasticity simulations using a visco-plastic self-consistent (VPSC) formulation conducted on a relatively weak AZ80 cast texture. The experiments were conducted on tubular samples which are loaded in axial tension or compression along the tube and with internal pressure to generate hoop stresses orthogonal to the axial direction. The results were analyzed in stress and strain space and also in terms of the evolution of crystallographic texture. In general, it was found that the VPSC simulations matched well with the experiments. However, some differences were observed for cases where basal slip and \\{ {10bar{1}2} \\} extension twinning were in close competition such as in the biaxial tension quadrant of the plastic potential. The evolution of texture measured experimentally and predicted from the VPSC simulations was qualitatively in good agreement. Finally, experiments and VPSC simulations were conducted on a second AZ80 material which had a stronger initial texture and a higher level of mechanical anisotropy. In the previous case, the agreement between experiments and simulations was good, but a larger difference was observed in the biaxial tension quadrant of the plastic potential.

  2. ALIGNING JIG

    DOEpatents

    Culver, J.S.; Tunnell, W.C.

    1958-08-01

    A jig or device is described for setting or aligning an opening in one member relative to another member or structure, with a predetermined offset, or it may be used for measuring the amount of offset with which the parts have previously been sct. This jig comprises two blocks rabbeted to each other, with means for securing thc upper block to the lower block. The upper block has fingers for contacting one of the members to be a1igmed, the lower block is designed to ride in grooves within the reference member, and calibration marks are provided to determine the amount of offset. This jig is specially designed to align the collimating slits of a mass spectrometer.

  3. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Ferroelectricity in low-symmetry biaxial nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Mikhail A.; Gorkunov, Maxim V.

    2010-09-01

    Order parameters and phenomenological theory for both high- and low-symmetry biaxial nematic phases are presented and it is predicted that the chiral low-symmetry biaxial phase must be ferroelectric. This conclusion is based on general symmetry arguments and on the results of the Landau-de Gennes theory. The microscopic mechanism of the ferroelectric ordering in this chiral biaxial phase is illustrated using a simple molecular model based on dispersion interactions between biaxial molecules of low symmetry. Similar to the chiral smectic C* phase, the ferroelectricity in the chiral biaxial nematic phase is improper, i.e., polarization is not a primary order parameter and is not determined by dipolar interactions. Ferroelectric ordering in biaxial nematics may be found, in principle, in materials composed of chiral analogues of the tetrapod molecules which are known to exhibit biaxial phases.

  4. The effects of biaxial loading on the fracture characteristics of several engineering materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. L.; Poulose, P. K.; Liebowitz, H.

    1986-01-01

    Using the George Washington University biaxial test system, a static fracture toughness study of two polymers (PMMA and PVC) and three aluminum alloys was performed for several variations in specimen geometry. Photoelastic experiments indicate that the applied load biaxiality has a very strong influence on the size and shape of the crack-tip stress field, and fracture toughness values for both polymers were seen to decrease with increasing load biaxiality. The load biaxiality was also found to have a strong influence on the crack growth direction in PMMA and a negligible influence on the PVC. The 7075-T6 aluminum toughness values increased with biaxiality, while intermediate peak toughness values were noted at a 0.5 biaxiality ratio for the more ductile 2024-T3 and 6061-T4 alloys. Fracture toughnesses at the highest biaxiality ratios were found to be equal to the uniaxial results.

  5. High-performance poly-Si thin film transistors with highly biaxially oriented poly-Si thin films using double line beam continuous-wave laser lateral crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamano, Masayuki; Kuroki, Shin-Ichiro; Sato, Tadashi; Kotani, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Highly biaxially oriented poly-Si thin films were formed by double-line beam continuous-wave laser lateral crystallization (DLB-CLC). The crystallinities of the DLB-CLC poly-Si thin films were (110), (111), and (211) for the laser scan, transverse, and surface directions, respectively, and an energetically stable Σ3 grain boundary was observed to be dominant. All silicon grains were elongated in the laser scan direction and one-dimensionally very large silicon grains with lengths of more than 100 µm were fabricated. Using these biaxially oriented polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) films, low-temperature poly-Si TFTs (LTPS-TFTs) were fabricated at low temperatures (≦550 °C) by a metal gate self-aligned process. As a result, a TFT with a high electron field effect mobility of μFE = 450 cm2 V-1 s-1 in a linear region was realized.

  6. Biaxial order and a rotation of the minor director in the nematic phase of an organo-siloxane tetrapode by the electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, K.; Nagaraj, M.; Kocot, A.; Kohlmeier, A.; Mehl, G. H.; Vij, J. K.

    2012-03-01

    Biaxiality in the nematic phase for a liquid crystalline tetrapode made up of organo-siloxanes mesogens is investigated using polarized infrared spectroscopy. An ordering of the minor director for the homeotropically aligned sample is found to depend on the amplitude of the in-plane electric field. On increasing the in-plane electric field, the minor director, lying initially along the rubbing direction, rotates to the direction of the applied field. The scalar order parameters of the second rank tensor are found to depend significantly on the strength of the electric field. A most significant increase is found in the nematic order parameter and in the parameter that characterizes the phase biaxiality.

  7. Image alignment

    DOEpatents

    Dowell, Larry Jonathan

    2014-04-22

    Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

  8. Uniaxial and biaxial mechanical properties of porcine linea alba.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Gerard M; Moerman, Kevin M; Takaza, Michael; Winter, Des C; Simms, Ciaran K

    2015-01-01

    Incisional hernia is a severe complication post-laparoscopic/laparotomy surgery that is commonly associated with the linea alba. However, the few studies on the mechanical properties of the linea alba in the literature appear contradictory, possible due to challenges with the physical dimensions of samples and variations in protocol. This study focuses on the tensile mechanical characterisation of the porcine linea alba, as determined by uniaxial and equi-load biaxial testing using image-based strain measurement methods. Results show that the linea alba demonstrated a non-linear elastic, anisotropic behaviour which is often observed in biological soft tissues. The transverse direction (parallel to fibres) was found to be approximately eight times stiffer than the longitudinal (cross-fibre) direction under both uniaxial and equi-load biaxial loading. The equi-load biaxial tensile tests revealed that contraction could occur in the transverse direction despite increasing load, probably due to the anisotropy of the tissue. Optical surface marker tracking and digital image correlation methods were found to greatly improve the accuracy of stretch measurement, resulting in a 75% change in the apparent stiffness compared to using strain derived from machine cross-head displacement. Additionally, a finite element model of the experiments using a combination of an Ogden and fibre exponential power law model for the linea alba was implemented to quantify the effect of clamping and tissue dimensions (which are suboptimal for tensile testing) on the results. The preliminary model results were used to apply a correction factor to the uniaxial experimental data prior to inverse optimisation to derive best fit material parameters for the fibre reinforced Ogden model. Application of the model to the equi-load biaxial case showed some differences compared to the experimental data, suggesting a more complex anisotropic model may be necessary to capture biaxial behaviour. These

  9. High strength uranium-tungsten alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Paul S.; Sheinberg, Haskell; Hogan, Billy M.; Lewis, Homer D.; Dickinson, James M.

    1991-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  10. High strength uranium-tungsten alloy process

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Paul S.; Sheinberg, Haskell; Hogan, Billy M.; Lewis, Homer D.; Dickinson, James M.

    1990-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  11. METHOD OF MAKING TUNGSTEN FILAMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Frazer, J.W.

    1962-12-18

    A method of making tungsten filaments is described in which the tungsten is completely free of isotope impurities in the range of masses 234 to 245 for use in mass spectrometers. The filament comprises a tantalum core generally less than 1 mil in diameter having a coating of potassium-free tantalum-diffused tungsten molecularly bonded thereto. In the preferred process of manufacture a short, thin tantalum filament is first mounted between terminal posts mounted in insulated relation through a backing plate. The tungsten is most conveniently vapor plated onto the tantalum by a tungsten carbonyl vapor decomposition method having a critical step because of the tendency of the tantalum to volatilize at the temperature of operntion of the filament. The preferred recipe comprises volatilizing tantalum by resistance henting until the current drops by about 40%, cutting the voltage back to build up the tungsten, and then gradually building the temperature back up to balance the rate of tungsten deposition with the rate of tantalum volatilization. (AEC)

  12. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM TUNGSTEN

    DOEpatents

    Newnam, K.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for the rccovery of uranium which has adhered to tungsten parts in electromagnetic isotope separation apparatus. Such a tungsten article is dissolved electrolytically in 20% NaOH by using the tungsten article as the anode. The resulting solution, containing soluble sodium lungstate and an insoluble slime, is then filtered. The slime residue is ignited successively with sodium nitrate and sodium pyrosulfate and leashed, and the resulting filtrates are combined with the original filtrate. Uranium is then recovered from the combined flltrates by diuranate precipitation.

  13. Tungsten Toxicity in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S.; Panteris, Emmanuel; Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P.

    2012-01-01

    Tungsten (W) is a rare heavy metal, widely used in a range of industrial, military and household applications due to its unique physical properties. These activities inevitably have accounted for local W accumulation at high concentrations, raising concerns about its effects for living organisms. In plants, W has primarily been used as an inhibitor of the molybdoenzymes, since it antagonizes molybdenum (Mo) for the Mo-cofactor (MoCo) of these enzymes. However, recent advances indicate that, beyond Mo-enzyme inhibition, W has toxic attributes similar with those of other heavy metals. These include hindering of seedling growth, reduction of root and shoot biomass, ultrastructural malformations of cell components, aberration of cell cycle, disruption of the cytoskeleton and deregulation of gene expression related with programmed cell death (PCD). In this article, the recent available information on W toxicity in plants and plant cells is reviewed, and the knowledge gaps and the most pertinent research directions are outlined. PMID:27137642

  14. Composite biaxially textured substrates using ultrasonic consolidation

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, Craig A; Goyal, Amit

    2013-04-23

    A method of forming a composite sheet includes disposing an untextured metal or alloy first sheet in contact with a second sheet in an aligned opposing position; bonding the first sheet to the second sheet by applying an oscillating ultrasonic force to at least one of the first sheet and the second sheet to form an untextured intermediate composite sheet; and annealing the untextured intermediate composite sheet at a temperature lower than a primary re-crystallization temperature of the second sheet and higher than a primary re-crystallization temperature of the first sheet to convert the untextured first sheet into a cube textured sheet, wherein the cube texture is characterized by a .phi.-scan having a FWHM of no more than 15.degree. in all directions, the second sheet remaining untextured, to form a composite sheet.

  15. Electrochemical Reduction of Tungsten Compounds to Produce Tungsten Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdoğan, Metehan; Karakaya, Ishak

    2010-08-01

    The production of tungsten by direct current reduction has been investigated. Experimental studies involved the electrochemical reduction of the solid tungsten compounds tungsten trioxide (WO3) and calcium tungstate (CaWO4) in the form of an assembled cathode of porous pellets attached to a current collector. Molten calcium chloride and a molten solution of calcium chloride and sodium chloride at eutectic composition, 48 pct mol NaCl, were used as the electrolytes. Reduced samples were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction analyses and scanning electron microscopy. The results of X-ray analyses, supported with thermodynamic computations, showed that WO3 cannot be used without loss in processes that involve the use of CaCl2 at high temperatures because it reacts with CaCl2 by releasing volatile tungsten oxychloride. In the electrochemical reduction of CaWO4, X-ray diffraction results indicated the presence of tungsten with significant concentrations of calcium compounds. Metallic tungsten was obtained after treating the reduced samples with dilute hydrochloric acid solutions.

  16. Heated die facilitates tungsten forming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattin, J. H.; Haystrick, J. E.; Laughlin, J. C.; Leidy, R. A.

    1966-01-01

    Tungsten forming in a press brake employs a bottom die assembly with a heating manifold between two water-cooled die sections. The manifold has hydrogen-oxygen burners spaced along its length for even heat during forming.

  17. Why Tungsten Instead of Wolfram?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, William B.

    2008-04-01

    In response to a reader query, the column traces the reason that American and British chemical literature use the name tungsten for element 74, while northern European literature uses the name wolfram.

  18. IUS prerelease alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, F. A.

    1978-01-01

    Space shuttle orbiter/IUS alignment transfer was evaluated. Although the orbiter alignment accuracy was originally believed to be the major contributor to the overall alignment transfer error, it was shown that orbiter alignment accuracy is not a factor affecting IUS alignment accuracy, if certain procedures are followed. Results are reported of alignment transfer accuracy analysis.

  19. Flexural rigidity of biaxially loaded reinforced concrete rectangular column sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resheidat, M.; Ghanma, M.; Sutton, C.; Chen, Wai-Fah

    1995-05-01

    An exact analysis is carried out utilizing the parabola-rectangle stress-strain curve for concrete and a typical idealized stress-strain curve for steel to develop the moment-curvature relationship for biaxially loaded reinforced concrete rectangular column sections. Based on that, the flexural rigidity EI of the section is determined at the yield curvature. A computer program is written by FORTRAN 77 to handle the required computations. The influence of material properties, the effect of steel ratios, and the impact of axial loads on the EI estimation were investigated. This study leads to the development of a new equation to estimate the flexural rigidity EI of reinforced concrete biaxially loaded rectangular columns in which these factors were considered. It is shown that the new equation stems from the actual behavior of the column. Therefore, it is recommended for general use in the design of slender columns.

  20. Mesogen polarity effects on biaxial nematics. Centrally located dipoles.

    PubMed

    Querciagrossa, Lara; Ricci, Matteo; Berardi, Roberto; Zannoni, Claudio

    2013-11-21

    We investigate the phase organisation of thermotropic biaxial Gay-Berne (GB) mesogens yielding a biaxial nematic (Nb) phase upon endowing them with a central point dipole. We study the effects of changing the strength and orientation of the dipole on the phase behaviour, and in particular we examine, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the possibility of improving the stability of the Nb phase. After mapping the boundaries of the Nb phase, we find that the strength of the embedded dipole is the parameter with the strongest influence on the mesogenic properties, while its orientation plays a minor role. For these central dipole systems, we find that the Nb phase organisation is stable only for mesogens with relatively weak dipole moments, while it disappears if electrostatic interactions become comparable in magnitude with dispersion interactions. PMID:24100468

  1. Biaxial fatigue properties of thin-walled composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krempl, E.; Elzey, D. M.; Ayar, T.; Loewy, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    A testing method for obtaining fatigue and fracture data under biaxial loading and for negative R-ratios is described. Thin-walled tubes of 1-in. outer nominal diameter with a tapered grip section were tested in an Axial-Torsion Servohydraulic Testing Machine with a 463 Data Control Processor at frequencies below 10 Hz up to the 1-million cycle range. Room temperature, uniaxial constant amplitude fatigue data for high temperature cure graphite-epoxy material are presented at R = -0.4 for a (+, - 5 deg) fiber orientation. The fatigue curve is almost horizontal. Tests on (+, - 5 deg) 'SP-328' resulted in failures which predominantly originated in the grip section. Presently, a new specimen design is being tested intended to eliminate cracking in the grip section. Biaxial in-phase loading of (0/+, - 45) tubes of Fiberite graphite-epoxy resulted in much steeper fatigue curves than observed under uniaxial loading.

  2. Scaling rules for critical current density in anisotropic biaxial superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingxu; Kang, Guozheng; Gao, Yuanwen

    2016-06-01

    Recent researches highlight the additional anisotropic crystallographic axis within the superconducting plane of high temperature superconductors (HTS), demonstrating the superconducting anisotropy of HTS is better understood in the biaxial frame than the previous uniaxial coordinates within the superconducting layer. To quantitatively evaluate the anisotropy of flux pinning and critical current density in HTS, we extend the scaling rule for single-vortex collective pinning in uniaxial superconductors to account for flux-bundle collective pinning in biaxial superconductors. The scaling results show that in a system of random uncorrected point defects, the field dependence of the critical current density is described by a unified function with the scaled magnetic field of the isotropic superconductor. The obtained angular dependence of the critical current density depicts the main features of experimental observations, considering possible corrections due to the strong-pinning interaction.

  3. Effects of tungsten on environmental systems.

    PubMed

    Strigul, Nikolay; Koutsospyros, Agamemnon; Arienti, Per; Christodoulatos, Christos; Dermatas, Dimitris; Braida, Washington

    2005-10-01

    Tungsten is a metal with many industrial and military applications, including manufacturing of commercial and military ammunition. Despite its widespread use, the potential environmental effects of tungsten are essentially unknown. This study addresses environmental effects of particulate and soluble forms of tungsten, and to a minor extent certain tungsten alloy components, present in some munitions formulations. Dissolution of tungsten powder significantly acidifies soils. Tungsten powder mixed with soils at rates higher than 1% on a mass basis, trigger changes in soil microbial communities resulting in the death of a substantial portion of the bacterial component and an increase of the fungal biomass. It also induces the death of red worms and plants. These effects appear to be related with the soil acidification occurring during tungsten dissolution. Dissolved tungsten species significantly decrease microbial yields by as much as 38% for a tungsten media concentration of 89 mg l(-1). Soluble tungsten concentrations as low as 10(-5) mg l(-1), cause a decrease in biomass production by 8% which is possibly related to production of stress proteins. Plants and worms take up tungsten ions from soil in significant amounts while an enrichment of tungsten in the plant rhizosphere is observed. These results provide an indication that tungsten compounds may be introduced into the food chain and suggest the possibility of development of phytoremediation-based technologies for the cleanup of tungsten contaminated sites. PMID:16168748

  4. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Frye, Lowell D.

    1984-01-01

    A gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to provide a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surfaces are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy contiguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  5. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Frye, L.D.

    1982-03-25

    The present invention is directed to a gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to profice a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surface are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy continguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  6. Anomalously temperature-independent birefringence in biaxial optical crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Grechin, Sergei G; Dmitriev, Valentin G; Dyakov, Vladimir A; Pryalkin, Vladimir I

    2000-01-31

    Temperature-independent birefringence in a biaxial crystal was predicted theoretically and observed experimentally for the first time. The width of the plot against temperature (the range corresponding to the temperature independence of the birefringence) at a fundamental radiation wavelength of 632.8 nm in a KTP crystal 5.9 mm long was more than 160{sup 0}C. (letters to the editor)

  7. The yield behavior of polyethylene tubes subjected to biaxial loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semeliss, M.; Wong, R.; Tuttle, M.

    1990-01-01

    High-density polyethylene is subjected to biaxial states of stress to examine the yield behavior of the semicrystalline thermoplastic under constant octahedral shear-stress rates. Combinations of internal pressures and axial loads are applied to thin-walled tubes of polyethylene, and the strain response in the axial and hoop directions are measured. The polyethylene specimens are found to be anisotropic, and the experimental measurements are compared to yield criteria that are applicable to isotropic and anisotropic materials.

  8. Efficient Driving of Piezoelectric Transducers Using a Biaxial Driving Technique

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Efficient driving of piezoelectric materials is desirable when operating transducers for biomedical applications such as high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) or ultrasound imaging. More efficient operation reduces the electric power required to produce the desired bioeffect or contrast. Our preliminary work [Cole et al. Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. 2014;26(13):135901.] suggested that driving transducers by applying orthogonal electric fields can significantly reduce the coercivity that opposes ferroelectric switching. We present here the experimental validation of this biaxial driving technique using piezoelectric ceramics typically used in HIFU. A set of narrow-band transducers was fabricated with two sets of electrodes placed in an orthogonal configuration (following the propagation and the lateral mode). The geometry of the ceramic was chosen to have a resonance frequency similar for the propagation and the lateral mode. The average (± s.d.) resonance frequency of the samples was 465.1 (± 1.5) kHz. Experiments were conducted in which each pair of electrodes was driven independently and measurements of effective acoustic power were obtained using the radiation force method. The efficiency (acoustic/electric power) of the biaxial driving method was compared to the results obtained when driving the ceramic using electrodes placed only in the pole direction. Our results indicate that the biaxial method increases efficiency from 50% to 125% relative to the using a single electric field. PMID:26418550

  9. Twisted quasiperiodic textures of biaxial nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Golo, V L; Kats, E I; Sevenyuk, A A; Sinitsyn, D O

    2013-10-01

    Textures (i.e., smooth space nonuniform distributions of the order parameter) in biaxial nematics turned out to be much more complex and interesting than expected. Scanning the literature we find only a very few publications on this topic. Thus, the immediate motivation of the present paper is to develop a systematic procedure to study, classify, and visualize possible textures in biaxial nematics. Based on the elastic energy of a biaxial nematic (written in the most simple form that involves the least number of phenomenological parameters) we derive and solve numerically the Lagrange equations of the first kind. It allows one to visualize the solutions and offers a deep insight into their geometrical and topological features. Performing Fourier analysis we find some particular textures possessing two or more characteristic space periods (we term such solutions quasiperiodic ones because the periods are not necessarily commensurate). The problem is not only of intellectual interest but also of relevance to optical characteristics of the liquid-crystalline textures. PMID:24229198

  10. Absence of rippling in graphene under biaxial tensile strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, Bipul; Mahadevan, Priya

    2010-10-01

    Recent experiments [C. H. Lui, L. Liu, K. F. Mak, G. W. Flynn, and T. F. Heinz, Nature (London) 462, 339 (2009)10.1038/nature08569] on graphene grown on ultraflat substrates have found no rippling in graphene when subject to temperature cycling. Unsupported/unstrained films of graphene as well as films grown on various substrates on the other hand have been found to show rippling effects. As graphene grown on a substrate is invariably strained, we examine the behavior of the out-of-plane acoustic-phonon mode with biaxial tensile strain. This mode is generally associated with the rippling of graphene. We find that it can be fit to a relation of the form w2=Ak4+Bk2 , where w and k are the frequency and wave vector, respectively. The coefficient A is found to show a weak dependence on strain while B is found to increase linearly with strain. The strain-induced hardening explains the absence of rippling in graphene subject to biaxial strain. In addition, we find that graphene when subject to a biaxial tensile strain is found to undergo a structural transition with the mode at K going soft at a strain percentage of 15%.

  11. Efficient Driving of Piezoelectric Transducers Using a Biaxial Driving Technique.

    PubMed

    Pichardo, Samuel; Silva, Rafael R C; Rubel, Oleg; Curiel, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Efficient driving of piezoelectric materials is desirable when operating transducers for biomedical applications such as high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) or ultrasound imaging. More efficient operation reduces the electric power required to produce the desired bioeffect or contrast. Our preliminary work [Cole et al. Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. 2014;26(13):135901.] suggested that driving transducers by applying orthogonal electric fields can significantly reduce the coercivity that opposes ferroelectric switching. We present here the experimental validation of this biaxial driving technique using piezoelectric ceramics typically used in HIFU. A set of narrow-band transducers was fabricated with two sets of electrodes placed in an orthogonal configuration (following the propagation and the lateral mode). The geometry of the ceramic was chosen to have a resonance frequency similar for the propagation and the lateral mode. The average (± s.d.) resonance frequency of the samples was 465.1 (± 1.5) kHz. Experiments were conducted in which each pair of electrodes was driven independently and measurements of effective acoustic power were obtained using the radiation force method. The efficiency (acoustic/electric power) of the biaxial driving method was compared to the results obtained when driving the ceramic using electrodes placed only in the pole direction. Our results indicate that the biaxial method increases efficiency from 50% to 125% relative to the using a single electric field. PMID:26418550

  12. Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten

    DOEpatents

    Slattery, Kevin T.; Driemeyer, Daniel E.; Davis, John W.

    2000-07-18

    Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by sintering a stack of individual copper and tungsten powder blend layers having progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in successive powder blend layers in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

  13. Polarographic determination of tungsten in rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichen, L.E.

    1954-01-01

    This work was undertaken to develop a simpler and faster method than the classical gravimetric procedure for the determination of tungsten in rocks and ores. A new polarographic wave of tungsten is obtained in a supporting electrolyte of dilute hydrochloric acid containing tartrate ion. This permits the determination of tungsten both rapidly and accurately. No precipitation of the tungsten is necessary, and only the iron need be separated from the tungsten. The accuracy is within the limits of a polarographic procedure; comparison of polarographic and gravimetric results is given. The method reduces appreciably the amount of time ordinarily consumed in determination of tungsten.

  14. Anomalous behavior in the crossover between the negative and positive biaxial nematic mesophases in a lyotropic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Erol; Reis, Dennys; Figueiredo Neto, Antonio M

    2014-05-19

    A novel quaternary lyotropic liquid-crystalline mixture of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DDTMABr)/sodium bromide/1-dodecanol/water, presenting the biaxial nematic phase (NB ) in addition to two uniaxial discotic (ND) and calamitic (NC) nematic ones, was synthesized. The partial phase diagram of this new mixture was constructed as a function of the DDTMABr molar-fraction concentration. The phase transitions from uniaxial to biaxial nematic phases were studied by means of the temperature dependence of the optical birefringence. In a particular region of the phase diagram, anomalous behavior was observed in the crossover from N-B to N+b: the contrast of the conoscopic fringes, which allows the birefringence measurements, almost vanishes, and the sample loses its alignment. This behavior, which was not observed before in lyotropics, was interpreted as a decrease in the mean diamagnetic susceptibility anisotropy (Δχ) of the sample, which was related to the shape anisotropy of the micelles. Small-angle X-ray scattering measurements were performed to evaluate the micellar shape anisotropy; these revealed that this mixture presented a smaller shape anisotropy than those of other lyotropic micellar systems presenting the NB phase. PMID:24692308

  15. Tungsten in iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, E. R. D.

    1978-01-01

    Tungsten concentrations have been determined by instrumental neutron activation in 104 iron meteorites, and range from 0.07 to 5 microg/g. In individual groups, concentrations vary by factors of between 1.5 and 8, but there are negative W-Ni correlations in 8 groups: IAB, IC, IIAB, IID, IIE, IIIAB, IIICD, and IIIF. The lowest W concentrations are found in groups IAB and IIICD, which also have the smallest slopes on a W-Ni plot. Eighteen anomalous irons have W concentrations between 5 microg/g (Butler) and 0.11 microg/g (Rafrueti). The distribution of W in irons shows similarities to that of other refractory sideophilic elements (except Mo), but is closest to the distribution of Ru and Pt. Assuming that chemical trends in group IIIAB were produced by fractional crystallization, a value of 1.6 can be deduced for the distribution coefficient of W between solid and liquid metal, as compared with 0.89 for Mo. Experimental evidence in support of these values is tenuous.

  16. Tungsten diffusion in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, A.; Texier, M.; Burle, N.; Oison, V.; Pichaud, B.; Portavoce, A.; Grosjean, C.

    2014-01-07

    Two doses (10{sup 13} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}) of tungsten (W) atoms were implanted in different Si(001) wafers in order to study W diffusion in Si. The samples were annealed or oxidized at temperatures between 776 and 960 °C. The diffusion profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and defect formation was studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. W is shown to reduce Si recrystallization after implantation and to exhibit, in the temperature range investigated, a solubility limit close to 0.15%–0.2%, which is higher than the solubility limit of usual metallic impurities in Si. W diffusion exhibits unusual linear diffusion profiles with a maximum concentration always located at the Si surface, slower kinetics than other metals in Si, and promotes vacancy accumulation close to the Si surface, with the formation of hollow cavities in the case of the higher W dose. In addition, Si self-interstitial injection during oxidation is shown to promote W-Si clustering. Taking into account these observations, a diffusion model based on the simultaneous diffusion of interstitial W atoms and W-Si atomic pairs is proposed since usual models used to model diffusion of metallic impurities and dopants in Si cannot reproduce experimental observations.

  17. Tungsten wire and tubing joined by nickel brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Thin tungsten wire and tungsten tubing are brazed together using a contacting coil of nickel wire heated to its melting point in an inert-gas atmosphere. This method is also effective for brazing tungsten to tungsten-rhenium parts.

  18. Fatigue flaw growth behavior in stiffened and unstiffened panels loaded in biaxial tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The effect was investigated of biaxial loading on the flaw growth rate of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy that would be typical of Space Shuttle cryogenic tankage design. The stress distribution and stress concentration factors for several integrally stiffened panels under various loading conditions were obtained. The flaw growth behavior of both stiffened and unstiffened panels under biaxial loading conditions was determined. The effect of a complex stress state was studied by introducing flaws in fillet areas of biaxially loaded stiffened panels.

  19. Application of magnetomechanical hysteresis modeling of magnetic techniques for monitoring neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sablik, M.J.; Kwun, H.; Burkhardt, G.L.

    1993-01-31

    Research was done on the biaxial stress problem accomplished in the first half of the second year. All of the work done was preparatory to magnetic measurements. Issues addressed were: construction of a model for extracting changes in the magnetic properties of a specimen from the readings of an indirect sensor; initial development of a model for how biaxial stress alters the intrinsic magnetic properties of thespecimen; use of finite element stress analysis modeling to determine a detailed shape for the cruciform biaxial stress specimen; and construction of the biaxial stress loading apparatus.

  20. Fabrication techniques developed for small- diameter, thin-wall tungsten and tungsten alloy tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brillhart, D. C.; Burt, W. R.; Karasek, F. J.; Mayfield, R. M.

    1968-01-01

    Report describes methods for the fabrication of tungsten and tungsten alloys into small-diameter, thin-wall tubing of nuclear quality. The tungsten, or tungsten alloy tube blanks are produced by double extrusion. Plug-drawing has emerged as an excellent secondary fabrication technique for the reduction of the overall tube dimensions.

  1. Mechanism of crystal alignment of CaO-stabilized ZrO2 through a mismatched interface of {110} <001> textured iron tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinose, Ataru; Watanabe, Ken; Naka, Junpei; Uchima, Takayuki; Horii, Shigeru; Doi, Toshiya

    2015-08-01

    To reduce the material cost in REBa2Cu3Oy-coated (RE: rare-earth elements) conductors, we attempted to exchange the high-cost metal substrate with iron. The biaxially textured iron was generally {110} <001>. Although this texture was unsuitable for buffer layer growth with a cubic structure because Fe(110) is a rectangle, (001)-oriented and biaxially aligned calcia-stabilized zirconia (CSZ) was the first to be successfully fabricated on iron tape. We found that the anisotropic deformation of CSZ is due to the rectangular shape of Fe(110). Furthermore, this deformation, as well as the easy formation of a CSZ(111) facet, was important in the formation of biaxially aligned CSZ.

  2. Tungsten contamination in ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polignano, M. L.; Barbarossa, F.; Galbiati, A.; Magni, D.; Mica, I.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper the tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes is studied by DLTS analysis both in typical operating conditions and after contamination of the implanter by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer. Of course the contaminant concentration is orders of magnitude higher after contamination of the implanter, but in addition our data show that different mechanisms are active in a not contaminated and in a contaminated implanter. A moderate tungsten contamination is observed also in a not contaminated implanter, however in that case contamination is completely not energetic and can be effectively screened by a very thin oxide. On the contrary, the contamination due to an implantation in a previously contaminated implanter is reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide. The comparison with SRIM calculations confirms that the observed deep penetration of the contaminant cannot be explained by a plain sputtering mechanism.

  3. Accurate pointing of tungsten welding electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegelmeier, P.

    1971-01-01

    Thoriated-tungsten is pointed accurately and quickly by using sodium nitrite. Point produced is smooth and no effort is necessary to hold the tungsten rod concentric. The chemically produced point can be used several times longer than ground points. This method reduces time and cost of preparing tungsten electrodes.

  4. Characteristics of strength and plasticity of tungsten and tungsten-base alloys I. Mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Bukhanovskii, V.V.; Golovin, S.A.; Kharchenko, V.K.; Kravchenko, V.S.; Nikol'skii, V.N.; Ol'shanskii, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    The authors establish the temperature relationship of the strength and plastic properties of tungsten and tungsten-base alloys taking into consideration the statistical parameters of the spread caused by structural and technical factors and a quantitative determination of the influence in tension of dispersion hardening of tungsten with refractory particles of hafnium and yttrium oxides. The observed dip in plasticity in the dispersion-hardened tungsten alloys does not contradict the mechanism of high temperature embrittlement of commercially pure tungsten.

  5. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  6. The role of biaxial stresses in discriminating between meaningful and illusory composite failure theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    The irrelevance of most composite failure criteria to conventional fiber-polymer composites is claimed to have remained undetected primarily because the experiments that can either validate or disprove them are difficult to perform. Uniaxial tests are considered inherently incapable of validating or refuting any composite failure theory because so much of the total load is carried by the fibers aligned in the direction of the load. The Ten-Percent Rule, a simple rule-of-mixtures analysis method, is said to work well only because of this phenomenon. It is stated that failure criteria can be verified for fibrous composites only by biaxial tests, with orthogonal in-plane stresses of the same as well as different signs, because these particular states of combined stress reveal substantial differences between the predictions of laminate strength made by various theories. Three scientifically plausible failure models for fibrous composites are compared, and it is shown that only the in-plane shear test (orthogonal tension and compression) is capable of distinguishing between them. This is because most theories are 'calibrated' against the measured uniaxial tension and compression tests and any cross-plied laminate tests dominated by those same states of stress must inevitably 'confirm' the theory.

  7. DNA Align Editor: DNA Alignment Editor Tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The SNPAlignEditor is a DNA sequence alignment editor that runs on Windows platforms. The purpose of the program is to provide an intuitive, user-friendly tool for manual editing of multiple sequence alignments by providing functions for input, editing, and output of nucleotide sequence alignments....

  8. Biaxial shear/tension failure criteria of spectra single fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianzhuo

    An experimental study was conducted to develop the biaxial failure surface criteria of single Spectra 130d and 100d filaments in a torsion-tension environment. The cross-sectional profiles of single Spectra fibers were investigated using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray computed tomography. A pin-gripping method to fix the ends of a polyethylene single fiber was developed. Effects of pin diameter on failure stress for both Spectra 130d and 100d were characterized. It was found that the perturbed stress field effect can be neglected when the pin diameter is larger than 0.8 mm. Additionally, the effect of the sample's gage length on fiber tensile strength was investigated. The gage length of 5.5 mm was determined as an appropriate length for single fiber samples under stress-wave loading. A twisting apparatus was built for a single fiber to achieve specific degrees of shear strains. Quasi-static experiments were conducted using an MTS servo-hydraulic system to apply tensile loads on pre-twisted Spectra fibers. A tension Kolsky bar was employed to study the biaxial shear/tensile behavior of Spectra fibers at high strain rates. A decreasing trend of tensile strength, with increasing torsional strain, for Spectra fibers was observed. Furthermore, a torsional pendulum apparatus was developed to determine the torsional shear stresses in fibers at various levels of axial loading. The relationship between apparent shear stress and axial stress was discovered. Finally, a biaxial shear/tension failure criterion envelope of each of the Spectra fibers was established. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed the specific feature on the surface of twisted fibers and fracture surface of failure fibers.

  9. Lightweight, Low-CTE Tubes Made From Biaxially Oriented LCPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Leslie; Federico, Frank; Formato, Richard; Larouco, John; Slager, William

    2004-01-01

    Tubes made from biaxially oriented liquid-crystal polymers (LCPs) have been developed for use as penetrations on cryogenic tanks. ( Penetrations in this context denotes feed lines, vent lines, and sensor tubes, all of which contribute to the undesired conduction of heat into the tanks.) In comparison with corresponding prior cryogenic-tank penetrations made from stainless steels and nickel alloys, the LCP penetrations offer advantages of less weight and less thermal conduction. An additional major advantage of LCP components is that one can tailor their coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs). The estimated cost of continuous production of LCP tubes of typical sizes is about $1.27/ft ($4.17/m) [based on 1998 prices]. LCP tubes that are compatible with liquid oxygen and that feature tailored biaxial molecular orientation and quasi-isotropic properties (including quasi-isotropic CTE) have been fabricated by a combination of proprietary and patented techniques that involve the use of counterrotating dies (CRDs). Tailoring of the angle of molecular orientation is what makes it possible to tailor the CTE over a wide range to match the CTEs of adjacent penetrations of other tank components; this, in turn, makes it possible to minimize differential-thermal expansion stresses that arise during thermal cycling. The fabrication of biaxially oriented LCP tubes by use of CRDs is not new in itself. The novelty of the present development lies in tailoring the orientations and thus the CTEs and other mechanical properties of the LCPs for the intended cryogenic applications and in modifications of the CRDs for this purpose. The LCP tubes and the 304-stainless-steel tubes that the LCP tubes were intended to supplant were tested with respect to burst strength, permeability, thermal conductivity, and CTE.

  10. Biaxially stretchable, integrated array of high performance microsupercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yein; Lim, By Yein; Yoon, Jangyeol; Yun, Junyeong; Kim, Daeil; Hong, Soo Yeong; Lee, Seung-Jung; Zi, Goangseup; Ha, Jeong Sook

    2014-11-25

    We report on the fabrication of a biaxially stretchable array of high performance microsupercapacitors (MSCs) on a deformable substrate. The deformable substrate is designed to suppress local strain applied to active devices by locally implanting pieces of stiff polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films within the soft elastomer of Ecoflex. A strain suppressed region is formed on the top surface of the deformable substrate, below which PET films are implanted. Active devices placed within this region can be isolated from the strain. Analysis of strain distribution by finite element method confirms that the maximum strain applied to MSC in the strain suppressed region is smaller than 0.02%, while that on the Ecoflex film is larger than 250% under both uniaxial strain of 70% and biaxial strain of 50%. The all-solid-state planar MSCs, fabricated with layer-by-layer deposited multiwalled carbon nanotube electrodes and patterned ionogel electrolyte of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide having high-potential windows, are dry-transferred onto the deformable substrate and electrically connected in series and parallel via embedded liquid metal interconnection and Ag nanowire contacts. Liquid metal interconnection, formed by injecting liquid metal into the microchannel embedded within the substrate, can endure severe strains and requires no additional encapsulation process. This formed MSC array exhibits high energy and power density of 25 mWh/cm(3) and 32 W/cm(3), and stable electrochemical performance up to 100% uniaxial and 50% biaxial stretching. The high output voltage of the MSC array is used to light micro-light-emitting diode (μ-LED) arrays, even under strain conditions. This work demonstrates the potential application of our stretchable MSC arrays to wearable and bioimplantable electronics with a self-powered system. PMID:25347595

  11. Valley degeneracy in biaxially strained aluminum arsenide quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu-Gaunkar, S.; Birner, S.; Dasgupta, S.; Knaak, C.; Grayson, M.

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes a complete analytical formalism for calculating electron subband energy and degeneracy in strained multivalley quantum wells grown along any orientation with explicit results for AlAs quantum wells (QWs). In analogy to the spin index, the valley degree of freedom is justified as a pseudospin index due to the vanishing intervalley exchange integral. A standardized coordinate transformation matrix is defined to transform between the conventional-cubic-cell basis and the QW transport basis whereby effective mass tensors, valley vectors, strain matrices, anisotropic strain ratios, piezoelectric fields, and scattering vectors are all defined in their respective bases. The specific cases of (001)-, (110)-, and (111)-oriented aluminum arsenide (AlAs) QWs are examined, as is the unconventional (411) facet, which is of particular importance in AlAs literature. Calculations of electron confinement and strain for the (001), (110), and (411) facets determine the critical well width for crossover from double- to single-valley degeneracy in each system. The biaxial Poisson ratio is calculated for the high-symmetry lower Miller index (001)-, (110)-, and (111)-oriented QWs. An additional shear-strain component arises in the higher Miller index (411)-oriented QWs and we define and solve for a shear-to-biaxial strain ratio. The notation is generalized to address non-Miller-indexed planes so that miscut substrates can also be treated, and the treatment can be adapted to other multivalley biaxially strained systems. To help classify anisotropic intervalley scattering, a valley scattering primitive unit cell is defined in momentum space, which allows one to distinguish purely in-plane momentum scattering events from those that require an out-of-plane momentum component.

  12. Field-Induced Rheology in Uniaxial and Biaxial Fields

    SciTech Connect

    MARTIN, JAMES E.

    1999-10-22

    Steady and oscillatory shear 3-D simulations of electro- and magnetorheology in uniaxial and biaxial fields are presented, and compared to the predictions of the chain model. These large scale simulations are three dimensional, and include the effect of Brownian motion. In the absence of thermal fluctuations, the expected shear thinning viscosity is observed in steady shear, and a striped phase is seen to rapidly form in a uniaxial field, with a shear slip zone in each sheet. However, as the influence of Brownian motion increases, the fluid stress decreases, especially at lower Mason numbers, and the striped phase eventually disappears, even when the fluid stress is still high. In a biaxial field, an opposite trend is seen, where Brownian motion decreases the stress most significantly at higher Mason numbers. to account for the uniaxial steady shear data they propose a microscopic chain model of the role played by thermal fluctuations on the rheology of ER and MR fluids that delineates the regimes where an applied field can impact the fluid viscosity, and gives an analytical prediction for the thermal effect. In oscillatory shear, a striped phase again appears in uniaxial field, at strain amplitudes greater than {approx} 0.15, and the presence of a shear slip zone creates strong stress nonlinearities at low strain amplitudes. In a biaxial field, a shear slip zone is not created, and so the stress nonlinearities develop only at expected strain amplitudes. The nonlinear dynamics of these systems is shown to be in good agreement with the Kinetic Chain Model.

  13. Density Functional Theory of Model Systems with the Biaxial Nematic Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzybowski, Piotr

    2009-07-01

    Present work is a theoretical study on the stability of the thermotropic biaxial nematic liquid crystal phase in model systems. Its main aim is to present the phase diagrams of spatially uniform liquid mesophases and to identify the molecular parameters that influence the stability of the biaxial nematic. The diagrams are obtained by means of the Local Density Functional Theory in low density approximation, and the relation between the molecular parameters of the models and macroscopic properties of the system close to the transition point are obtained by means of bifurcation analysis. We consider three model systems; the so-called L=2 model (the lowest coupling model of the orientational part of pair potential), the biaxial Gay-Berne interaction, and the bent-core system. For the second one, we also briefly investigate the temperature dependence of elastic constants in rod-like regime and in the vicinity of the Landau point and comment on the smectic phases. In every case we take into account rigid molecules. We find that the Landau points acquired from the square root rule for hard biaxial ellipsoids retain its significance, and provide qualitatively correct estimations of Landau points positions for Gay-Berne biaxial ellipsoids. In case of the bent-core model molecules build from uniaxial and biaxial Gay-Berne ellipsoids we find that the dipole-dipole interaction and degree of arms biaxiality change the stability of the biaxial nematic phase.

  14. Sol-gel deposition of buffer layers on biaxially textured metal substances

    DOEpatents

    Shoup, Shara S.; Paranthamam, Mariappan; Beach, David B.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Goyal, Amit

    2000-01-01

    A method is disclosed for forming a biaxially textured buffer layer on a biaxially oriented metal substrate by using a sol-gel coating technique followed by pyrolyzing/annealing in a reducing atmosphere. This method is advantageous for providing substrates for depositing electronically active materials thereon.

  15. Reliability analysis of structural ceramics subjected to biaxial flexure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Luen-Yuan; Shetty, Dinesh K.

    1991-01-01

    The reliability of alumina disks subjected to biaxial flexure is predicted on the basis of statistical fracture theory using a critical strain energy release rate fracture criterion. Results on a sintered silicon nitride are consistent with reliability predictions based on pore-initiated penny-shaped cracks with preferred orientation normal to the maximum principal stress. Assumptions with regard to flaw types and their orientations in each ceramic can be justified by fractography. It is shown that there are no universal guidelines for selecting fracture criteria or assuming flaw orientations in reliability analyses.

  16. Lattice model for biaxial and uniaxial nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauerwein, Ricardo A.; de Oliveira, Mário J.

    2016-05-01

    We use a lattice gas model to describe the phase transitions in nematic liquid crystals. The phase diagram displays, in addition to the isotropic phase, the two uniaxial nematics, the rod-like and discotic nematics, and the biaxial nematic. Each site of the lattice has a constituent unit that takes only six orientations and is understood as being a parallelepiped brick with the three axes distinct. The possible orientations of a brick are those in which its axes are parallel to the axes of a Cartesian reference frame. The analysis of the model is performed by the use of a mean-field approximation and a Landau expansion of the free energy.

  17. Tungsten carbide: Crystals by the ton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. N.

    1988-06-01

    A comparison is made of the conventional process of making tungsten carbide by carburizing tungsten powder and the Macro Process wherein the tungsten carbide is formed directly from the ore concentrate by an exothermic reaction of ingredients causing a simultaneous reduction and carburization. Tons of tungsten monocarbide crystals are formed in a very rapid reaction. The process is unique in that it is self regulating and produces a tungsten carbide compound with the correct stoichiometry. The high purity with respect to oxygen and nitrogen is achieved because the reactions occur beneath the molten metal. The morphology and hardness of these crystals has been studied by various investigators and reported in the listed references.

  18. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  19. Fabrication of tungsten wire needles

    SciTech Connect

    Roder, A.

    1983-02-01

    Fine point needles for field emissoin are conventionally produced by electrolytically or chemically etching tungsten wire. Points formed in this manner have a typical tip radius of about 0.5 microns and a cone angle of some 30 degrees. The construction of needle matrix detector chambers has created a need for tungsten needles whose specifications are: 20 mil tungsten wire, 1.5 inch total length, 3 mm-long taper (resulting in a cone angle of about 5 degrees), and 25 micron-radius point (similar to that found on sewing needles). In the process described here for producing such needles, tungsten wire, immersed in a NaOH solution and in the presence of an electrode, is connected first to an ac voltage and then to a dc supply, to form a taper and a point on the end of the wire immersed in the solution. The process parameters described here are for needles that will meet the above specifications. Possible variations will be discussed under each approprite heading.

  20. Mineral of the month: tungsten

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2006-01-01

    Tungsten has the highest melting point of all metals, one of the highest densities and, when combined with carbon, is almost as hard as diamond. These and other properties make it useful in a wide variety of important commercial, industrial and military applications.

  1. Scintillating fiber ribbon --- tungsten calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.; Crisler, M.; Kross, B.; Wrbanek, J.

    1989-07-14

    We describe an ultra-high density scintillating fiber and tungsten calorimeter used as an active beam-dump for electrons. Data showing the calorimeter response to electrons with momenta between 50 and 350 GeV/c are presented. 9 figs.

  2. Implementation of a Biaxial Resonant Fatigue Test Method on a Large Wind Turbine Blade

    SciTech Connect

    Snowberg, D.; Dana, S.; Hughes, S.; Berling, P.

    2014-09-01

    A biaxial resonant test method was utilized to simultaneously fatigue test a wind turbine blade in the flap and edge (lead-lag) direction. Biaxial resonant blade fatigue testing is an accelerated life test method utilizing oscillating masses on the blade; each mass is independently oscillated at the respective flap and edge blade resonant frequency. The flap and edge resonant frequency were not controlled, nor were they constant for this demonstrated test method. This biaxial resonant test method presented surmountable challenges in test setup simulation, control and data processing. Biaxial resonant testing has the potential to complete test projects faster than single-axis testing. The load modulation during a biaxial resonant test may necessitate periodic load application above targets or higher applied test cycles.

  3. Micromagnetic model for the influence of biaxial stress on hysteretic magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablik, M. J.; Riley, L. A.; Burkhardt, G. L.; Kwun, H.; Cannell, P. Y.; Watts, K. T.; Langman, R. A.

    1994-05-01

    A micromagnetic formulation has been developed for modeling the effect of biaxial stress on magnetoelastic processes in polycrystalline steels. In particular, the formulation employs the Schneider-Cannell-Watts model and involves substitution of an effective stress equal to one of the deviatoric (i.e., distortional) normal stress components, depending on whether the field is parallel to a tensile or compressive axis or to the third axis perpendicular to the plane of biaxial stress. Computer results are compared to experimental results on the effects of biaxial stress on magnetic properties in mild steel and in SAE-4130 steel. Good qualitative agreement is found in almost all cases, in that in going from one biaxial stress case to the next, the same kinds of changes are seen magnetically. It is also shown from the model and the data that a method can be formulated to nondestructively determine the difference in biaxial stresses.

  4. Micromagnetic model for the influence of biaxial stress on hysteretic magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sablik, M.J.; Riley, L.A.; Burkhardt, G.L.; Kwun, H. ); Cannell, P.Y.; Watts, K.T. ); Langman, R.A. )

    1994-05-15

    A micromagnetic formulation has been developed for modeling the effect of biaxial stress on magnetoelastic processes in polycrystalline steels. In particular, the formulation employs the Schneider--Cannell--Watts model and involves substitution of an effective stress equal to one of the deviatoric (i.e., distortional) normal stress components, depending on whether the field is parallel to a tensile or compressive axis or to the third axis perpendicular to the plane of biaxial stress. Computer results are compared to experimental results on the effects of biaxial stress on magnetic properties in mild steel and in SAE-4130 steel. Good qualitative agreement is found in almost all cases, in that in going from one biaxial stress case to the next, the same kinds of changes are seen magnetically. It is also shown from the model and the data that a method can be formulated to nondestructively determine the difference in biaxial stresses.

  5. Process development for cladding APT tungsten targets

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, M H; Barber, R; Dalder, E

    2000-11-27

    This report describes development of processes for cladding APT Target tungsten components with a thin layer (0.127-mm) of Alloy 718, Alloy 600 or 316L stainless steel alloy. The application requires that the cladding be thermally bonded to the tungsten in order to transfer heat generated in the tungsten volume to a surrounding coolant. High temperature diffusion bonding using the hot isostatic processing (HIP) technique was selected as the method for creating a metallurgical bond between pure tungsten tubes and rods and the cladding materials. Bonding studies using a uniaxially loaded vacuum hot press were conducted in preliminary experiments to determine acceptable time-temperature conditions for diffusion bonding. The results were successfully applied in cladding tungsten rods and tubes with these alloys. Temperatures 800-810 C were suitable for cladding tungsten with Alloy 600 and 316L stainless steel alloy, whereas tungsten was clad with Alloy 718 at 1020 C.

  6. Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten

    DOEpatents

    Slattery, Kevin T.; Driemeyer, Daniel E.

    1999-11-23

    Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by thermal plasma spraying mixtures of copper powder and tungsten powder in a varied blending ratio such that the blending ratio of the copper powder and the tungsten powder that is fed to a plasma torch is intermittently adjusted to provide progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in the interlayer in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

  7. High heat flux properties of pure tungsten and plasma sprayed tungsten coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Tamura, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Yoshida, N.; Noda, N.; Yang, L.; Xu, Z.

    2004-08-01

    High heat flux properties of pure tungsten and plasma sprayed tungsten coatings on carbon substrates have been studied by annealing and cyclic heat loading. The recrystallization temperature and an activation energy QR=126 kJ/mol for grain growth of tungsten coating by vacuum plasma spray (VPS) were estimated, and the microstructural changes of multi-layer tungsten and rhenium interface pre-deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD) with anneal temperature were investigated. Cyclic load tests indicated that pure tungsten and VPS-tungsten coating could withstand 1000 cycles at 33-35 MW/m 2 heat flux and 3 s pulse duration, and inert gas plasma spray (IPS)-tungsten coating showed local cracks by 300 cycles but did not induce failure by further cycles. However, the failure of pure tungsten and VPS-tungsten coating by fatigue cracking was observed under higher heat load (55-60 MW/m 2) for 420 and 230 cycles, respectively.

  8. The biaxial biomechanical behavior of abdominal aortic aneurysm tissue.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Siobhan A; Healey, Donagh A; Kavanagh, Eamon G; Walsh, Michael T; McGloughlin, Tim M; Doyle, Barry J

    2014-12-01

    Rupture of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when the local wall stress exceeds the local wall strength. Knowledge of AAA wall mechanics plays a fundamental role in the development and advancement of AAA rupture risk assessment tools. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate the biaxial mechanical properties of AAA tissue. Multiple biaxial test protocols were performed on AAA samples harvested from 28 patients undergoing open surgical repair. Both the Tangential Modulus (TM) and stretch ratio (λ) were recorded and compared in both the circumferential (ϴ) and longitudinal (L) directions at physiologically relevant stress levels, the influence of patient specific factors such as sex, age AAA diameter and status were examined. The biomechanical response was also fit to a hyperplastic material model. The AAA tissue was found to be anisotropic with a greater tendency to stiffen in the circumferential direction compared to the longitudinal direction. An anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model represented the data well and the properties were not influenced by the investigated patient specific factors however, a future study utilizing a larger cohort of patients is warranted to confirm these findings. This work provides further insights on the biomechanical behavior of AAA and may be useful in the development of more reliable rupture risk assessment tools. PMID:25201606

  9. Biaxial tensile tests of the porcine ascending aorta.

    PubMed

    Deplano, Valérie; Boufi, Mourad; Boiron, Olivier; Guivier-Curien, Carine; Alimi, Yves; Bertrand, Eric

    2016-07-01

    One of the aims of this work is to develop an original custom built biaxial set-up to assess mechanical behavior of soft tissues. Stretch controlled biaxial tensile tests are performed and stereoscopic digital image correlation (SDIC) is implemented to measure the 3D components of the generated displacements. Using this experimental device, the main goal is to investigate the mechanical behavior of porcine ascending aorta in the more general context of human ascending aorta pathologies. The results highlight that (i) SDIC arrangement allows accurate assessment of displacements and so stress strain curves, (ii) porcine ascending aorta has a nearly linear and anisotropic mechanical behavior until 30% of strain, (iii) porcine ascending aorta is stiffer in the circumferential direction than in the longitudinal one, (iv) the material coefficient representing the interaction between the two loading directions is thickness dependent, (v) taking into account the variability of the samples the stress values are independent of the stretch rate in the range of values from 10(-3) to 10(-1)s(-1) and finally, (vi) unlike other segments of the aorta, 4-month-old pigs ascending aorta is definitely not a relevant model to investigate the mechanical behavior of the human ascending aorta. PMID:27211783

  10. Thermal coarsening of uniaxial and biaxial field-structured composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James E.; Anderson, Robert A.; Tigges, Chris P.

    1999-03-01

    When a suspension of colloidal particles is subjected to a strong electric or magnetic field, the induced dipolar interactions will cause the particles to form organized structures, provided a sufficient permittivity or permeability mismatch exists, respectively, between the particles and the suspending liquid. A uniaxial field will produce uniaxial structures, and a biaxial field, such as a rotating field, will produce biaxial structures, and either of these structures can be pinned by polymerizing the continuous phase to produce field-structured composites. We have previously reported on the coarsening of field-structured composites in the absence of thermal effects, i.e., Brownian motion. Athermal simulations are primarily valid in describing the deep quenches that occur when the induced dipolar interactions between particles greatly exceed kBT. However, deep quenches can lead to kinetic structures that are far from equilibrium. By introducing Brownian motion we have shown that structures with significantly greater anisotropy and crystallinity can form. These structures have enhanced material properties, such as the conductivity, permittivity, and optical attenuation. Careful anneals at certain fixed fields, or at continuously increasing fields, should produce more anisotropic structures than the deep quenches we have used to synthesize real materials.

  11. Dynamic biaxial tissue properties of the human cadaver aorta.

    PubMed

    Shah, Chirag S; Hardy, Warren N; Mason, Matthew J; Yang, King H; Van Ee, Chris A; Morgan, Richard; Digges, Kennerly

    2006-11-01

    This study focuses on the biaxial mechanical properties of planar aorta tissue at strain rates likely to be experienced during automotive crashes. It also examines the structural response of the whole aorta to longitudinal tension. Twenty-six tissue-level tests were conducted using twelve thoracic aortas harvested from human cadavers. Cruciate samples were excised from the ascending, peri-isthmic, and descending regions. The samples were subjected to equibiaxial stretch at two nominal speed levels using a new biaxial tissue-testing device. Inertia-compensated loads were measured to facilitate calculation of true stress. High-speed videography and regional correlation analysis were used to track ink dots marked on the center of each sample to obtain strain. In a series of component-level tests, the response of the intact thoracic aorta to longitudinal stretch was obtained using seven aorta specimens. The aorta fails within the peri-isthmic region. The aorta fails in the transverse direction, and the intima fails before the media or adventitia. The aorta tissue exhibits nonlinear behavior. The aorta as complete structure can transect completely from 92 N axial load and 0.221 axial strain. Complete transection can be accompanied by intimal tears. These results have application to finite element modeling and the better understanding of traumatic rupture of the aorta. PMID:17311166

  12. Method of depositing buffer layers on biaxially textured metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Beach, David B.; Morrell, Jonathan S.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chirayil, Thomas; Specht, Eliot D.; Goyal, Amit

    2002-08-27

    A laminate article comprises a substrate and a biaxially textured (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer over the substrate, wherein 0biaxially textured metal, such as nickel. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  13. Resonant biaxial 7-mm MEMS mirror for omnidirectional scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, U.; Aikio, M.; Janes, J.; Senger, F.; Stenchly, V.; Weiss, M.; Quenzer, H.-J.; Wagner, B.; Benecke, W.

    2013-03-01

    Low-cost automotive laser scanners for environment perception are needed to enable the integration of advanced driver assistant systems (ADAS) into all automotive vehicle segments, a key to reducing the number of traffic accidents on roads. An omnidirectional 360 degree laser scanning concept has been developed based on combination of an omnidirectional lens and a biaxial large aperture MEMS mirror. This omnidirectional scanning concept is the core of a small sized low-cost time-of-flight based range sensor development. This paper describes concept, design, fabrication and first measurement results of a resonant biaxial 7mm gimbal-less MEMS mirror that is electrostatically actuated by stacked vertical comb drives. Identical frequencies of the two resonant axes are necessary to enable the required circle scanning capability. A tripod suspension was chosen since it allows minimizing the frequency splitting of the two resonant axes. Low mirror curvature is achieved by a thickness of the mirror of more than 500 μm. Hermetic wafer level vacuum packaging of such large mirrors based on multiple wafer bonding has been developed to enable to achieve a large mechanical tilt angle of +/- 6.5 degrees in each axis. The 7mm-MEMS mirror demonstrates large angle circular scanning at 1.5kHz.

  14. Selective LPCVD tungsten for contact barrier applications

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.A.; Green, M.L.; Gallagher, P.K.; Ali, Y.S.

    1986-09-01

    This study assesses the use of selective LPCVD tungsten as a contact barrier in VLSI circuits. Measurements of the contact resistance and leakage current are evaluated as a function of variations in W deposition parameters, implant type, implant dosage, and metallization heat-treatment. Addition of SiF/sub 4/ to alter the equilibrium of the displacement reaction is seen to cause minimal erosion and encroachment of the Si contacts as well as produce low and thermally stable contact resistance to both n/sup +/ and p/sup +/ diffusions. For surface doping concentrations of 1.44 x 10/sup 20/ cm/sup -3/ As and 0.62 x 10/sup 20/ cm/sup -3/B, measured values for the contact resistance for 2.0 ..mu..m sized vias are near 30..cap omega... Such values are quite compatible with high performance CMOS device requirements. Further reductions in these values are achieved with use of a self-aligned PtSi/W contact barrier metallization. The contact resistance for 2.0 ..mu..m sized vias are, in this case, near 4 and 15..cap omega.. for the n/sup +/ and p/sup +/ diffusions, respectively. Sporadic leakage across shallow n/sup +//P-Tub junctions remains, however, a serious problem associated with this selective LPCVD W process. Understanding the origin of this leakage and eliminating it can lead to numerous applications of this technology in VLSI manufacturing.

  15. Diffusion of tungsten clusters on tungsten (110) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dong; Hu, Wangyu; Yang, Jianyu; Deng, Huiqiu; Sun, Lixian; Gao, Fei

    2009-04-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulation and modified analytic embedded-atom method, we have investigated the self-diffusion of clusters on a tungsten (110) surface. As compared to the linear-chain configuration, the close-packed islands for tungsten clusters containing more than nine adatoms have been predicted to be more stable with the relatively lower binding energies. The migration energies show an interesting and oscillating behavior with increasing cluster size. The tetramer, hexamer and octamer have obviously higher migration energies than the others. The different atomic configurations and diffusion mechanisms have been determined during the diffusion processes. It is clear that the dimer-shearing mechanism occurs inside the hexamer, while it occurs at the periphery of heptamer. The successive hopping mechanism of individual atom is of critical importance in the migration of the clusters containing five or fewer adatoms. In addition, the diffusion of a cluster with nine adatoms is achieved through the changes of the cluster shape.

  16. Tungsten oxide nanowires grown on amorphous-like tungsten films.

    PubMed

    Dellasega, D; Pietralunga, S M; Pezzoli, A; Russo, V; Nasi, L; Conti, C; Vahid, M J; Tagliaferri, A; Passoni, M

    2015-09-11

    Tungsten oxide nanowires have been synthesized by vacuum annealing in the range 500-710 °C from amorphous-like tungsten films, deposited on a Si(100) substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in the presence of a He background pressure. The oxygen required for the nanowires formation is already adsorbed in the W matrix before annealing, its amount depending on deposition parameters. Nanowire crystalline phase and stoichiometry depend on annealing temperature, ranging from W18O49-Magneli phase to monoclinic WO3. Sufficiently long annealing induces the formation of micrometer-long nanowires, up to 3.6 μm with an aspect ratio up to 90. Oxide nanowire growth appears to be triggered by the crystallization of the underlying amorphous W film, promoting their synthesis at low temperatures. PMID:26292084

  17. Powder-in-tube and thick-film methods of fabricating high temperature superconductors having enhanced biaxial texture

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-11-11

    A method for forming an electronically active biaxially textured article includes the steps of providing a substrate having a single crystal metal or metal alloy surface, deforming the substrate to form an elongated substrate surface having biaxial texture and depositing an epitaxial electronically active layer on the biaxially textured surface. The method can include at least one annealing step after the deforming step to produce the biaxially textured substrate surface. The invention can be used to form improved biaxially textured articles, such as superconducting wire and tape articles having improved J.sub.c values.

  18. Morphological control of tungsten-assisted β-Si3N4 nanowhiskers: Synthesis, mechanical and photoluminescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Min; Ge, Changchun

    2012-02-01

    One-dimensional β-Si3N4 rod-like crystals, aligned whiskers and nanowires have been self-assembly synthesized by SHS process respectively. Morphologies of the β-Si3N4 crystals varied from rods to aligned whiskers and nanowires by using tungsten powders as catalysts. Results demonstrated that tungsten powders play a significant effect on the growth of the anisotropic β-Si3N4 crystals, and the particle size of tungsten powders determines the diameters of the whiskers and nanowires. Elastic bending modulus of individual whiskers was measured by in situ TEM process, the average value of elastic bending modulus of individual as-synthesized whiskers was 488 GPa. The photoluminescence study of nanowires confirmed a good crystalline structure.

  19. Molecular models for the smectic A smectic C phase transition in a system of biaxial molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkunov, Maxim V.; Osipov, Mikhail A.

    2008-07-01

    A molecular theory of the smectic A-smectic C transition in a system of biaxial molecules is developed in the mean-field approximation. The influence of molecular biaxiality on the transition is considered in detail and it is demonstrated how the biaxial order parameters are induced by the tilt. It is shown that the ordering of biaxial molecules of low symmetry in the smectic C phase is generally described by ten independent orientational order parameters, and there exist three different tilt angles which specify the tilt of three ordering tensors. The order parameters are calculated numerically as functions of temperature for two models of biaxial molecules: molecules with two principal axes and molecules with a pair of off-center transverse dipoles. A substantial difference between the three tilt angles is found, which makes impossible a strict definition of a unique director in the smectic C phase. It is also shown that biaxial interactions may lead to an anomalously weak layer contraction in the smectic C phase. Finally, it is demonstrated that the smectic A-smectic C phase transition may be directly driven by biaxial intermolecular interactions. In this case, the tilt of long molecular axes is not a primary order parameter, and its temperature dependence is very different from convention.

  20. Recent Advances in Modeling Stress Distributions in Multilayers Subjected to Biaxial Flexure Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, Chun-Hway; Luttrell, Claire Roberta

    2007-01-01

    Although biaxial flexure tests have been used extensively to measure the strength of brittle materials, the tests and analyses have been limited to materials of uniform properties. Despite the increasing applications of multilayered structures, characterization of their strengths using biaxial flexure tests has been difficult because the analytical description of the strength-fracture load relation for multilayers subjected to biaxial flexure tests is unavailable. The newly derived closed-form solutions for the elastic stress distributions in multilayered discs subjected to ring-on-ring tests are summarized here. These solutions are obtained by (i) finding the correlation between monolayered and multilayered discs subjected to biaxial bending moment and (ii) conversion from the existing solutions for monolayers. Using this methodology, the closed-form solutions for multilayers subjected to other biaxial flexure tests can also be obtained. Finite element results for ring-on-rings tests performed on (i) porcelain/zirconia bilayered discs and (ii) solid oxide fuel cells trilayered discs are also presented to validate the closed-form solutions. The closed-form solutions hence provide a basis for evaluating biaxial strength of multilayers using biaxial flexure tests.

  1. Plasma Influence on Tungsten Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, A.; Begrambekova, S.; Grunin, A.

    Modifications of tungsten powder comprised of micro particles with dimensions: 1 ± 0.2 μm and 5 ± 1.5 μm ("small" and «large" particles) under the influence of heating, electric field and hydrogen- and argon ion irradiation are investigated in this work. The processes in irradiated powder are described and discussed. Among them there are powder outgassing, particle emission from the powder surface in the electric field, pasting of small particles all over the large ones, integration of the adhered small particles and formation of the uniform layer around the groups of large particles, cone growth on uniform layers, formation of volumetric chains of sticking together tungsten particles and their transformations. Driving forces and processes providing different types of powder modifications and the role of each of them in the specific phenomena are discussed.

  2. Thermotropic Uniaxial and Biaxial Nematic and Smectic Phases in Bent-Core Mesogens

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Venna; Kang, Shin-Woong; Suresh, K.A.; Joshi, Leela; Wang, Qingbing; Kumar, Satyendra

    2010-07-20

    Two azo substituted achiral bent-core mesogens have been synthesized. Optical polarizing microscopy and synchrotron X-ray scattering studies of both compounds reveal the existence of the thermotropic uniaxial and biaxial nematic and three smectic phases at different temperatures in these single component small molecule systems. The transition from the uniaxial to biaxial nematic phase is confirmed to be second order. The transitions from the biaxial nematic to the underlying smectic phase and between the smectic phases have barely discernible heat capacity signatures and thus are also second order.

  3. Tungsten and tungsten-alloy powder metallurgy. (Latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the processing and fabrication of tungsten, tungsten alloys, and tungsten composites. Compacting, pressing, sintering, extruding, and rolling are among the methods described. Infiltration of porous tungsten shapes is included, as well as mechanical properties, thermal properties, and microstructure of end products. Applications include rocket nozzles, nuclear reactor materials, and porous ionizers. (Contains a minimum of 116 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Development of a biaxial compression test apparatus for granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lian-Wei; Zhang, Jian-Min

    2013-06-01

    A set of two-dimensional biaxial compression testing system was developed to investigate the stress-strain behavior and its change with the micro-structure of granular materials. The specimen was assembled using small metal bars with elliptical section. Load was then subjected in both horizontal and vertical directions. Three different stress paths could be realized, including constant lateral pressure, constant mean principal stress and constant principal stress ratio. A non-invasive measurement method using digital image correlation analysis was developed. The displacement of each particle in the specimen could be traced. As a result, the displacement field of each specimen and its microstructure evolution during loading process could be measured. The testing system was applied in monotonic shear tests for two-dimensional assemblies of metal bars with different size, showing its essential effectiveness for the investigation of the micro-structure change and mechanical behavior.

  5. Biaxial Strain Engineering in Suspended MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, David; Liu, Xinghui; Cantley, Lauren; Koch, Eric; Yang, Guang; Boddeti, Narasimha; Dunn, Martin L.; Bunch, J. Scott; Bunch Team

    2015-03-01

    Monolayer MoS2 is a direct gap semiconductor and has attracted significant interest for its potential uses in electronics and optoelectronics. It has also been shown to have a highly strain-sensitive bandgap and can sustain strains of up to 11 percent, making it ideally suited for using strain engineering to tune it's electrical and optical properties. Herein, we fabricate pressurized MoS2 blisters using single and few layer MoS2 membranes suspended over cylindrical microcavities. By applying a pressure difference across the membrane and measuring the changes to it's photoluminescence spectrumwe study the effect of elastic biaxial strain engineering on the bandgap of MoS2.

  6. Electromagnetic biaxial microscanner with mechanical amplification at resonance.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ah Ran; Han, Aleum; Ju, Suna; Jeong, Haesoo; Park, Jae-Hyoung; Kim, Inhoi; Bu, Jong-Uk; Ji, Chang-Hyeon

    2015-06-29

    We present the design, fabrication, and measurement results of an electromagnetic biaxial microscanner with mechanical amplification mechanism. A gimbaled scanner with two distinct single-crystal silicon layer thicknesses and integrated copper coils has been fabricated with combination of surface and bulk micromachining processes. A magnet assembly consisting of an array of permanent magnets and a pole piece has been placed under the substrate to provide high strength lateral magnetic field oriented 45° to two perpendicular scanning axes. Micromirror has been supported by additional gimbal to implement a mechanical amplification. A 1.2mm-diameter mirror with aluminum reflective surface has been actuated at 60Hz for vertical scan and at 21kHz for horizontal scan. Maximum scan angle of 36.12° at 21.19kHz and 17.62° at 60Hz have been obtained for horizontal and vertical scans, respectively. PMID:26191691

  7. Spatial filtering efficiency of monostatic biaxial lidar: analysis and applications.

    PubMed

    Agishev, Ravil R; Comeron, Adolfo

    2002-12-20

    Results of lidar modeling based on spatial-angular filtering efficiency criteria are presented. Their analysis shows that the low spatial-angular filtering efficiency of traditional visible and near-infrared systems is an important cause of low signal/background-radiation ratio (SBR) at the photodetector input The low SBR may be responsible for considerable measurement errors and ensuing the low accuracy of the retrieval of atmospheric optical parameters. As shown, the most effective protection against sky background radiation for groundbased biaxial lidars is the modifying of their angular field according to a spatial-angular filtering efficiency criterion. Some effective approaches to achieve a high filtering efficiency for the receiving system optimization are discussed. PMID:12510915

  8. Electromagnetic biaxial vector scanner using radial magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Han, Aleum; Cho, Ah Ran; Ju, Suna; Ahn, Si-Hong; Bu, Jong-Uk; Ji, Chang-Hyeon

    2016-07-11

    We present an electromagnetic biaxial vector-graphic scanning micromirror. In contrast to conventional electromagnetic actuators using linear magnetic field, proposed device utilizes a radial magnetic field and uniquely designed current paths to enable the 2 degree-of-freedom scanning motion. As the radial field is generated by concentrically assembled magnets placed under the scanner die, large driving torque can be generated without the aid of hermetic packaging and relatively small device volume can be achieved. Mechanical half scan angle of 6.43° and 4.20° have been achieved at DC current of 250mA and 350mA for horizontal and vertical scans, respectively. Forced actuation along both scan axes has been realized by feedback control. PMID:27410851

  9. Lattice model for biaxial and uniaxial nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Sauerwein, Ricardo A; de Oliveira, Mário J

    2016-05-21

    We use a lattice gas model to describe the phase transitions in nematic liquid crystals. The phase diagram displays, in addition to the isotropic phase, the two uniaxial nematics, the rod-like and discotic nematics, and the biaxial nematic. Each site of the lattice has a constituent unit that takes only six orientations and is understood as being a parallelepiped brick with the three axes distinct. The possible orientations of a brick are those in which its axes are parallel to the axes of a Cartesian reference frame. The analysis of the model is performed by the use of a mean-field approximation and a Landau expansion of the free energy. PMID:27208971

  10. Magnetic properties of biaxially oriented Ni-V substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Bettinelli, D.; Petrisor, T.; Gambardella, U.; Boffa, V.; Ceresara, S.; Nistor, L.; Pop, V.; Scardi, P.

    1999-04-20

    The paper presents the structural and magnetic properties of a new non-magnetic biaxially textured substrate based on Ni{sub 100{minus}x}V{sub x} solid-solution for YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}y} tape fabrication. The effective atomic magnetic moment monotonously decreases with the vanadium concentration, causing a corresponding decrease of Curie temperature. The Curie temperature reaches the zero value at about 11.5% of vanadium. The texturing studies revealed that (100)[-001] cube texture can be easily developed up to x = 11 at.%, by a cold rolling process followed by a recrystallization thermal treatment. The X-ray {omega} and {phi} scans have demonstrated that the samples have a good out-of-plane and in-plane texture for the whole solubility range, with FWHM of 7{degree} and 11{degree}, respectively. The correlation between the magnetic and structural anisotropy was also studied.

  11. Conductive layer for biaxially oriented semiconductor film growth

    DOEpatents

    Findikoglu, Alp T.; Matias, Vladimir

    2007-10-30

    A conductive layer for biaxially oriented semiconductor film growth and a thin film semiconductor structure such as, for example, a photodetector, a photovoltaic cell, or a light emitting diode (LED) that includes a crystallographically oriented semiconducting film disposed on the conductive layer. The thin film semiconductor structure includes: a substrate; a first electrode deposited on the substrate; and a semiconducting layer epitaxially deposited on the first electrode. The first electrode includes a template layer deposited on the substrate and a buffer layer epitaxially deposited on the template layer. The template layer includes a first metal nitride that is electrically conductive and has a rock salt crystal structure, and the buffer layer includes a second metal nitride that is electrically conductive. The semiconducting layer is epitaxially deposited on the buffer layer. A method of making such a thin film semiconductor structure is also described.

  12. Biaxial compressive strain engineering in graphene/boron nitride heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wei; Xiao, Jianliang; Zhu, Junwei; Yu, Chenxi; Zhang, Gang; Ni, Zhenhua; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Shi, Yi; Wang, Xinran

    2012-01-01

    Strain engineered graphene has been predicted to show many interesting physics and device applications. Here we study biaxial compressive strain in graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures after thermal cycling to high temperatures likely due to their thermal expansion coefficient mismatch. The appearance of sub-micron self-supporting bubbles indicates that the strain is spatially inhomogeneous. Finite element modeling suggests that the strain is concentrated on the edges with regular nano-scale wrinkles, which could be a playground for strain engineering in graphene. Raman spectroscopy and mapping is employed to quantitatively probe the magnitude and distribution of strain. From the temperature-dependent shifts of Raman G and 2D peaks, we estimate the TEC of graphene from room temperature to above 1000K for the first time. PMID:23189242

  13. Failure analysis of composite laminates including biaxial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Elliott, W. G.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes a continued effort on the development and application of the tensor polynomial failure criterion for composite laminate analysis. In particular, emphasis is given to the design, construction and testing of a cross-beam laminate configuration to obtain "pure' biaxial compression failure. The purpose of this test case was to provide to permit "closure' of the cubic form of the failure surface in the 1-2 compression-compression quadrant. This resulted in a revised set of interaction strength parameters and the construction of a failure surface which can be used with confidence for strength predictions, assuming a plane stress state exists. Furthermore, the problem of complex conjugate roots which can occur in some failure regions is addressed and an "engineering' interpretation is provided. Results are presented illustrating this behavior and the methodology for overcoming this problem is discussed.

  14. Tin-tungsten mineralizing processes in tungsten vein deposits: Panasqueira, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecumberri-Sanchez, P.; Pinto, F.; Vieira, R.; Wälle, M.; Heinrich, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Tungsten has a high heat resistance, density and hardness, which makes it widely applied in industry (e.g. steel, tungsten carbides). Tungsten deposits are typically magmatic-hydrothermal systems. Despite the economic significance of tungsten, there are no modern quantitative analytical studies of the fluids responsible for the formation of its highest-grade deposit type (tungsten vein deposits). Panasqueira (Portugal) is a tungsten vein deposit, one of the leading tungsten producers in Europe and one of the best geologically characterized tungsten vein deposits. In this study, compositions of the mineralizing fluids at Panasqueira have been determined through combination of detailed petrography, microthermometric measurements and LA-ICPMS analyses, and geochemical modeling has been used to determine the processes that lead to tungsten mineralization. We characterized the fluids related to the various mineralizing stages in the system: the oxide stage (tin and tungsten mineralization), the sulfide stage (chalcopyrite and sphalerite mineralization) and the carbonate stage. Thus, our results provide information on the properties of fluids related with specific paragenetic stages. Furthermore we used those fluid compositions in combination with host rock mineralogy and chemistry to evaluate which are the controlling factors in the mineralizing process. This study provides the first quantitative analytical data on fluid composition for tungsten vein deposits and evaluates the controlling mineralization processes helping to determine the mechanisms of formation of the Panasqueira tin-tungsten deposit and providing additional geochemical constraints on the local distribution of mineralization.

  15. Dynamics and rheology of biaxial liquid crystal polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircar, Sarthok K.

    In this thesis we derive a hydrodynamical kinetic theory to study the orientational response of a mesoscopic system of nematic liquid crystals in the presence of an external flow field. Various problems have been attempted in this direction. First, we understand the steady-state behavior of uniaxial LCPs under an imposed elongational flow, electric and magnetic field respectively. We show that (1) the Smoluchowski equation can be cast into a generic form, (2) the external field is parallel to one of the eigenvectors of the second moment tensor, and (3) the steady state probability density function is of the Boltzmann type. In the next problem, we study the mono-domain dynamics of rigid rod and platelet suspensions in a linear flow and a steady magnetic field. The flows with a rotational component is mapped to simple shear with rate parameter subject to a transverse magnetic field with strength parameter and the irrotational flows are reduced into a triaxial extensional flow with two extensional rate parameters. For rotational flows, various in-plane and out-of-plane stable steady attractors emerge. For irrotational flows, the biaxial equilibria is characterized generically in terms of an explicit Boltzmann distribution, providing a natural generalization of the analytical results on pure nematic equilibria. Finally, we present the dynamics of a mesoscopic system of biaxial liquid crystal polymers in the presence of a homogenous shear flow. The Smoluchowski equation is derived in the rotating frame and solved using a specially formulated Wigner-Galerkin approximation in selected regions of the material parameter space and a range of accessible shear rates, to investigate the stable mesoscopic states and robust structures.

  16. Electrodeposited Biaxially Textured Buffer Layers for YBCO Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, R.; Phok, S.; Zhao, W.; Norman, A.

    2009-06-01

    Non-vacuum electrodeposition (ED) was used to prepare simplified Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} and CeO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} buffer layers on a Ni-W substrate. Post-annealing conditions of electrodeposited precursor films were optimized to obtain high-quality biaxially textured buffer layers. The buffer layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical profiling, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of the cap layer thickness on the surface morphology and texture of the buffers was also studied. The microstructure of CeO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} was analyzed and compared to Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. The high-resolution TEM shows biaxially textured crystalline elctrodeposited Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2} cap layers on the electrodeposited Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} layers without any defects. YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}-delta (YBCO) superconductor was deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on the simplified ED-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} and ED-CeO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} buffers. Transport current density of 3.3 MA/cm{sup 2} at 77 K was obtained for PLD YBCO deposited on ED-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} buffer layers.

  17. Nearest Alignment Space Termination

    2006-07-13

    Near Alignment Space Termination (NAST) is the Greengenes algorithm that matches up submitted sequences with the Greengenes database to look for similarities and align the submitted sequences based on those similarities.

  18. T-1018 UCLA Spacordion Tungsten Powder Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Trentalange, Stephen; Tsai, Oleg; Igo, George; Huang, Huan; Pan, Yu Xi; Dunkelberger, Jay; Xu, Wen Qin; Soha, Aria; Heppelmann, Steven; Gagliardi, Carl; /Texas A-M

    2011-11-16

    The present experiments at the BNL-RHIC facility are evolving towards physics goals which require the detection of medium energy electromagnetic particles (photons, electrons, neutral pions, eta mesons, etc.), especially at forward angles. New detectors will place increasing demands on energy resolution, hadron rejection and two-photon resolution and will require large area, high performance electromagnetic calorimeters in a variety of geometries. In the immediate future, either RHIC or JLAB will propose a facility upgrade (Electron-Ion Collider, or EIC) with physics goals such as electron-heavy ion collisions (or p-A collisions) with a wide range of calorimeter requirements. An R and D program based at Brookhaven National Laboratory has awarded the group funding of approximately $110,000 to develop new types of calorimeters for EIC experiments. The UCLA group is developing a method to manufacture very flexible and cost-effective, yet high quality calorimeters based on scintillating fibers and tungsten powder. The design and features of the calorimeter can be briefly stated as follows: an arbitrarily large number of small diameter fibers (< 0.5 mm) are assembled as a matrix and held rigidly in place by a set of precision screens inside an empty container. The container is then back-filled with tungsten powder, compacted on a vibrating table and infused with epoxy under vacuum. The container is then removed. The resulting sub-modules are extremely uniform and achieve roughly the density of pure Lead. The sub-modules are stacked together to achieve a final detector of the desired shape. There is no dead space between sub-modules and the fibers can be in an accordion geometry bent to prevent 'channeling' of the particles due to accidental alignment of their track with the module axis. This technology has the advantage of being modular and inexpensive to the point where the construction work may be divided among groups the size of typical university physics departments

  19. 40 CFR 421.100 - Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary tungsten subcategory. 421.100 Section 421.100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Primary Tungsten Subcategory § 421.100 Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten... tungsten at primary tungsten facilities....

  20. 40 CFR 421.100 - Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary tungsten subcategory. 421.100 Section 421.100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Primary Tungsten Subcategory § 421.100 Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten... tungsten at primary tungsten facilities....

  1. 40 CFR 421.100 - Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary tungsten subcategory. 421.100 Section 421.100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Primary Tungsten Subcategory § 421.100 Applicability: Description of the primary tungsten... tungsten at primary tungsten facilities....

  2. Dispersion of the temperature-noncritical frequency conversion and birefringence in biaxial optical crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Grechin, Sergei G; Dmitriev, Valentin G; Dyakov, Vladimir A; Pryalkin, Vladimir I

    2004-05-31

    Dispersion of the temperature-noncritical frequency conversion (phase matching) and birefringence in biaxial crystals is considered. The possibility of simultaneous realisation of these processes during SHG in a KTP crystal is discussed. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  3. Suspended germanium cross-shaped microstructures for enhancing biaxial tensile strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Satomi; Kako, Satoshi; Oda, Katsuya; Ido, Tatemi; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-01

    We fabricate a suspended germanium cross-shaped microstructure to biaxially enhance residual tensile strain using a germanium epilayer directly grown on a silicon-on-insulator substrate. Such a suspended germanium system with enhanced biaxial tensile strain will be a promising platform for incorporating optical cavities toward the realization of germanium lasers. We demonstrate systematic control over biaxial tensile strain and photoluminescence peaks by changing structural geometry. The photoluminescence peaks corresponding to the direct recombination between the conduction Γ valley and two strain-induced separated valence bands have been clearly assigned. A maximum biaxial strain of 0.8% has been achieved, which is almost half of that required to transform germanium into a direct band-gap semiconductor.

  4. Method of deforming a biaxially textured buffer layer on a textured metallic substrate and articles therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Dominic F.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Goyal, Amit

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and biaxially textured articles having a deformed epitaxial layer formed therefrom for use with high temperature superconductors, photovoltaic, ferroelectric, or optical devices. A buffer layer is epitaxially deposited onto biaxially-textured substrates and then mechanically deformed. The deformation process minimizes or eliminates grooves, or other irregularities, formed on the buffer layer while maintaining the biaxial texture of the buffer layer. Advantageously, the biaxial texture of the buffer layer is not altered during subsequent heat treatments of the deformed buffer. The present invention provides mechanical densification procedures which can be incorporated into the processing of superconducting films through the powder deposit or precursor approaches without incurring unfavorable high-angle grain boundaries.

  5. Uniaxial-to-biaxial cholesteric and nematic phase transitions on a lyotropic alcohol-free mixture

    SciTech Connect

    de Sant'Ana, Z.A.; Figueiredo Neto, A.M. )

    1992-12-15

    Interferometric measurements of the chirality-induced biaxiality in the vicinity of the uniaxial-to-biaxial cholesteric transition of the lyotropic system potassium laurate, decylammonium chloride, H[sub 2]O, and brucine sulfate are reported. The mean-field approach to describe the cholesteric-to-cholesteric transition allows an estimate of the ratio between coefficients of the Landau expansion. The values of the bare correlation length, [xi][sub 0][similar to]1000 A, calculated are larger than in lyotropic systems with alcohol. The chirality-induced biaxiality measurements in the limit of zero elastic field ([ital q][sup 2]=0) and the birefringence measurements in the nematic phase confirm critical properties of the uniaxial-to-biaxial nematic transition. The critical exponents for the order parameter ([beta]) and the susceptibility ([gamma]) are in good agreement with the values calculated for the [ital XY] model.

  6. Maier-Saupe model for a mixture of uniaxial and biaxial molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, E. S.; Henriques, E. F.; Vieira, A. P.; Salinas, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    We introduce shape variations in a liquid-crystalline system by considering an elementary Maier-Saupe lattice model for a mixture of uniaxial and biaxial molecules. Shape variables are treated in the annealed (thermalized) limit. We analyze the thermodynamic properties of this system in terms of temperature T , concentration c of intrinsically biaxial molecules, and a parameter Δ associated with the degree of biaxiality of the molecules. At the mean-field level, we use standard techniques of statistical mechanics to draw global phase diagrams, which are shown to display a rich structure, including uniaxial and biaxial nematic phases, a reentrant ordered region, and many distinct multicritical points. Also, we use the formalism to write an expansion of the free energy in order to make contact with the Landau-de Gennes theory of nematic phase transitions.

  7. Shiva automatic pinhole alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Suski, G.J.

    1980-09-05

    This paper describes a computer controlled closed loop alignment subsystem for Shiva, which represents the first use of video sensors for large laser alignment at LLNL. The techniques used on this now operational subsystem are serving as the basis for all closed loop alignment on Nova, the 200 terawatt successor to Shiva.

  8. Fast statistical alignment.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Robert K; Roberts, Adam; Smoot, Michael; Juvekar, Sudeep; Do, Jaeyoung; Dewey, Colin; Holmes, Ian; Pachter, Lior

    2009-05-01

    We describe a new program for the alignment of multiple biological sequences that is both statistically motivated and fast enough for problem sizes that arise in practice. Our Fast Statistical Alignment program is based on pair hidden Markov models which approximate an insertion/deletion process on a tree and uses a sequence annealing algorithm to combine the posterior probabilities estimated from these models into a multiple alignment. FSA uses its explicit statistical model to produce multiple alignments which are accompanied by estimates of the alignment accuracy and uncertainty for every column and character of the alignment--previously available only with alignment programs which use computationally-expensive Markov Chain Monte Carlo approaches--yet can align thousands of long sequences. Moreover, FSA utilizes an unsupervised query-specific learning procedure for parameter estimation which leads to improved accuracy on benchmark reference alignments in comparison to existing programs. The centroid alignment approach taken by FSA, in combination with its learning procedure, drastically reduces the amount of false-positive alignment on biological data in comparison to that given by other methods. The FSA program and a companion visualization tool for exploring uncertainty in alignments can be used via a web interface at http://orangutan.math.berkeley.edu/fsa/, and the source code is available at http://fsa.sourceforge.net/. PMID:19478997

  9. Biaxial Testing of 2219-T87 Aluminum Alloy Using Cruciform Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Pollock, W. D.

    1997-01-01

    A cruciform biaxial test specimen was designed and seven biaxial tensile tests were conducted on 2219-T87 aluminum alloy. An elastic-plastic finite element analysis was used to simulate each tests and predict the yield stresses. The elastic-plastic finite analysis accurately simulated the measured load-strain behavior for each test. The yield stresses predicted by the finite element analyses indicated that the yield behavior of the 2219-T87 aluminum alloy agrees with the von Mises yield criterion.

  10. Biaxial loading effects on fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steel

    SciTech Connect

    McAfee, W.J.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W. Jr.; Pennell, W.E.

    1995-03-01

    The preliminary phases of a program to develop and evaluate fracture methodologies for assessing crack-tip constraint effects on fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels have been completed by the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program. Objectives were to investigate effect of biaxial loading on fracture toughness, quantify this effect through existing stress-based, dual-parameter, fracture-toughness correlations, or propose and verify alternate correlations. A cruciform beam specimen with 2-D, shallow, through-thickness flaw and a special loading fixture was designed and fabricated. Tests were performed using biaxial loading ratios of 0:1 (uniaxial), 0.6:1, and 1:1 (equi-biaxial). Critical fracture-toughness values were calculated for each test. Biaxial loading of 0.6:1 resulted in a reduction in the lower bound fracture toughness of {approximately}12% as compared to that from the uniaxial tests. The biaxial loading of 1:1 yielded two subsets of toughness values; one agreed well with the uniaxial data, while one was reduced by {approximately}43% when compared to the uniaxial data. Results were evaluated using J-Q theory and Dodds-Anderson (D-A) micromechanical scaling model. The D-A model predicted no biaxial effect, while the J-Q method gave inconclusive results. When applied to the 1:1 biaxial data, these constraint methodologies failed to predict the observed reduction in fracture toughness obtained in one experiment. A strain-based constraint methodology that considers the relationship between applied biaxial load, the plastic zone width in the crack plane, and fracture toughness was formulated and applied successfully to the data. Evaluation of this dual-parameter strain-based model led to the conclusion that it has the capability of representing fracture behavior of RPV steels in the transition region, including the effects of out-of-plane loading on fracture toughness. This report is designated as HSST Report No. 150.

  11. A biaxial method for inplane shear testing. [shear strain in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, H. G.; Weller, T.

    1978-01-01

    A biaxial method for performing inplane shear tests of materials using a shear frame is described. Aluminum plate and sandwich specimens were used to characterize the uniformity of shear strain imparted by the biaxial method of loading as opposed to the uniaxial method. The inplane stiffening effect of aluminum honeycomb core was determined. Test results for (+ or - 45) graphite-epoxy laminate are presented. Some theoretical considerations of subjecting an anisotropic material to a uniform shear deformation are discussed.

  12. Biaxial nematic phases in fluids of hard board-like particles.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ratón, Y; Varga, S; Velasco, E

    2011-08-01

    We use density-functional theory, of the fundamental-measure type, to study the relative stability of the biaxial nematic phase, with respect to non-uniform phases such as smectic and columnar, in fluids made of hard board-like particles with sizes σ(1) > σ(2) > σ(3). A restricted-orientation (Zwanzig) approximation is adopted. Varying the ratio κ(1) = σ(1)/σ(2) while keeping κ(2) = σ(2)/σ(3), we predict phase diagrams for various values of κ(2) which include all the uniform phases: isotropic, uniaxial rod- and plate-like nematics, and biaxial nematic. In addition, spinodal instabilities of the uniform phases with respect to fluctuations of the smectic, columnar and plastic-solid types are obtained. In agreement with recent experiments, we find that the biaxial nematic phase begins to be stable for κ(2)≳ 2.5. Also, as predicted by previous theories and simulations on biaxial hard particles, we obtain a region of biaxiality centred at κ(1)≈κ(2) which widens as κ(2) increases. For κ(2)≳ 5 the region κ(2)≈κ(1) of the packing-fraction vs. κ(1) phase diagrams exhibits interesting topologies which change qualitatively with κ(2). We have found that an increasing biaxial shape anisotropy favours the formation of the biaxial nematic phase. Our study is the first to apply FMT theory to biaxial particles and, therefore, it goes beyond the second-order virial approximation. Our prediction that the phase diagram must be asymmetric in the neighbourhood of κ(1)≈κ(2) is a genuine result of the present approach, which is not accounted for by previous studies based on second-order theories. PMID:21701729

  13. A parameter study on the biaxial behavior of flexible fabric composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, A.; Luo, S.Y.

    1994-12-31

    The nonlinear behavior of flexible fabric composite under large bi-axial deformation is attributed by many factors, including the ratio of biaxial loads, the crimps of the yarns, the thickness of the composite, and the properties of the yarn and the matrix. A parameter study has been conducted to evaluate the significance of these factors on the stress-strain relations of flexible fabric composites.

  14. Phase diagram of the uniaxial and biaxial soft-core Gay-Berne model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berardi, Roberto; Lintuvuori, Juho S.; Wilson, Mark R.; Zannoni, Claudio

    2011-10-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been used to explore the phase diagrams for a family of attractive-repulsive soft-core Gay-Berne models [R. Berardi, C. Zannoni, J. S. Lintuvuori, and M. R. Wilson, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 174107 (2009)] and determine the effect of particle softness, i.e., of a moderately repulsive short-range interaction, on the order parameters and phase behaviour of model systems of uniaxial and biaxial ellipsoidal particles. We have found that isotropic, uniaxial, and biaxial nematic and smectic phases are obtained for the model. Extensive calculations of the nematic region of the phase diagram show that endowing mesogenic particles with such soft repulsive interactions affect the stability range of the nematic phases, and in the case of phase biaxiality it also shifts it to lower temperatures. For colloidal particles, stabilised by surface functionalisation, (e.g., with polymer chains), we suggest that it should be possible to tune liquid crystal behaviour to increase the range of stability of uniaxial and biaxial phases (by varying solvent quality). We calculate second virial coefficients and show that they are a useful means of characterising the change in effective softness for such systems. For thermotropic liquid crystals, the introduction of softness in the interactions between mesogens with overall biaxial shape (e.g., through appropriate conformational flexibility) could provide a pathway for the actual chemical synthesis of stable room-temperature biaxial nematics.

  15. Phase diagram of the uniaxial and biaxial soft-core Gay-Berne model.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Roberto; Lintuvuori, Juho S; Wilson, Mark R; Zannoni, Claudio

    2011-10-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been used to explore the phase diagrams for a family of attractive-repulsive soft-core Gay-Berne models [R. Berardi, C. Zannoni, J. S. Lintuvuori, and M. R. Wilson, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 174107 (2009)] and determine the effect of particle softness, i.e., of a moderately repulsive short-range interaction, on the order parameters and phase behaviour of model systems of uniaxial and biaxial ellipsoidal particles. We have found that isotropic, uniaxial, and biaxial nematic and smectic phases are obtained for the model. Extensive calculations of the nematic region of the phase diagram show that endowing mesogenic particles with such soft repulsive interactions affect the stability range of the nematic phases, and in the case of phase biaxiality it also shifts it to lower temperatures. For colloidal particles, stabilised by surface functionalisation, (e.g., with polymer chains), we suggest that it should be possible to tune liquid crystal behaviour to increase the range of stability of uniaxial and biaxial phases (by varying solvent quality). We calculate second virial coefficients and show that they are a useful means of characterising the change in effective softness for such systems. For thermotropic liquid crystals, the introduction of softness in the interactions between mesogens with overall biaxial shape (e.g., through appropriate conformational flexibility) could provide a pathway for the actual chemical synthesis of stable room-temperature biaxial nematics. PMID:21992294

  16. Investigation of the Leak Response of a Carbon-Fiber Laminate Loaded in Biaxial Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Ratcliffe, James G.

    2013-01-01

    Designers of pressurized structures have been reluctant to use composite materials because of concerns over leakage. Biaxial stress states are expected to be the worst-case loading condition for allowing leakage to occur through microcracks. To investigate the leakage behavior under in-plane biaxial loading, a cruciform composite specimen was designed that would have a relatively large test section with a uniform 1:1 biaxial loading ratio. A 7.6-cm-square test section was desired for future investigations of the leakage response as a result of impact damage. Many iterations of the cruciform specimen were evaluated using finite element analysis to reduce stress concentrations and maximize the size of the uniform biaxial strain field. The final design allowed the specimen to go to relatively high biaxial strain levels without incurring damage away from the test section. The specimen was designed and manufactured using carbon/epoxy fabric with a four-ply-thick, quasi-isotropic, central test section. Initial validation and testing were performed on a specimen without impact damage. The specimen was tested to maximum biaxial strains of approximately 4500micro epsilon without apparent damage. A leak measurement system containing a pressurized cavity was clamped to the test section and used to measure the flow rate through the specimen. The leakage behavior of the specimen was investigated for pressure differences up to 172 kPa

  17. Seed growth of tungsten diselenide nanotubes from tungsten oxides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun; Yun, Seok Joon; Park, Jin Cheol; Park, Min Ho; Park, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Ki Kang; Lee, Young Hee

    2015-05-13

    We report growth of tungsten diselenide (WSe2) nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition with a two-zone furnace. WO3 nanowires were first grown by annealing tungsten thin films under argon ambient. WSe2 nanotubes were then grown at the tips of WO3 nanowires through selenization via two steps: (i) formation of tubular WSe2 structures on the outside of WO3 nanowires, resulting in core (WO3)-shell (WSe2) and (ii) growth of WSe2 nanotubes at the tips of WO3 nanowires. The observed seed growth is markedly different from existing substitutional growth of WSe2 nanotubes, where oxygen atoms are replaced by selenium atoms in WO3 nanowires to form WSe2 nanotubes. Another advantage of our growth is that WSe2 film was grown by simply supplying hydrogen gas, where the native oxides were reduced to thin film instead of forming oxide nanowires. Our findings will contribute to engineer other transition metal dichacogenide growth such as MoS2, WS2, and MoSe2. PMID:25581340

  18. Novel properties of Tungsten ditelluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huimei; National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Cent Collaboration

    Tungsten ditelluride has attracted intense research interest due to the recent discovery of its large unsaturated magnetoresistance up to 60 Tesla. By using density functional theory calculations, we qualitatively reproduced the observed spin texture. Since the spin texture would forbid back scatterings that are directly involved in the resistivity, we suggest that the SOC and the related spin and orbital angular momentum textures may play an important role in the anomalously large magnetoresistance of WTe2. Motivated by the presence of a small, sensitive Fermi surface of 5d electronic orbitals, we also boost the electronic properties by applying a high pressure, and introduce superconductivity successfully.

  19. Girder Alignment Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zackary; Ruland, Robert; LeCocq, Catherine; Lundahl, Eric; Levashov, Yurii; Reese, Ed; Rago, Carl; Poling, Ben; Schafer, Donald; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Wienands, Uli; /SLAC

    2010-11-18

    The girders for the LCLS undulator system contain components which must be aligned with high accuracy relative to each other. The alignment is one of the last steps before the girders go into the tunnel, so the alignment must be done efficiently, on a tight schedule. This note documents the alignment plan which includes efficiency and high accuracy. The motivation for girder alignment involves the following considerations. Using beam based alignment, the girder position will be adjusted until the beam goes through the center of the quadrupole and beam finder wire. For the machine to work properly, the undulator axis must be on this line and the center of the undulator beam pipe must be on this line. The physics reasons for the undulator axis and undulator beam pipe axis to be centered on the beam are different, but the alignment tolerance for both are similar. In addition, the beam position monitor must be centered on the beam to preserve its calibration. Thus, the undulator, undulator beam pipe, quadrupole, beam finder wire, and beam position monitor axes must all be aligned to a common line. All relative alignments are equally important, not just, for example, between quadrupole and undulator. We begin by making the common axis the nominal beam axis in the girder coordinate system. All components will be initially aligned to this axis. A more accurate alignment will then position the components relative to each other, without incorporating the girder itself.

  20. Endothelial cell alignment as a result of anisotropic strain and flow induced shear stress combinations

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Ravi; Le Gac, Séverine; Verdonschot, Nico; van den Berg, Albert; Koopman, Bart; Rouwkema, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are continuously exposed in vivo to cyclic strain and shear stress from pulsatile blood flow. When these stimuli are applied in vitro, ECs adopt an appearance resembling their in vivo state, most apparent in their alignment (perpendicular to uniaxial strain and along the flow). Uniaxial strain and flow perpendicular to the strain, used in most in vitro studies, only represent the in vivo conditions in straight parts of vessels. The conditions present over large fractions of the vasculature can be better represented by anisotropic biaxial strains at various orientations to flow. To emulate these biological complexities in vitro, we have developed a medium-throughput device to screen for the effects on cells of variously oriented anisotropic biaxial strains and flow combinations. Upon the application of only strains for 24 h, ECs (HUVECs) aligned perpendicular to the maximum principal strain and the alignment was stronger for a higher maximum:minimum principal strain ratio. A 0.55 Pa shear stress, when applied alone or with strain for 24 h, caused cells to align along the flow. Studying EC response to such combined physiological mechanical stimuli was not possible with existing platforms and to our best knowledge, has not been reported before. PMID:27404382

  1. Strengthening mechanisms of tungsten powder reinforced uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.A.K.; Hill, M.A.; Rollett, A.D.; Dunn, P.S.; Mortensen, A.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA )

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten powder reinforced uranium exhibits a three-fold increase in yield strength due to precipitation hardening. The tungsten-rich interphase precipitates form at moving phase boundaries during slow cooling. Further increases in yield strength, attained with increasing tungsten content, are due to composite strengthening; this is verified by increasing elastic modulus with increasing tungsten content. Age hardening behavior is observed, with strengthening occurring at aging temperatures low in the alpha phase. Aging higher in alpha gives initial strengthening followed by rapid overaging. Beta phase aging results in a very soft structure with precipitates visible optically. Wrought material exhibits significant strain hardening as well as composite strengthening due to elongation of the tungsten particles. 7 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Mirrorlike pulsed laser deposited tungsten thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Mostako, A. T. T.; Khare, Alika; Rao, C. V. S.

    2011-01-15

    Mirrorlike tungsten thin films on stainless steel substrate deposited via pulsed laser deposition technique in vacuum (10{sup -5} Torr) is reported, which may find direct application as first mirror in fusion devices. The crystal structure of tungsten film is analyzed using x-ray diffraction pattern, surface morphology of the tungsten films is studied with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope. The film composition is identified using energy dispersive x-ray. The specular and diffuse reflectivities with respect to stainless steel substrate of the tungsten films are recorded with FTIR spectra. The thickness and the optical quality of pulsed laser deposition deposited films are tested via interferometric technique. The reflectivity is approaching about that of the bulk for the tungsten film of thickness {approx}782 nm.

  3. Mirrorlike pulsed laser deposited tungsten thin film.

    PubMed

    Mostako, A T T; Rao, C V S; Khare, Alika

    2011-01-01

    Mirrorlike tungsten thin films on stainless steel substrate deposited via pulsed laser deposition technique in vacuum (10(-5) Torr) is reported, which may find direct application as first mirror in fusion devices. The crystal structure of tungsten film is analyzed using x-ray diffraction pattern, surface morphology of the tungsten films is studied with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope. The film composition is identified using energy dispersive x-ray. The specular and diffuse reflectivities with respect to stainless steel substrate of the tungsten films are recorded with FTIR spectra. The thickness and the optical quality of pulsed laser deposition deposited films are tested via interferometric technique. The reflectivity is approaching about that of the bulk for the tungsten film of thickness ∼782 nm. PMID:21280810

  4. Strengthening mechanisms of tungsten powder reinforced uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Krawizcki, M.A.

    1990-04-01

    Tungsten powder reinforced uranium composites exhibit a three-fold increase in yield strength due to precipitation hardening. The tungsten-rich interphase precipitates form at the moving beta to alpha phase boundary during slow cooling. Further increases in yield strength, attained with increasing tungsten content, are due to composite strengthening. The composite strengthening is verified by increasing elastic modulus with increasing tungsten content. Age hardening behavior is observed, with strengthening occurring at aging temperatures low, in the alpha phase. Temperatures higher in alpha give initial strengthening followed by rapid overaging. Beta phase aging temperatures result in a very soft structure with interphase precipitates observable optically. Wrought material exhibits significant strain hardening as well as composite strengthening due to elongation of the tungsten particles. 36 refs., 36 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Electronic and optical properties of silicene under uni-axial and bi-axial mechanical strains: A first principle study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Brij; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2014-07-01

    The uni-axial and bi-axial mechanical strain mediated electronic band structures and dielectric properties of silicene have been investigated. It is found that on applying uni- and bi-axial strains, the band gap opens for smaller strain in silicene. However, on further increase of strain beyond 8% silicene changed into metal. The ultimate tensile strength estimated is 3.4 GPa. Imaginary part of dielectric function shows that the inter-band transitions are red-shifted for uni- and bi-axial tensile strains and are blue shifted for uni- and bi-axial compressive strains. Electron energy loss (EEL) function shows that the π+σ plasmon energies are red-shifted for uni- and bi-axial strains and blue-shifted for compressive strains. The π plasmons disappears for tensile and asymmetric strains. Bi-axial asymmetric strain is found to have no influence on inter-band transitions and π+σ plasmon energies.

  6. Polycrystalline silicon on tungsten substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevolo, A. J.; Schmidt, F. A.; Shanks, H. R.; Campisi, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    Thin films of electron-beam-vaporized silicon were deposited on fine-grained tungsten substrates under a pressure of about 1 x 10 to the -10th torr. Mass spectra from a quadrupole residual-gas analyzer were used to determine the partial pressure of 13 residual gases during each processing step. During separate silicon depositions, the atomically clean substrates were maintained at various temperatures between 400 and 780 C, and deposition rates were between 20 and 630 A min. Surface contamination and interdiffusion were monitored by in situ Auger electron spectrometry before and after cleaning, deposition, and annealing. Auger depth profiling, X-ray analysis, and SEM in the topographic and channeling modes were utilized to characterize the samples with respect to silicon-metal interface, interdiffusion, silicide formation, and grain size of silicon. The onset of silicide formation was found to occur at approximately 625 C. Above this temperature tungsten silicides were formed at a rate faster than the silicon deposition. Fine-grain silicon films were obtained at lower temperatures.

  7. Surface roughness of MgO thin film and its critical thickness for optimal biaxial texturing by ion-beam-assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, S.; Ibi, A.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    2011-06-01

    We investigated the deposition time dependences of the in-plane grain alignment ({Delta}{phi}) and the surface roughness (w) of biaxially textured MgO thin films fabricated by ion-beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) and found a strong correlation between them. The time evolution of the surface roughness of IBAD-MgO showed an abrupt increase at the same time corresponding to the beginning of the deterioration in {Delta}{phi}. The roughness versus thickness profiles obtained under different deposition conditions with different assisting ion-beam currents collapsed to a single curve, even though the deposition rates were significantly different in each condition. This implies that the abrupt increase in roughness occurred at the same thickness--of about 4 nm--irrespective of the deposition rate. The result also indicated that the {Delta}{phi} deterioration began with the same thickness of about 4 nm. This ''critical'' thickness of about 4 nm might be related to the completion of the crystallization of the film. Further, deposition beyond the critical thickness, therefore, became merely a homoepitaxial deposition under the ''IBAD'' condition, which was far from optimal because of the ion bombardment and low temperature (no-heating), and thus {Delta}{phi} deteriorated. Based on these considerations, we propose an approach to attain a sharp texture in a IBAD-MgO-based biaxial substrate; moreover, we demonstrated this approach using a two-step deposition process.

  8. Macroscopic biaxiality and electric-field-induced rotation of the minor director in the nematic phase of a bent-core liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, Mamatha; Merkel, K.; Vij, J. K.; Kocot, A.

    2010-09-01

    Biaxiality in the nematic phase has been investigated for the bent-core liquid-crystal para-heptylbenzoate diester, using polarised IR spectroscopy. Anisotropic fluctuations of the nematic director are discussed in terms of the self-assembly of the chiral conformers. The ordering of the minor director for the homeotropicaly aligned sample is found to depend on the rubbing of the substrates of the cell and the amplitude of in-plane electric field. On increasing the in-plane electric field, the rotation of the minor director in the plane of the substrate is observed with an angle of approximately 45°, where initially the minor director is shown to lie along the rubbing direction. It is also shown that on the average the long axis of the molecules is normal to the substrate with surface treatment, with and without rubbing. The electric in-plane field combined with rubbing is shown to induce biaxial order in the nematic phase of a material with negative dielectic anisotropy for the first time.

  9. Development of tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites towards their use in DEMO—potassium doped tungsten wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesch, J.; Han, Y.; Almanstötter, J.; Coenen, J. W.; Höschen, T.; Jasper, B.; Zhao, P.; Linsmeier, Ch; Neu, R.

    2016-02-01

    For the next step fusion reactor the use of tungsten is inevitable to suppress erosion and allow operation at elevated temperature and high heat loads. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten and its susceptibility to operation embrittlement and thus allow its use as a structural as well as an armour material. That this concept works in principle has been shown in recent years. In this contribution we present a development approach towards its use in a future fusion reactor. A multilayer approach is needed addressing all composite constituents and manufacturing steps. A huge potential lies in the optimization of the tungsten wire used as fibre. We discuss this aspect and present studies on potassium doped tungsten wire in detail. This wire, utilized in the illumination industry, could be a replacement for the so far used pure tungsten wire due to its superior high temperature properties. In tensile tests the wire showed high strength and ductility up to an annealing temperature of 2200 K. The results show that the use of doped tungsten wire could increase the allowed fabrication temperature and the overall working temperature of the composite itself.

  10. Development of quantitative atomic modeling for tungsten transport study using LHD plasma with tungsten pellet injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H. A.; Suzuki, C.; Kato, D.; Goto, M.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Morita, S.

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative tungsten study with reliable atomic modeling is important for successful achievement of ITER and fusion reactors. We have developed tungsten atomic modeling for understanding the tungsten behavior in fusion plasmas. The modeling is applied to the analysis of tungsten spectra observed from plasmas of the large helical device (LHD) with tungsten pellet injection. We found that extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission of W24+ to W33+ ions at 1.5-3.5 nm are sensitive to electron temperature and useful to examine the tungsten behavior in edge plasmas. We can reproduce measured EUV spectra at 1.5-3.5 nm by calculated spectra with the tungsten atomic model and obtain charge state distributions of tungsten ions in LHD plasmas at different temperatures around 1 keV. Our model is applied to calculate the unresolved transition array (UTA) seen at 4.5-7 nm tungsten spectra. We analyze the effect of configuration interaction on population kinetics related to the UTA structure in detail and find the importance of two-electron-one-photon transitions between 4p54dn+1- 4p64dn-14f. Radiation power rate of tungsten due to line emissions is also estimated with the model and is consistent with other models within factor 2.

  11. Effect of light sources and curing mode techniques on sorption, solubility and biaxial flexural strength of a composite resin

    PubMed Central

    CARVALHO, Andreia Assis; MOREIRA, Francine do Couto Lima; FONSECA, Rodrigo Borges; SOARES, Carlos José; FRANCO, Eduardo Batista; de SOUZA, João Batista; LOPES, Lawrence Gonzaga

    2012-01-01

    Adequate polymerization plays an important role on the longevity of the composite resin restorations. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of light-curing units, curing mode techniques and storage media on sorption, solubility and biaxial flexural strength (BFS) of a composite resin. Material and Methods Two hundred and forty specimens were made of one composite resin (Esthet-X) in a stainless steel mold (2 mm x 8 mm Ø), and divided into 24 groups (n=10) established according to the 4 study factors: light-curing units: quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) lamp and light-emitting diodes (LED); energy densities: 16 J/cm2 and 20 J/cm2; curing modes: conventional (CM) and pulse-delay (PD); and permeants: deionized water and 75% ethanol for 28 days. Sorption and solubility tests were performed according to ISO 4049:2000 specifications. All specimens were then tested for BFS according to ASTM F394-78 specification. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA followed by Tukey, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). Results In general, no significant differences were found regarding sorption, solubility or BFS means for the light-curing units and curing modes (p>0.05). Only LED unit using 16 J/cm2 and PD using 10 s produced higher sorption and solubility values than QTH. Otherwise, using CM (16 J/cm2), LED produced lower values of BFS than QTH (p<0.05). 75% ethanol permeant produced higher values of sorption and solubility and lower values of BFS than water (p<0.05). Conclusion Ethanol storage media produced more damage on composite resin than water. In general the LED and QTH curing units using 16 and 20 J/cm2 by CM and PD curing modes produced no influence on the sorption, solubility or BFS of the tested resin. PMID:22666845

  12. [Incisions for biaxial and coaxial microincision cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Müller, M; Kohnen, T

    2010-02-01

    Microincision cataract surgery (MICS) represents a new level in the development of cataract surgery. Phacoemulsification with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation via incisions of biaxial approach, with separation of the phaco tip and irrigation (B-MICS). Compared with standard small-incision cataract surgery, the advantages of MICS are less corneal astigmatism and fewer corneal surface irregularities, with favorable implications for visual quality and early rehabilitation. In the effort toward smaller incisions, special interest should be given to wound integrity, especially regarding the risk of endophthalmitis. With limited corneal elastic capacity, irreversible expansion of the incision with tissue laceration may occur. Smaller incisions are superior only if they cause less trauma. This requires an optimized relationship between incision size and manipulation during IOL implantation as well as attention to safety issues. MICS offers a platform for new benchmarks in phacoemulsification. PMID:20107810

  13. Biomechanical properties of the transverse carpal ligament under biaxial strain.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Michael W R; Howarth, Samuel J; Callaghan, Jack P; Keir, Peter J

    2012-05-01

    The transverse carpal ligament (TCL) influences carpal stability and carpal tunnel mechanics, yet little is known about its mechanical properties. We investigated the tissue properties of TCLs extracted from eight cadaver arms and divided into six tissue samples from the distal radial, distal middle, distal ulnar, proximal radial, proximal middle, and proximal ulnar regions. The 5% and 15% strains were applied biaxially to each sample at rates of 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, and 1%/s. Ligament thickness ranged from 1.22 to 2.90 mm. Samples from the middle of the TCL were thicker proximally than distally (p < 0.013). Tissue location significantly affected elastic modulus (p < 0.001). Modulus was greatest in the proximal radial samples (mean 2.8 MPa), which were 64% and 44% greater than the distal radial and proximal ulnar samples, respectively. Samples from the middle had a modulus that was 20-39% greater in the proximal versus more distal samples. The TCL exhibited different properties within different locations and in particular greater moduli were found near the carpal bone attachments. These properties contribute to the understanding of carpal tunnel mechanics that is critical to understanding disorders of the wrist. PMID:22042748

  14. Inelastic response of metal matrix composites under biaxial loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissenden, C. J.; Mirzadeh, F.; Pindera, M.-J.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical predictions and experimental results were obtained for inelastic response of unidirectional and angle ply composite tubes subjected to axial and torsional loading. The composite material consist of silicon carbide fibers in a titanium alloy matrix. This material is known to be susceptible to fiber matrix interfacial damage. A method to distinguish between matrix yielding and fiber matrix interfacial damage is suggested. Biaxial tests were conducted on the two different layup configurations using an MTS Axial/Torsional load frame with a PC based data acquisition system. The experimentally determined elastic moduli of the SiC/Ti system are compared with those predicted by a micromechanics model. The test results indicate that fiber matrix interfacial damage occurs at relatively low load levels and is a local phenomenon. The micromechanics model used is the method of cells originally proposed by Aboudi. Finite element models using the ABACUS finite element program were used to study end effects and fixture specimen interactions. The results to date have shown good correlation between theory and experiment for response prior to damage initiation.

  15. Automatic biaxial sun tracking mechanism for sun ray utilization devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, P.A.

    1981-08-25

    The instant invention is an automatic biaxial sun tracking mechanism for use with sun ray utilization devices. Said devices are mounted on said invention, said devices forming no specific part of said invention. The invention is comprised of four principal parts: (1) a mount structure for positioning and supporting said sun ray utilization devices, (2) a polar shaft, (3) a declination crankshaft, and (4) suitable connecting members. Operation of the invention is as follows: the daily axis of said polar shaft is oriented parallel to the earth's polar axis. Said connecting members hold in a mutually perpendicular arrangement the daily axis of said polar shaft, the seasonal axis of a pivot pin for said mount structure, and the main journal axis of said declination crankshaft. Said connecting members with attached parts have suitable means to rotate about said daily axis one revolution per day. Said crankshaft has suitable means to rotate about said main journal axis one revolution per year. A suitable linkage, which simultaneously engages said crankshaft and said mount structure, serves to translate the rotary motion of said crankshaft into alternating pivotal motion of said mount structure. Modifications to the basic direct tracking form of the invention may be made for indirect tracking, heavy duty crankshaft and associated parts, and corrective compensation for a variety of rotational means.

  16. Electret properties of biaxially stretched polypropylene films containing various additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenbrand, J.; Behrendt, N.; Altstädt, V.; Schmidt, H.-W.; Sessler, G. M.

    2006-02-01

    Isotactic polypropylene (i-PP) films containing additives such as the commercial α -nucleation agent NA11 and the anorganic filler particles CaCO3 and Al2O3 were biaxially stretched. As a result, the films assume a cellular morphology with oblong cavities extending in the direction of the film elongation. In the present study, stretched films of 50 µm thickness with additive concentrations of 0.05-10 mass per cent were charged with a corona method to potentials of 400 or 500 V. The stability of the charges was tested isothermally at temperatures of 90 and 120 °C and by means of thermally stimulated discharge (TSD) experiments. The isothermal measurements show, for the above additives with concentrations higher than about 0.3%, a reduction of the charge decay with increasing additive concentrations. Compared with reference films of pure PP, the potential decay of the films containing additive concentrations of 10% is significantly reduced. Correspondingly, the TSD measurements indicate a shift of the main discharge peak to higher temperatures up to the melting temperature. Generally, the voiding and thus the stability also increases with the stretching ratio. These improvements of the charge stability are attributed to the barrier effect of the cavities. The results are of interest with respect to the various applications of PP electrets, such as ferroelectret devices and air filters.

  17. The generalized Mollweide projection of the biaxial ellipsoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafarend, E.; Heidenreich, A.

    1995-09-01

    The standard Mollweide projection of the sphere S{/R 2} which is of type pseudocylindrical — equiareal is generalized to the biaxial ellipsoid E {/A,B 2}. Within the class of pseudocylindrical mapping equations (1.8) of E {/A,B 2} (semimajor axis A, semiminor axis B) it is shown by solving the general eigenvalue problem (Tissot analysis) that only equiareal mappings, no conformal mappings exist. The mapping equations (2.1) which generalize those from S{/R 2} to E {/A,B 2} lead under the equiareal postulate to a generalized Kepler equation (2.21) which is solved by Newton iteration, for instance (Table 1). Two variants of the ellipsoidal Mollweide projection in particular (2.16), (2.17) versus (2.19), (2.20) are presented which guarantee that parallel circles (coordinate lines of constant ellipsoidal latitude) are mapped onto straight lines in the plane while meridians (coordinate lines of constant ellipsoidal longitude) are mapped onto ellipses of variable axes. The theorem collects the basic results. Six computer graphical examples illustrate the first pseudocylindrical map projection of E {/A,B 2} of generalized Mollweide type.

  18. Environmental fate of tungsten from military use.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Jay L; Korte, Nic

    2009-04-01

    This manuscript describes the distribution, fate and transport of tungsten used in training rounds at three small arms ranges at Camp Edwards on the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR), USA. Practice with tungsten/nylon rounds began in 2000 subsequent to a 1997 US Environmental Protection Agency ban on training with lead. Training with the tungsten rounds was halted in 2005 because of concerns regarding tungsten's environmental mobility and potential toxicity. This study, therefore, examines how tungsten partitions in the environment when fired on a small arms training range. Soil sampling revealed surface soil concentrations, highest at the berm face, up to 2080 mg/kg. Concentrations decreased rapidly with depth--at least by an order of magnitude by 25 cm. Nonetheless, tungsten concentrations remained above background to at least 150 cm. Pore-water samples from lysimeters installed in berm areas revealed a range of concentrations (<1-400 mg/L) elevated with respect to background although there was no discernable trend with depth. Groundwater monitoring well samples collected approximately 30 m below ground surface showed tungsten (0.001-0.56 mg/L) attributable to range use. PMID:19217645

  19. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies. PMID:27546174

  20. Orthodontics and Aligners

    MedlinePlus

    ... Repairing Chipped Teeth Teeth Whitening Tooth-Colored Fillings Orthodontics and Aligners Straighten teeth for a healthier smile. Orthodontics When consumers think about orthodontics, braces are the ...

  1. Alignability of Optical Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, Russell Scott

    With the continuing drive towards higher speed, density, and functionality in electronics, electrical interconnects become inadequate. Due to optics' high speed and bandwidth, freedom from capacitive loading effects, and freedom from crosstalk, optical interconnects can meet more stringent interconnect requirements. But, an optical interconnect requires additional components, such as an optical source and detector, lenses, holographic elements, etc. Fabrication and assembly of an optical interconnect requires precise alignment of these components. The successful development and deployment of optical interconnects depend on how easily the interconnect components can be aligned and/or how tolerant the interconnect is to misalignments. In this thesis, a method of quantitatively specifying the relative difficulty of properly aligning an optical interconnect is described. Ways of using this theory of alignment to obtain design and packaging guidelines for optical interconnects are examined. The measure of the ease with which an optical interconnect can be aligned, called the alignability, uses the efficiency of power transfer as a measure of alignment quality. The alignability is related to interconnect package design through the overall cost measure, which depends upon various physical parameters of the interconnect, such as the cost of the components and the time required for fabrication and alignment. Through a mutual dependence on detector size, the relationship between an interconnect's alignability and its bandwidth, signal-to-noise ratio, and bit-error -rate is examined. The results indicate that a range of device sizes exists for which given performance threshold values are satisfied. Next, the alignability of integrated planar-optic backplanes is analyzed in detail. The resulting data show that the alignability can be optimized by varying the substrate thickness or the angle of reflection. By including the effects of crosstalk, in a multi-channel backplane, the

  2. Tidal alignment of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazek, Jonathan; Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš

    2015-08-01

    We develop an analytic model for galaxy intrinsic alignments (IA) based on the theory of tidal alignment. We calculate all relevant nonlinear corrections at one-loop order, including effects from nonlinear density evolution, galaxy biasing, and source density weighting. Contributions from density weighting are found to be particularly important and lead to bias dependence of the IA amplitude, even on large scales. This effect may be responsible for much of the luminosity dependence in IA observations. The increase in IA amplitude for more highly biased galaxies reflects their locations in regions with large tidal fields. We also consider the impact of smoothing the tidal field on halo scales. We compare the performance of this consistent nonlinear model in describing the observed alignment of luminous red galaxies with the linear model as well as the frequently used "nonlinear alignment model," finding a significant improvement on small and intermediate scales. We also show that the cross-correlation between density and IA (the "GI" term) can be effectively separated into source alignment and source clustering, and we accurately model the observed alignment down to the one-halo regime using the tidal field from the fully nonlinear halo-matter cross correlation. Inside the one-halo regime, the average alignment of galaxies with density tracers no longer follows the tidal alignment prediction, likely reflecting nonlinear processes that must be considered when modeling IA on these scales. Finally, we discuss tidal alignment in the context of cosmic shear measurements.

  3. Properties of tungsten-rhenium and tungsten-rhenium with hafnium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Todd

    2009-07-01

    Historically, tungsten-25wt.% rhenium alloy has been manufactured into wire for the thermocouple market, but recent demands for high-temperature structural components have forced the development of novel processing techniques for tungsten-rhenium and tungsten-rhenium with hafnium carbide. With a melting temperature of 3,050°C, and a recrystallization temperature near 1,900°C, tungsten-rhenium alloys are being used in aerospace, temperature measuring, and friction stir welding applications. The mechanical properties and microstructures of tungsten-25wt.% rhenium and tungsten-25wt.% rhenium with hafnium carbide are reported at ambient temperature, 1,371°C, and 1,926°C, after processing by three methods: hot isostatic pressing, swaging, and extrusion.

  4. Role of solubility and tungsten powder size on densification of tungsten-based composites

    SciTech Connect

    Griffo, A.; Liu, Y.; German, R.M.

    1994-10-19

    The densification behavior of new tungsten-based alloys was evaluated as a function of the solubility of tungsten in the liquid and the particle size of the tungsten powder. The matrix phase was a combination of nickel or iron, and an aluminide-based intermetallics, Ni3A1, Ni2Al3, and Fe3Al. The aluminides were used to lower the matrix solubility for tungsten to inhibit grain coarsening. In addition, the low solubility systems used two different tungsten powders to examine the role of powder size on densification. Dilatometric experiments were performed to determined the liquid formation temperatures and to study the densification dynamics. A low solubility matrix required higher sintering temperatures and smaller tungsten particles to achieve near full density.

  5. Fabrication and properties of tungsten heavy metal alloys containing 30% to 90% tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Gurwell, W.E.; Nelson, R.G.; Dudder, G.B.; Davis, N.C.

    1984-09-01

    In 1983, Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a survey of tungsten heavy metal alloys having lower-than-normal (<90%) tungsten content. The purpose of the work was to develop tougher, more impact-resistant high-density alloys for applications benefitting from improved mechanical properties. Tungsten heavy metal alloys of 30 to 90% tungsten content were fabricated and their mechanical properties measured. Although ultimate strength was essentially independent of tungsten content, lower tungsten-content alloys had lower yield stress, hardness, and density, and decidedly higher elongations and impact energies. Cold work was effective in raising strength and hardness but detrimental to elongation and impact energies. Precipitation hardening and strain aging raised hardness effectively but had less influence on other mechanical properties. 34 figures, 7 tables.

  6. Dielectronic recombination of tungsten ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bowen; O’Sullivan, Gerry; Dong, Chenzhong; Chen, Ximeng

    2016-08-01

    Ab initio calculations of dielectronic recombination rate coefficients of Ne-, Pd- and Ag-like tungsten have been performed. Energy levels, radiative transition probabilities and autoionization rates were calculated using the Flexible Atomic Code. The contributions from different channels to the total rate coefficients are discussed. The present calculated rate coefficients are compared with other calculations where available. Excellent agreement has been found for Ne-like W while a large discrepancy was found for Pd-like W, which implies that more ab initio calculations and experimental measurements are badly needed. Further calculations demonstrated that the influence of configuration interaction is small while nonresonant radiative stabilizing (NRS) contribution to doubly excited non-autoionizing states are vital. The data obtained are expected to be useful for modeling plasmas for fusion applications, especially for the ITER community, which makes experimental verification even more essential.

  7. Tungsten Ditelluride: a layered semimetal.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Hui; Silva, Eduardo Cruz; Calderin, Lazaro; Nguyen, Minh An T; Hollander, Matthew J; Bersch, Brian; Mallouk, Thomas E; Robinson, Joshua A

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten ditelluride (WTe2) is a transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) with physical and electronic properties that make it attractive for a variety of electronic applications. Although WTe2 has been studied for decades, its structure and electronic properties have only recently been correctly described. We experimentally and theoretically investigate the structure, dynamics and electronic properties of WTe2, and verify that WTe2 has its minimum energy configuration in a distorted 1T structure (Td structure), which results in metallic-like transport. Our findings unambiguously confirm the metallic nature of WTe2, introduce new information about the Raman modes of Td-WTe2, and demonstrate that Td-WTe2 is readily oxidized via environmental exposure. Finally, these findings confirm that, in its thermodynamically favored Td form, the utilization of WTe2 in electronic device architectures such as field effect transistors may need to be reevaluated. PMID:26066766

  8. Tungsten Ditelluride: a layered semimetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chia-Hui; Silva, Eduardo Cruz; Calderin, Lazaro; Nguyen, Minh An T.; Hollander, Matthew J.; Bersch, Brian; Mallouk, Thomas E.; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2015-06-01

    Tungsten ditelluride (WTe2) is a transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) with physical and electronic properties that make it attractive for a variety of electronic applications. Although WTe2 has been studied for decades, its structure and electronic properties have only recently been correctly described. We experimentally and theoretically investigate the structure, dynamics and electronic properties of WTe2, and verify that WTe2 has its minimum energy configuration in a distorted 1T structure (Td structure), which results in metallic-like transport. Our findings unambiguously confirm the metallic nature of WTe2, introduce new information about the Raman modes of Td-WTe2, and demonstrate that Td-WTe2 is readily oxidized via environmental exposure. Finally, these findings confirm that, in its thermodynamically favored Td form, the utilization of WTe2 in electronic device architectures such as field effect transistors may need to be reevaluated.

  9. High strength and density tungsten-uranium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell

    1993-01-01

    Alloys of tungsten and uranium and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 55 vol % to about 85 vol %. A porous preform is made by sintering consolidated tungsten powder. The preform is impregnated with molten uranium such that (1) uranium fills the pores of the preform to form uranium in a tungsten matrix or (2) uranium dissolves portions of the preform to form a continuous uranium phase containing tungsten particles.

  10. Thermal properties of plasma-sprayed tungsten deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun-Ki

    2004-10-01

    Tungsten powder was plasma-sprayed onto a graphite substrate in order to examine the microstructures, porosities, and thermal conductivities of tungsten deposits. Tungsten was partially oxidized to tungsten oxide (WO 3) after plasma spraying. Most pores were found in the vicinity of lamellar layers in association with oxidation. It was revealed that both tungsten oxide and the lamellar structure with pores have a significant influence on the electrical and thermal conductivity.

  11. High strength and density tungsten-uranium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sheinberg, H.

    1991-01-01

    Alloys of tungsten and uranium and a method for making the alloys. Amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 55 to 85. A porous preform is made by sintering consolidated tungsten powder. The preform is impregnated with molten uranium such that (1) uranium fills the pores of the of the preform to form uranium in a tungsten matrix or (2) uranium dissolves portions of the preform to form a continuous uranium phase containing tungsten particles.

  12. High strength and density tungsten-uranium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sheinberg, H.

    1993-11-16

    Alloys of tungsten and uranium and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 55 vol % to about 85 vol %. A porous preform is made by sintering consolidated tungsten powder. The preform is impregnated with molten uranium such that (1) uranium fills the pores of the preform to form uranium in a tungsten matrix or (2) uranium dissolves portions of the preform to form a continuous uranium phase containing tungsten particles.

  13. High strength and density tungsten-uranium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sheinberg, H.

    1991-12-31

    Alloys of tungsten and uranium and a method for making the alloys. Amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 55 to 85. A porous preform is made by sintering consolidated tungsten powder. The preform is impregnated with molten uranium such that (1) uranium fills the pores of the of the preform to form uranium in a tungsten matrix or (2) uranium dissolves portions of the preform to form a continuous uranium phase containing tungsten particles.

  14. Defect structural evolution in high purity tungsten irradiated with electrons using high voltage electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzumi, S.; Yoshiie, T.; Satoh, Y.; Xu, Q.; Mori, H.; Kawai, M.

    2005-08-01

    Four types of high purity tungsten were irradiated with 2 MeV electrons to 5 dpa using a high voltage electron microscope, and defect structural evolutions were examined as a function of the irradiation temperature and the concentration of impurity atoms. Three of materials were made by sintering of tungsten powder with purity of 99.999% (5N-W), 99.99% (PF-W) and 99.95% (N-W), and one was a chemical vapor deposited tungsten of 99.9999% (CVD-W) purity. The formation of interstitial type dislocation loops is observed above room temperature by electron irradiation. In sintered tungsten, the number density of loops increases with increasing density of impurity atoms, i.e., N-W > PF-W > 5N-W. The density of loops in CVD-W is relatively high, contrary to its purity. In CVD-W, a heterogeneous formation of loops is observed at above 573 K. Loops are aligned on layers, and no loops are formed between the layers. All four types of specimens have a change in slop of the temperature dependence of loop number density at around 500 K which is caused by impurity atoms. Results of radioactivation analysis and hardness testing are also presented.

  15. Control of biaxial strain in single-layer molybdenite using local thermal expansion of the substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plechinger, Gerd; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Buscema, Michele; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Steele, Gary A.; Kuc, Agnieszka; Heine, Thomas; Schüller, Christian; Korn, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    Single-layer MoS2 is a direct-gap semiconductor whose electronic band structure strongly depends on the strain applied to its crystal lattice. While uniaxial strain can be easily applied in a controlled way, e.g., by bending of a flexible substrate with the atomically thin MoS2 layer on top, experimental realization of biaxial strain is more challenging. Here, we exploit the large mismatch between the thermal expansion coefficients of MoS2 and a silicone-based substrate to apply a controllable biaxial tensile strain by heating the substrate with a focused laser. The effect of this biaxial strain is directly observable in optical spectroscopy as a redshift of the MoS2 photoluminescence. We also demonstrate the potential of this method to engineer more complex strain patterns by employing highly absorptive features on the substrate to achieve non-uniform heat profiles. By comparison of the observed redshift to strain-dependent band structure calculations, we estimate the biaxial strain applied by the silicone-based substrate to be up to 0.2%, corresponding to a band gap modulation of 105 meV per percentage of biaxial tensile strain.

  16. Biaxial order parameter in the homologous series of orthogonal bent-core smectic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenilayam, S.; Panarin, Y. P.; Vij, J. K.; Osipov, M.; Lehmann, A.; Tschierske, C.

    2013-07-01

    The fundamental parameter of the uniaxial liquid crystalline state that governs nearly all of its physical properties is the primary orientational order parameter (S) for the long axes of molecules with respect to the director. The biaxial liquid crystals (LCs) possess biaxial order parameters depending on the phase symmetry of the system. In this paper we show that in the first approximation a biaxial orthogonal smectic phase can be described by two primary order parameters: S for the long axes and C for the ordering of the short axes of molecules. The temperature dependencies of S and C are obtained by the Haller's extrapolation technique through measurements of the optical birefringence and biaxiality on a nontilted polar antiferroelectric (Sm-APA) phase of a homologous series of LCs built from the bent-core achiral molecules. For such a biaxial smectic phase both S and C, particularly the temperature dependency of the latter, are being experimentally determined. Results show that S in the orthogonal smectic phase composed of bent cores is higher than in Sm-A calamatic LCs and C is also significantly large.

  17. Characterisation of the mechanical properties of infarcted myocardium in the rat under biaxial tension and uniaxial compression.

    PubMed

    Sirry, Mazin S; Butler, J Ryan; Patnaik, Sourav S; Brazile, Bryn; Bertucci, Robbin; Claude, Andrew; McLaughlin, Ron; Davies, Neil H; Liao, Jun; Franz, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the passive mechanical properties of infarcted tissue at different healing stages is essential to explore the emerging biomaterial injection-based therapy for myocardial infarction (MI). Although rats have been widely used as animal models in such investigations, the data in literature that quantify the passive mechanical properties of rat heart infarcts is very limited. MI was induced in rats and hearts were harvested immediately (0 day), 7, 14 and 28 days after infarction onset. Left ventricle anterioapical samples were cut and underwent equibiaxial and non equibiaxial tension followed by uniaxial compression mechanical tests. Histological analysis was conducted to confirm MI and to quantify the size of the induced infarcts. Infarcts maintained anisotropy and the nonlinear biaxial and compressive mechanical behaviour throughout the healing phases with the circumferential direction being stiffer than the longitudinal direction. Mechanical coupling was observed between the two axes in all infarct groups. The 0, 7, 14 and 28 days infarcts showed 438, 693, 1048 and 1218kPa circumferential tensile moduli. The 28 day infarct group showed a significantly higher compressive modulus compared to the other infarct groups (p=0.0060, 0.0293, and 0.0268 for 0, 7 and 14 days groups). Collagen fibres were found to align in a preferred direction for all infarct groups supporting the observed mechanical anisotropy. The presented data are useful for developing material models for healing infarcts and for setting a baseline for future assessment of emerging mechanical-based MI therapies. PMID:27434651

  18. Nondestructive measurement of esophageal biaxial mechanical properties utilizing sonometry.

    PubMed

    Aho, Johnathon M; Qiang, Bo; Wigle, Dennis A; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Urban, Matthew W

    2016-07-01

    Malignant esophageal pathology typically requires resection of the esophagus and reconstruction to restore foregut continuity. Reconstruction options are limited and morbid. The esophagus represents a useful target for tissue engineering strategies based on relative simplicity in comparison to other organs. The ideal tissue engineered conduit would have sufficient and ideally matched mechanical tolerances to native esophageal tissue. Current methods for mechanical testing of esophageal tissues both in vivo and ex vivo are typically destructive, alter tissue conformation, ignore anisotropy, or are not able to be performed in fluid media. The aim of this study was to investigate biomechanical properties of swine esophageal tissues through nondestructive testing utilizing sonometry ex vivo. This method allows for biomechanical determination of tissue properties, particularly longitudinal and circumferential moduli and strain energy functions. The relative contribution of mucosal-submucosal layers and muscular layers are compared to composite esophagi. Swine thoracic esophageal tissues (n  =  15) were tested by pressure loading using a continuous pressure pump system to generate stress. Preconditioning of tissue was performed by pressure loading with the pump system and pre-straining the tissue to in vivo length before data was recorded. Sonometry using piezocrystals was utilized to determine longitudinal and circumferential strain on five composite esophagi. Similarly, five mucosa-submucosal and five muscular layers from thoracic esophagi were tested independently. This work on esophageal tissues is consistent with reported uniaxial and biaxial mechanical testing and reported results using strain energy theory and also provides high resolution displacements, preserves native architectural structure and allows assessment of biomechanical properties in fluid media. This method may be of use to characterize mechanical properties of tissue engineered esophageal

  19. Biaxial flexural strength of bilayered zirconia using various veneering ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Chantranikul, Natravee

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) of one zirconia-based ceramic used with various veneering ceramics. MATERIALS AND METHODS Zirconia core material (Katana) and five veneering ceramics (Cerabien ZR; CZR, Lava Ceram; LV, Cercon Ceram Kiss; CC, IPS e.max Ceram; EM and VITA VM9; VT) were selected. Using the powder/liquid layering technique, bilayered disk specimens (diameter: 12.50 mm, thickness: 1.50 mm) were prepared to follow ISO standard 6872:2008 into five groups according to veneering ceramics as follows; Katana zirconia veneering with CZR (K/CZR), Katana zirconia veneering with LV (K/LV), Katana zirconia veneering with CC (K/CC), Katana zirconia veneering with EM (K/EM) and Katana zirconia veneering with VT (K/VT). After 20,000 thermocycling, load tests were conducted using a universal testing machine (Instron). The BFS were calculated and analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD (α=0.05). The Weibull analysis was performed for reliability of strength. The mode of fracture and fractured surface were observed by SEM. RESULTS It showed that K/CC had significantly the highest BFS, followed by K/LV. BFS of K/CZR, K/EM and K/VT were not significantly different from each other, but were significantly lower than the other two groups. Weibull distribution reported the same trend of reliability as the BFS results. CONCLUSION From the result of this study, the BFS of the bilayered zirconia/veneer composite did not only depend on the Young's modulus value of the materials. Further studies regarding interfacial strength and sintering factors are necessary to achieve the optimal strength. PMID:26576251

  20. Inelastic response of metal matrix composites under biaxial loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirzadeh, F.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1990-01-01

    Elements of the analytical/experimental program to characterize the response of silicon carbide titanium (SCS-6/Ti-15-3) composite tubes under biaxial loading are outlined. The analytical program comprises prediction of initial yielding and subsequent inelastic response of unidirectional and angle-ply silicon carbide titanium tubes using a combined micromechanics approach and laminate analysis. The micromechanics approach is based on the method of cells model and has the capability of generating the effective thermomechanical response of metal matrix composites in the linear and inelastic region in the presence of temperature and time-dependent properties of the individual constituents and imperfect bonding on the initial yield surfaces and inelastic response of (0) and (+ or - 45)sub s SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates loaded by different combinations of stresses. The generated analytical predictions will be compared with the experimental results. The experimental program comprises generation of initial yield surfaces, subsequent stress-strain curves and determination of failure loads of the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 tubes under selected loading conditions. The results of the analytical investigation are employed to define the actual loading paths for the experimental program. A brief overview of the experimental methodology is given. This includes the test capabilities of the Composite Mechanics Laboratory at the University of Virginia, the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composite tubes secured from McDonnell Douglas Corporation, a text fixture specifically developed for combined axial-torsional loading, and the MTS combined axial-torsion loader that will be employed in the actual testing.

  1. Nondestructive measurement of esophageal biaxial mechanical properties utilizing sonometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aho, Johnathon M.; Qiang, Bo; Wigle, Dennis A.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Urban, Matthew W.

    2016-07-01

    Malignant esophageal pathology typically requires resection of the esophagus and reconstruction to restore foregut continuity. Reconstruction options are limited and morbid. The esophagus represents a useful target for tissue engineering strategies based on relative simplicity in comparison to other organs. The ideal tissue engineered conduit would have sufficient and ideally matched mechanical tolerances to native esophageal tissue. Current methods for mechanical testing of esophageal tissues both in vivo and ex vivo are typically destructive, alter tissue conformation, ignore anisotropy, or are not able to be performed in fluid media. The aim of this study was to investigate biomechanical properties of swine esophageal tissues through nondestructive testing utilizing sonometry ex vivo. This method allows for biomechanical determination of tissue properties, particularly longitudinal and circumferential moduli and strain energy functions. The relative contribution of mucosal–submucosal layers and muscular layers are compared to composite esophagi. Swine thoracic esophageal tissues (n  =  15) were tested by pressure loading using a continuous pressure pump system to generate stress. Preconditioning of tissue was performed by pressure loading with the pump system and pre-straining the tissue to in vivo length before data was recorded. Sonometry using piezocrystals was utilized to determine longitudinal and circumferential strain on five composite esophagi. Similarly, five mucosa–submucosal and five muscular layers from thoracic esophagi were tested independently. This work on esophageal tissues is consistent with reported uniaxial and biaxial mechanical testing and reported results using strain energy theory and also provides high resolution displacements, preserves native architectural structure and allows assessment of biomechanical properties in fluid media. This method may be of use to characterize mechanical properties of tissue engineered

  2. SPEAR3 Construction Alignment

    SciTech Connect

    LeCocq, Catherine; Banuelos, Cristobal; Fuss, Brian; Gaudreault, Francis; Gaydosh, Michael; Griffin, Levirt; Imfeld, Hans; McDougal, John; Perry, Michael; Rogers, Michael; /SLAC

    2005-08-17

    An ambitious seven month shutdown of the existing SPEAR2 synchrotron radiation facility was successfully completed in March 2004 when the first synchrotron light was observed in the new SPEAR3 ring, SPEAR3 completely replaced SPEAR2 with new components aligned on a new highly-flat concrete floor. Devices such as magnets and vacuum chambers had to be fiducialized and later aligned on girder rafts that were then placed into the ring over pre-aligned support plates. Key to the success of aligning this new ring was to ensure that the new beam orbit matched the old SPEAR2 orbit so that existing experimental beamlines would not have to be reoriented. In this presentation a pictorial summary of the Alignment Engineering Group's surveying tasks for the construction of the SPEAR3 ring is provided. Details on the networking and analysis of various surveys throughout the project can be found in the accompanying paper.

  3. Two-dimensional tungsten oxide nanowire networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. M.; Li, Y. H.; Ahmad, I.; McCartney, D. G.; Zhu, Y. Q.; Hu, W. B.

    2006-09-01

    The authors report the synthesis and characterization of two-dimensional (2D) single crystalline nanonetworks consisting of tungsten oxide nanowires with diameters of ca. 20nm. The 2D networks are believed to result from the nanowire growth along the four crystallographic equivalent directions of ⟨110⟩ in the tetragonal WO2.9 structure. These 2D tungsten oxide networks may be potential precursors for creating 2D networks comprising WS2 nanotubes.

  4. International strategic mineral issues summary report: tungsten

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner, Antony B.T.; Sinclair, W. David; Amey, Earle B.

    1998-01-01

    In 1995, China and the former Soviet Union accounted for over three-fourths of the world's mine production of tungsten. China alone produced about two-thirds of world output. Given its vast resources, China will likely maintain its prominent role in world tungsten supply. By the year 2020, changes in supply patterns are likely to result from declining output from individual deposits in Australia, Austria, and Portugal and the opening of new mines in Canada, China, and the United Kingdom.

  5. Laser microsintering of tungsten in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Robby; Ullmann, Frank; Hartwig, Lars; Suess, Tino; Kloetzer, Sascha; Streek, Andre; Schille, Joerg; Regenfuss, Peter; Exner, Horst

    2010-02-01

    Laser microsintering of tungsten powder is investigated as a function of laser output power, pulse interval and vacuum level. The intensities are calculated for the evaporation thresholds of tungsten powder particles of various sizes. In addition, the powder layer generation and the resulting layer thicknesses are calculated. The powder abrasion occurring during the process was taken into consideration. Polished sections and REM images were prepared in order to analyse the experimental outcomes. The dependence of sinter density on the parameters is discussed.

  6. Strain aging in tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dowding, R.J.; Tauer, K.J. . Materials Technology Lab.)

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on tungsten heavy alloys which are two-phase mixtures of body center cubic (BCC) tungsten surrounded by a face center cubic (FCC) matrix. The matrix is most often composed of nickel and iron in a ratio of 70:30 but, occasionally, the matrix may also contain cobalt or copper. Nickel, however, is always the primary matrix component. The tungsten heavy alloy is fabricated through powder metallurgy techniques. Elemental powders are blended, pressed to shape, and sintered. Depending upon the tungsten content, the sintering temperatures are usually in the range of 1450{degrees}C to 1525{degrees}C. These temperatures are high enough that, as a result, the matrix is at the liquid phase and the process is known as liquid phase sintering. At the liquid phase temperature, the matrix becomes saturated with tungsten, but this does not change the FCC character of the matrix. The sintering is usually done in a hydrogen atmosphere furnace in order to reduce the oxides on the tungsten powder surfaces and create clean, active surfaces which will enhance the adherence between the tungsten and the matrix. The hydrogen atmosphere also creates the presence of excess dissolved hydrogen in the alloy. It has been shown that the hydrogen degrades the toughness and ductility of the heavy alloy. A post-sintering vacuum heat treatment is generally required to insure that there is no residual hydrogen present. The as-sintered tensile strength of a 90% tungsten, 7% nickel, 3% iron alloy (90W) is in the range of 800 to 940 MPa and can be increased significantly by cold working, usually rolling or swaging. Swaging to reductions in area of 20% can result in tensile strengths of 1250 MPa or more. As the strength increases, the elongation, which may have been 30% or more, decreases to less than 5%.

  7. Prediction of failure envelopes of composite tubes subjected to biaxial loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargiulo, C.; Marchetti, M.; Rizzo, A.

    1996-09-01

    Practical cylindrical structures including pressure vessels, pipes, drive shafts and rochet motors are usually subjected to complex loads involving biaxial or triaxial stress systems. In particular, filamentary composite vessels are used in applications of Space Shuttle tankage, as well as for the storage of fluids in various commercial applications. The object of this work is to provide numerical and experiment data on the strength of filament wound carbon fibre reinforced epoxy resin thin tubes under biaxial loading conditions. Internal or external pressure and axial loads are applied simultaneously to produce a variety of biaxial stress conditions. The effects of the winding angle of the fibre reinforcements on the failure loads of the pipes have been examined. Finite elements and thin shell analysis have been applied to the problem using different failure criteria in order to predict the specimen's failure for a comparison with experimental results.

  8. The mechanical behavior of extruded powder aluminum subjected to biaxial loadings at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, T.O.; Berghaus, D.G.; Peacock, H.B.

    1990-12-31

    The goal of this investigation is to develop a description of the biaxial behavior of extruded powder aluminum at elevated temperature. Specimens made of extruded 101 ALCOA (Aluminum Company of America) powder aluminum and specimens made from 1100 commercial aluminum rod are tested biaxially in tension-torsion and compression-torsion loadings at the extrusion temperature. The powder aluminum is examined microscopically and stereological methods are used to give a quantified description of the material behavior in terms of changes in the laminar powder material structure. A model for the biaxial (tension-torsion) behavior of extruded powder aluminum is developed. This description is consistent with a previous analysis of behavior in pure tension.

  9. The mechanical behavior of extruded powder aluminum subjected to biaxial loadings at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, T.O.; Berghaus, D.G. ); Peacock, H.B. )

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this investigation is to develop a description of the biaxial behavior of extruded powder aluminum at elevated temperature. Specimens made of extruded 101 ALCOA (Aluminum Company of America) powder aluminum and specimens made from 1100 commercial aluminum rod are tested biaxially in tension-torsion and compression-torsion loadings at the extrusion temperature. The powder aluminum is examined microscopically and stereological methods are used to give a quantified description of the material behavior in terms of changes in the laminar powder material structure. A model for the biaxial (tension-torsion) behavior of extruded powder aluminum is developed. This description is consistent with a previous analysis of behavior in pure tension.

  10. The Relationship Between Microstructure and Toughness of Biaxially Oriented Semicrytalline Polyester Films

    SciTech Connect

    Rao,Y.; Greener, J.; Avila-Orta, C.; Hsiao, B.; Blanton, T.

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between microstructure and toughness of biaxially stretched semicrystalline polyester films was investigated. Optically transparent films were prepared by simultaneous biaxial stretching of melt-cast sheets near the glass transition temperature. Copolyesters of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) with different compositions of two diols: ethylene glycol (EG) and cyclohexane dimethanol (CHDM), and stoichiometrically matched terephthalic acid were used to produce films with different degrees of crystallinity. In addition, the PET films with different crystalline morphologies were produced by constrained high temperature annealing of biaxially oriented films. The toughness, degree of crystallinity and crystalline morphology/molecular ordering were studied using mechanical testing, synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) techniques, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicate that the toughness of a semicrystalline polymeric film is determined by the interconnectivity of the crystalline phase within the amorphous phase and is greatly influenced by the degree of crystallinity and the underlying crystalline morphology.

  11. The elusive thermotropic biaxial nematic phase in rigid bent-core molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Bharat R.; Primak, Andrew; Dingemans, Theo J.; Samulski, Edward T.; Kumar, Satyendra

    2003-08-01

    The biaxial nematic liquid crystalline phase was predicted several decades ago. Several vigorous attempts to find it in various systems resulted in mis-identifications. The results of X-ray diffraction and optical texture studies of the phases exhibited by rigid bent-core molecules derived from 2,5-bis-(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole reveal that the biaxial nematic phase is formed by three compounds of this type. X-ray diffraction studies reveal that the nematic phase of these compounds has the achiral symmetry D2h, in which the overall long axes of the molecules are oriented parallel to each other to define the major axis of the biaxial phase. The apex of the bent-cores de- fines the minor axis of this phase along which the planes containing the bent-cores of neighboring molecules are oriented parallel to each other.

  12. Spin splitting in bulk wurtzite AlN under biaxial strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Hsiu-Fen; Lo, Ikai; Chiang, Jih-Chen; Lee, Meng-En; Wu, C. L.; Wang, W. T.; Chen, Chun-Nan; Hsu, Y. C.

    2012-05-01

    The spin-splitting energies in biaxially strained bulk wurtzite material AlN are calculated using the linear combination of atomic orbital (LCAO) method, and the equi-spin-splitting distributions in k-space near the minimum-spin-splitting (MSS) surfaces are illustrated. These data are compared with those derived analytically by two-band k . p (2KP) model. It is found that the results from these two methods are in good agreement for small k. However, the ellipsoidal MSS surface under biaxial compressive strain does not exist in the 2KP model, because the data points are far from the Γ point. Instead, three basic shapes of the MSS surface occur in the wurtzite Brillouin zone: a hyperboloid of two sheets, a hexagonal cone, and a hyperboloid of one sheet, evaluated from the LCAO method across the range of biaxial strains from compressive to tensile.

  13. Phase Shift of Polarized Light after Transmission through a Biaxial Anisotropic Thin Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yong-Qiang; Li, Xu; He, Kai; Qi, Hong-Ji; Yi, Kui; Shao, Jian-Da

    2013-01-01

    Based on the theoretical analysis of biaxial birefringent thin films with characteristic matrix method, we investigate the phase shift on transmission of a tilted columnar biaxial film at normal and oblique incidence over 300-1200 nm for s- and p-polarized waves. Compared with the simplified calculation method, the interference effects of the birefringent thin film are considered to yield more accurate results. The quarter wavelength phase shift calculated with the characteristic matrix method is consistent with that monitored with in situ measurement by two-angle ellipsometry, which validates our complied program for the calculation of the phase shift of the biaxial anisotropic thin film. Furthermore, the characteristic matrix method can be easily used to obtain continuous adjustable phase retardation at oblique incidence, whereas the simplified calculation method is valid for the case of normal incidence. A greater generality and superiority of the characteristic matrix method is presented.

  14. Biaxial texture development in aluminum nitride layers during off-axis sputter deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Ruopeng; Muralt, Paul; Gall, Daniel

    2012-09-15

    Polycrystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) layers were deposited by pulsed-dc reactive magnetron sputtering from a variable deposition angle {alpha} = 0 Degree-Sign -84 Degree-Sign in 5 mTorr pure N{sub 2} at room temperature. X-ray diffraction pole figure analyses show that layers deposited from a normal angle ({alpha} = 0 Degree-Sign ) exhibit fiber texture, with a random in-plane grain orientation and the c-axis tilted by 42 Degree-Sign {+-} 2 Degree-Sign off the substrate normal, yielding wurtzite AlN grains with the {l_brace}1012{r_brace} plane approximately parallel ({+-}2 Degree-Sign ) to the substrate surface. However, as {alpha} is increased to 45 Degree-Sign , two preferred in-plane grain orientations emerge, with populations I and II having the c-axis tilted toward and away from the deposition flux, by 53 Degree-Sign {+-} 2 Degree-Sign and 47 Degree-Sign {+-} 1 Degree-Sign off the substrate normal, respectively. Increasing {alpha} further to 65 Degree-Sign and 84 Degree-Sign , results in the development of a single population II with a 43 Degree-Sign {+-} 1 Degree-Sign tilt. This developing biaxial texture is attributed to a competitive growth mode under conditions where the adatom mobility is sufficient to cause intergrain mass transport, but insufficient for the thermodynamically favored low energy {l_brace}0001{r_brace} planes to align parallel to the layer surface. Consequently, AlN nuclei are initially randomly oriented and form a kinetically determined crystal habit exposing {l_brace}0001{r_brace} and {l_brace}1120{r_brace} facets. The expected direction of its highest growth rate is 49 Degree-Sign {+-} 5 Degree-Sign tilted relative to the c-axis, in good agreement with the 42 Degree-Sign -53 Degree-Sign measured tilt. The in-plane preferred orientation for {alpha} > 0 Degree-Sign is well explained by the orientation dependence in the cross section of the asymmetric pyramidal nuclei to capture directional deposition flux. The observed tilt is ideal for

  15. Planar polar liquid crystalline alignment in nanostructured porous silicon one-dimensional photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, Shahar; Torres-Costa, Vicente; Martín-Palma, Raúl J.; Abdulhalim, I.

    2010-09-01

    The ability of liquid crystals (LCs) to flow and fill nanopores assists in using them for infiltration into porous nanophotonic structures such as nanostructured porous silicon (nanoPS). The reflectivity spectra at normal incidence from periodic nanostructured nanoPS filters infiltrated with nematic LC is found to exhibit polarization dependence. This is experimental evidence that the LC molecules in the nanoPS matrix are aligned such that an effective anisotropy exists parallel to the substrate plane. From the theoretical fit the preferred configuration was found to be the planar-polar geometry which is shown to be biaxial.

  16. Uniaxial and biaxial tensile stress-stretch response of human linea alba.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Gerard M; Lake, Spencer P; Thompson, Dominic M; Castile, Ryan M; Winter, Des C; Simms, Ciaran K

    2016-10-01

    There are few studies on the stress-stretch behaviour of human linea alba, yet understanding the mechanics of this tissue is important for developing better methods of abdominal wound closure. Published data focuses mainly on porcine linea alba and for human tissue there are conflicting results and no bi-axial data available. This variability is likely due to challenges with the physical dimensions of the tissue and differences in experimental methodology. This study focussed on the tensile mechanical characterisation of the human linea alba using uniaxial and equi-load biaxial testing performed using image-based strain measurement methods. Thirteen freshly frozen human cadaveric abdominal walls were obtained and used to prepare 7 samples in both the transverse and longitudinal directions for uniaxial testing, and 13 square samples for bi-axial testing. The results showed significant anisotropy and for the equi-load biaxial tests the deformation was heavily biased in the longitudinal direction. In comparison with similar tests on porcine tissue from a previous study, it was found that the response of porcine linea alba to uniaxial loading is similar to that of human linea alba, with no statistically significant differences observed. Under biaxial loading human and porcine linea showed no statistical significance in the difference between their means in the transverse direction. However, a significant difference was observed in the longitudinal direction, and further study of the respective tissue structures is needed to better understand this result. These results provide the first data on the biaxial tensile properties of human linea alba and can aid in an improved assessment of wound closure mechanics. PMID:27367944

  17. Biaxial Stretch Improves Elastic Fiber Maturation, Collagen Arrangement, and Mechanical Properties in Engineered Arteries.

    PubMed

    Huang, Angela H; Balestrini, Jenna L; Udelsman, Brooks V; Zhou, Kevin C; Zhao, Liping; Ferruzzi, Jacopo; Starcher, Barry C; Levene, Michael J; Humphrey, Jay D; Niklason, Laura E

    2016-06-01

    Tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEVs) are typically produced using the pulsatile, uniaxial circumferential stretch to mechanically condition and strengthen the arterial grafts. Despite improvements in the mechanical integrity of TEVs after uniaxial conditioning, these tissues fail to achieve critical properties of native arteries such as matrix content, collagen fiber orientation, and mechanical strength. As a result, uniaxially loaded TEVs can result in mechanical failure, thrombus, or stenosis on implantation. In planar tissue equivalents such as artificial skin, biaxial loading has been shown to improve matrix production and mechanical properties. To date however, multiaxial loading has not been examined as a means to improve mechanical and biochemical properties of TEVs during culture. Therefore, we developed a novel bioreactor that utilizes both circumferential and axial stretch that more closely simulates loading conditions in native arteries, and we examined the suture strength, matrix production, fiber orientation, and cell proliferation. After 3 months of biaxial loading, TEVs developed a formation of mature elastic fibers that consisted of elastin cores and microfibril sheaths. Furthermore, the distinctive features of collagen undulation and crimp in the biaxial TEVs were absent in both uniaxial and static TEVs. Relative to the uniaxially loaded TEVs, tissues that underwent biaxial loading remodeled and realigned collagen fibers toward a more physiologic, native-like organization. The biaxial TEVs also showed increased mechanical strength (suture retention load of 303 ± 14.53 g, with a wall thickness of 0.76 ± 0.028 mm) and increased compliance. The increase in compliance was due to combinatorial effects of mature elastic fibers, undulated collagen fibers, and collagen matrix orientation. In conclusion, biaxial stretching is a potential means to regenerate TEVs with improved matrix production, collagen organization, and mechanical

  18. Biaxial Mechanical Testing of Posterior Sclera using High-Resolution Ultrasound Speckle Tracking for Strain Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Perez, Benjamin; Tang, Junhua; Morris, Hugh J.; Palko, Joel R.; Pan, Xueliang; Hart, Richard T.; Liu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the mechanical responses of the sclera, the white outer coat of the eye, under equal-biaxial loading with unrestricted shear. An ultrasound speckle tracking technique was used to measure tissue deformation through sample thickness, expanding the capabilities of surface strain techniques. Eight porcine scleral samples were tested within 72 hours postmortem. High resolution ultrasound scans of scleral cross-sections along the two loading axes were acquired at 25 consecutive biaxial load levels. An additional repeat of the biaxial loading cycle was performed to measure a third normal strain emulating a strain gauge rosette for calculating the in-plane shear. The repeatability of the strain measurements during identical biaxial ramps was evaluated. A correlation-based ultrasound speckle tracking algorithm was used to compute the displacement field and determine the distributive strains in the sample cross-sections. A Fung type constitutive model including a shear term was used to determine the material constants of each individual specimen by fitting the model parameters to the experimental stress-strain data. A non-linear stress-strain response was observed in all samples. The meridian direction had significantly larger strains than the circumferential direction during equal-biaxial loadings (P’s<0.05). The stiffness along the two directions were also significantly different (P=0.02) but highly correlated (R2=0.8). These results showed that the mechanical properties of the porcine sclera were nonlinear and anisotropic under biaxial loading. This work has also demonstrated the feasibility of using ultrasound speckle tracking for strain measurements during mechanical testing. PMID:24438767

  19. Tungsten targets the tumor microenvironment to enhance breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Alicia M; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients' years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery = 1.76 ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans. PMID:25324207

  20. Tungsten Targets the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bolt, Alicia M.; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M.; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K.

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients’ years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery = 1.76 ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans. PMID:25324207

  1. Polarized-cathodoluminescence study of uniaxial and biaxial stress in GaAs/Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, D. H.; Ksendzov, A.; Terhune, R. W.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Wilson, B. A.; Shen, H.; Dutta, M.; Vernon, S. M.; Dixon, T. M.

    1991-01-01

    The strain-induced splitting of the heavy-hole (hh) and light-hole (lh) valence bands for 4-microns thick GaAs/Si is examined on a microscopic scale using linear polarized-cathodoluminescence imaging and spectroscopy. The energies and intensities of the hh- and lh-exciton luminescence are quantitatively analyzed to determine spatial variations in the stress tensor. The results indicate that regions near and far from the microcracks are primarily subject to uniaxial and biaxial tensile stresses, respectively. The transition region where biaxial stress gradually converts to uniaxial stress is analyzed, and reveals a mixing of lh and hh characters in the strain-split bands.

  2. Strain Energy Effects on Texture Evolution in Thin Films: Biaxial vs. Uniaxial Stress State

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnweber-Ribic, P.; Dehm, G.; Gruber, P.; Arzt, E.

    2006-02-07

    Grain growth in thin films is usually accompanied by texture evolution due to the crystallographic dependencies of surface, interface and strain energies. In this work the driving forces for grain growth for a 1 and 5 {mu}m thick Cu thin film on a polyimide substrate are calculated assuming biaxial and uniaxial stress. While the results for the biaxial stress state are used to explain observed textures, for the case of uniaxial stress predictions suggest new ways to control the texture of thin films.

  3. Method for testing shell materials for fatigue crack resistance under biaxial bending

    SciTech Connect

    Esiev, T.S.; Basiev, K.D.; Steklov, O.I. |

    1995-10-01

    A method for testing shell materials for fatigue crack resistance is proposed. A stressed state typically occurring in shells is simulated on a specimen with a surface notch by subjecting it to biaxial surface tension. The time of fatigue crack generation or the crack propagation rate is used to evaluate the crack resistance of a material. Cross-shaped test specimens cut out of a real shell had a size and a loading scheme that made it possible to vary the biaxial stress ratio over the range of 0.5 {<=} {lambda} {<=} 1.

  4. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, N.E.

    1988-03-10

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam. 5 figs.

  5. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Nelson E.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam.

  6. Hybrid vehicle motor alignment

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Michael Benjamin

    2001-07-03

    A rotor of an electric motor for a motor vehicle is aligned to an axis of rotation for a crankshaft of an internal combustion engine having an internal combustion engine and an electric motor. A locator is provided on the crankshaft, a piloting tool is located radially by the first locator to the crankshaft. A stator of the electric motor is aligned to a second locator provided on the piloting tool. The stator is secured to the engine block. The rotor is aligned to the crankshaft and secured thereto.

  7. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning tungsten powder preparation and processing. Studies include sintering, densification, shrinkage, phase analysis, and heat treatment. The physical and mechanical properties of tungsten powder metal products are included. The effects of additives and particle size on the sintering and sintered articles are also described. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Chemical Solution Based Epitaxial Oxide Filmes on Biaxially Textured Ni-W Substrates with Improved Out-of-Plane Texture for YBCO Coated Conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuiyan, Md S; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan

    2007-01-01

    Epitaxial films of rare-earth (RE) niobates (where the rare earth includes La, Ce, and Nd) and lanthanum tantalate with pyrochlore structures were grown directly on biaxially textured nickel-3 at.% tungsten (Ni-W) substrates using a chemical solution deposition (CSD) process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis revealed the surface morphology of the films to be smooth and homogeneous. Detailed X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the films of pyrochlore RE niobate and La-tantalate are highly textured with cube-on-cube epitaxy. The overall texture quality of the films was investigated by measuring the full-width half-maximum (FWHM) of the (004) and (222) rocking curves. We observed a sharper texture for both lanthanum niobate (La{sub 3}NbO{sub 7}) and lanthanum tantalate (La{sub 3}TaO{sub 7}) films compared to the underlying Ni-W substrate, though they have a larger lattice misfit with the Ni-W substrates. These results were comparable to the texture improvement observed in vacuum-deposited Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} seed layers. Texture improvement in the seed layer is the key towards obtaining YBCO films with a higher critical current density. Hence, solution-deposited La{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} and La{sub 3}TaO{sub 7} films can be used as a seed layer towards developing all metalorganic-deposited (MOD) buffer/YBCO architectures.

  9. Antares alignment gimbal positioner

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.D.; Viswanathan, V.K.; Saxman, A.C.; Lujan, R.E.; Woodfin, G.L.; Sweatt, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    Antares is a 24-beam 40-TW carbon-dioxide (CO/sub 2/) laser fusion system currently under construction at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Antares alignment gimbal positioner (AGP) is an optomechanical instrument that will be used for target alignment and alignment of the 24 laser beams, as well as beam quality assessments. The AGP will be capable of providing pointing, focusing, and wavefront optical path difference, as well as aberration information at both helium-neon (He-Ne) and CO/sub 2/ wavelengths. It is designed to allow the laser beams to be aligned to any position within a 1-cm cube to a tolerance of 10 ..mu..m.

  10. EINSTEIN Cluster Alignments Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, S. W.; Melott, A. L.; Miller, C. J.

    2000-12-01

    We have examined whether the major axes of rich galaxy clusters tend to point (in projection) toward their nearest neighboring cluster. We used the data of Ulmer, McMillan and Kowalski, who used x-ray morphology to define position angles. Our cluster samples, with well measured redshifts and updated positions, were taken from the MX Northern Abell Cluster Survey. The usual Kolmogorov-Smirnov test shows no significant alignment signal for nonrandom angles for all separations less than 100 Mpc/h. Refining the null hypothesis, however, with the Wilcoxon rank-sum test, reveals a high confidence signal for alignment. This confidence is highest when we restrict our sample to small nearest neighbor separations. We conclude that we have identified a more powerful tool for testing cluster-cluster alignments. Moreover, there is a strong signal in the data for alignment, consistent with a picture of hierarchical cluster formation in which matter falls into clusters along large scale filamentary structures.

  11. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprintmore » that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.« less

  12. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Daily, PNNL

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprint that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.

  13. Process for recovering tungsten from organic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, J.A.; Patton, J.C.; Christini, J.N.

    1989-11-21

    This patent describes on improvement in a process wherein tungsten values are extracted from an aqueous alkali metal tungstate solution containing impurities by an organic solution containing an amine extractant wherein the organic solution consists essentially of from about 6% to about 10% by volume of the amine extractant, and the balance of the organic solution being an aromatic solvent consisting essentially of a mixture of alkyl benzenes wherein the alkyl benzenes have molecular weights of 120, 134, or 148, and the total number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chains attached to the benzene ring are either 3, 4, or 5, and thereafter the tungsten values are removed from the organic solution by contacting the organic solution with a stripping agent to form a tungsten containing strip solution. The improvement comprises carrying out the stripping step in an aqueous continuous mode, and having as the stripping agent, an aqueous solution formed from ammonium metatungstate. Wherein the aqueous solution has a tungsten concentration which allows the tungsten containing strip solution to have a specific gravity of no greater than about 1.5, and sufficient ammonia to maintain the pH of the stripping agent at from about 5 to about 8.

  14. Evaporites and strata-bound tungsten mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Ririe, G.T. )

    1989-02-01

    Discoidal gypsum crystal cavities occur in quartzites that host varying amounts of strata-bound scheelite mineralization near Halls Creek in Western Australia. The host quartzites have been regionally metamorphosed to greenschist facies and are contained within a Middle Proterozoic sequence that includes pelites, mafic and felsic volcanics, and volcaniclastic rocks. Textural, fluid inclusion, and oxygen isotope data indicate that scheelite was present in the host quartzites prior to regional metamorphism. The presence of crystal cavities after gypsum in the quartzites implies an evaporitic origin for this sequence. The continental-sabkha playa basins of the Mojave Desert, California, are suggested to be possible modern analogs-e.g., Searles Lake, where the tungsten content is up to 70 ppm WO{sub 3} in brines and 118 ppm in muds, and exceeds the amount of tungsten in all known deposits in the United States. Metamorphism of a continental evaporitic sequence containing tungsten could produce an assemblage of rocks very similar to those reported from several stratabound tungsten deposits. Some of these, such as at Halls Creek, may be related to original accumulations of tungsten in nonmarine evaporitic environments.

  15. Surfacing With Tungsten-containing Ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, N. A.; Galevsky, G. V.; Valuev, D. V.; Shurupov, V. M.; Kozyreva, O. E.

    2015-09-01

    Experimental research has been carried out into AN 26C flux surfacing with flux cored wires made of dust-like carbon and fluorine containing components and tungsten- containing ores. The investigations have revealed the fact that tungsten can be reduced immediately from tungsten-containing oxide materials. The chemical composition of added metal has been determined, as well as slag compositions after surfacing; hardness, wear resistance have been investigated and metallographic tests have been carried out. Thermodynamic calculations of reactions of WO3, as well as W2C and WC carbides reduction to W by carbon and carbon oxide have been made in standard conditions at temperature T = 1500 - 6000 K. The obtained thermodynamic characteristics of reactions have demonstrated that in the course of WO3 reduction tungsten is most likely to be obtained in terms of thermodynamics, subsequently W2C and WC carbides. After these reactions those of W2C and WC carbides obtaining are thermodynamically possible via reduced tungsten and carbon composition.

  16. PDV Probe Alignment Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, T L; May, C M; Strand, O T

    2007-10-26

    This alignment technique was developed while performing heterodyne velocimetry measurements at LLNL. There are a few minor items needed, such as a white card with aperture in center, visible alignment laser, IR back reflection meter, and a microscope to view the bridge surface. The work was performed on KCP flyers that were 6 and 8 mils wide. The probes used were Oz Optics manufactured with focal distances of 42mm and 26mm. Both probes provide a spot size of approximately 80?m at 1550nm. The 42mm probes were specified to provide an internal back reflection of -35 to -40dB, and the probe back reflections were measured to be -37dB and -33dB. The 26mm probes were specified as -30dB and both measured -30.5dB. The probe is initially aligned normal to the flyer/bridge surface. This provides a very high return signal, up to -2dB, due to the bridge reflectivity. A white card with a hole in the center as an aperture can be used to check the reflected beam position relative to the probe and launch beam, and the alignment laser spot centered on the bridge, see Figure 1 and Figure 2. The IR back reflection meter is used to measure the dB return from the probe and surface, and a white card or similar object is inserted between the probe and surface to block surface reflection. It may take several iterations between the visible alignment laser and the IR back reflection meter to complete this alignment procedure. Once aligned normal to the surface, the probe should be tilted to position the visible alignment beam as shown in Figure 3, and the flyer should be translated in the X and Y axis to reposition the alignment beam onto the flyer as shown in Figure 4. This tilting of the probe minimizes the amount of light from the bridge reflection into the fiber within the probe while maintaining the alignment as near normal to the flyer surface as possible. When the back reflection is measured after the tilt adjustment, the level should be about -3dB to -6dB higher than the probes

  17. In situ biaxial rotation at low-temperatures in high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Selby, N S; Crawford, M; Tracy, L; Tracey, L; Reno, J L; Pan, W

    2014-09-01

    We report the design, construction, and characterization of a biaxial sample rotation stage for use in a cryogenic system for orientation-dependent studies of anisotropic electronic transport phenomena at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. Our apparatus allows for continuous rotation of a sample about two axes, both independently and simultaneously. PMID:25273781

  18. In situ biaxial rotation at low-temperatures in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, N. S.; Crawford, M.; Tracy, L.; Reno, J. L.; Pan, W.

    2014-09-15

    We report the design, construction, and characterization of a biaxial sample rotation stage for use in a cryogenic system for orientation-dependent studies of anisotropic electronic transport phenomena at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. Our apparatus allows for continuous rotation of a sample about two axes, both independently and simultaneously.

  19. Biaxial loading and shallow-flaw effects on crack-tip constraint and fracture-toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; McAfee, W.J.; Theiss, T.J.; Rao, M.C.

    1993-12-01

    Uniaxial tests of single-edged notched bend (SENB) specimens with both deep- and shallow-flaws have shown elevated fracture-toughness for the shallow flaws. The elevation in fracture-toughness for shallow flaws has been shown to be the result of reduced constraint at the crack-tip. Biaxial loading has the potential to increase constraint at the crack-tip and thereby reduce some of the shallow-flaw, fracture-toughness elevation. Biaxial fracture-toughness tests have shown that the shallow-flaw, fracture-toughness elevation is reduced but not eliminated by biaxial loading. Dual-parameter, fracture-toughness correlations have been proposed to reflect the effect of crack-tip constraint on fracture-toughness. Test results from the uniaxial and biaxial tests were analyzed using the dual-parameter technology. Discrepancies between analysis results and cleavage initiation site data from fractographic examinations indicate that the analysis models are in need of further refinement. Addition of a precleavage, ductile-tearing element to the analysis model has the potential to resolve the noted discrepancies.

  20. Application of hysteresis modeling to magnetic techniques for monitoring biaxial stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sablik, M.J.; Burkhardt, G.L.; Kwun, H.

    1993-12-31

    A probe, consisting of two excitation coils and a detection coil wrapped around a core with a Hall probe between the pole pieces, has been used to measure indirectly the influence of biaxial stress on the magnetic properties of a ferromagnetic specimen, in this case annealed SAE-4130 steel. Properties measured indirectly included remanence, coercivity, and first, third and fifth harmonic amplitudes. The properties were extracted from the voltage measured across the detection coil and incorporate the magnetic influence of the soft iron core, but with the effect of air gap variation between pole piece and sample kept to a controlled range. Results were compared to a micromagnetic model for the effect of biaxial stress on hysteresis and on magnetic properties. The micromagnetic model is a modified version of a model previously employed by Schneider et al. The experimental remanence variation due to biaxial stress compared very well to the predictions of the model. Furthermore, the model predict,s and experiment bears out, that the remanence with the field along one stress axis minus the remanence with the field along the other stress axis falls in a straight-line band of values when plotted against the difference of the two stresses. This suggests a possible NDE technique for detecting differences in biaxial stresses at a given location in a steel specimen.

  1. Biaxial loading and shallow-flaw effects on crack-tip constraint and fracture-toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; McAfee, W.J.; Theiss, T.J.; Rao, M.C.

    1994-04-01

    Uniaxial tests of single-edged notched bend (SENB) specimens with both deep- and shallow-flaws have shown elevated fracturetoughness for the shallow flaws. The elevation in fracture-toughness for shallow flaws has been shown to be the result of reduced constraint at the crack-tip. Biaxial loading has the potential to increase constraint at the crack-tip and thereby reduce some of the shallow-flaw, fracture-toughness elevation. Biaxial fracture-toughness tests have shown that the shallow-flaw, fracture-toughness elevation is reduced but not eliminated by biaxial loading. Dual-parameter, fracture-toughness correlations have been proposed to reflect the effect of crack-tip constraint on fracture-toughness. Test results from the uniaxial and biaxial tests were analyzed using the dual-parameter technology. Discrepancies between analysis results and cleavage initiation site data from fractographic examinations indicate that the analysis models are in need of further refinement. Addition of a precleavage, ductile-tearing element to the analysis model has the potential to resolve the noted discrepancies.

  2. Numerical Validation of Analytical Biaxial True Stress—True Strain Curves from the Bulge Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vucetic, M.; Bouguecha, A.; Peshekhodov, I.; Götze, T.; Huinink, T.; Friebe, H.; Möller, T.; Behrens, B.-A.

    2011-08-01

    The present investigation deals with the validation of the experimentally obtained biaxial true stress—true strain curves of the HCT 780 C sheet material from the bulge test with the help of the FEA. Furthermore the investigation handles the consideration of the bending influence via the blank curvature evaluation with an optical measurement system Gom ARAMIS.

  3. Curriculum Alignment Research Suggests that Alignment Can Improve Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squires, David

    2012-01-01

    Curriculum alignment research has developed showing the relationship among three alignment categories: the taught curriculum, the tested curriculum and the written curriculum. Each pair (for example, the taught and the written curriculum) shows a positive impact for aligning those results. Following this, alignment results from the Third…

  4. Some Tungsten Oxidation-Reduction Chemistry: A Paint Pot Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Miles; Monts, David L.

    1982-01-01

    Reports an oxidation-reduction experiment using tungsten, somewhat analogous to the classical student experiment involving oxidation-reduction of vanadium. Includes experimental procedures, results, and toxicity/cost of tungsten compounds. (Author/JN)

  5. Growth of tungsten oxide on carbon nanowalls templates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hua; Su, Yan; Chen, Shuo; Quan, Xie

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Tungsten oxide deposited on carbon nanowalls by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique. ► This composite has two-dimensional uniform morphology with a crystalline structure of monoclinic tungsten trioxide. ► Surface photoelectric voltage measurements show that this product has photoresponse properties. - Abstract: In the present work we present a simple approach for coupling tungsten oxide with carbon nanowalls. The two-dimensional carbon nanowalls with open boundaries were grown using plasma enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition, and the subsequent tungsten oxide growth was performed in the same equipment by direct heating of a tungsten filament. The tungsten oxide coating is found to have uniform morphology with a crystalline structure of monoclinic tungsten trioxide. Surface photoelectric voltage measurements show that this product has photoresponse properties. The method of synthesis described here provides an operable route to the production of two-dimensional tungsten oxide nanocomposites.

  6. Element 74, the Wolfram Versus Tungsten Controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Holden,N.E.

    2008-08-11

    Two and a quarter centuries ago, a heavy mineral ore was found which was thought to contain a new chemical element called heavy stone (or tungsten in Swedish). A few years later, the metal was separated from its oxide and the new element (Z=74) was called wolfram. Over the years since that time, both the names wolfram and tungsten were attached to this element in various countries. Sixty years ago, IUPAC chose wolfram as the official name for the element. A few years later, under pressure from the press in the USA, the alternative name tungsten was also allowed by IUPAC. Now the original, official name 'wolfram' has been deleted by IUPAC as one of the two alternate names for the element. The history of this controversy is described here.

  7. Temperature dependence of the biaxial modulus, intrinsic stress and composition of plasma deposited silicon oxynitride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, David R.; Ogbuji, Linus U. T.; Freeman, Mathieu J.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon oxynitride films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. The elemental composition was varied between silicon nitride and silicon dioxide: SiO(0.3)N(1.0), SiO(0.7)N(1.6), SiO(0.7)N(1.1), and SiO(1.7)N(0.%). These films were annealed in air, at temperatures of 40-240 C above the deposition temperature (260 C), to determine the stability and behavior or each composition. the biaxial modulus, biaxial intrinsic stress, and elemental composition were measured at discrete intervals within the annealing cycle. Films deposited from primarily ammonia possessed considerable hydrogen (up to 38 at.%) and lost nitrogen and hydrogen at anneal temperatures (260-300 C) only marginally higher than the deposition temperature. As the initial oxygen content increased a different mechanism controlled the behavior or the film: The temperature threshold for change rose to approximately equal to 350 C and the loss of nitrogen was compensated by an equivalent rise in the oxygen content. The transformation from silicon oxynitride to silica was completed after 50 h at 400 C. The initial biaxial modulus of all compositions was 21-3- GPa and the intrinsic stress was -30 to 85 MPa. Increasing the oxygen content raised the temperature threshold where cracking first occurred; the two film compositions with the highest initial oxygen content did not crack, even at the highest temperature (450 C) investigated. At 450 C the biaxial modulus increased to approximately equal to 100 GPa and the intrinsic stress was approximately equal to 200 MPa. These increases could be correlated with the observed change in the film's composition. When nitrogen was replaced by oxygen, the induced stress remained lower than the biaxial strength of the material, but, when nitrogen and hydrogen were lost, stress-relieving microcracking occurred.

  8. Experimental and analytical comparison of constraint effects due to biaxial loading and shallow-flaws

    SciTech Connect

    Theiss, T.J.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.

    1993-12-31

    A program to develop and evaluate fracture methodologies for the assessment of crack-tip constraint effects on fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels has been initiated in the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program. The focus of studies described herein is on the evaluation of a micromechanical scaling model based on critical stressed volumes for quantifying crack-tip constraint through applications to experimental data. Data were utilized from single-edge notch bend (SENB) specimens and HSST-developed cruciform beam specimens that were tested in HSST shallow-crack and biaxial testing programs. Shallow-crack effects and far-field tensile out-of-plane biaxial loading have been identified as constraint issues that influence both fracture toughness and the extent of the toughness scatter band. Results from applications indicate that the micromechanical scaling model can be used successfully to interpret experimental data from the shallow- and deep-crack SENB specimen tests. When applied to the uniaxially and biaxially loaded cruciform specimens, the two methodologies showed some promising features, but also raised several questions concerning the interpretation of constraint conditions in the specimen based on near-tip stress fields. Crack-tip constraint analyses of the shallow-crack cruciform specimen based on near-tip stress fields. Crack-tip constraint analyses of the shallow-crack cruciform specimen subjected to uniaxial or biaxial loading conditions are shown to represent a significant challenge for these methodologies. Unresolved issued identified from these analyses require resolution as part of a validation process for biaxial loading applications.

  9. Biaxial flexural strength of Turkom-Cera core compared to two other all-ceramic systems

    PubMed Central

    AL-MAKRAMANI, Bandar Mohammed Abdullah; RAZAK, Abdul Aziz Abdul; ABU-HASSAN, Mohamed Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Advances in all-ceramic systems have established predictable means of providing metal-free aesthetic and biocompatible materials. These materials must have sufficient strength to be a practical treatment alternative for the fabrication of crowns and fixed partial dentures. Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the biaxial flexural strength of three core ceramic materials. Material and methods Three groups of 10 disc-shaped specimens (16 mm diameter x 1.2 mm thickness - in accordance with ISO-6872, 1995) were made from the following ceramic materials: Turkom-Cera Fused Alumina [(Turkom-Ceramic (M) Sdn Bhd, Puchong, Selangor, Malaysia)], In-Ceram (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany) and Vitadur-N (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany), which were sintered according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The specimens were subjected to biaxial flexural strength test in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The definitive fracture load was recorded for each specimen and the biaxial flexural strength was calculated from an equation in accordance with ISO-6872. Results The mean biaxial flexural strength values were: Turkom-Cera: 506.8±87.01 MPa, In-Ceram: 347.4±28.83 MPa and Vitadur-N: 128.7±12.72 MPa. The results were analyzed by the Levene's test and Dunnett's T3 post-hoc test (SPSS software V11.5.0 for Windows, SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA ) at a preset significance level of 5% because of unequal group variances (P<0.001). There was statistically significant difference between the three core ceramics (P<0.05). Turkom-Cera showed the highest biaxial flexural strength, followed by In-Ceram and Vitadur-N. Conclusions Turkom-Cera core had significantly higher flexural strength than In-Ceram and Vitadur-N ceramic core materials. PMID:21308292

  10. Raman scattering from rapid thermally annealed tungsten silicide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dasgupta, Samhita; Jackson, Howard E.; Boyd, Joseph T.

    1987-01-01

    Raman scattering as a technique for studying the formation of tungsten silicide is presented. The tungsten silicide films have been formed by rapid thermal annealing of thin tungsten films sputter deposited on silicon substrates. The Raman data are interpreted by using data from resistivity measurements, Auger and Rutherford backscattering measurements, and scanning electron microscopy.

  11. 40 CFR 721.10168 - Cesium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cesium tungsten oxide. 721.10168... Substances § 721.10168 Cesium tungsten oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cesium tungsten oxide (PMN P-08-275; CAS No....

  12. 40 CFR 721.10168 - Cesium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cesium tungsten oxide. 721.10168... Substances § 721.10168 Cesium tungsten oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cesium tungsten oxide (PMN P-08-275; CAS No....

  13. 40 CFR 721.10168 - Cesium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cesium tungsten oxide. 721.10168... Substances § 721.10168 Cesium tungsten oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cesium tungsten oxide (PMN P-08-275; CAS No....

  14. 40 CFR 721.10168 - Cesium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cesium tungsten oxide. 721.10168... Substances § 721.10168 Cesium tungsten oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cesium tungsten oxide (PMN P-08-275; CAS No....

  15. 40 CFR 721.10168 - Cesium tungsten oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cesium tungsten oxide. 721.10168... Substances § 721.10168 Cesium tungsten oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as cesium tungsten oxide (PMN P-08-275; CAS No....

  16. Ultra-broad band absorber made by tungsten and aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Ding; Li, Qiang; Qiu, Min

    2016-01-01

    A broadband absorber comprising tungsten cubic arrays, a alumina layer and a tungsten film, is numerically and experimentally investigated, which exhibits near-unity absorption of visible and near-infrared light from 400 nm to 1150 nm. Benefiting from high melting points of tungsten and alumina, this device has great application potential in solar cells and thermal emission.

  17. Electric field induced biaxiality and the electro-optic effect in a bent-core nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, Mamatha; Panarin, Y. P.; Manna, U.; Vij, J. K.; Keith, C.; Tschierske, C.

    2010-01-01

    We report the observation of a biaxial nematic phase in a bent-core molecular system using polarizing microscopy, electro-optics, and dielectric spectroscopy, where we find that the biaxiality exists on a microscopic scale. An application of electric field induces a macroscopic biaxiality and in consequence gives rise to electro-optic switching. This electro-optic effect shows significant potential in applications for displays due to its fast high-contrast response. The observed electro-optic switching is explained in terms of the interaction of the ferroelectric clusters with the electric field.

  18. Equipment simulation of selective tungsten deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, C.; Ulacia, J.I.; Hopfmann, C.; Flynn, P. )

    1992-02-01

    This paper presents the numerical modeling of a cold wall reactor for selective tungsten chemical vapor deposition. In a two dimensional simulation the mass and heat transfer equations were solved considering the five chemical species H{sub 2}, WF{sub 6}, HF, WF{sub x}, and SiF{sub y}. Detailed models for multicomponent diffusion and for the autocatalytic tungsten nucleation process were implemented. Model results are in good agreement with experimental findings. The simulations are used to study the impact of reactor design on selectivity.

  19. Method of making tungsten powder compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Peralta, R.E.

    1991-06-25

    This patent describes a process for forming a compact. It comprises essentially of pure tungsten metal powder by the steps of contacting a tungsten metal powder with and aqueous acid mixture at a sufficient concentration and for a sufficient period of time of etch the surface of the powder, the acid comprises a mixture of hydrofluoric acid and hydrochloric acid, and isostaticly pressuring the powder at an ambient temperature at a pressure of from about 18,000 to about 20,000 psi. for a sufficient period of time to form a compact.

  20. Surface alignment, anchoring transitions, optical properties, and topological defects in the nematic phase of thermotropic bent-core liquid crystal A131

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senyuk, B.; Wonderly, H.; Mathews, M.; Li, Q.; Shiyanovskii, S. V.; Lavrentovich, O. D.

    2010-10-01

    We study optical, structural, and surface anchoring properties of thermotropic nematic bent-core material A131. The focus is on the features associated with orientational order as the material has been reported to exhibit not only the usual uniaxial nematic but also the biaxial nematic phase. We demonstrate that A131 experiences a surface anchoring transition from a perpendicular to tilted alignment when the temperature decreases. The features of the tilted state are consistent with surface-induced birefringence associated with smectic layering near the surface and a molecular tilt that changes along the normal to the substrates. The surface-induced birefringence is reduced to zero by a modest electric field that establishes a uniform uniaxial nematic state. Both refractive and absorptive optical properties of A131 are consistent with the uniaxial order. We found no evidence of the “polycrystalline” biaxial behavior in the cells placed in crossed electric and magnetic fields. We observe stable topological point defects (boojums and hedgehogs) and nonsingular “escaped” disclinations pertinent only to the uniaxial order. Finally, freely suspended films of A131 show uniaxial nematic and smectic textures; a decrease in the film thickness expands the temperature range of stability of smectic textures, supporting the idea of surface-induced smectic layering. Our conclusion is that A131 features only a uniaxial nematic phase and that the apparent biaxiality is caused by subtle surface effects rather than by the bulk biaxial phase.

  1. FMIT alignment cart

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, R.C.; Dauelsberg, L.B.; Clark, D.C.; Grieggs, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility alignment cart must perform several functions. It must serve as a fixture to receive the drift-tube girder assembly when it is removed from the linac tank. It must transport the girder assembly from the linac vault to the area where alignment or disassembly is to take place. It must serve as a disassembly fixture to hold the girder while individual drift tubes are removed for repair. It must align the drift tube bores in a straight line parallel to the girder, using an optical system. These functions must be performed without violating any clearances found within the building. The bore tubes of the drift tubes will be irradiated, and shielding will be included in the system for easier maintenance.

  2. Barrel alignment fixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheeley, J. D.

    1981-04-01

    Fabrication of slapper type detonator cables requires bonding of a thin barrel over a bridge. Location of the barrel hole with respect to the bridge is critical: the barrel hole must be centered over the bridge uniform spacing on each side. An alignment fixture which permits rapid adjustment of the barrel position with respect to the bridge is described. The barrel is manipulated by pincer-type fingers which are mounted on a small x-y table equipped with micrometer adjustments. Barrel positioning, performed under a binocular microscopy, is rapid and accurate. After alignment, the microscope is moved out of position and an infrared (IR) heat source is aimed at the barrel. A 5-second pulse of infrared heat flows the adhesive under the barrel and bonds it to the cable. Sapphire and Fotoform glass barrels were bonded successfully with the alignment fixture.

  3. Improved docking alignment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, Leo G. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Improved techniques are provided for the alignment of two objects. The present invention is particularly suited for 3-D translation and 3-D rotational alignment of objects in outer space. A camera is affixed to one object, such as a remote manipulator arm of the spacecraft, while the planar reflective surface is affixed to the other object, such as a grapple fixture. A monitor displays in real-time images from the camera such that the monitor displays both the reflected image of the camera and visible marking on the planar reflective surface when the objects are in proper alignment. The monitor may thus be viewed by the operator and the arm manipulated so that the reflective surface is perpendicular to the optical axis of the camera, the roll of the reflective surface is at a selected angle with respect to the camera, and the camera is spaced a pre-selected distance from the reflective surface.

  4. Optics Alignment Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    The Optics Alignment Panel (OAP) was commissioned by the HST Science Working Group to determine the optimum alignment of the OTA optics. The goal was to find the position of the secondary mirror (SM) for which there is no coma or astigmatism in the camera images due to misaligned optics, either tilt or decenter. The despace position was reviewed of the SM and the optimum focus was sought. The results of these efforts are as follows: (1) the best estimate of the aligned position of the SM in the notation of HDOS is (DZ,DY,TZ,TY) = (+248 microns, +8 microns, +53 arcsec, -79 arcsec), and (2) the best focus, defined to be that despace which maximizes the fractional energy at 486 nm in a 0.1 arcsec radius of a stellar image, is 12.2 mm beyond paraxial focus. The data leading to these conclusions, and the estimated uncertainties in the final results, are presented.

  5. MUSE optical alignment procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Loupias, Magali; Kosmalski, Johan; Anwand, Heiko; Bacon, Roland; Boudon, Didier; Caillier, Patrick; Daguisé, Eric; Dubois, Jean-Pierre; Dupuy, Christophe; Kelz, Andreas; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Nicklas, Harald; Parès, Laurent; Remillieux, Alban; Seifert, Walter; Valentin, Hervé; Xu, Wenli

    2012-09-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation VLT integral field spectrograph (1x1arcmin² Field of View) developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO), operating in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently assembling and testing MUSE in the Integration Hall of the Observatoire de Lyon for the Preliminary Acceptance in Europe, scheduled for 2013. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic instrument mechanical structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2011, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested independently in each institute. After validations, the systems were shipped to the P.I. institute at Lyon and were assembled in the Integration Hall This paper describes the end-to-end optical alignment procedure of the MUSE instrument. The design strategy, mixing an optical alignment by manufacturing (plug and play approach) and few adjustments on key components, is presented. We depict the alignment method for identifying the optical axis using several references located in pupil and image planes. All tools required to perform the global alignment between each subsystem are described. The success of this alignment approach is demonstrated by the good results for the MUSE image quality. MUSE commissioning at the VLT (Very Large Telescope) is planned for 2013.

  6. Orientation and Alignment Echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karras, G.; Hertz, E.; Billard, F.; Lavorel, B.; Hartmann, J.-M.; Faucher, O.; Gershnabel, Erez; Prior, Yehiam; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2015-04-01

    We present one of the simplest classical systems featuring the echo phenomenon—a collection of randomly oriented free rotors with dispersed rotational velocities. Following excitation by a pair of time-delayed impulsive kicks, the mean orientation or alignment of the ensemble exhibits multiple echoes and fractional echoes. We elucidate the mechanism of the echo formation by the kick-induced filamentation of phase space, and provide the first experimental demonstration of classical alignment echoes in a thermal gas of CO2 molecules excited by a pair of femtosecond laser pulses.

  7. Segment alignment control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubrun, JEAN-N.; Lorell, Ken R.

    1988-01-01

    The segmented primary mirror for the LDR will require a special segment alignment control system to precisely control the orientation of each of the segments so that the resulting composite reflector behaves like a monolith. The W.M. Keck Ten Meter Telescope will utilize a primary mirror made up of 36 actively controlled segments. Thus the primary mirror and its segment alignment control system are directly analogous to the LDR. The problems of controlling the segments in the face of disturbances and control/structures interaction, as analyzed for the TMT, are virtually identical to those for the LDR. The two systems are briefly compared.

  8. Experimental and Modeling Study of Collagen Scaffolds with the Effects of Crosslinking and Fiber Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin; Chow, Ming-Jay; Zhang, Yanhang

    2011-01-01

    Collagen type I scaffolds are commonly used due to its abundance, biocompatibility, and ubiquity. Most applications require the scaffolds to operate under mechanical stresses. Therefore understanding and being able to control the structural-functional integrity of collagen scaffolds becomes crucial. Using a combined experimental and modeling approach, we studied the structure and function of Type I collagen gel with the effects of spatial fiber alignment and crosslinking. Aligned collagen scaffolds were created through the flow of magnetic particles enmeshed in collagen fibrils to mimic the anisotropy seen in native tissue. Inter- and intra- molecular crosslinking was modified chemically with Genipin to further improve the stiffness of collagen scaffolds. The anisotropic mechanical properties of collagen scaffolds were characterized using a planar biaxial tensile tester and parallel plate rheometer. The tangent stiffness from biaxial tensile test is two to three orders of magnitude higher than the storage moduli from rheological measurements. The biphasic nature of collagen gel was discussed and used to explain the mechanical behavior of collagen scaffolds under different types of mechanical tests. An anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model was used to capture the characteristics of the stress-strain behavior exhibited by collagen scaffolds. PMID:21876695

  9. Visible emission spectroscopy of highly charged tungsten ions in LHD: II. Evaluation of tungsten ion temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Nakai, Y.; Kato, D.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.; Hasuo, M.; Experiment Group2, LHD

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrated a polarization-resolved high resolution spectroscopy of a visible emission line of highly charged tungsten ions (λ0 = 668.899 nm, Shinohara et al Phys. Scr. 90 125402) for the large helical device (LHD) plasma, where the tungsten ions were introduced by a pellet injection. Its spectral profile shows broadening and polarization dependence, which are attributed to the Doppler and Zeeman effects, respectively. The tungsten ion temperature was evaluated for the first time from the broadening of visible the emission line, with its emission location determined by the Abel inversion of the chord-integrated emission intensities observed with multiple chords. The tungsten ion temperature was found to be close to the helium-like argon ion temperature, which is used as an ion temperature monitor in LHD.

  10. Combined flame and solution synthesis of nanoscale tungsten-oxide and zinc/tin-oxide heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhizhong; Huo, Di; Kear, Bernard H; Tse, Stephen D

    2015-12-28

    Heterostructures of tungsten-oxide nanowires decorated with zinc/tin-oxide nanostructures are synthesized via a combined flame and solution synthesis approach. Vertically well-aligned tungsten-oxide nanowires are grown on a tungsten substrate by a flame synthesis method. Here, tetragonal WO(2.9) nanowires (diameters of 20-50 nm, lengths >10 μm, and coverage density of 10(9)-10(10) cm(-2)) are produced by the vapor-solid mechanism at 1720 K. Various kinds of Zn/Sn-oxide nanostructures are grown or deposited on the WO(2.9) nanowires by adjusting the Sn(2+) : Zn(2+) molar ratio in an aqueous ethylenediamine solution at 65 °C. With WO(2.9) nanowires serving as the base structures, sequential growth or deposition on them of hexagonal ZnO nanoplates, Zn(2)SnO(4) nanocubes, and SnO(2) nanoparticles are attained for Sn(2+) : Zn(2+) ratios of 0 : 1, 1 : 10, and 10 : 1, respectively, along with different saturation conditions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of the interfaces at the nanoheterojunctions shows abrupt interfaces for ZnO/WO(2.9) and Zn(2)SnO(4)/WO(2.9), despite lattice mismatches of >20%. PMID:26585764

  11. Vertical Alignment and Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Donna; Calzada, Lucio; LaPointe, Nancy; Lee, Audra; Sullivan, Lynn

    This study investigated whether vertical (grade level sequence) alignment of the curriculum in conjunction with teacher collaboration would enhance student performance on the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) test in south Texas school districts of various sizes. Surveys were mailed to the office of the superintendent of 47 school…

  12. Curriculum Alignment: Establishing Coherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagné, Philippe; Dumont, Laurence; Brunet, Sabine; Boucher, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a step-by-step guide to implement a curricular alignment project, directed at professional development and student support, and developed in a higher education French as a second language department. We outline best practices and preliminary results from our experience and provide ways to adapt our experience to other…

  13. Aligning brains and minds

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Frank

    2012-01-01

    In this issue of Neuron, Haxby and colleagues describe a new method for aligning functional brain activity patterns across participants. Their study demonstrates that objects are similarly represented across different brains, allowing for reliable classification of one person’s brain activity based on another’s. PMID:22017984

  14. Aligned-or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseman, Jo Ellen; Koppal, Mary

    2015-01-01

    When state leaders and national partners in the development of the Next Generation Science Standards met to consider implementation strategies, states and school districts wanted to know which materials were aligned to the new standards. The answer from the developers was short but not sweet: You won't find much now, and it's going to…

  15. Optically Aligned Drill Press

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adderholdt, Bruce M.

    1994-01-01

    Precise drill press equipped with rotary-indexing microscope. Microscope and drill exchange places when turret rotated. Microscope axis first aligned over future hole, then rotated out of way so drill axis assumes its precise position. New procedure takes less time to locate drilling positions and produces more accurate results. Apparatus adapted to such other machine tools as milling and measuring machines.

  16. Spinarc gas tungsten arc torch holder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, D. F.; Crockett, J. L.

    1970-01-01

    Semiautomatic welding torch enables operator to control arc length, torch angle, and spring tension when welding small diameter aluminum tubing. Tungsten is preset for the weld to make arc initiation easier and to eliminate searching for the joint through a dark welding lens.

  17. Evidence of hydrogen embrittlement of tungsten carbide.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, G C

    1978-02-01

    Tungsten carbide vessels containing materials at high temperature and high pressure are used in many laboratories. We note that any oils at medium to high temperature which can break down and liberate hydrogen cause rapid failure of the pressure vessel, whereas perfluorated kerosenes used as lubricants inside a pressure vessel give sharply increased life of the vessel. PMID:18699072

  18. Gas tungsten arc welder with electrode grinder

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Brown, William F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  19. Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients

    SciTech Connect

    John Scott O'Dell

    2006-12-31

    The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

  20. Amalgam containing nickel or tungsten dispersions. I.

    PubMed

    Reisbick, M H; Bunshah, R F; Agarwal, N

    1977-12-01

    Wetting tests were conducted to determine compatability between select dispersion powders and Ag3Sn. Subsequently, a method was perfected for incorporating nickel or tungsten powder into the Ag3 Sn ingot. Initial studies reveal good distributions of the dispersed phase in the ingots and the comminuted alloys, after amalgamation, appear to retain their normal working characteristics. PMID:277462

  1. Electrospark doping of steel with tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisova, Yulia; Shugurov, Vladimir; Petrikova, Elizaveta; Seksenalina, Malika; Ivanova, Olga; Ikonnikova, Irina; Kunitsyna, Tatyana; Vlasov, Victor; Klopotov, Anatoliy; Ivanov, Yuriy

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the numerical modeling of thermal processes and the analysis of the structure and properties of the surface layer of carbon steel subjected to electrospark doping with tungsten. The problem of finding the temperature field in the system film (tungsten) / substrate (iron) is reduced to the solution of the heat conductivity equation. A one-dimensional case of heating and cooling of a plate with the thickness d has been considered. Calculations of temperature fields formed in the system film / substrate synthesized using methods of electrospark doping have been carried out as a part of one-dimensional approximation. Calculations have been performed to select the mode of the subsequent treatment of the system film / substrate with a high-intensity pulsed electron beam. Authors revealed the conditions of irradiation allowing implementing processes of steel doping with tungsten. A thermodynamic analysis of phase transformations taking place during doping of iron with tungsten in equilibrium conditions has been performed. The studies have been carried out on the surface layer of the substrate modified using the method of electrospark doping. The results showed the formation in the surface layer of a structure with a highly developed relief and increased strength properties.

  2. Polyol mediated synthesis of tungsten trioxide and Ti doped tungsten trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Porkodi, P.; Yegnaraman, V.; Jeyakumar, D. . E-mail: djkr@rediffmail.com

    2006-08-10

    Polyol mediated synthesis for the preparation of tungsten trioxide and titanium doped tungsten trioxide has been reported. The reaction was carried out using chlorides of tungsten and titanium in diethylene glycol medium and water as the reagent for hydrolysis at 190 deg. C. Formation of a blue coloured dimensionally stable suspension of the precursor materials was observed during the course of the reaction. The particle sizes of the precursor materials were observed to be around 100 nm. The precursor materials were annealed to give tungsten trioxide and titanium doped tungsten trioxide. The precursor materials were characterised using TGA/DTA, FT-IR, optical spectra, SEM, TEM and powder XRD methods. It was observed that the doping of titanium could be effected at least up to 10% of Ti in WO{sub 3}. The TGA/DTA studies indicated that WO{sub 3-x}.H{sub 2}O is the dominant material that formed during the polyol mediated synthesis. The XRD data of the annealed samples revealed that the crystalline phase could be manipulated by varying the extent of titanium doping in the tungsten trioxide matrix.

  3. Quantification of Shear Deformations and Corresponding Stresses in the Biaxially Tested Human Myocardium.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Gerhard; Haspinger, Daniel Ch; Andrä, Michaela; Sacherer, Michael; Viertler, Christian; Regitnig, Peter; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2015-10-01

    One goal of cardiac research is to perform numerical simulations to describe/reproduce the mechanoelectrical function of the human myocardium in health and disease. Such simulations are based on a complex combination of mathematical models describing the passive mechanical behavior of the myocardium and its electrophysiology, i.e., the activation of cardiac muscle cells. The problem in developing adequate constitutive models is the shortage of experimental data suitable for detailed parameter estimation in specific functional forms. A combination of shear and biaxial extension tests with different loading protocols on different specimen orientations is necessary to capture adequately the direction-dependent (orthotropic) response of the myocardium. In most experimental animal studies, where planar biaxial extension tests on the myocardium have been conducted, the generated shear stresses were neither considered nor discussed. Hence, in this study a method is presented which allows the quantification of shear deformations and related stresses. It demonstrates an approach for experimenters as to how the generation of these shear stresses can be minimized during mechanical testing. Experimental results on 14 passive human myocardial specimens, obtained from nine human hearts, show the efficiency of this newly developed method. Moreover, the influence of the clamping technique of the specimen, i.e., the load transmission between the testing device and the tissue, on the stress response is determined by testing an isotropic material (Latex). We identified that the force transmission between the testing device and the specimen by means of hooks and cords does not influence the performed experiments. We further showed that in-plane shear stresses definitely exist in biaxially tested human ventricular myocardium, but can be reduced to a minimum by preparing the specimens in an appropriate manner. Moreover, we showed whether shear stresses can be neglected when performing

  4. Molecular model of biaxial ordering in nematic liquid crystals composed of flat molecules with four mesogenic groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkunov, M. V.; Osipov, M. A.; Kocot, A.; Vij, J. K.

    2010-06-01

    Relative stability of uniaxial and biaxial nematic phases is analyzed in a model nematic liquid crystal composed of flat molecules of C2h symmetry with four mesogenic groups rigidly linked to the same center. The generalized effective quadrupole mean-field potential is proposed and its constants are evaluated numerically for the pair intermolecular potential based on Gay-Berne interaction between mesogenic groups. The dependencies of the constants on molecular shape parameters are systematically analyzed. Order parameters of the uniaxial and biaxial nematic phases are evaluated by direct minimization of the free energy at different temperatures. The corresponding phase diagrams are obtained enabling one to study the effects of molecular model parameters on the stability regions of uniaxial and biaxial phases. The results are used to clarify the nature of experimentally observed biaxial ordering in nematic liquid crystals composed of tetrapode molecules with the same symmetry.

  5. Effect of phase symmetry on the NMR spectrum of acetonitrile oriented in a uniaxial-biaxial-uniaxial phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepak, H. S. Vinay; Yelamaggad, C. V.; Khetrapal, C. L.; Ramanathan, K. V.

    2016-09-01

    We report here the measurement of the Csbnd H and the Hsbnd H dipolar couplings of the methyl group of acetonitrile oriented in the biaxial liquid crystal potassium laurate/1-decanol/water system. These parameters show large variations when measured as a function of temperature. The variations follow the symmetry of the phase as the liquid crystal goes through the sequence of uniaxial - biaxial - uniaxial phases and show a close correspondence to the phase changes that occur in the liquid crystalline solvent coinciding with the onset of biaxiality. The Hsbnd Csbnd H bond angle calculated after incorporating vibrational corrections to the dipolar couplings is discussed in terms of contributions in the case of the biaxial liquid crystal arising from vibration-rotation interaction effects.

  6. Molecular model of biaxial ordering in nematic liquid crystals composed of flat molecules with four mesogenic groups.

    PubMed

    Gorkunov, M V; Osipov, M A; Kocot, A; Vij, J K

    2010-06-01

    Relative stability of uniaxial and biaxial nematic phases is analyzed in a model nematic liquid crystal composed of flat molecules of C2h symmetry with four mesogenic groups rigidly linked to the same center. The generalized effective quadrupole mean-field potential is proposed and its constants are evaluated numerically for the pair intermolecular potential based on Gay-Berne interaction between mesogenic groups. The dependencies of the constants on molecular shape parameters are systematically analyzed. Order parameters of the uniaxial and biaxial nematic phases are evaluated by direct minimization of the free energy at different temperatures. The corresponding phase diagrams are obtained enabling one to study the effects of molecular model parameters on the stability regions of uniaxial and biaxial phases. The results are used to clarify the nature of experimentally observed biaxial ordering in nematic liquid crystals composed of tetrapode molecules with the same symmetry. PMID:20866427

  7. Synthesis of tungsten oxide tapered needles with nanotips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiliang; He, Yuehui; Zou, Jin; Cao, Peng; Jiang, Yao; Huang, Baiyun; Liu, C. T.; Liaw, P. K.

    2007-05-01

    Tungsten oxide tapered needles with nanotips were synthesized on a large scale by reacting tungsten nanopowders with hydrous nickel nitrate in hydrogen atmosphere. The resultant tungsten oxide needles have lengths more than 100 μm, root diameters of several hundred nanometers and tip diameters of several nanometers, showing a perfectly axisymmetric configuration. HRTEM and SAED analyses showed that the synthesized tungsten oxide tapered needles have a single-crystalline structure with growth direction of [0 1 0]. The effects of the experimental conditions (the ratio between tungsten and hydrous nickel nitrate, the size of tungsten powders, and the reaction atmosphere) on the morphology of the products were systematically investigated. It was found that tungsten oxide nanowires, submicro-/micro-whiskers and microtubules could be facilely obtained under different experimental conditions. The unique configuration and the single-crystal structure of the tapered needles may make them a potential candidate for field emitters and probing tips.

  8. Electrokinetic treatment of firing ranges containing tungsten-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Braida, Washington; Christodoulatos, Christos; Ogundipe, Adebayo; Dermatas, Dimitris; O'Connor, Gregory

    2007-11-19

    Tungsten-based alloys and composites are being used and new formulations are being considered for use in the manufacturing of different types of ammunition. The use of tungsten heavy alloys (WHA) in new munitions systems and tungsten composites in small caliber ammunition could potentially release substantial amounts of this element into the environment. Although tungsten is widely used in industrial and military applications, tungsten's potential environmental and health impacts have not been thoroughly addressed. This necessitates the research and development of remedial technologies to contain and/or remove tungsten from soils that may serve as a source for water contamination. The current work investigates the feasibility of using electrokinetics for the remediation of tungsten-contaminated soils in the presence of other heavy metals of concern such as Cu and Pb with aim to removing W from the soil while stabilizing in situ, Pb and Cu. PMID:17686582

  9. Fracture assessment of HSST Plate 14 shallow-flaw cruciform bend specimens tested under biaxial loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Williams, P.T.; Pennell, W.E.

    1998-06-01

    A technology to determine shallow-flaw fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is being developed for application to the safety assessment of RPVs containing postulated shallow surface flaws. Matrices of cruciform beam tests were developed to investigate and quantify the effects of temperature, biaxial loading, and specimen size on fracture initiation toughness of two-dimensional (constant depth), shallow, surface flaws. The cruciform beam specimens were developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to introduce a far-field, out-of-plane biaxial stress component in the test section that approximates the nonlinear stresses resulting from pressurized-thermal-shock or pressure-temperature loading of an RPV. Tests were conducted under biaxial load ratios ranging from uniaxial to equibiaxial. These tests demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower transition temperature region for an RPV material. The cruciform fracture toughness data were used to evaluate fracture methodologies for predicting the observed effects of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness. Initial emphasis was placed on assessment of stress-based methodologies, namely, the J-Q formulation, the Dodds-Anderson toughness scaling model, and the Weibull approach. Applications of these methodologies based on the hydrostatic stress fracture criterion indicated an effect of loading-biaxiality on fracture toughness; the conventional maximum principal stress criterion indicated no effect. A three-parameter Weibull model based on the hydrostatic stress criterion is shown to correlate the experimentally observed biaxial effect on cleavage fracture toughness by providing a scaling mechanism between uniaxial and biaxial loading states.

  10. High Temperature Slow Crack Growth of Si3N4 Specimens Subjected to Uniaxial and Biaxial Dynamic Fatigue Loading Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Nemeth, Noel N.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Powers, Lynn M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1995-01-01

    The slow crack growth of a hot-pressed silicon nitride was determined at 1300 C in air using dynamic fatigue testing under both uniaxial and biaxial stress states. Good agreement in fatigue parameter exists between the data obtained from uniaxial and biaxial loading conditions. A reasonable prediction of dynamic fatigue from one stress state to another was made using the recently developed CARES/LIFE computer code.

  11. Biaxial Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior in Aluminum Alloy 5083-H116 Under Ambient Laboratory and Saltwater Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perel, V. Y.; Misak, H. E.; Mall, S.; Jain, V. K.

    2015-04-01

    Crack growth of aluminum alloy 5083 was investigated when subjected to the in-plane biaxial tension-tension fatigue with stress ratio of 0.5 under ambient laboratory and saltwater environments. Cruciform specimens with a center hole, containing a notch and precrack at 45° to the specimen's arms, were tested in a biaxial fatigue test machine. Two biaxiality ratios, λ = 1 and λ = 1.5, were studied. For λ = 1, crack propagated along a straight line collinearly with the precrack, while for λ = 1.5 case, the crack path was curved and non-collinear with the precrack. Uniaxial fatigue tests were also conducted. Crack growth rates were faster under the biaxiality fatigue in comparison to uniaxial fatigue at a given crack driving force (Δ K I or Δ G) in both environments. Further, an increase in biaxiality ratio increased the crack growth rate, i.e., faster for λ = 1.5 case than λ = 1 case. Both biaxial fatigue and saltwater environment showed detrimental effects on the fatigue crack growth resistance of 5083, and its combination is highly detrimental when compared to uniaxial fatigue.

  12. Preliminary assessment of the effects of biaxial loading on reactor pressure vessel structural-integrity-assessment technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; Dickson, T.L.; McAfee, W.J.; Merkle, J.G.

    1996-04-01

    Effects of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness were studied to determine potential impact on structural integrity assessment of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under pressurized thermal shock (PTS) transient loading and pressure-temperature (PT) loading produced by reactor heatup and cooldown transients. Biaxial shallow-flaw fracture-toughness tests results were also used to determine the parameter controlling fracture in the transition temperature range, and to develop a related dual-parameter fracture-toughness correlation. Shallow-flaw and biaxial loading effects were found to reduce the conditional probability of crack initiation by a factor of nine when the shallow-flaw fracture-toughness K{sub Jc} data set, with biaxial-loading effects adjustments, was substituted in place of ASME Code K{sub Ic} data set in PTS analyses. Biaxial loading was found to reduce the shallow-flaw fracture toughness of RPV steel such that the lower-bound curve was located between ASME K{sub Ic} and K{sub IR} curves. This is relevant to future development of P-T curve analysis procedures. Fracture in shallow-flaw biaxial samples tested in the lower transition temperature range was shown to be strain controlled. A strain-based dual-parameter fracture-toughness correlation was developed and shown to be capable of predicting the effect of crack-tip constraint on fracture toughness for strain-controlled fracture.

  13. Surface damage and structure evolution of recrystallized tungsten exposed to ELM-like transient loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Y.; Du, J.; Wirtz, M.; Luo, G.-N.; Lu, G.-H.; Liu, W.

    2016-03-01

    Surface damage and structure evolution of the full tungsten ITER divertor under transient heat loads is a key concern for component lifetime and plasma operations. Recrystallization caused by transients and steady-state heat loads can lead to degradation of the material properties and is therefore one of the most serious issues for tungsten armor. In order to investigate the thermal response of the recrystallized tungsten under edge localized mode-like transient thermal loads, fully recrystallized tungsten samples with different average grain sizes are exposed to cyclic thermal shocks in the electron beam facility JUDITH 1. The results indicate that not only does the microstructure change due to recrystallization, but that the surface residual stress induced by mechanical polishing strongly influences the surface cracking behavior. The stress-free surface prepared by electro-polishing is shown to be more resistant to cracking than the mechanically polished one. The resulting surface roughness depends largely on the loading conditions instead of the recrystallized-grain size. As the base temperature increases from room temperature to 400 °C, surface roughening mainly due to the shear bands in each grain becomes more pronounced, and sub-grains (up to 3 μm) are simultaneously formed in the sub-surface. The directions of the shear bands exhibit strong grain-orientation dependence, and they are generally aligned with the traces of {1 1 2} twin habit planes. The results suggest that twinning deformation and dynamic recrystallization represent the predominant mechanism for surface roughening and related microstructure evolution.

  14. MUSE alignment onto VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Boudon, Didier; Caillier, Patrick; Daguisé, Eric; Dupuy, Christophe; Jarno, Aurélien; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Migniau, Jean-Emmanuel; Nicklas, Harald; Piqueras, Laure

    2014-07-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation Very Large Telescope (VLT) integral field spectrograph developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO). It combines a 1' x 1' field of view sampled at 0.2 arcsec for its Wide Field Mode (WFM) and a 7.5"x7.5" field of view for its Narrow Field Mode (NFM). Both modes will operate with the improved spatial resolution provided by GALACSI (Ground Atmospheric Layer Adaptive Optics for Spectroscopic Imaging), that will use the VLT deformable secondary mirror and 4 Laser Guide Stars (LGS) foreseen in 2015. MUSE operates in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently commissioning MUSE in the Very Large Telescope for the Preliminary Acceptance in Chile, scheduled for September, 2014. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2012 and 2013, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested to the P.I. institute at Lyon. After successful PAE in September 2013, MUSE instrument was shipped to the Very Large Telescope in Chile where that was aligned and tested in ESO integration hall at Paranal. After, MUSE was directly transported, fully aligned and without any optomechanical dismounting, onto VLT telescope where the first light was overcame the 7th of February, 2014. This paper describes the alignment procedure of the whole MUSE instrument with respect to the Very Large Telescope (VLT). It describes how 6 tons could be move with accuracy better than 0.025mm and less than 0.25 arcmin in order to reach alignment requirements. The success

  15. Hyperfine fields in ZnO studied under uni- and biaxial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przewodnik, R.; Kessler, P.; Vianden, R.

    2013-05-01

    The II-VI semiconductor ZnO has many potential applications in optoelectronic and sensor devices. When used as a transparent conducting contact it is often grown epitaxially onto a different substrate with the consequence that the layers are biaxially strained due to lattice mismatch. Similarly, impurity-implanted layers can lead to the development of local strain fields. Strain usually changes the electronic properties of layers and/ or implanted crystal regions. Detailed knowledge about local strain and its influence on the crystal fields is therefore helpful in predicting changes in crystal properties. The perturbed angular correlation technique was applied to study the electric field gradient (EFG) at the site of implanted In dopants in ZnO under uniaxial and biaxial strain. The observed linear change of the EFG with pressure and a change in symmetry due to compression perpendicular to the c-axis could be well reproduced by theoretical calculations using the point charge model.

  16. Mechanical properties of stanene under uniaxial and biaxial loading: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Mojumder, Satyajit; Amin, Abdullah Al; Islam, Md Mahbubul

    2015-09-28

    Stanene, a graphene like two dimensional honeycomb structure of tin has attractive features in electronics application. In this study, we performed molecular dynamics simulations using modified embedded atom method potential to investigate mechanical properties of stanene. We studied the effect of temperature and strain rate on mechanical properties of α-stanene for both uniaxial and biaxial loading conditions. Our study suggests that with the increasing temperature, both the fracture strength and strain of the stanene decrease. Uniaxial loading in zigzag direction shows higher fracture strength and strain compared to the armchair direction, while no noticeable variation in the mechanical properties is observed for biaxial loading. We also found at a higher loading rate, material exhibits higher fracture strength and strain. These results will aid further investigation of stanene as a potential nano-electronics substitute.

  17. Torsional and biaxial (tension-torsion) fatigue damage mechanisms in Waspaloy at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayaraman, N.; Ditmars, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Strain controlled torsional and biaxial (tension-torsion) low cycle fatigue behavior of Waspaloy was studied at room temperature as a function of heat treatment. Biaxial tests were conducted under proportional and nonproportional cyclic conditions. The deformation behavior under these different cyclic conditions was evaluated by slip trace analysis. For this, a Schmidt-type factor was defined for multiaxial loading conditions, and it was shown that when the slip deformation is predominant, nonproportional cycles are more damaging than proportional or pure axial or torsional cycles. This was attributed to the fact that under nonproportional cyclic conditions, deformation was through multiple slip, as opposed to single slip for other loading conditions, which gave rise to increased hardening. The total life for a given test condition was found to be independent of heat treatment. This was interpreted as being due to the differences in the cycles to initiation and propagation of cracks.

  18. Effect of Equal Biaxial Pre-Strain on Forming Limit Diagram of AA5083

    SciTech Connect

    Zhalehfar, F.; Hosseinipour, S. J.; Nourouzi, S.; Gorji, A. H.

    2011-01-17

    In this work, the effect of equal biaxial pre-strain on the forming limit curve (FLC) of 5083 aluminum alloy has been investigated. For this purpose, in the first stage, square blanks with dimensions of 200 mm in each length were cut from the original sheet and stretched by a spherical punch to the specified heights. Then, specimens were prepared by cutting the pre-strained blanks with the longitudinal axis parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction. In the second stage, the specimens were tested by the out-of-plane test method to determine the forming limit diagram (FLD) according to the ISO 12004. Furthermore, forming limit stress diagram (FLSD) was determined by using Hill's quadratic yield function. The results showed that the equal biaxial pre-straining decreased and shifted the FLC to the right hand side of the diagram. However, it had not any effect on the forming limit stress curves.

  19. Biaxial load effects on the crack border elastic strain energy and strain energy rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eftis, J.; Subramonian, N.; Liebowitz, H.

    1977-01-01

    The validity of the singular solution (first term of a series representation) is investigated for the crack tip stress and displacement field in an infinite sheet with a flat line crack with biaxial loads applied to the outer boundaries. It is shown that if one retains the second contribution to the series approximations for stress and displacement in the calculation of the local elastic strain energy density and elastic strain energy rate in the crack border region, both these quantities have significant biaxial load dependency. The value of the J-integral does not depend on the presence of the second term of the series expansion for stress and displacement. Thus J(I) is insensitive to the presence of loads applied parallel to the plane of the crack.

  20. Exploiting design freedom in biaxial dielectrics to enable spatially overlapping optical instruments

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh, Alireza; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Danner, Aaron J.

    2013-01-01

    The optical behavior of gradient biaxial dielectrics has not been widely explored in the literature due to their complicated nature, but the extra degrees of freedom in the index tensor have the potential of yielding useful optical instruments which are otherwise unachievable. In this work, a design method is described in detail which allows one to combine the behavior of up to four totally independent isotropic optical instruments in an overlapping region of space. This is non-trivial because of the mixing of the index tensor elements in the Hamiltonians; previously known methods only handled uniaxial dielectrics (where only two independent isotropic optical functions could overlap). The biaxial method introduced also allows three-dimensional multi-faced Janus devices to be designed; these are worked out in an example of what is possible to design with the method. PMID:23792651

  1. Tunable biaxial in-plane compressive strain in a Si nanomembrane transferred on a polyimide film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Munho; Mi, Hongyi; Cho, Minkyu; Seo, Jung-Hun; Zhou, Weidong; Gong, Shaoqin; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2015-05-01

    A method of creating tunable and programmable biaxial compressive strain in silicon nanomembranes (Si NMs) transferred onto a Kapton® HN polyimide film has been demonstrated. The programmable biaxial compressive strain (up to 0.54%) was generated utilizing a unique thermal property exhibited by the Kapton HN film, namely, it shrinks from its original size when exposed to elevated temperatures. The correlation between the strain and the annealing temperature was carefully investigated using Raman spectroscopy and high resolution X-ray diffraction. It was found that various amounts of compressive strains can be obtained by controlling the thermal annealing temperatures. In addition, a numerical model was used to evaluate the strain distribution in the Si NM. This technique provides a viable approach to forming in-plane compressive strain in NMs and offers a practical platform for further studies in strain engineering.

  2. Carrier transport simulation in a model liquid crystalline system with the biaxial Gay-Berne potential.

    PubMed

    Goto, Masanao; Takezoe, Hideo; Ishikawa, Ken

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, we performed carrier transport simulation to understand the unusual temperature dependence of the carrier mobility observed in nematic liquid crystals. For this purpose, we made a model liquid crystalline system consisting of biaxial Gay-Berne particles, and then we simulated hopping transport between these particles. The hopping rate was formulated suitably for the biaxial Gay-Berne particles based on the investigation of the electronic overlaps between actual aromatic molecules. The carrier transport simulation was performed by master equation method on the model system prepared by N-P-T ensemble Monte Carlo simulation. We reproduced gradual mobility increase in the nematic phase as a result of the change in the short range molecular order. PMID:20136321

  3. Carrier transport simulation in a model liquid crystalline system with the biaxial Gay-Berne potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Masanao; Takezoe, Hideo; Ishikawa, Ken

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, we performed carrier transport simulation to understand the unusual temperature dependence of the carrier mobility observed in nematic liquid crystals. For this purpose, we made a model liquid crystalline system consisting of biaxial Gay-Berne particles, and then we simulated hopping transport between these particles. The hopping rate was formulated suitably for the biaxial Gay-Berne particles based on the investigation of the electronic overlaps between actual aromatic molecules. The carrier transport simulation was performed by master equation method on the model system prepared by N-P-T ensemble Monte Carlo simulation. We reproduced gradual mobility increase in the nematic phase as a result of the change in the short range molecular order.

  4. Angular phase-matching bandwidths in biaxial nonlinear crystals for frequency converters

    SciTech Connect

    Grechin, Sergei G

    2010-11-13

    It is shown that the angular phase-matching bandwidths in biaxial nonlinear crystals in the general case must be calculated in the coordinate system in which the angular deviations of the crystal and the laser beam divergence are determined consistently. The angular phase-matching bandwidths in this coordinate system may considerably differ from the conventionally determined values. The optimum orientation of the coordinate system for determining the angular phase-matching bandwidths is found. It is established that, in the general case in biaxial crystals, as in uniaxial ones, phase matching is always angle-critical along one coordinate and noncritical along the other and that it is possible to realise angle-noncritical phase matching of the fourth order. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  5. Neutron diffraction investigation of an in-plane biaxial fatigued stainless steel sample of cruciform geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Yu V.; Balagurov, A. M.; Sheverev, S. G.; Schreiber, J.; Korsunsky, A. M.; Vorster, W. J. J.; Bomas, H.; Stoeberl, C.

    2008-03-01

    Fatigue and fracture under multiaxial stresses are among the most important current research topics aimed at ensuring improved reliability of industrial components. An ex situ in-plane biaxial low cycle fatigued sample of cruciform geometry from austenitic stainless steel AISI 321 H was investigated on the FSD stress-diffractometer at the IBR-2 pulsed nuclear reactor by using the neutron strain scanner and the uniaxial stress rig. The phase composition of fatigued material was determined and the residual macrostresses and phase microstresses were measured. To the best of our knowledge, no neutron diffraction investigations of materials subjected to biaxial loading have been previously carried out. The first results of the neutron diffraction experiment are presented and discussed.

  6. Tunable biaxial in-plane compressive strain in a Si nanomembrane transferred on a polyimide film

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Munho; Mi, Hongyi; Cho, Minkyu; Seo, Jung-Hun; Ma, Zhenqiang; Zhou, Weidong; Gong, Shaoqin

    2015-05-25

    A method of creating tunable and programmable biaxial compressive strain in silicon nanomembranes (Si NMs) transferred onto a Kapton{sup ®} HN polyimide film has been demonstrated. The programmable biaxial compressive strain (up to 0.54%) was generated utilizing a unique thermal property exhibited by the Kapton HN film, namely, it shrinks from its original size when exposed to elevated temperatures. The correlation between the strain and the annealing temperature was carefully investigated using Raman spectroscopy and high resolution X-ray diffraction. It was found that various amounts of compressive strains can be obtained by controlling the thermal annealing temperatures. In addition, a numerical model was used to evaluate the strain distribution in the Si NM. This technique provides a viable approach to forming in-plane compressive strain in NMs and offers a practical platform for further studies in strain engineering.

  7. High-performance transparent and stretchable all-solid supercapacitors based on highly aligned carbon nanotube sheets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Peng, Huisheng; Durstock, Michael; Dai, Liming

    2014-01-01

    By using highly aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) sheets of excellent optical transmittance and mechanical stretchability as both the current collector and active electrode, high-performance transparent and stretchable all-solid supercapacitors with a good stability were developed. A transmittance up to 75% at the wavelength of 550 nm was achieved for a supercapacitor made from a cross-over assembly of two single-layer CNT sheets. The transparent supercapacitor has a specific capacitance of 7.3 F g−1 and can be biaxially stretched up to 30% strain without any obvious change in electrochemical performance even over hundreds stretching cycles. PMID:24402400

  8. Effect of biaxial versus coaxial microincision cataract surgery on optical quality of the cornea

    PubMed Central

    Eliwa, Tamer Fahmy; Elsamkary, Mahmoud A; Hamza, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Context: Visual function is determined by a combination of the cornea, which has a larger effect and internal aberrations generated by the intraocular lens and those induced by the surgery. These corneal refractive changes are related to the location and size of the corneal incision. The smaller the incision, the lower the aberrations and the better the optical quality. Aims: To compare the effect of uneventful coaxial versus biaxial microincision cataract surgery (MICS) on the corneal aberrations. Settings and Design: Retrospective interventional nonrandomized comparative case study comprised 40 eyes of 36 patients with primary senile cataract. Subjects and Methods: They were divided into two groups: Group I (20 eyes) had operated by biaxial MICS and Group II (20 eyes) had operated by coaxial MICS. Each group were assessed by corneal topography and wavefront analysis over 6 mm pupil size preoperatively and 1-month postoperatively. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS for Windows (version 17.0.1, SPSS, Inc.). The paired t-test was used to compare the mean values of corneal aberrations preoperatively and 1-month postoperatively in each group. Results: There was a significant increase in trefoil and quatrefoil in biaxial MICS (P = 0.063, 0.032 respectively) while other aberrations insignificantly changed. The coaxial MICS showed a significant increase in root mean square (RMS) of total high order aberrations (HOAs) (P = 0.02) and coma (0.028), but not the others. In comparison to each other, there was the insignificant difference as regards astigmatism, RMS of individual and total HOAs. Conclusions: Coaxial and biaxial MICS are neutral on corneal astigmatism and aberrations. PMID:26265637

  9. Flexural strength of dental composite restoratives: comparison of biaxial and three-point bending test.

    PubMed

    Chung, S M; Yap, A U J; Chandra, S P; Lim, C T

    2004-11-15

    This study compared two test methods used to evaluate the flexural strength of resin-based dental composites. The two test methods evaluated were the three-point bending test4 and the biaxial flexural test. Materials used in this investigation were from the same manufacturer (3M ESPE) and included microfill (A110), minifill (Z100 and Filtek Z250), polyacid modified (F2000), and flowable [Filtek Flowable (FF)] composites. Flexural strength was determined with the use of both test methods after 1 week of conditioning in water at 37 degrees C. Data were analyzed with the use of an ANOVA/Scheffe test and an independent-samples t test at significance level 0.05. Mean flexural strength (n = 7) ranged from 66.61 to 147.21 and 67.27 to 182.81 MPa for three-point bending and ball-on-three-ball biaxial test methods, respectively. In both test methods, Z100 was significantly stronger than all other composites evaluated. In the three-point bending test, flexural strength of Z250 was significantly higher than A110, F2000 and FF, and FF was significantly stronger than A110 and F2000. The biaxial test method arrived at the same conclusions except that there was no significant difference between Z250 and FF. Pearson's correlation revealed a significantly (p < 0.01) positive and good correlation (R2 = 0.72) in flexural strength between the two test methods. Although the biaxial test has the advantage of utilizing small specimens, the low reproducibility of this test method does not support the proposition that it is a more reliable test method when compared to the ISO three-point bending test. PMID:15386492

  10. Mechanical characterisation of porcine rectus sheath under uniaxial and biaxial tension.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Mathew; Winter, Des C; Simms, Ciaran K

    2014-06-01

    Incisional hernia development is a significant complication after laparoscopic abdominal surgery. Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is known to initiate the extrusion of intestines through the abdominal wall, but there is limited data on the mechanics of IAP generation and the structural properties of rectus sheath. This paper presents an explanation of the mechanics of IAP development, a study of the uniaxial and biaxial tensile properties of porcine rectus sheath, and a simple computational investigation of the tissue. Analysis using Laplace׳s law showed a circumferential stress in the abdominal wall of approx. 1.1MPa due to an IAP of 11kPa, commonly seen during coughing. Uniaxial and biaxial tensile tests were conducted on samples of porcine rectus sheath to characterise the stress-stretch responses of the tissue. Under uniaxial tension, fibre direction samples failed on average at a stress of 4.5MPa at a stretch of 1.07 while cross-fibre samples failed at a stress of 1.6MPa under a stretch of 1.29. Under equi-biaxial tension, failure occurred at 1.6MPa with the fibre direction stretching to only 1.02 while the cross-fibre direction stretched to 1.13. Uniaxial and biaxial stress-stretch plots are presented allowing detailed modelling of the tissue either in silico or in a surrogate material. An FeBio computational model of the tissue is presented using a combination of an Ogden and an exponential power law model to represent the matrix and fibres respectively. The structural properties of porcine rectus sheath have been characterised and add to the small set of human data in the literature with which it may be possible to develop methods to reduce the incidence of incisional hernia development. PMID:24725440

  11. Damage and failure behavior of metal matrix composites under biaxial loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Steven Wayne

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are being considered for increased use in structures that require the ductility and damage tolerance of the metal matrix and the enhanced strength and creep resistance at elevated temperatures of high performance fibers. Particularly promising for advanced aerospace engines and airframes are SiC fiber/titanium matrix composites (TMCs). A large program was undertaken in the Air Force to characterize the deformation and failure behaviors of TMCs and to develop computational models that can be used for component design. The effort reported here focused on a SiC SCS-6/Timetal 21S composite under biaxial loading conditions. Biaxial loading conditions are important because multiaxial stresses have been shown to influence the strength and ductility of engineering materials and, in general, structural components are subjected to multiaxial loads. The TMC material response, including stress-strain curves and failure surfaces, was measured using a combination of off-axis uniaxial tension and compression tests and biaxial cruciform tests. The off-axis tests produce combinations of in-plane tension, compression, and shear stresses, the mix of which are controlled by the relative angle between the fiber and specimen axes. The biaxial cruciform tests allowed independent control over the tensile or compressive loads in the fiber and transverse directions. The results of these characterization tests were used to develop a microstructural constitutive model and failure criteria. The basis of the micromechanical constitutive model is a representative unit volume of the MMC with a periodic array of fibers. The representative unit volume is divided into a fiber and three matrix cells for which the microstructural equilibrium and compatibility equations can be analyzed. The resulting constitutive model and associated failure criteria can be used to predict the material behavior under general loading conditions.

  12. Human Annulus Fibrosus Material Properties from Biaxial Testing and Constitutive Modeling are Altered with Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Grace D.; Sen, Sounok; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2012-01-01

    The annulus fibrosus (AF) of the intervertebral disc undergoes large and multidirectional stresses and strains. Uniaxial tensile tests are limited for measuring AF material properties, because freely contracting edges can prevent fiber stretch and are not representative of in situ boundary conditions. The objectives of this study were to measure human AF biaxial tensile mechanics and to apply and validate a constitutive model to determine material properties. Biaxial tensile tests were performed on samples oriented along the circumferential-axial and the radial-axial directions. Data were fit to a structurally-motivated anisotropic hyperelastic model composed of isotropic extrafibrillar matrix, nonlinear fibers, and fiber-matrix interactions (FMI) normal to the fibers. The validated model was used to simulate shear and uniaxial tensile behavior, to investigate AF structure-function, and to quantify the effect of degeneration. The biaxial stress-strain response was described well by the model (R2>0.9). The model showed that the parameters for fiber nonlinearity and the normal FMI correlated with degeneration, resulting in an elongated toe region and lower stiffness with degeneration. The model simulations in shear and uniaxial tension successfully matched previously published circumferential direction Young’s modulus, provided an explanation for the low values in previously published axial direction Young’s modulus, and was able to simulate shear mechanics. The normal FMI were important contributors to stress and changed with degeneration, therefore, their microstructural and compositional source should be investigated. Finally, the biaxial mechanical data and constitutive model can be incorporated into a disc finite element model to provide improved quantification of disc mechanics. PMID:21748426

  13. Surface contour of a biaxially strained, doubly curved antenna reflective mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saylor, A. V.

    1982-01-01

    The elastic membrane equations which describe the deflection of a biaxially tensioned reflective mesh from an idealized surface were developed and solved. The conditions of equilibrium of the forces acting on a membrane element furnish equations which may be used to solve a variety of problems. Configurations considered include continuous, as well as incremental mesh attachment to structural members to form shapes which are approximately parabolic or spherical.

  14. Raman spectroscopy of graphene and bilayer under biaxial strain: bubbles and balloons.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Jakob; Nair, Rahul R; Ott, Anna; Georgiou, Thanasis; Geim, Andre K; Novoselov, Kostya S; Casiraghi, Cinzia

    2012-02-01

    We use graphene bubbles to study the Raman spectrum of graphene under biaxial (e.g., isotropic) strain. Our Gruneisen parameters are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values. Discrepancy in the previously reported values is attributed to the interaction of graphene with the substrate. Bilayer balloons (intentionally pressurized membranes) have been used to avoid the effect of the substrate and to study the dependence of strain on the interlayer interactions. PMID:22149458

  15. Evaporation-Induced Self-Assembly of Ultrathin Tungsten Oxide Nanowires over a Large Scale for Ultraviolet Photodetector.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Niederberger, Markus

    2016-03-15

    Self-assembly of inorganic nanowires on a large scale directly on a substrate represents a great challenge. Starting from colloidally stable dispersions of ultrathin tungsten oxide nanowires, we successfully assemble the nanowires on a centimeter scale on flat or patterned substrates by a simple evaporation-induced self-assembly method. The capillary flow generated during the evaporation is responsible for the assembly of the nanowires. The concentration of the nanowire dispersion has a significant influence on the self-assembly behavior. Well-aligned tungsten oxide nanowire thin films are achieved when the concentration of the dispersion is in the range from 0.5 to 3.0 mg/mL. While at higher concentrations disordered nanowire thin films with cracks are formed, lower concentrations do not result in the formation of a continuous thin film. A macroscopic device based on the self-assembled tungsten oxide nanowires is fabricated, exhibiting good performance for UV light detection. Our results may pave the road for integrating aligned ultrathin semiconductor nanowires into macroscopic devices for optoelectronic applications. PMID:26900019

  16. Inflation by alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, C.P.; Roest, Diederik

    2015-06-08

    Pseudo-Goldstone bosons (pGBs) can provide technically natural inflatons, as has been comparatively well-explored in the simplest axion examples. Although inflationary success requires trans-Planckian decay constants, f≳M{sub p}, several mechanisms have been proposed to obtain this, relying on (mis-)alignments between potential and kinetic energies in multiple-field models. We extend these mechanisms to a broader class of inflationary models, including in particular the exponential potentials that arise for pGB potentials based on noncompact groups (and so which might apply to moduli in an extra-dimensional setting). The resulting potentials provide natural large-field inflationary models and can predict a larger primordial tensor signal than is true for simpler single-field versions of these models. In so doing we provide a unified treatment of several alignment mechanisms, showing how each emerges as a limit of the more general setup.

  17. Alignments of RNA structures.

    PubMed

    Blin, Guillaume; Denise, Alain; Dulucq, Serge; Herrbach, Claire; Touzet, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    We describe a theoretical unifying framework to express the comparison of RNA structures, which we call alignment hierarchy. This framework relies on the definition of common supersequences for arc-annotated sequences and encompasses the main existing models for RNA structure comparison based on trees and arc-annotated sequences with a variety of edit operations. It also gives rise to edit models that have not been studied yet. We provide a thorough analysis of the alignment hierarchy, including a new polynomial-time algorithm and an NP-completeness proof. The polynomial-time algorithm involves biologically relevant edit operations such as pairing or unpairing nucleotides. It has been implemented in a software, called gardenia, which is available at the Web server http://bioinfo.lifl.fr/RNA/gardenia. PMID:20431150

  18. On the alignment space.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shi-Yi; Wang, Kui; Hu, Gang; Chen, Lu-Sheng; Zhang, Hua; Xia, Shu-Tao

    2005-01-01

    Sequences with generalized errors which are called mutations in bioinformatics and generalized error-correcting codes are studied in this paper. In the areas of bioinformatics, computer science and information theory, sequences with generalized errors are discussed respectively for different aims. Firstly, we give the definitions of alignment distance and Levenshtein distance by expansion sequences and discuss their properties and relations. Then the modular structure theory is introduced for strictly describe the expansion sequences. We show that the expansion modular structures of sequences form a Boolean algebra. As applications of the modular structure theory, we give a new and more strict proof of triangle inequality for alignment distance. At last, the definition and construction of generalized error-correcting codes are studied, and some optimal codes with small length are listed. PMID:17282158

  19. Presence of tungsten-containing fibers in tungsten refining and manufacturing processes.

    PubMed

    McKernan, John L; Toraason, Mark A; Fernback, Joseph E; Petersen, Martin R

    2009-04-01

    In tungsten refining and manufacturing processes, a series of tungsten oxides are typically formed as intermediates in the production of tungsten powder. The present study was conducted to characterize airborne tungsten-containing fiber dimensions, elemental composition and concentrations in the US tungsten refining and manufacturing industry. During the course of normal employee work activities, seven personal breathing zone and 62 area air samples were collected and analyzed using National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) fiber sampling and counting methods to determine dimensions, composition and airborne concentrations of fibers. Mixed models were used to identify relationships between potential determinants and airborne fiber concentrations. Results from transmission electron microscopy analyses indicated that airborne fibers with length >0.5 microm, diameter >0.01 microm and aspect ratios > or =3:1 were present on 35 of the 69 air samples collected. Overall, the airborne fibers detected had a geometric mean length approximately 3 microm and diameter approximately 0.3 microm. Ninety-seven percent of the airborne fibers identified were in the thoracic fraction (i.e. aerodynamic diameter < or = 10 microm). Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry results indicated that airborne fibers prior to the carburization process consisted primarily of tungsten and oxygen, with other elements being detected in trace quantities. Based on NIOSH fiber counting 'B' rules (length > 5 microm, diameter < 3 microm and aspect ratio > or = 5:1), airborne fiber concentrations ranged from below the limit of detection to 0.085 fibers cm(-3), with calcining being associated with the highest airborne concentrations. The mixed model procedure indicated that process temperature had a marginally significant relationship to airborne fiber concentration. This finding was expected since heated processes such as calcining created the highest airborne fiber concentrations. The

  20. Alignment reference device

    DOEpatents

    Patton, Gail Y.; Torgerson, Darrel D.

    1987-01-01

    An alignment reference device provides a collimated laser beam that minimizes angular deviations therein. A laser beam source outputs the beam into a single mode optical fiber. The output end of the optical fiber acts as a source of radiant energy and is positioned at the focal point of a lens system where the focal point is positioned within the lens. The output beam reflects off a mirror back to the lens that produces a collimated beam.

  1. Nuclear reactor alignment plate configuration

    DOEpatents

    Altman, David A; Forsyth, David R; Smith, Richard E; Singleton, Norman R

    2014-01-28

    An alignment plate that is attached to a core barrel of a pressurized water reactor and fits within slots within a top plate of a lower core shroud and upper core plate to maintain lateral alignment of the reactor internals. The alignment plate is connected to the core barrel through two vertically-spaced dowel pins that extend from the outside surface of the core barrel through a reinforcement pad and into corresponding holes in the alignment plate. Additionally, threaded fasteners are inserted around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad and into the alignment plate to further secure the alignment plate to the core barrel. A fillet weld also is deposited around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad. To accomodate thermal growth between the alignment plate and the core barrel, a gap is left above, below and at both sides of one of the dowel pins in the alignment plate holes through with the dowel pins pass.

  2. Dynamic Alignment at SLS

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, Robert E.

    2003-04-23

    The relative alignment of components in the storage ring of the Swiss Light Source (SLS) is guaranteed by mechanical means. The magnets are rigidly fixed to 48 girders by means of alignment rails with tolerances of less than {+-}15 {micro}m. The bending magnets, supported by 3 point ball bearings, overlap adjacent girders and thus establish virtual train links between the girders, located near the bending magnet centres. Keeping the distortion of the storage ring geometry within a tolerance of {+-}100 {micro}m in order to guarantee sufficient dynamic apertures, requires continuous monitoring and correction of the girder locations. Two monitoring systems for the horizontal and the vertical direction will be installed to measure displacements of the train link between girders, which are due to ground settings and temperature effects: The hydrostatic levelling system (HLS) gives an absolute vertical reference, while the horizontal positioning system (HPS), which employs low cost linear encoders with sub-micron resolution, measures relative horizontal movements. The girder mover system based on five DC motors per girder allows a dynamic realignment of the storage ring within a working window of more than {+-}1 mm for girder translations and {+-}1 mrad for rotations. We will describe both monitoring systems (HLS and HPS) as well as the applied correction scheme based on the girder movers. We also show simulations indicating that beam based girder alignment takes care of most of the static closed orbit correction.

  3. Docking alignment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, Leo G. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Improved techniques are provided for alignment of two objects. The present invention is particularly suited for three-dimensional translation and three-dimensional rotational alignment of objects in outer space. A camera 18 is fixedly mounted to one object, such as a remote manipulator arm 10 of the spacecraft, while the planar reflective surface 30 is fixed to the other object, such as a grapple fixture 20. A monitor 50 displays in real-time images from the camera, such that the monitor displays both the reflected image of the camera and visible markings on the planar reflective surface when the objects are in proper alignment. The monitor may thus be viewed by the operator and the arm 10 manipulated so that the reflective surface is perpendicular to the optical axis of the camera, the roll of the reflective surface is at a selected angle with respect to the camera, and the camera is spaced a pre-selected distance from the reflective surface.

  4. Band Gap Engineering with Ultralarge Biaxial Strains in Suspended Monolayer MoS2.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, David; Liu, Xinghui; Christopher, Jason W; Cantley, Lauren; Wadehra, Anubhav; Kim, Brian L; Goldberg, Bennett B; Swan, Anna K; Bunch, J Scott

    2016-09-14

    We demonstrate the continuous and reversible tuning of the optical band gap of suspended monolayer MoS2 membranes by as much as 500 meV by applying very large biaxial strains. By using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to grow crystals that are highly impermeable to gas, we are able to apply a pressure difference across suspended membranes to induce biaxial strains. We observe the effect of strain on the energy and intensity of the peaks in the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum and find a linear tuning rate of the optical band gap of 99 meV/%. This method is then used to study the PL spectra of bilayer and trilayer devices under strain and to find the shift rates and Grüneisen parameters of two Raman modes in monolayer MoS2. Finally, we use this result to show that we can apply biaxial strains as large as 5.6% across micron-sized areas and report evidence for the strain tuning of higher level optical transitions. PMID:27509768

  5. Biaxial Texture Evolution in MgO Films Fabricated Using Ion Beam-Assisted Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yan; Zhang, Ya-Hui; Zhao, Rui-Peng; Zhang, Fei; Lu, Yu-Ming; Cai, Chuan-Bing; Xiong, Jie; Tao, Bo-Wan

    2016-04-01

    The growth of multifunctional thin films on flexible substrates is important technologically, because flexible electronics require such a platform. In this study, we examined the evolution of biaxial texture in MgO films prepared using ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) on a Hastelloy substrate. Texture and microstructure developments were characterized through in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction monitoring, x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy, which demonstrated that biaxial texture was developed during the nucleation stage (~2.2 nm). The best biaxial texture was obtained with a thickness of approximately 12 nm. As MgO continued to grow, the influence of surface energy was reduced, and film growth was driven by the attempt to minimize volume free-energy density. Thus the MgO grains were subsequently rotated at the (002) direction toward the ion beam. In addition, an approach was developed for accelerating in-plane texture evolution by pre-depositing an amorphous MgO layer before IBAD.

  6. Uniaxial and biaxial tensioning effects on thin membrane materials. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinson, W. F.; Goslee, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Thin laminated membranes are being considered for various surface applications on future large space structural systems. Some of the thin membranes would be stretched across or between structural members with the requirement that the membrane be maintained within specified limits of smoothness which would be dictated by the particular applications such as antenna reflector requirements. The multiaxial tensile force required to maintain the smoothness in the membrane needs to be determined for use in the structure design. Therefore, several types of thicknesses of thin membrane materials have been subjected to varied levels of uniaxial and biaxial tensile loads. During the biaxial tests, deviations of the material surface smoothness were measured by a noncontacting capacitance probe. Basic materials consisted of composites of vacuum deposited aluminum on Mylar and Kapton ranging in thickness from 0.00025 in (0.000635 cm) to 0.002 in (0.00508 cm). Some of the material was reinforced with Kevlar and Nomex scrim. The uniaxial tests determined the material elongation and tensile forces up to ultimate conditions. Biaxial tests indicated that a relatively smooth material surface could be achieved with tensile force of approximately 1 to 15 Newtons per centimeter, depending upon the material thickness and/or reinforcement.

  7. Biaxial thermal creep of Inconel 617 and Haynes 230 at 850 and 950 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Hsiao-Ming; Mo, Kun; Stubbins, James F.

    2014-04-01

    The biaxial thermal creep behavior of Inconel 617 and Haynes 230 at 850 and 950 °C was investigated. Biaxial stresses were generated using the pressurized tube technique. The detailed creep deformation and fracture mechanism have been studied. Creep curves for both alloys showed that tertiary creep accounts for a greater portion of the materials' life, while secondary creep only accounts for a small portion. Fractographic examinations of the two alloys indicated that nucleation, growth, and coalescence of creep voids are the dominant micro-mechanisms for creep fracture. At 850 °C, alloy 230 has better creep resistance than alloy 617. When subjected to the biaxial stress state, the creep rupture life of the two alloys was considerably reduced when compared to the results obtained by uniaxial tensile creep tests. The Monkman-Grant relation proves to be a promising method for estimating the long-term creep life for alloy 617, whereas alloy 230 does not follow the relation. This might be associated with the significant changes in the microstructure of alloy 230 at high temperatures.

  8. Biaxial Texture Evolution in MgO Films Fabricated Using Ion Beam-Assisted Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yan; Zhang, Ya-Hui; Zhao, Rui-Peng; Zhang, Fei; Lu, Yu-Ming; Cai, Chuan-Bing; Xiong, Jie; Tao, Bo-Wan

    2016-07-01

    The growth of multifunctional thin films on flexible substrates is important technologically, because flexible electronics require such a platform. In this study, we examined the evolution of biaxial texture in MgO films prepared using ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) on a Hastelloy substrate. Texture and microstructure developments were characterized through in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction monitoring, x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy, which demonstrated that biaxial texture was developed during the nucleation stage (~2.2 nm). The best biaxial texture was obtained with a thickness of approximately 12 nm. As MgO continued to grow, the influence of surface energy was reduced, and film growth was driven by the attempt to minimize volume free-energy density. Thus the MgO grains were subsequently rotated at the (002) direction toward the ion beam. In addition, an approach was developed for accelerating in-plane texture evolution by pre-depositing an amorphous MgO layer before IBAD.

  9. Biaxial unloading and springback behavior of dual-phase DP590 steel using cruciform specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkolis, Yannis P.; Deng, Nengxiu; Kuwabara, Toshihiko

    2013-12-01

    The unloading behavior of a dual-phase steel (DP590) from a biaxial state of stress was probed using a newly-designed cruciform specimen. The specimen was designed to develop uniform and relatively large plastic strains (over 15% equivalent logarithmic plastic strain) in the gage section, before failure. Nine radial loading paths in the 1st quadrant of the plane stress space were probed. The experiments involved repeated loading and unloading up to failure. At every unloading, the initial response was found to agree with the linear, orthotropically elastic response of the undeformed material. This first linear response was followed by a second one, at a reduced slope. Beyond that, the recorded response was fully non-linear. The same sequence of events was observed during each reloading. The biaxial non-linear strain recovery components ɛxnl and ɛynl were measured to be on average approximately 11% of the elastic strains ɛxe and ɛye, respectively. This ratio was found to increase with plastic deformation. Subsequently, these biaxial experiments were used to calibrate the Yld2000-2D yield function.

  10. Fabrication and reliable implementation of an ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) biaxial bending actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gil-Yong; Choi, Jung-Oh; Kim, Myeungseon; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2011-10-01

    Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) are one of the most popular types of electro-active polymer actuator, due to their low electric driving potential, large deformation range, and light weight. IPMCs have been used as actuators or sensors in many areas of biomedical and robotic engineering. In this research, IPMCs were studied as a biaxial bending actuator capable of smart and flexible motion. We designed and fabricated this bending actuator and implemented it to have a reliable actuating motion using a systematic approach. The resulting device was bar shaped with a square cross section and had four insulated electrodes on its surface. By applying different voltages to these four electrodes, a biaxial bending motion can be induced. To construct this actuator, several fabrication processes were considered. We modified the Nafion stacking method, and established a complete sequence of actuator fabrication processes. Using these processes, we were able to fabricate an IPMC biaxial bending actuator with both high actuating force and high flexibility. Several experiments were conducted to investigate and verify the performance of the actuator. The IPMC actuator system was modeled from experimentally measured data, and using this actuator model, a closed-loop proportional integral (PI) controller was designed. Reference position tracking performances of open-loop and closed-loop systems were compared. Finally, circular motion tracking performances of the actuator tip were tested under different rotation frequencies and radii of a reference trajectory circle.

  11. Spin-orbit interactions of a Gaussian light propagating in biaxial crystals.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiancong; Chen, Lixiang

    2012-05-21

    Based on the plane-wave angular spectrum representation, we derive a formal expression for any light fields propagating in biaxial crystals, and particularly, present an effective numerical method to investigate the propagation behavior for a Gaussian light beam. Unlike uniaxial crystals, we observe the intriguing formation, repulsion and disappearance of vortex pairs, as the refractive indices deviate slightly and gradually from the uniaxial limit. In the Minkowski angular momentum picture, we also investigate the orbital angular momentum dynamics for both left- and right-handed circularly polarized components. Of further interest is the revelation of nonconservation of the angular momentum within the light field during the spin-orbit interactions, and the optical torque per photon that the light exerts on the biaxial crystal is quantified. We interpret these interesting phenomena by the weakly broken rotational invariance of biaxial crystals. The self-consistency of our theory is confirmed by the balance equation describing the conservation law of total angular momentum of filed and crystal in the Minkowski picture. PMID:22714163

  12. On the Use of Biaxial Properties in Modeling Annulus as a Holzapfel–Gasser–Ogden Material

    PubMed Central

    Momeni Shahraki, Narjes; Fatemi, Ali; Goel, Vijay K.; Agarwal, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Besides the biology, stresses and strains within the tissue greatly influence the location of damage initiation and mode of failure in an intervertebral disk. Finite element models of a functional spinal unit (FSU) that incorporate reasonably accurate geometry and appropriate material properties are suitable to investigate such issues. Different material models and techniques have been used to model the anisotropic annulus fibrosus, but the abilities of these models to predict damage initiation in the annulus and to explain clinically observed phenomena are unclear. In this study, a hyperelastic anisotropic material model for the annulus with two different sets of material constants, experimentally determined using uniaxial and biaxial loading conditions, were incorporated in a 3D finite element model of a ligamentous FSU. The purpose of the study was to highlight the biomechanical differences (e.g., intradiscal pressure, motion, forces, stresses, strains, etc.) due to the dissimilarity between the two sets of material properties (uniaxial and biaxial). Based on the analyses, the biaxial constants simulations resulted in better agreements with the in vitro and in vivo data, and thus are more suitable for future damage analysis and failure prediction of the annulus under complex multiaxial loading conditions. PMID:26090359

  13. Compressive, diametral tensile and biaxial flexural strength of cutting-edge calcium phosphate cements.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Ajaxon, Ingrid; Ginebra, Maria Pau; Engqvist, Håkan; Persson, Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are widely used in bone repair. Currently there are two main types of CPCs, brushite and apatite. The aim of this project was to evaluate the mechanical properties of particularly promising experimental brushite and apatite formulations in comparison to commercially available brushite- and apatite-based cements (chronOS(™) Inject and Norian(®) SRS(®), respectively), and in particular evaluate the diametral tensile strength and biaxial flexural strength of these cements in both wet and dry conditions for the first time. The cements׳ porosity and their compressive, diametral tensile and biaxial flexural strength were tested in wet (or moist) and dry conditions. The surface morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Phase composition was assessed with X-ray diffraction. It was found that the novel experimental cements showed better mechanical properties than the commercially available cements, in all loading scenarios. The highest compressive strength (57.2±6.5MPa before drying and 69.5±6.0MPa after drying) was found for the experimental brushite cement. This cement also showed the highest wet diametral tensile strength (10.0±0.8MPa) and wet biaxial flexural strength (30.7±1.8MPa). It was also the cement that presented the lowest porosity (approx. 12%). The influence of water content was found to depend on cement type, with some cements showing higher mechanical properties after drying and some no difference after drying. PMID:27082025

  14. Online estimation algorithm for a biaxial ankle kinematic model with configuration dependent joint axes.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Y H; Xie, S Q

    2011-02-01

    The kinematics of the human ankle is commonly modeled as a biaxial hinge joint model. However, significant variations in axis orientations have been found between different individuals and also between different foot configurations. For ankle rehabilitation robots, information regarding the ankle kinematic parameters can be used to estimate the ankle and subtalar joint displacements. This can in turn be used as auxiliary variables in adaptive control schemes to allow modification of the robot stiffness and damping parameters to reduce the forces applied at stiffer foot configurations. Due to the large variations observed in the ankle kinematic parameters, an online identification algorithm is required to provide estimates of the model parameters. An online parameter estimation routine based on the recursive least-squares (RLS) algorithm was therefore developed in this research. An extension of the conventional biaxial ankle kinematic model, which allows variation in axis orientations with different foot configurations had also been developed and utilized in the estimation algorithm. Simulation results showed that use of the extended model in the online algorithm is effective in capturing the foot orientation of a biaxial ankle model with variable joint axis orientations. Experimental results had also shown that a modified RLS algorithm that penalizes a deviation of model parameters from their nominal values can be used to obtain more realistic parameter estimates while maintaining a level of estimation accuracy comparable to that of the conventional RLS routine. PMID:21280877

  15. Effect of peroxide bleaching on the biaxial flexural strength and modulus of bovine dentin

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Adriana Oliveira; Ayres, Ana Paula Almeida; de Almeida, Letícia Cunha Amaral Gonzaga; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Rueggeberg, Frederick Allen; Giannini, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effects of carbamide peroxide and hydrogen peroxide on the biaxial flexural strength and flexural modulus of bovine dentin. Materials and Methods: Thirty coronal dentin disks (0.5 mm thick × 6.0 mm diameter) were prepared from bovine teeth. The disks were randomly divided into three groups (n=10): A control group (unbleached), a group bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide (8 h at 37°C), and a group bleached with 38% hydrogen peroxide (three 10 min applications at 37°C). The specimens were tested in a biaxial flexural apparatus held in a universal testing machine at 1.27 mm/min until failure occurred, and the biaxial mechanical properties were calculated. For each test parameter, the data were statistically analyzed by Fisher's PLSD test (predetermined α = 0.05). Results: The group bleached with 38% hydrogen peroxide demonstrated significantly lower flexural strength than the unbleached control group. Hydrogen peroxide treatment resulted in a significantly lower flexural modulus compared with the control group and with carbamide peroxide bleaching. Conclusion: Exposure of dentin to hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced both the flexural strength and the flexural modulus compared with the no-treatment control, whereas exposure to carbamide peroxide did not significantly affect either parameter. PMID:26038658

  16. Tungsten-induced carcinogenesis in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Laulicht, Freda; Brocato, Jason; Cartularo, Laura; Vaughan, Joshua; Wu, Feng; Kluz, Thomas; Sun, Hong; Oksuz, Betul Akgol; Shen, Steven; Peana, Massimiliano; Medici, Serenella; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Costa, Max

    2015-10-01

    Metals such as arsenic, cadmium, beryllium, and nickel are known human carcinogens; however, other transition metals, such as tungsten (W), remain relatively uninvestigated with regard to their potential carcinogenic activity. Tungsten production for industrial and military applications has almost doubled over the past decade and continues to increase. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate tungsten's ability to induce carcinogenic related endpoints including cell transformation, increased migration, xenograft growth in nude mice, and the activation of multiple cancer-related pathways in transformed clones as determined by RNA sequencing. Human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) exposed to tungsten developed carcinogenic properties. In a soft agar assay, tungsten-treated cells formed more colonies than controls and the tungsten-transformed clones formed tumors in nude mice. RNA-sequencing data revealed that the tungsten-transformed clones altered the expression of many cancer-associated genes when compared to control clones. Genes involved in lung cancer, leukemia, and general cancer genes were deregulated by tungsten. Taken together, our data show the carcinogenic potential of tungsten. Further tests are needed, including in vivo and human studies, in order to validate tungsten as a carcinogen to humans. PMID:26164860

  17. Polar cap arcs: Sun-aligned or cusp-aligned?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Paxton, L. J.; Zhang, Qinghe; Xing, Zanyang

    2016-08-01

    Polar cap arcs are often called sun-aligned arcs. Satellite observations reveal that polar cap arcs join together at the cusp and are actually cusp aligned. Strong ionospheric plasma velocity shears, thus field aligned currents, were associated with polar arcs and they were likely caused by Kelvin-Helmholtz waves around the low-latitude magnetopause under a northward IMF Bz. The magnetic field lines around the magnetopause join together in the cusp region so are the field aligned currents and particle precipitation. This explains why polar arcs are cusp aligned.

  18. Alignment and alignment transition of bent core nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elamain, Omaima; Hegde, Gurumurthy; Komitov, Lachezar

    2013-07-01

    We report on the alignment of nematics consisting of bimesogen bent core molecules of chlorine substituent of benzene derivative and their binary mixture with rod like nematics. It was found that the alignment layer made from polyimide material, which is usually used for promoting vertical (homeotropic) alignment of rod like nematics, promotes instead a planar alignment of the bent core nematic and its nematic mixtures. At higher concentration of the rod like nematic component in these mixtures, a temperature driven transition from vertical to planar alignment was found near the transition to isotropic phase.

  19. Alignment as a Teacher Variable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Andrew C.; Smithson, John; Blank, Rolf; Zeidner, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    With the exception of the procedures developed by Porter and colleagues (Porter, 2002), other methods of defining and measuring alignment are essentially limited to alignment between tests and standards. Porter's procedures have been generalized to investigating the alignment between content standards, tests, textbooks, and even classroom…

  20. Microstructural evolution of tungsten oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hembram, K. P. S. S.; Thomas, Rajesh; Rao, G. Mohan

    2009-10-01

    Tungsten oxide thin films are of great interest due to their promising applications in various optoelectronic thin film devices. We have investigated the microstructural evolution of tungsten oxide thin films grown by DC magnetron sputtering on silicon substrate. The structural characterization and surface morphology were carried out using X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The as deposited films were amorphous, where as, the films annealed above 400 °C were crystalline. In order to explain the microstructural changes due to annealing, we have proposed a "instability wheel" model for the evolution of the microstructure. This model explains the transformation of mater into various geometries within them selves, followed by external perturbation.

  1. Femtosecond fiber laser additive manufacturing of tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian; Yang, Pei; Zhai, Meiyu; Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is promising to produce complex shaped components, including metals and alloys, to meet requirements from different industries such as aerospace, defense and biomedicines. Current laser AM uses CW lasers and very few publications have been reported for using pulsed lasers (esp. ultrafast lasers). In this paper, additive manufacturing of Tungsten materials is investigated by using femtosecond (fs) fiber lasers. Various processing conditions are studied, which leads to desired characteristics in terms of morphology, porosity, hardness, microstructural and mechanical properties of the processed components. Fully dense Tungsten part with refined grain and increased hardness was obtained and compared with parts made with different pulse widths and CW laser. The results are evidenced that the fs laser based AM provides more dimensions to modify mechanical properties with controlled heating, rapid melting and cooling rates compared with a CW or long pulsed laser. This can greatly benefit to the make of complicated structures and materials that could not be achieved before.

  2. Ultrasonic ranking of toughness of tungsten carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasonic attenuation measurements to rank tungsten carbide alloys according to their fracture toughness was demonstrated. Six samples of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) were examined. These varied in cobalt content from approximately 2 to 16 weight percent. The toughness generally increased with increasing cobalt content. Toughness was first determined by the Palmqvist and short rod fracture toughness tests. Subsequently, ultrasonic attenuation measurements were correlated with both these mechanical test methods. It is shown that there is a strong increase in ultrasonic attenuation corresponding to increased toughness of the WC-Co alloys. A correlation between attenuation and toughness exists for a wide range of ultrasonic frequencies. However, the best correlation for the WC-Co alloys occurs when the attenuation coefficient measured in the vicinity of 100 megahertz is compared with toughness as determined by the Palmqvist technique.

  3. UVIS tungsten lamp cross-check

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, Sylvia

    2009-07-01

    This proposal will verify the operation of the spare UVIS channel calsystem tungsten lamp. Internal flatfields will be obtained in one filter from each of the twelve filter wheels, providing an initial baseline and comparison for those taken with the primary lamp {WF09, 11422}. Filters for this proposal were chosen based upon a balance of multiple factors: reasonable countrate with calsystem tungsten lamp {no long exposure times}, science priority of the filter, overall coverage of UVIS wavelength regime, and slot location in the wheel. Exposures will be taken in the default full-frame, four-amp, unbinned readout mode.This proposal corresponds to the spare lamp portion of SMOV activity id WFC3-09.

  4. WFC3 SS UVIS Spare Tungsten Lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John

    2012-10-01

    Part of side switch activities.This proposal will verify the operation of the spare UVIS channel calsystem tungsten lamp. Internal flatfields will be obtained in one filter from each of the twelve filter wheels, providing an initial baseline and comparison for those taken with the primary lamp {WF09}. Filters for this proposal were chosen based upon a balance of multiple factors: reasonable countrate with calsystem tungsten lamp {no long exposure times}, science priority of the filter, overall coverage of UVIS wavelength regime, and slot location in the wheel. Exposures will be taken in the default full-frame, four-amp, unbinned readout mode.This proposal corresponds to the spare lamp portion of SS SMOV activity ID: WF09b

  5. Tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys - A status review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.; Signorelli, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    After a review of refractory metal fiber/alloy matrix composite development, a discussion is presented of the fabrication techniques used in production of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys (TFRS), their most significant properties, and their potential applications in the hot section components of gas turbine engines. Emphasis is given the development of airfoil-fabrication technology, with a view to the production of TFRS turbine blades, and attention is given the first-generation TFRS material, a tungsten alloy fiber/FeCrAlY composite currently under evaluation. Detailed properties, design criteria and cost data are presented for this material. Among the properties covered are stress-rupture strength, high and low cycle fatigue, thermal fatigue, impact strength, oxidation and corrosion and thermal conductivity.

  6. Bend ductility of tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gurwell, W.E.; Garnich, M.R.; Dudder, G.B.; Lavender, C.A.

    1992-11-01

    A bend ductility test is used to indicate the formability of tungsten heavy alloys sheet. The primary test bends a notchless Charpy impact specimen to a bend angle of approximately 100C. This can be augmented by a bend-completion test. Finite element modeling as well as strain-gaged bend specimens elucidate the strain distribution in the specimen as a function of material thickness and bend angle. The bend ductilities of 70%W, 807.W and 90%W alloys are characterized. As expected, decreasing thickness or tungsten content enhances bend ductility. Oxidation is not detrimental; therefore, controlled atmosphere is not required for cooling. The potentially detrimental effects of mechanical working (e.g., rolling, roller-leveling, grit blasting, and peening) and machining (e.g., cutting and sanding) are illustrated.

  7. Application of magnetomechanical hysteresis modeling of magnetic techniques for monitoring neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress. Second year interim report, June 1992--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sablik, M.J.; Kwun, H.; Burkhardt, G.L.

    1993-01-31

    Research was done on the biaxial stress problem accomplished in the first half of the second year. All of the work done was preparatory to magnetic measurements. Issues addressed were: construction of a model for extracting changes in the magnetic properties of a specimen from the readings of an indirect sensor; initial development of a model for how biaxial stress alters the intrinsic magnetic properties of thespecimen; use of finite element stress analysis modeling to determine a detailed shape for the cruciform biaxial stress specimen; and construction of the biaxial stress loading apparatus.

  8. Health effects following chronic dosing with tungsten-iron and tungsten-polymer shot in adult game-farm mallards.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R R; Fitzgerald, S D; Aulerich, R J; Balander, R J; Powell, D C; Tempelman, R J; Stickle, R L; Stevens, W; Bursian, S J

    2001-07-01

    Permanent approval of shot composed of tungsten-iron and tungsten-polymer for waterfowl hunting by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was pending the results of the present study that examined the health and reproductive effects of the two shot types on mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) over a 150-day period. We collected data pertaining to the effects of tungsten-iron and tungsten-polymer shot on mortality, body weight, organ weight, tissue pathology, and shot erosion. Thirty-two bird groups (sexes equal) of adult mallards were dosed orally with eight #4 steel shot (control), eight #4 tungsten-iron shot, or eight #4 tungsten-polymer shot on days 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 of a 150-day trial (26 January 1998 to 25 June 1998). An additional 12 mallards (sexes equal) were dosed orally with eight #4 lead shot (positive control) on day 0 of the study. All lead-dosed ducks died by day 25, whereas no ducks died in the other treatment groups. Significant liver hemosiderosis was present in all control and tungsten-iron-dosed males, in five of eight control and three of eight tungsten-iron-dosed females, and in one tungsten-polymer-dosed male examined. The rate of shot erosion was highest for tungsten-polymer shot (99%), followed by tungsten-iron (72%), and steel (55%) shot. Tungsten-iron or tungsten-polymer shot repeatedly administered to adult mallards did not have deleterious health effects during the 150-day trial based on mortality, body weights, organ weights, and histology of the liver and kidneys. PMID:11504218

  9. Solar Alignments - Identification and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte, Juan Antonio

    The sun was such an important divinity in antiquity, and even today, that solar alignments should be expected within a large variety of places and cultures. These are probably the most conspicuous kind of astronomical alignments a field researcher can deal with. The need for a correct identification is thus evident. The different kind of solar phenomena susceptible of being determined by astronomical alignments will be scrutinized, following by the way in which such alignments can materialize in space. It will be shown that analyzing solar alignments is not always an easy task.

  10. Controlled nanostructuration of polycrystalline tungsten thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Girault, B.; Eyidi, D.; Goudeau, P.; Guerin, P.; Bourhis, E. Le; Renault, P.-O.; Sauvage, T.

    2013-05-07

    Nanostructured tungsten thin films have been obtained by ion beam sputtering technique stopping periodically the growing. The total thickness was maintained constant while nanostructure control was obtained using different stopping periods in order to induce film stratification. The effect of tungsten sublayers' thicknesses on film composition, residual stresses, and crystalline texture evolution has been established. Our study reveals that tungsten crystallizes in both stable {alpha}- and metastable {beta}-phases and that volume proportions evolve with deposited sublayers' thicknesses. {alpha}-W phase shows original fiber texture development with two major preferential crystallographic orientations, namely, {alpha}-W<110> and unexpectedly {alpha}-W<111> texture components. The partial pressure of oxygen and presence of carbon have been identified as critical parameters for the growth of metastable {beta}-W phase. Moreover, the texture development of {alpha}-W phase with two texture components is shown to be the result of a competition between crystallographic planes energy minimization and crystallographic orientation channeling effect maximization. Controlled grain size can be achieved for the {alpha}-W phase structure over 3 nm stratification step. Below, the {beta}-W phase structure becomes predominant.

  11. The tungsten divertor experiment at ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neu, R.; Asmussen, K.; Krieger, K.; Thoma, A.; Bosch, H.-S.; Deschka, S.; Dux, R.; Engelhardt, W.; García-Rosales, C.; Gruber, O.; Herrmann, A.; Kallenbach, A.; Kaufmann, M.; Mertens, V.; Ryter, F.; Rohde, V.; Roth, J.; Sokoll, M.; Stäbler, A.; Suttrop, W.; Weinlich, M.; Zohm, H.; Alexander, M.; Becker, G.; Behler, K.; Behringer, K.; Behrisch, R.; Bergmann, A.; Bessenrodt-Weberpals, M.; Brambilla, M.; Brinkschulte, H.; Büchl, K.; Carlson, A.; Chodura, R.; Coster, D.; Cupido, L.; de Blank, H. J.; de Peña Hempel, S.; Drube, R.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Feist, J.-H.; Feneberg, W.; Fiedler, S.; Franzen, P.; Fuchs, J. C.; Fußmann, G.; Gafert, J.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; Haas, G.; Herppich, G.; Herrmann, W.; Hirsch, S.; Hoek, M.; Hoenen, F.; Hofmeister, F.; Hohenöcker, H.; Jacobi, D.; Junker, W.; Kardaun, O.; Kass, T.; Kollotzek, H.; Köppendörfer, W.; Kurzan, B.; Lackner, K.; Lang, P. T.; Lang, R. S.; Laux, M.; Lengyel, L. L.; Leuterer, F.; Manso, M. E.; Maraschek, M.; Mast, K.-F.; McCarthy, P.; Meisel, D.; Merkel, R.; Müller, H. W.; Münich, M.; Murmann, H.; Napiontek, B.; Neu, G.; Neuhauser, J.; Niethammer, M.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Pasch, E.; Pautasso, G.; Peeters, A. G.; Pereverzev, G.; Pitcher, C. S.; Poschenrieder, W.; Raupp, G.; Reinmüller, K.; Riedl, R.; Röhr, H.; Salzmann, H.; Sandmann, W.; Schilling, H.-B.; Schlögl, D.; Schneider, H.; Schneider, R.; Schneider, W.; Schramm, G.; Schweinzer, J.; Scott, B. D.; Seidel, U.; Serra, F.; Speth, E.; Silva, A.; Steuer, K.-H.; Stober, J.; Streibl, B.; Treutterer, W.; Troppmann, M.; Tsois, N.; Ulrich, M.; Varela, P.; Verbeek, H.; Verplancke, Ph; Vollmer, O.; Wedler, H.; Wenzel, U.; Wesner, F.; Wolf, R.; Wunderlich, R.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.; Zehrfeld, H.-P.

    1996-12-01

    Tungsten-coated tiles, manufactured by plasma spray on graphite, were mounted in the divertor of the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak and cover almost 90% of the surface facing the plasma in the strike zone. Over 600 plasma discharges have been performed to date, around 300 of which were auxiliary heated with heating powers up to 10 MW. The production of tungsten in the divertor was monitored by a W I line at 400.8 nm. In the plasma centre an array of spectral lines at 5 nm emitted by ionization states around W XXX was measured. From the intensity of these lines the W content was derived. Under normal discharge conditions W-concentrations around 0741-3335/38/12A/013/img12 or even lower were found. The influence on the main plasma parameters was found to be negligible. The maximum concentrations observed decrease with increasing heating power. In several low power discharges accumulation of tungsten occurred and the temperature profile was flattened. The concentrations of the intrinsic impurities carbon and oxygen were comparable to the discharges with the graphite divertor. Furthermore, the density and the 0741-3335/38/12A/013/img13 limits remained unchanged and no negative influence on the energy confinement or on the H-mode threshold was found. Discharges with neon radiative cooling showed the same behaviour as in the graphite divertor case.

  12. Hydrogen permeation through disordered nanostructured tungsten films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemanič, V.; Zajec, B.; Dellasega, D.; Passoni, M.

    2012-10-01

    We report results on long-term hydrogen outgassing and permeation studies of structurally highly disordered tungsten films, deposited on 40 mm diameter highly permeable Eurofer substrates, using the Pulsed Laser Deposition technique. Hydrogen interaction with tungsten is becoming a highly relevant topic since tungsten was recognized as the most promising candidate for the first wall of future fusion reactors. Prediction of hydrogen isotopes migration and their abundance after plasma exposure is uncertain due to a great role played by structural disorder that is formed on the W surface. Vacancy sites are theoretically predicted to trap multiple H atoms exothermically, but their density and their potential influence on permeability has not been experimentally investigated yet. In our work, permeability of W films having different thicknesses (1 and 10 μm) was initially extremely low, and was gradually increasing over a several-day campaign. The final values at 400 °C, lying between P = 1.46 × 10-15 mol H2/(m s Pa0.5) and P = 4.8 × 10-15 mol H2/(m s Pa0.5), were substantially lower than those known for well ordered films. Surprisingly, the 10 μm thick W film initially contained a very high amount of hydrogen, ˜0.1 H/W, which was gradually releasing during the twenty-day campaign.

  13. Continuum source tungsten coil atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiyan; Donati, George L; Young, Carl G; Jones, Bradley T

    2011-04-01

    A simple continuum source tungsten coil atomic fluorescence spectrometer is constructed and evaluated. The heart of the system is the atomizer: a low-cost tungsten filament extracted from a 150 W light bulb. The filament is resistively heated with a small, solid-state, constant-current power supply. The atomizer is housed in a glass chamber and purged with a 1 L/min flow of a conventional welding gas mixture: 10% H(2)/Ar. A 25 μL sample aliquot is pipetted onto the tungsten coil, the liquid is dried at low current, and then the atomic vapor is produced by applying a current in the range 3.5-5.5 A. The atomization current does not produce temperatures high enough to excite atomic emission. Radiation from a 300 W xenon lamp is focused through the atomic vapor, exciting atomic fluorescence. Fluorescence signals are collected using a hand-held charge-coupled device (CCD) spectrometer. Simultaneous determination of ten elements (Ag, Bi, Cr, Cu, Ga, In, Mg, Mn, and Tl) results in detection limits in the range 0.3 to 10 ng. The application of higher atomization currents (10 A) leads to straightforward detection of atomic emission signals with no modifications to the instrument. PMID:21396184

  14. Mechanical behavior of tungsten shaped charge liner materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.

    1993-08-01

    Radiographs of jets produced by shaped charges with tungsten liners have documented both ductile and brittle breakup behavior. The relationships between the varying breakup behavior of tungsten shaped charge jets and metallurgical characteristics and/or mechanical behavior of the liner are not understood. In this paper the mechanical behavior of warm-forged and chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) tungsten is discussed relative to the typical deformation history of an element of liner material which becomes part of the jet. The analyses suggest the following: (1) tungsten liner material is damaged, or possibly pulverized, during shock loading at the high-explosive detonation front; (2) pulverized material is consolidated in the convergence zone under conditions of high pressure, and (3) variations in observed breakup behavior of tungsten may be related to high temperature embrittlement. The low temperature ductile-brittle transition temperature of tungsten (DBTT) is not believed to be directly related to observed variations in break-up behavior of jets.

  15. Measurement of thermophysical property of plasma forming tungsten nanofiber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajita, Shin; Yagi, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kenichi; Tokitani, Masayuki; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2016-05-01

    Thermophysical property of a nanostructured tungsten layer formed on a tungsten film was investigated. A 1-µm-thick tungsten film deposited on a quartz glass substrate was irradiated with a high density helium plasma at the surface temperature of 1500 K. The plasma irradiation led to the formation of highly porous fiberform-nanostructured tungsten layer with a thickness of 3.5 µm. Impulse heating was applied at the interface of the film/substrate, and transient heat diffusion was observed using a pulsed light heating thermoreflectance apparatus. The thermoreflectance signals clearly differed between the nanostructure existing and mechanically removed regions; the difference can be attributed to thermal effusivity of the nanostructured tungsten layer. The estimated thermal conductivity of the nanostructured tungsten decreases to ∼2% of that of bulk when the density of the nanostructure is assumed to be ∼6% of the bulk value.

  16. The tungsten powder study of the dispenser cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Ji-xiu; Wan, Bao-fei

    2006-06-01

    The intercorrelation of tungsten powder properties, such as grain size, distribution and morphology, and porous matrix parameters with electron emission capability and longevity of Ba dispenser cathodes has been investigated for the different grain morphologies. It is shown that a fully cleaning step of the tungsten powder is so necessary that the tungsten powder will be reduction of oxide in hydrogen atmosphere above 700 °C. The porosity of the tungsten matrix distributes more even and the closed pore is fewer, the average granule size of the tungsten powder distributes more convergent. The porosity of the tungsten matrix and the evaporation of the activator are bigger and the pulse of the cathode is smaller when the granularity is bigger by the analysis of the electronic microscope and diode experiment.

  17. TSGC and JSC Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Humberto

    2013-01-01

    NASA and the SGCs are, by design, intended to work closely together and have synergistic Vision, Mission, and Goals. The TSGC affiliates and JSC have been working together, but not always in a concise, coordinated, nor strategic manner. Today we have a couple of simple ideas to present about how TSGC and JSC have started to work together in a more concise, coordinated, and strategic manner, and how JSC and non-TSG Jurisdiction members have started to collaborate: Idea I: TSGC and JSC Technical Alignment Idea II: Concept of Clusters.

  18. Toxicologic evaluation of tungsten: 28-day inhalation study of tungsten blue oxide in rats.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Narayanan; Hu, Shu-Chieh; Sullivan, Dennis; Muzzio, Miguel; Detrisac, Carol J; Venezia, Carmen

    2012-12-01

    The toxicity and toxicokinetics of tungsten blue oxide (TBO) were examined. TBO is an intermediate in the production of tungsten powder, and has shown the potential to cause cellular damage in in vitro studies. However, in vivo evidence seems to indicate a lack of adverse effects. The present study was undertaken to address the dearth of longer-term inhalation toxicity studies of tungsten oxides by investigating the biological responses induced by TBO when administered via nose-only inhalation to rats at levels of 0.08, 0.325, and 0.65 mg TBO/L of air for 6 h/day for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day recovery period. Inhaled TBO was absorbed systemically and blood levels of tungsten increased as inhaled concentration increased. Among the tissues analyzed for tungsten levels, lung, femur and kidney showed increased levels, with lung at least an order of magnitude greater than kidney or femur. By exposure day 14, tungsten concentration in tissues had reached steady-state. Increased lung weight was noted for both terminal and recovery animals and was attributed to deposition of TBO in the lungs, inducing a macrophage influx. Microscopic evaluation of tissues revealed a dose-related increase in alveolar pigmented macrophages, alveolar foreign material and individual alveolar foamy macrophages in lung. After a recovery period there was a slight reduction in the incidence and severity of histopathological findings. Based on the absence of other adverse effects, the increased lung weights and the microscopic findings were interpreted as nonadverse response to exposure and were not considered a specific reaction to TBO. PMID:23216159

  19. Experimental setup for tungsten transport studies at the NSTX tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Clementson, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Roquemore, A. L.; Skinner, C. H.; Mansfield, D. K.; Hartzfeld, K.; Lepson, J. K.

    2010-10-15

    Tungsten particles have been introduced into the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) in Princeton with the purpose to investigate the effects of tungsten injection on subsequent plasma discharges. An experimental setup for the study of tungsten particle transport is described where the particles are introduced into the tokamak using a modified particle dropper, otherwise used for lithium-powder injection. An initial test employing a grazing-incidence extreme ultraviolet spectrometer demonstrates that the tungsten-transport setup could serve to infer particle transport from the edge to the hot central plasmas of NSTX.

  20. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure formation on tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo Chunlei

    2008-09-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate the generation of periodic surface structures on a technologically important material, tungsten, at both 400 and 800 nm, despite that the table values of dielectric constants for tungsten at these two wavelengths suggest the absence of surface plasmons, a wave necessary for forming periodic structures on metals. Furthermore, we find that the structure periods formed on tungsten are significantly less than the laser wavelengths. We believe that the dielectric constants of tungsten change significantly due to intense laser pulse heating and surface structuring and roughening at nanometer scales, permitting surface plasmon excitation and periodic structure formation.

  1. A visible light-sensitive tungsten carbide/tungsten trioxde composite photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-ho; Irie, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito

    2008-05-05

    A photocatalyst composed of tungsten carbide (WC) and tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) has been prepared by the mechanical mixing of each powder. Its photocatalytic activity was evaluated by the gaseous isopropyl alcohol decomposition process. The photocatalyst showed high visible light photocatalytic activity with a quantum efficiency of 3.2% for 400-530 nm light. The photocatalytic mechanism was explained by means of enhanced oxygen reduction reaction due to WC, which may serve as a multielectron reduction catalyst, as well as the photogeneration of holes in the valence band of WO{sub 3}.

  2. Solar sensor subsystems alignment check using solar scans for the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurczyk, S. G.; Moore, A. S.

    1989-01-01

    The alignment of a dual-axes sun sensor subsystem to a telescope having a multiple sensor subsystem is described. The sun sensor consists of two analog and one digital silicon detectors. The analog detectors are shadow mask type operating in the visible spectrum. The detectors are mounted for azimuth and elevation positioning of biaxial gimbals. The digital detector is a linear diode array that operates at a spectral position of 0.7 micron and is used for elevation positioning. The position signals correspond to relative angles between the sun sensor and the solar disk. These three detectors are aligned on an Invar structure which is mounted to a Cassegrain telescope. This telescope relays solar radiance to an eight channel detector subsystem operating in the infrared range from 2 to 10 microns. The test technique and results to check the boresight alignment of these two subsystems by scanning the solar disk will be reported. The boresight alignment for both the azimuth and elevation axes of the two detector subsystems is verified using this technique.

  3. Conditional alignment random fields for multiple motion sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minyoung

    2013-11-01

    We consider the multiple time-series alignment problem, typically focusing on the task of synchronizing multiple motion videos of the same kind of human activity. Finding an optimal global alignment of multiple sequences is infeasible, while there have been several approximate solutions, including iterative pairwise warping algorithms and variants of hidden Markov models. In this paper, we propose a novel probabilistic model that represents the conditional densities of the latent target sequences which are aligned with the given observed sequences through the hidden alignment variables. By imposing certain constraints on the target sequences at the learning stage, we have a sensible model for multiple alignments that can be learned very efficiently by the EM algorithm. Compared to existing methods, our approach yields more accurate alignment while being more robust to local optima and initial configurations. We demonstrate its efficacy on both synthetic and real-world motion videos including facial emotions and human activities. PMID:24051737

  4. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Buzhinskiy, O. I.; Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400-1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  5. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    SciTech Connect

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Buzhinskiy, O. I.; Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A.

    2015-12-15

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400–1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  6. Fourier transform interferometer alignment method.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Kenneth A; Naulleau, Patrick; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2002-08-01

    A rapid and convenient method has been developed to facilitate the alignment of the image-plane components of point-diffraction interferometers, including the phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer. In real time, the Fourier transform of the detected image is used to calculate a pseudoimage of the electric field in the image plane of the test optic where thecritical alignment o f variousoptical components is performed. Reconstruction of the pseudoimage is similar to off-axis, Fourier transform holography. Intermediate steps in the alignment procedure are described. Fine alignment is aided by the introduction and optimization of a global-contrast parameter that is easily calculated from the Fourier transform. Additional applications include the alignment of image-plane apertures in general optical systems, the rapid identification of patterned image-plane alignment marks, and the probing of important image-plane field properties. PMID:12153074

  7. Onorbit IMU alignment error budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The Star Tracker, Crew Optical Alignment Sight (COAS), and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) from a complex navigation system with a multitude of error sources were combined. A complete list of the system errors is presented. The errors were combined in a rational way to yield an estimate of the IMU alignment accuracy for STS-1. The expected standard deviation in the IMU alignment error for STS-1 type alignments was determined to be 72 arc seconds per axis for star tracker alignments and 188 arc seconds per axis for COAS alignments. These estimates are based on current knowledge of the star tracker, COAS, IMU, and navigation base error specifications, and were partially verified by preliminary Monte Carlo analysis.

  8. Nuclear reactor internals alignment configuration

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Singleton, Norman R.

    2009-11-10

    An alignment system that employs jacking block assemblies and alignment posts around the periphery of the top plate of a nuclear reactor lower internals core shroud to align an upper core plate with the lower internals and the core shroud with the core barrel. The distal ends of the alignment posts are chamfered and are closely received within notches machined in the upper core plate at spaced locations around the outer circumference of the upper core plate. The jacking block assemblies are used to center the core shroud in the core barrel and the alignment posts assure the proper orientation of the upper core plate. The alignment posts may alternately be formed in the upper core plate and the notches may be formed in top plate.

  9. Aligned Defrosting Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    17 August 2004 This July 2004 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a group of aligned barchan sand dunes in the martian north polar region. At the time, the dunes were covered with seasonal frost, but the frost had begun to sublime away, leaving dark spots and dark outlines around the dunes. The surrounding plains exhibit small, diffuse spots that are also the result of subliming seasonal frost. This northern spring image, acquired on a descending ground track (as MGS was moving north to south on the 'night' side of Mars) is located near 78.8oN, 34.8oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across and sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  10. Alignment system for encoders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villani, Daniel D. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An improved encoder alignment system is disclosed which provides an indication of the extent of misalignment and a measure of the rate at which the misalignment may be changing. The invention is adapted for use with a conventional encoder which provides a digital coarse word having at least significant bit and a digital fine word having a least significant bit and a most significant bit. The invention generates the exclusive or of the least significant bit of the coarse digital signal and the least significant bit of the fine digital signal to provide a first signal. The invention then generates the exclusive or of the first signal and the complement of the most significant bit of the fine digital signal to provide an output signal which represents the misalignment of the encoder.

  11. Solid-state chemistry route for supported tungsten and tungsten carbide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Hugot, N.; Desforges, A.; Fontana, S.; Mareche, J.F.; Herold, C.; Albiniak, A.

    2012-10-15

    Nanoparticles of tungsten and tungsten carbide have been prepared using solid-state chemistry methods. After the vapor phase impregnation of a tungsten hexachloride precursor on a carbon support, a temperature-programmed reduction/carburization was performed. Several parameters were investigated and the evolution of obtained samples was followed by XRD and TEM. The optimization of the reaction parameters led to the preparation of W, W{sub 2}C and WC particles well dispersed on the support. WC phase however could not be obtained alone with less than 10 nm mean size. This could be explained by the carburization mechanism and the carbon diffusion on the support. - Graphical abstract: Bright field picture of carbon-supported WC nanoparticles dispersed on the surface of the sample 1223 K in 10% CH{sub 4}/90% H{sub 2}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We aimed at the preparation of supported nanoparticulate tungsten derivatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Several parameters were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The evolution of obtained samples was followed by XRD and TEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimal preparation led to W, W{sub 2}C and WC particles dispersed on the support.

  12. Lunar Alignments - Identification and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, A. César

    Lunar alignments are difficult to establish given the apparent lack of written accounts clearly pointing toward lunar alignments for individual temples. While some individual cases are reviewed and highlighted, the weight of the proof must fall on statistical sampling. Some definitions for the lunar alignments are provided in order to clarify the targets, and thus, some new tools are provided to try to test the lunar hypothesis in several cases, especially in megalithic astronomy.

  13. Strain uniformity in biaxial specimens is highly sensitive to attachment details.

    PubMed

    Eilaghi, Armin; Flanagan, John G; Brodland, G Wayne; Ethier, C Ross

    2009-09-01

    Biaxial testing has been used widely to characterize the mechanical properties of soft tissues and other flexible materials, but fundamental issues related to specimen design and attachment have remained. Finite element models and experiments were used to investigate how specimen geometry and attachment details affect uniformity of the strain field inside the attachment points. The computational studies confirm that increasing the number of attachment points increases the size of the area that experiences sensibly uniform strain (defined here as the central sample region where the ratio of principal strains E(11)/E(22)<1.10), and that the strains experienced in this region are less than nominal strains based on attachment point movement. Uniformity of the strain field improves substantially when the attachment points span a wide zone along each edge. Subtle irregularities in attachment point positioning can significantly degrade strain field uniformity. In contrast, details of the apron, the region outside of the attachment points, have little effect on the interior strain field. When nonlinear properties consistent with those found in human sclera are used, similar results are found. Experiments were conducted on 6 x 6 mm talc-sprinkled rubber specimens loaded using wire "rakes." Points on a grid having 12 x 12 bays were tracked, and a detailed strain map was constructed. A finite element model based on the actual geometry of an experiment having an off-pattern rake tine gave strain patterns that matched to within 4.4%. Finally, simulations using nonequibiaxial strains indicated that the strain field uniformity was more sensitive to sample attachment details for the nonequibiaxial case as compared to the equibiaxial case. Specimen design and attachment were found to significantly affect the uniformity of the strain field produced in biaxial tests. Practical guidelines were offered for design and mounting of biaxial test specimens. The issues addressed here are

  14. Theory of biaxial graded-index optical fiber. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawalko, Stephen F.

    1990-01-01

    A biaxial graded-index fiber with a homogeneous cladding is studied. Two methods, wave equation and matrix differential equation, of formulating the problem and their respective solutions are discussed. For the wave equation formulation of the problem it is shown that for the case of a diagonal permittivity tensor the longitudinal electric and magnetic fields satisfy a pair of coupled second-order differential equations. Also, a generalized dispersion relation is derived in terms of the solutions for the longitudinal electric and magnetic fields. For the case of a step-index fiber, either isotropic or uniaxial, these differential equations can be solved exactly in terms of Bessel functions. For the cases of an istropic graded-index and a uniaxial graded-index fiber, a solution using the Wentzel, Krammers and Brillouin (WKB) approximation technique is shown. Results for some particular permittivity profiles are presented. Also the WKB solutions is compared with the vector solution found by Kurtz and Streifer. For the matrix formulation it is shown that the tangential components of the electric and magnetic fields satisfy a system of four first-order differential equations which can be conveniently written in matrix form. For the special case of meridional modes, the system of equations splits into two systems of two equations. A general iterative technique, asymptotic partitioning of systems of equations, for solving systems of differential equations is presented. As a simple example, Bessel's differential equation is written in matrix form and is solved using this asymptotic technique. Low order solutions for particular examples of a biaxial and uniaxial graded-index fiber are presented. Finally numerical results obtained using the asymptotic technique are presented for particular examples of isotropic and uniaxial step-index fibers and isotropic, uniaxial and biaxial graded-index fibers.

  15. Biaxial loading and shallow-flaw effects on crack-tip constraint and fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; Theiss, T.J.; Rao, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    A program to develop and evaluate fracture methodologies for the assessment of crack-tip constraint effects on fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels has been initiated in the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program. Crack-tip constraint is an issue that significantly impacts fracture mechanics technologies employed in safety assessment procedures for commercially licensed nuclear RPVs. The focus of studies described herein is on the evaluation of two stressed-based methodologies for quantifying crack-tip constraint (i.e., J-Q theory and a micromechanical scaling model based on critical stressed volumes) through applications to experimental and fractographic data. Data were utilized from single-edge notch bend (SENB) specimens and HSST-developed cruciform beam specimens that were tested in HSST shallow-crack and biaxial testing programs. Results from applications indicate that both the J-Q methodology and the micromechanical scaling model can be used successfully to interpret experimental data from the shallow- and deep-crack SENB specimen tests. When applied to the uniaxially and biaxially loaded cruciform specimens, the two methodologies showed some promising features, but also raised several questions concerning the interpretation of constraint conditions in the specimen based on near-tip stress fields. Fractographic data taken from the fracture surfaces of the SENB and cruciform specimens are used to assess the relevance of stress-based fracture characterizations to conditions at cleavage initiation sites. Unresolved issues identified from these analyses require resolution as part of a validation process for biaxial loading applications. This report is designated as HSST Report No. 142.

  16. Presence of Tungsten-Containing Fibers in Tungsten Refining and Manufacturing Processes

    PubMed Central

    Mckernan, John L.; Toraason, Mark A.; Fernback, Joseph E.; Petersen, Martin R.

    2009-01-01

    In tungsten refining and manufacturing processes, a series of tungsten oxides are typically formed as intermediates in the production of tungsten powder. The present study was conducted to characterize airborne tungsten-containing fiber dimensions, elemental composition and concentrations in the US tungsten refining and manufacturing industry. During the course of normal employee work activities, seven personal breathing zone and 62 area air samples were collected and analyzed using National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) fiber sampling and counting methods to determine dimensions, composition and airborne concentrations of fibers. Mixed models were used to identify relationships between potential determinants and airborne fiber concentrations. Results from transmission electron microscopy analyses indicated that airborne fibers with length >0.5 μm, diameter >0.01 μm and aspect ratios ≥3:1 were present on 35 of the 69 air samples collected. Overall, the airborne fibers detected had a geometric mean length ≈3 μm and diameter ≈0.3 μm. Ninety-seven percent of the airborne fibers identified were in the thoracic fraction (i.e. aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm). Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry results indicated that airborne fibers prior to the carburization process consisted primarily of tungsten and oxygen, with other elements being detected in trace quantities. Based on NIOSH fiber counting ‘B’ rules (length > 5 μm, diameter < 3 μm and aspect ratio ≥ 5:1), airborne fiber concentrations ranged from below the limit of detection to 0.085 fibers cm−3, with calcining being associated with the highest airborne concentrations. The mixed model procedure indicated that process temperature had a marginally significant relationship to airborne fiber concentration. This finding was expected since heated processes such as calcining created the highest airborne fiber concentrations. The finding of airborne tungsten-containing fibers in

  17. Gold Alignment and Internal Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarian, A.

    1997-07-01

    The measures of mechanical alignment are obtained for both prolate and oblate grains whose temperatures are comparable to the grain kinetic energy divided by k, the Boltzmann constant. For such grains, the alignment of angular momentum, J, with the axis of maximal inertia, a, is only partial, which substantially alters the mechanical alignment as compared with the results obtained by Lazarian and Roberge, Hanany, & Messinger under the assumption of perfect alignment. We also describe Gold alignment when the Barnett dissipation is suppressed and derive an analytical expression that relates the measure of alignment to the parameters of grain nonsphericity and the direction of the gas-grain drift. This solution provides the lower limit for the measure of alignment, while the upper limit is given by the method derived by Lazarian. Using the results of a recent study of incomplete internal relaxation by Lazarian & Roberge, we find measures of alignment for the whole range of ratios of grain rotational energy to kTs, where Ts is the grain temperature. To describe alignment for mildly supersonic drifts, we suggest an analytical approach that provides good correspondence with the results of direct numerical simulations by Roberge, Hanany, & Messinger. We also extend our approach to account for simultaneous action of the Gold and Davis-Greenstein mechanisms.

  18. Band offsets for biaxially and uniaxially stressed silicon-germanium layers with arbitrary substrate and channel orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eneman, Geert; Roussel, Philippe; Brunco, David Paul; Collaert, Nadine; Mocuta, Anda; Thean, Aaron

    2016-08-01

    The conduction and valence band offsets between a strained silicon-germanium layer and a silicon-germanium substrate are reported for arbitrary substrate and channel crystal orientations. The offsets are calculated both for the case of biaxial stress, corresponding approximately to the stress state of a thin strained channel in a planar field-effect transistor (FET), and for uniaxial stress, which is the approximate stress state for strained channels in a FinFET configuration. Significant orientation dependence is found for the conduction band offset, overall leading to the strongest electron quantum confinement in biaxial-tensile stressed channels on {100}-oriented substrates, and uniaxial-tensile stressed channels in the ⟨100⟩ and ⟨110⟩ directions. For biaxially stressed layers on {111} substrates, the conduction band offset is significantly smaller than for {100} or {110} directions. For the valence band offset, the dependence on crystal orientation is found to be small.

  19. Biaxially stretchable supercapacitors based on the buckled hybrid fiber electrode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nan; Zhou, Weiya; Zhang, Qiang; Luan, Pingshan; Cai, Le; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Xiao; Fan, Qingxia; Zhou, Wenbin; Xiao, Zhuojian; Gu, Xiaogang; Chen, Huiliang; Li, Kewei; Xiao, Shiqi; Wang, Yanchun; Liu, Huaping; Xie, Sishen

    2015-07-01

    In order to meet the growing need for smart bionic devices and epidermal electronic systems, biaxial stretchability is essential for energy storage units. Based on porous single-walled carbon nanotube/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (SWCNT/PEDOT) hybrid fiber, we designed and fabricated a biaxially stretchable supercapacitor, which possesses a unique configuration of the parallel buckled hybrid fiber array. Owing to the reticulate SWCNT film and the improved fabrication technique, the hybrid fiber retained its porous architecture both outwardly and inwardly, manifesting a superior capacity of 215 F g-1. H3PO4-polyvinyl alcohol gel with an optimized component ratio was introduced as both binder and stretchable electrolyte, which contributed to the regularity and stability of the buckled fiber array. The buckled structure and the quasi one-dimensional character of the fibers endow the supercapacitor with 100% stretchability along all directions. In addition, the supercapacitor exhibited good transparency, as well as excellent electrochemical properties and stability after being stretched 5000 times.In order to meet the growing need for smart bionic devices and epidermal electronic systems, biaxial stretchability is essential for energy storage units. Based on porous single-walled carbon nanotube/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (SWCNT/PEDOT) hybrid fiber, we designed and fabricated a biaxially stretchable supercapacitor, which possesses a unique configuration of the parallel buckled hybrid fiber array. Owing to the reticulate SWCNT film and the improved fabrication technique, the hybrid fiber retained its porous architecture both outwardly and inwardly, manifesting a superior capacity of 215 F g-1. H3PO4-polyvinyl alcohol gel with an optimized component ratio was introduced as both binder and stretchable electrolyte, which contributed to the regularity and stability of the buckled fiber array. The buckled structure and the quasi one-dimensional character of the

  20. The effects of out-of-phase biaxial-strain cycling on low-cycle fatigue.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamrik, S. Y.; Frishmuth, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of out-of-phase or nonsychronous straining on low-cycle fatigue was investigated. Biaxial strains were imposed on thin-walled tubular 7075-T6 aluminum specimens by tension-compression and torsion. Phase angles of 0, 30, 45, 60, and 90 deg were applied between two strains. It was found that out-of-phase cycling has an effect on the failure mode in the low-cycle-fatigue range. An analysis based on the maximum total strain in three-dimensional strain is proposed for treating 'out-of-phase' straining conditions in low-cycle fatigue.

  1. Appraisal of formulas for stresses in bilayered dental ceramics subjected to biaxial moment loading

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, Chun-Hway; Thompson, G. A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary - Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare three existing sets of formulas predicting stresses in a thin circular plate subjected to biaxial moment loading, such that limitations for each set of formulas could be understood. These formulas include American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) formulas for monolayered plates, Roark's formulas for bilayered plates, and Hsueh et al.'s formulas for multilayered plates. Methods: The three sets of formulas were summarized and appraised. Biaxial moment loading is generally achieved using biaxial flexure tests, and the plate is placed on a support ring and loaded in the central region. While both ASTM and Hsueh et al.'s formulas predict stresses through the thickness of the plate, Roark's formulas predict stresses only on the top and the bottom surfaces of the plate. Also, a simply supported plate at its edge is considered in Roark's formulas. We modified Roark's formulas to include the overhang region of the plate to more closely simulate the actual loading configuration. Then, the accuracy of formulas was examined by comparing with finite element results of monolayered and bilayered plates subjected to ring-on-ring loading. Results: Monolayer is a special case of bilayer, and both monolayer and bilayer are special cases of multilayer. For monolayered plates, ASTM and Hsueh et al.'s formulas are identical, and both are in excellent agreement with finite element results. For bilayered plates, Hsueh et al.'s formulas are in excellent agreement with finite element results. For both monolayered and bilayered plates, Roark's formulas deviate from finite element results while the modified Roark's formulas are accurate. Conclusions: Roark's formulas for evaluating the biaxial strength of bilayered dental ceramics will result in errors in predicted stresses which depend on the size of the overhang region of the plate in the actual loading configuration. Also, Roark's formulas are limited to predicting

  2. Non-Kramers freezing and unfreezing of tunneling in the biaxial spin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudnovsky, E. M.; Martínez-Hidalgo, X.

    2000-05-01

    The ground state tunnel splitting for the biaxial spin model in the magnetic field, Script H = - DSx2 + ESz2 - gμBSzHz, has been investigated using an instanton approach. We find a new type of spin instanton and a new quantum interference phenomenon associated with it: at a certain field, H2 = 2SE1/2(D + E)1/2/(gμB), the dependence of the tunneling splitting on the field switches from oscillations to a monotonic growth. The predictions of the theory can be tested in Fe8 molecular nanomagnets.

  3. Biaxial Texture Evolution of Nanostructured Films under Dynamic Shadowing Effect and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang

    Texture formation and evolution in polycrystalline films are quite complicated, and they still remain as challenging subjects. Oblique angle deposition is an effective way to control the texture due to the shadowing effect introduced by oblique incident flux. A new dynamic oblique angle sputter deposition technique, called flipping rotation, was developed. In this rotation mode, the substrate is arranged to rotate continuously at a fixed speed around an axis lying within and parallel to the substrate. The incident flux is always perpendicular to the rotational axis and the flux incident angle relative to the substrate normal changes continuously. To study the texture formation and evolution of Mo and W films grown by DC magnetron sputter depositions, three film categories were prepared: (1) normal incidence deposition without the shadowing effect, (2) stationary oblique angle deposition at various fixed flux incident angles with static shadowing effect, and (3) convention rotation and flipping rotation deposition with dynamic shadowing effect. Under the normal incidence deposition, ultrathin (2.5 nm) to thin (100 nm) Mo films have been deposited on SO2 membranes on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids. These samples can be directly compared with the films grown on glass or native oxide covered Si substrates. The result of a fiber texture with the [110] out-of-plane direction implies that the growth has gone through a recrystallization process that selects the minimum surface energy plane parallel to the substrate. This is in contrast to the conventional understanding of the selection of out-of-plane orientation, which is the fastest growth direction [100] at room temperature based on the low Mo homologous temperature (room temperature/melting temperature) of ~0.1. Under stationary oblique angle deposition, Mo thin films in the range of 175 nm to 1300 nm were observed to undergo a dramatic change in crystal texture orientation from a (110)[11¯¯0] biaxial

  4. Long-time dynamics of the three-dimensional biaxial Grinfeld instability.

    PubMed

    Paret, Jérôme

    2005-07-01

    Using a phase-field model including strain fields, we numerically investigate the melting-crystallization dynamics of a biaxially stressed semi-infinite solid. A multigrid algorithm is used to solve the elasticity part of the problem. Its efficiency allows us to explore the late stages of the full 3D Grinfeld instability. Recent analytical predictions [P. Berger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 176103 (2003)] regarding stability and selection of patterns are confirmed and precised. It appears that, in the presence of a large scale stabilization mechanism, the system reaches an equilibrium state corresponding to a nontrivial striped pattern. PMID:16089935

  5. Collinear Acousto-Optical Transformation of Bessel Light Beams in Biaxial Gyrotropic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyi, V. N.; Kulak, G. V.; Krokh, G. V.; Shakin, O. V.

    2016-05-01

    The collinear acousto-optical transformation of Bessel light beams in biaxial gyrotropic crystals into two annular, internal conical refraction beams with orthogonal elliptical polarization is studied. It is found that the diffraction efficiency is maximal (~50-60%) for low ultrasound intensities and varies slightly with further increases in acoustic power. At high ultrasound intensities, the intensities of the transmitted and diffracted annular beams differ insignificantly. The possible use of this acousto-optical interaction for creating collinear tuneable narrow-band acousto-optical filters at low ultrasonic frequencies is demonstrated.

  6. Tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys: A status review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.; Signorelli, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Improved performance of heat engines is largely dependent upon maximum cycle temperatures. Tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys (TFRS) are the first of a family of high temperature composites that offer the potential for significantly raising hot component operating temperatures and thus leading to improved heat engine performance. This status review of TFRS research emphasizes the promising property data developed to date, the status of TFRS composite airfoil fabrication technology, and the areas requiring more attention to assure their applicability to hot section components of aircraft gas turbine engines.

  7. Xenon-Ion Drilling of Tungsten Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    High-velocity xenon ions used to drill holes of controlled size and distribution through tungsten layer that sheaths surface of controlled-porosity dispenser cathode of traveling wave-tube electron emitter. Controlled-porosity dispenser cathode employs barium/calcium/ aluminum oxide mixture that migrates through pores in cathode surface, thus coating it and reducing its work function. Rapid, precise drilling technique applied to films of other metals and used in other applications where micron-scale holes required. Method requires only few hours, as opposed to tens of hours by prior methods.

  8. Low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Bingchen; Shen, Xiaonan; Shang, Jingzhi; Cong, Chunxiao; Yang, Weihuang; Eginligil, Mustafa E-mail: meginligil@ntu.edu.sg; Yu, Ting E-mail: meginligil@ntu.edu.sg

    2014-11-01

    High photoresponse can be achieved in monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides. However, the response times are inconveniently limited by defects. Here, we report low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide prepared by exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method. The exfoliated device exhibits n-type behaviour; while the CVD device exhibits intrinsic behaviour. In off state, the CVD device has four times larger ratio of photoresponse for laser on/off and photoresponse decay–rise times are 0.1 s (limited by our setup), while the exfoliated device has few seconds. These findings are discussed in terms of charge trapping and localization.

  9. Synthesis of nanocrystalline tungsten carbide (WC) powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singla, Gourav; Singh, K.; Pandey, O. P.

    2013-06-01

    Nanocrystalline tungsten carbide (WC) has been obtained from bulk WO3 by in situ reduction and carbonization reactions at low temperature (˜ 600 °C) by taking Mg as reductant and acetone C3H6O as carbon source. It was aimed to elucidate carburization behavior of WO3 powder and to establish optimal conditions for the synthesis of nanocrystalline WC. The role of reaction time on the synthesis of WC has been investigated and discussed. The synthesized powders were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, differential thermal analyzer (DTA), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA).

  10. A diffusion model for tungsten powder carburization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarty, Lewis V.; Donelson, Richard; Hehemann, Robert f.

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model describes the carburization kinetics of tungsten powders mixed with carbon and heated in hydrogen. It is based on diffusion of carbon through a shell of WC growing into particles which are modeled as spheres. The activation energy is 58 kcal/mole in the temperature range 1056 to 1833 °C. Hydrogen gas is important to transport carbon as methane or acetylene, but increased hydrogen pressure increases the rate of carburization so little that an adsorbed species such as CH probably controls the carbon concentration at the particle surface.

  11. Tungsten imido catalysts for selective ethylene dimerisation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Christopher M R; Turner, Zoë R; Buffet, Jean-Charles; O'Hare, Dermot

    2016-02-14

    A tungsten imido complex W(NDipp)Me3Cl (Dipp = 2,6-(i)Pr-C6H3) is active for the selective dimerisation of ethylene to yield 1-butene under mild conditions. Immobilisation and activation of W(NDipp)Cl4(THF) on layered double hydroxides, silica or polymethylaluminoxane yields active solid state catalysts for the selective dimerisation of ethylene. The polymethylaluminoxane-based catalyst displays a turnover frequency (4.0 molC2H4 molW(-1) h(-1)) almost 7 times that of the homogeneous catalyst. PMID:26779579

  12. Impact of temperature during He+ implantation on deuterium retention in tungsten, tungsten with carbon deposit and tungsten carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Yasuhisa; Sato, Misaki; Li, Xiaochun; Yuyama, Kenta; Fujita, Hiroe; Sakurada, Shodai; Uemura, Yuki; Hatano, Yuji; Yoshida, Naoaki; Ashikawa, Naoko; Sagara, Akio; Chikada, Takumi

    2016-02-01

    Temperature dependence on deuterium (D) retention for He+ implanted tungsten (W) was studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) to evaluate the tritium retention behavior in W. The activation energies were evaluated using Hydrogen Isotope Diffusion and Trapping (HIDT) simulation code and found to be 0.55 eV, 0.65 eV, 0.80 eV and 1.00 eV. The heating scenarios clearly control the D retention behavior and, dense and large He bubbles could work as a D diffusion barrier toward the bulk, leading to D retention enhancement at lower temperature of less than 430 K, even if the damage was introduced by He+ implantation. By comparing the D retention for W, W with carbon deposit and tungsten carbide (WC), the dense carbon layer on the surface enhances the dynamic re-emission of D as hydrocarbons, and induces the reduction of D retention. However, by He+ implantation, the D retention was increased for all the samples.

  13. Measurement of the Properties of Tungsten at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margrave, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The thermophysical properties of tungsten and other materials were measured using containerless techniques. Levitation of liquid silver, gallium and tungsten were studied. The studies of liquid aluminum are almost complete and are expected to derive new, reliable properties for liquid aluminum.

  14. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. Welding Module 6. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in gas tungsten arc welding. The module has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles involved in gas tungsten arc welding, supplies, and applications are covered. The materials included…

  15. Processing of tungsten scrap into powders by electroerosion disintegration

    SciTech Connect

    Fominskii, L.P.; Leuchuk, M.V.; Myuller, A.S.; Tarabrina, V.P.

    1985-04-01

    Utilization of tungsten and tungsten alloy swarf and other waste and also of rejected and worn parts is a matter of great importance in view of the shortage of this metal. The authors examine the electroerosion (EE) disintegration of tungsten in water as a means of utilizing swarf and other loose waste. Unlike chemical methods, EE disintegration ensures ecological purity since there are no effluent waters or toxic discharges. Swarf and trimmings of rods of diameters up to 20 mm obtained after the lathe-turning of tungsten bars sintered from PVN and PVV tungsten powders were disintegrated in water at room temperature between tungsten electrodes. The phase composition of the powder was studied using FeK /SUB alpha/ radiation, by x-ray diffraction methods in a DRON-2 diffractometer with a graphite monochromator on the secondary beam. When tungsten is heated to boiling during EE disintegration, the impurities present in it can evaporate and burn out. Thus, tungsten powder produced by EE disintegration can be purer than the starting metal.

  16. Calibration and Temperature Profile of a Tungsten Filament Lamp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Izarra, Charles; Gitton, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work proposed for undergraduate students and teachers is the calibration of a tungsten filament lamp from electric measurements that are both simple and precise, allowing to determine the temperature of tungsten filament as a function of the current intensity. This calibration procedure was first applied to a conventional filament…

  17. Thermal Spray Coating of Tungsten for Tokamak Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xianliang; F, Gitzhofer; M, I. Boulos

    2006-03-01

    Thermal spray, such as direct current (d.c.) plasma spray or radio frequency induced plasma spray, was used to deposit tungsten coatings on the copper electrodes of a tokamak device. The tungsten coating on the outer surface of one copper electrode was formed directly through d.c. plasma spraying of fine tungsten powder. The tungsten coating/lining on the inner surface of another copper electrode could be formed indirectly through induced plasma spraying of coarse tungsten powder. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the cross section and the interface of the tungsten coating. Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-ray (EDAX) was used to analyze the metallic elements attached to a separated interface. The influence of the particle size of the tungsten powder on the density, cracking behavior and adhesion of the coating is discussed. It is found that the coarse tungsten powder with the particle size of 45 ~ 75 μm can be melted and the coating can be formed only by using induced plasma. The coating deposited from the coarse powder has much higher cohesive strength, adhesive strength and crack resistance than the coating made from the fine powder with a particle size of 5 μm.

  18. Microstructure and tensile properties of tungsten at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tielong; Dai, Yong; Lee, Yongjoong

    2016-01-01

    In order to support the development of the 5 MW spallation target for the European Spallation Source, the effect of fabrication process on microstructure, ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), tensile and fracture behaviour of powder-metallurgy pure tungsten materials has been investigated. A hot-rolled (HR) tungsten piece of 12 mm thickness and a hot-forged (HF) piece of about 80 mm thickness were used to simulate the thin and thick blocks in the target. The two tungsten pieces were characterized with metallography analysis, hardness measurement and tensile testing. The HR piece exhibits an anisotropic grain structure with an average size of about 330 × 140 × 40 μm in rolling, long transverse and short transverse (thickness) directions. The HF piece possesses a bimodal grain structure with about 310 × 170 × 70 μm grain size in deformed part and about 25 μm sized grains remained from sintering process. Hardness (HV0.2) of the HR piece is slightly greater than that of the HF one. The ductility of the HR tungsten specimens is greater than that of the HF tungsten. For the HF tungsten piece, specimens with small grains in gauge section manifest lower ductility but higher strength. The DBTT evaluated from the tensile results is 250-300 °C for the HR tungsten and about 350 °C for the HF tungsten.

  19. Tungsten recycling in the United States in 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2011-01-01

    This report, which is one of a series of reports on metals recycling, defines and quantifies the flow of tungsten-bearing materials in the United States from imports and stock releases through consumption and disposition in 2000, with particular emphasis on the recycling of industrial scrap (new scrap) and used products (old scrap). Because of tungsten's many diverse uses, numerous types of scrap were available for recycling by a wide variety of processes. In 2000, an estimated 46 percent of U.S. tungsten supply was derived from scrap. The ratio of tungsten consumed from new scrap to that consumed from old scrap was estimated to be 20:80. Of all the tungsten in old scrap available for recycling, an estimated 66 percent was either consumed in the United States or exported to be recycled.

  20. Electrodeposited Biaxially Textured CeO2 and CeO2:Sm Buffer Layer for YBCO Superconductor Oxide Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Raghu; Phok, Sovannary; Spagnol, Priscila; Chaudhuri, Tapas

    2006-03-01

    Nonvacuum electrodeposition was used to prepare biaxially textured CeO2 and Sm-doped CeO2 coatings on Ni-W substrates. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (including θ/2θ, pole figures, omega scans, and phi scans), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Full-width at half-maximum values of the ω scan and φ scan of the electrodeposited layers were better than those of the Ni-W base substrates, indicating improved biaxial texturing of the electrodeposited layers.