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Sample records for aligned cnt arrays

  1. Order in vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsin; Xu, Z; Eres, Gyula

    2006-01-01

    We report the direct measurements on the bulk morphology of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). SANS measurements at different heights of CNT arrays corresponding to different stages of the growth reveal increasing alignment order along the thickness and two distinctly different CNT morphologies. The observations suggest that the evolution of the macroscopic CNT morphologies be driven by competing collective growth and spatial constraints.

  2. Large-Scale `Linker-Free Assembly' of swCNT-Based Biosensor Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Donghee; Lee, Byung Yang; Hong, Seunghun

    2008-03-01

    Biosensors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (swCNTs) have received a great deal of attention due to their potential applications such as genotyping, disease diagnosis, food analysis, etc. However, a lack of reliable mass-production method for such swCNT-based biosensor has been holding back their practical applications. One promising mass-production method for swCNT-based biosensor arrays can be `linker-free assembly' process (Nature Nanotechnology 1, 66 (2006)), where non-polar patterns guide the `selective assembly' and `precision alignment' of carbon nanotubes on bare substrates without using any external forces such as liquid flow, etc. We used this method to fabricate large-scale assembly of swCNT-based integrated devices on virtually general substrates including SiO2, Si, Al, Au, etc. To utilize swCNT devices for biosensors, we functionalized swCNT devices on SiO2 with receptor biomolecules such as enzyme L-glutamate oxidase or biotin. And then, we could detect the target biomolecules (L-glutamate or streptavidin, respectively) with high sensitivity and selectivity by monitoring the conductance change of swCNT junctions in aqueous environment. These studies provide biological implications on neurotransmitters and proteins onto swCNT patterned surface.

  3. Measurement of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Array Compression Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Changhong

    The use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the form of vertically aligned arrays or films has been of interest due to the super-compressible response and the ability to be used as electrical and thermal contacts. CNT arrays have shown the remarkable ability to react as foam-like structures and exhibit localized, coordinated buckling within specific regions. An understanding of the buckling region evolution and the resulting effects on the bulk CNT array response are important, unanswered fundamental questions necessary for the future application of CNT arrays. Here, we report on the low-cycle compression of bulk vertically aligned CNT arrays to observe initiation and growth of the buckling as a function of compressive strain and the contacting substrate material. A critical strain of ˜5.5% is found above which the buckling region length increased and below which remained at or below the applied strain. The results are corroborated with nanoindentation on the surfaces, which indicate a stiffening of the near surface by 9.4%-16.5% with increasing applied strain. Also, contact counterfaces with different stiffness, lithium niobate and a polymer gel, were compared, which resulted in changes of ˜32% in total array height after cyclic compression. Raman spectroscopy on CNT arrays before and after compressive deformation was performed observing repeatable vibrational shifts in the strained regions. Also, to observe the applicability of CNT arrays as contact sensors, electrical resistance change during compression was measured and found to increase by 4 times in the parallel versus vertical direction. Observation and results of the buckling region nature and relationship with applied strain and contacting substrates are important for applying the nanotube arrays to energy absorbing cushions, tunable dampers, thermal contacts, contact sensing, chemical sensing, or in sliding contact.

  4. Solution-based electric-field-assisted assembly of vertically aligned CNT membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Richard; Akin, Cevat; Shan, Jerry

    2014-11-01

    Carbon-nanotube (CNT) membranes are of interest due to experiments and simulations showing flow through nanotubes to be 3 to 5 orders of magnitude faster than predicted by viscous flow theory. Thus, membranes incorporating vertically aligned CNTs (VACNTs) as through-pores offer promise as highly efficient and permeable membranes for a variety of filter and separation processes. However, current membrane-fabrication techniques utilizing CVD-grown VACNT arrays are costly and difficult to scale up. We are developing a solution-based, electric-field-assisted approach as a cost-effective and scalable method to producing large-area VACNT membranes and composites. Post-growth nanotubes are first dispersed in a polymeric matrix and then aligned with an AC electric field. A DC component induces electrophoresis to the CNTs to significantly increase the VACNT number density. This composite field also introduces complex fluid motion caused by induced-charge electro-osmosis and the electrochemistry of the fluid/electrode interface. We experimentally probe all of these effects and consider factors affecting the number density and spatial uniformity of VACNT membranes. We also consider the basic electrokinetics of nanotube alignment under spatially uniform AC electric fields, making quantitative comparison with classical models of the dynamics of polarizable, 1D particles under the combined effects of electric fields, hydrodynamic drag, and Brownian motion. We conclude by discussing the implications of these fundamental electrohydrodynamic studies for producing large-area membranes containing aligned CNTs.

  5. Full elastic constitutive relation of non-isotropic aligned-CNT/PDMS flexible nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepúlveda, A. T.; Guzman de Villoria, R.; Viana, J. C.; Pontes, A. J.; Wardle, B. L.; Rocha, L. A.

    2013-05-01

    The elastic response of vertically aligned-carbon nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane (A-CNT/PDMS) nanocomposites is presented in this study and related to the underlying aligned-CNT morphology. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) at 1% Vf are embedded in a flexible substrate of PDMS to create a flexible polymer nanocomposite (PNC). The PNC properties are evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and tensile mechanical tests, and the full linearly elastic constitutive relation is established for such a PNC. The results suggest that the CNTs retain the alignment after wetting and curing of PDMS. PDMS is significantly modified by the reinforcing aligned-CNT fibers, demonstrating non-isotropic (as opposed to the isotropic neat PDMS) elastic properties all different from PDMS (Young's modulus of 0.8 MPa), including an anisotropy ratio of 4.8 and increases in the modulus of A-CNT/PDMS over PDMS by more than 900% and 100%, in the CNT longitudinal and transverse directions, respectively. This study reports the first full constitutive relation that may be useful in modeling PNCs as composites or as elements of hierarchical nanoengineered composites, particularly PDMS-CNT PNCs are envisioned as elements in biomedical devices such as pressure transducers and energy harvesters.

  6. Simulation of water impregnation through vertically aligned CNT forests using a molecular dynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajiri, Tomohiro; Matsuzaki, Ryosuke; Shimamura, Yoshinobu

    2016-08-01

    The flow rate of water through carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes is considerably large. Hence, CNT membranes can be used in nanofluidic applications. In this work, we performed a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the introduction of water into CNTs in the CNT membranes, especially in vertically aligned CNT forests. The results showed that the Knudsen number (Kn) increased with an increasing volume fraction of CNT (VC) and was greater than 10‑3 for each VC. Beyond this value, the flow became a slip flow. Further, the permeability increased as VC increased in the actual state calculated by the MD simulation, whereas the permeability in the no-slip state predicted by the Hagen–Poiseuille relationship decreased. Thus, a clear divergence in the permeability trend existed between the states. Finally, the flow enhancement ranged from 0.1 to 23,800, and the results show that water easily permeates as VC increases.

  7. Simulation of water impregnation through vertically aligned CNT forests using a molecular dynamics method.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Tomohiro; Matsuzaki, Ryosuke; Shimamura, Yoshinobu

    2016-08-26

    The flow rate of water through carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes is considerably large. Hence, CNT membranes can be used in nanofluidic applications. In this work, we performed a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the introduction of water into CNTs in the CNT membranes, especially in vertically aligned CNT forests. The results showed that the Knudsen number (Kn) increased with an increasing volume fraction of CNT (VC) and was greater than 10(-3) for each VC. Beyond this value, the flow became a slip flow. Further, the permeability increased as VC increased in the actual state calculated by the MD simulation, whereas the permeability in the no-slip state predicted by the Hagen-Poiseuille relationship decreased. Thus, a clear divergence in the permeability trend existed between the states. Finally, the flow enhancement ranged from 0.1 to 23,800, and the results show that water easily permeates as VC increases.

  8. Simulation of water impregnation through vertically aligned CNT forests using a molecular dynamics method

    PubMed Central

    Tajiri, Tomohiro; Matsuzaki, Ryosuke; Shimamura, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    The flow rate of water through carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes is considerably large. Hence, CNT membranes can be used in nanofluidic applications. In this work, we performed a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the introduction of water into CNTs in the CNT membranes, especially in vertically aligned CNT forests. The results showed that the Knudsen number (Kn) increased with an increasing volume fraction of CNT (VC) and was greater than 10−3 for each VC. Beyond this value, the flow became a slip flow. Further, the permeability increased as VC increased in the actual state calculated by the MD simulation, whereas the permeability in the no-slip state predicted by the Hagen–Poiseuille relationship decreased. Thus, a clear divergence in the permeability trend existed between the states. Finally, the flow enhancement ranged from 0.1 to 23,800, and the results show that water easily permeates as VC increases. PMID:27562112

  9. Simulation of water impregnation through vertically aligned CNT forests using a molecular dynamics method.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Tomohiro; Matsuzaki, Ryosuke; Shimamura, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    The flow rate of water through carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes is considerably large. Hence, CNT membranes can be used in nanofluidic applications. In this work, we performed a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the introduction of water into CNTs in the CNT membranes, especially in vertically aligned CNT forests. The results showed that the Knudsen number (Kn) increased with an increasing volume fraction of CNT (VC) and was greater than 10(-3) for each VC. Beyond this value, the flow became a slip flow. Further, the permeability increased as VC increased in the actual state calculated by the MD simulation, whereas the permeability in the no-slip state predicted by the Hagen-Poiseuille relationship decreased. Thus, a clear divergence in the permeability trend existed between the states. Finally, the flow enhancement ranged from 0.1 to 23,800, and the results show that water easily permeates as VC increases. PMID:27562112

  10. Stacked 3D RRAM Array with Graphene/CNT as Edge Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yue; Wu, Huaqiang; Wang, Kun; Wu, Riga; Song, Lin; Li, Tianyi; Wang, Jiangtao; Yu, Zhiping; Qian, He

    2015-01-01

    There are two critical challenges which determine the array density of 3D RRAM: 1) the scaling limit in both horizontal and vertical directions; 2) the integration of selector devices in 3D structure. In this work, we present a novel 3D RRAM structure using low-dimensional materials, including 2D graphene and 1D carbon nanotube (CNT), as the edge electrodes. A two-layer 3D RRAM with monolayer graphene as edge electrode is demonstrated. The electrical results reveal that the RRAM devices could switch normally with this very thin edge electrode at nanometer scale. Meanwhile, benefited from the asymmetric carrier transport induced by Schottky barrier at metal/CNT and oxide/CNT interfaces, a selector built-in 3D RRAM structure using CNT as edge electrode is successfully fabricated and characterized. Furthermore, the discussion of high array density potential is presented.

  11. Stacked 3D RRAM Array with Graphene/CNT as Edge Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yue; Wu, Huaqiang; Wang, Kun; Wu, Riga; Song, Lin; Li, Tianyi; Wang, Jiangtao; Yu, Zhiping; Qian, He

    2015-09-01

    There are two critical challenges which determine the array density of 3D RRAM: 1) the scaling limit in both horizontal and vertical directions; 2) the integration of selector devices in 3D structure. In this work, we present a novel 3D RRAM structure using low-dimensional materials, including 2D graphene and 1D carbon nanotube (CNT), as the edge electrodes. A two-layer 3D RRAM with monolayer graphene as edge electrode is demonstrated. The electrical results reveal that the RRAM devices could switch normally with this very thin edge electrode at nanometer scale. Meanwhile, benefited from the asymmetric carrier transport induced by Schottky barrier at metal/CNT and oxide/CNT interfaces, a selector built-in 3D RRAM structure using CNT as edge electrode is successfully fabricated and characterized. Furthermore, the discussion of high array density potential is presented.

  12. Highly uniform hole spacing micro brushes based on aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi; Zhu, Xingzhong; Huang, Xiaolu; Cheng, Yingwu; Liu, Yun; Geng, Huijuan; Wu, Yue; Su, Yanjie; Wei, Hao; Zhang, Yafei

    2013-11-25

    Highly uniform hole spacing micro brushes were fabricated based on aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays synthesized by chemical vapor deposition method with the assistance of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template. Different micro brushes from CNT arrays were constructed on silicon, glass, and polyimide substrates, respectively. The micro brushes had highly uniform hole spacing originating from the regularly periodic pore structure of AAO template. The CNT arrays, serving as bristles, were firmly grafted on the substrates. The brushes can easily clean particles with scale of micrometer on the surface of silicon wafer and from the narrow spaces between the electrodes in a series of cleaning experiments. The results show the potential application of the CNT micro brushes as a cleaning tool in microelectronics manufacture field.

  13. Highly uniform hole spacing micro brushes based on aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhi; Zhu, Xingzhong; Huang, Xiaolu; Cheng, Yingwu; Liu, Yun; Geng, Huijuan; Wu, Yue; Su, Yanjie; Wei, Hao; Zhang, Yafei

    2013-11-01

    Highly uniform hole spacing micro brushes were fabricated based on aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays synthesized by chemical vapor deposition method with the assistance of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template. Different micro brushes from CNT arrays were constructed on silicon, glass, and polyimide substrates, respectively. The micro brushes had highly uniform hole spacing originating from the regularly periodic pore structure of AAO template. The CNT arrays, serving as bristles, were firmly grafted on the substrates. The brushes can easily clean particles with scale of micrometer on the surface of silicon wafer and from the narrow spaces between the electrodes in a series of cleaning experiments. The results show the potential application of the CNT micro brushes as a cleaning tool in microelectronics manufacture field.

  14. Metal-modified and vertically aligned carbon nanotube sensors array for landfill gas monitoring applications.

    PubMed

    Penza, M; Rossi, R; Alvisi, M; Serra, E

    2010-03-12

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) layers were synthesized on Fe-coated low-cost alumina substrates using radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (RF-PECVD) technology. A miniaturized CNT-based gas sensor array was developed for monitoring landfill gas (LFG) at a temperature of 150 degrees C. The sensor array was composed of 4 sensing elements with unmodified CNT, and CNT loaded with 5 nm nominally thick sputtered nanoclusters of platinum (Pt), ruthenium (Ru) and silver (Ag). Chemical analysis of multicomponent gas mixtures constituted of CO(2), CH(4), H(2), NH(3), CO and NO(2) has been performed by the array sensor responses and pattern recognition based on principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA results demonstrate that the metal-decorated and vertically aligned CNT sensor array is able to discriminate the NO(2) presence in the multicomponent mixture LFG. The NO(2) gas detection in the mixture LFG was proved to be very sensitive, e.g.: the CNT:Ru sensor shows a relative change in the resistance of 1.50% and 0.55% for NO(2) concentrations of 3.3 ppm and 330 ppb dispersed in the LFG, respectively, with a wide NO(2) gas concentration range measured from 0.33 to 3.3 ppm, at the sensor temperature of 150 degrees C. The morphology and structure of the CNT networks have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. A forest-like nanostructure of vertically aligned CNT bundles in the multi-walled form appeared with a height of about 10 microm and a single-tube diameter varying in the range of 5-35 nm. The intensity ratio of the Raman spectroscopy D-peak and G-peak indicates the presence of disorder and defects in the CNT networks. The size of the metal (Pt, Ru, Ag) nanoclusters decorating the CNT top surface varies in the range of 5-50 nm. Functional characterization based on electrical charge transfer sensing mechanisms in the metal-modified CNT-chemoresistor array

  15. Aligned carbon nanotube array stiffness from stochastic three-dimensional morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Itai Y.; Lewis, Diana J.; Wardle, Brian L.

    2015-11-01

    The landmark theoretical properties of low dimensional materials have driven more than a decade of research on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and related nanostructures. While studies on isolated CNTs report behavior that aligns closely with theoretical predictions, studies on cm-scale aligned CNT arrays (>1010 CNTs) oftentimes report properties that are orders of magnitude below those predicted by theory. Using simulated arrays comprised of up to 105 CNTs with realistic stochastic morphologies, we show that the CNT waviness, quantified via the waviness ratio (w), is responsible for more than three orders of magnitude reduction in the effective CNT stiffness. Also, by including information on the volume fraction scaling of the CNT waviness, the simulation shows that the observed non-linear enhancement of the array stiffness as a function of the CNT close packing originates from the shear and torsion deformation mechanisms that are governed by the low shear modulus (~1 GPa) of the CNTs.The landmark theoretical properties of low dimensional materials have driven more than a decade of research on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and related nanostructures. While studies on isolated CNTs report behavior that aligns closely with theoretical predictions, studies on cm-scale aligned CNT arrays (>1010 CNTs) oftentimes report properties that are orders of magnitude below those predicted by theory. Using simulated arrays comprised of up to 105 CNTs with realistic stochastic morphologies, we show that the CNT waviness, quantified via the waviness ratio (w), is responsible for more than three orders of magnitude reduction in the effective CNT stiffness. Also, by including information on the volume fraction scaling of the CNT waviness, the simulation shows that the observed non-linear enhancement of the array stiffness as a function of the CNT close packing originates from the shear and torsion deformation mechanisms that are governed by the low shear modulus (~1 GPa) of the CNTs. Electronic

  16. Effect of CNT alignment on the strain sensing capability of carbon nanotube composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, Kaushik; Mahmoodi, Mehdi; Park, Chaneel; Park, Simon S.

    2013-07-01

    The effect of carbon nanotube (CNT) alignment on the strain sensing capabilities of multi-walled carbon nanotube/polycarbonate (MWCNT/PC) composites was investigated. Injection and compression molding techniques were used to fabricate 5 wt% MWCNT/PC composites. The effects of these molding techniques on the alignment of the MWCNTs were observed through micrographs obtained from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and investigated quantitatively using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. A one-dimensional piezoresistive model was developed to predict the changes in the resistance of the MWCNT/PC composites with respect to the applied strain. The strain sensing capabilities of the composites were examined along the lengths and widths of the samples through tensile testing, and gauge factors were calculated to compare the strain sensitivities. A linear correlation was observed between the resistance change and the applied strain when subjected to tension, and the composite samples fully recovered to their unstressed states upon unloading. A sensitivity factor defined by relating the analytical model and experimental data provided an indirect measure of the degree of MWCNT alignment in the composite. From the results obtained, it was evident that the injection molded samples, which exhibited high alignment, showed higher gauge factors than the compression molded samples. The highest gauge factor was found in the injection molded samples perpendicular to the MWCNT alignment.

  17. Vertically aligned CNT-Cu nano-composite material for stacked through-silicon-via interconnects.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuangxi; Mu, Wei; Edwards, Michael; Mencarelli, Davide; Pierantoni, Luca; Fu, Yifeng; Jeppson, Kjell; Liu, Johan

    2016-08-19

    For future miniaturization of electronic systems using 3D chip stacking, new fine-pitch materials for through-silicon-via (TSV) applications are likely required. In this paper, we propose a novel carbon nanotube (CNT)/copper nanocomposite material consisting of high aspect ratio, vertically aligned CNT bundles coated with copper. These bundles, consisting of hundreds of tiny CNTs, were uniformly coated by copper through electroplating, and aspect ratios as high as 300:1 were obtained. The resistivity of this nanomaterial was found to be as low as ∼10(-8) Ω m, which is of the same order of magnitude as the resistivity of copper, and its temperature coefficient was found to be only half of that of pure copper. The main advantage of the composite TSV nanomaterial is that its coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is similar to that of silicon, a key reliability factor. A finite element model was set up to demonstrate the reliability of this composite material and thermal cycle simulations predicted very promising results. In conclusion, this composite nanomaterial appears to be a very promising material for future 3D TSV applications offering both a low resistivity and a low CTE similar to that of silicon. PMID:27383767

  18. Vertically aligned CNT-Cu nano-composite material for stacked through-silicon-via interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuangxi; Mu, Wei; Edwards, Michael; Mencarelli, Davide; Pierantoni, Luca; Fu, Yifeng; Jeppson, Kjell; Liu, Johan

    2016-08-01

    For future miniaturization of electronic systems using 3D chip stacking, new fine-pitch materials for through-silicon-via (TSV) applications are likely required. In this paper, we propose a novel carbon nanotube (CNT)/copper nanocomposite material consisting of high aspect ratio, vertically aligned CNT bundles coated with copper. These bundles, consisting of hundreds of tiny CNTs, were uniformly coated by copper through electroplating, and aspect ratios as high as 300:1 were obtained. The resistivity of this nanomaterial was found to be as low as ˜10-8 Ω m, which is of the same order of magnitude as the resistivity of copper, and its temperature coefficient was found to be only half of that of pure copper. The main advantage of the composite TSV nanomaterial is that its coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is similar to that of silicon, a key reliability factor. A finite element model was set up to demonstrate the reliability of this composite material and thermal cycle simulations predicted very promising results. In conclusion, this composite nanomaterial appears to be a very promising material for future 3D TSV applications offering both a low resistivity and a low CTE similar to that of silicon.

  19. Vertically aligned CNT-Cu nano-composite material for stacked through-silicon-via interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuangxi; Mu, Wei; Edwards, Michael; Mencarelli, Davide; Pierantoni, Luca; Fu, Yifeng; Jeppson, Kjell; Liu, Johan

    2016-08-01

    For future miniaturization of electronic systems using 3D chip stacking, new fine-pitch materials for through-silicon-via (TSV) applications are likely required. In this paper, we propose a novel carbon nanotube (CNT)/copper nanocomposite material consisting of high aspect ratio, vertically aligned CNT bundles coated with copper. These bundles, consisting of hundreds of tiny CNTs, were uniformly coated by copper through electroplating, and aspect ratios as high as 300:1 were obtained. The resistivity of this nanomaterial was found to be as low as ∼10‑8 Ω m, which is of the same order of magnitude as the resistivity of copper, and its temperature coefficient was found to be only half of that of pure copper. The main advantage of the composite TSV nanomaterial is that its coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is similar to that of silicon, a key reliability factor. A finite element model was set up to demonstrate the reliability of this composite material and thermal cycle simulations predicted very promising results. In conclusion, this composite nanomaterial appears to be a very promising material for future 3D TSV applications offering both a low resistivity and a low CTE similar to that of silicon.

  20. Vertically aligned CNT-Cu nano-composite material for stacked through-silicon-via interconnects.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuangxi; Mu, Wei; Edwards, Michael; Mencarelli, Davide; Pierantoni, Luca; Fu, Yifeng; Jeppson, Kjell; Liu, Johan

    2016-08-19

    For future miniaturization of electronic systems using 3D chip stacking, new fine-pitch materials for through-silicon-via (TSV) applications are likely required. In this paper, we propose a novel carbon nanotube (CNT)/copper nanocomposite material consisting of high aspect ratio, vertically aligned CNT bundles coated with copper. These bundles, consisting of hundreds of tiny CNTs, were uniformly coated by copper through electroplating, and aspect ratios as high as 300:1 were obtained. The resistivity of this nanomaterial was found to be as low as ∼10(-8) Ω m, which is of the same order of magnitude as the resistivity of copper, and its temperature coefficient was found to be only half of that of pure copper. The main advantage of the composite TSV nanomaterial is that its coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is similar to that of silicon, a key reliability factor. A finite element model was set up to demonstrate the reliability of this composite material and thermal cycle simulations predicted very promising results. In conclusion, this composite nanomaterial appears to be a very promising material for future 3D TSV applications offering both a low resistivity and a low CTE similar to that of silicon.

  1. Copper-encapsulated vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Stano, Kelly L; Chapla, Rachel; Carroll, Murphy; Nowak, Joshua; McCord, Marian; Bradford, Philip D

    2013-11-13

    A new procedure is described for the fabrication of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) that are decorated, and even completely encapsulated, by a dense network of copper nanoparticles. The process involves the conformal deposition of pyrolytic carbon (Py-C) to stabilize the aligned carbon-nanotube structure during processing. The stabilized arrays are mildly functionalized using oxygen plasma treatment to improve wettability, and they are then infiltrated with an aqueous, supersaturated Cu salt solution. Once dried, the salt forms a stabilizing crystal network throughout the array. After calcination and H2 reduction, Cu nanoparticles are left decorating the CNT surfaces. Studies were carried out to determine the optimal processing parameters to maximize Cu content in the composite. These included the duration of Py-C deposition and system process pressure as well as the implementation of subsequent and multiple Cu salt solution infiltrations. The optimized procedure yielded a nanoscale hybrid material where the anisotropic alignment from the VACNT array was preserved, and the mass of the stabilized arrays was increased by over 24-fold because of the addition of Cu. The procedure has been adapted for other Cu salts and can also be used for other metal salts altogether, including Ni, Co, Fe, and Ag. The resulting composite is ideally suited for application in thermal management devices because of its low density, mechanical integrity, and potentially high thermal conductivity. Additionally, further processing of the material via pressing and sintering can yield consolidated, dense bulk composites. PMID:24143862

  2. Rectangular computed tomography using a stationary array of CNT emitters: initial experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Brian; Spronk, Derrek; Cheng, Yuan; Zhang, Zheng; Pan, Xiaochuan; Beckmann, Moritz; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2013-03-01

    XinRay Systems Inc has a rectangular x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging setup using multibeam x-ray tubes. These multibeam x-ray tubes are based on cold cathodes using carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters. Due to their unique design, a CNT x-ray tube can contain a dense array of independently controlled electron emitters which generate a linear array of x-ray focal spots. XinRay uses a set of linear CNT x-ray tubes to design and construct a stationary CT setup which achieves sufficient CT coverage from a fixed set of views. The CT system has no moving gantry, enabling it to be enclosed in a compact rectangular tunnel. The fixed locations of the x-ray focal spots were optimized through simulations. The rectangular shape creates significant variation in path length from the focal spots to the detector for different x-ray views. The shape also results in unequal x-ray coverage in the imaged space. We discuss the impact of this variation on the reconstruction. XinRay uses an iterative reconstruction algorithm to account for this unique geometry, which is implemented on a graphics processing unit (GPU). The fixed focal spots prohibit the use of an antiscatter grid. Quantitative measure of the scatter and its impact on the reconstruction will be discussed. These results represent the first known implementation of a completely stationary CT setup using CNT x-ray emitter arrays.

  3. Remarkably enhanced thermal transport based on a flexible horizontally-aligned carbon nanotube array film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Lin; Wang, Xiaotian; Su, Guoping; Tang, Dawei; Zheng, Xinghua; Zhu, Jie; Wang, Zhiguo; Norris, Pamela M.; Bradford, Philip D.; Zhu, Yuntian

    2016-02-01

    It has been more than a decade since the thermal conductivity of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays was reported possible to exceed that of the best thermal greases or phase change materials by an order of magnitude. Despite tremendous prospects as a thermal interface material (TIM), results were discouraging for practical applications. The primary reason is the large thermal contact resistance between the CNT tips and the heat sink. Here we report a simultaneous sevenfold increase in in-plane thermal conductivity and a fourfold reduction in the thermal contact resistance at the flexible CNT-SiO2 coated heat sink interface by coupling the CNTs with orderly physical overlapping along the horizontal direction through an engineering approach (shear pressing). The removal of empty space rapidly increases the density of transport channels, and the replacement of the fine CNT tips with their cylindrical surface insures intimate contact at CNT-SiO2 interface. Our results suggest horizontally aligned CNT arrays exhibit remarkably enhanced in-plane thermal conductivity and reduced out-of-plane thermal conductivity and thermal contact resistance. This novel structure makes CNT film promising for applications in chip-level heat dissipation. Besides TIM, it also provides for a solution to anisotropic heat spreader which is significant for eliminating hot spots.

  4. Remarkably enhanced thermal transport based on a flexible horizontally-aligned carbon nanotube array film

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Lin; Wang, Xiaotian; Su, Guoping; Tang, Dawei; Zheng, Xinghua; Zhu, Jie; Wang, Zhiguo; Norris, Pamela M.; Bradford, Philip D.; Zhu, Yuntian

    2016-01-01

    It has been more than a decade since the thermal conductivity of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays was reported possible to exceed that of the best thermal greases or phase change materials by an order of magnitude. Despite tremendous prospects as a thermal interface material (TIM), results were discouraging for practical applications. The primary reason is the large thermal contact resistance between the CNT tips and the heat sink. Here we report a simultaneous sevenfold increase in in-plane thermal conductivity and a fourfold reduction in the thermal contact resistance at the flexible CNT-SiO2 coated heat sink interface by coupling the CNTs with orderly physical overlapping along the horizontal direction through an engineering approach (shear pressing). The removal of empty space rapidly increases the density of transport channels, and the replacement of the fine CNT tips with their cylindrical surface insures intimate contact at CNT-SiO2 interface. Our results suggest horizontally aligned CNT arrays exhibit remarkably enhanced in-plane thermal conductivity and reduced out-of-plane thermal conductivity and thermal contact resistance. This novel structure makes CNT film promising for applications in chip-level heat dissipation. Besides TIM, it also provides for a solution to anisotropic heat spreader which is significant for eliminating hot spots. PMID:26880221

  5. Remarkably enhanced thermal transport based on a flexible horizontally-aligned carbon nanotube array film.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lin; Wang, Xiaotian; Su, Guoping; Tang, Dawei; Zheng, Xinghua; Zhu, Jie; Wang, Zhiguo; Norris, Pamela M; Bradford, Philip D; Zhu, Yuntian

    2016-01-01

    It has been more than a decade since the thermal conductivity of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays was reported possible to exceed that of the best thermal greases or phase change materials by an order of magnitude. Despite tremendous prospects as a thermal interface material (TIM), results were discouraging for practical applications. The primary reason is the large thermal contact resistance between the CNT tips and the heat sink. Here we report a simultaneous sevenfold increase in in-plane thermal conductivity and a fourfold reduction in the thermal contact resistance at the flexible CNT-SiO2 coated heat sink interface by coupling the CNTs with orderly physical overlapping along the horizontal direction through an engineering approach (shear pressing). The removal of empty space rapidly increases the density of transport channels, and the replacement of the fine CNT tips with their cylindrical surface insures intimate contact at CNT-SiO2 interface. Our results suggest horizontally aligned CNT arrays exhibit remarkably enhanced in-plane thermal conductivity and reduced out-of-plane thermal conductivity and thermal contact resistance. This novel structure makes CNT film promising for applications in chip-level heat dissipation. Besides TIM, it also provides for a solution to anisotropic heat spreader which is significant for eliminating hot spots. PMID:26880221

  6. Coupled process of plastics pyrolysis and chemical vapor deposition for controllable synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhou; Zhang, Qiang; Luo, Guohua; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Wei, Fei

    2010-08-01

    Efficient conversion of waste plastics into advanced materials is of conspicuous environmental, social and economic benefits. A coupled process of plastic pyrolysis and chemical vapor deposition for vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) array growth was proposed. Various kinds of plastics, such as polypropylene, polyethylene, and polyvinyl chloride, were used as carbon sources for the controllable growth of CNT arrays. The relationship between the length of CNT arrays and the growth time was investigated. It was found that the length of aligned CNTs increased with prolonged growth time. CNT arrays with a length of 500 μm were obtained for a 40-min growth and the average growth rate was estimated to be 12 μm/min. The diameter of CNTs in the arrays can be modulated by controlling the growth temperature and the feeding rate of ferrocene. In addition, substrates with larger specific surface area such as ceramic spheres, quartz fibers, and quartz particles, were adopted to support the growth of CNT arrays. Those results provide strong evidence for the feasibility of conversion from waste plastics into CNT arrays via this reported sustainable materials processing.

  7. Use of Patterned CNT Arrays for Display Purposes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for providing a dynamically reconfigurable display having nanometer-scale resolution, using a patterned array of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) clusters. A diode, phosphor or other light source on each MWCNT cluster is independently activated, and different color light sources (e.g., red, green, blue, grey scale, infrared) can be mixed if desired. Resolution is estimated to be 40-100 nm, and reconfiguration time for each MWCNT cluster is no greater than one microsecond.

  8. Synthesis and electron emission properties of aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, Suman

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have become one of the most interesting allotropes of carbon due to their intriguing mechanical, electrical, thermal and optical properties. The synthesis and electron emission properties of CNT arrays have been investigated in this work. Vertically aligned CNTs of different densities were synthesized on copper substrate with catalyst dots patterned by nanosphere lithography. The CNTs synthesized with catalyst dots patterned by spheres of 500 nm diameter exhibited the best electron emission properties with the lowest turn-on/threshold electric fields and the highest field enhancement factor. Furthermore, CNTs were treated with NH3 plasma for various durations and the optimum enhancement was obtained for a plasma treatment of 1.0 min. CNT point emitters were also synthesized on a flat-tip or a sharp-tip to understand the effect of emitter geometry on the electron emission. The experimental results show that electron emission can be enhanced by decreasing the screening effect of the electric field by neighboring CNTs. In another part of the dissertation, vertically aligned CNTs were synthesized on stainless steel (SS) substrates with and without chemical etching or catalyst deposition. The density and length of CNTs were determined by synthesis time. For a prolonged growth time, the catalyst activity terminated and the plasma started etching CNTs destructively. CNTs with uniform diameter and length were synthesized on SS substrates subjected to chemical etching for a period of 40 minutes before the growth. The direct contact of CNTs with stainless steel allowed for the better field emission performance of CNTs synthesized on pristine SS as compared to the CNTs synthesized on Ni/Cr coated SS. Finally, fabrication of large arrays of free-standing vertically aligned CNT/SnO2 core-shell structures was explored by using a simple wet-chemical route. The structure of the SnO2 nanoparticles was studied by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy

  9. Alignment method for solar collector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Driver, Jr., Richard B

    2012-10-23

    The present invention is directed to an improved method for establishing camera fixture location for aligning mirrors on a solar collector array (SCA) comprising multiple mirror modules. The method aligns the mirrors on a module by comparing the location of the receiver image in photographs with the predicted theoretical receiver image location. To accurately align an entire SCA, a common reference is used for all of the individual module images within the SCA. The improved method can use relative pixel location information in digital photographs along with alignment fixture inclinometer data to calculate relative locations of the fixture between modules. The absolute locations are determined by minimizing alignment asymmetry for the SCA. The method inherently aligns all of the mirrors in an SCA to the receiver, even with receiver position and module-to-module alignment errors.

  10. Electrospun Aligned Fibrous Arrays and Twisted Ropes: Fabrication, Mechanical and Electrical Properties, and Application in Strain Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jie; Yan, Xu; Li, Meng-Meng; Yu, Gui-Feng; Zhang, Hong-Di; Pisula, Wojciech; He, Xiao-Xiao; Duvail, Jean-Luc; Long, Yun-Ze

    2015-12-01

    Electrospinning (e-spinning) is a versatile technique to fabricate ultrathin fibers from a rich variety of functional materials. In this paper, a modified e-spinning setup with two-frame collector is proposed for the fabrication of highly aligned arrays of polystyrene (PS) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) nanofibers, as well as PVDF/carbon nanotube (PVDF/CNT) composite fibers. Especially, it is capable of producing fibrous arrays with excellent orientation over a large area (more than 14 cm × 12 cm). The as-spun fibers are suspended and can be easily transferred to other rigid or flexible substrates. Based on the aligned fibrous arrays, twisted long ropes are also prepared. Compared with the aligned arrays, twisted PVDF/CNT fiber ropes show enhanced mechanical and electrical properties and have potential application in microscale strain sensors.

  11. Electrospun Aligned Fibrous Arrays and Twisted Ropes: Fabrication, Mechanical and Electrical Properties, and Application in Strain Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jie; Yan, Xu; Li, Meng-Meng; Yu, Gui-Feng; Zhang, Hong-Di; Pisula, Wojciech; He, Xiao-Xiao; Duvail, Jean-Luc; Long, Yun-Ze

    2015-12-01

    Electrospinning (e-spinning) is a versatile technique to fabricate ultrathin fibers from a rich variety of functional materials. In this paper, a modified e-spinning setup with two-frame collector is proposed for the fabrication of highly aligned arrays of polystyrene (PS) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) nanofibers, as well as PVDF/carbon nanotube (PVDF/CNT) composite fibers. Especially, it is capable of producing fibrous arrays with excellent orientation over a large area (more than 14 cm × 12 cm). The as-spun fibers are suspended and can be easily transferred to other rigid or flexible substrates. Based on the aligned fibrous arrays, twisted long ropes are also prepared. Compared with the aligned arrays, twisted PVDF/CNT fiber ropes show enhanced mechanical and electrical properties and have potential application in microscale strain sensors. PMID:26646688

  12. Chemical Bath Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Buffer on Curved Surfaces for Growing Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haitao; Na, Chongzheng

    2015-07-01

    Direct growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on substrates requires the deposition of an aluminum oxide buffer (AOB) layer to prevent the diffusion and coalescence of catalyst nanoparticles. Although AOB layers can be readily created on flat substrates using a variety of physical and chemical methods, the preparation of AOB layers on substrates with highly curved surfaces remains challenging. Here, we report a new solution-based method for preparing uniform layers of AOB on highly curved surfaces by the chemical bath deposition of basic aluminum sulfate and annealing. We show that the thickness of AOB layer can be increased by extending the immersion time of a substrate in the chemical bath, following the classical Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov crystallization kinetics. The increase of AOB thickness in turn leads to the increase of CNT length and the reduction of CNT curviness. Using this method, we have successfully synthesized dense aligned CNT arrays of micrometers in length on substrates with highly curved surfaces including glass fibers, stainless steel mesh, and porous ceramic foam. PMID:26053766

  13. Aligning parallel arrays to reduce communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, Thomas J.; Schreiber, Robert; Gilbert, John R.; Chatterjee, Siddhartha

    1994-01-01

    Axis and stride alignment is an important optimization in compiling data-parallel programs for distributed-memory machines. We previously developed an optimal algorithm for aligning array expressions. Here, we examine alignment for more general program graphs. We show that optimal alignment is NP-complete in this setting, so we study heuristic methods. This paper makes two contributions. First, we show how local graph transformations can reduce the size of the problem significantly without changing the best solution. This allows more complex and effective heuristics to be used. Second, we give a heuristic that can explore the space of possible solutions in a number of ways. We show that some of these strategies can give better solutions than a simple greedy approach proposed earlier. Our algorithms have been implemented; we present experimental results showing their effect on the performance of some example programs running on the CM-5.

  14. Prospective gated chest tomosynthesis using CNT X-ray source array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Jing; Burk, Laurel; Wu, Gongting; Lee, Yueh Z.; Heath, Michael D.; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2015-03-01

    Chest tomosynthesis is a low-dose 3-D imaging modality that has been shown to have comparable sensitivity as CT in detecting lung nodules and other lung pathologies. We have recently demonstrated the feasibility of stationary chest tomosynthesis (s-DCT) using a distributed CNT X-ray source array. The technology allows acquisition of tomographic projections without moving the X-ray source. The electronically controlled CNT x-ray source also enables physiologically gated imaging, which will minimize image blur due to the patient's respiration motion. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of prospective gated chest tomosynthesis using a bench-top s-DCT system with a CNT source array, a high- speed at panel detector and realistic patient respiratory signals captured using a pressure sensor. Tomosynthesis images of inflated pig lungs placed inside an anthropomorphic chest phantom were acquired at different respiration rate, with and without gating for image quality comparison. Metal beads of 2 mm diameter were placed on the pig lung for quantitative measure of the image quality. Without gating, the beads were blurred to 3:75 mm during a 3 s tomosynthesis acquisition. When gated to the end of the inhalation and exhalation phase the detected bead size reduced to 2:25 mm, much closer to the actual bead size. With gating the observed airway edges are sharper and there are more visible structural details in the lung. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of prospective gating in the s-DCT, which substantially reduces image blur associated with lung motion.

  15. Thin film nanotube transistors based on self-assembled, aligned, semiconducting carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Engel, Michael; Small, Joshua P; Steiner, Mathias; Freitag, Marcus; Green, Alexander A; Hersam, Mark C; Avouris, Phaedon

    2008-12-23

    Thin film transistors (TFTs) are now poised to revolutionize the display, sensor, and flexible electronics markets. However, there is a limited choice of channel materials compatible with low-temperature processing. This has inhibited the fabrication of high electrical performance TFTs. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have very high mobilities and can be solution-processed, making thin film CNT-based TFTs a natural direction for exploration. The two main challenges facing CNT-TFTs are the difficulty of placing and aligning CNTs over large areas and low on/off current ratios due to admixture of metallic nanotubes. Here, we report the self-assembly and self-alignment of CNTs from solution into micron-wide strips that form regular arrays of dense and highly aligned CNT films covering the entire chip, which is ideally suitable for device fabrication. The films are formed from pre-separated, 99% purely semiconducting CNTs and, as a result, the CNT-TFTs exhibit simultaneously high drive currents and large on/off current ratios. Moreover, they deliver strong photocurrents and are also both photo- and electroluminescent.

  16. Algorithms for Automatic Alignment of Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Oliker, Leonid; Schreiber, Robert; Sheffler, Thomas J.

    1996-01-01

    Aggregate data objects (such as arrays) are distributed across the processor memories when compiling a data-parallel language for a distributed-memory machine. The mapping determines the amount of communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. A common approach is to break the mapping into two stages: an alignment that maps all the objects to an abstract template, followed by a distribution that maps the template to the processors. This paper describes algorithms for solving the various facets of the alignment problem: axis and stride alignment, static and mobile offset alignment, and replication labeling. We show that optimal axis and stride alignment is NP-complete for general program graphs, and give a heuristic method that can explore the space of possible solutions in a number of ways. We show that some of these strategies can give better solutions than a simple greedy approach proposed earlier. We also show how local graph contractions can reduce the size of the problem significantly without changing the best solution. This allows more complex and effective heuristics to be used. We show how to model the static offset alignment problem using linear programming, and we show that loop-dependent mobile offset alignment is sometimes necessary for optimum performance. We describe an algorithm with for determining mobile alignments for objects within do loops. We also identify situations in which replicated alignment is either required by the program itself or can be used to improve performance. We describe an algorithm based on network flow that replicates objects so as to minimize the total amount of broadcast communication in replication.

  17. Flexible CNT-array double helices Strain Sensor with high stretchability for Motion Capture

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Cui, Ya-Long; Tian, Gui-Li; Shu, Yi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Tian, He; Yang, Yi; Wei, Fei; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Motion capture is attracting more and more attention due to its potential wide applications in various fields. However, traditional methods for motion capture still have weakness such as high cost and space consuming. Based on these considerations, a flexible, highly stretchable strain sensor with high gauge factor for motion capture is fabricated with carbon nanotube (CNT) array double helices as the main building block. Ascribed to the unique flexible double helical CNT-array matrix, the strain sensor is able to measure strain up to 410%, with low hysteresis. Moreover, a demonstration of using this strain sensor for capture hand motion and to control a mechanical hand in real time is also achieved. A model based on finite difference method is also made to help understand the mechanism of the strain sensors. Our work demonstrates that strain sensors can measure very large strain while maintaining high sensitivity, and the motion capture based on this strain sensor is expected to be less expensive, more convenient and accessible. PMID:26530904

  18. Dramatic improvement in water retention and proton conductivity in electrically aligned functionalized CNT/SPEEK nanohybrid PEM.

    PubMed

    Gahlot, Swati; Kulshrestha, Vaibhav

    2015-01-14

    Nanohybrid membranes of electrically aligned functionalized carbon nanotube f CNT with sulfonated poly ether ether ketone (SPEEK) have been successfully prepared by solution casting. Functionalization of CNTs was done through a carboxylation and sulfonation route. Further, a constant electric field (500 V·cm(-2)) has been applied to align CNTs in the same direction during the membrane drying process. All the membranes are characterized chemically, thermally, and mechanically by the means of FTIR, DSC, DMA, UTM, SEM, TEM, and AFM techniques. Intermolecular interactions between the components in hybrid membranes are established by FTIR. Physicochemical measurements were done to analyze membrane stability. Membranes are evaluated for proton conductivity (30-90 °C) and methanol crossover resistance to reveal their potential for direct methanol fuel cell application. Incorporation of f CNT reasonably increases the ion-exchange capacity, water retention, and proton conductivity while it reduces the methanol permeability. The maximum proton conductivity has been found in the S-sCNT-5 nanohybrid PEM with higher methanol crossover resistance. The prepared membranes can be also used for electrode material for fuel cells and batteries.

  19. Controlled growth of super-aligned carbon nanotube arrays for spinning continuous unidirectional sheets with tunable physical properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Sun, Yinghui; Chen, Lei; Feng, Chen; Feng, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Kaili; Zhao, Yonggang; Fan, Shoushan

    2008-02-01

    We report controlled syntheses of super-aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays with the desired tube-diameter, number of walls, and length for spinning continuous unidirectional sheets to meet a variety of industrial demands. The tube-diameter distribution of super-aligned arrays is well controlled by varying the thicknesses of catalyst films, and the length of them is tuned by the growth time. Further investigation indicates that the physical properties of the unidirectional sheets, such as electrical transport, optical transmittance, and light emission properties, can be well tuned by the tube-diameter- and length-controlled growth. This work extends the understanding of the super-aligned CNT arrays and will be very helpful in developing further applications. PMID:18269255

  20. Conformal atomic layer deposition of alumina on millimeter tall, vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Stano, Kelly L; Carroll, Murphy; Padbury, Richard; McCord, Marian; Jur, Jesse S; Bradford, Philip D

    2014-11-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to coat high aspect ratio and high surface area substrates with conformal and precisely controlled thin films. Vertically aligned arrays of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with lengths up to 1.5 mm were conformally coated with alumina from base to tip. The nucleation and growth behaviors of Al2O3 ALD precursors on the MWCNTs were studied as a function of CNT surface chemistry. CNT surfaces were modified through a series of post-treatments including pyrolytic carbon deposition, high temperature thermal annealing, and oxygen plasma functionalization. Conformal coatings were achieved where post-treatments resulted in increased defect density as well as the extent of functionalization, as characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using thermogravimetric analysis, it was determined that MWCNTs treated with pyrolytic carbon and plasma functionalization prior to ALD coating were more stable to thermal oxidation than pristine ALD coated samples. Functionalized and ALD coated arrays had a compressive modulus more than two times higher than a pristine array coated for the same number of cycles. Cross-sectional energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed that Al2O3 could be uniformly deposited through the entire thickness of the vertically aligned MWCNT array by manipulating sample orientation and mounting techniques. Following the ALD coating, the MWCNT arrays demonstrated hydrophilic wetting behavior and also exhibited foam-like recovery following compressive strain.

  1. Field emission luminescence of nanodiamonds deposited on the aligned carbon nanotube array

    PubMed Central

    Fedoseeva, Yu. V.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.; Kanygin, M. A.; Gorodetskiy, D. V.; Asanov, I. P.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Puzyr, A. P.; Bondar, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    Detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) were deposited on the surface of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by immersing a CNT array in an aqueous suspension of NDs in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). The structure and electronic state of the obtained CNT–ND hybrid material were studied using optical and electron microscopy and Infrared, Raman, X-ray photoelectron and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. A non-covalent interaction between NDs and CNT and preservation of vertical orientation of CNTs in the hybrid were revealed. We showed that current-voltage characteristics of the CNT–ND cathode are changed depending on the applied field; below ~3 V/µm they are similar to those of the initial CNT array and at the higher field they are close to the ND behavior. Involvement of the NDs in field emission process resulted in blue luminescence of the hybrid surface at an electric field higher than 3.5 V/µm. Photoluminescence measurements showed that the NDs emit blue-green light, while blue luminescence prevails in the CNT–ND hybrid. The quenching of green luminescence was attributed to a partial removal of oxygen-containing groups from the ND surface as the result of the hybrid synthesis. PMID:25797710

  2. Synthesis and Investigation of Millimeter-Scale Vertically Aligned Boron Nitride Nanotube Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tay, Roland; Li, Hongling; Tsang, Siu Hon; Jing, Lin; Tan, Dunlin; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have shown potential in a wide range of applications due to their superior properties such as exceptionally high mechanical strength, excellent chemical and thermal stabilities. However, previously reported methods to date only produced BNNTs with limited length/density and insufficient yield at high temperatures. Here we present a facile and effective two-step synthesis route involving template-assisted chemical vapor deposition at a relatively low temperature of 900 degree C and subsequent annealing process to fabricate vertically aligned (VA) BN coated carbon nanotube (VA-BN/CNT) and VA-BNNT arrays. By using this method, we achieve the longest VA-BN/CNTs and VA-BNNTs to date with lengths of over millimeters (exceeding two orders of magnitude longer than the previously reported length of VA-BNNTs). In addition, the morphology, chemical composition and microstructure of the resulting products, as well as the mechanism of coating process are systematically investigated. This versatile BN coating technique and the synthesis of millimeter-scale BN/CNT and BNNT arrays pave a way for new applications especially where the aligned geometry of the NTs is essential such as for field-emission, interconnects and thermal management.

  3. Improved Synthesis of Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays for Optical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudel, Trilochan; Gao, Yantao; Lan, Yucheng; Macmohan, Gregs; Kempa, Krzysztof; Naughton, Michael; Ren, Zhifeng

    2009-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes were grown on the high temperature glass (Aluminosilicate, Corning 1737) substrates with improved characteristics compared to previous attempts. The glass substrates were first coated with a buffer layer of either Chromium or Titanium, thick enough to facilitate CNT growth, but thin enough as to be largely transparent. On the top of the buffer layer, a monolayer of polystyrene spheres was deposited with close compaction, and then a Nickel catalyst film was evaporated. The polystyrene spheres were then removed to obtain honeycomb Ni patterns. On top of the Ni patterns, vertically aligned carbon nanotubes were grown by the direct current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (dc PECVD). These aligned carbon nanotubes, which can range in height from 0.5 to 10 microns, and in diameter from 50 to 350 nm, can then be coated with various dielectrics to function as components in optical waveguides, including solar cells.

  4. Tailoring the morphology of carbon nanotube arrays: from spinnable forests to undulating foams.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Zou, Guifu; Doorn, Stephen K; Htoon, Han; Stan, Liliana; Hawley, Marilyn E; Sheehan, Chris J; Zhu, Yuntian; Jia, Quanxi

    2009-08-25

    Directly spinning carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers from vertically aligned CNT arrays is a promising way for the application of CNTs in the field of high-performance materials. However, most of the reported CNT arrays are not spinnable. In this work, by controlling catalyst pretreatment conditions, we demonstrate that the degree of spinnability of CNTs is closely related to the morphology of CNT arrays. Shortest catalyst pretreatment time led to CNT arrays with the best spinnability, while prolonged pretreatment resulted in coarsening of catalyst particles and nonspinnable CNTs. By controlling the coalescence of catalyst particles, we further demonstrate the growth of undulating CNT arrays with uniform and tunable waviness. The CNT arrays can be tuned from well-aligned, spinnable forests to uniformly wavy, foam-like films. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematical study on the correlation between catalyst pretreatment, CNT morphology, and CNT spinnability. PMID:19640000

  5. Nanoelectrode Arrays Based on Low Site Density Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Tu; Lin, Yuehe ); Ren, Zhifeng N.

    2003-01-29

    Nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs) were fabricated from the low site density aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNTs were grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on Ni nanoparticles made by the electrochemical deposition.

  6. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Array Functionalization for Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Platinum Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dameron, A. A.; Pylypenko, S.; Bult, J. B.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Bochert, C.; Leong, G. J.; Frisco, S. L.; Simpson, L.; Dinh, H. N.; Pivovar, B.

    2012-04-15

    Uniform metal deposition onto high surface area supports is a key challenge of developing successful efficient catalyst materials. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) circumvents permeation difficulties, but relies on gas-surface reactions to initiate growth. Our work demonstrates that modified surfaces within vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays, from plasma and molecular precursor treatments, can lead to improved catalyst deposition. Gas phase functionalization influences the number of ALD nucleation sites and the onset of ALD growth and, in turn, affects the uniformity of the coating along the length of the CNTs within the aligned arrays. The induced chemical changes for each functionalization route are identified by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The most effective functionalization routes increase the prevalence of oxygen moieties at defect sites on the carbon surfaces. The striking effects of the functionalization are demonstrated with ALD Pt growth as a function of surface treatment and ALD cycles examined by electron microscopy of the arrays and the individual CNTs. Finally, we demonstrate applicability of these materials as fuel cell electrocatalysts and show that surface functionalization affects their performance towards oxygen reduction reaction.

  7. Effect of the morphology of CNT arrays on the current density of field-emitter matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Galperin, V. A. Zhukov, A. A.; Pavlov, A. A.; Skorik, S. N.; Shaman, Yu. P.; Shamanaev, A. A.

    2014-12-15

    Structured carbon-nanotube arrays synthesized in topological regions formed by electron-beam lithography are studied. The effect of the morphology and topology of the carbon-nanotube arrays on the emission characteristics of the structures being formed are considered.

  8. Finite element and micromechanical modeling for investigating effective material properties of polymer-matrix nanocomposites with microfiber, reinforced by CNT arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahouneh, Vahid; Mashhadi, Mahmoud Mosavi; Naei, Mohammad Hasan

    2016-09-01

    This paper is motivated by the lack of studies to investigate the effect of fiber reinforced CNT arrays on the material properties of nanocomposites. To make a comprehensive study, this research work is conducted in two ways. Firstly, the effect of microfiber as reinforcement on the effective material properties is investigated; secondly, the study is carried on as the microfibers reinforced by CNT arrays. In both above-mentioned approaches, the results are compared to the results of generalized mixture rule which is known as a widely used micro-mechanical model. The representative volume element (RVE) is considered as a well-known method to investigate the effect of adding CNT arrays on the skin of microfibers. The results show that Generalized Mixture Rule cannot properly predict the effects of changing the length and diameter of nanotubes on the effective properties of nanocomposites. The main objective of this research work is to determine the effects of increasing nanotubes on the elastic properties which are achieved using two aforementioned methods including FE and rule of mixture. It is also absorbed; effective properties of RVE can be improved by increasing the volume fraction, length and decreasing CNT arrays diameter.

  9. Aligned selenium microtubes array: Synthesis, growth mechanism and photoelectrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippo, Emanuela; Manno, Daniela; Serra, Antonio

    2011-06-01

    Aligned selenium microtubes array vertically grown on a silicon substrate was synthesized in a tubular furnace under argon flow at an evaporation temperature of 300 °C. The microtubes were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-vis spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The photoelectrical properties of the microtube array with light were investigated. It was found a stable relative increase of the conductivity by 180% when the sample was taken from the dark and exposed with tungsten light and a sharp on/off switching behavior. These results hold promise for the fabrication of microtubes-detector arrays.

  10. Large hexagonal arrays of aligned ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, D.; Rybczynski, J.; Huang, J. Y.; Wang, D. Z.; Kempa, K.; Ren, Z. F.

    2005-02-01

    Large-scale truly periodic arrays of vertically aligned zinc oxide nanorods were grown on pre-patterned and pre-annealed gold dots on a-plane sapphire substrates via the vapor liquid solid mechanism. Periodic arrays of triangular gold islands were first patterned on the a-plane sapphire substrates by the nanosphere self-assembly technique. Zinc has been found to be an effective interfacial modifier between gold and sapphire to form single catalytic dots from triangular islands. The successful fabrication of zinc oxide nanowires in truly periodic arrays opens up the possibility of achieving enhanced room-temperature ultraviolet lasing and photonic crystal based devices and sensors.

  11. LDRD final report : chromophore-functionalized aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Andrew L.; Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter; Krafcik, Karen Lee

    2011-09-01

    The goal of this project was to expand upon previously demonstrated single carbon nanotube devices by preparing a more practical, multi-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) device. As a late-start, proof-of-concept project, the work focused on the fabrication and testing of chromophore-functionalized aligned SWNT field effect transistors (SWNT-FET). Such devices have not yet been demonstrated. The advantages of fabricating aligned SWNT devices include increased device cross-section to improve sensitivity to light, elimination of increased electrical resistance at nanotube junctions in random mat devices, and the ability to model device responses. The project did not achieve the goal of fabricating and testing chromophore-modified SWNT arrays, but a new SWNT growth capability was established that will benefit future projects. Although the ultimate goal of fabricating and testing chromophore-modified SWNT arrays was not achieved, the work did lead to a new carbon nanotube growth capability at Sandia/CA. The synthesis of dense arrays of horizontally aligned SWNTs is a developing area of research with significant potential for new discoveries. In particular, the ability to prepare arrays of carbon nanotubes of specific electronic types (metallic or semiconducting) could yield new classes of nanoscale devices.

  12. Pulsed Growth of Vertically Aligned Nanotube Arrays with Variable Density

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Jeremy Joseph; Puretzky, Alexander A; More, Karren Leslie; Rouleau, Christopher M; Eres, Gyula; Geohegan, David B

    2010-01-01

    The density of vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays is shown to vary significantly during normal growth by chemical vapor deposition and respond rapidly to changes in feedstock flux. Pulsing the feedstock gas to repeatedly stop and start nanotube growth is shown to induce density variations up to a factor of 1.6 within ~1-2 micron-long layers, allowing the synthesis of new array architectures with distinct regions of controllable length and density variation. The evolution of density within each layer of growth is determined from time-resolved optical reflectivity measurements of the height and optical extinction coefficient of the array as it grows, providing a real-time diagnostic of both density and growth kinetics. Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy of corresponding sections of the arrays is used to independently assess and confirm these density variations.

  13. Energy harvesting from vertically aligned PZT nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakooti, Mohammad H.; Zhou, Zhi; Sodano, Henry A.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a nanostructured piezoelectric beam is fabricated using vertically aligned lead zirconate titanate (PZT) nanowire arrays and its capability of continuous power generation is demonstrated through direct vibration tests. The lead zirconate titanate nanowires are grown on a PZT thin film coated titanium foil using a hydrothermal reaction. The PZT thin film serves as a nucleation site while the titanium foil is used as the bottom electrode. Electromechanical frequency response function (FRF) analysis is performed to evaluate the power harvesting efficiency of the fabricated device. Furthermore, the feasibility of the continuous power generation using the nanostructured beam is demonstrated through measuring output voltage from PZT nanowires when beam is subjected to a sinusoidal base excitation. The effect of tip mass on the voltage generation of the PZT nanowire arrays is evaluated experimentally. The final results show the great potential of synthesized piezoelectric nanowire arrays in a wide range of applications, specifically power generation at nanoscale.

  14. Thermal Conduction in Vertically Aligned Copper Nanowire Arrays and Composites.

    PubMed

    Barako, Michael T; Roy-Panzer, Shilpi; English, Timothy S; Kodama, Takashi; Asheghi, Mehdi; Kenny, Thomas W; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2015-09-01

    The ability to efficiently and reliably transfer heat between sources and sinks is often a bottleneck in the thermal management of modern energy conversion technologies ranging from microelectronics to thermoelectric power generation. These interfaces contribute parasitic thermal resistances that reduce device performance and are subjected to thermomechanical stresses that degrade device lifetime. Dense arrays of vertically aligned metal nanowires (NWs) offer the unique combination of thermal conductance from the constituent metal and mechanical compliance from the high aspect ratio geometry to increase interfacial heat transfer and device reliability. In the present work, we synthesize copper NW arrays directly onto substrates via templated electrodeposition and extend this technique through the use of a sacrificial overplating layer to achieve improved uniformity. Furthermore, we infiltrate the array with an organic phase change material and demonstrate the preservation of thermal properties. We use the 3ω method to measure the axial thermal conductivity of freestanding copper NW arrays to be as high as 70 W m(-1) K(-1), which is more than an order of magnitude larger than most commercial interface materials and enhanced-conductivity nanocomposites reported in the literature. These arrays are highly anisotropic, and the lateral thermal conductivity is found to be only 1-2 W m(-1) K(-1). We use these measured properties to elucidate the governing array-scale transport mechanisms, which include the effects of morphology and energy carrier scattering from size effects and grain boundaries. PMID:26284489

  15. Thermal Conduction in Vertically Aligned Copper Nanowire Arrays and Composites.

    PubMed

    Barako, Michael T; Roy-Panzer, Shilpi; English, Timothy S; Kodama, Takashi; Asheghi, Mehdi; Kenny, Thomas W; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2015-09-01

    The ability to efficiently and reliably transfer heat between sources and sinks is often a bottleneck in the thermal management of modern energy conversion technologies ranging from microelectronics to thermoelectric power generation. These interfaces contribute parasitic thermal resistances that reduce device performance and are subjected to thermomechanical stresses that degrade device lifetime. Dense arrays of vertically aligned metal nanowires (NWs) offer the unique combination of thermal conductance from the constituent metal and mechanical compliance from the high aspect ratio geometry to increase interfacial heat transfer and device reliability. In the present work, we synthesize copper NW arrays directly onto substrates via templated electrodeposition and extend this technique through the use of a sacrificial overplating layer to achieve improved uniformity. Furthermore, we infiltrate the array with an organic phase change material and demonstrate the preservation of thermal properties. We use the 3ω method to measure the axial thermal conductivity of freestanding copper NW arrays to be as high as 70 W m(-1) K(-1), which is more than an order of magnitude larger than most commercial interface materials and enhanced-conductivity nanocomposites reported in the literature. These arrays are highly anisotropic, and the lateral thermal conductivity is found to be only 1-2 W m(-1) K(-1). We use these measured properties to elucidate the governing array-scale transport mechanisms, which include the effects of morphology and energy carrier scattering from size effects and grain boundaries.

  16. Array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes and method of producing the array

    DOEpatents

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Simpson, John T; Hendricks, Troy R

    2013-06-11

    An array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes includes an elongate drawn body including a plurality of channels extending therethrough from a first end to a second end of the body, where the channels have a number density of at least about 100,000 channels/mm.sup.2 over a transverse cross-section of the body. A plurality of carbon nanotubes are disposed in each channel, and the carbon nanotubes are sufficiently dispersed and aligned along a length of the channels for the array to comprise an average resistivity per channel of about 9700 .OMEGA.m or less.

  17. Array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes and method of producing the array

    DOEpatents

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Simpson, John T.; Hendricks, Troy R.

    2012-06-19

    An array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes includes an elongate drawn body including a plurality of channels extending therethrough from a first end to a second end of the body, where the channels have a number density of at least about 100,000 channels/mm.sup.2 over a transverse cross-section of the body. A plurality of carbon nanotubes are disposed in each channel, and the carbon nanotubes are sufficiently dispersed and aligned along a length of the channels for the array to comprise an average resistivity per channel of about 9700 .OMEGA.m or less.

  18. Modelling clustering of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    PubMed Central

    Schaber, Clemens F.; Filippov, Alexander E.; Heinlein, Thorsten; Schneider, Jörg J.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research demonstrated that arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) exhibit strong frictional properties. Experiments indicated a strong decrease of the friction coefficient from the first to the second sliding cycle in repetitive measurements on the same VACNT spot, but stable values in consecutive cycles. VACNTs form clusters under shear applied during friction tests, and self-organization stabilizes the mechanical properties of the arrays. With increasing load in the range between 300 µN and 4 mN applied normally to the array surface during friction tests the size of the clusters increases, while the coefficient of friction decreases. To better understand the experimentally obtained results, we formulated and numerically studied a minimalistic model, which reproduces the main features of the system with a minimum of adjustable parameters. We calculate the van der Waals forces between the spherical friction probe and bunches of the arrays using the well-known Morse potential function to predict the number of clusters, their size, instantaneous and mean friction forces and the behaviour of the VACNTs during consecutive sliding cycles and at different normal loads. The data obtained by the model calculations coincide very well with the experimental data and can help in adapting VACNT arrays for biomimetic applications. PMID:26464787

  19. Modelling clustering of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Schaber, Clemens F; Filippov, Alexander E; Heinlein, Thorsten; Schneider, Jörg J; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2015-08-01

    Previous research demonstrated that arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) exhibit strong frictional properties. Experiments indicated a strong decrease of the friction coefficient from the first to the second sliding cycle in repetitive measurements on the same VACNT spot, but stable values in consecutive cycles. VACNTs form clusters under shear applied during friction tests, and self-organization stabilizes the mechanical properties of the arrays. With increasing load in the range between 300 µN and 4 mN applied normally to the array surface during friction tests the size of the clusters increases, while the coefficient of friction decreases. To better understand the experimentally obtained results, we formulated and numerically studied a minimalistic model, which reproduces the main features of the system with a minimum of adjustable parameters. We calculate the van der Waals forces between the spherical friction probe and bunches of the arrays using the well-known Morse potential function to predict the number of clusters, their size, instantaneous and mean friction forces and the behaviour of the VACNTs during consecutive sliding cycles and at different normal loads. The data obtained by the model calculations coincide very well with the experimental data and can help in adapting VACNT arrays for biomimetic applications. PMID:26464787

  20. Algorithm for Aligning an Array of Receiving Radio Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogstad, David

    2006-01-01

    A digital-signal-processing algorithm (somewhat arbitrarily) called SUMPLE has been devised as a means of aligning the outputs of multiple receiving radio antennas in a large array for the purpose of receiving a weak signal transmitted by a single distant source. As used here, aligning signifies adjusting the delays and phases of the outputs from the various antennas so that their relatively weak replicas of the desired signal can be added coherently to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for improved reception, as though one had a single larger antenna. The method was devised to enhance spacecraft-tracking and telemetry operations in NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN); the method could also be useful in such other applications as both satellite and terrestrial radio communications and radio astronomy. Heretofore, most commonly, alignment has been effected by a process that involves correlation of signals in pairs. This approach necessitates the use of a large amount of hardware most notably, the N(N - 1)/2 correlators needed to process signals from all possible pairs of N antennas. Moreover, because the incoming signals typically have low SNRs, the delay and phase adjustments are poorly determined from the pairwise correlations. SUMPLE also involves correlations, but the correlations are not performed in pairs. Instead, in a partly iterative process, each signal is appropriately weighted and then correlated with a composite signal equal to the sum of the other signals (see Figure 1). One benefit of this approach is that only N correlators are needed; in an array of N much greater than 1 antennas, this results in a significant reduction of the amount of hardware. Another benefit is that once the array achieves coherence, the correlation SNR is N - 1 times that of a pair of antennas.

  1. Boron Nitride Coated Carbon Nanotube Arrays with Enhanced Compressive Mechanical Property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Lin; Tay, Roland Yingjie; Li, Hongling; Tsang, Siu Hon; Tan, Dunlin; Zhang, Bowei; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) array is one of the most promising energy dissipating materials due to its excellent temperature invariant mechanical property. However, the CNT arrays with desirable recoverability after compression is still a challenge. Here, we report on the mechanical enhancement of the CNT arrays reinforced by coating with boron nitride (BN) layers. These BN coated CNT (BN/CNT) arrays exhibit excellent compressive strength and recoverability as compared to those of the as-prepared CNT arrays which totally collapsed after compression. In addition, the BN coating also provides better resistance to oxidation due to its intrinsic thermal stability. This work presented here opens a new pathway towards tuning mechanical behavior of any arbitrary CNT arrays for promising potential such as damper, vibration isolator and shock absorber applications.

  2. Carbon nanotube array actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.; Mahrholz, T.; Wierach, P.; Sinapius, M.

    2013-09-01

    Experimental investigations of highly vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), also known as CNT-arrays, are the main focus of this paper. The free strain as result of an active material behavior is analyzed via a novel experimental setup. Previous test experiences of papers made of randomly oriented CNTs, also called Bucky-papers, reveal comparably low free strain. The anisotropy of aligned CNTs promises better performance. Via synthesis techniques like chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD), highly aligned arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are synthesized. Two different types of CNT-arrays are analyzed, morphologically first, and optically tested for their active characteristics afterwards. One type of the analyzed arrays features tube lengths of 750-2000 μm with a large variety of diameters between 20 and 50 nm and a wave-like CNT-shape. The second type features a maximum, almost uniform, length of 12 μm and a constant diameter of 50 nm. Different CNT-lengths and array types are tested due to their active behavior. As result of the presented tests, it is reported that the quality of orientation is the most decisive property for excellent active behavior. Due to their alignment, CNT-arrays feature the opportunity to clarify the actuation mechanism of architectures made of CNTs.

  3. Aligning a Receiving Antenna Array to Reduce Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jongeling, Andre P.; Rogstad, David H.

    2009-01-01

    A digital signal-processing algorithm has been devised as a means of aligning (as defined below) the outputs of multiple receiving radio antennas in a large array for the purpose of receiving a desired weak signal transmitted by a single distant source in the presence of an interfering signal that (1) originates at another source lying within the antenna beam and (2) occupies a frequency band significantly wider than that of the desired signal. In the original intended application of the algorithm, the desired weak signal is a spacecraft telemetry signal, the antennas are spacecraft-tracking antennas in NASA s Deep Space Network, and the source of the wide-band interfering signal is typically a radio galaxy or a planet that lies along or near the line of sight to the spacecraft. The algorithm could also afford the ability to discriminate between desired narrow-band and nearby undesired wide-band sources in related applications that include satellite and terrestrial radio communications and radio astronomy. The development of the present algorithm involved modification of a prior algorithm called SUMPLE and a predecessor called SIMPLE. SUMPLE was described in Algorithm for Aligning an Array of Receiving Radio Antennas (NPO-40574), NASA Tech Briefs Vol. 30, No. 4 (April 2006), page 54. To recapitulate: As used here, aligning signifies adjusting the delays and phases of the outputs from the various antennas so that their relatively weak replicas of the desired signal can be added coherently to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for improved reception, as though one had a single larger antenna. Prior to the development of SUMPLE, it was common practice to effect alignment by means of a process that involves correlation of signals in pairs. SIMPLE is an example of an algorithm that effects such a process. SUMPLE also involves correlations, but the correlations are not performed in pairs. Instead, in a partly iterative process, each signal is appropriately weighted

  4. A small-area low-power current readout circuit using two-stage conversion method for 64-channel CNT sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young-San; Lee, Seongsoo; Wee, Jae-Kyung; Song, Inchae

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a small-area and low-power current readout circuit with a novel two-stage conversion method is presented for 64-channel CNT (carbon nanotube) sensor arrays. In the first stage, current of each CNT sensor is amplified by 64 active input current mirrors (AICMs). In the second stage, the amplified current is converted to a voltage level through the shared variable gain amplifier (S-VGA). Then the S-VGA output is digitalized by successive approximation register analog-to-digital converter (SAR-ADC). The proposed readout circuit significantly reduces chip area and power consumption, since VGA is shared over 64 channels and passive elements are used only in S-VGA. Fabricated chip area is 0.173 mm(2) in 0.13 μm CMOS technology. Measured power consumption and linearity error are 73.06 μW and 5.3%, respectively, at the input current range of 10 nA-10 μA and conversion rate of 640 samples/s. A prototype real-time CNT sensor system was implemented using the fabricated readout circuit, and successfully detected alcohol reaction.

  5. A small-area low-power current readout circuit using two-stage conversion method for 64-channel CNT sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young-San; Lee, Seongsoo; Wee, Jae-Kyung; Song, Inchae

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a small-area and low-power current readout circuit with a novel two-stage conversion method is presented for 64-channel CNT (carbon nanotube) sensor arrays. In the first stage, current of each CNT sensor is amplified by 64 active input current mirrors (AICMs). In the second stage, the amplified current is converted to a voltage level through the shared variable gain amplifier (S-VGA). Then the S-VGA output is digitalized by successive approximation register analog-to-digital converter (SAR-ADC). The proposed readout circuit significantly reduces chip area and power consumption, since VGA is shared over 64 channels and passive elements are used only in S-VGA. Fabricated chip area is 0.173 mm(2) in 0.13 μm CMOS technology. Measured power consumption and linearity error are 73.06 μW and 5.3%, respectively, at the input current range of 10 nA-10 μA and conversion rate of 640 samples/s. A prototype real-time CNT sensor system was implemented using the fabricated readout circuit, and successfully detected alcohol reaction. PMID:23853327

  6. Aligned Silver Nanorod Array as SERS Substrates for Viral Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yiping; Shanmukh, Saratchandra; Chaney, Stephen B.; Jones, Les; Dluhy, Richard A.; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2006-03-01

    The aligned silver nanorod array substrates prepared by the oblique angle deposition method are capable of providing extremely high enhancement factors (˜10^9) at near-infrared wavelengths (785 nm) for a standard reporter molecule 1,2 trans-(bis)pyridyl-ethene (BPE). The enhancement factor depends strongly on the length of the Ag nanorods, the substrate coating, as well as the polarization of the excitation laser beam. With the current optimum structure, we demonstrate that the detection limit for BPE can be lower than 0.1 fM. The applicability of this substrate to the detection of bioagents has been investigated by looking several viruses, such as Adenovirus, HIV, Rhinovirus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), at low quantities (˜0.5uL). Different viruses have different fingerprint Raman spectrum. The detection of virus presented in infected cells has also been demonstrated.

  7. Vertically aligned carbon nanofiber electrode arrays for nucleic acid detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumugam, Prabhu U.; Yu, Edmond; Riviere, Roger; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-10-01

    We present electrochemical detection of DNA targets that corresponds to Escherichia coli O157:H7 16S rRNA gene using a nanoelectrode array consisting of vertically aligned carbon nanofiber (VACNF) electrodes. Parylene C is used as gap filling 'matrix' material to avoid high temperature processing in electrode construction. This easy to deposit film of several micron heights provides a conformal coating between the high aspect ratio VACNFs with negligible pin-holes. The low background currents show the potential of this approach for ultra-sensitive detection. Consistent and reproducible electrochemical-signals are achieved using a simple electrode preparation. This simple, reliable and low-cost approach is a forward step in developing practical sensors for applications like pathogen detection, early cancer diagnosis and environmental monitoring.

  8. Graphene/carbon nanotube hybrid-based transparent 2D optical array.

    PubMed

    Kim, Un Jeong; Lee, Il Ha; Bae, Jung Jun; Lee, Sangjin; Han, Gang Hee; Chae, Seung Jin; Güneş, Fethullah; Choi, Jun Hee; Baik, Chan Wook; Kim, Sun Il; Kim, Jong Min; Lee, Young Hee

    2011-09-01

    Graphene/carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrid structures are fabricated for use as optical arrays. Vertically aligned CNTs are directly synthesized on a graphene/quartz substrate using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Graphene preserves the transparency and resistance during CNT growth. Highly aligned single-walled CNTs show a better performance for the diffraction intensity. PMID:21769950

  9. Controlling the morphology of carbon nanotube arrays: from spinnable forests to undulating foams

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yingying; Zou, Guifu; Stan, Liliana; Hawley, Marilyn E; Sheehan, Chris J; Zhu, Yuntain; Jia, Quanxi; Doorn, Stephen K; Htoon, Han

    2009-01-01

    By controlling catalyst pretreatment conditions, we demonstrate that the degree of spinnability of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is closely related to the morphology of CNT arrays. Shortest catalyst pretreatment time led to CNT arrays with the best spinnability, while prolonged pretreatment resulted in coarsening of catalyst particles and non-spinnable CNTs. We further demonstrate the growth of undulating CNT arrays with uniform and tunable waviness by controlling the coalescence of catalyst particles. The CNT arrays can be tuned from well-aligned, spinnable forests to uniformly wavy, foam-like films by controlling catalyst pretreatment conditions.

  10. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  11. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

    2006-12-12

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  12. X-band printed phased array antennas using high-performance CNT/ion gel/Ag transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubb, Peter M.; Bidoky, Fazel; Mahajan, Ankit; Subbaraman, Harish; Li, Wentao; Frisbie, Daniel; Chen, Ray T.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports a fully printed phased array antenna developed on a 125 micron thick flexible Kapton substrate. Switching for the phase delay lines is accomplished using printed carbon nanotube transistors with ion gel dielectric layers. Design of each element of the phased array antenna is reported, including a low loss constant impedance power divider, a phase shifter network, and patch antenna design. Steering of an X-band PAA operating at 10GHz from 0 degrees to 22.15 degrees is experimentally demonstrated. In order to completely package the array with electrical interconnects, a single substrate interconnect scheme is also investigated.

  13. Aligned/micropatterned carbon nanotube arrays: surface functionalization and electrochemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Liangti; He, Pingang; Li, Lingchuan; Gao, Mei; Wallace, Gordon; Dai, Liming

    2005-03-01

    We have previously developed a simple pyrolytic method for large-scale production of aligned multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays perpendicular to the substrate. These aligned carbon nanotube arrays can be transferred onto various substrates of particular interest (e.g. polymer films for organic optoelectronic devices) in either a patterned or non-patterned fashion. The well-aligned structure provides additional advantages for not only an efficient device construction but also for surface functionalization. The surface functionalization of aligned carbon nanotubes is particularly attractive, as it allows surface characteristics of the aligned carbon nanotubes to be tuned to meet specific requirements for particular applications while their alignment structure can be largely retained. These aligned carbon nanotubes with tunable surface characteristics are of great significance to various practical applications ranging from sensors to electronics. Single-strand DNA chains could be covalently immobilized onto plasma-activated aligned carbon nanotubes for sensing complementary DNA and/or target DNA chains of specific sequences with a high sensitivity and selectivity. Furthermore, glucose oxidase (GOX) could also be immobilized onto the aligned carbon nanoutbe arrays by electropolymerization of pyrrole in the presence of GOX. The resultant GOX-containing polypyrrole-carbon nanotube coaxial nanowires were shown to be promising new sensing active materials for making advanced glucose sensors with a high sensitivity.

  14. En route to controlled catalytic CVD synthesis of densely packed and vertically aligned nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Boncel, Slawomir; Pattinson, Sebastian W; Geiser, Valérie; Shaffer, Milo S P; Koziol, Krzysztof K K

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic chemical vapour deposition (c-CVD) technique was applied in the synthesis of vertically aligned arrays of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs). A mixture of toluene (main carbon source), pyrazine (1,4-diazine, nitrogen source) and ferrocene (catalyst precursor) was used as the injection feedstock. To optimize conditions for growing the most dense and aligned N-CNT arrays, we investigated the influence of key parameters, i.e., growth temperature (660, 760 and 860 °C), composition of the feedstock and time of growth, on morphology and properties of N-CNTs. The presence of nitrogen species in the hot zone of the quartz reactor decreased the growth rate of N-CNTs down to about one twentieth compared to the growth rate of multi-wall CNTs (MWCNTs). As revealed by electron microscopy studies (SEM, TEM), the individual N-CNTs (half as thick as MWCNTs) grown under the optimal conditions were characterized by a superior straightness of the outer walls, which translated into a high alignment of dense nanotube arrays, i.e., 5 × 10(8) nanotubes per mm(2) (100 times more than for MWCNTs grown in the absence of nitrogen precursor). In turn, the internal crystallographic order of the N-CNTs was found to be of a 'bamboo'-like or 'membrane'-like (multi-compartmental structure) morphology. The nitrogen content in the nanotube products, which ranged from 0.0 to 3.0 wt %, was controlled through the concentration of pyrazine in the feedstock. Moreover, as revealed by Raman/FT-IR spectroscopy, the incorporation of nitrogen atoms into the nanotube walls was found to be proportional to the number of deviations from the sp(2)-hybridisation of graphene C-atoms. As studied by XRD, the temperature and the [pyrazine]/[ferrocene] ratio in the feedstock affected the composition of the catalyst particles, and hence changed the growth mechanism of individual N-CNTs into a 'mixed base-and-tip' (primarily of the base-type) type as compared to the purely 'base'-type for undoped

  15. En route to controlled catalytic CVD synthesis of densely packed and vertically aligned nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube arrays

    PubMed Central

    Pattinson, Sebastian W; Geiser, Valérie; Shaffer, Milo S P

    2014-01-01

    Summary The catalytic chemical vapour deposition (c-CVD) technique was applied in the synthesis of vertically aligned arrays of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs). A mixture of toluene (main carbon source), pyrazine (1,4-diazine, nitrogen source) and ferrocene (catalyst precursor) was used as the injection feedstock. To optimize conditions for growing the most dense and aligned N-CNT arrays, we investigated the influence of key parameters, i.e., growth temperature (660, 760 and 860 °C), composition of the feedstock and time of growth, on morphology and properties of N-CNTs. The presence of nitrogen species in the hot zone of the quartz reactor decreased the growth rate of N-CNTs down to about one twentieth compared to the growth rate of multi-wall CNTs (MWCNTs). As revealed by electron microscopy studies (SEM, TEM), the individual N-CNTs (half as thick as MWCNTs) grown under the optimal conditions were characterized by a superior straightness of the outer walls, which translated into a high alignment of dense nanotube arrays, i.e., 5 × 108 nanotubes per mm2 (100 times more than for MWCNTs grown in the absence of nitrogen precursor). In turn, the internal crystallographic order of the N-CNTs was found to be of a ‘bamboo’-like or ‘membrane’-like (multi-compartmental structure) morphology. The nitrogen content in the nanotube products, which ranged from 0.0 to 3.0 wt %, was controlled through the concentration of pyrazine in the feedstock. Moreover, as revealed by Raman/FT-IR spectroscopy, the incorporation of nitrogen atoms into the nanotube walls was found to be proportional to the number of deviations from the sp2-hybridisation of graphene C-atoms. As studied by XRD, the temperature and the [pyrazine]/[ferrocene] ratio in the feedstock affected the composition of the catalyst particles, and hence changed the growth mechanism of individual N-CNTs into a ‘mixed base-and-tip’ (primarily of the base-type) type as compared to the purely

  16. En route to controlled catalytic CVD synthesis of densely packed and vertically aligned nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Boncel, Slawomir; Pattinson, Sebastian W; Geiser, Valérie; Shaffer, Milo S P; Koziol, Krzysztof K K

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic chemical vapour deposition (c-CVD) technique was applied in the synthesis of vertically aligned arrays of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs). A mixture of toluene (main carbon source), pyrazine (1,4-diazine, nitrogen source) and ferrocene (catalyst precursor) was used as the injection feedstock. To optimize conditions for growing the most dense and aligned N-CNT arrays, we investigated the influence of key parameters, i.e., growth temperature (660, 760 and 860 °C), composition of the feedstock and time of growth, on morphology and properties of N-CNTs. The presence of nitrogen species in the hot zone of the quartz reactor decreased the growth rate of N-CNTs down to about one twentieth compared to the growth rate of multi-wall CNTs (MWCNTs). As revealed by electron microscopy studies (SEM, TEM), the individual N-CNTs (half as thick as MWCNTs) grown under the optimal conditions were characterized by a superior straightness of the outer walls, which translated into a high alignment of dense nanotube arrays, i.e., 5 × 10(8) nanotubes per mm(2) (100 times more than for MWCNTs grown in the absence of nitrogen precursor). In turn, the internal crystallographic order of the N-CNTs was found to be of a 'bamboo'-like or 'membrane'-like (multi-compartmental structure) morphology. The nitrogen content in the nanotube products, which ranged from 0.0 to 3.0 wt %, was controlled through the concentration of pyrazine in the feedstock. Moreover, as revealed by Raman/FT-IR spectroscopy, the incorporation of nitrogen atoms into the nanotube walls was found to be proportional to the number of deviations from the sp(2)-hybridisation of graphene C-atoms. As studied by XRD, the temperature and the [pyrazine]/[ferrocene] ratio in the feedstock affected the composition of the catalyst particles, and hence changed the growth mechanism of individual N-CNTs into a 'mixed base-and-tip' (primarily of the base-type) type as compared to the purely 'base'-type for undoped

  17. Dry oxidation and vacuum annealing treatments for tuning the wetting properties of carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Aria, Adrianus Indrat; Gharib, Morteza

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe a simple method to reversibly tune the wetting properties of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays. Here, CNT arrays are defined as densely packed multi-walled carbon nanotubes oriented perpendicular to the growth substrate as a result of a growth process by the standard thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique.(1,2) These CNT arrays are then exposed to vacuum annealing treatment to make them more hydrophobic or to dry oxidation treatment to render them more hydrophilic. The hydrophobic CNT arrays can be turned hydrophilic by exposing them to dry oxidation treatment, while the hydrophilic CNT arrays can be turned hydrophobic by exposing them to vacuum annealing treatment. Using a combination of both treatments, CNT arrays can be repeatedly switched between hydrophilic and hydrophobic.(2) Therefore, such combination show a very high potential in many industrial and consumer applications, including drug delivery system and high power density supercapacitors.(3-5) The key to vary the wettability of CNT arrays is to control the surface concentration of oxygen adsorbates. Basically oxygen adsorbates can be introduced by exposing the CNT arrays to any oxidation treatment. Here we use dry oxidation treatments, such as oxygen plasma and UV/ozone, to functionalize the surface of CNT with oxygenated functional groups. These oxygenated functional groups allow hydrogen bond between the surface of CNT and water molecules to form, rendering the CNT hydrophilic. To turn them hydrophobic, adsorbed oxygen must be removed from the surface of CNT. Here we employ vacuum annealing treatment to induce oxygen desorption process. CNT arrays with extremely low surface concentration of oxygen adsorbates exhibit a superhydrophobic behavior. PMID:23629482

  18. Mobile and replicated alignment of arrays in data-parallel programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Schreiber, Robert

    1993-01-01

    When a data-parallel language like FORTRAN 90 is compiled for a distributed-memory machine, aggregate data objects (such as arrays) are distributed across the processor memories. The mapping determines the amount of residual communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. A common approach is to break the mapping into two stages: first, an alignment that maps all the objects to an abstract template, and then a distribution that maps the template to the processors. We solve two facets of the problem of finding alignments that reduce residual communication: we determine alignments that vary in loops, and objects that should have replicated alignments. We show that loop-dependent mobile alignment is sometimes necessary for optimum performance, and we provide algorithms with which a compiler can determine good mobile alignments for objects within do loops. We also identify situations in which replicated alignment is either required by the program itself (via spread operations) or can be used to improve performance. We propose an algorithm based on network flow that determines which objects to replicate so as to minimize the total amount of broadcast communication in replication. This work on mobile and replicated alignment extends our earlier work on determining static alignment.

  19. A Double-Side CMOS-CNT Biosensor Array With Padless Structure for Simple Bare-Die Measurements in a Medical Environment.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jinhong; Hong, Sang Hoon; Park, Youngjune

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a double-side CMOS-carbon nanotube (CNT) sensor array for simple bare-die measurements in a medical environment based on a 0.35 μm standard CMOS process. This scheme allows robust measurements due to its inherent back-side rectifying diodes with a high latch-up resistance. In particular, instead of using pads, only two contact metal structures: a wide ring structure around the sensor area on the front side and a plate structure at the backside are used for both power and single I/O line. The back-side rectification is made possible by creating VDD and VSS through the back-side and front-side, respectively. The single I/O line is conditioned such that it doubles as either the power source or the ground, depending on whether the chip is face down or face up. A modified universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter (UART) serial communication scheme with pulse based I/O signal transmission is developed to reduce the power degradation during the signaling intervals. In addition, communication errors and I/O power dissipation for the receiver path are minimized by using level sensitive switch control and double sampling difference amplifier. In order to implement these special functions, a controller chip with a special I/O protocol is designed. Using this controller chip, issuing commands and receiving data can both be performed on a single line and the results are flexibly measured through either the backside or the front side of the chip contacts. As a result, a stable operation of under 150 mW maximum power at 2 MHz data rate can be achieved. The double-side chips with 32 × 32 and 64 × 64 sensor arrays occupy areas of 1.9 × 2.3 mm(2) and 3.7 × 3.9 mm(2), respectively.

  20. Periodically striped films produced from super-aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Sun, Yinghui; Liu, Peng; Wang, Jiaping; Li, Qunqing; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2009-08-19

    We report a novel way to draw films from super-aligned carbon nanotube arrays at large drawing angles. The obtained super-aligned carbon nanotube films have a periodically striped configuration with alternating thinner and thicker film sections, and the width of the stripes is equal to the height of the original arrays. Compared with ordinary uniform films, the striped films provide a better platform for understanding the mechanism of spinning films from arrays because carbon nanotube junctions are easily observed and identified at the boundary of the stripes. Further studies show that the carbon nanotube junctions are bottleneck positions for thermal conduction and mechanical strength of the film, but do not limit its electrical conduction. These films can be utilized as striped and high-degree polarized light emission sources. Our results will be valuable for new applications and future large-scale production of tunable super-aligned carbon nanotube films. PMID:19636102

  1. Microwave characterization of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsounaros, Anestis; Rajab, Khalid Z.; Hao, Yang; Mann, Mark; Milne, William I.

    2011-05-01

    Vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube (VACNT) films have been characterized by rectangular waveguide measurements. The complex scattering parameters (S-parameters) are measured by a vector network analyzer at X-band frequencies. The effective complex permittivity and permeability of the VACNT films have been extracted. The extracted parameters are verified by full wave simulations and very good agreement has been obtained. The results of the systematic error analysis are presented and the errors are within the acceptable range. The performance of VACNT films as an absorber is examined, and comparison with the conventional carbon loaded materials shows that a 90% size reduction is possible while maintaining the same absorption level.

  2. Hydrogen evolution on hydrophobic aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Misra, Abha; Giri, Jyotsnendu; Daraio, Chiara

    2009-12-22

    We investigate for the first time hydrophobic carbon nanotube-based electrochemical cells as an alternative solution to hydrogen sorting. We show that the electrically conducting surface of the nanotube arrays can be used as a cathode for hydrogen generation and absorption by electrolyzing water. We support our findings with Raman and gas chromatography measurements. These results suggest that carbon nanotube forests, presenting a unique combination of hydrophobicity and conductivity, are suitable for application in fuel cells and microelectromechanical devices.

  3. Steering epitaxial alignment of Au, Pd, and AuPd nanowire arrays by atom flux change.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Youngdong; Seo, Kwanyong; Han, Sol; Varadwaj, Kumar S K; Kim, Hyun You; Ryu, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hyuck Mo; Ahn, Jae Pyoung; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Kim, Bongsoo

    2010-02-10

    We have synthesized epitaxial Au, Pd, and AuPd nanowire arrays in vertical or horizontal alignment on a c-cut sapphire substrate. We show that the vertical and horizontal nanowire arrays grow from half-octahedral seeds by the correlations of the geometry and orientation of seed crystals with those of as-grown nanowires. The alignment of nanowires can be steered by changing the atom flux. At low atom deposition flux vertical nanowires grow, while at high atom flux horizontal nanowires grow. Similar vertical/horizontal epitaxial growth is also demonstrated on SrTiO(3) substrates. This orientation-steering mechanism is visualized by molecular dynamics simulations.

  4. Vertically aligned carbon nanofiber nanoelectrode arrays: electrochemical etching and electrode reusability

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rakesh K.; Meyyappan, M.; Koehne, Jessica E.

    2014-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers in the form of nanoelectrode arrays were grown on nine individual electrodes, arranged in a 3 × 3 array geometry, in a 2.5 cm2 chip. Electrochemical etching of the carbon nanofibers was employed for electrode activation and enhancing the electrode kinetics. Here, we report the effects of electrochemical etching on the fiber height and electrochemical properties. Electrode regeneration by amide hydrolysis and electrochemical etching is also investigated for electrode reusability. PMID:25089188

  5. Role of height and contact interface of CNT microstructures on Si for high current field emission cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navitski, A.; Serbun, P.; Müller, G.; Joshi, R. K.; Engstler, J.; Schneider, J. J.

    2012-07-01

    Regular arrays of vertically aligned microstructures consisting of entangled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of different height and contact interface were grown on Si substrates with a bimetallic catalyst by water-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The arrays of high and wide CNT blocks (150-300 μm, 50-140 μm square) showed the ability to reach high stable field emission (FE) currents per block up to 300 μA due to the presence of multiple CNT emitters. However, significant outgrowth of the CNTs and limited mechanical stiffness of such blocks led to a limited FE homogeneity and alignment of the emitters. For the arrays of small rounded CNT bundles (˜5 μm, 20 μm diameter), well-aligned and highly efficient FE with maximum currents up to 40 μA per CNT bundle have been achieved. Unusual I-V curves with current saturation, strong activation effects and glowing spots just before destruction have been observed and are discussed by means of band structure considerations.

  6. Aligned silver nanorod arrays for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Teng; Zhang, Wenjun; Chu, Paul K.

    2009-05-01

    A convenient nanotechnique is used to place analyte molecules between closely spaced silver nanorods for investigating surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The route involves letting absorption of saturated AgNO 3 solution in the pores of the porous anodic alumina templates, followed by drying and decomposition of the salt at high temperatures. The silver nanorod arrays boast a high SERS enhancement and large dynamic range. The interrod-coupling-induced enhancement was attributed to the broadening of the plasmon resonance peak because the probability of the resonance covering both the excitation wavelength and the Raman peak increases with its width. The method will be useful in the development of plasmon-based analytical devices, specifically SERS-based biosensors.

  7. Stability Measurements for Alignment of the NIF Neutron Imaging System Pinhole Array

    SciTech Connect

    Fittinghoff, D N; Bower, D E; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Frank, M; Buckles, R A; Munson, C; Wilde, C H

    2011-03-29

    The alignment system for the National Ignition Facility's neutron imaging system has been commissioned and measurements of the relative stability of the 90-315 DIM, the front and the back of the neutron imaging pinhole array and an exploding pusher target have been made using the 90-135 and the 90-258 opposite port alignment systems. Additionally, a laser beam shot from the neutron-imaging Annex and reflected from a mirror at the back of the pinhole array was used to monitor the pointing of the pinhole. Over a twelve hour period, the relative stability of these parts was found to be within {approx} {+-}18 {micro}m rms even when using manual methods for tracking the position of the objects. For highly visible features, use of basic particle tracking techniques found that the front of the pinhole array was stable relative to the 90-135 opposite port alignment camera to within {+-}3.4 {micro}m rms. Reregistration, however, of the opposite port alignment systems themselves using the target alignment sensor was found to change the expected position of target chamber center by up to 194 {micro}m.

  8. Phase aligner for the Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chren, William A., Jr.; Zomberg, Brian G.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype Phase Aligner (PA) or the Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer instrument has been designed and tested. Implemented in a single Xilinx XC3042PC84-125 Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), it is a dual-port register file which allows independent storage and phase coherent retrieval of antenna array data by the Central Processing Unit (CPU). It has dimensions of 4 x 20 bits and can be used at clock frequencies as high as 25 MHz. The ESTAR is a passive synthetic-aperture radiometer designed to sense soil moisture and ocean salinity at L-band.

  9. Density controlled carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng F.; Tu, Yi

    2008-12-16

    CNT materials comprising aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with pre-determined site densities, catalyst substrate materials for obtaining them and methods for forming aligned CNTs with controllable densities on such catalyst substrate materials are described. The fabrication of films comprising site-density controlled vertically aligned CNT arrays of the invention with variable field emission characteristics, whereby the field emission properties of the films are controlled by independently varying the length of CNTs in the aligned array within the film or by independently varying inter-tubule spacing of the CNTs within the array (site density) are disclosed. The fabrication of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) formed utilizing the carbon nanotube material of the invention is also described.

  10. Density Detection of Aligned Nanowire Arrays Using Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Wenfeng; Wang, Xin; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, JiaQi; Zhao, Kun

    2016-07-01

    A rapid technique is necessary to quantitatively detect the density of nanowire (NW) and nanotube arrays in one-dimensional devices which have been identified as useful building blocks for nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, biomedical devices, etc. Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy was employed in this research to detect the density of aligned Ni NW arrays. The transmitted amplitude of THz peaks and optical thickness of NW arrays was found to be the effective parameters to analyze the density change of NW arrays. Owing to the low multiple scattering and high order of Ni NW arrays, a linear relationship was observed for the transmitted amplitude and optical thickness regarding NW density, respectively. Therefore, THz technique may be used as a promising tool to characterize the density of one-dimensional structures in the large-scale integrated nanodevice fabrication.

  11. Density Detection of Aligned Nanowire Arrays Using Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Wenfeng; Wang, Xin; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, JiaQi; Zhao, Kun

    2016-12-01

    A rapid technique is necessary to quantitatively detect the density of nanowire (NW) and nanotube arrays in one-dimensional devices which have been identified as useful building blocks for nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, biomedical devices, etc. Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy was employed in this research to detect the density of aligned Ni NW arrays. The transmitted amplitude of THz peaks and optical thickness of NW arrays was found to be the effective parameters to analyze the density change of NW arrays. Owing to the low multiple scattering and high order of Ni NW arrays, a linear relationship was observed for the transmitted amplitude and optical thickness regarding NW density, respectively. Therefore, THz technique may be used as a promising tool to characterize the density of one-dimensional structures in the large-scale integrated nanodevice fabrication.

  12. Density Detection of Aligned Nanowire Arrays Using Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Wenfeng; Wang, Xin; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, JiaQi; Zhao, Kun

    2016-12-01

    A rapid technique is necessary to quantitatively detect the density of nanowire (NW) and nanotube arrays in one-dimensional devices which have been identified as useful building blocks for nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, biomedical devices, etc. Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy was employed in this research to detect the density of aligned Ni NW arrays. The transmitted amplitude of THz peaks and optical thickness of NW arrays was found to be the effective parameters to analyze the density change of NW arrays. Owing to the low multiple scattering and high order of Ni NW arrays, a linear relationship was observed for the transmitted amplitude and optical thickness regarding NW density, respectively. Therefore, THz technique may be used as a promising tool to characterize the density of one-dimensional structures in the large-scale integrated nanodevice fabrication. PMID:27431495

  13. Structure-thermal property correlation of aligned silicon dioxide nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jie; Zhu, Yu; Wu, Xuewang; Song, Helun; Zhang, Yaohui; Wang, Xiaojia

    2016-06-01

    Quantitative characterization of thermal properties of nanorod (NR) arrays appears to be challenging due to the complex combination of high volume of air voids, anisotropy, and structural non-uniformity. This work investigates the structure-thermal property correlation of arrays consisting of either vertically aligned or slanted silicon dioxide (SiO2) NRs, fabricated by the dynamic shadowing growth technique. We apply the frequency-dependent time-domain thermoreflectance method to quantify the thermal properties of SiO2 NR arrays that may possess inhomogeneity along the depth direction. The effective thermal conductivities of four SiO2 NR array films and one reference capping layer for the SiO2 NR array are obtained. The impact of the structure on the effective thermal conductivities of the SiO2 NR array is discussed. The lowest effective thermal conductivity among all samples in this work is found to be 0.13 W m-1 K-1 for the slanted NR array. We attribute the reduction in the effective thermal conductivity of the NR array to the discontinuous nature of SiO2 NRs, which reduces the density of the thermal transport channels and thus prevents heat flux from propagating downwards along the through-plane direction. The results from this work facilitate the potential applications of NR-array-based thermal insulators for micro-thermal devices.

  14. Large format focal plane array integration with precision alignment, metrology and accuracy capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Jay; Parlato, Russell; Tracy, Gregory; Randolph, Max

    2015-09-01

    Focal plane alignment for large format arrays and faster optical systems require enhanced precision methodology and stability over temperature. The increase in focal plane array size continues to drive the alignment capability. Depending on the optical system, the focal plane flatness of less than 25μm (.001") is required over transition temperatures from ambient to cooled operating temperatures. The focal plane flatness requirement must also be maintained in airborne or launch vibration environments. This paper addresses the challenge of the detector integration into the focal plane module and housing assemblies, the methodology to reduce error terms during integration and the evaluation of thermal effects. The driving factors influencing the alignment accuracy include: datum transfers, material effects over temperature, alignment stability over test, adjustment precision and traceability to NIST standard. The FPA module design and alignment methodology reduces the error terms by minimizing the measurement transfers to the housing. In the design, the proper material selection requires matched coefficient of expansion materials minimizes both the physical shift over temperature as well as lowering the stress induced into the detector. When required, the co-registration of focal planes and filters can achieve submicron relative positioning by applying precision equipment, interferometry and piezoelectric positioning stages. All measurements and characterizations maintain traceability to NIST standards. The metrology characterizes the equipment's accuracy, repeatability and precision of the measurements.

  15. Secondary nanotube growth on aligned carbon nanofibre arrays for superior field emission.

    PubMed

    Watts, Paul C P; Lyth, Stephen M; Henley, Simon J; Silva, S Ravi P

    2008-04-01

    We report substantial improvement of the field emission properties from aligned carbon nanotubes grown on aligned carbon nanofibres by a two-stage plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process. The threshold field decreased from 15.0 to 3.6 V/microm after the secondary growth. The field enhancement factor increased from 240 to 1480. This technique allows for superior emission of electrons for carbon nanotube/nanofibre arrays grown directly on highly doped silicon for direct integration in large area displays. PMID:18572626

  16. Periodically Aligned Si Nanopillar Arrays as Efficient Antireflection Layers for Solar Cell Applications

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Periodically aligned Si nanopillar (PASiNP) arrays were fabricated on Si substrate via a silver-catalyzed chemical etching process using the diameter-reduced polystyrene spheres as mask. The typical sub-wavelength structure of PASiNP arrays had excellent antireflection property with a low reflection loss of 2.84% for incident light within the wavelength range of 200–1,000 nm. The solar cell incorporated with the PASiNP arrays exhibited a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of ~9.24% with a short circuit current density (JSC) of ~29.5 mA/cm2 without using any extra surface passivation technique. The high PCE of PASiNP array-based solar cell was attributed to the excellent antireflection property of the special periodical Si nanostructure. PMID:21124636

  17. Thermal conductivity of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays: Growth conditions and tube inhomogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Matthew L.; Pham, Quang N.; Saltonstall, Christopher B.; Norris, Pamela M.

    2014-10-13

    The thermal conductivity of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays (VACNTAs) grown on silicon dioxide substrates via chemical vapor deposition is measured using a 3ω technique. For each sample, the VACNTA layer and substrate are pressed to a heating line at varying pressures to extract the sample's thermophysical properties. The nanotubes' structure is observed via transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The presence of hydrogen and water vapor in the fabrication process is tuned to observe the effect on measured thermal properties. The presence of iron catalyst particles within the individual nanotubes prevents the array from achieving the overall thermal conductivity anticipated based on reported measurements of individual nanotubes and the packing density.

  18. Array of 12 coils to measure the position, alignment, and sensitivity of magnetic sensors over temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husstedt, Hendrik; Ausserlechner, Udo; Kaltenbacher, Manfred

    2012-04-01

    A measurement setup is presented that allows one to determine the position, alignment, and sensitivity of magnetic sensors over temperature. To this end, an array of 12 coils is used where the number of coils is larger than the number of unknowns to increase accuracy, and to ensure an adequate measurement signal for an arbitrary orientation of the magnetic sensors. With this coil array, a 3D sensing system is analyzed which is used during the testing of automotive magnetic sensors. In particular, the influence of assembly tolerances, and the variation of temperature are examined.

  19. Wafer-scale high-throughput ordered growth of vertically aligned ZnO nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yaguang; Wu, Wenzhuo; Guo, Rui; Yuan, Dajun; Das, Suman; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2010-09-01

    This article presents an effective approach for patterned growth of vertically aligned ZnO nanowire (NW) arrays with high throughput and low cost at wafer scale without using cleanroom technology. Periodic hole patterns are generated using laser interference lithography on substrates coated with the photoresist SU-8. ZnO NWs are selectively grown through the holes via a low-temperature hydrothermal method without using a catalyst and with a superior control over orientation, location/density, and as-synthesized morphology. The development of textured ZnO seed layers for replacing single crystalline GaN and ZnO substrates extends the large-scale fabrication of vertically aligned ZnO NW arrays on substrates of other materials, such as polymers, Si, and glass. This combined approach demonstrates a novel method of manufacturing large-scale patterned one-dimensional nanostructures on various substrates for applications in energy harvesting, sensing, optoelectronics, and electronic devices.

  20. Steering epitaxial alignment of Au, Pd, and AuPd nanowire arrays by atom flux change.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Youngdong; Seo, Kwanyong; Han, Sol; Varadwaj, Kumar S K; Kim, Hyun You; Ryu, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hyuck Mo; Ahn, Jae Pyoung; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Kim, Bongsoo

    2010-02-10

    We have synthesized epitaxial Au, Pd, and AuPd nanowire arrays in vertical or horizontal alignment on a c-cut sapphire substrate. We show that the vertical and horizontal nanowire arrays grow from half-octahedral seeds by the correlations of the geometry and orientation of seed crystals with those of as-grown nanowires. The alignment of nanowires can be steered by changing the atom flux. At low atom deposition flux vertical nanowires grow, while at high atom flux horizontal nanowires grow. Similar vertical/horizontal epitaxial growth is also demonstrated on SrTiO(3) substrates. This orientation-steering mechanism is visualized by molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:20050692

  1. Highly aligned arrays of high aspect ratio barium titanate nanowires via hydrothermal synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bowland, Christopher C.; Zhou, Zhi; Malakooti, Mohammad H.; Sodano, Henry A.

    2015-06-01

    We report on the development of a hydrothermal synthesis procedure that results in the growth of highly aligned arrays of high aspect ratio barium titanate nanowires. Using a multiple step, scalable hydrothermal reaction, a textured titanium dioxide film is deposited on titanium foil upon which highly aligned nanowires are grown via homoepitaxy and converted to barium titanate. Scanning electron microscope images clearly illustrate the effect the textured film has on the degree of orientation of the nanowires. The alignment of nanowires is quantified by calculating the Herman's Orientation Factor, which reveals a 58% improvement in orientation as compared to growth in the absence of the textured film. The ferroelectric properties of barium titanate combined with the development of this scalable growth procedure provide a powerful route towards increasing the efficiency and performance of nanowire-based devices in future real-world applications such as sensing and power harvesting.

  2. Planarized arrays of aligned, untangled multiwall carbon nanotubes with Ohmic back contacts

    DOE PAGES

    Rochford, C.; Limmer, S. J.; Howell, S. W.; Beechem, T. E.; Siegal, M. P.

    2014-11-26

    Vertically aligned, untangled planarized arrays of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with Ohmic back contacts were grown in nanopore templates on arbitrary substrates. The templates were prepared by sputter depositing Nd-doped Al films onto W-coated substrates, followed by anodization to form an aluminum oxide nanopore array. The W underlayer helps eliminate the aluminum oxide barrier that typically occurs at the nanopore bottoms by instead forming a thin WO3 layer. The WO3 can be selectively etched to enable electrodeposition of Co catalysts with control over the Co site density. This led to control of the site density of MWNTs grown by thermalmore » chemical vapor deposition, with the W also serving as a back electrical contact. As a result, Ohmic contact to MWNTs was confirmed, even following ultrasonic cutting of the entire array to a uniform height.« less

  3. Planarized arrays of aligned, untangled multiwall carbon nanotubes with Ohmic back contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Rochford, C.; Limmer, S. J.; Howell, S. W.; Beechem, T. E.; Siegal, M. P.

    2014-11-26

    Vertically aligned, untangled planarized arrays of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with Ohmic back contacts were grown in nanopore templates on arbitrary substrates. The templates were prepared by sputter depositing Nd-doped Al films onto W-coated substrates, followed by anodization to form an aluminum oxide nanopore array. The W underlayer helps eliminate the aluminum oxide barrier that typically occurs at the nanopore bottoms by instead forming a thin WO3 layer. The WO3 can be selectively etched to enable electrodeposition of Co catalysts with control over the Co site density. This led to control of the site density of MWNTs grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition, with the W also serving as a back electrical contact. As a result, Ohmic contact to MWNTs was confirmed, even following ultrasonic cutting of the entire array to a uniform height.

  4. Growth of high-density horizontally aligned SWNT arrays using Trojan catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yue; Kang, Lixing; Zhao, Qiuchen; Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Shuchen; Yang, Liangwei; Wang, Zequn; Lin, Jingjing; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Zhiyong; Peng, Lianmao; Liu, Zhongfan; Zhang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based electronics have been regarded as one of the most promising candidate technologies to replace or supplement silicon-based electronics in the future. These applications require high-density horizontally aligned SWNT arrays. During the past decade, significant efforts have been directed towards growth of high-density SWNT arrays. However, obtaining SWNT arrays with suitable density and quality still remains a big challenge. Herein, we develop a rational approach to grow SWNT arrays with ultra-high density using Trojan catalysts. The density can be as high as 130 SWNTs μm-1. Field-effect transistors fabricated with our SWNT arrays exhibit a record drive current density of -467.09 μA μm-1 and an on-conductance of 233.55 μS μm-1. Radio frequency transistors fabricated on these samples exhibit high intrinsic fT and fMAX of 6.94 and 14.01 GHz, respectively. These results confirm our high-density SWNT arrays are strong candidates for applications in electronics.

  5. Growth of high-density horizontally aligned SWNT arrays using Trojan catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Kang, Lixing; Zhao, Qiuchen; Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Shuchen; Yang, Liangwei; Wang, Zequn; Lin, Jingjing; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Zhiyong; Peng, Lianmao; Liu, Zhongfan; Zhang, Jin

    2015-01-20

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based electronics have been regarded as one of the most promising candidate technologies to replace or supplement silicon-based electronics in the future. These applications require high-density horizontally aligned SWNT arrays. During the past decade, significant efforts have been directed towards growth of high-density SWNT arrays. However, obtaining SWNT arrays with suitable density and quality still remains a big challenge. Herein, we develop a rational approach to grow SWNT arrays with ultra-high density using Trojan catalysts. The density can be as high as 130 SWNTs μm(-1). Field-effect transistors fabricated with our SWNT arrays exhibit a record drive current density of -467.09 μA μm(-1) and an on-conductance of 233.55 μS μm(-1). Radio frequency transistors fabricated on these samples exhibit high intrinsic fT and fMAX of 6.94 and 14.01 GHz, respectively. These results confirm our high-density SWNT arrays are strong candidates for applications in electronics.

  6. Fabricating vertically aligned sub-20 nm Si nanowire arrays by chemical etching and thermal oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Luping; Fang, Yin; Xu, Cheng; Zhao, Yang; Zang, Nanzhi; Jiang, Peng; Ziegler, Kirk J.

    2016-04-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are appealing building blocks in various applications, including photovoltaics, photonics, and sensors. Fabricating SiNW arrays with diameters <100 nm remains challenging through conventional top-down approaches. In this work, chemical etching and thermal oxidation are combined to fabricate vertically aligned, sub-20 nm SiNW arrays. Defect-free SiNWs with diameters between 95 and 200 nm are first fabricated by nanosphere (NS) lithography and chemical etching. The key aspects for defect-free SiNW fabrication are identified as: (1) achieving a high etching selectivity during NS size reduction; (2) retaining the circular NS shape with smooth sidewalls; and (3) using a directional metal deposition technique. SiNWs with identical spacing but variable diameters are demonstrated by changing the reactive ion etching power. The diameter of the SiNWs is reduced by thermal oxidation, where self-limiting oxidation is encountered after oxidizing the SiNWs at 950 °C for 1 h. A second oxidation is performed to achieve vertically aligned, sub-20 nm SiNW arrays. Si/SiO2 core/shell NWs are obtained before removing the oxidized shell. HRTEM imaging shows that the SiNWs have excellent crystallinity.

  7. Charge trapping in aligned single-walled carbon nanotube arrays induced by ionizing radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Esqueda, Ivan S.; Cress, Cory D.; Che, Yuchi; Cao, Yu; Zhou, Chongwu

    2014-02-07

    The effects of near-interfacial trapping induced by ionizing radiation exposure of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) arrays are investigated via measurements of gate hysteresis in the transfer characteristics of aligned SWCNT field-effect transistors. Gate hysteresis is attributed to charge injection (i.e., trapping) from the SWCNTs into radiation-induced traps in regions near the SWCNT/dielectric interface. Self-consistent calculations of surface-potential, carrier density, and trapped charge are used to describe hysteresis as a function of ionizing radiation exposure. Hysteresis width (h) and its dependence on gate sweep range are investigated analytically. The effects of non-uniform trap energy distributions on the relationship between hysteresis, gate sweep range, and total ionizing dose are demonstrated with simulations and verified experimentally.

  8. Vertically-aligned BCN nanotube arrays with superior performance in electrochemical capacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junshuang; Li, Na; Gao, Faming; Zhao, Yufeng; Hou, Li; Xu, Ziming

    2014-08-15

    Electrochemical capacitors (EC) have received tremendous interest due to their high potential to satisfy the urgent demand in many advanced applications. The development of new electrode materials is considered to be the most promising approach to enhance the EC performance substantially. Herein, we present a high-capacity capacitor material based on vertically-aligned BC₂N nanotube arrays (VA-BC₂NNTAs) synthesized by low temperature solvothermal route. The obtained VA-BC₂NNTAs display the good aligned nonbuckled tubular structure, which could indeed advantageously enhance capacitor performance. VA-BC₂NNTAs exhibit an extremely high specific capacitance, 547 Fg(-1), which is about 2-6 times larger than that of the presently available carbon-based materials. Meanwhile, VA-BC₂NNTAs maintain an excellent rate capability and high durability. All these characteristics endow VA-BC₂NNTAs an alternative promising candidate for an efficient electrode material for electrochemical capacitors (EC).

  9. Fabrication of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube or Zinc Oxide Nanorod Arrays for Optical Diffraction Gratings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong; Kim, Sun Il; Cho, Seong-Ho; Hwang, Sungwoo; Lee, Young Hee; Hur, Jaehyun

    2015-11-01

    We report on new fabrication methods for a transparent, hierarchical, and patterned electrode comprised of either carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorods. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorod arrays were fabricated by either chemical vapor deposition or hydrothermal growth, in combination with photolithography. A transparent conductive graphene layer or zinc oxide seed layer was employed as the transparent electrode. On the patterned surface defined using photoresist, the vertically grown carbon nanotubes or zinc oxides could produce a concentrated electric field under applied DC voltage. This periodic electric field was used to align liquid crystal molecules in localized areas within the optical cell, effectively modulating the refractive index. Depending on the material and morphology of these patterned electrodes, the diffraction efficiency presented different behavior. From this study, we established the relationship between the hierarchical structure of the different electrodes and their efficiency for modulating the refractive index. We believe that this study will pave a new path for future optoelectronic applications.

  10. A Robust Highly Aligned DNA Nanowire Array-Enabled Lithography for Graphene Nanoribbon Transistors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seok Hee; Hwang, Wan Sik; Lin, Zhiqun; Kwon, Se Hun; Hong, Suck Won

    2015-12-01

    Because of its excellent charge carrier mobility at the Dirac point, graphene possesses exceptional properties for high-performance devices. Of particular interest is the potential use of graphene nanoribbons or graphene nanomesh for field-effect transistors. Herein, highly aligned DNA nanowire arrays were crafted by flow-assisted self-assembly of a drop of DNA aqueous solution on a flat polymer substrate. Subsequently, they were exploited as "ink" and transfer-printed on chemical vapor deposited (CVD)-grown graphene substrate. The oriented DNA nanowires served as the lithographic resist for selective removal of graphene, forming highly aligned graphene nanoribbons. Intriguingly, these graphene nanoribbons can be readily produced over a large area (i.e., millimeter scale) with a high degree of feature-size controllability and a low level of defects, rendering the fabrication of flexible two terminal devices and field-effect transistors.

  11. Aligned carbon nanotube sheet piezoresistive strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ang; Bogdanovich, Alexander E.; Bradford, Philip D.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have a unique set of properties that may be useful in the production of next generation structural health monitoring composites. This research introduces a novel CNT based material system for strain and damage sensing applications. An aligned sheet of interconnected CNTs was drawn from a chemical vapor deposition grown CNT array and then bonded to the surface of glass fiber/epoxy composite coupons. Various types of mechanical tests were conducted, accompanied by real-time electrical data acquisition, in order to evaluate the electro-mechanical behavior of the developed sensing material. Specimens were loaded in the longitudinal and transverse CNT sheet orientations to investigate the anisotropy of the piezoresistive effect. The CNT sheets exhibited good sensing stability, linearity, sensitivity and repeatability within a practical strain range; which are crucial sensor features for health monitoring. It was also demonstrated that the CNT orientation in the sheet had a dramatic effect on the sensitivity, thus validating the usefulness of this sensing material for directional strain/damage monitoring. Finally, pre-straining of the CNT sheet sensors was conducted to further enhance the linearity of electro-mechanical response and long-term stability of the sensors during cyclic loading.

  12. Vertically aligned graphitic carbon nanosheet arrays fabricated from graphene oxides for supercapacitors and Li-O2 batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangyu; Zhang, Li; Lv, Jixian; Li, Changle; Sun, Kening

    2016-05-11

    Vertically aligned graphitic carbon nanosheet arrays were fabricated from graphene oxide solution by a hydrothermal method. The arrays exhibited a specific capacitance of 240 F g(-1) at 200 A g(-1) as a supercapacitor electrode and a capacity of 6500 mA h g(-1) as a Li-O2 battery cathode.

  13. Nanoscale Resolution, Multi-component Biomolecular Arrays Generated By Aligned Printing With Parylene Peel-Off

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Christine P.; Cipriany, Benjamin R.; Lin, David M.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2010-01-01

    We present Print-and-Peel, a high-throughput method to generate multi-component biomolecular arrays with sub-100nm nanoscale feature width. An inkjet printer is first aligned to a parylene template containing nanoscale openings. After printing, the parylene is peeled off to reveal uniformly patterned nanoscale features, despite the imperfect morphologies of the original inkjet spots. We further patterned combinatorial nanoarrays by performing a second print-run superimposed over the first, thereby extending the multiplexing capability of the technique. PMID:20088589

  14. Angular distribution of field emitted electrons from vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobucci, S.; Fratini, M.; Rizzo, A.; Scarinci, F.; Zhang, Y.; Mann, M.; Li, C.; Milne, W. I.; El Gomati, M. M.; Lagomarsino, S.; Stefani, G.

    2012-01-01

    Angular field emission (FE) properties of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays have been measured on samples grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and characterized by scanning electron microscope and I-V measurements. These properties determine the angular divergence of electron beams, a crucial parameter in order to obtain high brilliance FE based cathodes. From angular distributions of the electron beam transmitted through extraction grids of different mesh size and by using ray-tracing simulations, the maximum emission angle from carbon nanotube tips has been determined to be about ± 30° around the tube main axis.

  15. Growth and characterization of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes using PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, Suman; Li, Wenzhi

    2010-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been grown by using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique (PECVD). The density of the CNTs is controlled by the density of the nickel catalyst nanoparticles on silicon (Si) surface. Photolithography and nanosphere lithography have been employed to form a catalyst nanoparticle pattern on Si to grow periodic array of CNTS with controllable size and distribution. The electron emission properties of the CNT array have also been investigated.

  16. Identification of energy dissipation mechanisms in CNT-reinforced nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Gardea, Frank; Glaz, Bryan; Riddick, Jaret; Lagoudas, Dimitris C; Naraghi, Mohammad

    2016-03-11

    In this paper we present our recent findings on the mechanisms of energy dissipation in polymer-based nanocomposites obtained through experimental investigations. The matrix of the nanocomposite was polystyrene (PS) which was reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). To study the mechanical strain energy dissipation of nanocomposites, we measured the ratio of loss to storage modulus for different CNT concentrations and alignments. CNT alignment was achieved via hot-drawing of PS-CNT. In addition, CNT agglomeration was studied via a combination of SEM imaging and Raman scanning. We found that at sufficiently low strains, energy dissipation in composites with high CNT alignment is not a function of applied strain, as no interfacial slip occurs between the CNTs and PS. However, below the interfacial slip strain threshold, damping scales monotonically with CNT content, which indicates the prevalence of CNT-CNT friction dissipation mechanisms within agglomerates. At higher strains, interfacial slip also contributes to energy dissipation. However, the increase in damping with strain, especially when CNT agglomerates are present, does not scale linearly with the effective interface area between CNTs and PS, suggesting a significant contribution of friction between CNTs within agglomerates to energy dissipation at large strains. In addition, for the first time, a comparison between the energy dissipation in randomly oriented and aligned CNT composites was made. It is inferred that matrix plasticity and tearing caused by misorientation of CNTs with the loading direction is a major cause of energy dissipation. The results of our research can be used to design composites with high energy dissipation capability, especially for applications where dynamic loading may compromise structural stability and functionality, such as rotary wing structures and antennas. PMID:26866611

  17. Identification of energy dissipation mechanisms in CNT-reinforced nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardea, Frank; Glaz, Bryan; Riddick, Jaret; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.; Naraghi, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present our recent findings on the mechanisms of energy dissipation in polymer-based nanocomposites obtained through experimental investigations. The matrix of the nanocomposite was polystyrene (PS) which was reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). To study the mechanical strain energy dissipation of nanocomposites, we measured the ratio of loss to storage modulus for different CNT concentrations and alignments. CNT alignment was achieved via hot-drawing of PS-CNT. In addition, CNT agglomeration was studied via a combination of SEM imaging and Raman scanning. We found that at sufficiently low strains, energy dissipation in composites with high CNT alignment is not a function of applied strain, as no interfacial slip occurs between the CNTs and PS. However, below the interfacial slip strain threshold, damping scales monotonically with CNT content, which indicates the prevalence of CNT-CNT friction dissipation mechanisms within agglomerates. At higher strains, interfacial slip also contributes to energy dissipation. However, the increase in damping with strain, especially when CNT agglomerates are present, does not scale linearly with the effective interface area between CNTs and PS, suggesting a significant contribution of friction between CNTs within agglomerates to energy dissipation at large strains. In addition, for the first time, a comparison between the energy dissipation in randomly oriented and aligned CNT composites was made. It is inferred that matrix plasticity and tearing caused by misorientation of CNTs with the loading direction is a major cause of energy dissipation. The results of our research can be used to design composites with high energy dissipation capability, especially for applications where dynamic loading may compromise structural stability and functionality, such as rotary wing structures and antennas.

  18. Vertically Aligned Nanostructured Arrays of Inorganic Materials: Synthesis, Distinctive Physical Phenomena, and Device Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, Jesus Manuel

    The manifestation of novel physical phenomena upon scaling materials to finite size has inspired new device concepts that take advantage of the distinctive electrical, mechanical, and optical, properties of nanostructures. The development of fabrication approaches for the preparation of their 1D nanostructured form, such as nanowires and nanotubes, has contributed greatly to advancing fundamental understanding of these systems, and has spurred the integration of these materials in novel electronics, photonic devices, power sources, and energy scavenging constructs. Significant progress has been achieved over the last decade in the preparation of ordered arrays of carbon nanotubes, II---VI and III---V semiconductors, and some binary oxides such as ZnO. In contrast, relatively less attention has been focused on layered materials with potential for electrochemical energy storage. Here, we describe the catalyzed vapor transport growth of vertical arrays of orthorhombic V2O 5 nanowires. In addition, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy is used to precisely probe the alignment, uniformity in crystal growth direction, and electronic structure of single-crystalline V2O5 nanowire arrays prepared by a cobalt-catalyzed vapor transport process. The dipole selection rules operational for core-level electron spectroscopy enable angle-dependant NEXAFS spectroscopy to be used as a sensitive probe of the anisotropy of these systems and provides detailed insight into bond orientation and the symmetry of the frontier orbital states. The experimental spectra are matched to previous theoretical predictions and allow experimental verification of features such as the origin of the split-off conduction band responsible for the n-type conductivity of V2O5 and the strongly anisotropic nature of vanadyl-oxygen-derived (V=O) states thought to be involved in catalysis. We have also invested substantial effort in obtaining shape and size control of metal oxide

  19. A vertically aligned carbon nanotube-based impedance sensing biosensor for rapid and high sensitive detection of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abdolahad, Mohammad; Taghinejad, Mohammad; Taghinejad, Hossein; Janmaleki, Mohsen; Mohajerzadeh, Shams

    2012-03-21

    A novel vertically aligned carbon nanotube based electrical cell impedance sensing biosensor (CNT-ECIS) was demonstrated for the first time as a more rapid, sensitive and specific device for the detection of cancer cells. This biosensor is based on the fast entrapment of cancer cells on vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays and leads to mechanical and electrical interactions between CNT tips and entrapped cell membranes, changing the impedance of the biosensor. CNT-ECIS was fabricated through a photolithography process on Ni/SiO(2)/Si layers. Carbon nanotube arrays have been grown on 9 nm thick patterned Ni microelectrodes by DC-PECVD. SW48 colon cancer cells were passed over the surface of CNT covered electrodes to be specifically entrapped on elastic nanotube beams. CNT arrays act as both adhesive and conductive agents and impedance changes occurred as fast as 30 s (for whole entrapment and signaling processes). CNT-ECIS detected the cancer cells with the concentration as low as 4000 cells cm(-2) on its surface and a sensitivity of 1.7 × 10(-3)Ω cm(2). Time and cell efficiency factor (TEF and CEF) parameters were defined which describe the sensor's rapidness and resolution, respectively. TEF and CEF of CNT-ECIS were much higher than other cell based electrical biosensors which are compared in this paper. PMID:22294045

  20. Coaxial carbon@boron nitride nanotube arrays with enhanced thermal stability and compressive mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Jing, Lin; Tay, Roland Yingjie; Li, Hongling; Tsang, Siu Hon; Huang, Jingfeng; Tan, Dunlin; Zhang, Bowei; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong

    2016-06-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have aroused considerable interest because of their remarkable mechanical properties. However, the mechanical behaviour of as-synthesized CNT arrays could vary drastically at a macro-scale depending on their morphologies, dimensions and array density, which are determined by the synthesis method. Here, we demonstrate a coaxial carbon@boron nitride nanotube (C@BNNT) array with enhanced compressive strength and shape recoverability. CNT arrays are grown using a commercially available thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD) technique and an outer BNNT with a wall thickness up to 1.37 nm is introduced by a post-growth TCVD treatment. Importantly, compared to the as-grown CNT arrays which deform almost plastically upon compression, the coaxial C@BNNT arrays exhibit an impressive ∼4-fold increase in compressive strength with nearly full recovery after the first compression cycle at a 50% strain (76% recovery maintained after 10 cycles), as well as a significantly high and persistent energy dissipation ratio (∼60% at a 50% strain after 100 cycles), attributed to the synergistic effect between the CNT and outer BNNT. Additionally, the as-prepared C@BNNT arrays show an improved structural stability in air at elevated temperatures, attributing to the outstanding thermal stability of the outer BNNT. This work provides new insights into tailoring the mechanical and thermal behaviours of arbitrary CNT arrays which enables a broader range of applications. PMID:27227818

  1. Patterning square and rectangular arrays using shear-aligned block copolymer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, So Youn; Davis, Raleigh L.; Register, Richard A.; Gwyther, Jessica; Nunns, Adam; Manners, Ian; Chaikin, Paul M.

    2014-03-01

    Microphase separation of block copolymers in thin films can generate periodic structures: hexagonally packed arrays of dots from spherical or cylindrical phase block copolymers, or periodic stripes from cylindrical or lamellar phase block copolymers. Square or rectangular patterns, however, do not naturally form by spontaneous self-assembly of a simple diblock copolymer, and are a challenge to create. We present a simple way to create nano-square/rectangular arrays by building up a double-layer film of a cylinder-forming diblock, where each layer is sequentially deposited, shear-aligned independently, and cross-linked. Any block copolymer with at least one crosslinkable block can in principle be employed; in this study we use cylinder-forming polystyrene-b-poly(ferrocenylisopropylmethylsilane) and polystyrene-b-poly(hexylmethacrylate). The pitch of the array is tunable by varying polymer molecular weight. Oxygen reactive ion etching is used to reveal the grid structures, and these grids can in turn form nano-wells in the silicon substrate when the cylinder-forming block is very etch-resistant under the conditions used for silicon etching. Additionally, metal dots ordered in square arrays can be created using these grids as templates, via metal evaporation and lift-off.

  2. Investigation of anisotropic reflectance from densified arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanotube forests (VACNTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Masud; Asyraf, M. R. Mohd; Saleh, T.; Muthalif, Asan G. A.

    2016-08-01

    VACNTs is commonly known as darkest absorber on earth owing to their highly inherent porosity. To reduce this porosity, in this letter, we introduce a simple process to densify VACNTs by soaking into water. Later on, the VACNTs was dried at ambient temperature, which made VACNTs more compacted due to their capillary action. Optical characterization of the densified CNT forest was carried out. It was observed that at a fixed incident angle 70° with P-polarized incident light, densified CNT forest shows enhanced reflectance with anisotropic behavior as compared to bare CNT forest.

  3. Microwave purification of large-area horizontally aligned arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xu; Jin, Sung Hun; Wahab, Muhammad A; Islam, Ahmad E; Zhang, Chenxi; Du, Frank; Seabron, Eric; Lu, Tianjian; Dunham, Simon N; Cheong, Hou In; Tu, Yen-Chu; Guo, Zhilin; Chung, Ha Uk; Li, Yuhang; Liu, Yuhao; Lee, Jong-Ho; Song, Jizhou; Huang, Yonggang; Alam, Muhammad A; Wilson, William L; Rogers, John A

    2014-11-12

    Recent progress in the field of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) significantly enhances the potential for practical use of this remarkable class of material in advanced electronic and sensor devices. One of the most daunting challenges is in creating large-area, perfectly aligned arrays of purely semiconducting SWNTs (s-SWNTs). Here we introduce a simple, scalable, large-area scheme that achieves this goal through microwave irradiation of aligned SWNTs grown on quartz substrates. Microstrip dipole antennas of low work-function metals concentrate the microwaves and selectively couple them into only the metallic SWNTs (m-SWNTs). The result allows for complete removal of all m-SWNTs, as revealed through systematic experimental and computational studies of the process. As one demonstration of the effectiveness, implementing this method on large arrays consisting of ~20,000 SWNTs completely removes all of the m-SWNTs (~7,000) to yield a purity of s-SWNTs that corresponds, quantitatively, to at least to 99.9925% and likely significantly higher.

  4. On the rate dependence of mechanical properties of aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. C.; Zhang, Q.; Dai, L.; Baur, J.

    2015-08-01

    Aligned carbon nanotube arrays are a new form of carbon nanomaterials that have received great interest due to their superior structure and properties. The present work comprehensively examines the rate-dependent mechanical deformation of the vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays (VA-CNTs) by the use of indentation tests. The small-displacement, elastic property of the VA-CNTs was measured by a spherical indenter. The effective indentation strain rate was varied by adjusting the indenter unloading rate. The instantaneous modulus of the VA-CNTs has been calculated and is found to increase linearly with indentation strain rate. The large-displacement, plastic property of the VA-CNTs was measured by a cylindrical, flat-ended indenter. At large indentation depths, the stress-strain curve of the VA-CNTs reveals distinct plastic deformation. The indentation strain rate was varied by directly changing the indenter velocity. The yield strength ( σ y) of the VA-CNTs also increases linearly with respect to indentation strain rate.

  5. Spray-coating route for highly aligned and large-scale arrays of nanowires.

    PubMed

    Assad, Ossama; Leshansky, Alexander M; Wang, Bin; Stelzner, Thomas; Christiansen, Silke; Haick, Hossam

    2012-06-26

    Technological implementation of nanowires (NWs) requires these components to be organized with controlled orientation and density on various substrates. Here, we report on a simple and efficient route for the deposition of highly ordered and highly aligned NW arrays on a wide range of receiver substrates, including silicon, glass, metals, and flexible plastics with controlled density. The deposition approach is based on spray-coating of a NW suspension under controlled conditions of the nozzle flow rate, droplet size of the sprayed NWs suspension, spray angle, and the temperature of the receiver substrate. The dynamics of droplet generation is understood by a combined action of shear forces and capillary forces. Provided that the size of the generated droplet is comparable to the length of the single NW, the shear-driven elongation of the droplets results presumably in the alignment of the confined NW in the spraying direction. Flattening the droplets upon their impact with the substrate yields fast immobilization of the spray-aligned NWs on the surface due to van der Waals attraction. The availability of the spray-coating technique in the current microelectronics technology would ensure immediate implementation in production lines, with minimal changes in the fabrication design and/or auxiliary tools used for this purpose.

  6. Characterization of Hybrid CNT Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Cano, Roberto J.; Kinney, Megan C.; Pressley, James; Sauti, Godfrey; Czabaj, Michael W.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been studied extensively since their discovery and demonstrated at the nanoscale superior mechanical, electrical and thermal properties in comparison to micro and macro scale properties of conventional engineering materials. This combination of properties suggests their potential to enhance multi-functionality of composites in regions of primary structures on aerospace vehicles where lightweight materials with improved thermal and electrical conductivity are desirable. In this study, hybrid multifunctional polymer matrix composites were fabricated by interleaving layers of CNT sheets into Hexcel® IM7/8552 prepreg, a well-characterized toughened epoxy carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite. The resin content of these interleaved CNT sheets, as well as ply stacking location were varied to determine the effects on the electrical, thermal, and mechanical performance of the composites. The direct-current electrical conductivity of the hybrid CNT composites was characterized by in-line and Montgomery four-probe methods. For [0](sub 20) laminates containing a single layer of CNT sheet between each ply of IM7/8552, in-plane electrical conductivity of the hybrid laminate increased significantly, while in-plane thermal conductivity increased only slightly in comparison to the control IM7/8552 laminates. Photo-microscopy and short beam shear (SBS) strength tests were used to characterize the consolidation quality of the fabricated laminates. Hybrid panels fabricated without any pretreatment of the CNT sheets resulted in a SBS strength reduction of 70 percent. Aligning the tubes and pre-infusing the CNT sheets with resin significantly improved the SBS strength of the hybrid composite To determine the cause of this performance reduction, Mode I and Mode II fracture toughness of the CNT sheet to CFRP interface was characterized by double cantilever beam (DCB) and end notch flexure (ENF) testing, respectively. Results are compared to the

  7. Facile preparation of free-standing carbon nanotube arrays produced using two-step floating-ferrocene chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoshuang; Yuan, Lixiang; Peterson, Vanessa K; Minett, Andew I; Yin, Yongbai; Harris, Andrew T

    2012-03-01

    A two-step floating-ferrocene chemical vapor deposition method has been devised for the preparation of single-layered aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays. In the first step, uniform Fe catalysts are in situ produced and coated on a Si substrate from ferrocene; single-layered CNT arrays are prepared on these catalysts from ethylene in the second step. The effect of ferrocene loading on the distribution of Fe catalysts, as well as the morphology, diameter, and height of the CNT arrays, was investigated. A novel vacuum extraction process was employed to release the as-prepared CNT array from the Si wafer after water etching at 750 °C. The structural integrity of the free-standing arrays was preserved after the detachment process. The interface between the substrate and the as-grown CNT array was examined. The Fe catalyst distribution on the Si substrate remained homogeneous when the CNT array was removed, and the tops and bottoms of the arrays had different structures, suggesting that the arrays were formed predominantly by a base-growth mode. These free-standing arrays could potentially be applied in membrane or electronic applications.

  8. Design and fabrication of microlens and spatial filter array by self-alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ren; Chan, Kin Foong; Feng, Zhiqiang; Mei, Wenhui

    2003-01-01

    For typically small volume production of MEMS, MOEMS, fine feature PCB, high density chip packaging and display panels, especially for lab tests, low cost and the capability to change the original design easily and quickly are very important for customers and researchers. BALL Semiconductor Inc.'s Maskless Lithography Systems (MLS) feature the Digital Mirror Device (DMD) as the pattern generator to replace photo-masks. This can remove masks from UV lithography, and dramatically reduce the running cost and save time for lab tests and small volume production. At Ball Semiconductor Inc, 1.5μm line/space, 10μm line/space, and 20μm line/space Maskless Lithography Systems were developed. In our MLS, an 848×600 microlens and spatial filter array (MLSFA) was used to focus the light and to filter the noise. In order to produce smaller line-space than 16μm the MLSFA was used to get smaller UV light pad (compared with the SVGA DMD"s micro-mirror: 17μm×17μm) and to filter the noise produced from the DMD, optical lens system, and micro lens array. This MLSFA is one of the key devices for our Maskless Lithography System, and determines the resolution and quality of maskless lithography. A novel design and fabrication process of a single-package MLSFA for our Maskless Lithography System will be introduced. To avoid problems produced by misalignment between a two-piece spatial filter and microlens array, MEMS processing is used to integrate the microlens array with the spatial filter array. In this paper, the self-alignment method used to fabricate exactly matched MLSFA will be presented.

  9. Interdigitated array of Pt electrodes for electrical stimulation and engineering of aligned muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Ahadian, Samad; Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Ostrovidov, Serge; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Hosseini, Vahid; Kaji, Hirokazu; Ino, Kosuke; Shiku, Hitoshi; Khademhosseini, Ali; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2012-09-21

    Engineered skeletal muscle tissues could be useful for applications in tissue engineering, drug screening, and bio-robotics. It is well-known that skeletal muscle cells are able to differentiate under electrical stimulation (ES), with an increase in myosin production, along with the formation of myofibers and contractile proteins. In this study, we describe the use of an interdigitated array of electrodes as a novel platform to electrically stimulate engineered muscle tissues. The resulting muscle myofibers were analyzed and quantified in terms of their myotube characteristics and gene expression. The engineered muscle tissues stimulated through the interdigitated array of electrodes demonstrated superior performance and maturation compared to the corresponding tissues stimulated through a conventional setup (i.e., through Pt wires in close proximity to the muscle tissue). In particular, the ES of muscle tissue (voltage 6 V, frequency 1 Hz and duration 10 ms for 1 day) through the interdigitated array of electrodes resulted in a higher degree of C2C12 myotube alignment (∼80%) as compared to ES using Pt wires (∼65%). In addition, higher amounts of C2C12 myotube coverage area, myotube length, muscle transcription factors and protein biomarkers were found for myotubes stimulated through the interdigitated array of electrodes compared to those stimulated using the Pt wires. Due to the wide array of potential applications of ES for two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) engineered tissues, the suggested platform could be employed for a variety of cell and tissue structures to more efficiently investigate their response to electrical fields.

  10. Vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes for pressure, tactile and vibration sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmazoglu, O.; Popp, A.; Pavlidis, D.; Schneider, J. J.; Garth, D.; Schüttler, F.; Battenberg, G.

    2012-03-01

    We report a simple method for the micro-nano integration of flexible, vertically aligned multiwalled CNT arrays sandwiched between a top and bottom carbon layer via a porous alumina (Al2O3) template approach. The electromechanical properties of the flexible CNT arrays have been investigated under mechanical stress conditions. First experiments show highly sensitive piezoresistive sensors with a resistance decrease of up to ˜35% and a spatial resolution of <1 mm. The results indicate that these CNT structures can be utilized for tactile sensing components. They also confirm the feasibility of accessing and utilizing nanoscopic CNT bundles via lithographic processing. The method involves room-temperature processing steps and standard microfabrication techniques.

  11. Vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes for pressure, tactile and vibration sensing.

    PubMed

    Yilmazoglu, O; Popp, A; Pavlidis, D; Schneider, J J; Garth, D; Schüttler, F; Battenberg, G

    2012-03-01

    We report a simple method for the micro-nano integration of flexible, vertically aligned multiwalled CNT arrays sandwiched between a top and bottom carbon layer via a porous alumina (Al(2)O(3)) template approach. The electromechanical properties of the flexible CNT arrays have been investigated under mechanical stress conditions. First experiments show highly sensitive piezoresistive sensors with a resistance decrease of up to ∼35% and a spatial resolution of <1 mm. The results indicate that these CNT structures can be utilized for tactile sensing components. They also confirm the feasibility of accessing and utilizing nanoscopic CNT bundles via lithographic processing. The method involves room-temperature processing steps and standard microfabrication techniques.

  12. The effects of DRIE operational parameters on vertically aligned micropillar arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kane; Li, Mingxiao; Walsh, Kevin M.; Fu, Xiao-An

    2013-03-01

    Vertically aligned silicon micropillar arrays have been created by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and used for a number of microfabricated devices including microfluidic devices, micropreconcentrators and photovoltaic cells. This paper delineates an experimental design performed on the Bosch process of DRIE of micropillar arrays. The arrays are fabricated with direct-write optical lithography without photomask, and the effects of DRIE process parameters, including etch cycle time, passivation cycle time, platen power and coil power on profile angle, scallop depth and scallop peak-to-peak distance are studied by statistical design of experiments. Scanning electron microscope images are used for measuring the resultant profile angles and characterizing the scalloping effect on the pillar sidewalls. The experimental results indicate the effects of the determining factors, etch cycle time, passivation cycle time and platen power, on the micropillar profile angles and scallop depths. An optimized DRIE process recipe for creating nearly 90° and smooth surface (invisible scalloping) has been obtained as a result of the statistical design of experiments.

  13. Fabrication of free-standing aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube array for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusheva, L. G.; Arkhipov, V. E.; Fedorovskaya, E. O.; Zhang, Su; Kurenya, A. G.; Kanygin, M. A.; Asanov, I. P.; Tsygankova, A. R.; Chen, Xiaohong; Song, Huaihe; Okotrub, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    We show that a high-temperature CCl4 vapor treatment of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs) grown on silicon substrate allows carefully detach the array from the substrate. Moreover, this procedure partially purifies the VA-MWCNTs from the residual iron catalyst. To improve electrical connectivity of free-standing VA-MWCNTs in an electrochemical cell, the array was placed between the layers of Ni foam. Such assembly demonstrated the better performance in Li-battery as compared to the disordered MWCNTs. After 50 cycles, the specific capacity of VA-MWCNT array synthesized from 0.5 wt% ferrocene solution in toluene was 350 mAh g-1 at a current density of 0.1 A g-1, while the battery with the disordered MWCNTs achieved 197 mAh g-1 only. By the results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, the higher capacity of VA-MWCNTs was attributed to larger surface area available for electrolyte and Li ions due to the absence of binder coating.

  14. Versatile Particle-Based Route to Engineer Vertically Aligned Silicon Nanowire Arrays and Nanoscale Pores.

    PubMed

    Elnathan, Roey; Isa, Lucio; Brodoceanu, Daniel; Nelson, Adrienne; Harding, Frances J; Delalat, Bahman; Kraus, Tobias; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-10-28

    Control over particle self-assembly is a prerequisite for the colloidal templating of lithographical etching masks to define nanostructures. This work integrates and combines for the first time bottom-up and top-down approaches, namely, particle self-assembly at liquid-liquid interfaces and metal-assisted chemical etching, to generate vertically aligned silicon nanowire (VA-SiNW) arrays and, alternatively, arrays of nanoscale pores in a silicon wafer. Of particular importance, and in contrast to current techniques, including conventional colloidal lithography, this approach provides excellent control over the nanowire or pore etching site locations and decouples nanowire or pore diameter and spacing. The spacing between pores or nanowires is tuned by adjusting the specific area of the particles at the liquid-liquid interface before deposition. Hence, the process enables fast and low-cost fabrication of ordered nanostructures in silicon and can be easily scaled up. We demonstrate that the fabricated VA-SiNW arrays can be used as in vitro transfection platforms for transfecting human primary cells.

  15. Ultralight anisotropic foams from layered aligned carbon nanotube sheets.

    PubMed

    Faraji, Shaghayegh; Stano, Kelly L; Yildiz, Ozkan; Li, Ang; Zhu, Yuntian; Bradford, Philip D

    2015-10-28

    In this work, we present large scale, ultralight aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) structures which have densities an order of magnitude lower than CNT arrays, have tunable properties and exhibit resiliency after compression. By stacking aligned sheets of carbon nanotubes and then infiltrating with a pyrolytic carbon (PyC), resilient foam-like materials were produced that exhibited complete recovery from 90% compressive strain. With density as low as 3.8 mg cm(-3), the foam structure is over 500 times less dense than bulk graphite. Microscopy revealed that PyC coated the junctions among CNTs, and also increased CNT surface roughness. These changes in the morphology explain the transition from inelastic behavior to foam-like recovery of the layered CNT sheet structure. Mechanical and thermal properties of the foams were tuned for different applications through variation of PyC deposition duration while dynamic mechanical analysis showed no change in mechanical properties over a large temperature range. Observation of a large and linear electrical resistance change during compression of the aligned CNT/carbon (ACNT/C) foams makes strain/pressure sensors a relevant application. The foams have high oil absorption capacities, up to 275 times their own weight, which suggests they may be useful in water treatment and oil spill cleanup. Finally, the ACNT/C foam's high porosity, surface area and stability allow for demonstration of the foams as catalyst support structures.

  16. Ultralight anisotropic foams from layered aligned carbon nanotube sheets.

    PubMed

    Faraji, Shaghayegh; Stano, Kelly L; Yildiz, Ozkan; Li, Ang; Zhu, Yuntian; Bradford, Philip D

    2015-10-28

    In this work, we present large scale, ultralight aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) structures which have densities an order of magnitude lower than CNT arrays, have tunable properties and exhibit resiliency after compression. By stacking aligned sheets of carbon nanotubes and then infiltrating with a pyrolytic carbon (PyC), resilient foam-like materials were produced that exhibited complete recovery from 90% compressive strain. With density as low as 3.8 mg cm(-3), the foam structure is over 500 times less dense than bulk graphite. Microscopy revealed that PyC coated the junctions among CNTs, and also increased CNT surface roughness. These changes in the morphology explain the transition from inelastic behavior to foam-like recovery of the layered CNT sheet structure. Mechanical and thermal properties of the foams were tuned for different applications through variation of PyC deposition duration while dynamic mechanical analysis showed no change in mechanical properties over a large temperature range. Observation of a large and linear electrical resistance change during compression of the aligned CNT/carbon (ACNT/C) foams makes strain/pressure sensors a relevant application. The foams have high oil absorption capacities, up to 275 times their own weight, which suggests they may be useful in water treatment and oil spill cleanup. Finally, the ACNT/C foam's high porosity, surface area and stability allow for demonstration of the foams as catalyst support structures. PMID:26419855

  17. The feasibility of producing MWCNT paper and strong MWCNT film from VACNT array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guanghui; Zhang, Qiang; Zhou, Weiping; Huang, Jiaqi; Wei, Fei

    2008-08-01

    This study sought to produce carbon nanotube (CNT) pulp out of extremely long, vertically aligned CNT arrays as raw materials. After high-speed shearing and mixing nitric acid and sulfuric acid, which served as the treatment, the researchers produced the desired pulp, which was further transformed into CNT paper by a common filtration process. The paper’s tensile strength, Young’s modulus and electrical conductivity were 7.5 MPa, 785 MPa and 1.0×104 S/m, respectively, when the temperature of the acid treatment was at 110°C. Apart from this, the researchers also improved the mechanical property of CNT paper by polymers. The CNT paper was soaked in polyethylene oxide, polyvinyl pyrrolidone, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) solution, eventually making the CNT/PVA film show its mechanical properties, which increased, while its electrical conductivity decreased. To diffuse the polymer into the CNT paper thoroughly, the researchers used vacuum filtration to fabricate a CNT/PVA film by penetrating PVA into the CNT paper. After a ten-hour filtration, the tensile strength and Young’s modulus of CNT/PVA film were 96.1 MPa and 6.23 GPa, respectively, which show an increase by factors of 12 and 7, respectively, although the material’s electrical conductivity was lowered to 0.16×104 S/m.

  18. Automatic laser alignment for multifocal microscopy using a LCOS SLM and a 32×32 pixel CMOS SPAD array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyndall, David; Walker, Richard; Nguyen, Krzysztof; Galland, Rémi; Gao, Jie; Wang, Irène; Kloster, Meike; Delon, Antoine; Henderson, Robert

    2011-07-01

    Alignment of a laser to a point source detector for confocal microscopy can be a time-consuming task. The problem is further exacerbated when multiple laser excitation spots are used in conjunction with a multiple pixel single photon detector; in addition to X, Y and Z positioning, pixels in a 2D array detector can also be misaligned in roll, pitch and yaw with respect to each other, causing magnification, rotation and focus variation across the array. We present a technique for automated multiple point laser alignment to overcome these issues using closed-loop feedback between a laser illuminated computer controlled Liquid Crystal on Silicon Spatial Light Modulator (LCOS-SLM) acting as the excitation source and a 32×32 pixel CMOS Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) array as the multiple pixel detection element. The alignment procedure is discussed and simulated to prove its feasibility before being implemented and tested in a practical optical system. We show that it is possible to align each independent laser point in a sub-second time scale, significantly simplifying and speeding up experimental set-up times. The approach provides a solution to the difficulties associated with multiple point confocal laser alignment to multiple point detector arrays, paving the way for further advances in applications such as Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM).

  19. Automated co-alignment of coherent fiber laser arrays via active phase-locking.

    PubMed

    Goodno, Gregory D; Weiss, S Benjamin

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate a novel closed-loop approach for high-precision co-alignment of laser beams in an actively phase-locked, coherently combined fiber laser array. The approach ensures interferometric precision by optically transducing beam-to-beam pointing errors into phase errors on a single detector, which are subsequently nulled by duplication of closed-loop phasing controls. Using this approach, beams from five coherent fiber tips were simultaneously phase-locked and position-locked with sub-micron accuracy. Spatial filtering of the sensed light is shown to extend the control range over multiple beam diameters by recovering spatial coherence despite the lack of far-field beam overlap.

  20. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  1. Advanced Multifunctional Properties of Aligned Carbon Nanotube-Epoxy Composites from Carbon Nanotube Aerogel Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Thang; Liu, Peng; Fan, Zeng; Ngern, Nigel; Duong, Hai

    2015-03-01

    Unlike previous methods of making carbon nanotube (CNT) thin films, aligned CNT thin films in this work are synthesized directly from CNT aerogels in a CVD process. CH4/H2/He gases and ferrocene/thiophene catalysts are mixed and reacted in the reactor at 1200 °C to form CNT aerogel socks. By pulling out the socks with a metal rod, CNT thin films with 15-nm diameter MWNTs are aligned and produced continuously at a speed of a few meters per minute. The number of the aligned CNT thin film layers/ thickness can also be controlled well. The as-synthesized aligned CNT films are further condensed by acetone spray and post-treated by UV light. The aligned CNT films without any above post-treatment have a high electrical conductivity of 400S/cm. We also develop aligned CNT-epoxy composites by infiltrating epoxy into the above aligned CNT thin films using Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) method. Our cost-effective fabrication method of the aligned CNT films is more advanced for developing the composites having CNT orientation control. The mechanical, electrical and optical properties of the aligned CNT epoxy composites are measured. About 2% of the aligned CNTs can enhance significantly the electrical conductivity and hardness of aligned CNT-epoxy composite films. Effects of morphologies, volume fraction, and alignment of the CNTs on the advanced multifunctional properties of the aligned CNT-epoxy composites are also quantified.

  2. Photoluminescence enhancement of aligned arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes by polymer transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweiger, Manuel; Zakharko, Yuriy; Gannott, Florentina; Grimm, Stefan B.; Zaumseil, Jana

    2015-10-01

    The photoluminescence of as-grown, aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on quartz is strongly quenched and barely detectable. Here we show that transferring these SWNTs to another substrate such as clean quartz or glass increases their emission efficiency by up to two orders of magnitude. By statistical analysis of large nanotube arrays we show at what point of the transfer process the emission enhancement occurs and how it depends on the receiving substrate and the employed transfer polymer. We find that hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) as the transfer polymer results in higher photoluminescence enhancement than the more hydrophilic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Possible mechanisms for this enhancement such as strain relief, disruption of the strong interaction of SWNTs with the substrate and localized emissive states are discussed.The photoluminescence of as-grown, aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on quartz is strongly quenched and barely detectable. Here we show that transferring these SWNTs to another substrate such as clean quartz or glass increases their emission efficiency by up to two orders of magnitude. By statistical analysis of large nanotube arrays we show at what point of the transfer process the emission enhancement occurs and how it depends on the receiving substrate and the employed transfer polymer. We find that hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) as the transfer polymer results in higher photoluminescence enhancement than the more hydrophilic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Possible mechanisms for this enhancement such as strain relief, disruption of the strong interaction of SWNTs with the substrate and localized emissive states are discussed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05163k

  3. A new angle for probing field-aligned irregularities with the Murchison Widefield Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Murphy, Tara; Cairns, Iver H.; Trott, Cathryn M.; Hurley-Walker, Natasha; Feng, Lu; Hancock, Paul J.; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-06-01

    Electron density irregularities in the ionosphere are known to be magnetically anisotropic, preferentially elongated along the lines of force. While many studies of their morphology have been undertaken by topside sounding and whistler measurements, it is only recently that detailed regional-scale reconstructions have become possible, enabled by the advent of widefield radio telescopes. Here we present a new approach for visualizing and studying field-aligned irregularities (FAIs), which involves transforming interferometric measurements of total electron content gradients onto a magnetic shell tangent plane. This removes the perspective distortion associated with the oblique viewing angle of the irregularities from the ground, facilitating the decomposition of dynamics along and across magnetic field lines. We apply this transformation to the data set of Loi et al. (2015a), obtained on 15 October 2013 by the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) radio telescope and displaying prominent FAIs. We study these FAIs in the new reference frame, quantifying field-aligned and field-transverse behavior, examining time and altitude dependencies, and extending the analysis to FAIs on subarray scales. We show that the inclination of the plane can be derived solely from the data and verify that the best fit value is consistent with the known magnetic inclination. The ability of the model to concentrate the fluctuations along a single spatial direction may find practical application to future calibration strategies for widefield interferometry, by providing a compact representation of FAI-induced distortions.

  4. Self-alignment of silver nanoparticles in highly ordered 2D arrays.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-León, Ericka; Íñiguez-Palomares, Ramón; Urrutia-Bañuelos, Efraín; Herrera-Urbina, Ronaldo; Tánori, Judith; Maldonado, Amir

    2015-01-01

    We have synthesized silver nanoparticles in the non-polar phase of non-aqueous microemulsions. The nanocrystals have been grown by reducing silver ions in the microemulsion cylindrical micelles formed by the reducing agent (ethylene glycol). By a careful deposit of the microemulsion phase on a substrate, the micelles align in a hexagonal geometry, thus forming a 2D array of parallel strings of individual silver nanoparticles on the substrate. The microemulsions are the ternary system of anionic surfactant, non-polar solvent (isooctane), and solvent polar (ethylene glycol); the size of synthesized nanoparticles is about 7 nm and they are monodisperse. The study of the microstructure was realized by transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution technique transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), and Fourier processing using the software Digital Micrograph for the determination of the crystalline structure of the HR-TEM images of the nanocrystals; chemical composition was determined using the energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Addition technique polarizing light microscopy allowed the observation of the hexagonal phase of the system. This method of synthesis and self-alignment could be useful for the preparation of patterned materials at the nanometer scale.

  5. Parallel Aligned Mesopore Arrays in Pyramidal-Shaped Gallium Nitride and Their Photocatalytic Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jun; Park, Joonmo; Ye, Byeong Uk; Yoo, Chul Jong; Lee, Jong-Lam; Ryu, Sang-Wan; Lee, Heon; Choi, Kyoung Jin; Baik, Jeong Min

    2016-07-20

    Parallel aligned mesopore arrays in pyramidal-shaped GaN are fabricated by using an electrochemical anodic etching technique, followed by inductively coupled plasma etching assisted by SiO2 nanosphere lithography, and used as a promising photoelectrode for solar water oxidation. The parallel alignment of the pores of several tens of micrometers scale in length is achieved by the low applied voltage and prepattern guided anodization. The dry etching of single-layer SiO2 nanosphere-coated GaN produces a pyramidal shape of the GaN, making the pores open at both sides and shortening the escape path of evolved gas bubbles produced inside pores during the water oxidation. The absorption spectra show that the light absorption in the UV range is ∼93% and that there is a red shift in the absorption edge by 30 nm, compared with the flat GaN. It also shows a remarkable enhancement in the photocurrent density by 5.3 times, compared with flat GaN. Further enhancement (∼40%) by the deposition of Ni was observed due to the generation of an electric field, which increases the charge separation ratio. PMID:27347685

  6. Parallel Aligned Mesopore Arrays in Pyramidal-Shaped Gallium Nitride and Their Photocatalytic Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jun; Park, Joonmo; Ye, Byeong Uk; Yoo, Chul Jong; Lee, Jong-Lam; Ryu, Sang-Wan; Lee, Heon; Choi, Kyoung Jin; Baik, Jeong Min

    2016-07-20

    Parallel aligned mesopore arrays in pyramidal-shaped GaN are fabricated by using an electrochemical anodic etching technique, followed by inductively coupled plasma etching assisted by SiO2 nanosphere lithography, and used as a promising photoelectrode for solar water oxidation. The parallel alignment of the pores of several tens of micrometers scale in length is achieved by the low applied voltage and prepattern guided anodization. The dry etching of single-layer SiO2 nanosphere-coated GaN produces a pyramidal shape of the GaN, making the pores open at both sides and shortening the escape path of evolved gas bubbles produced inside pores during the water oxidation. The absorption spectra show that the light absorption in the UV range is ∼93% and that there is a red shift in the absorption edge by 30 nm, compared with the flat GaN. It also shows a remarkable enhancement in the photocurrent density by 5.3 times, compared with flat GaN. Further enhancement (∼40%) by the deposition of Ni was observed due to the generation of an electric field, which increases the charge separation ratio.

  7. Self-alignment of silver nanoparticles in highly ordered 2D arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-León, Ericka; Íñiguez-Palomares, Ramón; Urrutia-Bañuelos, Efraín; Herrera-Urbina, Ronaldo; Tánori, Judith; Maldonado, Amir

    2015-03-01

    We have synthesized silver nanoparticles in the non-polar phase of non-aqueous microemulsions. The nanocrystals have been grown by reducing silver ions in the microemulsion cylindrical micelles formed by the reducing agent (ethylene glycol). By a careful deposit of the microemulsion phase on a substrate, the micelles align in a hexagonal geometry, thus forming a 2D array of parallel strings of individual silver nanoparticles on the substrate. The microemulsions are the ternary system of anionic surfactant, non-polar solvent (isooctane), and solvent polar (ethylene glycol); the size of synthesized nanoparticles is about 7 nm and they are monodisperse. The study of the microstructure was realized by transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution technique transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), and Fourier processing using the software Digital Micrograph for the determination of the crystalline structure of the HR-TEM images of the nanocrystals; chemical composition was determined using the energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Addition technique polarizing light microscopy allowed the observation of the hexagonal phase of the system. This method of synthesis and self-alignment could be useful for the preparation of patterned materials at the nanometer scale.

  8. Self-alignment of silver nanoparticles in highly ordered 2D arrays.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-León, Ericka; Íñiguez-Palomares, Ramón; Urrutia-Bañuelos, Efraín; Herrera-Urbina, Ronaldo; Tánori, Judith; Maldonado, Amir

    2015-01-01

    We have synthesized silver nanoparticles in the non-polar phase of non-aqueous microemulsions. The nanocrystals have been grown by reducing silver ions in the microemulsion cylindrical micelles formed by the reducing agent (ethylene glycol). By a careful deposit of the microemulsion phase on a substrate, the micelles align in a hexagonal geometry, thus forming a 2D array of parallel strings of individual silver nanoparticles on the substrate. The microemulsions are the ternary system of anionic surfactant, non-polar solvent (isooctane), and solvent polar (ethylene glycol); the size of synthesized nanoparticles is about 7 nm and they are monodisperse. The study of the microstructure was realized by transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution technique transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), and Fourier processing using the software Digital Micrograph for the determination of the crystalline structure of the HR-TEM images of the nanocrystals; chemical composition was determined using the energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Addition technique polarizing light microscopy allowed the observation of the hexagonal phase of the system. This method of synthesis and self-alignment could be useful for the preparation of patterned materials at the nanometer scale. PMID:25883540

  9. Fabrication of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube or Zinc Oxide Nanorod Arrays for Optical Diffraction Gratings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong; Kim, Sun Il; Cho, Seong-Ho; Hwang, Sungwoo; Lee, Young Hee; Hur, Jaehyun

    2015-11-01

    We report on new fabrication methods for a transparent, hierarchical, and patterned electrode comprised of either carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorods. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorod arrays were fabricated by either chemical vapor deposition or hydrothermal growth, in combination with photolithography. A transparent conductive graphene layer or zinc oxide seed layer was employed as the transparent electrode. On the patterned surface defined using photoresist, the vertically grown carbon nanotubes or zinc oxides could produce a concentrated electric field under applied DC voltage. This periodic electric field was used to align liquid crystal molecules in localized areas within the optical cell, effectively modulating the refractive index. Depending on the material and morphology of these patterned electrodes, the diffraction efficiency presented different behavior. From this study, we established the relationship between the hierarchical structure of the different electrodes and their efficiency for modulating the refractive index. We believe that this study will pave a new path for future optoelectronic applications. PMID:26726580

  10. Direct current injection and thermocapillary flow for purification of aligned arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xu; Islam, Ahmad E.; Seabron, Eric; Dunham, Simon N.; Du, Frank; Lin, Jonathan; Wilson, William L.; Rogers, John A.; Wahab, Muhammad A.; Alam, Muhammad A.; Li, Yuhang; Tomic, Bojan; Huang, Jiyuan; Burns, Branden; Song, Jizhou; Huang, Yonggang

    2015-04-07

    Aligned arrays of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) represent ideal configurations for use of this class of material in high performance electronics. Development of means for removing the metallic SWNTs (m-SWNTs) in as-grown arrays represents an essential challenge. Here, we introduce a simple scheme that achieves this type of purification using direct, selective current injection through interdigitated electrodes into the m-SWNTs, to allow their complete removal using processes of thermocapillarity and dry etching. Experiments and numerical simulations establish the fundamental aspects that lead to selectivity in this process, thereby setting design rules for optimization. Single-step purification of arrays that include thousands of SWNTs demonstrates the effectiveness and simplicity of the procedures. The result is a practical route to large-area aligned arrays of purely s-SWNTs with low-cost experimental setups.

  11. Direct current injection and thermocapillary flow for purification of aligned arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xu; Wahab, Muhammad A.; Li, Yuhang; Islam, Ahmad E.; Tomic, Bojan; Huang, Jiyuan; Burns, Branden; Seabron, Eric; Dunham, Simon N.; Du, Frank; Lin, Jonathan; Wilson, William L.; Song, Jizhou; Huang, Yonggang; Alam, Muhammad A.; Rogers, John A.

    2015-04-01

    Aligned arrays of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) represent ideal configurations for use of this class of material in high performance electronics. Development of means for removing the metallic SWNTs (m-SWNTs) in as-grown arrays represents an essential challenge. Here, we introduce a simple scheme that achieves this type of purification using direct, selective current injection through interdigitated electrodes into the m-SWNTs, to allow their complete removal using processes of thermocapillarity and dry etching. Experiments and numerical simulations establish the fundamental aspects that lead to selectivity in this process, thereby setting design rules for optimization. Single-step purification of arrays that include thousands of SWNTs demonstrates the effectiveness and simplicity of the procedures. The result is a practical route to large-area aligned arrays of purely s-SWNTs with low-cost experimental setups.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of well-aligned and ultra-sharp silicon nanotip array

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Well-defined, uniform, and large-area nanoscaled tips are of great interest for scanning probe microscopy and high-efficiency field emission. An ultra-sharp nanotip causes higher electrical field and, hence, improves the emission current. In this paper, a large-area and well-aligned ultra-sharp nanotip arrays by reactive ion etching and oxidation techniques are fabricated. The apex of nanotips can be further sharpened to reach 3-nm radius by subsequent oxidation and etching process. A schematic model to explain the formation of nanotip array is proposed. When increasing the etching time, the photoresist on top of the nanotip is also consumed, and the exposed silicon substrate is etched away to form the nanotip. At the end, the photoresist is consumed completely and a nanotip with pyramid-like shape is developed. The field emission property was measured, and the turn-on field and work function of the ultra-sharp nanotip was about 5.37 V/μm and 4.59 eV, respectively. A nanotip with an oxide layer capped on the sidewall is also fabricated in this paper. Comparing to the uncapped nanotip, the oxide-capped sample exhibits stable and excellent field emission property against environmental disturbance. PMID:22330967

  13. Fast growth of well-aligned ZnO nanowire arrays by a microwave heating method and their photocatalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guangxia; Hong, Kunquan; Wang, Wenda; Liu, Liqing; Xu, Mingxiang

    2016-10-28

    The fast growth of aligned ZnO nanowire arrays with optimized structure is attractive for electrical and optical devices. In this paper, we report a controllable and rapid growth of ZnO nanowire arrays by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. When using different zinc salts as the precursors, the morphology of the samples changes a lot and the length growth rate is several times different. The growth mechanism is also investigated. It is found that the solution near neutral pH value is ideal for fast nanowire growth, in which the length of the nanowires increases linearly with growth time and the growth rate is over ten times faster than that in the traditional hydrothermal method. Therefore, aligned ZnO nanowire arrays can grow up to tens of microns in a few hours, while the density and sizes of these nanowires can be well controlled. The ZnO nanowire arrays used as photocatalysts present good photocatalytic performance to the degradation of methyl orange (MO) due to the large surface area. So this paper provides an effective method to obtain vertically aligned ZnO nanowire arrays for practical applications. PMID:27655230

  14. Fast growth of well-aligned ZnO nanowire arrays by a microwave heating method and their photocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Guangxia; Hong, Kunquan; Wang, Wenda; Liu, Liqing; Xu, Mingxiang

    2016-10-01

    The fast growth of aligned ZnO nanowire arrays with optimized structure is attractive for electrical and optical devices. In this paper, we report a controllable and rapid growth of ZnO nanowire arrays by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. When using different zinc salts as the precursors, the morphology of the samples changes a lot and the length growth rate is several times different. The growth mechanism is also investigated. It is found that the solution near neutral pH value is ideal for fast nanowire growth, in which the length of the nanowires increases linearly with growth time and the growth rate is over ten times faster than that in the traditional hydrothermal method. Therefore, aligned ZnO nanowire arrays can grow up to tens of microns in a few hours, while the density and sizes of these nanowires can be well controlled. The ZnO nanowire arrays used as photocatalysts present good photocatalytic performance to the degradation of methyl orange (MO) due to the large surface area. So this paper provides an effective method to obtain vertically aligned ZnO nanowire arrays for practical applications.

  15. Fast growth of well-aligned ZnO nanowire arrays by a microwave heating method and their photocatalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guangxia; Hong, Kunquan; Wang, Wenda; Liu, Liqing; Xu, Mingxiang

    2016-10-28

    The fast growth of aligned ZnO nanowire arrays with optimized structure is attractive for electrical and optical devices. In this paper, we report a controllable and rapid growth of ZnO nanowire arrays by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. When using different zinc salts as the precursors, the morphology of the samples changes a lot and the length growth rate is several times different. The growth mechanism is also investigated. It is found that the solution near neutral pH value is ideal for fast nanowire growth, in which the length of the nanowires increases linearly with growth time and the growth rate is over ten times faster than that in the traditional hydrothermal method. Therefore, aligned ZnO nanowire arrays can grow up to tens of microns in a few hours, while the density and sizes of these nanowires can be well controlled. The ZnO nanowire arrays used as photocatalysts present good photocatalytic performance to the degradation of methyl orange (MO) due to the large surface area. So this paper provides an effective method to obtain vertically aligned ZnO nanowire arrays for practical applications.

  16. Quality assurance of asymmetric jaw alignment using 2D diode array

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Mo; Yeung, Ivan W. T.; Moseley, Douglas J.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: A method using a 2D diode array is proposed to measure the junction gap (or overlap) and dose with high precision for routine quality assurance of the asymmetric jaw alignment.Methods: The central axis (CAX) of the radiation field was determined with a 15 × 15 cm{sup 2} photon field at four cardinal collimator angles so that the junction gap (or overlap) can be measured with respect to the CAX. Two abutting fields having a field size of 15 cm (length along the axis parallel to the junction) × 7.5 cm (width along the axis perpendicular to the junction) were used to irradiate the 2D diode array (MapCHECK2) with 100 MU delivered at the photon energy of 6 MV. The collimator was slightly rotated at 15° with respect to the beam central axis to increase the number of diodes effective on the measurement of junction gap. The junction gap and dose measured in high spatial resolution were compared to the conventional methods using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and radiochromic film, respectively. In addition, the reproducibility and sensitivity of the proposed method to the measurements of junction gap and dose were investigated.Results: The junction gap (or overlap) and dose measured by MapCHECK2 agreed well to those measured by the conventional methods of EPID and film (the differences ranged from −0.01 to 0 cm and from −1.34% to 0.6% for the gap and dose, respectively). No variation in the repeat measurements of the junction gap was found whereas the measurements of junction dose were found to vary in quite a small range over the days of measurement (0.21%–0.35%). While the sensitivity of the measured junction gap to the actual junction gap applied was the ideal value of 1 cm/cm as expected, the sensitivity of the junction dose to the actual junction gap increased as the junction gap (or overlap) decreased (maximum sensitivity: 201.7%/cm).Conclusions: The initial results suggest that the method is applicable for a comprehensive quality

  17. Inorganic/organic hybrid solar cells: optimal carrier transport in vertically aligned silicon nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Keisuke; Dutta, Mrinal; Fukata, Naoki

    2014-05-01

    Inorganic/organic hybrid radial heterojunction solar cells that combine vertically-aligned n-type silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene-sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) have great potential for replacing commercial Si solar cells. The chief advantage of such solar cells is that they exhibit higher absorbance for a given thickness than commercial Si solar cells, due to incident light-trapping within the NW arrays, thus enabling lower-cost solar cell production. We report herein on the effects of NW length, annealing and surface electrode on the device performance of SiNW/PEDOT:PSS hybrid radial heterojunction solar cells. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the obtained SiNW/PEDOT:PSS hybrid solar cells can be optimized by tuning the thickness of the surface electrode, and the etching conditions during NW formation and post-annealing. The PCE of 9.3% is obtained by forming efficient transport pathways for photogenerated charge carriers to electrodes. Our approach is a significant contribution to design of high-performance and low-cost inorganic/organic hybrid heterojunction solar cells.Inorganic/organic hybrid radial heterojunction solar cells that combine vertically-aligned n-type silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene-sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) have great potential for replacing commercial Si solar cells. The chief advantage of such solar cells is that they exhibit higher absorbance for a given thickness than commercial Si solar cells, due to incident light-trapping within the NW arrays, thus enabling lower-cost solar cell production. We report herein on the effects of NW length, annealing and surface electrode on the device performance of SiNW/PEDOT:PSS hybrid radial heterojunction solar cells. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the obtained SiNW/PEDOT:PSS hybrid solar cells can be optimized by tuning the thickness of the surface electrode, and the etching conditions during NW formation and

  18. Coaxial carbon@boron nitride nanotube arrays with enhanced thermal stability and compressive mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Lin; Tay, Roland Yingjie; Li, Hongling; Tsang, Siu Hon; Huang, Jingfeng; Tan, Dunlin; Zhang, Bowei; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong

    2016-05-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have aroused considerable interest because of their remarkable mechanical properties. However, the mechanical behaviour of as-synthesized CNT arrays could vary drastically at a macro-scale depending on their morphologies, dimensions and array density, which are determined by the synthesis method. Here, we demonstrate a coaxial carbon@boron nitride nanotube (C@BNNT) array with enhanced compressive strength and shape recoverability. CNT arrays are grown using a commercially available thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD) technique and an outer BNNT with a wall thickness up to 1.37 nm is introduced by a post-growth TCVD treatment. Importantly, compared to the as-grown CNT arrays which deform almost plastically upon compression, the coaxial C@BNNT arrays exhibit an impressive ~4-fold increase in compressive strength with nearly full recovery after the first compression cycle at a 50% strain (76% recovery maintained after 10 cycles), as well as a significantly high and persistent energy dissipation ratio (~60% at a 50% strain after 100 cycles), attributed to the synergistic effect between the CNT and outer BNNT. Additionally, the as-prepared C@BNNT arrays show an improved structural stability in air at elevated temperatures, attributing to the outstanding thermal stability of the outer BNNT. This work provides new insights into tailoring the mechanical and thermal behaviours of arbitrary CNT arrays which enables a broader range of applications.Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have aroused considerable interest because of their remarkable mechanical properties. However, the mechanical behaviour of as-synthesized CNT arrays could vary drastically at a macro-scale depending on their morphologies, dimensions and array density, which are determined by the synthesis method. Here, we demonstrate a coaxial carbon@boron nitride nanotube (C@BNNT) array with enhanced compressive strength and shape recoverability

  19. Low-temperature growth of well-aligned zinc oxide nanorod arrays on silicon substrate and their photocatalytic application

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Ameer; Babkair, Saeed Salem

    2014-01-01

    Well-aligned and single-crystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod arrays were grown on silicon (Si) substrate using a wet chemical route for the photodegradation of organic dyes. Structural analysis using X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and selected area electron diffraction confirmed the formation of ZnO nanorods grown preferentially oriented in the (001) direction and with a single phase nature with a wurtzite structure. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy micrographs showed that the length and diameter of the well-aligned rods were about ~350–400 nm and ~80–90 nm, respectively. Raman scattering spectra of ZnO nanorod arrays revealed the characteristic E2 (high) mode that is related to the vibration of oxygen atoms in the wurtzite ZnO. The photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) using ZnO nanorod arrays was performed under ultraviolet light irradiation. The results of photodegradation showed that ZnO nanorod arrays were capable of degrading ~80% of MB within 60 minutes of irradiation, whereas ~92% of degradation was achieved in 120 minutes. Complete degradation of MB was observed after 270 minutes of irradiation time. Owing to enhanced photocatalytic degradation efficiency and low-temperature growth method, prepared ZnO nanorod arrays may open up the possibility for the successful utilization of ZnO nanorod arrays as a future photocatalyst for environmental remediation. PMID:24812511

  20. Inorganic/organic hybrid solar cells: optimal carrier transport in vertically aligned silicon nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Sato, Keisuke; Dutta, Mrinal; Fukata, Naoki

    2014-06-01

    Inorganic/organic hybrid radial heterojunction solar cells that combine vertically-aligned n-type silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene-sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) have great potential for replacing commercial Si solar cells. The chief advantage of such solar cells is that they exhibit higher absorbance for a given thickness than commercial Si solar cells, due to incident light-trapping within the NW arrays, thus enabling lower-cost solar cell production. We report herein on the effects of NW length, annealing and surface electrode on the device performance of SiNW/PEDOT:PSS hybrid radial heterojunction solar cells. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the obtained SiNW/PEDOT:PSS hybrid solar cells can be optimized by tuning the thickness of the surface electrode, and the etching conditions during NW formation and post-annealing. The PCE of 9.3% is obtained by forming efficient transport pathways for photogenerated charge carriers to electrodes. Our approach is a significant contribution to design of high-performance and low-cost inorganic/organic hybrid heterojunction solar cells.

  1. Nanofabrication of arrays of silicon field emitters with vertical silicon nanowire current limiters and self-aligned gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrera, S. A.; Akinwande, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    We developed a fabrication process for embedding a dense array (108 cm-2) of high-aspect-ratio silicon nanowires (200 nm diameter and 10 μm tall) in a dielectric matrix and then structured/exposed the tips of the nanowires to form self-aligned gate field emitter arrays using chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). Using this structure, we demonstrated a high current density (100 A cm-2), uniform, and long lifetime (>100 h) silicon field emitter array architecture in which the current emitted by each tip is regulated by the silicon nanowire current limiter connected in series with the tip. Using the current voltage characteristics and with the aid of numerical device models, we estimated the tip radius of our field emission arrays to be ≈4.8 nm, as consistent with the tip radius measured using a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  2. Nanofabrication of arrays of silicon field emitters with vertical silicon nanowire current limiters and self-aligned gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrera, S. A.; Akinwande, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    We developed a fabrication process for embedding a dense array (108 cm‑2) of high-aspect-ratio silicon nanowires (200 nm diameter and 10 μm tall) in a dielectric matrix and then structured/exposed the tips of the nanowires to form self-aligned gate field emitter arrays using chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). Using this structure, we demonstrated a high current density (100 A cm‑2), uniform, and long lifetime (>100 h) silicon field emitter array architecture in which the current emitted by each tip is regulated by the silicon nanowire current limiter connected in series with the tip. Using the current voltage characteristics and with the aid of numerical device models, we estimated the tip radius of our field emission arrays to be ≈4.8 nm, as consistent with the tip radius measured using a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  3. Nanofabrication of arrays of silicon field emitters with vertical silicon nanowire current limiters and self-aligned gates.

    PubMed

    Guerrera, S A; Akinwande, A I

    2016-07-22

    We developed a fabrication process for embedding a dense array (10(8) cm(-2)) of high-aspect-ratio silicon nanowires (200 nm diameter and 10 μm tall) in a dielectric matrix and then structured/exposed the tips of the nanowires to form self-aligned gate field emitter arrays using chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). Using this structure, we demonstrated a high current density (100 A cm(-2)), uniform, and long lifetime (>100 h) silicon field emitter array architecture in which the current emitted by each tip is regulated by the silicon nanowire current limiter connected in series with the tip. Using the current voltage characteristics and with the aid of numerical device models, we estimated the tip radius of our field emission arrays to be ≈4.8 nm, as consistent with the tip radius measured using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). PMID:27292120

  4. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Gerald J.; Way, Austin J.; Safron, Nathaniel S.; Evensen, Harold T.; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G0 = 4e2/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm−1, fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm−1, which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm−1 and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies.

  5. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs.

    PubMed

    Brady, Gerald J; Way, Austin J; Safron, Nathaniel S; Evensen, Harold T; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S

    2016-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G 0 = 4e (2)/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G 0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm(-1), fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G 0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm(-1), which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm(-1) and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies. PMID:27617293

  6. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs.

    PubMed

    Brady, Gerald J; Way, Austin J; Safron, Nathaniel S; Evensen, Harold T; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S

    2016-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G 0 = 4e (2)/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G 0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm(-1), fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G 0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm(-1), which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm(-1) and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies.

  7. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Gerald J.; Way, Austin J.; Safron, Nathaniel S.; Evensen, Harold T.; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G0 = 4e2/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm−1, fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm−1, which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm−1 and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies. PMID:27617293

  8. Determination of the effective Young's modulus of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays: a simple nanotube-based varactor.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Niklas; Ek-Weis, Johan; Eriksson, Anders; Idda, Tonio; Campbell, Eleanor E B

    2009-09-23

    The electromechanical properties of arrays of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes were studied in a parallel plate capacitor geometry. The electrostatic actuation was visualized using both optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and highly reproducible behaviour was achieved for actuation voltages below the pull-in voltage. The walls of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes behave as solid cohesive units. The effective Young's modulus for the carbon nanotube arrays was determined by comparing the actuation results with the results of electrostatic simulations and was found to be exceptionally low, of the order of 1-10 MPa. The capacitance change and Q-factor were determined by measuring the frequency dependence of the radio-frequency transmission. Capacitance changes of over 20% and Q-factors in the range 100-10 were achieved for a frequency range of 0.2-1.5 GHz.

  9. Catalyst-free highly vertically aligned ZnO nanoneedle arrays grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. S.; Yang, C. S.; Chen, P. I.; Su, C. F.; Chen, W. J.; Chiu, K. C.; Chou, W. C.

    2009-11-01

    This work describes the growth of highly vertically aligned ZnO nanoneedle arrays on wafer-scale catalyst-free c-plane sapphire substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under high Zn flux conditions. The photoluminescence spectrum of the as-grown samples reveals strong free exciton emissions and donor-bound exciton emissions with an excellent full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 1.4 meV. The field emission of highly vertically aligned ZnO nanoneedle arrays closely follows the Fowler-Nordheim theory. The turn-on electric field was about 5.9 V/µm with a field enhancement factor β of around 793.

  10. Low-Cost, Large-Area, Facile, and Rapid Fabrication of Aligned ZnO Nanowire Device Arrays.

    PubMed

    Cadafalch Gazquez, Gerard; Lei, Sidong; George, Antony; Gullapalli, Hemtej; Boukamp, Bernard A; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Ten Elshof, Johan E

    2016-06-01

    Well aligned nanowires of ZnO have been made with an electrospinning technique using zinc acetate precursor solutions. Employment of two connected parallel collector plates with a separating gap of 4 cm resulted in a very high degree of nanowire alignment. By adjusting the process parameters, the deposition density of the wires could be controlled. Field effect transistors were prepared by depositing wires between two gold electrodes on top of a heavily doped Si substrate covered with a 300 nm oxide layer. These devices showed good FET characteristics and photosensitivity under UV-illumination. The method provides a fast and scalable fabrication route for functional nanowire arrays with a high degree of alignment and control over nanowire spacing. PMID:27173007

  11. Dense arrays of highly aligned graphene nanoribbons produced by substrate-controlled metal-assisted etching of graphene.

    PubMed

    Solís-Fernández, Pablo; Yoshida, Kazuma; Ogawa, Yui; Tsuji, Masaharu; Ago, Hiroki

    2013-12-01

    Dense arrays of aligned graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are fabricated by substrate-controlled etching of large-area single-layer graphene. An adequate choice of etching substrate and catalyst deposition method allows densities up to 25 nanoribbons μm(-1) to be obtained with average widths of 19 nm. The efficacy of the method is evidenced by the high on/off ratios of back-gated transistors made with these GNRs, which can go up to 5000. PMID:24030892

  12. Advanced materials from natural materials: synthesis of aligned carbon nanotubes on wollastonites.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Huang, Jia-Qi; Nie, Jing-Qi; Wei, Fei

    2010-04-26

    The growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on natural materials is a low-cost, environmentally benign, and materials-saving method for the large-scale production of CNTs. Directly building 3D CNT architectures on natural materials is a key issue for obtaining advanced materials with high added value. We report the fabrication of aligned CNT arrays on fibrous natural wollastonite. Strongly dispersed iron particles with small sizes were produced on a planar surface of soaked fibrous wollastonite by a reduction process. These particles then catalyzed the decomposition of ethylene, leading to the synchronous growth of CNTs to form leaf- and brush-like wollastonite/CNT hybrids. The as-obtained hybrids could be further transformed into porous SiO(2)/CNT hybrids by reaction with hydrochloric acid. Further treatment with hydrofluoric acid resulted in aligned CNT arrays, with purities as high as 98.7 %. The presented work is very promising for the fabrication of advanced materials with unique structures and properties that can be used as fillers, catalyst supports, or energy-absorbing materials. PMID:20183856

  13. Advanced materials from natural materials: synthesis of aligned carbon nanotubes on wollastonites.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Huang, Jia-Qi; Nie, Jing-Qi; Wei, Fei

    2010-04-26

    The growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on natural materials is a low-cost, environmentally benign, and materials-saving method for the large-scale production of CNTs. Directly building 3D CNT architectures on natural materials is a key issue for obtaining advanced materials with high added value. We report the fabrication of aligned CNT arrays on fibrous natural wollastonite. Strongly dispersed iron particles with small sizes were produced on a planar surface of soaked fibrous wollastonite by a reduction process. These particles then catalyzed the decomposition of ethylene, leading to the synchronous growth of CNTs to form leaf- and brush-like wollastonite/CNT hybrids. The as-obtained hybrids could be further transformed into porous SiO(2)/CNT hybrids by reaction with hydrochloric acid. Further treatment with hydrofluoric acid resulted in aligned CNT arrays, with purities as high as 98.7 %. The presented work is very promising for the fabrication of advanced materials with unique structures and properties that can be used as fillers, catalyst supports, or energy-absorbing materials.

  14. The rapid growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes using laser heating.

    PubMed

    Park, J B; Jeong, S H; Jeong, M S; Lim, S C; Lee, I H; Lee, Y H

    2009-05-01

    Growth of densely packed vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs) using laser-induced chemical vapor deposition with visible laser (lambda = 532 nm) irradiation at room temperature is reported. Using a multiple-catalyst layer (Fe/Al/Cr) on quartz as the substrate and an acetylene-hydrogen mixture as the precursor gas, VA-CNT pillars with 60 microm height and 4 microm diameter were grown at a high rate of around 1 microm s(-1) with good reproducibility. It is demonstrated that the fabrication of uniform pillar arrays of VA-CNTs can be achieved with a single irradiation for each pillar using LCVD with no annealing or preprocessing of the substrate. Here, laser fast heating is considered the primary mechanism facilitating the growth of VA-CNT pillars. Field emission characteristics of an array of VA-CNT pillars were then examined to investigate their potential application in vacuum electronic devices.

  15. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Patry, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carrier liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to the CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  16. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the . substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carver liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to The CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  17. Ultra-violet Sensing Characteristic and Field Emission Properties of Vertically Aligned Aluminum Doped Zinc Oxide Nanorod Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Mamat, M. H.; Malek, M. F.; Musa, M. Z.; Khusaimi, Z.; Rusop, M.

    2011-05-25

    Ultra-violet (UV) sensing behavior and field emission characteristic have been investigated on vertically aligned aluminum (Al) doped zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod arrays prepared using sol-gel immersion method. Uniform and high coverage density of ZnO nanorod arrays have been successfully deposited on seeded-catalyst coated substrates. The synthesized nanorods have diameter sizes between 50 nm to 150 nm. The XRD spectra show Al doped ZnO nanorod array has high crystallinity properties with the dominancy of crystal growth along (002) plane or c-axis. UV photoresponse measurement indicates that Al doped ZnO nanorod array sensitively detects UV light as shown by conductance increment after UV illumination exposure. The nanorod array shows good field emission properties with low turn on field and threshold field at 2.1 V/{mu}m and 5.6 V/{mu}m, respectively. The result suggested that Al doped ZnO nanorod arrays prepared by low-cost sol-gel immersion method show promising result towards fabrication of multi applications especially in UV photoconductive sensor and field emission displays.

  18. The Alignment System for a Medium-Sized Schwarzschild-Couder Telescope Prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Deivid; Humensky, Brian; Nieto, Daniel; V Vassiliev Group in UCLA division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P Kaaret Group at Iowa University Department of Physics and Astronomy, CTA Consortium

    2016-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is an international project for a next-generation ground-based gamma-ray observatory. CTA, conceived as an array of tens of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, comprising small, medium and large-size telescopes, is aiming to improve on the sensitivity of current-generation experiments by an order of magnitude and provide energy coverage from 20 GeV to more than 300 TeV. The Schwarzschild-Couder design is a candidate 9-m diameter medium-sized telescope featuring a novel aplanatic two-mirror optical design capable of a wide field of view with significantly improved imaging resolution as compared to the traditional Davies-Cotton optical design. Achieving this imaging resolution imposes strict mirror alignment requirements that necessitate a sophisticated alignment system. This system uses a collection of position sensors between panels to determine the relative position of adjacent panels; each panel is mounted on a Stewart platform to allow motion control with six degrees of freedom, facilitating the alignment of the optical surface for the segmented primary and secondary mirrors. Alignments of the primary and secondary mirrors and the camera focal plane with respect to each other are performed utilizing a set of CCD cameras which image LEDs placed on the mirror panels to measure relative translation, and custom-built auto-collimators to measure relative tilt between the primary and secondary mirrors along the optical axis of the telescope. In this contribution we present the status of the development of the SC optical alignment system, soon to be materialized in a full-scale prototype SC medium-size telescope (pSCT) at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in southern Arizona.

  19. Advanced materials based on carbon nanotube arrays, yarns and papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Phlip David

    Carbon nanotubes have hundreds of potential applications but require innovative processing techniques to manipulate the microscopic carbon dust into useful devices and products. This thesis describes efforts to process carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using novel methods with the goals of: (1) improving the properties of energy absorbing and composite carbon nanotube materials and (2) increasing understanding of fundamental structure-property relationships within these materials. Millimeter long CNTs, in the form of arrays, yarns and papers, were used to produce energy absorbing foams and high volume fraction CNT composites. Vertically aligned CNT arrays were grown on silicon substrates using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of ethylene gas over iron nano-particles. The low density, millimeter thick arrays were tested under compression as energy absorbing foams. With additional CVD processing steps, it was possible to tune the compressive properties of the arrays. After the longest treatment, the compressive strength of the arrays was increased by a factor of 35 with a density increase of only six fold, while also imparting recovery from compression to the array. Microscopy revealed that the post-synthesis CVD treatment increased the number of CNT walls through an epitaxial type radial growth on the surface of the as-grown tubes. The increase in tube radius and mutual support between nanotubes explained the increases in compressive strength while an increase in nanotube roughness was proposed as the morphological change responsible for recovery in the array. Carbon nanotube yarns were used as the raw material for macroscopic textile preforms with a multi-level hierarchical carbon nanotube (CNT) structure: nanotubes, bundles, spun single yarns, plied yarns and 3-D braids. In prior tensile tests, composites produced from the 3-D braids exhibited unusual mechanical behavior effects. The proposed physical hypotheses explained those effects by molecular level interactions and

  20. Aligned ZnO/CdTe core-shell nanocable arrays on indium tin oxide: synthesis and photoelectrochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xina; Zhu, Haojun; Xu, Yeming; Wang, Hao; Tao, Yin; Hark, Suikong; Xiao, Xudong; Li, Quan

    2010-06-22

    Vertically aligned ZnO/CdTe core-shell nanocable arrays-on-indium tin oxide (ITO) are fabricated by electrochemical deposition of CdTe on ZnO nanorod arrays in an electrolyte close to neutral pH. By adjusting the total charge quantity applied during deposition, the CdTe shell thickness can be tuned from several tens to hundreds of nanometers. The CdTe shell, which has a zinc-blende structure, is very dense and uniform both radially and along the axial direction of the nanocables, and forms an intact interface with the wurtzite ZnO nanorod core. The absorption of the CdTe shell above its band gap ( approximately 1.5 eV) and the type II band alignment between the CdTe shell and the ZnO core, respectively, demonstrated by absorption and photoluminescence measurements, make a nanocable array-on-ITO architecture a promising photoelectrode with excellent photovoltaic properties for solar energy applications. A photocurrent density of approximately 5.9 mA/cm(2) has been obtained under visible light illumination of 100 mW cm(-2) with zero bias potential (vs saturated calomel electrode). The neutral electrodeposition method can be generally used for plating CdTe on nanostructures made of different materials, which would be of interest in various applications. PMID:20446665

  1. Scintillating Fiber Array Characterization and Alignment for Neutron Imaging using the High Energy X-ray (HEX) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Buckles, R. A., Ali, Z. A., Cradick, J. R., Traille, A. J., Warthan, W. A.

    2009-09-04

    The Neutron Imager diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will produce high-resolution, gated images of neutron-generating implosions. A similar pinhole imaging experiment (PINEX) diagnostic was recently deployed at the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Both the SNL and LLNL neutron imagers use similar fiber array scintillators (BCF-99-555). Despite diverse resolution and magnification requirements, both diagnostics put significant onus on the scintillator spatial quality and alignment precision to maintain optimal point spread. Characterization and alignment of the Z-PINEX scintillator and imaging system were done at NSTec/Livermore Operations in 2009, and is currently underway for the NIF Neutron Imager.

  2. Phonon processes in vertically aligned silicon nanowire arrays produced by low-cost all-solution galvanic displacement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debika; Trudeau, Charles; Gerlein, Luis Felipe; Cloutier, Sylvain G.

    2016-03-01

    The nanoscale engineering of silicon can significantly change its bulk optoelectronic properties to make it more favorable for device integration. Phonon process engineering is one way to enhance inter-band transitions in silicon's indirect band structure alignment. This paper demonstrates phonon localization at the tip of silicon nanowires fabricated by galvanic displacement using wet electroless chemical etching of a bulk silicon wafer. High-resolution Raman micro-spectroscopy reveals that such arrayed structures of silicon nanowires display phonon localization behaviors, which could help their integration into the future generations of nano-engineered silicon nanowire-based devices such as photodetectors and solar cells.

  3. Photoelectrochemical Properties of Vertically Aligned CuInS2 Nanorod Arrays Prepared via Template-Assisted Growth and Transfer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wooseok; Oh, Yunjung; Kim, Jimin; Kim, Hyunchul; Shin, Hyunjung; Moon, Jooho

    2016-01-13

    Although copper-based chalcopyrite materials such as CuInS2 have been considered promising photocathodes for solar water splitting, the fabrication route for a nanostructure with vertical orientation has not yet been developed. Here, a fabrication route for vertically aligned CuInS2 nanorod arrays from an aqueous solution using anodic aluminum oxide template-assisted growth and transfer is presented. The nanorods exhibit a phase-pure CuInS2 chalcopyrite structure and cathodic photocurrent response without co-catalyst loading. Small particles of CdS and ZnS were conformally decorated onto CuInS2 nanorods using a successive ion layer adsorption and reaction method. With surface modification of CdS/ZnS, the photoelectrochemical properties of CuInS2 nanorod arrays are enhanced via flat-band potential shift, as determined by analyses of onset potential and Mott-Schottky plots. PMID:26645722

  4. Ultralight anisotropic foams from layered aligned carbon nanotube sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraji, Shaghayegh; L. Stano, Kelly; Yildiz, Ozkan; Li, Ang; Zhu, Yuntian; Bradford, Philip D.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we present large scale, ultralight aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) structures which have densities an order of magnitude lower than CNT arrays, have tunable properties and exhibit resiliency after compression. By stacking aligned sheets of carbon nanotubes and then infiltrating with a pyrolytic carbon (PyC), resilient foam-like materials were produced that exhibited complete recovery from 90% compressive strain. With density as low as 3.8 mg cm-3, the foam structure is over 500 times less dense than bulk graphite. Microscopy revealed that PyC coated the junctions among CNTs, and also increased CNT surface roughness. These changes in the morphology explain the transition from inelastic behavior to foam-like recovery of the layered CNT sheet structure. Mechanical and thermal properties of the foams were tuned for different applications through variation of PyC deposition duration while dynamic mechanical analysis showed no change in mechanical properties over a large temperature range. Observation of a large and linear electrical resistance change during compression of the aligned CNT/carbon (ACNT/C) foams makes strain/pressure sensors a relevant application. The foams have high oil absorption capacities, up to 275 times their own weight, which suggests they may be useful in water treatment and oil spill cleanup. Finally, the ACNT/C foam's high porosity, surface area and stability allow for demonstration of the foams as catalyst support structures.In this work, we present large scale, ultralight aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) structures which have densities an order of magnitude lower than CNT arrays, have tunable properties and exhibit resiliency after compression. By stacking aligned sheets of carbon nanotubes and then infiltrating with a pyrolytic carbon (PyC), resilient foam-like materials were produced that exhibited complete recovery from 90% compressive strain. With density as low as 3.8 mg cm-3, the foam structure is over 500 times less dense than

  5. Synthesis of Large Arrays of Well-Aligned Carbon Nanotubes on Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, P. Siegal, M.P.; Huang, Z.P.; Provencio, P.N.; Ren, Z.F.; Wang, J.H.; Xu, J.W.

    1998-11-10

    Free-standing aligned carbon nanotubes have previously been grown above 7000C on mesoporous silica embedded with iron nanoparticles. Here, carbon nanotubes aligned over areas up to several square centimeters were grown on nickel-coated glass below 666oC by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition. Acetylene (C2H2) gas was used as the carbon source and ammonia (NH3) gas was used as a catalyst and dilution gas. Nanotubes with controllable diameters from 20 to 400 nanometers and lengths from 0.1 to 50 micrometers were obtained. Using this method, large panels of aligned carbon nanotubes can be made under conditions that are suitable for device fabrication.

  6. Large-scale fabrication of vertically aligned ZnO nanowire arrays

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhong Lin; Hu, Youfan; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Chen; Zhu, Guang

    2014-09-09

    A generator includes a substrate, a first electrode layer, a dense plurality of vertically-aligned piezoelectric elongated nanostructures, an insulating layer and a second electrode layer. The substrate has a top surface and the first electrode layer is disposed on the top surface of the substrate. The dense plurality of vertically-aligned piezoelectric elongated nanostructures extends from the first electrode layer. Each of the nanostructures has a top end. The insulating layer is disposed on the top ends of the nanostructures. The second electrode layer is disposed on the non-conductive layer and is spaced apart from the nanostructures.

  7. Nanoconfinement induced crystal orientation and large piezoelectric coefficient in vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array.

    PubMed

    Liew, Weng Heng; Mirshekarloo, Meysam Sharifzadeh; Chen, Shuting; Yao, Kui; Tay, Francis Eng Hock

    2015-05-12

    Vertically aligned piezoelectric P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array comprising nanotubes embedded in anodized alumina membrane matrix without entanglement has been fabricated. It is found that the crystallographic polar axes of the P(VDF-TrFE) nanotubes are oriented along the nanotubes long axes. Such a desired crystal orientation is due to the kinetic selection mechanism for lamellae growth confined in the nanopores. The preferred crystal orientation in nanotubes leads to huge piezoelectric coefficients of the P(VDF-TrFE). The piezoelectric strain and voltage coefficients of P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array are observed to be 1.97 and 3.40 times of those for conventional spin coated film. Such a significant performance enhancement is attributed to the well-controlled polarization orientation, the elimination of the substrate constraint, and the low dielectric constant of the nanotube array. The P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array exhibiting the unique structure and outstanding piezoelectric performance is promising for wide applications, including various electrical devices and electromechanical sensors and transducers.

  8. Seed layer-free electrodeposition of well-aligned ZnO submicron rod arrays via a simple aqueous electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Feng; Lu Yinong; Xia Lili; Xie Yan; Dai Min; Liu Yunfei

    2009-08-05

    A potentiostatic electrodeposition technique was used to directly fabricate large-scale, well-aligned, and single-crystalline submicron ZnO rod arrays on tin doped indium oxide glass substrate without a pre-prepared seed layer of ZnO from an aqueous solution only containing zinc nitrate. The effects of electrochemical parameters, such as electrodeposition potential, electrodeposition duration, solution temperature, and precursor concentration, on the orientation, morphology, aspect ratio, and growth rate of ZnO rod arrays were systematically investigated. Results show that submicron ZnO rod arrays with (0 0 0 2) preferred orientation and perfect crystallization were obtained when electrodeposition potential was in the range from -0.6 to -1.1 V and solution temperature was controlled above 60 deg. C. Both high solution temperature and low precursor concentration resulted in the decrease in rod diameters. Photoluminescence measures showed that small diameter and nanotips of ZnO rod arrays should be responsible for strong and sharp ultraviolet emission in the room temperature photoluminescence spectra.

  9. Nanoconfinement induced crystal orientation and large piezoelectric coefficient in vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Weng Heng; Mirshekarloo, Meysam Sharifzadeh; Chen, Shuting; Yao, Kui; Tay, Francis Eng Hock

    2015-01-01

    Vertically aligned piezoelectric P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array comprising nanotubes embedded in anodized alumina membrane matrix without entanglement has been fabricated. It is found that the crystallographic polar axes of the P(VDF-TrFE) nanotubes are oriented along the nanotubes long axes. Such a desired crystal orientation is due to the kinetic selection mechanism for lamellae growth confined in the nanopores. The preferred crystal orientation in nanotubes leads to huge piezoelectric coefficients of the P(VDF-TrFE). The piezoelectric strain and voltage coefficients of P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array are observed to be 1.97 and 3.40 times of those for conventional spin coated film. Such a significant performance enhancement is attributed to the well-controlled polarization orientation, the elimination of the substrate constraint, and the low dielectric constant of the nanotube array. The P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array exhibiting the unique structure and outstanding piezoelectric performance is promising for wide applications, including various electrical devices and electromechanical sensors and transducers. PMID:25966301

  10. Volumetric Heating of Ultra-High Energy Density Relativistic Plasmas by Ultrafast Laser Irradiation of Aligned Nanowire Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargsten, Clayton; Hollinger, Reed; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav; Pukhov, Alexander; Keiss, David; Townsend, Amanda; Wang, Yong; Wang, Shoujun; Prieto, Amy; Rocca, Jorge

    2014-10-01

    We have demonstrated the volumetric heating of near-solid density plasmas to keV temperatures by ultra-high contrast femtosecond laser irradiation of arrays of vertically aligned nanowires with an average density up to 30% solid density. X-ray spectra show that irradiation of Ni and Au nanowire arrays with laser pulses of relativistic intensities ionizes plasma volumes several micrometers in depth to the He-like and Co-like (Au 52 +) stages respectively. The penetration depth of the heat into the nanowire array was measured monitoring He-like Co lines from irradiated arrays in which the nanowires are composed of a Co segment buried under a selected length of Ni. The measurement shows the ionization reaches He-like Co for depth of up to 5 μm within the target. This volumetric plasma heating approach creates a new laboratory plasma regime in which extreme plasma parameters can be accessed with table-top lasers. Scaling to higher laser intensities promises to create plasmas with temperatures and pressures approaching those in the center of the sun. Work supported by the U.S Department of Energy, Fusion Energy Sciences and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency grant HDTRA-1-10-1-0079. A.P was supported by of DFG-funded project TR18.

  11. Nanoconfinement induced crystal orientation and large piezoelectric coefficient in vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array.

    PubMed

    Liew, Weng Heng; Mirshekarloo, Meysam Sharifzadeh; Chen, Shuting; Yao, Kui; Tay, Francis Eng Hock

    2015-01-01

    Vertically aligned piezoelectric P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array comprising nanotubes embedded in anodized alumina membrane matrix without entanglement has been fabricated. It is found that the crystallographic polar axes of the P(VDF-TrFE) nanotubes are oriented along the nanotubes long axes. Such a desired crystal orientation is due to the kinetic selection mechanism for lamellae growth confined in the nanopores. The preferred crystal orientation in nanotubes leads to huge piezoelectric coefficients of the P(VDF-TrFE). The piezoelectric strain and voltage coefficients of P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array are observed to be 1.97 and 3.40 times of those for conventional spin coated film. Such a significant performance enhancement is attributed to the well-controlled polarization orientation, the elimination of the substrate constraint, and the low dielectric constant of the nanotube array. The P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array exhibiting the unique structure and outstanding piezoelectric performance is promising for wide applications, including various electrical devices and electromechanical sensors and transducers. PMID:25966301

  12. Embedded arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanotube carpets and methods for making them

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Myung Jong; Nicholas, Nolan Walker; Kittrell, W. Carter; Schmidt, Howard K.

    2015-06-30

    According to some embodiments, the present invention provides a system and method for supporting a carbon nanotube array that involve an entangled carbon nanotube mat integral with the array, where the mat is embedded in an embedding material. The embedding material may be depositable on a carbon nanotube. A depositable material may be metallic or nonmetallic. The embedding material may be an adhesive material. The adhesive material may optionally be mixed with a metal powder. The embedding material may be supported by a substrate or self-supportive. The embedding material may be conductive or nonconductive. The system and method provide superior mechanical and, when applicable, electrical, contact between the carbon nanotubes in the array and the embedding material. The optional use of a conductive material for the embedding material provides a mechanism useful for integration of carbon nanotube arrays into electronic devices.

  13. Ruggedized microchannel-cooled laser diode array with self-aligned microlens

    DOEpatents

    Freitas, Barry L.; Skidmore, Jay A.

    2003-11-11

    A microchannel-cooled, optically corrected, laser diode array is fabricated by mounting laser diode bars onto Si surfaces. This approach allows for the highest thermal impedance, in a ruggedized, low-cost assembly that includes passive microlens attachment without the need for lens frames. The microlensed laser diode array is usable in all solid-state laser systems that require efficient, directional, narrow bandwidth, high optical power density pump sources.

  14. Microwave systems analysis, solar power satellite. [alignment of the antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Various alternative active approaches to achieving aand maintaining flatness for the microwave power transmission system (MPTS) were studied. A baseline active alignment scheme was developed which includes subarray attachment mechanisms, height and tilting adjustments, service corridors, a rotating laser beam reference system, monopulse pointing techniques, and the design of a beam-centering photoconductive sensor.

  15. Surface diffuse discharge mechanism of well-aligned atmospheric pressure microplasma arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren-Wu, Zhou; Ru-Sen, Zhou; Jin-Xing, Zhuang; Jiang-Wei, Li; Mao-Dong, Chen; Xian-Hui, Zhang; Dong-Ping, Liu; Kostya (Ken, Ostrikov; Si-Ze, Yang

    2016-04-01

    A stable and homogeneous well-aligned air microplasma device for application at atmospheric pressure is designed and its electrical and optical characteristics are investigated. Current-voltage measurements and intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) images show that the well-aligned air microplasma device is able to generate a large-area and homogeneous discharge at the applied voltages ranging from 12 kV to 14 kV, with a repetition frequency of 5 kHz, which is attributed to the diffusion effect of plasma on dielectric surface. Moreover, this well-aligned microplasma device may result in the uniform and large-area surface modification of heat-sensitive PET polymers without damage, such as optimization in hydrophobicity and biocompatibility. In the biomedical field, the utility of this well-aligned microplasma device is further testified. It proves to be very efficient for the large-area and uniform inactivation of E. coli cells with a density of 103/cm2 on LB agar plate culture medium, and inactivation efficiency can reach up to 99% for 2-min treatment. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Fujian Province, China (Grant No. 2014J01025), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11275261), the Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 2015A030313005), and the Fund from the Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, China.

  16. 3D RVE models able to capture and quantify the dispersion, agglomeration and orientation state of CNT in CNT/PP nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiyan, Md; Pucha, Raghuram; Kalaitzidou, Kyriaki

    2016-02-01

    The focus of this study is to investigate the capabilities of 3D RVE models in predicting the tensile modulus of carbon nanotube polypropylene (CNT/PP) composites which differ slightly in the dispersion, agglomeration and orientation states of CNT within the PP matrix. The composites are made using melt mixing followed by either injection molding or melt spinning of fibers. The dispersion, agglomeration and orientation of CNT within the PP are experimentally altered by using a surfactant and by forcing the molten material to flow through a narrow orifice (melt spinning) that promotes alignment of CNT along the flow/drawing direction. An elaborate image analysis technique is used to quantify the CNT characteristics in terms of probability distribution functions (PDF). The PDF are then introduced to the 3D RVE models which also account for the CNT-PP interfacial interactions. It is concluded that the 3D RVE models can accurately distinguish among the different cases (dispersion, distribution, geometry and alignment of CNT) as the predicted tensile modulus is in good agreement with the experimentally determined one.

  17. Vertically aligned ZnO nanorod core-polypyrrole conducting polymer sheath and nanotube arrays for electrochemical supercapacitor energy storage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nanocomposite electrodes having three-dimensional (3-D) nanoscale architecture comprising of vertically aligned ZnO nanorod array core-polypyrrole (PPy) conducting polymer sheath and the vertical PPy nanotube arrays have been investigated for supercapacitor energy storage. The electrodes in the ZnO nanorod core-PPy sheath structure are formed by preferential nucleation and deposition of PPy layer over hydrothermally synthesized vertical ZnO nanorod array by controlled pulsed current electropolymerization of pyrrole monomer under surfactant action. The vertical PPy nanotube arrays of different tube diameter are created by selective etching of the ZnO nanorod core in ammonia solution for different periods. Cyclic voltammetry studies show high areal-specific capacitance approximately 240 mF.cm-2 for open pore and approximately 180 mF.cm-2 for narrow 30-to-36-nm diameter PPy nanotube arrays attributed to intensive faradic processes arising from enhanced access of electrolyte ions through nanotube interior and exterior. Impedance spectroscopy studies show that capacitive response extends over larger frequency domain in electrodes with PPy nanotube structure. Simulation of Nyquist plots by electrical equivalent circuit modeling establishes that 3-D nanostructure is better represented by constant phase element which accounts for the inhomogeneous electrochemical redox processes. Charge-discharge studies at different current densities establish that kinetics of the redox process in PPy nanotube electrode is due to the limitation on electron transport rather than the diffusive process of electrolyte ions. The PPy nanotube electrodes show deep discharge capability with high coulomb efficiency and long-term charge-discharge cyclic studies show nondegrading performance of the specific areal capacitance tested for 5,000 cycles. PMID:25246867

  18. Vertically aligned ZnO nanorod core-polypyrrole conducting polymer sheath and nanotube arrays for electrochemical supercapacitor energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, Navjot Kaur; Rastogi, Alok C.

    2014-08-01

    Nanocomposite electrodes having three-dimensional (3-D) nanoscale architecture comprising of vertically aligned ZnO nanorod array core-polypyrrole (PPy) conducting polymer sheath and the vertical PPy nanotube arrays have been investigated for supercapacitor energy storage. The electrodes in the ZnO nanorod core-PPy sheath structure are formed by preferential nucleation and deposition of PPy layer over hydrothermally synthesized vertical ZnO nanorod array by controlled pulsed current electropolymerization of pyrrole monomer under surfactant action. The vertical PPy nanotube arrays of different tube diameter are created by selective etching of the ZnO nanorod core in ammonia solution for different periods. Cyclic voltammetry studies show high areal-specific capacitance approximately 240 mF.cm-2 for open pore and approximately 180 mF.cm-2 for narrow 30-to-36-nm diameter PPy nanotube arrays attributed to intensive faradic processes arising from enhanced access of electrolyte ions through nanotube interior and exterior. Impedance spectroscopy studies show that capacitive response extends over larger frequency domain in electrodes with PPy nanotube structure. Simulation of Nyquist plots by electrical equivalent circuit modeling establishes that 3-D nanostructure is better represented by constant phase element which accounts for the inhomogeneous electrochemical redox processes. Charge-discharge studies at different current densities establish that kinetics of the redox process in PPy nanotube electrode is due to the limitation on electron transport rather than the diffusive process of electrolyte ions. The PPy nanotube electrodes show deep discharge capability with high coulomb efficiency and long-term charge-discharge cyclic studies show nondegrading performance of the specific areal capacitance tested for 5,000 cycles.

  19. Vertically aligned ZnO nanorod core-polypyrrole conducting polymer sheath and nanotube arrays for electrochemical supercapacitor energy storage.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Navjot Kaur; Rastogi, Alok C

    2014-01-01

    Nanocomposite electrodes having three-dimensional (3-D) nanoscale architecture comprising of vertically aligned ZnO nanorod array core-polypyrrole (PPy) conducting polymer sheath and the vertical PPy nanotube arrays have been investigated for supercapacitor energy storage. The electrodes in the ZnO nanorod core-PPy sheath structure are formed by preferential nucleation and deposition of PPy layer over hydrothermally synthesized vertical ZnO nanorod array by controlled pulsed current electropolymerization of pyrrole monomer under surfactant action. The vertical PPy nanotube arrays of different tube diameter are created by selective etching of the ZnO nanorod core in ammonia solution for different periods. Cyclic voltammetry studies show high areal-specific capacitance approximately 240 mF.cm(-2) for open pore and approximately 180 mF.cm(-2) for narrow 30-to-36-nm diameter PPy nanotube arrays attributed to intensive faradic processes arising from enhanced access of electrolyte ions through nanotube interior and exterior. Impedance spectroscopy studies show that capacitive response extends over larger frequency domain in electrodes with PPy nanotube structure. Simulation of Nyquist plots by electrical equivalent circuit modeling establishes that 3-D nanostructure is better represented by constant phase element which accounts for the inhomogeneous electrochemical redox processes. Charge-discharge studies at different current densities establish that kinetics of the redox process in PPy nanotube electrode is due to the limitation on electron transport rather than the diffusive process of electrolyte ions. The PPy nanotube electrodes show deep discharge capability with high coulomb efficiency and long-term charge-discharge cyclic studies show nondegrading performance of the specific areal capacitance tested for 5,000 cycles. PMID:25246867

  20. Large-scale fabrication of vertically aligned ZnO nanowire arrays

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhong L; Das, Suman; Xu, Sheng; Yuan, Dajun; Guo, Rui; Wei, Yaguang; Wu, Wenzhuo

    2013-02-05

    In a method for growing a nanowire array, a photoresist layer is placed onto a nanowire growth layer configured for growing nanowires therefrom. The photoresist layer is exposed to a coherent light interference pattern that includes periodically alternately spaced dark bands and light bands along a first orientation. The photoresist layer exposed to the coherent light interference pattern along a second orientation, transverse to the first orientation. The photoresist layer developed so as to remove photoresist from areas corresponding to areas of intersection of the dark bands of the interference pattern along the first orientation and the dark bands of the interference pattern along the second orientation, thereby leaving an ordered array of holes passing through the photoresist layer. The photoresist layer and the nanowire growth layer are placed into a nanowire growth environment, thereby growing nanowires from the nanowire growth layer through the array of holes.

  1. Horizontal transfer of aligned Si nanowire arrays and their photoconductive performance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An easy and low-cost method to transfer large-scale horizontally aligned Si nanowires onto a substrate is reported. Si nanowires prepared by metal-assisted chemical etching were assembled and anchored to fabricate multiwire photoconductive devices with standard Si technology. Scanning electron microscopy images showed highly aligned and successfully anchored Si nanowires. Current-voltage tests showed an approximately twofold change in conductivity between the devices in dark and under laser irradiation. Fully reversible light switching ON/OFF response was also achieved with an ION/IOFF ratio of 230. Dynamic response measurement showed a fast switching feature with response and recovery times of 10.96 and 19.26 ms, respectively. PMID:25520603

  2. The Surface Interface Characteristics of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube and Graphitic Carbon Fiber Arrays Grown by Thermal and Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance; Nguyen, Cattien; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-01-01

    The development of nano-arrays for sensors and devices requires the growth of arrays with the proper characteristics. One such application is the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphitic carbon fibers (GCFs) for the chemical attachment of probe molecules. The effectiveness of such an array is dependent not only upon the effectiveness of the probe and the interface between that probe and the array, but also the array and the underlaying substrate. If that array is a growth of vertically aligned CNTs or GCFs then the attachment of that array to the surface is of the utmost importance. This attachment provides the mechanical stability and durability of the array, as well as, the electrical properties of that array. If the detection is to be acquired through an electrical measurement, then the appropriate resistance between the array and the surface need to be fabricated into the device. I will present data on CNTs and GCFs grown from both thermal and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The focus will be on the characteristics of the metal film from which the CNTs and GCFs are grown and the changes that occur due to changes within the growth process.

  3. Enhanced field electron emission from aligned diamond-like carbon nanorod arrays prepared by reactive ion beam etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yong; Qin, Shi-Qiao; Zhang, Xue-Ao; Chang, Sheng-Li; Li, Hui-Hui; Yuan, Ji-Ren

    2016-05-01

    Homogeneous diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on Si supports by a pulsed filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition system. Using DLC films masked by Ni nanoparticles as precursors, highly aligned diamond-like carbon nanorod (DLCNR) arrays were fabricated by the etching of inductively coupled radio frequency oxygen plasma. The as-prepared DLCNR arrays exhibit excellent field emission properties with a low turn-on field of 2.005 V μm‑1 and a threshold field of 4.312 V μm‑1, respectively. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to determine the chemical bonding structural change of DLC films before and after etching. It is confirmed that DLC films have good connection with Si supports via the formation of the SiC phase, and larger conductive sp2 domains are formed in the as-etched DLC films, which play essential roles in the enhanced field emission properties for DLCNR arrays.

  4. Self-Aligned Multichannel Graphene Nanoribbon Transistor Arrays Fabricated at Wafer Scale.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seong-Jun; Jo, Sanghyun; Lee, Jooho; Yang, Kiyeon; Lee, Hyangsook; Lee, Chang-Seok; Park, Heesoon; Park, Seongjun

    2016-09-14

    We present a novel method for fabricating large-area field-effect transistors (FETs) based on densely packed multichannel graphene nanoribbon (GNR) arrays using advanced direct self-assembly (DSA) nanolithography. The design of our strategy focused on the efficient integration of the FET channel and using fab-compatible processes such as thermal annealing and chemical vapor deposition. We achieved linearly stacked DSA nanopattern arrays with sub-10 nm half-pitch critical dimensions (CD) by controlling the thickness of topographic Au confinement patterns. Excellent roughness values (∼10% of CD) were obtained, demonstrating the feasibility of integrating sub-10 nm GNRs into commercial semiconductor processes. Based on this facile process, FETs with such densely packed multichannel GNR arrays were successfully fabricated on 6 in. silicon wafers. With these high-quality GNR arrays, we achieved FETs showing the highest performance reported to date (an on-to-off ratio larger than 10(2)) for similar devices produced using conventional photolithography and block-copolymer lithography.

  5. Self-Aligned Multichannel Graphene Nanoribbon Transistor Arrays Fabricated at Wafer Scale.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seong-Jun; Jo, Sanghyun; Lee, Jooho; Yang, Kiyeon; Lee, Hyangsook; Lee, Chang-Seok; Park, Heesoon; Park, Seongjun

    2016-09-14

    We present a novel method for fabricating large-area field-effect transistors (FETs) based on densely packed multichannel graphene nanoribbon (GNR) arrays using advanced direct self-assembly (DSA) nanolithography. The design of our strategy focused on the efficient integration of the FET channel and using fab-compatible processes such as thermal annealing and chemical vapor deposition. We achieved linearly stacked DSA nanopattern arrays with sub-10 nm half-pitch critical dimensions (CD) by controlling the thickness of topographic Au confinement patterns. Excellent roughness values (∼10% of CD) were obtained, demonstrating the feasibility of integrating sub-10 nm GNRs into commercial semiconductor processes. Based on this facile process, FETs with such densely packed multichannel GNR arrays were successfully fabricated on 6 in. silicon wafers. With these high-quality GNR arrays, we achieved FETs showing the highest performance reported to date (an on-to-off ratio larger than 10(2)) for similar devices produced using conventional photolithography and block-copolymer lithography. PMID:27532894

  6. Vertically-Aligned Single-Crystal Nanocone Arrays: Controlled Fabrication and Enhanced Field Emission.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jing Lai; Lei, Dang Yuan; Chen, Fei; Lau, Shu Ping; Milne, William I; Toimil-Molares, M E; Trautmann, Christina; Liu, Jie

    2016-01-13

    Metal nanostructures with conical shape, vertical alignment, large ratio of cone height and curvature radius at the apex, controlled cone angle, and single-crystal structure are ideal candidates for enhancing field electron-emission efficiency with additional merits, such as good mechanical and thermal stability. However, fabrication of such nanostructures possessing all these features is challenging. Here, we report on the controlled fabrication of large scale, vertically aligned, and mechanically self-supported single-crystal Cu nanocones with controlled cone angle and enhanced field emission. The Cu nanocones were fabricated by ion-track templates in combination with electrochemical deposition. Their cone angle is controlled in the range from 0.3° to 6.2° by asymmetrically selective etching of the ion tracks and the minimum tip curvature diameter reaches down to 6 nm. The field emission measurements show that the turn-on electric field of the Cu nanocone field emitters can be as low as 1.9 V/μm at current density of 10 μA/cm(2) (a record low value for Cu nanostructures, to the best of our knowledge). The maximum field enhancement factor we measured was as large as 6068, indicating that the Cu nanocones are promising candidates for field emission applications.

  7. Large-scale horizontally aligned ZnO microrod arrays with controlled orientation, periodic distribution as building blocks for chip-in piezo-phototronic LEDs.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhen; Li, Haiwen; Zhou, Lianqun; Zhao, Dongxu; Wu, Yihui; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Chuanyu; Yao, Jia

    2015-01-27

    A novel method of fabricating large-scale horizontally aligned ZnO microrod arrays with controlled orientation and periodic distribution via combing technology is introduced. Horizontally aligned ZnO microrod arrays with uniform orientation and periodic distribution can be realized based on the conventional bottom-up method prepared vertically aligned ZnO microrod matrix via the combing method. When the combing parameters are changed, the orientation of horizontally aligned ZnO microrod arrays can be adjusted (θ = 90° or 45°) in a plane and a misalignment angle of the microrods (0.3° to 2.3°) with low-growth density can be obtained. To explore the potential applications based on the vertically and horizontally aligned ZnO microrods on p-GaN layer, piezo-phototronic devices such as heterojunction LEDs are built. Electroluminescence (EL) emission patterns can be adjusted for the vertically and horizontally aligned ZnO microrods/p-GaN heterojunction LEDs by applying forward bias. Moreover, the emission color from UV-blue to yellow-green can be tuned by investigating the piezoelectric properties of the materials. The EL emission mechanisms of the LEDs are discussed in terms of band diagrams of the heterojunctions and carrier recombination processes.

  8. High-performance semiconductor optical amplifier array for self-aligned packaging using Si V-groove flip-chip technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, D.; Brosson, P.; Pommereau, F.; Ngo, R.; Doussiere, P.; Mallecot, F.; Gavignet, P.; Wamsler, I.; Laube, G.; Hunziker, W.

    1995-05-01

    A high performance four-tilted stripe semiconductor optical amplifier array, with low polarization sensitivity and very low-gain ripple, compatible with self-aligned flip-chip mounting on a Si motherboard is reported. Up to 32 dB of internal gain with 2-dB polarization sensitivity is obtained. A multifiber module has been realized, following an almost static optical alignment procedure, showing no degradation of the SOA array performances. Fiber-to-fiber gain, measured on the four stripes, is 14.4 +/- 1.3 dB with a gain ripple below +/- 0.1 dB.

  9. Well-Aligned Arrays of Vertically Oriented ZnO Nanorod Films for Photocatalytic Degradation of Textile Dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasr-Esfahani, Mojtaba; Nekoubin, Amin

    2011-05-01

    Well-aligned hexagonal ZnO nanorods arrays were synthesized via mild hydrothermal method under different conditions. A two-step approach was employed for the epitaxial growth of ZnO. First a ZnO seed layer was prepared by spin-coating process and then ZnO nanorods were deposited on it. The influences of growth time on the surface morphology, length, diameters and phase structure of ZnO rods films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The photocatalytic degradation of X6G an anionic monoazo dye, in aqueous solutions, was investigated and the effects of hydrothermal process time were examined. The results showed that the ZnO nonorods film hydrothermal treated for 4 h have a very high photocatalytic performance.

  10. Performance assessments of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes multi-electrode arrays using Cath.a-differentiated (CAD) cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Du Won; Jung, Jongjin; Kim, Gook Hwa; Yang, Cheol-Soo; Kim, Ju Jin; Jung, Sang Don; Lee, Jeong-O

    2015-08-21

    In this work, Cath.a-differentiated (CAD) cells were used in place of primary neuronal cells to assess the performance of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) multi-electrode arrays (MEA). To fabricate high-performance MEA, VACNTs were directly grown on graphene/Pt electrodes via plasma enhanced chemical deposition technique. Here, graphene served as an intermediate layer lowering contact resistance between VACNTs and Pt electrode. In order to lower the electrode impedance and to enhance the cell adhesion, VACNTs-MEAs were treated with UV-ozone for 20 min. Impedance of VACNTs electrode at 1 kHz frequency exhibits a reasonable value (110 kΩ) for extracellular signal recording, and the signal to noise ratio the is good enough to measure low signal amplitude (15.7). Spontaneous firing events from CAD cells were successfully measured with VACNTs MEAs that were also found to be surprisingly robust toward the biological interactions. PMID:26222018

  11. Performance assessments of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes multi-electrode arrays using Cath.a-differentiated (CAD) cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Du Won; Jung, Jongjin; Kim, Gook Hwa; Yang, Cheol-Soo; Kim, Ju Jin; Jung, Sang Don; Lee, Jeong-O

    2015-08-21

    In this work, Cath.a-differentiated (CAD) cells were used in place of primary neuronal cells to assess the performance of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) multi-electrode arrays (MEA). To fabricate high-performance MEA, VACNTs were directly grown on graphene/Pt electrodes via plasma enhanced chemical deposition technique. Here, graphene served as an intermediate layer lowering contact resistance between VACNTs and Pt electrode. In order to lower the electrode impedance and to enhance the cell adhesion, VACNTs-MEAs were treated with UV-ozone for 20 min. Impedance of VACNTs electrode at 1 kHz frequency exhibits a reasonable value (110 kΩ) for extracellular signal recording, and the signal to noise ratio the is good enough to measure low signal amplitude (15.7). Spontaneous firing events from CAD cells were successfully measured with VACNTs MEAs that were also found to be surprisingly robust toward the biological interactions.

  12. Cross-linking multiwall carbon nanotubes using PFPA to build robust, flexible and highly aligned large-scale sheets and yarns.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yoku; Nakamura, Kazumichi; Miyasaka, Yuta; Nakano, Takayuki; Kletetschka, Gunther

    2016-03-18

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) structures, including unidirectionally aligned sheets and spun yarns, were fabricated by direct dry-spinning methods from spinnable CNT arrays. We improved the mechanical properties of the CNT structures. CNTs were tailored in sheets and yarns using perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA) as a binding agent. The azide group of PFPA bonds to graphene crystal surfaces under UV radiation exposed for 1 h. For the CNT sheet, Young's modulus increased from 1.6 to 32.9 GPa and tensile strength increased from 35.9 MPa to 144.5 MPa. For the CNT yarns Young's modulus increased from 29.5 to 78.0 GPa and tensile strength increased from 639.1 to 675.6 MPa. With this treatment, the CNT sheets became more robust and more flexible materials. Since cross-linking of CNTs by PFPA is a simple and rapid process, it is suitable for fabrication of enhanced CNT materials. PMID:26871413

  13. Cross-linking multiwall carbon nanotubes using PFPA to build robust, flexible and highly aligned large-scale sheets and yarns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Yoku; Nakamura, Kazumichi; Miyasaka, Yuta; Nakano, Takayuki; Kletetschka, Gunther

    2016-03-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) structures, including unidirectionally aligned sheets and spun yarns, were fabricated by direct dry-spinning methods from spinnable CNT arrays. We improved the mechanical properties of the CNT structures. CNTs were tailored in sheets and yarns using perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA) as a binding agent. The azide group of PFPA bonds to graphene crystal surfaces under UV radiation exposed for 1 h. For the CNT sheet, Young’s modulus increased from 1.6 to 32.9 GPa and tensile strength increased from 35.9 MPa to 144.5 MPa. For the CNT yarns Young’s modulus increased from 29.5 to 78.0 GPa and tensile strength increased from 639.1 to 675.6 MPa. With this treatment, the CNT sheets became more robust and more flexible materials. Since cross-linking of CNTs by PFPA is a simple and rapid process, it is suitable for fabrication of enhanced CNT materials.

  14. Modeling and simulations of carbon nanotube (CNT) dispersion in water/surfactant/polymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Nasir Mohammad

    An innovative multiscale (atomistic to mesoscale) model capable of predicting carbon nanotube (CNT) interactions and dispersion in water/surfactant/polymer systems was developed. The model was verified qualitatively with available experimental data in the literature. It can be used to computationally screen potential surfactants, solvents, polymers, and CNT with appropriate diameter and length to obtain improved CNT dispersion in aqueous medium. Thus the model would facilitate the reduction of time and cost required to produce CNT dispersed homogeneous solutions and CNT reinforced materials. CNT dispersion in any water/surfactant/polymer system depends on interactions between CNTs and surrounding molecules. Central to the study was the atomistic scale model which used the atomic structure of the surfactant, solvent, polymer, and CNT. The model was capable of predicting the CNT interactions in terms of potential of mean force (PMF) between CNTs under the influence of surrounding molecules in an aqueous solution. On the atomistic scale, molecular dynamics method was used to compute the PMF as a function of CNT separation and CNT alignment. An adaptive biasing force (ABF) method was used to speed up the calculations. Correlations were developed to determine the effective interactions between CNTs as a function of their any inter-atomic distance and orientation angle in water as well as in water/surfactant by fitting the calculated PMF data. On the mesoscale, the fitted PMF correlations were used as input in the Monte Carlo simulations to determine the degree of dispersion of CNTs in water and water/surfactant system. The distribution of CNT cluster size was determined for the CNTs dispersed in water with and without surfactant addition. The entropie and enthalpie contributions to the CNT interactions in water were determined to understand the dispersion mechanism of CNTs in water. The effects of CNT orientation, length, diameter, chirality and surfactant

  15. Approach for fabricating microgated field-emission arrays with individual carbon nanotube emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Ming Q.; Shao, Wen S.; Li, Xing H.; Bai, Guo D.; Zhang, Fu Q.; Li, Han Y.; Feng, Jin J.

    2005-12-05

    We propose an approach for fabricating microgated field-emission arrays (FEAs) with individual carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters. Beginning with the fabrication of microgated cell arrays, the process involves depositing a sacrificial layer at a glancing angle to close in the aperture that a small area catalyst can be placed on the bottom of the cells (for type A) or on the predeposited Mo tips (for type B); then, vertically aligned CNTs are grown by a dc plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition following a lift-off process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of both types of CNT FEAs show a large percentage of emitters with single, double or triple CNTs. For a 5x5 type B CNT FEA, at a gate voltage of 100 V, an average anode current reaches 1.4 {mu}A per cell while the gate current is less than 5% of the anode current.

  16. Impact of carbon nanotube length on electron transport in aligned carbon nanotube networks

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeonyoon; Stein, Itai Y.; Devoe, Mackenzie E.; Lewis, Diana J.; Lachman, Noa; Buschhorn, Samuel T.; Wardle, Brian L.; Kessler, Seth S.

    2015-02-02

    Here, we quantify the electron transport properties of aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) networks as a function of the CNT length, where the electrical conductivities may be tuned by up to 10× with anisotropies exceeding 40%. Testing at elevated temperatures demonstrates that the aligned CNT networks have a negative temperature coefficient of resistance, and application of the fluctuation induced tunneling model leads to an activation energy of ≈14 meV for electron tunneling at the CNT-CNT junctions. Since the tunneling activation energy is shown to be independent of both CNT length and orientation, the variation in electron transport is attributed to the number of CNT-CNT junctions an electron must tunnel through during its percolated path, which is proportional to the morphology of the aligned CNT network.

  17. Ultrahigh density array of vertically aligned small-molecular organic nanowires on arbitrary substrates.

    PubMed

    Starko-Bowes, Ryan; Pramanik, Sandipan

    2013-01-01

    In recent years π-conjugated organic semiconductors have emerged as the active material in a number of diverse applications including large-area, low-cost displays, photovoltaics, printable and flexible electronics and organic spin valves. Organics allow (a) low-cost, low-temperature processing and (b) molecular-level design of electronic, optical and spin transport characteristics. Such features are not readily available for mainstream inorganic semiconductors, which have enabled organics to carve a niche in the silicon-dominated electronics market. The first generation of organic-based devices has focused on thin film geometries, grown by physical vapor deposition or solution processing. However, it has been realized that organic nanostructures can be used to enhance performance of above-mentioned applications and significant effort has been invested in exploring methods for organic nanostructure fabrication. A particularly interesting class of organic nanostructures is the one in which vertically oriented organic nanowires, nanorods or nanotubes are organized in a well-regimented, high-density array. Such structures are highly versatile and are ideal morphological architectures for various applications such as chemical sensors, split-dipole nanoantennas, photovoltaic devices with radially heterostructured "core-shell" nanowires, and memory devices with a cross-point geometry. Such architecture is generally realized by a template-directed approach. In the past this method has been used to grow metal and inorganic semiconductor nanowire arrays. More recently π-conjugated polymer nanowires have been grown within nanoporous templates. However, these approaches have had limited success in growing nanowires of technologically important π-conjugated small molecular weight organics, such as tris-8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum (Alq3), rubrene and methanofullerenes, which are commonly used in diverse areas including organic displays, photovoltaics, thin film transistors

  18. Ultrahigh Density Array of Vertically Aligned Small-molecular Organic Nanowires on Arbitrary Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Starko-Bowes, Ryan; Pramanik, Sandipan

    2013-01-01

    In recent years π-conjugated organic semiconductors have emerged as the active material in a number of diverse applications including large-area, low-cost displays, photovoltaics, printable and flexible electronics and organic spin valves. Organics allow (a) low-cost, low-temperature processing and (b) molecular-level design of electronic, optical and spin transport characteristics. Such features are not readily available for mainstream inorganic semiconductors, which have enabled organics to carve a niche in the silicon-dominated electronics market. The first generation of organic-based devices has focused on thin film geometries, grown by physical vapor deposition or solution processing. However, it has been realized that organic nanostructures can be used to enhance performance of above-mentioned applications and significant effort has been invested in exploring methods for organic nanostructure fabrication. A particularly interesting class of organic nanostructures is the one in which vertically oriented organic nanowires, nanorods or nanotubes are organized in a well-regimented, high-density array. Such structures are highly versatile and are ideal morphological architectures for various applications such as chemical sensors, split-dipole nanoantennas, photovoltaic devices with radially heterostructured "core-shell" nanowires, and memory devices with a cross-point geometry. Such architecture is generally realized by a template-directed approach. In the past this method has been used to grow metal and inorganic semiconductor nanowire arrays. More recently π-conjugated polymer nanowires have been grown within nanoporous templates. However, these approaches have had limited success in growing nanowires of technologically important π-conjugated small molecular weight organics, such as tris-8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum (Alq3), rubrene and methanofullerenes, which are commonly used in diverse areas including organic displays, photovoltaics, thin film transistors

  19. Electrochemically Reduced Graphene Oxide on Well-Aligned Titanium Dioxide Nanotube Arrays for Betavoltaic Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changsong; Wang, Na; Zhou, Peng; San, Haisheng; Wang, Kaiying; Chen, Xuyuan

    2016-09-21

    We report a novel betavoltaic device with significant conversion efficiency by using electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) on TiO2 nanotube arrays (TNTAs) for enhancing the absorption of beta radiation as well as the transportation of carriers. ERGO on TNTAs (G-TNTAs) were prepared by electrochemical anodization and subsequently cyclic voltammetry techniques. A 10 mCi of (63)Ni/Ni source was assembled to G-TNTAs to form the sandwich-type betavoltaic devices (Ni/(63)Ni/G-TNTAs/Ti). By I-V measurements, the optimum betavoltaic device exhibits a significant effective energy conversion efficiency of 26.55% with an open-circuit voltage of 2.38 V and a short-circuit current of 14.69 nAcm(-2). The experimental results indicate that G-TNTAs are a high-potential nanocomposite for developing betavoltaic batteries. PMID:27575802

  20. Electrochemically Reduced Graphene Oxide on Well-Aligned Titanium Dioxide Nanotube Arrays for Betavoltaic Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changsong; Wang, Na; Zhou, Peng; San, Haisheng; Wang, Kaiying; Chen, Xuyuan

    2016-09-21

    We report a novel betavoltaic device with significant conversion efficiency by using electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) on TiO2 nanotube arrays (TNTAs) for enhancing the absorption of beta radiation as well as the transportation of carriers. ERGO on TNTAs (G-TNTAs) were prepared by electrochemical anodization and subsequently cyclic voltammetry techniques. A 10 mCi of (63)Ni/Ni source was assembled to G-TNTAs to form the sandwich-type betavoltaic devices (Ni/(63)Ni/G-TNTAs/Ti). By I-V measurements, the optimum betavoltaic device exhibits a significant effective energy conversion efficiency of 26.55% with an open-circuit voltage of 2.38 V and a short-circuit current of 14.69 nAcm(-2). The experimental results indicate that G-TNTAs are a high-potential nanocomposite for developing betavoltaic batteries.

  1. High performance piezoelectric devices based on aligned arrays of nanofibers of poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-trifluoroethylene).

    PubMed

    Persano, Luana; Dagdeviren, Canan; Su, Yewang; Zhang, Yihui; Girardo, Salvatore; Pisignano, Dario; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2013-01-01

    Multifunctional capability, flexible design, rugged lightweight construction and self-powered operation are desired attributes for electronics that directly interface with the human body or with advanced robotic systems. For these applications, piezoelectric materials, in forms that offer the ability to bend and stretch, are attractive for pressure/force sensors and mechanical energy harvesters. Here, we introduce a large area, flexible piezoelectric material that consists of sheets of electrospun fibres of the polymer poly[(vinylidenefluoride-co-trifluoroethylene]. The flow and mechanical conditions associated with the spinning process yield free-standing, three-dimensional architectures of aligned arrangements of such fibres, in which the polymer chains adopt strongly preferential orientations. The resulting material offers exceptional piezoelectric characteristics, to enable ultra-high sensitivity for measuring pressure, even at exceptionally small values (0.1 Pa). Quantitative analysis provides detailed insights into the pressure sensing mechanisms, and establishes engineering design rules. Potential applications range from self-powered micro-mechanical elements, to self-balancing robots and sensitive impact detectors.

  2. Massive transfer of vertically aligned Si nanowire array onto alien substrates and their characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiu, Shu-Chia; Hung, Shih-Che; Chao, Jiun-Jie; Lin, Ching-Fuh

    2009-07-01

    Si nanowires (NWs) are promising materials for future electronic, photovoltaic, and sensor applications. So far the Si NWs are mainly formed on particular substrates or at high temperatures, greatly limiting their application flexibility. Here we report a low temperature process for forming and massively transferring vertically aligned Si NWs on alien substrates with a large density of about (3-5) × 10 7 NWs/mm 2. The X-ray diffraction spectrum reveals that the transferred NWs exhibit almost the same crystal property as the bulk Si. Our investigation further shows that the transferred NWs have exceptional optical characteristics. The transferred Si NWs of 12.14 μm exhibit the transmittance as low as 0.3% in the near infrared region and 0.07% in the visible region. The extracted absorption coefficient of Si NWs in the near infrared region is about 3 × 10 3 cm -1, over 30 times larger than that of the bulk Si. Because of the low temperature process, it enables a large variety of alien substrates such as glass and plastics to be used. In addition, the exceptional properties of the transferred NWs offer potential applications for photovoltaic, photo-detectors, sensors, and flexible electronics.

  3. Vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures on flexible pillar arrays

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon-Young; Yun, Tae Gwang; Qaiser, Nadeem; Paik, Haemin; Roh, Hee Seok; Hong, Jongin; Hong, Seungbum; Han, Seung Min; No, Kwangsoo

    2015-01-01

    PVDF and P(VDF-TrFE) nano- and micro- structures have been widely used due to their potential applications in several fields, including sensors, actuators, vital sign transducers, and energy harvesters. In this study, we developed vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures using high modulus polyurethane acrylate (PUA) pillars as the support structure to maintain the structural integrity. In addition, we were able to improve the piezoelectric effect by 1.85 times from 40 ± 2 to 74 ± 2 pm/V when compared to the thin film counterpart, which contributes to the more efficient current generation under a given stress, by making an effective use of the P(VDF-TrFE) thin top layer as well as the side walls. We attribute the enhancement of piezoelectric effects to the contributions from the shell component and the strain confinement effect, which was supported by our modeling results. We envision that these organic-based P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures will be used widely as 3D sensors and power generators because they are optimized for current generations by utilizing all surface areas, including the side walls of core-shell structures. PMID:26040539

  4. High performance piezoelectric devices based on aligned arrays of nanofibers of poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-trifluoroethylene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persano, Luana; Dagdeviren, Canan; Su, Yewang; Zhang, Yihui; Girardo, Salvatore; Pisignano, Dario; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2013-03-01

    Multifunctional capability, flexible design, rugged lightweight construction and self-powered operation are desired attributes for electronics that directly interface with the human body or with advanced robotic systems. For these applications, piezoelectric materials, in forms that offer the ability to bend and stretch, are attractive for pressure/force sensors and mechanical energy harvesters. Here, we introduce a large area, flexible piezoelectric material that consists of sheets of electrospun fibres of the polymer poly[(vinylidenefluoride-co-trifluoroethylene]. The flow and mechanical conditions associated with the spinning process yield free-standing, three-dimensional architectures of aligned arrangements of such fibres, in which the polymer chains adopt strongly preferential orientations. The resulting material offers exceptional piezoelectric characteristics, to enable ultra-high sensitivity for measuring pressure, even at exceptionally small values (0.1 Pa). Quantitative analysis provides detailed insights into the pressure sensing mechanisms, and establishes engineering design rules. Potential applications range from self-powered micro-mechanical elements, to self-balancing robots and sensitive impact detectors.

  5. Vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures on flexible pillar arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoon-Young; Yun, Tae Gwang; Qaiser, Nadeem; Paik, Haemin; Roh, Hee Seok; Hong, Jongin; Hong, Seungbum; Han, Seung Min; No, Kwangsoo

    2015-06-04

    PVDF and P(VDF-TrFE) nano- and micro- structures are widely used due to their potential applications in several fields, including sensors, actuators, vital sign transducers, and energy harvesters. In this study, we developed vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures using high modulus polyurethane acrylate (PUA) pillars as the support structure to maintain the structural integrity. In addition, we were able to improve the piezoelectric effect by 1.85 times from 40 ± 2 to 74 ± 2 pm/V when compared to the thin film counterpart, which contributes to the more efficient current generation under a given stress, by making an effective use of the P(VDF-TrFE) thin top layer as well as the side walls. We attribute the enhancement of piezoelectric effects to the contributions from the shell component and the strain confinement effect, which was supported by our modeling results. We envision that these organic-based P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures will be used widely as 3D sensors and power generators because they are optimized for current generations by utilizing all surface areas, including the side walls of core-shell structures.

  6. Vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures on flexible pillar arrays

    DOE PAGES

    Choi, Yoon-Young; Yun, Tae Gwang; Qaiser, Nadeem; Paik, Haemin; Roh, Hee Seok; Hong, Jongin; Hong, Seungbum; Han, Seung Min; No, Kwangsoo

    2015-06-04

    PVDF and P(VDF-TrFE) nano- and micro- structures are widely used due to their potential applications in several fields, including sensors, actuators, vital sign transducers, and energy harvesters. In this study, we developed vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures using high modulus polyurethane acrylate (PUA) pillars as the support structure to maintain the structural integrity. In addition, we were able to improve the piezoelectric effect by 1.85 times from 40 ± 2 to 74 ± 2 pm/V when compared to the thin film counterpart, which contributes to the more efficient current generation under a given stress, by making an effective use ofmore » the P(VDF-TrFE) thin top layer as well as the side walls. We attribute the enhancement of piezoelectric effects to the contributions from the shell component and the strain confinement effect, which was supported by our modeling results. We envision that these organic-based P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures will be used widely as 3D sensors and power generators because they are optimized for current generations by utilizing all surface areas, including the side walls of core-shell structures.« less

  7. Vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures on flexible pillar arrays.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon-Young; Yun, Tae Gwang; Qaiser, Nadeem; Paik, Haemin; Roh, Hee Seok; Hong, Jongin; Hong, Seungbum; Han, Seung Min; No, Kwangsoo

    2015-01-01

    PVDF and P(VDF-TrFE) nano- and micro- structures have been widely used due to their potential applications in several fields, including sensors, actuators, vital sign transducers, and energy harvesters. In this study, we developed vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures using high modulus polyurethane acrylate (PUA) pillars as the support structure to maintain the structural integrity. In addition, we were able to improve the piezoelectric effect by 1.85 times from 40 ± 2 to 74 ± 2 pm/V when compared to the thin film counterpart, which contributes to the more efficient current generation under a given stress, by making an effective use of the P(VDF-TrFE) thin top layer as well as the side walls. We attribute the enhancement of piezoelectric effects to the contributions from the shell component and the strain confinement effect, which was supported by our modeling results. We envision that these organic-based P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures will be used widely as 3D sensors and power generators because they are optimized for current generations by utilizing all surface areas, including the side walls of core-shell structures. PMID:26040539

  8. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavoto, G.; Cirillo, E. N. M.; Cocina, F.; Ferretti, J.; Polosa, A. D.

    2016-06-01

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (≈ 11 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency.

  9. Enhanced piezoelectric properties of vertically aligned single-crystalline NKN nano-rod arrays.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Gyu; Oh, Seung-Min; Jung, Woo-Suk; Moon, Hi Gyu; Baek, Seung-Hyub; Nahm, Sahn; Yoon, Seok-Jin; Kang, Chong-Yun

    2015-05-08

    Piezoelectric materials capable of converting between mechanical and electrical energy have a great range of potential applications in micro- and nano-scale smart devices; however, their performance tends to be greatly degraded when reduced to a thin film due to the large clamping force by the substrate and surrounding materials. Herein, we report an effective method for synthesizing isolated piezoelectric nano-materials as means to relax the clamping force and recover original piezoelectric properties of the materials. Using this, environmentally friendly single-crystalline NaxK1-xNbO3 (NKN) piezoelectric nano-rod arrays were successfully synthesized by conventional pulsed-laser deposition and demonstrated to have a remarkably enhanced piezoelectric performance. The shape of the nano-structure was also found to be easily manipulated by varying the energy conditions of the physical vapor. We anticipate that this work will provide a way to produce piezoelectric micro- and nano-devices suitable for practical application, and in doing so, open a new path for the development of complex metal-oxide nano-structures.

  10. Enhanced piezoelectric properties of vertically aligned single-crystalline NKN nano-rod arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min-Gyu; Oh, Seung-Min; Jung, Woo-Suk; Gyu Moon, Hi; Baek, Seung-Hyub; Nahm, Sahn; Yoon, Seok-Jin; Kang, Chong-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Piezoelectric materials capable of converting between mechanical and electrical energy have a great range of potential applications in micro- and nano-scale smart devices; however, their performance tends to be greatly degraded when reduced to a thin film due to the large clamping force by the substrate and surrounding materials. Herein, we report an effective method for synthesizing isolated piezoelectric nano-materials as means to relax the clamping force and recover original piezoelectric properties of the materials. Using this, environmentally friendly single-crystalline NaxK1-xNbO3 (NKN) piezoelectric nano-rod arrays were successfully synthesized by conventional pulsed-laser deposition and demonstrated to have a remarkably enhanced piezoelectric performance. The shape of the nano-structure was also found to be easily manipulated by varying the energy conditions of the physical vapor. We anticipate that this work will provide a way to produce piezoelectric micro- and nano-devices suitable for practical application, and in doing so, open a new path for the development of complex metal-oxide nano-structures. PMID:25955763

  11. Hybrid core-shell nanowire electrodes utilizing vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays for high-performance energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klankowski, Steven Arnold

    Nanostructured electrode materials for electrochemical energy storage systems have been shown to improve both rate performance and capacity retention, while allowing considerably longer cycling lifetime. The nano-architectures provide enhanced kinetics by means of larger surface area, higher porosity, better material interconnectivity, shorter diffusion lengths, and overall mechanical stability. Meanwhile, active materials that once were excluded from use due to bulk property issues are now being examined in new nanoarchitecture. Silicon was such a material, desired for its large lithium-ion storage capacity of 4,200 mAh g-1 and low redox potential of 0.4 V vs. Li/Li+; however, a ˜300% volume expansion and increased resistivity upon lithiation limited its broader applications. In the first study, the silicon-coated vertically aligned carbon nanofiber (VACNF) array presents a unique core-shell nanowire (NW) architecture that demonstrates both good capacity and high rate performance. In follow-up, the Si-VACNFs NW electrode demonstrates enhanced power rate capabilities as it shows excellent storage capacity at high rates, attributed to the unique nanoneedle structure that high vacuum sputtering produces on the three-dimensional array. Following silicon's success, titanium dioxide has been explored as an alternative high-rate electrode material by utilizing the dual storage mechanisms of Li+ insertion and pseudocapacitance. The TiO 2-coated VACNFs shows improved electrochemical activity that delivers near theoretical capacity at larger currents due to shorter Li+ diffusion lengths and highly effective electron transport. A unique cell is formed with the Si-coated and TiO2-coated electrodes place counter to one another, creating the hybrid of lithium ion battery-pseudocapacitor that demonstrated both high power and high energy densities. The hybrid cell operates like a battery at lower current rates, achieving larger discharge capacity, while retaining one-third of

  12. Bi-directional-bi-dimensionality alignment of self-supporting Mn3O4 nanorod and nanotube arrays with different bacteriostasis and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qun; Wei, Chengzhen; Gao, Feng; Pang, Huan; Lu, Qingyi

    2013-12-21

    Self-supported Mn3O4 patterns of aligned nanorods and nanotubes were synthesized through a bi-directional-bi-dimensionality growth model by using sodium gluconate and urea as additives under mild hydrothermal conditions without the use of any substrates. In one direction, Mn3O4 grows to form one-dimensional nanorods or nanotubes, while in the other direction Mn3O4 grows into two-dimensional nanoplates to support the nanorods or nanotubes to align into arrays. These two kinds of new nanostructures, a nanotube pattern and a nanorod pattern, show similar and good bacteriostasis for Gram positive bacteria, but for Gram negative bacteria the nanotube pattern shows much better bacterial restraint than the nanorod pattern. Magnetic studies show that the nanorod arrays display similar magnetic properties to the commercial Mn3O4, while the nanotube arrays show different ferromagnetic behaviors with enhanced remnant magnetization and saturation magnetization (Ms) at low temperature.

  13. Island nucleation, optical and ferromagnetic properties of vertically aligned secondary growth ZnO : Cu nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun; Zhu, Liping; Hu, Liang; Liu, Shijiang; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Honghai; Yang, Xiaopeng; Sun, Luwei; Li, Dehui; Ye, Zhizhen

    2012-02-01

    The paper reports an island nucleation and secondary growth of aligned ZnO : Cu nanorod arrays via thermal vapor phase transport. Results analysis indicates that the secondary segment is epitaxially grown on the ZnO : Cu nanorods with the radius strongly dependent on temperature and the concentration of zinc vapor. The modified characteristic radius (Rc) model is used to explain the nucleation and secondary growth process. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectra indicate that the band gap emission of the secondary growth nanorods is greatly restrained. A controversial 3.31 eV emission (A line) and two different donor-acceptor pair (DAP) recombinations at 3.24 eV and 2.48 eV are observed at 13 K. The A line shows a different behavior from the two DAP emissions during the heat-up process. Intrinsic room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) is observed in the secondary growth ZnO : Cu nanorods and it can be explained by oxygen vacancy and copper defects related to bound magnetic polar (BMP) or double exchange mechanism.The paper reports an island nucleation and secondary growth of aligned ZnO : Cu nanorod arrays via thermal vapor phase transport. Results analysis indicates that the secondary segment is epitaxially grown on the ZnO : Cu nanorods with the radius strongly dependent on temperature and the concentration of zinc vapor. The modified characteristic radius (Rc) model is used to explain the nucleation and secondary growth process. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectra indicate that the band gap emission of the secondary growth nanorods is greatly restrained. A controversial 3.31 eV emission (A line) and two different donor-acceptor pair (DAP) recombinations at 3.24 eV and 2.48 eV are observed at 13 K. The A line shows a different behavior from the two DAP emissions during the heat-up process. Intrinsic room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) is observed in the secondary growth ZnO : Cu nanorods and it can be explained by oxygen vacancy and copper

  14. Aligned Titania Nanotube Array Thin Films: Growth Kinetics, Branched Structures, and Photovoltaic Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butail, Gorun

    for Vanod<20 V constrains homogeneous branching to occur only V2 ≤ V12 -- V0, where V1 and V 2 are the initial and final anodization voltages and V0 is a voltage offset dependent on the anodization bath chemistry. Our technique circumvents the constraints of multi-bath and multi-temperature methods for branching, and provides a versatile means for creating hierarchically sized and/or interconnected titania nanotubes for applications. Pore microstructure and photovoltaic characteristics of dye-sensitized solar cells fabricated from branched titania nanotube arrays are compared with those from unbranched ones. Branched titania nanotubes result in increased efficiency and short circuit density without any discernible increases in dark current, than in devices with unbranched tubes due to increased internal surface area measured by adsorption isotherms. Enhanced photovoltaic and photocatalytic activities in branched titania nanotubes could be attractive for use in photovoltaics, water purification and energy storage applications.

  15. Enhanced photocurrent and dynamic response in vertically aligned In₂S₃/Ag core/shell nanorod array photoconductive devices.

    PubMed

    Cansizoglu, Hilal; Cansizoglu, Mehmet F; Watanabe, Fumiya; Karabacak, Tansel

    2014-06-11

    Enhanced photocurrent values were achieved through a semiconductor-core/metal-shell nanorod array photoconductive device geometry. Vertically aligned indium sulfide (In2S3) nanorods were formed as the core by using glancing angle deposition technique (GLAD). A thin silver (Ag) layer is conformally coated around nanorods as the metallic shell through a high pressure sputter deposition method. This was followed by capping the nanorods with a metallic blanket layer of Ag film by utilizing a new small angle deposition technique combined with GLAD. Radial interface that was formed by the core/shell geometry provided an efficient charge carrier collection by shortening carrier transit times, which led to a superior photocurrent and gain. Thin metal shells around nanorods acted as a passivation layer to decrease surface states that cause prolonged carrier lifetimes and slow recovery of the photocurrent in nanorods. A combination of efficient carrier collection with surface passivation resulted in enhanced photocurrent and dynamic response at the same time in one device structure. In2S3 nanorod devices without the metal shell and with relatively thicker metal shell were also fabricated and characterized for comparison. In2S3 nanorods with thin metal shell showed the highest photosensitivity (photocurrent/dark current) response compared to two other designs. Microstructural, morphological, and electronic properties of the core/shell nanorods were used to explain the results observed.

  16. Transparent, well-aligned TiO(2) nanotube arrays with controllable dimensions on glass substrates for photocatalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lee Kheng; Kumar, Manippady K; An, Wen Wen; Gao, Han

    2010-02-01

    Transparent, well-aligned TiO(2) nanotube arrays (NTAs) with controllable dimensions are grown on glass substrates via atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiO(2) onto free-standing porous anodic alumina (PAA) templates. Photodegradation of aqueous methylene blue (MB) solution and solid stearic acid (SA) film using TiO(2) NTAs of various wall thicknesses are investigated. The Pd functionalized TiO(2) NTAs, with a wall thickness of 15 nm and height of 200 nm, has the highest photodegradation efficiency at 76% after 4 h of UV irradiation. These functionalized NTAs are able to photodegrade MB molecules completely as no obvious demethylated byproducts are observed during the process. It also demonstrates excellent photocatalytic activity for solid contaminants such as SA film. By using the ALD technique, the nanotube wall thickness can be precisely controlled so that it is sufficiently thin to be transparent while sufficiently thick for excellent photocatalytic performances. The transparent TiO(2) NTAs on glass substrates with excellent photocatalytic properties might have potential applications in self-cleaning coating, transparent electronics, and solar cells.

  17. Fabrication and Optimization of Vertically Aligned ZnO Nanorod Array-Based UV Photodetectors via Selective Hydrothermal Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Yeong Hwan; Nagaraju, Goli; Yu, Jae Su

    2015-08-01

    Vertically aligned ZnO nanorod array (NRA)-based ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors (PDs) were successfully fabricated and optimized via a facile hydrothermal process. Using a shadow mask technique, the thin ZnO seed layer was deposited between the patterned Au/Ti electrodes to bridge the electrodes. Thus, both the Au electrodes could be connected by the ZnO seed layer. As the sample was immersed into growth solution and heated at 90 °C, the ZnO NRAs were crystallized and vertically grown on the ZnO seed layer, thus creating a metal-semiconductor-metal PD structure. To investigate the size effect of ZnO NRAs on photocurrent, the PDs were readily prepared with different concentrations of growth solution. For the ZnO NRAs grown at 25 mM of concentration, the PD with 10 μm of channel width (i.e., gap distance between two electrodes) exhibited a high photocurrent of 1.91 × 10-4 A at an applied bias of 10 V under 365 nm of UV light illumination. The PD was optimized by adjusting the channel width. For 15 μm of channel width, a relatively high photocurrent on-off ratio of 37.4 and good current transient characteristics were observed at the same applied bias. These results are expected to be useful for cost-effective and practical UV PD applications.

  18. Automated bead alignment apparatus using a single bead capturing technique for fabrication of a miniaturized bead-based DNA probe array.

    PubMed

    Noda, Hideyuki; Kohara, Yoshinobu; Okano, Kazunori; Kambara, Hideki

    2003-07-01

    We have developed an automated bead alignment apparatus for fabricating a bead-based DNA probe array inside a capillary. The apparatus uses 16 micro vacuum tweezers to extract single beads from among a large amount of beads in bead stock wells. It then manipulates single beads into the probe array capillaries. Single 100-microm-diameter beads were successfully extracted from the water-contained bead-stock well by the vacuum tweezers, which have inner and outer diameters of 50 and 150 microm. An interesting aspect is that unexpected extra beads adsorbed on the outer wall of the vacuum tweezers can be removed using the surface tension force between the water and the atmosphere. In testing the total performance of this apparatus, the DNA probe arrays with 10 sets of probe-conjugated beads and 2 plain beads were produced in the intended order in the capillaries. The time needed to align the 12 beads was 10 min, and the 16 bead arrays were fabricated simultaneously. After hybridization experiments using these fabricated DNA probe arrays, fluorescence from each bead was clearly observed.

  19. MiniCNT - A Tabletop Stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugan, Chris; Pedersen, Thomas; Berkery, John

    2006-10-01

    MiniCNT is a scaled down version of the Columbia Non-Neutral Torus, a stellarator built to study confinement of non-neutral plasmas on magnetic surfaces. MiniCNT is a glass vacuum chamber capable of holding pressures six orders of magnitude below atmospheric pressure. Unlike CNT, in which plasmas are invisible, MiniCNT allows some collisions with neutrals, causing it to glow. Using two twelve-volt car batteries to power four magnetic coils, MiniCNT generates a 0.02 Tesla magnetic field. While CNT, being larger, is obviously more accurate, there are multiple benefits in MiniCNT. First, it is more flexible and can be adjusted to fit many scenarios easily. The car batteries can be switched for other power sources, the coils can be realigned, and the chamber can be pumped to various pressures of various gases. Also, it is visually accessible; while CNT has glass viewing ports and its plasma is dark, MiniCNT is made of glass and its plasma glows, allowing visualization of the magnetic surfaces.

  20. Effects of Nanowire Length and Surface Roughness on the Electrochemical Sensor Properties of Nafion-Free, Vertically Aligned Pt Nanowire Array Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiyang; Leung, Calvin; Gao, Fan; Gu, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, vertically aligned Pt nanowire arrays (PtNWA) with different lengths and surface roughnesses were fabricated and their electrochemical performance toward hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) detection was studied. The nanowire arrays were synthesized by electroplating Pt in nanopores of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template. Different parameters, such as current density and deposition time, were precisely controlled to synthesize nanowires with different surface roughnesses and various lengths from 3 μm to 12 μm. The PtNWA electrodes showed better performance than the conventional electrodes modified by Pt nanowires randomly dispersed on the electrode surface. The results indicate that both the length and surface roughness can affect the sensing performance of vertically aligned Pt nanowire array electrodes. Generally, longer nanowires with rougher surfaces showed better electrochemical sensing performance. The 12 μm rough surface PtNWA presented the largest sensitivity (654 μA·mM⁻¹·cm⁻²) among all the nanowires studied, and showed a limit of detection of 2.4 μM. The 12 μm rough surface PtNWA electrode also showed good anti-interference property from chemicals that are typically present in the biological samples such as ascorbic, uric acid, citric acid, and glucose. The sensing performance in real samples (river water) was tested and good recovery was observed. These Nafion-free, vertically aligned Pt nanowires with surface roughness control show great promise as versatile electrochemical sensors and biosensors. PMID:26404303

  1. Effects of Nanowire Length and Surface Roughness on the Electrochemical Sensor Properties of Nafion-Free, Vertically Aligned Pt Nanowire Array Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiyang; Leung, Calvin; Gao, Fan; Gu, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, vertically aligned Pt nanowire arrays (PtNWA) with different lengths and surface roughnesses were fabricated and their electrochemical performance toward hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection was studied. The nanowire arrays were synthesized by electroplating Pt in nanopores of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template. Different parameters, such as current density and deposition time, were precisely controlled to synthesize nanowires with different surface roughnesses and various lengths from 3 μm to 12 μm. The PtNWA electrodes showed better performance than the conventional electrodes modified by Pt nanowires randomly dispersed on the electrode surface. The results indicate that both the length and surface roughness can affect the sensing performance of vertically aligned Pt nanowire array electrodes. Generally, longer nanowires with rougher surfaces showed better electrochemical sensing performance. The 12 μm rough surface PtNWA presented the largest sensitivity (654 μA·mM−1·cm−2) among all the nanowires studied, and showed a limit of detection of 2.4 μM. The 12 μm rough surface PtNWA electrode also showed good anti-interference property from chemicals that are typically present in the biological samples such as ascorbic, uric acid, citric acid, and glucose. The sensing performance in real samples (river water) was tested and good recovery was observed. These Nafion-free, vertically aligned Pt nanowires with surface roughness control show great promise as versatile electrochemical sensors and biosensors. PMID:26404303

  2. Increased Alignment in Carbon Nanotube Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for fabricating an array of two or more carbon nanotube (CNT) structures on a coated substrate surface, the structures having substantially the same orientation with respect to a substrate surface. A single electrode, having an associated voltage source with a selected voltage, is connected to a substrate surface after the substrate is coated and before growth of the CNT structures, for a selected voltage application time interval. The CNT structures are then grown on a coated substrate surface with the desired orientation. Optionally, the electrode can be disconnected before the CNT structures are grown.

  3. Preparation of 1-3 Connectivity Composite Films of Well-Aligned ZnO Whisker Arrays with AN Organic Resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Xue-Chuan; Wang, Shu-Bing

    Zinc oxide whisker arrays well-aligned along [0001] direction have been grown on the substrates of glass and single crystal silicon by atmospheric metal organic chemical vapor deposition method (MOCVD). The SEM observation indicated that the whiskers were quite uniform in length and diameter. The whisker arrays were very dense, and the gap among the whiskers was less than 1 μm. The array materials were proposed as the component to prepare 1-3 piezoelectric composite film in-situ. Epoxy resin was used as the matrix materials. The key points to prepare the composites are how to make the resin enter the array and control a suitable thickness of the resin films. Several approaches were studied. The results showed that the best was the vertical sucking method. The SEM observations indicated that the thickness was well controlled as almost same as the length of the whiskers, and the resin perfectly entered the array without pore. The 1-3 piezoelectric composite film has great potential applications in micro sensor and actuator arrays.

  4. Electrical, Thermal, and Machining Behaviour of Injection Moulded Polymeric CNT Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodi, Mehdi

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising additives for thermoplastics, resulting from their superior electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. Due to the desirable properties of CNT/polymer composites and their wide application in technological devices, these materials have attracted a great deal of attention from both academia and industry. A considerable amount of research has been devoted to the processing of CNT-filled nanocomposites, but only a few investigations have focussed on the injection moulding of these nanocomposites. This research was aimed at the study of the flow-induced alignment of CNT/polymer nanocomposites through the injection moulding process. We focussed on the understanding of the alignment of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in a thermoplastic matrix and the investigation of the alignment's effect on the electrical, thermal and machining characteristics of the injection moulded nanocomposites. The nanocomposites were first prepared with a melt mixing technique (i.e. twin screw extrusion), and they were then injection moulded under various processing conditions and mould geometries. High aspect ratio nanotubes could be partially aligned in the parallel-to-flow direction, resulting from the in-plane shear flow exerted on the polymeric melt in the injection cavity. It can be concluded that the volume resistivity of the moulded samples could be varied up to 7 orders of magnitude by changing the processing conditions and gate type in the injection moulding process. The electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI SE) of the moulded composites was studied by considering the alignment of the MWCNTs. The EMI SE decreased with an increase in the alignment of the injection moulded MWCNTs in the polymer matrix. Anisotropic thermal conductivity was observed for the injection moulded nanocomposites. It was shown that thermal conductivity can be enhanced by aligning the nanotubes in the parallel-to-flow direction. The post

  5. Controlled synthesis of CNT-based nanostructures for enhanced boiling and wicking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Glen Allen

    This thesis investigates a nanostructure of copper-coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) fabricated on copper substrates that improves heat transfer in boiling and evaporation. Multi-walled CNTs are grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) on copper plates of 1 mm thickness and copper wicks prepared from spherical copper powder sintered in forming gas. Two CNT growth catalysts are considered: (i) a metal trilayer of titanium, aluminum and iron films deposited by e-beam evaporation, and (ii) a liquid solution of ferric chloride hexahydrate applied by spray coating onto substrates prepared with a titanium film. To fabricate CNT arrays reliably on Cu, catalyst is re-deposited following an initial growth run. The second growth results in arrays of CNTs of approximately 40 μm in length on Cu substrates and approximately 10 μm in length on Cu wicks. CNT arrays are functionalized to make them hydrophilic by e-beam evaporation of a nominal thickness of 150 nm Cu directly onto the CNT array. Cu metal conformally covers the CNTs to a depth of approximately 10 μm from the CNT tips. A multi-layer structure using these hydrophilic copper coated CNT (Cu-CNT) arrays is proposed for enhancing wick heat transfer and is produced by sintering Cu powder on Cu-CNT arrays and growing Cu-CNTs on the resulting composite. Sessile drop tests and capillary rise tests demonstrate that Cu-CNT arrays have superior wetting and wicking properties as compared to CNT arrays, and establish that they may be used with water without degrading wicking behavior. When such Cu-CNT arrays are integrated with powder wicks by sintering of Cu powder on top of the Cu-CNTs, a poor bond results, and the sintered wick often detaches from the underlying Cu-CNT layer. High-temperature processing of the Cu-CNTs causes Ostwald ripening of the Cu coating on the CNTs, and sintering shrinks the Cu powder layer as necks between adjacent particles grow; these two factors affect poor bonding to the Cu

  6. Altering the catalytic activity of thin metal catalyst films for controlled growth of chemical vapor deposited vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Rouleau, Christopher M; Christen, Hans M; Cui, Hongtao; Eres, Gyula; Puretzky, Alexander A; Geohegan, David B

    2008-01-01

    The growth rate and terminal length of vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays (VANTAs) grown by chemical vapor deposition have been dramatically improved through pulsed KrF-excimer laser pretreatments of multilayer metal catalyst films. Silicon wafers coated with Al, Mo, and Fe layers were laser processed in air with single laser shots of varying fluence through circular apertures, then heated to ~750C and exposed to acetylene and ferrocene-containing gas mixtures typically used to grow vertically-aligned nanotube arrays. In situ videography was used to record the growth kinetics of the nanotube arrays in both patterned and unpatterned regions to understand changes in catalytic activity, growth rates, and termination of growth. The height of the patterned regions varied with fluence, with the most successful treatment resulting in 1.4 cm-tall posts of nanotubes embedded in a 0.4 cm-tall nanotube carpet. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images from the nanotubes in the posts revealed fewer walls, smaller diameters, and a much narrower distribution of diameters compared to nanotubes grown in the carpet. This information, along with data obtained from weighing the material from each region, suggests that pulsed laser processing can also significantly increase the areal density of VANTAs.

  7. Combined antenna and localized plasmon resonance in Raman scattering from random arrays of silver-coated, vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dawson, P; Duenas, J A; Boyle, M G; Doherty, M D; Bell, S E J; Kern, A M; Martin, O J F; Teh, A-S; Teo, K B K; Milne, W I

    2011-02-01

    The electric field enhancement associated with detailed structure within novel optical antenna nanostructures is modeled using the surface integral equation technique in the context of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The antennae comprise random arrays of vertically aligned, multiwalled carbon nanotubes dressed with highly granular Ag. Different types of "hot-spot" underpinning the SERS are identified, but contrasting characteristics are revealed. Those at the outer edges of the Ag grains are antenna driven with field enhancement amplified in antenna antinodes while intergrain hotspots are largely independent of antenna activity. Hot-spots between the tops of antennae leaning towards each other also appear to benefit from antenna amplification.

  8. Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays Co-doped with Phosphorus and Nitrogen as Efficient Metal-Free Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dingshan; Xue, Yuhua; Dai, Liming

    2012-10-01

    Using a mixture of ferrocene, pyridine, and triphenylphosphine as precursors for injection-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD), we prepared the first vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube array co-doped with phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) with a relatively high P-doping level (designated as PN-ACNT). We have also demonstrated the potential applications of the resultant PN-ACNTs as high-performance electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). PN-ACNT arrays were shown to exhibit a high ORR electrocatalytic activity, superb long-term durability, and good tolerance to methanol and carbon monoxide, significantly outperforming their counterparts doped with P (P-ACNT) or N (N-ACNT) only and even comparable to the commercially available Pt-C catalyst (45 wt % Pt on Vulcan XC-72R; E-TEK) due to a demonstrated synergetic effect arising from the co-doping of CNTs with both P and N.

  9. Photoelectrochemical cell/dye-sensitized solar cell tandem water splitting systems with transparent and vertically aligned quantum dot sensitized TiO2 nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Kahee; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Park, Jong Hyeok

    2013-03-01

    The present work reports fabrication of vertically aligned CdS sensitized TiO2 nanorod arrays grown on transparent conducting oxide substrate with high transparency as a photoanode in photoelectrochemical cell for water splitting. To realize an unassisted water splitting system, the photoanode and dye-sensitized solar cell tandem structures are tried and their electrochemical behaviors are also investigated. The hydrothermally grown TiO2 nanorod arrays followed by CdS nanoparticle decoration can improve the light absorption of long wavelength light resulting in increased photocurrent density. Two different techniques (electrodeposition and spray pyrolysis deposition) of CdS nanoparticle sensitization are carried out and their water splitting behaviors in the tandem cell are compared.

  10. ZnO nanorod-templated well-aligned ZrO2 nanotube arrays for fibroblast adhesion and proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhisong; Zhu, Zhihong; Liu, Jinping; Hu, Weihua; Li, Chang Ming

    2014-05-01

    Cellular responses to porous tubular structures have recently been investigated in highly ordered ZrO2 nanotube arrays fabricated with anodization. However, the potential applications of the nanotube arrays are hindered by instrument requirements and substrate limitations, as well as by the complicated processes needed for synthesis. In this work, ZrO2 nanotube arrays were synthesized by in situ hydrolysis of zirconium propoxide with a zinc oxide nanorod array-based template. Fibroblast cells were able to grow on the nanotube array surface with produced elongated filopodia. Studies of the capability of cell growth and the expression of adhesion- and proliferation-related genes reveal that ZrO2 nanotube arrays may provide a better environment for cell adhesion and growth than a flat titanium surface. These findings not only provide fundamental insight into cell response to nanostructures but also provide an opportunity to use a unique approach to fabricate ZrO2 nanotube array structures for potential implant applications.

  11. Ni foam supported three-dimensional vertically aligned and networked layered CoO nanosheet/graphene hybrid array as a high-performance oxygen evolution electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Weiyong; Zhao, Ming; Yuan, Jia; Li, Chang Ming

    2016-07-01

    The sluggish oxygen evolution reaction (OER) represents a major kinetic bottleneck in water splitting. Herein we report the synthesis of a novel Ni foam (NF) supported 3-D vertically aligned and interconnected layered CoO nanosheet array with controlled density, layer thickness, and interlayer spacing, and the conformal self-assembly of graphene on this nanosheet array. The obtained CoO layered nanosheet/graphene hybrid nanoarray was directly used as an OER electrode, showing a current density of 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of 330 mV and a Tafel slope of 79 mV dec-1, both of which are much lower than pristine NF and the nanosheet array without graphene, and are among the lowest reported for Co-based OER catalysts and transition metal oxide-based ones measured under the same conditions. In addition, it can retain 92.4% of the current density after 66 h of chronoamperometry testing at a potential of 1.0 V vs. SCE, and 94.3% of the current density at 1.0 V vs. SCE after 200 cyclic voltammetry cycles (0-1.0 V vs. SCE). The excellent catalytic activity and stability toward OER are ascribed to the 3-D NF supported robustly grown networked layered nanosheet array structure and the synergistic effects between CoO layered nanosheets and graphene.

  12. Preparation and Transport Performances of High-Density, Aligned Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Bin; Jiang, Chuan; Yang, Junhe; Zheng, Guangping

    2015-06-01

    We report a simple and effective method for the preparation of high-density and aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes. The CNT arrays were prepared by water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and were subsequently pushed over and stacked into dense membranes by mechanical rolling. It was demonstrated that various gases and liquids, including H2, He, N2, O2, Ar, water, ethanol, hexane, and kerosene, could effectively pass through the aligned carbon nanotube membranes. The membranes exhibited different selections on different gases, indicating that there was a separation potential for the gas mixtures. The selectivities (H2 relative to other gases) of H2/He, H2/N2, H2/O2, and H2/Ar were found to be lower than that of the ideal Knudsen model. For pure water, the permeability was measured to be 3.23 ± 0.05 ml·min-1·cm-2 at 1 atm, indicating that the CNT membranes were promising for applications in liquid filtration and separation.

  13. A template and catalyst-free metal-etching-oxidation method to synthesize aligned oxide nanowire arrays: NiO as an example.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhi Peng; Arredondo, Miryam; Peng, Hai Yang; Zhang, Zhou; Guo, Dong Lai; Xing, Guo Zhong; Li, Yong Feng; Wong, Lai Mun; Wang, Shi Jie; Valanoor, Nagarajan; Wu, Tom

    2010-08-24

    Although NiO is one of the canonical functional binary oxides, there has been no report so far on the effective fabrication of aligned single crystalline NiO nanowire arrays. Here we report a novel vapor-based metal-etching-oxidation method to synthesize high-quality NiO nanowire arrays with good vertical alignment and morphology control. In this method, Ni foils are used as both the substrates and the nickel source; NiCl(2) powder serves as the additional Ni source and provides Cl(2) to initiate mild etching. No template is deliberately employed; instead a nanograined NiO scale formed on the NiO foil guides the vapor infiltration and assists the self-assembled growth of NiO nanowires via a novel process comprising simultaneous Cl(2) etching and gentle oxidation. Furthermore, using CoO nanowires and Co-doped NiO as examples, we show that this general method can be employed to produce nanowires of other oxides as well as the doped counterparts. PMID:20614899

  14. Fabrication and characterization of vertically aligned carbon-nanotube membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Richard; Akin, Cevat; Purri, Matt; Shan, Jerry; Kim, Sangil; Fornasiero, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    Membranes having vertically-aligned carbon-nanotube (VACNT) pores offer promise as highly efficient and permeable membranes for use as breathable thin films, or in filtration and separation applications, among others. However, current membrane-fabrication techniques utilizing chemical-vapor-deposition-grown VACNT arrays are costly and difficult to scale up. We have developed a solution-based, electric-field-assisted approach as a cost-effective and scalable method to produce large-area VACNT membranes. Nanotubes are dispersed in a liquid polymer, and aligned and electrodeposited with the aid of an electric field prior to crosslinking the polymer to create VACNT membranes. We experimentally examine the electrodeposition process, focusing on parameters including the electric field, composition of the solution, and CNT functionalization that can affect the nanotube number density in the resulting membrane. We characterize the CNT pore size and number density and investigate the transport properties of the membrane. Size-exclusion tests are used to check for defects and infer the pore size of the VACNT membranes. Dry-gas membrane permeability is measured with a pressurized nitrogen-flow system, while moisture-vapor-transfer rate is measured with the ASTM-E96 upright-cup test. We discuss the measured transport properties of the solution-based, electric-field-fabricated VACNT membranes in reference to their application as breathable thin films. We would like to acknowledge DTRA for their funding and support of our research.

  15. Structural CNT Composites Part II: Assessment of CNT Yarns as Reinforcement for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Cano, Roberto J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Czabaj, Michael; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one-dimensional nanomaterials with outstanding electrical and thermal conductivities and mechanical properties. This combination of properties offers routes to enable lightweight structural aerospace components. Recent advances in the manufacturing of CNTs have made bulk forms such as yarns, tapes and sheets available in commercial quantities to permit the evaluation of these materials for aerospace use, where the superior tensile properties of CNT composites can be exploited in tension dominated applications such as composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). To investigate their utility in this application, aluminum rings were overwrapped with thermoset/CNT yarn composite and their mechanical properties measured. CNT composite overwrap characteristics such as processing method, CNT/resin ratio, and applied tension during CNT yarn winding were varied to determine their effects on the mechanical performance of the CNT composite overwrapped Al rings (CCOARs). Mechanical properties of the CCOARs were measured under static and cyclic loads at room, elevated, and cryogenic temperatures to evaluate their mechanical performance relative to bare Al rings. At room temperature, the breaking load of CCOARs with a 10.8% additional weight due to the CNT yarn/thermoset overwrap increased by over 200% compared to the bare Al ring. The quality of the wound CNT composites was also investigated using x-ray computed tomography.

  16. A Novel Self-aligned and Maskless Process for Formation of Highly Uniform Arrays of Nanoholes and Nanopillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Dey, Dibyendu; Memis, Omer G.; Katsnelson, Alex; Mohseni, Hooman

    2008-03-01

    Fabrication of a large area of periodic structures with deep sub-wavelength features is required in many applications such as solar cells, photonic crystals, and artificial kidneys. We present a low-cost and high-throughput process for realization of 2D arrays of deep sub-wavelength features using a self-assembled monolayer of hexagonally close packed (HCP) silica and polystyrene microspheres. This method utilizes the microspheres as super-lenses to fabricate nanohole and pillar arrays over large areas on conventional positive and negative photoresist, and with a high aspect ratio. The period and diameter of the holes and pillars formed with this technique can be controlled precisely and independently. We demonstrate that the method can produce HCP arrays of hole of sub-250 nm size using a conventional photolithography system with a broadband UV source centered at 400 nm. We also present our 3D FDTD modeling, which shows a good agreement with the experimental results.

  17. Gas phase synthesis and field emission properties of 3D aligned double walled carbon nanotube/anatase hybrid architectures.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Ravi K; Engstler, Jörg; Navitski, Aliaksandr; Sakharuk, Vitali; Müller, Günter; Schneider, Jörg J

    2011-08-01

    A 3D hybrid architecture composed of macroscopic, vertically aligned CNT blocks which are formed via a metal catalyzed CVD process followed by deposition of TiO(2) on the CNT side walls in nanocrystalline or amorphous form is presented. The morphology of the deposited TiO(2) can be tailored by the deposition method employed. Depositing TiO(2) from the gas phase by employing the organometallic precursor Ti[OCH(CH(3))(2)](4) leads to formation of nanocrystalline anatase or rutile particles with a dense coverage on the surface and within the 3D CNT scaffold. Phase pure TiO(2) (anatase) is formed between 500 and 700 °C, while higher temperatures resulted in rutile modification of TiO(2). Below 500 °C, TiO(2) forms an amorphous oxide layer. At higher temperatures such initially formed TiO(2) layers segregate into particles which tend to crystallize. In contrast, when generating TiO(2) by oxidation of Ti metal which is deposited by vaporization onto the 3D CNT block array, and subsequently oxidized in air or controlled O(2) atmosphere this leads to a porous layer with a particular nanostructure on top of the CNT blocks. First studies of the fabrication and field emission of the new 3D CNT/TiO(2) hybrid cathodes display good and stable FE characteristics with onset fields for current density of 1 μA cm(-2) of 1.7 to 1.9 V μm(-1), while the average field enhancement factor is in the range between 2000 and 2500 depending on the O(2) base pressure during the measurements.

  18. Tough and Flexible CNT-Polymeric Hybrid Scaffolds for Engineering Cardiac Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Kharaziha, Mahshid; Ryon Shin, Su; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Nur Topkaya, Seda; Masoumi, Nafiseh; Annabi, Nasim; Dokmeci, Mehmet. R.

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, a considerable amount of effort has been devoted toward the development of biomimetic scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering. However, most of the previous scaffolds have been electrically insulating or lacked the structural and mechanical robustness to engineer cardiac tissue constructs with suitable electrophysiological functions. Here, we developed tough and flexible hybrid scaffolds with enhanced electrical properties composed of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded aligned poly(glycerol sebacate):gelatin (PG) electrospun nanofibers. Incorporation of varying concentrations of CNTs from 0 to 1.5% within the PG nanofibrous scaffolds (CNT-PG scaffolds) notably enhanced fiber alignment and improved the electrical conductivity and toughness of the scaffolds while maintaining the viability, retention, alignment, and contractile activities of cardiomyocytes (CMs) seeded on the scaffolds. The resulting CNT-PG scaffolds resulted in stronger spontaneous and synchronous beating behavior (3.5-fold lower excitation threshold and 2.8-fold higher maximum capture rate) compared to those cultured on PG scaffold. Overall, our findings demonstrated that aligned CNT-PG scaffold exhibited superior mechanical properties with enhanced CM beating properties. It is envisioned that the proposed hybrid scaffolds can be useful for generating cardiac tissue constructs with improved organization and maturation. PMID:24927679

  19. Facile construction of vertically aligned EuS-ZnO hybrid core shell nanorod arrays for visible light driven photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjith, K. S.; Kumar, D. Ranjith; Kumar, R. T. Rajendra

    2015-06-24

    We demonstrated the development of coupled semiconductor in the form of hybrid heterostructures for significant advancement in catalytic functional materials. In this article, we report the preparation of vertically aligned core shell ZnO-EuS nanorod photocatalyst arrays by a simple chemical solution process followed by sulfudation process. The XRD pattern confirmed formation of the hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO and cubic nature of the EuS. Cross sectional FESEM images show vertical rod array structure, and the size of the nanorods ranges from 80 to 120 nm. UV-Vis DRS spectra showed that the optical absorption of ZnO was significantly enhanced to the visible region by modification with EuS surfaces. TEM study confirmed that the surface of ZnO was drastically improved by the modification with EuS nanoparticle. The catalytic activity of EuS−ZnO core shell nanorod arrays were evaluated by the photodegradation of Methylene Blue (MB) dye under visible irradiation. The results revealed that the photocatalytic activity of EuS−ZnO was much higher than that of ZnO under natural sunlight. EuS−ZnO was found to be stable and reusable without appreciable loss of catalytic activity up to four consecutive cycles.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of vertically aligned carbon nanotube forest for solid state fiber spinning.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seong Woo; Hwang, Jae Won; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2012-07-01

    Continuous carbon nanotubes (CNT) fibers were directly spun from a vertically aligned CNT forest grown by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The correlation of the CNT structure with Fe catalyst coarsening, reaction time, and the CNTs bundling phenomenon was investigated. We controlled the diameters and walls of the CNTs and minimized the amorphous carbon deposition on the CNTs for favorable bundling and spinning of the CNT fibers. The CNT fibers were fabricated with an as-grown vertically aligned CNT forest by a PECVD process using nanocatalyst an Al2O3 buffer layer, followed by a dry spinning process. Well-aligned CNT fibers were successfully manufactured using a dry spinning process and a surface tension-based densification process by ethanol. The mechanical properties were characterized for the CNT fibers spun from different lengths of a vertically aligned CNT forest. Highly oriented CNT fibers from the dry spinning process were characterized with high strength, high modulus, and high electrical as well as thermal conductivities for possible application as ultralight, highly strong structural materials. Examples of structural materials include space elevator cables, artificial muscle, and armor material, while multifunctional materials include E-textile, touch panels, biosensors, and super capacitors. PMID:22966627

  1. Synthesis and characterization of vertically aligned carbon nanotube forest for solid state fiber spinning.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seong Woo; Hwang, Jae Won; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2012-07-01

    Continuous carbon nanotubes (CNT) fibers were directly spun from a vertically aligned CNT forest grown by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The correlation of the CNT structure with Fe catalyst coarsening, reaction time, and the CNTs bundling phenomenon was investigated. We controlled the diameters and walls of the CNTs and minimized the amorphous carbon deposition on the CNTs for favorable bundling and spinning of the CNT fibers. The CNT fibers were fabricated with an as-grown vertically aligned CNT forest by a PECVD process using nanocatalyst an Al2O3 buffer layer, followed by a dry spinning process. Well-aligned CNT fibers were successfully manufactured using a dry spinning process and a surface tension-based densification process by ethanol. The mechanical properties were characterized for the CNT fibers spun from different lengths of a vertically aligned CNT forest. Highly oriented CNT fibers from the dry spinning process were characterized with high strength, high modulus, and high electrical as well as thermal conductivities for possible application as ultralight, highly strong structural materials. Examples of structural materials include space elevator cables, artificial muscle, and armor material, while multifunctional materials include E-textile, touch panels, biosensors, and super capacitors.

  2. Carbon nanotube (CNT) fins for enhanced cooling of shape memory alloy wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Anupam; AuBuchon, Joseph; Brei, Diann; Shaw, John; Luntz, Jonathan; Jin, Sungho

    2008-03-01

    A commonly noted disadvantage of shape memory alloys is their frequency response which is limited by how fast the material can be cooled. This paper presents a feasibility study of using vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) as microscopic cooling fins to improve convective heat transfer. Using DC plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), aligned CNT's were successfully grown directly on ½ of the surface of a 0.38 mm diameter SMA wire, achieving desirable thermal contact. Cooling speeds were measured with a thermal imaging camera, and the effective convective coefficient was extracted from the temperature profiles using a basic cooling model of the wire. From this model, the effective convective coefficient was estimated to have increased by 24% (from 50 W/m2K for untreated SMA wire to 62 W/m2K for the nanotube treated wire), indicating that the deposition of CNT's indeed increased performance. By extrapolating these results to full wire coverage, up to a 46% improvement in frequency response with zero weight or volumetric penalties is predicted. Further improvements in cooling performance are likely to occur with higher CNT densities and longer nanotube lengths, allowing further developments of this technology to benefit many future applications utilizing high-speed miniature/micro-scale SMA actuators.

  3. Overview of recent results from CNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Thomas Sunn; Boozer, Allen H.; Brenner, Paul W.; Durand de Gevigney, Benoit; Sarasola, Xabier; Traverso, Peter

    2010-11-01

    This poster will give an overview of recent results from The Columbia Non-neutral Torus (CNT). CNT was recently reconfigured by repositioning the internal coils, creating magnetic surfaces substantially different from those previously used. Field line mapping, confinement, and stability results will be summarized; they are covered in more detail in adjacent posters. Numerical studies of drift orbits will be presented. Toroidal resonances and electrostatic perturbations can create complicated unconfined orbits in CNT, which can affect confinement negatively but also provides ways of injecting electrons, or positrons. The issue of Debye shielding in a non-neutral plasma is discussed. Debye screening is very different compared to the textbook calculation for a quasineutral plasma. The ability to affect drift orbits with external electrostatic perturbations may be used to inject electrons or positrons across the magnetic surfaces. An update on the plans for an electron-positron plasma experiment will also be given.

  4. Photolithographic fabrication of gated self-aligned parallel electron beam emitters with a single-stranded carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Justin; Ono, Takahito; Tsai, Ching-Hsiang; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we report on the development of a photolithographic process to fabricate a gated-emitter array with single-stranded carbon nanotubes (CNTs) self-aligned to the center of the emitter gate using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Si tips are formed on a silicon wafer by anisotropic etching of Si using SiO2 as a mask. Deposition of a SiO2 insulating layer and Cr-W electrode layers creates protrusions above the Si tips. This wafer is polished, and the Cr-W on the tips is removed. Etching of the SiO2 using hydrofluoric acid is performed to expose the gated Si tip. Incorporation of a novel diffusion process produces single-stranded CNTs by depositing a thin Ni layer on the Si tips and thermally diffusing the Ni layer to yield a catalyst particle for single-stranded CNT growth. The large surface to volume ratio at the apex of the Si tip allows a Ni particle to remain to act as a catalyst to grow a single-stranded CNT for fabricating the CNT based emitter structure. Diffusion of the Ni is carried out in situ during the heating phase of the PECVD CNT growth process at 600 °C. The diameters of the observed CNTs are on the order of 20 nm. The field emission characteristics of the gated field emitters are evaluated. The measured turn-on voltage of the gated emitter is 5 V.

  5. Integrating metal-oxide-decorated CNT networks with a CMOS readout in a gas sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunjoong; Lee, Sanghoon; Kim, Dai-Hong; Perello, David; Park, Young June; Hong, Seong-Hyeon; Yun, Minhee; Kim, Suhwan

    2012-01-01

    We have implemented a tin-oxide-decorated carbon nanotube (CNT) network gas sensor system on a single die. We have also demonstrated the deposition of metallic tin on the CNT network, its subsequent oxidation in air, and the improvement of the lifetime of the sensors. The fabricated array of CNT sensors contains 128 sensor cells for added redundancy and increased accuracy. The read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) was combined with coarse and fine time-to-digital converters to extend its resolution in a power-efficient way. The ROIC is fabricated using a 0.35 μm CMOS process, and the whole sensor system consumes 30 mA at 5 V. The sensor system was successfully tested in the detection of ammonia gas at elevated temperatures.

  6. Plasmon enhanced fluorescence studies from aligned gold nanorod arrays modified with SiO{sub 2} spacer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Damm, Signe; Fedele, Stefano; Rice, James H.; Murphy, Antony; Holsgrove, Kristina; Arredondo, Miryam; Pollard, Robert; Barry, James N.; Dowling, Denis P.

    2015-05-04

    Here, we demonstrate that quasi self-standing Au nanorod arrays prepared with plasma polymerisation deposited SiO{sub 2} dielectric spacers support surface enhanced fluorescence (SEF) while maintaining high signal reproducibility. We show that it is possible to find a balance between enhanced radiative and non-radiative decay rates at which the fluorescent intensity is maximized. The SEF signal optimised with a 30 nm spacer layer thickness showed a 3.5-fold enhancement with a signal variance of <15% thereby keeping the integrity of the nanorod array. We also demonstrate the decreased importance of obtaining resonance conditions when localized surface plasmon resonance is positioned within the spectral region of Au interband transitions. Procedures for further increasing the SEF enhancement factor are also discussed.

  7. Surface-roughness-assisted formation of large-scale vertically aligned CdS nanorod arrays via solvothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Minmin; Yan, Shancheng; Shi, Yi; Yang, Meng; Sun, Huabin; Wang, Jianyu; Yin, Yao; Gao, Fan

    2013-05-01

    Large-scale cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorod arrays were successfully synthesized on several different substrates through solvothermal reaction. During the growth experiments, we observed that the adhesion strength of the CdS nanorod arrays to different substrates differed dramatically, causing some of the CdS coating being easily flushed away by deionized water (DI water). With doubts and suspicions, we seriously investigate the original morphology of all the substrates by using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The phase, morphology, crystal structure and photoelectric property of all the products were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy and current-voltage (I-V) probe station. The growth mechanism of solvothermal reaction was proposed on the basis of all the characterizations. Our approach presents a universal method of liquid phase epitaxy of 1D material on a wide range of substrates of any shape.

  8. Determination of the texture of arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes from the angular dependence of the X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Okotrub, A. V. Belavin, V. V.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Gusel'nikov, A. V.; Kudashov, A. G.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Molodtsov, S. L.

    2008-09-15

    The properties of materials containing carbon nanotubes depend on the degree of alignment and the internal structure of nanotubes. It is shown that the degree of misorientation of carbon nanotubes in samples can be evaluated from the measurements of the angular dependences of the carbon X-ray emission and carbon X-ray absorption spectra. The CK{sub {alpha}} emission and CK X-ray absorption spectra of the array of multiwalled carbon nanotubes synthesized by catalytic thermolysis of a mixture of fullerene and ferrocene are measured. A comparison of the calculated model dependences of the relative intensities of the {pi} and {sigma} bands in the spectra with the experimental results makes it possible to evaluate the degree of misorientation of nanotubes in the sample and their internal texture.

  9. Self-aligned tip deinsulation of atomic layer deposited Al2O3 and parylene C coated Utah electrode array based neural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xianzong; Rieth, Loren; Negi, Sandeep; Bhandari, Rajmohan; Caldwell, Ryan; Sharma, Rohit; Tathireddy, Prashant; Solzbacher, Florian

    2014-03-01

    The recently developed alumina and parylene C bilayer encapsulation improved the lifetime of neural interfaces. Tip deinsulation of Utah electrode array based neural interfaces is challenging due to the complex 3D geometries and high aspect ratios of the devices. A three-step self-aligned process was developed for tip deinsulation of bilayer encapsulated arrays. The deinsulation process utilizes laser ablation to remove parylene C, O2 reactive ion etching to remove carbon and parylene residues, and buffered oxide etch to remove alumina deposited by atomic layer deposition, and expose the IrOx tip metallization. The deinsulated iridium oxide area was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to determine the morphology, surface morphology, composition, and electrical properties of the deposited layers and deinsulated tips. The alumina layer was found to prevent the formation of micro cracks on iridium oxide during the laser ablation process, which has been previously reported as a challenge for laser deinsulation of parylene films. The charge injection capacity, charge storage capacity, and impedance of deinsulated iridium oxide were characterized to determine the deinsulation efficacy compared to parylene-only insulation. Deinsulated iridium oxide with bilayer encapsulation had higher charge injection capacity (240 versus 320 nC) and similar electrochemical impedance (2.5 versus 2.5 kΩ) compared to deinsulated iridium oxide with only parylene coating for an area of 2 × 10-4 cm2. Tip impedances were in the range of 20-50 kΩ, with a median of 32 kΩ and a standard deviation of 30 kΩ, showing the effectiveness of the self-aligned deinsulation process for alumina and parylene C bilayer encapsulation. The relatively uniform tip impedance values demonstrated the consistency of tip exposures.

  10. SELF ALIGNED TIP DEINSULATION OF ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITED AL2O3 AND PARYLENE C COATED UTAH ELECTRODE ARRAY BASED NEURAL INTERFACES

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xianzong; Rieth, Loren; Negi, Sandeep; Bhandari, Rajmohan; Caldwell, Ryan; Sharma, Rohit; Tathireddy, Prashant; Solzbacher, Florian

    2014-01-01

    The recently developed alumina and Parylene C bi-layer encapsulation improved the lifetime of neural interfaces. Tip deinsulation of Utah electrode array based neural interfaces is challenging due to the complex 3D geometries and high aspect ratios of the devices. A three-step self-aligned process was developed for tip deinsulation of bilayer encapsulated arrays. The deinsulation process utilizes laser ablation to remove Parylene C, O2 reactive ion etching to remove carbon and Parylene residues, and buffered oxide etch to remove alumina deposited by atomic layer deposition, and expose the IrOx tip metallization. The deinsulated iridium oxide area was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to determine the morphology, surface morphology, composition, and electrical properties of the deposited layers and deinsulated tips. The alumina layer was found to prevent the formation of micro cracks on iridium oxide during the laser ablation process, which has been previously reported as a challenge for laser deinsulation of Parylene films. The charge injection capacity, charge storage capacity, and impedance of deinsulated iridium oxide were characterized to determine the deinsulation efficacy compared to Parylene-only insulation. Deinsulated iridium oxide with bilayer encapsulation had higher charge injection capacity (240 vs 320 nC) and similar electrochemical impedance (2.5 vs 2.5 kΩ) compared to deinsulated iridium oxide with only Parylene coating for an area of 2 × 10−4 cm2. Tip impedances were in the ranges of 20 to 50 kΩ, with median of 32 KΩ and standard deviation of 30 kΩ, showing the effectiveness of the self-aligned deinsulation process for alumina and Parylene C bi-layer encapsulation. The relatively uniform tip impedance values demonstrated the consistency of tip exposures. PMID:24771981

  11. Low-Temperature Growth of Well-Aligned ZnO Nanorod Arrays by Chemical Bath Deposition for Schottky Diode Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhaolin

    2015-04-01

    A well-aligned ZnO nanorod array (ZNRA) was successfully grown on an indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate by chemical bath deposition at low temperature. The morphology, crystalline structure, transmittance spectrum and photoluminescence spectrum of as-grown ZNRA were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and spectrophotometer, respectively. The results of these measurements showed that the ZNRA contained densely packed, aligned nanorods with diameters from 30 nm to 40 nm and a wurtzite structure. The ZNRA exhibited good optical transparency within the visible spectral range, with >80% transmission. Gold (Au) was deposited on top of the ZNRA, and the current-voltage characteristics of the resulting ITO/ZNRA/Au device in the dark were evaluated in detail. The ITO/ZNRA/Au device acted as a Schottky barrier diode with rectifying behaviour, low turn-on voltage (0.6 V), small reverse-bias saturation current (3.73 × 10-6 A), a high ideality factor (3.75), and a reasonable barrier height (0.65 V) between the ZNRA and Au.

  12. Hydrothermal synthesis of highly crystalline ZnO nanorod arrays: Dependence of morphology and alignment on growth conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzez, Shrook A.; Hassan, Z.; Hassan, J. J.; Alimanesh, M.; Rasheed, Hiba S.; Sabah, Fayroz A.; Abdulateef, Sinan A.

    2016-07-01

    Highly oriented zinc oxide nanorod were successfully grown on seeded p-type silicone substrate by hydrothermal methode. The morphology and the crystallinty of ZnO c-axis (002) arrays were systematically studied using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. The effect of seed layer pre-annealing on nanorods properties was explained according to the nucleation site of ZnO nanoparticles on silicon substrate. In addition, the variation of the equal molarity of zinc nitrate hexahydrate and hexamine concentrations in the reaction vessel play a crucial role related to the ZnO nanorods.

  13. Demonstration of a Segment Alignment Maintenance System on a Seven-Segment Sub-Array of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, in collaboration with Blue Line Engineering of Colorado Springs, Colorado, is developing a Segment Alignment Maintenance System (SAMS) for McDonald Observatory's Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). The SAMS shall sense motions of the 91 primary mirror segments and send corrections to HET's primary mirror controller as the mirror segments misalign due to thermo-elastic deformations of the mirror support structure. The SAMS consists of inductive edge sensors supplemented by inclinometers for global radius of curvature sensing. All measurements are sent to the SAMS computer where mirror motion corrections are calculated. In October 2000, a prototype SAMS was installed on a seven-segment cluster of the HET. Subsequent testing has shown that the SAMS concept and architecture are a viable practical approach to maintaining HET's primary mirror figure, or the figure of any large segmented telescope. This paper gives a functional description of the SAMS sub-array components and presents test data to characterize the performance of the sub-array SAMS.

  14. Self-Aligned Cu-Si Core-Shell Nanowire Array as a High-Performance Anode for Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Li, Huaqing; Henry Jr, John James; Martha, Surendra K; Dudney, Nancy J; Lance, Michael J; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Besmann, Theodore M; Dai, Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Silicon nanowires (NWs) have been reported as a promising anode that demonstrated high capacity without pulverization during cycling, however, they present some technical issues that remain to be solved. The high aspect ratio of the NWs and their small contact areas with the current collector cause high electrical resistance, which results in inefficient electron transport. The nano-size interface between a NW and the substrate experiences high shear stress during lithiation, causing the wire to separate from the current collector. In addition, most reported methods for producing silicon NWs involve high-temperature processing and require catalysts that later become contaminants. This study developed a new self-aligned Cu-Si core-shell NW array using a low-temperature, catalyst-free process to address the issues described. The silicon shell is amorphous as synthesized and accommodates Li-ions without phase transformation. The copper core functions as a built-in current collector to provide very short (nm) electron transport pathways as well as backbone to improve mechanical strength. Initial electrochemical evaluation has demonstrated good capacity retention and high Coulombic efficiency for this new anode material in a half-cell configuration. No wire fracture or core-shell separation was observed after cycling. However, electrolyte decomposition products largely covered the top surface of the NW array, restricting electrolyte access and causing capacity reduction at high charging rates.

  15. Morphology and composition controlled growth of polar c-axis and nonpolar m-axis well-aligned ternary III-nitride nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huijie; Zhao, Guijuan; Kong, Susu; Han, Dongyue; Wei, Hongyuan; Wang, Lianshan; Chen, Zhen; Yang, Shaoyan

    2015-10-01

    Control over the nanostructure morphology and growth orientation is in high demand for fundamental research and technological applications. Herein we report a general strategy to fabricate polar c-axis and nonpolar m-axis well-aligned III-nitride ternary nanotube arrays with controllable morphologies and compositions. By depositing AlN on the InN nanorod array templates and thermally removing the InN templates, InAlN nanotubes can be obtained. Polar c-axis and nonpolar m-axis nanotubes were formed on the c- and r-plane sapphire substrates, respectively. The nanotubes are single crystalline and highly ordered on the substrates, as revealed by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and selected area electron microscopy characterization. It was found that the In droplets on top of the InN nanorods play a critical role in controlling the morphology of the nanotubes. By keeping or removing the In droplets, the obtained nanotubes exhibited both ends open or only one end open. And by varying the AlN deposition temperature, the In composition in the nanotubes can be changed from 0 to 0.29. The nanotube synthesis method is simple and can be applied to the formation of other III-nitride ternary (InGaN, and AlGaN) or quaternary (InAlGaN) alloy nanotube arrays.Control over the nanostructure morphology and growth orientation is in high demand for fundamental research and technological applications. Herein we report a general strategy to fabricate polar c-axis and nonpolar m-axis well-aligned III-nitride ternary nanotube arrays with controllable morphologies and compositions. By depositing AlN on the InN nanorod array templates and thermally removing the InN templates, InAlN nanotubes can be obtained. Polar c-axis and nonpolar m-axis nanotubes were formed on the c- and r-plane sapphire substrates, respectively. The nanotubes are single crystalline and highly ordered on the substrates, as revealed by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and selected area electron microscopy

  16. The Highly Robust Electrical Interconnects and Ultrasensitive Biosensors Based on Embedded Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun; Cassell, Alan; Koehne, Jessica; Chen, Hua; Ng, Hou Tee; Ye, Qi; Stevens, Ramsey; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2003-01-01

    We report on our recent breakthroughs in two different applications using well-aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on Si chips, including (1) a novel processing solution for highly robust electrical interconnects in integrated circuit manufacturing, and (2) the development of ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA sensors. Both of them rely on the invention of a bottom-up fabrication scheme which includes six steps, including: (a) lithographic patterning, (b) depositing bottom conducting contacts, (c) depositing metal catalysts, (d) CNT growth by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), (e) dielectric gap-filling, and (f) chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). Such processes produce a stable planarized surface with only the open end of CNTs exposed, whch can be further processed or modified for different applications. By depositing patterned top contacts, the CNT can serve as vertical interconnects between the two conducting layers. This method is fundamentally different fiom current damascene processes and avoids problems associated with etching and filling of high aspect ratio holes at nanoscales. In addition, multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) are highly robust and can carry a current density of 10(exp 9) A/square centimeters without degradation. It has great potential to help extending the current Si technology. The embedded MWCNT array without the top contact layer can be also used as a nanoelectrode array in electrochemical biosensors. The cell time-constant and sensitivity can be dramatically improved. By functionalizing the tube ends with specific oligonucleotide probes, specific DNA targets can be detected with electrochemical methods down to subattomoles.

  17. Mapping self-assembled dots and line arrays by image analysis for quantification of defect density and alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simão, C.; Tuchapsky, D.; Khunsin, W.; Amann, A.; Morris, M. A.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.

    2015-03-01

    Bottom-up alternative lithographic masks from directed self-assembly systems have been extending the limits of critical dimensions in a cost-effective manner although great challenges in controlling defectivity remain open. Particularly, defectivity and dimensional metrology are two main challenges in lithography due to the increasing miniaturisation of circuits. To gain insights about the percentage of alignment, defectivity and order quantification, directed self-assembly block copolymer fingerprints were investigated via an image analysis methodology. Here we present the analysis of hexagonal phase of polystyrene-b-polydimethylsiloxane (PS-b-PDMS) forming linear patterns in topological substrates. From our methodology, we have performed dimensional metrology estimating pitch size and error, and the linewidth of the lines was estimated. In parallel, the methodology allowed us identification and quantification of typical defects observable in self-assembly, such as turning points, disclination or branching points, break or lone points and end points. The methodology presented here yields high volume statistical data useful for advancing dimensional metrology and defect analysis of self- and directed assembly systems.

  18. Development of advanced catalytic layer based on vertically aligned conductive polymer arrays for thin-film fuel cell electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shangfeng; Yi, Baolian; Cao, Longsheng; Song, Wei; Zhao, Qing; Yu, Hongmei; Shao, Zhigang

    2016-10-01

    The degradation of carbon supports significantly influences the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), particularly in the cathode, which must be overcome for the wide application of fuel cells. In this study, advanced catalytic layer with electronic conductive polymer-polypyrrole (PPy) nanowire as ordered catalyst supports for PEMFCs is prepared. A platinum-palladium (PtPd) catalyst thin layer with whiskerette shapes forms along the long axis of the PPy nanowires. The resulting arrays are hot-pressed on both sides of a Nafion® membrane to construct a membrane electrode assembly (without additional ionomer). The ordered thin catalyst layer (approximately 1.1 μm) is applied in a single cell as the anode and the cathode without additional Nafion® ionomer. The single cell yields a maximum performance of 762.1 mW cm-2 with a low Pt loading (0.241 mg Pt cm-2, anode + cathode). The advanced catalyst layer indicates better mass transfer in high current density than that of commercial Pt/C-based electrode. The mass activity is 1.08-fold greater than that of DOE 2017 target. Thus, the as-prepared electrodes have the potential for application in fuel cells.

  19. A computational study of the quantum transport properties of a Cu–CNT composite† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5cp01470k Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Koziol, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    The quantum transport properties of a Cu–CNT composite are studied using a non-equilibrium Green's function approach combined with the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding method. The results show that the electrical conductance of the composite depends strongly on CNT density and alignment but more weakly on chirality. Alignment with the applied bias is preferred and the conductance of the composite increases as its mass density increases. PMID:26120607

  20. Microwave Conductivity of Sorted CNT Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Bulmer, John S.; Martens, Jon; Kurzepa, Lukasz; Gizewski, Tomasz; Egilmez, M.; Blamire, M. G.; Yahya, Noorhana; Koziol, Krzysztof K. K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress with tailored growth and post-process sorting enables carbon nanotube (CNT) assemblies with predominantly metallic or semi-conducting concentrations. Cryogenic and microwave measurements performed here show transport dimensionality and overall order increasing with increasing metallic concentration, even in atmospheric doping conditions. By 120 GHz, the conductivity of predominantly semi-conducting assemblies grew to 400% its DC value at an increasing growth rate, while other concentrations a growth rate that tapered off. A generalized Drude model fits to the different frequency dependent behaviors and yields useful quality control parameters such as plasma frequency, mean free path, and degree of localization. As one of the first demonstrations of waveguides fabricated from this material, sorted CNTs from both as-made and post-process sources were inserted into sections of practical micro-strip. With both sources, sorted CNT micro-strip increasingly outperformed the unsorted with increasing frequency-- illustrating that sorted CNT assemblies will be important for high frequency applications. PMID:24446019

  1. Microwave conductivity of sorted CNT assemblies.

    PubMed

    Bulmer, John S; Martens, Jon; Kurzepa, Lukasz; Gizewski, Tomasz; Egilmez, M; Blamire, M G; Yahya, Noorhana; Koziol, Krzysztof K K

    2014-01-21

    Recent progress with tailored growth and post-process sorting enables carbon nanotube (CNT) assemblies with predominantly metallic or semi-conducting concentrations. Cryogenic and microwave measurements performed here show transport dimensionality and overall order increasing with increasing metallic concentration, even in atmospheric doping conditions. By 120 GHz, the conductivity of predominantly semi-conducting assemblies grew to 400% its DC value at an increasing growth rate, while other concentrations a growth rate that tapered off. A generalized Drude model fits to the different frequency dependent behaviors and yields useful quality control parameters such as plasma frequency, mean free path, and degree of localization. As one of the first demonstrations of waveguides fabricated from this material, sorted CNTs from both as-made and post-process sources were inserted into sections of practical micro-strip. With both sources, sorted CNT micro-strip increasingly outperformed the unsorted with increasing frequency-- illustrating that sorted CNT assemblies will be important for high frequency applications.

  2. Atomic layer deposition of Al-doped ZnO/Al2O3 double layers on vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays.

    PubMed

    Malek, Gary A; Brown, Emery; Klankowski, Steven A; Liu, Jianwei; Elliot, Alan J; Lu, Rongtao; Li, Jun; Wu, Judy

    2014-05-14

    High-aspect-ratio, vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) were conformally coated with aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) using atomic layer deposition (ALD) in order to produce a three-dimensional array of metal-insulator-metal core-shell nanostructures. Prefunctionalization before ALD, as required for initiating covalent bonding on a carbon nanotube surface, was eliminated on VACNFs due to the graphitic edges along the surface of each CNF. The graphitic edges provided ideal nucleation sites under sequential exposures of H2O and trimethylaluminum to form an Al2O3 coating up to 20 nm in thickness. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and scanning electron microscopy images confirmed the conformal core-shell AZO/Al2O3/CNF structures while energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy verified the elemental composition of the different layers. HRTEM selected area electron diffraction revealed that the as-made Al2O3 by ALD at 200 °C was amorphous, and then, after annealing in air at 450 °C for 30 min, was converted to polycrystalline form. Nevertheless, comparable dielectric constants of 9.3 were obtained in both cases by cyclic voltammetry at a scan rate of 1000 V/s. The conformal core-shell AZO/Al2O3/VACNF array structure demonstrated in this work provides a promising three-dimensional architecture toward applications of solid-state capacitors with large surface area having a thin, leak-free dielectric.

  3. Assembly, physics, and application of highly electronic-type purified semiconducting carbon nanotubes in aligned array field effect transistors and photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in (1) achieving highly monodisperse semiconducting carbon nanotubes without problematic metallic nanotubes and (2) depositing these nanotubes into useful, organized arrays and assemblies on substrates have created new opportunities for studying the physics of these one-dimensional conductors and for applying them in electronics and photonics technologies. In this talk, I will present on two topics that are along these lines. In the first, we have pioneered a scalable approach for depositing aligned arrays of ultrahigh purity semiconducting SWCNTs (prepared using polyfluorene-derivatives) called floating evaporative self-assembly (FESA). FESA is exploited to create FETs with exceptionally high combined on-conductance and on-off ratio of 261 μS/ μm and 2 x105, respectively, for a channel length of 240 nm. This is 1400 x greater on-off ratio than SWCNT FETs fabricated by other methods, at comparable on-conductance per width of 250 μS/ μm, and 30-100 x greater on-conductance per width, at comparable on-off ratio of 105-107. In the second, we have discovered how to efficiently harvest photons using semiconducting SWCNTs by driving the dissociation of excitons using donor/acceptor heterojunctions. The flow of energy in SWCNT films occurs across a complex energy landscape, temporally resolved using two-dimensional white light ultrafast spectroscopy. We have demonstrated simple solar cells driven by SWCNT excitons, based on bilayers between C60 and ultrathin (5 nm) films of SWCNTs that achieve a 1% solar power conversion efficiency (7% at the bandgap). High internal quantum efficiency indicates that future blended or multijunction cells exploiting multiple layers will be many times more efficient.

  4. Atomic layer deposition of Al-doped ZnO/Al2O3 double layers on vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays.

    PubMed

    Malek, Gary A; Brown, Emery; Klankowski, Steven A; Liu, Jianwei; Elliot, Alan J; Lu, Rongtao; Li, Jun; Wu, Judy

    2014-05-14

    High-aspect-ratio, vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) were conformally coated with aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) using atomic layer deposition (ALD) in order to produce a three-dimensional array of metal-insulator-metal core-shell nanostructures. Prefunctionalization before ALD, as required for initiating covalent bonding on a carbon nanotube surface, was eliminated on VACNFs due to the graphitic edges along the surface of each CNF. The graphitic edges provided ideal nucleation sites under sequential exposures of H2O and trimethylaluminum to form an Al2O3 coating up to 20 nm in thickness. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and scanning electron microscopy images confirmed the conformal core-shell AZO/Al2O3/CNF structures while energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy verified the elemental composition of the different layers. HRTEM selected area electron diffraction revealed that the as-made Al2O3 by ALD at 200 °C was amorphous, and then, after annealing in air at 450 °C for 30 min, was converted to polycrystalline form. Nevertheless, comparable dielectric constants of 9.3 were obtained in both cases by cyclic voltammetry at a scan rate of 1000 V/s. The conformal core-shell AZO/Al2O3/VACNF array structure demonstrated in this work provides a promising three-dimensional architecture toward applications of solid-state capacitors with large surface area having a thin, leak-free dielectric. PMID:24689702

  5. A facile method to align carbon nanotubes on polymeric membrane substrate

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haiyang; Zhou, Zhijun; Dong, Hang; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Huanlin; Hou, Lian

    2013-01-01

    The alignment of carbon nanotubes (CNT) is the fundamental requirement to ensure their excellent functions but seems to be desolated in recent years. A facile method, hot-press combined with peel-off (HPPO), is introduced here, through which CNT can be successfully vertically aligned on the polymeric membrane substrate. Shear force and mechanical stretch are proposed to be the main forces to align the tubes perpendicular to the substrate surface during the peel-off process. The alignment of CNT keeps its orientation in a thin hybrid membrane by dip-coating cellulose acetate dope solution. It is expected that the stable alignment of CNT by HPPO would contribute to the realization of its potential applications. PMID:24326297

  6. A facile method to align carbon nanotubes on polymeric membrane substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haiyang; Zhou, Zhijun; Dong, Hang; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Huanlin; Hou, Lian

    2013-12-01

    The alignment of carbon nanotubes (CNT) is the fundamental requirement to ensure their excellent functions but seems to be desolated in recent years. A facile method, hot-press combined with peel-off (HPPO), is introduced here, through which CNT can be successfully vertically aligned on the polymeric membrane substrate. Shear force and mechanical stretch are proposed to be the main forces to align the tubes perpendicular to the substrate surface during the peel-off process. The alignment of CNT keeps its orientation in a thin hybrid membrane by dip-coating cellulose acetate dope solution. It is expected that the stable alignment of CNT by HPPO would contribute to the realization of its potential applications.

  7. Controllable growth of vertically aligned Bi-doped TiO2 nanorod arrays for all-oxide solid-state DSSCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asemi, Morteza; Ghanaatshoar, Majid

    2016-09-01

    In this study, vertically aligned Bi-doped TiO2 nanorod arrays as photoanodes were successfully grown on the fluorine-doped tin oxide by hydrothermal method. Structural analysis showed that bismuth was successfully incorporated into the TiO2 lattice at low concentration, but at higher concentration, phase segregation of Bi2O3 in the TiO2 matrix was occurred. TiO2 nanorods with 3 % bismuth concentration had minimum electrical resistivity. As the solid-state electrolyte, Mg-doped CuCrO2 nanoparticles with p-type conductivity were synthesized by sol-gel method. The fabricated all-oxide solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells with Bi-doped TiO2 nanorods displayed better photovoltaic performance due to the presence of Bi. The improved cell performance was correlated with the higher dye loading, slower charge recombination rate and the higher electrical conductivity of the photoanodes. After mechanical pressing, the all-oxide solid-state DSSC exhibited enhanced photovoltaic performance due to the formation of the large neck between adjacent nanoparticles by mechanical sintering. The open-circuit photovoltage decay measurement of the devices and electrical conductivity of the nanoparticles before and after pressing revealed that the mechanical pressing technique reduces charge recombination rate and facilitates electron transport through the interconnected nanoparticles.

  8. Growth of long and aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes on carbon and metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmas, M.; Pinault, M.; Patel, S.; Porterat, D.; Reynaud, C.; Mayne-L'Hermite, M.

    2012-03-01

    Well aligned, long and dense multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) can be grown on both carbon fibres and any metal substrates compatible with the CNT synthesis temperature. The injection-CVD process developed involves two stages, including fibre pretreatment by depositing a SiO2-based sub-layer from an organometallic precursor followed by CNT growth from toluene/ferrocene precursor mixture. Carbon substrates, as well as metals, can easily be treated with this process, which takes place in the same reactor and does not need any handling in between the two stages. The aligned CNT carpets obtained are similar to the ones grown on reference quartz substrates. The CNT growth rate is fairly high (ca. 30 μm min-1) and it is possible to control CNT length by varying the CNT synthesis duration. The thickness of the SiO2-based sub-layer can be varied and is shown to have an influence on the CNT growth. This layer is assumed to play a diffusion barrier layer role between the substrate and the iron based catalyst nanoparticles producing CNT. The CNT anchorage to the carbon fibres has been checked and good overall adhesion proved, which is in favour of a good transfer of electrical charge and heat between the nanotubes and fibre.

  9. Growth of horizontally aligned dense carbon nanotubes from trench sidewalls.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingyu; Miao, Jianmin; Xu, Ting; Yan, Bin; Yu, Ting; Shen, Zexiang

    2011-07-01

    Horizontally aligned, dense carbon nanotubes (HADCNTs) in the form of CNT cantilevers/bridges were grown from selected trench sidewalls in silicon substrate by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The as-grown CNT cantilevers/bridges are packed with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with a linear density of about 10 CNTs µm(-1). The excellent horizontal alignment of these CNTs is mainly ascribed to the van der Waals interactions within the dense CNT bundles. What is more, the Raman intensity ratio I(G)/I(D) shows a gradual increase from the CNT roots to tips, indicating a defect gradient along CNTs generated during their growth. These results will inspire further efforts to explore the fundamentals and applications of HADCNTs. PMID:21586807

  10. Strong adhesion and friction coupling in hierarchical carbon nanotube arrays for dry adhesive applications.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shihao; Xia, Zhenhai; Gao, Xiaosheng

    2012-04-01

    The adhesion and friction coupling of hierarchical carbon nanotube arrays was investigated with a hierarchical multiscale modeling approach. At device level, vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNT) arrays with laterally distributed segments on top were analyzed via finite element methods to determine the macroscopic adhesion and friction force coupling. At the nanoscale, molecular dynamics simulation was performed to explore the origin of the adhesion enhancement due to the existence of the laterally distributed CNTs. The results show interfacial adhesion force is drastically promoted by interfacial friction force when a single lateral CNT is being peeled from an amorphous carbon substrate. By fitting with experiments, we find that under shearing loadings the maximum interfacial adhesion force is increased by a factor of ~5, compared to that under normal loadings. Pre-existing surface asperities of the substrate have proven to be the source of generating large interfacial friction, which in turn results in an enhanced adhesion. The critical peeling angles derived from the continuum and nano- levels are comparable to those of geckos and other synthetic adhesives. Our analysis indicates that the adhesion enhancement factor of the hierarchically structured VA-CNT arrays could be further increased by uniformly orienting the laterally distributed CNTs on top. Most importantly, a significant buckling of the lateral CNT at peeling front is captured on the molecular level, which provides a basis for the fundamental understanding of local deformation, and failure mechanisms of nanofibrillar structures. This work gives an insight into the durability issues that prevent the success of artificial dry adhesives.

  11. Using surface creep rate to infer fraction locked for sections of the San Andreas fault system in northern California from alignment array and GPS data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lienkaemper, James J.; McFarland, Forrest S.; Simpson, Robert W.; Caskey, S. John

    2014-01-01

    Surface creep rate, observed along five branches of the dextral San Andreas fault system in northern California, varies considerably from one section to the next, indicating that so too may the depth at which the faults are locked. We model locking on 29 fault sections using each section’s mean long‐term creep rate and the consensus values of fault width and geologic slip rate. Surface creep rate observations from 111 short‐range alignment and trilateration arrays and 48 near‐fault, Global Positioning System station pairs are used to estimate depth of creep, assuming an elastic half‐space model and adjusting depth of creep iteratively by trial and error to match the creep observations along fault sections. Fault sections are delineated either by geometric discontinuities between them or by distinctly different creeping behaviors. We remove transient rate changes associated with five large (M≥5.5) regional earthquakes. Estimates of fraction locked, the ratio of moment accumulation rate to loading rate, on each section of the fault system provide a uniform means to inform source parameters relevant to seismic‐hazard assessment. From its mean creep rates, we infer the main branch (the San Andreas fault) ranges from only 20%±10% locked on its central creeping section to 99%–100% on the north coast. From mean accumulation rates, we infer that four urban faults appear to have accumulated enough seismic moment to produce major earthquakes: the northern Calaveras (M 6.8), Hayward (M 6.8), Rodgers Creek (M 7.1), and Green Valley (M 7.1). The latter three faults are nearing or past their mean recurrence interval.

  12. Nucleation, Growth Mechanism, and Controlled Coating of ZnO ALD onto Vertically Aligned N-Doped CNTs.

    PubMed

    Silva, R M; Ferro, M C; Araujo, J R; Achete, C A; Clavel, G; Silva, R F; Pinna, N

    2016-07-19

    Zinc oxide thin films were deposited on vertically aligned nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) from diethylzinc and water. The study demonstrates that doping CNTs with nitrogen is an effective approach for the "activation" of the CNTs surface for the ALD of metal oxides. Conformal ZnO coatings are already obtained after 50 ALD cycles, whereas at lower ALD cycles an island growth mode is observed. Moreover, the process allows for a uniform growth from the top to the bottom of the vertically aligned N-CNT arrays. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that ZnO nucleation takes place at the N-containing species on the surface of the CNTs by the formation of the Zn-N bonds at the interface between the CNTs and the ZnO film. PMID:27333190

  13. Nucleation, Growth Mechanism, and Controlled Coating of ZnO ALD onto Vertically Aligned N-Doped CNTs.

    PubMed

    Silva, R M; Ferro, M C; Araujo, J R; Achete, C A; Clavel, G; Silva, R F; Pinna, N

    2016-07-19

    Zinc oxide thin films were deposited on vertically aligned nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) from diethylzinc and water. The study demonstrates that doping CNTs with nitrogen is an effective approach for the "activation" of the CNTs surface for the ALD of metal oxides. Conformal ZnO coatings are already obtained after 50 ALD cycles, whereas at lower ALD cycles an island growth mode is observed. Moreover, the process allows for a uniform growth from the top to the bottom of the vertically aligned N-CNT arrays. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that ZnO nucleation takes place at the N-containing species on the surface of the CNTs by the formation of the Zn-N bonds at the interface between the CNTs and the ZnO film.

  14. Understanding and improving confinement in CNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Paul; Pedersen, Thomas; Sarasola, Xabier; Durand de Gevigney, Benoit; Traverso, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Confinement studies in the Columbia Non-neutral Torus (CNT) are providing new insights into the physics of pure electron plasmas confined on magnetic surfaces. The confinement of pure electron plasmas has now been measured in the absence of internal objects . These transient plasmas exhibit confinement times that are shorter than expected and have a strong dependence on neutral pressure. Plasmas created by electron emission in one direction have been compared to those created by emission in two directions. The confinement is significantly longer when emitting in only one direction, suggesting that a two-stream instability is present and affects the radial transport rate. Progress on verifying the existence of a two-stream instability will be presented. Experimental results from previously unexplored stellarator configurations, with low shear and large islands will also be shown.

  15. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube emitter on metal foil for medical X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Je Hwang; Kim, Wan Sun; Lee, Seung Ho; Eom, Young Ju; Park, Hun Kuk; Park, Kyu Chang

    2013-10-01

    A simple method is proposed for growing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on metal foil using the triode direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The carbon nanotube (CNT) electron emitter was fabricated using fewer process steps with an acid treated metal substrate. The CNT emitter was used for X-ray generation, and the X-ray image of mouse's joint was obtained with an anode current of 0.5 mA at an anode bias of 60 kV. The simple fabrication of a well-aligned CNT with a protection layer on metal foil, and its X-ray application, were studied. PMID:24245201

  16. Hydrodynamics of CNT dispersion in high shear dispersion mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young Min; Lee, Dong Hyun; Hwang, Wook Ryol; Lee, Sang Bok; Jung, Seung-Il

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we investigate the carbon nanotube (CNT) fragmentation mechanism and dispersion in high shear homogenizers as a plausible dispersion technique, correlating with device geometries and processing conditions, for mass production of CNT-aluminum composites for automobile industries. A CNT dispersion model has been established in a turbulent flow regime and an experimental method in characterizing the critical yield stress of CNT flocs are presented. Considering CNT dispersion in ethanol as a model system, we tested two different geometries of high shear mixers — blade-stirrer type and rotor-stator type homogenizers — and reported the particle size distributions in time and the comparison has been made with the modeling approach and partly with the computational results.

  17. Optimally conductive networks in randomly dispersed CNT:graphene hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Wonbo; Kwon, Youbin; Jeon, Seung-Yeol; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2015-01-01

    A predictive model is proposed that quantitatively describes the synergistic behavior of the electrical conductivities of CNTs and graphene in CNT:graphene hybrids. The number of CNT-to-CNT, graphene-to-graphene, and graphene-to-CNT contacts is calculated assuming a random distribution of CNTs and graphene particles in the hybrids and using an orientation density function. Calculations reveal that the total number of contacts reaches a maximum at a specific composition and depends on the particle sizes of the graphene and CNTs. The hybrids, prepared using inkjet printing, are distinguished by higher electrical conductivities than that of 100% CNT or graphene at certain composition ratios. These experimental results provide strong evidence that this approach involving constituent element contacts is suitable for investigating the properties of particulate hybrid materials. PMID:26564249

  18. Modifying surface structure to tune surface properties of vertically aligned carbon nanotube films.

    PubMed

    Ci, Lijie; Ajayan, P M

    2010-06-01

    We report a simple etching process to modify surface of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays for their applications in superhydrophobic surface, field emission display, and sun energy conversion, etc. At a high temperature (700-800 degrees C), very low concentration water vapor in presence with Ar and hydrogen flow can be a weak oxidant, and mildly etch nanotube tips without damaging their walls. This process can be performed right after the CNT growth process. Surface of nanotube arrays becomes multi-tiered nanotube patterns with open-ended nanotubes standing straightly. Surface morphology of nanotube arrays can be tuned by changing the etching time. Water droplets on a modified nanotube surface show a large contact angle and sliding angle, which make the etched nanotube film suitable for application such as small amount liquid transport. Light absorption measurement indicated that surface roughness has no effect to improve the light absorption, indicating a different mechanism from other black material. The surface modified nanotube arrays have much increased field enhancement factor in our field emission test, showing the better field emission ability of the nanotube arrays with open tips. PMID:20355379

  19. Multi-scale simulation of electron emission from a triode-type electron source with a carbon-nanotube column array cathode.

    PubMed

    Becker, Joel; Hong, Nguyen Tuan; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Leblanc, Francois; Lee, Soonil; Cipriani, Fabrice

    2013-11-22

    We have designed and fabricated a new type of field electron source for a novel onboard mass spectrometer. The new electron source, which is a field effect emitter in a triode configuration, consists of a CNT-column array cathode and an extraction gate with holes that are aligned concentrically with respect to the cylindrical CNT columns. In triode mode operation, cathode currents as large as ~420 μA have been emitted with an anode-to-gate current ratio of ~1.5. To account for the observed emission characteristics of the new electron source, we have carried out multi-scale simulations that combine a three-dimensional (3D) microscopic model in the vicinity of an actual emission site with a two-dimensional (2D) macroscopic model that covers the whole device structure. Because the mesh size in the microscopic 3D model is as small as 100 nm, the contributions of the extruding CNT bundle at the top edge of an electron column can be examined in detail. Unlike the macroscopic 2D simulation that shows only small field enhancement at CNT column's top edge, the multi-scale simulation successfully reproduced the local electric field strongly enough to emit the measured cathode currents and the electric field distribution which is consistent with the measured anode-to-gate current ratio.

  20. Electrodeposition of Various Au Nanostructures on Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as Highly Sensitive Nanoelectrode Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayazfar, H.; Afshar, A.; Dolati, A.

    2015-05-01

    An efficient method has been developed to synthesize well-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on a conductive Ta substrate by chemical vapor deposition. Free-standing MWCNTs arrays were functionalized through electrochemical oxidation with the formation of hydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups. Facile template-free electrochemical routes were then developed for the shape-selective synthesis of less-common Au nanostructures, including flower, sphere, dendrite, rod, sheet, and cabbage onto the aligned MWCNTs at room temperature. Especially, among all the synthesis methods for Au nanocrystals, this is the first report using electrochemical technique to synthesize wide variety shapes of gold nanostructures (GNs) onto the aligned MWCNTs. The morphology of electrodeposited Au nanostructures was controlled by adjustment of the deposition time and potential, the number of potential cycles, the kind of deposition bath, and electrodeposition method. Transmission electron microscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the products. Cyclic voltammograms showed that the MWCNT/Ta electrodes modified with GNs have higher sensitivity compared to the unmodified electrodes in the presence of Fe2+/Fe3+ redox couple. These kinds of aligned-CNT/Au nanostructure hybrid materials introduced by these efficient and simple electrochemical methods could lead to the development of a new generation device for ultrasensitive catalytic and biological application.

  1. Photolithographic fabrication of gated self-aligned parallel electron beam emitters with a single-stranded carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Ho, Justin; Ono, Takahito; Tsai, Ching-Hsiang; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2008-09-10

    In this paper we report on the development of a photolithographic process to fabricate a gated-emitter array with single-stranded carbon nanotubes (CNTs) self-aligned to the center of the emitter gate using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Si tips are formed on a silicon wafer by anisotropic etching of Si using SiO(2) as a mask. Deposition of a SiO(2) insulating layer and Cr-W electrode layers creates protrusions above the Si tips. This wafer is polished, and the Cr-W on the tips is removed. Etching of the SiO(2) using hydrofluoric acid is performed to expose the gated Si tip. Incorporation of a novel diffusion process produces single-stranded CNTs by depositing a thin Ni layer on the Si tips and thermally diffusing the Ni layer to yield a catalyst particle for single-stranded CNT growth. The large surface to volume ratio at the apex of the Si tip allows a Ni particle to remain to act as a catalyst to grow a single-stranded CNT for fabricating the CNT based emitter structure. Diffusion of the Ni is carried out in situ during the heating phase of the PECVD CNT growth process at 600 °C. The diameters of the observed CNTs are on the order of 20 nm. The field emission characteristics of the gated field emitters are evaluated. The measured turn-on voltage of the gated emitter is 5 V. PMID:21828872

  2. INHALATION EXPOSURE TO CARBON NANOTUBES (CNT) AND CARBON NANOFIBERS (CNF): METHODOLOGY AND DOSIMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Oberdörster, Günter; Castranova, Vincent; Asgharian, Bahman; Sayre, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and nanofibers (CNF) are used increasingly in a broad array of commercial products. Given current understandings, the most significant life-cycle exposures to CNT/CNF occur from inhalation when they become airborne at different stages of their life cycle, including workplace, use, and disposal. Increasing awareness of the importance of physicochemical properties as determinants of toxicity of CNT/CNF and existing difficulties in interpreting results of mostly acute rodent inhalation studies to date necessitate a reexamination of standardized inhalation testing guidelines. The current literature on pulmonary exposure to CNT/CNF and associated effects is summarized; recommendations and conclusions are provided that address test guideline modifications for rodent inhalation studies that will improve dosimetric extrapolation modeling for hazard and risk characterization based on the analysis of exposure-dose-response relationships. Several physicochemical parameters for CNT/CNF, including shape, state of agglomeration/aggregation, surface properties, impurities, and density, influence toxicity. This requires an evaluation of the correlation between structure and pulmonary responses. Inhalation, using whole-body exposures of rodents, is recommended for acute to chronic pulmonary exposure studies. Dry powder generator methods for producing CNT/CNF aerosols are preferred, and specific instrumentation to measure mass, particle size and number distribution, and morphology in the exposure chambers are identified. Methods are discussed for establishing experimental exposure concentrations that correlate with realistic human exposures, such that unrealistically high experimental concentrations need to be identified that induce effects under mechanisms that are not relevant for workplace exposures. Recommendations for anchoring data to results seen for positive and negative benchmark materials are included, as well as periods for postexposure observation

  3. Enhancement in photo-induced hydrophilicity of TiO2/CNT nanostructures by applying voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi, Yaser; Khalilian, Maryam; Arzi, Ezatollah

    2011-06-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays were synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition on a silicon substrate. Cabbage-like TiO2 nanostructures on the CNTs were produced by atmospheric-pressure chemical vapour deposition. Scanning electron microcopy was used to study the morphology of the TiO2/CNT structures while x-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to verify the characteristics of the prepared nanostructures. Their hydrophilicity under UV and visible light was investigated and compared with the activity of thin films of TiO2. The TiO2/CNTs showed a highly improved photocatalytic activity in comparison with the TiO2 film. The excellent visible-light-induced hydrophilicity of the TiO2/CNTs was attributed to the generation of electron-hole pairs by visible light excitation with a low recombination rate. The results of this study showed that the fabricated cabbage-like TiO2/CNT nanostructures have a super-hydrophilic surface without further UV irradiation. Electrical measurements showed that a p-n junction was formed at the interface of the TiO2/CNTs. Consequently, a super-hydrophilic surface was achieved by applying an electric bias voltage. Visible-light- and electro-induced hydrophilicity of the obtained nanostructure was reported in this work.

  4. PEDOT-CNT coated electrodes stimulate retinal neurons at low voltage amplitudes and low charge densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samba, R.; Herrmann, T.; Zeck, G.

    2015-02-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare two different microelectrode materials—the conductive polymer composite poly-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT)-carbon nanotube(CNT) and titanium nitride (TiN)—at activating spikes in retinal ganglion cells in whole mount rat retina through stimulation of the local retinal network. Stimulation efficacy of the microelectrodes was analyzed by comparing voltage, current and transferred charge at stimulation threshold. Approach. Retinal ganglion cell spikes were recorded by a central electrode (30 μm diameter) in the planar grid of an electrode array. Extracellular stimulation (monophasic, cathodic, 0.1-1.0 ms) of the retinal network was performed using constant voltage pulses applied to the eight surrounding electrodes. The stimulation electrodes were equally spaced on the four sides of a square (400 × 400 μm). Threshold voltage was determined as the pulse amplitude required to evoke network-mediated ganglion cell spiking in a defined post stimulus time window in 50% of identical stimulus repetitions. For the two electrode materials threshold voltage, transferred charge at threshold, maximum current and the residual current at the end of the pulse were compared. Main results. Stimulation of retinal interneurons using PEDOT-CNT electrodes is achieved with lower stimulation voltage and requires lower charge transfer as compared to TiN. The key parameter for effective stimulation is a constant current over at least 0.5 ms, which is obtained by PEDOT-CNT electrodes at lower stimulation voltage due to its faradaic charge transfer mechanism. Significance. In neuroprosthetic implants, PEDOT-CNT may allow for smaller electrodes, effective stimulation in a safe voltage regime and lower energy-consumption. Our study also indicates, that the charge transferred at threshold or the charge injection capacity per se does not determine stimulation efficacy.

  5. DFT studies of CNT-functionalized uracil-acetate hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaei, Mahmoud; Gulseren, Oguz

    2015-09-01

    Calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) have been performed to investigate the stabilities and properties of hybrid structures consisting of a molecular carbon nanotube (CNT) and uracil acetate (UA) counterparts. The investigated models have been relaxed to minimum energy structures and then various physical properties and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties have been evaluated. The results indicated the effects of functionalized CNT on the properties of hybrids through comparing the results of hybrids and individual structures. The oxygen atoms of uracil counterparts have been seen as the detection points of properties for the CNT-UA hybrids.

  6. Disabling CNT Electronic Devices by Use of Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petkov, Mihail

    2008-01-01

    Bombardment with tightly focused electron beams has been suggested as a means of electrically disabling selected individual carbon-nanotubes (CNTs) in electronic devices. Evidence in support of the suggestion was obtained in an experiment in which a CNT field-effect transistor was disabled (see figure) by focusing a 1-keV electron beam on a CNT that served as the active channel of a field-effect transistor (FET). Such bombardment could be useful in the manufacture of nonvolatile-memory circuits containing CNT FETs. Ultimately, in order to obtain the best electronic performances in CNT FETs and other electronic devices, it will be necessary to fabricate the devices such that each one contains only a single CNT as an active element. At present, this is difficult because there is no way to grow a single CNT at a specific location and with a specific orientation. Instead, the common practice is to build CNTs into electronic devices by relying on spatial distribution to bridge contacts. This practice results in some devices containing no CNTs and some devices containing more than one CNT. Thus, CNT FETs have statistically distributed electronic characteristics (including switching voltages, gains, and mixtures of metallic and semiconducting CNTs). According to the suggestion, by using a 1-keV electron beam (e.g., a beam from a scanning electron microscope), a particular nanotube could be rendered electrically dysfunctional. This procedure could be repeated as many times as necessary on different CNTs in a device until all of the excess CNTs in the device had been disabled, leaving only one CNT as an active element (e.g., as FET channel). The physical mechanism through which a CNT becomes electrically disabled is not yet understood. On one hand, data in the literature show that electron kinetic energy >86 keV is needed to cause displacement damage in a CNT. On the other hand, inasmuch as a 1-keV beam focused on a small spot (typically a few tens of nanometers wide

  7. Variable deflection response of sensitive CNT-on-fiber artificial hair sensors from CNT synthesis in high aspect ratio microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinker, Keith; Maschmann, Matthew R.; Kondash, Corey; Severin, Benjamin; Phillips, David; Dickinson, Benjamin T.; Reich, Gregory; Baur, Jeff

    2015-03-01

    Crickets, locusts, bats, and many other animals detect changes in their environment with distributed arrays of flow-sensitive hairs. Here we discuss the fabrication and characterization of a relatively new class of pore-based, artificial hair sensors that take advantage of the mechanical properties of structural microfibers and the electromechanical properties of self-aligned carbon nanotube arrays to rapidly transduce changes in low speed air flow. The radially aligned nanotubes are able to be synthesized along the length of the fibers inside the high aspect ratio cavity between the fiber surface and the wall of a microcapillary pore. The growth self-positions the fibers within the capillary and forms a conductive path between detection electrodes. As the hair is deflected, nanotubes are compressed to produce a typical resistance change of 1-5% per m/s of air speed which we believe are the highest sensitivities reported for air velocities less than 10 m/s. The quasi-static response of the sensors to point loads is compared to that from the distributed loads of air flow. A plane wave tube is used to measure their dynamic response when perturbed at acoustic frequencies. Correlation of the nanotube height profile inside the capillary to a diffusion transport model suggests that the nanotube arrays can be controllably tapered along the fiber. Like their biological counterparts, many applications can be envisioned for artificial hair sensors by tailoring their individual response and incorporating them into arrays for detecting spatio-temporal flow patterns over rigid surfaces such as aircraft.

  8. Synthetic approach to designing optical alignment systems.

    PubMed

    Whang, A J; Gallagher, N C

    1988-08-15

    The objective of this study is twofold: to design reticle patterns with desirable alignment properties; to build an automatic alignment system using these patterns. We design such reticle patterns via a synthetic approach; the resultant patterns, so-called pseudonoise arrays, are binary and their autocorrelation functions are bilevel. Both properties are desirable in optical alignment. Besides, these arrays have attractive signal-to-noise ratio performance when employed in alignment. We implement the pseudonoise array as a 2-D cross-grating structure of which the grating period is much less than the wavelength of impinging light used for alignment. The short grating period feature, together with the use of polarized light, enables us to perform essentially 2-D optical alignment in one dimension. This alignment separability allows us to build a system that performs alignment automatically according to a simple 1-D algorithm. PMID:20539412

  9. Growth of ultra long multiwall carbon nanotube arrays by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Heejun; Kim, Sang Yong; Koh, Ken Ha; Lee, Soonil

    2010-09-01

    Using a home-made aerosol nebulizer, we developed a new aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) process that made it possible to synthesize vertically-aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays with heights over a few millimeters routinely. An essential part of this technique was in-situ formation of metal catalyst nanoparticles via pyrolysis of ferrocene-ethanol aerosol right before CNT synthesis. Through the optimization of aerosol supply and CVD process parameters, we were able to synthesize clean VACNT arrays as long as 4.38 mm with very low metal contents in 20 min. Furthermore, it is worthy noting that such an outstanding height is achieved very quickly without supporting materials and water-assistance. By taking advantage of almost complete inhibition of CNT growth on low melting-temperature metals, we were able to fabricate patterned VACNT arrays by combining AACVD process with a conventional photolithograpic patterning of gold lines. Characterizations of as-grown nanotubes such as morphology, purity, and metal contents are presented. PMID:21133158

  10. Dry Process Based Infrared Sensors with CNT Film Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Kum-Pyo; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Lim, Lee-Taek; Choi, Chang-Seon; Lee, Dong Il; Lee, Cheol Jin; Park, Chan-Won; Min, Nam Ki

    In this paper, we describe the fabrication and characterization of a front-side micromachined thermopiles consisting of a suspended membrane and a carbon nanotube (CNT) film absorber. Thermocouples of 52 pairs which are composed of phosphorous-doped silicon and aluminum were formed and connected in series. A CNT film collected by filter was transferred on hot junction. A CNT absorber has an absorptance of about 50% in the midinfrared region. The suspended membrane was fabricated by an isotropic silicon dry etching process with XeF2 gas at the front side of the substrates. The output voltage with the CNT film is found to be 250.2 mV at 7 mW of incident power, approximately 1.8 times higher than that of one without an absorber.

  11. Study of adhesion of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes to a substrate by atomic-force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageev, O. A.; Blinov, Yu. F.; Il'ina, M. V.; Il'in, O. I.; Smirnov, V. A.; Tsukanova, O. G.

    2016-02-01

    The adhesion to a substrate of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA CNT) produced by plasmaenhanced chemical vapor deposition has been experimentally studied by atomic-force microscopy in the current spectroscopy mode. The longitudinal deformation of VA CNT by applying an external electric field has been simulated. Based on the results, a technique of determining VA CNT adhesion to a substrate has been developed that is used to measure the adhesion strength of connecting VA CNT to a substrate. The adhesion to a substrate of VA CNT 70-120 nm in diameter varies from 0.55 to 1.19 mJ/m2, and the adhesion force from 92.5 to 226.1 nN. When applying a mechanical load, the adhesion strength of the connecting VA CNT to a substrate is 714.1 ± 138.4 MPa, and the corresponding detachment force increases from 1.93 to 10.33 μN with an increase in the VA CNT diameter. As an external electric field is applied, the adhesion strength is almost doubled and is 1.43 ± 0.29 GPa, and the corresponding detachment force is changed from 3.83 to 20.02 μN. The results can be used in the design of technological processes of formation of emission structures, VA CNT-based elements for vacuum microelectronics and micro- and nanosystem engineering, and also the methods of probe nanodiagnostics of VA CNT.

  12. Determination of material constants of vertically aligned carbon nanotube structures in compressions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yupeng; Kang, Junmo; Choi, Jae-Boong; Nam, Jae-Do; Suhr, Jonghwan

    2015-06-19

    Different chemical vapour deposition (CVD) fabrication conditions lead to a wide range of variation in the microstructure and morphologies of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which actually determine the compressive mechanical properties of CNTs. However, the underlying relationship between the structure/morphology and mechanical properties of CNTs is not fully understood. In this study, we characterized and compared the structural and morphological properties of three kinds of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays from different CVD fabrication methods and performed monotonic compressive tests for each VACNT array. The compressive stress-strain responses and plastic deformation were first compared and analyzed with nanotube buckling behaviours. To quantify the compressive properties of the VACNT arrays, a strain density energy function was used to determine their intrinsic material constants. Then, the structural and morphological effects on the quantified material constants of the VACNTs were statistically investigated and analogized to cellular materials with an open-cell model. The statistical analysis shows that density, defect degree, and the moment of inertia of the CNTs are key factors in the improvement of the compressive mechanical properties of VACNT arrays. This approach could allow a model-driven CNT synthesis for engineering their mechanical behaviours. PMID:26011574

  13. Determination of material constants of vertically aligned carbon nanotube structures in compressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yupeng; Kang, Junmo; Choi, Jae-Boong; Nam, Jae-Do; Suhr, Jonghwan

    2015-06-01

    Different chemical vapour deposition (CVD) fabrication conditions lead to a wide range of variation in the microstructure and morphologies of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which actually determine the compressive mechanical properties of CNTs. However, the underlying relationship between the structure/morphology and mechanical properties of CNTs is not fully understood. In this study, we characterized and compared the structural and morphological properties of three kinds of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays from different CVD fabrication methods and performed monotonic compressive tests for each VACNT array. The compressive stress-strain responses and plastic deformation were first compared and analyzed with nanotube buckling behaviours. To quantify the compressive properties of the VACNT arrays, a strain density energy function was used to determine their intrinsic material constants. Then, the structural and morphological effects on the quantified material constants of the VACNTs were statistically investigated and analogized to cellular materials with an open-cell model. The statistical analysis shows that density, defect degree, and the moment of inertia of the CNTs are key factors in the improvement of the compressive mechanical properties of VACNT arrays. This approach could allow a model-driven CNT synthesis for engineering their mechanical behaviours.

  14. Alignment control of carbon nanotube forest from random to nearly perfectly aligned by utilizing the crowding effect.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming; Futaba, Don N; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji

    2012-07-24

    Alignment represents an important structural parameter of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) owing to their exceptionally high aspect ratio, one-dimensional property. In this paper, we demonstrate a general approach to control the alignment of few-walled CNT forests from nearly random to nearly ideally aligned by tailoring the density of active catalysts at the catalyst formation stage, which can be experimentally achieved by controlling the CNT forest mass density. Experimentally, we found that the catalyst density and the degree of alignment were inseparably linked because of a crowding effect from neighboring CNTs, that is, the increasing confinement of CNTs with increased density. Therefore, the CNT density governed the degree of alignment, which increased monotonically with the density. This relationship, in turn, allowed the precise control of the alignment through control of the mass density. To understand this behavior further, we developed a simple, first-order model based on the flexural modulus of the CNTs that could quantitatively describe the relationship between the degree of alignment (HOF) and carbon nanotube spacing (crowding effect) of any type of CNTs.

  15. High resolution telescope including an array of elemental telescopes aligned along a common axis and supported on a space frame with a pivot at its geometric center

    DOEpatents

    Norbert, Massie A.; Yale, Oster

    1992-01-01

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employes speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by a electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activities. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes.

  16. High resolution telescope including an array of elemental telescopes aligned along a common axis and supported on a space frame with a pivot at its geometric center

    DOEpatents

    Norbert, M.A.; Yale, O.

    1992-04-28

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employes speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by a electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activities. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes. 15 figs.

  17. Denser and taller carbon nanotube arrays on Cu foils useable as thermal interface materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Nuri; Hasegawa, Kei; Zhou, Xiaosong; Nihei, Mizuhisa; Noda, Suguru

    2015-09-01

    To achieve denser and taller carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on Cu foils, catalyst and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) conditions were carefully engineered. CNTs were grown to ˜50 µm using Fe/TiN/Ta catalysts in which Ta and TiN acted as diffusion barriers for Cu and Ta, respectively. A tradeoff was found between the mass density and height of the CNT arrays, and CNT arrays with a mass density of 0.30 g cm-3 and height of 45 µm were achieved under optimized conditions. Thermal interface materials (TIMs) with CNT array/Cu foil/CNT array structures showed decreasing thermal resistance from 86 to 24 mm2 K W-1 with increasing CNT array mass densities from 0.07-0.08 to 0.19-0.26 g cm-3 for Cu and Al blocks with surfaces as rough as 20-30 µm. The best CNT/Cu/CNT TIMs showed thermal resistance values comparable to that of a typical indium sheet TIM.

  18. The screening effects of carbon nanotube arrays and its field emission optimum density

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Dan Liu, Lie

    2013-12-15

    In order to investigate the field emission optimum density of carbon nanotube (CNT) array, the screening effects of CNT array have been studied. It has been shown that the electric field in the vicinity of an individual nanotube of array can be notable distorted due to the screening action of the surrounding neighbors. The optimum normalized spacing s/l(as referred to the length) for the maximum emission current is inversely proportional to aspect ratio l/r and electric field strength for CNT arrays with a fixed dimension.

  19. Ultrafast laser orthogonal alignment and patterning of carbon nanotube-polymer composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Ryan D.; Abere, Michael J.; Zhang, Huanan; Sun, Haiping; Torralva, Ben; Mansfield, John F.; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Yalisove, Steven M.

    2012-11-01

    Dual orthogonal alignment of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) within the plane and perpendicular to a substrate is essential for many applications but difficult to obtain. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible using a combination of layer-by-layer deposition and ultrafast laser irradiation. Single-wall CNT-polymer composites preferentially aligned within the plane are irradiated with ultrafast laser pulses. After irradiation with distinct fluences at ambient conditions, morphology is seen where CNTs are formed into bundled CNTs with some orthogonal alignment. A model is presented to account for thermal expansion of the polymer and the formation of CNT bundles.

  20. Active vacuum brazing of CNT films to metal substrates for superior electron field emission performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longtin, Rémi; Sanchez-Valencia, Juan Ramon; Shorubalko, Ivan; Furrer, Roman; Hack, Erwin; Elsener, Hansrudolf; Gröning, Oliver; Greenwood, Paul; Rupesinghe, Nalin; Teo, Kenneth; Leinenbach, Christian; Gröning, Pierangelo

    2015-02-01

    The joining of macroscopic films of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to titanium substrates is demonstrated by active vacuum brazing at 820 °C with a Ag-Cu-Ti alloy and at 880 °C with a Cu-Sn-Ti-Zr alloy. The brazing methodology was elaborated in order to enable the production of highly electrically and thermally conductive CNT/metal substrate contacts. The interfacial electrical resistances of the joints were measured to be as low as 0.35 Ω. The improved interfacial transport properties in the brazed films lead to superior electron field-emission properties when compared to the as-grown films. An emission current of 150 μA was drawn from the brazed nanotubes at an applied electric field of 0.6 V μm-1. The improvement in electron field-emission is mainly attributed to the reduction of the contact resistance between the nanotubes and the substrate. The joints have high re-melting temperatures up to the solidus temperatures of the alloys; far greater than what is achievable with standard solders, thus expanding the application potential of CNT films to high-current and high-power applications where substantial frictional or resistive heating is expected.

  1. Highly aligned dense carbon nanotube sheets induced by multiple stretching and pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qianli; Li, Min; Gu, Yizhuo; Zhang, Yongyi; Wang, Shaokai; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2014-03-01

    The CNT sheet fabricated by the floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method has attracted great attention due to its easy fabrication process and promising mass production at low cost. However, the randomly oriented CNT sheet with a loose stacking density shows relatively poor mechanical properties. In this work, a highly aligned dense CNT sheet was successfully fabricated by a simple process of two-time stretching and pressing of a multilayered CVD-grown CNT sheet. Drastic nanotube rearrangements occurred during stretching and pressing processes. A polymer-like tensile necking behavior was observed during the stretching process, accompanied by inter-tube junction breakage due to long-distance slippage. Simultaneously the CNT sheet was thickened after the stretching process due to the increase of the inter-layer space, which could be effectively eliminated by the following pressing treatment. After two-time stretching and pressing, a highly aligned dense CNT sheet was fabricated with the volume density increasing to 0.98 g cm-3 (by 109%) and the tensile strength increasing to 598 MPa (by 221%) compared to the as-prepared CNT sheet.

  2. New CNT/poly(brilliant green) and CNT/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) based electrochemical enzyme biosensors.

    PubMed

    Barsan, Madalina M; Pifferi, Valentina; Falciola, Luigi; Brett, Christopher M A

    2016-07-13

    A combination of the electroactive polymer poly(brilliant green) (PBG) or conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) with carbon nanotubes to obtain CNT/PBG and CNT/PEDOT modified carbon film electrodes (CFE) has been investigated as a new biosensor platform, incorporating the enzymes glucose oxidase (GOx) as test enzyme, alcohol oxidase (AlcOx) or alcohol dehydrogenase (AlcDH). The sensing parameters were optimized for all biosensors based on CNT/PBG/CFE, CNT/PEDOT/CFE platforms. Under optimized conditions, both GOx biosensors exhibited very similar sensitivities, while in the case of AlcOx and AlcDH biosensors, AlcOx/CNT/PBG/CFE was found to give a higher sensitivity and lower detection limit. The influence of dissolved O2 on oxidase-biosensor performance was investigated and was shown to be different for each enzyme. Comparisons were made with similar reported biosensors, showing the advantages of the new biosensors, and excellent selectivity against potential interferents was successfully demonstrated. Finally, alcohol biosensors were successfully used for the determination of ethanol in alcoholic beverages. PMID:27237835

  3. Photoluminescence enhancement of aligned arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes by polymer transfer† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05163k Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Schweiger, Manuel; Zakharko, Yuriy; Gannott, Florentina; Grimm, Stefan B.

    2015-01-01

    The photoluminescence of as-grown, aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on quartz is strongly quenched and barely detectable. Here we show that transferring these SWNTs to another substrate such as clean quartz or glass increases their emission efficiency by up to two orders of magnitude. By statistical analysis of large nanotube arrays we show at what point of the transfer process the emission enhancement occurs and how it depends on the receiving substrate and the employed transfer polymer. We find that hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) as the transfer polymer results in higher photoluminescence enhancement than the more hydrophilic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Possible mechanisms for this enhancement such as strain relief, disruption of the strong interaction of SWNTs with the substrate and localized emissive states are discussed. PMID:26400227

  4. Alignment validation

    SciTech Connect

    ALICE; ATLAS; CMS; LHCb; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-06

    The four experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb are currently under constructionat CERN. They will study the products of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. All experiments are equipped with sophisticated tracking systems, unprecedented in size and complexity. Full exploitation of both the inner detector andthe muon system requires an accurate alignment of all detector elements. Alignmentinformation is deduced from dedicated hardware alignment systems and the reconstruction of charged particles. However, the system is degenerate which means the data is insufficient to constrain all alignment degrees of freedom, so the techniques are prone to converging on wrong geometries. This deficiency necessitates validation and monitoring of the alignment. An exhaustive discussion of means to validate is subject to this document, including examples and plans from all four LHC experiments, as well as other high energy experiments.

  5. A study of the polymer-cnt interactions in polymer/cnt composites using experimental and computational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jiangsha

    This dissertation work focuses on research related to understanding and controlling the polymer-carbon nanotube (CNT) interactions during composite fiber processing using both experimental and computational means, in order to achieve consistent formation of the interphase regions for various polymers in the vicinity of CNT. The development of the polymer crystalline interphase is important, since it has been shown to have a significant and positive impact on the mechanical performance of polymer/CNT composites. This is achieved by the improvement of stress transfer mechanisms between the polymer matrix and CNT. The preliminary results (i.e., both experimental and computational) provide insight toward understanding the fundamental mechanisms of polymer-CNT interactions under various processing conditions, as well as the resultant polymer or CNT behaviors and composite fibers performance governed by them. In this thesis work, the initialization and the development of the interphase region in fibers throughout all processing steps are investigated using full-atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) approach as well as experimental means. SWNT dispersion quality with and without polymers present during sonication process is also investigated experimentally, where the polymer-SWNT interactions are impacted by SWNT dispersion qualities. The resultant morphologies and composite fibers properties are also analyzed. The effect of laminar-flow rates (used during spinning) on the polymer/SWNT composite fiber properties as well as on the fundamental polymer-SWNT interactions and the resultant chain morphologies near the SWNT surface are studied in detail. Full-atomistic MD simulations are conducted to study the influence of various laminar-flow rates on the chain morphologies in the vicinity of SWNT. By combining results from both experimentation and computation, a better understanding of the spinning parameters on the microscopic fiber properties as well as on the microscopic

  6. Alignment and Load Transfer in Carbon Nanotube and Dicyclopentadiene Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severino, Joseph Vincent

    Individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the strongest materials available but their macroscopic assemblies are weak. This work establishes a new thermosetting dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) and CNT composite that increases the strength of CNT assemblies. These high volume fraction and void free structures constitute advanced materials that could one day replace traditional composite systems. To further the understanding of physical interactions between polymer and CNTs, a novel "capstan" load transfer mechanism is also introduced. Self-supporting assemblies of interconnected carbon nanotubes were stretched, twisted and compressed to fashion composites by the infusion and polymerization of low viscosity DCPD based monomeric resins. The properties of the CNTs, polymer and composite were characterized with thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and Raman spectroscopy. The microstructure was analyzed by wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Sheets were drawn at 15 m/min from a growth furnace to impart alignment then stretched to further modify alignment. The mechanical properties were determined in five orientations with respect to the growth direction. The strength was nearly three times higher along this growth direction than it was perpendicular, and modulus was nearly six times higher. Transverse stretching achieved 1.5 times the elongation but alignment was inferior due to CNT kinking that prevented alignment and consolidation. Composites yarns and sheets were investigated for the mechanical properties, microstructure and load transfer. The DCPD resin was found to wet the CNTs and lubricated deformation. This reduced loads during processing, and curing solidified the aligned and consolidated structure. The stretched and twisted composite yarns increased the failure stress 51%. In aligned composite sheet, the failure stress increased 200%. The increased stresses

  7. CNT Reinforced Hybrid Microgels as Scaffold Materials for Cell Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Su Ryon; Bae, Hojae; Cha, Jae Min; Mun, Ji Young; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Tekin, Halil; Shin, Hyeongho; Farshchi, Saeed; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Tang, Shirley

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels that mimic biological extracellular matrix (ECM) can provide cells with mechanical support and signaling cues to regulate their behavior. However, despite the ability of hydrogels to generate artificial ECM that can modulate cellular behavior, they often lack the mechanical strength needed for many tissue constructs. Here, we present reinforced CNT-gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hybrid as a biocompatible, cell-responsive hydrogel platform for creating cell-laden three dimensional (3D) constructs. The addition of CNTs successfully reinforced GelMA hydrogels without decreasing their porosity or inhibiting cell growth. The CNT-GelMA hybrids were also photopatternable allowing for easy fabrication of microscale structures without harsh processes. NIH-3T3 cells and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) readily spread and proliferated after encapsulation in CNT-GelMA hybrid microgels. By controlling the amount of CNTs incorporated into the GelMA hydrogel system, we demonstrated that the mechanical properties of the hybrid material can be tuned making it suitable for various tissue engineering applications. Furthermore, due to the high pattern fidelity and resolution of CNT incorporated GelMA, it can be used for in vitro cell studies or fabricating complex 3D biomimetic tissue-like structures. PMID:22117858

  8. Improved Photoresist Coating for Making CNT Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toda, Risaku; Manohara, Harish

    2009-01-01

    An improved photoresist-coating technique has been developed for use in the fabrication of carbon-nanotube- (CNT) based field emitters is described. The improved photoresist coating technique overcomes what, heretofore, has been a major difficulty in the fabrication process.

  9. Electron Beam Irradiated Intercalated CNT Yarns For Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, Deborah L.; Gaier, James R.; Williams, Tiffany S.; Lopez Calero, Johnny E.; Ramirez, Christopher; Meador, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-walled CNT yarns have been experimentally and commercially created to yield lightweight, high conductivity fibers with good tensile properties for application as electrical wiring and multifunctional tendons. Multifunctional tendons are needed as the cable structures in tensegrity robots for use in planetary exploration. These lightweight robust tendons can provide mechanical strength for movement of the robot in addition to power distribution and data transmission. In aerospace vehicles, such as Orion, electrical wiring and harnessing mass can approach half of the avionics mass. Use of CNT yarns as electrical power and data cables could reduce mass of the wiring by thirty to seventy percent. These fibers have been intercalated with mixed halogens to increase their specific electrical conductivity to that near copper. This conductivity, combined with the superior strength and fatigue resistance makes it an attractive alternative to copper for wiring and multifunctional tendon applications. Electron beam irradiation has been shown to increase mechanical strength in pristine CNT fibers through increased cross-linking. Both pristine and intercalated CNT yarns have been irradiated using a 5-megavolt electron beam for various durations and the conductivities and tensile properties will be discussed. Structural information obtained using a field emission scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and Raman spectroscopy will correlate microstructural details with bulk properties.

  10. Controlled growth of aligned carbon nanotube using pulsed glow barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Kimura, Yoshihito; Okazaki, Ken

    2002-10-01

    We first achieved a catalytic growth of aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) using atmospheric pressure pulsed glow barrier discharge combined with DC bias (1000 V). Aligned CNT can grow with the directional electric field, and this is a big challenge in barrier discharges since dielectric barrier does not allow DC bias and forces to use AC voltage to maintain stable plasma conditions. To overcome this, we developed a power source generating Gaussian-shape pulses at 20 kpps with 4% duty, and DC bias was applied to the GND electrode where Ni-, Fe-coated substrate existed. With positive pulse, i.e. substrate was the cathode, random growth of CNT was observed at about 10^9 cm-2. Growth rate significantly reduced when applied negative pulse; Negative glow formation near substrate is essential for sufficient supply of radical species to the catalyst. If -DC was biased, aligned CNT with 20 nm was synthesized because negative bias enhanced negative glow formation. Interestingly, 2 to 3 CNTs stuck each other with +DC bias, resulting in 50-70 nm and non-aligned CNT. Atmospheric pressure glow barrier discharges can be highly controlled and be a potential alternative to vacuum plasmas for CVD, micro-scale, nano-scale fabrication.

  11. Self-assembled ordered carbon-nanotube arrays and membranes.

    SciTech Connect

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Siegal, Michael P.; Yelton, William Graham

    2004-11-01

    Imagine free-standing flexible membranes with highly-aligned arrays of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) running through their thickness. Perhaps with both ends of the CNTs open for highly controlled nanofiltration? Or CNTs at heights uniformly above a polymer membrane for a flexible array of nanoelectrodes or field-emitters? How about CNT films with incredible amounts of accessible surface area for analyte adsorption? These self-assembled crystalline nanotubes consist of multiple layers of graphene sheets rolled into concentric cylinders. Tube diameters (3-300 nm), inner-bore diameters (2-15 nm), and lengths (nanometers - microns) are controlled to tailor physical, mechanical, and chemical properties. We proposed to explore growth and characterize nanotube arrays to help determine their exciting functionality for Sandia applications. Thermal chemical vapor deposition growth in a furnace nucleates from a metal catalyst. Ordered arrays grow using templates from self-assembled hexagonal arrays of nanopores in anodized-aluminum oxide. Polymeric-binders can mechanically hold the CNTs in place for polishing, lift-off, and membrane formation. The stiffness, electrical and thermal conductivities of CNTs make them ideally suited for a wide-variety of possible applications. Large-area, highly-accessible gas-adsorbing carbon surfaces, superb cold-cathode field-emission, and unique nanoscale geometries can lead to advanced microsensors using analyte adsorption, arrays of functionalized nanoelectrodes for enhanced electrochemical detection of biological/explosive compounds, or mass-ionizers for gas-phase detection. Materials studies involving membrane formation may lead to exciting breakthroughs in nanofiltration/nanochromatography for the separation of chemical and biological agents. With controlled nanofilter sizes, ultrafiltration will be viable to separate and preconcentrate viruses and many strains of bacteria for 'down-stream' analysis.

  12. Using the carbon nanotube (CNT)/CNT interaction to obtain hybrid conductive nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, J.; Silva, A.; Bretas, R.

    2015-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) combine unique physical, electrical, chemical, thermal and mechanical properties with a huge surface area that qualify them to a broad range of applications. These potential applications, however, are often limited due to the strong inter-tubes van der Waals interactions, which results in poor dispersion in polymeric matrixes or solvents in general. Thus, the goal of this work was to use this limitation as an advantage, to produce novel conductive hybrid nanostructures, which consist of nonwoven Nylon 6 (PA6) mats of electrospun nanofibers with a large amount of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) strongly attached and adsorbed on the nanofiberś surfaces. To produce such structures, the MWCNT were previously functionalized with carboxylic groups and subsequently incorporated in the nanofibers by two subsequent steps: i) preparation of nonwoven mats of PA6/MWCNT by electrospinning and ii) treatment of the mats in an aqueous dispersion of MWCNT/Triton X-100. Analyses of UV-visible light showed that carboxylic groups were actually inserted in the MWCNT. Thermogravimetric analyzes (TGA) showed that the amount of adsorbed MWCNT on the fiberś surfaces at the end of the procedure was approximately 12 times higher than after the first step. Micrographs obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed this result and electrical conductivities measurements of the MWCNT/PA6, after the treatment in the aqueous solution, showed that these structures had conductivity of 10-2 S/m. It was concluded that the adhesion of CNTs at the surface of the nanofibers occurred due a combination of two types of bonding: hydrogen bonds between the carboxylic groups of the functionalized CNT and the PA6 and van der Waals interactions between the CNTs.

  13. Using the carbon nanotube (CNT)/CNT interaction to obtain hybrid conductive nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, J.; Silva, A.; Bretas, R. E-mail: bretas@ufscar.br

    2015-05-22

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) combine unique physical, electrical, chemical, thermal and mechanical properties with a huge surface area that qualify them to a broad range of applications. These potential applications, however, are often limited due to the strong inter-tubes van der Waals interactions, which results in poor dispersion in polymeric matrixes or solvents in general. Thus, the goal of this work was to use this limitation as an advantage, to produce novel conductive hybrid nanostructures, which consist of nonwoven Nylon 6 (PA6) mats of electrospun nanofibers with a large amount of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) strongly attached and adsorbed on the nanofibers´ surfaces. To produce such structures, the MWCNT were previously functionalized with carboxylic groups and subsequently incorporated in the nanofibers by two subsequent steps: i) preparation of nonwoven mats of PA6/MWCNT by electrospinning and ii) treatment of the mats in an aqueous dispersion of MWCNT/Triton X–100. Analyses of UV-visible light showed that carboxylic groups were actually inserted in the MWCNT. Thermogravimetric analyzes (TGA) showed that the amount of adsorbed MWCNT on the fibers´ surfaces at the end of the procedure was approximately 12 times higher than after the first step. Micrographs obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed this result and electrical conductivities measurements of the MWCNT/PA6, after the treatment in the aqueous solution, showed that these structures had conductivity of 10-2 S/m. It was concluded that the adhesion of CNTs at the surface of the nanofibers occurred due a combination of two types of bonding: hydrogen bonds between the carboxylic groups of the functionalized CNT and the PA6 and van der Waals interactions between the CNTs.

  14. Properties of Retinal Precursor Cells Grown on Vertically Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Generated for the Modification of Retinal Implant-Embedded Microelectrode Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Johnen, Sandra; Meißner, Frank; Krug, Mario; Baltz, Thomas; Endler, Ingolf; Mokwa, Wilfried; Walter, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background. To analyze the biocompatibility of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), used as nanomodification to optimize the properties of prostheses-embedded microelectrodes that induce electrical stimulation of surviving retinal cells. Methods. MWCNT were synthesized on silicon wafers. Their growth was achieved by iron particles (Fe) or mixtures of iron-platinum (Fe-Pt) and iron-titanium (Fe-Ti) acting as catalysts. Viability, growth, adhesion, and gene expression of L-929 and retinal precursor (R28) cells were analyzed after nondirect and direct contact. Results. Nondirect contact had almost no influence on cell growth, as measured in comparison to reference materials with defined levels of cytotoxicity. Both cell types exhibited good proliferation properties on each MWCNT-coated wafer. Viability ranged from 95.9 to 99.8%, in which better survival was observed for nonfunctionalized MWCNT generated with the Fe-Pt and Fe-Ti catalyst mixtures. R28 cells grown on the MWCNT-coated wafers showed a decreased gene expression associated with neural and glial properties. Expression of the cell cycle-related genes CCNC, MYC, and TP53 was slightly downregulated. Cultivation on plasma-treated MWCNT did not lead to additional changes. Conclusions. All tested MWCNT-covered slices showed good biocompatibility profiles, confirming that this nanotechnology is a promising tool to improve prostheses bearing electrodes which connect with retinal tissue. PMID:27200182

  15. Novel Aluminum (Al)-Carbon Nanotube (CNT) Open-Cell Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsi, K.; Krommenhoek, Max; Shamma, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents for the first time the processing of aluminum (Al)-carbon nanotube (CNT) open-cell foams. Al-2wt pct CNT and Al foams were successfully produced using a spark plasma sintering and dissolution process. Al-CNT foams with porosity levels of ~78 pct were produced. The mechanical response of the open-cell foams reveals initial evidence of enhanced damage tolerance of Al-CNT foams over Al foams produced in this study.

  16. Efficient fabrication of carbon nanotube micro tip arrays by tailoring cross-stacked carbon nanotube sheets.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yang; Liu, Peng; Zhu, Feng; Jiang, Kaili; Li, Qunqing; Fan, Shoushan

    2012-04-11

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) micro tip arrays with hairpin structures on patterned silicon wafers were efficiently fabricated by tailoring the cross-stacked CNT sheet with laser. A blade-like structure was formed at the laser-cut edges of the CNT sheet. CNT field emitters, pulled out from the end of the hairpin by an adhesive tape, can provide 150 μA intrinsic emission currents with low beam noise. The nice field emission is ascribed to the Joule-heating-induced desorption of the emitter surface by the hairpin structure, the high temperature annealing effect, and the surface morphology. The CNT emitters with hairpin structures will greatly promote the applications of CNTs in vacuum electronic devices and hold the promises to be used as the hot tips for thermochemical nanolithography. More CNT-based structures and devices can be fabricated on a large scale by this versatile method. PMID:22433000

  17. Alignment fixture

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Grover C.; Gibson, O. Theodore

    1980-01-01

    A part alignment fixture is provided which may be used for precise variable lateral and tilt alignment relative to the fixture base of various shaped parts. The fixture may be used as a part holder for machining or inspection of parts or alignment of parts during assembly and the like. The fixture includes a precisely machined diameter disc-shaped hub adapted to receive the part to be aligned. The hub is nested in a guide plate which is adapted to carry two oppositely disposed pairs of positioning wedges so that the wedges may be reciprocatively positioned by means of respective micrometer screws. The sloping faces of the wedges contact the hub at respective quadrants of the hub periphery. The lateral position of the hub relative to the guide plate is adjusted by positioning the wedges with the associated micrometer screws. The tilt of the part is adjusted relative to a base plate, to which the guide plate is pivotally connected by means of a holding plate. Two pairs of oppositely disposed wedges are mounted for reciprocative lateral positioning by means of separate micrometer screws between flanges of the guide plate and the base plate. Once the wedges are positioned to achieve the proper tilt of the part or hub on which the part is mounted relative to the base plate, the fixture may be bolted to a machining, inspection, or assembly device.

  18. Curriculum Alignment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowell, Ronald; Tissot, Paula

    Curriculum alignment (CA) refers to the congruence of all the elements of a school's curriculum: curriculum goals; instructional program--what is taught and the materials used; and tests used to judge outcomes. CA can be a very powerful can be a very powerful factor in improving schools. Although further research is needed on CA, there is…

  19. Vertically aligned carbon-coated titanium dioxide nanorod arrays on carbon paper with low platinum for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shangfeng; Yi, Baolian; Zhang, Changkun; Liu, Sa; Yu, Hongmei; Shao, Zhigang

    2015-02-01

    Carbon-coated titanium dioxide (TiO2-C) has received much attention as a catalyst support in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. In this study, TiO2 nanorod arrays (NRs) are hydrothermally grown on carbon paper and converted into TiO2-C NRs by heat treatment at 900 °C under methane atmosphere. Then, platinum nanoparticles are sputtered onto the TiO2 NRs by physical vapor deposition to produce Pt-TiO2-C. The as-prepared Pt-TiO2-C exhibits high stability during accelerated durability tests. As compared with the commercial gas diffusion electrode (GDE, 34.4% decrease), a minor reduction in the electrochemically active surface area of the Pt-TiO2-C electrode after 1500 cycles (10.6% decrease) is observed. When the as-prepared electrode with ultra-low platinum content (Pt loading: 28.67 μg cm-2) is employed as the cathode of a single cell, the electrode generates power that is 4.84 × that of the commercial GDE (Pt loading: 400 μg cm-2). An electrode that generates power of 11.9 kW gPt-1 (as the cathode) is proposed. The fabricated Pt-TiO2-C electrode can be used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  20. Multifunctional Characteristics of Carbon Nanotube (CNT) Yarn Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Corey D.; Zhang, Mei; Fang, Shaoli; Baughman, Ray H.; Gates, Thomas S.; Kahng, Seun K.

    2006-01-01

    By forming composite structures with Carbon Nanotube (CNT) yarns we achieve materials capable of measuring strain and composite structures with increased mechanical strength. The CNT yarns used are of the 2-ply and 4-ply variety with the yarns having diameters of about 15-30 micrometers. The strain sensing characteristics of the yarns are investigated on test beams with the yarns arranged in a bridge configuration. Additionally, the strain sensing properties are also investigated on yarns embedded on the surface of a flexible membrane. Initial mechanical strength tests also show an increase in the modulus of elasticity of the composite materials while incurring a weight penalty of less than one-percent. Also presented are initial temperature characterizations of the yarns.

  1. Graphene as an atomically thin interface for growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rahul; Chen, Gugang; Arava, Leela Mohana Reddy; Kalaga, Kaushik; Ishigami, Masahiro; Heinz, Tony F.; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Harutyunyan, Avetik R.

    2013-01-01

    Growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests is highly sensitive to the nature of the substrate. This constraint narrows the range of available materials to just a few oxide-based dielectrics and presents a major obstacle for applications. Using a suspended monolayer, we show here that graphene is an excellent conductive substrate for CNT forest growth. Furthermore, graphene is shown to intermediate growth on key substrates, such as Cu, Pt, and diamond, which had not previously been compatible with nanotube forest growth. We find that growth depends on the degree of crystallinity of graphene and is best on mono- or few-layer graphene. The synergistic effects of graphene are revealed by its endurance after CNT growth and low contact resistances between the nanotubes and Cu. Our results establish graphene as a unique interface that extends the class of substrate materials for CNT growth and opens up important new prospects for applications. PMID:23712556

  2. ALIGNING JIG

    DOEpatents

    Culver, J.S.; Tunnell, W.C.

    1958-08-01

    A jig or device is described for setting or aligning an opening in one member relative to another member or structure, with a predetermined offset, or it may be used for measuring the amount of offset with which the parts have previously been sct. This jig comprises two blocks rabbeted to each other, with means for securing thc upper block to the lower block. The upper block has fingers for contacting one of the members to be a1igmed, the lower block is designed to ride in grooves within the reference member, and calibration marks are provided to determine the amount of offset. This jig is specially designed to align the collimating slits of a mass spectrometer.

  3. Image alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, Larry Jonathan

    2014-04-22

    Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

  4. Quantum analytical modeling and simulation of CNT on insulator (COI) and CNT on nothing (CON) FET: a comparative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sudipta; Bandyopadhyay, Dipan; Dutta, Pranab Kishore; Sarkar, Subir Kumar

    2016-06-01

    A comprehensive performance analysis by quantum analytical modeling of CNT on insulator (COI) and CNT on nothing (CON) FET having channel length 20 nm has been proposed and investigated on the basis of 2D Poisson's Equation and solution of 1-D Schrodinger's Equation and validated using ATLAS 2D simulator. As classical approximations fail to describe carrier quantization, charge inversion and potential profile of a device at sub-100 nm regime, here for the first time an analytical model in quantum mechanical aspect for COI/CON devices has been derived. Effects of high-k dielectrics in place of conventional SiO2 over the device characteristics have been thoroughly discussed. Moreover, all noticeable benefits of our device to the so called SOI/SON architecture have also been vividly justified.

  5. Tunable and label-free virus enrichment for ultrasensitive virus detection using carbon nanotube arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Yin-Ting; Tang, Yi; Sebastian, Aswathy; Dasgupta, Archi; Perea-Lopez, Nestor; Albert, Istvan; Lu, Huaguang; Terrones, Mauricio; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Viral infectious diseases can erupt unpredictably, spread rapidly, and ravage mass populations. Although established methods, such as polymerase chain reaction, virus isolation, and next-generation sequencing have been used to detect viruses, field samples with low virus count pose major challenges in virus surveillance and discovery. We report a unique carbon nanotube size-tunable enrichment microdevice (CNT-STEM) that efficiently enriches and concentrates viruses collected from field samples. The channel sidewall in the microdevice was made by growing arrays of vertically aligned nitrogen-doped multiwalled CNTs, where the intertubular distance between CNTs could be engineered in the range of 17 to 325 nm to accurately match the size of different viruses. The CNT-STEM significantly improves detection limits and virus isolation rates by at least 100 times. Using this device, we successfully identified an emerging avian influenza virus strain [A/duck/PA/02099/2012(H11N9)] and a novel virus strain (IBDV/turkey/PA/00924/14). Our unique method demonstrates the early detection of emerging viruses and the discovery of new viruses directly from field samples, thus creating a universal platform for effectively remediating viral infectious diseases. PMID:27730213

  6. Influence of matching solubility parameter of polymer matrix and CNT on electrical conductivity of CNT/rubber composite

    PubMed Central

    Ata, Seisuke; Mizuno, Takaaki; Nishizawa, Ayumi; Subramaniam, Chandramouli; Futaba, Don N.; Hata, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    We report a general approach to fabricate elastomeric composites possessing high electrical conductivity for applications ranging from wireless charging interfaces to stretchable electronics. By using arbitrary nine kinds of rubbers as matrices, we experimentally demonstrate that the matching the solubility parameter of CNTs and the rubber matrix is important to achieve higher electrical conductivity in CNT/rubber composite, resulting in continuous conductive pathways leading to electrical conductivities as high as 15 S/cm with 10 vol% CNT in fluorinated rubber. Further, using thermodynamic considerations, we demonstrate an approach to mix CNTs to arbitrary rubber matrices regardless of solubility parameter of matrices by adding small amounts of fluorinated rubber as a polymeric-compatibilizer of CNTs. We thereby achieved electrical conductivities ranging from 1.2 to 13.8 S/cm (10 vol% CNTs) using nine varieties of rubber matrices differing in chemical structures and physical properties. Finally, we investigated the components of solubility parameter of CNT by using Hansen solubility parameters, these findings may useful for controlling solubility parameter of CNTs. PMID:25434701

  7. Crack-free and scalable transfer of carbon nanotube arrays into flexible and highly thermal conductive composite film.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Chen, Hongyuan; Lin, Wei; Li, Zhuo; Li, Qiang; Chen, Minghai; Meng, Fancheng; Xing, Yajuan; Yao, Yagang; Wong, Ching-ping; Li, Qingwen

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays show great promise in developing anisotropic thermal conductive composites for efficiently dissipating heat from high-power devices along thickness direction. However, CNT arrays are always grown on some substrates and liable to be deformed and broken into pieces during transfer and solution treatment. In the present study, we intentionally synthesized well-crystallized and large-diameter (~80 nm) multiwalled CNT (MWCNT) arrays by floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (FCCVD) method. Such arrays provided high packing density and robust structure from collapse and crack formation during post solution treatment and therefore favored to maintain original thermal and electrical conductive paths. Under optimized condition, the CNT arrays can be transferred into flexible composite films. Furthermore, the composite film also exhibited excellent thermal conductivity at 8.2 W/(m·K) along thickness direction. Such robust, flexible, and highly thermal conductive composite film may enable some prospective applications in advanced thermal management.

  8. Highly Stretchable Fully-Printed CNT-Based Electrochemical Sensors and Biofuel Cells: Combining Intrinsic and Design-Induced Stretchability.

    PubMed

    Bandodkar, Amay J; Jeerapan, Itthipon; You, Jung-Min; Nuñez-Flores, Rogelio; Wang, Joseph

    2016-01-13

    We present the first example of an all-printed, inexpensive, highly stretchable CNT-based electrochemical sensor and biofuel cell array. The synergistic effect of utilizing specially tailored screen printable stretchable inks that combine the attractive electrical and mechanical properties of CNTs with the elastomeric properties of polyurethane as a binder along with a judiciously designed free-standing serpentine pattern enables the printed device to possess two degrees of stretchability. Owing to these synergistic design and nanomaterial-based ink effects, the device withstands extremely large levels of strains (up to 500% strain) with negligible effect on its structural integrity and performance. This represents the highest stretchability offered by a printed device reported to date. Extensive electrochemical characterization of the printed device reveal that repeated stretching, torsional twisting, and indenting stress has negligible impact on its electrochemical properties. The wide-range applicability of this platform to realize highly stretchable CNT-based electrochemical sensors and biofuel cells has been demonstrated by fabricating and characterizing potentiometric ammonium sensor, amperometric enzyme-based glucose sensor, enzymatic glucose biofuel cell, and self-powered biosensor. Highly stretchable printable multianalyte sensor, multifuel biofuel cell, or any combination thereof can thus be realized using the printed CNT array. Such combination of intrinsically stretchable printed nanomaterial-based electrodes and strain-enduring design patterns holds considerable promise for creating an attractive class of inexpensive multifunctional, highly stretchable printed devices that satisfy the requirements of diverse healthcare and energy fields wherein resilience toward extreme mechanical deformations is mandatory. PMID:26694819

  9. Synthesis of Millimeter-Scale Carbon Nanotube Arrays and Their Applications on Electrochemical Supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xinwei

    This research is aimed at synthesizing millimeter-scale carbon nanotube arrays (CNTA) by conventional chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) and water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (WACVD) methods, and exploring their application as catalyst supports for electrochemical supercapacitors. The growth mechanism and growth kinetics of CNTA under different conditions were systematically investigated to understand the relationship among physical characteristics of catalyst particles, growth parameters, and carbon nanotube (CNT) structures within CNTAs. Multiwalled CNT (MWCNT) array growth demonstrates lengthening and thickening stages in CCVD and WACVD. In CCVD, the lengthening and thickening were found to be competitive. By investigating catalyst particles after different pretreatment conditions, it has been found that inter-particle spacing plays a significant role in influencing CNTA height, CNT diameter and wall number. In WACVD, a long linear lengthening stage has been found. CNT wall number remains constant and catalysts preserve the activity in this stage, while MWCNTs thicken substantially and catalysts deactivate following the previously proposed radioactive decay model in the thickening stage of WACVD. Water was also shown to preserve the catalyst activity by significantly inhibiting catalyst-induced and gas phase-induced thickening processes in WACVD. Mn3O4 nanoparticles were successfully deposited and uniformly distributed within millimeter-long CNTAs by dip-casting method from non-aqueous solutions. After modification with Mn3O4 nanoparticles, CNTAs have been changed from hydrophobic to hydrophilic without their alignment and integrity being destroyed. The hydrophilic Mn 3O4/CNTA composite electrodes present ideal capacitive behavior with high reversibility. This opens up a new route of utilizing ultra-long CNTAs, based on which a scalable and cost-effective method was developed to fabricate composite electrodes using millimeter-long CNTAs. To improve the

  10. Behavior of oxidized platinum nanoparticles on an aligned carbon nanotube forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Keita; Norimatsu, Wataru; Arai, Shigeo; Kusunoki, Michiko

    2016-10-01

    We observed and analyzed the behavior of platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) supported on aligned-carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at high temperatures by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscope observations. We found that the PtNPs moved toward the inner-side along each CNT on which they were deposited. The mechanism of this behavior is related to the redox reaction of Pt with the carbon atoms in the CNT. We also performed in-situ observation of this process at a high temperature using an environmental transmission electron microscope under an oxygen atmosphere. We found that the PtNPs penetrated down into a high-density aligned CNT forest along the tube axis and that the PtNPs changed their shape to fit the structure of the CNTs during their movement.

  11. The alignment-distribution graph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Schreiber, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Implementing a data-parallel language such as Fortran 90 on a distributed-memory parallel computer requires distributing aggregate data objects (such as arrays) among the memory modules attached to the processors. The mapping of objects to the machine determines the amount of residual communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. We present a program representation called the alignment-distribution graph that makes these communication requirements explicit. We describe the details of the representation, show how to model communication cost in this framework, and outline several algorithms for determining object mappings that approximately minimize residual communication.

  12. The alignment-distribution graph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Schreiber, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Implementing a data-parallel language such as Fortran 90 on a distributed-memory parallel computer requires distributing aggregate data objects (such as arrays) among the memory modules attached to the processors. The mapping of objects to the machine determines the amount of residual communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. We present a program representation called the alignment distribution graph that makes these communication requirements explicit. We describe the details of the representation, show how to model communication cost in this framework, and outline several algorithms for determining object mappings that approximately minimize residual communication.

  13. A flexible and implantable microelectrode arrays using high-temperature grown vertical carbon nanotubes and a biocompatible polymer substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Wenwen; Chen, Chaoyang; Feng, Zhaoying; Xu, Yong; Zhou, Chengpeng; Masurkar, Nirul; Cavanaugh, John; Ming-Cheng Cheng, Mark

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a novel microelectrode arrays using high-temperature grown vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) integrated on a flexible and biocompatible parylene substrate. A simple microfabrication process is proposed to unite the high quality vertical CNTs grown at high temperature with the heat sensitive parylene substrate in a highly controllable manner. Briefly, the CNTs electrode is encapsulated by two layers of parylene and the device is released using xenon difluoride (XeF2). The process is compatible with wafer-scale post complementary metal oxide semiconductor integration. Lower impedance and larger interfacial capacitance have been demonstrated using CNTs compared to a Pt electrode. The flexible CNT electrodes have been utilized for extracellular neuronal recording and stimulation in rats. The signal-to-noise ratio of the device is about 12.5. The threshold voltage for initiating action potential is about 0.5 V.

  14. Nanoengineered Thermal Materials Based on Carbon Nanotube Array Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method for providing for thermal conduction using an array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). An array of vertically oriented CNTs is grown on a substrate having high thermal conductivity, and interstitial regions between adjacent CNTs in the array are partly or wholly filled with a filler material having a high thermal conductivity so that at least one end of each CNT is exposed. The exposed end of each CNT is pressed against a surface of an object from which heat is to be removed. The CNT-filler composite adjacent to the substrate provides improved mechanical strength to anchor CNTs in place and also serves as a heat spreader to improve diffusion of heat flux from the smaller volume (CNTs) to a larger heat sink.

  15. Nanoengineered thermal materials based on carbon nanotube array composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor); Dangelo, Carlos (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for providing for thermal conduction using an array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). An array of vertically oriented CNTs is grown on a substrate having high thermal conductivity, and interstitial regions between adjacent CNTs in the array are partly or wholly filled with a filler material having a high thermal conductivity so that at least one end of each CNT is exposed. The exposed end of each CNT is pressed against a surface of an object from which heat is to be removed. The CNT-filler composite adjacent to the substrate provides improved mechanical strength to anchor CNTs in place and also serves as a heat spreader to improve diffusion of heat flux from the smaller volume (CNTs) to a larger heat sink.

  16. Nanoengineered thermal materials based on carbon nanotube array composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method for providing for thermal conduction using an array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). An array of vertically oriented CNTs is grown on a substrate having high thermal conductivity, and interstitial regions between adjacent CNTs in the array are partly or wholly filled with a filler material having a high thermal conductivity so that at least one end of each CNT is exposed. The exposed end of each CNT is pressed against a surface of an object from which heat is to be removed. The CNT-filler composite adjacent to the substrate provides improved mechanical strength to anchor CNTs in place and also serves as a heat spreader to improve diffusion of heat flux from the smaller volume (CNTs) to a larger heat sink.

  17. Effect of milling time and CNT concentration on hardness of CNT/Al{sub 2024} composites produced by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Bustamante, R.; Perez-Bustamante, F.; Estrada-Guel, I.; Licea-Jimenez, L.; Miki-Yoshida, M.; Martinez-Sanchez, R.

    2013-01-15

    Carbon nanotube/2024 aluminum alloy (CNT/Al{sub 2024}) composites were fabricated with a combination of mechanical alloying (MA) and powder metallurgy routes. Composites were microstructurally and mechanically evaluated at sintering condition. A homogeneous dispersion of CNTs in the Al matrix was observed by a field emission scanning electron microscopy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy confirmed not only the presence of well dispersed CNTs but also needle-like shape aluminum carbide (Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}) crystals in the Al matrix. The formation of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} was suggested as the interaction between the outer shells of CNTs and the Al matrix during MA process in which crystallization took place after the sintering process. The mechanical behavior of composites was evaluated by Vickers microhardness measurements indicating a significant improvement in hardness as function of the CNT content. This improvement was associated to a homogeneous dispersion of CNTs and the presence of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} in the aluminum alloy matrix. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 2024 aluminum alloy was reinforced by CNTs by mechanical alloying process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composites were microstructural and mechanically evaluated after sintering condition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The greater the CNT concentration, the greater the hardness of the composites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher hardness in composites is achieved at 20 h of milling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} does not present a direct relationship with the milling time.

  18. One-step synthesis of vertically aligned anatase thornbush-like TiO2 nanowire arrays on transparent conducting oxides for solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Roh, Dong Kyu; Chi, Won Seok; Ahn, Sung Hoon; Jeon, Harim; Kim, Jong Hak

    2013-08-01

    Herein, we report a facile synthesis of high-density anatase-phase vertically aligned thornbush-like TiO2 nanowires (TBWs) on transparent conducting oxide glasses. Morphologically controllable TBW arrays of 9 μm in length are generated through a one-step hydrothermal reaction at 200 °C over 11 h using potassium titanium oxide oxalate dehydrate, diethylene glycol (DEG), and water. The TBWs consist of a large number of nanoplates or nanorods, as confirmed by SEM and TEM imaging. The morphologies of TBWs are controllable by adjusting DEG/water ratios. TBW diameters gradually decrease from 600 (TBW600) to 400 (TBW400) to 200 nm (TBW200) and morphologies change from nanoplates to nanorods with an increase in DEG content. TBWs are utilized as photoanodes for quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (qssDSSCs) and solid-state DSSCs (ssDSSCs). The energy-conversion efficiency of qssDSSCs is in the order: TBW200 (5.2%)>TBW400 (4.5%)>TBW600 (3.4%). These results can be attributed to the different surface areas, light-scattering effects, and charge transport rates, as confirmed by dye-loading measurements, reflectance spectroscopy, and incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency and intensity-modulated photovoltage spectroscopy/intensity-modulated photocurrent spectroscopy analyses. TBW200 is further treated with a graft-copolymer-directed organized mesoporous TiO2 to increase the surface area and interconnectivity of TBWs. As a result, the energy-conversion efficiency of the ssDSSC increases to 6.7% at 100 mW cm(-2) , which is among the highest values for N719-dye-based ssDSSCs.

  19. Field line mapping and equilibrium reconstructions in new CNT Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traverso, Peter; Pedersen, Thomas; Brenner, Paul; Sarasola, Xabier; Durand de Gevigney, Benoit

    2010-11-01

    The Columbia Non-neutral Torus (CNT) has the useful feature of having adjustable coil geometry, creating up to three different stellarators each having a completely new shape to its magnetic surfaces and a different Iota profile. Recently the tilt angle between the two interlocking coils has been changed for the first time on CNT, allowing a study of the new magnetic geometry. In the new configuration field line mapping has been accomplished for multiple current ratios and magnetic fields to confirm the existence of good nested magnetic surfaces. At a specific current ratio a large one-three island chain is created. Plasma parameters have been measured with the new coil configuration, both in cases of a large internal island chain, and in cases without. Full 3D equilibrium reconstructions of potential and density are being performed using a modified version of the existing Poisson-Boltzmann solver. Field line mapping in this configuration will be presented, and a progress report on the equilibrium reconstructions will also be given.

  20. Functionalizing CNTs for Making Epoxy/CNT Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jian; Rajagopal, Ramasubramaniam

    2009-01-01

    Functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with linear molecular side chains of polyphenylene ether (PPE) has been shown to be effective in solubilizing the CNTs in the solvent components of solutions that are cast to make epoxy/CNT composite films. (In the absence of solubilization, the CNTs tend to clump together instead of becoming dispersed in solution as needed to impart, to the films, the desired CNT properties of electrical conductivity and mechanical strength.) Because the PPE functionalizes the CNTs in a noncovalent manner, the functionalization does not damage the CNTs. The functionalization can also be exploited to improve the interactions between CNTs and epoxy matrices to enhance the properties of the resulting composite films. In addition to the CNTs, solvent, epoxy resin, epoxy hardener, and PPE, a properly formulated solution also includes a small amount of polycarbonate, which serves to fill voids that, if allowed to remain, would degrade the performance of the film. To form the film, the solution is drop-cast or spin-cast, then the solvent is allowed to evaporate.

  1. Engineering Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Growth by Decoupled Thermal Treatment of Precursor and Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Meshot, E.; Plata, D; Tawfick, S; Zhang, Y; Verploegen, E; Hart, A

    2009-01-01

    We study synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) 'forests' by a decoupled method that facilitates control of the mean diameter and structural quality of the CNTs and enables tuning of the kinetics for efficient growth to forest heights of several millimeters. The growth substrate temperature (Ts) primarily determines the CNT diameter, whereas independent and rapid thermal treatment (Tp) of the C2H4/H2 reactant mixture significantly changes the growth rate and terminal forest height but does not change the CNT diameter. Synchrotron X-ray scattering is utilized for precise, nondestructive measurement of CNT diameter in large numbers of samples. CNT structural quality monotonically increases with Ts yet decreases with Tp, and forests grown by this decoupled method have significantly higher quality than those grown using a conventional single-zone tube furnace. Chemical analysis reveals that the thermal treatment generates a broad population of hydrocarbon species, and a nonmonotonic relationship between catalyst lifetime and Tp suggests that certain carbon species either enhance or inhibit CNT growth. However, the forest height kinetics, as measured in real-time during growth, are self-similar, thereby indicating that a common mechanism of growth termination may be present over a wide range of process conditions.

  2. Growth of High-Density Self-Aligned Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers Using Palladium Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollebregt, S.; Derakhshandeh, J.; Ishihara, R.; Wu, M. Y.; Beenakker, C. I. M.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we demonstrate vertical self-aligned growth of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanofibers (CNF) using 1 nm of Pd as the catalyst material. Results were compared with those obtained using traditional catalysts (Co, Fe, and Ni). Pd is of interest as it has been demonstrated to be an excellent material for electrical contact to nanotubes. CNT were grown using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at 450°C to 500°C and using atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) between 450°C and 640°C. The results were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy. High-density (1011 cm-2 to 1012 cm-2) self-aligned CNT growth was obtained using APCVD and Pd as the catalyst, while Co and Fe resulted in random growth. TEM revealed that the CNT grown by Pd with PECVD form large bundles of tubes, while Ni forms large-diameter CNF. It was found that the CNT grown using Pd or Ni are of low quality compared with those grown by Co and Fe.

  3. Global alignment: Finding rearrangements during alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Brudno, Michael; Malde, Sanket; Poliakov, Alexander; Do, Chuong B.; Couronne, Olivier; Dubchak, Inna; Batzoglou, Serafim

    2003-01-06

    Motivation: To compare entire genomes from different species, biologists increasingly need alignment methods that are efficient enough to handle long sequences, and accurate enough to correctly align the conserved biological features between distant species. The two main classes of pairwise alignments are global alignment, where one string is transformed into the other, and local alignment, where all locations of similarity between the two strings are returned. Global alignments are less prone to demonstrating false homology as each letter of one sequence is constrained to being aligned to only one letter of the other. Local alignments, on the other hand, can cope with rearrangements between non-syntenic, orthologous sequences by identifying similar regions in sequences; this, however, comes at the expense of a higher false positive rate due to the inability of local aligners to take into account overall conservation maps.

  4. Fiber alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, S.H.; Warren, M.E.; Snipes, M.B. Jr.; Armendariz, M.G.; Word, J.C. V

    1997-08-19

    A fiber alignment apparatus includes a micro-machined nickel spring that captures and locks arrays of single mode fibers into position. The design consists of a movable nickel leaf shaped spring and a fixed pocket where fibers are held. The fiber is slid between the spring and a fixed block, which tensions the spring. When the fiber reaches the pocket, it automatically falls into the pocket and is held by the pressure of the leaf spring. 8 figs.

  5. Fiber alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Warren, Mial Evans; Snipes, Jr., Morris Burton; Armendariz, Marcelino Guadalupe; Word, V., James Cole

    1997-01-01

    A fiber alignment apparatus includes a micro-machined nickel spring that captures and locks arrays of single mode fibers into position. The design consists of a movable nickel leaf shaped spring and a fixed pocket where fibers are held. The fiber is slid between the spring and a fixed block, which tensions the spring. When the fiber reaches the pocket, it automatically falls into the pocket and is held by the pressure of the leaf spring.

  6. Thermal property tuning in aligned carbon nanotube films and random entangled carbon nanotube films by ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Di; Wang, Xuemei; Bykova, Julia S.; Zakhidov, Anvar A.; Shao, Lin

    2015-10-12

    Ion irradiation effects on thermal property changes are compared between aligned carbon nanotube (A-CNT) films and randomly entangled carbon nanotube (R-CNT) films. After H, C, and Fe ion irradiation, a focusing ion beam with sub-mm diameter is used as a heating source, and an infrared signal is recorded to extract thermal conductivity. Ion irradiation decreases thermal conductivity of A-CNT films, but increases that of R-CNT films. We explain the opposite trends by the fact that neighboring CNT bundles are loosely bonded in A-CNT films, which makes it difficult to create inter-tube linkage/bonding upon ion irradiation. In a comparison, in R-CNT films, which have dense tube networking, carbon displacements are easily trapped between touching tubes and act as inter-tube linkage to promote off-axial phonon transport. The enhancement overcomes the phonon transport loss due to phonon-defect scattering along the axial direction. A model is established to explain the dependence of thermal conductivity changes on ion irradiation parameters including ion species, energies, and current.

  7. Optical properties of ordered vertical arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes from FDTD simulations.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hua; Ruan, Xiulin; Fisher, Timothy S

    2010-03-15

    A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is used to model thermal radiative properties of vertical arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Individual CNTs are treated as solid circular cylinders with an effective dielectric tensor. Consistent with experiments, the results confirm that CNT arrays are highly absorptive. Compared with the commonly used Maxwell-Garnett theory, the FDTD calculations generally predict larger reflectance and absorbance, and smaller transmittance, which are attributed to the diffraction and scattering within the cylinder array structure. The effects of volume fraction, tube length, tube distance, and incident angle on radiative properties are investigated systematically. Low volume fraction and long tubes are more favorable to achieve low reflectance and high absorbance. For a fixed volume fraction and finite tube length, larger periodicity results in larger reflectance and absorbance. The angular dependence studies reveal an optimum incident angle at which the reflectance can be minimized. The results also suggest that an even darker material could be achieved by using CNTs with good alignment on the top surface.

  8. Integrated random-aligned carbon nanotube layers: deformation mechanism under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhiping; Gui, Xuchun; Gan, Qiming; Lin, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Yuan; Zhang, Wenhui; Xiang, Rong; Cao, Anyuan; Tang, Zikang

    2014-01-01

    constructing hierarchical carbon nanotube structures with tailored energy absorption properties, for applications such as cushioning and buffering layers in microelectromechanical systems. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Low-magnification SEM images showing the deformation process of the double-layered structure, SEM images of sponge-array double-layered structure under the compressive strain of 32% and 52%, and compressive stress-strain curves of a CNT array and sponges separately for 50 cycles. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr04667b

  9. Effect of vertically aligned carbon nanotube density on the water flux and salt rejection in desalination membranes.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Samarth; Alameh, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) membranes of different densities are developed and their performances are investigated. VACNT arrays of densities 5 × 10(9), 10(10), 5 × 10(10) and 10(11) tubes cm(-2), are initially grown on 1 cm × 1 cm silicon substrates using chemical vapour deposition. A VACNT membrane is realised by attaching a 300 μm-thick 1 cm × 1 cm VACNT array on silicon to a 4″ glass substrate, applying polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) through spin coating to fill the gaps between the VACNTs, and using a microtome to slice the VACNT-PDMS composite into 25-μm-thick membranes. Experimental results show that the permeability of the developed VACNT membranes increases with the density of the VACNTs, while the salt rejection is almost independent of the VACNT density. The best measured permeance is attained with a VACNT membrane having a CNT density of 10(11) tubes cm(-2) is 1203 LMH at 1 bar.

  10. Effect of vertically aligned carbon nanotube density on the water flux and salt rejection in desalination membranes.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Samarth; Alameh, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) membranes of different densities are developed and their performances are investigated. VACNT arrays of densities 5 × 10(9), 10(10), 5 × 10(10) and 10(11) tubes cm(-2), are initially grown on 1 cm × 1 cm silicon substrates using chemical vapour deposition. A VACNT membrane is realised by attaching a 300 μm-thick 1 cm × 1 cm VACNT array on silicon to a 4″ glass substrate, applying polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) through spin coating to fill the gaps between the VACNTs, and using a microtome to slice the VACNT-PDMS composite into 25-μm-thick membranes. Experimental results show that the permeability of the developed VACNT membranes increases with the density of the VACNTs, while the salt rejection is almost independent of the VACNT density. The best measured permeance is attained with a VACNT membrane having a CNT density of 10(11) tubes cm(-2) is 1203 LMH at 1 bar. PMID:27504256

  11. Self aligned hysteresis free carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlafman, M.; Tabachnik, T.; Shtempluk, O.; Razin, A.; Kochetkov, V.; Yaish, Y. E.

    2016-04-01

    Hysteresis phenomenon in the transfer characteristics of carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNT FET) is being considered as the main obstacle for successful realization of electronic devices based on CNTs. In this study, we prepare four kinds of CNTFETs and explore their hysteretic behavior. Two kinds of devices comprise on-surface CNTs (type I) and suspended CNTs (type II) with thin insulating layer underneath and a single global gate which modulates the CNT conductance. The third and fourth types (types III and IV) consist of suspended CNT over a metallic local gate underneath, where for type IV the local gate was patterned self aligned with the source and drain electrodes. The first two types of devices, i.e., type I and II, exhibit substantial hysteresis which increases with scanning range and sweeping time. Under high vacuum conditions and moderate electric fields ( |E |>4 ×106 V /cm ), the hysteresis for on-surface devices cannot be eliminated, as opposed to suspended devices. Interestingly, type IV devices exhibit no hysteresis at all at ambient conditions, and from the different roles which the global and local gates play for the four types of devices, we could learn about the hysteresis mechanism of this system. We believe that these self aligned hysteresis free FETs will enable the realization of different electronic devices and sensors based on CNTs.

  12. Modeling and experimental study of resistive switching in vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageev, O. A.; Blinov, Yu F.; Ilina, M. V.; Ilin, O. I.; Smirnov, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    Model of the resistive switching in vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA CNT) taking into account the processes of deformation, polarization and piezoelectric charge accumulation have been developed. Origin of hysteresis in VA CNT-based structure is described. Based on modeling results the VACNTs-based structure has been created. The ration resistance of high-resistance to low-resistance states of the VACNTs-based structure amounts 48. The correlation the modeling results with experimental studies is shown. The results can be used in the development nanoelectronics devices based on VA CNTs, including the nonvolatile resistive random-access memory.

  13. Super growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on pulsed laser deposited catalytic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fejes, D.; Pápa, Z.; Kecsenovity, E.; Réti, B.; Toth, Z.; Hernadi, K.

    2015-03-01

    Efficient and reproducible growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) requires precise setting of the properties of the catalyst thin films and CVD conditions. In this work, super growth of vertically aligned CNTs onto Al2O3 support and Fe-Co catalyst layer system is presented. The layers were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) onto silicon wafer pieces. Their thickness and optical properties were controlled by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The effect of heat treatment at 750 °C in nitrogen and in hydrogen of these PLD layers was compared. High-resolution electron microscopic images showed that treatment of catalyst layers in H2 resulted in finer and denser catalytic particles. As a result, well-aligned, dense and few-walled CNT forests with 1-1.5 mm height were deposited by water-vapor-assisted CVD on the hydrogen-treated films, while without hydrogen treatment defected CNT structures were grown. According to these observations, Raman spectroscopy showed a higher degree of crystallinity in case of CNT-s, where reduction by hydrogen influenced the oxidation state of the metallic catalytic particles in a beneficial way.

  14. Fabrication process and electromagnetic wave absorption characterization of a CNT/Ni/epoxy nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seongwoo; Mo, Chan Bin; Lee, Haeshin; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Since carbon nanotube (CNT) was first discovered in 1991, it has been considered as a viable type of conductive filler for electromagnetic wave absorption materials in the GHz range. In this paper, pearl-necklace-structure CNT/Ni nano-powders were fabricated by a polyol process as conductive fillers. Compared to synthesized CNT, pearl-necklace Ni-decorated CNT increased the electrical conductivity by an order of 1 due to the enhancement of the Ni-conductive network. Moreover, the decorated Ni particles prevented the agglomeration of CNTs by counterbalancing the Van der Walls interaction between the CNTs. A CNT/Ni nanocomposite showed a homogeneous dispersion in an epoxy-based matrix. This enhanced physical morphology and electrical properties lead to an increase in the loss tangent and reflection loss in the CNT/Ni/Epoxy nanocomposite compared to these characteristics of a CNT/Epoxy nanocomposite in range of 8-12 GHz. The electromagnetic wave absorption properties of CNT/Ni/epoxy nanocomposites will provide enormous opportunities for electronic applications where lightweight EMI shielding or electro-magnetic wave absorption properties are necessary.

  15. Antibacterial activity and reusability of CNT-Ag and GO-Ag nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Dang; Yun, Hyosuk; Kim, Gwui Cheol; Lee, Chul Won; Choi, Hyun Chul

    2013-10-01

    A facile approach to the synthesis of novel CNT-Ag and GO-Ag antibacterial materials, in which thiol groups are utilized as linkers to secure silver (Ag) nanoparticles to the CNT and GO surfaces without agglomeration, is reported. The resulting CNT-Ag and GO-Ag samples were characterized by performing TEM, XRD, Auger, XPS, and Raman measurements, which revealed that in these antibacterial materials size-similar and quasi-spherical Ag nanoparticles are anchored to the CNT and GO surfaces. The Ag nanoparticles in CNT-Ag and GO-Ag have narrow size distributions with average diameters of 2.6 and 3.5 nm respectively. The antibacterial activities of CNT-Ag and GO-Ag against Escherichia coli were assessed with the paper-disk diffusion method and by determining the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). CNT-Ag was found to have higher antibacterial activity than the reference Ag colloid. Moreover, both CNT-Ag and GO-Ag retain more than 50% of their original antibacterial activities after 20 washes with detergent, which indicates their potential as antibacterial materials for laboratory and medical purposes.

  16. Multi-scale numerical simulations of thermal expansion properties of CNT-reinforced nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the thermal expansion properties of carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced nanocomposites with CNT content ranging from 1 to 15 wt% were evaluated using a multi-scale numerical approach, in which the effects of two parameters, i.e., temperature and CNT content, were investigated extensively. For all CNT contents, the obtained results clearly revealed that within a wide low-temperature range (30°C ~ 62°C), thermal contraction is observed, while thermal expansion occurs in a high-temperature range (62°C ~ 120°C). It was found that at any specified CNT content, the thermal expansion properties vary with temperature - as temperature increases, the thermal expansion rate increases linearly. However, at a specified temperature, the absolute value of the thermal expansion rate decreases nonlinearly as the CNT content increases. Moreover, the results provided by the present multi-scale numerical model were in good agreement with those obtained from the corresponding theoretical analyses and experimental measurements in this work, which indicates that this multi-scale numerical approach provides a powerful tool to evaluate the thermal expansion properties of any type of CNT/polymer nanocomposites and therefore promotes the understanding on the thermal behaviors of CNT/polymer nanocomposites for their applications in temperature sensors, nanoelectronics devices, etc. PMID:23294669

  17. Fabrication process and electromagnetic wave absorption characterization of a CNT/Ni/epoxy nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seongwoo; Mo, Chan Bin; Lee, Haeshin; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Since carbon nanotube (CNT) was first discovered in 1991, it has been considered as a viable type of conductive filler for electromagnetic wave absorption materials in the GHz range. In this paper, pearl-necklace-structure CNT/Ni nano-powders were fabricated by a polyol process as conductive fillers. Compared to synthesized CNT, pearl-necklace Ni-decorated CNT increased the electrical conductivity by an order of 1 due to the enhancement of the Ni-conductive network. Moreover, the decorated Ni particles prevented the agglomeration of CNTs by counterbalancing the Van der Walls interaction between the CNTs. A CNT/Ni nanocomposite showed a homogeneous dispersion in an epoxy-based matrix. This enhanced physical morphology and electrical properties lead to an increase in the loss tangent and reflection loss in the CNT/Ni/Epoxy nanocomposite compared to these characteristics of a CNT/Epoxy nanocomposite in range of 8-12 GHz. The electromagnetic wave absorption properties of CNT/Ni/epoxy nanocomposites will provide enormous opportunities for electronic applications where lightweight EMI shielding or electro-magnetic wave absorption properties are necessary. PMID:24245312

  18. Obtaining a Well-Aligned ZnO Nanotube Array Using the Hydrothermal Growth Method / Labi Sakārtotu Zno Nanocauruļu Kopu Iegūšana, Izmantojot Hidrotermālo Metodi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasovska, M.; Gerbreders, V.; Paskevics, V.; Ogurcovs, A.; Mihailova, I.

    2015-10-01

    Optimal growing parameters have been found using the hydrothermal method to obtain well-aligned vertical ZnO nanorod and nanotube arrays. The influence of different growing factors (such as temperature, growing solution concentration, method of obtaining seed layer and condition) on nanotube morphology and size is described in the paper. Well-structured ZnO nanotubes have been obtained by using a selfselective etching method with lowering temperatures of growth during the hydrothermal process. It is shown that the optical properties of the nanostructure arrays obtained are sensitive to the medium in which they are placed, which is why they can be used as sensors for pure substance detection and in different solutions for impurity determination. Dotajā darbā tika noteikti optimāli parametri labi sakārtotu ZnO nanocaurulīšu kopu iegūšanai, izmantojot hidrotermālo metodi ar temperatūras pazemināšanu, jeb t.s. selektīvu pa\\vskodināšanas metodi (self-selective etching), ir uzsvērtas šās metodes priekšrocības salīdzinājumā ar ķīmiskās kodināšanas metodi, kā arī tika aprakstīta dažādu augšanas faktora (tādu, ka darba šķīduma koncentrācija, augšanas temperatūra un laiks, iedīgļu slāņa iegūšanas veids un iegūšanas parametri) ietekme uz iegūtu nanostraktūra morfoloģiju. Tika konstatēts, ka noteicošu lomu ZnO nanocaurulīšu audzēšanas procesā spēlē iedīgļu slāņa graudu izmēri, kas savā staipā nosaka augošu nanostieņu izmērus un to tendenci pie pa\\vskodināšanas. Rentgenogrannnas parāda, ka iegūtām pie noteiktiem parametriem ZnO nanostruktūrām piemīt augsta kristāliskuma pakāpe un sakārtotība vertikālā virzienā. Optiskie mērījumi parāda, ka ZnO nanocauralītes ir jutīgas gan pret tīrām vielām (ūdens, spirts), gan pret dažādiem šķīdumiem, kas ļauj izmantot tos kā pie­jaukumu sensora. Salīdzinājumā ar ZnO nanostieņiem caurulīšu jūtība pieaug, jo pieaug nanostrakt

  19. Multi-Scale CNT-Based Reinforcing Polymer Matrix Composites for Lightweight Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberly, Daniel; Ou, Runqing; Karcz, Adam; Skandan, Ganesh; Mather, Patrick; Rodriguez, Erika

    2013-01-01

    Reinforcing critical areas in carbon polymer matrix composites (PMCs), also known as fiber reinforced composites (FRCs), is advantageous for structural durability. Since carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have extremely high tensile strength, they can be used as a functional additive to enhance the mechanical properties of FRCs. However, CNTs are not readily dispersible in the polymer matrix, which leads to lower than theoretically predicted improvement in mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of CNT composites. The inability to align CNTs in a polymer matrix is also a known issue. The feasibility of incorporating aligned CNTs into an FRC was demonstrated using a novel, yet commercially viable nanofiber approach, termed NRMs (nanofiber-reinforcing mats). The NRM concept of reinforcement allows for a convenient and safe means of incorporating CNTs into FRC structural components specifically where they are needed during the fabrication process. NRMs, fabricated through a novel and scalable process, were incorporated into FRC test panels using layup and vacuum bagging techniques, where alternating layers of the NRM and carbon prepreg were used to form the reinforced FRC structure. Control FRC test panel coupons were also fabricated in the same manner, but comprised of only carbon prepreg. The FRC coupons were machined to size and tested for flexural, tensile, and compression properties. This effort demonstrated that FRC structures can be fabricated using the NRM concept, with an increased average load at break during flexural testing versus that of the control. The NASA applications for the developed technologies are for lightweight structures for in-space and launch vehicles. In addition, the developed technologies would find use in NASA aerospace applications such as rockets, aircraft, aircraft/spacecraft propulsion systems, and supporting facilities. The reinforcing aspect of the technology will allow for more efficient joining of fiber composite parts, thus offering

  20. Strain rate effects on compressive behavior of covalently bonded CNT networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkayak, Levent

    2016-06-01

    In this study, strain rate effects on the compressive mechanical properties of randomly structured carbon nanotube (CNT) networks were examined. For this purpose, three-dimensional atomistic models of CNT networks with covalently-bonded junctions were generated. After that, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of compressive loading were performed at five different strain rates to investigate the basic deformation characteristic mechanisms of CNT networks and determine the effect of strain rate on stress-strain curves. The simulation results showed that the strain rate of compressive loading increases, so that a higher resistance of specimens to deformation is observed. Furthermore, the local deformation characteristics of CNT segments, which are mainly driven by bending and buckling modes, and their prevalence are strongly affected by the deformation rate. It was also observed that CNT networks have superior features to metal foams such as metal matrix syntactic foams (MMSFs) and porous sintered fiber metals (PSFMs) in terms of energy absorbing capabilities.

  1. Effect of electric charging on the velocity of water flow in CNT.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Hossein Reza; Karimian, S M Hossein

    2016-09-01

    The role of electrical charge in controlling the velocity of water molecules in a finite single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) was studied in detail using molecular dynamics simulation. Different test cases were examined to determine the parameters affecting the control of water-flow velocity in CNT upon electrically charging the surface of a CNT. The results showed that charge magnitude and volume, as well as the charging scenario, are the parameters having greatest effect. The implementation of electric charge on the surface of a CNT was demonstrated to decrease the resistance of CNT to incoming water flow at the entrance, but to increase friction-type resistance to flow along the CNT. Therefore, through controlling the magnitude of electric charge, water flow through the CNT may be accelerated, or decelerated. The results show that the velocity of molecular flow in the CNT increases to a maximum value, and then decreases with electric charge regardless of its sign. In the case studied here, this maximum velocity occurs at electric charging of ±0.25e/atom. It was also shown that, to reach similar flow velocities in a CNT, it is not sufficient to merely implement equal volumes of electric charge, where the volume of electric charging is defined as charge magnitude × charging time. In fact , both magnitude of charging and volume of electric charging must be equal to each other. These findings, together with options to implement scenarios with alternative charging, provide the means to effectively adjust desired velocities in a CNT. PMID:27488104

  2. Effect of electric charging on the velocity of water flow in CNT.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Hossein Reza; Karimian, S M Hossein

    2016-09-01

    The role of electrical charge in controlling the velocity of water molecules in a finite single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) was studied in detail using molecular dynamics simulation. Different test cases were examined to determine the parameters affecting the control of water-flow velocity in CNT upon electrically charging the surface of a CNT. The results showed that charge magnitude and volume, as well as the charging scenario, are the parameters having greatest effect. The implementation of electric charge on the surface of a CNT was demonstrated to decrease the resistance of CNT to incoming water flow at the entrance, but to increase friction-type resistance to flow along the CNT. Therefore, through controlling the magnitude of electric charge, water flow through the CNT may be accelerated, or decelerated. The results show that the velocity of molecular flow in the CNT increases to a maximum value, and then decreases with electric charge regardless of its sign. In the case studied here, this maximum velocity occurs at electric charging of ±0.25e/atom. It was also shown that, to reach similar flow velocities in a CNT, it is not sufficient to merely implement equal volumes of electric charge, where the volume of electric charging is defined as charge magnitude × charging time. In fact , both magnitude of charging and volume of electric charging must be equal to each other. These findings, together with options to implement scenarios with alternative charging, provide the means to effectively adjust desired velocities in a CNT.

  3. Enhanced field emission properties from CNT arrays synthesized on Inconel superalloy.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, S; Ge, L; Tiwary, C S; Hart, A C; Ozden, S; Kalaga, K; Lei, S; Sridhar, S V; Sinha, R K; Harsh, H; Kordas, K; Ajayan, P M; Vajtai, R

    2014-02-12

    One of the most promising materials for fabricating cold cathodes for next generation high-performance flat panel devices is carbon nanotubes (CNTs). For this purpose, CNTs grown on metallic substrates are used to minimize contact resistance. In this report, we compare properties and field emission performance of CNTs grown via water assisted chemical vapor deposition using Inconel vs silicon (Si) substrates. Carbon nanotube forests grown on Inconel substrates are superior to the ones grown on silicon; low turn-on fields (∼1.5 V/μm), high current operation (∼100 mA/cm(2)) and very high local field amplification factors (up to ∼7300) were demonstrated, and these parameters are most beneficial for use in vacuum microelectronic applications. PMID:24417432

  4. An aptamer based competition assay for protein detection using CNT activated gold-interdigitated capacitor arrays.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Anjum; Roci, Irena; Gurbuz, Yasar; Niazi, Javed H

    2012-04-15

    An aptamer can specifically bind to its target molecule, or hybridize with its complementary strand. A target bound aptamer complex has difficulty to hybridize with its complementary strand. It is possible to determine the concentration of target based on affinity separation system for the protein detection. Here, we exploited this property using C-reactive protein (CRP) specific RNA aptamers as probes that were immobilized by physical adsorption on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) activated gold interdigitated electrodes of capacitors. The selective binding ability of RNA aptamer with its target molecule was determined by change in capacitance after allowing competitive binding with CRP and complementary RNA (cRNA) strands in pure form and co-mixtures (CRP:cRNA=0:1, 1:0, 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1). The sensor showed significant capacitance change with pure forms of CRP/cRNA while responses reduced considerably in presence of CRP:cRNA in co-mixtures (1:1 and 1:2) because of the binding competition. At a critical CRP:cRNA ratio of 2:1, the capacitance response was dramatically lost because of the dissociation of adsorbed aptamers from the sensor surface to bind when excess CRP. Binding assays showed that the immobilized aptamers had strong affinity for cRNA (K(d)=1.98 μM) and CRP molecules (K(d)=2.4 μM) in pure forms, but low affinity for CRP:cRNA ratio of 2:1 (K(d)=8.58 μM). The dynamic detection range for CRP was determined to be 1-8 μM (0.58-4.6 μg/capacitor). The approach described in this study is a sensitive label-free method to detect proteins based on affinity separation of target molecules that can potentially be used for probing molecular interactions.

  5. Liquid-crystalline processing of highly oriented carbon nanotube arrays for thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hyunhyub; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2006-07-01

    We introduce a simple solution-based method for the fabrication of highly oriented carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays to be used for thin-film transistors. We exploit the liquid-crystalline behavior of a CNT solution near the receding contact line during tilted-drop casting and produced long-range nematic-like ordering of carbon nanotube stripes caused by confined micropatterned geometry. We further demonstrate that the performance of thin-film transistors based on these densely packed and uniformly oriented CNT arrays is largely improved compared to random CNTs. This approach has great potential in low-cost, large-scale processing of high-performance electronic devices based on high-density oriented CNT films with record electrical characteristics such as high conductance, low resistivity, and high career mobility.

  6. Fine alignment of a large segmented mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dey, Thomas William (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system for aligning a segmented mirror includes a source of radiation directed along a first axis to the segmented mirror and a beamsplitter removably inserted along the first axis for redirecting radiation from the first axis to a second axis, substantially perpendicular to the first axis. An imaging array is positioned along the second axis for imaging the redirected radiation, and a knife-edge configured for cutting the redirected radiation is serially positioned to occlude and not occlude the redirected radiation, effectively providing a variable radiation pattern detected by the imaging array for aligning the segmented mirror.

  7. Uniformly spaced arrays of purely semiconducting carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Abram; Kumar, Bharat; Tulevski, George; Farmer, Damon; Hannon, James; Han, Shu-Jen

    Patterning uniformly spaced arrays of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is a key challenge for carbon electronics. Our group adopts a hybrid approach to meeting this goal. We use top-down lithography to pattern trenches on chips. We then use surface-selective chemical monolayers to facilitate the bottom-up assembly of solution-processed CNTs into these trenches. Previously, we showed large-scale integration of CNTs based on this approach, but modifications to this process have been needed in order to improve the yield and decrease the fraction of non-switching devices. Our latest results show a high degree of selectivity, alignment and yield of successfully placed CNTs at a 100 nm pitch. Electrical measurements confirm that these chemically placed CNTs are nearly 100% semiconducting and of similar quality to randomly dispersed ones. I will then discuss our strategies for increasing the CNT density and extending these results from chip- to wafer-scale electronics. email: alfalk@us.ibm.com.

  8. Relaxation of Liquid Crystal Alignment Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, David C.; Sichel, Enid K.; Cebe, Peggy

    1997-03-01

    A new method for investigating thermophysical transitions in liquid crystal alignment layers is discussed. The technique involves curing a set of alignment films at an array of temperatures after the films have been brushed with a cloth, but before liquid crystal cells are constructed from the films. When a thermal transition in the polymer is initiated by a post-brush cure, the aligning ability of the brushed films is destroyed. The technique is demonstrated using polyamide- imide, PMDA-APB polyimide, poly(phenylene ether sulfide) and PVA poly(vinyl alcohol) alignment films. The technique is advantageous for examining brush-aligned surfaces which, due to surface roughness, can not be examined using conventional ellipsometry .

  9. High Resolution CNT-FED and Improvement in Field-Emission Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurachi, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Sashiro; Yotani, Junko; Nagasako, Takeshi; Yamada, Hiromu; Ezaki, Tomotaka; Maesoba, Tsuyoshi; Nakao, Takehiro; Ito, Masaaki; Sakurai, Akira; Shimoda, Hideo; Saito, Yahachi; Shinohara, Hisanori

    A recent study of carbon nanotube (CNT)-field emission display (FED) was described, and luminance uniformity of the experimental panel and the results of the life test of the CNT emitters were revealed. Furthermore, a high-resolution CNT-FED was investigated for graphic-displays. The sub-pixel size was 0.2 mm × 0.6 mm. The configuration of the display was a metal-backed color-phosphor screen, tall-spacer of 0.5-1.0 mm height for individual phosphor line, a metal gate-substrate with tall spacer and chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown-CNT on a metal-electrode. In order to improve field-emission characteristics of the CNT cathode, we developed two kinds of new CNT emitters by thermal-CVD. One is an emitter with thin CNTs which were grown on an alumina layer. The emission was extremely increased at lower voltage, compared to our conventional CNT emitter. Another is an emitter with secondary thin CNTs grown on thick CNTs. The emission showed an improvement in emission distribution uniformity.

  10. Electrochemical studies of CNT/Si–SnSb nanoparticles for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Nithyadharseni, P.; Reddy, M.V.; Nalini, B.; Ravindran, T.R.; Pillai, B.C.; Kalpana, M.; Chowdari, B.V.R.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Si added SnSb and CNT exhibits very low particle size of below 30 nm • A strong PL quenching due to the addition of Si to SnSb. • Electrochemical studies show CNT added SnSb shows good capacity retention. - Abstract: Nano-structured SnSb, SnSb–CNT, Si–SnSb and Si–SnSb–CNT alloys were synthesized from metal chlorides of Sn, Sb and Si via reductive co-precipitation technique using NaBH{sub 4} as reducing agent. The as prepared compounds were characterized by various techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Raman, Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The electrochemical performances of the compounds were characterized by galvanostatic cycling (GC) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The Si–SnSb–CNT compound shows a high reversible capacity of 1200 mAh g{sup −1}. However, the rapid capacity fading was observed during cycling. In contrast, SnSb–CNT compound showed a high reversible capacity of 568 mAh g{sup −1} at 30th cycles with good cycling stability. The improved reversible capacity and cyclic performance of the SnSb–CNT compound could be attributed to the nanosacle dimension of SnSb particles and the structural advantage of CNTs.

  11. Amine functionalized graphene oxide/CNT nanocomposite for ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of trinitrotoluene.

    PubMed

    Sablok, Kavita; Bhalla, Vijayender; Sharma, Priyanka; Kaushal, Roohi; Chaudhary, Shilpa; Suri, C Raman

    2013-03-15

    Binding of electron-deficient trinitrotoluene (TNT) to the electron rich amine groups on a substrate form specific charge-transfer Jackson-Meisenheimer (JM) complex. In the present work, we report formation of specific JM complex on amine functionalized reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotubes- (a-rGO/CNT) nanocomposite leading to sensitive detection of TNT. The CNT were dispersed using graphene oxide that provides excellent dispersion by attaching to CNT through its hydrophobic domains and solubilizes through the available OH and COOH groups on screen printed electrode (SPE). The GO was reduced electrochemically to form reduced graphene that remarkably increases electrochemical properties owing to the intercalation of high aspect CNT on graphene flakes as shown by TEM micrograph. The surface amine functionalization of dropcasted and rGO/CNT was carried out using a bi-functional cross linker ethylenediamine. The extent of amine functionalization on modified electrodes was confirmed using energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and confocal microscopy. The FTIR and Raman spectra further suggested the formation of JM complex between amine functionalized electrodes and TNT leading to a shift in peak intensity together with peak broadening. The a-rGO/CNT nanocomposite prepared electrode surface leads to ultra-trace detection of TNT upto 0.01 ppb with good reproducibility (n=3). The a-rGO/CNT sensing platform could be an alternate for sensitive detection of TNT explosive for various security and environmental applications.

  12. Dielectrophoretically aligned carbon nanotubes to control electrical and mechanical properties of hydrogels to fabricate contractile muscle myofibers.

    PubMed

    Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Ahadian, Samad; Estili, Mehdi; Liang, Xiaobin; Ostrovidov, Serge; Kaji, Hirokazu; Shiku, Hitoshi; Ramalingam, Murugan; Nakajima, Ken; Sakka, Yoshio; Khademhosseini, Ali; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2013-08-01

    Dielectrophoresis is used to align carbon nanotubes (CNTs) within gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogels in a facile and rapid manner. Aligned GelMA-CNT hydrogels show higher electrical properties compared with pristine and randomly distributed CNTs in GelMA hydrogels. The muscle cells cultured on these materials demonstrate higher maturation compared with cells cultured on pristine and randomly distributed CNTs in GelMA hydrogels.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of multiwalled CNT-PAN based composite carbon nanofibers via electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Narinder; Kumar, Vipin; Dhakate, Sanjay R

    2016-01-01

    Electrospun fibrous membranes find place in diverse applications like sensors, filters, fuel cell membranes, scaffolds for tissue engineering, organic electronics etc. The objectives of present work are to electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers and PAN-CNT nanocomposite nanofibers and convert into carbon nanofiber and carbon-CNT composite nanofiber. The work was divided into two parts, development of nanofibers and composite nanofiber. The PAN nanofibers were produced from 9 wt% PAN solution by electrospinning technique. In another case PAN-CNT composite nanofibers were developed from different concentrations of MWCNTs (1-3 wt%) in 9 wt% PAN solution by electrospinning. Both types of nanofibers were undergone through oxidation, stabilization, carbonization and graphitization. At each stage of processing of carbon and carbon-CNT composite nanofibers were characterized by SEM, AFM, TGA and XRD. It was observed that diameter of nanofiber varies with processing parameters such as applied voltage tip to collector distance, flow rate of solution and polymer concentrations etc. while in case of PAN-CNT composite nanofiber diameter decreases with increasing concentration of CNT in PAN solution. Also with stabilization, carbonization and graphitization diameter of nanofiber decreases. SEM images shows that the minimum fiber diameter in case of 3 wt% of CNT solution because as viscosity increases it reduces the phase separation of PAN and solvent and as a consequence increases in the fiber diameter. AFM images shows that surface of film is irregular which give idea about mat type orientation of fibers. XRD results show that degree of graphitization increases on increasing CNT concentration because of additional stresses exerting on the nanofiber surface in the immediate vicinity of CNTs. TGA results shows wt loss decreases as CNT concentration increases in fibers. PMID:27217998

  14. Synthesis and characterization of multiwalled CNT-PAN based composite carbon nanofibers via electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Narinder; Kumar, Vipin; Dhakate, Sanjay R

    2016-01-01

    Electrospun fibrous membranes find place in diverse applications like sensors, filters, fuel cell membranes, scaffolds for tissue engineering, organic electronics etc. The objectives of present work are to electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers and PAN-CNT nanocomposite nanofibers and convert into carbon nanofiber and carbon-CNT composite nanofiber. The work was divided into two parts, development of nanofibers and composite nanofiber. The PAN nanofibers were produced from 9 wt% PAN solution by electrospinning technique. In another case PAN-CNT composite nanofibers were developed from different concentrations of MWCNTs (1-3 wt%) in 9 wt% PAN solution by electrospinning. Both types of nanofibers were undergone through oxidation, stabilization, carbonization and graphitization. At each stage of processing of carbon and carbon-CNT composite nanofibers were characterized by SEM, AFM, TGA and XRD. It was observed that diameter of nanofiber varies with processing parameters such as applied voltage tip to collector distance, flow rate of solution and polymer concentrations etc. while in case of PAN-CNT composite nanofiber diameter decreases with increasing concentration of CNT in PAN solution. Also with stabilization, carbonization and graphitization diameter of nanofiber decreases. SEM images shows that the minimum fiber diameter in case of 3 wt% of CNT solution because as viscosity increases it reduces the phase separation of PAN and solvent and as a consequence increases in the fiber diameter. AFM images shows that surface of film is irregular which give idea about mat type orientation of fibers. XRD results show that degree of graphitization increases on increasing CNT concentration because of additional stresses exerting on the nanofiber surface in the immediate vicinity of CNTs. TGA results shows wt loss decreases as CNT concentration increases in fibers.

  15. Surface activation of CNT Webs towards layer by layer assembly of biosensors.

    PubMed

    Musameh, Mustafa; Huynh, Chi P; Hickey, Mark; Kyratzis, Ilias Louis

    2016-04-25

    Several surface activation methods such as chemical, electrochemical and plasma have been used for enhancing the electrochemical performance of carbon based electrodes for various applications. However, some of these surface activation methods may not be useful depending on the chemical and physical properties of the activated surface. Herein we investigate the surface activation of carbon nanotube (CNT) webs by electrochemical and plasma techniques to enhance their electrochemical performance and enable the fabrication of a biosensor using the layer-by-layer (LBL) approach. The pretreated CNT webs were characterized by SEM, TEM, Raman, XPS and electrochemical methods. TEM images and Raman analysis showed an increase in the level of surface defects upon pretreatment with higher number of defects after electrochemical pretreatment. XPS analysis showed an increase in the level of oxygen functional groups after pretreatment (4 to 5 times increase) which resulted in enhanced water wettability especially for plasma pretreated CNT webs. The pretreated CNT web electrodes also showed an enhanced electrochemical activity towards the oxidation and reduction of different redox probes with higher sensitivity for the electrochemically pretreated CNT web electrode that was accompanied by a higher level of noise in amperometric measurements. A highly linear response was obtained for the untreated and the electrochemically pretreated CNT web electrodes towards the amperometric detection of NADH (R(2) of 0.9996 and 0.9986 respectively) while a non-linear response was observed for the plasma pretreated CNT web electrode (R(2) of 0.8538). The pretreated CNT web electrodes enabled the fabrication of a LBL biosensor for alcohol detection with highest operational stability obtained for the plasma pretreated CNT web surface.

  16. Latest Progress in CNT-Based Composites for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klebor, Maximilian; Heep, Felicitas; Pfeiffer, Ernst K.; Linke, Stefan; Roddecke, Susanne; Lodereau, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    Composite materials used in S/C platforms and pay- loads can benefit from the latest developments in carbon fibres and nano-technologies. One of the most relevant novelties is the gradual incorporation of nano-species in the resin systems. This paper addresses the results of several technology studies lead and or performed by HPS. They deal with the incorporation of CNT and other nano-species into CFRP to improve the physical properties and to antagonise specific CFRP drawbacks like e.g. the anisotropic properties based on the respective carbon fibre setup. The most interesting and promising applications for these novel composites were assessed and selected for composite development. Entities from several European countries worked together to establish composite and structure processing methods. Promising results concerning electrical and thermal properties were obtained but also many challenges had and still have to be faced. During the projects it has been found that different ingredient combinations and manufacturing processes are favourable for different applications/improvements. It seems that the CNTs and the processes have to be tailored for one specific target property, e.g. electrical conductivity enhancement. The achieved material improvements were and are still further investigated.

  17. Three-Day Continuous Exposure Monitoring of CNT Manufacturing Workplaces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Ahn, Kang Ho; Kim, Sun Man; Kim, Ellen; Lee, Gun Ho; Han, Jeong Hee; Yu, Il Je

    2015-01-01

    Continuous monitoring for possible exposure to carbon nanotubes was conducted over a period of 2 to 3 days at workplaces that manufacture multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). To estimate the potential emission of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and potential exposure of workers, personal sampling, area monitoring, and real-time monitoring using an scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and dust monitor were conducted at workplaces where the workers manufactured CNTs. The personal and area sampling of the total suspended particulate (TSP) at the MWCNT manufacturing facilities ranged from 0.031 to 0.254 and from N.D (not detected) to 0.253 mg/m(3), respectively. This 2- to 3-day monitoring study found that nanoparticles were released when opening the chemical vapor deposit (CVD) reactor door after the synthesis of MWCNTs, when transferring the MWCNTs to containers and during blending and grinding. However, distinguishing the background concentration from the work process particle emission was complicated due to sustained and even increased particle concentrations after the work processes were terminated. The MWCNTs sampled for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation exhibited a tangled shape with no individual dispersed CNT structures. PMID:26125022

  18. Nanoscale optical and electrical characterization of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Raul D; Toader, Marius; Hermann, Sascha; Sheremet, Evgeniya; Müller, Susanne; Gordan, Ovidiu D; Yu, Haibo; Schulz, Stefan E; Hietschold, Michael; Zahn, Dietrich Rt

    2012-01-01

    During the recent years, a significant amount of research has been performed on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a channel material in thin-film transistors (Pham et al. IEEE Trans Nanotechnol 11:44-50, 2012). This has prompted the application of advanced characterization techniques based on combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy studies (Mureau et al. Electrophoresis 29:2266-2271, 2008). In this context, we use confocal Raman microscopy and current sensing atomic force microscopy (CS-AFM) to study phonons and the electronic transport in semiconducting SWCNTs, which were aligned between palladium electrodes using dielectrophoresis (Kuzyk Electrophoresis 32:2307-2313, 2011). Raman imaging was performed in the region around the electrodes on the suspended CNTs using several laser excitation wavelengths. Analysis of the G+/G- splitting in the Raman spectra (Sgobba and Guldi Chem Soc Rev 38:165-184, 2009) shows CNT diameters of 2.5 ± 0.3 nm. Neither surface modification nor increase in defect density or stress at the CNT-electrode contact could be detected, but rather a shift in G+ and G- peak positions in regions with high CNT density between the electrodes. Simultaneous topographical and electrical characterization of the CNT transistor by CS-AFM confirms the presence of CNT bundles having a stable electrical contact with the transistor electrodes. For a similar load force, reproducible current-voltage (I/V) curves for the same CNT regions verify the stability of the electrical contact between the nanotube and the electrodes as well as the nanotube and the AFM tip over different experimental sessions using different AFM tips. Strong variations observed in the I/V response at different regions of the CNT transistor are discussed.

  19. Temperature-dependent gas transport performance of vertically aligned carbon nanotube/parylene composite membranes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A novel composite membrane consisting of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and parylene was successfully fabricated. Seamless filling of the spaces in CNT forests with parylene was achieved by a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique and followed with the Ar/O2 plasma etching to expose CNT tips. Transport properties of various gases through the CNT/parylene membranes were explored. And gas permeances were independent on feed pressure in accordance with the Knudsen model, but the permeance values were over 60 times higher than that predicted by the Knudsen diffusion kinetics, which was attributed to specular momentum reflection inside smooth CNT pores. Gas permeances and enhancement factors over the Knudsen model firstly increased and then decreased with rising temperature, which confirmed the existence of non-Knudsen transport. And surface adsorption diffusion could affect the gas permeance at relatively low temperature. The gas permeance of the CNT/parylene composite membrane could be improved by optimizing operating temperature. PMID:25246864

  20. Local growth of aligned carbon nanotubes at surface sites irradiated by pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, K.; Böhme, R.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2008-05-01

    The utilization of the unique properties of nanostructures often requires their arrangement in mesoscopic patterns, e.g., to facilitate the connection to microelectrodes. Such arrangements can be achieved by local growth of nanostructures. The stimulation of the localized growth of carbon nanotubes (CNT) has been achieved by excimer laser irradiation of iron(III)nitride-coated silicon substrates at a wavelength of 248 nm. After the growth using a thermal CVD process, vertical aligned CNT bundles were found within the laser-irradiated areas. Pulsed UV-laser irradiation causes the transformation of the nitride film into nanoparticles at the substrate surface as AFM measurements show. Surface modification by direct writing techniques allows the growth of arbitrary shaped CNT-forest patterns. Despite the optimization of the processing parameters, an unequal growth of CNT has been observed at the regions of pulse overlap at direct writing. The dissimilar particle properties at the overlap regions are the reason for the different CNT heights. These differences in the catalytic particles properties are caused by the lower laser fluence at the mask edges and the interaction of the laser plasma plume with the pristine nitride film.

  1. Temperature-dependent gas transport performance of vertically aligned carbon nanotube/parylene composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Yang, Junhe; Wang, Xianying; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Guangping

    2014-01-01

    A novel composite membrane consisting of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and parylene was successfully fabricated. Seamless filling of the spaces in CNT forests with parylene was achieved by a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique and followed with the Ar/O2 plasma etching to expose CNT tips. Transport properties of various gases through the CNT/parylene membranes were explored. And gas permeances were independent on feed pressure in accordance with the Knudsen model, but the permeance values were over 60 times higher than that predicted by the Knudsen diffusion kinetics, which was attributed to specular momentum reflection inside smooth CNT pores. Gas permeances and enhancement factors over the Knudsen model firstly increased and then decreased with rising temperature, which confirmed the existence of non-Knudsen transport. And surface adsorption diffusion could affect the gas permeance at relatively low temperature. The gas permeance of the CNT/parylene composite membrane could be improved by optimizing operating temperature. PMID:25246864

  2. Dipole Alignment at the Carbon Nanotube and Methyl Ammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Przepioski, Joshua

    2015-08-28

    This work correlates resonant peaks from first principles calculation on ammonia (NH3) Nitrogen 1s x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) within the methyl ammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3), and proposes a curve to determine the alignment of the methyl ammonium dipole if there exists angular dependence. The Nitrogen 1s XAS was performed at varying incident angles on the perovskite with and without a carbon nanotube (CNT) interface produced from an ultrasonic spray deposition. We investigated the peak contribution from PbI2 and the poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene- 2,7-diyl) with bipyridine (PFO-BPy) wrapped around the CNT, and used normalization techniques to better identify the dipole alignment. There was angular dependence on samples containing the CNT interface suggesting an existing dipole alignment, but there was no angular dependence on the perovskite samples alone; however, more normalization techniques and experimental work must be performed in order to ensure its validity and to better describe its alignment, and possible controlling factors.

  3. Dipole Alignment at the Carbon Nanotube and Methyl Ammonium Lead Trihalide Perovskite Interface - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Przepioski, Joshua

    2015-08-25

    This work correlates resonant peaks from first principles calculation on ammonia (NH3) Nitrogen 1s x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) within the methyl ammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3), and proposes a curve to determine the alignment of the methyl ammonium dipole if there exists angular dependence. The Nitrogen 1s XAS was performed at varying incident angles on the perovskite with and without a carbon nanotube (CNT) interface produced from an ultrasonic spray deposition. We investigated the peak contribution from PbI2 and the poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-2,7-diyl) with bipyridine (PFO-BPy) wrapped around the CNT, and used normalization techniques to better identify the dipole alignment. There was angular dependence on samples containing the CNT interface suggesting an existing dipole alignment, but there was no angular dependence on the perovskite samples alone; however, more normalization techniques and experimental work must be performed in order to ensure its validity and to better describe its alignment, and possible controlling factors.

  4. Influence of Different Defects in Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes on TiO2 Nanoparticle Formation through Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Acauan, Luiz; Dias, Anna C; Pereira, Marcelo B; Horowitz, Flavio; Bergmann, Carlos P

    2016-06-29

    The chemical inertness of carbon nanotubes (CNT) requires some degree of "defect engineering" for controlled deposition of metal oxides through atomic layer deposition (ALD). The type, quantity, and distribution of such defects rules the deposition rate and defines the growth behavior. In this work, we employed ALD to grow titanium oxide (TiO2) on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT). The effects of nitrogen doping and oxygen plasma pretreatment of the CNT on the morphology and total amount of TiO2 were systematically studied using transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The induced chemical changes for each functionalization route were identified by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The TiO2 mass fraction deposited with the same number of cycles for the pristine CNT, nitrogen-doped CNT, and plasma-treated CNT were 8, 47, and 80%, respectively. We demonstrate that TiO2 nucleation is dependent mainly on surface incorporation of heteroatoms and their distribution rather than structural defects that govern the growth behavior. Therefore, selecting the best way to functionalize CNT will allow us to tailor TiO2 distribution and hence fabricate complex heterostructures.

  5. Influence of Different Defects in Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes on TiO2 Nanoparticle Formation through Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Acauan, Luiz; Dias, Anna C; Pereira, Marcelo B; Horowitz, Flavio; Bergmann, Carlos P

    2016-06-29

    The chemical inertness of carbon nanotubes (CNT) requires some degree of "defect engineering" for controlled deposition of metal oxides through atomic layer deposition (ALD). The type, quantity, and distribution of such defects rules the deposition rate and defines the growth behavior. In this work, we employed ALD to grow titanium oxide (TiO2) on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT). The effects of nitrogen doping and oxygen plasma pretreatment of the CNT on the morphology and total amount of TiO2 were systematically studied using transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The induced chemical changes for each functionalization route were identified by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The TiO2 mass fraction deposited with the same number of cycles for the pristine CNT, nitrogen-doped CNT, and plasma-treated CNT were 8, 47, and 80%, respectively. We demonstrate that TiO2 nucleation is dependent mainly on surface incorporation of heteroatoms and their distribution rather than structural defects that govern the growth behavior. Therefore, selecting the best way to functionalize CNT will allow us to tailor TiO2 distribution and hence fabricate complex heterostructures. PMID:27269125

  6. Enhanced electrical properties of vertically aligned carbon nanotube-epoxy nanocomposites with high packing density.

    PubMed

    Souier, Tewfik; Santos, Sergio; Al Ghaferi, Amal; Stefancich, Marco; Chiesa, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    During their synthesis, multi-walled carbon nanotubes can be aligned and impregnated in a polymer matrix to form an electrically conductive and flexible nanocomposite with high backing density. The material exhibits the highest reported electrical conductivity of CNT-epoxy composites (350 S/m). Here, we show how conductive atomic force microscopy can be used to study the electrical transport mechanism in order to explain the enhanced electrical properties of the composite. The high spatial resolution and versatility of the technique allows us to further decouple the two main contributions to the electrical transport: (1) the intrinsic resistance of the tube and (2) the tunneling resistance due to nanoscale gaps occurring between the epoxy-coated tubes along the composite. The results show that the material behaves as a conductive polymer, and the electrical transport is governed by electron tunneling at interconnecting CNT-polymer junctions. We also point out the theoretical formulation of the nanoscale electrical transport between the AFM tip and the sample in order to derive both the composite conductivity and the CNT intrinsic properties. The enhanced electrical properties of the composite are attributed to high degree of alignment, the CNT purity, and the large tube diameter which lead to low junction resistance. By controlling the tube diameter and using other polymers, the nanocomposite electrical conductivity can be improved. PMID:23158381

  7. Improving sensitivity of the polyurethane/CNT laminate strain sensor by controlled mechanical preload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobodian, Petr; Olejnik, Robert; Matyas, Jiri; Gorakh Babar, Dipak

    2016-03-01

    This article describes strain detection potential of polyurethane/CNT layered composite and further possible enhance of its sensitivity to strain, expressed by value of gauge factor, GF, employing its controlled mechanical preload. In course of its fabrication a non-woven polyurethane membrane made by electro spinning was used as filtering membrane for CNT aqueous dispersion. Final CNT polyurethane laminate composite is prepared by compression molding. Produced polyurethane/CNT composite laminate is electrically conductive and high elastic. Its elongation leads to change of its macroscopic electrical resistance. Changes in resistance are further reversible, reproducible and can monitor deformation in real time. Gauge factor reaches very high values around 8 for strain reaching 3.5% comparing with conventional metallic strain gauges. Finally, controlled mechanical preload significantly increases value of GF. For example for value of 8.1% of preload value of GF reaches 23.3 for strain 3.5%.

  8. Microfabrication of pre-aligned fiber bundle couplers using ultraviolet lithography of SU-8.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ren; Soper, Steven A; Wang, Wanjun

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the design, microfabrication and testing of a pre-aligned array of fiber couplers using direct UV-lithography of SU-8. The fiber coupler array includes an out-of-plane refractive microlens array and two fiberport collimator arrays. With the optical axis of the pixels parallel to the substrate, each pixel of the microlens array can be pre-aligned with the corresponding pixels of the fiberport collimator array as defined by the lithography mask design. This out-of-plane polymer 3D microlens array is pre-aligned with the fiber collimator arrays with no additional adjustment and assembly required, therefore, it helps to dramatically reduce the running cost and improve the alignment quality and coupling efficiency. In addition, the experimental results for the fiber couplers are also presented and analyzed.

  9. μ-Patterning of Carbon Nanotube (CNT) forest for MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, T.

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes three new approaches for micro patterning of CNT forest in order to make it useful for MEMS based applications. The first two techniques are based on micro electro discharge machining (μ-EDM). However, the biggest problem associated with μ-EDM is the spark gap which limits the structural resolution of the fabricated pattern. In order to overcome this challenge the first technique proposed in this paper is reverse μ-EDMing of CNT forest where the CNTs are used as cathode instead of tungsten tool. This dramatically reduces discharge voltage hence the spark gap. In the second method Sulphur Hexafluoride (SF6) SF6 was used as dielectric instead of air which has three time higher dielectric strength than air. This helps to reduce spark gap further. This research work also discusses the experimental results when SF6 was used as dielectric medium for reverse EDMing CNT forest. It was observed that at too low voltage (~10V) air gives lower spark gap than SF6, however at moderately high voltage (~25V) SF6 performs better. Finally, the third approach for patterning CNT forest described in this paper is mechanical bending of CNTs. In this method patterning of CNT forest is carried out by moving a rotating cylindrical μ-tool (3000RPM) in X,Y and Z direction. The Z movement of the tool is controlled in step mode to provide the overall depth of the μ-structures with 1 (μm/step. In XY plane the tool moves continuously at 1mm/min speed. The movement of the tool on the CNT forest causes the CNTs to be bent and flattened in the direction of the tool motion hence the patterns are formed on bare CNT forest. The most significant observation made from the processed CNT forest is the visible optical reflection from bent and flattened area. Typically, CNT forest is known to be the darkest material on earth. However, this new processing technique causes the CNT surface to reflect light like mirror. A detail comparison between all proposed techniques (mechanical

  10. Heat transfer performance of two-phase closed thermosyphon with oxidized CNT/water nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeinali Heris, Saeed; Fallahi, Marjan; Shanbedi, Mehdi; Amiri, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of different acids on the thermal performance of oxidized carbon nanotubes (CNT)/water nanofluids in a two-phase closed thermosyphon were studied. The structures morphology and functionalization degree were studied concurrently. The results indicated that strong oxidants increased dispersivity of CNT in the nanofluids. In other words, as the number of COOH groups increased in the nanofluids, an upward trend was also observed in the thermal efficiency of the thermosyphon.

  11. Synthesis and electrical properties of PANI-CNT-CdS nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, M.; Mukherjee, A.; Ghosh, R.; Meikap, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    Polyaniline-CNT-CdS nanocomposite has been synthesized by the chemical oxidative polymerization reaction. The particle size of nanocomposites lies in between 2.7 to 4.8 nm. I-V characteristics of the nanocomposite shows a non linear behaviour. The dc electrical transport property of Polyaniline-CNT-CdS nanocomposites has been investigated within a temperature range 77≤T≤300K. The dc conductivity follows 3D variable range hopping (VRH) model.

  12. Chronic in vivo evaluation of PEDOT/CNT for stable neural recordings

    PubMed Central

    Catt, Kasey; Du, Zhanhong; Na, Kyounghwan; Srivannavit, Onnop; Haque, Razi-ul M.; Seymour, John; Wise, Kensall D; Yoon, Euisik

    2015-01-01

    Objective Sub-cellular sized chronically implanted recording electrodes have demonstrated significant improvement in single-unit (SU) yield over larger recording probes. Additional work expands on this initial success by combining the subcellular fiber-like lattice structures with the design space versatility of silicon microfabrication to further improve the signal-to-noise ratio, density of electrodes, and stability of recorded units over months to years. However, ultra-small microelectrodes present very high impedance, which must be lowered for SU recordings. While poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) doped with polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) coating has demonstrated great success in acute to early-chronic studies for lowering the electrode impedance, concern exists over long-term stability. Here, we demonstrate a new blend of PEDOT doped with carboxyl functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) which shows dramatic improvement over the traditional PEDOT/PSS formula. Methods Lattice style subcellular electrode arrays were fabricated using previously established method. PEDOT was polymerized with carboxylic acid functionalized carbon nanotubes onto high impedance (8.0±0.1 MΩ: M±S.E.) 250 µm2 gold recording sites. Results PEDOT/CNT coated subcellular electrodes demonstrated significant improvement in chronic spike recording stability over four months compared to PEDOT/PSS recording sites. Conclusion These results demonstrate great promise for subcellular sized recording and stimulation electrodes and long-term stability. Significance This project uses leading-edge biomaterials to develop chronic neural probes that are small (sub-cellular) with excellent electrical properties for stable long-term recordings. High density ultrasmall electrodes combined with advanced electrode surface modification are likely to make significant contributions to the development of long-term (permanent), high quality, and selective neural interfaces. PMID:26087481

  13. [Tabular excel editor for analysis of aligned nucleotide sequences].

    PubMed

    Demkin, V V

    2010-01-01

    Excel platform was used for transition of results of multiple aligned nucleotide sequences obtained using the BLAST network service to the form appropriate for visual analysis and editing. Two macros operators for MS Excel 2007 were constructed. The array of aligned sequences transformed into Excel table and processed using macros operators is more appropriate for analysis than initial html data.

  14. High Current Emission from Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Fabricated by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Linfan; Chen, Jiangtao; Yang, Bingjun; Jiao, Tifeng

    2015-12-01

    Vertically, carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays were successfully fabricated on hexagon patterned Si substrates through radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using gas mixtures of acetylene (C2H2) and hydrogen (H2) with Fe/Al2O3 catalysts. The CNTs were found to be graphitized with multi-walled structures. Different H2/C2H2 gas flow rate ratio was used to investigate the effect on CNT growth, and the field emission properties were optimized. The CNT emitters exhibited excellent field emission performance (the turn-on and threshold fields were 2.1 and 2.4 V/μm, respectively). The largest emission current could reach 70 mA/cm2. The emission current was stable, and no obvious deterioration was observed during the long-term stability test of 50 h. The results were relevant for practical applications based on CNTs.

  15. High Current Emission from Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Fabricated by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linfan; Chen, Jiangtao; Yang, Bingjun; Jiao, Tifeng

    2015-12-01

    Vertically, carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays were successfully fabricated on hexagon patterned Si substrates through radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using gas mixtures of acetylene (C2H2) and hydrogen (H2) with Fe/Al2O3 catalysts. The CNTs were found to be graphitized with multi-walled structures. Different H2/C2H2 gas flow rate ratio was used to investigate the effect on CNT growth, and the field emission properties were optimized. The CNT emitters exhibited excellent field emission performance (the turn-on and threshold fields were 2.1 and 2.4 V/μm, respectively). The largest emission current could reach 70 mA/cm(2). The emission current was stable, and no obvious deterioration was observed during the long-term stability test of 50 h. The results were relevant for practical applications based on CNTs. PMID:26666912

  16. Embedded Fin-Like Metal/CNT Hybrid Structures for Flexible and Transparent Conductors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Di; Wang, Nan; Edwards, Michael; Mu, Wei; Nylander, Andreas; Fu, Yifeng; Jeppson, Kjell; Liu, Johan

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, an embedded fin-like metal-coated carbon nanotube (Fin-M/CNT) structure is demonstrated for flexible and transparent conductor wire applications. Embedded in a polydimethylsiloxane polymeric substrate, Fin-M/CNT wires with a minimum width of 5 μm and a minimum pitch of 10 μm have been achieved. Direct current resistances of single Fin-M/CNT wires, where the supporting CNT structures have been covered by Ti/Al/Au metal coatings of different thicknesses, have been measured. The high aspect ratio of the fin-like structures not only improves the adhesion between the wires and the polymeric substrate, but also yields a low resistance at a small surface footprint. In addition, transparent Fin-M/CNT grid lines with hexagonal patterns, with a sheet resistance of as low as 45 Ω sq(-1) , have been achieved at an optical transmittance of 88%. The robustness of the Fin-M/CNT structures has been demonstrated in bending tests up to 500 cycles and no significant changes in wire resistances are observed. PMID:26766128

  17. Embedded Fin-Like Metal/CNT Hybrid Structures for Flexible and Transparent Conductors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Di; Wang, Nan; Edwards, Michael; Mu, Wei; Nylander, Andreas; Fu, Yifeng; Jeppson, Kjell; Liu, Johan

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, an embedded fin-like metal-coated carbon nanotube (Fin-M/CNT) structure is demonstrated for flexible and transparent conductor wire applications. Embedded in a polydimethylsiloxane polymeric substrate, Fin-M/CNT wires with a minimum width of 5 μm and a minimum pitch of 10 μm have been achieved. Direct current resistances of single Fin-M/CNT wires, where the supporting CNT structures have been covered by Ti/Al/Au metal coatings of different thicknesses, have been measured. The high aspect ratio of the fin-like structures not only improves the adhesion between the wires and the polymeric substrate, but also yields a low resistance at a small surface footprint. In addition, transparent Fin-M/CNT grid lines with hexagonal patterns, with a sheet resistance of as low as 45 Ω sq(-1) , have been achieved at an optical transmittance of 88%. The robustness of the Fin-M/CNT structures has been demonstrated in bending tests up to 500 cycles and no significant changes in wire resistances are observed.

  18. SnO2/CNT nanocomposite supercapacitors fabricated using scanning atmospheric-pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chang-Han; Chiu, Yi-Fan; Yeh, Po-Wei; Chen, Jian-Zhang

    2016-08-01

    SnO2/CNT electrodes for supercapacitors are fabricated by first screen-printing pastes containing SnO2 nanoparticles and CNTs on carbon cloth, following which nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) sintering is performed at various APPJ scan rates. The APPJ scan rates change the time intervals for which the reactive plasma species and the heat of the nitrogen APPJs influence the designated sintering spot on the carbon cloth, resulting in APPJ-sintered SnO2/CNT nanocomposites with different properties. The water contact angle decreases with the APPJ scan rate. The improved wettability can facilitate the penetration of the electrolyte into the nanopores of the SnO2/CNT nanocomposites, thereby improving the charge storage and specific capacitance of the supercapacitors. Among the three tested APPJ scan rates, 1.5, 3, and 6 mm s‑1, the SnO2/CNT supercapacitor sintered by APPJ under the lowest APPJ scan rate of 1.5 mm s‑1 shows the best specific capacitance of ∼90 F g‑1 as evaluated by cyclic voltammetry under a potential scan rate of 2 mV s‑1. A high APPJ scan rate may result in low degree of materials activation and sintering, leading to poorer performance of SnO2/CNT supercapacitors. The results suggest the feasibility of an APPJ roll-to-roll process for the fabrication of SnO2/CNT nanocomposite supercapacitors.

  19. SnO2/CNT nanocomposite supercapacitors fabricated using scanning atmospheric-pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chang-Han; Chiu, Yi-Fan; Yeh, Po-Wei; Chen, Jian-Zhang

    2016-08-01

    SnO2/CNT electrodes for supercapacitors are fabricated by first screen-printing pastes containing SnO2 nanoparticles and CNTs on carbon cloth, following which nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) sintering is performed at various APPJ scan rates. The APPJ scan rates change the time intervals for which the reactive plasma species and the heat of the nitrogen APPJs influence the designated sintering spot on the carbon cloth, resulting in APPJ-sintered SnO2/CNT nanocomposites with different properties. The water contact angle decreases with the APPJ scan rate. The improved wettability can facilitate the penetration of the electrolyte into the nanopores of the SnO2/CNT nanocomposites, thereby improving the charge storage and specific capacitance of the supercapacitors. Among the three tested APPJ scan rates, 1.5, 3, and 6 mm s-1, the SnO2/CNT supercapacitor sintered by APPJ under the lowest APPJ scan rate of 1.5 mm s-1 shows the best specific capacitance of ˜90 F g-1 as evaluated by cyclic voltammetry under a potential scan rate of 2 mV s-1. A high APPJ scan rate may result in low degree of materials activation and sintering, leading to poorer performance of SnO2/CNT supercapacitors. The results suggest the feasibility of an APPJ roll-to-roll process for the fabrication of SnO2/CNT nanocomposite supercapacitors.

  20. MAVID multiple alignment server.

    PubMed

    Bray, Nicolas; Pachter, Lior

    2003-07-01

    MAVID is a multiple alignment program suitable for many large genomic regions. The MAVID web server allows biomedical researchers to quickly obtain multiple alignments for genomic sequences and to subsequently analyse the alignments for conserved regions. MAVID has been successfully used for the alignment of closely related species such as primates and also for the alignment of more distant organisms such as human and fugu. The server is fast, capable of aligning hundreds of kilobases in less than a minute. The multiple alignment is used to build a phylogenetic tree for the sequences, which is subsequently used as a basis for identifying conserved regions in the alignment. The server can be accessed at http://baboon.math.berkeley.edu/mavid/.

  1. Nearest Alignment Space Termination

    2006-07-13

    Near Alignment Space Termination (NAST) is the Greengenes algorithm that matches up submitted sequences with the Greengenes database to look for similarities and align the submitted sequences based on those similarities.

  2. Hybrid hydrogels containing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with anisotropic electrical conductivity for muscle myofiber fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Ahadian, Samad; Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Estili, Mehdi; Liang, Xiaobin; Ostrovidov, Serge; Shiku, Hitoshi; Ramalingam, Murugan; Nakajima, Ken; Sakka, Yoshio; Bae, Hojae; Matsue, Tomokazu; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Biological scaffolds with tunable electrical and mechanical properties are of great interest in many different fields, such as regenerative medicine, biorobotics, and biosensing. In this study, dielectrophoresis (DEP) was used to vertically align carbon nanotubes (CNTs) within methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) hydrogels in a robust, simple, and rapid manner. GelMA-aligned CNT hydrogels showed anisotropic electrical conductivity and superior mechanical properties compared with pristine GelMA hydrogels and GelMA hydrogels containing randomly distributed CNTs. Skeletal muscle cells grown on vertically aligned CNTs in GelMA hydrogels yielded a higher number of functional myofibers than cells that were cultured on hydrogels with randomly distributed CNTs and horizontally aligned CNTs, as confirmed by the expression of myogenic genes and proteins. In addition, the myogenic gene and protein expression increased more profoundly after applying electrical stimulation along the direction of the aligned CNTs due to the anisotropic conductivity of the hybrid GelMA-vertically aligned CNT hydrogels. We believe that platform could attract great attention in other biomedical applications, such as biosensing, bioelectronics, and creating functional biomedical devices. PMID:24642903

  3. Hybrid hydrogels containing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with anisotropic electrical conductivity for muscle myofiber fabrication.

    PubMed

    Ahadian, Samad; Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Estili, Mehdi; Liang, Xiaobin; Ostrovidov, Serge; Shiku, Hitoshi; Ramalingam, Murugan; Nakajima, Ken; Sakka, Yoshio; Bae, Hojae; Matsue, Tomokazu; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Biological scaffolds with tunable electrical and mechanical properties are of great interest in many different fields, such as regenerative medicine, biorobotics, and biosensing. In this study, dielectrophoresis (DEP) was used to vertically align carbon nanotubes (CNTs) within methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) hydrogels in a robust, simple, and rapid manner. GelMA-aligned CNT hydrogels showed anisotropic electrical conductivity and superior mechanical properties compared with pristine GelMA hydrogels and GelMA hydrogels containing randomly distributed CNTs. Skeletal muscle cells grown on vertically aligned CNTs in GelMA hydrogels yielded a higher number of functional myofibers than cells that were cultured on hydrogels with randomly distributed CNTs and horizontally aligned CNTs, as confirmed by the expression of myogenic genes and proteins. In addition, the myogenic gene and protein expression increased more profoundly after applying electrical stimulation along the direction of the aligned CNTs due to the anisotropic conductivity of the hybrid GelMA-vertically aligned CNT hydrogels. We believe that platform could attract great attention in other biomedical applications, such as biosensing, bioelectronics, and creating functional biomedical devices.

  4. Hybrid hydrogels containing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with anisotropic electrical conductivity for muscle myofiber fabrication.

    PubMed

    Ahadian, Samad; Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Estili, Mehdi; Liang, Xiaobin; Ostrovidov, Serge; Shiku, Hitoshi; Ramalingam, Murugan; Nakajima, Ken; Sakka, Yoshio; Bae, Hojae; Matsue, Tomokazu; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Biological scaffolds with tunable electrical and mechanical properties are of great interest in many different fields, such as regenerative medicine, biorobotics, and biosensing. In this study, dielectrophoresis (DEP) was used to vertically align carbon nanotubes (CNTs) within methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) hydrogels in a robust, simple, and rapid manner. GelMA-aligned CNT hydrogels showed anisotropic electrical conductivity and superior mechanical properties compared with pristine GelMA hydrogels and GelMA hydrogels containing randomly distributed CNTs. Skeletal muscle cells grown on vertically aligned CNTs in GelMA hydrogels yielded a higher number of functional myofibers than cells that were cultured on hydrogels with randomly distributed CNTs and horizontally aligned CNTs, as confirmed by the expression of myogenic genes and proteins. In addition, the myogenic gene and protein expression increased more profoundly after applying electrical stimulation along the direction of the aligned CNTs due to the anisotropic conductivity of the hybrid GelMA-vertically aligned CNT hydrogels. We believe that platform could attract great attention in other biomedical applications, such as biosensing, bioelectronics, and creating functional biomedical devices. PMID:24642903

  5. Hybrid hydrogels containing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with anisotropic electrical conductivity for muscle myofiber fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahadian, Samad; Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Estili, Mehdi; Liang, Xiaobin; Ostrovidov, Serge; Shiku, Hitoshi; Ramalingam, Murugan; Nakajima, Ken; Sakka, Yoshio; Bae, Hojae; Matsue, Tomokazu; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-03-01

    Biological scaffolds with tunable electrical and mechanical properties are of great interest in many different fields, such as regenerative medicine, biorobotics, and biosensing. In this study, dielectrophoresis (DEP) was used to vertically align carbon nanotubes (CNTs) within methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) hydrogels in a robust, simple, and rapid manner. GelMA-aligned CNT hydrogels showed anisotropic electrical conductivity and superior mechanical properties compared with pristine GelMA hydrogels and GelMA hydrogels containing randomly distributed CNTs. Skeletal muscle cells grown on vertically aligned CNTs in GelMA hydrogels yielded a higher number of functional myofibers than cells that were cultured on hydrogels with randomly distributed CNTs and horizontally aligned CNTs, as confirmed by the expression of myogenic genes and proteins. In addition, the myogenic gene and protein expression increased more profoundly after applying electrical stimulation along the direction of the aligned CNTs due to the anisotropic conductivity of the hybrid GelMA-vertically aligned CNT hydrogels. We believe that platform could attract great attention in other biomedical applications, such as biosensing, bioelectronics, and creating functional biomedical devices.

  6. Investigation of the environmental implications of the CNT switch through its life cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlben, Lindsay Johanna

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are unique allotropes of carbon that have high tensile strength, a high Young's modulus, good thermal conductivity, and depending on the CNT chirality can be metallic or semiconducting. These mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties make CNTs an attractive element in electronic applications such as conductive films, photovoltaics, non-volatile memory devices, batteries, sensors, and displays. Although commercialization of CNT-enabled products is increasing, there remains a significant lack of information regarding the health effects and environmental impacts of CNTs. Some studies have even shown that the behavior, toxicity, and persistence of CNTs may differ from bulk heterogeneous carbon. Given these uncertainties, it is prudent to assess the environmental attributes of CNT products and processes now to discover and potentially prevent adverse effects. This study investigates the environmental implications of a non-volatile bi-stable electromechanical CNT switch through its life cycle. Life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology is used to track the environmental impacts of the CNT switch through its fabrication and expected use and end-of-life (EOL) stages. Process parameters, energy consumption, input materials, output emissions, and yield efficiencies are determined for the laboratory and full-scale manufacture environments. The Ecoinvent(TM) inventory database and Eco-indicator 1999(TM) method are utilized for the impact assessment. Results for the fabrication stage are reported for highest contributions to environmental impact such as airborne inorganics, land use, and fossil fuels due to Au refining processes and electricity consumption. Extension of the LCA scope is evaluated for the potential replacement of CNT switches to current field-effect transistors (FETs) in flash memory for a cellular phone application. First-order predictions are made for the functionality and performance of the CNT switch during the use stage through an

  7. Optical properties of ordered carbon nanotube arrays grown in porous anodic alumina templates.

    PubMed

    Zuidema, John; Ruan, Xiulin; Fisher, Timothy S

    2013-09-23

    We have synthesized ordered carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays in porous anodic alumina (PAA) matrix, and have characterized their total optical reflectance and bi-directional reflectance distribution function after each processing step of the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process (MPCVD). For a PAA sample without CNT growth, the reflectance shows an oscillating pattern with wavelength that agrees reasonably with a multilayer model. During the MPCVD process, heating the sample significantly reduces the reflectance by 30-40%, the plasma treatment reduces the reflectance by another 5-10%, and the CNT growth further reduces the reflectance by 2-3%. After an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process, the reflectance increases to the embedded CNT arrays. After etching and exposure of CNT tips, the reflectance almost returns to the original pattern with slightly higher reflectance. Bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) measurements show that the CNT-PAA surface is quite specular as indicated by a large lobe at the specular angle, while the secondary lobe can be attributed to surface roughness. PMID:24104097

  8. Girder Alignment Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zackary; Ruland, Robert; LeCocq, Catherine; Lundahl, Eric; Levashov, Yurii; Reese, Ed; Rago, Carl; Poling, Ben; Schafer, Donald; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Wienands, Uli; /SLAC

    2010-11-18

    The girders for the LCLS undulator system contain components which must be aligned with high accuracy relative to each other. The alignment is one of the last steps before the girders go into the tunnel, so the alignment must be done efficiently, on a tight schedule. This note documents the alignment plan which includes efficiency and high accuracy. The motivation for girder alignment involves the following considerations. Using beam based alignment, the girder position will be adjusted until the beam goes through the center of the quadrupole and beam finder wire. For the machine to work properly, the undulator axis must be on this line and the center of the undulator beam pipe must be on this line. The physics reasons for the undulator axis and undulator beam pipe axis to be centered on the beam are different, but the alignment tolerance for both are similar. In addition, the beam position monitor must be centered on the beam to preserve its calibration. Thus, the undulator, undulator beam pipe, quadrupole, beam finder wire, and beam position monitor axes must all be aligned to a common line. All relative alignments are equally important, not just, for example, between quadrupole and undulator. We begin by making the common axis the nominal beam axis in the girder coordinate system. All components will be initially aligned to this axis. A more accurate alignment will then position the components relative to each other, without incorporating the girder itself.

  9. Interstellar Dust Grain Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, B.-G.; Lazarian, A.; Vaillancourt, John E.

    2015-08-01

    Interstellar polarization at optical-to-infrared wavelengths is known to arise from asymmetric dust grains aligned with the magnetic field. This effect provides a potentially powerful probe of magnetic field structure and strength if the details of the grain alignment can be reliably understood. Theory and observations have recently converged on a quantitative, predictive description of interstellar grain alignment based on radiative processes. The development of a general, analytical model for this radiative alignment torque (RAT) theory has allowed specific, testable predictions for realistic interstellar conditions. We outline the theoretical and observational arguments in favor of RAT alignment, as well as reasons the "classical" paramagnetic alignment mechanism is unlikely to work, except possibly for the very smallest grains. With further detailed characterization of the RAT mechanism, grain alignment and polarimetry promise to not only better constrain the interstellar magnetic field but also provide new information on the dust characteristics.

  10. Design, simulation and comparative analysis of CNT based cascode operational transconductance amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizamuddin, M.; Loan, Sajad A.; Alamoud, Abdul R.; Abbassi, Shuja A.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, design and calibrated simulation of carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNTFET)-based cascode operational transconductance amplifiers (COTA) have been performed. Three structures of CNTFET-based COTAs have been designed using HSPICE and have been compared with the conventional CMOS-based COTAs. The proposed COTAs include one using pure CNTFETs and two others that employ CNTFETs, as well as the conventional MOSFETs. The simulation study has revealed that the CNTFET-based COTAs have significantly outperformed the conventional MOSFET-based COTAs. A significant increase in dc gain, output resistance and slew rate of 81.4%, 25% and 13.2%, respectively, have been achieved in the proposed pure CNT-based COTA in comparison to the conventional CMOS-based COTA. The power consumption in the pure CNT-COTA is 324 times less in comparison to the conventional CMOS-COTA. Further, the phase margin (PM), gain margin (GM), common mode and power supply rejection ratios have been significantly increased in the proposed CNT-based COTAs in comparison to the conventional CMOS-based COTAs. Furthermore, to see the advantage of cascoding, the proposed CNT-based cascode OTAs have been compared with the CNT-based OTAs. It has been observed that by incorporating the concept of cascode in the CNTFET-based OTAs, significant increases in gain (12.5%) and output resistance (13.07%) have been achieved. The performance of the proposed COTAs has been further observed by changing the number of CNTs (N), CNT pitch (S) and CNT diameter (DCNT) in the CNTFETs used. It has been observed that the performance of the proposed COTAs can be significantly improved by using optimum values of N, S and DCNT.

  11. Carbon Nanotubes Based Nanoelectrode Arrays: Fabrication, Evaluation, and Sensing Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuehe; Tu, Yi; Lu, Fang; Yantasee, Wassana; Ren, Zhifeng

    2004-10-05

    The fabrication, electrochemical characterization, and applications of low-site density carbon nanotubes based nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) are reported in this work. Spin-coating of an epoxy resin provides a new way to create the electrode passivation layer that effectively reduces the current leakage and eliminates the electrode capacitance by sealing the side-wall of CNTs. The CNT-NEAs fabricated in our work effectively use the open ends of CNTs for electrochemical sensing. The open ends of the CNTs have fast electron transfer rates similar to a graphite edge-plane electrode, while the side-walls present very slow electron transfer rates similar to the graphitic basal plane. Cyclic voltammetry showed the sigmoidal shape curves with low capacitive current and scan-rate-independent limiting current. The CNT-NEAs were used successfully for voltammetric detection of trace concentrations of lead (II) at ppb level. The successful development of a glucose biosensor based on CNT-NEAs for the selective detection of glucose is also described. Glucose oxidase was covalently immobilized on the CNTs tips via carbodiimide chemistry by forming amide linkages between the amine residues and carboxylic acid groups on the open ends of CNTs. The biosensor effectively performs selective electrochemical detections of glucose in the presence of common interferences. The CNT-NEAs provide an excellent platform for ultra sensitive electrochemical sensors for chemical and biological sensing.

  12. Polymer-derived ceramic composite fibers with aligned pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sourangsu; Zou, Jianhua; Liu, Jianhua; Xu, Chengying; An, Linan; Zhai, Lei

    2010-04-01

    Polymer-derived ceramic fibers with aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are fabricated through the electrospinning of polyaluminasilazane solutions with well-dispersed MWCNTs followed by pyrolysis. Poly(3-hexylthiophene)-b-poly (poly (ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate) (P3HT-b-PPEGA), a conjugated block copolymer compatible with polyaluminasilazane, is used to functionalize MWCNT surfaces with PPEGA, providing a noninvasive approach to disperse carbon nanotubes in polyaluminasilazane chloroform solutions. The electrospinning of the MWCNT/polyaluminasilazane solutions generates polymer fibers with aligned MWCNTs where MWCNTs are oriented along the electrospun jet by a sink flow. The subsequent pyrolysis of the obtained composite fibers produces ceramic fibers with aligned MWCNTs. The study of the effect of polymer and CNT concentration on the fiber structures shows that the fiber size increases with the increment of polymer concentration, whereas higher CNT content in the polymer solutions leads to thinner fibers attributable to the increased conductivity. Both the SEM and TEM characterization of the polymer and ceramic fibers demonstrates the uniform orientation of CNTs along the fibers, suggesting excellent dispersion of CNTs and efficient CNT alignment via the electrospinning. The electrical conductivity of a ceramic fibers with 1.2% aligned MWCNTs is measured to be 1.58 x 10(-6) S/cm, which is more than 500 times higher than that of bulk ceramic (3.43 x 10(-9) S/cm). Such an approach provides a versatile method to disperse CNTs in preceramic polymer solutions and offers a new approach to integrate aligned CNTs in ceramics. PMID:20423134

  13. Fully Printed, Flexible, Phased Array Antenna for Lunar Surface Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbaraman, Harish; Hen, Ray T.; Lu, Xuejun; Chen, Maggie Yihong

    2013-01-01

    NASAs future exploration missions focus on the manned exploration of the Moon, Mars, and beyond, which will rely heavily on the development of a reliable communications infrastructure from planetary surface-to-surface, surface-to-orbit, and back to Earth. Flexible antennas are highly desired in many scenarios. Active phased array antennas (active PAAs) with distributed control and processing electronics at the surface of an antenna aperture offer numerous advantages for radar communications. Large-area active PAAs on flexible substrates are of particular interest in NASA s space radars due to their efficient inflatable package that can be rolled up during transportation and deployed in space. Such an inflatable package significantly reduces stowage volume and mass. Because of these performance and packaging advantages, large-area inflatable active PAAs are highly desired in NASA s surface-to-orbit and surface-to-relay communications. To address the issues of flexible electronics, a room-temperature printing process of active phased-array antennas on a flexible Kapton substrate was developed. Field effect transistors (FETs) based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), with many unique physical properties, were successfully proved feasible for the PAA system. This innovation is a new type of fully inkjet-printable, two-dimensional, high-frequency PAA on a flexible substrate at room temperature. The designed electronic circuit components, such as the FET switches in the phase shifter, metal interconnection lines, microstrip transmission lines, etc., are all printed using a special inkjet printer. Using the developed technology, entire 1x4, 2x2, and 4x4 PAA systems were developed, packaged, and demonstrated at 5.3 GHz. Several key solutions are addressed in this work to solve the fabrication issues. The source/drain contact is developed using droplets of silver ink printed on the source/drain areas prior to applying CNT thin-film. The wet silver ink droplets allow the silver to

  14. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites by Chemical Vapor Infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Zhan Jun; Yang, Ying Chao; Li, Kai Yuan; Tao, Xin Yong; Eres, Gyula; Howe, Jane Y; Zhang, Li Tong; Li, Xiao Dong; Pan, Zhengwei

    2011-01-01

    Owing to their exceptional stiffness and strength1 4, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have long been considered to be an ideal reinforcement for light-weight, high-strength, and high-temperature-resistant ceramic matrix composites (CMCs)5 10. However, the research and development in CNT-reinforced CMCs have been greatly hindered due to the challenges related to manufacturing including poor dispersion, damages during dispersion, surface modification, densification and sintering, weak tube/matrix interfaces, and agglomeration of tubes at the matrix grain boundaries5,11. Here we report the fabrication of high-quality aligned CNT/SiC composites by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI), a technique that is being widely used to fabricate commercial continuous-filament CMCs12 15. Using the CVI technique most of the challenges previously encountered in the fabrication of CNT composites were readily overcome. Nanotube pullouts, an important toughening mechanism for CMCs, were consistently observed on all fractured CNT/SiC samples. Indeed, three-point bending tests conducted on individual CNT/SiC nanowires (diameters: 50 200 nm) using an atomic force microscope show that the CNT-reinforced SiC nanowires are about an order of magnitude tougher than the bulk SiC. The tube/matrix interface is so intimate and the SiC matrix is so dense that a ~50-nm-thick SiC coating can effectively protect the inside nanotubes from being oxidized at 1600 C in air. The CVI method may be extended to produce nanotube composites from a variety of matrix

  15. Nanostructued core-shell Sn nanowires @ CNTs with controllable thickness of CNT shells for lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yu; Li, Xifei; Zhang, Yong; Li, Ruying; Cai, Mei; Sun, Xueliang

    2015-03-01

    Core-shell structure of Sn nanowires encapsulated in amorphous carbon nanotubes (Sn@CNTs) with controlled thickness of CNT shells was in situ prepared via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The thickness of CNT shells was accurately controlled from 4 to 99 nm by using different growth time, flow rate of hydrocarbon gas (C2H4) and synthesis temperature. The microstructure and composition of the coaxial Sn@CNTs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. Moreover, the Sn@CNTs were studied as anode materials for Li-ion batteries and showed excellent cycle performance. The capacity was affected by the thickness of outer CNT shells: thick CNT shells contributed to a better retention while thin CNT shells led to a higher capacity. The thin CNT shell of 6 nm presented the highest capacity around 630 mAh g-1.

  16. Biochemical Sensors Using Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Method and system for detecting presence of biomolecules in a selected subset, or in each of several selected subsets, in a fluid. Each of an array of two or more carbon nanotubes ("CNTs") is connected at a first CNT end to one or more electronics devices, each of which senses a selected electrochemical signal that is generated when a target biomolecule in the selected subset becomes attached to a functionalized second end of the CNT, which is covalently bonded with a probe molecule. This approach indicates when target biomolecules in the selected subset are present and indicates presence or absence of target biomolecules in two or more selected subsets. Alternatively, presence of absence of an analyte can be detected.

  17. Multiwalled CNT-pHEMA composite conduit for peripheral nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Arslantunali, D; Budak, G; Hasirci, V

    2014-03-01

    A nerve conduit is designed to improve peripheral nerve regeneration by providing guidance to the nerve cells. Conductivity of such guides is reported to enhance this process. In the current study, a nerve guide was constructed from poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA), which was loaded with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (mwCNT) to introduce conductivity. PHEMA hydrogels were designed to have a porous structure to facilitate the transportation of the compounds needed for cell nutrition and growth and also for waste removal. We showed that when loaded with relatively high concentrations of mwCNTs (6%, w/w in hydrogels), the pHEMA guide was more conductive and more hydrophobic than pristine pHEMA hydrogel. The mechanical properties of the composites were better when they carried mwCNT. Elastic modulus of 6% mwCNT loaded pHEMA was twofold higher (0.32 ± 0.06 MPa) and similar to that of the soft tissues. Electrical conductivity was significantly improved (11.4-fold) from 7 × 10(-3) Ω(-1).cm(-1) (pHEMA) to 8.0 × 10(-2) Ω(-1).cm(-1) (6% mwCNT loaded pHEMA). On application of electrical potential, the SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells seeded on mwCNTs carrying pHEMA maintained their viability, whereas those on pure pHEMA could not, indicating that mwCNT helped conduct electricity and make them more suitable as nerve conduits. PMID:23554154

  18. Effect of the mechanical deformation on the electrical properties of the polymer/CNT fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyun Woo; Sung, Bong June; Nano-Bio Computational Chemistry Laboratory Team

    2014-03-01

    We elucidate the effect of the mechanical deformation on the electrical properties of the polymer/CNT fiber. The conductive polymer fiber has drawn a great attention for its potential application to a stretchable electronics such as wearable devices and artificial muscles, etc. However, the electrical conductivity of the polymer-based stretchable electronics decreases significantly during the deformation, which may limit the applicability of the polymer/CNT fiber for the stretchable electronics. Moreover, its physical origin for the decrease in electrical conductivity has not been explained clearly. In this work, we employ a coarse-grained model for the polymer/CNT fiber, and we calculate the electric conductivity using global tunneling network (GTN) model. We show that the electric conductivity decreases during the elongation of the polymer/CNT fiber. We also find using critical path approximation (CPA) that the structure of the electrical network of the CNTs changes collectively during the elongation of the fiber, which is strongly responsible for the reduction of the electrical conductivity of the polymer/CNT fiber.

  19. Air-bridge and Vertical CNT Switches for High Performance Switching Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Wong, Eric W.; Epp, Larry; Bronikowski, Michael J.; Hunt, BBrian D.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are attractive for switching applications since electrostatically-actuated CNT switches have low actuation voltages and power requirements, while allowing GHz switching speeds that stem from the inherently high elastic modulus and low mass of the CNT.Our first NEM structure, the air-bridge switch, consists of suspended single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) that lie above a sputtered Nb base electrode, where contact to the CNTs is made using evaporated Au/Ti. Electrical measurements of these air-bridge devices show well-defined ON and OFF states as a dc bias of a few volts is applied between the CNT and the Nb-base electrode. The CNT air-bridge switches were measured to have switching times down to a few nanoseconds. Our second NEM structure, the vertical CNT switch, consists of nanotubes grown perpendicular to the substrate. Vertical multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs) are grown directly on a heavily doped Si substrate, from 200 - 300 nm wide, approximately 1 micrometer deep nano-pockets, with Nb metal electrodes to result in the formation of a vertical single-pole-double-throw switch architecture.

  20. Solvothermal synthesis of TiO{sub 2}/CNT composites and its physical and chemical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatraman, M. R. Muthukumarasamy, N.; Agilan, S.; Balasundaraprabhu, R.; Velauthapillai, Dhayalan

    2015-06-24

    Anatase TiO{sub 2}/CNT composites of different CNT ratio were prepared by solvothermal method. The X-ray diffraction analysis result showed that the sample has characteristic peaks of anatase TiO{sub 2}. CNT incorporated TiO{sub 2} showed less peak intensity when compared to bare TiO{sub 2}. The grain size was calculated using the Scherrer equation and it is found to be ∼ 2.38 and 2.46 nm for pure TiO{sub 2} and 5% CNT/TiO{sub 2} composites respectively. Optical properties were studied using UV-visible diffuse reflectance analysis and photo luminescence analysis respectively. UV analysis reveals the shift in absorption peaks towards the visible region for composites when compared to bare TiO{sub 2} powder. Raman spectroscopy studies show the presence of characteristic peaks corresponding to anatase TiO{sub 2}, CNT. Morphological nature of the compounds was studied using High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy analysis respectively.

  1. High-speed multiple sequence alignment on a reconfigurable platform.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Tim; Schmidt, Bertil; Maskell, Douglas; Nathan, Darran; Clemens, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    Progressive alignment is a widely used approach to compute multiple sequence alignments (MSAs). However, aligning several hundred sequences by popular progressive alignment tools requires hours on sequential computers. Due to the rapid growth of sequence databases biologists have to compute MSAs in a far shorter time. In this paper we present a new approach to MSA on reconfigurable hardware platforms to gain high performance at low cost. We have constructed a linear systolic array to perform pairwise sequence distance computations using dynamic programming. This results in an implementation with significant runtime savings on a standard FPGA.

  2. Electronic Switch Arrays for Managing Microbattery Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad; Alahmad, Mahmoud; Sukumar, Vinesh; Zghoul, Fadi; Buck, Kevin; Hess, Herbert; Li, Harry; Cox, David

    2008-01-01

    Integrated circuits have been invented for managing the charging and discharging of such advanced miniature energy-storage devices as planar arrays of microscopic energy-storage elements [typically, microscopic electrochemical cells (microbatteries) or microcapacitors]. The architecture of these circuits enables implementation of the following energy-management options: dynamic configuration of the elements of an array into a series or parallel combination of banks (subarrarys), each array comprising a series of parallel combination of elements; direct addressing of individual banks for charging/or discharging; and, disconnection of defective elements and corresponding reconfiguration of the rest of the array to utilize the remaining functional elements to obtain the desited voltage and current performance. An integrated circuit according to the invention consists partly of a planar array of field-effect transistors that function as switches for routing electric power among the energy-storage elements, the power source, and the load. To connect the energy-storage elements to the power source for charging, a specific subset of switches is closed; to connect the energy-storage elements to the load for discharging, a different specific set of switches is closed. Also included in the integrated circuit is circuitry for monitoring and controlling charging and discharging. The control and monitoring circuitry, the switching transistors, and interconnecting metal lines are laid out on the integrated-circuit chip in a pattern that registers with the array of energy-storage elements. There is a design option to either (1) fabricate the energy-storage elements in the corresponding locations on, and as an integral part of, this integrated circuit; or (2) following a flip-chip approach, fabricate the array of energy-storage elements on a separate integrated-circuit chip and then align and bond the two chips together.

  3. Vertically aligned ZnO@CuS@PEDOT core@shell nanorod arrays decorated with MnO₂ nanoparticles for a high-performance and semi-transparent supercapacitor electrode.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moreno, Jorge; Navarrete-Astorga, Elena; Dalchiele, Enrique A; Schrebler, Ricardo; Ramos-Barrado, José R; Martín, Francisco

    2014-05-30

    Hybrid nano-architectures with high electrochemical performance for supercapacitors have been designed by growing hierarchical ZnO NRs@CuS@PEDOT@MnO2 core@shell heterostructured nanorod arrays on ITO/glass substrates. This hybrid nano-structured electrode exhibits excellent electrochemical performance, with a high specific areal capacitance of 19.85 mF cm(-2), good rate capability, cycling stability and diffused coloured transparency.

  4. Vertically aligned ZnO@CuS@PEDOT core@shell nanorod arrays decorated with MnO₂ nanoparticles for a high-performance and semi-transparent supercapacitor electrode.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moreno, Jorge; Navarrete-Astorga, Elena; Dalchiele, Enrique A; Schrebler, Ricardo; Ramos-Barrado, José R; Martín, Francisco

    2014-05-30

    Hybrid nano-architectures with high electrochemical performance for supercapacitors have been designed by growing hierarchical ZnO NRs@CuS@PEDOT@MnO2 core@shell heterostructured nanorod arrays on ITO/glass substrates. This hybrid nano-structured electrode exhibits excellent electrochemical performance, with a high specific areal capacitance of 19.85 mF cm(-2), good rate capability, cycling stability and diffused coloured transparency. PMID:24756158

  5. Atmospheric-pressure-plasma-jet sintered nanoporous AlN/CNT composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Yi-Fan; Yeh, Po-Wei; Cheng, I.-Chun; Chen, Jian-Zhang

    2016-07-01

    A nanoporous AlN-5 wt% CNT composite is successfully sintered using atmospheric-pressure plasma jets (APPJs). The AlN in an APPJ-sintered AlN/CNT composite shows a pure hexagonal [space group: P63mc] crystal structure. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) results indicate that the CN violet emission intensity rapidly increases and then decreases owing to the vigorous interaction between the nitrogen APPJ and the carbonaceous materials in the printed pastes. Because the vigorous interaction may over-burn the CNTs, the conductivity of AlN first increases and then decreases as the APPJ sintering duration increases. APPJ-sintered AlN/CNT composites exhibit good CF4 inductively coupled plasma erosion resistant property.

  6. Crack Formation in Powder Metallurgy Carbon Nanotube (CNT)/Al Composites During Post Heat-Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Biao; Imai, Hisashi; Li, Shufeng; Jia, Lei; Umeda, Junko; Kondoh, Katsuyoshi

    2015-12-01

    After the post heat-treatment (PHT) process of powder metallurgy carbon nanotubes (CNT)/Al composites, micro-cracks were observed in the composites, leading to greatly degraded mechanical properties. To understand and suppress the crack formation, an in situ observation of CNT/Al composites was performed at elevated temperatures. PHT was also applied to various bulk pure Al and CNT/Al composites fabricated under different processes. It was observed that the composites consolidated by hot-extrusion might form micro-cracks, but those consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) showed no crack after PHT. A high-temperature SPS process before hot-extrusion was effective to prevent crack formation. The release of residual stress in severe plastic deformed (SPD) materials was responsible for the cracking phenomena during the PHT process. Furthermore, a good particle bonding was essential and effective to suppress cracks for SPD materials in the PHT process.

  7. Fabrication of Dense ZrO2/CNT Composites: Influence of Bead-Milling Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Gustavo; Jang, Byung-Koog; Aglietti, Esteban F.; Sakka, Yoshio

    2013-09-01

    Highly concentrated zirconia-carbon nanotube (CNT) water suspensions were prepared using an advanced milling technique. The bead-milling operation parameters were optimized for this system and used to prepare zirconia-stabilized water-based suspensions with different CNT contents. The effects of different milling conditions were studied. The particle dispersion was evaluated by SEM observations on dried suspension. Green's density and SEM observations of compacts were used to follow the colloidal dispersability of the composites. Materials of tetragonal zirconia and CNTs were prepared with a high concentration of CNTs (1, 5, and 10 wt pct CNT). The homogeneous dispersion and distribution of the fibers in the bulk material after slip casting of the suspension were examined. The samples were sintered using spark plasma sintering (SPS) at 1473 K (1200 °C) and finally, fully dense materials were obtained. The mechanical properties were evaluated using the Vickers indentation technique.

  8. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies. PMID:27546174

  9. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies.

  10. Orthodontics and Aligners

    MedlinePlus

    ... Repairing Chipped Teeth Teeth Whitening Tooth-Colored Fillings Orthodontics and Aligners Straighten teeth for a healthier smile. Orthodontics When consumers think about orthodontics, braces are the ...

  11. Tidal alignment of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazek, Jonathan; Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš

    2015-08-01

    We develop an analytic model for galaxy intrinsic alignments (IA) based on the theory of tidal alignment. We calculate all relevant nonlinear corrections at one-loop order, including effects from nonlinear density evolution, galaxy biasing, and source density weighting. Contributions from density weighting are found to be particularly important and lead to bias dependence of the IA amplitude, even on large scales. This effect may be responsible for much of the luminosity dependence in IA observations. The increase in IA amplitude for more highly biased galaxies reflects their locations in regions with large tidal fields. We also consider the impact of smoothing the tidal field on halo scales. We compare the performance of this consistent nonlinear model in describing the observed alignment of luminous red galaxies with the linear model as well as the frequently used "nonlinear alignment model," finding a significant improvement on small and intermediate scales. We also show that the cross-correlation between density and IA (the "GI" term) can be effectively separated into source alignment and source clustering, and we accurately model the observed alignment down to the one-halo regime using the tidal field from the fully nonlinear halo-matter cross correlation. Inside the one-halo regime, the average alignment of galaxies with density tracers no longer follows the tidal alignment prediction, likely reflecting nonlinear processes that must be considered when modeling IA on these scales. Finally, we discuss tidal alignment in the context of cosmic shear measurements.

  12. Alignability of Optical Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, Russell Scott

    With the continuing drive towards higher speed, density, and functionality in electronics, electrical interconnects become inadequate. Due to optics' high speed and bandwidth, freedom from capacitive loading effects, and freedom from crosstalk, optical interconnects can meet more stringent interconnect requirements. But, an optical interconnect requires additional components, such as an optical source and detector, lenses, holographic elements, etc. Fabrication and assembly of an optical interconnect requires precise alignment of these components. The successful development and deployment of optical interconnects depend on how easily the interconnect components can be aligned and/or how tolerant the interconnect is to misalignments. In this thesis, a method of quantitatively specifying the relative difficulty of properly aligning an optical interconnect is described. Ways of using this theory of alignment to obtain design and packaging guidelines for optical interconnects are examined. The measure of the ease with which an optical interconnect can be aligned, called the alignability, uses the efficiency of power transfer as a measure of alignment quality. The alignability is related to interconnect package design through the overall cost measure, which depends upon various physical parameters of the interconnect, such as the cost of the components and the time required for fabrication and alignment. Through a mutual dependence on detector size, the relationship between an interconnect's alignability and its bandwidth, signal-to-noise ratio, and bit-error -rate is examined. The results indicate that a range of device sizes exists for which given performance threshold values are satisfied. Next, the alignability of integrated planar-optic backplanes is analyzed in detail. The resulting data show that the alignability can be optimized by varying the substrate thickness or the angle of reflection. By including the effects of crosstalk, in a multi-channel backplane, the

  13. Electrospinning of unidirectionally and orthogonally aligned thermoplastic polyurethane nanofibers: Fiber orientation and cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Hao-Yang; Salick, Max R.; Jing, Xin; Crone, Wendy C.; Peng, Xiang-Fang; Turng, Lih-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Unidirectionally and orthogonally aligned thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) nanofibers were electrospun using a custom-built electrospinning device. The unidirectionally aligned fibers were collected using two parallel copper plates, and the orthogonally aligned fibers were collected using two orthogonal sets of parallel copper plates with alternate negative connections. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) were added to modify the polymer solution. It was found that both CNT and PAA were capable of increasing solution conductivity. The TPU/PAA fiber showed the highest degree of fiber orientation with more than 90% of the fibers having an orientation angle between −10° and 10° for unidirectionally aligned fibers, and for orthogonally aligned fibers, the orientation angle of 50% fibers located between −10° and 10° and 48% fibers located between 80° and 100°. Viability assessment of 3T3 fibroblasts cultured on TPU/PAA fibers suggested that the material was cytocompatible. The cells’ orientation and migration direction closely matched the fibers’ orientation. The cell migration velocity and distance were both enhanced with the guidance of fibers compared with cells cultured on random fibers and common tissue culture plastic. Controlling cell migration velocity and directionality may provide ways to influence differentiation and gene expression and systems that would allow further exploration of wound repair and metastatic cell behavior. PMID:24771704

  14. Electrospinning of unidirectionally and orthogonally aligned thermoplastic polyurethane nanofibers: fiber orientation and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Mi, Hao-Yang; Salick, Max R; Jing, Xin; Crone, Wendy C; Peng, Xiang-Fang; Turng, Lih-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    Unidirectionally and orthogonally aligned thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) nanofibers were electrospun using a custom-built electrospinning device. The unidirectionally aligned fibers were collected using two parallel copper plates, and the orthogonally aligned fibers were collected using two orthogonal sets of parallel copper plates with alternate negative connections. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) were added to modify the polymer solution. It was found that both CNT and PAA were capable of increasing solution conductivity. The TPU/PAA fiber showed the highest degree of fiber orientation with more than 90% of the fibers having an orientation angle between -10° and 10° for unidirectionally aligned fibers, and for orthogonally aligned fibers, the orientation angle of 50% fibers located between -10° and 10° and 48% fibers located between 80° and 100°. Viability assessment of 3T3 fibroblasts cultured on TPU/PAA fibers suggested that the material was cytocompatible. The cells' orientation and migration direction closely matched the fibers' orientation. The cell migration velocity and distance were both enhanced with the guidance of fibers compared with cells cultured on random fibers and common tissue culture plastic. Controlling cell migration velocity and directionality may provide ways to influence differentiation and gene expression and systems that would allow further exploration of wound repair and metastatic cell behavior. PMID:24771704

  15. Advanced 3D Ni(OH)2/CNT Gel Composite Electrodes for Supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hanlin; Duong, Hai Minh

    2015-03-01

    In order to enhance the performance of supercapacitors, advanced 3D Porous CNT/Ni(OH)2 gel composite electrodes are developed in this work. Compared with previously reported graphene gel supercapacitors, our electrodes using 1D CNTs have smaller diffusion resistance due to a shorter ion transport path. The developed 3D xerogel composite electrodes demonstrate the success of a careful engineered guest/host materials interface. Initially, the CNT gels are coated on the nickel foam to form a 3D scaffold, which serves as a microscopic electrical conductive network. Then Ni(OH)2 are incorporated using a traditional electrodeposition method. In this work, two types of the 3D CNT-coated nickel foams are investigated. The gels can be used directly as hydrogels or dried in air to form xerogels. Both hydrogels and xerogels present 3D tangled CNT networks. It shows that the hydrogel composite electrodes with unbundled CNTs, though presenting high capacitances of 1400 F/g at low discharge rate, possess lower capacitances at higher discharge rate and a poor cycling performance of less than 23% retention. In contrast, the xerogel composite electrodes can overcome these limitations in terms of a satisfied discharge performance of 1200 F/g and a good cycling retention more than 85% due to a stronger Ni(OH)2/CNT interface. The CNT bundles in the xerogel electrodes formed during the drying process can give a flat surface with small curvature, which facilitate the Ni(OH)2 nucleation and growth. Thanks for the support from the A star R-265-000-424-305.

  16. Nanostructured arrays for sensing and energy storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangu, Raghu

    Vertically aligned multi walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) arrays fabricated by xylene pyrolysis in anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) templates without the use of a catalyst, were integrated into a resistive sensor design. The steady state sensitivities as high as 5% and 10% for 100 ppm of NH3 and NO2 respectively at a flow rate of 750 sccm were observed. A study was undertaken to elucidate (i) the dependence of sensitivity on the thickness of amorphous carbon layers, (ii) the effect of UV light on gas desorption characteristics and (iii) the dependence of room temperature sensitivity on different NH3 and NO2 flow rates. An equivalent circuit model was developed to understand the operation and propose design changes for increased sensitivity. Multi Walled Carbon NanoTubes (MWCNTs) -- Polymer composite based hybrid sensors were fabricated and integrated into a resistive sensor design for gas sensing applications. Thin films of MWCNTs were grown onto Si/SiO 2 substrates via xylene pyrolysis using chemical vapor deposition technique. Polymers like PEDOT:PSS and Polyaniline (PANI) mixed with various solvents like DMSO, DMF, 2-Propanol and Ethylene Glycol were used to synthesize the composite films. These sensors exhibited excellent response and selectivity at room temperature when exposed to low concentrations (100ppm) of gases like NH3 and NO2. Effect of various solvents on the sensor response imparting selectivity to CNT -- Polymer nanocomposites was investigated extensively. Sensitivities as high as 28% was observed for a MWCNT -- PEDOT:PSS composite sensor when exposed to 100ppm of NH3 and -29.8% sensitivity for a MWCNT-PANI composite sensor to 100ppm of NO2. A novel nanostructured electrode design for Li based batteries and electrochemical capacitor applications was developed and tested. High density and highly aligned metal oxide nanowire arrays were fabricated via template assisted electrochemical deposition. Nickel and Molybdenum nanowires fabricated via cathodic

  17. An Investigation of CNT Cytotoxicity by Using Surfactants in Different Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Neeraj; Thakur, Rajesh; Bhanjana, Gaurav; Dilbaghi, Neeraj

    2011-12-01

    This account reports a comparative analysis on dispersion of multiwalled and single walled carbon nanotubes with different surfactants like—Triton X-100, Tween 20, Tween 80, and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Dispersion of CNTs has been characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, electron microscopy and probe microscopy. An optimum CNT-to-surfactant ratio has been determined for each surfactant. Surfactant concentration in different ratio is found to deteriorate the quality of nanotube dispersion. Electron microscopy analysis of a high-surfactant sample concentration enables us to construct a plausible mechanism for increase or decrease in CNT dispersion at high surfactant concentration.

  18. Anisotropic fiber alignment in composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Graham, A.L.; Mondy, L.A.; Guell, D.C.

    1993-11-16

    High strength material composite structures are formed with oriented fibers to provide controlled anisotropic fibers. Fibers suspended in non-dilute concentrations (e.g., up to 20 volume percent for fibers having an aspect ratio of 20) in a selected medium are oriented by moving an axially spaced array of elements in the direction of desired fiber alignment. The array elements are generally perpendicular to the desired orientation. The suspension medium may also include sphere-like particles where the resulting material is a ceramic. 5 figures.

  19. Anisotropic fiber alignment in composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Graham, Alan L.; Mondy, Lisa A.; Guell, David C.

    1993-01-01

    High strength material composite structures are formed with oriented fibers to provide controlled anisotropic fibers. Fibers suspended in non-dilute concentrations (e.g., up to 20 volume percent for fibers having an aspect ratio of 20) in a selected medium are oriented by moving an axially spaced array of elements in the direction of desired fiber alignment. The array elements are generally perpendicular to the desired orientation. The suspension medium may also include sphere-like particles where the resulting material is a ceramic.

  20. Cell electroporation by CNT-featured microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Shahini, Mehdi; Yeow, John T W

    2013-07-01

    We present the application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for cell electroporation that is performed in a microfluidic device. Lab on a chip (LOC) developments have raised unique possibilities to scale down cell manipulation systems to a cellular level to achieve higher performance and accuracy. Among the systems employed for cell disruption, electroporation without chemical reagents provides many advantages but suffers from high voltage requirements. We have exploited the electric field enhancement by CNTs to realize low-voltage electroporation. A microchip with embedded aligned CNTs has been developed to test the effect of the enhanced electric field on electroporation of mammalian CHO cells. Fluorogenic Calcein AM dye is used to image the release of the intercellular medium as an indication of electroporation. The electroporation phenomenon is recorded in real-time and compared with that of a device without CNTs. The results show that at a voltage as low as 3 volts, the electroporation yield rate is increased by 72% with the incorporation of CNTs. This enhancement is a promising advancement towards integration of low-voltage electroporation with other low-voltage cell manipulation techniques.

  1. Magnetic arrays

    DOEpatents

    Trumper, David L.; Kim, Won-jong; Williams, Mark E.

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness.

  2. Magnetic arrays

    DOEpatents

    Trumper, D.L.; Kim, W.; Williams, M.E.

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays are disclosed which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness. 12 figs.

  3. Hole-Aligning Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Frank A.; Saude, Frank; Sep, Martin J.

    1996-01-01

    Tool designed for use in aligning holes in plates or other structural members to be joined by bolt through holes. Holes aligned without exerting forces perpendicular to planes of holes. Tool features screw-driven-wedge design similar to (but simpler than) that of some automotive exhaust-pipe-expanding tools.

  4. Spent fuel container alignment device and method

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Stewart D.; Chapek, George V.

    1996-01-01

    An alignment device is used with a spent fuel shipping container including a plurality of fuel pockets for spent fuel arranged in an annular array and having a rotatable cover including an access opening therein. The alignment device includes a lightweight plate which is installed over the access opening of the cover. A laser device is mounted on the plate so as to emit a laser beam through a laser admittance window in the cover into the container in the direction of a pre-established target associated with a particular fuel pocket. An indexing arrangement on the container provides an indication of the angular position of the rotatable cover when the laser beam produced by the laser is brought into alignment with the target of the associated fuel pocket.

  5. Fabrication of high thermal conductivity arrays of carbon nanotubes and their composites

    DOEpatents

    Geohegan, David B [Knoxville, TN; Ivanov, Ilya N [Knoxville, TN; Puretzky, Alexander A [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-27

    Methods and apparatus are described for fabrication of high thermal conductivity arrays of carbon nanotubes and their composites. A composition includes a vertically aligned nanotube array including a plurality of nanotubes characterized by a property across substantially all of the vertically aligned nanotube array. A method includes depositing a vertically aligned nanotube array that includes a plurality of nanotubes; and controlling a deposition rate of the vertically aligned nanotubes array as a function of an in situ monitored property of the plurality of nanotubes.

  6. A novel gate structure in large diagonal size printable CNT-FED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qilong; Lei, Wei; Zhang, Xiaobing; Wang, Baoping; Liu, Min; Zhou, Xuedong; Di, Yunsong; Ma, Xiaoyan

    2005-01-01

    In the normal gate CNT-FED, the gate electrode is used to modulate and address the electron beam. Some electrons may bombard on the gate electrode, thus the luminant efficiency of CNT-FED decreases. This paper proposes a new gate structure, which is the metal mesh with cone funnels. MgO film and MgF 2 film are vaporized on the surface of the mesh and the funnels. When the primary electrons bombard on the gate electrode with initial energy, the secondary electrons and backscatters are generated. As results, more electrons can pass through the gate electrode and land on the anode. Consequently, the brightness of the novel triode structure CNT-FED can increase obviously. In the paper, we show the results of numerical simulation of the secondary electron emission process with Monte Carlo method. Some CNT-FED devices with the new type of gate structure are fabricated. The surface of the gate electrode is coated with MgO, MgF 2 and SiO 2 film, respectively. The results of emission experiments are also shown in this paper.

  7. Clinically relevant CNT dispersions with exceptionally high dielectric properties for microwave theranostic applications.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shawn X; Gao, Fuqiang; Patel, Sunny C; Booske, John H; Hagness, Susan C; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2014-11-01

    We present a formulation for achieving stable high-concentration (up to 20 mg/ml) aqueous dispersions of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with exceptionally high microwave-frequency (0.5-6 GHz) dielectric properties. The formulation involves functionalizing CVD-synthesized CNTs via sonication in nitric and sulfuric acid. The overall chemical integrity of the CNTs is largely preserved, as demonstrated via physical and chemical characterizations, despite significant shortening and functionalization with oxygen-containing groups. This is attributed to the protected inner walls of double-walled CNTs in the samples. The resulting CNT dispersions show greatly enhanced dielectric properties compared to a CNT-free control. For example, at 3 GHz, the average relative permittivity and effective conductivity across several 20 mg/ml CNT samples were increased by ∼ 70% and ∼ 400%, respectively, compared to the control. These CNT dispersions exhibit the stability and extraordinary microwave properties desired in systemically administered theranostic agents for microwave diagnostic imaging and/or thermal therapy.

  8. Characterization of CNT-MnO2 nanocomposite by electrophoretic deposition as potential electrode for supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darari, Alfin; Ardiansah, Hafidh Rahman; Arifin, Rismaningsih, Nurmanita; Ningrum, Andini Novia; Subagio, Agus

    2016-04-01

    Energy crisis that occured in Indonesia suggests that energy supply could not offset the high rate request and needs an electric energy saving device which can save high voltage, safety, and unlimited lifetime. The weakness of batteries is durable but has a low power density while the capacitor has a high power density but it doesn't durable. The renewal of this study is CNT-MnO2 thin film fabrication method using electrophoretic deposition. Electrophoretic deposition is a newest method to deposited CNT using power supply with cheap, and make a good result. The result of FTIR analysis showed that the best CNT-MnO2 composition is 75:25 and C-C bond is detected in fingerprint area. The result is electrode thin film homogen and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks 2θ=26,63° is characterization of graphite, and 2θ=43,97° is characterization of diamond Carbon type and measured by Scherrer formula results 52,3 nm material average size .EIS test results its capacitance about 7,86 F. from the data it can be concluded that CNT-MnO2 potential electrode very promising for further study and has a potential to be a high capacitance, and fast charge supercapacitor which can be applied for electronic devices, energy converter, even electric car.

  9. Structural CNT Composites. Part I; Developing a Carbon Nanotube Filament Winder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauti, Godfrey; Kim, Jae-Woo; Wincheski, Russell A.; Antczak, Andrew; Campero, Jamie C.; Luong, Hoa H.; Shanahan, Michelle H.; Stelter, Christopher J.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) based materials promise advances in the production of high strength and multifunctional components for aerospace and other applications. Specifically, in tension dominated applications, the latest CNT based filaments are yielding composite properties comparable to or exceeding composites from more established fibers such as Kevlar and carbon fiber. However, for the properties of these materials to be fully realized at the component level, suitable manufacturing processes have to be developed. These materials handle differently from conventional fibers, with different wetting characteristics and behavior under load. The limited availability of bulk forms also requires that the equipment be scaled down accordingly to tailor the process development approach to material availability. Here, the development of hardware and software for filament winding of carbon nanotube based tapes and yarns is described. This hardware features precision guidance of the CNT material and control of the winding tension over a wide range in an open architecture that allows for effective process control and troubleshooting during winding. Use of the filament winder to develop CNT based Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) shall also be discussed.

  10. Flexible transparent conductive films combining flexographic printed silver grids with CNT coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Lixin; Ran, Jun; Yang, Li; Fang, Yi; Zhai, Qingbin; Li, Luhai

    2016-02-01

    A high-performance ITO-free transparent conductive film (TCF) has been made by combining high resolution Ag grids with a carbon nanotube (CNT) coating. Ag grids printed with flexography have a 20 μm line width at a grid interval of 400 μm. The Ag grid/CNT hybrid film exhibits excellent overall performance, with a typical sheet resistance of 14.8 Ω/□ and 82.6% light transmittance at room temperature. This means a 23.98% reduction in sheet resistance and only 2.52% loss in transmittance compared to a pure Ag grid film. Analysis indicates that filling areas between the Ag grids and interconnecting the silver nanoparticles with the CNT coating are the primary reasons for the significantly improved conductivity of the hybrid film that also exhibits excellent flexibility and mechanical strength compared to an ITO film. The hybrid film may fully satisfy the requirements of different applications, e.g. use as the anode of polymer solar cells (PSCs). The J-V curve shows that the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the PSCs using the Ag grid/CNT hybrid anode is 0.61%, which is 24.5% higher than that of the pure Ag grids with a PCE of 0.49%. Further investigations to improve the performance of the solar cells based on the printed hybrid TCFs are ongoing.

  11. Flexible transparent conductive films combining flexographic printed silver grids with CNT coating.

    PubMed

    Mo, Lixin; Ran, Jun; Yang, Li; Fang, Yi; Zhai, Qingbin; Li, Luhai

    2016-02-12

    A high-performance ITO-free transparent conductive film (TCF) has been made by combining high resolution Ag grids with a carbon nanotube (CNT) coating. Ag grids printed with flexography have a 20 μm line width at a grid interval of 400 μm. The Ag grid/CNT hybrid film exhibits excellent overall performance, with a typical sheet resistance of 14.8 Ω/□ and 82.6% light transmittance at room temperature. This means a 23.98% reduction in sheet resistance and only 2.52% loss in transmittance compared to a pure Ag grid film. Analysis indicates that filling areas between the Ag grids and interconnecting the silver nanoparticles with the CNT coating are the primary reasons for the significantly improved conductivity of the hybrid film that also exhibits excellent flexibility and mechanical strength compared to an ITO film. The hybrid film may fully satisfy the requirements of different applications, e.g. use as the anode of polymer solar cells (PSCs). The J-V curve shows that the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the PSCs using the Ag grid/CNT hybrid anode is 0.61%, which is 24.5% higher than that of the pure Ag grids with a PCE of 0.49%. Further investigations to improve the performance of the solar cells based on the printed hybrid TCFs are ongoing. PMID:26758939

  12. Synthesis of TiO2 /CNT Composites and its Photocatalytic Activity Toward Sudan (I) Degradation.

    PubMed

    Miribangul, Amat; Ma, Xiaoli; Zeng, Chen; Zou, Huan; Wu, Yahui; Fan, Tengpeng; Su, Zhi

    2016-07-01

    Semiconductor photocatalysis has the potential for achieving sustainable energy generation and degrading organic contaminants. In TiO2 , the addition of carbonaceous nanomaterials has attracted extensive attention as a means to increase its photocatalytic activity. In this study, composites of TiO2 and carbon nanotubes (CNT) in various proportions were synthesized by the hydrothermal method. The crystalline structures, morphologies, and light absorption properties of the TiO2 /CNT photocatalysts were characterized by PXRD, TEM and UV-Vis absorption spectra. The photocatalytic efficiency of the composites was evaluated by the degradation of Sudan (I) in UV-Vis light. Introducing 0.1-0.5 wt% CNT was shown to substantially improve the photoactivity of TiO2 . The composite with 0.3 wt% CNT showed the best catalytic activity, and its reaction activation energy was calculated as 39.57 kJ mol(-1) from experimental rates. The degradation products of Sudan (I) with different irradiation durations were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and a degradation reaction process was proposed.

  13. Electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions involved in CNT biofunctionalization with short ss-DNA.

    PubMed

    Carot, Maria Lucrecia; Torresi, Roberto M; Garcia, Carlos D; Esplandiu, Maria Jose; Giacomelli, Carla E

    2010-03-18

    This work is aimed at studying the adsorption mechanism of short chain 20-mer pyrimidinic homo-ss-DNA (oligodeoxyribonucleotide, ODN: polyC(20) and polyT(20)) onto CNT by reflectometry. To analyze the experimental data, the effective-medium theory using the Bruggemann approximation represents a suitable optical model to account for the surface properties (roughness, thickness and optical constants) and the size of the adsorbate. Systematic information about the involved interactions is obtained by changing the physico-chemical properties of the system. Hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions are evaluated by comparing the adsorption on hydrophobic CNT and on hydrophilic silica and by modulating the ionic strength with and without Mg(2+). The ODN adsorption process on CNT is driven by hydrophobic interactions only when the electrostatic repulsion is suppressed. The adsorption mode results in ODN molecules in a side-on orientation with the bases (non-polar region) towards the surface. This unfavorable orientation is partially reverse by adding Mg(2+). On the other hand, the adsorption on silica is dominated by the strong repulsive electrostatic interaction that is screened at high ionic strength or mediated by Mg(2+). The cation-mediated process induces the interaction of the phosphate backbone (polar region) with the surface, leaving the bases free for hybridization. Although the general adsorption behavior of the pyrimidine bases is the same, polyC(20) presents higher affinity for the CNT surface due to its acid-base properties. PMID:20563224

  14. Electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions involved in CNT biofunctionalization with short ss-DNA

    PubMed Central

    Carot, Maria Lucrecia; Torresi, Roberto M.; Garcia, Carlos D.; Esplandiu, Maria Jose; Giacomelli, Carla E.

    2010-01-01

    This work is aimed at studying the adsorption mechanism of short chain 20-mer pyrimidinic homo-ss-DNA (oligodeoxyribonucleotide, ODN: polyC20 and polyT20) onto CNT by reflectometry. To analyze the experimental data, the effective-medium theory using the Bruggemann approximation represents a suitable optical model to account for the surface properties (roughness, thickness and optical constants) and the size of the adsorbate. Systematic information about the involved interactions is obtained by changing the physico-chemical properties of the system. Hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions are evaluated by comparing the adsorption on hydrophobic CNT and on hydrophilic silica and by modulating the ionic strength with and without Mg2+. The ODN adsorption process on CNT is driven by hydrophobic interactions only when the electrostatic repulsion is suppressed. The adsorption mode results in ODN molecules in a side-on orientation with the bases (non-polar region) towards the surface. This unfavorable orientation is partially reverse by adding Mg2+. On the other hand, the adsorption on silica is dominated by the strong repulsive electrostatic interaction that is screened at high ionic strength or mediated by Mg2+. The cation-mediated process induces the interaction of the phosphate backbone (polar region) with the surface, leaving the bases free for hybridization. Although the general adsorption behavior of the pyrimidine bases is the same, polyC20 presents higher affinity for the CNT surface due to its acid-base properties. PMID:20563224

  15. Controlled growth of CNT in mesoporous AAO through optimized conditions for membrane preparation and CVD operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciambelli, P.; Arurault, L.; Sarno, M.; Fontorbes, S.; Leone, C.; Datas, L.; Sannino, D.; Lenormand, P.; Le Blond Du Plouy, S.

    2011-07-01

    Anodic aluminium oxide (RAAO) membranes with a mesoporous structure were prepared under strictly controlling experimental process conditions, and physically and chemically characterized by a wide range of experimental techniques. Commercial anodic aluminium oxide (CAAO) membranes were also investigated for comparison. We demonstrated that RAAO membranes have lower content of both water and phosphorus and showed better porosity shape than CAAO. The RAAO membranes were used for template growth of carbon nanotubes (CNT) inside its pores by ethylene chemical vapour deposition (CVD) in the absence of a catalyst. A composite material, containing one nanotube for each channel, having the same length as the membrane thickness and an external diameter close to the diameter of the membrane holes, was obtained. Yield, selectivity and quality of CNTs in terms of diameter, length and arrangement (i.e. number of tubes for each channel) were optimized by investigating the effect of changing the experimental conditions for the CVD process. We showed that upon thermal treatment RAAO membranes were made up of crystallized allotropic alumina phases, which govern the subsequent CNT growth, because of their catalytic activity, likely due to their Lewis acidity. The strict control of experimental conditions for membrane preparation and CNT growth allowed us to enhance the carbon structural order, which is a critical requisite for CNT application as a substitute for copper in novel nano-interconnects.

  16. Clinically relevant CNT dispersions with exceptionally high dielectric properties for microwave theranostic applications.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shawn X; Gao, Fuqiang; Patel, Sunny C; Booske, John H; Hagness, Susan C; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2014-11-01

    We present a formulation for achieving stable high-concentration (up to 20 mg/ml) aqueous dispersions of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with exceptionally high microwave-frequency (0.5-6 GHz) dielectric properties. The formulation involves functionalizing CVD-synthesized CNTs via sonication in nitric and sulfuric acid. The overall chemical integrity of the CNTs is largely preserved, as demonstrated via physical and chemical characterizations, despite significant shortening and functionalization with oxygen-containing groups. This is attributed to the protected inner walls of double-walled CNTs in the samples. The resulting CNT dispersions show greatly enhanced dielectric properties compared to a CNT-free control. For example, at 3 GHz, the average relative permittivity and effective conductivity across several 20 mg/ml CNT samples were increased by ∼ 70% and ∼ 400%, respectively, compared to the control. These CNT dispersions exhibit the stability and extraordinary microwave properties desired in systemically administered theranostic agents for microwave diagnostic imaging and/or thermal therapy. PMID:24876108

  17. High-performance supercapacitors, actuators and elastomeric composites based on CNT assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Mikhail; Oh, Jiyoung; Shin, Minkyoon; Robles, Raquel; Lima, M. Árcio; Baughman, Ray

    2009-03-01

    A number of materials ranging from carbon nanotube (CNT) yarns, sheets and CNT-based composites to shape memory alloys (SMA) have been explored for the application in the area of energy conversion and storage. Highly porous sheets comprised of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes and doped polypyrrole (SWNT-PPy) were found to possess remarkably high specific capacitance of about 131 F/g; CNT-elastomeric polymer composites exhibited electrical conductivity of about 0.5 S/cm and can be stretched by 1400%. We found that if powered electrically, the isometric stress generated by the CNT-based actuators could be as large as 12 MPa. This approaches the stress generation capability of commercial ferroelectrics and is significantly larger than that of natural muscles. We also report several types of artificial muscles that convert the chemical energy of high--energy-density fuels to mechanical energy. Because of more than 30 times higher energy density obtainable for fuels like methanol, compared to that for the most advanced batteries, the major expected benefits are dramatic increase in energy conversion efficiency, work capacity, power performance.

  18. Thermoelectric Transport Through Arrays Of Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuljanishvili, Irma; Choe, Jim; Chandrasekhar, Venkat; Shafraniuk, Serhii

    2011-03-01

    The work addresses the voltage-controlled thermal flow and electric current through the carbon nanotube (CNT) junction arrays. The CNT thermoelectric generation (TEG) promises a high efficiency for thermal and electric energy conversion in a variety of applications. The energy generation had been studied using advanced methods of the condensed matter physics and nanotechnology. We will outline our experimental findings based on CNTs - TEG devices. We will report on our results that involve TEG-CNTs devices in array and /or single CNTs junctions geometries. We will describe fabrications protocols for preferential CVD growth of CNTs and nanoscale precision patterning of the catalyst on predefined device architectures. Electronic transport and optical properties of the CNTs-TEG nanostructures will also be discussed. I.K. and S.S. acknowledge support from the U.S. Army CECOM Acquisition Center #W909MY-10-C-0032. I.K. acknowledge collaboration with NanoInk Inc.

  19. Gas composition sensing using carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method and system for estimating one, two or more unknown components in a gas. A first array of spaced apart carbon nanotubes (''CNTs'') is connected to a variable pulse voltage source at a first end of at least one of the CNTs. A second end of the at least one CNT is provided with a relatively sharp tip and is located at a distance within a selected range of a constant voltage plate. A sequence of voltage pulses {V(t.sub.n)}.sub.n at times t=t.sub.n (n=1, . . . , N1; N1.gtoreq.3) is applied to the at least one CNT, and a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is estimated for one or more gas components, from an analysis of a curve I(t.sub.n) for current or a curve e(t.sub.n) for electric charge transported from the at least one CNT to the constant voltage plate. Each estimated pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage is compared with known threshold voltages for candidate gas components to estimate whether at least one candidate gas component is present in the gas. The procedure can be repeated at higher pulse voltages to estimate a pulse discharge breakdown threshold voltage for a second component present in the gas.

  20. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Nelson E.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam.

  1. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, N.E.

    1988-03-10

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam. 5 figs.

  2. Galaxy Alignments: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachimi, Benjamin; Cacciato, Marcello; Kitching, Thomas D.; Leonard, Adrienne; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Schäfer, Björn Malte; Sifón, Cristóbal; Hoekstra, Henk; Kiessling, Alina; Kirk, Donnacha; Rassat, Anais

    2015-11-01

    The alignments between galaxies, their underlying matter structures, and the cosmic web constitute vital ingredients for a comprehensive understanding of gravity, the nature of matter, and structure formation in the Universe. We provide an overview on the state of the art in the study of these alignment processes and their observational signatures, aimed at a non-specialist audience. The development of the field over the past one hundred years is briefly reviewed. We also discuss the impact of galaxy alignments on measurements of weak gravitational lensing, and discuss avenues for making theoretical and observational progress over the coming decade.

  3. Radiative Grain Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, B. G.

    2015-12-01

    Polarization due to aligned dust grains was discovered in the interstellar medium more than 60 years ago. A quantitative, observationally well tested theory of the phenomenon has finally emerged in the last decade, promising not only an improved understanding of interstellar magnetic fields, but new tools for studying the dust environments and grain characteristics. This Radiative Alignment Torque (RAT) theory also has many potential applications in solar system physics, including for comet dust characteristics. I will review the main aspects of the theory and the observational tests performed to date, as well as some of the new possibilities for using polarization as a tool to study dust and its environment, with RAT alignment.

  4. Hybrid vehicle motor alignment

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Michael Benjamin

    2001-07-03

    A rotor of an electric motor for a motor vehicle is aligned to an axis of rotation for a crankshaft of an internal combustion engine having an internal combustion engine and an electric motor. A locator is provided on the crankshaft, a piloting tool is located radially by the first locator to the crankshaft. A stator of the electric motor is aligned to a second locator provided on the piloting tool. The stator is secured to the engine block. The rotor is aligned to the crankshaft and secured thereto.

  5. Chemical strategies for die/wafer submicron alignment and bonding.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James Ellis; Baca, Alicia I.; Chu, Dahwey; Rohwer, Lauren Elizabeth Shea

    2010-09-01

    This late-start LDRD explores chemical strategies that will enable sub-micron alignment accuracy of dies and wafers by exploiting the interfacial energies of chemical ligands. We have micropatterned commensurate features, such as 2-d arrays of micron-sized gold lines on the die to be bonded. Each gold line is functionalized with alkanethiol ligands before the die are brought into contact. The ligand interfacial energy is minimized when the lines on the die are brought into registration, due to favorable interactions between the complementary ligand tails. After registration is achieved, standard bonding techniques are used to create precision permanent bonds. We have computed the alignment forces and torque between two surfaces patterned with arrays of lines or square pads to illustrate how best to maximize the tendency to align. We also discuss complex, aperiodic patterns such as rectilinear pad assemblies, concentric circles, and spirals that point the way towards extremely precise alignment.

  6. Implied alignment: a synapomorphy-based multiple-sequence alignment method and its use in cladogram search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Ward C.

    2003-01-01

    A method to align sequence data based on parsimonious synapomorphy schemes generated by direct optimization (DO; earlier termed optimization alignment) is proposed. DO directly diagnoses sequence data on cladograms without an intervening multiple-alignment step, thereby creating topology-specific, dynamic homology statements. Hence, no multiple-alignment is required to generate cladograms. Unlike general and globally optimal multiple-alignment procedures, the method described here, implied alignment (IA), takes these dynamic homologies and traces them back through a single cladogram, linking the unaligned sequence positions in the terminal taxa via DO transformation series. These "lines of correspondence" link ancestor-descendent states and, when displayed as linearly arrayed columns without hypothetical ancestors, are largely indistinguishable from standard multiple alignment. Since this method is based on synapomorphy, the treatment of certain classes of insertion-deletion (indel) events may be different from that of other alignment procedures. As with all alignment methods, results are dependent on parameter assumptions such as indel cost and transversion:transition ratios. Such an IA could be used as a basis for phylogenetic search, but this would be questionable since the homologies derived from the implied alignment depend on its natal cladogram and any variance, between DO and IA + Search, due to heuristic approach. The utility of this procedure in heuristic cladogram searches using DO and the improvement of heuristic cladogram cost calculations are discussed. c2003 The Willi Hennig Society. Published by Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  7. Kokkos Array

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards Daniel Sunderland, Harold Carter

    2012-09-12

    The Kokkos Array library implements shared-memory array data structures and parallel task dispatch interfaces for data-parallel computational kernels that are performance-portable to multicore-CPU and manycore-accelerator (e.g., GPGPU) devices.

  8. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Daily, PNNL

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprint that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.

  9. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprintmore » that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.« less

  10. Diameter-selective alignment of carbon nanotubes on Si(001) stepped surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Enkhtaivan, Batnyam; Yoshimura, Masahide; Iwata, Jun-Ichi; Oshiyama, Atsushi

    2014-01-28

    We report total-energy electronic-structure calculations based on the density-functional theory that provide stable adsorption sites, structural characteristics, and energy bands of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) adsorbed on the Si(001) stepped surfaces. We choose (5,5), (9,9), and (13,13) armchair CNTs with the diameters of 6.8 Å, 12.2 Å, and 17.6 Å, respectively, as representatives of CNTs and explore all the possible adsorption sites either on the terrace or at step edges. We find that the (9,9) CNT is most favorably adsorbed at the edge of the double-layer step D{sub B} along the 〈110〉 direction, whereas the (5,5) and (13,13) CNTs favor the terrace site where the CNTs are perpendicular to the Si dimer rows. This finding is indicative of the diameter-selective self-organized alignment of CNTs by exploiting the Si surface steps along the particular direction. We also find that the electronic structure of each CNT is modified upon adsorption depending on the adsorption site and the diameter of the CNTs. In particular, the (9,9) CNT at the most stable step edge site becomes semiconducting and the resultant valence and conduction bands exhibit nearly linear dispersion with the effective mass of 0.085 m{sub 0} (m{sub 0}: bare electron mass), preserving the characteristics of the Dirac electrons. We also find that the flat bands appear near the Fermi level (E{sub F}) when the (13,13) CNT is adsorbed at the metastable D{sub B} step edge, inferring that spin polarization is possible for the CNT on the Si(001) stepped surface.

  11. A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sigen; Calderon, Xiomara; Peng, Rui; Schreiber, Eric C.; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5×10) chip with electron field emission. A dose rate on the order of >1.2 Gy∕min per x-ray pixel beam is achieved at the center of the irradiated volume. The measured dose rate is in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation result. PMID:21691440

  12. A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Sigen; Calderon, Xiomara; Peng Rui; Schreiber, Eric C.; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha

    2011-05-23

    The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5x10) chip with electron field emission. A dose rate on the order of >1.2 Gy/min per x-ray pixel beam is achieved at the center of the irradiated volume. The measured dose rate is in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation result.

  13. Electrochemical double layer capacitor electrodes using aligned carbon nanotubes grown directly on metals.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rakesh; Zhang, Xianfeng; Talapatra, Saikat

    2009-09-30

    We report on the fabrication of electrochemical double layer capacitor (EDLC) electrodes with aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown directly on conductive substrates using an air assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. The fabricated EDLCs showed very small equivalent series resistances (approximately few hundreds of mOmega), a direct consequence of integrating CNTs with metal current collectors. The specific capacitance of the CNTs used for EDLC electrodes increased with decreasing CNT lengths and ranged from 10.75 F g(-1) to 21.57 F g(-1) with maximum energy and power density ranging from 2.3 to 5.4 Wh kg(-1) and 19.6 to 35.4 kW kg(-1), respectively. These results indicate that the integrated CNT electrodes fabricated using a simple single step process hold significant promise in applications related to electrochemical energy storage. PMID:19726841

  14. Systolic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, W.R.; McCabe, A.P.H.; Vrquhart, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    Selected Contents of this book are: Efficient Systolic Arrays for the Solution of Toeplitz Systems, The Derivation and Utilization of Bit Level Systolic Array Architectures, an Efficient Systolic Array for Distance Computation Required in a Video-Codec Based Motion-Detection, On Realizations of Least-Squares Estimation and Kalman Filtering by Systolic Arrays, and Comparison of Systolic and SIMD Architectures for Computer Vision Computations.

  15. Nanocylinder arrays

    DOEpatents

    Tuominen, Mark; Schotter, Joerg; Thurn-Albrecht, Thomas; Russell, Thomas P.

    2009-08-11

    Pathways to rapid and reliable fabrication of nanocylinder arrays are provided. Simple methods are described for the production of well-ordered arrays of nanopores, nanowires, and other materials. This is accomplished by orienting copolymer films and removing a component from the film to produce nanopores, that in turn, can be filled with materials to produce the arrays. The resulting arrays can be used to produce nanoscale media, devices, and systems.

  16. Nanocylinder arrays

    DOEpatents

    Tuominen, Mark; Schotter, Joerg; Thurn-Albrecht, Thomas; Russell, Thomas P.

    2007-03-13

    Pathways to rapid and reliable fabrication of nanocylinder arrays are provided. Simple methods are described for the production of well-ordered arrays of nanopores, nanowires, and other materials. This is accomplished by orienting copolymer films and removing a component from the film to produce nanopores, that in turn, can be filled with materials to produce the arrays. The resulting arrays can be used to produce nanoscale media, devices, and systems.

  17. Nanoengineered Thermal Materials Based on Carbon Nanotube Array Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun; Meyyappan, Meyya; Dangelo, Carols

    2012-01-01

    State-of-the-art integrated circuits (ICs) for microprocessors routinely dissipate power densities on the order of 50 W/cm2. This large power is due to the localized heating of ICs operating at high frequencies and must be managed for future high-frequency microelectronic applications. As the size of components and devices for ICs and other appliances becomes smaller, it becomes more difficult to provide heat dissipation and transport for such components and devices. A thermal conductor for a macro-sized thermal conductor is generally inadequate for use with a microsized component or device, in part due to scaling problems. A method has been developed for providing for thermal conduction using an array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). An array of vertically oriented CNTs is grown on a substrate having high thermal conductivity, and interstitial regions between adjacent CNTs in the array are partly or wholly filled with a filler material having a high thermal conductivity so that at least one end of each CNT is exposed. The exposed end of each CNT is pressed against a surface of an object from which heat is to be removed. The CNT-filler-composite adjacent to the substrate provides improved mechanical strength to anchor CNTs in place, and also serves as a heat spreader to improve diffusion of heat flux from the smaller volume (CNTs) to a larger heat sink.

  18. PDV Probe Alignment Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, T L; May, C M; Strand, O T

    2007-10-26

    This alignment technique was developed while performing heterodyne velocimetry measurements at LLNL. There are a few minor items needed, such as a white card with aperture in center, visible alignment laser, IR back reflection meter, and a microscope to view the bridge surface. The work was performed on KCP flyers that were 6 and 8 mils wide. The probes used were Oz Optics manufactured with focal distances of 42mm and 26mm. Both probes provide a spot size of approximately 80?m at 1550nm. The 42mm probes were specified to provide an internal back reflection of -35 to -40dB, and the probe back reflections were measured to be -37dB and -33dB. The 26mm probes were specified as -30dB and both measured -30.5dB. The probe is initially aligned normal to the flyer/bridge surface. This provides a very high return signal, up to -2dB, due to the bridge reflectivity. A white card with a hole in the center as an aperture can be used to check the reflected beam position relative to the probe and launch beam, and the alignment laser spot centered on the bridge, see Figure 1 and Figure 2. The IR back reflection meter is used to measure the dB return from the probe and surface, and a white card or similar object is inserted between the probe and surface to block surface reflection. It may take several iterations between the visible alignment laser and the IR back reflection meter to complete this alignment procedure. Once aligned normal to the surface, the probe should be tilted to position the visible alignment beam as shown in Figure 3, and the flyer should be translated in the X and Y axis to reposition the alignment beam onto the flyer as shown in Figure 4. This tilting of the probe minimizes the amount of light from the bridge reflection into the fiber within the probe while maintaining the alignment as near normal to the flyer surface as possible. When the back reflection is measured after the tilt adjustment, the level should be about -3dB to -6dB higher than the probes

  19. Bundled and densified carbon nanotubes (CNT) fabrics as flexible ultra-light weight Li-ion battery anode current collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yehezkel, Shani; Auinat, Mahmud; Sezin, Nina; Starosvetsky, David; Ein-Eli, Yair

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) fabrics were studied and evaluated as anode current collectors, replacing the traditional copper foil current collector in Li-ion batteries. Glavanostatic measurements reveal high values of irreversible capacities (as high as 28%), resulted mainly from the formation of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer at the CNT fabric surface. Various pre-treatments to the CNT fabric prior to active anode material loading have shown that the lowest irreversible capacity is achieved by immersing and washing the CNT fabric with iso-propanol (IPA), which dramatically modified the fabric surface. Additionally, the use of very thin CNT fabrics (5 μm) results in a substantial irreversible capacity minimization. A combination of IPA rinse action and utilization of the thinnest CNT fabric provides the lowest irreversible capacity of 13%. The paper describes innovative and rather simple techniques towards a complete implementation of CNT fabric as an anode current collector in Li-ion batteries, instead of the relatively heavy and expensive copper foil, enabling an improvement in the gravimetric and volumetric energy densities of such advanced batteries.

  20. Enhanced electrical contact of microbes using Fe(3)O(4)/CNT nanocomposite anode in mediator-less microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Park, In Ho; Christy, Maria; Kim, Pil; Nahm, Kee Suk

    2014-08-15

    A novel Fe(3)O(4)/CNT nanocomposite was synthesized and employed for the modification of carbon paper anode in a mediator-less microbial fuel cell (MFC) to enhance its performance. The Fe(3)O(4)/CNT composite modified anodes with various Fe(3)O(4) contents were investigated to find the optimum ratio of the nanocomposite for the best MFC performance. The Fe(3)O(4)/CNT modified anodes produced much higher power densities than unmodified carbon anode and the 30wt% Fe3O4/CNT modified anode exhibited a maximum power density of 830mW/m(2). In the Fe(3)O(4)/CNT composite modified anode, Fe(3)O(4) helps to attach the CNT on anode surface by its magnetic attraction and forms a multi layered network, whereas CNT offers a better nanostructure environment for bacterial growth and helps electron transfer from E.coli to electrode resulting in the increase in the current production with the catalytic activity of bacteria. The electrocatalytic behavior and all possible mechanism for their better performance are discussed in detail with the help of various structural and electrochemical techniques.