Science.gov

Sample records for aligned breakup deformation

  1. Deformed halo nuclei probed by breakup reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takashi

    2013-07-01

    Breakup reactions play important roles in elucidating the structures near the drip lines, such as nuclear halo. The recent experimental results using the Coulomb and nuclear breakup reactions for the neutron-drip-line nuclei at the new-generation RI beam facility, RIBF at RIKEN, are presented. Focuses are put on the results on the newly found halo nucleus 31Ne, which is intriguing also in that this nucleus is in the island-of-inversion and thus could be strongly deformed. The results on other Ne/Mg/Si neutron rich isotopes ranging from N=20 towards N=28 are also briefly reported. The first breakup experiments using SAMURAI facility at RIBF and future perspectives are also presented.

  2. Droplet Deformation Prediction With the Droplet Deformation and Breakup Model (DDB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The Droplet Deformation and Breakup Model was used to predict deformation of droplets approaching the leading edge stagnation line of an airfoil. The quasi-steady model was solved for each position along the droplet path. A program was developed to solve the non-linear, second order, ordinary differential equation that governs the model. A fourth order Runge-Kutta method was used to solve the equation. Experimental slip velocities from droplet breakup studies were used as input to the model which required slip velocity along the particle path. The center of mass displacement predictions were compared to the experimental measurements from the droplet breakup studies for droplets with radii in the range of 200 to 700 mm approaching the airfoil at 50 and 90 m/sec. The model predictions were good for the displacement of the center of mass for small and medium sized droplets. For larger droplets the model predictions did not agree with the experimental results.

  3. The effect of surfactants on drop deformation, collisions and breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristini, Vittorio; Zhou, Hua; Lowengrub, John; Macosko, Chris

    2001-11-01

    The dynamics of deformable drops in viscous flows are investigated via numerical simulations. A novel finite-element/sharp-interface algorithm based on adaptive tetrahedra (Hooper et al. 2001) for simulations is used. Three-dimensional drop deformation is studied in the presence of a surfactant coating of the drop interface. Under these conditions, flow-driven surfactant redistribution induces Marangoni stresses at the interface that modify the hydrodynamics and thus affect the rheology of emulsions and polymer blends. The effects of the equation of state that relates the concentration of surfactant on the interface to the surface tension, and of diffusion and solubility of surfactant molecules are included in our model. Results of simulations under strong-flow conditions are presented that describe the effect of surfactants on the development of lamellar microstructures in emulsions (Wetzel and Tucker 2001; Cristini et al. 2001). More stable drop lamellae with larger interfacial area are predicted in the presence of surfactants, in agreement with recent experimental observations (Jeon and Macosko 2000). In addition, the feasibility of accurate simulations of drop collisions and breakup is demonstrated using our model, and preliminary results on the effects of surfactants on these phenomena are presented.

  4. Investigation on Transient Oscillation of Droplet Deformation before Conical Breakup under Alternating Current Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haipeng; He, Limin; Luo, Xiaoming; Wang, Jing; Huang, Xin; Lü, Yuling; Yang, Donghai

    2015-08-04

    In this paper, the conical breakup of a water droplet suspended in oil under the alternating current (ac) electric field was experimentally studied with the help of a high-speed video camera. We observed three stages of transient oscillation of deformation characterized by deformation degree l* before the conical breakup that were described in detail. Then a theoretical model was developed to find out the dynamic mechanisms of that behavior. Despite a very small discrepancy, good agreement between model predictions and experimental observations of the evolution of the droplet deformation was observed, and the possible reasons for the discrepancy were discussed as well. Finally, the stresses on the interface were calculated with the theoretical model and their influence on the dynamic behavior before the breakup was obtained. The differences between the droplet breakup mode of ac and direct current electric field are also discussed in our paper.

  5. Constraining Lithosphere Deformation Modes during Continental Breakup for the Iberia-Newfoundland Conjugate Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanniot, L.; Kusznir, N. J.; Mohn, G.; Manatschal, G.

    2014-12-01

    How the lithosphere and asthenosphere deforms during continental rifting leading to breakup and sea-floor spreading initiation is poorly understood. Observations at present-day and fossil analogue rifted margins show a complex OCT architecture which cannot be explained by a single simplistic lithosphere deformation modes. This OCT complexity includes hyper-extended continental crust and lithosphere, detachments faults, exhumed mantle, continental slivers and scattered embryonic oceanic crust. We use a coupled kinematic-dynamic model of lithosphere and asthenosphere deformation to determine the sequence of lithosphere deformation modes leading to continental breakup for Iberia-Newfoundland conjugate margin profiles. We quantitatively calibrate the models using observed present-day water loaded subsidence and crustal thickness, together with subsidence history and the age of melt generation. Flow fields, representing a sequence of lithosphere deformation modes, are generated by a 2D finite element viscous flow model (FE-Margin), and used to advect lithosphere and asthenosphere temperature and material. FE-Margin is kinematically driven by divergent deformation in the upper 15-20 km of the lithosphere inducing passive upwelling below. Buoyancy enhanced upwelling (Braun et al. 2000) is also kinematically included. Melt generation by decompressional melting is predicted using the methodology of Katz et al., 2003. The extension magnitudes used in the lithosphere deformation models are taken from Sutra et al (2013). The best fit calibrated models of lithosphere deformation evolution for the Iberia-Newfoundland conjugate margins require (i) an initial broad region of lithosphere deformation and passive upwelling, (ii) lateral migration of deformation, (iii) an increase in extension rate with time, (iv) focussing of deformation and (v) buoyancy induced upwelling. The preferred calibrated models predict faster extension rates and earlier continental crustal rupture and

  6. Influences of periodic mechanical deformation on spiral breakup in excitable media.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Xu, Jiang-Rong; Yuan, Xiao-Ping; Ying, He-Ping

    2009-01-22

    Influences of periodic mechanical deformation (PMD) on spiral breakup that results from Doppler instability in excitable media are investigated. We present a new effect: a high degree of homogeneous PMD is favored to prevent the low-excitability-induced breakup of spiral waves. The frequency and amplitude of PMD are also significant for achieving this purpose. The underlying mechanism of successful control is also discussed, which is believed to be related to the increase of the minimum temporal period of the meandering spiral when the suitable PMD is applied.

  7. Deformation pathways and breakup modes in acoustically levitated bicomponent droplets under external heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Binita; Basu, Saptarshi

    2016-03-01

    Controlled breakup of droplets using heat or acoustics is pivotal in applications such as pharmaceutics, nanoparticle production, and combustion. In the current work we have identified distinct thermal acoustics-induced deformation regimes (ligaments and bubbles) and breakup dynamics in externally heated acoustically levitated bicomponent (benzene-dodecane) droplets with a wide variation in volatility of the two components (benzene is significantly more volatile than dodecane). We showcase the physical mechanism and universal behavior of droplet surface caving in leading to the inception and growth of ligaments. The caving of the top surface is governed by a balance between the acoustic pressure field and the restrictive surface tension of the droplet. The universal collapse of caving profiles for different benzene concentration (<70 % by volume) is shown by using an appropriate time scale obtained from force balance. Continuous caving leads to the formation of a liquid membrane-type structure which undergoes radial extension due to inertia gained during the precursor phase. The membrane subsequently closes at the rim and the kinetic energy leads to ligament formation and growth. Subsequent ligament breakup is primarily Rayleigh-Plateau type. The breakup mode shifts to diffusional entrapment-induced boiling with an increase in concentration of the volatile component (benzene >70 % by volume). The findings are portable to any similar bicomponent systems with differential volatility.

  8. Deformation and Break-up of Suspension Droplets Sheared in an Immiscible Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desse, Melinda; Hill, Sandra E.; Mitchell, John R.; Wolf, Bettina; Budtova, Tatiana

    2008-07-01

    The deformation and break-up behaviour of suspension droplets immersed in an immiscible fluid has not been widely studied albeit such systems are frequently encountered in every day multiphase products such as foods and cosmetics. Starch is a common thickener used in the food industry. Starch suspensions have shown to offer better flavour perception than polymer thickened solutions; a better understanding of their behaviour under flow would be beneficial in terms of advancement on product formulation. Deformation and break-up of a droplet of swollen-in-water starch granules placed in high viscosity silicon oil was visualised using a counter-rotating parallel-plate shear cell. The silicon oil had a high viscosity to induce shear stresses high enough to deform the droplet; it is also transparent and inert towards the studied system. The starch suspension was prepared to have a volume fraction of 100% swollen granules, i.e. that all water was bound within the swollen starch granules. The shear flow behaviour of this starch suspension is characterised by an apparent yield stress, shear-thinning and first normal stress differences. The rheo-optical experiments were conducted as start-up flow experiments applying shear stresses above the apparent yield stress. A constant shear stress throughout the experiment allows a constant viscosity of the droplet and therefore rules out the shear thinning aspect. Analysis showed droplet break-up at critical Capillary numbers close to those reported for Newtonian fluids. The results demonstrate that the droplet break-up behaviour in a complex emulsion system submitted to shear flow may not be fully described by the rheology of the individual phases alone but may require a microstructure component.

  9. Mantle exhumation and OCT architecture dependency on lithosphere deformation modes during continental breakup: Numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanniot, Ludovic; Kusznir, Nick; Manatschal, Gianreto; Cowie, Leanne

    2013-04-01

    The initiation of sea-floor spreading, during the continental breakup process, requires both the rupture of the continental crust and the initiation of decompression melting. This process results in mantle upwelling and at some point decompressional melting which creates new oceanic crust. Using numerical experiments, we investigate how the deformation mode of continental lithosphere thinning and stretching controls the rupture of continental crust and lithospheric mantle, the onset of decompression melting, their relative timing, and the circumstances under which mantle exhumation may occur. We assume that the topmost continental and ocean lithosphere, corresponding to the cooler brittle seismogenic layer, deforms by extensional faulting (pure-shear deformation) and magmatic intrusion, consistent with the observations of deformation processes occurring at slow spreading ocean ridges (Cannat, 1996). We assume that deformation beneath this topmost lithosphere layer (approximately 15-20 km thick) occurs in response to passive upwelling and thermal and melt buoyancy driven small-scale convection. We use a 2D finite element viscous flow model (FeMargin) to describe lithosphere and asthenosphere deformation. This flow field is used to advect lithosphere and asthenosphere temperature and material. The finite element model is kinematically driven by Vx for the topmost upper crust inducing passive upwelling beneath that layer. A vertical velocity Vz is defined for buoyancy enhanced upwelling as predicted by Braun et al. (2000). Melt generation is predicted by decompression melting using the parameterization and methodology of Katz et al. (2003). Numerical experiments have been used to investigate the dependency of continental crust and lithosphere rupture, decompression melt initiation, rifted margin ocean-continent transition architecture and subsidence history on the half-spreading rate Vx, buoyancy driven upwelling rate Vz, the relative contribution of these deformation

  10. Theory of the deformation of aligned polyethylene

    PubMed Central

    Hammad, A.; Swinburne, T. D.; Hasan, H.; Del Rosso, S.; Iannucci, L.; Sutton, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Solitons are proposed as the agents of plastic and viscoelastic deformation in aligned polyethylene. Interactions between straight, parallel molecules are mapped rigorously onto the Frenkel–Kontorova model. It is shown that these molecular interactions distribute an applied load between molecules, with a characteristic transfer length equal to the soliton width. Load transfer leads to the introduction of tensile and compressive solitons at the chain ends to mark the onset of plasticity at a well-defined yield stress, which is much less than the theoretical pull-out stress. Interaction energies between solitons and an equation of motion for solitons are derived. The equation of motion is based on Langevin dynamics and the fluctuation–dissipation theorem and it leads to the rigorous definition of an effective mass for solitons. It forms the basis of a soliton dynamics in direct analogy to dislocation dynamics. Close parallels are drawn between solitons in aligned polymers and dislocations in crystals, including the configurational force on a soliton. The origins of the strain rate and temperature dependencies of the viscoelastic behaviour are discussed in terms of the formation energy of solitons. A failure mechanism is proposed involving soliton condensation under a tensile load. PMID:26339196

  11. Constraining lithosphere deformation modes during continental breakup for the Iberia-Newfoundland conjugate rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanniot, Ludovic; Kusznir, Nick; Mohn, Geoffroy; Manatschal, Gianreto; Cowie, Leanne

    2016-06-01

    A kinematic model of lithosphere and asthenosphere deformation has been used to investigate lithosphere stretching and thinning modes during continental rifting leading to breakup and seafloor spreading. The model has been applied to two conjugate profiles across the Iberia-Newfoundland rifted margins and quantitatively calibrated using observed present-day water loaded subsidence and crustal thickness, together with observed mantle exhumation, subsidence and melting generation histories. The kinematic model uses an evolving prescribed flow-field to deform the lithosphere and asthenosphere leading to lithospheric breakup from which continental crustal thinning, lithosphere thermal evolution, decompression melt initiation and subsidence are predicted. We explore the sensitivity of model predictions to extension rate history, deformation migration and buoyancy induced upwelling. The best fit calibrated models of lithosphere deformation evolution for the Iberia-Newfoundland conjugate margins require; (1) an initial broad region of lithosphere deformation with passive upwelling, (2) lateral migration of deformation, (3) an increase in extension rate with time, (4) focussing of the deformation and (5) buoyancy induced upwelling. The model prediction of exhumed mantle at the Iberia-Newfoundland margins, as observed, requires a critical threshold of melting to be exceeded before melt extraction. The preferred calibrated models predict faster extension rates and earlier continental crustal separation and mantle exhumation for the Iberia Abyssal Plain-Flemish Pass conjugate margin profile than for the Galicia Bank-Flemish Cap profile to the north. The predicted N-S differences in the deformation evolution give insights into the 3D evolution of Iberia-Newfoundland margin crustal separation.

  12. Drop deformation and breakup in a partially filled horizontal rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Andrew; Pereira, Caroline; Hyacinthe, Hyaquino; Ward, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Drop deformation and breakup due to shear flow has been studied extensively in Couette devices as well as in gravity-driven flows. In these cases shear is generated either by the moving wall or the drop's motion. For such flows the drop shape remains unperturbed at low capillary number (Ca), deforms at moderate Ca , and can experience breakup as Ca --> 1 and larger. Here single drops of NaOH(aq) will be placed in a horizontal cylindrical rotating tank partially filled with vegetable oil resulting in 10-2 < Ca <101 . It will be shown that the reactive vegetable oil-NaOH(aq) system, where surfactants are produced in situ by saponification, can yield lower minimum surface tensions and faster adsorption than non-reactive surfactant systems. Oil films between the wall and drop as well as drop shape will be observed as rotation rates and NaOH(aq) concentration are varied. Results will be presented in the context of previous work on bubble and drop shapes and breakup. NSF CBET #1262718.

  13. Deformation and breakup of micro- and nanoparticle stabilized droplets in microfluidic extensional flows.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Molly K; Rothstein, Jonathan P

    2011-08-16

    Using a microfluidic flow-focusing device, monodisperse water droplets in oil were generated and their interface populated by either 1 μm or 500 nm amine modified silica particles suspended in the water phase. The deformation and breakup of these Pickering droplets were studied in both pure extensional flow and combined extensional and shear flow at various capillary numbers using a microfluidic hyperbolic contraction. The shear resulted from droplet confinement and increased with droplet size and position along the hyperbolic contraction. Droplet deformation was found to increase with increasing confinement and capillary number. At low confinements and low capillary numbers, the droplet deformation followed the predictions of theory. For fully confined droplets, where the interface was populated by 1 μm silica particles, the droplet deformation increased precipitously and two tails were observed to form at the rear of the droplet. These tails were similar to those seen for surfactant covered droplets. At a critical capillary number, daughter droplets were observed to stream from these tails. Due to the elasticity of the particle-laden interface, these drops did not return to a spherical shape, but were observed to buckle. Although increases in droplet deformation were observed, no tail streaming occurred for the 500 nm silica particle covered droplets over the range of capillary numbers studied.

  14. Rotating Rig Development for Droplet Deformation/Breakup and Impact Induced by Aerodynamic Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feo, A.; Vargas, M.; Sor, A.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the development of a Rotating Rig Facility by the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in cooperation with the NASA Glenn Research Center. The facility is located at the INTA installations near Madrid, Spain. It has been designed to study the deformation, breakup and impact of large droplets induced by aerodynamic bodies. The importance of these physical phenomena is related to the effects of Supercooled Large Droplets in icing clouds on the impinging efficiency of the droplets on the body, that may change should these phenomena not be taken into account. The important variables and the similarity parameters that enter in this problem are presented. The facility's components are described and some possible set-ups are explained. Application examples from past experiments are presented in order to indicate the capabilities of the new facility.

  15. A droplet deformation and breakup model based on virtual work principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sichani, Arash B.; Emami, Mohsen D.

    2015-03-01

    A new method of modeling the deformation and secondary breakup of a droplet is presented. The general formulation is based on the virtual work principle and potential flow assumption. To reach the final model, some approximations are made in the aerodynamic calculations including moderate Reynolds number of gas, Reg ˜ 1000, and high density ratio of liquid to gas phase, ρl/ρg ≫ 1. The dynamics of a drop is considered using two degrees of freedom. Two coupled ordinary differential equations are derived which describe time evolution of drop within both vibrational and bag regimes. The model is capable of keeping track of droplet deformation and distortion up to the onset of the bag rupture. The critical Weber number has been predicted with an error of around 20% as compared to the experimental data. The model performance is enhanced after a minor tuning, which result in the critical Weber number of 12.5. The predicted distortion quantities in lateral and longitudinal directions, as well as the drop profiles, are validated against experiments for bag and vibrational regimes. A good agreement is found between the computed results and experiments. Overall, achievements of the present work indicate a promising potential of the current approach for modeling droplet dynamics.

  16. Effects of insoluble surfactants on the nonlinear deformation and breakup of stretching liquid bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambravaneswaran, Bala; Basaran, Osman A.

    1999-05-01

    During the emission of single drops and the atomization of a liquid from a nozzle, threads of liquid are stretched and broken. A convenient setup for studying in a controlled manner the dynamics of liquid threads is the so-called liquid bridge, which is created by holding captive a volume of liquid between two solid disks and pulling apart the two disks at a constant velocity. Although the stability of static bridges and the dynamics of stretching bridges of pure liquids have been extensively studied, even a rudimentary understanding of the dynamics of the stretching and breakup of bridges of surfactant-laden liquids is lacking. In this work, the dynamics of a bridge of a Newtonian liquid containing an insoluble surfactant are analyzed by solving numerically a one-dimensional set of equations that results from a slender-jet approximation of the Navier-Stokes system that governs fluid flow and the convection-diffusion equation that governs surfactant transport. The computational technique is based on the method-of-lines, and uses finite elements for discretization in space and finite differences for discretization in time. The computational results reveal that the presence of an insoluble surfactant can drastically alter the physics of bridge deformation and breakup compared to the situation in which the bridge is surfactant free. They also make clear how the distribution of surfactant along the free surface varies with stretching velocity, bridge geometry, and bulk and surface properties of the liquid bridge. Gradients in surfactant concentration along the interface give rise to Marangoni stresses which can either retard or accelerate the breakup of the liquid bridge. For example, a high-viscosity bridge being stretched at a low velocity is stabilized by the presence of a surfactant of low surface diffusivity (high Peclet number) because of the favorable influence of Marangoni stresses on delaying the rupture of the bridge. This effect, however, can be lessened or

  17. Interpretation of Coulomb breakup of {sup 31}Ne in terms of deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamamoto, Ikuko

    2010-02-15

    The recent experimental data on Coulomb breakup of the nucleus {sup 31}Ne are interpreted in terms of deformation. The measured large one-neutron removal cross section indicates that the ground state of {sup 31}Ne is either an s halo or a p halo. The data can be most easily interpreted as the spin of the ground state being 3/2{sup -} coming from either the Nilsson level [330 1/2] or the Nilsson level [321 3/2] depending on the neutron separation energy S{sub n}. However, the possibility of 1/2{sup +} coming from [200 1/2] is not excluded. It is suggested that if the large ambiguity in the measured value of S{sub n} of {sup 31}Ne, 0.29+-1.64 MeV, can be reduced by an order of magnitude, say to be +-100 keV, one may get a clear picture of the spin-parity of the halo ground state.

  18. Numerical simulation of drop deformations and breakup modes caused by direct current electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paknemat, H.; Pishevar, A. R.; Pournaderi, P.

    2012-10-01

    A drop suspended in another fluid shows different dynamic behaviors in an electric field that depends on its physical properties. The phenomenon of drop deformation under the application of an electric field, in the absence of a net volume charge, is simply caused by the surface stresses. Therefore, an accurate method is required for numerical modeling of the electric driving force at the interface to handle all of the discontinuities involved in the model. For this purpose, in this study the level set method is used along with the ghost fluid method to investigate the responses of three types of drop in the presence of an electric field. Moreover, to demonstrate the accuracy of the method, the breakup modes of each electric model are carefully simulated. Finally, the results of the simulations are compared with similar numerical and experimental results from the literature. The simulation results indicate the accuracy of the method for modeling of the phenomenon over a wide range of electric capillary numbers, and particularly for the capture of the drop profile at the instant of disintegration.

  19. Experimental Observations on the Deformation and Breakup of Water Droplets Near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Feo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. An airfoil model placed at the end of the rotating arm was moved at speeds of 50 to 90 m/sec. A monosize droplet generator was employed to produce droplets that were allowed to fall from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil at a given location. High speed imaging was employed to observe the interaction between the droplets and the airfoil. The high speed imaging allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. A tracking software program was used to measure from the high speed movies the horizontal and vertical displacement of the droplet against time. The velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of a given droplet from beginning of deformation to breakup and/or hitting the airfoil. Results are presented for droplets with a diameter of 490 micrometers at airfoil speeds of 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90 m/sec

  20. Using crustal thickness and subsidence history on the Iberia-Newfoundland margins to constrain lithosphere deformation modes during continental breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanniot, Ludovic; Kusznir, Nick; Manatschal, Gianreto; Mohn, Geoffroy

    2014-05-01

    Observations at magma-poor rifted margins such as Iberia-Newfoundland show a complex lithosphere deformation history during continental breakup and seafloor spreading initiation leading to complex OCT architecture with hyper-extended continental crust and lithosphere, exhumed mantle and scattered embryonic oceanic crust and continental slivers. Initiation of seafloor spreading requires both the rupture of the continental crust and lithospheric mantle, and the onset of decompressional melting. Their relative timing controls when mantle exhumation may occur; the presence or absence of exhumed mantle provides useful information on the timing of these events and constraints on lithosphere deformation modes. A single lithosphere deformation mode leading to continental breakup and sea-floor spreading cannot explain observations. We have determined the sequence of lithosphere deformation events for two profiles across the present-day conjugate Iberia-Newfoundland margins, using forward modelling of continental breakup and seafloor spreading initiation calibrated against observations of crustal basement thickness and subsidence. Flow fields, representing a sequence of lithosphere deformation modes, are generated by a 2D finite element viscous flow model (FeMargin), and used to advect lithosphere and asthenosphere temperature and material. FeMargin is kinematically driven by divergent deformation in the upper 15-20 km of the lithosphere inducing passive upwelling beneath that layer; extensional faulting and magmatic intrusions deform the topmost upper lithosphere, consistent with observations of deformation processes occurring at slow spreading ocean ridges (Cannat, 1996). Buoyancy enhanced upwelling, as predicted by Braun et al. (2000) is also kinematically included in the lithosphere deformation model. Melt generation by decompressional melting is predicted using the parameterization and methodology of Katz et al. (2003). The distribution of lithosphere deformation, the

  1. Dependency of continental crustal rupture, decompression melt initiation and OCT architecture on lithosphere deformation modes during continental breakup: Numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanniot, L.; Kusznir, N. J.; Manatschal, G.

    2012-12-01

    During the continental breakup process, the initiation of sea-floor spreading requires both the rupture of the continental crust and the initiation of decompression melting. Using numerical experiments, we investigate how the deformation mode of continental lithosphere thinning and stretching controls the rupture of continental crust and lithospheric mantle, the onset of decompression melting and their relative timing. We use a two dimensional finite element viscous flow model to describe lithosphere and asthenosphere deformation. This flow field is used to advect lithosphere and asthenosphere material and temperature. Decompression melting is predicted using the parameterization scheme of Katz et al. (2003). Consistent with the observations of deformation processes occurring at slow spreading ocean ridges (Cannat, 1996), we assume that the topmost continental and oceanic lithosphere, corresponding to the cooler brittle seismogenic layer, deforms by extensional faulting (which we approximate to pure-shear deformation) and magmatic intrusion. Beneath this topmost lithosphere layer approximately 15-20 km thick, we assume that deformation occurs in response to passive upwelling and thermal and melt buoyancy driven small-scale convection. The relative contribution of these deformation components is parameterised by the ratio Vz/Vx, where Vx is the half spreading rate applied to the topmost lithosphere deformation and Vz is the upwelling velocity associated with the small scale convection. We use a series of numerical experiments to investigate the dependency of continental crust and lithosphere rupture, decompression melt initiation, rifted margin ocean-continent transition architecture and subsidence history on the half-spreading rate Vx, buoyancy driven upwelling rate Vz, the ratio Vz/Vx and upper lithosphere pure-shear width W. Based on the numerical experiment results we explore a polyphase evolution of deformation modes leading to continental breakup, sea

  2. Modeling of drop breakup in the bag breakup regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Chang, S.; Wu, H.; Xu, J.

    2014-04-01

    Several analytic models for predicting the drop deformation and breakup have been developed over the last three decades, but modeling drop breakup in the bag-type regime is less reported. In this Letter, a breakup model has been proposed to predict the drop deformation length and breakup time in the bag-type breakup regime in a more accurate manner. In the present model, the drop deformation which is approximately as the displacement of the centre of mass (c. m.) along the axis located at the centre of the drop, and the movement of c. m. is obtained by solving the pressure balance equation. The effects of the drop deformation on the drop external aerodynamic force are considered in this model. Drop breakup occurs when the deformation length reaches the maximum value and the maximum deformation length is a function of Weber number. The performance and applicability of the proposed breakup model are tested against the published experimental data.

  3. The optical manifestation of dispersive field-aligned bursts in auroral breakup arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlgren, H.; Semeter, J. L.; Marshall, R. A.; Zettergren, M.

    2013-07-01

    High-resolution optical observations of a substorm expansion show dynamic auroral rays with surges of luminosity traveling up the magnetic field lines. Observed in ground-based imagers, this phenomenon has been termed auroral flames, whereas the rocket signatures of the corresponding energy dispersions are more commonly known as field-aligned bursts. In this paper, observations of auroral flames obtained at 50 frames/s with a scientific-grade Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) sensor (30° × 30° field of view, 30 m resolution at 120 km) are used to provide insight into the nature of the precipitating electrons similar to high-resolution particle detectors. Thanks to the large field of view and high spatial resolution of this system, it is possible to obtain a first-order estimate of the temporal evolution in altitude of the volume emission rate from a single sensor. The measured volume emission rates are compared with the sum of modeled eigenprofiles obtained for a finite set of electron beams with varying energy provided by the TRANSCAR auroral flux tube model. The energy dispersion signatures within each auroral ray can be analyzed in detail during a fraction of a second. The evolution of energy and flux of the precipitation shows precipitation spanning over a large range of energies, with the characteristic energy dropping from 2.1 keV to 0.87 keV over 0.2 s. Oscillations at 2.4 Hz in the magnetic zenith correspond to the period of the auroral flames, and the acceleration is believed to be due to Alfvenic wave interaction with electrons above the ionosphere.

  4. Secondary breakup of coal water slurry drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Liu, Hai-Feng; Xu, Jian-Liang; Li, Wei-Feng

    2011-11-01

    To investigate secondary atomization of coal water slurry (CWS), deformation and breakup of eight kinds of CWS drops are presented using high speed digital camera. Based on morphology, deformation and breakup regimes of CWS drops can be termed some different modes: deformation, multimode breakup (including two sub-modes: hole breakup and tensile breakup), and shear breakup. Correlations on the ranges of breakup modes are also obtained. The conventional Weber number and Ohnesorge number are found to be insufficient to classify all breakup modes of CWS drops, so two other non-dimensional numbers based on rheology of CWS are suggested to use in the deformation and breakup regime map. Finally, total breakup time is studied and correlated, which increases with Ohnesorge number.

  5. Directional Correlation of Nuclear-Collision Probability for Aligned Beams of Deformed Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Mitsunori; Tanaka, Masaomi; Yamaoka, Shintaro; Ohno, Junichi; Mihara, Mototsugu; Matsuta, Kensaku; Nishimura, Daiki; Yoshinaga, Kenta; Takechi, Maya; Ohtsubo, Takashi; Izumikawa, Takuji; Nagashima, Masayuki; Suzuki, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Sato, Shinji; Suzuki, Shinji; Fukuda, Shigekazu; Himac H093 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    In the long history of nuclear physics, a lot of observables have been discussed in connection with the nuclear deformation. In this work, an investigation have been carried out on the directional correlation of the nuclear-collision probability between the direction of beam of deformed nuclei and the deformation axis, to sense the nuclear deformation directly. Few experimental studies of this kind have been done because of the difficulties in producing aligned beams. We utilized the projectile fragmentation to produce the aligned nuclear beams. We tested these measurements for 9Be, 10B, and 26Al at the HIMAC facility. By selecting the parallel momentum using the separator, spin aligned beams were produced, with which the interaction cross sections were measured. The cross sections were precisely measured as a function of longitudinal momentum. We will report on the details of measurements and discussions on this intriguing result.

  6. Using crustal thickness, subsidence and P-T-t history on the Iberia-Newfoundland & Alpine Tethys margins to constrain lithosphere deformation modes during continental breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanniot, L.; Kusznir, N. J.; Manatschal, G.; Mohn, G.; Beltrando, M.

    2013-12-01

    Observations at magma-poor rifted margins such as Iberia-Newfoundland show a complex lithosphere deformation history and OCT architecture, resulting in hyper-extended continental crust and lithosphere, exhumed mantle and scattered embryonic oceanic crust before continental breakup and seafloor spreading. Initiation of seafloor spreading requires both the rupture of the continental crust and lithospheric mantle, and the onset of decompressional melting. Their relative timing controls when mantle exhumation may occur; the presence or absence of exhumed mantle provides useful information on the timing of these events and constraints on lithosphere deformation modes. A single kinematic lithosphere deformation mode leading to continental breakup and sea-floor spreading cannot explain observations. We have determined the sequence of lithosphere deformation events, using forward modelling of crustal thickness, subsidence and P-T-t history calibrated against observations on the present-day Iberia-Newfoundland and the fossil analogue Alpine Tethys margins. Lithosphere deformation modes, represented by flow fields, are generated by a 2D finite element viscous flow model (FeMargin), and used to advect lithosphere and asthenosphere temperature and material. FeMargin is kinematically driven by divergent deformation in the topmost upper lithosphere inducing passive upwelling beneath that layer; the upper lithosphere is assumed to deform by extensional faulting and magmatic intrusions, consistent with observations of deformation processes occurring at slow spreading ocean ridges (Cannat, 1996). Buoyancy enhanced upwelling is also included in the kinematic model as predicted by Braun et al (2000). We predict melt generation by decompressional melting using the parameterization and methodology of Katz et al., 2003. We use a series of numerical experiments, tested and calibrated against crustal thicknesses and subsidence observations, to determine the distribution of lithosphere

  7. Proximally placed alignment control strap for ankle varus deformity: a case report.

    PubMed

    Oh-Park, Mooyeon; Park, Geun Young; Hosamane, Sadvi; Kim, Dennis D

    2007-01-01

    Ankle varus is a commonly encountered deformity in patients with neurologic or musculoskeletal disorders. It impedes stability during the stance phase of gait and often causes skin lesions on the lateral ankle area. Plastic or conventional ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) with supplementary features such as a T-strap or increased contact area of the lateral flange have been used for correctable varus deformities. These supplementary modifications, however, have limitations as effective tools for varus control, and ankle varus may persist despite their use. We are revisiting the concept of a proximally placed alignment control strap for ankle varus, which may overcome the limitations of currently available modifications. This alignment control strap is designed to provide a medially directed force on the tibia and fibula against the force of varus deformation of the ankle. This modification can be easily added to various types of existing AFOs with acceptable aesthetic appearance. We describe 2 cases of manually correctable but persistent varus deformities of the ankle that were successfully controlled by utilization of the proximally placed alignment control strap.

  8. Sagittal alignment of the first metatarsophalangeal joint after arthrodesis for rheumatoid forefoot deformity.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Akihiko; Majima, Tokifumi; Onodera, Tomohiro; Sawaguchi, Naohiro; Watanabe, Takuya; Kasahara, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    The present study assessed the midterm results of reconstruction for rheumatoid forefoot deformity with arthrodesis of the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint, scarf osteotomy, resection arthroplasty of the metatarsal head of the lesser toes, and surgical repair of hammertoe deformity (arthrodesis of the proximal interphalangeal joint). Special focus was placed on the sagittal alignment of the first metatarsophalangeal joint after arthrodesis. We retrospectively evaluated the postoperative clinical outcomes and radiographic findings for 16 consecutive female patients (20 feet) with symptomatic rheumatoid forefoot deformities. The mean duration of follow-up was 7.9 (range 4 to 13) years. All first MTP joints and first metatarsal bones were fused successfully. The mean value of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society and Japanese Society for Foot Surgery clinical scores significantly improved overall, except for 2 patients (10%), who complained of first toe pain at the final follow-up visit owing to sagittal misalignment of the fused first MTP joint. Sagittal alignment of the first metatarsal varies greatly because of the rheumatoid midfoot and hindfoot deformities. Therefore, inclination of the first metatarsal should be considered when determining the first MTP joint sagittal fusion angle.

  9. The Breakup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the breakup between Texas Southmost College (TSC) and the upper-division University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB). The split marks the official end of an unusual 20-year partnership between TSC and the University of Texas System that, for the first time, ushered four-year university education into overwhelmingly Latino…

  10. Using subsidence and P-T-t history on the Alpine Tethys margin to constrain lithosphere deformation modes during continental breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanniot, Ludovic; Kusznir, Nick; Manatschal, Gianreto; Mohn, Geoffroy; Beltrando, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Mantle exhumation and hyper-extended crust, as observed on the Iberia-Newfoundland conjugate margins, are key components of both present-day and fossil analogue magma-poor rifted margins. Conceptual models of the Alpine Tethys paleogeography evolution show a complex subsidence history, determined by the nature and composition of sedimentary, crustal and mantle rocks in the Alpine domains (Mohn et al., 2010). The relative timing of crustal rupture and decompressional melt initiation and inherited mantle composition control whether mantle exhumation may occur; the presence or absence of exhumed mantle therefore provides useful information on the timing of these events and constraints on lithosphere deformation modes and composition. A single mode of lithosphere deformation leading to continental breakup and sea-floor spreading cannot explain observations. We have determined the sequence of lithosphere deformation modes for the fossil Alpine Tethys margin using a numerical model of the temporal and spatial evolution of lithosphere deformation; the model has been calibrated against observations of subsidence and P-T-t history for the Alpine Tethys margin. A 2D finite element viscous flow model (FeMargin) is used to generate flow fields for a sequence of lithosphere deformation modes, which are used to advect lithosphere and asthenosphere temperature and material. FeMargin is kinematically driven by divergent deformation in the topmost 15-20 km of the lithosphere inducing passive upwelling beneath that layer; the upper lithosphere is assumed to deform by extensional faulting and magmatic intrusions, consistent with observations of deformation processes occurring at slow spreading ocean ridges (Cannat, 1996). We also include buoyancy enhanced upwelling in the kinematic model as proposed by Braun et al. (2000). We generate melt by decompressional melting using the parameterization and methodology of Katz et al. (2003). In the modelling of the Alpine Tethys margin

  11. Light modulation in planar aligned short-pitch deformed-helix ferroelectric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, Svetlana P.; Samagin, Sergey A.; Pozhidaev, Evgeny P.; Kiselev, Alexei D.

    2015-12-01

    We study both experimentally and theoretically modulation of light in a planar aligned deformed-helix ferroelectric liquid crystal (DHFLC) cell with subwavelength helix pitch, which is also known as a short-pitch DHFLC. In our experiments, the azimuthal angle of the in-plane optical axis and electrically controlled parts of the principal in-plane refractive indices are measured as a function of voltage applied across the cell. Theoretical results giving the effective optical tensor of a short-pitch DHFLC expressed in terms of the smectic tilt angle and the refractive indices of the ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) are used to fit the experimental data. The optical anisotropy of the FLC material is found to be weakly biaxial. For both the transmissive and reflective modes, the results of fitting are applied to model the phase and amplitude modulation of light in the DHFLC cell. We demonstrate that if the thickness of the DHFLC layer is about 50 μ m , the detrimental effect of field-induced rotation of the in-plane optical axes on the characteristics of an axicon designed using the DHFLC spatial light modulator in the reflective mode is negligible.

  12. Surviving Atmospheric Spacecraft Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; Conley, Catharine A.

    2003-01-01

    In essence, to survival a spacecraft breakup an animal must not experience a lethal event. Much as with surviving aircraft breakup, dissipation of lethal forces via breakup of the craft around the organism is likely to greatly increase the odds of survival. As spacecraft can travel higher and faster than aircraft, it is often assumed that spacecraft breakup is not a survivable event. Similarly, the belief that aircraft breakup or crashes are not survivable events is still prevalent in the general population. As those of us involved in search and rescue know, it is possible to survive both aircraft breakup and crashes. Here we make the first report of an animal, C. elegans, surviving atmospheric breakup of the spacecraft supporting it and discuss both the lethal events these animals had to escape and the implications implied for search and rescue following spacecraft breakup.

  13. Surfactant-laden drop jellyfish-breakup mode induced by the Marangoni effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Xu, Jian-Liang; Li, Wei-Feng; Liu, Hai-Feng

    2017-03-01

    Drop breakup is a familiar event in both nature and technology. In this study, we find that the bag breakup mode can be replaced by a new breakup mode: jellyfish breakup, when the surfactant concentration of a surfactant-laden drop is high. This new breakup mode has a morphology resembling a jellyfish with many long tentacles. This is due to the inhomogeneous distribution of surfactant in the process of drop deformation and breakup. The thin film of liquid can remain stable as a result of the Marangoni effect. Finally, we propose that the dimensionless surfactant concentration can serve as a criterion for breakup mechanisms.

  14. A patient alignment solution for lung SBRT setups based on a deformable registration technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Bo; Mittauer, Kathryn; Li, Jonathan; Samant, Sanjiv; Dagan, Roi; Okunieff, Paul; Kahler, Darren; Liu, Chihray

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors propose a novel registration strategy for translation-only correction scenarios of lung stereotactic body radiation therapy setups, which can achieve optimal dose coverage for tumors as well as preserve the consistency of registrations with minimal human interference. Methods: The proposed solution (centroid-to-centroidor CTC solution) uses the average four-dimensional CT (A4DCT) as the reference CT. The cone-beam CT (CBCT) is deformed to acquire a new centroid for the internal target volume (ITV) on the CBCT. The registration is then accomplished by simply aligning the centroids of the ITVs between the A4DCT and the CBCT. Sixty-seven cases using 64 patients (each case is associated with separate isocenters) have been investigated with the CTC method and compared with the conventional gray-value (G) mode and bone (B) mode registration methods. Dosimetric effects among the tree methods were demonstrated by 18 selected cases. The uncertainty of the CTC method has also been studied. Results: The registration results demonstrate the superiority of the CTC method over the other two methods. The differences in the D99 and D95 ITV dose coverage between the CTC method and the original plan is small (within 5%) for all of the selected cases except for one for which the tumor presented significant growth during the period between the CT scan and the treatment. Meanwhile, the dose coverage differences between the original plan and the registration results using either the B or G method are significant, as tumor positions varied dramatically, relative to the rib cage, from their positions on the original CT. The largest differences between the D99 and D95 dose coverage of the ITV using the B or G method versus the original plan are as high as 50%. The D20 differences between any of the methods versus the original plan are all less than 2%. Conclusions: The CTC method can generate optimal dose coverage to tumors with much better consistency

  15. Surviving atmospheric spacecraft breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; McLamb, William

    2005-01-01

    Spacecraft travel higher and faster than aircraft, making breakup potentially less survivable. As with aircraft breakup, the dissipation of lethal forces via spacecraft breakup around an organism is likely to greatly increase the odds of survival. By employing a knowledge of space and aviation physiology, comparative physiology, and search-and-rescue techniques, we were able to correctly predict and execute the recovery of live animals following the breakup of the space shuttle Columbia. In this study, we make what is, to our knowledge, the first report of an animal, Caenorhabditis elegans, surviving the atmospheric breakup of the spacecraft that was supporting it and discuss both the lethal events these animals had to escape and the implications for search and rescue following spacecraft breakup.

  16. Cell-generated traction forces and the resulting matrix deformation modulate microvascular alignment and growth during angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Clayton J.; Edgar, Lowell T.; Hoying, James B.

    2014-01-01

    The details of the mechanical factors that modulate angiogenesis remain poorly understood. Previous in vitro studies of angiogenesis using microvessel fragments cultured within collagen constructs demonstrated that neovessel alignment can be induced via mechanical constraint of the boundaries (i.e., boundary conditions). The objective of this study was to investigate the role of mechanical boundary conditions in the regulation of angiogenic alignment and growth in an in vitro model of angiogenesis. Angiogenic microvessels within three-dimensional constructs were subjected to different boundary conditions, thus producing different stress and strain fields during growth. Neovessel outgrowth and orientation were quantified from confocal image data after 6 days. Vascularity and branching decreased as the amount of constraint imposed on the culture increased. In long-axis constrained hexahedral constructs, microvessels aligned parallel to the constrained axis. In contrast, constructs that were constrained along the short axis had random microvessel orientation. Finite element models were used to simulate the contraction of gels under the various boundary conditions and to predict the local strain field experienced by microvessels. Results from the experiments and simulations demonstrated that microvessels aligned perpendicular to directions of compressive strain. Alignment was due to anisotropic deformation of the matrix from cell-generated traction forces interacting with the mechanical boundary conditions. These findings demonstrate that boundary conditions and thus the effective stiffness of the matrix regulate angiogenesis. This study offers a potential explanation for the oriented vascular beds that occur in native tissues and provides the basis for improved control of tissue vascularization in both native tissues and tissue-engineered constructs. PMID:24816262

  17. Alignment of sparse freehand 3-D ultrasound with preoperative images of the liver using models of respiratory motion and deformation.

    PubMed

    Blackall, Jane M; Penney, Graeme P; King, Andrew P; Hawkes, David J

    2005-11-01

    We present a method for alignment of an interventional plan to optically tracked two-dimensional intraoperative ultrasound (US) images of the liver. Our clinical motivation is to enable the accurate transfer of information from three-dimensional preoperative imaging modalities [magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT)] to intraoperative US to aid needle placement for thermal ablation of liver metastases. An initial rigid registration to intraoperative coordinates is obtained using a set of US images acquired at maximum exhalation. A preprocessing step is applied to both the preoperative images and the US images to produce evidence of corresponding structures. This yields two sets of images representing classification of regions as vessels. The registration then proceeds using these images. The preoperative images and plan are then warped to correspond to a single US slice acquired at an unknown point in the breathing cycle where the liver is likely to have moved and deformed relative to the preoperative image. Alignment is constrained using a patient-specific model of breathing motion and deformation. Target registration error is estimated by carrying out simulation experiments using resliced MR volumes to simulate real US and comparing the registration results to a "bronze-standard" registration performed on the full MR volume. Finally, the system is tested using real US and verified using visual inspection.

  18. Breakup Characteristics of Nanocylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Harinath; Tiwari, Anupam; Mukhopadhyay, Saumyadip; Abraham, John

    2008-11-01

    Liquid breakup at the macroscale has been studied extensively for over a hundred years, but breakup at the nanoscale has only recently attracted attention. The focus of the present work is on the breakup of liquid nanocylinders. Nanocylinders are encountered in several engineering applications and biological systems, e.g. printing on micro-circuitry, precision manufacturing, Golgi apparatus. Breakup at the nanoscale is primarily through the Rayleigh capillary mechanism since the Reynolds numbers are low. The specific research question we address is: does the breakup-time of liquid cylinders at the nanolevel follow the classical scaling relationships derived for capillary breakup at the macrolevel. A coarse-grained molecular dynamics approach is employed for the studies. We will show that for changes in cylinder radius, the scaling holds; but, when viscosity and surface tension are varied, the scaling does not hold. Possible reasons, attributed primarily to the origin of the instability that leads to the breakup, are discussed. Comparisons of other outcomes at the two levels will also be presented.

  19. Description of Jet Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1996-01-01

    In this article we review recent results on the breakup of cylindrical jets of a Newtonian fluid. Capillary forces provide the main driving mechanism and our interest is in the description of the flow as the jet pinches to form drops. The approach is to describe such topological singularities by constructing local (in time and space) similarity solutions from the governing equations. This is described for breakup according to the Euler, Stokes or Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that slender jet theories can be applied when viscosity is present, but for inviscid jets the local shape of the jet at breakup is most likely of a non-slender geometry. Systems of one-dimensional models of the governing equations are solved numerically in order to illustrate these differences.

  20. Droplet breakup dynamics of weakly viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Kristin; Walker, Travis

    2016-11-01

    The addition of macromolecules to solvent, even in dilute quantities, can alter a fluid's response in an extensional flow. For low-viscosity fluids, the presence of elasticity may not be apparent when measured using a standard rotational rheometer, yet it may still alter the response of a fluid when undergoing an extensional deformation, especially at small length scales where elastic effects are enhanced. Applications such as microfluidics necessitate investigating the dynamics of fluids with elastic properties that are not pronounced at large length scales. In the present work, a microfluidic cross-slot configuration is used to study the effects of elasticity on droplet breakup. Droplet breakup and the subsequent iterated-stretching - where beads form along a filament connecting two primary droplets - were observed for a variety of material and flow conditions. We present a relationship on the modes of bead formation and how and when these modes will form based on key parameters such as the properties of the outer continuous-phase fluid. The results are vital not only for simulating the droplet breakup of weakly viscoelastic fluids but also for understanding how the droplet breakup event can be used for characterizing the extensional properties of weakly-viscoelastic fluids.

  1. Cervical compensatory alignment changes following correction of adult thoracic deformity: a multicenter experience in 57 patients with a 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Oh, Taemin; Scheer, Justin K; Eastlack, Robert; Smith, Justin S; Lafage, Virginie; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Klineberg, Eric; Passias, Peter G; Deviren, Vedat; Hostin, Richard; Gupta, Munish; Bess, Shay; Schwab, Frank; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Ames, Christopher P

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT Alignment changes in the cervical spine that occur following surgical correction for thoracic deformity remain poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate such changes in a cohort of adults with thoracic deformity treated surgically. METHODS The authors conducted a multicenter retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with thoracic deformity. Inclusion criteria for this study were as follows: corrective osteotomy for thoracic deformity, upper-most instrumented vertebra (UIV) between T-1 and T-4, lower-most instrumented vertebra (LIV) at or above L-5 (LIV ≥ L-5) or at the ilium (LIV-ilium), and a minimum radiographic follow-up of 2 years. Sagittal radiographic parameters were assessed preoperatively as well as at 3 months and 2 years postoperatively, including the C-7 sagittal vertical axis (SVA), C2-7 cervical lordosis (CL), C2-7 SVA, T-1 slope (T1S), T1S minus CL (T1S-CL), T2-12 thoracic kyphosis (TK), apical TK, lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic incidence (PI), PI-LL, pelvic tilt (PT), and sacral slope (SS). RESULTS Fifty-seven patients with a mean age of 49.1 ± 14.6 years met the study inclusion criteria. The preoperative prevalence of increased CL (CL > 15°) was 48.9%. Both 3-month and 2-year apical TK improved from baseline (p < 0.05, statistically significant). At the 2-year follow-up, only the C2-7 SVA increased significantly from baseline (p = 0.01), whereas LL decreased from baseline (p < 0.01). The prevalence of increased CL was 35.3% at 3 months and 47.8% at 2 years, which did not represent a significant change. Postoperative cervical alignment changes were not significantly different from preoperative values regardless of the LIV (LIV ≥ L-5 or LIV-ilium, p > 0.05 for both). In a subset of patients with a maximum TK ≥ 60° (35 patients) and 3-column osteotomy (38 patients), no significant postoperative cervical changes were seen. CONCLUSION Increased CL is common in adult spinal deformity patients with thoracic deformities

  2. How the neck affects the back: changes in regional cervical sagittal alignment correlate to HRQOL improvement in adult thoracolumbar deformity patients at 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Scheer, Justin K; Terran, Jamie S; Smith, Justin S; Hamilton, D Kojo; Kim, Han Jo; Mundis, Greg M; Hart, Robert A; McCarthy, Ian M; Klineberg, Eric; Lafage, Virginie; Bess, Shay; Schwab, Frank; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Ames, Christopher P

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT Regional cervical sagittal alignment (C2-7 sagittal vertical axis [SVA]) has been shown to correlate with health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The study objective was to examine the relationship between cervical and thoracolumbar alignment parameters with HRQOL among patients with operative and nonoperative adult thoracolumbar deformity. METHODS This is a multicenter prospective data collection of consecutive patients with adult thoracolumbar spinal deformity. Clinical measures of disability included the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Scoliosis Research Society-22 Patient Questionnaire (SRS-22), and 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Cervical radiographic parameters were correlated with global sagittal parameters within the nonoperative and operative cohorts. A partial correlation analysis was performed controlling for C-7 SVA. The operative group was subanalyzed by the magnitude of global deformity (C-7 SVA ≥ 5 cm vs < 5 cm). RESULTS A total of 318 patients were included (186 operative and 132 nonoperative). The mean age was 55.4 ± 14.9 years. Operative patients had significantly worse baseline HRQOL and significantly larger C-7 SVA, pelvic tilt (PT), mismatch between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis (PI-LL), and C2-7 SVA. The operative patients with baseline C-7 SVA ≥ 5 cm had significantly larger C2-7 lordosis (CL), C2-7 SVA, C-7 SVA, PI-LL, and PT than patients with a normal C-7 SVA. For all patients, baseline C2-7 SVA and CL significantly correlated with baseline ODI, Physical Component Summary (PCS), SRS Activity domain, and SRS Appearance domain. Baseline C2-7 SVA also correlated with SRS Pain and SRS Total. For the operative patients with baseline C-7 SVA ≥ 5 cm, the 2-year C2-7 SVA significantly correlated with 2-year Mental Component Summary, SRS Mental, SRS Satisfaction, and decreases in ODI. Decreases in C2-7 SVA at 2 years significantly correlated with lower ODI at 2 years. Using partial correlations while controlling for

  3. Drop Breakup in Fixed Bed Flows as Model Stochastic Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.; Mosler, Alisa B.; Patel, Prateek

    1999-01-01

    We examine drop breakup in a class of stochastic flow fields as a model for the flow through fixed fiber beds and to elucidate the general mechanisms whereby drops breakup in disordered, Lagrangian unsteady flows. Our study consists of two parallel streams of investigation. First, large scale numerical simulations of drop breakup in a class of anisotropic Gaussian fields will be presented. These fields are generated spectrally and have been shown in a previous publication to be exact representations of the flow in a dilute disordered bed of fibers if close interactions between the fibers and the drops are dynamically unimportant. In these simulations the drop shape is represented by second and third order small deformation theories which have been shown to be excellent for the prediction of drop breakup in steady strong flows. We show via these simulations that the mechanisms of drop breakup in these flows are quite different than in steady flows. The predominant mechanism of breakup appears to be very short lived twist breakups. Moreover, the occurrence of breakup events is poorly predicted by either the strength of the local flow in which the drop finds itself at breakup, or the degree of deformation that the drop achieves prior to breakup. It is suggested that a correlation function of both is necessary to be predictive of breakup events. In the second part of our research experiments are presented where the drop deformation and breakup in PDMS/polyisobutylene emulsions is considered. We consider very dilute emulsions such that coalescence is unimportant. The flows considered are simple shear and the flow through fixed fiber beds. Turbidity, small angle light scattering, dichroism and microscopy are used to interrogate the drop deformation process in both flows. It is demonstrated that breakup at very low capillary numbers occurs in both flows but larger drop deformation occurs in the fixed bed flow. Moreover, it is witnessed that breakup in the bed occurs

  4. Capillary breakup of fluid threads within confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guoqing; Xue, Chundong; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-11-01

    Fluid thread breakup is a widespread phenomenon in nature, industry, and daily life. Driven by surface tension (or capillarity) at low flow-rate condition, the breakup scenario is usually called capillary instability or Plateau-Rayleigh instability. Fluid thread deforms under confinement of ambient fluid to form a fluid neck. Thinning of the neck at low flow-rate condition is quasistatic until the interface becomes unstable and collapses to breakup. Underlying mechanisms and universalities of both the stable and unstable thinning remain, however, unclear and even contradictory. Here we conduct new numerical and experimental studies to show that confined interfaces are not only stabilized but also destabilized by capillarity at low flow-rate condition. Capillary stabilization is attributed to confinement-determined internal pressure that is higher than capillary pressure along the neck. Two origins of capillary destabilization are identified: one is confinement-induced gradient of capillary pressure along the interface; the other is the competition between local capillary pressure and internal pressure. This work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11402274, 11272321, and 11572334).

  5. Quantitative analysis of tissue deformation dynamics reveals three characteristic growth modes and globally aligned anisotropic tissue deformation during chick limb development.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Yoshihiro; Kuroiwa, Atsushi; Suzuki, Takayuki

    2015-05-01

    Tissue-level characterization of deformation dynamics is crucial for understanding organ morphogenetic mechanisms, especially the interhierarchical links among molecular activities, cellular behaviors and tissue/organ morphogenetic processes. Limb development is a well-studied topic in vertebrate organogenesis. Nevertheless, there is still little understanding of tissue-level deformation relative to molecular and cellular dynamics. This is mainly because live recording of detailed cell behaviors in whole tissues is technically difficult. To overcome this limitation, by applying a recently developed Bayesian approach, we here constructed tissue deformation maps for chick limb development with high precision, based on snapshot lineage tracing using dye injection. The precision of the constructed maps was validated with a clear statistical criterion. From the geometrical analysis of the map, we identified three characteristic tissue growth modes in the limb and showed that they are consistent with local growth factor activity and cell cycle length. In particular, we report that SHH signaling activity changes dynamically with developmental stage and strongly correlates with the dynamic shift in the tissue growth mode. We also found anisotropic tissue deformation along the proximal-distal axis. Morphogenetic simulation and experimental studies suggested that this directional tissue elongation, and not local growth, has the greatest impact on limb shaping. This result was supported by the novel finding that anisotropic tissue elongation along the proximal-distal axis occurs independently of cell proliferation. Our study marks a pivotal point for multi-scale system understanding in vertebrate development.

  6. On the breakup of tectonic plates by polar wandering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.-S.

    1974-01-01

    The equations for the stresses in a homogeneous shell of uniform thickness caused by a shift of the axis of rotation are derived. The magnitude of these stresses reaches a maximum value of the order of 10 to the 9th power dyn/sq cm, which is sufficient for explaining a tectonic breakup. In order to deduce the fracture pattern according to which the breakup of tectonic plates can be expected the theory of plastic deformation of shells is applied. The analysis of this pattern gives an explanation of the existing boundary systems of the major tectonic plates as described by Morgan (1968), LePichon (1968) and Isacks et al. (1968).

  7. Elastic Coulomb breakup of 34Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, G.; Shubhchintak, Chatterjee, R.

    2016-08-01

    Background: 34Na is conjectured to play an important role in the production of seed nuclei in the alternate r -process paths involving light neutron rich nuclei very near the β -stability line, and as such, it is important to know its ground state properties and structure to calculate rates of the reactions it might be involved in, in the stellar plasma. Found in the region of `island of inversion', its ground state might not be in agreement with normal shell model predictions. Purpose: The aim of this paper is to study the elastic Coulomb breakup of 34Na on 208Pb to give us a core of 33Na with a neutron and in the process we try and investigate the one neutron separation energy and the ground state configuration of 34Na. Method: A fully quantum mechanical Coulomb breakup theory within the architecture of post-form finite range distorted wave Born approximation extended to include the effects of deformation is used to research the elastic Coulomb breakup of 34Na on 208Pb at 100 MeV/u. The triple differential cross section calculated for the breakup is integrated over the desired components to find the total cross-section, momentum, and angular distributions as well as the average momenta, along with the energy-angular distributions. Results: The total one neutron removal cross section is calculated to test the possible ground state configurations of 34Na. The average momentum results along with energy-angular calculations indicate 34Na to have a halo structure. The parallel momentum distributions with narrow full widths at half-maxima signify the same. Conclusion: We have attempted to analyze the possible ground state configurations of 34Na and in congruity with the patterns in the `island of inversion' conclude that even without deformation, 34Na should be a neutron halo with a predominant contribution to its ground state most probably coming from 33Na(3 /2+)⊗ 2 p3 /2ν configuration. We also surmise that it would certainly be useful and rewarding to test our

  8. Multivariate analysis of factors associated with kyphotic deformity after laminoplasty in cervical spondylotic myelopathy patients without preoperative kyphotic alignment

    PubMed Central

    Cao, JunMing; Zhang, JingTao; Yang, DaLong; Yang, Liu; Shen, Yong

    2017-01-01

    The risk factors of post-laminoplasty kyphosis in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) without preoperative kyphotic alignment are not well known. This study aimed to compare clinical and radiological data between patients with or without post-laminoplasty kyphosis and to investigate the factors associated with post-laminoplasty kyphosis in CSM patients without preoperative kyphotic alignment. Patients (n = 194) who received unilateral expansive open-door cervical laminoplasty with miniplate fixation and completed a 1-year follow-up were enrolled. Patients were grouped according to whether they suffered from postoperative kyphosis (P) or not (NP). Postoperative kyphosis was observed in 21 (10.8%) patients. The recovery rates of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores at the 1-year follow-up in the P group were inferior to those in the NP group (31.9% vs. 65.2%, P < 0.001). Logistic regression with post-laminoplasty kyphosis as the dependent variable showed independent risks associated with an increased C2–7 sagittal vertical axis (SVA, odds ratio [OR] = 1.085, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.025–1.203, P = 0.015), destroyed facet joints (OR = 1.132, 95% CI = 1.068–1.208, P < 0.001), and cephalad vertebral level undergoing laminoplasty (CVLL, OR = 2.860, 95% CI = 1.164–6.847, P = 0.021). These findings suggest that CVLL, C2–7 SVA, and destroyed facet joints are associated with kyphosis after laminoplasty in CSM patients without preoperative kyphotic alignment. PMID:28240309

  9. Breakup modes of fluid drops in confined shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barai, Nilkamal; Mandal, Nibir

    2016-07-01

    Using a conservative level set method we investigate the deformation behavior of isolated spherical fluid drops in a fluid channel subjected to simple shear flows, accounting the following three non-dimensional parameters: (1) degree of confinement (Wc = 2a/h, where a is the drop radius and h is the channel thickness); (2) viscosity ratio between the two fluids (λ = μd/μm, where μd is the drop viscosity and μm is the matrix viscosity); and (3) capillary number (Ca). For a given Wc, a drop steadily deforms to attain a stable geometry (Taylor number and inclination of its long axis to the shear direction) when Ca < 0.3. For Ca > 0.3, the deformation behavior turns to be unsteady, leading to oscillatory variations of both its shape and orientation with progressive shear. This kind of unsteady deformation also occurs in a condition of high viscosity ratios (λ > 2). Here we present a detailed parametric analysis of the drop geometry with increasing shear as a function of Wc, Ca, and λ. Under a threshold condition, deforming drops become unstable, resulting in their breakup into smaller droplets. We recognize three principal modes of breakup: Mode I (mid-point pinching), Mode II (edge breakup), and Mode III (homogeneous breakup). Each of these modes is shown to be most effective in the specific field defined by Ca and λ. Our study also demonstrates the role of channel confinement (Wc) in controlling the transition of Mode I to III. Finally, we discuss implications of the three modes in determining characteristic drop size distributions in multiphase flows.

  10. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Damage during Compressive Deformation of Amorphous Zr-Based Foams with Aligned, Elongated Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Marie E.; Dunand, David C.

    2013-07-01

    Acoustic emission methods are used to investigate the evolution of internal microfractural damage during uniaxial compression of amorphous Zr-based foams with aligned, elongated pores. The foams are fabricated by means of densifying a blend of crystalline W powders and amorphous Zr-based powders with two oxygen contents (0.078 and 0.144 wt pct) by warm equal channel angular extrusion, followed by dissolution of the elongated W phase from the fully densified amorphous matrix. For the high-oxygen foams, prior powder boundaries in the amorphous struts promote damage that accumulates during compression, resulting in energy-absorbing properties comparable with the low-oxygen foams without stress-concentrating powder boundaries. The influence of pore orientation on the evolution of microfracture damage and the ability of the foams to accumulate damage without catastrophic failure is also investigated: pores oriented from 24 to 68 deg to the loading direction promote wall bending, resulting in foams with more diffuse damage and better energy-absorbing properties.

  11. Correction of static axial alignment in children with knee varus or valgus deformities through guided growth: Does it also correct dynamic frontal plane moments during walking?

    PubMed

    Böhm, Harald; Stief, Felix; Sander, Klaus; Hösl, Matthias; Döderlein, Leonhard

    2015-09-01

    Malaligned knees are predisposed to the development and progression of unicompartmental degenerations because of the excessive load placed on one side of the knee. Therefore, guided growth in skeletally immature patients is recommended. Indication for correction of varus/valgus deformities are based on static weight bearing radiographs. However, the dynamic knee abduction moment during walking showed only a weak correlation to malalignment determined by static radiographs. Therefore, the aim of the study was to measure the effects of guided growth on the normalization of frontal plane knee joint moments during walking. 15 legs of 8 patients (11-15 years) with idiopathic axial varus or valgus malalignment were analyzed. 16 typically developed peers served as controls. Instrumented gait analysis and clinical assessment were performed the day before implantation and explantation of eight-plates. Correlation between static mechanical tibiofemoral axis angle (MAA) and dynamic frontal plane knee joint moments and their change by guided growth were performed. The changes in dynamic knee moment in the frontal plane following guided growth showed high and significant correlation to the changes in static MAA (R=0.97, p<0.001). Contrary to the correlation of the changes, there was no correlation between static and dynamic measures in both sessions. In consequence two patients that had a natural knee moment before treatment showed a more pathological one after treatment. In conclusion, the changes in the dynamic load situation during walking can be predicted from the changes in static alignment. If pre-surgical gait analysis reveals a natural load situation, despite a static varus or valgus deformity, the intervention must be critically discussed.

  12. Recent developments in Coulomb breakup calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Capel, P.

    2008-05-12

    The theory of reactions applied to Coulomb breakup of loosely-bound projectiles is reviewed. Both the Continuum Discretized Coupled Channel (CDCC) and time-dependent models are described. Recent results about sensitivity of breakup calculations to the projectile wave function are reviewed. Analyses of the extraction of radiative-capture cross section from Coulomb breakup measurements are presented. Current developments in breakup theory are also mentioned.

  13. Mechanism of Water Droplet Breakup near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida Garcia

    2012-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de T cnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. The airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Droplet deformation is defined and studied against main parameters. The high speed imaging allowed observation of the actual mechanism of breakup and identification of the sequence of configurations from the initiation of the breakup to the disintegration of the droplet. Results and comparisons are presented for droplets of diameters in the range of 500 to 1800 micrometers, and airfoil velocities of 70 and 90 meters/second.

  14. Mechanism of Water Droplet Breakup Near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida, Garcia

    2012-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. The airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Droplet deformation is defined and studied against main parameters. The high speed imaging allowed observation of the actual mechanism of breakup and identification of the sequence of configurations from the initiation of the breakup to the disintegration of the droplet. Results and comparisons are presented for droplets of diameters in the range of 500 to 1800 microns, and airfoil velocities of 70 and 90 m/sec.

  15. Droplet Breakup Mechanisms in Air-blast Atomizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliabadi, Amir Abbas; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Lim, Kelly

    2011-11-01

    Atomization processes are encountered in many natural and man-made phenomena. Examples are pollen release by plants, human cough or sneeze, engine fuel injectors, spray paint and many more. The physics governing the atomization of liquids is important in understanding and utilizing atomization processes in both natural and industrial processes. We have observed the governing physics of droplet breakup in an air-blast water atomizer using a high magnification, high speed, and high resolution LASER imaging technique. The droplet breakup mechanisms are investigated in three major categories. First, the liquid drops are flattened to form an oblate ellipsoid (lenticular deformation). Subsequent deformation depends on the magnitude of the internal forces relative to external forces. The ellipsoid is converted into a torus that becomes stretched and disintegrates into smaller drops. Second, the drops become elongated to form a long cylindrical thread or ligament that break up into smaller drops (Cigar-shaped deformation). Third, local deformation on the drop surface creates bulges and protuberances that eventually detach themselves from the parent drop to form smaller drops.

  16. Breakup Densities of Hot Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, V. E.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Natowitz, J. B.; Yennello, S. J.

    2004-09-01

    Breakup densities of hot 197Au-like residues have been deduced from the systematic trends of Coulomb parameters required to fit intermediate-mass-fragment kinetic-energy spectra. The results indicate emission from nuclei near normal nuclear density below an excitation energy E*/A≲2 MeV, followed by a gradual decrease to a near-constant value of ρ/ρ0˜0.3 for E*/A≳5 MeV. Temperatures derived from these data with a density-dependent Fermi-gas model yield a nuclear caloric curve that is generally consistent with those derived from isotope ratios.

  17. Revised Capillary Breakup Rheometer Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Louise; Schultz, William; Solomon, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Rather than integrate the one-dimensional equation of motion for a capillary breakup rheometer, we take the axial derivative of that equation. This avoids the determination of the axial force with all of its complications and correction factors. The resulting evolutionary equation that involves either two or four derivatives of the capillary radius as a function of the axial coordinate determines the ratio of elongational viscosity to surface tension coefficient. We examine several silicone and olive oils to show the accuracy of the method for Newtonian fluids. We will discuss our surface tension measurement techniques and briefly describe measurements of viscoelastic materials, including saliva.

  18. Antimisting fuel breakup and flammability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, P.; Fleeter, R.; Sarohia, V.

    1983-01-01

    The breakup behavior and flammability of antimisting turbine fuels subjected to aerodynamic shear are investigated. Fuels tested were Jet A containing 0.3% FM-9 polymer at various levels of degradation ranging from virgin AMK to neat Jet A. The misting behavior of the fuels was quantified by droplet size distribution measurements. A technique based on high resolution laser photography and digital image processing of photographic records for rapid determination of droplet size distribution was developed. The flammability of flowing droplet-air mixtures was quantified by direct measurements of temperature rise in a flame established in the wake of a continuous ignition source. The temperature rise measurements were correlated with droplet size measurements. The flame anchoring phenomenon associated with the breakup of a liquid fuel in the wake of bluff body was shown to be important in the context of a survivable crash scenario. A pass/fail criterion for flammability testing of antimisting fuels, based on this flame-anchoring phenomenon, was proposed. The role of various ignition sources and their intensity in ignition and post-ignition behavior of antimisting fuels was also investigated.

  19. Exclusive breakup measurements for {sup 9}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, B.R.; Cowin, R.L.; Woolliscroft, R.J.; Clarke, N.M.; Donadille, L.; Freer, M.; Leask, P.J.; Singer, S.M.; Nicoli, M.P.; Benoit, B.; Hanappe, F.; Ninane, A.; Orr, N.A.; Tillier, J.; Stuttge, L.

    2004-10-01

    The first exclusive breakup measurements for the nucleus {sup 9}Be are presented. Breakup via several discrete states is observed following scattering off {sup 12}C and {sup 208}Pb. The results support the prediction of a recent microscopic cluster calculation for a strong n+{sup 8}Be(2{sup +}) state component in the second excited state.

  20. Droplet Breakup in Expansion-contraction Microchannels

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pingan; Kong, Tiantian; Lei, Leyan; Tian, Xiaowei; Kang, Zhanxiao; Wang, Liqiu

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the influences of expansion-contraction microchannels on droplet breakup in capillary microfluidic devices. With variations in channel dimension, local shear stresses at the injection nozzle and focusing orifice vary, significantly impacting flow behavior including droplet breakup locations and breakup modes. We observe transition of droplet breakup location from focusing orifice to injection nozzle, and three distinct types of recently-reported tip-multi-breaking modes. By balancing local shear stresses and interfacial tension effects, we determine the critical condition for breakup location transition, and characterize the tip-multi-breaking mode quantitatively. In addition, we identify the mechanism responsible for the periodic oscillation of inner fluid tip in tip-multi-breaking mode. Our results offer fundamental understanding of two-phase flow behaviors in expansion-contraction microstructures, and would benefit droplet generation, manipulation and design of microfluidic devices. PMID:26899018

  1. Droplet Breakup in Expansion-contraction Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Pingan; Kong, Tiantian; Lei, Leyan; Tian, Xiaowei; Kang, Zhanxiao; Wang, Liqiu

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the influences of expansion-contraction microchannels on droplet breakup in capillary microfluidic devices. With variations in channel dimension, local shear stresses at the injection nozzle and focusing orifice vary, significantly impacting flow behavior including droplet breakup locations and breakup modes. We observe transition of droplet breakup location from focusing orifice to injection nozzle, and three distinct types of recently-reported tip-multi-breaking modes. By balancing local shear stresses and interfacial tension effects, we determine the critical condition for breakup location transition, and characterize the tip-multi-breaking mode quantitatively. In addition, we identify the mechanism responsible for the periodic oscillation of inner fluid tip in tip-multi-breaking mode. Our results offer fundamental understanding of two-phase flow behaviors in expansion-contraction microstructures, and would benefit droplet generation, manipulation and design of microfluidic devices.

  2. Bag breakup of low viscosity drops in the presence of a continuous air jet

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, V. Sojka, P. E.

    2014-07-15

    This work examines the breakup of a single drop of various low viscosity fluids as it deforms in the presence of continuous horizontal air jet. Such a fragmentation typically occurs after the bulk liquid has disintegrated upon exiting the atomizer and is in the form of an ensemble of drops which undergo further breakup. The drop deformation and its eventual disintegration is important in evaluating the efficacy of a particular industrial process, be it combustion in automobile engines or pesticide spraying in agricultural applications. The interplay between competing influences of surface tension and aerodynamic disruptive forces is represented by the Weber number, We, and Ohnesorge number, Oh, and used to describe the breakup morphology. The breakup pattern considered in our study corresponds to that of a bag attached to a toroidal ring which occurs from ∼12 < We < ∼16. We aim to address several issues connected with this breakup process and their dependence on We and Oh which have been hitherto unexplored. The We boundary at which breakup begins is theoretically determined and the expression obtained, We=12(1+2/3Oh{sup 2}), is found to match well with experimental data ([L.-P. Hsiang and G. M. Faeth, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 21(4), 545–560 (1995)] and [R. S. Brodkey, “Formation of drops and bubbles,” in The Phenomena of Fluid Motions (Addison-Wesley, Reading, 1967)]). An exponential growth in the radial extent of the deformed drop and the streamline dimension of the bag is predicted by a theoretical model and confirmed by experimental findings. These quantities are observed to strongly depend on We. However, their dependence on Oh is weak.

  3. Bag breakup of low viscosity drops in the presence of a continuous air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, V.; Sojka, P. E.

    2014-07-01

    This work examines the breakup of a single drop of various low viscosity fluids as it deforms in the presence of continuous horizontal air jet. Such a fragmentation typically occurs after the bulk liquid has disintegrated upon exiting the atomizer and is in the form of an ensemble of drops which undergo further breakup. The drop deformation and its eventual disintegration is important in evaluating the efficacy of a particular industrial process, be it combustion in automobile engines or pesticide spraying in agricultural applications. The interplay between competing influences of surface tension and aerodynamic disruptive forces is represented by the Weber number, We, and Ohnesorge number, Oh, and used to describe the breakup morphology. The breakup pattern considered in our study corresponds to that of a bag attached to a toroidal ring which occurs from ˜12 < We < ˜16. We aim to address several issues connected with this breakup process and their dependence on We and Oh which have been hitherto unexplored. The We boundary at which breakup begins is theoretically determined and the expression obtained, We = 12( {1 + 2/3 Oh^2 } ), is found to match well with experimental data {[L.-P. Hsiang and G. M. Faeth, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 21(4), 545-560 (1995)] and [R. S. Brodkey, "Formation of drops and bubbles," in The Phenomena of Fluid Motions (Addison-Wesley, Reading, 1967)]}. An exponential growth in the radial extent of the deformed drop and the streamline dimension of the bag is predicted by a theoretical model and confirmed by experimental findings. These quantities are observed to strongly depend on We. However, their dependence on Oh is weak.

  4. Breakup Densities of Hot Nuclei.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Vic

    2006-04-01

    Breakup densities of hot ^197Au-like residues have been deduced from the systematic trends of Coulomb parameters required to fit intermediate-mass-fragment kinetic-energy spectra. The results indicate emission from nuclei near normal nuclear density below an excitation energy E*/A .3ex<˜x 2 MeV, followed by a gradual decrease to a near-constant value of ρ/ρ0˜ 3 for E*/A .3ex>˜x 5 MeV. Temperatures derived from these data with a density-dependent Fermi-gas model yield a nuclear caloric curve that is generally consistent with those derived from isotope ratios.

  5. Invariant Coordinates in Breakup Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skwira-Chalot, I.; Ciepał, I.; Kistryn, St.; Kozela, A.; Parol, W.; Stephan, E.

    2017-03-01

    Systematic experimental studies of few-nucleon systems expose various dynamical ingredients which play an important role in correct description of observables, such as three-nucleon force, Coulomb force and relativistic effects. A large set of existing experimental data for ^1H(d, p p)n reaction allows for systematic investigations of these dynamical effects, which vary with energy and appear with different strength in certain observables and phase space regions. Moreover, systematic comparisons with exact theoretical calculations, done in variables related to the system dynamics in a possibly direct ways is a very important tool to verify and improve the existing description of the nucleon interaction. Examples of experimental data for a breakup reaction, transformed to the variables based on Lorentz-invariants are compared with modern theoretical calculations.

  6. Phenomenological model for light-projectile breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalbach, C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Projectile breakup can make a large contribution to reactions induced by projectiles with mass numbers 2, 3, and 4, yet there is no global model for it and no clear agreement on the details of the reaction mechanism. Purpose: This project aims to develop a phenomenological model for light-projectile breakup that can guide the development of detailed theories and provide a useful tool for applied calculations. Method: An extensive database of double-differential cross sections for the breakup of deuterons, 3He ions, and α particles was assembled from the literature and analyzed in a consistent way. Results: Global systematics for the centroid energies, peak widths, and angular distributions of the breakup peaks have been extracted from the data. The dominant mechanism appears to be absorptive breakup, where the unobserved projectile fragment fuses with the target nucleus during the initial interaction. The global target-mass-number and incident-energy dependencies of the absorptive breakup cross section have also been determined, along with channel-specific normalization constants. Conclusions: Results from the model generally agree with the original data after subtraction of a reasonable underlying continuum. Absorptive breakup can account for as much as 50%-60% of the total reaction cross section.

  7. Design of Breakup Ice Control Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    ER D C/ CR R EL T R -0 6 -7 Design of Breakup Ice Control Structures Andrew M. Tuthill and James H. Lever March 2006 C ol d R eg...March 2006 Design of Breakup Ice Control Structures Andrew M. Tuthill and James H. Lever Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory U.S. Army...ice control structure (ICS) is to retain a breakup ice run upstream of a traditional ice jam problem area and thereby miti- gate ice-jam flooding

  8. Breakup of finite thickness viscous shell microbubbles by ultrasound: A simplified zero-thickness shell model

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Chahine, Georges L.

    2013-01-01

    A simplified three-dimensional (3-D) zero-thickness shell model was developed to recover the non-spherical response of thick-shelled encapsulated microbubbles subjected to ultrasound excitation. The model was validated by comparison with previously developed models and was then used to study the mechanism of bubble break-up during non-spherical deformations resulting from the presence of a nearby rigid boundary. The effects of the shell thickness and the bubble standoff distance from the solid wall on the bubble break-up were studied parametrically for a fixed insonification frequency and amplitude. A diagram of bubble shapes versus the normalized shell thickness and wall standoff was derived, and the potential bubble shapes at break-up from reentrant jets were categorized resulting in four distinct zones. PMID:23556560

  9. Intrusive Thoughts: A Primary Variable in Breakup Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Pelaez, Martha; Deeds, Osvelia; Delgado, Jeannette

    2013-01-01

    University students who were high versus low on breakup distress scores were given self-report measures to assess their intrusive thoughts about the romantic breakup and their somatic symptoms that followed the breakup as well as their extracurricular activities and social support that might alleviate their breakup distress. In a regression…

  10. Negative Emotions and Behaviors are Markers of Breakup Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Pelaez, Martha; Deeds, Osvelia; Delgado, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    Method: University students who experienced a recent romantic breakup were given several self-report measures and were then divided into high versus low breakup distress groups. Results: The high breakup distress versus the low breakup distress groups had higher scores on negative emotions scales including depression, anxiety and anger and…

  11. On the breakup of viscous liquid threads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1995-01-01

    A one-dimensional model evolution equation is used to describe the nonlinear dynamics that can lead to the breakup of a cylindrical thread of Newtonian fluid when capillary forces drive the motion. The model is derived from the Stokes equations by use of rational asymptotic expansions and under a slender jet approximation. The equations are solved numerically and the jet radius is found to vanish after a finite time yielding breakup. The slender jet approximation is valid throughout the evolution leading to pinching. The model admits self-similar pinching solutions which yield symmetric shapes at breakup. These solutions are shown to be the ones selected by the initial boundary value problem, for general initial conditions. Further more, the terminal state of the model equation is shown to be identical to that predicted by a theory which looks for singular pinching solutions directly from the Stokes equations without invoking the slender jet approximation throughout the evolution. It is shown quantitatively, therefore, that the one-dimensional model gives a consistent terminal state with the jet shape being locally symmetric at breakup. The asymptotic expansion scheme is also extended to include unsteady and inerticial forces in the momentum equations to derive an evolution system modelling the breakup of Navier-Stokes jets. The model is employed in extensive simulations to compute breakup times for different initial conditions; satellite drop formation is also supported by the model and the dependence of satellite drop volumes on initial conditions is studied.

  12. Breakup modes of the drops suspended in a vertical wind tunnel in presence of the horizontal electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalwankar, Rohini; Deshpande, C. G.; Kamra, A. K.

    2017-02-01

    The influence of strong horizontal electric field (EH) on different stages of deformation and eventual breakup of the large water drops of 6.6, 7.0, and 7.25 mm diameter has been observed in a vertical wind tunnel using high-speed photography. Dumbbell, filament, and bag modes of drop breakup are observed when EH = 0. However, drops elongate in horizontal direction, mostly develop sharp curvature at their ends, eject a fine jet spray of tiny droplets, and ultimately break up into several droplets in EH = 500 kV m-1. Extreme elongation up to 29 mm is observed for a 7.0 mm diameter drop. Results show that the breakup time, i.e., the time from the drop's extreme prolate shape to its breakup in its final oscillation, ranges from 13 to 41 ms when EH = 0 and 57-105 ms when EH = 500 kV m-1. So although the lifetime of the drop since its suspension to breakup is reduced, its elongation and breakup time increase in EH. It suggests that the effect of EH in final oscillation before breakup overcomes the effect of hydrodynamic and aerodynamic forces in elongating the drop. Also, no breakup of bag type is observed in EH = 500 kV m-1. Moreover, the fragments formed after the drop breakup and tiny droplets ejected by their fragments carry electrical charges of polarity determined by the induced charge on the parent drop in EH. The significance of the results is discussed in modifying the drop growth and the radar echo-precipitation relationships in thunderclouds.

  13. Inferences Concerning the Magnetospheric Source Region for Auroral Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.

    1992-01-01

    It is argued that the magnetospheric source region for auroral arc breakup and substorm initiation is along boundary plasma sheet (BPS) magnetic field lines. This source region lies beyond a distinct central plasma sheet (CPS) region and sufficiently far from the Earth that energetic ion motion violates the guiding center approximation (i.e., is chaotic). The source region is not constrained to any particular range of distances from the Earth, and substorm initiation may be possible over a wide range of distances from near synchronous orbit to the distant tail. It is also argued that the layer of low-energy electrons and velocity dispersed ion beams observed at low altitudes on Aureol 3 is not a different region from the region of auroral arcs. Both comprise the BPS. The two regions occasionally appear distinct at low altitudes because of the effects of arc field-aligned potential drops on precipitating particles.

  14. How is continental break-up recorded in magma-poor rifted margins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peron-Pinvidic, G.; Manatschal, G.; Minshull, T.; Sawyer, D.

    2006-12-01

    In classical models of continental break-up, rifting is immediately followed by seafloor spreading, which implies that break-up can be identified as a specific spatial and temporal boundary. However, this simple concept is not supported by observations at rifted margins. The classical indicators for determining break-up (break-up unconformity, magnetic anomalies, distribution of high-angle faults and sedimentary wedges) may no longer be relied upon to identify unambiguously the location and age of break-up. We studied the spatial and temporal evolution of the deep Iberia-Newfoundland margins, which are the type examples of magma-poor rifted margins. Our study was based on borehole data and on a mapping of the sedimentary and basement architecture in 3D on seismic reflection profiles. Our results allow us to describe the tectono-sedimentary and morpho-tectonic evolution of final rifting and show that continental break-up is complex. In the Iberia-Newfoundland rift system, the tectono-sedimentary evolution of final rifting can be reconstructed back to 145Ma, when the crust was already thinned to less than 10km. Two major deformation phases have been identified: a first, Tithonian to Barremian in age (145-128Ma) and a second, dated as latest Aptian (112Ma). The Tithonian-Barremian phase is characterized by a migration of the tectonic activity oceanwards and a change of the deformation mechanisms from south to north, from zones of mantle exhumed via downward concave faults to classical half-grabens formed by the normal tilting of thinned continental blocks along upward concave faults. This phase terminates with the formation of the first unequivocal magnetic anomaly (M3 128Ma) and the accretion of more than 170km of crust, at rates of about 1cm/yr, that is neither oceanic nor continental, commonly referred to as Zone of Exhumed Continental Mantle (ZECM). The late-Aptian phase is associated with a major tectono-magmatic event and is responsible for the observed basement

  15. Evidence for a Battle Mountain-Eureka crustal fault zone, north-central Nevada, and its relation to Neoproterozoic-Early Paleozoic continental breakup

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grauch, V.J.S.; Rodriguez, B.D.; Bankey, V.; Wooden, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Combined evidence from gravity, radiogenic isotope, and magnetotelluric (MT) data indicates a crustal fault zone that coincides with the northwest-trending Battle Mountain-Eureka (BME) mineral trend in north-central Nevada, USA. The BME crustal fault zone likely originated during Neoproterozoic-Early Paleozoic rifting of the continent and had a large influence on subsequent tectonic events, such as emplacement of allochthons and episodic deformation, magmatism, and mineralization throughout the Phanerozoic. MT models show the fault zone is about 10 km wide, 130-km long, and extends from 1 to 5 km below the surface to deep crustal levels. Isotope data and gravity models imply the fault zone separates crust of fundamentally different character. Geophysical evidence for such a long-lived structure, likely inherited from continental breakup, defies conventional wisdom that structures this old have been destroyed by Cenozoic extensional processes. Moreover, the coincidence with the alignment of mineral deposits supports the assertion by many economic geologists that these alignments are indicators of buried regional structures.

  16. Inclusive Proton Emission Spectra from Deuteron Breakup Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, B. V.; Capote, R.; Sin, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present calculations of deuteron elastic and nonelastic breakup cross sections and angular distributions at deuteron energies below 100 MeV obtained using the post-form DWBA approximation. The elastic breakup cross section was extensively studied in the past. Very few calculations of nonelastic breakup have been performed, however. We compare two forms of the elastic DWBA breakup amplitude but conclude that neither provides a correct description of the inclusive proton emission cross section.

  17. Breakup branches of Borromean beryllium-9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R.; Freer, M.; Wheldon, C.; Curtis, N.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Aprahamian, A.; Ashwood, N. I.; Barr, M.; Bucher, B.; Copp, P.; Couder, M.; Fang, X.; Goldring, G.; Jung, F.; Kokalova, Tz.; Lesher, S. R.; Lu, W.; Malcolm, J. D.; Roberts, A.; Tan, W. P.; Ziman, V. A.

    2015-10-01

    The breakup reaction 9Be(4He, 3α)n was measured using an array of four double-sided silicon strip detectors at beam energies of 22 and 26 MeV. Excited states in 9Be up to 12 MeV were populated and reconstructed through the measurement of the charged reaction products. It is proposed that limits on the spins and parities of the states can be derived from the way that they decay. Various breakup paths for excited states in 9Be have been explored including the 8Beg.s. + n, 8Be2+ + n and 5Heg.s. + 4He channels. By imposing the condition that the breakup proceeded via the 8Be ground state, clean excitation spectra for 9Be were reconstructed. The remaining two breakup channels were found to possess strongly-overlapping kinematic signatures and more sophisticated methods (referenced) are required to completely disentangle these other possibilities. Emphasis is placed on the development of the experimental analysis and the usefulness of Monte-Carlo simulations for this purpose.

  18. Breakup branches of Borromean beryllium-9

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Freer, M.; Wheldon, C.; Curtis, N.; Ashwood, N. I.; Barr, M.; Kokalova, Tz.; Malcolm, J. D.; Ziman, V. A.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Aprahamian, A.; Bucher, B.; Couder, M.; Fang, X.; Jung, F.; Lu, W.; Roberts, A.; Tan, W. P.; Copp, P.; Lesher, S. R.; and others

    2015-10-15

    The breakup reaction {sup 9}Be({sup 4}He, 3α)n was measured using an array of four double-sided silicon strip detectors at beam energies of 22 and 26 MeV. Excited states in {sup 9}Be up to 12 MeV were populated and reconstructed through the measurement of the charged reaction products. It is proposed that limits on the spins and parities of the states can be derived from the way that they decay. Various breakup paths for excited states in {sup 9}Be have been explored including the {sup 8}Be{sub g.s.} + n, {sup 8}Be{sub 2{sup +}} + n and {sup 5}He{sub g.s.} + {sup 4}He channels. By imposing the condition that the breakup proceeded via the {sup 8}Be ground state, clean excitation spectra for {sup 9}Be were reconstructed. The remaining two breakup channels were found to possess strongly-overlapping kinematic signatures and more sophisticated methods (referenced) are required to completely disentangle these other possibilities. Emphasis is placed on the development of the experimental analysis and the usefulness of Monte-Carlo simulations for this purpose.

  19. Modification of the alignment between the tibial tubercle and the trochlear groove induced by temporary hemiepiphysiodesis for lower extremity angular deformities: a trigonometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Ceroni, Dimitri; Dhouib, Amira; Merlini, Laura; Kampouroglou, Georgios

    2016-12-09

    This study aimed to predict the modification of the alignment between the tibial tubercle (TT) and the trochlear groove (TG) that occurs during femoral or tibial hemiepiphysiodesis. MRI scans of 541 knees were retrospectively reviewed to determine the distances between the cranial insertion of the patellar tendon on the TT and the femoral physis (FP)/tibial physis (TP). Thereafter, we developed a trigonometric formula to calculate the predicted change of the TT-TG distance that occurs during hemiepiphysiodesis around the knee using both the planned angular correction as well as the length between the physis (both distal femoral and proximal tibial) and the insertion of the patellar tendon of the TT. This study showed that TT-FP and TT-TP distances vary very little with sex and age during growth and the mean values of FP-TT and TP-TT distances (55 and 7 mm, respectively) can thus be used in clinical settings for calculating a rough estimate of the translation of the TT position that will occur during 'guided growth'. On this subject, one can expect a 1 mm simultaneous lateral or medial transfer of the TT for every 1° of angular correction during distal femoral hemiepiphysiodesis. For proximal tibial hemiepiphysiodesis, an angular correction of 8° should roughly translate into a simultaneous 1 mm transfer of the TT. This study puts forward the hypothesis that a simultaneous modification of the TT-TG distance has to be expected following hemiepiphysiodesis, whether femoral or tibial.

  20. Entrainment instability and vertical motion as causes of stratocumulus breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, C. J.; Pearson, R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Entrainment instability is thought to be a cause of stratocumulus breakup. At the interface between the cloud and the overlying air, mixtures may form which are negatively buoyant because of cloud droplet evaporation. Quantities devised to predict breakup are obtained from aircraft observations and are tested against cloud observations from satellite. Often, the parameters indicate that breakup should occur but the clouds remain, sometimes for several days. One possible explanation for breakup is vertical motion from passing synoptic cyclones. Several cases suggest that breakup is associated with the downward vertical motion from the cold air advected behind an eastward moving cyclone.

  1. The break-up of continents and the formation of new ocean basins.

    PubMed

    Minshull, T A

    2002-12-15

    Rifted continental margins are the product of stretching, thinning and ultimate break-up of a continental plate into smaller fragments, and the rocks lying beneath them store a record of this rifting process. Earth scientists can read this record by careful sampling and with remote geophysical techniques. These experimental studies have been complemented by theoretical analyses of continental extension and associated magmatism. Some rifted margins show evidence for extensive volcanic activity and uplift during rifting; at these margins, the record of the final stages of rifting is removed by erosion and obscured by the thick volcanic cover. Other margins were underwater throughout their formation and showed rather little volcanic activity; here the ongoing deposition of sediment provides a clearer record. During the last decade, vast areas of exhumed mantle rocks have been discovered at such margins between continental and oceanic crust. This observation conflicts with the well-established idea that the mantle melts to produce new crust when it is brought close to the Earth's surface. In contrast to the steeply dipping faults commonly seen in zones of extension within continental interiors, faults with very shallow dips play a key role in the deformation immediately preceding continental break-up. Future progress in the study of continental break-up will depend on studies of pairs of margins which were once joined and on the development of computer models which can handle rigorously the complex transition from distributed continental deformation to sea-floor spreading focused at a mid-ocean ridge.

  2. Post-breakup Basin Evolution along the South-Atlantic Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozyk, Frank; Back, Stefan; Kukla, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The post-breakup tectono-stratigraphic evolution of large offshore basins along the South American and African continental margins record strongly varying post-rift sedimentary successions. The northernmost segment of the South Atlantic rift and salt basins is characterized by a pronounced asymmetry, with the Brazilian margin comprising narrower and deeper rift basins with less salt in comparison to the Congo-Gabon conjugate margin. Another important observation is that multiple phases of uplift and subsidence are recorded after the break-up of the southern South Atlantic on both sides of the Florianopolis-Walvis Ridge volcanic complex, features that are regarded as atypical when compared to published examples of other post-breakup margin successions. A regional comparison based on tectonic-stratigraphic analysis of selected seismic transects between the large basins offshore southern Brazil (Espirito Santo Basin, Campos Basin, Santos Basin, Pelotas Basin) and southwest Africa (Lower Congo Basin, Kwanza Basin, Namibe Basin, Walvis Basin) provides a comprehensive basin-to-basin documentation of the key geological parameters controlling ocean and continental margin development. This comparison includes the margin configuration, subsidence development through time, sediment influx and storage patterns, type of basin fill (e.g. salt vs. non-salt systems; carbonate-rich vs. clastics-dominated systems) and finally major tectonic and magmatic events. Data from the salt basins indicate that salt-related tectonic deformation is amongst the prime controls for the non-uniform post-rift margin development. The diversity in the stratigraphic architecture of the conjugate margins offshore southern Brazil, Namibia and Angola reflects variations in the interplay of a number of controlling factors, of which the most important are (a) the structural configuration of each margin segment at the time of break-up, (b) the post break-up subsidence history of the respective margin segment

  3. Modeling breakup and relaxation of Newtonian droplets using the advected phase-field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucourt, J.; Biben, T.; Leyrat, A.; Verdier, C.

    2007-02-01

    The relaxation and breakup of Newtonian droplets is considered using the advected field approach. This method allows one to follow the deformation of interfaces using an order parameter field [Biben , Europhys. Lett. 63, 623 (2003)] based on a Ginzburg-Landau equation. Using this method, it is possible to follow the breakup of droplets and stability curves can be obtained in both two- and three-dimensional shear and elongational flows. Finally, relaxation of a droplet is considered, following the application of an elongational flow. The results are compared with previous experimental data [Ha and Leal, Phys. Fluids 13, 1568 (2001)], and are found to be in satisfactory agreement. The method is general enough to be applied to other non-Newtonian fluids, such as Oldroyd-B fluids or viscoplastic materials.

  4. Microfluidic breakups of confined droplets against a linear obstacle: The importance of the viscosity contrast.

    PubMed

    Salkin, Louis; Courbin, Laurent; Panizza, Pascal

    2012-09-01

    Combining experiments and theory, we investigate the break-up dynamics of deformable objects, such as drops and bubbles, against a linear micro-obstacle. Our experiments bring the role of the viscosity contrast Δη between dispersed and continuous phases to light: the evolution of the critical capillary number to break a drop as a function of its size is either nonmonotonic (Δη>0) or monotonic (Δη≤0). In the case of positive viscosity contrasts, experiments and modeling reveal the existence of an unexpected critical object size for which the critical capillary number for breakup is minimum. Using simple physical arguments, we derive a model that well describes observations, provides diagrams mapping the four hydrodynamic regimes identified experimentally, and demonstrates that the critical size originating from confinement solely depends on geometrical parameters of the obstacle.

  5. Coupled map lattice model of jet breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Minich, R W; Schwartz, A J; Baker, E L

    2001-01-25

    An alternative approach is described to evaluate the statistical nature of the breakup of shaped charge liners. Experimental data from ductile and brittle copper jets are analyzed in terms of velocity gradient, deviation of {Delta}V from linearity, R/S analysis, and the Hurst exponent within the coupled map lattice model. One-dimensional simulations containing 600 zones of equal mass and using distinctly different force-displacement curves are generated to simulate ductile and brittle behavior. A particle separates from the stretching jet when an element of material reaches the failure criterion. A simple model of a stretching rod using brittle, semi-brittle, and ductile force-displacement curves is in agreement with the experimental results for the Hurst exponent and the phase portraits and indicates that breakup is a correlated phenomenon.

  6. Confinement and viscosity ratio effect on droplet break-up in a concentrated emulsion flowing through a narrow constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khor, Jian Wei; Gai, Ya; Tang, Sindy

    2016-11-01

    We describe the dimensionless groups that determine the break-up probability of droplets in a concentrated emulsion during its flow in a tapered microchannel consisting of a narrow constriction. Such channel geometry is commonly used in droplet microfluidics to investigate the content of droplets from a concentrated emulsion. In contrast to solid wells in multi-well plates, drops are metastable, and are prone to break-up which compromises the accuracy and the throughput of the assay. Unlike single drops, the break-up process in a concentrated emulsion is stochastic. Analysis of the behavior of a large number of drops (N >5000) shows that the probability of break-up increases with applied flow rate, the size of the drops relative to the size of the constriction, and the viscosity ratio of the emulsion. We found that the break-up probability collapses into a single curve when plotted as a function of the product of capillary number, viscosity ratio, and confinement factor defined as the un-deformed radius of the drop relative to the hydraulic radius of the constriction. The results represent a critical step towards the understanding of the physics governing instability in concentrated emulsions.

  7. The Break-up and Drifting of the Continental Plates in 2D Models of Convecting Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Zilio, L.; Faccenda, M.; Capitanio, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Since the early theory of Wegener, the break-up and drift of continents have been controversial and hotly debated topics. To assist the interpretation of the break-up and drift mechanisms and its relation with mantle circulation patterns, we carried out a 2D numerical modelling of the dynamics of these processes. Different regimes of upper plate deformation are studied as consequence of stress coupling with convection patterns. Subduction of the oceanic plate and induced mantle flow propagate basal tractions to the upper plate. This mantle drag forces (FMD) can be subdivided in two types: (1) active mantle drag occurring when the flow drives plate motion (FAD), and (2) passive mantle drag (FPD), when the asthenosphere resists plate motion. The active traction generated by the convective cell is counterbalanced by passive mantle viscous drag away from it and therefore tension is generated within the continental plate. The shear stress profiles indicate that break-up conditions are met where the gradient of the basal shear stress is maximised, however the break-up location varies largely depending on the convection style primarily controlled by slab stagnation on the transition zone, avalanching through or subduction in the lower mantle. We found good correspondence between our models and the evolution of convergent margins on Earth, giving precious insights into the break-up and drifting mechanisms of some continental plates, such as the North and South American plates, Calabria and the Japan Arc.

  8. Marine particle aggregate breakup in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Matthew; Ackleson, Steven; Smith, Geoffrey

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of marine particle aggregate formation and breakup due to turbulence is studied experimentally. Aggregates of clay particles, initially in a quiescent aggregation tank, are subjected to fully developed turbulent pipe flow at Reynolds numbers of up to 25,000. This flow arrangement simulates the exposure of marine aggregates in coastal waters to a sudden turbulent event. Particle size distributions are measured by in-situ sampling of the small-angle forward volume scattering function and the volume concentration of the suspended particulate matter is quantified through light attenuation measurements. Results are compared to measurements conducted under laminar and turbulent flow conditions. At low shear rates, larger sized particles indicate that aggregation initially governs the particle dynamics. Breakup is observed when large aggregates are exposed to the highest levels of shear in the experiment. Models describing the aggregation and breakup rates of marine particles due to turbulence are evaluated with the population balance equation and results from the simulation and experiment are compared. Additional model development will more accurately describe aggregation dynamics for remote sensing applications in turbulent marine environments.

  9. Beam Breakup Effects in Dielectric Based Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Jing, C.; Kustov, A.; Altmark, A.; Power, J. G.; Gai, W.

    2009-01-22

    The dynamics of the beam in structure-based wakefield accelerators leads to beam stability issues not ordinarily found in other machines. In particular, the high current drive beam in an efficient wakefield accelerator loses a large fraction of its energy in the decelerator structure, resulting in physical emittance growth, increased energy spread, and the possibility of head-tail instability for an off axis beam, all of which can lead to severe reduction of beam intensity. Beam breakup (BBU) effects resulting from parasitic wakefields provide a potentially serious limitation to the performance of dielectric structure based wakefield accelerators as well. We report on experimental and numerical investigation of BBU and its mitigation. The experimental program focuses on BBU measurements at the AWA facility in a number of high gradient and high transformer ratio wakefield devices. New pickup-based beam diagnostics will provide methods for studying parasitic wakefields that are currently unavailable. The numerical part of this research is based on a particle-Green's function beam breakup code we are developing that allows rapid, efficient simulation of beam breakup effects in advanced linear accelerators. The goal of this work is to be able to compare the results of detailed experimental measurements with the accurate numerical results and to design an external FODO channel for the control of the beam in the presence of strong transverse wakefields.

  10. The Beam Break-Up Numerical Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Travish, G.A.

    1989-11-01

    Beam Break-Up (BBU) is a severe constraint in accelerator design, limiting beam current and quality. The control of BBU has become the focus of much research in the design of the next generation collider, recirculating and linear induction accelerators and advanced accelerators. Determining the effect on BBU of modifications to cavities, the focusing elements or the beam is frequently beyond the ability of current analytic models. A computer code was written to address this problem. The Beam Break-Up Numerical Simulator (BBUNS) was designed to numerically solve for beam break-up (BBU) due to an arbitrary transverse wakefield. BBUNS was developed to be as user friendly as possible on the Cray computer series. The user is able to control all aspects of input and output by using a single command file. In addition, the wakefield is specified by the user and read in as a table. The program can model energy variations along and within the beam, focusing magnetic field profiles can be specified, and the graphical output can be tailored. In this note we discuss BBUNS, its structure and application. Included are detailed instructions, examples and a sample session of BBUNS. This program is available for distribution. 50 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Alignment validation

    SciTech Connect

    ALICE; ATLAS; CMS; LHCb; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-06

    The four experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb are currently under constructionat CERN. They will study the products of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. All experiments are equipped with sophisticated tracking systems, unprecedented in size and complexity. Full exploitation of both the inner detector andthe muon system requires an accurate alignment of all detector elements. Alignmentinformation is deduced from dedicated hardware alignment systems and the reconstruction of charged particles. However, the system is degenerate which means the data is insufficient to constrain all alignment degrees of freedom, so the techniques are prone to converging on wrong geometries. This deficiency necessitates validation and monitoring of the alignment. An exhaustive discussion of means to validate is subject to this document, including examples and plans from all four LHC experiments, as well as other high energy experiments.

  12. Force Required to Breakup a Continent: Implications on Rifting Localization and Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svartman Dias, A. E.; Lavier, L. L.; Hayman, N. W.

    2014-12-01

    The maximum force from ridge push available is about 5 TN/m, lower than that required by 2D and 3D numerical experiments to rift the lithosphere in the absence of magmatic input. We carry out 2D numerical experiments without any magmatic input to study the extensional force necessary to start a rift basin and to breakup a continent. We assume a range of initial temperature structure, crust and mantle initial thicknesses and composition. In a first step, we use velocity boundary conditions (1cm/yr) and we monitor the force necessary to breakup the continent. Results can be classified in two groups according to the amount of force needed to rift through time: (1) The initial force builds up rapidly to 12-20 TN/m within 0.4-1.0 Myr. This is followed by an exponential decrease due to early strain localization and lithospheric weakening. The force is < 5TN/m after 4.4-7.0 Myr of extension. Continental breakup occurs approximately 10 Myr after the onset of extension forming narrow conjugate margins. This group encompasses experiments with initial Tmoho < 650oC and crustal thicknesses ≤ 35 km, where crust and mantle deformation are coupled from the early stages of rifting. (2) The initial build-up is more discrete, from < 3 TN/m to 4-6.5 TN/m in the first 0.1 Myr, followed by a decrease to a nearly constant value of 3-5 TN/m from 0.4 Myr to 10 Myr, when strain starts localizing. The constant force through time reflects lithosphere strengthening and migration of the deformation. This rift migration forms a wide basin (> 250 km wide) that may evolve to form very asymmetric conjugate margins. Breakup occurs 18 Myr after the onset of rifting or later. This second group corresponds to experiments with initial Tmoho > 650 km and crustal thicknesses ≥ 35 km. High bending stresses result in upper crust brittle failure and on enhancement of lower crust lateral flow. Interaction between ductile failure in the lower crust and brittle failure in the upper crust controls the

  13. Substorm Onset and the Possible Role of O+ IONS Flowing out during Pseudo-Breakup Auroras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, G. K.; Lee, E.; Fillingim, M. O.; Fu, S.; Cui, Y.; Hong, J.

    2014-12-01

    An isolated substorm onset event that occurred on 14 February 2001 was recorded by the WIC on IMAGE. WIC observed an enhanced electron precipitation region that grew out of a pseudo-breakup auroral spot at the poleward boundary that moved southward and activitated an aurora. An isolated substorm onset was triggered when the pseudo-breakup region connected to the activitated aurora at the lower boundary. This observation is a global scale phenomenon, whose behavior is similar but also different from observations of north-south motion at smaller localized scales that precede the onset of substorms (Nishimura et al., 2010). Fortuitously, Cluster during this pseudo-break auroral activity, detected escape of low energy (20-50 eV) field-aligned O+ ions. The triggered onset was accompanied by the escape of more energetic O+ (80 eV -300 eV) ions. Our observations suggest that the escaping O+ ions during pseudo-breakup auroras may be the seed for the onset of isolated substorms needed in some simulation models (Winglee and Harnett, 2010).

  14. Satellites in the inviscid breakup of bubbles.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, J M; Fontelos, M A

    2007-04-06

    In this Letter, we stress the essential role played by gas inertia in the breakup of gas bubbles. Our results reveal that, whenever the gas to liquid density ratio Lambda=rhog/rhol is different from zero, tiny satellite bubbles may be formed as a result of the large gas velocities that are reached close to pinch-off. Moreover, we provide a closed expression for the characteristic satellite diameter, which decreases when decreasing Lambda and which shows order of magnitude agreement with the micron-sized satellite bubbles observed experimentally.

  15. Phenomenology of break-up modes in contact free externally heated nanoparticle laden fuel droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Binita; Basu, Saptarshi

    2016-12-01

    We study thermally induced atomization modes in contact free (acoustically levitated) nanoparticle laden fuel droplets. The initial droplet size, external heat supplied, and suspended particle concentration (wt. %) in droplets govern the stability criterion which ultimately determines the dominant mode of atomization. Pure fuel droplets exhibit two dominant modes of breakup namely primary and secondary. Primary modes are rather sporadic and normally do not involve shape oscillations. Secondary atomization however leads to severe shape deformations and catastrophic intense breakup of the droplets. The dominance of these modes has been quantified based on the external heat flux, dynamic variation of surface tension, acoustic pressure, and droplet size. Addition of particles alters the regimes of the primary and secondary atomization and introduces bubble induced boiling and bursting. We analyze this new mode of atomization and estimate the time scale of bubble growth up to the point of bursting using energy balance to determine the criterion suitable for parent droplet rupture. All the three different modes of breakup have been well identified in a regime map determined in terms of Weber number and the heat utilization rate which is defined as the energy utilized for transient heating, vaporization, and boiling in droplets.

  16. Volcanic Versus Non-Volcanic Passive Margins: Two Different Ways to Break-up Continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geoffroy, L.; Burov, E. B.; Werner, P.; Unternehr, P.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic passive margins (VPMs) are distinctive features of Larges Igneous Provinces. They characterize continental breakup associated with the extrusion and intrusion of large volumes of magma, predominantly mafic. In Large Igneous Provinces, regional fissural volcanism predates localized syn-magmatic break-up of the lithosphere, suggesting that mantle melting is a cause of continental break-up, not a consequence. Early melt covers as volcanic traps large cratonic or/and cratonic-edge continental areas. Crustal dilatation through dyking in the upper crust and magma underplating at Moho level is thought to occur massively during this early stage. Lithosphere extension leading to break-up and VPMs development is coeval with a 3D focusing of mantle melting, giving rise to VPMs. From a combination of deep seismic reflection profiles and onshore observations, we show that the mechanism of continental breakup at volcanic passive margins is very different from the one generally proposed for non-magmatic systems. Crustal extension and coeval extrusion of thick wedges of seaward-dipping basalts are accommodated by continentward-dipping detachment-faults at both conjugate margins. Those faults root on a deformed ductile crust whose composition seems partly magmatic. Our numerical modeling show that hardening of deep continental crust during the early magmatic stages provokes a divergent flow of the ductile lithosphere (mantle and lower crust) away from a central continental block which thins through advection with time. Magma-assisted crustal-scale faults dipping continentward root over this flowing material, isolating micro-continents which may be lost in the future oceanic domain. The structure and tectonic evolution of volcanic passive margins cannot therefore be compared to non-volcanic ones, where major detachment faults dip oceanward during the necking-stage and where mantle is finally exhumed during the mechanical breakup. Confusions may exist where ancient hyper

  17. Breakup of particle clumps on liquid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurupatham, S.; Hossain, M.; Dalal, B.; Fischer, I.; Singh, P.; Joseph, D.

    2011-11-01

    In this talk we describe the mechanism by which clumps of some powdered materials breakup and disperse on a liquid surface to form a monolayer of particles. We show that a clump breaks up because when particles on its outer periphery come in contact with the liquid surface they are pulled into the interface by the vertical component of capillary force overcoming the cohesive forces which keep them attached, and then these particles move away from the clump. In some cases, the clump itself is broken into smaller pieces and then these smaller pieces break apart by the aforementioned mechanism. The newly-adsorbed particles move away from the clump, and each other, because when particles are adsorbed on a liquid surface they cause a flow on the interface away from themselves. This flow may also cause particles newly-exposed on the outer periphery of the clump to break away. Since millimeter-sized clumps can breakup and spread on a liquid surface within a few seconds, their behavior appears to be similar to that of some liquid drops which can spontaneously disperse on solid surfaces.

  18. Breakup channels for C12 triple-α continuum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diget, C. Aa.; Barker, F. C.; Borge, M. J. G.; Boutami, R.; Dendooven, P.; Eronen, T.; Fox, S. P.; Fulton, B. R.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Huikari, J.; Hyldegaard, S.; Jeppesen, H. B.; Jokinen, A.; Jonson, B.; Kankainen, A.; Moore, I.; Nieminen, A.; Nyman, G.; Penttilä, H.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Riisager, K.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Tengblad, O.; Wang, Y.; Wilhelmsen, K.; Äystö, J.

    2009-09-01

    The triple-α-particle breakup of states in the triple-α continuum of C12 has been investigated by way of coincident detection of all three α particles of the breakup. The states have been fed in the β decay of N12 and B12, and the α particles measured using a setup that covers all of the triple-α phase space. Contributions from the breakup through the Be8(0+) ground state as well as other channels—interpreted as breakup through excited energies in Be8—have been identified. Spins and parities of C12 triple-α continuum states are deduced from the measured phase-space distributions for breakup through Be8 above the ground state by comparison to a fully symmetrized sequential R-matrix description of the breakup. At around 10 MeV in C12, the breakup is found to be dominated by 0+ strength breaking up through the ghost of the Be8(0+) ground state with L=0 angular momentum between the first emitted α particle and the intermediate Be8 nucleus. For C12 energies above the 12.7 MeV 1+ state, however, L=2 breakup of a C12 2+ state through the Be8(2+) excited state dominates. Furthermore, the possibility of a 2+ excited state in the 9-12 MeV region of C12 is investigated.

  19. Breakup Effects on University Students' Perceived Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Pelaez, Martha; Deeds, Osvelia; Delgado, Jeannette

    2012-01-01

    The Problem: Problems that might be expected to affect perceived academic performance were studied in a sample of 283 university students. Results: Breakup Distress Scale scores, less time since the breakup and no new relationship contributed to 16% of the variance on perceived academic performance. Variables that were related to academic…

  20. Modeling of Turbulence Effects on Liquid Jet Atomization and Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Chen, C. P.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations and physical modeling studies have indicated that turbulence behaviors within a liquid jet have considerable effects on the atomization process. This study aims to model the turbulence effect in the atomization process of a cylindrical liquid jet. Two widely used models, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability of Reitz (blob model) and the Taylor-Analogy-Breakup (TAB) secondary droplet breakup by O Rourke et al, are further extended to include turbulence effects. In the primary breakup model, the level of the turbulence effect on the liquid breakup depends on the characteristic scales and the initial flow conditions. For the secondary breakup, an additional turbulence force acted on parent drops is modeled and integrated into the TAB governing equation. The drop size formed from this breakup regime is estimated based on the energy balance before and after the breakup occurrence. This paper describes theoretical development of the current models, called "T-blob" and "T-TAB", for primary and secondary breakup respectivety. Several assessment studies are also presented in this paper.

  1. 24 CFR 982.315 - Family break-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Family break-up. 982.315 Section... SECTION 8 TENANT BASED ASSISTANCE: HOUSING CHOICE VOUCHER PROGRAM Leasing a Unit § 982.315 Family break-up. (a) The PHA has discretion to determine which members of an assisted family continue to...

  2. Artificial satellite break-ups. I - Soviet ocean surveillance satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, N. L.

    1983-02-01

    An analysis of the breakup patterns of eight Soviet Kosmos series ocean surveillance satellites is presented. It is noted that half of the 4700 objects presently detected in earth orbit are shards from destroyed objects. The locations and heading of each Soviet satellite breakup were tracked by the Naval Space Survelliance System. All events in the eastern hemisphere occurred in the ascending phase, while western hemisphere breakups happened in the descending phase. Gabbard (1971) diagrams of altitude vs. period are plotted as a function of a fragment's orbital period. The diagrams have been incorporated into a NASA computer program to backtrack along the fragments' paths to determine the pattern of the breakup. Although objects have been projected to have separated from some of the satellites before breakup, a discussion of the evidence leads to the conclusion that even though the satellites may have exploded no purpose can yet be discerned for the actions.

  3. Breakup of free liquid jets influenced by external mechanical vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lad, V. N.; Murthy, Z. V. P.

    2017-02-01

    The breakup of liquid jets has been studied with various test liquids using externally imposed mechanical vibrations. Images of the jets were captured by a high speed camera up to the speed of 1000 frames per second, and analyzed to obtain the profile of the jet and breakup length. The dynamics of the jets have also been studied to understand the effects of additives—a surfactant and polymer—incorporating externally imposed mechanical vibrations. Different types of breakup modes have been explored with respect to the Weber number and Ohnesorge number. The introduction of mechanical vibrations have caused jet breakup with separated droplets at a comparatively lower Weber number. The region of jet breakup by neck formation at constant jet velocities also contracted due to mechanical vibrations.

  4. ALIGNING JIG

    DOEpatents

    Culver, J.S.; Tunnell, W.C.

    1958-08-01

    A jig or device is described for setting or aligning an opening in one member relative to another member or structure, with a predetermined offset, or it may be used for measuring the amount of offset with which the parts have previously been sct. This jig comprises two blocks rabbeted to each other, with means for securing thc upper block to the lower block. The upper block has fingers for contacting one of the members to be a1igmed, the lower block is designed to ride in grooves within the reference member, and calibration marks are provided to determine the amount of offset. This jig is specially designed to align the collimating slits of a mass spectrometer.

  5. Image alignment

    DOEpatents

    Dowell, Larry Jonathan

    2014-04-22

    Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

  6. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) stimulation of jet breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) excitation of liquid jets offers an alternative to piezoelectric excitation without the complex frequency response caused by piezoelectric and mechanical resonances. In an EHD exciter, an electrode near the nozzle applies an alternating Coulomb force to the jet surface, generating a disturbance which grows until a drop breaks off downstream. This interaction is modelled quite well by a linear, long wave model of the jet together with a cylindrical electric field. The breakup length, measured on a 33 micrometer jet, agrees quite well with that predicted by the theory, and increases with the square of the applied voltage, as expected. In addition, the frequency response is very smooth, with pronounced nulls occurring only at frequencies related to the time which the jet spends inside the exciter.

  7. Impacts, tillites, and the breakup of Gondwanaland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, Verne R.; Marshall, John R.; Aggarwal, Hans

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical analysis demonstrates that substantial impact crater deposits should have been produced during the last 2 Gy of Earth's history. Textures of impact deposits are shown to resemble textures of tillites and diamictites of Precambrian and younger ages. The calculated thickness distribution for impact crater deposits produced during 2 Gy is similar to that of tillites and diamictites of 2 Ga or younger. We suggest, therefore, that some tillites/diamictites could be of impact origin. Extensive tillite/diamictite deposits predated continental flood basalts on the interior of Gondwanaland. Significantly, other investigators have already associated impact cratering with flood basalt volcanism and continental rifting. Thus, it is proposed that the breakup of Gondwanaland could have been initiated by crustal fracturing from impacts.

  8. Mapping the evolving strain field during continental breakup from crustal anisotropy in the Afar Depression

    PubMed Central

    Keir, Derek; Belachew, M.; Ebinger, C.J.; Kendall, J.-M.; Hammond, J.O.S.; Stuart, G.W.; Ayele, A.; Rowland, J.V.

    2011-01-01

    Rifting of the continents leading to plate rupture occurs by a combination of mechanical deformation and magma intrusion, yet the spatial and temporal scales over which these alternate mechanisms localize extensional strain remain controversial. Here we quantify anisotropy of the upper crust across the volcanically active Afar Triple Junction using shear-wave splitting from local earthquakes to evaluate the distribution and orientation of strain in a region of continental breakup. The pattern of S-wave splitting in Afar is best explained by anisotropy from deformation-related structures, with the dramatic change in splitting parameters into the rift axis from the increased density of dyke-induced faulting combined with a contribution from oriented melt pockets near volcanic centres. The lack of rift-perpendicular anisotropy in the lithosphere, and corroborating geoscientific evidence of extension dominated by dyking, provide strong evidence that magma intrusion achieves the majority of plate opening in this zone of incipient plate rupture. PMID:21505441

  9. On the shear stabilization of capillary break-up of finite liquid bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dijkstra, Henk A.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we consider an isothermal finite liquid bridge under zero-gravity. A sinusoidal interfacial shear stress drives a nonparallel flow in the bridge. The linear stability of this flow to three-dimensional disturbances (which may deform the cylindrical gas-liquid interface) is determined numerically by solving an elliptic eigenvalue problem. Previous results on shear stabilization of capillary break-up of axially unbounded cylindrical interfaces containing a parallel flow are hereby extended to a nonparallel flow. The turning flow regions influence the stability significantly. However, for the particular cases considered, a small area in parameter space remains where the capillary instability is suppressed through interfacial shear. Second, non-axisymmetric oscillatory instabilities are found which originate from an interaction of the interface deformation and the basic flow. These instabilities may be the isothermal limit of the oscillatory instabilities observed in float-zone crystal growth.

  10. On the Mach number Effects on Droplet Breakup in Laminar Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syahdan, Irfan Miladi

    A Volume of Fluid (VOF) multiphase numerical study was conducted using the commercial simulation software ANSYS Fluent to understand the effects of compressibility on droplet breakup in the laminar flow regime. A 2D axisymmetric domain which consists of four subdomains was used for the simulations. Validation of the setup and mesh was conducted by comparing to analytical shock tube equation, Engel's, and Boger et al.'s work. Two regimes of flows, subsonic and supersonic, were used and were obtained by selection of the operating pressure, velocity, density, dynamic viscosity, and temperature to keep the Reynolds, Weber, and Mach numbers at fixed values between cases. The Reynolds number was held constant at 100. Significant differences within the stripping breakup mode between the supersonic and subsonic cases for similar values of the Weber and Reynolds numbers were observed. The difference was observed in terms of droplet deformation, droplet deformed shape, and droplet lifetime. A Weber number effect is also observed to influence the droplet lifetime. Differences in the pressure distribution were found to drive the different degrees of vertical elongation while the viscous stress mainly acts to bend the droplet downstream. The pressure was found to be the major factor while viscous stress acts as the smaller factor in the physics during most of the deformation process, but viscous stress shows to be the major role at the beginning of the process. Comparison to the solid sphere case provided confirmation of the pressure distribution difference observed between supersonic and subsonic case was expected. Comparison to solid sphere also shows how droplet deformation itself plays a role in effecting the flow field.

  11. Signatures of Pseudo-breakup, Breakup of a Full Substorm Onset, and Poleward Border Intensifications Compared.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronkov, I.; Donovan, E. F.; Samson, J. C.

    2001-12-01

    For several exceptional events, we use ground-based and in-situ data to compare the ionospheric, geostationary, and mid-tail signatures of the pseudo-breakup, breakup, and poleward border intensifications (PBIs). In doing so, we utilize CANOPUS magnetometer and multi-wavelength photometer and All-sky imager data, as well as field measurements provided by the GOES 8, GOES 9, and Geotail spacecraft. We have identified a set of distinguishable signatures of each process. Pseudo-breakup consists of two distinct stages: near-linear arc intensification corresponding to the ``explosive growth phase" at geostationary orbit, and poleward vortex expansion that starts simultaneously with explosive onset of short period pulsations (Pi1, Pi2) and dipolarization observed at geostationary orbit. It can be accompanied by local perturbations of the equatorward part of the electron precipitation region and by formation of the substorm-like local current system but neither by optical signatures of the lobe flux reconnection nor by perturbations in the mid-tail. It typically saturates near the equatorward border of the electron precipitation region producing a mushroom-like auroral structure. Breakup starts with the same two-stage initial scenario of the arc intensification and vortex evolution but it rapidly expands poleward and is accompanied by optical signatures of reconnection onset, namely the aurora develops into a cell-like structure of the size compatible with the whole auroral zone width. This occurs at the time when mid-tail disruption signatures are observed. Full onset launches a second, more global, larger Pi2 burst. Finally, we show an example of PBIs observed as long period pulses of electron precipitation at the poleward border of auroral region, followed by the high-latitude proton aurora. The commencement of PBI coincided with bursty bulk flows and pulses of plasma energization in the mid-tail. Observed features are discussed with respect to recent ideas claiming

  12. Trends of ice breakup date in south-central Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Congsheng; Yao, Huaxia

    2015-09-01

    Large-scale ice phenology studies have revealed overall patterns of later freeze, earlier breakup, and shorter duration of ice in the Northern Hemisphere. However, there have been few studies regarding the trends, including their spatial patterns, in ice phenology for individual waterbodies on a local or small regional scale, although the coherence of ice phenology has been shown to decline rapidly in the first few hundred kilometers. In this study, we extracted trends, analyzed affecting factors, and investigated relevant spatial patterns for ice breakup date time series at 10 locations with record length ≥90 years in south-central Ontario, Canada. Wavelet methods, including the multiresolution analysis (MRA) method for nonlinear trend extraction and the wavelet coherence (WTC) method for identifying the teleconnections between large-scale climate modes and ice breakup date, are proved to be effective in ice phenology analysis. Using MRA method, the overall trend of ice breakup date time series (1905-1991) varied from earlier ice breakup to later ice breakup, then to earlier breakup again from south to north in south-central Ontario. Ice breakup date is closely correlated with air temperature during certain winter/spring months, as well as the last day with snow on the ground and number of snow-on-ground days. The influences of solar activity and Pacific North American on ice breakup were comparatively uniform across south-central Ontario, while those of El Niño-Southern Oscillation, North Atlantic Oscillation, and Arctic Oscillation on ice phenology changed with distance of 50-100 km in the north-south direction.

  13. MUSE alignment onto VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Boudon, Didier; Caillier, Patrick; Daguisé, Eric; Dupuy, Christophe; Jarno, Aurélien; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Migniau, Jean-Emmanuel; Nicklas, Harald; Piqueras, Laure

    2014-07-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation Very Large Telescope (VLT) integral field spectrograph developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO). It combines a 1' x 1' field of view sampled at 0.2 arcsec for its Wide Field Mode (WFM) and a 7.5"x7.5" field of view for its Narrow Field Mode (NFM). Both modes will operate with the improved spatial resolution provided by GALACSI (Ground Atmospheric Layer Adaptive Optics for Spectroscopic Imaging), that will use the VLT deformable secondary mirror and 4 Laser Guide Stars (LGS) foreseen in 2015. MUSE operates in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently commissioning MUSE in the Very Large Telescope for the Preliminary Acceptance in Chile, scheduled for September, 2014. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2012 and 2013, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested to the P.I. institute at Lyon. After successful PAE in September 2013, MUSE instrument was shipped to the Very Large Telescope in Chile where that was aligned and tested in ESO integration hall at Paranal. After, MUSE was directly transported, fully aligned and without any optomechanical dismounting, onto VLT telescope where the first light was overcame the 7th of February, 2014. This paper describes the alignment procedure of the whole MUSE instrument with respect to the Very Large Telescope (VLT). It describes how 6 tons could be move with accuracy better than 0.025mm and less than 0.25 arcmin in order to reach alignment requirements. The success

  14. The oil body formation and breakup in the compound vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplina, T. O.; Stepanova, E. V.

    2012-04-01

    The flows in the Ocean and Atmosphere combine different types of motion: streams, jets, wakes, vortices and waves. When flows transport solid bodies or immiscible admixtures picturesque flow patterns are revealed and indicated the type of flow. Different spiral patterns visualize vortex flow structure. In experiments is studied the transport of finite volumes of immiscible admixture introduced on the free surface of water drawn into the vortex motion in the vertical cylindrical container. The basic medium was tap water, preliminary degasified to make the visualization less difficult. The fixed volume of immiscible admixture (castor or sunflower oil) is introduced on the quiescent free surface of water inside the cylindrical container. The generation of compound vortex in the cylindrical container started after all the disturbances caused by deposition of the oil volume are damped. In compound vortex the flow oil patch with smooth boundary placed onto free surface is transformed into a set of spiral arms and separate drops contacting with the central oil volume. The droplets are separated from the central spot and slowly travel towards the container sidewall. With time, the spot is transformed into pronounced spiral arms. The most part of oil under the influence of vortex flow is gathered into the central volume contacting with the free surface. This volume is called "the oil body". On the lower frequencies of disk rotation and respectively slow flow gyration the oil body has smooth boundaries with water and air. The growth of disk rotation frequency leads to more pronounced deformation of the contact surface between liquid and air, the boundary of the oil body and water then is covered by small pimples. At the further increase of disk rotation frequency the oil body comes to the breakup, the water-oil boundary become irregular and on the lowest part of the oil body the analog of foam appears (the water-oil emulsion). The work is supported by Ministry of Education

  15. Transient deformation in the Asal-Ghoubbet Rift (Djibouti) since the 1978 diking event: Is deformation controlled by magma supply rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smittarello, D.; Grandin, R.; De Chabalier, J.-B.; Doubre, C.; Deprez, A.; Masson, F.; Socquet, A.; Saad, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    The Asal-Ghoubbet Rift (AG Rift) in Djibouti lies in the subaerial continuation of the Aden ridge system, thereby constituting a unique location to study rifting processes and mechanisms involved in continental breakup and oceanic spreading. Continually upgraded and expanded geodetic technology has been used to record the 1978 Asal rifting event and postdiking deformation. In light of recent results obtained for the Manda Hararo-Dabbahu rifting event (2005-2010), we propose that the horizontal and vertical geodetic data can be modeled with a double source, involving a dike-like inflation component aligned along the rift axis and a spherical pressure source located at midsegment below the Fieale caldera. By revisiting the codiking data, we propose that the reservoir below Fieale could have fed, at least partially, the 1978 injection and the contemporaneous Ardoukôba eruption and potentially induced local subsidence due to magma draining out of the central reservoir. As an alternative to previously proposed viscoelastic relaxation models, we reinterpret postdiking observations using a purely elastic rheology. We determine the relative contribution of a midsegment reservoir inflation and a dike-like opening component, together with their respective time evolutions. Our results suggest that interactions between steadily accumulating tectonic strain and temporal variations in melt supply to the shallow magma plumbing system below the AG Rift may entirely explain the geodetic observations and that viscoelastic deformation processes played a minor role in the 30 years following the 1978 rifting event.

  16. The Spectrum of Satellite Breakup and Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkleman, D.

    The objective of this paper is to expose the spectrum of satellite breakup physics and is implications for debris production and observables. Satellite response to the debris environment generally emphasizes small scale hypervelocity impact or the interaction of intense, coherent radiation with satellite surfaces or internals. There are empirical correlations of fragment size distributions based on arena tests and extremely rare observations of breakups in space. Klinkrad describes well research on material response to hypervelocity impact such as the ballistic limit for various materials and shielding walls. Smirnov, et. al., report well the phenomenology of breakups under the influence of nonuniform internal loading of monolithic bodies, such as pressurized tanks. They set forth the transformation of elastic energy into fragment kinetic energy. They establish a sound physical framework for bounding the number of fragments. We took advantage of these works in our previous papers. There is not much research into the response of nonuniform structures to hypervelocity collisions with similarly massive and complex objects. This work generally employs complex hydrodynamic and finite element computation that is not well suited to real time, operational assessment of the consequences of such encounters. We hope to diminish the void between the extremes of microscopic impact and complex hydrocodes. Our previous reports employed the framework established by Chobotov and Spencer, fundamentally equilibrium, Newtonian approach. We now explore the spectrum of interactions and debris evolutions possible with realistic combinations of these theories. The spectrum encompasses Newtonian, semi-elastic energy and momentum transfer through little or no momentum exchange and from virtually all of the mass of the colliders being involved through fractional mass involvement. We observe that the more Newtonian outcomes do not agree well with sparse observations of the few collisions that

  17. Using electric current to surpass the microstructure breakup limit.

    PubMed

    Qin, Rongshan

    2017-01-25

    The elongated droplets and grains can break up into smaller ones. This process is driven by the interfacial free energy minimization, which gives rise to a breakup limit. We demonstrated in this work that the breakup limit can be overpassed drastically by using electric current to interfere. Electric current free energy is dependent on the microstructure configuration. The breakup causes the electric current free energy to reduce in some cases. This compensates the increment of interfacial free energy during breaking up and enables the processing to achieve finer microstructure. With engineering practical electric current parameters, our calculation revealed a significant increment of the obtainable number of particles, showing electric current a powerful microstructure refinement technology. The calculation is validated by our experiments on the breakup of Fe3C-plates in Fe matrix. Furthermore, there is a parameter range that electric current can drive spherical particles to split into smaller ones.

  18. Self-similar breakup of near-inviscid liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso A.; Castrejon-Pita, J. Rafael; Lister, John R.; Hinch, E. John; Hutchings, Ian M.

    2012-11-01

    Experimental results are presented for the final stages of drop pinch-off and ligament breakup for different initial conditions. Water and ethanol were used as working fluids. High-speed imaging and image analysis were utilized in order to determine the contraction rate of the thinning neck and the shape of the liquid thread just before the breakup. Our results show that the geometry of the breakup of near-inviscid fluids is self-similar in the domain of simple dripping. We also demonstrate that, independently of the initial conditions, the necking of these liquids scales with τ 2 / 3, asymptotically giving a unique breakup angle of 18 . 0 +/- 0 .4° . Both observations are in complete agreement with previous theoretical predictions. The angle converges towards self similarity like τ 1 / 2, also as predicted. Project supported by the EPSRC-UK (EP/G029458/1 and EP/H018913/1) and Cambridge-KACST.

  19. New description of the four-body breakup reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Takuma; Kato, Kiyoshi; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2010-11-15

    We present a novel method of smoothing discrete breakup cross sections calculated by the method of continuum-discretized coupled channels. The smoothing method based on the complex scaling method is tested with success for a {sup 58}Ni(d,pn) reaction at 80 MeV as an example of three-body breakup reactions and applied to a {sup 12}C({sup 6}He,nn {sup 4}He) reaction at 229.8 MeV as an example of four-body breakup reactions. Fast convergence of the breakup cross section with respect to extending the model space is confirmed. The method is also applied to {sup 12}C({sup 6}He,nn {sup 4}He) and {sup 208}Pb({sup 6}He,nn {sup 4}He) reactions at 240 MeV/A and compared with the experimental data.

  20. Using electric current to surpass the microstructure breakup limit

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Rongshan

    2017-01-01

    The elongated droplets and grains can break up into smaller ones. This process is driven by the interfacial free energy minimization, which gives rise to a breakup limit. We demonstrated in this work that the breakup limit can be overpassed drastically by using electric current to interfere. Electric current free energy is dependent on the microstructure configuration. The breakup causes the electric current free energy to reduce in some cases. This compensates the increment of interfacial free energy during breaking up and enables the processing to achieve finer microstructure. With engineering practical electric current parameters, our calculation revealed a significant increment of the obtainable number of particles, showing electric current a powerful microstructure refinement technology. The calculation is validated by our experiments on the breakup of Fe3C-plates in Fe matrix. Furthermore, there is a parameter range that electric current can drive spherical particles to split into smaller ones. PMID:28120919

  1. Investigation of the intermediate-energy deuteron breakup reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Divadeenam, M.; Ward, T.E.; Mustafa, M.G.; Udagawa, T.; Tamura, T.

    1989-01-01

    The Udagawa-Tamura formalism is employed to calculate the proton singles both in the bound and unbound regions. Both the Elastic-Breakup (EB) and the Breakup-Fusion (BF) processes are considered to calculate the doubly-differential cross section for light and intermediate mass nuclei. The calculated spectra for 25 and 56 MeV deuterons reproduce the experimental spectra very well except for the spectra at large angle and at low energies, of the outgoing particle. Contributions due to precompound and evaporation processes are estimated to supplement the spectral results based on the Elastic-Breakup and Breakup-Fusion mechanisms. An extension of the model calculations to higher deuteron energies is being made to test the (EB + BF) model limitations. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  2. {sup 17}F breakup reactions: a touchstone for indirect measurements

    SciTech Connect

    De Napoli, M.; Raciti, G.; Sfienti, C.; Capel, P.; Baye, D.; Descouvemont, P.; Sparenberg, J.-M.; Giacoppo, F.; Rapisarda, E.; Cardella, G.; Mazzocchi, C.

    2011-10-28

    An exclusive study of {sup 17}F breakup reactions has been performed at the FRIBs facility of the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud in Catania (Italy). The experiment has been performed with the aim of testing the accuracy of the Coulomb-breakup indirect technique used to infer radiative-capture cross sections at low energies. This technique has been used in the {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B case, but has never been tested. By measuring the breakup of {sup 17}F into {sup 16}O+p, and comparing the inferred cross section for {sup 16}O(p,{gamma}){sup 17}F to direct precise measurements, the influence of E2 transitions and higher-order effects, that are predicted to be significant in Coulomb-breakup reactions, can be evaluated. The first results and preliminary model comparison are reported.

  3. ISS Update: ATV-3 ReEntry Breakup Recorder

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update Commentator Pat Ryan talks with Dr. William Ailor, Principal Investigator for the ReEntry Breakup Recorder (REBR) for The Aerospace Corporation. Ailor talks about capturing data as Europ...

  4. Using electric current to surpass the microstructure breakup limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Rongshan

    2017-01-01

    The elongated droplets and grains can break up into smaller ones. This process is driven by the interfacial free energy minimization, which gives rise to a breakup limit. We demonstrated in this work that the breakup limit can be overpassed drastically by using electric current to interfere. Electric current free energy is dependent on the microstructure configuration. The breakup causes the electric current free energy to reduce in some cases. This compensates the increment of interfacial free energy during breaking up and enables the processing to achieve finer microstructure. With engineering practical electric current parameters, our calculation revealed a significant increment of the obtainable number of particles, showing electric current a powerful microstructure refinement technology. The calculation is validated by our experiments on the breakup of Fe3C-plates in Fe matrix. Furthermore, there is a parameter range that electric current can drive spherical particles to split into smaller ones.

  5. Analytical Description of the Breakup of Liquid Jets in Air

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    Papageorgiou and Orellana (1993), referred to as PO, to describe breakup of jets of one fluid into another with different density, with or without...as a small parameter. As noted by Papageorgiou and Orellana , such an ansatz can be applied to flows which have initial conditions characterized by a...formation in capillary jet breakup. Phys. Fluids A, 2, 1141-1144. " Papageorgiou, D.T. and Orellana , 0. 1993 Pinching solutions of slender

  6. Aggregate breakup in a contracting nozzle.

    PubMed

    Soos, Miroslav; Ehrl, Lyonel; Bäbler, Matthäus U; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-01-05

    The breakup of dense aggregates in an extensional flow was investigated experimentally. The flow was realized by pumping the suspension containing the aggregates through a contracting nozzle. Variation of the cluster mass distribution during the breakage process was measured by small-angle light scattering. Because of the large size of primary particles and the dense aggregate structure image analysis was used to determine the shape and structure of the produced fragments. It was found, that neither aggregate structure, characterized by a fractal dimension d(f) = 2.7, nor shape, characterized by an average aspect ratio equal to 1.5, was affected by breakage. Several passes through the nozzle were required to reach the steady state. This is explained by the radial variation of the hydrodynamic stresses at the nozzle entrance, characterized through computational fluid dynamics, which implies that only the fraction of aggregates whose strength is smaller than the local hydrodynamic stress is broken during one pass through the nozzle. Scaling of the steady-state aggregate size as a function of the hydrodynamic stress was used to determine the aggregate strength.

  7. Coulomb and nuclear effects in breakup and reaction cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descouvemont, P.; Canto, L. F.; Hussein, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    We use a three-body continuum discretized coupled channel (CDCC) model to investigate Coulomb and nuclear effects in breakup and reaction cross sections. The breakup of the projectile is simulated by a finite number of square integrable wave functions. First we show that the scattering matrices can be split in a nuclear term and in a Coulomb term. This decomposition is based on the Lippmann-Schwinger equation and requires the scattering wave functions. We present two different methods to separate both effects. Then, we apply this separation to breakup and reaction cross sections of 7Li+208Pb . For breakup, we investigate various aspects, such as the role of the α +t continuum, the angular-momentum distribution, and the balance between Coulomb and nuclear effects. We show that there is a large ambiguity in defining the Coulomb and nuclear breakup cross sections, since both techniques, although providing the same total breakup cross sections, strongly differ for the individual components. We suggest a third method which could be efficiently used to address convergence problems at large angular momentum. For reaction cross sections, interference effects are smaller, and the nuclear contribution is dominant above the Coulomb barrier. We also draw attention to different definitions of the reaction cross section which exist in the literature and which may induce small, but significant, differences in the numerical values.

  8. Breakup of rivulet falling over an inclined plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajesh; Galvin, Janine

    2016-11-01

    The multiscale modeling of solvent absorption in a structured packing is a complex problem. The local hydrodynamics in the packing, specifically existing flow regimes, is a key factor for overall efficiency. A single packing unit is made of corrugated sheets arranged perpendicularly to each other. In this effort, breakup of rivulet over an inclined plate is examined, which might be helpful to explain some fundamental aspects of this system. Rivulet breakup is a complex phenomenon dictated by many factors such as solvent physical properties, contact angle (γ) , inertia, plate inclination angle (θ) , etc. The multiphase flow simulations using the volume of fluid method were conducted considering these factors. Decreasing solvent flow rate results in the transition of flow regimes from a film to a rivulet and then to a droplet. Demarcation between a stable and an unstable flow regime that leads to breakup is presented in terms of the critical Weber number (Wecr) . Values of Weber number below Wecr correspond to breakup behavior and above to a stable rivulet. The impact of solvent properties is presented by the Kapitza number (Ka), which only depends on fluid properties. Variation of Wecr with Ka shows two trends depending on the Ka value of the solvent. Solvents with low Ka show a linear variation of Wecr with Ka whereas those with high Ka show a quadratic variation. The effect of plate inclination on the rivulet breakup reveals that Wecr decreases with increased θ value. In addition, higher values of γ promote breakup.

  9. Coalescence, torus formation and breakup of sedimenting drops: experiments and computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machu, Gunther; Meile, Walter; Nitsche, Ludwig C.; Schaflinger, Uwe

    2001-11-01

    The motion and shape evolution of viscous drops made from a dilute suspension of tiny, spherical glass beads sedimenting in an otherwise quiescent liquid is investigated both experimentally and theoretically for conditions of low Reynolds number. In the (presumed) absence of any significant interfacial tension, the Bond number [script B] = ([Delta][rho])gR2/[sigma] is effectively infinite. The key stages of deformation of single drops and pairs of interacting drops are identified. Of particular interest are (i) the coalescence of two trailing drops, (ii) the subsequent formation of a torus, and (iii) the breakup of the torus into two or more droplets in a repeating cascade. To overcome limitations of the boundary-integral method in tracking highly deformed interfaces and coalescing and dividing drops, we develop a formal analogy between drops of homogeneous liquid and a dilute, uniformly distributed swarm of sedimenting particles, for which only the 1/r far-field hydrodynamic interactions are important. Simple, robust numerical simulations using only swarms of Stokeslets reproduce the main phenomena observed in the classical experiments and in our flow-visualization studies. Detailed particle image velocimetry (PIV) for axisymmetric configurations enable a mechanistic analysis and confirm the theoretical results. We expose the crucial importance of the initial condition why a single spherical drop does not deform substantially, but a pair of spherical drops, or a bell-shaped drop similar to what is actually formed in the laboratory, does undergo the torus/breakup transformation. The extreme sensitivity of the streamlines to the shape of the ring-like swarm explains why the ring that initially forms in the experiments does not behave like the slender open torus analysed asymptotically by Kojima, Hinch & Acrivos (1984). Essentially all of the phenomena described above can be explained within the realm of Stokes flow, without resort to interfacial tension or inertial

  10. Modeling of Turbulence Effects on Liquid Jet Atomization and Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu; Chen, C. P.

    2004-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations and physical modeling studies have indicated that turbulence behaviors within a liquid jet have considerable effects on the atomization process. For certain flow regimes, it has been observed that the liquid jet surface is highly turbulent. This turbulence characteristic plays a key role on the breakup of the liquid jet near to the injector exit. Other experiments also showed that the breakup length of the liquid core is sharply shortened as the liquid jet is changed from the laminar to the turbulent flow conditions. In the numerical and physical modeling arena, most of commonly used atomization models do not include the turbulence effect. Limited attempts have been made in modeling the turbulence phenomena on the liquid jet disintegration. The subject correlation and models treat the turbulence either as an only source or a primary driver in the breakup process. This study aims to model the turbulence effect in the atomization process of a cylindrical liquid jet. In the course of this study, two widely used models, Reitz's primary atomization (blob) and Taylor-Analogy-Break (TAB) secondary droplet breakup by O Rourke et al. are examined. Additional terms are derived and implemented appropriately into these two models to account for the turbulence effect on the atomization process. Since this enhancement effort is based on a framework of the two existing atomization models, it is appropriate to denote the two present models as T-blob and T-TAB for the primary and secondary atomization predictions, respectively. In the primary breakup model, the level of the turbulence effect on the liquid breakup depends on the characteristic time scales and the initial flow conditions. This treatment offers a balance of contributions of individual physical phenomena on the liquid breakup process. For the secondary breakup, an addition turbulence force acted on parent drops is modeled and integrated into the TAB governing equation. The drop size

  11. Breakup of Droplets in an Accelerating Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, R. A.; Coultas, T. A.

    1966-01-01

    A study of droplet breakup phenomena by an accelerating gas flow is described. The phenomena are similar to what propellant droplets experience when exposed to accelerating combustion gas flow in a rocket engine combustion zone. Groups of several dozen droplets in the 100-10 750-micron-diameter range were injected into a flowing inert gas in a transparent rectangular nozzle. Motion photography of the behavior of the droplets at various locations in the accelerating gas flow has supplied quantitative and qualitative data on the breakup phenomena which occur under conditions similar to those found in large rocket engine combustors. A blowgun injection device, used to inject very small amounts of liquid at velocities of several hundred feet per second into a moving gas stream, is described. The injection device was used to inject small amounts of liquid RP-1 and water into the gas stream at a velocity essentially equal to the gas velocity where the group of droplets was allowed to stabilize its formation in a constant area section before entering the convergent section of the transparent nozzle. Favorable comparison with the work of previous investigators who have used nonaccelerating gas flow is found with the data obtained from this study with accelerating gas flow. The criterion for the conditions of minimum severity required to produce shear-type droplet breakup in an accelerating gas flow is found to agree well with the criterion previously established at Rocketdyne for breakup in nonaccelerating flow. An extension of the theory of capillary surface wave effects during droplet breakup is also presented. Capillary surface waves propagating in the surface of the droplet, according to classical hydrodynamical laws, are considered. The waves propagate tangentially over the surface of the droplet from the forward stagnation point to the major diameter. Consideration of the effects of relative gas velocity on the amplitude growth of these waves allows conclusions to be

  12. Micro-scale extensional rheometry using hyperbolic converging/diverging channels and jet breakup.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Bavand; McKinley, Gareth H

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the elongational rheology of dilute polymer solutions plays an important role in many biological and industrial applications ranging from microfluidic lab-on-a-chip diagnostics to phenomena such as fuel atomization and combustion. Making quantitative measurements of the extensional viscosity for dilute viscoelastic fluids is a long-standing challenge and it motivates developments in microfluidic fabrication techniques and high speed/strobe imaging of millifluidic capillary phenomena in order to develop new classes of instruments. In this paper, we study the elongational rheology of a family of dilute polymeric solutions in two devices: first, steady pressure-driven flow through a hyperbolic microfluidic contraction/expansion and, second, the capillary driven breakup of a thin filament formed from a small diameter jet ([Formula: see text]). The small length scale of the device allows very large deformation rates to be achieved. Our results show that in certain limits of low viscosity and elasticity, jet breakup studies offer significant advantages over the hyperbolic channel measurements despite the more complex implementation. Using our results, together with scaling estimates of the competing viscous, elastic, inertial and capillary timescales that control the dynamics, we construct a dimensionless map or nomogram summarizing the operating space for each instrument.

  13. The breakup mechanism of biomolecular and colloidal aggregates in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ó Conchúir, Breanndán; Zaccone, Alessio

    2014-03-01

    The theory of self-assembly of colloidal particles in shear flow is incomplete. Previous analytical approaches have failed to capture the microscopic interplay between diffusion, shear and intermolecular interactions which controls the aggregates fate in shear. In this work we analytically solved the drift-diffusion equation for the breakup rate of a dimer in flow. Then applying rigidity percolation theory, we found that the lifetime of a generic cluster formed under shear is controlled by the typical lifetime of a single bond in its interior, which in turn depends on the efficiency of the stress transmitted from other bonds in the cluster. We showed that aggregate breakup is a thermally-activated process where the activation energy is controlled by the interplay between intermolecular forces and the shear drift, and where structural parameters determine whether cluster fragmentation or surface erosion prevails. In our latest work, we analyzed floppy modes and nonaffine deformations to derive a lower bound on the fractal dimension df below which aggregates are mechanically unstable, ie. for large aggregates df ~= 2.4. This theoretical framework is in quantitative agreement with experiments and can be used for population balance modeling of colloidal and protein aggregation.

  14. Morphological classification of low viscosity drop bag breakup in a continuous air jet stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Liu, Hai-Feng; Li, Wei-Feng; Xu, Jian-Liang

    2010-11-01

    To investigate the effect of Rayleigh-Taylor wave number in the region of maximum cross stream dimension (NRT) on drop breakup morphology, the breakup properties of accelerating low viscosity liquid drops (water and ethanol drops, diameter=1.2-6.6 mm, Weber number=10-80) were investigated using high-speed digital photography. The results of morphological analysis show a good correlation of the observed breakup type with NRT; bag breakup occurred when NRT was 1/√3 -1, bag-stamen breakup at 1-2, and dual-bag breakup at 2-3. The number of nodes in bag breakup, bag-stamen breakup, and dual-bag breakup all increased with Weber number. The experimental results are consistent with the model estimates and in good agreement with those reported in the literature.

  15. Inclusive breakup of three-fragment weakly bound nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, B. V.; Frederico, T.; Hussein, M. S.

    2017-04-01

    The inclusive breakup of three-fragment projectiles is discussed within a four-body spectator model. Both the elastic breakup and the non-elastic breakup are obtained in a unified framework. Originally developed in the 80's for two-fragment projectiles such as the deuteron, in this paper the theory is successfully generalized to three-fragment projectiles. The expression obtained for the inclusive cross section allows the extraction of the incomplete fusion cross section, and accordingly generalizes the surrogate method to cases such as (t, p) and (t, n) reactions. It is found that two-fragment correlations inside the projectile affect in a conspicuous way the elastic breakup cross section. The inclusive non-elastic breakup cross section is calculated and is found to contain the contribution of a three-body absorption term that is also strongly influenced by the two-fragment correlations. This latter cross section contains the so-called incomplete fusion where more than one compound nuclei are formed. Our theory describes both stable weakly bound three-fragment projectiles and unstable ones such as the Borromean nuclei.

  16. History of satellite break-ups in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabbard, J.

    1985-01-01

    By 28 June 1961 the 1st Aerospace Control Squadron had cataloged 115 Earth orbiting satellites from data supplied by a rather diverse collection of radar and optical sensors. On 29 June 1961, the Able Star rocket of the 1961 Omicron launch exploded causing a quantum jump in the number of Earth orbiting objects. Since that time there have been 69 Earth orbiting satellites break up in space whose debris remained in orbit long enough for orbital elements to be developed. A list of the 69 breakups is provided. The debris from some of the lower altitude breakups has all decayed. Among the 69 breakups, 44 have cataloged debris remaining in orbit. As of 1 July 1982, the size of the cataloged orbiting population was exactly 4700. Forty-nine percent of these objects are fragments of the forty-four breakups. For each breakup the various orbits of its debris represent a family of orbits that are related in characteristics due to their common impulse launch. A few examples are shown of how the families are oriented in space.

  17. Current reduction in a pseudo-breakup event: THEMIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Z. H.; Pu, Z. Y.; Owen, C. J.; Fu, S. Y.; Chu, X. N.; Liu, J.; Angelopoulos, V.; Rae, I. J.; Yue, C.; Zhou, X.-Z.; Zong, Q.-G.; Cao, X.; Shi, Q. Q.; Forsyth, C.; Du, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    Pseudo-breakup events are thought to be generated by the same physical processes as substorms. This paper reports on the cross-tail current reduction in an isolated pseudo-breakup observed by three of the THEMIS probes (THEMIS A (THA), THEMIS D (THD), and THEMIS E (THE)) on 22 March 2010. During this pseudo-breakup, several localized auroral intensifications were seen by ground-based observatories. Using the unique spatial configuration of the three THEMIS probes, we have estimated the inertial and diamagnetic currents in the near-Earth plasma sheet associated with flow braking and diversion. We found the diamagnetic current to be the major contributor to the current reduction in this pseudo-breakup event. During flow braking, the plasma pressure was reinforced, and a weak electrojet and an auroral intensification appeared. After flow braking/diversion, the electrojet was enhanced, and a new auroral intensification was seen. The peak current intensity of the electrojet estimated from ground-based magnetometers, ~0.7 × 105 A, was about 1 order of magnitude lower than that in a typical substorm. We suggest that this pseudo-breakup event involved two dynamical processes: a current-reduction associated with plasma compression ahead of the earthward flow and a current-disruption related to the flow braking/diversion. Both processes are closely connected to the fundamental interaction between fast flows, the near-Earth ambient plasma, and the magnetic field.

  18. Drift and breakup of spiral waves in reaction-diffusion-mechanics systems.

    PubMed

    Panfilov, A V; Keldermann, R H; Nash, M P

    2007-05-08

    Rotating spiral waves organize excitation in various biological, physical, and chemical systems. They underpin a variety of important phenomena, such as cardiac arrhythmias, morphogenesis processes, and spatial patterns in chemical reactions. Important insights into spiral wave dynamics have been obtained from theoretical studies of the reaction-diffusion (RD) partial differential equations. However, most of these studies have ignored the fact that spiral wave rotation is often accompanied by substantial deformations of the medium. Here, we show that joint consideration of the RD equations with the equations of continuum mechanics for tissue deformations (RD-mechanics systems), yield important effects on spiral wave dynamics. We show that deformation can induce the breakup of spiral waves into complex spatiotemporal patterns. We also show that mechanics leads to spiral wave drift throughout the medium approaching dynamical attractors, which are determined by the parameters of the model and the size of the medium. We study mechanisms of these effects and discuss their applicability to the theory of cardiac arrhythmias. Overall, we demonstrate the importance of RD-mechanics systems for mathematics applied to life sciences.

  19. Review of semi-classical calculations for breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Baye, Daniel

    2005-10-14

    In semi-classical approximations, the relative motion between target and projectile is represented by a classical trajectory but the projectile internal motion is treated quantum mechanically. A time-dependent Schroedinger equation describes the breakup of exotic nuclei induced by the Coulomb and nuclear forces. Different accurate techniques of resolution of this time-dependent equation are reviewed for one space dimension. The respective merits of their extensions to three dimensions are compared. Applications to the breakup of the 11Be, 15C, and 19C halo nuclei are presented and discussed. The first-order perturbation theory is compared with the time-dependent method and its relevance for the Coulomb breakup determination of the astrophysical S factor is analyzed.

  20. Modeling Tear Film Evaporation and Breakup with Duplex Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapf, Michael; Braun, Richard; Begley, Carolyn; Driscoll, Tobin; King-Smith, Peter Ewen

    2015-11-01

    Tear film thinning, hyperosmolarity, and breakup can irritate and damage the ocular surface. Recent research hypothesizes deficiencies in the lipid layer may cause locally increased evaporation, inducing conditions for breakup. We consider a model for team film evolution incorporating two mobile fluid layers, the aqueous and lipid layers. In addition, we include the effects of salt concentration, osmosis, evaporation as modified by the lipid layer, and the polar portion of the lipid layer. Numerically solving the resulting model, we explore the conditions for tear film breakup and analyze the response of the system to changes in our parameters. Our studies indicate sufficiently fast peak values or sufficiently wide areas of evaporation promote TBU, as does diffusion of solutes. In addition, the Marangoni effect representing polar lipids dominates viscous dissipation from the non-polar lipid layer in the model. This work was supported in part by NSF grant 1412085 and NIH grant 1R01EY021794.

  1. Effect of boiling regime on melt stream breakup in water

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.W.; Gabor, J.D.; Cassulo, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been performed examining the breakup and mixing behavior of an initially coherent stream of high-density melt as it flows downward through water. This work has application to the quenching of molten core materials as they drain downward during a postulated severe reactor accident. The study has included examination of various models of breakup distances based upon interfacial instabilities dominated either by liquid-liquid contact or by liquid-vapor contact. A series of experiments was performed to provide a data base for assessment of the various modeling approaches. The experiments involved Wood's metal (T/sub m/ = 73/sup 0/C, rho = 9.2 g/cm/sup 3/, d/sub j/ = 20 mm) poured into a deep pool of water. The temperature of the water and wood's metal were varied to span the range from single-phase, liquid-liquid contact to the film boiling regime. Experiment results showed that breakup occurred largely as a result of the spreading and entrainment from the leading edge of the jet. However, for streams of sufficient lengths a breakup length could be discerned at which there was no longer a coherent central core of the jet to feed the leading edge region. The erosion of the vertical trailing column is by Kelvin-Helmoltz instabilities and related disengagement of droplets from the jet into the surrounding fluid. For conditions of liquid-liquid contact, the breakup length has been found to be about 20 jet diameters; when substantial vapor is produced at the interface due to heat transfer from the jet to the water, the breakup distance was found to range to as high as 50 jet diameters. The former values are close to the analytical prediction of Taylor, whereas the latter values are better predicted by the model of Epstein and Fauske.

  2. Asymptotic and near-target direct breakup of 6Li and 7Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Sunil; Simpson, E. C.; Luong, D. H.; Cook, K. J.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.; Carter, I. P.; Jeung, D. Y.; Mohanto, G.; Palshetkar, C. S.; Prasad, E.; Rafferty, D. C.; Simenel, C.; Vo-Phuoc, K.; Williams, E.; Gasques, L. R.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Linares, R.

    2016-04-01

    Background: Li,76 and 9Be are weakly bound against breakup into their cluster constituents. Breakup location is important for determining the role of breakup in above-barrier complete fusion suppression. Recent works have pointed out that experimental observables can be used to separate near-target and asymptotic breakup. Purpose: Our purpose is to distinguish near-target and asymptotic direct breakup of Li,76 in reactions with nuclei in different mass regions. Method: Charged particle coincidence measurements are carried out with pulsed Li,76 beams on 58Ni and 64Zn targets at sub-barrier energies and compared with previous measurements using 208Pb and 209Bi targets. A detector array providing a large angular coverage is used, along with time-of-flight information to give definitive particle identification of the direct breakup fragments. Results: In interactions of 6Li with 58Ni and 64Zn, direct breakup occurs only asymptotically far away from the target. However, in interactions with 208Pb and 209Bi, near-target breakup occurs in addition to asymptotic breakup. Direct breakup of 7Li into α -t is not observed in interactions with 58Ni and 64Zn. However, near-target dominated direct breakup was observed in measurements with 208Pb and 209Bi. A modified version of the Monte Carlo classical trajectory model code platypus, which explicitly takes into account lifetimes associated with unbound states, is used to simulate sub-barrier breakup reactions. Conclusions: Near-target breakup in interactions with Li,76 is an important mechanism only for the heavy targets 208Pb and 209Bi. There is insignificant near-target direct breakup of 6Li and no direct breakup of 7Li in reactions with 58Ni and 64Zn. Therefore, direct breakup is unlikely to suppress the above-barrier fusion cross section in reactions of Li,76 with 58Ni and 64Zn nuclei.

  3. Framework for Control of Dynamic Ice Breakup by River Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    and if ration. Other important characteristics of these wave formation occurs upstream or in a tribu - waves are significant stage increase, short dura...stage must occur to produce the high forces cut River danis for a controlled ice lireakup experi- needed for a dynamic breakup, and very high 1e1it

  4. Mass estimation in the breakups of Soviet satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.; Anz-Meador, Phillip D.

    1990-01-01

    An attempt is made to estimate the mass of the parent satellite from the mass of the debris remaining from its breakup using a technique based on the decay rate and radar cross-section time history. The decay of perigee and apogee with time of an object in orbit provides the area-to-mass ratio and the radar cross-section provides a measure of the effective area of the object, while combining the two gives the mass of the object. The technique has been successfully applied to 12 U.S. breakups and one Arianespace breakup. Calculations exhibiting good agreement with reference mass are also discussed for Soviet intact C-class boosters, intact ASAT target satellites, and intact navigational satellites. It is found that the calculated mass of the ASAT interceptor spacecraft is about one-half of the expected mass, but it is pointed out that this may be due to fuel carried on board. For ASAT target breakups the calculated mass is 20-30 times too low; no clear explanation can yet be found for this phenomenon.

  5. A fundamental study of liquid phase particle breakup. Revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-12-01

    Combustion efficiency of aluminized propellants in solid rocket motors is reduced by incomplete aluminum combustion and two-phase nozzle flow losses. Combustion of these propellants can produce large Al/Al2O3 agglomerates. As a direct result of agglomerate breakup, the aluminum combustion rate is increased, and the thermal energy released is more efficiently transferred into exhaust kinetic energy. This research sought to obtain physical data to characterize the mechanisms of aerodynamic droplet breakup. Experiments have been completed in which conventional liquids and a liquid metal (mercury) was studied. The primary goal of the conventional liquid experiments was to examine the effect of liquid properties (viscosity and surface tension) on the breakup mechanism, time scale, and fragment size distribution. The goal of the mercury experiments was to examine the effect of the much higher surface tension more characteristic of liquid aluminum. A key element of the experimental effort is the use of nonintrusive laser diagnostics including pulsed laser holography (PLH) and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). The exceptional temporal and spatial resolution of PLH provided the ability to resolve the mechanism of breakup and the size distribution of the fragments. LDV was used to determine drop velocity distributions along the nozzle revealing the rapid acceleration of the flattened droplets and then, surprisingly, the milder acceleration of the fragments.

  6. 24 CFR 982.315 - Family break-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Family break-up. 982.315 Section 982.315 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN...

  7. Breakup of New Orleans Households after Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendall, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Theory and evidence on disaster-induced population displacement have focused on individual and population-subgroup characteristics. Less is known about impacts on households. I estimate excess incidence of household breakup resulting from Hurricane Katrina by comparing a probability sample of pre-Katrina New Orleans resident adult household heads…

  8. Color Breakup In Sequentially-Scanned LC Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arend, L.; Lubin, J.; Gille, J.; Larimer, J.; Statler, Irving C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In sequentially-scanned liquid-crystal displays the chromatic components of color pixels are distributed in time. For such displays eye, head, display, and image-object movements can cause the individual color elements to be visible. We analyze conditions (scan designs, types of eye movement) likely to produce color breakup.

  9. Properties of spray formation by turbulent primary breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallam, Khaled Abd-Elmonem

    The formation of drops at the surface of turbulent liquids, e.g., turbulent primary breakup, was studied due to the importance of this mechanism for a variety of natural and technological spray formation processes, e.g., white caps on water, water falls, white water rapids, bow waves of ships, and many types of commercial spray atomizers, among others. Pulsed shadowgraphy and holography were used to observe the properties of the liquid surface and the drops formed by turbulent primary breakup of liquid jets in still air. Measured properties included liquid surface velocities, conditions at the onset of ligament and drop formation, ligament and drop sizes, ligament and drop velocities, rates of drop formation and the lengths of the liquid jets. Phenomenological theories were used to help interpret and correlate the measurements. Present results show that the onset of ligament formation occurs once the kinetic energy of the turbulent eddies that form the ligaments exceeds the required surface tension energy of a ligament of comparable size. Subsequently, the onset of drop formation occurs once drops form at the tips of ligaments due to classical Rayleigh breakup. This same mechanism controls the subsequent variation of drop sizes due to turbulent primary breakup as a function of distance from the jet exit. Breakup of the entire liquid jet occurs in two ways: a turbulent mechanism where the drops formed by turbulent primary breakup became comparable to the size of the liquid jet itself, and an aerodynamic mechanism where large turbulent eddies place the liquid jet in cross flow. In addition, ligament and drop velocities were associated with mean and fluctuating velocities of the liquid, and rates of drop formation could be expressed by surface efficiency factors defined as the fraction of the maximum cross stream liquid mass flux. Liquid volume fraction measurements indicated a rather dilute spray structure in contrast to earlier speculations. Finally, the turbulence

  10. Shear alignment of a disordered lamellar mesophase.

    PubMed

    Kumaran, V; Raman, D S S

    2011-03-01

    The shear alignment of an initially disordered lamellar phase is examined using lattice Boltzmann simulations of a mesoscopic model based on a free-energy functional for the concentration modulation. For a small shear cell of width 8λ, the qualitative features of the alignment process are strongly dependent on the Schmidt number Sc=ν/D (ratio of kinematic viscosity and mass diffusion coefficient). Here, λ is the wavelength of the concentration modulation. At low Schmidt number, it is found that there is a significant initial increase in the viscosity, coinciding with the alignment of layers along the extensional axis, followed by a decrease at long times due to the alignment along the flow direction. At high Schmidt number, alignment takes place due to the breakage and reformation of layers because diffusion is slow compared to shear deformation; this results in faster alignment. The system size has a strong effect on the alignment process; perfect alignment takes place for a small systems of width 8λ and 16λ, while a larger system of width 32λ does not align completely even at long times. In the larger system, there appears to be a dynamical steady state in which the layers are not perfectly aligned--where there is a balance between the annealing of defects due to shear and the creation due to an instability of the aligned lamellar phase under shear. We observe two types of defect creation mechanisms: the buckling instability under dilation, which was reported earlier, as well as a second mechanism due to layer compression.

  11. The role of deep subduction in supercontinent breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitanio, Fabio; Dal Zilio, Luca; Faccenda, Manuele

    2016-04-01

    The breakup of continents is a crucial stage of the episodic aggregation and dispersal of tectonic plates. In particular, the transition from a stable supercontinent to its rifting, breakup and subsequent drifting is one of the least understood aspects of plate tectonics. Over the last decades, several works have highlighted the potential role of pre-existing weaknesses or that of raising mantle plumes in assisting the localization of strain. However, to sustain large-scale divergent regime over geological time, extensional stresses are strictly required. Here we present results from 2-D thermo-mechanical numerical experiments and we show that rifting and drifting of continents result from lithospheric subduction at convergent margins, when this extends to lower mantle depths. We quantify the drag exerted by subduction-induced mantle flow along the basal surface of continental plates, comparing models where lithospheric slabs stagnate above the upper-lower mantle boundary with those where slabs penetrate into the lower mantle. When subduction is upper mantle-confined, divergent basal tractions localize at distances comparable to the effective upper mantle thickness (~500 km), causing the breakup of a microcontinent and opening of a marginal basin. Instead, when the descending lithosphere subducts deeper, extensional stresses localize at greater distances from the trench (≥ 2900 km), are higher and are sustained over a longer time. Although relatively low, basal shear stresses integrated over large plates generate tension forces that may exceed the strength of the continental lithosphere, eventually leading to breakup and opening of an intervening distal basin. The models illustrate that the mechanism leading to the formation of back-arc basins above upper mantle-confined subduction provides a viable explanation for the opening of larger basins above deeper subduction. Examples include the Atlantic Ocean formation and the South and North American plates drifting

  12. Breakup dynamics and dripping-to-jetting transition in a Newtonian/shear-thinning multiphase microsystem.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yong; Liu, Zhou; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2015-01-07

    The breakup dynamics in non-Newtonian multiphase microsystems is associated with a variety of industrial applications such as food production and biomedical engineering. In this study, we numerically and experimentally characterize the dripping-to-jetting transition under various flow conditions in a Newtonian/shear-thinning multiphase microsystem. Our work can help to predict the formation of undesirable satellite droplets, which is one of the challenges in dispensing non-Newtonian fluids. We also demonstrate the variations in breakup dynamics between shear-thinning and Newtonian fluids under the same flow conditions. For shear-thinning fluids, the droplet size increases when the capillary number is smaller than a critical value, while it decreases when the capillary number is beyond the critical value. The variations highlight the importance of rheological effects in flows with a non-Newtonian fluid. The viscosity of shear-thinning fluids significantly affects the control over the droplet size, therefore necessitating the manipulation of the shear rate through adjusting the flow rate and the dimensions of the nozzle. Consequently, the droplet size can be tuned in a controlled manner. Our findings can guide the design of novel microdevices for generating droplets of shear-thinning fluids with a predetermined droplet size. This enhances the ability to fabricate functional particles using an emulsion-templated approach. Moreover, elastic effects are also investigated experimentally using a model shear-thinning fluid that also exhibits elastic behaviors: droplets are increasingly deformed with increasing elasticity of the continuous phase. The overall understanding in the model multiphase microsystem will facilitate the use of a droplet-based approach for non-Newtonian multiphase applications ranging from energy to biomedical sciences.

  13. Post-breakup topographic rejuvenation of passive margins is directly related to the architecture of hyperextension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, Tim; Terje Osmundsen, Per

    2014-05-01

    Post-breakup topographic rejuvenation of individual escarpment sectors atop passive continental margins has been documented for decades. In two recent publications we have identified and quantified a scaling relationship that links the width of a proximal margin sector to the absolute elevation of its seaward-facing escarpment. The scaling relationship appears to be valid, globally, on margin sectors where hyperextended crustal architecture is present offshore (see Osmundsen & Redfield, 2011). In a detailed test we have also documented clear correlations between the geomorphic characteristics of the Scandinavian hinterland backslope, its point of flexure against the Archean craton, today's seismicity, and the now-offshore Taper Break, or the point of deformation coupling/decoupling that was active during high-beta thinning (see Redfield & Osmundsen, 2013). In one particularly fine example the More og Trondelag Fault Complex is shown to have reactivated in accordance with a normal displacement gradient that in turn obeys a simple distance relationship with the Taper Break. These results demonstrate that the topographic fate of a passive margin is determined by the end of the rift phase, and is directly related to the pattern of large-magnitude extensional faults that created the crustal taper and decided the location of the Taper Break. Post-breakup and/or 'accommodation-phase' uplift at passive margins is the inexorable and penultimate phase of hyperextension and is independent of external factors such as mantle convection, lithoshpheric composition/delamination, glacial history, magmatic style, or far field stresses such as those postulated from 'ridge push' or changes in plate motion. Osmundsen & Redfield, 2011, Terra Nova, 23, 349-361. Redfield & Osmundsen, 2013, GSA Bulletin, 125, 184-200.

  14. Droplet Deformation Prediction with the Droplet Deormation and Break Up Model (DDB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The Droplet Deformation and Breakup Model was used to predict deformation of droplets approaching the leading edge stagnation line of an airfoil. The quasi-steady model was solved for each position along the droplet path. A program was developed to solve the non-linear, second order, ordinary differential equation that governs the model. A fourth order Runge-Kutta method was used to solve the equation. Experimental slip velocities from droplet breakup studies were used as input to the model which required slip velocity along the particle path. The center of mass displacement predictions were compared to the experimental measurements from the droplet breakup studies for droplets with radii in the range of 200 to 700 mm approaching the airfoil at 50 and 90 m/sec. The model predictions were good for the displacement of the center of mass for small and medium sized droplets. For larger droplets the model predictions did not agree with the experimental results.

  15. Viscous Particle Breakup within a Cooling Nuclear Fireball

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, J. T.; Knight, K. B.; Dai, Z.; Ramon, C. E.; Reid, J. D.

    2016-10-04

    Following the surface detonation of a nuclear weapon, the Earth’s crust and immediate surroundings are drawn into the fireball and form melts. Fallout is formed as these melts incorporate radioactive material from the bomb vapor and cool rapidly. The resultant fallout plume and dispersion of radioactive contamination is a function of several factors including weather patterns and fallout particle shapes and size distributions. Accurate modeling of the size distributions of fallout forms an important data point for dispersion codes that calculate the aerial distribution of fallout. While morphological evidence for aggregation of molten droplets is well documented in fallout glass populations, the breakup of these molten droplets has not been similarly studied. This study documents evidence that quenched fallout populations preserve evidence of molten breakup mechanisms.

  16. Additive empirical parametrization and microscopic study of deuteron breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.

    2017-02-01

    Comparative assessment of the total breakup proton-emission cross sections measured for 56 MeV deuteron interaction with target nuclei from 12C to 209Bi, with an empirical parametrization and recently calculated microscopic neutron-removal cross sections was done at the same time with similar data measured at 15, 25.5, 70, and 80 MeV. Comparable mass dependencies of the elastic-breakup (EB) cross sections provided by the empirical parametrization and the microscopic results have been also found at the deuteron energy of 56 MeV, while the assessment of absolute-values variance up to a factor of two was not possible because of the lack of EB measurements at energies higher than 25.5 MeV. While the similarities represent an additional validation of the microscopic calculations, the cross-section difference should be considered within the objectives of further measurements.

  17. Breakup reaction study of the Brunnian nucleus {sup 10}C

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, N.; Ashwood, N. I.; Clarke, N. M.; Freer, M.; Haigh, P. J.; Ziman, V.; Achouri, N. L.; Laurent, B.; Orr, N. A.; Bohlen, H. G.; Catford, W. N.; Patterson, N. P.; Thomas, J. S.; Soic, N.

    2008-02-15

    The structure and 2{alpha}+2p breakup of {sup 10}C, the only known Brunnian nucleus, has been studied at 33.3 MeV/nucleon. The breakup kinematics were used to reconstruct the {sup 10}C {yields} {sup 9}B +p,{sup 9}B {yields} {sup 8}Be +p,{sup 8}Be {yields}{alpha}+{alpha} and {sup 10}C {yields} {sup 6}Be +{alpha},{sup 6}Be {yields} {sup 5}Li +p,{sup 5}Li {yields}{alpha}+p decay paths. Proton emission was seen to be favored. The decay of excited states at E{sub x}=4.20,5.31, and 6.74 MeV was observed. The previously unobserved state at 4.20 MeV may correspond to a J{sup {pi}}=0{sup +}{alpha}+2p+{alpha} cluster structure.

  18. Thermally induced breakup of metallic nanowires: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Schnedlitz, Martin; Lasserus, Maximilian; Knez, Daniel; Hauser, Andreas W; Hofer, Ferdinand; Ernst, Wolfgang E

    2017-04-05

    We present time-resolved transmission electron microscopy studies of the degradation of Au, Ag, Cu and Ni nanowires deposited on a heated support. The wires are grown under fully inert conditions in superfluid helium droplets and deposited onto amorphous carbon. The inherent stability of these pristine metal nanowires with diameters below 10 nm is investigated in the absence of any stabilizers, templates or solvents. The phenomenon of Rayleigh-breakup, a consequence of diffusion processes along the wire surfaces, is analysed in situ via scans over time and support temperature. Our experimental efforts are combined with simulations based on a novel model featuring a cellular automaton to emulate surface diffusion. Based on this model, correlations between the material parameters and actual breakup behaviour are studied.

  19. Radial electron-beam-breakup transit-time oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Mostrom, M.A.; Kwan, T.J.T.

    1995-01-01

    A new radially-driven electron-beam-breakup transit-time oscillator has been investigated analytically and through computer simulation as a compact low-impedance high-power microwave generator. In a 1MV, 50kA device 35cm in radius and 15cm long, with no external magnetic field, 5GW of extracted power and a growth rate of 0.26/ns have been observed. Theoretical maximum efficiencies are several times higher.

  20. Semiclassical calculations of observable cross sections in breakup reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marta, H. D.; Canto, L. F.; Donangelo, R.

    2008-09-15

    We develop a semiclassical procedure to calculate breakup reaction products' angular and energy distributions in the laboratory frame of reference. The effects of the Coulomb and nuclear interaction potentials on the classical trajectories, as well as bound-bound, bound-continuum, and continuum-continuum couplings, are included. As an example we consider the {sup 8}B+{sup 58}Ni system at E{sub lab}=26 MeV and find very good agreement with the available experimental data.

  1. Peregrine soliton generation and breakup in standard telecommunications fiber.

    PubMed

    Hammani, Kamal; Kibler, Bertrand; Finot, Christophe; Morin, Philippe; Fatome, Julien; Dudley, John M; Millot, Guy

    2011-01-15

    We present experimental and numerical results showing the generation and breakup of the Peregrine soliton in standard telecommunications fiber. The impact of nonideal initial conditions is studied through direct cutback measurements of the longitudinal evolution of the emerging soliton dynamics and is shown to be associated with the splitting of the Peregrine soliton into two subpulses, with each subpulse itself exhibiting Peregrine soliton characteristics. Experimental results are in good agreement with simulations.

  2. The Effect of Crustal Strength on Volcanism During Continental Breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, J. J.; Petersen, K. D.; Perez-Gussinye, M.; Collier, J.; Pik, R.

    2015-12-01

    Segmentation is a fundamental property of rifted margins which is thought to be inherited from pre-breakup lithospheric structure. The volume of melt emplaced during rifting typically varies across these segments. Notable examples are the Gulf of California, break-up in the South Atlantic, and the Afar depression. For example in Afar there is a clear north south transition from break-up in the Erta Ale segment, where there is localised young (<1 Ma) volcanism, to the Dabbahu segment where there is the 4-1 Ma Stratoid volcanic series and distributed faulting. Along the Namibian and conjugate Argentinian margin there is evidence that surface area of seaward dipping reflectors change across segments. Such lateral changes in volcanism over a relatively short spatial scale are hard to explain by change in mantle temperature. We will demonstrate that crustal strength places a crucial control on the volume and composition of melt generated during break-up. We have compared models of extension with a weaker and strong lower crust based on observed rock rheologies. Melt composition and volume is found to be a function of the lower crustal rheology as it effects the shape of the melt zone during extension. By comparing a suite models we find that Afar volcanism can be matched by models with both a weak or strong lower crust. If however the crust is weaker then the equivalent volume and composition is created with less crustal thinning but over a greater period of time. The difference in time required to generate significant volcanic rock may explain the change in surface area of sub-areal volcanism in both Afar, where there is a transition of strong to weak crust from Erta Ale to Dabbahu, and off-shore Namibia. Lateral variation in volcanism between segments may therefore be fundamentally controlled by the crust.

  3. Beam breakup integral measurement on high-power laser chains.

    PubMed

    Villate, Denis; Blanchot, Nathalie; Rouyer, Claude

    2007-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the efficiency of a single-shot method to measure the beam breakup integral (B) accumulated across a high power chain. The technique uses spectrally shaped strongly chirped femtosecond pulses and takes advantage of time-to-spectral coupling generated by nonlinear effects. We performed B measurements on regenerative amplifiers (Ti:sapphire) and on the ALISE 200 J facility currently installed at CEA-CESTA (France).

  4. Study of Liquid Breakup Process in Solid Rocket Motors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Averaged Navier-Stokes code ( URANS ) to investigate the interaction of the liquid film flow with the gas flow, and analyzed the breakup process for...unsteady-flow Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes code ( URANS ) to investigate the interaction of the liquid film flow with the gas flow, and analyzed the...predict the flows by solving the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes ( URANS ) equations16. The system of equations was solved in an Eulerian multi

  5. The Soviet Breakup and U.S. Foreign Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Allen

    1991-01-01

    This issue of a quarterly publication on world affairs explores the historical significance of the disintegration of the Soviet Union and the implication for U.S. foreign policy. With the breakup of the USSR in 1990-91, Russia for the first time this century does not have control over the non-Russian nations of its former empire in Central Asia,…

  6. Beam break-up in the two beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, D.H.; Travish, G.A.; Sessler, A.M.; Craig, G.D.; DeFord, J.F.

    1989-03-01

    We have studied numerically beam break-up (BBU) in the drive beam of a Two-Beam Accelerator (TBA), using transverse wakes calculated numerically using the AMOS Code. We examine only cumulative BBU due to the wake of the linear induction accelerator cavities. We do not consider regenerative BBU due to the relativistic klystron (RK) cavities. We find growth lengths of order /approximately/100 m for typical parameters. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. The Fragmented Manihiki Plateau - Key Region for Understanding the Break-up of the "Super" Large Igneous Province Ontong Java Nui

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochmuth, K.; Gohl, K.; Uenzelmann-Neben, G.; Werner, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Manihiki Plateau of the western Pacific is one of the world - wide greatest Large Igneous Province (LIP) on oceanic crust. It is assumed that the Manihiki Plateau was emplaced as the centerpiece of the "Super-LIP" Ontong Java Nui by multiple volcanic phases during the Cretaceous Magnetic Quiet Period. The subsequent break-up of Ontong Java Nui led to fragmentation of the Manihiki Plateau into three sub-plateaus, which all exhibit individual relicts of the "Super-LIP" break-up. We examine two deep crustal seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profiles crossing the two largest sub-plateaus of the Manihiki Plateau, the Western Plateaus and the High Plateau. Modeling of P- and S-wave velocities reveals surprising differences in the crustal structure between the two sub-plateaus. Whereas the High Plateau shows a constant crustal thickness of 20 km, relicts of multiple volcanic phases and break-up features at its margins, the model of the Western Plateaus reveals a crustal thickness decreasing from 17 km to only 9 km. There is only little evidence of secondary phases of volcanic activity. The main upper crustal structure on the Western Plateaus consists of fault systems and sedimentary basins. We infer that the High Plateau experienced phases of strong secondary volcanism, and that tectonic deformation was limited to its edges. The Western Plateaus, on the contrary, were deformed by crustal stretching and underwent only little to no secondary volcanism. This indicates that the two main sub-plateaus of the Manihiki Plateau experienced a different geological history and have played their individual parts in the break-up history of Ontong Java Nui.

  8. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis.

  9. Examining of the Collision Breakup Model between Geostationary Orbit Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Hidehiro; Hanada, Toshiya; Akahoshi, Yasuhiro; Yasaka, Tetsuo; Harada, Shoji

    This paper will examine the applicability of the hypervelocity collision model included in the NASA standard breakup model 2000 revision to low-velocity collisions possible in space, especially in the geosynchronous regime. The analytic method used in the standard breakup model will be applied to experimental data accumulated through low-velocity impact experiments performed at Kyushu Institute of Technology at a velocity about 300m/s and 800m/s. The projectiles and target specimens used were aluminum solid balls and aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels with face sheets of carbon fiber reinforced plastic, respectively. Then, we have found that a kind of lower boundary exists on fragment area-to-mass distribution at a smaller characteristic length range. This paper will describe the theoretical derivation of lower boundary and propose another modification on fragment area-to-mass distribution and it will conclude that the hypervelocity collision model in the standard breakup model can be applied to low-velocity collisions possible with some modifications.

  10. NAVSPASUR orbital processing for satellite break-up events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, Paul W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Satellite breakups via explosion or collision can instantly increase the trackable orbiting population by up to several hundred objects, temporarily perturbing the routine space surveillance operations at U.S. Space Command (USSPACWCOM) and the Naval Space Surveillance Center (NAVSPASUR). This paper is a survey of some of the procedures and techniques used by NAVSPASUR to respond to such events. First, the overall data flow at NAVSPASUR is described highlighting the places at which human analysts may intervene with special processing. So-called manual intervention is required in a variety of non-nominal situations, including breakups. Second, a description is given of some of the orbital analysis and other software tools available to NAVSPASUR analysts. These tools were developed in-house over the past thirty years and can be employed in a highly flexible manner. The basic design philosophy for these tools was to implement simple concepts as efficiently as possible and to allow the analyst maximum use of his personal expertise. Finally, several historical breakup scenarios are discussed briefly. These scenarios provide examples of the types of questions that are fairly easy to answer in the present operational environment, as well as examples of questions that are very difficult to answer.

  11. Resonant breakup of {sup 19}C on a proton target

    SciTech Connect

    Crespo, R.; Rodriguez-Gallardo, M.; Moro, A. M.; Deltuva, A.; Cravo, E.; Fonseca, A. C.

    2011-05-15

    The resonant breakup of {sup 19}C on a proton target at 70 MeV/nucleon is analyzed using Faddeev-Alt, Grassberger, Sandhas (Faddeev-AGS) and continuum-discretized coupled-channels (CDCC) reaction frameworks, where in both cases a three-body model ({sup 18}C+n+p) for the reaction is considered. Taking a {sup 18}C + p potential from a global nucleon-nucleus parametrization and a L-independent Gaussian proton-neutron potential, both methods provide very similar results for the calculated observables. However, when this simplified proton-neutron potential is replaced by the more realistic CD-Bonn potential, the breakup cross section, calculated with the Faddeev AGS formalism, decreases by almost one order of magnitude, largely underestimating the experimental data. From this calculation, we conclude that, within a core + valence neutron model, the single-particle mechanism gives a negligible contribution to the calculated resonant breakup and therefore core-excitation mechanisms should be taken into account.

  12. Breakup length of harmonically stimulated capillary jets - theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Garcia, Francisco Javier; Gonzalez Garcia, Heliodoro; Castrejon-Pita, Jose Rafael; Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso Arturo

    2014-11-01

    A stream of liquid breaks up into several drops by the action of surface tension. Capillary breakup forms the basis of some modern digital technologies, especially inkjet printing (including 3D manufacturing). Therefore, the control and prediction of the breakup length of harmonically modulated capillary jets is of great importance, in particular in Continuous InkJet systems (CIJ). However, a theoretical model that rigorously takes into account the physical characteristics of the system, and that properly describes this phenomenon did not exist until now. In this work we present a simple transfer function, derived from first principles, that accurately predicts the experimentally obtained breakup lengths of pressure-modulated capillary jets. No fitting parameters are necessary. A detailed description of the theoretical model and experimental setup will be presented. Spanish government (FIS2011-25161), Junta de Andalucia (P09-FQM-4584 and P11-FQM-7919), EPSRC-UK (EP/H018913/1), Royal Society and John Fell Fund (OUP).

  13. MP-Align: alignment of metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Comparing the metabolic pathways of different species is useful for understanding metabolic functions and can help in studying diseases and engineering drugs. Several comparison techniques for metabolic pathways have been introduced in the literature as a first attempt in this direction. The approaches are based on some simplified representation of metabolic pathways and on a related definition of a similarity score (or distance measure) between two pathways. More recent comparative research focuses on alignment techniques that can identify similar parts between pathways. Results We propose a methodology for the pairwise comparison and alignment of metabolic pathways that aims at providing the largest conserved substructure of the pathways under consideration. The proposed methodology has been implemented in a tool called MP-Align, which has been used to perform several validation tests. The results showed that our similarity score makes it possible to discriminate between different domains and to reconstruct a meaningful phylogeny from metabolic data. The results further demonstrate that our alignment algorithm correctly identifies subpathways sharing a common biological function. Conclusion The results of the validation tests performed with MP-Align are encouraging. A comparison with another proposal in the literature showed that our alignment algorithm is particularly well-suited to finding the largest conserved subpathway of the pathways under examination. PMID:24886436

  14. Girder Alignment Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zackary; Ruland, Robert; LeCocq, Catherine; Lundahl, Eric; Levashov, Yurii; Reese, Ed; Rago, Carl; Poling, Ben; Schafer, Donald; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Wienands, Uli; /SLAC

    2010-11-18

    The girders for the LCLS undulator system contain components which must be aligned with high accuracy relative to each other. The alignment is one of the last steps before the girders go into the tunnel, so the alignment must be done efficiently, on a tight schedule. This note documents the alignment plan which includes efficiency and high accuracy. The motivation for girder alignment involves the following considerations. Using beam based alignment, the girder position will be adjusted until the beam goes through the center of the quadrupole and beam finder wire. For the machine to work properly, the undulator axis must be on this line and the center of the undulator beam pipe must be on this line. The physics reasons for the undulator axis and undulator beam pipe axis to be centered on the beam are different, but the alignment tolerance for both are similar. In addition, the beam position monitor must be centered on the beam to preserve its calibration. Thus, the undulator, undulator beam pipe, quadrupole, beam finder wire, and beam position monitor axes must all be aligned to a common line. All relative alignments are equally important, not just, for example, between quadrupole and undulator. We begin by making the common axis the nominal beam axis in the girder coordinate system. All components will be initially aligned to this axis. A more accurate alignment will then position the components relative to each other, without incorporating the girder itself.

  15. A Numerical Analysis of Droplet Breakup in Asymmetric T-Junctions with Different Outlet Pressure Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Way Lee; Han, Arum; Sadr, Reza

    2016-11-01

    Droplet splitting is the breakup of a parent droplet into two or more daughter droplets of desired sizes. It is done to improve production efficiency and investigational capacity in microfluidic devices. Passive splitting is the breakup of droplets into precise volume ratios at predetermined locations without external power sources. In this study, a 3-D simulation was conducted using the Volume-of-Fluid method to analysis the breakup process of a droplet in asymmetric T-junctions with different outlet arm lengths. The arrangement allows a droplet to be split into two smaller droplets of different sizes, where the volumetric ratio of the daughter droplets depends on the length ratios of the outlet arms. The study identified different breakup regimes such as primary, transition, bubble and non-breakup under different flow conditions and channel configurations. Furthermore, a close analysis to the primary breakup regimes were done to determine the breakup mechanisms at various flow conditions. The analysis show that the breakup mechanisms in asymmetric T-junctions is different than a regular split. A pseudo-phenomenological model for the breakup criteria was presented at the end. The model was an expanded version to a theoretically derived model for the symmetric droplet breakup. The Qatar National Research Fund (a member of the Qatar Founda- tion), under Grant NPRP 5-671-2-278, supported this work.

  16. Deformation and Breakup of Stretching Liquid Bridges Held Captive Between Unequal Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panditaratne, Jayanta C.; Schreiweis, Amanda L.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1999-11-01

    In industrial processes including gravure coating, liquid atomization, and pin-tools used in genomic analysis, threads of liquid are stretched and broken. A convenient setup for studying the dynamics of stretching liquid threads is the liquid bridge, which is a volume of liquid held captive between two solid disks. Although the dynamics of stretching bridges with equal disks have been extensively studied, studies of stretching bridges with unequal disks are in their infancy. This paper reports the results of a combined computational and experimental study, the aim of which is to remedy the aforementioned deficiency. The computations entail solution of both the full set of governing two-dimensional (2-d) equations and a simpler set of one-dimensional (1-d) equations based on slender-jet theory. The experiments use high-speed imaging with dual imagers that focus on both the global and local features of interface rupture. The limitations of the 1-d model are brought out by comparison of its predictions with the 2-d predictions and measurements.

  17. Simulations of insonated contrast agents: Saturation and transient break-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigklifis, Kostas; Pelekasis, Nikos A.

    2013-03-01

    Under insonation contrast agents are known to perform nonlinear pulsations and deform statically, in the form of buckling, or dynamically via parametric mode excitation, and often exhibit jetting and break-up like bubbles without coating. Boundary element simulations are performed in the context of axisymmetry in order to establish the nonlinear evolution of these patterns. The viscoelastic stresses that develop on the coating form the dominant force balance tangentially to the shell-liquid interface, whereas the dynamic overpressure across the shell balances viscoelastic stresses in the normal direction. Strain softening and strain hardening behavior is studied in the presence of shape instabilities for various initial conditions. Simulations recover the pattern of static buckling, subharmonic/harmonic excitation, and dynamic buckling predicted by linear stability. Preferential mode excitation during compression is obtained supercritically for strain softening phospholipid shells while the shell regains its sphericity at expansion. It is a result of energy transfer between the emerging unstable modes and the radial mode, eventually leading to saturated oscillations of shape modes accompanied by asymmetric radial pulsations in favor of compression. Strain softening shells are more prone to sustain saturated pulsations due to the mechanical behavior of the shell. As the sound amplitude increases and before the onset of dynamic buckling, both types of shells exhibit transient break-up via unbalanced growth of a number of unstable shape modes. The effect of pre-stress in lowering the amplitude threshold for shape mode excitation is captured numerically and compared against the predictions of linear stability analysis. The amplitude interval for which sustained shape oscillations are obtained is extended, in the presence of pre-stress, by switching from a strain softening constitutive law to a strain hardening one once the shell curvature increases beyond a certain

  18. Supercontinental inheritance and its influence on supercontinental breakup: The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province and the breakup of Pangea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, Lisa; Gazel, Esteban; Vidito, Christopher; Puffer, John; Bizimis, Michael; Henika, William; Caddick, Mark J.

    2015-10-01

    The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) is the large igneous province (LIP) that coincides with the breakup of the supercontinent Pangea. Major and trace element data, Sr-Nd-Pb radiogenic isotopes, and high-precision olivine chemistry were collected on primitive CAMP dikes from Virginia (VA). These new samples were used in conjunction with a global CAMP data set to elucidate different mechanisms for supercontinent breakup and LIP formation. On the Eastern North American Margin, CAMP flows are found primarily in rift basins that can be divided into northern or southern groups based on differences in tectonic evolution, rifting history, and supercontinental inheritance. Geochemical signatures of CAMP suggest an upper mantle source modified by subduction processes. We propose that the greater number of accretionary events, or metasomatism by sediment melts as opposed to fluids on the northern versus the southern Laurentian margin during the formation of Pangea led to different subduction-related signatures in the mantle source of the northern versus southern CAMP lavas. CAMP samples have elevated Ni and low Ca in olivine phenocrysts indicating a significant pyroxenite component in the source, interpreted here as a result of subduction metasomatism. Different collisional styles during the Alleghanian orogeny in the North and South may have led to the diachroneity of the rifting of Pangea. Furthermore, due to a low angle of subduction, the Rheic Plate may have underplated the lithosphere then delaminated, triggering both the breakup of Pangea and the formation of CAMP.

  19. Correcting the beam centroid motion in an induction accelerator and reducing the beam breakup instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, J. E.; Ekdahl, C. A.; Moir, D. C.; Sullivan, G. W.; Crawford, M. T.

    2014-09-01

    Axial beam centroid and beam breakup (BBU) measurements were conducted on an 80 ns FWHM, intense relativistic electron bunch with an injected energy of 3.8 MV and current of 2.9 kA. The intense relativistic electron bunch is accelerated and transported through a nested solenoid and ferrite induction core lattice consisting of 64 elements, exiting the accelerator with a nominal energy of 19.8 MeV. The principal objective of these experiments is to quantify the coupling of the beam centroid motion to the BBU instability and validate the theory of this coupling for the first time. Time resolved centroid measurements indicate a reduction in the BBU amplitude, ⟨ξ⟩, of 19% and a reduction in the BBU growth rate (Γ) of 4% by reducing beam centroid misalignments ˜50% throughout the accelerator. An investigation into the contribution of the misaligned elements is made. An alignment algorithm is presented in addition to a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results which include axial beam centroid oscillations, BBU amplitude, and growth with different dipole steering.

  20. Tidal alignment of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, Jonathan; Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš

    2015-08-01

    We develop an analytic model for galaxy intrinsic alignments (IA) based on the theory of tidal alignment. We calculate all relevant nonlinear corrections at one-loop order, including effects from nonlinear density evolution, galaxy biasing, and source density weighting. Contributions from density weighting are found to be particularly important and lead to bias dependence of the IA amplitude, even on large scales. This effect may be responsible for much of the luminosity dependence in IA observations. The increase in IA amplitude for more highly biased galaxies reflects their locations in regions with large tidal fields. We also consider the impact of smoothing the tidal field on halo scales. We compare the performance of this consistent nonlinear model in describing the observed alignment of luminous red galaxies with the linear model as well as the frequently used "nonlinear alignment model," finding a significant improvement on small and intermediate scales. We also show that the cross-correlation between density and IA (the "GI" term) can be effectively separated into source alignment and source clustering, and we accurately model the observed alignment down to the one-halo regime using the tidal field from the fully nonlinear halo-matter cross correlation. Inside the one-halo regime, the average alignment of galaxies with density tracers no longer follows the tidal alignment prediction, likely reflecting nonlinear processes that must be considered when modeling IA on these scales. Finally, we discuss tidal alignment in the context of cosmic shear measurements.

  1. Tidal alignment of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, Jonathan; Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš E-mail: zvlah@stanford.edu

    2015-08-01

    We develop an analytic model for galaxy intrinsic alignments (IA) based on the theory of tidal alignment. We calculate all relevant nonlinear corrections at one-loop order, including effects from nonlinear density evolution, galaxy biasing, and source density weighting. Contributions from density weighting are found to be particularly important and lead to bias dependence of the IA amplitude, even on large scales. This effect may be responsible for much of the luminosity dependence in IA observations. The increase in IA amplitude for more highly biased galaxies reflects their locations in regions with large tidal fields. We also consider the impact of smoothing the tidal field on halo scales. We compare the performance of this consistent nonlinear model in describing the observed alignment of luminous red galaxies with the linear model as well as the frequently used 'nonlinear alignment model,' finding a significant improvement on small and intermediate scales. We also show that the cross-correlation between density and IA (the 'GI' term) can be effectively separated into source alignment and source clustering, and we accurately model the observed alignment down to the one-halo regime using the tidal field from the fully nonlinear halo-matter cross correlation. Inside the one-halo regime, the average alignment of galaxies with density tracers no longer follows the tidal alignment prediction, likely reflecting nonlinear processes that must be considered when modeling IA on these scales. Finally, we discuss tidal alignment in the context of cosmic shear measurements.

  2. Observations of breakup processes of liquid jets using real-time X-ray radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Char, J. M.; Kuo, K. K.; Hsieh, K. C.

    1988-01-01

    To unravel the liquid-jet breakup process in the nondilute region, a newly developed system of real-time X-ray radiography, an advanced digital image processor, and a high-speed video camera were used. Based upon recorded X-ray images, the inner structure of a liquid jet during breakup was observed. The jet divergence angle, jet breakup length, and fraction distributions along the axial and transverse directions of the liquid jets were determined in the near-injector region. Both wall- and free-jet tests were conducted to study the effect of wall friction on the jet breakup process.

  3. An Analysis of Recent Major Breakups in the Low Earth Orbit Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Anz-Meador, P. D.

    2010-01-01

    Of the 4 recent major breakup events, the FY-1C ASAT test and the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 generated the most long-term impact to the environment. About half of the fragments will still remain in orbit at least 20 years after the breakup. The A/M distribution of the Cosmos 2251 fragments is well-described by the NASA Breakup Model. Satellites made of modern materials (such as Iridium 33), equipped with large solar panels, or covered with large MLI layers (such as FY-1C) may generated significant amount of high A/M fragments upon breakup.

  4. The visibility of color breakup and a means to reduce it

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Paul V.; Kim, Joohwan; Banks, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    Color breakup is an artifact seen on displays that present colors sequentially. When the eye tracks a moving object on such a display, different colors land on different places on the retina, and this gives rise to visible color fringes at the object's leading and trailing edges. Interestingly, color breakup is also observed when the eye is stationary and an object moves by. Using a novel psychophysical procedure, we measured breakup both when viewers tracked and did not track a moving object. Breakup was somewhat more visible in the tracking than in the non-tracking condition. The video frames contained three subframes, one each for red, green, and blue. We spatially offset the green and blue stimuli in the second and third subframes, respectively, to find the values that minimized breakup. In the tracking and non-tracking conditions, spatial offsets of Δx/3 in the second subframe (where Δx is the displacement of the object in one frame) and 2Δx/3 in the third eliminated breakup. Thus, this method offers a way to minimize or even eliminate breakup whether the viewer is tracking or not. We suggest ways to implement the method with real video content. We also developed a color-breakup model based on spatiotemporal filtering in color-opponent pathways in early vision. We found close agreement between the model's predictions and the experimental results. The model can be used to predict breakup for a wide variety of conditions. PMID:25527148

  5. Bag-breakup control of surface drag in hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Zilitinkevich, Sergej; Kandaurov, Alexander; Ermakova, Olga; Kozlov, Dmitry; Sergeev, Daniil

    2016-04-01

    Air-sea interaction at extreme winds is of special interest now in connection with the problem of the sea surface drag reduction at the wind speed exceeding 30-35 m/s. This phenomenon predicted by Emanuel (1995) and confirmed by a number of field (e.g., Powell, et al, 2003) and laboratory (Donelan et al, 2004) experiments still waits its physical explanation. Several papers attributed the drag reduction to spume droplets - spray turning off the crests of breaking waves (e.g., Kudryavtsev, Makin, 2011, Bao, et al, 2011). The fluxes associated with the spray are determined by the rate of droplet production at the surface quantified by the sea spray generation function (SSGF), defined as the number of spray particles of radius r produced from the unit area of water surface in unit time. However, the mechanism of spume droplets' formation is unknown and empirical estimates of SSGF varied over six orders of magnitude; therefore, the production rate of large sea spray droplets is not adequately described and there are significant uncertainties in estimations of exchange processes in hurricanes. Herewith, it is unknown what is air-sea interface and how water is fragmented to spray at hurricane wind. Using high-speed video, we observed mechanisms of production of spume droplets at strong winds by high-speed video filming, investigated statistics and compared their efficiency. Experiments showed, that the generation of the spume droplets near the wave crest is caused by the following events: bursting of submerged bubbles, generation and breakup of "projections" and "bag breakup". Statistical analysis of results of these experiments showed that the main mechanism of spray-generation is attributed to "bag-breakup mechanism", namely, inflating and consequent blowing of short-lived, sail-like pieces of the water-surface film. Using high-speed video, we show that at hurricane winds the main mechanism of spray production is attributed to "bag-breakup", namely, inflating and

  6. Plate break-up geometry in SE-Afar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geoffroy, Laurent; Le Gall, Bernard; Daoud, Mohamed

    2014-05-01

    New structural data acquired in Djibouti strongly support the view of a magma-rich to magma-poor pair of conjugate margins developed in SE Afar since at least 9 Ma. Our model is illustrated by a crustal-scale transect that emphasizes the role of a two-stage extensional detachment fault system, with opposing senses of motion through time. The geometry and kinematics of this detachment fault pattern are mainly documented from lavas and fault dip data extracted from remote sensing imagery (Landsat ETM+, and corresponding DEM), further calibrated by field observations. Although expressed by opposite fault geometries, the two successive extensional events evidenced here are part of a two-stage continental extensional tear-system associated with the ongoing propagation of the Aden-Tadjoura oceanic axis to the NW. A flip-flop evolution of detachment faults accommodating lithosphere divergence has recently been proposed for the development of the Indian Ocean and continental margins (Sauter et al., 2013). However, the SE Afar evolution further suggests a radical and sudden change in lithosphere behavior during extension, from a long-term and widespread magmatic stage to a syn-sedimentary break-up stage where mantle melting concentrates along the future oceanic axis. Of special interest is the fact that a late and rapid stage of non-magmatic extension led to break-up, whose geometry triggered the location of the break-up axis and earliest oceanic accretion. New structural data acquired in Djibouti strongly support the view of a magma-rich to magma-poor pair of conjugate margins developed in SE Afar since at least 9 Ma. Our model is illustrated by a crustal-scale transect that emphasizes the role of a two-stage extensional detachment fault system, with opposing senses of motion through time. The geometry and kinematics of this detachment fault pattern are mainly documented from lavas and fault dip data extracted from remote sensing imagery (Landsat ETM+, and corresponding

  7. Numerical simulation of drop breakup and coalescence with soluble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristini, Vittorio; Lowengrub, John; Zhou, Hua; Macosko, Chris

    2003-11-01

    In the processing of emulsions and polymer blends, the drop size distributions are determined by two coexisting processes: drop breakup and coalescence. Here we study the effects of surfactants, e.g. block copolymers, on these phenomena and on the shear and normal stress in dilute blends by direct numerical simulation. We use a newly developed 3D adaptive algorithm. A nonlinear equation of state for the surfactant is used and van der Waals forces, which are responsible for coalescence, are included in the numerical method. Surfactants are transported by convection-diffusion on the drop/matrix interface and between the interface and the bulk phases. Our accurate and robust numerical method features parallel computation and adaptive reconstruction of the finite element meshes describing the bulk phases and the interface. We find that surfactants affect strongly the breakup and coalescence mechanisms by introducing nonuniformities in surface tension. The related Marangoni (tangential) stresses at the interface greatly inhibit coalescence but in a nontrivial fashion. At small coverages of surfactant at the interface, the critical capillary number for coalescence (below which coalescence will occur) decreases. However, at larger coverages, the critical capillary number reaches a minimum and then increases again and tends to the value for clean (surfactant-free) interfaces. This behavior was first observed experimentally by Leal and coworkers. In this talk, we demonstrate that this behavior is a consequence of a nontrivial evolution of the Marangoni stresses. We also demonstrate that under certain conditions surfactants enhance coalescence by a totally different mechanism. This surfactant induced coalescence occurs when drops are separating and the surfactant-enriched highly-stretched drop tips interact. Finally, we present preliminary results of simulations that indicate that surfactants have a strong effect on the size of the fragments resulting from drop breakup

  8. Hard breakup of the deuteron into two {Delta} isobars

    SciTech Connect

    Granados, Carlos G.; Sargsian, Misak M.

    2011-05-15

    We study high-energy photodisintegration of the deuteron into two {Delta} isobars at large center of mass angles within the QCD hard rescattering model (HRM). According to the HRM, the process develops in three main steps: the photon knocks a quark from one of the nucleons in the deuteron; the struck quark rescatters off a quark from the other nucleon sharing the high energy of the photon; then the energetic quarks recombine into two outgoing baryons which have large transverse momenta. Within the HRM, the cross section is expressed through the amplitude of pn{yields}{Delta}{Delta} scattering which we evaluated based on the quark-interchange model of hard hadronic scattering. Calculations show that the angular distribution and the strength of the photodisintegration is mainly determined by the properties of the pn{yields}{Delta}{Delta} scattering. We predict that the cross section of the deuteron breakup to {Delta}{sup ++}{Delta}{sup -} is 4-5 times larger than that of the breakup to the {Delta}{sup +}{Delta}{sup 0} channel. Also, the angular distributions for these two channels are markedly different. These can be compared with the predictions based on the assumption that two hard {Delta} isobars are the result of the disintegration of the preexisting {Delta}{Delta} components of the deuteron wave function. In this case, one expects the angular distributions and cross sections of the breakup in both {Delta}{sup ++}{Delta}{sup -} and {Delta}{sup +}{Delta}{sup 0} channels to be similar.

  9. Kinematic Model of River Ice Motion During Dynamic Breakup

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    Texas: Gulf Publish- nal of Computational Physics, 101: 130-139. ing Co. Shen, H.T. and Y.C. Chen (1992) Lagrangian discrete Calkins , DJ. (1978...OTIC9 ~jjELECTE0 lV 919 3 AD-A273 141 * Kinematic Model of River Ice Motion During Dynamic Breakup Michael G . Ferrick, Patricia B. Weyrick and David...Bottom) Looking across the river during brash ice motion at about 1 m /s. (Photos by M . Ferrick.) For conversion of SI metric units to U.S./British

  10. Breakup effects on alpha spectroscopic factors of 16O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, S.; Basu, C.; Sugathan, P.; Jhinghan, A.; Behera, B. R.; Saneesh, N.; Kaur, G.; Thakur, M.; Mahajan, R.; Dubey, R.; Mitra, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    The triton angular distribution for the 12C(7Li,t)16O* reaction is measured at 20 MeV, populating discrete states of 16O. Continuum discretized coupled reaction channel calculations are used to to extract the alpha spectroscopic properties of 16O states instead of the distorted wave born approximation theory to include the effects of breakup on the transfer process. The alpha reduced width, spectroscopic factors and the asymptotic normalization constant (ANC) of 16O states are extracted. The error in the spectroscopic factor is about 35% and in that of the ANC about 27%.

  11. Radial electron-beam-breakup transit-time oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Kwan, Thomas J. T.; Mostrom, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    A radial electron-beam-breakup transit-time oscillator (RBTO) provides a compact high power microwave generator. The RBTO includes a coaxial vacuum transmission line having an outer conductor and an inner conductor. The inner conductor defines an annular cavity with dimensions effective to support an electromagnetic field in a TEM.sub.00m mode. A radial field emission cathode is formed on the outer conductor for providing an electron beam directed toward the annular cavity electrode. Microwave energy is then extracted from the annular cavity electrode.

  12. Core excitation effects in the breakup of halo nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, A. M.; Diego, R. de; Lay, J. A.; Crespo, R.; Johnson, R. C.; Arias, J. M.; Gomez-Camacho, J.

    2012-10-20

    The role of core excitation in the structure and dynamics of two-body halo nuclei is investigated. We present calculations for the resonant breakup of {sup 11}Be on protons at an incident energy of 63.7 MeV/nucleon, where core excitation effects were shown to be important. To describe the reaction, we use a recently developed extension of the DWBA formalism which incorporates these core excitation effects within the no-recoil approximation. The validity of the no-recoil approximation is also examined by comparing with DWBA calculations which take into account core recoil. In addition, calculations with two different continuum representations are presented and compared.

  13. Ballistic Imaging of Liquid Breakup Processes in Dense Sprays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-24

    spray breakup in its entirety. Gas-phase flowfield dynamics can be captured via particle image velocimetry (PIV) and/or laser Doppler velocimetry... Coherent Legend Ti:Sapphire regenerative amplifier, seeded with a Spectra-Physics Tsunami Ti:Sapphire mode-locked laser generating 40 fs, 2.5 mJ pulses...scattering turbid media. Laser Phys. Lett., 3(9):464–7, 2006. [44] B. Kaldvee, A. Ehn, J. Bood, and M. Aldén. Development of a picosecond- LIDAR system

  14. Heterogeneous Data Fusion via Space Alignment Using Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, Jaegul; Bohn, Shawn J.; Nakamura, Grant C.; White, Amanda M.; Park, Haesun

    2012-04-26

    Heterogeneous data sets are typically represented in different feature spaces, making it difficult to analyze relationships spanning different data sets even when they are semantically related. Data fusion via space alignment can remedy this task by integrating multiple data sets lying in different spaces into one common space. Given a set of reference correspondence data that share the same semantic meaning across different spaces, space alignment attempts to place the corresponding reference data as close together as possible, and accordingly, the entire data are aligned in a common space. Space alignment involves optimizing two potentially conflicting criteria: minimum deformation of the original relationships and maximum alignment between the different spaces. To solve this problem, we provide a novel graph embedding framework for space alignment, which converts each data set into a graph and assigns zero distance between reference correspondence pairs resulting in a single graph. We propose a graph embedding method for fusion based on nonmetric multidimensional scaling (MDS). Its criteria using the rank order rather than the distance allows nonmetric MDS to effectively handle both deformation and alignment. Experiments using parallel data sets demonstrate that our approach works well in comparison to existing methods such as constrained Laplacian eigenmaps, Procrustes analysis, and tensor decomposition. We also present standard cross-domain information retrieval tests as well as interesting visualization examples using space alignment.

  15. Breakup of Bubbles or Drops by Capillary Waves Induced by Coalescence or Other Excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng Hua; Taborek, Peter; Burton, Justin; Cheong Khoo, Boo; Thoroddsen, Siggi

    2012-02-01

    Capillary breakup of a bubble or drop by various excitations is ubiquitous in both nature and technology. Examples include coalescence with another bubble or drop, wetting on a solid surface, impact on a solid surface, detachment from a nozzle, or vibrations driven by acoustic, electrical, or magnetic fields. When the excitation ceases, capillary forces on the surface naturally drive the deformed bubble or drop to recover its spherical shape. However, when the viscosity is small, this recovery can lead to nonlinear oscillations of the interface and a singularity in the flow. Here we use high-speed imaging to investigate the coalescence of bubbles and drops of various sizes. In many cases, coalescence leads to pinch-off events and the formation of the satellite and sub-satellite. Our experiments use pressured xenon gas in glycerol/water mixtures so that the density ratio and viscosity ratio can be varied over many orders of magnitude. We characterize the generation, propagation, and convergence of capillary waves, the formation time and sizes of satellites, and the dynamics of two-fluid pinch-off as a function of the density ratio and viscosity ratio. The work shall benefit the wide-spread applications and fulfill the scientific and public curiosities.

  16. Marangoni stresses and drop breakup due to wall shear in a partially filled rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Andrew; Odesanya, Azeez; Ward, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Drop deformation and breakup in a rotating cylinder partially filled with oil is studied. Experiments using a rotating cylinder are relatively new but we will demonstrate that they are analogous to studies involving tubes and other geometries. Surfactants are added to the drop phase in concentrations at and below the CMC while the rotation rate of the cylinder is varied. Of interest is the effect of interfacial surfactant transport on changes in oil film thickness, drop shape and the onset of tail streaming. Two Biot numbers comparing the importance of surfactant adsorption and desorption to convection of surfactant on the interface are estimated. As shown in previous work on drops and bubbles in tubes, the balance between surface convection, diffusion and adsorption can affect the placement of Marangoni stresses, resulting in thicker or thinner films than with clean surfaces. When surface convection is large, surfactant builds up at the tail and Marangoni stresses can lead to tail streaming when surface tensions are sufficiently small. Experimental results are compared to numerical simulations and to previous work on drops and bubbles in tubes. National Science Foundation (#1262718).

  17. Solar Wind-Magnetosphere Coupling Influences on Pseudo-Breakup Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Brittnacher, M.; Parks, G. K.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.

    1998-01-01

    Pseudo-breakups are brief, localized aurora[ arc brightening, which do not lead to a global expansion, are historically observed during the growth phase of substorms. Previous studies have demonstrated that phenomenologically there is very little difference between substorm onsets and pseudo-breakups except for the degree of localization and the absence of a global expansion phase. A key open question is what physical mechanism prevents a pseudo-breakup form expanding globally. Using Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) images, we identify periods of pseudo-breakup activity. Foe the data analyzed we find that most pseudo-breakups occur near local midnight, between magnetic local times of 21 and 03, at magnetic latitudes near 70 degrees, through this value may change by several degrees. While often discussed in the context of substorm growth phase events, pseudo-breakups are also shown to occur during prolonged relatively inactive periods. These quiet time pseudo-breakups can occur over a period of several hours without the development of a significant substorm for at least an hour after pseudo-breakup activity stops. In an attempt to understand the cause of quiet time pseudo-breakups, we compute the epsilon parameter as a measure of the efficiency of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. It is noted that quiet time pseudo-breakups occur typically when epsilon is low; less than about 50 GW. We suggest that quiet time pseudo-breakups are driven by relatively small amounts of energy transferred to the magnetosphere by the solar wind insufficient to initiate a substorm expansion onset.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Thin Film Breakup on Nonwettable Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzzi, N.; Croce, G.

    2017-01-01

    When a continuous film flows on a nonwettable substrate surface, it may break up, with the consequent formation of a dry-patch. The actual shape of the resulting water layer is of great interest in several engineering applications, from in-flight icing simulation to finned dehumidifier behavior modeling. Here, a 2D numerical solver for the prediction of film flow behavior is presented. The effect of the contact line is introduced via the disjoining pressure terms, and both gravity and shear are included in the formulation. The code is validated with literature experimental data for the case of a stationary dry-patch on an inclined plane. Detailed numerical results are compared with literature simplified model prediction. Numerical simulation are then performed in order to predict the threshold value of the film thickness allowing for film breakup and to analyze the dependence of the dynamic contact angle on film velocity and position along the contact line. Those informations will be useful in order to efficiently predict more complex configuration involving multiple breakups on arbitrarily curved substrate surfaces (as those involved in in-flight icing phenomena on aircraft).

  19. Plethora of transitions during breakup of liquid filaments

    PubMed Central

    Castrejón-Pita, José Rafael; Castrejón-Pita, Alfonso Arturo; Thete, Sumeet Suresh; Sambath, Krishnaraj; Hutchings, Ian M.; Hinch, John; Lister, John R.; Basaran, Osman A.

    2015-01-01

    Thinning and breakup of liquid filaments are central to dripping of leaky faucets, inkjet drop formation, and raindrop fragmentation. As the filament radius decreases, curvature and capillary pressure, both inversely proportional to radius, increase and fluid is expelled with increasing velocity from the neck. As the neck radius vanishes, the governing equations become singular and the filament breaks. In slightly viscous liquids, thinning initially occurs in an inertial regime where inertial and capillary forces balance. By contrast, in highly viscous liquids, initial thinning occurs in a viscous regime where viscous and capillary forces balance. As the filament thins, viscous forces in the former case and inertial forces in the latter become important, and theory shows that the filament approaches breakup in the final inertial–viscous regime where all three forces balance. However, previous simulations and experiments reveal that transition from an initial to the final regime either occurs at a value of filament radius well below that predicted by theory or is not observed. Here, we perform new simulations and experiments, and show that a thinning filament unexpectedly passes through a number of intermediate transient regimes, thereby delaying onset of the inertial–viscous regime. The new findings have practical implications regarding formation of undesirable satellite droplets and also raise the question as to whether similar dynamical transitions arise in other free-surface flows such as coalescence that also exhibit singularities. PMID:25825761

  20. Scaling During Drop Formation and Filament (Thread) Breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagoner, Brayden; Thete, Sumeet; Basaran, Osman

    2016-11-01

    Many free surface flows such as drop formation, filament (thread) breakup, and drop coalescence are important in applications as diverse as ink jet printing, atomization, and emulsion science and technology. A common feature of these flows is that they all exhibit finite time singularities. When a liquid filament undergoes capillary thinning and tends toward pinch-off, it is instructive to monitor how certain quantities, such as the thread's radius, vary with time remaining until the pinch-off singularity. Experimental determination of this so-called scaling behavior of thread radius and other quantities is important for testing scaling theories and the accuracy of numerical simulations of free surface flows. Conversely, the experimental measurements can be used to develop new theories when none are available. In this talk, we will present some novel ways of experimentally measuring scaling behaviors. The results will be highlighted in terms of experiments involving the formation and breakup of drops and filaments of (a) simple or pure Newtonian fluids and also (b) particle-laden liquids or suspensions containing non-Brownian particles.

  1. Distribution of living Cupressaceae reflects the breakup of Pangea

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Kangshan; Milne, Richard I.; Zhang, Libing; Peng, Yanling; Liu, Jianquan; Thomas, Philip; Mill, Robert R.; S. Renner, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Most extant genus-level radiations in gymnosperms are of Oligocene age or younger, reflecting widespread extinction during climate cooling at the Oligocene/Miocene boundary [∼23 million years ago (Ma)]. Recent biogeographic studies have revealed many instances of long-distance dispersal in gymnosperms as well as in angiosperms. Acting together, extinction and long-distance dispersal are likely to erase historical biogeographic signals. Notwithstanding this problem, we show that phylogenetic relationships in the gymnosperm family Cupressaceae (162 species, 32 genera) exhibit patterns expected from the Jurassic/Cretaceous breakup of Pangea. A phylogeny was generated for 122 representatives covering all genera, using up to 10,000 nucleotides of plastid, mitochondrial, and nuclear sequence per species. Relying on 16 fossil calibration points and three molecular dating methods, we show that Cupressaceae originated during the Triassic, when Pangea was intact. Vicariance between the two subfamilies, the Laurasian Cupressoideae and the Gondwanan Callitroideae, occurred around 153 Ma (124–183 Ma), when Gondwana and Laurasia were separating. Three further intercontinental disjunctions involving the Northern and Southern Hemisphere are coincidental with or immediately followed the breakup of Pangea. PMID:22550176

  2. Correlations between polarization observables in inclusive deuteron breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, B.; Perdrisat, C.F.; Strokovsky, E.A.

    1995-10-01

    The tensor analyzing power T{sub 20} and the spin transfer coefficient {kappa}{sub 0} for the deuteron breakup reaction {sup 1}H(d, p)X at 0{degrees} and at high energy are functions of the D/S ratio of the deuteron wave function (DWF) and are related by the equation of a circle in the {kappa}{sub 0}-T{sub 20} plane if (1) the deuteron wave function has the commonly accepted S- and D-component structures and (2) the mechanism of the breakup reaction does not change the spin of the detected proton. This correlation of the two polarization observables is independent of any model of the deuteron wave function with 2-component structure. The experimental data deviate from the {kappa}{sub 0}-T{sub 20} circle, indicating that at least one of the above assumptions is not fulfilled. Two assumptions are discussed to explain this deviation: (1) the DWF has additional components, for example the N{sup *}N P-wave and (2) complicated spin-dependent interfering graphs change the spin of the detected proton. We suggest an experimental way to verify the first of these assumptions by searching for the {eta} decay of the negative parity N{sup *}(1535) baryon of the N{sup *}N component in the deuteron ground state. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Non-rigid alignment in electron tomography in materials science.

    PubMed

    Printemps, Tony; Bernier, Nicolas; Bleuet, Pierre; Mula, Guido; Hervé, Lionel

    2016-09-01

    Electron tomography is a key technique that enables the visualization of an object in three dimensions with a resolution of about a nanometre. High-quality 3D reconstruction is possible thanks to the latest compressed sensing algorithms and/or better alignment and preprocessing of the 2D projections. Rigid alignment of 2D projections is routine in electron tomography. However, it cannot correct misalignments induced by (i) deformations of the sample due to radiation damage or (ii) drifting of the sample during the acquisition of an image in scanning transmission electron microscope mode. In both cases, those misalignments can give rise to artefacts in the reconstruction. We propose a simple-to-implement non-rigid alignment technique to correct those artefacts. This technique is particularly suited for needle-shaped samples in materials science. It is initiated by a rigid alignment of the projections and it is then followed by several rigid alignments of different parts of the projections. Piecewise linear deformations are applied to each projection to force them to simultaneously satisfy the rigid alignments of the different parts. The efficiency of this technique is demonstrated on three samples, an intermetallic sample with deformation misalignments due to a high electron dose typical to spectroscopic electron tomography, a porous silicon sample with an extremely thin end particularly sensitive to electron beam and another porous silicon sample that was drifting during image acquisitions.

  4. Preferred orientation in experimentally deformed stishovite: implications for deformation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, P. M.; Zepeda-Alarcon, E.; Prakapenka, V.; Kanitpanyacharoen, W.; Smith, J.; Sinogeikin, S. V.; Wenk, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    The crystal structure of the high pressure SiO2 polymorph stishovite has been studied in detail, yet little is known about its deformation mechanisms. Information about how stishovite deforms under stress is important for understanding subduction of quartz-bearing crustal rocks into the mantle. Particularly, stishovite is elastically anisotropic and thus development of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) during deformation may contribute to seismic anomalies in the mantle. We converted a natural sample of flint to stishovite in a laser heated diamond anvil cell and compressed the stishovite aggregate up to 38 GPa. Diffraction patterns were collected in situ in radial geometry at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and the Advanced Photon Source (APS) to examine development of CPO during deformation. We find that (001) poles preferentially align with the compression direction and infer deformation mechanisms leading to the observed CPO with visco-plastic self consistent (VPSC) polycrystal plasticity models. Our results show pyramidal and basal slip are most likely active at high pressure and ambient temperature, in agreement with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of rutile (TiO2) and paratellurite (TeO2), which are isostructural to stishovite. Conversely other TEM studies of stishovite done at higher temperature suggest dominant prismatic slip. This indicates that a variety of slip systems may be active in stishovite, depending on conditions. As a result, stishovite's contribution to the seismic signature in the mantle may vary as a function of pressure and temperature and thus depth.

  5. New tectonic data constrain the mechanisms of breakup along the Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bot, Anna; Geoffroy, Laurent; Authemayou, Christine; Graindorge, David

    2014-05-01

    The Gulf of California is resulting from an oblique-rift system due to the separation of the Pacific and the North American plates in the ~N110E to ~N125E trend. The age, nature and orientation of strain which ended with continental break-up and incipient oceanization at ~3.6 Ma, is largely misunderstood. It is generally proposed that early stages of extension began at around 12 Ma with strain partitioning into two components: a pure ENE directed extension in the Gulf Extensional Province (which includes Sonora and the eastern Baja California Peninsula in Mexico) and a dextral strike-slip displacement west of the Baja California Peninsula along the San Benito and Tosco-Abreojos faults. This evolution would have lasted ~5-6 Ma when a new transtensional strain regime took place. This regime, with extension trending ~N110E +/-10° , led to the final break-up and the subsequent individualization of a transform-fault system and subordoned short oceanic ridges. This two-steps interpretation has recently been challenged by authors suggesting a continuous transtensional extension from 12Ma in the trend of the PAC-NAM plates Kinematic. We question both of those models in term of timing and mode of accommodation basing ourselves on field investigations in Baja California Sur (Mexico). The volcano-sedimentary formations of the Comondù group dated 25 to 20 Ma exhibit clear examples of syn-sedimentary and syn-magmatic extensive deformations. This extension, oriented N65° E+/-15° , is proposed to initiate during the Magdalena Plate subduction. It would be related to the GOC initialization. In addition to this finding, we present tectonic and dating evidences of complex detachment-faulting tectonics varying in trend and kinematics with time and space for the development to the south of Baja California Sur. The extension associated with the early detachment-fault system trended ~N110E. From ~17 Ma to, probably, ~7-8 Ma, this extension controlled the early development of the San

  6. Features of Capillary Breakup of a Liquid Jet at Ohnesorge Numbers Larger Than Unity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronov, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical study has been made of the forced capillary breakup of a jet of viscous liquid at a value of the Ohnesorge number larger than unity. The regions of breakup of the jet without the formation of satellites have been determined. The dependences of the dimensions of main and satellite droplets on the wave number have been obtained for different Ohnesorge numbers.

  7. Practical Method to Identify Orbital Anomaly as Breakup Event in the Geostationary Region

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-14

    fragmentation debris from a specific breakup event by using orbital debris modeling techniques. This paper explains the proposed strategy and reports...debris generated from a specific breakup event can be predicted by orbital debris modeling techniques. The orbital debris modeling techniques describe...were not associated with the target. 2. STRATEGY OVERVIEW 2.1. Orbital debris modeling techniques The orbital debris modeling

  8. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, N.E.

    1988-03-10

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam. 5 figs.

  9. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Nelson E.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam.

  10. Hybrid vehicle motor alignment

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Michael Benjamin

    2001-07-03

    A rotor of an electric motor for a motor vehicle is aligned to an axis of rotation for a crankshaft of an internal combustion engine having an internal combustion engine and an electric motor. A locator is provided on the crankshaft, a piloting tool is located radially by the first locator to the crankshaft. A stator of the electric motor is aligned to a second locator provided on the piloting tool. The stator is secured to the engine block. The rotor is aligned to the crankshaft and secured thereto.

  11. Near Term Effects from Satellite Break-Ups on Manned Space Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theall, J. R.; Matney, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    Since 1961, almost 160 satellite break-ups have occurred on-orbit, and have been the major contributor to the growth of the orbital debris population. When a satellite breaks up, the debris exists in a relatively concentrated form, orbiting in a loose cloud with the parent body until orbital perturbations disperse the cloud into the average background. Manned space activities, which usually take place in low Earth orbit at altitudes less than 500 km, have been continuous for the past I I years while Mir was inhabited and promise to be again continuous when the International Space Station becomes permanently manned. This paper surveys historical breakups over the last I I years to determine the number that affect altitudes lower than 500 km. Selected breakup are analyzed using NASA's Satellite Breakup Risk Assessment Model (SBRAM) to determine the specific short term risk from those breakups to manned missions.

  12. Breakup and early seafloor spreading between India and Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Carmen; Müller, R. Dietmar; Brown, Belinda; Ishihara, Takemi; Ivanov, Sergey

    2007-07-01

    We present a tectonic interpretation of the breakup and early seafloor spreading between India and Antarctica based on improved coverage of potential field and seismic data off the east Antarctic margin between the Gunnerus Ridge and the Bruce Rise. We have identified a series of ENE trending Mesozoic magnetic anomalies from chron M9o (~130.2 Ma) to M2o (~124.1 Ma) in the Enderby Basin, and M9o to M4o (~126.7 Ma) in the Princess Elizabeth Trough and Davis Sea Basin, indicating that India-Antarctica and India-Australia breakups were roughly contemporaneous. We present evidence for an abandoned spreading centre south of the Elan Bank microcontinent; the estimated timing of its extinction corresponds to the early surface expression of the Kerguelen Plume at the Southern Kerguelen Plateau around 120 Ma. We observe an increase in spreading rate from west to east, between chron M9 and M4 (38-54 mm yr-1), along the Antarctic margin and suggest the tectono-magmatic segmentation of oceanic crust has been influenced by inherited crustal structure, the kinematics of Gondwanaland breakup and the proximity to the Kerguelen hotspot. A high-amplitude, E-W oriented magnetic lineation named the Mac Robertson Coast Anomaly (MCA), coinciding with a landwards step-down in basement observed in seismic reflection data, is tentatively interpreted as the boundary between continental/transitional zone and oceanic crust. The exposure of lower crustal rocks along the coast suggests that this margin formed in a metamorphic core complex extension mode with a high strength ratio between upper and lower crust, which typically occurs above anomalously hot mantle. Together with the existence of the MCA zone this observation suggests that a mantle temperature anomaly predated the early surface outpouring/steady state magmatic production of the Kerguelen LIP. An alternative model suggests that the northward ridge jump was limited to the Elan Bank region, whereas seafloor spreading continued in the

  13. Alignment of CEBAF cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, W.J.; Bisognano, J.J.; Fischer, J.

    1993-06-01

    CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, when completed, will house a 4 GeV recirculating accelerator. Each of the accelerator`s two linacs contains 160 superconducting radio frequency (SRF) 1497 MHz niobium cavities in 20 cryomodules. Alignments of the cavities within the cryomodule with respect to beam axis is critical to achieving the optimum accelerator performance. This paper discusses the rationale for the current specification on cavity mechanical alignment: 2 mrad (rms) applied to the 0.5 m active length cavities. We describe the tooling that was developed to achieve the tolerance at the time of cavity pair assembly, to preserve and integrate alignment during cryomodule assembly, and to translate alignment to appropriate installation in the beam line.

  14. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Daily, PNNL

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprint that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.

  15. Inadvertent Earth Reentry Breakup Analysis for the New Horizons Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Lisa M.; Salama, Ahmed; Ivanov, Mark; McRonald, Angus

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons (NH) spacecraft was launched in January 2006 aboard an Atlas V launch vehicle, in a mission to explore Pluto, its moons, and other bodies in the Kuiper Belt. The NH spacecraft is powered by a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) which encases multiple General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. Thus, a pre-launch vehicle breakup analysis for an inadvertent atmospheric reentry in the event of a launch failure was required to assess aerospace nuclear safety and for launch contingency planning. This paper addresses potential accidental Earth reentries analyzed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) which may arise during the ascent to parking orbit, resulting in a suborbital reentry, as well as a departure from parking orbit, resulting in an orbital reentry.

  16. Inversion Breakup in Small Rocky Mountain and Alpine Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, Charles D.; Pospichal, Bernhard; Eisenbach, Stefan; Weihs, P.; Clements, Craig B.; Steinacker, Reinhold; Mursch-Radlgruber, Erich; Dorninger, Manfred

    2004-08-01

    Comparisons are made between the post-sunrise breakup of temperature inversions in two similar closed basins in quite different climate settings, one in the eastern Alps and one in the Rocky Mountains. The small, high-altitude, limestone sinkholes have both experienced extreme temperature minima below -50°C. On undisturbed clear nights, temperature inversions reach to 120 m heights in both sinkholes, but are much stronger in the drier Rocky Mountain basin (24K versus 13K). Inversion destruction takes place 2.6 to 3 hours after sunrise and is accomplished primarily by subsidence warming associated with the removal of air from the base of the inversion by the upslope flows that develop over the sidewalls. Differences in inversion strengths and post-sunrise heating rates are caused by differences in the surface energy budget, with drier soil and a higher sensible heat flux in the Rocky Mountain sinkhole.

  17. Regenerative multi-pass beam breakup in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Eduard Pozdeyev

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, a formula, describing a threshold of the regenerative multi-pass Beam Breakup (BBU) for a single dipole higher order mode with arbitrary polarization in a two-pass accelerator with a general-form, 4x4 recirculation matrix, is derived. Also a new two-dimensional BBU code is introduced. To illustrate specifics of the BBU in two dimensions, the formula is used to calculate the threshold in several cases including two-dimensional uncoupled optics, reflecting optics, and rotating optics. The analytical results are compared to results of simulation obtained with the new code. At the end of the paper, a mathematical relation between transfer matrices between cavities of the accelerating structure and recirculation matrices for each cavity, which must be satisfied in order to successfully suppress the BBU by reflection or rotation in several cavities, is presented.

  18. Beam breakup in an advanced linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl August; Coleman, Joshua Eugene; McCuistian, Brian Trent

    2016-07-01

    Two linear induction accelerators (LIAs) have been in operation for a number of years at the Los Alamos Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility. A new multipulse LIA is being developed. We have computationally investigated the beam breakup (BBU) instability in this advanced LIA. In particular, we have explored the consequences of the choice of beam injector energy and the grouping of LIA cells. We find that within the limited range of options presently under consideration for the LIA architecture, there is little adverse effect on the BBU growth. The computational tool that we used for this investigation was the beam dynamics code linear accelerator model for DARHT (LAMDA). In conclusion, to confirm that LAMDA was appropriate for this task, we first validated it through comparisons with the experimental BBU data acquired on the DARHT accelerators.

  19. Dynamical eikonal approximation in breakup reactions of {sup 11}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, G.; Baye, D.

    2006-02-15

    The dynamical eikonal approximation is a quantal method unifying the semiclassical time-dependent and eikonal methods by taking into account interference effects. The principle of the calculation is described and expressions for different types of cross sections are established for two variants of the method, differing by a phase choice. The 'coherent' variant respects rotational symmetry around the beam axis and is therefore prefered. A good agreement is obtained with experimental differential and integrated cross sections for the elastic breakup of the {sup 11}Be halo nucleus on {sup 12}C and {sup 208}Pb near 70 MeV/nucleon, without any parameter adjustment. The dynamical approximation is compared with the traditional eikonal method. Differences are analyzed and the respective merits of both methods are discussed.

  20. Helium breakup states in 10Be and 12Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, M.; Angélique, J. C.; Axelsson, L.; Benoit, B.; Bergmann, U.; Catford, W. N.; Chappell, S. P.; Clarke, N. M.; Curtis, N.; D'arrigo, A.; de Góes Brennard, E.; Dorvaux, O.; Fulton, B. R.; Giardina, G.; Gregori, C.; Grévy, S.; Hanappe, F.; Kelly, G.; Labiche, M.; Le Brun, C.; Leenhardt, S.; Lewitowicz, M.; Markenroth, K.; Marqués, F. M.; Murgatroyd, J. T.; Nilsson, T.; Ninane, A.; Orr, N. A.; Piqueras, I.; Saint Laurent, M. G.; Singer, S. M.; Sorlin, O.; Stuttgé, L.; Watson, D. L.

    2001-03-01

    The breakup of 10,12Be into He clusters has been studied using the p,12C(12Be,6He,6He) and 12C(12Be,4He,6He) inelastic scattering and two neutron transfer reactions with a 378 MeV 12Be beam incident on 12C and (CH2)n targets. Evidence has been found for three new states in 10Be at excitation energies of 13.2, 14.8, and 16.1 MeV, which may be associated with a 4He+6He cluster structure. The evidence for He cluster states in 12Be in the excitation energy range 12 to 25 MeV is also discussed.

  1. Droplet breakup in accelerating gas flows. Part 2: Secondary atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zajac, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation to determine the effects of an accelerating gas flow on the atomization characteristics of liquid sprays was conducted. The sprays were produced by impinging two liquid jets. The liquid was molten wax and the gas was nitrogen. The use of molten wax allowed for a quantitative measure of the resulting dropsize distribution. The results of this study, indicate that a significant amount of droplet breakup will occur as a result of the action of the gas on the liquid droplets. Empirical correlations are presented in terms of parameters that were found to affect the mass median dropsize most significantly, the orifice diameter, the liquid injection velocity, and the maximum gas velocity. An empirical correlation for the normalized dropsize distribution is also presented. These correlations are in a form that may be incorporated readily into existing combustion model computer codes for the purpose of calculating rocket engine combustion performance.

  2. Beam breakup in an advanced linear induction accelerator

    DOE PAGES

    Ekdahl, Carl August; Coleman, Joshua Eugene; McCuistian, Brian Trent

    2016-07-01

    Two linear induction accelerators (LIAs) have been in operation for a number of years at the Los Alamos Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility. A new multipulse LIA is being developed. We have computationally investigated the beam breakup (BBU) instability in this advanced LIA. In particular, we have explored the consequences of the choice of beam injector energy and the grouping of LIA cells. We find that within the limited range of options presently under consideration for the LIA architecture, there is little adverse effect on the BBU growth. The computational tool that we used for this investigation wasmore » the beam dynamics code linear accelerator model for DARHT (LAMDA). In conclusion, to confirm that LAMDA was appropriate for this task, we first validated it through comparisons with the experimental BBU data acquired on the DARHT accelerators.« less

  3. Luminosity variations in several parallel auroral arcs before auroral breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safargaleev, V.; Lyatsky, W.; Tagirov, V.

    1997-08-01

    Variation of the luminosity in two parallel auroral arcs before auroral breakup has been studied by using digitised TV-data with high temporal and spatial resolution. The intervals when a new arc appears near already existing one were chosen for analysis. It is shown, for all cases, that the appearance of a new arc is accompanied by fading or disappearance of another arc. We have named these events out-of-phase events, OP. Another type of luminosity variation is characterised by almost simultaneous enhancement of intensity in the both arcs (in-phase event, IP). The characteristic time of IP events is 10-20 s, whereas OP events last about one minute. Sometimes out-of-phase events begin as IP events. The possible mechanisms for OP and IP events are discussed.

  4. The role of surfactants in drop formation and thread breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamat, Pritish; Wagoner, Brayden; Thete, Sumeet; Basaran, Osman

    2016-11-01

    The ability of surfactants to adsorb onto and lower the surface tension of water-air and water-oil interfaces is exploited in industrial applications, nature, and everyday life. An important example is provided by drop formation where a thinning liquid thread connects an about-to-form globular, primary drop to the rest of the liquid that remains on the nozzle when the primary drop falls from it. Surfactants can affect pinch-off in two ways: first, by lowering surface tension they lower capillary pressure (which equals, to highest order, surface tension divided by thread radius), and second, as surfactant concentration along the interface can be non-uniform, they cause the interface to be subjected to a gradient of surface tension, or Marangoni stress. By means of high-accuracy simulations and supporting experiments, we clarify the role played by surfactants on drop formation and thread breakup.

  5. Gondwanan break-up: legacies of a lost world?

    PubMed

    Upchurch, Paul

    2008-04-01

    Fierce debate surrounds the history of organisms in the southern hemisphere; did Gondwanan break-up produce ocean barriers that imposed distribution patterns on phylogenies (vicariance)? Or have organisms modified their distributions through trans-oceanic dispersal? Recent advances in biogeographical theory suggest that the current focus on vicariance versus dispersal is too narrow because it ignores 'geodispersal' (i.e. expansion of species into areas when geographical barriers disappear), extinction and sampling errors. Geodispersal produces multiple, conflicting vicariance patterns, and extinction and sampling errors destroy vicariance patterns. This perspective suggests that it is more difficult to detect vicariance than trans-oceanic dispersal and that specialized methods must be applied if an unbiased understanding of southern hemisphere biogeography is to be achieved.

  6. Changes in spinal alignment.

    PubMed

    Veintemillas Aráiz, M T; Beltrán Salazar, V P; Rivera Valladares, L; Marín Aznar, A; Melloni Ribas, P; Valls Pascual, R

    2016-04-01

    Spinal misalignments are a common reason for consultation at primary care centers and specialized departments. Misalignment has diverse causes and is influenced by multiple factors: in adolescence, the most frequent misalignment is scoliosis, which is idiopathic in 80% of cases and normally asymptomatic. In adults, the most common cause is degenerative. It is important to know the natural history and to detect factors that might predict progression. The correct diagnosis of spinal deformities requires specific imaging studies. The degree of deformity determines the type of treatment. The aim is to prevent progression of the deformity and to recover the flexibility and balance of the body.

  7. Correlating early evolution of parasitic platyhelminths to Gondwana breakup.

    PubMed

    Badets, Mathieu; Whittington, Ian; Lalubin, Fabrice; Allienne, Jean-Francois; Maspimby, Jean-Luc; Bentz, Sophie; Du Preez, Louis H; Barton, Diane; Hasegawa, Hideo; Tandon, Veena; Imkongwapang, Rangpenyuba; Imkongwapang, Rangpenyubai; Ohler, Annemarie; Combes, Claude; Verneau, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    Investigating patterns and processes of parasite diversification over ancient geological periods should involve comparisons of host and parasite phylogenies in a biogeographic context. It has been shown previously that the geographical distribution of host-specific parasites of sarcopterygians was guided, from Palaeozoic to Cainozoic times, mostly by evolution and diversification of their freshwater hosts. Here, we propose phylogenies of neobatrachian frogs and their specific parasites (Platyhelminthes, Monogenea) to investigate coevolutionary processes and historical biogeography of polystomes and further discuss all the possible assumptions that may account for the early evolution of these parasites. Phylogenetic analyses of concatenated rRNA nuclear genes (18S and partial 28S) supplemented by cophylogenetic and biogeographic vicariance analyses reveal four main parasite lineages that can be ascribed to centers of diversity, namely Australia, India, Africa, and South America. In addition, the relationships among these biogeographical monophyletic groups, substantiated by molecular dating, reflect sequential origins during the breakup of Gondwana. The Australian polystome lineage may have been isolated during the first stages of the breakup, whereas the Indian lineage would have arisen after the complete separation of western and eastern Gondwanan components. Next, polystomes would have codiverged with hyloid sensu stricto and ranoid frog lineages before the completion of South American and African plate separation. Ultimately, they would have undergone an extensive diversification in South America when their ancestral host families diversified. Therefore, the presence of polystome parasites in specific anuran host clades and in discrete geographic areas reveals the importance of biogeographic vicariance in diversification processes and supports the occurrence and radiation of amphibians over ancient and recent geological periods.

  8. Flow bursts, breakup arc, and substorm current wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Energy liberated by the reconnection process in the near-Earth tail is transported via flow bursts toward the dipolar magnetosphere during substorms. The breakup arc is a manifestation of the arrival of the bursts under flow braking and energy deposition. Its structure and behavior is analyzed on the basis of five striking spatial, temporal, and energetic properties, qualitatively and in part also quantitatively. A key element is the formation of stop layers. They are thin layers, of the width of an ion gyro radius, in which the magnetic field makes a transition from tail to near-dipolar magnetosphere configurations and in which the kinetic energy of fast flows is converted into electromagnetic energy of kinetic Alfvén waves. The flows arise from the relaxation of the strong magnetic shear stresses in the leading part of the flow bursts. The bright narrow arcs of less than 10 km width inside the broad poleward expanding breakup arc, Alfvénic in nature and visually characterized by erratic short-lived rays, are seen as traces of the stop layers. The gaps between two narrow and highly structured arcs are filled with more diffuse emissions. They are attributed to the relaxation of the less strained magnetic field of the flow bursts. Eastward flows along the arcs are linked to the shrinking gaps between two successive arcs and the entry of auroral streamers into the dipolar magnetosphere in the midnight sector. Flow braking in the stop layers forms multiple pairs of narrow balanced currents and cannot be behind the formation of the substorm current wedge. Instead, its origin is attributed to the force exerted by the dipolarized magnetic field of the flow bursts on the high-beta plasma, after the high magnetic shears have relaxed and the fast flows and stop layer process have subsided, in other words, to the "dying flow bursts."

  9. Curriculum Alignment Research Suggests that Alignment Can Improve Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squires, David

    2012-01-01

    Curriculum alignment research has developed showing the relationship among three alignment categories: the taught curriculum, the tested curriculum and the written curriculum. Each pair (for example, the taught and the written curriculum) shows a positive impact for aligning those results. Following this, alignment results from the Third…

  10. How to identify oceanic crust-Evidence for a complex break-up in the Mozambique Channel, off East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimke, Jennifer; Franke, Dieter; Gaedicke, Christoph; Schreckenberger, Bernd; Schnabel, Michael; Stollhofen, Harald; Rose, Jens; Chaheire, Mohamed

    2016-12-01

    The identification of oceanic crust at rifted margins plays a crucial role in academic research understanding rifting mechanisms and the architecture of continent-ocean boundaries, and is also important for hydrocarbon exploration extending into deeper water. In this paper, we provide a workflow for the determination of the crustal nature in the Mozambique Channel, east of Davie Ridge, by presenting a compilation of several geophysical attributes of oceanic crust at divergent margins. Previous reconstructions locate the Davie Ridge at the trace of a transform fault, along which Madagascar drifted to the south during the breakup of Gondwana. This implies a sharp transition from continental to oceanic crust seaward of Davie Ridge. Using new multichannel seismic profiles offshore northern Mozambique, we are able to identify distinct portions of stretched basement east of Davie Ridge. Two phases of deformation affecting the basement are observed, with the initial phase resulting in the formation of rotated fault blocks bounded by listric faults. Half-grabens are filled with wedge-shaped, syn-extensional sediments overlain by a prominent unconformity that northward merges with the top of highly reflective, mildly deformed basement, interpreted as oceanic crust. The second phase of deformation is associated with wrench faulting and probably correlates with the southward drift of Madagascar, which implies that the preceding phase affected basement generated or modified prior to the opening of the West Somali Basin. We conclude that the basement is unlikely to consist of normal oceanic crust and suggest that the first extensional phase corresponds to rifting between Madagascar and Africa. We find evidence for a wide area affected by strike-slip deformation, in contrast to the earlier proposed major single transform fault in the vicinity of Davie Ridge and suggest that the Mozambique Channel area to the north of Madagascar may be classified as an oblique rather than sheared

  11. Preferred orientation in experimentally deformed stishovite: implications for deformation mechanisms

    DOE PAGES

    Kaercher, Pamela M.; Zepeda-Alarcon, Eloisa; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; ...

    2014-11-07

    Although the crystal structure of the high pressure SiO2 polymorph stishovite has been studied in detail, little is known about the development of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) during deformation in stishovite. Insight into CPO and associated deformation mechanics of stishovite would provide important information for understanding subduction of quartz-bearing crustal rocks into the mantle. To study CPO development, we converted a natural sample of flint to stishovite in a laser heated diamond anvil cell and compressed the stishovite aggregate up to 38 GPa. We collected diffraction patterns in radial geometry to examine in situ development of crystallographic preferred orientation andmore » find that (001) poles preferentially align with the compression direction. Viscoplastic self-consistent modeling suggests the most likely slip systems at high pressure and ambient temperature are pyramidal and basal slip.« less

  12. Preferred orientation in experimentally deformed stishovite: implications for deformation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, Pamela M.; Zepeda-Alarcon, Eloisa; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2015-04-01

    Although the crystal structure of the high-pressure SiO2 polymorph stishovite has been studied in detail, little is known about the development of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) during deformation in stishovite. Insight into CPO and associated deformation mechanics of stishovite would provide important information for understanding subduction of quartz-bearing crustal rocks into the mantle. To study CPO development, we converted a natural sample of flint to stishovite in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell and compressed the stishovite aggregate up to 38 GPa. We collected diffraction patterns in radial geometry to examine in situ development of crystallographic preferred orientation and find that (001) poles preferentially align with the compression direction. Viscoplastic self-consistent modeling suggests the most likely slip systems at high pressure and ambient temperature are pyramidal and basal slip.

  13. Preferred orientation in experimentally deformed stishovite: implications for deformation mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kaercher, Pamela M.; Zepeda-Alarcon, Eloisa; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2014-11-07

    Although the crystal structure of the high pressure SiO2 polymorph stishovite has been studied in detail, little is known about the development of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) during deformation in stishovite. Insight into CPO and associated deformation mechanics of stishovite would provide important information for understanding subduction of quartz-bearing crustal rocks into the mantle. To study CPO development, we converted a natural sample of flint to stishovite in a laser heated diamond anvil cell and compressed the stishovite aggregate up to 38 GPa. We collected diffraction patterns in radial geometry to examine in situ development of crystallographic preferred orientation and find that (001) poles preferentially align with the compression direction. Viscoplastic self-consistent modeling suggests the most likely slip systems at high pressure and ambient temperature are pyramidal and basal slip.

  14. Evidence of recent warming and El Nino-related variations in ice breakup of Wisconsin lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, W.L.; Robertson, D.M.; Magnuson, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Ice breakup dates from 1968 to 1988 were examined for 20 Wisconsin lakes to determine whether consistent interannual and long-term changes exist. Each ice record had a trend toward earlier breakup dates, as demonstrated by a negative slope with time, indicating a recent warming trend. The average change in breakup dates was 0.82 d earlier per year for the lakes in southern Wisconsin, which was more extreme than that for the northern Wisconsin lakes (0.45 d yr-1). Interannual variation in breakup dates was related to the warm phase of El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) episodes. El Nino events occurred five times during this period (1965, 1972, 1976, 1982, and 1986). Average breakup dates were significantly earlier than average (5-14 d) during the mature phase of El Nino. This variability was affected by the location of the lake: El Nino-related variation was more evident for the southern lakes than the northern lakes. This difference was caused by the average date of breakup for the southern lakes being in late March directly following the period when air temperatures were strongly related to El Nino events, whereas the average dates of breakup of the northern lakes was in mid- to late April following a period when air temperatures were not significantly related to El Nino events. Overall, the interannual and long-term patterns across Wisconsin were relatively consistent, indicating that recent warming and El Nino- related variation are regional climatic responses.

  15. The Effect of Surfactants on the Breakup of an Axisymmetric Laminar Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Justin; Calabrese, Richard

    2011-11-01

    The breakup of a laminar axisymmetric jet is a well-studied fluid dynamics phenomenon, first studied by Savart (1833) and Rayleigh (1879). Many papers have been published over the years describing the theory of jet breakup, such as the paper by Tomotika (1935). More recently, many studies have been performed using various computational simulations to better understand the mechanics of jet breakup, notable among these are Homma et al. (2006). Despite the extensive literature on the topic, the impact of surface active agents on jet breakup has received limited attention, whether due to the system's inherent complexity or a poor understanding of the mechanics of the action of surface active agents themselves. In this study, the drop size distribution and jet breakup length resulting from the breakup of liquid jet systems were studied experimentally. Jets were formed by forcing a fluid through a narrow capillary using pneumatic pressure. Experiments involving oil-water jets with aqueous surfactants were performed. Several distinct regimes were identified based on hydrodynamic and physicochemical conditions. Jet length was found to increase with surfactant concentration, while droplet diameter was found to decrease (dependent on jet regime). A Semiempirical model to predict the breakup length of Jets in the presence of surfactants is also proposed.

  16. A consistent definition of the Arctic polar vortex breakup in both the lower and upper stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, W.; Seo, J.

    2014-12-01

    Breakup of the polar vortex is a dominant feature of the seasonal transition from winter to summer in the stratosphere, which significantly affects stratospheric O3 concentration and tropospheric weather. Previously several criteria for the vortex breakup have been suggested based on the potential vorticity (PV) and wind speed, however, those mainly have focused on the lower stratospheric vortex of which spatiotemporal evolution and decay are more continuous than those of the upper stratospheric vortex. To find a consistent criterion for the vortex breakup in both the lower and upper stratosphere, the present study defined a polar vortex breakup day as when PV gradient at the polar vortex edge becomes lower than that at the subtropical edge on the area equivalent latitude based on PV. With applying the new definition to the UK Met Office reanalysis data, the breakup days of the Arctic polar vortices on 18 isentropic levels from 450 K to 1300 K were calculated for the period of 1993-2005. In comparison with CH4, N2O and O3 measured by the ILAS and POAM II/III satellite instruments, the breakup days are well consistent with changes in the distribution of such tracers as well as their zonal standard deviations associated with the vortex structure breaking and irreversible mixing. The vortex breakup in the upper stratosphere occurs more or less a month prior to that in the middle and lower stratosphere while the stratospheric final warming events occurs simultaneously in the upper and lower stratosphere.

  17. Dislocation mediated alignment during metal nanoparticle coalescence

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, A. P.; Samanta, A.; Majidi, H.; Mahajan, S.; Ging, J.; Olson, T. Y.; van Benthem, K.; Elhadj, S.

    2016-09-13

    Dislocation mediated alignment processes during gold nanoparticle coalescence were studied at low and high temperatures using molecular dynamics simulations and transmission electron microscopy. Particles underwent rigid body rotations immediately following attachment in both low temperature (500 K) simulated coalescence events and low temperature (~315 K) transmission electron microscopy beam heating experiments. In many low temperature simulations, some degree of misorientation between particles remained after rigid body rotations, which was accommodated by grain boundary dislocation nodes. These dislocations were either sessile and remained at the interface for the duration of the simulation or dissociated and cross-slipped through the adjacent particles, leading to improved co-alignment. Minimal rigid body rotations were observed during or immediately following attachment in high temperature (1100 K) simulations, which is attributed to enhanced diffusion at the particles' interface. However, rotation was eventually induced by {111} slip on planes parallel to the neck groove. These deformation modes led to the formation of single and multi-fold twins whose structures depended on the initial orientation of the particles. The driving force for {111} slip is attributed to high surface stresses near the intersection of low energy {111} facets in the neck region. The details of this twinning process were examined in detail using simulated trajectories, and the results reveal possible mechanisms for the nucleation and propagation of Shockley partials on consecutive planes. Deformation twinning was also observed in-situ using transmission electron microscopy, which resulted in the co-alignment of a set of the particles' {111} planes across their grain boundary and an increase in their dihedral angle. As a result, this constitutes the first detailed experimental observation of deformation twinning during nanoparticle coalescence, validating simulation results

  18. Dislocation mediated alignment during metal nanoparticle coalescence

    DOE PAGES

    Lange, A. P.; Samanta, A.; Majidi, H.; ...

    2016-09-13

    Dislocation mediated alignment processes during gold nanoparticle coalescence were studied at low and high temperatures using molecular dynamics simulations and transmission electron microscopy. Particles underwent rigid body rotations immediately following attachment in both low temperature (500 K) simulated coalescence events and low temperature (~315 K) transmission electron microscopy beam heating experiments. In many low temperature simulations, some degree of misorientation between particles remained after rigid body rotations, which was accommodated by grain boundary dislocation nodes. These dislocations were either sessile and remained at the interface for the duration of the simulation or dissociated and cross-slipped through the adjacent particles, leadingmore » to improved co-alignment. Minimal rigid body rotations were observed during or immediately following attachment in high temperature (1100 K) simulations, which is attributed to enhanced diffusion at the particles' interface. However, rotation was eventually induced by {111} slip on planes parallel to the neck groove. These deformation modes led to the formation of single and multi-fold twins whose structures depended on the initial orientation of the particles. The driving force for {111} slip is attributed to high surface stresses near the intersection of low energy {111} facets in the neck region. The details of this twinning process were examined in detail using simulated trajectories, and the results reveal possible mechanisms for the nucleation and propagation of Shockley partials on consecutive planes. Deformation twinning was also observed in-situ using transmission electron microscopy, which resulted in the co-alignment of a set of the particles' {111} planes across their grain boundary and an increase in their dihedral angle. As a result, this constitutes the first detailed experimental observation of deformation twinning during nanoparticle coalescence, validating simulation results

  19. Spatial and temporal patterns in Arctic river ice breakup revealed by automated ice detection from MODIS imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, Sarah; Pavelsky, Tamlin

    2016-04-01

    The annual spring breakup of river ice has important consequences for northern ecosystems and significant economic implications for Arctic industry and transportation. River ice breakup research is restricted by the sparse distribution of hydrological stations in the Arctic, where limited available data suggests a trend towards earlier ice breakup. The specific climatic mechanisms driving this trend, however, are complex and can vary both regionally and within river systems. Consequently, understanding the response of river ice processes to a warming Arctic requires simultaneous examination of spatial and temporal patterns in breakup timing. Here we present an automated algorithm for river ice breakup detection using MODIS satellite imagery that enables identification of spatial and temporal breakup patterns at large scales. We examine breakup timing on the Mackenzie, Lena, Ob' and Yenisey rivers for the period 2000-2014. First, we split each river into 10 km segments. Next, for each day of the breakup season, we classify each river pixel as snow/ice, mixed ice/water or open water based on MODIS reflectance values and remove all cloud-covered segments using the MODIS cloud product. We then define the breakup date as the first day where the segment is 75% open water. Using this method, we are able to determine breakup dates with a mean uncertainty of +/-1.3 days. We find our remotely sensed breakup dates to be highly correlated to ground breakup dates and the timing of peak discharge. All statistically significant temporal trends in breakup timing are negative, indicating an overall shift towards earlier breakup. Considerable variability in the statistical significance and magnitude of trends along each river suggests that different climatic and physiographic drivers are impacting spatial patterns in breakup. Trends detected on the lower Mackenzie corroborate recent studies indicating weakening ice resistance and earlier breakup timing near the Mackenzie Delta. In

  20. Bunionette deformity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Bruce E; Nicholson, Christopher W

    2007-05-01

    The bunionette, or tailor's bunion, is a lateral prominence of the fifth metatarsal head. Most commonly, bunionettes are the result of a widened 4-5 intermetatarsal angle with associated varus of the metatarsophalangeal joint. When symptomatic, these deformities often respond to nonsurgical treatment methods, such as wider shoes and padding techniques. When these methods are unsuccessful, surgical treatment is based on preoperative radiographs and associated lesions, such as hyperkeratoses. In rare situations, a simple lateral eminence resection is appropriate; however, the risk of recurrence or overresection is high with this technique. Patients with a lateral bow to the fifth metatarsal are treated with a distal chevron-type osteotomy. A widened 4-5 intermetatarsal angle often requires a diaphyseal osteotomy for correction.

  1. Isomer ratio measurements as a probe of the dynamics of breakup and incomplete fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Gasques, L. R.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.; Peatey, T.; Diaz-Torres, A.; Newton, J. O.

    2006-12-15

    The incomplete fusion mechanism following breakup of {sup 6,7}Li and {sup 9}Be projectiles incident on targets of {sup 209}Bi and {sup 208}Pb is investigated through isomer ratio measurements for the {sup 212}At and {sup 211}Po products. The phenomenological analysis presented in this paper indicates that incomplete fusion brings relatively more angular momentum into the system than equivalent reactions with a direct beam of the fused fragment. This is attributed to the trajectories of breakup fragments. Calculations with a 3D classical trajectory model support this. Isomer ratio measurements for incomplete fusion reactions can provide a test of new theoretical models of breakup and fusion.

  2. Measurements of the breakup and neutron removal cross sections for {sup 16}C

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, N. I.; Freer, M.; Clarke, N.M.; Curtis, N.; Soic, N.; Ziman, V.A.; Angelique, J.C.; Lecouey, J.L.; Marques, F.M.; Normand, G.; Orr, N.A.; Timis, C.; Bouchat, V.; Hanappe, F.; Kerckx, Y.; Materna, T.; Catford, W.N.; Dorvaux, O.; Stuttge, L.

    2004-12-01

    Measurements of the breakup and the neutron removal reactions of {sup 16}C have been made at 46 MeV/A and the decay cross sections measured. A correlation between the cluster breakup channels and the reaction Q value suggests that the reaction mechanism is strongly linked to quasielastic processes. No enhancement of the two-body cluster breakup cross section is seen for {sup 16}C. This result would indicate that {sup 16}C does not have a well developed cluster structure in the ground state, in agreement with recent calculations.

  3. Neutron Halo Structure at the Limit of Stability Probed by Breakup Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    Atomic nuclei along the neutron drip line are investigated experimentally by breakup reactions of the rare isotope beams. Such exotic nuclei often show the neutron halo structure, which is the main focus of this paper. Characteristic features of the Coulomb and nuclear breakup at intermediate to high incident energies are described. Then, recent experimental results on halo nuclei, mainly on 31Ne, obtained at the new-generation RI-beam facility, RIBF (RI Beam factory) at RIKEN, are presented. Perspectives for the breakup experiments using the new facility SAMURAI at RIBF ara also discussed.

  4. Coulomb-nuclear interference in 56 MeV deuteron breakup at extreme forward angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, C.; Kanungo, Rituparna; Mukherjee, Sanjukta; Basu, D. N.

    1995-02-01

    Recently measured 12C(d,pn) 12C breakup data show a dip in the energy integrated cross section below a momentum transfer ∼ 117 MeV/ c. We analyse these data by the prior form distorted-wave Born approximation theory. Although the double humped structure of the θp = θn = 0° data exhibit the dominance of Coulomb-breakup, the pronounced asymmetry of the energy sharing data cannot be explained through Coulomb breakup only. A closer agreement to the data is obtained through Coulomb-nuclear interference and an unusual optical potential of longer range in the exit channel.

  5. Magnetically Aligned Supramolecular Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Matthew; Cardoso, Andre Zamith; Frith, William J; Iggo, Jonathan A; Adams, Dave J

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic-field-induced alignment of the fibrillar structures present in an aqueous solution of a dipeptide gelator, and the subsequent retention of this alignment upon transformation to a hydrogel upon the addition of CaCl2 or upon a reduction in solution pH is reported. Utilising the switchable nature of the magnetic field coupled with the slow diffusion of CaCl2, it is possible to precisely control the extent of anisotropy across a hydrogel, something that is generally very difficult to do using alternative methods. The approach is readily extended to other compounds that form viscous solutions at high pH. It is expected that this work will greatly expand the utility of such low-molecular-weight gelators (LMWG) in areas where alignment is key. PMID:25345918

  6. Improved docking alignment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, Leo G. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Improved techniques are provided for the alignment of two objects. The present invention is particularly suited for 3-D translation and 3-D rotational alignment of objects in outer space. A camera is affixed to one object, such as a remote manipulator arm of the spacecraft, while the planar reflective surface is affixed to the other object, such as a grapple fixture. A monitor displays in real-time images from the camera such that the monitor displays both the reflected image of the camera and visible marking on the planar reflective surface when the objects are in proper alignment. The monitor may thus be viewed by the operator and the arm manipulated so that the reflective surface is perpendicular to the optical axis of the camera, the roll of the reflective surface is at a selected angle with respect to the camera, and the camera is spaced a pre-selected distance from the reflective surface.

  7. Imaging continental breakup using teleseismic body waves: The Woodlark Rift, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilon, Zachary; Abers, Geoffrey A.; Gaherty, James B.; Jin, Ge

    2015-09-01

    This study images the upper mantle beneath the D'Entrecasteax Islands, Papua New Guinea, providing insight into mantle deformation beneath a highly rifted continent adjacent to propagating spreading centers. Differential travel times from P and S-wave teleseisms recorded during the 2010-2011 CDPapua passive seismic experiment are used to invert for separate VP and VS velocity models of the continental rift. A low-velocity structure marks the E-W axis of the rift, correlating with the thinnest crust, high heat flow, and a linear trend of volcanoes. This slow region extends 250 km along strike from the oceanic spreading centers, demonstrating significant mantle extension ahead of seafloor breakup. The rift remains narrow to depth indicating localization of extension, perhaps as a result of mantle hydration. A high-VP structure at depths of 90-120 km beneath the north of the array is more than 6.5% faster than the rift axis and contains well-located intermediate depth earthquakes. These independent observations place firm constraints on the lateral thermal contrast at depth between the rift axis and cold lithosphere to the north that may be related to recent subduction, although the polarity of subduction cannot be resolved. This geometry is gravitationally unstable; downwelling or small-scale convection could have facilitated rifting and rapid lithospheric removal, although this may require a wet mantle to be realistic on the required time scales. The high-V structure agrees with the maximum P,T conditions recorded by young ultra-high pressure rocks exposed on the rift axis and may be implicated in their genesis.

  8. MUSE optical alignment procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Loupias, Magali; Kosmalski, Johan; Anwand, Heiko; Bacon, Roland; Boudon, Didier; Caillier, Patrick; Daguisé, Eric; Dubois, Jean-Pierre; Dupuy, Christophe; Kelz, Andreas; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Nicklas, Harald; Parès, Laurent; Remillieux, Alban; Seifert, Walter; Valentin, Hervé; Xu, Wenli

    2012-09-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation VLT integral field spectrograph (1x1arcmin² Field of View) developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO), operating in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently assembling and testing MUSE in the Integration Hall of the Observatoire de Lyon for the Preliminary Acceptance in Europe, scheduled for 2013. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic instrument mechanical structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2011, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested independently in each institute. After validations, the systems were shipped to the P.I. institute at Lyon and were assembled in the Integration Hall This paper describes the end-to-end optical alignment procedure of the MUSE instrument. The design strategy, mixing an optical alignment by manufacturing (plug and play approach) and few adjustments on key components, is presented. We depict the alignment method for identifying the optical axis using several references located in pupil and image planes. All tools required to perform the global alignment between each subsystem are described. The success of this alignment approach is demonstrated by the good results for the MUSE image quality. MUSE commissioning at the VLT (Very Large Telescope) is planned for 2013.

  9. Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation after EVAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, Stefanie; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Navab, Nassir

    2009-02-01

    Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation is an important requirement for the evaluation of endovascular stenting procedures and the further refinement of stent graft design. During endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment, the aortic shape is subject to severe deformation that is imposed by medical instruments such as guide wires, catheters, and, the stent graft. This deformation can affect the flow characteristics and morphology of the aorta which have been shown to be elicitors for stent graft failures and be reason for reappearance of aneurysms. We present a method for quantifying the deformation of an aneurysmatic aorta imposed by an inserted stent graft device. The outline of the procedure includes initial rigid alignment of the two abdominal scans, segmentation of abdominal vessel trees, and automatic reduction of their centerline structures to one specified region of interest around the aorta. This is accomplished by preprocessing and remodeling of the pre- and postoperative aortic shapes before performing a non-rigid registration. We further narrow the resulting displacement fields to only include local non-rigid deformation and therefore, eliminate all remaining global rigid transformations. Finally, deformations for specified locations can be calculated from the resulting displacement fields. In order to evaluate our method, experiments for the extraction of aortic deformation fields are conducted on 15 patient datasets from endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment. A visual assessment of the registration results and evaluation of the usage of deformation quantification were performed by two vascular surgeons and one interventional radiologist who are all experts in EVAR procedures.

  10. PILOT optical alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longval, Y.; Mot, B.; Ade, P.; André, Y.; Aumont, J.; Baustista, L.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Bray, N.; de Bernardis, P.; Boulade, O.; Bousquet, F.; Bouzit, M.; Buttice, V.; Caillat, A.; Charra, M.; Chaigneau, M.; Crane, B.; Crussaire, J.-P.; Douchin, F.; Doumayrou, E.; Dubois, J.-P.; Engel, C.; Etcheto, P.; Gélot, P.; Griffin, M.; Foenard, G.; Grabarnik, S.; Hargrave, P..; Hughes, A.; Laureijs, R.; Lepennec, Y.; Leriche, B.; Maestre, S.; Maffei, B.; Martignac, J.; Marty, C.; Marty, W.; Masi, S.; Mirc, F.; Misawa, R.; Montel, J.; Montier, L.; Narbonne, J.; Nicot, J.-M.; Pajot, F.; Parot, G.; Pérot, E.; Pimentao, J.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rodriguez, L.; Roudil, G.; Salatino, M.; Savini, G.; Simonella, O.; Saccoccio, M.; Tapie, P.; Tauber, J.; Torre, J.-P.; Tucker, C.

    2016-07-01

    PILOT is a balloon-borne astronomy experiment designed to study the polarization of dust emission in the diffuse interstellar medium in our Galaxy at wavelengths 240 μm with an angular resolution about two arcminutes. Pilot optics is composed an off-axis Gregorian type telescope and a refractive re-imager system. All optical elements, except the primary mirror, are in a cryostat cooled to 3K. We combined the optical, 3D dimensional measurement methods and thermo-elastic modeling to perform the optical alignment. The talk describes the system analysis, the alignment procedure, and finally the performances obtained during the first flight in September 2015.

  11. Pulsation tectonics as the control of continental breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, Robert E.

    1987-11-01

    New data from the recent IPOD drilling of DSDP Site 534 in the Blake-Bahama Basin give a definitive age for the spreading-center shift involved in the breakup of the North American Atlantic margin. A basal Callovian age (~155 m.y.) is determined for the Blake Spur anomaly marking this spreading-center shift that signals the birth of the modern North Atlantic Ocean. This is some 20 m.y. younger than previously thought. One implication of this result is that this spreading-center shift starting North Atlantic breakup is now of an age which could be assigned to the spreading-center shift needed to end the rifting in the Gulf of Mexico. It is suggested that this might be one and the same event. Another implication of this younger age for the Blake Spur event is that relatively high spreading rates are now required for the Jurassic outer magnetic quiet zone along the North American margin. This association of a relatively high spreading rate with a magnetic quiet zone is similar to that for the mid-Cretaceous and implies a link between the processes controlling plate spreading, which are in the upper mantle, and the processes controlling the magnetic field, which are in the outer core. The cycles of fast and slow spreading and quiet and reversing magnetic field have a period of 60-100 m.y. A theory of pulsation tectonics involving the cyclic eruption of plumes of hot mantle material from the lowermost D″ layer of the mantle could explain the correlation. Plumes carry heat away from the core/mantle boundary and later reach the asthenosphere and lithosphere to induce faster spreading. The pulse of fast spreading in the Jurassic apparently caused the breakup of the North Atlantic. Other pulses of fast spreading appear to correlate with major ocean openings on various parts of the globe, implying that this might be a prevalent process. I suggest rifting of passive margins may be controlled by the more fundamental global processes described by the theory of pulsation

  12. Early breakup of Gondwana: constraints from global plate motion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seton, Maria; Zahirovic, Sabin; Williams, Simon; Whittaker, Joanne; Gibbons, Ana; Muller, Dietmar; Brune, Sascha; Heine, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Supercontinent break-up and amalgamation is a fundamental Earth cycle, contributing to long-term sea-level fluctuations, species diversity and extinction events, long-term greenhouse-icehouse cycles and changes in the long-wavelength density structure of the mantle. The most recent and best-constrained example involves the fragmentation of Gondwana, starting with rifting between Africa/Madagascar and Antarctica in the Early Jurassic and ending with the separation of the Lord Howe microcontinental blocks east of Australia in the Late Cretaceous. Although the first order configuration of Gondwana within modern reconstructions appears similar to that first proposed by Wegener a century ago, recent studies utilising a wealth of new geophysical and geological data provide a much more detailed picture of relative plate motions both during rifting and subsequent seafloor spreading. We present our latest global plate motion model that includes extensive, new regional analyses. These include: South Atlantic rifting, which started at 150 Ma and propagated into cratonic Africa by 145 Ma (Heine et al., 2013); rifting and early seafloor spreading between Australia, India and Antarctica, which reconciles the fit between Broken Ridge-Kergulean Plateau and the eastern Tasman region (Whittaker et al., 2013); rifting of continental material from northeastern Gondwana and its accretion onto Eurasia and SE Asia including a new model of microcontinent formation and early seafloor spreading in the eastern Indian Ocean (Gibbons et al., 2012; 2013; in review; Williams et al., 2013; Zahirovic et al., 2014); and a new model for the isolation of Zealandia east of Australia, with rifting initiating at 100 Ma until the start of seafloor spreading in the Tasman Sea at ~85 Ma (Williams et al., in prep). Using these reconstructions within the open-source GPlates software, accompanied by a set of evolving plates and plate boundaries, we can explore the factors that govern the behavior of plate

  13. Curious Fluid Flows: From Complex Fluid Breakup to Helium Wetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Fawn Mitsu

    This work encompasses three projects; pinch-off dynamics in non-Newtonian fluids; helium wetting on alkali metals; and the investigation of quartz tuning forks as cryogenic pressure transducers. Chapter 1 discusses the breakup of a non-Newtonian yield stress fluid bridge. We measured the minimum neck radius, hmin, as a function of time and fit it to a power law with exponent n 1. We then compare n1 to exponent n2, obtained from a rotational rheometer using a Herschel-Bulkley model. We confirm n1=n2 for the widest variety of non-Newtonian fluids to date. When these fluids are diluted with a Newtonian fluid n1 does not equal n2. No current models predict that behavior, identifying a new class of fluid breakup. Chapter 2 presents the first chemical potential-temperature phase diagram of helium on lithium, sodium and gold, using a novel pressure measurement system. The growth and superfluid transition of a helium film on these substrates is measured via an oscillator for isotherms (fixed temperature, varying amount of helium gas), and quenches (fixed amount of helium gas, varying temperature). The chemical potential-temperature plot is similar for gold, lithium and sodium despite the large difference in the substrate binding energies. No signs of a 2-D liquid-vapor transition were seen. Chapter 3 discusses the creation of a 32.768 kHz quartz tuning fork in situ pressure transducer. Tuning forks are used to measure pressure at room temperature, but no work addresses their potential as cryogenic pressure transducers. We mapped out the behavior of a tuning fork as a function of pressure at 298, 7.0, 2.5, 1.6, 1.0 and 0.7 K by measuring the quality factor. The fork is sensitive to pressures above 0.1 mTorr, limiting its use as a pressure gauge at 0.6 K and below. The experimental curves were compared to a theoretical Q(P, T) function that was refined using the 298 K data. At cryogenic temperatures the formula breaks down in the viscous region and becomes inaccurate. The

  14. Breakup of an electrified viscous thread with charged surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, D. T.; Matar, O. K.; Craster, R. V.; Papageorgiou, D. T.

    2011-02-01

    The dynamics and breakup of electrified viscous jets in the presence of ionic surfactants at the interface are investigated theoretically. Axisymmetric configurations are considered and the jet is surrounded by a concentrically placed cylindrical electrode, which is held at a constant voltage potential. The annular region between the jet and the electrode is taken to be a hydrodynamically passive dielectric medium and an electric field is set up there and drives the flow, along with other physical mechanisms including capillary instability and viscous effects. The jet fluid is taken to be a symmetric electrolyte and proper modeling of the cationic and anionic species is used by considering the Nernst-Planck equations in order to find the volume charge density that influences the electric field in the jet. A positively charged insoluble surfactant is present at the interface, and its evolution, as well as the resulting value of the local surface tension coefficient, is coupled with the voltage potential at the interface. The resulting coupled nonlinear systems are derived and analytical progress is made by carrying out a nonlinear slender jet approximation. The reduced model is described by a number of hydrodynamic, electrical, and electrokinetic parameters, and an extensive computational study is undertaken to elucidate the dynamics along with allied linear properties. It is established that the jet ruptures in finite time provided the outer electrode is sufficiently far away, and numerous examples are given where the dimensionless parameters can be used to control the size of the satellite drops that form beyond the topological transition, as well as the time to break up. It is also shown that pinching solutions follow the self-similar dynamics of clean viscous jets at times close to the breakup time. Finally, a further asymptotic theory is developed for large Debye layers to produce an additional model that incorporates the effects of surface charge diffusion

  15. The influence of inherited structures on dyke emplacement during Gondwana break-up in southwestern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Thomas; Frimmel, Hartwig

    2013-04-01

    A kinematic analysis of Cretaceous and pre-Cretaceous faulting and fracturing was carried out along the west coast of Southern Africa extending from the greater Cape Town area to the Orange River and beyond into southern Namibia. This study was augmented by the geometric analysis of mainly Cretaceous mafic dykes exposed from SW Angola to the southern tip of Africa. The kinematic analysis shows that the Cretaceous rifting event that led to the opening of the modern South Atlantic was largely controlled by NW-SE and NE-SW-striking structures. In the coastal areas of South Africa the Cretaceous deformation was dominated by NE-SW extension, whereas a general E-W-oriented extension prevailed further north. Analysis of reverse and strike-slip faulting in the Gariep and western Saldania Belts shows that the Pan-African constrictional deformation in South Africa was mainly controlled by ENE-WSW- to ESE-WNW-oriented shortening. Further north, the geometry of the Odgen Rock Mylonites in Namibia is controlled by N-S-striking strike-slip faults. The geometric analysis of the orientation of the mafic dykes also points to an E-W-oriented extension direction in the coastal areas extending from southern Angola to Meob and Conception Bay in west-central Namiba and changes to a generally NE-SW-oriented extension along the west coast of South Africa. Further inland in the Damara Belt sensu strictu, the geometric analysis of dykes belonging to the Hentjes Bay-Outjo Dyke Swarm also indicates NE-SW-oriented extension but, in addition, also a strong component of NW-SE-directed extension controlled dyke emplacement. The results of this study suggest that Pan-African (or older) structural discontinuities were re-utilised during the opening of the South Atlantic in the Early Cretaceous. The extension directions associated with Cretaceous Gondwana break-up structures are subparallel to the Pan-African shortening orientations. The inherited structural anisotropies are generally parallel to

  16. Aligned-or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseman, Jo Ellen; Koppal, Mary

    2015-01-01

    When state leaders and national partners in the development of the Next Generation Science Standards met to consider implementation strategies, states and school districts wanted to know which materials were aligned to the new standards. The answer from the developers was short but not sweet: You won't find much now, and it's going to…

  17. Optically Aligned Drill Press

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adderholdt, Bruce M.

    1994-01-01

    Precise drill press equipped with rotary-indexing microscope. Microscope and drill exchange places when turret rotated. Microscope axis first aligned over future hole, then rotated out of way so drill axis assumes its precise position. New procedure takes less time to locate drilling positions and produces more accurate results. Apparatus adapted to such other machine tools as milling and measuring machines.

  18. Curriculum Alignment: Establishing Coherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagné, Philippe; Dumont, Laurence; Brunet, Sabine; Boucher, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a step-by-step guide to implement a curricular alignment project, directed at professional development and student support, and developed in a higher education French as a second language department. We outline best practices and preliminary results from our experience and provide ways to adapt our experience to other…

  19. Thermonuclear breakup reactions of light nuclei. II - Gamma-ray line production and other applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guessoum, Nidhal

    1989-01-01

    The main consequence of nuclear breakup reactions in high-temperature plasmas is shown to be to reduce the production of the gamma-ray lines, due to the breakup of these species at high temperature. Results of the emissivities of all the relevant gamma-ray lines are discussed. It is shown that the magnitude of the breakup effect on the line emissivities depends strongly on temperature, but more importantly on the plasma density and on the available time for the ion processes. Other effects considered include the production of neutrons (from the breakup of helium) and its consequences (such as the production of gamma rays from n-capture reactions and dynamical effects in accretion disk plasmas).

  20. Magnetic Alignment of Pulsed Solenoids Using the Pulsed Wire Method

    SciTech Connect

    Arbelaez, D.; Madur, A.; Lipton, T.M.; Waldron, W.L.; Kwan, J.W.

    2011-04-01

    A unique application of the pulsed-wire measurement method has been implemented for alignment of 2.5 T pulsed solenoid magnets. The magnetic axis measurement has been shown to have a resolution of better than 25 {micro}m. The accuracy of the technique allows for the identification of inherent field errors due to, for example, the winding layer transitions and the current leads. The alignment system is developed for the induction accelerator NDCX-II under construction at LBNL, an upgraded Neutralized Drift Compression experiment for research on warm dense matter and heavy ion fusion. Precise alignment is essential for NDCX-II, since the ion beam has a large energy spread associated with the rapid pulse compression such that misalignments lead to corkscrew deformation of the beam and reduced intensity at focus. The ability to align the magnetic axis of the pulsed solenoids to within 100 pm of the induction cell axis has been demonstrated.

  1. Analytical description of the breakup of liquid jets in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1993-01-01

    A viscous or inviscid cylindrical jet with surface tension in a vacuum tends to pinch due to the mechanism of capillary instability. Similarity solutions are constructed which describe this phenomenon as a critical time is encountered, for two physically distinct cases: inviscid jets governed by the Euler equations and highly viscous jets governed by the Stokes equations. In both cases the only assumption imposed is that at the time of pinching the jet shape has a radial length scale which is smaller than the axial length scale. For the inviscid case, we show that our solution corresponds exactly to one member of the one-parameter family of solutions obtained from slender jet theories and the shape of the jet is locally concave at breakup. For highly viscous jets our theory predicts local shapes which are monotonic increasing or decreasing indicating the formation of a mother drop connected to the jet by a thin fluid tube. This qualitative behavior is in complete agreement with both direct numerical simulations and experimental observations.

  2. Breakup of evaporating/burning slurry drops by additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, P. Roy; Gerstein, M.

    Single drops of silicon carbide-cumene slurry were suspended from a quartz fiber and ignited. An inert material such as silicon carbide was chosen so that the droplets can be burned until all the fuel is consumed and only the inert residue is left on the quartz fiber. Benzoyl peroxide was added to cumene and the time to disruption of the liquid drop was measured. In the case of benzoyl peroxide, the breaking up of the drop resulting from its thermal decomposition produced CO 2. Both the drop disruption time and the burning of the slurry to dryness were predicted theoretically. Radiation absorption was found to be an important factor in the case of the slurry. Benzoyl peroxide and carbamide peroxide were investigated as additives to a boron slurry to determine if effective drop break-up could be achieved. Both additives produced drop shattering. The carbamide peroxide was particularly effective due to the production of O 2. The green flame associated with boron burning was clearly evident.

  3. Decrease in oceanic crustal thickness since the breakup of Pangaea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Avendonk, Harm J. A.; Davis, Joshua K.; Harding, Jennifer L.; Lawver, Lawrence A.

    2017-01-01

    Earth's mantle has cooled by 6-11 °C every 100 million years since the Archaean, 2.5 billion years ago. In more recent times, the surface heat loss that led to this temperature drop may have been enhanced by plate-tectonic processes, such as continental breakup, the continuous creation of oceanic lithosphere at mid-ocean ridges and subduction at deep-sea trenches. Here we use a compilation of marine seismic refraction data from ocean basins globally to analyse changes in the thickness of oceanic crust over time. We find that oceanic crust formed in the mid-Jurassic, about 170 million years ago, is 1.7 km thicker on average than crust produced along the present-day mid-ocean ridge system. If a higher mantle temperature is the cause of thicker Jurassic ocean crust, the upper mantle may have cooled by 15-20 °C per 100 million years over this time period. The difference between this and the long-term mantle cooling rate indeed suggests that modern plate tectonics coincide with greater mantle heat loss. We also find that the increase of ocean crustal thickness with plate age is stronger in the Indian and Atlantic oceans compared with the Pacific Ocean. This observation supports the idea that upper mantle temperature in the Jurassic was higher in the wake of the fragmented supercontinent Pangaea due to the effect of continental insulation.

  4. Beam break-up estimates for the ERL at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Calaga, R.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; Johnson, E.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.; Kewisch, J.; Xu, W.

    2010-05-23

    A prototype Ampere-class superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) is under advanced construction at BNL. The ERL facility is comprised of a five-cell SC Linac plus a half-cell SC photo-injector RF electron gun, both operating at 703.75 MHz. The facility is designed for either a high-current mode of operation up to 0.5 A at 703.75 MHz or a high-bunch-charge mode of 5 nC at 10 MHz bunch frequency. The R&D facility serves a test bed for an envisioned electron-hadron collider, eRHIC. The high-current, high-charge operating parameters make effective higher-order-mode (HOM) damping mandatory, and requires the determination of HOM tolerances for a cavity upgrade. The niobium cavity has been tested at superconducting temperatures and has provided measured quality factors (Q) for a large number of modes. These numbers were used for the estimate of the beam breakup instability (BBU). The facility will be assembled with a highly flexible lattice covering a vast operational parameter space for verification of the estimates and to serve as a test bed for the concepts directed at future projects.

  5. Aerosol cluster impact and break-up : model and implementation.

    SciTech Connect

    Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2010-10-01

    In this report a model for simulating aerosol cluster impact with rigid walls is presented. The model is based on JKR adhesion theory and is implemented as an enhancement to the granular (DEM) package within the LAMMPS code. The theory behind the model is outlined and preliminary results are shown. Modeling the interactions of small particles is relevant to a number of applications (e.g., soils, powders, colloidal suspensions, etc.). Modeling the behavior of aerosol particles during agglomeration and cluster dynamics upon impact with a wall is of particular interest. In this report we describe preliminary efforts to develop and implement physical models for aerosol particle interactions. Future work will consist of deploying these models to simulate aerosol cluster behavior upon impact with a rigid wall for the purpose of developing relationships for impact speed and probability of stick/bounce/break-up as well as to assess the distribution of cluster sizes if break-up occurs. These relationships will be developed consistent with the need for inputs into system-level codes. Section 2 gives background and details on the physical model as well as implementations issues. Section 3 presents some preliminary results which lead to discussion in Section 4 of future plans.

  6. Cheating, breakup, and divorce: is Facebook use to blame?

    PubMed

    Clayton, Russell B; Nagurney, Alexander; Smith, Jessica R

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between using the social networking site known as Facebook and negative interpersonal relationship outcomes. A survey of 205 Facebook users aged 18-82 was conducted using a 16-question online survey to examine whether high levels of Facebook use predicted negative relationship outcomes (breakup/divorce, emotional cheating, and physical cheating). It was hypothesized that those with higher levels of Facebook use would demonstrate more negative relationship outcomes than those with lower use. The study then examined whether these relationships were mediated by Facebook-related conflict. Furthermore, the researchers examined length of relationship as a moderator variable in the aforementioned model. The results indicate that a high level of Facebook usage is associated with negative relationship outcomes, and that these relationships are indeed mediated by Facebook-related conflict. This series of relationships only holds for those who are, or have been, in relatively newer relationships of 3 years or less. The current study adds to the growing body of literature investigating Internet use and relationship outcomes, and may be a precursor to further research investigating whether Facebook use attributes to the divorce rate, emotional cheating, and physical cheating.

  7. Drag reduction - Jet breakup correlation with kerosene-based additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, J. W.; Altman, R. L.; Taylor, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    The drag-reduction effectiveness of a number of high-polymer additives dissolved in aircraft fuel has been measured in a turbulent-flow rheometer. These solutions were further subjected to high elongational stress and breakup forces in a jet discharging in air. The jet was photographed using a high-resolution camera with special lighting. The object of the work was to study the possible spray-suppression ability of high-polymer additives to aircraft fuel and to correlate this with the drag-reducing properties of the additives. It was found, in fact, that the rheometer results indicate the most effective spray-suppressing additives. Using as a measure the minimum polymer concentration to give a maximum friction-reducing effect, the order of effectiveness of eight different polymer additives as spray-suppressing agents was predicted. These results may find application in the development of antimisting additives for aircraft fuel which may increase fire safety in case of crash or accident.

  8. On tear film breakup (TBU): dynamics and imaging.

    PubMed

    Braun, Richard J; Driscoll, Tobin A; Begley, Carolyn G; King-Smith, P Ewen; Siddique, Javed I

    2017-02-20

    We report the results of some recent experiments to visualize tear film dynamics. We then study a mathematical model for tear film thinning and tear film breakup (TBU), a term from the ocular surface literature. The thinning is driven by an imposed tear film thinning rate which is input from in vivo measurements. Solutes representing osmolarity and fluorescein are included in the model. Osmolarity causes osmosis from the model ocular surface, and the fluorescein is used to compute the intensity corresponding closely to in vivo observations. The imposed thinning can be either one-dimensional or axisymmetric, leading to streaks or spots of TBU, respectively. For a spatially-uniform (flat) film, osmosis would cease thinning and balance mass lost due to evaporation; for these space-dependent evaporation profiles TBU does occur because osmolarity diffuses out of the TBU into the surrounding tear film, in agreement with previous results. The intensity pattern predicted based on the fluorescein concentration is compared with the computed thickness profiles; this comparison is important for interpreting in vivo observations. The non-dimensionalization introduced leads to insight about the relative importance of the competing processes; it leads to a classification of large vs small TBU regions in which different physical effects are dominant. Many regions of TBU may be considered small, revealing that the flow inside the film has an appreciable influence on fluorescence imaging of the tear film.

  9. Asteroid breakup linked to the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Birger; Harper, David A. T.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard; Stouge, Svend; Alwmark, Carl; Cronholm, Anders; Bergström, Stig M.; Tassinari, Mario; Xiaofeng, Wang

    2008-01-01

    The rise and diversification of shelled invertebrate life in the early Phanerozoic eon occurred in two major stages. During the first stage (termed as the Cambrian explosion), a large number of new phyla appeared over a short time interval ~540Myrago. Biodiversity at the family, genus and species level, however, remained low until the second stage marked by the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event in the Middle Ordovician period. Although this event represents the most intense phase of species radiation during the Palaeozoic era and led to irreversible changes in the biological make-up of Earth's seafloors, the causes of this event remain elusive. Here, we show that the onset of the major phase of biodiversification ~470Myrago coincides with the disruption in the asteroid belt of the L-chondrite parent body-the largest documented asteroid breakup event during the past few billion years. The precise coincidence between these two events is established by bed-by-bed records of extraterrestrial chromite, osmium isotopes and invertebrate fossils in Middle Ordovician strata in Baltoscandia and China. We argue that frequent impacts on Earth of kilometre-sized asteroids-supported by abundant Middle Ordovician fossil meteorites and impact craters-accelerated the biodiversification process.

  10. Vibration-Induced Gas-Liquid Interface Breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hern, Timothy; Torczynski, John; Romero, Ed; Shelden, Bion

    2010-11-01

    Gas-liquid interfaces can be forced to break up when subjected to vibrations within critical ranges of frequency and amplitude. This breakup mechanism was examined experimentally using deep layers of silicone oils over a range of viscosity and sinusoidal, primarily axial vibration conditions that can produce dramatic disturbances at the gas-liquid free surface. Although small-amplitude vibrations produce standing Faraday waves, large-amplitude vibrations produce liquid jets into the gas, droplets pinching off from the jets, gas cavities in the liquid from droplet impact, and bubble transport below the interface. Experiments used several different silicone oils over a range of pressures and vibration conditions. Computational simulations exhibiting similar behavior will be included in the presentation. Applications include liquid fuel rockets, inertial sensing devices, moving vehicles, mixing processes, and acoustic excitation. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. The importance of momentum transfer in collision-induced breakups in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Robert C.; Lillie, Brian J.

    1991-01-01

    Although there is adequate information on larger objects in low Earth orbit, specifically those objects larger than about 10 cm in diameter, there is little direct information on objects from this size down to 1 mm. Yet, this is the sized regime where objects acting as projectiles represent the ability to seriously damage or destroy a functioning spacecraft if they collide with it. The observed consequences of known collisional breakups in orbit indicates no significant momentum transfer in the resulting debris cloud. The position taken in this paper is that this is an observational selection effect: what is seen in these events is an explosion-like breakup of the target structure arising from shock waves introduced into the structure by the collision, but one that occurs significantly after the collision processes are completed; the collision cloud, in which there is momentum transfer, consists of small, unobserved fragments. Preliminary computations of the contribution of one known collisional breakup, Solwind at 500 km in 1985, and Cosmos 1275 in 1981, assume no momentum transfer on breakup and indicate that these two events are the dominant contributors to the current millimeter and centimeter population. A different story would emerge if momentum transfer was taken into account. The topics covered include: (1) observation of on-orbit collisional breakups; (2) a model for momentum transfer; and (3) velocity space representation of breakup clouds.

  12. Numerical study of three-dimensional liquid jet breakup with adaptive unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhihua; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Salinas, Pablo; Pain, Christopher; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    Liquid jet breakup is an important fundamental multiphase flow, often found in many industrial engineering applications. The breakup process is very complex, involving jets, liquid films, ligaments, and small droplets, featuring tremendous complexity in interfacial topology and a large range of spatial scales. The objective of this study is to investigate the fluid dynamics of three-dimensional liquid jet breakup problems, such as liquid jet primary breakup and gas-sheared liquid jet breakup. An adaptive unstructured mesh modelling framework is employed here, which can modify and adapt unstructured meshes to optimally represent the underlying physics of multiphase problems and reduce computational effort without sacrificing accuracy. The numerical framework consists of a mixed control volume and finite element formulation, a 'volume of fluid' type method for the interface capturing based on a compressive control volume advection method and second-order finite element methods, and a force-balanced algorithm for the surface tension implementation. Numerical examples of some benchmark tests and the dynamics of liquid jet breakup with and without ambient gas are presented to demonstrate the capability of this method.

  13. Flexible structural protein alignment by a sequence of local transformations

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Jairo; Segura, Joan; Wilson, Richard C.; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Throughout evolution, homologous proteins have common regions that stay semi-rigid relative to each other and other parts that vary in a more noticeable way. In order to compare the increasing number of structures in the PDB, flexible geometrical alignments are needed, that are reliable and easy to use. Results: We present a protein structure alignment method whose main feature is the ability to consider different rigid transformations at different sites, allowing for deformations beyond a global rigid transformation. The performance of the method is comparable with that of the best ones from 10 aligners tested, regarding both the quality of the alignments with respect to hand curated ones, and the classification ability. An analysis of some structure pairs from the literature that need to be matched in a flexible fashion are shown. The use of a series of local transformations can be exported to other classifiers, and a future golden protein similarity measure could benefit from it. Availability: A public server for the program is available at http://dmi.uib.es/ProtDeform/. Contact: jairo@uib.es Supplementary information: All data used, results and examples are available at http://dmi.uib.es/people/jairo/bio/ProtDeform.Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19417057

  14. Kernel Manifold Alignment for Domain Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Tuia, Devis; Camps-Valls, Gustau

    2016-01-01

    The wealth of sensory data coming from different modalities has opened numerous opportunities for data analysis. The data are of increasing volume, complexity and dimensionality, thus calling for new methodological innovations towards multimodal data processing. However, multimodal architectures must rely on models able to adapt to changes in the data distribution. Differences in the density functions can be due to changes in acquisition conditions (pose, illumination), sensors characteristics (number of channels, resolution) or different views (e.g. street level vs. aerial views of a same building). We call these different acquisition modes domains, and refer to the adaptation problem as domain adaptation. In this paper, instead of adapting the trained models themselves, we alternatively focus on finding mappings of the data sources into a common, semantically meaningful, representation domain. This field of manifold alignment extends traditional techniques in statistics such as canonical correlation analysis (CCA) to deal with nonlinear adaptation and possibly non-corresponding data pairs between the domains. We introduce a kernel method for manifold alignment (KEMA) that can match an arbitrary number of data sources without needing corresponding pairs, just few labeled examples in all domains. KEMA has interesting properties: 1) it generalizes other manifold alignment methods, 2) it can align manifolds of very different complexities, performing a discriminative alignment preserving each manifold inner structure, 3) it can define a domain-specific metric to cope with multimodal specificities, 4) it can align data spaces of different dimensionality, 5) it is robust to strong nonlinear feature deformations, and 6) it is closed-form invertible, which allows transfer across-domains and data synthesis. To authors' knowledge this is the first method addressing all these important issues at once. We also present a reduced-rank version of KEMA for computational

  15. Kernel Manifold Alignment for Domain Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Tuia, Devis; Camps-Valls, Gustau

    2016-01-01

    The wealth of sensory data coming from different modalities has opened numerous opportunities for data analysis. The data are of increasing volume, complexity and dimensionality, thus calling for new methodological innovations towards multimodal data processing. However, multimodal architectures must rely on models able to adapt to changes in the data distribution. Differences in the density functions can be due to changes in acquisition conditions (pose, illumination), sensors characteristics (number of channels, resolution) or different views (e.g. street level vs. aerial views of a same building). We call these different acquisition modes domains, and refer to the adaptation problem as domain adaptation. In this paper, instead of adapting the trained models themselves, we alternatively focus on finding mappings of the data sources into a common, semantically meaningful, representation domain. This field of manifold alignment extends traditional techniques in statistics such as canonical correlation analysis (CCA) to deal with nonlinear adaptation and possibly non-corresponding data pairs between the domains. We introduce a kernel method for manifold alignment (KEMA) that can match an arbitrary number of data sources without needing corresponding pairs, just few labeled examples in all domains. KEMA has interesting properties: 1) it generalizes other manifold alignment methods, 2) it can align manifolds of very different complexities, performing a discriminative alignment preserving each manifold inner structure, 3) it can define a domain-specific metric to cope with multimodal specificities, 4) it can align data spaces of different dimensionality, 5) it is robust to strong nonlinear feature deformations, and 6) it is closed-form invertible, which allows transfer across-domains and data synthesis. To authors’ knowledge this is the first method addressing all these important issues at once. We also present a reduced-rank version of KEMA for computational

  16. Inflation by alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, C.P.; Roest, Diederik

    2015-06-08

    Pseudo-Goldstone bosons (pGBs) can provide technically natural inflatons, as has been comparatively well-explored in the simplest axion examples. Although inflationary success requires trans-Planckian decay constants, f≳M{sub p}, several mechanisms have been proposed to obtain this, relying on (mis-)alignments between potential and kinetic energies in multiple-field models. We extend these mechanisms to a broader class of inflationary models, including in particular the exponential potentials that arise for pGB potentials based on noncompact groups (and so which might apply to moduli in an extra-dimensional setting). The resulting potentials provide natural large-field inflationary models and can predict a larger primordial tensor signal than is true for simpler single-field versions of these models. In so doing we provide a unified treatment of several alignment mechanisms, showing how each emerges as a limit of the more general setup.

  17. Automatic Word Alignment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-18

    strategy was evalu­ ated in the context of English -to-Pashto (E2P) and Pashto-to- English (P2E), a low-resource language pair. For E2P, the training and...improves the quality of automatic word alignment, for example for resource poor language pairs, thus improving Statistical Machine Translation (SMT...example for resource poor language pairs, thus improving Statistical Machine Translation (SMT) performance. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY

  18. Is collisional breakup an important process within mixed-phase deep convective clouds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, A.; Khain, A.; Mayer, F.

    2003-04-01

    The microphysics of deep convective clouds determines their precipitation efficiency as well as the dynamical evolution of cloud systems and is therefore of great importance for numerical weather prediction, flood forecasting and regional climate modeling. Of all cloud systems mixed-phase deep convection is maybe the most complex and least understood. One reason is that the numerous microphysical processes taking place are highly nonlinear and strongly coupled with each other as well as with the hydrodynamics of the cloud. Collisional breakup of raindrops is one of these cloud microphysical processes, but is often neglected or not well represented in state-of-the-art cloud resolving models. The importance of collisional breakup is well known for tropical cloud systems, which are dominated by warm phase processes. In addition various studies using so-called rainshaft models showed that collisional breakup can alter the raindrop size distribution below cloud base. But what happens within the clouds and especially within strong convective updrafts? Can collisional breakup lead to a different cloud evolution by changing the drop size distribution? Using the Hebrew University Cloud Model (HUCM), which includes the most detailed spectral microphysics model available today, we performed a sensitivity study to answer these questions. Collisional breakup was therefore recently included in HUCM using Bleck's numerical method, which is standard for simulation of the breakup process. Our breakup scheme itself is mainly based on the parameterization of Low and List (1982, JAS), but includes also additional data for small raindrops by Beard and Ochs (1995, JAS). As a test case a deep convective mixed-phase cloud is simulated with initial conditions based on a sounding from 13 August 1999, Midland/Texas. We present a detailed analysis of the simulated cloud evolution with and without collisional breakup taken into account. The conclusion from our sensitivity study is that

  19. Orbit IMU alignment: Error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive accuracy analysis of orbit inertial measurement unit (IMU) alignments using the shuttle star trackers was completed and the results are presented. Monte Carlo techniques were used in a computer simulation of the IMU alignment hardware and software systems to: (1) determine the expected Space Transportation System 1 Flight (STS-1) manual mode IMU alignment accuracy; (2) investigate the accuracy of alignments in later shuttle flights when the automatic mode of star acquisition may be used; and (3) verify that an analytical model previously used for estimating the alignment error is a valid model. The analysis results do not differ significantly from expectations. The standard deviation in the IMU alignment error for STS-1 alignments was determined to the 68 arc seconds per axis. This corresponds to a 99.7% probability that the magnitude of the total alignment error is less than 258 arc seconds.

  20. Nuclear reactor alignment plate configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, David A; Forsyth, David R; Smith, Richard E; Singleton, Norman R

    2014-01-28

    An alignment plate that is attached to a core barrel of a pressurized water reactor and fits within slots within a top plate of a lower core shroud and upper core plate to maintain lateral alignment of the reactor internals. The alignment plate is connected to the core barrel through two vertically-spaced dowel pins that extend from the outside surface of the core barrel through a reinforcement pad and into corresponding holes in the alignment plate. Additionally, threaded fasteners are inserted around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad and into the alignment plate to further secure the alignment plate to the core barrel. A fillet weld also is deposited around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad. To accomodate thermal growth between the alignment plate and the core barrel, a gap is left above, below and at both sides of one of the dowel pins in the alignment plate holes through with the dowel pins pass.

  1. Multiple protein structure alignment.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, W. R.; Flores, T. P.; Orengo, C. A.

    1994-01-01

    A method was developed to compare protein structures and to combine them into a multiple structure consensus. Previous methods of multiple structure comparison have only concatenated pairwise alignments or produced a consensus structure by averaging coordinate sets. The current method is a fusion of the fast structure comparison program SSAP and the multiple sequence alignment program MULTAL. As in MULTAL, structures are progressively combined, producing intermediate consensus structures that are compared directly to each other and all remaining single structures. This leads to a hierarchic "condensation," continually evaluated in the light of the emerging conserved core regions. Following the SSAP approach, all interatomic vectors were retained with well-conserved regions distinguished by coherent vector bundles (the structural equivalent of a conserved sequence position). Each bundle of vectors is summarized by a resultant, whereas vector coherence is captured in an error term, which is the only distinction between conserved and variable positions. Resultant vectors are used directly in the comparison, which is weighted by their error values, giving greater importance to the matching of conserved positions. The resultant vectors and their errors can also be used directly in molecular modeling. Applications of the method were assessed by the quality of the resulting sequence alignments, phylogenetic tree construction, and databank scanning with the consensus. Visual assessment of the structural superpositions and consensus structure for various well-characterized families confirmed that the consensus had identified a reasonable core. PMID:7849601

  2. Dynamic Alignment at SLS

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, Robert E.

    2003-04-23

    The relative alignment of components in the storage ring of the Swiss Light Source (SLS) is guaranteed by mechanical means. The magnets are rigidly fixed to 48 girders by means of alignment rails with tolerances of less than {+-}15 {micro}m. The bending magnets, supported by 3 point ball bearings, overlap adjacent girders and thus establish virtual train links between the girders, located near the bending magnet centres. Keeping the distortion of the storage ring geometry within a tolerance of {+-}100 {micro}m in order to guarantee sufficient dynamic apertures, requires continuous monitoring and correction of the girder locations. Two monitoring systems for the horizontal and the vertical direction will be installed to measure displacements of the train link between girders, which are due to ground settings and temperature effects: The hydrostatic levelling system (HLS) gives an absolute vertical reference, while the horizontal positioning system (HPS), which employs low cost linear encoders with sub-micron resolution, measures relative horizontal movements. The girder mover system based on five DC motors per girder allows a dynamic realignment of the storage ring within a working window of more than {+-}1 mm for girder translations and {+-}1 mrad for rotations. We will describe both monitoring systems (HLS and HPS) as well as the applied correction scheme based on the girder movers. We also show simulations indicating that beam based girder alignment takes care of most of the static closed orbit correction.

  3. Break-up of Pangaea and Tectonic History of the Adria Microplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schettino, A.; Turco, E.

    2008-12-01

    .4) describe the process of formation of an independent Iberian plate and the opening of the Valais oceanic seaway. The sixth phase, from chron M0 (120.4) to the Albian-Cenomanian boundary ("î100 Ma), is associated with the early Alpine collision. During the seventh phase, from the Albian-Cenomanian boundary ("î100 Ma) to chron C34ny (83.5 Ma), a relatively large block comprising Adria, Greece, and Turkey separated from Africa, determining a new spreading event in the eastern Mediterranean and further East in the Tethys. The next four phases, from chron C34ny (83.5 Ma) to chron C13 (33.1 Ma), describe the Pyrenean and Alpine collisions, the subduction of the Ligurian and Valais oceans, the progressive internal deformation of Adria, and the assembly of the modern Anatolian block. In phase 12, from chron C13 (33.1 Ma) to chron C6n (19 Ma), are included the formation of the Atlas mountain belt and the onset of rifting and sea-floor spreading in the western Mediterranean. During this time interval Morocco was an independent plate with a distinct spreading rate with respect to North America. Finally, during the last phase passive subduction of the last remains of southern Liguride, Ionian, and Pennine oceans determined the opening of the Alboran, Tyrrhenian, and Pannonian basins, accompanied by trench retreat. Thirteen plate tectonic reconstructions and a computer animation are proposed to illustrate the major phases of plate motions in the western Tethys region during and after the breakup of the Pangaea supercontinent.

  4. Continental breakup and its effect on MORB chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandl, P. A.; Regelous, M.; Beier, C.; Haase, K. M.

    2012-12-01

    The formation and breakup of supercontinents has major influences on the climate, sealevel and the biosphere on a global scale. The question of possible effects of a supercontinent on mantle convection and thus spreading in the ocean basins has been recently addressed by various studies, focused on numerical modelling. These studies predict higher mantle temperatures on the order of 100°C higher due to the effect of 'continental insulation'. This temperature difference would amplify the effects on sealevel and volcanic CO2 output associated with creation of new spreading centres. However, there is as yet no direct geochemical evidence that could confirm or quantify the continental insulation effect. We have sampled 340 fresh glasses from 30 different sites drilled into old oceanic crust (6-170 Ma) and determined their chemical composition using electron microprobe and ICP-MS techniques. The oldest MORB recovered from the Atlantic and Indian Oceans have lower Na72, higher Fe72 than zero-age MORB. If interpreted as the effects of mantle potential temperature, this chemical difference indicates a mantle source hotter by 50-150°C depending on primary melt composition and applied geothermometry. Higher mantle potential temperatures during the Mesozoic are not a global phenomena but instead restricted to the proto-Atlantic and Indian Ocean. Zero-age MORB from the juvenile Red Sea - Gulf of Aden have similar major element compositions, indicating that higher mantle temperatures beneath young ocean basins result from continental insulation. A subset of about 120 samples has been also analysed for trace element composition using laser ablation and solution ICPMS techniques. These samples are representative for our ancient MORB database in terms of age and geological setting. Trace element ratios sensitive to the degree of partial melting or source fertility such as La/Sm, Sm/Yb, La/Yb or (Dy/Yb)N are positively correlated with fractionation corrected Na2O and negatively

  5. Method for alignment of microwires

    DOEpatents

    Beardslee, Joseph A.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Sadtler, Bryce

    2017-01-24

    A method of aligning microwires includes modifying the microwires so they are more responsive to a magnetic field. The method also includes using a magnetic field so as to magnetically align the microwires. The method can further include capturing the microwires in a solid support structure that retains the longitudinal alignment of the microwires when the magnetic field is not applied to the microwires.

  6. Alignment as a Teacher Variable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Andrew C.; Smithson, John; Blank, Rolf; Zeidner, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    With the exception of the procedures developed by Porter and colleagues (Porter, 2002), other methods of defining and measuring alignment are essentially limited to alignment between tests and standards. Porter's procedures have been generalized to investigating the alignment between content standards, tests, textbooks, and even classroom…

  7. Possible Effects of Collisional Breakup on Mixed-Phase Deep Convection Simulated by a Spectral (Bin) Cloud Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Axel; Khain, Alexander; Blahak, Ulrich; Beheng, Klaus D.

    2005-06-01

    The effects of the collisional breakup of raindrops are investigated using the Hebrew University Cloud Model (HUCM). The parameterizations, which are combined in the new breakup scheme, are those of Low and List, Beard and Ochs, as well as Brown. A sensitivity study reveals strong effects of collisional breakup on the precipitation formation in mixed-phase deep convective clouds for strong as well as for weak precipitation events. Collisional breakup reduces the number of large raindrops, increases the number of small raindrops, and, as a consequence, decreases surface rain rates and considerably reduces the speed of rain formation. In addition, it was found that including breakup can lead to a more intense triggering of secondary convective cells. But a statistical comparison with observed raindrop size distributions shows that the parameterizations might systematically overestimate collisional breakup.

  8. Precision alignment and mounting apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An alignment and mounting apparatus for mounting two modules (10,12) includes a first portion having a cylindrical alignment pin (16) projecting normal to a module surface, a second portion having a three-stage alignment guide (18) including a shoehorn flange (34), a Y-slot (42) and a V-block (22) which sequentially guide the alignment pin (16) with successively finer precision and a third portion in the form of a spring-loaded captive fastener (20) for connecting the two modules after alignment is achieved.

  9. Engineering cell alignment in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhui; Huang, Guoyou; Zhang, Xiaohui; Wang, Lin; Du, Yanan; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Cell alignment plays a critical role in various cell behaviors including cytoskeleton reorganization, membrane protein relocation, nucleus gene expression, and ECM remodeling. Cell alignment is also known to exert significant effects on tissue regeneration (e.g., neuron) and modulate mechanical properties of tissues including skeleton, cardiac muscle and tendon. Therefore, it is essential to engineer cell alignment in vitro for biomechanics, cell biology, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. With advances in nano- and micro-scale technologies, a variety of approaches have been developed to engineer cell alignment in vitro, including mechanical loading, topographical patterning, and surface chemical treatment. In this review, we first present alignments of various cell types and their functionality in different tissues in vivo including muscle and nerve tissues. Then, we provide an overview of recent approaches for engineering cell alignment in vitro. Finally, concluding remarks and perspectives are addressed for future improvement of engineering cell alignment.

  10. TSGC and JSC Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Humberto

    2013-01-01

    NASA and the SGCs are, by design, intended to work closely together and have synergistic Vision, Mission, and Goals. The TSGC affiliates and JSC have been working together, but not always in a concise, coordinated, nor strategic manner. Today we have a couple of simple ideas to present about how TSGC and JSC have started to work together in a more concise, coordinated, and strategic manner, and how JSC and non-TSG Jurisdiction members have started to collaborate: Idea I: TSGC and JSC Technical Alignment Idea II: Concept of Clusters.

  11. Assessment of the Breakup of the Antarctic Polar Vortex in Two New Chemistry-Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Newman, P. A.; Oman, L. D.; Li, F.; Morgenstern, O.; Braesicke, P.; Pyle, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Successful simulation of the breakup of the Antarctic polar vortex depends on the representation of tropospheric stationary waves at Southern Hemisphere middle latitudes. This paper assesses the vortex breakup in two new chemistry-climate models (CCMs). The stratospheric version of the UK Chemistry and Aerosols model is able to reproduce the observed timing of the vortex breakup. Version 2 of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS V2) model is typical of CCMs in that the Antarctic polar vortex breaks up too late; at 10 hPa, the mean transition to easterlies at 60 S is delayed by 12-13 days as compared with the ERA-40 and National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalyses. The two models' skill in simulating planetary wave driving during the October-November period accounts for differences in their simulation of the vortex breakup, with GEOS V2 unable to simulate the magnitude and tilt of geopotential height anomalies in the troposphere and thus underestimating the wave driving. In the GEOS V2 CCM the delayed breakup of the Antarctic vortex biases polar temperatures and trace gas distributions in the upper stratosphere in November and December.

  12. Western Canadian Arctic ringed seal organic contaminant trends in relation to sea ice break-up.

    PubMed

    Gaden, A; Ferguson, Steve H; Harwood, L; Melling, H; Alikamik, J; Stern, G A

    2012-04-17

    The association between changing sea ice conditions and contaminant exposure to Arctic animals interests Inuvialuit harvesters, communities, and researchers. We examined organochlorine contaminant (OC) concentrations in the blubber of 90 male adult ringed seals (Phoca hispida) sampled from the subsistence harvest in Ulukhaktok (formerly Holman), NT, Canada, just prior to break-up of the sea ice (1993-2008). OC blubber concentrations were assessed with respect to year and sea ice break-up date. HCB and age- and blubber-adjusted concentrations of p,p'-DDT and ΣCHB (chlorobornane) significantly decreased over the study period. With respect to the timing of the spring break-up, highly lipophlic OCs, such as p,p'-DDE and PCB 153, were higher during years of early ice clearing (at least 12 days earlier than the mean annual break-up date), whereas no trends were observed for α, β, and γ isomers of HCH, trans- and cis-chlordane, oxychlordane, or ΣCHB. The higher contaminant concentrations found in earlier break-up years is likely due to earlier and/or increased foraging opportunities. This situation also has potential for enhancing bioaccumulation and biomagnification of contaminants over the long-term if projected changes continue to result in lighter and earlier ice conditions.

  13. Capillary thinning and breakup of saliva threads and rheological aging of mucin solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Caroline; Bourouiba, Lydia; McKinley, Gareth

    2014-11-01

    The elasticity of saliva, which is essential for many of its primary functions such as lubrication, arises largely as a result of the presence of MUC5B mucins. These are large glycoproteins composed of numerous repeated polymeric subunits forming a weakly crosslinked network. It has been noted for nearly a century that once removed from the mouth, saliva quickly loses its elasticity, which can be quantified by a decrease in its capillary breakup time. We model saliva as a dilute finitely extensible nonlinear elastic (FENE-P) fluid with polymer chains composed of dispersed Hookean dumbbells of maximum extensibility b related to the number of MUC5B subunits. We show that under conditions of simple elongational flow, an analytic prediction of the time evolution of the radius and the filament breakup time can be derived. Furthermore, our model shows that decreasing the maximum extensibility b leads to a decrease in the breakup time, which suggests that the aging process of saliva outside the mouth involves a shortening of the MUC5B mucin chains into smaller groupings. Finally, we compare the analytic breakup times from the model with experimental results obtained using a capillary breakup extensional rheometer and human whole saliva.

  14. Neutron Induced D Breakup in Inertial Confinement Fusion at the Omega Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Knauer, J. P.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Schroder, W. U.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2015-11-01

    High-resolution neutron spectroscopy is used to study the deuteron breakup reaction D(n,n ') np in the thermonuclear environment created in inertial confinement fusion experiments at the Omega Laser Facility. Neutrons with an energy of 14.1 MeV generated in the primary D-T fusion reactions scatter elastically and inelastically off the dense (cryogenic) D-T fuel assembly surrounding the central hot spot at peak fuel compression. These neutrons also induce a breakup of the fuel deuterons. The corresponding breakup cross section is measured relative to elastic n -D and n -T scattering, i.e., simultaneously in the same environment. Apart from astrophysical and technological interest, the neutron-induced deuteron breakup reaction is of interest to the physics of nucleon -nucleon forces. For example, theoretical calculations predict a noticeable influence of nucleonic three-body forces on the magnitude of the breakup cross section. Preliminary results from measurements of the neutron contribution in the 2- to 6-MeV range show reasonable agreement with the published ENDL 2008.2 semi-empirical cross-section. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  15. Physics-Based Modeling of Meteor Entry and Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Agrawal, Parul; Allen, Gary A., Jr.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Brandis, Aaron M.; Chen, Yih-Kanq; Jaffe, Richard L.; Palmer, Grant E.; Saunders, David A.; Stern, Eric C.; Tauber, Michael E.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2015-01-01

    A new research effort at NASA Ames Research Center has been initiated in Planetary Defense, which integrates the disciplines of planetary science, atmospheric entry physics, and physics-based risk assessment. This paper describes work within the new program and is focused on meteor entry and breakup. Over the last six decades significant effort was expended in the US and in Europe to understand meteor entry including ablation, fragmentation and airburst (if any) for various types of meteors ranging from stony to iron spectral types. These efforts have produced primarily empirical mathematical models based on observations. Weaknesses of these models, apart from their empiricism, are reliance on idealized shapes (spheres, cylinders, etc.) and simplified models for thermal response of meteoritic materials to aerodynamic and radiative heating. Furthermore, the fragmentation and energy release of meteors (airburst) is poorly understood. On the other hand, flight of human-made atmospheric entry capsules is well understood. The capsules and their requisite heat shields are designed and margined to survive entry. However, the highest speed Earth entry for capsules is 13 kms (Stardust). Furthermore, Earth entry capsules have never exceeded diameters of 5 m, nor have their peak aerothermal environments exceeded 0.3 atm and 1 kWcm2. The aims of the current work are: (i) to define the aerothermal environments for objects with entry velocities from 13 to 20 kms; (ii) to explore various hypotheses of fragmentation and airburst of stony meteors in the near term; (iii) to explore the possibility of performing relevant ground-based tests to verify candidate hypotheses; and (iv) to quantify the energy released in airbursts. The results of the new simulations will be used to anchor said risk assessment analyses.With these aims in mind, state-of-the-art entry capsule design tools are being extended for meteor entries. We describe: (i) applications of current simulation tools to

  16. Physics-Based Modeling of Meteor Entry and Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Agrawal, Parul; Allen, Gary A.; Brandis, Aaron M.; Chen, Yih-Kanq; Jaffe, Richard L.; Saunders, David A.; Stern, Eric C.; Tauber, Michael E.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2015-01-01

    A new research effort at NASA Ames Research Center has been initiated in Planetary Defense, which integrates the disciplines of planetary science, atmospheric entry physics, and physics-based risk assessment. This paper describes work within the new program and is focused on meteor entry and breakup. Over the last six decades significant effort was expended in the US and in Europe to understand meteor entry including ablation, fragmentation and airburst (if any) for various types of meteors ranging from stony to iron spectral types. These efforts have produced primarily empirical mathematical models based on observations. Weaknesses of these models, apart from their empiricism, are reliance on idealized shapes (spheres, cylinders, etc.) and simplified models for thermal response of meteoritic materials to aerodynamic and radiative heating. Furthermore, the fragmentation and energy release of meteors (airburst) is poorly understood. On the other hand, flight of human-made atmospheric entry capsules is well understood. The capsules and their requisite heatshields are designed and margined to survive entry. However, the highest speed Earth entry for capsules is less than 13 km/s (Stardust). Furthermore, Earth entry capsules have never exceeded diameters of 5 m, nor have their peak aerothermal environments exceeded 0.3 atm and 1 kW/cm2. The aims of the current work are: (i) to define the aerothermal environments for objects with entry velocities from 13 to greater than 20 km/s; (ii) to explore various hypotheses of fragmentation and airburst of stony meteors in the near term; (iii) to explore the possibility of performing relevant ground-based tests to verify candidate hypotheses; and (iv) to quantify the energy released in airbursts. The results of the new simulations will be used to anchor said risk assessment analyses. With these aims in mind, state-of-the-art entry capsule design tools are being extended for meteor entries. We describe: (i) applications of current

  17. Physics-Based Modeling of Meteor Entry and Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Agrawal, Parul; Allen, Gary A., Jr.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Brandis, Aaron M.; Chen, Yih-Kang; Jaffe, Richard L.; Palmer, Grant E.; Saunders, David A.; Stern, Eric C.; Tauber, Michael E.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2015-01-01

    A new research effort at NASA Ames Research Center has been initiated in Planetary Defense, which integrates the disciplines of planetary science, atmospheric entry physics, and physics-based risk assessment. This paper describes work within the new program and is focused on meteor entry and breakup.Over the last six decades significant effort was expended in the US and in Europe to understand meteor entry including ablation, fragmentation and airburst (if any) for various types of meteors ranging from stony to iron spectral types. These efforts have produced primarily empirical mathematical models based on observations. Weaknesses of these models, apart from their empiricism, are reliance on idealized shapes (spheres, cylinders, etc.) and simplified models for thermal response of meteoritic materials to aerodynamic and radiative heating. Furthermore, the fragmentation and energy release of meteors (airburst) is poorly understood.On the other hand, flight of human-made atmospheric entry capsules is well understood. The capsules and their requisite heatshields are designed and margined to survive entry. However, the highest speed Earth entry for capsules is 13 kms (Stardust). Furthermore, Earth entry capsules have never exceeded diameters of 5 m, nor have their peak aerothermal environments exceeded 0.3 atm and 1 kW/sq cm. The aims of the current work are: (i) to define the aerothermal environments for objects with entry velocities from 13 to 20 kms; (ii) to explore various hypotheses of fragmentation and airburst of stony meteors in the near term; (iii) to explore the possibility of performing relevant ground-based tests to verify candidate hypotheses; and (iv) to quantify the energy released in airbursts. The results of the new simulations will be used to anchor said risk assessment analyses. With these aims in mind, state-of-the-art entry capsule design tools are being extended for meteor entries. We describe: (i) applications of current simulation tools to

  18. Lithosphere erosion and breakup due to the interaction between extension and plume upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavecchia, Alessio; Thieulot, Cedric; Beekman, Fred; Cloetingh, Sierd; Clark, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    We have built up 2D numerical models of coupled crust - lithospheric mantle - upper mantle systems. The reconstructed sections are subjected to external velocity fields and mantle plume impingement beneath the lithosphere, both acting simultaneously. The models are designed to simulate the interaction between plumes and lithosphere in an extensional setting with the main purpose to contribute to address the following questions: 1) Are plumes capable of weakening certain lithospheric regions? Where and when are the main effects observed? 2a) Can a plume really cause a plate break-off and drifting with no external contribution; 2b) if yes, are there any particularly favorable conditions required? In our models a novel aspect is melt generation due to plume, upper mantle and lithospheric mantle partial melting. Produced melts are capable to ascend across the reconstructed sections due to buoyancy. Furthermore, heat transport related to melt movement is taken into account and leads to a significant heating of host rocks at the melt neutral buoyancy depth. In absence of external stress or velocity fields, the effects of plume impingement beneath the lithosphere are negligible at surface. Here the main observed feature is the production of doming at various length scales, depending on the adopted rheology for the crust. At depth, the main effect is a thermo-mechanical erosion of the lithospheric mantle with production of melts and subsequent underplating of the crust. The heat flux due to plume impingement and crust underplating determines a weakening of crust and lithosphere. However, the strength drop is not followed by an appreciable deformation. When external stress or velocity fields are applied, the coupled effects with plume presence and melt production lead to great modifications of the lithospheric structure. Topography profiles are characterized by the presence of a horst and graben structure, and extensive erosion of the lithosphere always occurs. The presence

  19. Droplet formation from the breakup of micron-sized liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hoeve, Wim; van der Bos, Arjan; Versluis, Michel; Snoeijer, Jacco; Brenner, Michael P.; Lohse, Detlef

    2009-11-01

    Droplet formation from the breakup of a liquid jet emerging from a micron-sized circular nozzle is investigated with ultra high-speed imaging at 1 million frames per second and within a lubrication approximation model [Eggers and Dupont, Phys. Rev. Lett. 262, 1994, 205-221]. The capillary time τc= √ρr^3 / γ is extremely small -- of the order of 1μs. In the analyzed low Reynolds number regime the jet breakup is driven by surface tension forces only. Rayleigh breakup is not influenced by the surrounding air. The high- speed imaging results and those from the model calculation perfectly agree for various liquid viscosities and jet velocities, confirming a universal scaling law also for diminutive Rayleigh jets.

  20. Proton-Deuteron Break-Up Measurements with Bina at 135 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami-Kalantari, M.; Amir-Ahmadi, H. R.; Biegun, A.; Gašparić, I.; Joulaeizadeh, L.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kistryn, St.; Kozela, A.; Mardanpour, H.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Moeini, H.; Ramazani-Moghaddam-Arani, A.; Shende, S. V.; Stephan, E.; Sworst, R.

    High-precision measurements of the proton-deuteron elastic and break-up reaction have been performed in the past at KVI and elsewhere with the aim to study three-nucleon force (3NF) effects. In the present work, we explored 3NF effects in the break-up scattering process by performing a measurement of vector analyzing powers and differential cross sections using a 135 MeV polarized-proton beam impinging on a liquid-deuterium target. For this study, we used a new experimental setup, Big Instrument for Nuclear-polarization Analysis, BINA, which covers almost the entire kinematical phase space of the break-up reaction. The results are interpreted with the help of state-of-the-art Faddeev calculations.

  1. Measurements of scattering observables for the pd break-up reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami-Kalantari, M.; Amir-Ahmadi, H. R.; Biegun, A.; Gašparic, I.; Joulaeizadeh, L.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kistryn, St.; Kozela, A.; Mardanpour, H.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Moeini, H.; Ramazani-Moghaddam-Arani, A.; Shende, S. V.; Stephan, E.; Sworst, R.

    2010-04-01

    High-precision measurements of the scattering observables such as cross sections and analyzing powers for the proton-deuteron elastic and break-up reactions have been performed at KVI in the last two decades and elsewhere to investigate various aspects of the three-nucleon force (3NF) effects simultaneously. In 2006 an experiment was performed to study these effects in p+d break-up reaction at 135 MeV with the detection system, Big Instrument for Nuclear polarization Analysis, BINA. BINA covers almost the entire kinematical phase space of the break-up reaction. The results are interpreted with the help of state-of-the-art Faddeev calculations and are partly presented in this contribution.

  2. Practical method to identify orbital anomaly as spacecraft breakup in the geostationary region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uetsuhara, Masahiko; Hanada, Toshiya

    2013-09-01

    Identifying spacecraft breakup events is an essential issue for better understanding of the current orbital debris environment. This paper proposes an observation planning approach to identify an orbital anomaly, which appears as a significant discontinuity in archived orbital history, as a spacecraft breakup. The proposed approach is applicable to orbital anomalies in the geostationary region. The proposed approach selects a spacecraft that experienced an orbital anomaly, and then predicts trajectories of possible fragments of the spacecraft at an observation epoch. This paper theoretically demonstrates that observation planning for the possible fragments can be conducted. To do this, long-term behaviors of the possible fragments are evaluated. It is concluded that intersections of their trajectories will converge into several corresponding regions in the celestial sphere even if the breakup epoch is not specified and it has uncertainty of the order of several weeks.

  3. Instability of nano- and microscale liquid metal filaments: Transition from single droplet collapse to multidroplet breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnett, Chris A.; Mahady, Kyle; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Afkhami, Shahriar; Rack, P. D.; Kondic, L.

    2015-11-23

    We carry out experimental and numerical studies to investigate the collapse and breakup of finite size, nano- and microscale, liquid metal filaments supported on a substrate. We find the critical dimensions below which filaments do not break up but rather collapse to a single droplet. The transition from collapse to breakup can be described as a competition between two fluid dynamic phenomena: the capillary driven end retraction and the Rayleigh–Plateau type instability mechanism that drives the breakup. We focus on the unique spatial and temporal transition region between these two phenomena using patterned metallic thin film strips and pulsed-laser-induced dewetting. The experimental results are compared to an analytical model proposed by Driessen et al. and modified to include substrate interactions. Additionally, we report the results of numerical simulations based on a volume-of-fluid method to provide additional insight and highlight the importance of liquid metal resolidification, which reduces inertial effects.

  4. Three-body breakup in dissociative electron attachment to the water molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, Daniel J.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2008-08-28

    We report the results of {\\em ab initio} calculations on dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to water that demonstrate the importance of including three-body breakup in the dissociation dynamics. While three-body breakup is ubiquitous in the analogous process of dissociative recombination, its importance in low-energy dissociative electron attachment to a polyatomic target has not previously been quantified. Our calculations, along with our earlier studies of DEA into two-body channels, indicate that three-body breakup is a major component of the observed O- cross section. The local complex potential model provides a generally accurate picture of the experimentallyobserved features in this system, reproducing some quantitatively, others qualitatively, and one not at all.

  5. Oil slicks on water surface: Breakup, coalescence, and droplet formation under breaking waves.

    PubMed

    Nissanka, Indrajith D; Yapa, Poojitha D

    2017-01-15

    The ability to calculate the oil droplet size distribution (DSD) and its dynamic behavior in the water column is important in oil spill modeling. Breaking waves disperse oil from a surface slick into the water column as droplets of varying sizes. Oil droplets undergo further breakup and coalescence in the water column due to the turbulence. Available models simulate oil DSD based on empirical/equilibrium equations. However, the oil DSD evolution due to subsequent droplet breakup and coalescence in the water column can be best represented by a dynamic population model. This paper develops a phenomenological model to calculate the oil DSD in wave breaking conditions and ocean turbulence and is based on droplet breakup and coalescence. Its results are compared with data from laboratory experiments that include different oil types, different weathering times, and different breaking wave heights. The model comparisons showed a good agreement with experimental data.

  6. Study of 10 Be and 16 C cluster structure by means of breakup reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Aquila, D.

    2016-03-01

    The study of cluster structures in nuclei far from stability represents a valid tool to explore the nuclear force in few-body systems. In this paper we discuss a new experimental investigation of the structure of 10Be and 16C nuclei by means of projectile sequential break-up reactions induced on CH2 target at intermediate-energies. Their spectroscopy is obtained via a relative energy analysis of break-up fragments with the CHIMERA multi-detector. From 4He+6He correlations we suggest the presence of a new state at about 13.5MeV in 10Be. The inspection of 6He+10Be break-up channel reveals the existence of a possible high-lying excited state at 20.6MeV in 16C. Finally, new perspectives concerning the improvement of the present results are discussed.

  7. The initiation of segmented buoyancy-driven melting during continental breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallacher, Ryan J.; Keir, Derek; Harmon, Nicholas; Stuart, Graham; Leroy, Sylvie; Hammond, James O. S.; Kendall, J.-Michael; Ayele, Atalay; Goitom, Berhe; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Ahmed, Abdulhakim

    2016-10-01

    Melting of the mantle during continental breakup leads to magmatic intrusion and volcanism, yet our understanding of the location and dominant mechanisms of melt generation in rifting environments is impeded by a paucity of direct observations of mantle melting. It is unclear when during the rifting process the segmented nature of magma supply typical of seafloor spreading initiates. Here, we use Rayleigh-wave tomography to construct a high-resolution absolute three-dimensional shear-wave velocity model of the upper 250 km beneath the Afar triple junction, imaging the mantle response during progressive continental breakup. Our model suggests melt production is highest and melting depths deepest early during continental breakup. Elevated melt production during continental rifting is likely due to localized thinning and melt focusing when the rift is narrow. In addition, we interpret segmented zones of melt supply beneath the rift, suggesting that buoyancy-driven active upwelling of the mantle initiates early during continental rifting.

  8. The initiation of segmented buoyancy-driven melting during continental breakup.

    PubMed

    Gallacher, Ryan J; Keir, Derek; Harmon, Nicholas; Stuart, Graham; Leroy, Sylvie; Hammond, James O S; Kendall, J-Michael; Ayele, Atalay; Goitom, Berhe; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Ahmed, Abdulhakim

    2016-10-18

    Melting of the mantle during continental breakup leads to magmatic intrusion and volcanism, yet our understanding of the location and dominant mechanisms of melt generation in rifting environments is impeded by a paucity of direct observations of mantle melting. It is unclear when during the rifting process the segmented nature of magma supply typical of seafloor spreading initiates. Here, we use Rayleigh-wave tomography to construct a high-resolution absolute three-dimensional shear-wave velocity model of the upper 250 km beneath the Afar triple junction, imaging the mantle response during progressive continental breakup. Our model suggests melt production is highest and melting depths deepest early during continental breakup. Elevated melt production during continental rifting is likely due to localized thinning and melt focusing when the rift is narrow. In addition, we interpret segmented zones of melt supply beneath the rift, suggesting that buoyancy-driven active upwelling of the mantle initiates early during continental rifting.

  9. On jet impingement and thin film breakup on a horizontal superhydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, Joseph F.; Maynes, Daniel; Crockett, Julie

    2015-11-01

    When a vertical laminar jet impinges on a horizontal surface, it will spread out in a thin film. If the surface is hydrophobic and a downstream depth is not maintained, the film will radially expand until it breaks up into filaments or droplets. We present the first analysis and model that describes the location of this transition for both isotropic and anisotropic structured superhydrophobic (SH) surfaces. All surfaces explored are hydrophobic or SH, where the SH surfaces exhibit an apparent slip at the plane of the surface due to a shear free condition above the air filled cavities between the structures. The influence of apparent slip on the entire flow field is significant and yields behavior that deviates notably from classical behavior for a smooth hydrophilic surface where a hydraulic jump would form. Instead, break up into droplets occurs where the jet's outward radial momentum is balanced by the inward surface tension force of the advancing film. For hydrophobic surfaces, or SH surfaces with random micropatterning, the apparent slip on the surface is uniform in all directions and droplet breakup occurs in a circular pattern. When alternating rib/cavity microstructures are used to create the SH surface, the apparent slip varies as a function of the azimuthal coordinate, and thus, the breakup location is elliptically shaped. The thin film dynamics are modeled by a radial momentum analysis for a given jet Weber number and specified slip length and the location of breakup for multiple surfaces over a range of jet Weber numbers and realistic slip length values is quantified. The results of the analysis show that the breakup radius increases with increasing Weber number and slip length. The eccentricity of the breakup ellipse for the rib/cavity SH structures increases with increasing Weber number and slip length as well. A generalized model that allows prediction of the transition (break-up) location as a function of all influencing parameters is presented

  10. The Dispersal of East Gondwana from Continental Breakup to the Start of the Cretaceous Quiet Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. K.; Lawver, L. A.; Norton, I. O.; Gahagan, L.

    2014-12-01

    Existing plate models for the breakup of Africa and East Gondwana (Australia, East Antarctica, India, Madagascar, the Seychelles, and Sri Lanka) are problematic and require revision. Specific problems include the utilization of dubious Gondwana configurations, improbable plate motion, and/or a failure to satisfy the holistic marine magnetic anomaly data. I present here a new model for the breakup of East Gondwana. This new model begins from a constrained, pre-breakup, Gondwana configuration. Out of this initial "tight-fit" configuration, East Gondwana rifts from West Gondwana (Africa & South America) as a cohesive unit. During this breakup and subsequent seafloor spreading, East Gondwana is devoid of any internal compression or anomalous plate motion. The overall motion of East Gondwana is constrained by seafloor spreading in the coeval Somali Basin and Mozambique/Riiser Larsen Basins. Seafloor spreading in these basins is modeled using existing marine magnetic anomaly interpretations and satellite-derived gravity data. Our model is uniquely able to satisfy the magnetic anomaly observations in both of the aforementioned basins without invoking improbable plate motion or configurations. Additionally, our plate model provides valuable insight into the breakup of India and East Antarctica. In this model, we fix India to Madagascar from breakup to 90 Ma, thus eventual separation between India and East Antarctica is an output, not an input of our model. We suggest that this separation occurred diachronously from ~140 Ma in the east to ~120 Ma in the west. This modeled motion between India and East Antarctica agrees well with geophysical observations from the margin of East Antarctica and our preliminary analysis of margin character and variability.

  11. Preventing alternans-induced spiral wave breakup in cardiac tissue: An ion-channel-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allexandre, D.; Otani, N. F.

    2004-12-01

    The detailed processes involved in spiral wave breakup, believed to be one major mechanism by which tachycardia evolves into fibrillation, are still poorly understood. This has rendered difficult the proper design of an efficient and practical control stimulus protocol to eliminate such events. In order to gain new insights into the underlying electrophysiological and dynamical mechanisms of breakup, we applied linear perturbation theory to a steadily rotating spiral wave in two spatial dimensions. The tissue was composed of cells modeled using the Fenton-Karma equations whose parameters were chosen to emphasize alternans as a primary mechanism for breakup. Along with one meandering mode, not just one but several unstable alternans modes were found with differing growth rates, frequencies, and spatial structures. As the conductance of the fast inward current was increased, the instability of the modes increased, consistent with increased meandering and propensity for spiral breakup in simulations. We also explored a promising new approach, based on the theory, for the design of an energy efficient electrical stimulus protocol to control spiral wave breakup. The novelty lies in addressing the problem directly at the ion channel level and taking advantage of the inherent two dimensional nature of the rotating wave. With the help of the eigenmode method, we were able to calculate the exact timing and amplitude of the stimulus, and locate it optimally to maximize efficiency. The analysis led to a special-case example that demonstrated that a single, properly timed stimulus can have a global effect, suppressing all growing alternans modes over the entire tissue, thus inhibiting spiral wave breakup.

  12. Mechanisms of free-surface breakup in vibration-induced liquid atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukasinovic, Bojan; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms of droplet formation that take place during vibration-induced drop atomization are investigated experimentally. Droplet ejection results from the breakup of transient liquid spikes that form following the localized collapse of free-surface waves. Breakup typically begins with capillary pinch-off of a droplet from the tip of the spike and can be followed by additional pinch-offs of satellite droplets if the corresponding capillary number is sufficiently small (e.g., in low-viscosity liquids). If the capillary number is increased (e.g., in viscous liquids), breakup first occurs near the base of the spike, with or without subsequent breakup of the detached, thread-like spike. The formation of these detached threads is governed by a breakup mechanism that is separated from the tip-dominated capillary pinch-off mechanism by an order of magnitude in terms of dimensionless driving frequency f*. The dependence of breakup time and unbroken spike length on fluid and driving parameters is established over a broad range of dimensionless driving frequencies (10-3

  13. On the driving forces of the Pangea breakup and northward drift of the Indian subcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Masaki; Hamano, Yozo

    2015-04-01

    During the breakup of the supercontinent Pangea, the Indian subcontinent became isolated from the southern part of Pangea, called Gondwanaland, at around 130 Ma, moved northwards, and eventually collided with Eurasia to form the Himalayas at around 40-50 Ma. The reason why the Indian subcontinent moved at such a high speed of up to c. 20 cm/yr remains a controversial issue in geodynamics. Here, numerical simulation of 3-D spherical mantle convection with an Earth-like Rayleigh number is reported, considering the assembly of highly viscous continental blocks with the configuration of Pangea, to determine the geodynamic mechanisms of the Pangea breakup, the subsequent continental drift, and the high-speed northward drift of the Indian subcontinent. Our numerical simulations approximately reproduced the process of continental drift from the breakup of Pangea at 200 Ma to the present-day continental distribution. These simulations revealed that a major factor in the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent was the large-scale cold mantle downwelling that developed spontaneously in the North Tethys Ocean, attributed to the overall shape of Pangea. The strong lateral mantle flow caused by the high-temperature anomaly beneath Pangea, due to the thermal insulation effect, enhanced the acceleration of the Indian subcontinent during the early stage of the Pangea breakup. The large-scale hot upwelling plumes from the lower mantle, initially located under Africa, might have contributed to the formation of the large-scale cold mantle downwelling in the North Tethys Ocean. References: [1] Yoshida, M., Effects of various lithospheric yield stresses and different mantle-heating modes on the breakup of the Pangea supercontinent, Geophys. Res. Lett., 41(9), 3060-3067, doi:10.1002/2014GL060023, 2014. [2] Yoshida, M. and Y. Hamano, Pangea breakup and northward drift of the Indian subcontinent reproduced by a numerical model of mantle convection, Submitted to Scientific Reports, 2015

  14. Onorbit IMU alignment error budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The Star Tracker, Crew Optical Alignment Sight (COAS), and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) from a complex navigation system with a multitude of error sources were combined. A complete list of the system errors is presented. The errors were combined in a rational way to yield an estimate of the IMU alignment accuracy for STS-1. The expected standard deviation in the IMU alignment error for STS-1 type alignments was determined to be 72 arc seconds per axis for star tracker alignments and 188 arc seconds per axis for COAS alignments. These estimates are based on current knowledge of the star tracker, COAS, IMU, and navigation base error specifications, and were partially verified by preliminary Monte Carlo analysis.

  15. Nova laser alignment control system

    SciTech Connect

    Van Arsdall, P.J.; Holloway, F.W.; McGuigan, D.L.; Shelton, R.T.

    1984-03-29

    Alignment of the Nova laser requires control of hundreds of optical components in the ten beam paths. Extensive application of computer technology makes daily alignment practical. The control system is designed in a manner which provides both centralized and local manual operator controls integrated with automatic closed loop alignment. Menudriven operator consoles using high resolution color graphics displays overlaid with transport touch panels allow laser personnel to interact efficiently with the computer system. Automatic alignment is accomplished by using image analysis techniques to determine beam references points from video images acquired along the laser chain. A major goal of the design is to contribute substantially to rapid experimental turnaround and consistent alignment results. This paper describes the computer-based control structure and the software methods developed for aligning this large laser system.

  16. Nuclear reactor internals alignment configuration

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Singleton, Norman R.

    2009-11-10

    An alignment system that employs jacking block assemblies and alignment posts around the periphery of the top plate of a nuclear reactor lower internals core shroud to align an upper core plate with the lower internals and the core shroud with the core barrel. The distal ends of the alignment posts are chamfered and are closely received within notches machined in the upper core plate at spaced locations around the outer circumference of the upper core plate. The jacking block assemblies are used to center the core shroud in the core barrel and the alignment posts assure the proper orientation of the upper core plate. The alignment posts may alternately be formed in the upper core plate and the notches may be formed in top plate.

  17. Sparking limits, cavity loading, and beam breakup instability associated with high-current rf linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Faehl, R.J.; Lemons, D.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    The limitations on high-current rf linacs due to gap sparking, cavity loading, and the beam breakup instability are studied. It appears possible to achieve cavity accelerating gradients as high as 35 MV/m without sparking. Furthermore, a linear analysis, as well as self-consistent particle simulations of a multipulsed 10 kA beam, indicated that only a negligible small fraction of energy is radiated into nonfundamental cavity modes. Finally, the beam breakup instability is analyzed and found to be able to magnify initial radial perturbations by a factor of no more than about 20 during the beam transit time through a 1 GeV accelerator.

  18. Alignment between seafloor spreading directions and absolute plate motions through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Simon E.; Flament, Nicolas; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2016-02-01

    The history of seafloor spreading in the ocean basins provides a detailed record of relative motions between Earth's tectonic plates since Pangea breakup. Determining how tectonic plates have moved relative to the Earth's deep interior is more challenging. Recent studies of contemporary plate motions have demonstrated links between relative plate motion and absolute plate motion (APM), and with seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle. Here we explore the link between spreading directions and APM since the Early Cretaceous. We find a significant alignment between APM and spreading directions at mid-ocean ridges; however, the degree of alignment is influenced by geodynamic setting, and is strongest for mid-Atlantic spreading ridges between plates that are not directly influenced by time-varying slab pull. In the Pacific, significant mismatches between spreading and APM direction may relate to a major plate-mantle reorganization. We conclude that spreading fabric can be used to improve models of APM.

  19. Aligned Defrosting Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    17 August 2004 This July 2004 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a group of aligned barchan sand dunes in the martian north polar region. At the time, the dunes were covered with seasonal frost, but the frost had begun to sublime away, leaving dark spots and dark outlines around the dunes. The surrounding plains exhibit small, diffuse spots that are also the result of subliming seasonal frost. This northern spring image, acquired on a descending ground track (as MGS was moving north to south on the 'night' side of Mars) is located near 78.8oN, 34.8oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across and sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  20. Lunar Alignments - Identification and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, A. César

    Lunar alignments are difficult to establish given the apparent lack of written accounts clearly pointing toward lunar alignments for individual temples. While some individual cases are reviewed and highlighted, the weight of the proof must fall on statistical sampling. Some definitions for the lunar alignments are provided in order to clarify the targets, and thus, some new tools are provided to try to test the lunar hypothesis in several cases, especially in megalithic astronomy.

  1. The alignment strategy of HADES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechenova, O.; Pechenov, V.; Galatyuk, T.; Hennino, T.; Holzmann, R.; Kornakov, G.; Markert, J.; Müntz, C.; Salabura, P.; Schmah, A.; Schwab, E.; Stroth, J.

    2015-06-01

    The global as well as intrinsic alignment of any spectrometer impacts directly on its performance and the quality of the achievable physics results. An overview of the current alignment procedure of the DiElectron Spectrometer HADES is presented with an emphasis on its main features and its accuracy. The sequence of all steps and procedures is given, including details on photogrammetric and track-based alignment.

  2. Automatic bone segmentation and alignment from MR knee images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Liang; Zach, Christopher; Styner, Martin; Charles, Cecil; Niethammer, Marc

    2010-03-01

    Automatic image analysis of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the knee is simplified by bringing the knee into a reference position. While the knee is typically put into a reference position during image acquisition, this alignment will generally not be perfect. To correct for imperfections, we propose a two-step process of bone segmentation followed by elastic tissue deformation. The approach makes use of a fully-automatic segmentation of femur and tibia from T1 and T2* images. The segmentation algorithm is based on a continuous convex optimization problem, incorporating regional, and shape information. The regional terms are included from a probabilistic viewpoint, which readily allows the inclusion of shape information. Segmentation of the outer boundary of the cortical bone is encouraged by adding simple appearance-based information to the optimization problem. The resulting segmentation without the shape alignment step is globally optimal. Standard registration is problematic for knee alignment due to the distinct physical properties of the tissues constituting the knee (bone, muscle, etc.). We therefore develop an alternative alignment approach based on a simple elastic deformation model combined with strict enforcement of similarity transforms for femur and tibia based on the obtained segmentations.

  3. Alignment of Helical Membrane Protein Sequences Using AlignMe

    PubMed Central

    Khafizov, Kamil; Forrest, Lucy R.

    2013-01-01

    Few sequence alignment methods have been designed specifically for integral membrane proteins, even though these important proteins have distinct evolutionary and structural properties that might affect their alignments. Existing approaches typically consider membrane-related information either by using membrane-specific substitution matrices or by assigning distinct penalties for gap creation in transmembrane and non-transmembrane regions. Here, we ask whether favoring matching of predicted transmembrane segments within a standard dynamic programming algorithm can improve the accuracy of pairwise membrane protein sequence alignments. We tested various strategies using a specifically designed program called AlignMe. An updated set of homologous membrane protein structures, called HOMEP2, was used as a reference for optimizing the gap penalties. The best of the membrane-protein optimized approaches were then tested on an independent reference set of membrane protein sequence alignments from the BAliBASE collection. When secondary structure (S) matching was combined with evolutionary information (using a position-specific substitution matrix (P)), in an approach we called AlignMePS, the resultant pairwise alignments were typically among the most accurate over a broad range of sequence similarities when compared to available methods. Matching transmembrane predictions (T), in addition to evolutionary information, and secondary-structure predictions, in an approach called AlignMePST, generally reduces the accuracy of the alignments of closely-related proteins in the BAliBASE set relative to AlignMePS, but may be useful in cases of extremely distantly related proteins for which sequence information is less informative. The open source AlignMe code is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/alignme/, and at http://www.forrestlab.org, along with an online server and the HOMEP2 data set. PMID:23469223

  4. Deformations in VLBI antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, T. A.; Thomsen, P.

    1988-01-01

    A study is presented of deformations in antennas with the emphasis on their influence on VLBI measurements. The GIFTS structural analysis program has been used to model the VLBI antenna in Fairbanks (Alaska). The report identifies key deformations and studies the effect of gravity, wind, and temperature. Estimates of expected deformations are given.

  5. GS-align for glycan structure alignment and similarity measurement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hui Sun; Jo, Sunhwan; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Park, Sang-Jun; Skolnick, Jeffrey; Lee, Jooyoung; Im, Wonpil

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Glycans play critical roles in many biological processes, and their structural diversity is key for specific protein-glycan recognition. Comparative structural studies of biological molecules provide useful insight into their biological relationships. However, most computational tools are designed for protein structure, and despite their importance, there is no currently available tool for comparing glycan structures in a sequence order- and size-independent manner. Results: A novel method, GS-align, is developed for glycan structure alignment and similarity measurement. GS-align generates possible alignments between two glycan structures through iterative maximum clique search and fragment superposition. The optimal alignment is then determined by the maximum structural similarity score, GS-score, which is size-independent. Benchmark tests against the Protein Data Bank (PDB) N-linked glycan library and PDB homologous/non-homologous N-glycoprotein sets indicate that GS-align is a robust computational tool to align glycan structures and quantify their structural similarity. GS-align is also applied to template-based glycan structure prediction and monosaccharide substitution matrix generation to illustrate its utility. Availability and implementation: http://www.glycanstructure.org/gsalign. Contact: wonpil@ku.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25857669

  6. Theoretical analysis and simulation of obstructed breakup of micro-droplet in T-junction under an asymmetric pressure difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuhang; Bai, Lin; Jin, Yong; Cheng, Yi

    2017-03-01

    Asymmetric droplet breakup under a pressure difference at two outlets of a T-junction is investigated theoretically and numerically in this study. An accurate analysis of the evolution of droplet dynamics during the obstructed breakup process has been conducted. Meanwhile, the lattice Boltzmann method based on color gradient model is employed to simulate the system with the verification of the theoretical results. It is demonstrated that the Zou-He boundary setting at each outlet is advantageous for modifying the pressure drop of the two branches of T-junction. The results reveal that asymmetric breakup of the unequally sized droplets follows two steps, namely, the filling stage and the breakup stage. Then a universal parameter is proposed to describe the asymmetric condition of droplet breakup in T-junction, which plays a key role to characterize the temporal evolution of volume ratio and the droplet length of formed smaller droplets.

  7. Mask alignment system for semiconductor processing

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Aaron P.; Carlson, Charles T.; Weaver, William T.; Grant, Christopher N.

    2017-02-14

    A mask alignment system for providing precise and repeatable alignment between ion implantation masks and workpieces. The system includes a mask frame having a plurality of ion implantation masks loosely connected thereto. The mask frame is provided with a plurality of frame alignment cavities, and each mask is provided with a plurality of mask alignment cavities. The system further includes a platen for holding workpieces. The platen may be provided with a plurality of mask alignment pins and frame alignment pins configured to engage the mask alignment cavities and frame alignment cavities, respectively. The mask frame can be lowered onto the platen, with the frame alignment cavities moving into registration with the frame alignment pins to provide rough alignment between the masks and workpieces. The mask alignment cavities are then moved into registration with the mask alignment pins, thereby shifting each individual mask into precise alignment with a respective workpiece.

  8. The effects of extensional inheritance on transtensional deformation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naliboff, J.; Buiter, S. J.; Le Pourhiet, L.; May, D.

    2015-12-01

    Continental rifting and breakup frequently occurs through multiple phases of extension in which margin architecture is governed by distinct modes of brittle and viscous deformation, as well as surface processes. Transitions between such phases of extension may in some cases reflect plate-scale changes in extension obliquity and velocity. For example, recent studies indicate that localization of transtensional deformation onto a narrow shear zone in the Gulf of California Rift corresponds temporally with an increase in rift obliquity. Here, we use high-resolution 3-D models (run with pTatin3D) to examine how transtensional deformation patterns evolve with such increases in extension obliquity. Our models build on previous crustal-scale analogue and numerical studies examining oblique reactivation of normal faults. These studies show that the orientation and strength of inherited normal faults strongly control the style of slip and deformation partitioning between new and reactivated faults. While highly insightful, these studies examine deformation over limited spatial extents and do not account for key processes such as isostasy and temperature-dependent rock strength. Here, we model the thermal-mechanical evolution of the lithosphere and asthenosphere to a depth of 200 km. Deformation occurs through an initial phase of orthogonal, Basin and Range style extension, followed by 1-2 phases of extension at different obliquities. The initial lithospheric structure and time-dependent boundary conditions follow geologic observations and plate-reconstructions within the Gulf of California. Our experiments highlight the strong control of inheritance on transtensional crustal deformation. By comparing fault development, crustal thickness evolution and block rotations directly with observations from the Gulf of California and other extensional and transtensional regions, we can better evaluate the relative control of structural inheritance on passive margin architecture.

  9. Lexical alignment in triadic communication

    PubMed Central

    Foltz, Anouschka; Gaspers, Judith; Thiele, Kristina; Stenneken, Prisca; Cimiano, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Lexical alignment refers to the adoption of one’s interlocutor’s lexical items. Accounts of the mechanisms underlying such lexical alignment differ (among other aspects) in the role assigned to addressee-centered behavior. In this study, we used a triadic communicative situation to test which factors may modulate the extent to which participants’ lexical alignment reflects addressee-centered behavior. Pairs of naïve participants played a picture matching game and received information about the order in which pictures were to be matched from a voice over headphones. On critical trials, participants did or did not hear a name for the picture to be matched next over headphones. Importantly, when the voice over headphones provided a name, it did not match the name that the interlocutor had previously used to describe the object. Participants overwhelmingly used the word that the voice over headphones provided. This result points to non-addressee-centered behavior and is discussed in terms of disrupting alignment with the interlocutor as well as in terms of establishing alignment with the voice over headphones. In addition, the type of picture (line drawing vs. tangram shape) independently modulated lexical alignment, such that participants showed more lexical alignment to their interlocutor for (more ambiguous) tangram shapes compared to line drawings. Overall, the results point to a rather large role for non-addressee-centered behavior during lexical alignment. PMID:25762955

  10. Well-pump alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1998-01-01

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping.

  11. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool.

    PubMed

    Henstock, Peter V; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow.

  12. Drive alignment pays maintenance dividends

    SciTech Connect

    Fedder, R.

    2008-12-15

    Proper alignment of the motor and gear drive on conveying and processing equipment will result in longer bearing and coupling life, along with lower maintenance costs. Selecting an alignment free drive package instead of a traditional foot mounted drive and motor is a major advancement toward these goals. 4 photos.

  13. Origins of axial inhomogeneity of magnetic performance in hot deformed Nd-Fe-B ring magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wen-Zong; Chen, Ren-Jie; Tang, Xu; Lin, Min; Lee, Don; Yan, Aru

    2012-04-01

    Hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B ring magnets have wide potential applications. These ring magnets, however, exhibit axial inhomogeneity of magnetic performance. In this work, the effects of density, pressure, deformation temperature, deformation rate, and texture on axial magnetic performance were investigated over ring magnets prepared by backward extrusion method. It was demonstrated that the texture accounted for the variation of magnetic performance along axial direction. Microstructures of the ring magnets were examined with SEM, which further revealed two different origins of axial inhomogeneity of magnetic performance. The deformation degree of Nd-Fe-B grains plays a critical role in the performance difference between the top and middle part of ring magnet. But that between the middle and bottom part mainly results from different alignment orientations of platelet Nd-Fe-B grains. It was both deformation degree and alignment orientation that determined the axial texture and consequent magnetic performance of hot-deformed ring magnets.

  14. DebriSat - A Planned Laboratory-Based Satellite Impact Experiment for Breakup Fragment Characterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Clark, S.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Huynh, T.; Opiela, J.; Polk, M.; Roebuck, B.; Rushing, R.; Sorge, M.; Werremeyer, M.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the DebriSat project is to characterize fragments generated by a hypervelocity collision involving a modern satellite in low Earth orbit (LEO). The DebriSat project will update and expand upon the information obtained in the 1992 Satellite Orbital Debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT), which characterized the breakup of a 1960 s US Navy Transit satellite. There are three phases to this project: the design and fabrication of DebriSat - an engineering model representing a modern, 60-cm/50-kg class LEO satellite; conduction of a laboratory-based hypervelocity impact to catastrophically break up the satellite; and characterization of the properties of breakup fragments down to 2 mm in size. The data obtained, including fragment size, area-to-mass ratio, density, shape, material composition, optical properties, and radar cross-section distributions, will be used to supplement the DoD s and NASA s satellite breakup models to better describe the breakup outcome of a modern satellite.

  15. Development of continental margins of the Atlantic Ocean and successive breakup of the Pangaea-3 supercontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melankholina, E. N.; Sushchevskaya, N. M.

    2017-01-01

    Comparative tectonic analysis of passive margins of the Atlantic Ocean has been performed. Tectonotypes of both volcanic and nonvolcanic margins are described, and their comparison with other passive Atlantic margins is given. The structural features of margins, peculiarities of magmatism, its sources and reasons for geochemical enrichment of melts are discussed. The important role of melting of the continental lithosphere in the development of magmatism is demonstrated. Enriched EM I and EM II sources are determined for the lower parts of the volcanic section, and a depleted or poorly enriched source is determined for the upper parts of the volcanic section based on isotope data. The conclusions of the paper relate to tectonic settings of the initial occurrence of magmatism and rifting and breakup during the period of opening of the Mesozoic Ocean. It was found out that breakup and magmatism at proximal margins led only to insignificant structural transformations and reduction of the thickness of the ancient continental crust, while very important magmatic events happened later in the distal zone. New growth of magmatic crust at the stage of continental breakup is determined as a typical feature of distal zones of the margins under study. The relationship of development of margins with the impact of deep plumes as the source of magmatic material or a heat source only is discussed. Progradation of the zone of extension and breakup into the areas of cold lithosphere of the Atlantic and the formation of a single tectonomagmatic system of the ocean are under consideration.

  16. Bouncing Back from a Breakup: Attachment, Time Perspective, Mental Health, and Romantic Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Steven P.; Sifers, Sarah K.

    2011-01-01

    Coping with a romantic breakup is a normal developmental task of emerging adulthood. Because of their role in influencing interpersonal relationships and adjustment, attachment history and time perspectives may influence resilience to romantic loss. In an online survey of 1,404 university students ages 18-25 who reported experiencing recent…

  17. An Analysis of Recent Major Breakups in he Low Earth Orbit Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Anz-Meador, P. D.

    2010-01-01

    Of the 190 known satellite breakups between 1961 and 2006, only one generated more than 500 cataloged fragments. The event was the explosion of the Pegasus Hydrazine Auxiliary Propulsion System in 1996, adding 713 fragments to the U.S. Satellite Catalog. Since the beginning of 2007; however, the near-Earth environment has been subjected to several major breakups, including the Fengyun-1C anti-satellite test and the explosion of Briz-M in 2007, the unusual breakup of Cosmos 2421 in 2008, and the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 in 2009. Combined, these events added more than 5000 large (> or equal 10 cm) fragments to the environment. Detailed analysis of the radar cross section measurements and orbit histories of the fragments from these major events reveals several unusual characteristics in their size and area-to-mass ratio distributions. The characteristics could be related to the material composition of the parent vehicles, the nature of the breakup, and the composition and physical property of the fragments. In addition, the majority of these fragments are expected to remain in orbit for at least decades. Their long-term impact to the environment is analyzed using the NASA orbital debris evolutionary model, LEGEND. Descriptions of these analyses and a summary are included in this paper.

  18. Characterization of the 2012-044C Briz-M Upper Stage Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, M. J.; Hamilton, J.; Horstman, M.; Papanyan, V.

    2013-01-01

    On 6 August, 2012, Russia launched two commercial satellites aboard a Proton rocket, and attempted to place them in geosynchronous orbit using a Briz-M upper stage (2012-044C, SSN 38746). Unfortunately, the upper stage failed early in its burn and was left stranded in an elliptical orbit with a perigee in low Earth orbit (LEO). Because the stage failed with much of its fuel on board, it was deemed a significant breakup risk. These fears were confirmed when it broke up 16 October, creating a large cloud of debris with perigees below that of the International Space Station. The debris cloud was tracked by the US Space Surveillance Network (SSN), which can reliably detect and track objects down to about 10 cm in size. Because of the unusual geometry of the breakup, there was an opportunity for NASA Orbital Debris Program Office to use specialized radar assets to characterize the extent of the debris cloud in sizes smaller than the standard debris tracked by the SSN. This paper will describe the observation campaign to measure the small particle distributions of this cloud, and presents the results of the analysis of the data. We shall compare the data to the modelled size distribution, number, and shape of the cloud, and what implications this may have for future breakup debris models. We shall conclude the paper with a discussion how this measurement process can be improved for future breakups.

  19. Real-Time Characterization of Formation and Breakup of Iridium Clusters in Highly Dealuminated Zeolite Y

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun, Alper; Gates, Bruce C.

    2009-01-15

    The chemistry of formation of iridium clusters from mononuclear iridium diethylene complexes anchored in dealuminated Y zeolite, and their subsequent breakup -- all including changes in the metal-metal, metal-support, and metal-ligand interactions -- is demonstrated by time-resolved EXAFS, XANES, and IR spectroscopy.

  20. Four-body calculation of {sup 6}He breakup with the Coulomb-corrected eikonal method

    SciTech Connect

    Baye, D.; Capel, P.; Descouvemont, P.; Suzuki, Y.

    2009-02-15

    The elastic breakup of a three-body projectile on a target is studied within the eikonal approximation with full account of final-state interactions. Bound and scattering states are calculated in hyperspherical coordinates on a Lagrange mesh. A correction is introduced to avoid the divergence of breakup cross sections due to the Coulomb interaction. The eikonal approximation allows the direct calculation of various cross sections, and in particular multidifferential cross sections can be obtained. The model is applied to the breakup of {sup 6}He on {sup 208}Pb. The {sup 6}He halo nucleus is described within a three-body {alpha}+n+n model involving effective {alpha}n and nn interactions. The eikonal phase is obtained from optical potentials between {alpha} and n, and the target. Around 0.8 MeV, the total breakup cross sections exhibit a narrow 2{sup +} resonant peak superimposed over a broad bump corresponding to a 1{sup -} resonance. These results suffer from a disagreement with experimental data at 240 MeV/nucleon, where cross sections are much smaller at low energies. The obtained E1 strength distribution resembles other theoretical results and reopens a long-standing problem about the existence of a 1{sup -} low-energy resonance in the {sup 6}He continuum.

  1. Neutron Beams from Deuteron Breakup at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, M.A.; Ahle, L.; Bleuel, D.L.; Bernstein, L.; Braquest, B.R.; Cerny, J.; Heilbronn, L.H.; Jewett, C.C.; Thompson, I.; Wilson, B.

    2007-07-31

    Accelerator-based neutron sources offer many advantages, in particular tunability of the neutron beam in energy and width to match the needs of the application. Using a recently constructed neutron beam line at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL, tunable high-intensity sources of quasi-monoenergetic and broad spectrum neutrons from deuteron breakup are under development for a variety of applications.

  2. Beam Dynamics Simulation Platform and Studies of Beam Breakup in Dielectric Wakefield Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Jing, C.; Kustov, A.; Altmark, A.; Gai, W.

    2010-11-01

    A particle-Green's function beam dynamics code (BBU-3000) to study beam breakup effects is incorporated into a parallel computing framework based on the Boinc software environment, and supports both task farming on a heterogeneous cluster and local grid computing. User access to the platform is through a web browser.

  3. Beam Dynamics Simulation Platform and Studies of Beam Breakup in Dielectric Wakefield Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Jing, C.; Kustov, A.; Altmark, A.; Gai, W.

    2010-11-04

    A particle-Green's function beam dynamics code (BBU-3000) to study beam breakup effects is incorporated into a parallel computing framework based on the Boinc software environment, and supports both task farming on a heterogeneous cluster and local grid computing. User access to the platform is through a web browser.

  4. DebriSat- A Planned Laboratory-Based Satellite Impact Experiment for Breakup Fragment Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Clark, S.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Huynh, T.; Opiela, J.; Polk, M.; Roebuck, B.; Rushing, R.; Sorge, M.; Werremeyer, M.

    2013-08-01

    The goal of the DebriSat project is to characterize fragments generated by a hypervelocity collision involving a modern satellite in low Earth orbit (LEO). The DebriSat project will update and expand upon the information obtained in the 1992 Satellite Orbital Debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT), which characterized the breakup of a 1960s U.S. Navy Transit satellite. There are three phases to this project: the design and fabrication of DebriSat - an engineering model representing a modern, 60-cm/50-kg LEO satellite; performance of a laboratory-based hypervelocity impact to catastrophically break up the satellite; and characterization of the properties of breakup fragments down to 2 mm in size. The data obtained, including fragment size, area-to-mass ratio, density, shape, material composition, optical properties, and radar cross-section distributions, will be used to supplement the DoD and NASA satellite breakup models to better describe the breakup outcome of a modern satellite.

  5. Effect of interior surface finish on the break-up of commercial shaped charge liners

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E L; Schwartz, A J

    1999-08-11

    A series of experiments aimed at understanding the influence of the liner interior surface finish on the break-up of shaped charge jets has been completed. The experiments used a standard 81-mm shaped charge design, loaded with LX-14 high explosive; incorporating high-precision copper shaped charged liners. The results indicate that a significant reduction of jet break-up time occurs between a surface finish of 99.30 microinches and 375.65 microinches. Surface finishes of 4.78, 44.54 and 99.30 microinches produced significantly better ductility and associated break-up times than the 375.65-microinch finish. The baseline production process high-precision liners were measured to have an average surface finish of 44.54 microinches. The results show that for the shaped charge warhead geometry and explosive combination investigated, some care must be taken in respect to surface finish, but that very fine surface finishes do not significantly improve the jet ductility and associated break-up times.

  6. Fusion, reaction, and breakup cross sections of {sup 9}Be on a light mass target

    SciTech Connect

    Marti, G.V.; Capurro, O.A.; Pacheco, A.J.; Testoni, J.E.; Ramirez, M.; Arazi, A.; Gomes, P.R.S.; Padron, I.; Anjos, R.M.; Lubian, J.; Crema, E.

    2005-02-01

    The total fusion cross section for the {sup 9}Be+{sup 27}Al system has been measured at energies close and above the Coulomb barrier. Reaction cross sections for this system were derived from elastic scattering data, and the breakup-plus-transfer-channel cross sections were estimated from the difference between these data and measured cross-section fusion.

  7. Alignment of the MINOS FD

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, B.; Boehnlein, D.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    The results and procedure of the alignment of the MINOS Far Detector are presented. The far detector has independent alignments of SM1 and SM2. The misalignments have an estimated uncertainty of {approx}850 {micro}m for SM1 and {approx}750 {micro}m for SM2. The alignment has as inputs the average rotations of U and V as determined by optical survey and strip positions within modules measured from the module mapper. The output of this is a module-module correction for transverse mis-alignments. These results were verified by examining an independent set of data. These alignment constants on average contribute much less then 1% to the total uncertainty in the transverse strip position.

  8. The dynamics of continental breakup-related magmatism on the Norwegian volcanic margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, A. J.; Faleide, J. I.; Mjelde, R.

    2004-12-01

    The Vøring margin off mid-Norway was initiated during the earliest Eocene (~54 Ma), and large volumes of magmatic rocks were emplaced during and after continental breakup. In 2003, an ocean bottom seismometer survey was acquired on the Norwegian margin to constrain continental breakup and early seafloor spreading processes. The profile P-wave model described here crosses the northern part of the Vøring Plateau. Maximum igneous crustal thickness was found to be 18 km, decreasing to ~6.5 km over ~6 M.y. after continental breakup. Both the volume and the duration of excess magmatism after breakup is about twice of what is observed off the Møre Margin south of the Jan Mayen Fracture Zone, which offsets the margin segments by ~170 km. A similar reduction in magmatism occurs to the north over an along-margin distance of ~100 km to the Lofoten margin, but without a margin offset. There is a strong correlation between magma productivity and early plate spreading rate, which are highest just after breakup, falling with time. This is seen both at the Møre and the Vøring margin segments, suggesting a common cause. A model for the breakup- related magmatism should be able to (1) explain this correlation, (2) the magma production peak at breakup, and (3) the magmatic segmentation. Proposed end-member hypotheses are elevated upper-mantle temperatures caused by a hot mantle plume, or edge-driven small-scale convection fluxing mantle rocks through the melt zone. Both the average P-wave velocity and the major-element data at the Vøring margin indicate a low degree of melting consistent with convection. However, small scale convection does not easily explain the issues listed above. An elaboration of the mantle plume model by N. Sleep, in which buoyant plume material fills the rift-topography at the base of the lithosphere, can explain these: When the continents break apart, the buoyant plume-material flows up into the rift zone, causing excess magmatism by both elevated

  9. The dynamics of continental breakup-related magmatism on the Norwegian volcanic margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, A. J.; Faleide, J. I.; Mjelde, R.

    2007-12-01

    The Vøring margin off mid-Norway was initiated during the earliest Eocene (~54 Ma), and large volumes of magmatic rocks were emplaced during and after continental breakup. In 2003, an ocean bottom seismometer survey was acquired on the Norwegian margin to constrain continental breakup and early seafloor spreading processes. The profile P-wave model described here crosses the northern part of the Vøring Plateau. Maximum igneous crustal thickness was found to be 18 km, decreasing to ~6.5 km over ~6 M.y. after continental breakup. Both the volume and the duration of excess magmatism after breakup is about twice of what is observed off the Møre Margin south of the Jan Mayen Fracture Zone, which offsets the margin segments by ~170 km. A similar reduction in magmatism occurs to the north over an along-margin distance of ~100 km to the Lofoten margin, but without a margin offset. There is a strong correlation between magma productivity and early plate spreading rate, which are highest just after breakup, falling with time. This is seen both at the Møre and the Vøring margin segments, suggesting a common cause. A model for the breakup- related magmatism should be able to (1) explain this correlation, (2) the magma production peak at breakup, and (3) the magmatic segmentation. Proposed end-member hypotheses are elevated upper-mantle temperatures caused by a hot mantle plume, or edge-driven small-scale convection fluxing mantle rocks through the melt zone. Both the average P-wave velocity and the major-element data at the Vøring margin indicate a low degree of melting consistent with convection. However, small scale convection does not easily explain the issues listed above. An elaboration of the mantle plume model by N. Sleep, in which buoyant plume material fills the rift-topography at the base of the lithosphere, can explain these: When the continents break apart, the buoyant plume-material flows up into the rift zone, causing excess magmatism by both elevated

  10. Breakup Style and Magmatic Underplating West of the Lofoten Islands, Norway, Based on OBS Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, A. J.; Faleide, J. I.; Mjelde, R.; Murai, Y.; Flueh, E. R.

    2014-12-01

    The breakup of the Northeast Atlantic in the Early Eocene was magma-rich, forming the major part of the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP). This is seen as extrusive and intrusive magmatism in the continental domain, and as a thicker than normal oceanic crust produced the first few million years after continental breakup. The maximum magma productivity and the duration of excess magmatism varies along the margins of Northwest Europe and East Greenland, to some extent as a function of the distance from the Iceland hotspot. The Vøring Plateau off mid-Norway is the northernmost of the margin segments in northwestern Europe with extensive magmatism. North of the plateau, magmatism dies off towards the Lofoten Margin, marking the northern boundary of the NAIP here. In 2003, as part of the Euromargins Program we collected an Ocean Bottom Seismometer (OBS) profile from mainland Norway, across the Lofoten Islands, and out into the deep ocean. Forward velocity modeling using raytracing reveals a continental margin that shows transitional features between magma-rich and magma-poor rifting. On one hand, we detect an up to 2 km thick and 40-50 km wide magmatic underplate of the outer continent, on the other hand, continental thinning is greater and intrusive magmatism less than farther south. Continental breakup also appears to be somewhat delayed compared to breakup on the Vøring Plateau, consistent with increased extension. This indicates that magmatic diking, believed to quickly lead to continental breakup of volcanic margins and thus to reduce continental thinning, played a much lesser role here than at the plateau. Early post-breakup oceanic crust is up to 8 km thick, less than half of that observed farther south. The most likely interpretation of these observations, is that the source for the excess magmatism of the NAIP was not present at the Lofoten Margin during rifting, and that the excess magmatism actually observed was the result of lateral transport from the

  11. Numerical models for continental break-up: Implications for the South Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniest, A.; Koptev, A.; Burov, E.

    2017-03-01

    We propose a mechanism that explains in one unified framework the presence of continental break-up features such as failed rift arms and high-velocity and high-density bodies that occur along the South Atlantic rifted continental margins. We used 2D and 3D numerical models to investigate the impact of thermo-rheological structure of the continental lithosphere and initial plume position on continental rifting and break-up processes. 2D experiments show that break-up can be 1) "central", mantle plume-induced and directly located above the centre of the mantle anomaly, 2) "shifted", mantle plume-induced and 50 to 200 km shifted from the initial plume location or 3) "distant", self-induced due to convection and/or slab-subduction/delamination and 300 to 800 km off-set from the original plume location. With a 3D, perfectly symmetrical and laterally homogeneous setup, the location of continental break-up can be shifted hundreds of kilometres from the initial position of the mantle anomaly. We demonstrate that in case of shifted or distant continental break-up with respect to the original plume location, multiple features can be explained. Its deep-seated source can remain below the continent at one or both sides of the newly-formed ocean. This mantle material, glued underneath the margins at lower crustal levels, resembles the geometry and location of high velocity/high density bodies observed along the South Atlantic conjugate margins. Impingement of vertically up-welled plume material on the base of the lithosphere results in pre-break-up topography variations that are located just above this initial anomaly impingement. This can be interpreted as aborted rift features that are also observed along the rifted margins. When extension continues after continental break-up, high strain rates can relocalize. This relocation has been so far attributed to rift jumps. Most importantly, this study shows that there is not one, single rift mode for plume-induced crustal break-up.

  12. Breakup of bubbles and drops in steadily sheared foams and concentrated emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golemanov, K.; Tcholakova, S.; Denkov, N. D.; Ananthapadmanabhan, K. P.; Lips, A.

    2008-11-01

    This experimental study is focused on the process of bubble breakup in steadily sheared foams, at constant shear rate or constant shear stress. Two different types of surfactants were used and glycerol was added to the aqueous phase, to check how the bubble breakup depends on the surface modulus and on bulk viscosity of the foaming solutions. The experiments show that bubble breakup in foams occurs above a well defined critical dimensionless stress, τ˜CR≡(τCRR/σ)≈0.40 , which is independent of surfactant used, solution viscosity, and bubble volume fraction (varied between 92 and 98 %). Here τCR is the dimensional shear stress, above which a bubble with radius R and surface tension σ would break in sheared foam. The value of the critical stress experimentally found by us τ˜CR≈0.40 , is about two orders of magnitude lower than the critical stress for breakup of single bubbles in sheared Newtonian liquids, τ˜CR≈25 . This large difference in the critical stress is explained by the strong interaction between neighboring bubbles in densely populated foams, which facilitates bubble subdivision into smaller bubbles. A strong effect of bubble polydispersity on the kinetics of bubble breakup (at similar mean bubble size) was observed and explained. Experiments were also performed with hexadecane-in-water emulsions of drop volume fraction 83% ⩽Φ⩽95% to study drop breakup in concentrated emulsions. Qualitatively similar behavior was observed to that of foams, with the critical dimensionless stress for drop breakup being lower, τ˜CR≈0.15 , and practically independent of the drop volume fraction and viscosity ratio (varied between 0.01 and 1). This critical stress is by several times lower than the critical stress for breakage of single drops in sheared Newtonian fluids at comparable viscosity ratio, which evidences for facilitated drop subdivision in concentrated emulsions. To explain the measured low values of the critical stress, a different type of

  13. Sharing Remote and Local Information for Tracking Spring Breakup in the Mackenzie Delta and Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, D. L.; Whalen, D.; Fraser, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Mackenzie Delta is the second largest on the Arctic Ocean, covering 13 000 km2. The annual flood regime in the delta is dominated by the spring snowmelt freshet and associated ice breakup, as water from the south arrives in the ice-covered delta and spreads over bottomfast and adjacent floating sea ice at the delta front. The complex processes of water-ice interaction, flow partitioning, and overbank flooding to replenish waters in 43 000 delta lakes threaten community, transportation, subsistence, and energy infrastructure in the delta. The annual breakup season is a time of rejuvenation, excitement, and anxiety for delta residents and stakeholders. To track the progress of breakup and meet the need for knowledge dissemination to the local communities, a Mackenzie-Beaufort breakup newsletter has been produced by Natural Resources Canada on a quasi-daily basis during the May-June spring flood season for 10 years, and distributed to an e-mail list that grew to over 300 subscribers. This provides near real-time tracking of water levels and breakup using on-line gauges (Environment Canada), daily MODIS satellite imagery (NASA), Landsat imagery (USGS) and intermittent radar imagery (various sources). In earlier years, information was also supplied from field programs operating in the delta during breakup, but changing priorities and funding have reduced the number of outside researchers present during these critical weeks. Meanwhile the number of local contributors has grown, providing observations and photographs to share with the local, regional and global readership. In this way the newsletter evolved into a two-way communication tool and community portal. The newsletter is a chronicle of each breakup season and a key resource for territorial and municipal managers, subsistence organizations, and emergency response agencies, with routine requests for specific imagery in areas of concern. With the completion of 10 years under the present model, we are exploring

  14. Magnetic alignment and the Poisson alignment reference system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, L. V.; Schenz, R. F.; Sommargren, G. E.

    1990-08-01

    Three distinct metrological operations are necessary to align a free-electron laser (FEL): the magnetic axis must be located, a straight line reference (SLR) must be generated, and the magnetic axis must be related to the SLR. This article begins with a review of the motivation for developing an alignment system that will assure better than 100-μm accuracy in the alignment of the magnetic axis throughout an FEL. The 100-μm accuracy is an error circle about an ideal axis for 300 m or more. The article describes techniques for identifying the magnetic axes of solenoids, quadrupoles, and wiggler poles. Propagation of a laser beam is described to the extent of revealing sources of nonlinearity in the beam. Development of a straight-line reference based on the Poisson line, a diffraction effect, is described in detail. Spheres in a large-diameter laser beam create Poisson lines and thus provide a necessary mechanism for gauging between the magnetic axis and the SLR. Procedures for installing FEL components and calibrating alignment fiducials to the magnetic axes of the components are also described. The Poisson alignment reference system should be accurate to 25 μm over 300 m, which is believed to be a factor-of-4 improvement over earlier techniques. An error budget shows that only 25% of the total budgeted tolerance is used for the alignment reference system, so the remaining tolerances should fall within the allowable range for FEL alignment.

  15. Testing the tidal alignment model of galaxy intrinsic alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, Jonathan; Seljak, Uroš; McQuinn, Matthew E-mail: mmcquinn@berkeley.edu

    2011-05-01

    Weak gravitational lensing has become a powerful probe of large-scale structure and cosmological parameters. Precision weak lensing measurements require an understanding of the intrinsic alignment of galaxy ellipticities, which can in turn inform models of galaxy formation. It is hypothesized that elliptical galaxies align with the background tidal field and that this alignment mechanism dominates the correlation between ellipticities on cosmological scales (in the absence of lensing). We use recent large-scale structure measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to test this picture with several statistics: (1) the correlation between ellipticity and galaxy overdensity, w{sub g+}; (2) the intrinsic alignment auto-correlation functions; (3) the correlation functions of curl-free, E, and divergence-free, B, modes, the latter of which is zero in the linear tidal alignment theory; (4) the alignment correlation function, w{sub g}(r{sub p},θ), a recently developed statistic that generalizes the galaxy correlation function to account for the angle between the galaxy separation vector and the principle axis of ellipticity. We show that recent measurements are largely consistent with the tidal alignment model and discuss dependence on galaxy luminosity. In addition, we show that at linear order the tidal alignment model predicts that the angular dependence of w{sub g}(r{sub p},θ) is simply w{sub g+}(r{sub p})cos (2θ) and that this dependence is consistent with recent measurements. We also study how stochastic nonlinear contributions to galaxy ellipticity impact these statistics. We find that a significant fraction of the observed LRG ellipticity can be explained by alignment with the tidal field on scales ∼> 10 \\hMpc. These considerations are relevant to galaxy formation and evolution.

  16. Does the Taylor Spatial Frame Accurately Correct Tibial Deformities?

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Kira; Ilizarov, Svetlana; Fragomen, Austin T.; Ilizarov, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    Background Optimal leg alignment is the goal of tibial osteotomy. The Taylor Spatial Frame (TSF) and the Ilizarov method enable gradual realignment of angulation and translation in the coronal, sagittal, and axial planes, therefore, the term six-axis correction. Questions/purposes We asked whether this approach would allow precise correction of tibial deformities. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 102 patients (122 tibiae) with tibial deformities treated with percutaneous osteotomy and gradual correction with the TSF. The proximal osteotomy group was subdivided into two subgroups to distinguish those with an intentional overcorrection of the mechanical axis deviation (MAD). The minimum followup after frame removal was 10 months (average, 48 months; range, 10–98 months). Results In the proximal osteotomy group, patients with varus and valgus deformities for whom the goal of alignment was neutral or overcorrection experienced accurate correction of MAD. In the proximal tibia, the medial proximal tibial angle improved from 80° to 89° in patients with a varus deformity and from 96° to 85° in patients with a valgus deformity. In the middle osteotomy group, all patients had less than 5° coronal plane deformity and 15 of 17 patients had less that 5° sagittal plane deformity. In the distal osteotomy group, the lateral distal tibial angle improved from 77° to 86° in patients with a valgus deformity and from 101° to 90° for patients with a varus deformity. Conclusions Gradual correction of all tibial deformities with the TSF was accurate and with few complications. Level of Evidence Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19911244

  17. Atmospheric breakup of a small comet in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teterev, A. V.; Misychenko, N. I.; Rudak, L. V.; Romanov, G. S.; Smetannikov, A. S.; Nemchinov, I. V.

    1993-01-01

    The aerodynamic stresses can lead to the deformation and even to destruction of the meteoroids during their flight through the atmosphere. The pressure at the blunt nose of the cosmic body moving at very high speed through the dense layers of the atmosphere may be much larger than the tensile or the compressive strength of the body. So the usage of the hydrodynamics theory is validated. The estimates show that the transverse velocity of the substance of the body U is of the order of (rho(sub a)/rho(sub o))(sup 1/2)V where V is the velocity of the body and rho(sub o) is its density, rho(sub a) is the density of the atmosphere. The separation of the fragments is larger than the diameter of the body D if D is less than D(sub c) = 2H(square root of rho(sub a)/rho(sub o)), where H is the characteristic scale of the atmosphere. For an icy body one obtains U = 1/30(V) and critical diameter D(sub C) = 500 m. The process of the disintegration of the body is still not fully understood and so one can use the numerical simulation to investigate it. Such simulations where conducted for the Venusian atmosphere and the gaseous equation of state of the body was used. For the Earth atmosphere for the velocity V = 50 km/s the pressure at the blunt nose of the body is 25 kbar, and is of the order of bulk modulus of compressibility of the water or ice. The realistic EOS of water in tabular form was used. It was assumed that the initial shape of the body was spherical and the initial diameter D(sub o) of the body is 200 m and so it is smaller than the critical diameter D(sub C). The initial kinetic energy of the icy body is equivalent to the energy of the explosion 1200 Mt of TNT. The results of the simulation of the deformation of the body during its vertical flight through the atmosphere and during its impact into the ocean are presented.

  18. Mid-space-independent deformable image registration.

    PubMed

    Aganj, Iman; Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Reuter, Martin; Sabuncu, Mert Rory; Fischl, Bruce

    2017-02-24

    Aligning images in a mid-space is a common approach to ensuring that deformable image registration is symmetric - that it does not depend on the arbitrary ordering of the input images. The results are, however, generally dependent on the mathematical definition of the mid-space. In particular, the set of possible solutions is typically restricted by the constraints that are enforced on the transformations to prevent the mid-space from drifting too far from the native image spaces. The use of an implicit atlas has been proposed as an approach to mid-space image registration. In this work, we show that when the atlas is aligned to each image in the native image space, the data term of implicit-atlas-based deformable registration is inherently independent of the mid-space. In addition, we show that the regularization term can be reformulated independently of the mid-space as well. We derive a new symmetric cost function that only depends on the transformation morphing the images to each other, rather than to the atlas. This eliminates the need for anti-drift constraints, thereby expanding the space of allowable deformations. We provide an implementation scheme for the proposed framework, and validate it through diffeomorphic registration experiments on brain magnetic resonance images.

  19. DebriSat - A Planned Laboratory-Based Satellite Impact Experiment for Breakup Fragment Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Werremeyer, M.; Huynh, T.; Voelker, M.; Opiela, J.

    2012-01-01

    DebriSat is a planned laboratory ]based satellite hypervelocity impact experiment. The goal of the project is to characterize the orbital debris that would be generated by a hypervelocity collision involving a modern satellite in low Earth orbit (LEO). The DebriSat project will update and expand upon the information obtained in the 1992 Satellite Orbital Debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT), which characterized the breakup of a 1960 's US Navy Transit satellite. There are three phases to this project: the design and fabrication of an engineering model representing a modern, 50-cm/50-kg class LEO satellite known as DebriSat; conduction of a laboratory-based hypervelocity impact to catastrophically break up the satellite; and characterization of the properties of breakup fragments down to 2 mm in size. The data obtained, including fragment size, area ]to ]mass ratio, density, shape, material composition, optical properties, and radar cross ]section distributions, will be used to supplement the DoD fs and NASA fs satellite breakup models to better describe the breakup outcome of a modern satellite. Updated breakup models will improve mission planning, environmental models, and event response. The DebriSat project is sponsored by the Air Force fs Space and Missile Systems Center and the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office. The design and fabrication of DebriSat is led by University of Florida with subject matter experts f support from The Aerospace Corporation. The major milestones of the project include the complete fabrication of DebriSat by September 2013, the hypervelocity impact of DebriSat at the Air Force fs Arnold Engineering Development Complex in early 2014, and fragment characterization and data analyses in late 2014.

  20. BAYESIAN PROTEIN STRUCTURE ALIGNMENT1

    PubMed Central

    RODRIGUEZ, ABEL; SCHMIDLER, SCOTT C.

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the three-dimensional structure of proteins is an important topic in molecular biochemistry. Structure plays a critical role in defining the function of proteins and is more strongly conserved than amino acid sequence over evolutionary timescales. A key challenge is the identification and evaluation of structural similarity between proteins; such analysis can aid in understanding the role of newly discovered proteins and help elucidate evolutionary relationships between organisms. Computational biologists have developed many clever algorithmic techniques for comparing protein structures, however, all are based on heuristic optimization criteria, making statistical interpretation somewhat difficult. Here we present a fully probabilistic framework for pairwise structural alignment of proteins. Our approach has several advantages, including the ability to capture alignment uncertainty and to estimate key “gap” parameters which critically affect the quality of the alignment. We show that several existing alignment methods arise as maximum a posteriori estimates under specific choices of prior distributions and error models. Our probabilistic framework is also easily extended to incorporate additional information, which we demonstrate by including primary sequence information to generate simultaneous sequence–structure alignments that can resolve ambiguities obtained using structure alone. This combined model also provides a natural approach for the difficult task of estimating evolutionary distance based on structural alignments. The model is illustrated by comparison with well-established methods on several challenging protein alignment examples. PMID:26925188

  1. Attachment Styles and Personal Growth following Romantic Breakups: The Mediating Roles of Distress, Rumination, and Tendency to Rebound

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Tara C.; Bejanyan, Kathrine; Ferenczi, Nelli

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the associations of attachment anxiety and avoidance with personal growth following relationship dissolution, and to test breakup distress, rumination, and tendency to rebound with new partners as mediators of these associations. Study 1 (N = 411) and Study 2 (N = 465) measured attachment style, breakup distress, and personal growth; Study 2 additionally measured ruminative reflection, brooding, and proclivity to rebound with new partners. Structural equation modelling revealed in both studies that anxiety was indirectly associated with greater personal growth through heightened breakup distress, whereas avoidance was indirectly associated with lower personal growth through inhibited breakup distress. Study 2 further showed that the positive association of breakup distress with personal growth was accounted for by enhanced reflection and brooding, and that anxious individuals’ greater personal growth was also explained by their proclivity to rebound. These findings suggest that anxious individuals’ hyperactivated breakup distress may act as a catalyst for personal growth by promoting the cognitive processing of breakup-related thoughts and emotions, whereas avoidant individuals’ deactivated distress may inhibit personal growth by suppressing this cognitive work. PMID:24066169

  2. Aligning for Innovation - Alignment Strategy to Drive Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Hurel; Teltschik, David; Bussey, Horace, Jr.; Moy, James

    2010-01-01

    With the sudden need for innovation that will help the country achieve its long-term space exploration objectives, the question of whether NASA is aligned effectively to drive the innovation that it so desperately needs to take space exploration to the next level should be entertained. Authors such as Robert Kaplan and David North have noted that companies that use a formal system for implementing strategy consistently outperform their peers. They have outlined a six-stage management systems model for implementing strategy, which includes the aligning of the organization towards its objectives. This involves the alignment of the organization from the top down. This presentation will explore the impacts of existing U.S. industrial policy on technological innovation; assess the current NASA organizational alignment and its impacts on driving technological innovation; and finally suggest an alternative approach that may drive the innovation needed to take the world to the next level of space exploration, with NASA truly leading the way.

  3. Deformations of superconformal theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdova, Clay; Dumitrescu, Thomas T.; Intriligator, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    We classify possible supersymmetry-preserving relevant, marginal, and irrelevant deformations of unitary superconformal theories in d ≥ 3 dimensions. Our method only relies on symmetries and unitarity. Hence, the results are model independent and do not require a Lagrangian description. Two unifying themes emerge: first, many theories admit deformations that reside in multiplets together with conserved currents. Such deformations can lead to modifications of the supersymmetry algebra by central and non-central charges. Second, many theories with a sufficient amount of supersymmetry do not admit relevant or marginal deformations, and some admit neither. The classification is complicated by the fact that short superconformal multiplets display a rich variety of sporadic phenomena, including supersymmetric deformations that reside in the middle of a multiplet. We illustrate our results with examples in diverse dimensions. In particular, we explain how the classification of irrelevant supersymmetric deformations can be used to derive known and new constraints on moduli-space effective actions.

  4. Fusion bonding and alignment fixture

    DOEpatents

    Ackler, Harold D.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Tarte, Lisa A.; Hicks, Randall K.

    2000-01-01

    An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all the components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

  5. Magnetic axis alignment and the Poisson alignment reference system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Lee V.; Schenz, Richard F.; Sommargren, Gary E.

    1989-01-01

    Three distinct metrological operations are necessary to align a free-electron laser (FEL): the magnetic axis must be located, a straight line reference (SLR) must be generated, and the magnetic axis must be related to the SLR. This paper begins with a review of the motivation for developing an alignment system that will assure better than 100 micrometer accuracy in the alignment of the magnetic axis throughout an FEL. The paper describes techniques for identifying the magnetic axis of solenoids, quadrupoles, and wiggler poles. Propagation of a laser beam is described to the extent of revealing sources of nonlinearity in the beam. Development and use of the Poisson line, a diffraction effect, is described in detail. Spheres in a large-diameter laser beam create Poisson lines and thus provide a necessary mechanism for gauging between the magnetic axis and the SLR. Procedures for installing FEL components and calibrating alignment fiducials to the magnetic axes of the components are also described. An error budget shows that the Poisson alignment reference system will make it possible to meet the alignment tolerances for an FEL.

  6. Laser beam alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Gruhn, C.R.; Hammond, R.B.

    The disclosure related to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

  7. Laser beam alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Gruhn, Charles R.; Hammond, Robert B.

    1981-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

  8. Theory of grain alignment in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Wayne G.

    1993-01-01

    Research accomplishments are presented and include the following: (1) mathematical theory of grain alignment; (2) super-paramagnetic alignment of molecular cloud grains; and (3) theory of grain alignment by ambipolar diffusion.

  9. Inter-relationship between tectonic, magmatic and sedimentary processes during hyperextension and breakup: constraints from the southern North Atlantic and exposed analogues in the Alps and Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manatschal, Gianreto

    2014-05-01

    The discovery of hyperextended crust, associated with either exhumed mantle or variable amounts of magmatic additions is at the origin of a paradigm shift in the research of rifted margins. At present, little is known about how deformation and magmatic processes interact during lithospheric thinning and breakup, what are the magmatic systems and depositional environments, sedimentary facies, the kinematics and age of structures, or the subsidence and thermal history of hyperextended domains. In my presentation I will therefore review key observations made along the Iberia-Newfoundland, Bay of Biscay-Pyrenean and Alpine Tethys rift systems and will try to show how they may impact our thinking and understanding of hyperextended systems in present-day margins. The study of the Iberia-Newfoundland and the Bay of Biscay enabled to define and map rift domains and to restore these domains in order to quantify the total amount of extension as well as to investigate their relation to inherited structures and define the kinematics of these complex rift systems. This observation questions the existence of sharp and well-defined ocean-continent boundaries as well as some of the well-accepted concepts such as the breakup unconformity, the nature and significance of first magnetic anomalies in ocean continent transitions and the simple assumptions about the relation between strain and magma production. In contrast to the large-scale observations made along the present-day margins, the study of ancient rift systems preserved in the Pyrenees and Alps enables to get access to rocks, structures, as well as the sedimentary systems that are related to hyperextension. The most prominent structures observed in hyperextended domains are a set of extensional detachment faults. The study of these fault systems show that they are far more complex as previously assumed. These detachment faults are polyphase, interact in a complex way with ductile layers and are associated with sedimentary

  10. Fixture for aligning motor assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Shervington, Roger M.; Vaghani, Vallabh V.; Vanek, Laurence D.; Christensen, Scott A.

    2009-12-08

    An alignment fixture includes a rotor fixture, a stator fixture and a sensor system which measures a rotational displacement therebetween. The fixture precisely measures rotation of a generator stator assembly away from a NULL position referenced by a unique reference spline on the rotor shaft. By providing an adjustable location of the stator assembly within the housing, the magnetic axes within each generator shall be aligned to a predetermined and controlled tolerance between the generator interface mounting pin and the reference spline on the rotor shaft. Once magnetically aligned, each generator is essentially a line replaceable unit which may be readily mounted to any input of a multi-generator gearbox assembly with the assurance that the magnetic alignment will be within a predetermined tolerance.

  11. Stellar Alignments - Identification and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    Fortuitous stellar alignments can be fitted to structural orientations with relative ease by the unwary. Nonetheless, cautious approaches taking into account a broader range of cultural evidence, as well as paying due attention to potential methodological pitfalls, have been successful in identifying credible stellar alignments—and constructing plausible assessments of their cultural significance—in a variety of circumstances. These range from single instances of alignments upon particular asterisms where the corroborating historical or ethnographic evidence is strong to repeated instances of oriented structures with only limited independent cultural information but where systematic, data-driven approaches can be productive. In the majority of cases, the identification and interpretation of putative stellar alignments relates to groups of similar monuments or complex single sites and involves a balance between systematic studies of the alignments themselves, backed up by statistical analysis where appropriate, and the consideration of a range of contextual evidence, either derived from the archaeological record alone or from other relevant sources.

  12. RF Jitter Modulation Alignment Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, L. F.; Fulda, P.; Diaz-Ortiz, M.; Perez Sanchez, G.; Ciani, G.; Voss, D.; Mueller, G.; Tanner, D. B.

    2017-01-01

    We will present the numerical and experimental results of a new alignment sensing scheme which can reduce the complexity of alignment sensing systems currently used, while maintaining the same shot noise limited sensitivity. This scheme relies on the ability of electro-optic beam deflectors to create angular modulation sidebands in radio frequency, and needs only a single-element photodiode and IQ demodulation to generate error signals for tilt and translation degrees of freedom in one dimension. It distances itself from current techniques by eliminating the need for beam centering servo systems, quadrant photodetectors and Gouy phase telescopes. RF Jitter alignment sensing can be used to reduce the complexity in the alignment systems of many laser optical experiments, including LIGO and the ALPS experiment.

  13. Receiver function and magnetotelluric analysis to understand the first stage of a continental lithospheric break-up : case of the North Tanzanian Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plasman, M.; Tiberi, C.; Tarits, P.; Hautot, S.; Gautier, S.; Ebinger, C. J.; Mulibo, G. D.; Khalfan, M.

    2015-12-01

    First stage of continental break-up, though intensively studied, is yet poorly understood. This is partly because actual rifting areas are either too mature (more than 10 My) or not easily accessible (thick sediment cover or under water). The North Tanzania part of the East African Rift is the place of a lithosphere's early break-up (less than 5My) in response to a combination of regional pulling forces and mantle upwelling. Deformation there results from complex interactions between magmatic intrusions, faulting, asthenospheric dynamics and far field stresses. CoLiBrEA (ANR) and CRAFTI (NSF) are two multidisciplinary projects which collaboratively focus on this area to understand the interactions between faults and magma, the role of inherited structures and rheological heterogeneities of the lithosphere. For that purpose, we deployed 38 broadband seismic stations in the Natron and Ngorongoro areas from January 2013 to December 2014 and carried out a 120 km East-West magnetotelluric (MT) profile to image the crustal and mantle structures. The 3D resistivity model, obtained from the inversion of the MT data along the profile, shows an highly heterogeneous crust with three-dimensional structures over a more homogeneous upper mantle. The first inversion result from the receiver function (RF) by the Zhu and Kanamori's inversion method show a thick crust (~35 km) with important variations (maximum 15km) especially in the Ngorongoro area, and an average Vp/Vs ratio of 1.75. We then completed this study by combining the MT data and the RF at the 11 sites of the EW profile. For each site, we built a 1D velocity model (Vs and VpVs) obtained by combining the Sambridge forward solution with a non linear descent research algorithm and constrained by the resistivity structure. The inversion shows an heterogeneous crust obviously dominated by the Moho interface at different depths, with low velocity layers mainly corresponding to low resistivity features.

  14. Pre-breakup geology of the Gulf of Mexico-Caribbean: Its relation to Triassic and Jurassic rift systems of the region

    SciTech Connect

    Bartok, P. )

    1993-02-01

    A review of the pre-breakup geology of west-central Pangea, comprised of northern South America, Gulf of Mexico and West Africa, combined with a study of the Mesozoic rift trends of the region confirms a relation between the rift systems and the underlying older grain of deformation. The pre-breakup analysis focuses attention on the Precambrian, Early Paleozoic and Late Paleozoic tectonic events affecting the region and assumes a Pindell fit. Two Late Precambrian orogenic belts are observed in the west central Pangea. Along the northern South American margin and Yucatan a paleo northeast trending Pan-African aged fold belt is documented. A second system is observed along West Africa extending from the High Atlas to the Mauritanides and Rockelides. During the Late Paleozoic, renewed orogenic activity, associated with the Gondwana/Laurentia suture, affected large segments of west central Pangea. The general trend of the system is northeast-southwest and essentially parallels the Gyayana Shield, West African, and eastern North American cratons. Mesozoic rifting closely followed either the Precambrian trends or the Late Paleozoic orogenic belt. The Triassic component focuses along the western portions of the Gulf of Mexico continuing into eastern Mexico and western South America. The Jurassic rift trend followed along the separation between Yucatan and northern South America. At Lake Maracaibo the Jurassic rift system eventually overlaps the Triassic rifts. The Jurassic rift resulted in the [open quotes]Hispanic Corridor[close quotes] that permitted Tethyan and Pacific marine faunas to mix at a time when the Gulf of Mexico underwent continental sedimentation.

  15. A Record of Dissolved Metal Concentrations in the Lena River During the Period of Ice Breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monson, O. D.; Guay, C. K.; Holmes, R. M.; Zhulidov, A. V.

    2004-12-01

    The PARTNERS project is a 5-year research program (2002-2007) funded by the Arctic System Science Program of the U.S. National Science Foundation. The objective of the PARTNERS project is to measure several biogeochemical parameters in the six largest rivers that drain the watershed of the Arctic Ocean (Yenisey, Lena, Ob, Mackenzie, Yukon, and Kolyma) as a means to study the origins and fates of continental runoff. As part of the PARTNERS field program for 2004, samples were collected on the Lena River in the spring (May-June) during the period of peak discharge and ice breakup. Samples were collected from the bank at the town of Zhigansk (66.75 N, 23.38 E) once daily from May 28th through June 7th, 2004. The river was completely ice covered at the beginning of this period. The river level rose dramatically each day until ice breakup, which occurred on May 30th. Following breakup, the river level began to drop steadily. Visual observation of daily water samples indicated a darkening of the tannic brown color of the river water as discharge levels increased up until breakup, suggesting an increase in DOC concentrations associated with the peak discharge and ice breakup period. Water samples for metals analyses were syringe filtered in the field through 0.45 um polypropylene and 0.02 um Anotop filter discs and acidified under clean conditions upon return to the laboratory. The samples were analyzed by high-resolution ICPMS for a suite of metals including Ba, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Rb, Re, Sr, Tl, U, V, and Zn. Here we report the results from these analyses as a daily time series of metal concentrations bracketing the ice breakup and peak discharge events. During this relatively short amount of time, significant fluctuations in metal concentrations were observed, which are likely related to concurrent fluctuations in DOC concentrations and other changes in river chemistry occurring during this dynamic period of the annual hydrologic cycle in

  16. Liquid Crystal Research Shows Deformation By Drying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    These images, from David Weitz's liquid crystal research, show ordered uniform sized droplets (upper left) before they are dried from their solution. After the droplets are dried (upper right), they are viewed with crossed polarizers that show the deformation caused by drying, a process that orients the bipolar structure of the liquid crystal within the droplets. When an electric field is applied to the dried droplets (lower left), and then increased (lower right), the liquid crystal within the droplets switches its alignment, thereby reducing the amount of light that can be scattered by the droplets when a beam is shone through them.

  17. Well-pump alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1998-10-20

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

  18. The Rigors of Aligning Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    bearing in mind customer perceptions. Recommendations include employee training centered on goal alignment, which is vital to highlight the...appeared to be lacking in some areas when bearing in mind customer perceptions. Recommendations include employee training centered on goal alignment...through the strategic plan and CONOPS. However, the extent of goal accomplishment appears to be lacking in some areas when bearing in mind the

  19. National Ignition Facility system alignment.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, S C; Bliss, E; Di Nicola, P; Kalantar, D; Lowe-Webb, R; McCarville, T; Nelson, D; Salmon, T; Schindler, T; Villanueva, J; Wilhelmsen, K

    2011-03-10

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest optical instrument, comprising 192 37 cm square beams, each generating up to 9.6 kJ of 351 nm laser light in a 20 ns beam precisely tailored in time and spectrum. The Facility houses a massive (10 m diameter) target chamber within which the beams converge onto an ∼1 cm size target for the purpose of creating the conditions needed for deuterium/tritium nuclear fusion in a laboratory setting. A formidable challenge was building NIF to the precise requirements for beam propagation, commissioning the beam lines, and engineering systems to reliably and safely align 192 beams within the confines of a multihour shot cycle. Designing the facility to minimize drift and vibration, placing the optical components in their design locations, commissioning beam alignment, and performing precise system alignment are the key alignment accomplishments over the decade of work described herein. The design and positioning phases placed more than 3000 large (2.5 m×2 m×1 m) line-replaceable optics assemblies to within ±1 mm of design requirement. The commissioning and alignment phases validated clear apertures (no clipping) for all beam lines, and demonstrated automated laser alignment within 10 min and alignment to target chamber center within 44 min. Pointing validation system shots to flat gold-plated x-ray emitting targets showed NIF met its design requirement of ±50 μm rms beam pointing to target chamber. Finally, this paper describes the major alignment challenges faced by the NIF Project from inception to present, and how these challenges were met and solved by the NIF design and commissioning teams.

  20. Motion of Deformable Drops Through Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinchenko, Alexander Z.; Davis, Robert H.

    2017-01-01

    This review describes recent progress in the fundamental understanding of deformable drop motion through porous media with well-defined microstructures, through rigorous first-principles hydrodynamical simulations and experiments. Tight squeezing conditions, when the drops are much larger than the pore throats, are particularly challenging numerically, as the drops nearly coat the porous material skeleton with small surface clearance, requiring very high surface resolution in the algorithms. Small-scale prototype problems for flow-induced drop motion through round capillaries and three-dimensional (3D) constrictions between solid particles, and for gravity-induced squeezing through round orifices and 3D constrictions, show how forcing above critical conditions is needed to overcome trapping. Scaling laws for the squeezing time are suggested. Large-scale multidrop/multiparticle simulations for emulsion flow through a random granular material with multiple drop breakup show that the drop phase generally moves faster than the carrier fluid; both phase velocities equilibrate much faster to the statistical steady state than does the drop-size distribution.

  1. Binocular collimation vs conditional alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, William J.

    2012-10-01

    As binocular enthusiasts share their passion, topics related to collimation abound. Typically, we find how observers, armed only with a jeweler's screwdriver, can "perfectly collimate" his or her binocular, make it "spot on," or other verbiage of similar connotation. Unfortunately, what most are addressing is a form of pseudo-collimation I have referred to since the mid-1970s as "Conditional Alignment." Ignoring the importance of the mechanical axis (hinge) in the alignment process, this "condition," while having the potential to make alignment serviceable, or even outstanding—within a small range of IPD (Interpupillary Distance) settings relative to the user's spatial accommodation (the ability to accept small errors in parallelism of the optical axes)—may take the instrument farther from the 3-axis collimation conscientious manufacturers seek to implement. Becoming more optically savvy—and especially with so many mechanically inferior binoculars entering the marketplace— the consumer contemplating self-repair and alignment has a need to understand the difference between clinical, 3-axis "collimation" (meaning both optical axes are parallel with the axis of the hinge) and "conditional alignment," as differentiated in this paper. Furthermore, I believe there has been a long-standing need for the term "Conditional Alignment," or some equivalent, to be accepted as part of the vernacular of those who use binoculars extensively, whether for professional or recreational activities. Achieving that acceptance is the aim of this paper.

  2. Projection-Based Volume Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lingbo; Snapp, Robert R.; Ruiz, Teresa; Radermacher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    When heterogeneous samples of macromolecular assemblies are being examined by 3D electron microscopy (3DEM), often multiple reconstructions are obtained. For example, subtomograms of individual particles can be acquired from tomography, or volumes of multiple 2D classes can be obtained by random conical tilt reconstruction. Of these, similar volumes can be averaged to achieve higher resolution. Volume alignment is an essential step before 3D classification and averaging. Here we present a projection-based volume alignment (PBVA) algorithm. We select a set of projections to represent the reference volume and align them to a second volume. Projection alignment is achieved by maximizing the cross-correlation function with respect to rotation and translation parameters. If data are missing, the cross-correlation functions are normalized accordingly. Accurate alignments are obtained by averaging and quadratic interpolation of the cross-correlation maximum. Comparisons of the computation time between PBVA and traditional 3D cross-correlation methods demonstrate that PBVA outperforms the traditional methods. Performance tests were carried out with different signal-to-noise ratios using modeled noise and with different percentages of missing data using a cryo-EM dataset. All tests show that the algorithm is robust and highly accurate. PBVA was applied to align the reconstructions of a subcomplex of the NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I) from the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, followed by classification and averaging. PMID:23410725

  3. Primary mirror alignment and assembly for a multispectral space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Shenq-Tsong; Chang, Sheng-Hsiung; Chang, Chen-Peng; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Huang, Po-Hsuan; Tsay, Ho-Lin; Chin, Chi-Chieh; Pan, Hsu-Pin; Huang, Ting-Ming

    2013-10-01

    For a currently developing multispectral space Cassegrain telescope, the primary mirror with 450 mm clear aperture is made of Zerodur and lightweighted at a ratio about 50 % to meet both thermal and mass requirement. For this mirror, it is critical to reduce the astigmatism caused from the gravity effect, bonding process and the deformation from the mounting to the main structure of the telescope (main plate). In this article, the primary mirror alignment, MGSE, assembly process and the optical performance test for the primary mirror assembly are presented. The mechanical shim is the interface between the iso-static mount and main plate. It is used to compensate the manufacture errors of components and differences of local co-planarity errors to prevent the stress while iso-static mount (ISM) is screwed to main plate. After primary mirror assembly, an optical performance test method called bench test with novel algorithm is used to analyze the astigmatism caused from the gravity effect and the deformation from the mounting or supporter. In an effort to achieve the requirement for the tolerance in primary mirror assembly, the astigmatism caused from the gravity and deformation by the mounting force could be less than P-V 0.02λ at 633 nm. The consequence of these demonstrations indicates that the designed mechanical ground supported equipment (MGSE) for the alignment and assembly processes meet the critical requirements for primary mirror assembly of the telescope.

  4. Numerical and experimental study of liquid breakup process in solid rocket motor nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Yi-Hsin

    Rocket propulsion is an important travel method for space exploration and national defense, rockets needs to be able to withstand wide range of operation environment and also stable and precise enough to carry sophisticated payload into orbit, those engineering requirement makes rocket becomes one of the state of the art industry. The rocket family have been classified into two major group of liquid and solid rocket based on the fuel phase of liquid or solid state. The solid rocket has the advantages of simple working mechanism, less maintenance and preparing procedure and higher storage safety, those characters of solid rocket make it becomes popular in aerospace industry. Aluminum based propellant is widely used in solid rocket motor (SRM) industry due to its avalibility, combusion performance and economical fuel option, however after aluminum react with oxidant of amonimum perchrate (AP), it will generate liquid phase alumina (Al2O3) as product in high temperature (2,700˜3,000 K) combustion chamber enviornment. The liquid phase alumina particles aggromorate inside combustion chamber into larger particle which becomes major erosion calprit on inner nozzle wall while alumina aggromorates impinge on the nozzle wall surface. The erosion mechanism result nozzle throat material removal, increase the performance optimized throat diameter and reduce nozzle exit to throat area ratio which leads to the reduction of exhaust gas velocity, Mach number and lower the propulsion thrust force. The approach to avoid particle erosion phenomenon taking place in SRM's nozzle is to reduce the alumina particle size inside combustion chamber which could be done by further breakup of the alumina droplet size in SRM's combustion chamber. The study of liquid breakup mechanism is an important means to smaller combustion chamber alumina droplet size and mitigate the erosion tack place on rocket nozzle region. In this study, a straight two phase air-water flow channel experiment is set up

  5. Learning a hierarchical deformable template for rapid deformable object parsing.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Long Leo; Chen, Yuanhao; Yuille, Alan

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, we address the tasks of detecting, segmenting, parsing, and matching deformable objects. We use a novel probabilistic object model that we call a hierarchical deformable template (HDT). The HDT represents the object by state variables defined over a hierarchy (with typically five levels). The hierarchy is built recursively by composing elementary structures to form more complex structures. A probability distribution--a parameterized exponential model--is defined over the hierarchy to quantify the variability in shape and appearance of the object at multiple scales. To perform inference--to estimate the most probable states of the hierarchy for an input image--we use a bottom-up algorithm called compositional inference. This algorithm is an approximate version of dynamic programming where approximations are made (e.g., pruning) to ensure that the algorithm is fast while maintaining high performance. We adapt the structure-perceptron algorithm to estimate the parameters of the HDT in a discriminative manner (simultaneously estimating the appearance and shape parameters). More precisely, we specify an exponential distribution for the HDT using a dictionary of potentials, which capture the appearance and shape cues. This dictionary can be large and so does not require handcrafting the potentials. Instead, structure-perceptron assigns weights to the potentials so that less important potentials receive small weights (this is like a "soft" form of feature selection). Finally, we provide experimental evaluation of HDTs on different visual tasks, including detection, segmentation, matching (alignment), and parsing. We show that HDTs achieve state-of-the-art performance for these different tasks when evaluated on data sets with groundtruth (and when compared to alternative algorithms, which are typically specialized to each task).

  6. Deformation mechanisms in experimentally deformed Boom Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schuck, Bernhard; Urai, Janos

    2016-04-01

    Bulk mechanical and transport properties of reference claystones for deep disposal of radioactive waste have been investigated since many years but little is known about microscale deformation mechanisms because accessing the relevant microstructure in these soft, very fine-grained, low permeable and low porous materials remains difficult. Recent development of ion beam polishing methods to prepare high quality damage free surfaces for scanning electron microscope (SEM) is opening new fields of microstructural investigation in claystones towards a better understanding of the deformation behavior transitional between rocks and soils. We present results of Boom Clay deformed in a triaxial cell in a consolidated - undrained test at a confining pressure of 0.375 MPa (i.e. close to natural value), with σ1 perpendicular to the bedding. Experiments stopped at 20 % strain. As a first approximation, the plasticity of the sample can be described by a Mohr-Coulomb type failure envelope with a coefficient of cohesion C = 0.117 MPa and an internal friction angle ϕ = 18.7°. After deformation test, the bulk sample shows a shear zone at an angle of about 35° from the vertical with an offset of about 5 mm. We used the "Lamipeel" method that allows producing a permanent absolutely plane and large size etched micro relief-replica in order to localize and to document the shear zone at the scale of the deformed core. High-resolution imaging of microstructures was mostly done by using the BIB-SEM method on key-regions identified after the "Lamipeel" method. Detailed BIB-SEM investigations of shear zones show the following: the boundaries between the shear zone and the host rock are sharp, clay aggregates and clastic grains are strongly reoriented parallel to the shear direction, and the porosity is significantly reduced in the shear zone and the grain size is smaller in the shear zone than in the host rock but there is no evidence for broken grains. Comparison of microstructures

  7. Constraining lithosphere deformation mode evolution for the Iberia-Newfoundland rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanniot, Ludovic; Kusznir, Nick; Mohn, Geoffroy; Manatschal, Gianreto

    2015-04-01

    The deformation of lithosphere and asthenosphere and its evolution during continental rifting leading to breakup and seafloor spreading initiation is poorly understood. The resulting margin architecture and OCT structure is complex and diverse, and observations at magma poor margins includes hyper-extended continental crust and lithosphere, detachments faults, exhumed mantle, continental slivers and scattered embryonic oceanic crust. A coupled kinematic-dynamic model of lithosphere and asthenosphere deformation has been used to investigate the sequence of lithosphere deformation modes for 2 conjugate margin profiles for the Iberia-Newfoundland rifted margins. We use the observed water-loaded subsidence and crustal thickness, together with subsidence history and the age of melt generation, to test and constrain lithosphere and asthenosphere deformation models. A sequence of lithosphere deformation modes is represented by a succession of flow-fields, which are generated by a 2D finite element viscous flow model (FE-Margin), and is used to advect lithosphere and asthenosphere temperature and material. FE-Margin is kinematically driven by divergent deformation in the upper 15-20 km of the lithosphere inducing passive upwelling below. Buoyancy enhanced upwelling (e.g. Braun et al. 2000) is also kinematically included. The methodology of Katz et al., 2003 is used to predict melt generation by decompressional melting. The magnitude of extension used in the modelling is consistent with that proposed by Sutra et al (2013). The best fit calibrated models of lithosphere deformation evolution for the Iberia-Newfoundland conjugate margins require (i) an initial broad region of lithosphere deformation and passive upwelling, (ii) lateral migration of deformation, (iii) an increase in extension rate with time, (iv) focussing of deformation and (v) buoyancy induced upwelling. The preferred calibrated models predict faster extension rates and earlier continental crustal rupture and

  8. Importance of lifetime effects in breakup and suppression of complete fusion in reactions of weakly bound nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, K. J.; Simpson, E. C.; Luong, D. H.; Kalkal, Sunil; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.

    2016-06-01

    Background: Complete fusion cross sections in collisions of light weakly bound nuclei and high-Z targets show suppression of complete fusion at above-barrier energies. This has been interpreted as resulting from the breakup of the weakly bound nucleus prior to reaching the fusion barrier, reducing the probability of complete charge capture. Below-barrier studies of reactions of 9Be have found that the breakup of 8Be formed by neutron stripping dominates over direct breakup and that transfer-triggered breakup may account for the observed suppression of complete fusion. Purpose: This paper investigates how the above conclusions are affected by lifetimes of the resonant states that are populated prior to breakup. If the mean life of a populated resonance (above the breakup threshold) is much longer than the fusion time scale, then its breakup (decay) cannot suppress complete fusion. For short-lived resonances, the situation is more complex. This work explicitly includes the mean life of the short-lived 2+ resonance in 8Be in classical dynamical model calculations to determine its effect on energy and angular correlations of the breakup fragments and on model predictions of suppression of cross sections for complete fusion at above-barrier energies. Method: Previously performed coincidence measurements of breakup fragments produced in reactions of 9Be with 144Sm, 168Er, 186W, 196Pt, 208Pb, and 209Bi at energies below the barrier have been reanalyzed using an improved efficiency determination of the BALiN detector array. Predictions of breakup observables and of complete and incomplete fusion at energies above the fusion barrier are then made using the classical dynamical simulation code platypus, modified to include the effect of lifetimes of resonant states. Results: The agreement of the breakup observables is much improved when lifetime effects are included explicitly. Sensitivity to subzeptosecond lifetime is observed. The predicted suppression of complete fusion

  9. Romantic Partner Monitoring After Breakups: Attachment, Dependence, Distress, and Post-Dissolution Online Surveillance via Social Networking Sites.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jesse; Tokunaga, Robert S

    2015-09-01

    Romantic relationship dissolution can be stressful, and social networking sites make it difficult to separate from a romantic partner online as well as offline. An online survey (N = 431) tested a model synthesizing attachment, investment model variables, and post-dissolution emotional distress as predictors of interpersonal surveillance (i.e., "Facebook stalking") of one's ex-partner on Facebook after a breakup. Results indicated that anxious attachment predicted relational investment but also seeking relationship alternatives; avoidant attachment was negatively related to investment but positively related to seeking alternatives. Investment predicted commitment, whereas seeking alternatives was negatively related to commitment. Commitment predicted emotional distress after the breakup. Distress predicted partner monitoring immediately following the breakup, particularly for those who did not initiate the breakup, as well as current partner monitoring. Given their affordances, social media are discussed as potentially unhealthy enablers for online surveillance after relationship termination.

  10. Calculation of A x for the Proton-Deuteron Breakup Reaction at 135 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami-Kalantari, M.; Mehmandoost-Khajeh-Dad, A. A.; Shafaei, M. A.; Amir-Ahmadi, H. R.; Biegun, A.; Gašparic, I.; Joulaeizadeh, L.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kistryn, St.; Kozela, A.; Mardanpour, H.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Moeini, H.; Ramazani-Moghaddam-Arani, A.; Shende, S. V.; Stephan, E.; Sworst, R.

    2013-08-01

    Observables in proton-deuteron scattering are sensitive probes of the nucleon-nucleon interaction and three-nucleon force effects (3NF). Several facilities in the world, including Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI), allow a detailed study a few-nucleon interaction below the pion-production threshold exploiting polarized proton and deuteron beams. In this contribution we explored 3NF effects in the break-up scattering process by performing a measurement of differential cross section and the analyzing power, especially the x component of the analyzing power, using a 135 MeV polarized-proton beam impinging on a liquid-deuteron target. The proton-deuteron breakup reaction leads to a final state with three free particles and a rich phase space that allows us to study observables for continuous set of kinematical configurations of the outgoing nucleons. The results are interpreted with the help of state-of-the-art Faddeev calculations.

  11. Investigation of the dp Breakup and dp Elastic Reactions at Intermediate Energies at Nuclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janek, Marian; Ladygin, Vladimir P.; Piyadin, Semen M.; Batyuk, Pavel N.; Gurchin, Yuri V.; Isupov, Alexander Yu.; Karachuk, Julia-Tatiana; Kurilkin, Alexei K.; Kurilkin, Pavel K.; Livanov, Alexei N.; Martinska, Gabriela; Merts, Sergei P.; Reznikov, Sergei G.; Tarjanyiova, Gabriela; Terekhin, Arkadyi A.; Vnukov, Igor E.

    2017-03-01

    The main goal of the deuteron spin structure project is to investigate the spin structure of nucleon-nucleon and three nucleon short-range correlations via the measurements of the polarization observables in the deuteron induced reactions at intermediate energies at Nuclotron (Dubna, Russia). In this framework, dp nonmesonic breakup and dp elastic reactions are investigated using internal target station. The dp breakup data are obtained with the detection of two outgoing protons at the angles of 19°-54° in lab. frame at the deuteron energies of 300-500 MeV. The data of dp elastic scattering for the deuteron energies up to 2000 MeV are obtained in angular range 70°-120° in cm. The further perspectives of the investigations using polarized deuteron beam as well as the studies of the {}^3{He}(d,p){}^4{He} reaction are discussed.

  12. Suppression of Spiral Breakup in Excitable Media by Local Periodic Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guiquan; Ying, Heping; Luo, Honglei; Liu, Xiaoxia; Yang, Jinghua

    2016-12-01

    Lowered excitability leads to unstable meandering of spiral tip, which result in breakup of spiral waves into chaotic states induced by Doppler effects. This phenomenon is responsible for the transition from tachycardia to ventricular fibrillation in cardiac tissues. Numerical simulations show that low-energy local periodic forcing (LPF) applied around spiral tip can efficiently suppress the meandering behavior and consequently prevent spiral breakup. The controllable phase diagrams that describe the amplitude and period of LPF against excitability parameter are presented to illustrate the control region. The underlying mechanism of suppressing spiral meandering behavior is explored by greatly decreasing the radius of the meandering tip. The proposed scheme can potentially contribute to controlling cardiac arrhythmia.

  13. Coulomb-corrected eikonal description of the breakup of halo nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Capel, P.; Baye, D.

    2008-11-15

    The eikonal description of breakup reactions diverges because of the Coulomb interaction between the projectile and the target. This divergence is due to the adiabatic, or sudden, approximation usually made, which is incompatible with the infinite range of the Coulomb interaction. A correction for this divergence is analyzed by comparison with the dynamical eikonal approximation, which is derived without the adiabatic approximation. The correction consists in replacing the first-order term of the eikonal Coulomb phase by the first-order of the perturbation theory. This allows taking into account both nuclear and Coulomb interactions on the same footing within the computationally efficient eikonal model. Excellent results are found for the dissociation of {sup 11}Be on lead at 69 MeV/nucleon. This Coulomb-corrected eikonal approximation provides a competitive alternative to more elaborate reaction models for investigating breakup of three-body projectiles at intermediate and high energies.

  14. Analysis of Coulomb breakup experiments of {sup 8}B with a dynamical eikonal approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, G.; Capel, P.; Baye, D.

    2007-08-15

    Various measurements of the Coulomb breakup of {sup 8}B are analyzed within the dynamical eikonal approximation using a single description of {sup 8}B. We obtain a good agreement with experiment for different observables measured between 40 and 80 MeV/nucleon. A simple {sup 7}Be-p potential model description of {sup 8}B seems sufficient to describe all observables. In particular, the asymmetry in parallel-momentum distributions due to E1-E2 interferences is well reproduced without any scaling. The projectile-target nuclear interactions seem negligible if data are selected at forward angles. On the contrary, like in previous analyses we observe a significant influence of higher-order effects. The accuracy of astrophysical S factors for the {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B reaction at stellar energies extracted from breakup measurements therefore seems difficult to evaluate.

  15. Analysis of Coulomb breakup experiments of B8 with a dynamical eikonal approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, G.; Capel, P.; Baye, D.

    2007-08-01

    Various measurements of the Coulomb breakup of B8 are analyzed within the dynamical eikonal approximation using a single description of B8. We obtain a good agreement with experiment for different observables measured between 40 and 80 MeV/nucleon. A simple Be7-p potential model description of B8 seems sufficient to describe all observables. In particular, the asymmetry in parallel-momentum distributions due to E1-E2 interferences is well reproduced without any scaling. The projectile-target nuclear interactions seem negligible if data are selected at forward angles. On the contrary, like in previous analyses we observe a significant influence of higher-order effects. The accuracy of astrophysical S factors for the Be7(p,γ)B8 reaction at stellar energies extracted from breakup measurements therefore seems difficult to evaluate.

  16. The breakup of a main-belt asteroid 450 thousand years ago.

    PubMed

    Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David; Bottke, William F

    2006-06-09

    Collisions in the asteroid belt frequently lead to catastrophic breakups, where more than half of the target's mass is ejected into space. Several dozen large asteroids have been disrupted by impacts over the past several billion years. These impact events have produced groups of fragments with similar orbits called asteroid families. Here we report the discovery of a very young asteroid family around the object 1270 Datura. Our work takes advantage of a method for identification of recent breakups in the asteroid belt using catalogs of osculating (i.e., instantaneous) asteroid orbits. The very young families show up in these catalogs as clusters in a five-dimensional space of osculating orbital elements.

  17. Spontaneous spiral wave breakup caused by pinning to the tissue defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachalov, V. N.; Kudryashova, N. N.; Agladze, K. I.

    2016-11-01

    The work presents a mechanism of spiral wave initiation due to the specific boundary conditions on a border of cardiac tissue defect. There are known scenarios when anatomical or functional defects in cardiac tissue may provoke the spiral wave origination, including unidirectional blockage while passing through the narrow gates, bent over critical curvature wave fronts, inhomogeneous recovery of the tissue, etc. We show a new scenario of spiral wave breakup on a small defect, which is unexcitable but permeable for ionic currents supporting the excitation wave. It was believed that such defects stabilize the rotating wave; however, as shown, instead of stabilizing it leads to the spiral breakup and subsequent multiplication of the rotating waves.

  18. A new method to solve the Nd breakup scattering problem in configuration space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, Vladimir

    2005-11-01

    A new computational method for solving the configuration-space Faddeev equations for three nucleon system has been developed. This method is based on the spline-decomposition in the angular variable and a generalization of the Numerov method for the hyperradius. The s-wave calculations of the inelasticity and phase-shift, as well as breakup amplitudes for nd and pd breakup scattering for lab energies 14.1 and 42.0 MeV were performed with the Malfliet -Tjon MT I-III potential. In the case of nd breakup scattering the results are in good agreement with those of the benchmark solution [1],[2]. In the case of pd quartet breakup scattering disagreement for the inelasticities reaches up to 6% as compared with those of the Pisa group [3]. The calculated pd amplitudes fulfill the optical theorem with a good precision. 1. J. L. Friar, B. F. Gibson, G. Berthold, W. Gloeckle, Th. Cornelius, H. Witala, J. Haidenbauer, Y. Koike, G. L. Payne, J. A. Tjon, and W. M. Kloet,: http://link.aip.org/link/?&lcreator=getabs-normal&ldir=FWD&lrel=CITES&fromkey=PRVCAN000069000004044003000001&fromkeyType=CVIPS&fromloc=AIP&toj=PRVCAN&tov=42&top=1838&toloc=APS&tourl=http%3A%2F%2Flink.aps.org%2Fabstract%2FPRC%2Fv42%2FPhys. Rev. C 42, 1838 (1990). 2. Frair J.L, Payne G.L., Gl"ockle W., Hueber D., Witala H.: Phys. Rev. C 51, 2356 (1995) 3. Kievsky A., Viviani M., and Rosati S.: Phys. Rev. C 64, 024002 (2001)

  19. Digital image communication scheme based on the breakup of spiral waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidelys, Martynas; Lu, Chen; Cheng, Yujie; Ragulskis, Minvydas

    2017-02-01

    A digital image communication scheme based on the breakup of spiral waves is presented in this paper. This communication system does not require spatially homogeneous random initial conditions. Moreover, the secret image is not embedded into the initial conditions of the evolving self-organizing patterns. Such features increase the security of the communication, but still enable an effective transmission of the secret image. Computational experiments are used to demonstrate the properties and efficiency of the proposed scheme.

  20. Multiple mechanisms of spiral wave breakup in a model of cardiac electrical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenton, Flavio H.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Hastings, Harold M.; Evans, Steven J.

    2002-09-01

    It has become widely accepted that the most dangerous cardiac arrhythmias are due to reentrant waves, i.e., electrical wave(s) that recirculate repeatedly throughout the tissue at a higher frequency than the waves produced by the heart's natural pacemaker (sinoatrial node). However, the complicated structure of cardiac tissue, as well as the complex ionic currents in the cell, have made it extremely difficult to pinpoint the detailed dynamics of these life-threatening reentrant arrhythmias. A simplified ionic model of the cardiac action potential (AP), which can be fitted to a wide variety of experimentally and numerically obtained mesoscopic characteristics of cardiac tissue such as AP shape and restitution of AP duration and conduction velocity, is used to explain many different mechanisms of spiral wave breakup which in principle can occur in cardiac tissue. Some, but not all, of these mechanisms have been observed before using other models; therefore, the purpose of this paper is to demonstrate them using just one framework model and to explain the different parameter regimes or physiological properties necessary for each mechanism (such as high or low excitability, corresponding to normal or ischemic tissue, spiral tip trajectory types, and tissue structures such as rotational anisotropy and periodic boundary conditions). Each mechanism is compared with data from other ionic models or experiments to illustrate that they are not model-specific phenomena. Movies showing all the breakup mechanisms are available at http://arrhythmia.hofstra.edu/breakup and at ftp://ftp.aip.org/epaps/chaos/E-CHAOEH-12-039203/ INDEX.html. The fact that many different breakup mechanisms exist has important implications for antiarrhythmic drug design and for comparisons of fibrillation experiments using different species, electromechanical uncoupling drugs, and initiation protocols.

  1. Low-altitude acceleration of auroral electrons during breakup observed by a mother-daughter rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnstone, A. D.; Davis, T. N.

    1974-01-01

    By the use of a mother-daughter rocket combination and ground-based observations with television, time and space variations are resolved in particle measurements in breakup aurora. The spectral variations measured during a temporal variation in the aurora can be explained by a nearly uniform acceleration of all the electrons such as would be caused by an electric potential drop along the magnetic field lines. Many other explanations can be eliminated.

  2. Dynamics of Growth and Breakup of Viscous Pendant Drops into Air.

    PubMed

    Zhang

    1999-04-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the dynamics of a viscous liquid drop that is being formed directly at the tip of a vertical tube into ambient air. A model is developed to predict the evolution of the drop shape and its breakup based on RIPPLE, which is a solution algorithm for computing transient, two-dimensional, incompressible fluid flow with surface tension on free surfaces of general topology (D. B. Kothe and R. C. Mjolsness, AIAA J. 30, 2694 (1992)). The full Navier-Stokes system is solved by using finite-difference formulation on a Eulerian mesh. The mesh is fixed in space, with the flow and surface moving through it to ensure accurate calculations of complex free surface flows and topology, including surface breakup and coalescence. The novel feature of the numerical algorithm is the use of a Eulerian volume-tracking approach which allows the calculations to pass the breaking point during formation of a drop continuously without interruption or numerical modification and, therefore, to explore the features of generation of satellite droplets. The effects of physical and geometric parameters on the nonlinear dynamics of drop growth and breakup are investigated. The focus here is on drop breakup and subsequent formation of satellite droplets. The effects of finite inertial, capillary, viscous, and gravitational forces are all accounted for to classify different formation dynamics and to elucidate features of satellite droplet generation. The numerical predictions are compared with experimental measurements for water drops, and the results show good agreement. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  3. Alignment and Load Transfer in Carbon Nanotube and Dicyclopentadiene Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severino, Joseph Vincent

    Individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the strongest materials available but their macroscopic assemblies are weak. This work establishes a new thermosetting dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) and CNT composite that increases the strength of CNT assemblies. These high volume fraction and void free structures constitute advanced materials that could one day replace traditional composite systems. To further the understanding of physical interactions between polymer and CNTs, a novel "capstan" load transfer mechanism is also introduced. Self-supporting assemblies of interconnected carbon nanotubes were stretched, twisted and compressed to fashion composites by the infusion and polymerization of low viscosity DCPD based monomeric resins. The properties of the CNTs, polymer and composite were characterized with thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and Raman spectroscopy. The microstructure was analyzed by wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Sheets were drawn at 15 m/min from a growth furnace to impart alignment then stretched to further modify alignment. The mechanical properties were determined in five orientations with respect to the growth direction. The strength was nearly three times higher along this growth direction than it was perpendicular, and modulus was nearly six times higher. Transverse stretching achieved 1.5 times the elongation but alignment was inferior due to CNT kinking that prevented alignment and consolidation. Composites yarns and sheets were investigated for the mechanical properties, microstructure and load transfer. The DCPD resin was found to wet the CNTs and lubricated deformation. This reduced loads during processing, and curing solidified the aligned and consolidated structure. The stretched and twisted composite yarns increased the failure stress 51%. In aligned composite sheet, the failure stress increased 200%. The increased stresses

  4. The NASA Ames Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility: Experimental Simulation of the Atmospheric Break-Up of Meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilder, M. C.; Bogdanoff, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    The Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility at NASA Ames Research Center provides a potential platform for the experimental simulation of meteor breakup at conditions that closely match full-scale entry condition for select parameters. The poster describes the entry environment simulation capabilities of the Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF) at NASA Ames Research Center and provides example images of the fragmentation of a hypersonic projectile for which break-up was initiated by mechanical forces (impact with a thin polymer diaphragm).

  5. Explicit demonstration of the role of Marangoni effect in the breakup of nanoscale liquid filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seric, Ivana; Mahady, Kyle; Afkhami, Shahriar; Hartnett, Chris; Fowlkes, Jason; Rack, Philip; Kondic, Lou

    2016-11-01

    We consider a breakup of bi-metal filaments deposited on a solid substrate. These filaments are exposed to laser irradiation and, while in the liquid phase, evolve by a process resembling breakup of a liquid jet governed by the Rayleigh-Plateau instability. The novel element is that the Marangoni effect, resulting from a different surface tension of the two metals from which the filament is built, is crucial in understanding the instability development. In particular, Marangoni effect may lead to the inversion of the breakup process, producing droplets at the locations where according to the Rayleigh-Plateau theory dry spots would be expected. We present experimental results carried out with Cu-Ni filaments, as well as direct numerical simulations based on a novel algorithm that includes variable surface tension in a Volume-of-Fluid based Navier-Stokes solver. These results suggest the possibility of using Marangoni effect for the purpose of self- and directed-assembly on the nanoscale. Supported by the NSF Grant No. CBET-1604351.

  6. Thermal instabilities and Rayleigh breakup of ultrathin silver nanowires grown in helium nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Volk, Alexander; Knez, Daniel; Thaler, Philipp; Hauser, Andreas W; Grogger, Werner; Hofer, Ferdinand; Ernst, Wolfgang E

    2015-10-14

    Ag nanowires with diameters below 6 nm are grown within vortex containing superfluid helium nanodroplets and deposited onto a heatable substrate at cryogenic temperatures. The experimental setup allows an unbiased investigation of the inherent stability of pristine silver nanowires, which is virtually impossible with other methods due to chemical processes or templates involved in standard production routes. We demonstrate by experiment and by adaption of a theoretical model that initially continuous wires disintegrate into chains of spheres. This phenomenon is well described by a Rayleigh-like breakup mechanism when the substrate is heated to room temperature. Our findings clarify the recent discussions on the cause of the observed segmented patterns, where a breakup during deposition [Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2012, 108, 155302] or mechanisms intrinsic to the helium droplet mediated growth process [Spence et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014, 16, 6903] have been proposed. The experimental setup confirms the validity of previous suggestions derived from bulk superfluid helium experiments [Gordon et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014, 16, 25229] for the helium droplet system, and further allows a much more accurate determination of the breakup temperature.

  7. Liquid-bridge stability and breakup on surfaces with contact-angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Amir; Hill, Reghan J

    2016-08-10

    We study the stability and breakup of liquid bridges with a free contact line on surfaces with contact-angle hysteresis (CAH) under zero-gravity conditions. Non-ideal surfaces exhibit CAH because of surface imperfections, by which the constraints on three-phase contact lines are influenced. Given that interfacial instabilities are constraint-sensitive, understanding how CAH affects the stability and breakup of liquid bridges is crucial for predicting the drop size in contact-drop dispensing. Unlike ideal surfaces on which contact lines are always free irrespective of surface wettability, contact lines may undergo transitions from pinned to free and vice versa during drop deposition on non-ideal surfaces. Here, we experimentally and theoretically examine how stability and breakup are affected by CAH, highlighting cases where stability is lost during a transition from a pinned-pinned (more constrained) to pinned-free (less constrained) interface-rather than a critical state. This provides a practical means of expediting or delaying stability loss. We also demonstrate how the dynamic contact angle can control the contact-line radius following stability loss.

  8. A user`s guide for BREAKUP: A computer code for parallelizing the overset grid approach

    SciTech Connect

    Barnette, D.W.

    1998-04-01

    In this user`s guide, details for running BREAKUP are discussed. BREAKUP allows the widely used overset grid method to be run in a parallel computer environment to achieve faster run times for computational field simulations over complex geometries. The overset grid method permits complex geometries to be divided into separate components. Each component is then gridded independently. The grids are computationally rejoined in a solver via interpolation coefficients used for grid-to-grid communications of boundary data. Overset grids have been in widespread use for many years on serial computers, and several well-known Navier-Stokes flow solvers have been extensively developed and validated to support their use. One drawback of serial overset grid methods has been the extensive compute time required to update flow solutions one grid at a time. Parallelizing the overset grid method overcomes this limitation by updating each grid or subgrid simultaneously. BREAKUP prepares overset grids for parallel processing by subdividing each overset grid into statically load-balanced subgrids. Two-dimensional examples with sample solutions, and three-dimensional examples, are presented.

  9. The initiation of segmented buoyancy-driven melting during continental breakup

    PubMed Central

    Gallacher, Ryan J.; Keir, Derek; Harmon, Nicholas; Stuart, Graham; Leroy, Sylvie; Hammond, James O. S.; Kendall, J-Michael; Ayele, Atalay; Goitom, Berhe; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Ahmed, Abdulhakim

    2016-01-01

    Melting of the mantle during continental breakup leads to magmatic intrusion and volcanism, yet our understanding of the location and dominant mechanisms of melt generation in rifting environments is impeded by a paucity of direct observations of mantle melting. It is unclear when during the rifting process the segmented nature of magma supply typical of seafloor spreading initiates. Here, we use Rayleigh-wave tomography to construct a high-resolution absolute three-dimensional shear-wave velocity model of the upper 250 km beneath the Afar triple junction, imaging the mantle response during progressive continental breakup. Our model suggests melt production is highest and melting depths deepest early during continental breakup. Elevated melt production during continental rifting is likely due to localized thinning and melt focusing when the rift is narrow. In addition, we interpret segmented zones of melt supply beneath the rift, suggesting that buoyancy-driven active upwelling of the mantle initiates early during continental rifting. PMID:27752044

  10. Dynamics of Three-Nucleon System Studied in Deuteron-Proton Breakup Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, E.; Kistryn, St.; Skwira-Chalot, I.; Ciepał, I.; Kłos, B.; Kozela, A.; Parol, W.; Rusnok, A.; Wilczek, A.; Zejma, J.

    2017-03-01

    Systems composed of three nucleons have been a subject of precise experimental studies for many years. Recently, the database of observables for the deuteron breakup in collision with protons has been significantly extended at intermediate energies. In this region the comparison with exact theoretical calculations is possible, while the sensitivity to various aspects of the interaction, in particular to the subtle effects of the dynamics beyond the pairwise nucleon-nucleon force, is significant. The Coulomb interaction and relativistic effects show also their influence on the observables of the breakup reaction. All these effects vary with energy and appear with different strength in certain observables and phase-space regions, which calls for systematic investigations of a possibly rich set of observables determined in a wide range of energies. Moreover, a systematic comparison with theoretical predictions performed in coordinates related to the system dynamics in a possibly direct way is of importance. The examples of existing experimental data for the breakup reaction are briefly presented and the amenability of a set of invariant coordinates for that type of analysis is discussed.

  11. Instability of nano- and microscale liquid metal filaments: Transition from single droplet collapse to multidroplet breakup

    DOE PAGES

    Hartnett, Chris A.; Mahady, Kyle; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; ...

    2015-11-23

    We carry out experimental and numerical studies to investigate the collapse and breakup of finite size, nano- and microscale, liquid metal filaments supported on a substrate. We find the critical dimensions below which filaments do not break up but rather collapse to a single droplet. The transition from collapse to breakup can be described as a competition between two fluid dynamic phenomena: the capillary driven end retraction and the Rayleigh–Plateau type instability mechanism that drives the breakup. We focus on the unique spatial and temporal transition region between these two phenomena using patterned metallic thin film strips and pulsed-laser-induced dewetting.more » The experimental results are compared to an analytical model proposed by Driessen et al. and modified to include substrate interactions. Additionally, we report the results of numerical simulations based on a volume-of-fluid method to provide additional insight and highlight the importance of liquid metal resolidification, which reduces inertial effects.« less

  12. A Southern Hemisphere origin for campanulid angiosperms, with traces of the break-up of Gondwana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background New powerful biogeographic methods have focused attention on long-standing hypotheses regarding the influence of the break-up of Gondwana on the biogeography of Southern Hemisphere plant groups. Studies to date have often concluded that these groups are too young to have been influenced by these ancient continental movements. Here we examine a much larger and older angiosperm clade, the Campanulidae, and infer its biogeographic history by combining Bayesian divergence time information with a likelihood-based biogeographic model focused on the Gondwanan landmasses. Results Our analyses imply that campanulids likely originated in the middle Albian (~105 Ma), and that a substantial portion of the early evolutionary history of campanulids took place in the Southern Hemisphere, despite their greater species richness in the Northern Hemisphere today. We also discovered several disjunctions that show biogeographic and temporal correspondence with the break-up of Gondwana. Conclusions While it is possible to discern traces of the break-up of Gondwana in clades that are old enough, it will generally be difficult to be confident in continental movement as the prime cause of geographic disjunctions. This follows from the need for the geographic disjunction, the inferred biogeographic scenario, and the dating of the lineage splitting events to be consistent with the causal hypothesis. PMID:23565668

  13. The absence of a dense potential core in supercritical injection: A thermal break-up mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banuti, Daniel T.; Hannemann, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Certain experiments in quasi-isobaric supercritical injection remain unexplained by the current state of theory: Without developing a constant value potential core as expected from the mechanical view of break-up, density is observed to drop immediately upon entering the chamber. Furthermore, this phenomenon has never been captured in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) despite having become a de facto standard case for real fluid CFD validation. In this paper, we present strong evidence for a thermal jet disintegration mechanism (in addition to classical mechanical break-up) which resolves both the theoretical and the computational discrepancies. A new interpretation of supercritical jet disintegration is introduced, based on pseudo-boiling, a nonlinear supercritical transition from gas-like to liquid-like states. We show that thermal disintegration may dominate classical mechanical break-up when heat transfer takes place in the injector and when the fluid state is sufficiently close to the pseudo-boiling point. A procedure which allows to capture subsided cores with standard CFD is provided and demonstrated.

  14. On the breakup of a thin liquid film subject to interfacial shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, Hamed H.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2004-02-01

    The breakup of a thin non-evaporating liquid film that is either flowing down or climbing on a vertical or inclined surface and subject to cocurrent or countercurrent interfacial shear (or gas flow) is investigated analytically. Analytical expressions for the dimensionless liquid film thickness, Delta_{scriptsizemin}, and wetting rate, Gamma_{scriptsizemin}, at breakup are derived based on the minimization of the total energy of a stable rivulet, formed following the film breakup. For a downflowing liquid film, increasing the cocurrent interfacial shear (or gas velocity) or decreasing the equilibrium contact angle, theta_{o}, decreases both Delta_{scriptsizemin} and Gamma _{scriptsizemin}, below their values with zero interfacial shear. Conversely, increasing the countercurrent interfacial shear or theta_{o}, increases both Delta_{scriptsizemin} and Gamma_{scriptsizemin}, above their values with zero interfacial shear. The predictions of Delta _{scriptsizemin} and Gamma _{scriptsizemin} for a climbing water film on a vertical surface are in good agreement with reported experimental data for a wide range of cocurrent gas velocities.

  15. DebriSat: The New Hypervelocity Impact Test for Satellite Breakup Fragment Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, Heather

    2015-01-01

    To replicate a hyper-velocity fragmentation event using modern-day spacecraft materials and construction techniques to better improve the existing DoD and NASA breakup models: DebriSat is intended to be representative of modern LEO satellites. Major design decisions were reviewed and approved by Aerospace subject matter experts from different disciplines. DebriSat includes 7 major subsystems. Attitude determination and control system (ADCS), command and data handling (C&DH), electrical power system (EPS), payload, propulsion, telemetry tracking and command (TT&C), and thermal management. To reduce cost, most components are emulated based on existing design of flight hardware and fabricated with the same materials. center dotA key laboratory-based test, Satellite Orbital debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT), supporting the development of the DoD and NASA satellite breakup models was conducted at AEDC in 1992. Breakup models based on SOCIT have supported many applications and matched on-orbit events reasonably well over the years.

  16. Interplay of projectile breakup and target excitation in reactions induced by weakly bound nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ramos, M.; Moro, A. M.

    2017-03-01

    Background: Reactions involving weakly bound nuclei require formalisms able to deal with continuum states. The majority of these formalisms struggle to treat collective excitations of the systems involved. For continuum-discretized coupled channels (CDCC), extensions to include target excitation have been developed but have only been applied to a small number of cases. Purpose: In this work, we reexamine the extension of the CDCC formalism to include target excitation and apply it to a variety of reactions to study the effect of breakup on inelastic cross sections. Methods: We use a transformed oscillator basis to discretize the continuum of the projectiles in the different reactions and use the extended CDCC method developed in this work to solve the resulting coupled differential equations. A new code has been developed to perform the calculations. Results: Reactions 58Ni(d ,d )*58Ni , 24Mg(d ,d )*24Mg , 144Sm(6Li,6Li)*144Sm , and 9Be(6Li,6Li)*9Be are studied. Satisfactory agreement is found between experimental data and extended CDCC calculations. Conclusions: The studied CDCC method has proven to be an accurate tool to describe target excitation in reactions with weakly bound nuclei. Moderate effects of breakup on inelastic observables are found for the reactions studied. Cross-section magnitudes are not modified much, but angular distributions present smoothing when opposed to calculations without breakup.

  17. Facebook Surveillance of Former Romantic Partners: Associations with PostBreakup Recovery and Personal Growth

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Previous research has found that continuing offline contact with an ex-romantic partner following a breakup may disrupt emotional recovery. The present study examined whether continuing online contact with an ex-partner through remaining Facebook friends and/or engaging in surveillance of the ex-partner's Facebook page inhibited postbreakup adjustment and growth above and beyond offline contact. Analysis of the data provided by 464 participants revealed that Facebook surveillance was associated with greater current distress over the breakup, more negative feelings, sexual desire, and longing for the ex-partner, and lower personal growth. Participants who remained Facebook friends with the ex-partner, relative to those who did not remain Facebook friends, reported less negative feelings, sexual desire, and longing for the former partner, but lower personal growth. All of these results emerged after controlling for offline contact, personality traits, and characteristics of the former relationship and breakup that tend to predict postbreakup adjustment. Overall, these findings suggest that exposure to an ex-partner through Facebook may obstruct the process of healing and moving on from a past relationship. PMID:22946958

  18. Experimental Study of Three-Nucleon Dynamics in the Dp Breakup Collisions Using the WASA Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłos, B.; Ciepał, I.; Jamróz, B.; Khatri, G.; Kistryn, S.; Kozela, A.; Magiera, A.; Parol, W.; Skwira-Chalot, I.; Stephan, E.

    2017-03-01

    Until recently, all calculations of breakup observables were carried out in a non-relativistic regime. The relativistic treatment of the breakup reaction in 3 N system is quite a new achievement. The detailed study of various aspects of few-nucleon system dynamics in medium energy region, with a particular emphasis on investigation of relativistic effects and their interplay with three nucleon force (3NF) becomes feasible with increasing available energy in the three nucleon system. Therefore an experiment to investigate the ^1H(d, pp)n breakup cross section using a deuteron beam of 300, 340, 380 and 400 MeV and the WASA detector has been performed at COSY-Jülich. The almost 4π geometry of the WASA detector gives an unique possibility to study variety of kinematic configurations, which reveal different sensitivity to aspects of dynamics of the three nucleon system. The main steps of the analysis, including energy calibration, PID, normalization and efficiency studies, and their impact on the final accuracy of the result, are discussed.

  19. Characterization of a Tunable Quasi-Monoenergetic Neutron Beamfrom Deuteron Breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D.L.; McMahan, M.A.; Ahle, L.; Barquest, B.R.; Cerny, J.; Heilbronn, L.H.; Jewett, C.C.

    2006-12-14

    A neutron irradiation facility is being developed at the88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for thepurposes of measuring neutron reaction cross sections on radioactivetargets and for radiation effects testing. Applications are of benefit tostockpile stewardship, nuclear astrophysics, next generation advancedfuel reactors, and cosmic radiation biology and electronics in space. Thefacility will supply a tunable, quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam in therange of 10-30 MeV or a white neutron source, produced by deuteronbreakup reactions on thin and thick targets, respectively. Because thedeuteron breakup reaction has not been well studied at intermediateincident deuteron energies, above the target Coulomb barrier and below 56MeV, a detailed characterization was necessary of the neutron spectraproduced by thin targets.Neutron time of flight (TOF) methods have beenused to measure the neutron spectra produced on thin targets of low-Z(titanium) and high-Z (tantalum) materials at incident deuteron energiesof 20 MeV and 29 MeV at 0 deg. Breakup neutrons at both energies fromlow-Z targets appear to peak at roughly half of the available kineticenergy, while neutrons from high-Z interactions peak somewhat lower inenergy, owing to the increased proton energy due to breakup within theCoulomb field. Furthermore, neutron spectra appear narrower for high-Ztargets. These centroids are consistent with recent preliminary protonenergy measurements using silicon telescope detectors conducted at LBNL,though there is a notable discrepancy with spectral widths.

  20. Large-eddy simulation of cavitating nozzle flow and primary jet break-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ã-rley, F.; Trummler, T.; Hickel, S.; Mihatsch, M. S.; Schmidt, S. J.; Adams, N. A.

    2015-08-01

    We employ a barotropic two-phase/two-fluid model to study the primary break-up of cavitating liquid jets emanating from a rectangular nozzle, which resembles a high aspect-ratio slot flow. All components (i.e., gas, liquid, and vapor) are represented by a homogeneous mixture approach. The cavitating fluid model is based on a thermodynamic-equilibrium assumption. Compressibility of all phases enables full resolution of collapse-induced pressure wave dynamics. The thermodynamic model is embedded into an implicit large-eddy simulation (LES) environment. The considered configuration follows the general setup of a reference experiment and is a generic reproduction of a scaled-up fuel injector or control valve as found in an automotive engine. Due to the experimental conditions, it operates, however, at significantly lower pressures. LES results are compared to the experimental reference for validation. Three different operating points are studied, which differ in terms of the development of cavitation regions and the jet break-up characteristics. Observed differences between experimental and numerical data in some of the investigated cases can be caused by uncertainties in meeting nominal parameters by the experiment. The investigation reveals that three main mechanisms promote primary jet break-up: collapse-induced turbulent fluctuations near the outlet, entrainment of free gas into the nozzle, and collapse events inside the jet near the liquid-gas interface.

  1. Large-eddy simulation of cavitating nozzle flow and primary jet break-up

    SciTech Connect

    Örley, F. Trummler, T.; Mihatsch, M. S.; Schmidt, S. J.; Adams, N. A.; Hickel, S.

    2015-08-15

    We employ a barotropic two-phase/two-fluid model to study the primary break-up of cavitating liquid jets emanating from a rectangular nozzle, which resembles a high aspect-ratio slot flow. All components (i.e., gas, liquid, and vapor) are represented by a homogeneous mixture approach. The cavitating fluid model is based on a thermodynamic-equilibrium assumption. Compressibility of all phases enables full resolution of collapse-induced pressure wave dynamics. The thermodynamic model is embedded into an implicit large-eddy simulation (LES) environment. The considered configuration follows the general setup of a reference experiment and is a generic reproduction of a scaled-up fuel injector or control valve as found in an automotive engine. Due to the experimental conditions, it operates, however, at significantly lower pressures. LES results are compared to the experimental reference for validation. Three different operating points are studied, which differ in terms of the development of cavitation regions and the jet break-up characteristics. Observed differences between experimental and numerical data in some of the investigated cases can be caused by uncertainties in meeting nominal parameters by the experiment. The investigation reveals that three main mechanisms promote primary jet break-up: collapse-induced turbulent fluctuations near the outlet, entrainment of free gas into the nozzle, and collapse events inside the jet near the liquid-gas interface.

  2. Transverse liquid fuel jet breakup, burning, and ignition. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Hsi-Shang

    1990-01-01

    An analytical study of the breakup, burning, and ignition of liquid fuels injected transversely into a hot air stream is conducted. The non-reacting liquid jet breakup location is determined by the local sonic point criterion. Two models, one employing analysis of an elliptical jet cross-section and the other employing a two-dimensional blunt body to represent the transverse jet, were used for sonic point calculations. An auxiliary criterion based on surface tension stability is used as a separate means of determining the breakup location. For the reacting liquid jet problem, a diffusion flame supported by a one-step chemical reaction within the gaseous boundary layer is solved along the ellipse surface in subsonic cross flow. Typical flame structures and concentration profiles were calculated for various locations along the jet cross-section as a function of upstream Mach numbers. The integration reaction rate along the jet cross-section is used to predict ignition position, which is found to be situated near the stagnation point. While a multi-step reaction is needed to represent the ignition process more accurately, the present calculation does yield reasonable predictions concerning ignition along a curved surface.

  3. Coulomb breakup of 22C in a four-body model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla, E. C.; Descouvemont, P.

    2016-08-01

    Breakup cross sections are determined for the Borromean nucleus 22C by using a four-body eikonal model, including Coulomb corrections. Bound and continuum states are constructed within a 20C+n +n three-body model in hyperspherical coordinates. We compute continuum states with the correct asymptotic behavior through the R -matrix method. For the n +n potential, we use the Minnesota interaction. As there is no precise experimental information on 21C, we define different parameter sets for the 20C+n potentials. These parameter sets provide different scattering lengths, and resonance energies of an expected 3 /2+ excited state. Then we analyze the 22C ground-state energy and rms radius, as well as E 1 strength distributions and breakup cross sections. The E 1 strength distribution presents an enhancement at low energies. Its amplitude is associated with the low binding energy, rather than with a three-body resonance. We show that the shape of the cross section at low energies is sensitive to the ground-state properties. In addition, we suggest the existence of a low-energy 2+ resonance, which should be observable in breakup experiments.

  4. Flocculation kinetics of low-turbidity raw water and the irreversible floc breakup process.

    PubMed

    Marques, Rodrigo de Oliveira; Ferreira Filho, Sidney Seckler

    2017-04-01

    The main objective of this study was to propose an improvement to the flocculation kinetics model presented by Argaman and Kaufman, by including a new term that accounts for the irreversible floc breakup process. Both models were fitted to the experimental results obtained with flocculation kinetics assays of low turbidity raw water containing Microcystis aeruginosa cells. Aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride were used as coagulants, and three distinct average velocity gradient (G) values were applied in the flocculation stage (20, 40 and 60 s(-1)). Experimental results suggest that the equilibrium between the aggregation and breakup process, as depicted by Argaman and Kaufman's original model, might not be constant over time, since the residual turbidity increased in various assays (phenomenon that was attributed to the irreversible floc breakup process). In the aluminum sulfate assays, the residual turbidity increase was visible when G = 20 s(-1) (dosages of 60 and 80 mg L(-1)). For the ferric chloride assays, the phenomenon was noticed when G = 60 s(-1) (dosages of 60 and 80 mg L(-1)). The proposed model presented a better fit to the experimental results, especially at higher coagulant dosages and/or higher values of average velocity gradient (G).

  5. Thin sheet break-up in droplet-pool impact events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirjalili, Shahab; Mani, Ali

    2014-11-01

    Many experiment have shown that during the impact of a droplet of the size of a few millimeters on a pool of the same liquid with a velocity of a few meters per second, a thin sheet of gas is entrapped delaying the contact of the two liquid bodies. It has also been demonstrated that the break-up of this sheet, which happens in very small time scales, can lead to the generation of micro-bubbles. Given the very small scales involved, this problem is cumbersome to study numerically. In this work, we have undertaken this task by tackling the problem in 2-D. First, we use a relatively cheap boundary element simulation to find the evolution of the profiles prior to impact. After identifying the regimes of interest, and the relevant parameters and scales, diffuse interface CFD calculations are done and the process of sheet breakup and bubble generation is resolved via this approach. Parameter dependence studies are performed using these tools and statistics such as thin film thickness, length and micro-bubble distributions are presented. Finally, a linear stability analysis of thin gas sheet is performed and using the data from the two aforementioned approaches, thin gas sheet breakup is examined in the context of hydrodynamic instabilities. Supported by ONR.

  6. Breakup of metal jets penetrating a volatile liquid. Final report, October 1, 1991--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.P.

    1995-07-01

    In a loss of coolant accident, the core may become uncovered, causing the fuel pins to melt. The molten fuel would pour onto the plenum and collect on the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head. The RPV internal structure includes one or more perforated plates in the lower plenum which would divide the molten fuel into small diameter streams or jets, which would break up as they penetrate the coolant in the lower plenum. The breakup of these jets would occur in two phases, each dominated by a distinct fragmentation mechanism. As a fuel jet first penetrates the coolant, a stagnation flow develops at its leading edge, causing the column to spread radially and eject molten fuel into the coolant. The jet fluid in the column is fragmented by pressure fluctuations due to the jet/ambient fluid relative motion, so that a steady jet is reduced to a field of falling drops below a critical depth called the breakup length. The present work includes analyses yielding simple correlations for jet breakup length and jet leading edge penetration.

  7. Depth-dependent extension, two-stage breakup and cratonic underplating at rifted margins.

    PubMed

    Huismans, Ritske; Beaumont, Christopher

    2011-05-05

    Uniform lithospheric extension predicts basic properties of non-volcanic rifted margins but fails to explain other important characteristics. Significant discrepancies are observed at 'type I' margins (such as the Iberia-Newfoundland conjugates), where large tracts of continental mantle lithosphere are exposed at the sea floor, and 'type II' margins (such as some ultrawide central South Atlantic margins), where thin continental crust spans wide regions below which continental lower crust and mantle lithosphere have apparently been removed. Neither corresponds to uniform extension. Instead, either crust or mantle lithosphere has been preferentially removed. Using dynamical models, we demonstrate that these margins are opposite end members: in type I, depth-dependent extension results in crustal-necking breakup before mantle-lithosphere breakup and in type II, the converse is true. These two-layer, two-stage breakup behaviours explain the discrepancies and have implications for the styles of the associated sedimentary basins. Laterally flowing lower-mantle cratonic lithosphere may underplate some type II margins, thereby contributing to their anomalous characteristics.

  8. Snowball Earth ocean chemistry driven by extensive ridge volcanism during Rodinia breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gernon, T. M.; Hincks, T. K.; Tyrrell, T.; Rohling, E. J.; Palmer, M. R.

    2016-03-01

    During Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth glaciations, the oceans gained massive amounts of alkalinity, culminating in the deposition of massive cap carbonates on deglaciation. Changes in terrestrial runoff associated with both breakup of the Rodinia supercontinent and deglaciation can explain some, but not all of the requisite changes in ocean chemistry. Submarine volcanism along shallow ridges formed during supercontinent breakup results in the formation of large volumes of glassy hyaloclastite, which readily alters to palagonite. Here we estimate fluxes of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, silica and bicarbonate associated with these shallow-ridge processes, and argue that extensive submarine volcanism during the breakup of Rodinia made an important contribution to changes in ocean chemistry during Snowball Earth glaciations. We use Monte Carlo simulations to show that widespread hyaloclastite alteration under near-global sea-ice cover could lead to Ca2+ and Mg2+ supersaturation over the course of the glaciation that is sufficient to explain the volume of cap carbonates deposited. Furthermore, our conservative estimates of phosphorus release are sufficient to explain the observed P:Fe ratios in sedimentary iron formations from this time. This large phosphorus release may have fuelled primary productivity, which in turn would have contributed to atmospheric O2 rises that followed Snowball Earth episodes.

  9. With or Without You? Contextualizing the Impact of Romantic Relationship Breakup on Crime Among Serious Adolescent Offenders.

    PubMed

    Larson, Matthew; Sweeten, Gary; Piquero, Alex R

    2016-01-01

    The decline and delay of marriage has prolonged adolescence and the transition to adulthood, and consequently fostered greater romantic relationship fluidity during a stage of the life course that is pivotal for both development and offending. Yet, despite a growing literature of the consequences of romantic relationships breakup, little is known about its connection with crime, especially among youth enmeshed in the criminal justice system. This article addresses this gap by examining the effects of relationship breakup on crime among justice-involved youth-a key policy-relevant group. We refer to data from the Pathways to Desistance Study, a longitudinal study of 1354 (14% female) adjudicated youth from the juvenile and adult court systems in Phoenix and Philadelphia, to assess the nature and complexity of this association. In general, our results support prior evidence of breakup's criminogenic influence. Specifically, they suggest that relationship breakup's effect on crime is particularly acute among this at-risk sample, contingent upon post-breakup relationship transitions, and more pronounced for relationships that involve cohabitation. Our results also extend prior work by demonstrating that breakup is attenuated by changes in psychosocial characteristics and peer associations/exposure. We close with a discussion of our findings, their policy implications, and what they mean for research on relationships and crime among serious adolescent offenders moving forward.

  10. Cavity alignment using fringe scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinkunaite, Laura Paulina; Kawabe, Keita; Landry, Michael

    2017-01-01

    LIGO employs two 4-km long Fabry-Pérot arm cavities, which need to be aligned in order for an interferometer to be locked on a TEM00 mode. Once the cavity is locked, alignment signals can be derived from wave-front sensors which measure the TEM01 mode content. However, the alignment state is not always good enough for locking on TEM00. Even when this is the case, the alignment can be evaluated using a free swinging cavity, that shows flashes when higher-order modes become resonant. By moving test masses, small changes are made to the mirror orientation, and hence the TEM00 mode can be optimized iteratively. Currently, this is a manual procedure, and thus it is very time-consuming. Therefore, this project is aimed to study another possible way to lock the cavity on the TEM00 mode. Misalignment information can also be extracted from the power of the higher-order modes transmitted through the cavity. This talk will present an algorithm for this alternative and faster way to derive the alignment state of the arm cavities. Supported by APS FIP, NSF, and Caltech SFP.

  11. SU-E-J-105: Trusting Dose Deformation and Accumulation for GYN Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Poplawski, L; Li, T; Chino, J; Craciunescu, O

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In brachytherapy, structures surrounding the target have the potential to move between treatments and receive unknown dose. Deformable image registration could overcome challenges through dose accumulation. This study uses two possible deformable dose summation techniques and compares the results to point dose summation currently performed in clinic. Methods: Data for ten patients treated with a Syed template was imported into the MIM software (Cleveland, OH). The deformable registration was applied to structures by masking other image data to a single intensity. The registration flow consisted of the following steps: 1) mask CTs so that each of the structures-of-interest had one unique intensity; 2) perform applicator — based rigid registration; 3) Perform deformable registration; 4) Refine registration by changing local alignments manually; 5) Repeat steps 1 to 3 until desired structure adequately deformed; 5) Transfer each deformed contours to the first CT. The deformed structure accuracy was determined by a dice similarity coefficient (DSC) comparison with the first fraction. Two dose summation techniques were investigated: a deformation and recalculation on the structure; and a dose deformation and accumulation method. Point doses were used as a comparison value. Results: The Syed deformations have DSC ranging from 0.53 to 0.97 and 0.75 and 0.95 for the bladder and rectum, respectively. For the bladder, contour deformation addition ranged from −34.8% to 0.98% and dose deformation accumulation ranged from −35% to 29.3% difference from clinical calculations. For the rectum, contour deformation addition ranged from −5.2% to 16.9% and the dose deformation accumulation ranged from −29.1% to 15.3% change. Conclusion: Deforming dose for summation leads to different volumetric doses than when dose is recalculated on deformed structures, raising concerns about the accuracy of the deformed dose. DSC alone cannot be used to establish the accuracy of a

  12. A Nonlinear Observer for Gyro Alignment Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thienel, J.; Sanner, R. M.

    2003-01-01

    A nonlinear observer for gyro alignment estimation is presented. The observer is composed of two error terms, an attitude error and an alignment error. The observer is globally stable with exponential convergence of the attitude errors. The gyro alignment estimate converges to the true alignment when the system is completely observable.

  13. Calcaneo-valgus deformity.

    PubMed

    Evans, D

    1975-08-01

    A discussion of the essential deformity in calcaneo-valgus feet develops a theme originally put forward in 1961 on the relapsed club foot (Evans 1961). Whereas in the normal foot the medial and lateral columns are about equal in length, in talipes equino-varus the lateral column is longer and in calcaneo-valgus shorter than the medial column. The suggestion is that in the treatment of both deformities the length of the columns be made equal. A method is described of treating calcaneo-valgus deformity by inserting cortical bone grafts taken from the tibia to elongate the anterior end of the calcaneus.

  14. Linking collisional and accretionary orogens during Rodinia assembly and breakup: Implications for models of supercontinent cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawood, Peter A.; Strachan, Robin A.; Pisarevsky, Sergei A.; Gladkochub, Dmitry P.; Murphy, J. Brendan

    2016-09-01

    Periodic assembly and dispersal of continental fragments has been a characteristic of the solid Earth for much of its history. Geodynamic drivers of this cyclic activity are inferred to be either top-down processes related to near surface lithospheric stresses at plate boundaries or bottom-up processes related to mantle convection and, in particular, mantle plumes, or some combination of the two. Analysis of the geological history of Rodinian crustal blocks suggests that internal rifting and breakup of the supercontinent were linked to the initiation of subduction and development of accretionary orogens around its periphery. Thus, breakup was a top-down instigated process. The locus of convergence was initially around north-eastern and northern Laurentia in the early Neoproterozoic before extending to outboard of Amazonia and Africa, including Avalonia-Cadomia, and arcs outboard of Siberia and eastern to northern Baltica in the mid-Neoproterozoic (∼760 Ma). The duration of subduction around the periphery of Rodinia coincides with the interval of lithospheric extension within the supercontinent, including the opening of the proto-Pacific at ca. 760 Ma and the commencement of rifting in east Laurentia. Final development of passive margin successions around Laurentia, Baltica and Siberia was not completed until the late Neoproterozoic to early Paleozoic (ca. 570-530 Ma), which corresponds with the termination of convergent plate interactions that gave rise to Gondwana and the consequent relocation of subduction zones to the periphery of this supercontinent. The temporal link between external subduction and internal extension suggests that breakup was initiated by a top-down process driven by accretionary tectonics along the periphery of the supercontinent. Plume-related magmatism may be present at specific times and in specific places during breakup but is not the prime driving force. Comparison of the Rodinia record of continental assembly and dispersal with that

  15. Effects of primary breakup modeling on spray and combustion characteristics of compression ignition engines

    SciTech Connect

    Som, S.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2010-06-15

    Injector flow dynamics and primary breakup processes are known to play a pivotal role in determining combustion and emissions in diesel engines. In the present study, we examine the effects of primary breakup modeling on the spray and combustion characteristics under diesel engine conditions. The commonly used KH model, which considers the aerodynamically induced breakup based on the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, is modified to include the effects of cavitation and turbulence generated inside the injector. The KH model and the new (KH-ACT) model are extensively evaluated by performing 3-D time-dependent simulations with detailed chemistry under diesel engine conditions. Results indicate that the inclusion of cavitation and turbulence enhances primary breakup, leading to smaller droplet sizes, decrease in liquid penetration, and increase in the radial dispersion of spray. Predictions are compared with measurements for non-evaporating and evaporating sprays, as well as with flame measurements. While both the models are able to reproduce the experimentally observed global spray and combustion characteristics, predictions using the KH-ACT model exhibit closer agreement with measurements in terms of liquid penetration, cone angle, spray axial velocity, and liquid mass distribution for non-evaporating sprays. Similarly, the KH-ACT model leads to better agreement with respect to the liquid length and vapor penetration distance for evaporating sprays, and with respect to the flame lift-off location for combusting sprays. The improved agreement is attributed to the ability of the new model to account for the effects of turbulence and cavitation generated inside the injector, which enhance the primary breakup. Results further indicate that the combustion under diesel engine conditions is characterized by a double-flame structure with a rich premixed reaction zone near the flame stabilization region and a non-premixed reaction zone further downstream. This flame structure is

  16. Alignment method for parabolic trough solar concentrators

    DOEpatents

    Diver, Richard B.

    2010-02-23

    A Theoretical Overlay Photographic (TOP) alignment method uses the overlay of a theoretical projected image of a perfectly aligned concentrator on a photographic image of the concentrator to align the mirror facets of a parabolic trough solar concentrator. The alignment method is practical and straightforward, and inherently aligns the mirror facets to the receiver. When integrated with clinometer measurements for which gravity and mechanical drag effects have been accounted for and which are made in a manner and location consistent with the alignment method, all of the mirrors on a common drive can be aligned and optimized for any concentrator orientation.

  17. An introduction to the Lagan alignment toolkit.

    PubMed

    Brudno, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The Lagan Toolkit is a software package for comparison of genomic sequences. It includes the CHAOS local alignment program, LAGAN global alignment program for two, or more sequences and Shuffle-LAGAN, a "glocal" alignment method that handles genomic rearrangements in a global alignment framework. The alignment programs included in the Lagan Toolkit have been widely used to compare genomes of many organisms, from bacteria to large mammalian genomes. This chapter provides an overview of the algorithms used by the LAGAN programs to construct genomic alignments, explains how to build alignments using either the standalone program or the web server, and discusses some of the common pitfalls users encounter when using the toolkit.

  18. Combining Multiple Pairwise Structure-based Alignments

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-12

    CombAlign is a new Python code that generates a gapped, one-to-many, multiple structure-based sequence alignment(MSSA) given a set of pairwise structure-based alignments. In order to better define regions of similarity among related protein structures, it is useful to detect the residue-residue correspondences among a set of pairwise structure alignments. Few codes exist for constructing a one-to-many, multiple sequence alignment derived from a set of structure alignments, and we perceived a need for creating a new tool for combing pairwise structure alignments that would allow for insertion of gaps in the reference structure.

  19. Multiple sequence alignment with hierarchical clustering.

    PubMed Central

    Corpet, F

    1988-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for the multiple alignment of sequences, either proteins or nucleic acids, that is both accurate and easy to use on microcomputers. The approach is based on the conventional dynamic-programming method of pairwise alignment. Initially, a hierarchical clustering of the sequences is performed using the matrix of the pairwise alignment scores. The closest sequences are aligned creating groups of aligned sequences. Then close groups are aligned until all sequences are aligned in one group. The pairwise alignments included in the multiple alignment form a new matrix that is used to produce a hierarchical clustering. If it is different from the first one, iteration of the process can be performed. The method is illustrated by an example: a global alignment of 39 sequences of cytochrome c. PMID:2849754

  20. Modelling Polymer Deformation during 3D Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlroy, Claire; Olmsted, Peter

    Three-dimensional printing has the potential to transform manufacturing processes, yet improving the strength of printed parts, to equal that of traditionally-manufactured parts, remains an underlying issue. The fused deposition modelling technique involves melting a thermoplastic, followed by layer-by-layer extrusion to fabricate an object. The key to ensuring strength at the weld between layers is successful inter-diffusion. However, prior to welding, both the extrusion process and the cooling temperature profile can significantly deform the polymer micro-structure and, consequently, how well the polymers are able to ``re-entangle'' across the weld. In particular, polymer alignment in the flow can cause de-bonding of the layers and create defects. We have developed a simple model of the non-isothermal extrusion process to explore the effects that typical printing conditions and material rheology have on the conformation of a polymer melt. In particular, we incorporate both stretch and orientation using the Rolie-Poly constitutive equation to examine the melt structure as it flows through the nozzle, the subsequent alignment with the build plate and the resulting deformation due to the fixed nozzle height, which is typically less than the nozzle radius.

  1. The alignment-distribution graph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Schreiber, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Implementing a data-parallel language such as Fortran 90 on a distributed-memory parallel computer requires distributing aggregate data objects (such as arrays) among the memory modules attached to the processors. The mapping of objects to the machine determines the amount of residual communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. We present a program representation called the alignment-distribution graph that makes these communication requirements explicit. We describe the details of the representation, show how to model communication cost in this framework, and outline several algorithms for determining object mappings that approximately minimize residual communication.

  2. The alignment-distribution graph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Schreiber, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Implementing a data-parallel language such as Fortran 90 on a distributed-memory parallel computer requires distributing aggregate data objects (such as arrays) among the memory modules attached to the processors. The mapping of objects to the machine determines the amount of residual communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. We present a program representation called the alignment distribution graph that makes these communication requirements explicit. We describe the details of the representation, show how to model communication cost in this framework, and outline several algorithms for determining object mappings that approximately minimize residual communication.

  3. Alignment Tool For Inertia Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    Compact, easy-to-use tool aligns drive bar of inertia welder over hole in stub. Ensures drive bar concentric to hole within 0.002 in. (0.051 mm.). Holds two batteries and light bulb. Electrical circuit completed, providing current to bulb when pin in contact with post. When pin centered in post hole, it does not touch post, and lamp turns off. Built for use in making repair welds on liquid-oxygen-injector posts in Space Shuttle main engine. Version having suitably modified dimensions used to facilitate alignment in other forests of post.

  4. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G.; Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Johnsson, P.; Lucchini, M.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2011-11-15

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO{sub 2} molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  5. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Rock Deformation Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Harry

    The Third Rock Deformation Colloquium was held December 4, 1989, at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. Steve Kirby of the U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, Calif., reported on actions taken by the rock deformation steering committee. Brian Wernicke of Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., talked on the structural geology of the Great Basin.The steering committee voted for “Committee on Deformation of Earth Materials” as the name for the AGU technical committee on rock deformation, Kirby said. Considerable discussion has occurred in the steering committee over our relationship to the AGU Mineral Physics Committee. Indeed, Kirby will become chairman of that committee in 1990, underlining the overlap of the two groups. It was agreed that we will pursue closer association with Mineral Physics.

  7. Wrist deformities after fracture.

    PubMed

    Vanheest, Ann

    2006-02-01

    Wrist deformities can occur after fracture because of malunion of the fracture or injury to the growth plate leading to imbalance of growth. Prevention of malunion is paramount by early recognition with proper reduction and casting or fixation with casting. If a mal-union occurs, an osteotomy may be necessary if anticipated growth will not correct the deformity. Injury of the growth plate may lead to wrist deformity in two ways: angular growth or growth arrest. Angular growth deformities are corrected most commonly by osteotomy. Growth arrest of the radius or the ulna leads to an ulnar-positive or an ulnar-negative variance at the wrist. If the ulnar variance is symptomatic, treatment is centered on achieving a level joint. Options for joint leveling procedures include epiphysiodesis or physeal stapling of the longer bone, lengthening osteotomy of the shorter bone, or shortening osteotomy of the longer bone.

  8. Modelling of Continental Lithosphere Breakup and Rifted Margin Formation in Response to an Upwelling Divergent Flow Field Incorporating a Temperature Dependent Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tymms, V. J.; Kusznir, N. J.

    2005-05-01

    We numerically model continental lithosphere deformation leading to breakup and sea floor spreading initiation in response to an imposed upwelling and divergent flow field applied to continental lithosphere and asthenosphere. The model is used to predict rifted continental margin lithosphere thinning and temperature structure. Model predictions are compared with observed rifted margin structure for four diverse case studies. Prior to application of the upwelling divergent flow field the continental lithosphere is undeformed with a uniform temperature gradient. The upwelling divergent flow field is defined kinematically using boundary conditions consisting of the upwelling velocity Vz at the divergence axis and the half divergence rate Vx . The resultant velocity field throughout the continuum is computed using finite element (FE) code incorporating a Newtonian temperature dependent rheology. The flow field is used to advect the continental lithosphere material and lithospheric and asthenospheric temperatures. Viscosity structure is hence modified and the velocities change correspondingly in a feedback loop. We find the kinematic boundary conditions Vz and Vx to be of first order importance. A high Vz/Vx (greater than10), corresponding to buoyancy assisted flow, leads to minimal mantle exhumation and a well defined continent ocean transition consistent with observations at volcanic margins. For Vz/Vx near unity, corresponding to plate boundary driven divergence, mantle exhumation over widths of up to 100 km is predicted which is consistent with observations at non-volcanic margins. The FE method allows the upwelling velocity Vz to be propagated upwards from the top of the asthenosphere to the Earth's surface without the requirement of imposing Vx. When continental breakup is achieved the half divergence velocity Vx can be applied at the lithosphere surface and the upwelling velocity Vz left free. We find this time and space dependent set of boundary conditions is

  9. Computer-assisted oblique single-cut rotation osteotomy to reduce a multidirectional tibia deformity: case report.

    PubMed

    Dobbe, J G G; du Pré, K J; Blankevoort, L; Streekstra, G J; Kloen, P

    2017-03-01

    The correction of multiplanar deformity is challenging. We describe preoperative 3-D planning and treatment of a complex tibia malunion using an oblique single-cut rotation osteotomy to correct deformity parameters in the sagittal, coronal and transverse plane. At 5 years postoperatively, the patient ambulates without pain with a well-aligned leg.

  10. Principles of rock deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolas, A.

    1987-01-01

    This text focuses on the recent achievements in the analysis of rock deformation. It gives an analytical presentation of the essential structures in terms of kinetic and dynamic interpretation. The physical properties underlying the interpretation of rock structures are exposed in simple terms. Emphasized in the book are: the role of fluids in rock fracturing; the kinematic analysis of magnetic flow structures; the application of crystalline plasticity to the kinematic and dynamic analysis of the large deformation imprinted in many metamorphic rocks.

  11. Offshore Deformation Front in Miaoli Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, P.; Gwo-shyn, S.

    2015-12-01

    Taiwan is located at the junction of the Eurasian Plate and the Philippine Sea Plate. It's because arc-continent collision occurs in the western Taiwan, resulting in the orogeny has formed a fold-and-thrust belt, developing a series of thrusts aligned in north-south direction. The thrust faults, locating in the central island, are the oldest and have almost inactive. Westward to the island, the faults become younger, dipping angles are smaller, and motions were stronger. On the west side, the foot of the Taiwan Western Foothill is considered the youngest thrust faults located along west Taiwan. Scholars recognized them as so-called the deformation front, and they also believed that the deformation front is located in between the compressive terrain uplifted area and the extensional subsidence area. Therefore, this front line is on the boundary of two different tectonic zones. This study investigates the trace of the deformation front in Miaoli area. Previous studies suggested that the west side of Miaoli collision zone should be fault-bounded, and is located in the seabed. However, in the geological map, there is no geologic evidence that appears on land and so-called active faults related with this deformation front. In the near coast seafloor, according to the reflection earthquakes data from the Institute of Oceanography of NTU, we can only see the offshore strata have been uplifted, and the data also shows that seabed is only covered by thin layer of sediments. This study indicates that in offshore place within three kilometers, shallow formations show a special layer of slime which was extruded to be corrugated transversely. Accordingly, we believe that this slime layer should be pressurized and filled with muddy water. Such features should be further investigated with other geological and geophysical survey data to check if they belong to the structural product of the deformation front.

  12. ALIGN_MTX--an optimal pairwise textual sequence alignment program, adapted for using in sequence-structure alignment.

    PubMed

    Vishnepolsky, Boris; Pirtskhalava, Malak

    2009-06-01

    The presented program ALIGN_MTX makes alignment of two textual sequences with an opportunity to use any several characters for the designation of sequence elements and arbitrary user substitution matrices. It can be used not only for the alignment of amino acid and nucleotide sequences but also for sequence-structure alignment used in threading, amino acid sequence alignment, using preliminary known PSSM matrix, and in other cases when alignment of biological or non-biological textual sequences is required. This distinguishes it from the majority of similar alignment programs that make, as a rule, alignment only of amino acid or nucleotide sequences represented as a sequence of single alphabetic characters. ALIGN_MTX is presented as downloadable zip archive at http://www.imbbp.org/software/ALIGN_MTX/ and available for free use. As application of using the program, the results of comparison of different types of substitution matrix for alignment quality in distantly related protein pair sets were presented. Threading matrix SORDIS, based on side-chain orientation in relation to hydrophobic core centers with evolutionary change-based substitution matrix BLOSUM and using multiple sequence alignment information position-specific score matrices (PSSM) were taken for test alignment accuracy. The best performance shows PSSM matrix, but in the reduced set with lower sequence similarity threading matrix SORDIS shows the same performance and it was shown that combined potential with SORDIS and PSSM can improve alignment quality in evolutionary distantly related protein pairs.

  13. Polygonal deformation bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonellini, Marco; Mollema, Pauline Nella

    2015-12-01

    We report for the first time the occurrence of polygonal faults in sandstone, which is compelling given that layer-bound polygonal fault systems have been observed so far only in fine-grained sediments such as clay and chalk. The polygonal faults are shear deformation bands that developed under shallow burial conditions via strain hardening in dm-wide zones. The edges of the polygons are 1-5 m long. The shear deformation bands are organized as conjugate faults along each edge of the polygon and form characteristic horst-like structures. The individual deformation bands have slip magnitudes ranging from a few mm to 1.5 cm; the cumulative average slip magnitude in a zone is up to 10 cm. The deformation bands heaves, in aggregate form, accommodate a small isotropic horizontal extension (strain <0.005). The individual shear deformation bands show abutting T-junctions, veering, curving, and merging where they mechanically interact. Crosscutting relationships are rare. The interactions of the deformation bands are similar to those of mode I opening fractures. The documented fault networks have important implications for evaluating the geometry of km-scale polygonal fault systems in the subsurface, top seal integrity, as well as constraining paleo-tectonic stress regimes.

  14. Improving pairwise sequence alignment accuracy using near-optimal protein sequence alignments

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While the pairwise alignments produced by sequence similarity searches are a powerful tool for identifying homologous proteins - proteins that share a common ancestor and a similar structure; pairwise sequence alignments often fail to represent accurately the structural alignments inferred from three-dimensional coordinates. Since sequence alignment algorithms produce optimal alignments, the best structural alignments must reflect suboptimal sequence alignment scores. Thus, we have examined a range of suboptimal sequence alignments and a range of scoring parameters to understand better which sequence alignments are likely to be more structurally accurate. Results We compared near-optimal protein sequence alignments produced by the Zuker algorithm and a set of probabilistic alignments produced by the probA program with structural alignments produced by four different structure alignment algorithms. There is significant overlap between the solution spaces of structural alignments and both the near-optimal sequence alignments produced by commonly used scoring parameters for sequences that share significant sequence similarity (E-values < 10-5) and the ensemble of probA alignments. We constructed a logistic regression model incorporating three input variables derived from sets of near-optimal alignments: robustness, edge frequency, and maximum bits-per-position. A ROC analysis shows that this model more accurately classifies amino acid pairs (edges in the alignment path graph) according to the likelihood of appearance in structural alignments than the robustness score alone. We investigated various trimming protocols for removing incorrect edges from the optimal sequence alignment; the most effective protocol is to remove matches from the semi-global optimal alignment that are outside the boundaries of the local alignment, although trimming according to the model-generated probabilities achieves a similar level of improvement. The model can also be used to

  15. Tonal Alignment in Irish Dialects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Martha; Ni Chasaide, Ailbhe

    2005-01-01

    A comparison of the contour alignment of nuclear and initial prenuclear accents was carried out for the Irish dialects of Gaoth Dobhair in Ulster (GD-U) and Cois Fharraige in Connaught (CF-C). This was done across conditions where the number of unstressed syllables following the nuclear and preceding the initial prenuclear accents was varied from…

  16. Alignment in Second Language Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Albert; Pickering, Martin; Sorace, Antonella

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the nature of second language dialogues, involving at least one non-native (L2) speaker. We assume that dialogue is characterised by a process in which interlocutors develop similar mental states to each other (Pickering & Garrod, 2004). We first consider various means in which interlocutors align their mental states, and…

  17. Aligning Assessments for COSMA Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Curt; Johnson, Dennis A.; Alderman, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Many higher education sport management programs are currently in the process of seeking accreditation from the Commission on Sport Management Accreditation (COSMA). This article provides a best-practice method for aligning student learning outcomes with a sport management program's mission and goals. Formative and summative assessment procedures…

  18. Laser-optic instruments improve machinery alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, H.P.

    1987-10-12

    Laser-optic alignment systems are fast becoming cost-effective devices that improve the accuracy and speed of machinery shaft alignment. Because of the difficulty, if not impossibility, of aligning operating machinery, cold alignment specifications must be determined to compensate for thermal growth so that the shaft alignment remains within tolerances when the machine reaches normal operating temperature. Some methods for accomplishing this are reviewed here. Three years' field experience with laser-optic alignment systems shows that many of these limitations can be eliminated, resulting in a more accurate alignment in less time. Some actual field alignments are given as examples of the improvement achieved by the use of laser equipment, and a procedure is given that shows how the laser-optic system may be used to determine running alignment changes caused by thermal growth.

  19. Progressive multiple sequence alignments from triplets

    PubMed Central

    Kruspe, Matthias; Stadler, Peter F

    2007-01-01

    Background The quality of progressive sequence alignments strongly depends on the accuracy of the individual pairwise alignment steps since gaps that are introduced at one step cannot be removed at later aggregation steps. Adjacent insertions and deletions necessarily appear in arbitrary order in pairwise alignments and hence form an unavoidable source of errors. Research Here we present a modified variant of progressive sequence alignments that addresses both issues. Instead of pairwise alignments we use exact dynamic programming to align sequence or profile triples. This avoids a large fractions of the ambiguities arising in pairwise alignments. In the subsequent aggregation steps we follow the logic of the Neighbor-Net algorithm, which constructs a phylogenetic network by step-wisely replacing triples by pairs instead of combining pairs to singletons. To this end the three-way alignments are subdivided into two partial alignments, at which stage all-gap columns are naturally removed. This alleviates the "once a gap, always a gap" problem of progressive alignment procedures. Conclusion The three-way Neighbor-Net based alignment program aln3nn is shown to compare favorably on both protein sequences and nucleic acids sequences to other progressive alignment tools. In the latter case one easily can include scoring terms that consider secondary structure features. Overall, the quality of resulting alignments in general exceeds that of clustalw or other multiple alignments tools even though our software does not included heuristics for context dependent (mis)match scores. PMID:17631683

  20. Fabrication of aligned nanofibers by electric-field-controlled electrospinning: insulating-block method.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Wontae; Pang, Changhyun; Chae, Heeyeop

    2016-10-28

    Aligned nanofiber arrays and mats were fabricated with an electrospinning process by manipulating the electric field. The electric field was modified by insulating blocks (IBs) that were installed between the nozzle and the substrate as guiding elements to control the trajectory of the electrospinning jet flow. Simulation results showed that the electric field was deformed near the IBs, resulting in confinement of the electrospinning jet between the blocks. The balance of the electric field in the vertical direction and the repulsive force by space charges in the confined electrified jet stream was attributed to the aligned motion of the jet. Aligned arrays of 200 nm thick polyethylene oxide nanofibers were obtained, exhibiting wave-shaped and cross patterns as well as rectilinear patterns. In addition, 40 μm thick quasi-aligned carbon-nanofiber mats with anisotropic electrical property were also attained by this method.

  1. Fabrication of aligned nanofibers by electric-field-controlled electrospinning: insulating-block method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Wontae; Pang, Changhyun; Chae, Heeyeop

    2016-10-01

    Aligned nanofiber arrays and mats were fabricated with an electrospinning process by manipulating the electric field. The electric field was modified by insulating blocks (IBs) that were installed between the nozzle and the substrate as guiding elements to control the trajectory of the electrospinning jet flow. Simulation results showed that the electric field was deformed near the IBs, resulting in confinement of the electrospinning jet between the blocks. The balance of the electric field in the vertical direction and the repulsive force by space charges in the confined electrified jet stream was attributed to the aligned motion of the jet. Aligned arrays of 200 nm thick polyethylene oxide nanofibers were obtained, exhibiting wave-shaped and cross patterns as well as rectilinear patterns. In addition, 40 μm thick quasi-aligned carbon-nanofiber mats with anisotropic electrical property were also attained by this method.

  2. Experimental Deformation of Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, J. L.; Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. F. G.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetite is an important iron ore mineral and the most prominent Fe-oxide phase in the Earth's crust. The systematic occurrence of magnetite in zones of intense deformation in oceanic core complexes suggests that it may play a role in strain localization in some silicate rocks. We performed a series of high-temperature deformation experiments on synthetic magnetite aggregates and natural single crystals to characterize the rheological behavior of magnetite. As starting material, we used fine-grained magnetite powder that was hot isostatically pressed at 1100°C for several hours, resulting in polycrystalline material with a mean grain size of around 40 μm and containing 3-5% porosity. Samples were deformed to 15-20% axial strain under constant load (approximating constant stress) conditions in a Paterson-type gas apparatus for triaxial deformation at temperatures between 900 and 1100°C and 300 MPa confining pressure. The aggregates exhibit typical power-law creep behavior. At high stresses, samples deformed by dislocation creep exhibit stress exponents close to 3, revealing a transition to near-Newtonian creep with stress exponents around 1.3 at lower stresses. Natural magnetite single crystals deformed at 1 atm pressure and temperatures between 950°C and 1150 °C also exhibit stress exponents close to 3, but with lower flow stresses and a lower apparent activation energy than the aggregates. Such behavior may result from the different oxygen fugacity buffers used. Crystallographic-preferred orientations in all polycrystalline samples are very weak and corroborate numerical models of CPO development, suggesting that texture development in magnetite may be inherently slow compared with lower symmetry phases. Comparison of our results with experimental deformation data for various silicate minerals suggests that magnetite should be weaker than most silicates during ductile creep in dry igneous rocks.

  3. SU-E-J-218: Novel Validation Paradigm of MRI to CT Deformation of Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Padgett, K; Pirozzi, S; Nelson, A; Piper, J; Horvat, M; Stoyanova, R; Dogan, N; Pollack, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Deformable registration algorithms are inherently difficult to characterize in the multi-modality setting due to a significant differences in the characteristics of the different modalities (CT and MRI) as well as tissue deformations. We present a unique paradigm where this is overcome by utilizing a planning-MRI acquired within an hour of the planning-CT serving as a surrogate for quantifying MRI to CT deformation by eliminating the issues of multi-modality comparisons. Methods: For nine subjects, T2 fast-spin-echo images were acquired at two different time points, the first several weeks prior to planning (diagnostic-MRI) and the second on the same day as the planning-CT (planning-MRI). Significant effort in patient positioning and bowel/bladder preparation was undertaken to minimize distortion of the prostate in all datasets. The diagnostic-MRI was rigidly and deformably aligned to the planning-CT utilizing a commercially available deformable registration algorithm synthesized from local registrations. Additionally, the quality of rigid alignment was ranked by an imaging physicist. The distances between corresponding anatomical landmarks on rigid and deformed registrations (diagnostic-MR to planning-CT) were evaluated. Results: It was discovered that in cases where the rigid registration was of acceptable quality the deformable registration didn’t improve the alignment, this was true of all metrics employed. If the analysis is separated into cases where the rigid alignment was ranked as unacceptable the deformable registration significantly improved the alignment, 4.62mm residual error in landmarks as compared to 5.72mm residual error in rigid alignments with a p-value of 0.0008. Conclusion: This paradigm provides an ideal testing ground for MR to CT deformable registration algorithms by allowing for inter-modality comparisons of multi-modality registrations. Consistent positioning, bowel and bladder preparation may Result in higher quality rigid

  4. Superplastic deformation in carbonate apatite ceramics under constant compressive loading for near-net-shape production of bioresorbable bone substitutes.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Masanori; Wakamatsu, Nobukazu; Doi, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    To produce carbonate apatite (CAP) ceramics with the desired complex shapes using superplastic deformation, deformation behavior of CAP ceramics under constant loading as well as physical properties after deformation were evaluated. Sintered CAP ceramics were plastically deformed in an electric furnace attached to a universal hydraulic testing machine under a constant load. CAP ceramics subjected to an initial compressive pressure of 10 MPa showed an appreciable amount of plastic deformation at temperatures ranging from 720 to 800 degrees C. Plastic deformation increased with increasing temperature from about 10% to 70% after two hours of loading. X-ray diffraction analysis and SEM observation further revealed that some CAP crystals were elongated and aligned with the c-axis normal to the loading direction during superplastic deformation. It was thus concluded that a marked plastic deformation of about 70% at 800 degrees C would be sufficient for near-net-shape production of bioresorbable CAP bone substitutes with complex shapes.

  5. An efficient method for multiple sequence alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.; Pramanik, S.

    1994-12-31

    Multiple sequence alignment has been a useful method in the study of molecular evolution and sequence-structure relationships. This paper presents a new method for multiple sequence alignment based on simulated annealing technique. Dynamic programming has been widely used to find an optimal alignment. However, dynamic programming has several limitations to obtain optimal alignment. It requires long computation time and cannot apply certain types of cost functions. We describe detail mechanisms of simulated annealing for multiple sequence alignment problem. It is shown that simulated annealing can be an effective approach to overcome the limitations of dynamic programming in multiple sequence alignment problem.

  6. Bokeh mirror alignment for Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, S. A.; Adam, J.; Ahnen, M. L.; Baack, D.; Balbo, M.; Bergmann, M.; Biland, A.; Blank, M.; Bretz, T.; Bruegge, K. A.; Buss, J.; Dmytriiev, A.; Dorner, D.; Einecke, S.; Hempfling, C.; Hildebrand, D.; Hughes, G.; Linhoff, L.; Mannheim, K.; Neise, D.; Neronov, A.; Noethe, M.; Paravac, A.; Pauss, F.; Rhode, W.; Shukla, A.; Temme, F.; Thaele, J.; Walter, R.

    2016-08-01

    Segmented imaging reflectors are a great choice for Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs). However, the alignment of the individual mirror facets is challenging. We align a segmented reflector by observing and optimizing its Bokeh function. Bokeh alignment can already be done with very little resources and little preparation time. Further, Bokeh alignment can be done anytime, even during the day. We present a first usage of Bokeh alignment on FACT, a 4m IACT on Canary Island La Palma, Spain and further a first Bokeh alignment test on the CTA MST IACT prototype in Brelin Adlershof.

  7. Electromagnetic launcher studies of breakup and aerosol formation in molten uranium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.A.; Rader, D.J.

    1990-03-01

    An understanding of dispersal of nuclear materials from an explosive event is needed to support design studies of weapon storage and transportation. Assessing the consequences and requirements for cleanup of a fire or nonnuclear detonation of a system containing nuclear material requires knowledge of the aerosol formation process. Information about the aerosol chemical composition, the physical size and shape of the particulates, as well as the efficiency of aerosol formation ate needed to conduct meaningful assessments. This report describes laboratory tests to study aerosol from materials of interest. An electromagnetic launcher is used to heat and propel molten metallic samples under energetic high-velocity conditions. We describe the apparatus and first results from tests using uranium-molybdenum alloy samples. Contained laboratory-scale measurements are described that determine aerosol morphology, chemical composition, and aerosol formation efficiency under high-velocity conditions. Data from the launcher tests describe (1) the aerodynamic breakup process of high-velocity molten liquid into droplets, and (2) the formation of still finer aerosols by combustion of these droplets at high velocity. The measurements show efficient aerosol production in air that is dominated by the formation of fine chain-agglomerate combustion aerosol. Particle morphology information for both the chain agglomerate and the less common liquid breakup products is described. The aerodynamic breakup of the liquid sample material is described. Lognormal distributions are shown to accurately represent the data. The geometric mean diameter is related to the mass mean diameter and maximum stable droplet diameter for the distributions. 28 refs., 27 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. A Fragment-Cloud Approach for Modeling Atmospheric Breakup of Asteroids with Varied Internal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Lorien; Mathias, Donovan; NASA Engineering Risk Assessment Team, NASA Asteroid Threat Assessment Project

    2016-10-01

    As an asteroid descends toward Earth, it deposits energy in the atmosphere through aerodynamic drag and ablation. Asteroid impact risk assessments rely on energy deposition estimates to predict blast overpressures and ground damage that may result from an airburst, such as the one that occurred over Chelyabinsk, Russia in 2013. The rates and altitudes at which energy is deposited along the entry trajectory depend upon how the bolide fragments, which in turn depends upon its internal structure and composition. In this work, an analytic asteroid fragmentation model has been developed to model the atmospheric breakup and resulting energy deposition of asteroids with a range of internal structures. The modeling approach combines successive fragmentation of larger independent pieces with aggregate debris clouds released with each fragmentation event. The model can vary the number and masses of fragments produced, the amount of mass released as debris clouds, and the size-strength scaling used to increase the robustness of smaller fragments. The initial asteroid body can be seeded with a distribution of independent fragment sizes amid a remaining debris mass to represent loose rubble pile conglomerations, or can be defined as a monolith with an outer regolith layer. This approach enables the model to represent a range of breakup behaviors and reproduce detailed energy deposition features such as multiple flares due to successive burst events, high-altitude regolith blow-off, or initial disruption of rubble piles followed by more energetic breakup of the constituent boulders. These capabilities provide a means to investigate sensitivities of ground damage to potential variations in asteroid structure.

  9. Solving the three-body Coulomb breakup problem using exterior complex scaling

    SciTech Connect

    McCurdy, C.W.; Baertschy, M.; Rescigno, T.N.

    2004-05-17

    Electron-impact ionization of the hydrogen atom is the prototypical three-body Coulomb breakup problem in quantum mechanics. The combination of subtle correlation effects and the difficult boundary conditions required to describe two electrons in the continuum have made this one of the outstanding challenges of atomic physics. A complete solution of this problem in the form of a ''reduction to computation'' of all aspects of the physics is given by the application of exterior complex scaling, a modern variant of the mathematical tool of analytic continuation of the electronic coordinates into the complex plane that was used historically to establish the formal analytic properties of the scattering matrix. This review first discusses the essential difficulties of the three-body Coulomb breakup problem in quantum mechanics. It then describes the formal basis of exterior complex scaling of electronic coordinates as well as the details of its numerical implementation using a variety of methods including finite difference, finite elements, discrete variable representations, and B-splines. Given these numerical implementations of exterior complex scaling, the scattering wave function can be generated with arbitrary accuracy on any finite volume in the space of electronic coordinates, but there remains the fundamental problem of extracting the breakup amplitudes from it. Methods are described for evaluating these amplitudes. The question of the volume-dependent overall phase that appears in the formal theory of ionization is resolved. A summary is presented of accurate results that have been obtained for the case of electron-impact ionization of hydrogen as well as a discussion of applications to the double photoionization of helium.

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: Solving the three-body Coulomb breakup problem using exterior complex scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, C. W.; Baertschy, M.; Rescigno, T. N.

    2004-09-01

    Electron-impact ionization of the hydrogen atom is the prototypical three-body Coulomb breakup problem in quantum mechanics. The combination of subtle correlation effects and the difficult boundary conditions required to describe two electrons in the continuum have made this one of the outstanding challenges of atomic physics. A complete solution of this problem in the form of a 'reduction to computation' of all aspects of the physics is given by the application of exterior complex scaling, a modern variant of the mathematical tool of analytic continuation of the electronic coordinates into the complex plane that was used historically to establish the formal analytic properties of the scattering matrix. This review first discusses the essential difficulties of the three-body Coulomb breakup problem in quantum mechanics. It then describes the formal basis of exterior complex scaling of electronic coordinates as well as the details of its numerical implementation using a variety of methods including finite difference, finite elements, discrete variable representations and B-splines. Given these numerical implementations of exterior complex scaling, the scattering wavefunction can be generated with arbitrary accuracy on any finite volume in the space of electronic coordinates, but there remains the fundamental problem of extracting the breakup amplitudes from it. Methods are described for evaluating these amplitudes. The question of the volume-dependent overall phase that appears in the formal theory of ionization is resolved. A summary is presented of accurate results that have been obtained for the case of electron-impact ionization of hydrogen as well as a discussion of applications to the double photoionization of helium.

  11. Analysis of orbital occupancy of valence neutron in {sup 15}C through Coulomb breakup reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, P. E-mail: pardeep.phy@dcrustm.org

    2015-03-15

    The Coulomb breakup reactions {sup 208}Pb({sup 15}C, {sup 14}C + n){sup 208}Pb and {sup 181}Ta({sup 15}C, {sup 14}C + n){sup 181}Ta have been studied at 68 and 85 A MeV beam energies, respectively, within the framework of the eikonal approximation to investigate the orbital occupancy of valence neutron in the {sup 15}C nucleus. The outcomes of the present work favor 0{sup +} ⊗ 2s{sub 1/2} as the core-neutron coupling for the ground-state structure with 0.91 as a spectroscopic factor.

  12. Systematic Study of Three-Nucleon System Dynamics in Deuteron-Proton Breakup Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozela, A.; Ciepał, I.; Garbacz, M.; Jamróz, B.; Kłos, B.; Kistryn, St.; Khatri, G.; Kuboś, J.; Kulessa, P.; Liptak, A.; Parol, W.; Rusnok, A.; Sȩkowski, P.; Skwira-Chalot, I.; Stephan, E.; Wilczek, A.; Włoch, B.; Zejma, J.

    2017-03-01

    We report on preliminary results of the first measurement of elastic scattering of protons from deuterons and proton induced deuteron breakup at proton beam energy of 108 MeV conducted at new Cyclotron Center Bronowice IFJ PAN in Kraków. The experiment is aimed at precise determination of the differential cross section for extensive set of kinematical configurations in a wide range of angular acceptance. In the first data taking run the average statistical per-point accuracy of about 5% has been reached.

  13. Resonant and nonresonant breakup of {sup 11}Be on a proton target

    SciTech Connect

    Cravo, E.; Deltuva, A.; Fonseca, A. C.; Crespo, R.

    2009-06-15

    Full Faddeev-type calculations are performed for the breakup of {sup 11}Be on a proton target at 63.7 MeV/nucleon incident energy. A simplified two-body model for {sup 11}Be involves an inert {sup 10}Be(0{sup +}) core and a valence neutron. Inclusive cross sections as a function of the proton angle are calculated around the well known resonance at E{sub r}=1.275 MeV including both resonant and nonresonant contributions. A reasonable agreement between the calculated angular distributions and the data is obtained but a large discrepancy relative to similar CDCC calculations is found at small proton angles.

  14. Resonant and Nonresonant Breakup of {sup 11}Be and {sup 19}C on a Proton Target

    SciTech Connect

    Crespo, R.; Cravo, E.; Deltuva, A.; Fonseca, A. C.

    2009-08-26

    Full Faddeev-type calculations are performed for the breakup of {sup 11}Be and {sup 19}C on proton target at 63.7 MeV/u and 70 MeV/u incident energy, respectively. We make use of a simplified two-body model for the one-neutron halo nucleus which involves an inert core and a valence neutron. Inclusive cross sections as a function of the center of mass angle of the n-core pair are calculated including both resonant and non-resonant contributions. The agreement between the calculated angular distributions and the data is discussed in each case.

  15. Influence of the Surface Viscosity on the Breakup of a Surfactant-Laden Drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce-Torres, A.; Montanero, J. M.; Herrada, M. A.; Vega, E. J.; Vega, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    We examine both theoretically and experimentally the breakup of a pendant drop loaded with an insoluble surfactant. The experiments show that a significant amount of surfactant is trapped in the resulting satellite droplet. This result contradicts previous theoretical predictions, where the effects of surface tension variation were limited to solutocapillarity and Marangoni stresses. We solve numerically the hydrodynamic equations, including not only those effects but also those of surface shear and dilatational viscosities. We show that surface viscosities play a critical role to explain the accumulation of surfactant in the satellite droplet.

  16. Cumulative beam breakup in linear accelerators with time-dependent parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Jean Delayen

    2004-10-01

    A formalism presented in a previous paper for the analysis of cumulative beam breakup (BBU) with arbitrary time dependence of the beam current and with misalignment of the cavities and focusing elements [J. R. Delayen, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 6, 084402 (2003)] is extended to include time dependence of the focusing and coupling between the beam and the dipole modes. Such time dependence, which could result from an energy chirp imposed on the beam or from rf focusing, is known to be effective in reducing BBU-induced instabilities and emittance growth. The analytical results are presented and applied to practical accelerator configurations and compared to numerical simulations.

  17. Effect of breakup coupling on fusion for 6,7Li+24Mg systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, M. K.; Mukherjee, A.; Dasmahapatra, B.

    2015-01-01

    To study the effect of breakup coupling on fusion we have derived fusion cross sections in the framework of continuum discretised coupled channels (CDCC) method using the coupled channels code FRESCO for the systems 6,7Li+24Mg. The CDCC predicted fusion cross sections for the 7Li+24Mg system agree well with the experimental fusion data whereas for the 6Li+24Mg system the agreement is reasonable at below barrier energies. However, within the limits of the present work no definite conclusion could be obtained from the quality of agreement at above barrier energies for the 6Li+24Mg system.

  18. An Attempt to Observe Debris from the Breakup of a Titan 3C-4 Transtage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, E. S.; Matney, M. J.; Yanagisawa, T.; Liou, J.-C.; Abercromby, K. J.; Rodriquez, H. M.; Horstman, M. F.; Seitzer, P.

    2007-01-01

    In February 2007 dedicated observations were made of the orbital space predicted to contain debris from the breakup of the Titan 3C-4 transtage back on February 21, 1992. These observations were carried out on the Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope (MODEST) in Chile with its 1.3deg field of view. The search region or orbital space (inclination and right ascension of the ascending node (RAAN) was predicted using NASA#s LEGEND (LEO-to-GEO Environment Debris) code to generate a Titan debris cloud. Breakup fragments are created based on the NASA Standard Breakup Model (including fragment size, area-to-mass (A/M), and delta-V distributions). Once fragments are created, they are propagated forward in time with a subroutine GEOPROP. Perturbations included in GEOPROP are those due to solar/lunar gravity, radiation pressure, and major geopotential terms. Barker, et. al, (AMOS Conference Proceedings, 2006, pp. 596-604) used similar LEGEND predictions to correlate survey observations made by MODEST (February 2002) and found several possible night-to-night correlations in the limited survey dataset. One conc lusion of the survey search was to dedicate a MODEST run to observing a GEO region predicted to contain debris fragments and actual Titan debris objects (SSN 25000, 25001 and 30000). Such a dedicated run was undertaken with MODEST between February 17 and 23, 2007 (UT dates). MODEST#s limiting magnitude of 18.0 (S\\N approx.10) corresponds to a size of 22cm assuming a diffuse Lambertian albedo of 0.2. However, based on observed break-up data, we expect most debris fragments to be smaller than 22cm which implies a need to increase the effective sensitivity of MODEST for smaller objects. MODEST#s limiting size can be lowered by increasing the exposure time (20 instead of 5 seconds) and applying special image processing. The special processing combines individual CCD images to detect faint objects that are invisible on a single CCD image. Sub-images are cropped from six

  19. Neutron-proton final-state interaction in. pi. d breakup: Vector analyzing power

    SciTech Connect

    List, W.; Boschitz, E.T.; Garcilazo, H.; Gyles, W.; Ottermann, C.R.; Tacik, R.; Mango, S.; Konter, J.A.; van den Brandt, B.; Smith, G.R.; and others

    1988-04-01

    The vector analyzing power iT/sub 11/ has been measured for the ..pi..d breakup reaction in a kinematically complete experiment. The dependence of iT/sub 11/ on the momentum of the proton has been obtained for 36 pion-proton angle pairs at T/sub ..pi../ = 134 and 228 MeV. The data are compared with predictions from the new relativistic Faddeev theory of Garcilazo. The sensitivity of the observable iT/sub 11/, in particular in the np final-state interaction region, to details of the theory is investigated.

  20. Hydrological Measurements in Several Streams During Breakup in the National Petroleum Reserve - Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vas, D. A.; Toniolo, H. A.; Kemnitz, R.; Brailey, D.; Lamb, E. K.

    2011-12-01

    The National Petroleum Reserve - Alaska (NPR - A) expands from the North side of the Brooks Range to the Arctic Ocean over 23.5 million acres. There is a renewed interest in opening NPR -A for oil and gas exploration and hydrological data is critical to the development of pipelines, roads, and bridges. A set of hydraulic measurements, which includes discharge measurements using Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP), water slope, and suspended sediment sampling during breakup were conducted on Otuk Creek, Seabee Creek, Prince Creek, Ikpikpuk River, Judy Creek, Fish Creek, and Ublutuoch River in the NPR - A region. We will present preliminary results, grouped by stream characteristics.

  1. Recirculating Beam Breakup Study for the 12 GeV Upgrade at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Ilkyoung Shin, Todd Satogata, Shahid Ahmed, Slawomir Bogacz, Mircea Stirbet, Haipeng Wang, Yan Wang, Byung Yunn, Ryan Bodenstein

    2012-07-01

    Two new high gradient C100 cryomodules with a total of 16 new cavities were installed at the end of the CEBAF south linac during the 2011 summer shutdown as part of the 12-GeV upgrade project at Jefferson Lab. We surveyed the higher order modes (HOMs) of these cavities in the Jefferson Lab cryomodule test facility and CEBAF tunnel. We then studied recirculating beam breakup (BBU) in November 2011 to evaluate CEBAF low energy performance, measure transport optics, and evaluate BBU thresholds due to these HOMs. This paper discusses the experiment setup, cavity measurements, machine setup, optics measurements, and lower bounds on BBU thresholds by new cryomodules.

  2. Assessment of the consequences of the Fengyun-1C breakup in low Earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardini, Carmen

    On 11 January 2007, the 880 kg (958 kg at launch) weather spacecraft Fengyun-1C, launched on 10 May 1999 into a sun-synchronous orbit with a CZ-4B booster from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, was destroyed over central China as a result of the first successful Chinese anti-satellite weapon test. It was carried out with a direct ascent interception with a kinetic energy kill vehicle launched by an SC-19 missile, fired from a mobile ground platform close to the Xichang Satellite Launch Center. While the technical details of the test, probably the third attempt, and the characteristics of the weapon used remain shrouded in secrecy, the intentional breakup of the aging weather spacecraft, fully functional until 2005, produced a huge amount of debris in one of the orbital regimes already most affected by past fragmentation events. At present, the US Space Surveillance Network has identified about 2600 objects, typically larger than 10 cm, but the fragments larger than 1 cm may be more than 100,000. After two decades of substantial international progress in the field of orbital debris mitigation, in order to preserve the low Earth and geosynchronous environments for future space missions, the Fengyun-1C destruction represented a serious turnabout. In fact, it abruptly increased by approximately 20% the number of cataloged debris in orbit. To give a rough idea of the impact of this single event on the circumterrestrial environment, it is sufficient to realize that about 15 years of global space activity - including failures and accidental breakups - had been needed to increase, by a comparable amount, the number of cataloged debris in orbit to the level observed before the Chinese anti-satellite test. The purpose of this presentation is to assess the impact of the debris cloud generated by the Fengyun-1C breakup on the low Earth environment. The anti-satellite test was carried out at an altitude of about 863 km, spreading the cataloged fragments between 200 and 4000

  3. Flow visualization of Taylor-mode breakup of a viscous liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shirley C.; Luu, Patrick; Tam, Patrick; Roski, Gerald; Tsai, Chen S.

    1999-06-01

    We recently reported a new spray technique called ultrasound-modulated two-fluid (UMTF) atomization and the pertinent "resonant liquid capillary wave (RLCW) theory" based on linear models of Taylor-mode breakup of capillary waves. In this article, flow visualizations of liquid jets near the nozzle tip are presented to verify the central assumption of the RLCW theory that the resonant liquid capillary wave in UMTF atomization is initiated by the ultrasound at the nozzle tip. Specifically, a bright band beneath the nozzle tip was seen in ultrasonic and UMTF atomization separately, but not in two-fluid atomization. The bright band can be attributed to scattering of laser light sheet by the capillary waves generated by the ultrasound on the intact liquid jet. As the capillary wave travels downstream in the direction of airflow, it is amplified by the air blowing around it and eventually collapsed into drops. Therefore, the jet breakup time can be determined by dividing the measured band length with the capillary wave velocity. The breakup times thus determined for water and glycerol/water jets are twice the values predicted by the modified Taylor's model with a sheltering parameter, and are one order of magnitude shorter than those in conventional two-fluid atomization. Furthermore, the images of the spray in the proximity of the nozzle tip obtained by 30 ns laser pulses are consistent with the drop sizes obtained 2.3-6 cm downstream from the nozzle tip by 13 s time average of continuous laser light. Also reported in this article is the good agreement between the measured viscosity effects on the drop-size and size distribution in UMTF atomization and those on the relative amplitude growth rates of capillary waves at different wavelengths predicted by Taylor's model as a result of its inclusion of higher order terms other than the first in viscosity. These new findings have led to the conclusion that UMTF atomization occurs via Taylor-mode breakup of capillary waves

  4. Silicic Volcanics in the South Mountain Region: A Volcanic Center with the Breakup of Rodinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, C. W.; Rooney, T. O.; Sinha, A.

    2008-12-01

    Commonly, large igneous provinces are associated with the break-up of continents. The waning stages of large igneous provinces prior to continental rifting and breakup are characterized by volumetrically less significant felsic volcanics. The origin of these felsic volcanics remains a source of significant debate - do they represent additions of new crust derived from the mantle, or the melting and recycling of continental crust? We examine the South Mountain felsic volcanicism in Pennsylvania, part of a sequence of metabasalts and metarhyolites of the Catoctin Formation. These Late Neoproterozoic magmas are associated with the breakup of Rodinia and the formation of the Iapetus Ocean. The South Mountain felsic volcanics are predominantly rhyolitic and can be subdivided into high Al2O3 (>11.8 wt.%) and low Al2O3 (<11.8 wt.%) groups. Each group forms distinctive trends against differentiation indices. Cl Chondrite normalized spider diagrams show that both groups are parallel to each other, the low-Al group having higher REE concentrations. The low-Al group forms REE trends that decrease at a greater magnitude than the high-Al group with increasing SiO2, excluding Eu. A Eu anomaly is present in both groups but is more pronounced in the low-Al group. Models of REE variations in felsic liquids [Brophy, 2008] indicate that amphibolite melting yields magmas with decreasing La and Yb with increasing SiO2. In both groups, La and Yb indicate amphibolite partial melting trends. Decreasing Dy/Yb with increasing SiO2 is an indicator of a hornblende rich source for the South Mountain rhyolites. To explain these geochemical trends, we propose that the South Mountain rhyolites were produced by the partial melting of a plagioclase-bearing amphibolite source. The difference in magnitude of the Eu anomaly between the two groups may be produced by variable concentrations of plagioclase in the source amphibolite. Comparison of the South Mountain rhyolites with other large igneous

  5. Reaction-dependent spin population and evidence of breakup in {sup 18}O

    SciTech Connect

    Hojman, D.; Pacheco, A.J.; Testoni, J.E.; Davidson, J.; Davidson, M.; Cardona, M.A.; Fernandez-Niello, J.O.; Kreiner, A.J.; Arazi, A.; Capurro, O.A.; Marti, G.V.; Bazzacco, D.; Lenzi, S.M.; Lunardi, S.; Alvarez, C. Rossi; Ur, C.; Burlon, A.; Debray, M.E.; De Angelis, G.; De Poli, M.

    2006-04-15

    Angular distributions and angular correlations have been measured for the emission of one and two {alpha}-particles in the {sup 18}O+{sup 207,208}Pb,{sup 209}Bi reactions at several beam energies above the Coulomb barrier. The results rule out fusion evaporation as the main reaction mechanism for the channels involving {alpha}-particle emission and support the interpretation of the breakup of the {sup 18}O projectiles into at least {sup 14}C+{alpha} and {sup 10}Be+{sup 8}Be before fusion.

  6. Influence of the Surface Viscosity on the Breakup of a Surfactant-Laden Drop.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Torres, A; Montanero, J M; Herrada, M A; Vega, E J; Vega, J M

    2017-01-13

    We examine both theoretically and experimentally the breakup of a pendant drop loaded with an insoluble surfactant. The experiments show that a significant amount of surfactant is trapped in the resulting satellite droplet. This result contradicts previous theoretical predictions, where the effects of surface tension variation were limited to solutocapillarity and Marangoni stresses. We solve numerically the hydrodynamic equations, including not only those effects but also those of surface shear and dilatational viscosities. We show that surface viscosities play a critical role to explain the accumulation of surfactant in the satellite droplet.

  7. The Eastern Sardinian Margin (Tyrrhenian Sea, Western Mediterranean) : a key area to study the rifting and post-breakup evolution of a back-arc passive continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaullier, Virginie; Chanier, Frank; Vendeville, Bruno; Maillard, Agnès; Thinon, Isabelle; Graveleau, Fabien; Lofi, Johanna; Sage, Françoise

    2016-04-01

    The Eastern Sardinian passive continental margin formed during the opening of the Tyrrhenian Sea, which is a back-arc basin created by continental rifting and oceanic spreading related to the eastward migrating Apennine subduction system (middle Miocene to Pliocene). Up to now, rifting in this key area was considered to be pro parte coeval with the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC, 5.96-5.32 Ma). We use the MSC seismic markers and the deformation of viscous salt and its brittle overburden as proxies to better delineate the timing of rifting and post-rift reactivation, and especially to quantify vertical and horizontal movements. On this young, highly-segmented margin, the Messinian Erosion Surface and the Upper and Mobile Units are systematically associated, respectively, to basement highs and deeper basins, showing that a rifted deep-sea domain already existed by Messinian times, therefore a major pre-MSC rifting episode occurred across the entire domain. Data show that there are no signs of Messinian syn-rift sediments, hence no evidence for rifting after Late Tortonian times. Moreover, because salt tectonics creates fan-shaped geometries in sediments, syn-rift deposits have to be carefully re-examined to distinguish the effects of crustal tectonics (rifting) and salt tectonics. We also precise that rifting is clearly diachronous from the upper margin (East-Sardinia Basin) to the lower margin (Cornaglia Terrace) with two unconformities, attributed respectively to the necking and to the lithospheric breakup unconformities. The onshore part of the upper margin has been recently investigated in order to characterize the large crustal faults affecting the Mesozoic series (geometry, kinematics and chronology) and to decipher the role of the structural inheritance and of the early rifting. Seaward, we also try to constrain the architecture and timing of the continent-ocean transition, between the hyper-extended continental crust and the first oceanic crust. Widespread

  8. Tectono-magmatic evolution at distal magma-poor rifted margins: insights of the lithospheric breakup at the Australia-Antarctica margins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillard, Morgane; Autin, Julia; Manatschal, Gianreto

    2015-04-01

    The discovery of large domains of hyper-extended continental crust and exhumed mantle along many present-day magma-poor rifted margins questions the processes that play during the lithospheric breakup and the onset of seafloor spreading. In particular, the amount of magma and its relation to tectonic structures is yet little understood. Trying to find answers to these questions asks to work at the most distal parts of rifted margins where the transition from rifting to steady state seafloor spreading occurred. The Australian-Antarctic conjugated margins provide an excellent study area. Indeed, the central sector of the Great Australian Bight/Wilkes Land developed in a magma-poor probably ultra-slow setting and displays a complex and not yet well understood Ocean-Continent Transition (OCT). This distal area is well imaged by numerous high quality seismic lines covering the whole OCT and the steady-state oceanic crust. The deformation recorded in the sedimentary units along these margins highlights a migration of the deformation toward the ocean and a clear polyphase evolution. In particular, the observation that each tectono-sedimentary unit downlaps oceanwards onto the basement suggests that final rifting is associated with the creation of new depositional ground under conditions that are not yet those of a steady state oceanic crust. These observations lead to a model of evolution for these distal margins implying the development of multiple detachment systems organizing out-of-sequence, each new detachment fault developing into the previously exhumed basement. This spatial and temporal organization of fault systems leads to a final symmetry of exhumed domains at both conjugated margins. Magma appears to gradually increase during the margin development and is particularly present in the more distal domain where we can observe clear magma/fault interactions. We propose that the evolution of such rifted margins is linked to cycles of delocalisation

  9. Deformed band structures at high spin in 200Tl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Soumik; Bhattacharyya, S.; Das Gupta, S.; Pai, H.; Mukherjee, G.; Palit, R.; Xu, F. R.; Wu, Q.; Shrivastava, A.; Asgar, Md. A.; Banik, R.; Bhattacharjee, T.; Chanda, S.; Chatterjee, A.; Goswami, A.; Nanal, V.; Pandit, S. K.; Saha, S.; Sethi, J.; Roy, T.; Thakur, S.

    2017-01-01

    High-spin band structures of 200Tl have been studied by γ -ray spectroscopic methods using the 198Pt(7Li,5 n )200Tl reaction at 45 MeV of beam energy. The level scheme of 200Tl has been extended significantly and several new band structures have been established with the observation of 60 new transitions. The π h9 /2⊗ν i13 /2 oblate band has been extended beyond the particle alignment frequencies. The band structures and the other excited states have been compared with the neighboring odd-odd Tl isotopes. Total Routhian surface calculations have been performed to study the deformation and shape changes as a function of spin in this nucleus. These calculations could reproduce the particle alignment frequency and suggest that the neutron pair alignment in ν i13 /2 orbital induces γ softness in 200Tl.

  10. Sagittal deformities of the spine: factors influencing the outcomes and complications.

    PubMed

    Diebo, Bassel G; Henry, Jensen; Lafage, Virginie; Berjano, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative changes have the potential to greatly disrupt the normal curvature of the spine, leading to sagittal malalignment. This phenomenon is often treated with operative modalities, such as osteotomies, though even with surgery, only one-third of patients may reach neutral alignment. Improvement in surgical outcomes may be achieved through better understanding of radiographic spino-pelvic parameters and their association with deformity. Methodical surgical planning, including selection of levels of instrumentation and site of the osteotomy, is crucial in determining the optimal plan for a patient's specific pathology and may minimize risk of developing postoperative proximal junctional kyphosis/failure. While sagittal alignment is essential in operative strategy, the coronal plane should not be overlooked, as it may affect the osteotomy technique. The concepts of sagittal balance and alignment are further complicated in patients with neuromuscular diseases such as Parkinson's disease, and appreciation of the interplay between anatomic and postural deformities is necessary to properly treat these patients. Finally, given the importance of sagittal alignment and the role of osteotomies in treatment for deformity, the need for future research becomes apparent. Novel intraoperative measurement techniques and three-dimensional analysis of the spine may allow for vastly improved operative correction. Furthermore, awareness of the relationship between alignment and balance, the soft tissue envelope, and compensatory mechanisms will provide a more comprehensive conception of the nature of spinal deformity and the modalities with which it is treated.

  11. Crustal deformation and earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    The manner in which the Earth's surface deforms during the cycle of stress accumulation and release along major faults is investigated. In an investigation of the crustal deformation associated with a thin channel asthenosphere displacements are reduced from those computed for a half space asthenosphere. A previous finding by other workers that displacements are enhanced when flow is confined to a thin channel is based on several invalid approximations. The major predictions of the finite element model are that the near field postseismic displacements and strain rates are less than those for a half space asthenosphere and that the postseismic strain rates at intermediate distances are greater (in magnitude). The finite width of the asthenosphere ceases to have a significant impact on the crustal deformation pattern when its magnitude exceeds about three lithosphere thicknesses.

  12. Interfacial Bubble Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Brian; Shabane, Parvis; Cypull, Olivia; Cheng, Shengfeng; Feitosa, Klebert

    Soap bubbles floating at an air-water experience deformations as a result of surface tension and hydrostatic forces. In this experiment, we investigate the nature of such deformations by taking cross-sectional images of bubbles of different volumes. The results show that as their volume increases, bubbles transition from spherical to hemispherical shape. The deformation of the interface also changes with bubble volume with the capillary rise converging to the capillary length as volume increases. The profile of the top and bottom of the bubble and the capillary rise are completely determined by the volume and pressure differences. James Madison University Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4VA Consortium, Research Corporation for Advancement of Science.

  13. Shuttle onboard IMU alignment methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The current approach to the shuttle IMU alignment is based solely on the Apollo Deterministic Method. This method is simple, fast, reliable and provides an accurate estimate for the present cluster to mean of 1,950 transformation matrix. If four or more star sightings are available, the application of least squares analysis can be utilized. The least squares method offers the next level of sophistication to the IMU alignment solution. The least squares method studied shows that a more accurate estimate for the misalignment angles is computed, and the IMU drift rates are a free by-product of the analysis. Core storage requirements are considerably more; estimated 20 to 30 times the core required for the Apollo Deterministic Method. The least squares method offers an intermediate solution utilizing as much data that is available without a complete statistical analysis as in Kalman filtering.

  14. Prism Window for Optical Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Hong

    2008-01-01

    A prism window has been devised for use, with an autocollimator, in aligning optical components that are (1) required to be oriented parallel to each other and/or at a specified angle of incidence with respect to a common optical path and (2) mounted at different positions along the common optical path. The prism window can also be used to align a single optical component at a specified angle of incidence. Prism windows could be generally useful for orienting optical components in manufacture of optical instruments. "Prism window" denotes an application-specific unit comprising two beam-splitter windows that are bonded together at an angle chosen to obtain the specified angle of incidence.

  15. Aligned mesoporous architectures and devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Lu, Yunfeng

    2011-03-01

    This is the final report for the Presidential Early Career Award for Science and Engineering - PECASE (LDRD projects 93369 and 118841) awarded to Professor Yunfeng Lu (Tulane University and University of California-Los Angeles). During the last decade, mesoporous materials with tunable periodic pores have been synthesized using surfactant liquid crystalline as templates, opening a new avenue for a wide spectrum of applications. However, the applications are somewhat limited by the unfavorabe pore orientation of these materials. Although substantial effort has been devoted to align the pore channels, fabrication of mesoporous materials with perpendicular pore channels remains challenging. This project focused on fabrication of mesoporous materials with perpendicularly aligned pore channels. We demonstrated structures for use in water purification, separation, sensors, templated synthesis, microelectronics, optics, controlled release, and highly selective catalysts.

  16. Plate motion and deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Minster, B.; Prescott, W.; Royden, L.

    1991-02-01

    Our goal is to understand the motions of the plates, the deformation along their boundaries and within their interiors, and the processes that control these tectonic phenomena. In the broadest terms, we must strive to understand the relationships of regional and local deformation to flow in the upper mantle and the rheological, thermal and density structure of the lithosphere. The essential data sets which we require to reach our goal consist of maps of current strain rates at the earth's surface and the distribution of integrated deformation through time as recorded in the geologic record. Our success will depend on the effective synthesis of crustal kinematics with a variety of other geological and geophysical data, within a quantitative theoretical framework describing processes in the earth's interior. Only in this way can we relate the snapshot of current motions and earth structure provided by geodetic and geophysical data with long-term processes operating on the time scales relevant to most geological processes. The wide-spread use of space-based techniques, coupled with traditional geological and geophysical data, promises a revolution in our understanding of the kinematics and dynamics of plate motions over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales and in a variety of geologic settings. The space-based techniques that best address problems in plate motion and deformation are precise space-geodetic positioning -- on land and on the seafloor -- and satellite acquisition of detailed altimetric and remote sensing data in oceanic and continental areas. The overall science objectives for the NASA Solid Earth Science plan for the 1990's, are to Understand the motion and deformation of the lithosphere within and across plate boundaries'', and to understand the dynamics of the mantle, the structure and evolution of the lithosphere, and the landforms that result from local and regional deformation. 57 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Aligning incentives in supply chains.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, V G; Raman, Ananth

    2004-11-01

    Most companies don't worry about the behavior of their supply chain partners. Instead, they expect the supply chain to work efficiently without interference, as if guided by Adam Smith's famed invisible hand. In their study of more than 50 supply networks, V.G. Narayanan and Ananth Raman found that companies often looked out for their own interests and ignored those of their network partners. Consequently, supply chains performed poorly. Those results aren't shocking when you consider that supply chains extend across several functions and many companies, each with its own priorities and goals. Yet all those functions and firms must pull in the same direction for a chain to deliver goods and services to consumers quickly and cost-effectively. According to the authors, a supply chain works well only if the risks, costs, and rewards of doing business are distributed fairly across the network. In fact, misaligned incentives are often the cause of excess inventory, stock-outs, incorrect forecasts, inadequate sales efforts, and even poor customer service. The fates of all supply chain partners are interlinked: If the firms work together to serve consumers, they will all win. However, they can do that only if incentives are aligned. Companies must acknowledge that the problem of incentive misalignment exists and then determine its root cause and align or redesign incentives. They can improve alignment by, for instance, adopting revenue-sharing contracts, using technology to track previously hidden information, or working with intermediaries to build trust among network partners. It's also important to periodically reassess incentives, because even top-performing networks find that changes in technology or business conditions alter the alignment of incentives.

  18. Fiber alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, S.H.; Warren, M.E.; Snipes, M.B. Jr.; Armendariz, M.G.; Word, J.C. V

    1997-08-19

    A fiber alignment apparatus includes a micro-machined nickel spring that captures and locks arrays of single mode fibers into position. The design consists of a movable nickel leaf shaped spring and a fixed pocket where fibers are held. The fiber is slid between the spring and a fixed block, which tensions the spring. When the fiber reaches the pocket, it automatically falls into the pocket and is held by the pressure of the leaf spring. 8 figs.

  19. Fiber alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Warren, Mial Evans; Snipes, Jr., Morris Burton; Armendariz, Marcelino Guadalupe; Word, V., James Cole

    1997-01-01

    A fiber alignment apparatus includes a micro-machined nickel spring that captures and locks arrays of single mode fibers into position. The design consists of a movable nickel leaf shaped spring and a fixed pocket where fibers are held. The fiber is slid between the spring and a fixed block, which tensions the spring. When the fiber reaches the pocket, it automatically falls into the pocket and is held by the pressure of the leaf spring.

  20. Nanolaminate deformable mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.; Olivier, Scot S.

    2009-04-14

    A deformable mirror formed out of two layers of a nanolaminate foil attached to a stiff substrate is introduced. Deformation is provided by an electrostatic force between two of the layers. The internal stiffness of the structure allows for high-spatial-frequency shapes. The nanolaminate foil of the present invention allows for a high-quality mirror surface. The device achieves high precision in the vertical direction by using foils with accurately controlled thicknesses, but does not require high precision in the lateral dimensions, allowing such mirrors to be fabricated using crude lithography techniques. Such techniques allow structures up to about the meter scale to be fabricated.