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Sample records for aligned phospholipid bilayers

  1. Magnetically aligned phospholipid bilayers with positive ordering: a new model membrane system.

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, R S; Hwang, J S; Vold, R R

    1998-01-01

    A stable smectic phospholipid bilayer phase aligned with the director parallel to the magnetic field can be generated by the addition of certain trivalent paramagnetic lanthanide ions to a bicellar solution of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) in water. Suitable lanthanide ions are those with positive anisotropy of their magnetic susceptibility, namely Eu3+, Er3+, Tm3+, and Yb3+. For samples doped with Tm3+, this phase extends over a wide range of Tm3+ concentrations (6-40 mM) and temperatures (35-90 degrees C) and appears to undergo a transition from a fluid nematic discotic to a fluid, but highly ordered, smectic phase at a temperature that depends on the thulium concentration. As a membrane mimetic, these new, positively ordered phospholipid phases have high potential for structural studies using a variety of techniques such as magnetic resonance (EMR and NMR), small-angle x-ray and neutron diffraction, as well as optical and infrared spectroscopy. PMID:9591667

  2. Water at the Surfaces of Aligned Phospholipid Multi-Bilayer Model Membranes Probed with Ultrafast Vibrational Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Moilanen, David E.; Fenn, Emily E.; Fayer, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of water at the surface of artificial membranes composed of aligned multibilayers of the phospholipid dilauroyl phosphatidylcholine (DLPC) are probed with ultrafast polarization selective vibrational pump-probe spectroscopy. The experiments are performed at various hydration levels, x = 2 – 16 water molecules per lipid at 37 °C. The water molecules are ~1 nm above or below the membrane surface. The experiments are conducted on the OD stretching mode of dilute HOD in H2O to eliminate vibrational excitation transfer. The FT-IR absorption spectra of the OD stretch in the DLPC bilayer system at low hydration levels shows a red-shift in frequency relative to bulk water, which is in contrast to the blue shift often observed in systems such as water nanopools in reverse micelles. The spectra for x = 4 – 16 can be reproduced by a superposition of the spectra for x = 2 and bulk water. IR Pump-probe measurements reveal that the vibrational population decays (lifetimes) become longer as the hydration level is decreased. The population decays are fit well by biexponential functions. The population decays, measured as a function of the OD stretch frequency, suggest the existence of two major types of water molecules in the interfacial region of the lipid bilayers. One component may be a clathrate-like water cluster near the hydrophobic choline group and the other may be related to the hydration water molecules mainly associated with the phosphate group. As the hydration level increases, the vibrational lifetimes of these two components decrease, suggesting a continuous evolution of the hydration structures in the two components associated with the swelling of the bilayers. The agreement of the magnitudes of the two components obtained from IR spectra with those from vibrational lifetime measurements further supports the two component model. The vibrational population decay fitting also gives an estimation of the number of phosphate-associated water molecules

  3. Possible mechanism of adhesion in a mica supported phospholipid bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Pertsin, Alexander; Grunze, Michael

    2014-05-14

    Phospholipid bilayers supported on hydrophilic solids like silica and mica play a substantial role in fundamental studies and technological applications of phospholipid membranes. In both cases the molecular mechanism of adhesion between the bilayer and the support is of primary interest. Since the possibilities of experimental methods in this specific area are rather limited, the methods of computer simulation acquire great importance. In this paper we use the grand canonical Monte Carlo technique and an atomistic force field to simulate the behavior of a mica supported phospholipid bilayer in pure water as a function of the distance between the bilayer and the support. The simulation reveals a possible adhesion mechanism, where the adhesion is due to individual lipid molecules that protrude from the bilayer and form widely spaced links with the support. Simultaneously, the bilayer remains separated from the bilayer by a thin water interlayer which maintains the bilayer fluidity.

  4. Neutron diffraction studies of amphipathic helices in phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, J.P.; Gilchrist, P.J.; Duff, K.C.; Saxena, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    The structural feature which is thought to facilitate the interaction of many peptides with phospholipid bilayers is the ability to fold into an amphipathic helix. In most cases the exact location and orientation of this helix with respect to the membrane is not known, and may vary with factors such as pH and phospholipid content of the bilayer. The growing interest in this area is stimulated by indications that similar interactions can contribute to the binding of certain hormones to their cell-surface receptors. We have been using the techniques of neutron diffraction from stacked phospholipid bilayers in an attempt to investigate this phenomenon with a number of membrane-active peptides. Here we report some of our findings with three of these: the bee venom melittin; the hormone calcitonin; and a synthetic peptide representing the ion channel fragment of influenza A M2 protein.

  5. The immiscible cholesterol bilayer domain exists as an integral part of phospholipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; Widomska, Justyna; Subczynski, Witold K

    2011-04-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-labeling methods were used to study the organization of cholesterol and phospholipids in membranes formed from Chol/POPS (cholesterol/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine) mixtures, with mixing ratios from 0 to 3. It was confirmed using the discrimination by oxygen transport and polar relaxation agent accessibility methods that the immiscible cholesterol bilayer domain (CBD) was present in all of the suspensions when the mixing ratio exceeded the cholesterol solubility threshold (CST) in the POPS membrane. The behavior of phospholipid molecules was monitored with phospholipid analogue spin labels (n-PCs), and the behavior of cholesterol was monitored with the cholesterol analogue spin labels CSL and ASL. Results indicated that phospholipid and cholesterol mixtures can form a membrane suspension up to a mixing ratio of ~2. Additionally, EPR spectra for n-PC, ASL, and CSL indicated that both phospholipids and cholesterol exist in these suspensions in the lipid-bilayer-like structures. EPR spectral characteristics of n-PCs (spin labels located in the phospholipid cholesterol bilayer, outside the CBD) change with increase in the cholesterol content up to and beyond the CST. These results present strong evidence that the CBD forms an integral part of the phospholipid bilayer when formed from a Chol/POPS mixture up to a mixing ratio of ~2. Interestingly, CSL in cholesterol alone (without phospholipids) when suspended in buffer does not detect formation of bilayer-like structures. A broad, single-line EPR signal is given, similar to that obtained for the dry film of cholesterol before addition of the buffer. This broad, single-line signal is also observed in suspensions formed for Chol/POPS mixtures (as a background signal) when the Chol/POPS ratio is much greater than 3. It is suggested that the EPR spin-labeling approach can discriminate and characterize the fraction of cholesterol that forms the CBD within the

  6. Supported phospholipid bilayers for two-dimensional protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    Uzgiris, E E

    1986-01-29

    Phospholipid bilayers, supported on UV irradiated carbon shadowed nitrocellulose electron microscope grids, have been used to induce two-dimensional crystal growth of IgE and IgG anti-DNP monoclonal antibodies. The UV irradiation renders the grids hydrophilic in a very uniform fashion and allows for the transfer of phospholipid monolayers from an air/water interface in a sequential dipping procedure. The surface coverage achieved was nearly 100% as measured by antibody binding and by the formation of protein arrays on the bilayer covered grids. The supported bilayers appear to be stably held and are appropriate for slow binding conditions and long incubation times with low concentrations of binding protein.

  7. Sponge mesoporous silica formation using disordered phospholipid bilayers as template.

    PubMed

    Galarneau, Anne; Sartori, Federica; Cangiotti, Michela; Mineva, Tzonka; Di Renzo, Francesco; Ottaviani, M Francesca

    2010-02-18

    Lecithin/dodecylamine/lactose mixtures in ethanol/aqueous media led to the formation of sponge mesoporous silica (SMS) materials by means of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as silica source. SMS materials show a "sponge-mesoporous" porosity with a pore diameter of about 5-6 nm, in accordance to the length of a lecithin bilayer. SMS synthesis was developed to create a new class of powerful biocatalysts able to efficiently encapsulate enzymes by adding a porosity control to the classical sol-gel synthesis and by using phospholipids and lactose as protecting agents for the enzymes. In the present study, the formation of SMS was investigated by using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) probes inserted inside phospholipid bilayers. The influence of progressive addition of each component (ethanol, dodecylamine, lactose, TEOS) on phospholipid bilayers was first examined; then, the time evolution of EPR spectra during SMS synthesis was studied. Parameters informative of mobility, structure, order, and polarity around the probes were extracted by computer analysis of the EPR line shape. The results were discussed on the basis of solids characterization by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen isotherm, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The results, together with the well-known ability of ethanol to promote membrane hemifusion, suggested that the templating structure is a bicontinuous phospholipid bilayer phase, shaped as a gyroid, resulting of multiple membrane hemifusions induced by the high alcohol content used in SMS synthesis. SMS synthesis was compared to hexagonal mesoporous silica (HMS) synthesis accomplished by adding TEOS to a dodecylamine/EtOH/water mixture. EPR evidenced the difference between HMS and SMS synthesis; the latter uses an already organized but slowly growing mesophase of phospholipids, never observed before, whereas the former shows a progressive elongation of micelles into wormlike structures. SMS-type materials represent a new

  8. Cholesterol autoxidation in phospholipid membrane bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Sevanian, A.; McLeod, L.L.

    1987-09-01

    Lipid peroxidation in unilamellar liposomes of known cholesterol-phospholipid composition was monitored under conditions of autoxidation or as induced by a superoxide radical generating system, gamma-irradiation or cumene hydroperoxide. Formation of cholesterol oxidation products was indexed to the level of lipid peroxidation. The major cholesterol oxidation products identified were 7-keto-cholesterol, isomeric cholesterol 5,6-epoxides, isomeric 7-hydroperoxides and isomeric 3,7-cholestane diols. Other commonly encountered products included 3,5-cholestadiene-7-one and cholestane-3 beta, 5 alpha, 6 beta-triol. Superoxide-dependent peroxidation required iron and produced a gradual increase in 7-keto-cholesterol and cholesterol epoxides. Cholesterol oxidation was greatest in liposomes containing high proportions of unsaturated phospholipid to cholesterol (4:1 molar ratio), intermediate with low phospholipid to cholesterol ratios (2:1) and least in liposomes prepared with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and cholesterol. This relationship held regardless of the oxidizing conditions used. Cumene hydroperoxide-dependent lipid peroxidation and/or more prolonged oxidations with other oxidizing systems yielded a variety of products where cholesterol-5 beta,6 beta-epoxide, 7-ketocholesterol and the 7-hydroperoxides were most consistently elevated. Oxyradical initiation of lipid peroxidation produced a pattern of cholesterol oxidation products distinguishable from the pattern derived by cumene hydroperoxide-dependent peroxidation.

  9. Electron Diffraction of Wet Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Hui, S. W.; Parsons, D. F.; Cowden, M.

    1974-01-01

    The structure of fully hydrated dipalmitoyl lecithin single bilayers, and monolayers deposited on Formvar substrates are studied by electron diffraction, using a hydration stage fitted to an electron microscope. Selective area diffraction patterns of these films indicate that there are domains consisting of mosaics of crystallites of hexagonally packed lipid chains. The size of these domains are typically several μm in diameter. The diffraction intensity agrees with that calculated from the electron scattering factor of the hydrocarbon chains of the lipid molecule. Images PMID:4531037

  10. Properties of a Hydrated Excess Proton Near the Cholesterol-Containing Phospholipid Bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Takefumi

    In order to study effects of cholesterol (Chol) on the interaction between the excess proton and the phospholipid bilayer, reactive molecular dynamics simulations are performed with the multistate empirical valence bond model. Although Chol significantly affects the bilayer structure, the proton affinity of the Chol-containing phospholipid bilayer is as high as that of the pure phospholipid bilayer. It is found that the excess proton is strongly trapped by the carbonyl groups and the phosphate groups of the phospholipids. This structure is quite similar to the structure observed in the pure lipid bilayer systems.

  11. Aqueous solutions at the interface with phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Max L; Vácha, Robert

    2012-01-17

    In a sense, life is defined by membranes, because they delineate the barrier between the living cell and its surroundings. Membranes are also essential for regulating the machinery of life throughout many interfaces within the cell's interior. A large number of experimental, computational, and theoretical studies have demonstrated how the properties of water and ionic aqueous solutions change due to the vicinity of membranes and, in turn, how the properties of membranes depend on the presence of aqueous solutions. Consequently, understanding the character of aqueous solutions at their interface with biological membranes is critical to research progress on many fronts. The importance of incorporating a molecular-level description of water into the study of biomembrane surfaces was demonstrated by an examination of the interaction between phospholipid bilayers that can serve as model biological membranes. The results showed that, in addition to well-known forces, such as van der Waals and screened Coulomb, one has to consider a repulsion force due to the removal of water between surfaces. It was also known that physicochemical properties of biological membranes are strongly influenced by the specific character of the ions in the surrounding aqueous solutions because of the observation that different anions produce different effects on muscle twitch tension. In this Account, we describe the interaction of pure water, and also of aqueous ionic solutions, with model membranes. We show that a symbiosis of experimental and computational work over the past few years has resulted in substantial progress in the field. We now better understand the origin of the hydration force, the structural properties of water at the interface with phospholipid bilayers, and the influence of phospholipid headgroups on the dynamics of water. We also improved our knowledge of the ion-specific effect, which is observed at the interface of the phospholipid bilayer and aqueous solution, and its

  12. NMR Structures of Membrane Proteins in Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Radoicic, Jasmina; Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins have always presented technical challenges for structural studies because of their requirement for a lipid environment. Multiple approaches exist including X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy that can give significant insights into their structure and function. However, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is unique in that it offers the possibility of determining the structures of unmodified membrane proteins in their native environment of phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. Furthermore, NMR enables the characterization of the structure and dynamics of backbone and side chain sites of the proteins alone and in complexes with both small molecules and other biopolymers. The learning curve has been steep for the field as most initial studies were performed under non-native environments using modified proteins until ultimately progress in both techniques and instrumentation led to the possibility of examining unmodified membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions. This review aims to provide an overview of the development and application of NMR to membrane proteins. It highlights some of the most significant structural milestones that have been reached by NMR spectroscopy of membrane proteins; especially those accomplished with the proteins in phospholipid bilayer environments where they function. PMID:25032938

  13. Anisotropic metal growth on phospholipid nanodiscs via lipid bilayer expansion

    PubMed Central

    Oertel, Jana; Keller, Adrian; Prinz, Julia; Schreiber, Benjamin; Hübner, René; Kerbusch, Jochen; Bald, Ilko; Fahmy, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembling biomolecules provide attractive templates for the preparation of metallic nanostructures. However, the intuitive transfer of the “outer shape” of the assembled macromolecules to the final metallic particle depends on the intermolecular forces among the biomolecules which compete with interactions between template molecules and the metal during metallization. The shape of the bio-template may thus be more dynamic than generally assumed. Here, we have studied the metallization of phospholipid nanodiscs which are discoidal particles of ~10 nm diameter containing a lipid bilayer ~5 nm thick. Using negatively charged lipids, electrostatic adsorption of amine-coated Au nanoparticles was achieved and followed by electroless gold deposition. Whereas Au nanoparticle adsorption preserves the shape of the bio-template, metallization proceeds via invasion of Au into the hydrophobic core of the nanodisc. Thereby, the lipidic phase induces a lateral growth that increases the diameter but not the original thickness of the template. Infrared spectroscopy reveals lipid expansion and suggests the existence of internal gaps in the metallized nanodiscs, which is confirmed by surface-enhanced Raman scattering from the encapsulated lipids. Interference of metallic growth with non-covalent interactions can thus become itself a shape-determining factor in the metallization of particularly soft and structurally anisotropic biomaterials. PMID:27216789

  14. Anisotropic metal growth on phospholipid nanodiscs via lipid bilayer expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oertel, Jana; Keller, Adrian; Prinz, Julia; Schreiber, Benjamin; Hübner, René; Kerbusch, Jochen; Bald, Ilko; Fahmy, Karim

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembling biomolecules provide attractive templates for the preparation of metallic nanostructures. However, the intuitive transfer of the “outer shape” of the assembled macromolecules to the final metallic particle depends on the intermolecular forces among the biomolecules which compete with interactions between template molecules and the metal during metallization. The shape of the bio-template may thus be more dynamic than generally assumed. Here, we have studied the metallization of phospholipid nanodiscs which are discoidal particles of ~10 nm diameter containing a lipid bilayer ~5 nm thick. Using negatively charged lipids, electrostatic adsorption of amine-coated Au nanoparticles was achieved and followed by electroless gold deposition. Whereas Au nanoparticle adsorption preserves the shape of the bio-template, metallization proceeds via invasion of Au into the hydrophobic core of the nanodisc. Thereby, the lipidic phase induces a lateral growth that increases the diameter but not the original thickness of the template. Infrared spectroscopy reveals lipid expansion and suggests the existence of internal gaps in the metallized nanodiscs, which is confirmed by surface-enhanced Raman scattering from the encapsulated lipids. Interference of metallic growth with non-covalent interactions can thus become itself a shape-determining factor in the metallization of particularly soft and structurally anisotropic biomaterials.

  15. Normal vibrational modes of phospholipid bilayers observed by low-frequency Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surovtsev, N. V.; Dmitriev, A. A.; Dzuba, S. A.

    2017-03-01

    Low-frequency Raman spectra of multilamellar vesicles made either of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-s n -glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) or 1,2-dipalmitoyl-s n -glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) have been studied in a wide temperature range. Below 0 ∘C two peaks are found at frequencies around 8-9 and 14 -17 c m -1 and attributed to the normal vibrational modes of the phospholipid bilayer, which are determined by the bilayer thickness and stiffness (elastic modulus). The spectral positions of the peaks depend on the temperature and the bilayer composition. It is suggested that the ratio of the intensities of the first and second peaks can serve as a measure of the interleaflet elastic coupling. The addition of cholesterol to the phospholipid bilayer leads to peak shift and broadening, which may be assigned to the composition heterogeneities commonly attributed to the lipid raft formation.

  16. Modeling success and failure of Langmuir-Blodgett transfer of phospholipid bilayers to silicon dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, T D; Yager, P

    1995-01-01

    Formation of planar phospholipid bilayers on solid and porous substrates by Langmuir-Blodgett transfer of monolayers from the air-water interface could be of much greater utility if the process were not irreproducible and poorly understood. To that end the energetics of transferring two phospholipid monolayers to a hydrophilic surface has been examined. An approximate mathematical relationship is formulated that relates the surface pressure of the precursor monolayers to the tension within the bilayer created. Data are presented that demonstrate that bilayer transfer can be carried out reproducibly even with refractory phospholipids such as phosphatidylcholine, but only over a very narrow range of precursor monolayer surface pressures. This range is related to the lysis tension of the bilayer. The morphology of films formed within and below the successful range of surface pressures are examined by fluorescence microscopy, and the observed features are discussed in terms of the relationship above. These results provide practical guidelines for successful formation of lipid bilayers on hydrophilic surfaces; these guidelines should prove useful for research into the properties of biomembranes and for development of bilayer-based biosensors. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:7540429

  17. Biophysical changes induced by xenon on phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Booker, Ryan D; Sum, Amadeu K

    2013-05-01

    Structural and dynamic changes in cell membrane properties induced by xenon, a volatile anesthetic molecule, may affect the function of membrane-mediated proteins, providing a hypothesis for the mechanism of general anesthetic action. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulation and differential scanning calorimetry to examine the biophysical and thermodynamic effects of xenon on model lipid membranes. Our results indicate that xenon atoms preferentially localize in the hydrophobic core of the lipid bilayer, inducing substantial increases in the area per lipid and bilayer thickness. Xenon depresses the membrane gel-liquid crystalline phase transition temperature, increasing membrane fluidity and lipid head group spacing, while inducing net local ordering effects in a small region of the lipid carbon tails and modulating the bilayer lateral pressure profile. Our results are consistent with a role for nonspecific, lipid bilayer-mediated mechanisms in producing xenon's general anesthetic action.

  18. Fluorescence of Supported Phospholipid Bilayers Recorded in a Conventional Horizontal-Beam Spectrofluorometer.

    PubMed

    Kovrigina, Elizaveta A; Kovrigin, Evgenii L

    2016-03-01

    Supported phospholipid bilayers are a convenient model of cellular membranes in studies of membrane biophysics and protein-lipid interactions. Traditionally, supported lipid bilayers are formed on a flat surface of a glass slide to be observed through fluorescence microscopes. This paper describes a method to enable fluorescence detection from the supported lipid bilayers using standard horizontal-beam spectrofluorometers instead of the microscopes. In the proposed approach, the supported lipid bilayers are formed on the inner optical surfaces of the standard fluorescence microcell. To enable observation of the bilayer absorbed on the cell wall, the microcell is placed in a standard fluorometer cell holder and specifically oriented to expose the inner cell walls to both excitation and emission channels with a help of the custom cell adaptor. The signal intensity from supported bilayers doped with 1 % (mol) of rhodamine-labeled lipid in the standard 3-mm optical microcell was equivalent to fluorescence of the 70-80 nM reference solution of rhodamine recorded in a commercial microcell adaptor. Because no modifications to the instruments are required in this method, a variety of steady-state and time-domain fluorescence measurements of the supported phospholipid bilayers may be performed with the spectral resolution using standard horizontal-beam spectrofluorometers.

  19. Interaction of substance P with phospholipid bilayers: A neutron diffraction study.

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, J P; Davies, S M; Hauss, T

    1998-01-01

    Neutron diffraction has been used to study the membrane-bound structure of substance P (SP), a member of the tachykinin family of neuropeptides. The depth of penetration of its C-terminus in zwitterionic and anionic phospholipid bilayers was probed by specific deuteration of leucine 10, the penultimate amino acid residue. The results show that the interaction of SP with bilayers, composed of either dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), or a 50:50 mixture of DOPC and the anionic phospholipid dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG), takes place at two locations. One requires insertion of the peptide into the hydrophobic region of the bilayer, the other is much more peripheral. The penetration of the peptide into the hydrophobic region of the bilayer is reflected in a marked difference in the water distribution profiles. SP is seen to insert into DOPC bilayers, but a larger proportion of the peptide is found at the surface when compared to the anionic bilayers. The positions of the two label populations show only minor differences between the two types of bilayer. PMID:9675189

  20. Interaction of an ionic liquid with a supported phospholipid bilayer is lipid-dependent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Liquid salts, commonly called ionic liquids, are used as solvents to conduct transformation of vegetable oils into new products. These reactions are often catalyzed via immobilized enzymes. However, some enzymes were found to lose activity and are in need of some protection. Phospholipid bilayers...

  1. Nanomechanical characterization of phospholipid bilayer islands on flat and porous substrates: a force spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Nussio, Matthew R; Oncins, Gerard; Ridelis, Ingrid; Szili, Endre; Shapter, Joseph G; Sanz, Fausto; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2009-07-30

    In this study, we compare for the first time the nanomechanical properties of lipid bilayer islands on flat and porous surfaces. 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers were deposited on flat (silicon and mica) and porous silicon (pSi) substrate surfaces and examined using atomic force spectroscopy and force volume imaging. Force spectroscopy measurements revealed the effects of the underlying substrate and of the lipid phase on the nanomechanical properties of bilayers islands. For mica and silicon, significant differences in breakthrough force between the center and the edges of bilayer islands were observed for both phospolipids. These differences were more pronounced for DMPC than for DPPC, presumably due to melting effects at the edges of DMPC bilayers. In contrast, bilayer islands deposited on pSi yielded similar breakthrough forces in the central region and along the perimeter of the islands, and those values in turn were similar to those measured along the perimeter of bilayer islands deposited on the flat substrates. The study also demonstrates that pSi is suitable solid support for the formation of pore-spanning phospholipid bilayers with potential applications in transmembrane protein studies, drug delivery, and biosensing.

  2. Cholesterol enhances surface water diffusion of phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi; Olijve, Luuk L. C.

    2014-12-14

    Elucidating the physical effect of cholesterol (Chol) on biological membranes is necessary towards rationalizing their structural and functional role in cell membranes. One of the debated questions is the role of hydration water in Chol-embedding lipid membranes, for which only little direct experimental data are available. Here, we study the hydration dynamics in a series of Chol-rich and depleted bilayer systems using an approach termed {sup 1}H Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) NMR relaxometry that enables the sensitive and selective determination of water diffusion within 5–10 Å of a nitroxide-based spin label, positioned off the surface of the polar headgroups or within the nonpolar core of lipid membranes. The Chol-rich membrane systems were prepared from mixtures of Chol, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and/or dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine lipid that are known to form liquid-ordered, raft-like, domains. Our data reveal that the translational diffusion of local water on the surface and within the hydrocarbon volume of the bilayer is significantly altered, but in opposite directions: accelerated on the membrane surface and dramatically slowed in the bilayer interior with increasing Chol content. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lineshape analysis shows looser packing of lipid headgroups and concurrently tighter packing in the bilayer core with increasing Chol content, with the effects peaking at lipid compositions reported to form lipid rafts. The complementary capability of ODNP and EPR to site-specifically probe the hydration dynamics and lipid ordering in lipid membrane systems extends the current understanding of how Chol may regulate biological processes. One possible role of Chol is the facilitation of interactions between biological constituents and the lipid membrane through the weakening or disruption of strong hydrogen-bond networks of the surface hydration layers that otherwise exert stronger repulsive forces, as reflected in

  3. Cholesterol enhances surface water diffusion of phospholipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Olijve, Luuk L. C.; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi

    2014-12-01

    Elucidating the physical effect of cholesterol (Chol) on biological membranes is necessary towards rationalizing their structural and functional role in cell membranes. One of the debated questions is the role of hydration water in Chol-embedding lipid membranes, for which only little direct experimental data are available. Here, we study the hydration dynamics in a series of Chol-rich and depleted bilayer systems using an approach termed 1H Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) NMR relaxometry that enables the sensitive and selective determination of water diffusion within 5-10 Å of a nitroxide-based spin label, positioned off the surface of the polar headgroups or within the nonpolar core of lipid membranes. The Chol-rich membrane systems were prepared from mixtures of Chol, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and/or dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine lipid that are known to form liquid-ordered, raft-like, domains. Our data reveal that the translational diffusion of local water on the surface and within the hydrocarbon volume of the bilayer is significantly altered, but in opposite directions: accelerated on the membrane surface and dramatically slowed in the bilayer interior with increasing Chol content. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lineshape analysis shows looser packing of lipid headgroups and concurrently tighter packing in the bilayer core with increasing Chol content, with the effects peaking at lipid compositions reported to form lipid rafts. The complementary capability of ODNP and EPR to site-specifically probe the hydration dynamics and lipid ordering in lipid membrane systems extends the current understanding of how Chol may regulate biological processes. One possible role of Chol is the facilitation of interactions between biological constituents and the lipid membrane through the weakening or disruption of strong hydrogen-bond networks of the surface hydration layers that otherwise exert stronger repulsive forces, as reflected in faster

  4. Bilayer/cytoskeleton interactions in lipid-symmetric erythrocytes assessed by a photoactivable phospholipid analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, D.; Schlegel, R.A. ); Williamson, P. )

    1991-08-06

    Two mechanisms have been proposed for maintenance of transbilayer phospholipid asymmetry in the erythrocyte plasma membrane, one involving specific interactions between the aminophospholipids of the inner leaflet of the bilayer and the cytoskeleton, particularly spectrin, and the other involving the aminophospholipid translocase. If the former mechanism is correct, then erythrocytes which have lost their asymmetric distribution of phospholipids should display altered bilayer/cytoskeleton interactions. To test this possibility, normal erythrocytes, erythrocytes from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia or sickle disease, and lipid-symmetric and -asymmetric erythrocyte ghosts were labeled with the radioactive photoactivable analogue of phosphatidylethanolamine, 2-(2-azido-4-nitrobenzoyl)-1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho({sup 14}C) ethanolamine (({sup 14}C)AzPE), previously shown to label cytoskeletal proteins from the bilayer. The labeling pattern of cytoskeletal proteins in pathologic erythrocytes and lipid-asymmetric erythrocyte ghosts was indistinguishable from normal erythrocytes, indicating that the probe detects no differences in bilayer/cytoskeleton interactions in these cells. In contrast, in lipid-symmetric erythrocyte ghosts, labeling of bands 4.1 and 4.2 and actin, and to a lesser extent ankyrin, by ({sup 14}C)AzPE was considerably reduced. Significantly, however, labeling of spectrin was unaltered in the lipid-symmetric cells. These results do not support a model in which spectrin is involved in the maintenance of an asymmetric distribution of phospholipids in erythrocytes.

  5. General model of phospholipid bilayers in fluid phase within the single chain mean field theory.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yachong; Pogodin, Sergey; Baulin, Vladimir A

    2014-05-07

    Coarse-grained model for saturated phospholipids: 1,2-didecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DCPC), 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) and unsaturated phospholipids: 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), 1,2- dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) is introduced within the single chain mean field theory. A single set of parameters adjusted for DMPC bilayers gives an adequate description of equilibrium and mechanical properties of a range of saturated lipid molecules that differ only in length of their hydrophobic tails and unsaturated (POPC, DOPC) phospholipids which have double bonds in the tails. A double bond is modeled with a fixed angle of 120°, while the rest of the parameters are kept the same as saturated lipids. The thickness of the bilayer and its hydrophobic core, the compressibility, and the equilibrium area per lipid correspond to experimentally measured values for each lipid, changing linearly with the length of the tail. The model for unsaturated phospholipids also fetches main thermodynamical properties of the bilayers. This model is used for an accurate estimation of the free energies of the compressed or stretched bilayers in stacks or multilayers and gives reasonable estimates for free energies. The proposed model may further be used for studies of mixtures of lipids, small molecule inclusions, interactions of bilayers with embedded proteins.

  6. Molecular dynamics of dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its metabolite interacting with lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Chavarría, Helmut I; Guizado, Teobaldo R C; Pimentel, Andre S

    2015-08-28

    The interaction of dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its ultimate carcinogenic 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide with lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers was successfully performed using molecular dynamics. The DPPC/DPPG/cholesterol bilayer (64 : 64 : 2) was used as the lung surfactant phospholipid bilayer model and compared with the DPPC bilayer as a reference. Dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide were inserted in water and lipid phases in order to investigate their interactions with the lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers. The radial distribution function between two P atoms in polar heads shows that the 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide affects the order between the P atoms in the DPPC/DPPG/cholesterol model more than dibenz[a,h]anthracene, which is a consequence of its preference for the polar heads and dibenz[a,h]anthracene prefers to be located in the hydrocarbon chain of the phospholipid bilayers. Dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide may form aggregates in water and lipid phases, and in the water-lipid interface. The implications for the possible effect of dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide in the lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers are discussed.

  7. Use of thiol-disulfide equilibria to measure the energetics of assembly of transmembrane helices in phospholipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristian, Lidia; Lear, James D.; Degrado, William F.

    2003-12-01

    Despite significant efforts and promising progress, the understanding of membrane protein folding lags behind that of soluble proteins. Insights into the energetics of membrane protein folding have been gained from biophysical studies in membrane-mimicking environments (primarily detergent micelles). However, the development of techniques for studying the thermodynamics of folding in phospholipid bilayers remains a considerable challenge. We had previously used thiol-disulfide exchange to study the thermodynamics of association of transmembrane -helices in detergent micelles; here, we extend this methodology to phospholipid bilayers. The system for this study is the homotetrameric M2 proton channel protein from the influenza A virus. Transmembrane peptides from this protein specifically self-assemble into tetramers that retain the ability to bind to the drug amantadine. Thiol-disulfide exchange under equilibrium conditions was used to quantitatively measure the thermodynamics of this folding interaction in phospholipid bilayers. The effects of phospholipid acyl chain length and cholesterol on the peptide association were investigated. The association of the helices strongly depends on the thickness of the bilayer and cholesterol levels present in the phospholipid bilayer. The most favorable folding occurred when there was a good match between the width of the apolar region of the bilayer and the hydrophobic length of the transmembrane helix. Physiologically relevant variations in the cholesterol level are sufficient to strongly influence the association. Evaluation of the energetics of peptide association in the presence and absence of cholesterol showed a significantly tighter association upon inclusion of cholesterol in the lipid bilayers.

  8. Adsorption of phospholipid bilayers onto pullulan-modified cellulose surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Heejun; Liu, Zelin; Esker, Alan

    2009-03-01

    1,2-Dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) vesicle adsorption onto regenerated cellulose and pullulan 4-bromocinnamate (P4BC) modified cellulose surfaces was investigated via surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). P4BC with a degree of substitution (DS) of 0.061 ± 0.002 from UV measurements and 0.058 from ^1H NMR was synthesized from pullulan and 4-bromocinnamic acid to yield P4BC. The deduced thicknesses from SPR for DMPC layers were ˜3.7 nm (bilayer) on regenerated cellulose surfaces and ˜2.1 nm (monolayer) on P4BC modified cellulose surfaces. Qualitative analysis of the QCM-D data also indicated that the DMPC layers on P4BC modified cellulose surfaces were thinner than on regenerated cellulose surfaces.

  9. In vitro determination of the solubility limit of cholesterol in phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Epand, Richard M; Bach, Diana; Wachtel, Ellen

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol has limited solubility in phospholipid bilayers. The solubility limit is strongly dependent on the nature of the lipid with which the cholesterol is mixed while properties of the crystals formed can be modified by phospholipid-cholesterol interactions. In this review we summarize the various methods that have been developed to prepare hydrated mixtures of cholesterol and phospholipid. We point out some of the factors that determine the form adopted when cholesterol crystallizes in such mixtures, i.e. two- or three-dimensional, monohydrate or anhydrous. These differences can greatly affect the ability to experimentally detect the presence of these crystals in a membrane. Several methods for detecting cholesterol crystals are discussed and compared including DSC, X-ray and GIXRD diffraction methods, NMR and EPR spectroscopy. The importance of the history of the sample in determining the amount and nature of the cholesterol crystals formed is emphasized.

  10. Effects of Stretching Speed on Mechanical Rupture of Phospholipid/Cholesterol Bilayers: Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Shigematsu, Taiki; Koshiyama, Kenichiro; Wada, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of biological cell membrane under mechanical stresses is critical for cell viability. It is triggered by local rearrangements of membrane molecules. We investigated the effects of stretching speed on mechanical rupture of phospholipid/cholesterol bilayers using unsteady molecular dynamics simulations. We focused on pore formation, the trigger of rupture, in a 40 mol% cholesterol-including bilayer. The unsteady stretching was modeled by proportional and temporal scaling of atom positions at stretching speeds from 0.025 to 30 m/s. The effects of the stretching speed on the critical areal strain, where the pore forms, is composed of two regimes. At low speeds (<1.0 m/s), the critical areal strain is insensitive to speed, whereas it significantly increases at higher speeds. Also, the strain is larger than that of a pure bilayer, regardless of the stretching speeds, which qualitatively agrees with available experimental data. Transient recovery of the cholesterol and phospholipid molecular orientations was evident at lower speeds, suggesting the formation of a stretch-induced interdigitated gel-like phase. However, this recovery was not confirmed at higher speeds or for the pure bilayer. The different responses of the molecular orientations may help explain the two regimes for the effect of stretching speed on pore formation. PMID:26471872

  11. Effect of cholesterol on molecular order and dynamics in highly polyunsaturated phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, D C; Litman, B J

    1998-01-01

    The effect of cholesterol on phospholipid acyl chain packing in bilayers consisting of highly unsaturated acyl chains in the liquid crystalline phase was examined for a series of symmetrically and asymmetrically substituted phosphatidylcholines (PCs). The time-resolved fluorescence emission and decay of fluorescence anisotropy of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) was used to characterize equilibrium and dynamic structural properties of bilayers containing 30 mol % cholesterol. The bilayers were composed of symmetrically substituted PCs with acyl chains of 14:0, 18:1n9, 20:4n6, or 22:6n3, containing 0, 1, 4, or 6 double bonds, respectively, and mixed-chain PCs with a saturated 16:0 sn-1 chain and 1, 4, or 6 double bonds in the sn-2 chain. DPH excited-state lifetime was fit to a Lorentzian lifetime distribution, the center of which was increased 1-2 ns by 30 mol % cholesterol relative to the cholesterol-free bilayers. Lifetime distributions were dramatically narrowed by the addition of cholesterol in all bilayers except the two consisting of dipolyunsaturated PCs. DPH anisotropy decay was interpreted in terms of the Brownian rotational diffusion model. The effect of cholesterol on both the perpendicular diffusion coefficient D perpendicular and the orientational distribution function f(theta) varied with acyl chain unsaturation. In all bilayers, except the two dipolyunsaturated PCs, 30 mol % cholesterol dramatically slowed DPH rotational motion and restricted DPH orientational freedom. The effect of cholesterol was especially diminished in di-22:6n3 PC, suggesting that this phospholipid may be particularly effective at promoting lateral domains, which are cholesterol-rich and unsaturation-rich, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of a model for lipid packing in membranes containing cholesterol and PCs with highly unsaturated acyl chains. PMID:9675190

  12. Visualization and analysis of lipopolysaccharide distribution in binary phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, Maria Florencia; Sanchez, Susana; Bakas, Laura

    2009-05-22

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an endotoxin released from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria during infections. It have been reported that LPS may play a role in the outer membrane of bacteria similar to that of cholesterol in eukaryotic plasma membranes. In this article we compare the effect of introducing LPS or cholesterol in liposomes made of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine on the solubilization process by Triton X-100. The results show that liposomes containing LPS or cholesterol are more resistant to solubilization by Triton X-100 than the binary phospholipid mixtures at 4 {sup o}C. The LPS distribution was analyzed on GUVs of DPPC:DOPC using FITC-LPS. Solid and liquid-crystalline domains were visualized labeling the GUVs with LAURDAN and GP images were acquired using a two-photon microscope. The images show a selective distribution of LPS in gel domains. Our results support the hypothesis that LPS could aggregate and concentrate selectively in biological membranes providing a mechanism to bring together several components of the LPS-sensing machinery.

  13. Comparison Actin- and Glass-Supported Phospholipid Bilayer Diffusion Coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Sarah M.; Dawes, Ryan; Allgeyer, Edward S.; Ashworth, Sharon L.; Neivandt, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of biomimetic lipid membranes has the potential to provide insights into cellular lipid membrane dynamics. The construction of such membranes necessitates not only the utilization of appropriate lipids, but also physiologically relevant substrate/support materials. The substrate materials employed have been shown to have demonstrable effects on the behavior of the overlying lipid membrane, and thus must be studied before use as a model cushion support. To our knowledge, we report the formation and investigation of a novel actin protein-supported lipid membrane. Specifically, inner leaflet lateral mobility of globular actin-supported DMPC (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) bilayers, deposited via the Langmuir-Blodgett/Langmuir Schaefer methodology, was investigated by z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy across a temperature range of 20–44°C. The actin substrate was found to decrease the diffusion coefficient when compared to an identical membrane supported on glass. The depression of the diffusion coefficient occurred across all measured temperatures. These results indicated that the actin substrate exerted a direct effect on the fluidity of the lipid membrane and highlighted the fact that the choice of substrate/support is critical in studies of model lipid membranes. PMID:25902434

  14. Functionalization of cobalt porphyrin-phospholipid bilayers with his-tagged ligands and antigens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shuai; Geng, Jumin; Ah Yi, Hyun; Gogia, Shobhit; Neelamegham, Sriram; Jacobs, Amy; Lovell, Jonathan F.

    2015-05-01

    Methods to attach polypeptides to lipid bilayers are often indirect and ineffective, and can represent a substantial bottleneck in the formation of functionalized lipid-based materials. Although the polyhistidine tag (his-tag) has been transformative in its simplicity and efficacy in binding to immobilized metals, the successful application of this approach has been challenging in physiological settings. Here we show that lipid bilayers containing porphyrin-phospholipid conjugates that are chelated with cobalt, but not with other metals, can effectively capture his-tagged proteins and peptides. The binding follows a Co(II) to Co(III) transition and occurs within the sheltered hydrophobic bilayer, resulting in an essentially irreversible attachment in serum or in a million fold excess of competing imidazole. Using this approach we anchored homing peptides into the bilayer of preformed and cargo-loaded liposomes to enable tumour targeting without disrupting the bilayer integrity. As a further demonstration, a synthetic protein fragment derived from the human immunodeficiency virus was bound to immunogenic liposomes for potent antibody generation for an otherwise non-antigenic peptide.

  15. Importance of phospholipid bilayer integrity in the analysis of protein–lipid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Drücker, Patrick; Gerke, Volker; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • We show long-term mechanical stabilization of solid supported bilayers. • Bilayer integrity is essential for the investigation of protein–lipid interactions. • Protein adsorption to a bilayer containing defects causes membrane destruction. - Abstract: The integrity of supported phospholipid bilayer membranes is of crucial importance for the investigation of lipid–protein interactions. Therefore we recorded the formation of supported membranes on SiO{sub 2} and mica by quartz crystal microbalance and controlled the integrity by atomic force microscopy. This study aims to analyze how membrane defects affect protein–lipid interactions. The experiments focused on a lipid mixture of POPC/DOPC/Chol/POPS/PI(4,5)P{sub 2} (37:20:20:20:3) and the binding of the peripheral membrane associated protein annexin A2. We found that formation of a continuous undisturbed bilayer is an indispensable precondition for a reliable determination and quantification of lipid–protein-interactions. If membrane defects were present, protein adsorption causes membrane disruption and lipid detachment on a support thus leading to false determination of binding constants. Our results obtained for PI(4,5)P{sub 2} and cholesterol containing supported membranes yield new knowledge to construct functional surfaces that may cover nanoporous substrates, form free standing membranes or may be used for lab-on-a-chip applications.

  16. Functionalization of Cobalt Porphyrin-Phospholipid Bilayers with His-tagged Ligands and Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Shuai; Geng, Jumin; Yi, Hyun Ah; Gogia, Shobhit; Neelamegham, Sriram; Jacobs, Amy; Lovell, Jonathan F.

    2015-01-01

    Methods to attach polypeptides to lipid bilayers are often indirect, ineffective and can represent a substantial bottleneck in the formation of functionalized lipid-based materials. Although the polyhistidine tag (his-tag) has been transformative in its simplicity and efficacy in binding to immobilized metals, the successful application of this approach has been challenging in physiological settings. Here we show that lipid bilayers containing porphyin-phospholipid that is chelated with cobalt, but not other metals, can effectively capture his-tagged proteins and peptides. The binding follows a Co(II) to Co(III) transition and occurs within the sheltered hydrophobic bilayer, resulting in essentially irreversible attachment in serum or in million-fold excess of competing imidazole. Using this approach we anchored homing peptides into the bilayer of preformed and cargo-loaded liposomes to enable tumour-targeting without disrupting the bilayer integrity. As a further demonstration, a synthetic HIV-derived protein fragment was bound to immunogenic liposomes for potent antibody generation for an otherwise non-antigenic peptide. PMID:25901823

  17. Ether- versus Ester-Linked Phospholipid Bilayers Containing either Linear or Branched Apolar Chains

    PubMed Central

    Balleza, Daniel; Garcia-Arribas, Aritz B.; Sot, Jesús; Ruiz-Mirazo, Kepa; Goñi, Félix M.

    2014-01-01

    We studied the properties of bilayers formed by ether-and ester-containing phospholipids, whose hydrocarbon chains can be either linear or branched, using sn-1,2 dipalmitoyl, dihexadecyl, diphytanoyl, and diphytanyl phosphatidylcholines (DPPC, DHPC, DPhoPC, and DPhPC, respectively) either pure or in binary mixtures. Differential scanning calorimetry and confocal fluorescence microscopy of giant unilamellar vesicles concurred in showing that equimolar mixtures of linear and branched lipids gave rise to gel/fluid phase coexistence at room temperature. Mixtures containing DHPC evolved in time (0.5 h) from initial reticulated domains to extended solid ones when an equilibrium was achieved. The nanomechanical properties of supported planar bilayers formed by each of the four lipids studied by atomic force microscopy revealed average breakdown forces Fb decreasing in the order DHPC ≥ DPPC > DPhoPC >> DPhPC. Moreover, except for DPPC, two different Fb values were found for each lipid. Atomic force microscopy imaging of DHPC was peculiar in showing two coexisting phases of different heights, probably corresponding to an interdigitated gel phase that gradually transformed, over a period of 0.5 h, into a regular tilted gel phase. Permeability to nonelectrolytes showed that linear-chain phospholipids allowed a higher rate of solute + water diffusion than branched-chain phospholipids, yet the former supported a smaller extent of swelling of the corresponding vesicles. Ether or ester bonds appeared to have only a minor effect on permeability. PMID:25229144

  18. Ether- versus ester-linked phospholipid bilayers containing either linear or branched apolar chains.

    PubMed

    Balleza, Daniel; Garcia-Arribas, Aritz B; Sot, Jesús; Ruiz-Mirazo, Kepa; Goñi, Félix M

    2014-09-16

    We studied the properties of bilayers formed by ether-and ester-containing phospholipids, whose hydrocarbon chains can be either linear or branched, using sn-1,2 dipalmitoyl, dihexadecyl, diphytanoyl, and diphytanyl phosphatidylcholines (DPPC, DHPC, DPhoPC, and DPhPC, respectively) either pure or in binary mixtures. Differential scanning calorimetry and confocal fluorescence microscopy of giant unilamellar vesicles concurred in showing that equimolar mixtures of linear and branched lipids gave rise to gel/fluid phase coexistence at room temperature. Mixtures containing DHPC evolved in time (0.5 h) from initial reticulated domains to extended solid ones when an equilibrium was achieved. The nanomechanical properties of supported planar bilayers formed by each of the four lipids studied by atomic force microscopy revealed average breakdown forces Fb decreasing in the order DHPC ≥ DPPC > DPhoPC > DPhPC. Moreover, except for DPPC, two different Fb values were found for each lipid. Atomic force microscopy imaging of DHPC was peculiar in showing two coexisting phases of different heights, probably corresponding to an interdigitated gel phase that gradually transformed, over a period of 0.5 h, into a regular tilted gel phase. Permeability to nonelectrolytes showed that linear-chain phospholipids allowed a higher rate of solute + water diffusion than branched-chain phospholipids, yet the former supported a smaller extent of swelling of the corresponding vesicles. Ether or ester bonds appeared to have only a minor effect on permeability.

  19. Neutron reflectivity study of substrate surface chemistry effects on supported phospholipid bilayer formation on (1120) sapphire.

    SciTech Connect

    Oleson, Timothy A.; Sahai, Nita; Wesolowski, David J; Dura, Joseph A; Majkrzak, Charles F; Giuffre, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Oxide-supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) used as biomimetric membranes are significant for a broad range of applications including improvement of biomedical devices and biosensors, and in understanding biomineralization processes and the possible role of mineral surfaces in the evolution of pre-biotic membranes. Continuous-coverage and/or stacjed SPBs retain properties (e.,g. fluidity) more similar to native biological membranes, which is desirable for most applications. Using neutron reflectivity, we examined face coverage and potential stacking of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers on the (1120) face of sapphire (a-Al2O3). Nearly full bilayers were formed at low to neutral pH, when the sapphire surface is positively charged, and at low ionic strength (l=15 mM NaCl). Coverage decreased at higher pH, close to the isoelectric point of sapphire, and also at high I>210mM, or with addition of 2mM Ca2+. The latter two effects are additive, suggesting that Ca2+ mitigates the effect of higher I. These trends agree with previous results for phospholipid adsorption on a-Al2O3 particles determined by adsorption isotherms and on single-crystal (1010) sapphire by atomic force microscopy, suggesting consistency of oxide surface chemistry-dependent effects across experimental techniques.

  20. Hybrid phospholipid bilayer coatings for separations of cationic proteins in capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Elyssia S; Adem, Seid M; Bright, Leonard K; Calderon, Isen A C; Mansfield, Elisabeth; Aspinwall, Craig A

    2014-04-01

    Protein separations in CZE suffer from nonspecific adsorption of analytes to the capillary surface. Semipermanent phospholipid bilayers have been used to minimize adsorption, but must be regenerated regularly to ensure reproducibility. We investigated the formation, characterization, and use of hybrid phospholipid bilayers (HPBs) as more stable biosurfactant capillary coatings for CZE protein separations. HPBs are formed by covalently modifying a support with a hydrophobic monolayer onto which a self-assembled lipid monolayer is deposited. Monolayers prepared in capillaries using 3-cyanopropyldimethylchlorosilane (CPDCS) or n-octyldimethylchlorosilane (ODCS) yielded hydrophobic surfaces with lowered surface free energies of 6.0 ± 0.3 or 0.2 ± 0.1 mJ m(-2) , respectively, compared to 17 ± 1 mJ m(-2) for bare silica capillaries. HPBs were formed by subsequently fusing vesicles comprised of 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine to CPDCS- or ODCS-modified capillaries. The resultant HPB coatings shielded the capillary surface and yielded reduced electroosmotic mobility (1.3-1.9 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) ) compared to CPDCS- and ODCS-modified or bare capillaries (3.6 ± 0.2 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) , 4.8 ± 0.4 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) , and 6.0 ± 0.2 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) , respectively), with increased stability compared to phospholipid bilayer coatings. HPB-coated capillaries yielded reproducible protein migration times (RSD ≤ 3.6%, n ≥ 6) with separation efficiencies as high as 200 000 plates/m.

  1. Partitioning of propranolol in the phospholipid bilayer coat of anionic magnetoliposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocquyt, J.; Soenen, S. J. H.; Saveyn, P.; Van der Meeren, P.; DeCuyper, M.

    2008-05-01

    This work deals with the partitioning of the cationic amphiphilic drug, propranolol, in the coating of so-called magnetoliposomes (MLs), which consist of nanometre-sized, magnetizable iron oxide cores covered with a phospholipid bilayer. MLs of two types were used: either the ML coat consisted entirely of anionic dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol, or it was mixed with zwitterionic dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine in a 5/95 molar ratio. To separate sorbed from non-sorbed propranolol, high-gradient magnetophoresis was used. The sorption profiles clearly show that electrostatic interactions play a key role in the sorption process as drug incorporation in the ML coat was favoured by increasing the anionic character of the ML envelope and by reducing the salt concentration of the medium. Also, upon drug binding some phospholipid molecules were expelled from the ML coat. The observations may be of relevance in the biomedical field, i.e. in the development of ML-based, intracellular theranostics.

  2. Preparation and Characterization of Cross-linked Phospholipid Bilayer Capillary Coatings for Protein Separations

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Elisabeth; Ross, Eric E.; Aspinwall, Craig A.

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of protein and peptide mixtures via capillary electrophoresis is hindered by non-specific adsorption of analytes to the capillary walls, resulting in poor separations and quantitative reproducibility. Phospholipid bilayer (PLB) coatings are very promising for improving protein and peptide separations due to the native resistance to non-specific protein adsorption offered by PLBs; however, these coatings display limited chemical and temporal stability. Here, we show the preparation and characterization of a highly cross-linked, polymerized phospholipid capillary coating prepared using bis-SorbPC. Poly(bis-SorbPC) PLB coatings are prepared in situ within fully enclosed fused silica capillaries via self assembly and radical polymerization. Polymerization of the PLB coating stabilizes the membrane against desorption from the surface and migration in an electric field, improves the temporal and chemical stability, and allows for the separation of both cationic and anionic proteins, while preserving the native resistance to non-specific protein adsorption of natural PLBs. PMID:17373774

  3. Binding of lysozyme to phospholipid bilayers: evidence for protein aggregation upon membrane association.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galyna P; Ioffe, Valeriya M; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2007-07-01

    Biological functions of lysozyme, including its antimicrobial, antitumor, and immune-modulatory activities have been suggested to be largely determined by the lipid binding properties of this protein. To gain further insight into these interactions on a molecular level the association of lysozyme to liposomes composed of either 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine or its mixtures with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-glycerol, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-phosphatidylserine, or bovine heart cardiolipin was studied by a combination of fluorescence techniques. The characteristics of the adsorption of lysozyme to lipid bilayers were investigated using fluorescein 5'-isothiocyanate labeled protein, responding to membrane association by a decrease in fluorescence. Upon increasing the content of anionic phospholipids in lipid vesicles, the binding isotherms changed from Langmuir-like to sigmoidal. Using adsorption models based on scaled particle and double-layer theories, this finding was rationalized in terms of self-association of the membrane-bound protein. The extent of quenching of lysozyme tryptophan fluorescence by acrylamide decreased upon membrane binding, revealing a conformational transition for the protein upon its surface association, resulting in a diminished access of the fluorophore to the aqueous phase. Steady-state fluorescence anisotropy of bilayer-incorporated probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene was measured at varying lipid-to-protein molar ratios. Lysozyme was found to increase acyl-chain order for liposomes with the content of acidic phospholipid exceeding 10 mol %. Both electrostatic and hydrophobic protein-lipid interactions can be concluded to modulate the aggregation behavior of lysozyme when bound to lipid bilayers. Modulation of lysozyme aggregation propensity by membrane binding may have important implications for protein fibrillogenesis in vivo. Disruption of membrane integrity by the aggregated

  4. Binding of Lysozyme to Phospholipid Bilayers: Evidence for Protein Aggregation upon Membrane Association

    PubMed Central

    Gorbenko, Galyna P.; Ioffe, Valeriya M.; Kinnunen, Paavo K. J.

    2007-01-01

    Biological functions of lysozyme, including its antimicrobial, antitumor, and immune-modulatory activities have been suggested to be largely determined by the lipid binding properties of this protein. To gain further insight into these interactions on a molecular level the association of lysozyme to liposomes composed of either 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine or its mixtures with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-glycerol, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-phosphatidylserine, or bovine heart cardiolipin was studied by a combination of fluorescence techniques. The characteristics of the adsorption of lysozyme to lipid bilayers were investigated using fluorescein 5′-isothiocyanate labeled protein, responding to membrane association by a decrease in fluorescence. Upon increasing the content of anionic phospholipids in lipid vesicles, the binding isotherms changed from Langmuir-like to sigmoidal. Using adsorption models based on scaled particle and double-layer theories, this finding was rationalized in terms of self-association of the membrane-bound protein. The extent of quenching of lysozyme tryptophan fluorescence by acrylamide decreased upon membrane binding, revealing a conformational transition for the protein upon its surface association, resulting in a diminished access of the fluorophore to the aqueous phase. Steady-state fluorescence anisotropy of bilayer-incorporated probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene was measured at varying lipid-to-protein molar ratios. Lysozyme was found to increase acyl-chain order for liposomes with the content of acidic phospholipid exceeding 10 mol %. Both electrostatic and hydrophobic protein-lipid interactions can be concluded to modulate the aggregation behavior of lysozyme when bound to lipid bilayers. Modulation of lysozyme aggregation propensity by membrane binding may have important implications for protein fibrillogenesis in vivo. Disruption of membrane integrity by the aggregated

  5. Tip-induced deformation of a phospholipid bilayer: Theoretical perspective of sum frequency generation imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, Victor

    2014-10-21

    The paper addresses theory of Sum Frequency Generation imaging of an atomic force microscopy tip-induced deformation of a bilayer phospholipid membrane deposited over a pore: known as a nano-drum system. Image modeling employed nonlinearities of the normal modes specific to hydrocarbon terminal methyls, which are distributed about the deformed surfaces of inner and outer leaflets. The deformed profiles are according to the solutions of shape equation for Canham-Helfrich Hamiltonian accounting properties of four membranes, which differ in elasticity and adhesion. The results indicate that in continuous deformed surfaces, the difference in the curvature of the outer and inner leaflets dominates in the imaged nonlinearity. This is different comparing to the results for a perfect bilayer spherical cap system (the subject of previous study), where nonlinear image response is dominated by the mismatch of the inner and outer leaflets’ surface areas (as projected to the image plane) at the edge of perfectly spherical structure. The results of theoretical studies, here, demonstrate that Sum Frequency Generation imaging in continuous and deformed bilayer surfaces are helpful to address curvature locally and anticipate mechanical properties of membrane. The articles discuss applicability and practical limitations of the approach. Combination of Atomic Force Microscopy and Sum Frequency Generation imaging under controlled tip-induced deformation provides a good opportunity to probe and test membranes physical properties with rigor of adopted theory.

  6. The Affinity of Cholesterol for Different Phospholipids Affects Lateral Segregation in Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Engberg, Oskar; Hautala, Victor; Yasuda, Tomokazu; Dehio, Henrike; Murata, Michio; Slotte, J Peter; Nyholm, Thomas K M

    2016-08-09

    Saturated and unsaturated phospholipids (PLs) can segregate into lateral domains. The preference of cholesterol for saturated acyl chains over monounsaturated, and especially polyunsaturated ones, may also affect lateral segregation. Here we have studied how cholesterol influenced the lateral segregation of saturated and unsaturated PLs, for which cholesterol had a varying degree of affinity. The fluorescence lifetime of trans-parinaric acid reported the formation of ordered domains (gel or liquid-ordered (lo)) in bilayers composed of different unsaturated phosphatidylcholines, and dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine or n-palmitoyl-sphingomyelin, in the presence or absence of cholesterol. We observed that cholesterol facilitated lateral segregations and the degree of facilitation correlated with the relative affinity of cholesterol for the different PLs in the bilayers. Differential scanning calorimetry and (2)H nuclear magnetic resonance showed that cholesterol increased the thermostability of both the gel and lo-domains. Increased number of double bonds in the unsaturated PL increased the order in the lo-domains, likely by enriching the ordered domains in saturated lipids and cholesterol. This supported the conclusions from the trans-parinaric acid experiments, and offers insight into how cholesterol facilitated lateral segregation. In conclusion, the relative affinity of cholesterol for different PLs appears to be an important determinant for the formation of ordered domains. Our data suggests that knowledge of the affinity of cholesterol for the different PLs in a bilayer allows prediction of the degree to which the sterol promotes lo-domain formation.

  7. Tip-induced deformation of a phospholipid bilayer: Theoretical perspective of sum frequency generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Victor

    2014-10-01

    The paper addresses theory of Sum Frequency Generation imaging of an atomic force microscopy tip-induced deformation of a bilayer phospholipid membrane deposited over a pore: known as a nano-drum system. Image modeling employed nonlinearities of the normal modes specific to hydrocarbon terminal methyls, which are distributed about the deformed surfaces of inner and outer leaflets. The deformed profiles are according to the solutions of shape equation for Canham-Helfrich Hamiltonian accounting properties of four membranes, which differ in elasticity and adhesion. The results indicate that in continuous deformed surfaces, the difference in the curvature of the outer and inner leaflets dominates in the imaged nonlinearity. This is different comparing to the results for a perfect bilayer spherical cap system (the subject of previous study), where nonlinear image response is dominated by the mismatch of the inner and outer leaflets' surface areas (as projected to the image plane) at the edge of perfectly spherical structure. The results of theoretical studies, here, demonstrate that Sum Frequency Generation imaging in continuous and deformed bilayer surfaces are helpful to address curvature locally and anticipate mechanical properties of membrane. The articles discuss applicability and practical limitations of the approach. Combination of Atomic Force Microscopy and Sum Frequency Generation imaging under controlled tip-induced deformation provides a good opportunity to probe and test membranes physical properties with rigor of adopted theory.

  8. Self-assembly of single integral membrane proteins into soluble nanoscale phospholipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Bayburt, Timothy H.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2003-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in pharmaceutical research is obtaining integral membrane proteins in a functional, solubilized, and monodisperse state that provides a native-like environment that maintains the spectrum of in vivo activities. Many of these integral membrane proteins are receptors, enzymes, or other macromolecular assemblies that are important drug targets. An example is the general class of proteins composed of seven-transmembrane segments (7-TM) as exemplified by the G-protein–coupled receptors. In this article, we describe a simple system for self-assembling bacteriorhodopsin, as a model protein containing 7-TM helices, with phospholipids to form a nanometer-scale soluble bilayer structure encircled by a 200 amino acid scaffold protein. The result is the single molecule incorporation of an integral membrane protein target into a soluble and monodisperse structure that allows the structural and functional tools of solution biochemistry to be applied. PMID:14573860

  9. The relationship between water vapor absorption and desorption by phospholipids and bilayer phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Heidi M; Zografi, George

    2007-02-01

    Water vapor absorption and desorption at 25 degrees C and phase transition temperatures of phospholipid bilayers were measured as a function of relative humidity (RH) to better understand how the patterns of water vapor absorption and desorption are linked to corresponding phase changes induced by the level of hydration. Comparisons were made of the dipalmitoyl and palmitoyloleyol esters of glycerol derivatized with phosphatidyl-choline, -glycerol, -ethanolamine and with phosphatidic acid. The results suggest that the extent of water vapor absorption and desorption at a given RH reflects the combined effects of water-polar group interaction and access of water to the polar region as controlled by intra- and interbilayer molecular packing and intermolecular attractive and repulsive interactions. The results further suggest that the extent of water vapor absorption and desorption over a range of relative humidities reflects the combined effects of the polar group's ability to interact with water, the access that water has to the polar groups as determined by molecular size and various intermolecular and intrabilayer forces of attraction and repulsion, and interbilayer interactions which influence the degree of order/disorder present in the overall solid-state structure. This behavior is also reflected in the changes observed in the various bilayer phase transition temperatures as a function of RH. Analyses of absorption isotherms suggests that after exceeding a critical RH, water initially interacting with these phospholipids most likely forms either stoichiometric or nonstoichiometric crystal hydrates, as with the disaturated derivatives, or hydrated mesophases, as with the gel states of the monounsaturated derivatives.

  10. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on water penetration and rotational dynamics in phospholipid-cholesterol bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Bernsdorff, C; Wolf, A; Winter, R; Gratton, E

    1997-01-01

    The effect of high hydrostatic pressure on the lipid bilayer hydration, the mean order parameter, and rotational dynamics of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) cholesterol vesicles has been studied by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy up to 1500 bar. Whereas the degree of hydration in the lipid headgroup and interfacial region was assessed from fluorescence lifetime data using the probe 1-(4-trimethylammonium-phenyl)-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (TMA-DPH), the corresponding information in the upper acyl chain region was estimated from its effect on the fluorescence lifetime of and 3-(diphenylhexatrienyl)propyl-trimethylammonium (TMAP-DPH). The lifetime data indicate a greater level of interfacial hydration for DPPC bilayers than for POPC bilayers, but there is no marked difference in interchain hydration of the two bilayer systems. The addition of cholesterol at levels from 30 to 50 mol% to DPPC has a greater effect on the increase of hydrophobicity in the interfacial region of the bilayer than the application of hydrostatic pressure of several hundred to 1000 bar. Although the same trend is observed in the corresponding system, POPC/30 mol% cholesterol, the observed effects are markedly less pronounced. Whereas the rotational correlation times of the fluorophores decrease in passing the pressure-induced liquid-crystalline to gel phase transition of DPPC, the wobbling diffusion coefficient remains essentially unchanged. The wobbling diffusion constant of the two fluorophores changes markedly upon incorporation of 30 mol% cholesterol, and increases at higher pressures, also in the case of POPC/30 mol% cholesterol. The observed effects are discussed in terms of changes in the rotational characteristics of the fluorophores and the phase-state of the lipid mixture. The results demonstrate the ability of cholesterol to adjust the structural and dynamic properties of membranes composed of

  11. Formation of pit-spanning phospholipid bilayers on nanostructured silicon dioxide surfaces for studying biological membrane events.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Indriati; Zäch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Zwitterionic phospholipid vesicles are known to adsorb and ultimately rupture on flat silicon dioxide (SiO2) surfaces to form supported lipid bilayers. Surface topography, however, alters the kinetics and mechanistic details of vesicles adsorption, which under certain conditions may be exploited to form a suspended bilayer. Here we describe the use of nanostructured SiO2 surfaces prepared by the colloidal lithography technique to scrutinize the formation of suspended 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) lipid bilayers from a solution of small unilamellar lipid vesicles (SUVs). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) were employed to characterize nanostructure fabrication and lipid bilayer assembly on the surface.

  12. Effect of divalent cations on the assembly of neutral and charged phospholipid bilayers in patch-recording pipettes.

    PubMed Central

    Coronado, R

    1985-01-01

    Monolayers of the negatively charged phospholipid phosphatidylserine (PS) and of the amphoteric phospholipid dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) were used to assemble bilayers at the tip of patch-recording pipettes. PS bilayers, with seal resistances in the range of gigaohmns (gigaseals), could only be generated when millimolar concentration of divalent cations, Ca++, Mg++, or Ba++ were present in the pipette and bath solutions. In contrast, gigaseals of DOPE were independent of divalent ion concentration in the pH range where DOPE is predominantly neutral (pH 6.5) or positively charged (pH 1.5). At pH 10.0, when most DOPE molecules bear a net negative charge, gigaseals became divalent cation dependent, in a manner quantitatively similar to that of PS at neutral pH. The results indicate that divalent cations play an important role in stabilizing gigaseals of negatively charged lipid but are of no consequence in neutral or positively charged seals. PMID:4016202

  13. Conformation of alamethicin in oriented phospholipid bilayers determined by (15)N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Bak, M; Bywater, R P; Hohwy, M; Thomsen, J K; Adelhorst, K; Jakobsen, H J; Sørensen, O W; Nielsen, N C

    2001-01-01

    The conformation of the 20-residue antibiotic ionophore alamethicin in macroscopically oriented phospholipid bilayers has been studied using (15)N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in combination with molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Differently (15)N-labeled variants of alamethicin and an analog with three of the alpha-amino-isobutyric acid residues replaced by alanines have been investigated to establish experimental structural constraints and determine the orientation of alamethicin in hydrated phospholipid (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) bilayers and to investigate the potential for a major kink in the region of the central Pro(14) residue. From the anisotropic (15)N chemical shifts and (1)H-(15)N dipolar couplings determined for alamethicin with (15)N-labeling on the Ala(6), Val(9), and Val(15) residues and incorporated into phospholipid bilayer with a peptide:lipid molar ratio of 1:8, we deduce that alamethicin has a largely linear alpha-helical structure spanning the membrane with the molecular axis tilted by 10-20 degrees relative to the bilayer normal. In particular, we find compatibility with a straight alpha-helix tilted by 17 degrees and a slightly kinked molecular dynamics structure tilted by 11 degrees relative to the bilayer normal. In contrast, the structural constraints derived by solid-state NMR appear not to be compatible with any of several model structures crossing the membrane with vanishing tilt angle or the earlier reported x-ray diffraction structure (Fox and Richards, Nature. 300:325-330, 1982). The solid-state NMR-compatible structures may support the formation of a left-handed and parallel multimeric ion channel. PMID:11509381

  14. Phospholipid bilayer relaxation dynamics as revealed by the pulsed electron-electron double resonance of spin labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syryamina, V. N.; Dzuba, S. A.

    2012-10-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy in the form of pulsed electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) was applied to 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) phospholipid bilayers containing lipids that were spin-labeled at different carbon positions along the lipid acyl chain. Pulsed ELDOR detects motionally induced spin flips of nitrogen nuclei in the nitroxide spin labels, which manifests itself as magnetization transfer (MT) in the nitroxide EPR spectrum. The MT effect was observed over a wide temperature range (100-225 K) on a microsecond time scale. In line with a previous study on molecular glasses [N. P. Isaev and S. A. Dzuba, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 094508 (2011), 10.1063/1.3633241], the motions that induce MT effect were suggested to have the same nature as those in dielectric secondary (β) Johari-Goldstein fast relaxation. The results were compared with literature dielectric relaxation data for POPC bilayers, revealing some common features. Molecular motions resulting in MT are faster for deeper spin labels in the membrane interior. The addition of cholesterol to the bilayer suppresses the lipid motions near the steroid nucleus and accelerates the lipid motions beyond the steroid nucleus, in the bilayer interior. This finding was attributed to the lipid acyl chains being more ordered near the steroid nucleus and less ordered in the bilayer interior. The motions are absent in dry lipids, indicating that the motions are determined by intermolecular interactions in the bilayer.

  15. Gramicidin conformational studies with mixed-chain unsaturated phospholipid bilayer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, K.J.; Ho, Cojen; Lombardi, J.V.; Stubbs, C.D. )

    1992-02-04

    The transition of gramicidin from a nonchannel to a channel form was investigated using mixed-chain phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. Gramicidin and phospholipids were codispersed, after removal of the solvents chloroform/methanol or trifluoroethanol which resulted in nonchannel and channel conformations, respectively, as confirmed using circular dichroism (CD). The fluorescence emission maxima of the nonchannel form were shifted toward shorter wavelengths by heating at 60C (for 0-12 h), which converted it to a channel form, again as confirmed by CD. The channel form did not respond to heat treatment. Heat treatment also increased the fluorescence anisotropy of the nonchannel gramicidin tryptophans. The rate of transition from the nonchannel to channel conformation was found to be faster is phosphatidylethanolamine was present in combination with phosphatidylcholine compared to phosphatidylcholine alone. Using the fluorescence anisotropy of the membrane lipid probe, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, it was also shown that the motional properties of the surrounding lipid acyl chains differed for the channel and nonchannel gramicidin conformations. The possibility that lipids tending to favor the hexagonal phase (H{sub II}) would enhance the rate of the nonchannel to channel transition was supported by {sup 31}P NMR which revealed the presence of some H{sub II} lipids in the channel preparations. The results of this study suggest that gramicidin may serve as a useful model for similar conformational transitions in other more complex membrane proteins.

  16. Anthrax toxin: channel-forming activity of protective antigen in planar phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Blaustein, R O; Koehler, T M; Collier, R J; Finkelstein, A

    1989-01-01

    The three separate proteins that make up anthrax toxin--protective antigen (PA), edema factor (EF), and lethal factor (LF)--act in binary combinations to produce two distinct reactions in experimental animals: edema (PA + EF) and death (PA + LF). PA is believed to interact with a membrane receptor, and after proteolytic processing, to mediate endocytosis and subsequent translocation of EF or LF into the cytosol. PA can be separated, after mild trypsinolysis, into two fragments, PA65 (65 kDa) and PA20 (20 kDa). We demonstrate that trypsin-cleaved PA is capable of forming cation-selective channels in planar phospholipid bilayer membranes and that this activity is confined to the PA65 fragment; PA20, LF, and EF are devoid of channel-forming activity. These PA65 channels exhibit pH-dependent and voltage-dependent activity--a property reminiscent of the channels formed by the two-chain proteins diphtheria, tetanus, and botulinum toxins. Images PMID:2467303

  17. Structure-Based Prediction of Drug Distribution Across the Headgroup and Core Strata of a Phospholipid Bilayer Using Surrogate Phases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Solvation of drugs in the core (C) and headgroup (H) strata of phospholipid bilayers affects their physiological transport rates and accumulation. These characteristics, especially a complete drug distribution profile across the bilayer strata, are tedious to obtain experimentally, to the point that even simplified preferred locations are only available for a few dozen compounds. Recently, we showed that the partition coefficient (P) values in the system of hydrated diacetyl phosphatidylcholine (DAcPC) and n-hexadecane (C16), as surrogates of the H- and C-strata of the bilayer composed of the most abundant mammalian phospholipid, PC, agree well with the preferred bilayer location of compounds. High P values are typical for lipophiles accumulating in the core, and low P values are characteristic of cephalophiles preferring the headgroups. This simple pattern does not hold for most compounds, which usually have more even distribution and may also accumulate at the H/C interface. To model complete distribution, the correlates of solvation energies are needed for each drug state in the bilayer: (1) for the H-stratum it is the DAcPC/W P value, calculated as the ratio of the C16/W and C16/DAcPC (W for water) P values; (2) for the C-stratum, the C16/W P value; (3) for the H/C interface, the P values for all plausible molecular poses are characterized using the fragment DAcPC/W and C16/W solvation parameters for the parts of the molecule embedded in the H- and C-strata, respectively. The correlates, each scaled by two Collander coefficients, were used in a nonlinear, mass-balance based model of intrabilayer distribution, which was applied to the easily measurable overall P values of compounds in the DMPC (M = myristoyl) bilayers and monolayers as the dependent variables. The calibrated model for 107 neutral compounds explains 94% of experimental variance, achieves similar cross-validation levels, and agrees well with the nontrivial, experimentally determined bilayer

  18. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor recognition of endocannabinoids via the lipid bilayer: molecular dynamics simulations of CB1 transmembrane helix 6 and anandamide in a phospholipid bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Diane L.; Reggio, Patricia H.

    2006-08-01

    The phospholipid bilayer plays a central role in the lifecycle of the endogenous cannabinoid, N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide, AEA). Therefore, the orientation and location of AEA in the phospholipid bilayer with respect to key membrane associated proteins, is a central issue in understanding the mechanism of endocannabinoid signaling. In this paper, we report a test of the hypothesis that a βXX β motif (formed by beta branching amino acids, V6.43 and I6.46) on the lipid face of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor in its inactive state may serve as an initial CB1 interaction site for AEA. Eight 6 ns NAMD2 molecular dynamics simulations of AEA were conducted in a model system composed of CB1 transmembrane helix 6 (TMH6) in a 1,2-dioleoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayer. In addition, eight 6 ns NAMD2 molecular dynamics simulations of a low CB1 affinity (20:2, n-6) analog of AEA were conducted in the same model system. AEA was found to exhibit a higher incidence of V6.43/I6.46 groove insertion than did the (20:2, n-6) analog. In certain cases, AEA established a high energy of interaction with TMH6 by first associating with the V6.43/I6.46 groove and then molding itself to the lipid face of TMH6 to establish a hydrogen bonding interaction with the exposed backbone carbonyl of P6.50. Based upon these results, we propose that the formation of this hydrogen bonded AEA/TMH6 complex may be the initial step in CB1 recognition of AEA in the lipid bilayer.

  19. Creation and Relaxation of Phospholipid Compositional Asymmetry in Lipid Bilayers Examined by Sum-Frequency Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglin, Timothy C.; Brown, Krystal; Conboy, John C.

    2010-08-01

    Eukaryotic cells contain an asymmetric distribution of phospholipids in the two leaflets of the lipid bilayer which is known to contribute to cellular function. In the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells, the aminophospholipids with phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) headgroups are predominately located on the cytosolic leaflet while sphingolipids with phosphatidylcholine (PC) headgroups and sphingomeylin are on the extra-cellular leaflet. There have been a number of theories about the mechanism of transbilayer movement of lipids in cellular systems and the physical process by which lipid compositional asymmetry in the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells is maintained. It is generally accepted that a significant barrier to native lipid translocation (movement between leaflets of the bilayer) exists which is related to the energetic penalty of moving the hydrophilic headgroup of a phospholipid through the hydrophobic core of the membrane. Overcoming this energetic barrier represents the rate limiting step in the spontaneous flip-flop of phospholipids in biological membranes, yet, while numerous kinetic studies of phospholipid flip-flop have been conducted, few researchers have reported thermodynamic parameters for the process. Using methods of classical surface chemistry coupled with nonlinear optical methods, we have developed a novel analytical approach, using sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy (SFVS), to selectively probe lipid compositional asymmetry in a planar supported lipid bilayer. This new method allows for the detection of lipid flip-flop kinetics and compositional asymmetry without the need for a fluorescent or spin-labeled lipid species by exploiting the coherent nature of SFVS. The SFVS intensity arising from the terminal methyl groups of the lipid fatty acid chains is used as an internal probe to directly monitor the compositional asymmetry in planar supported lipid bilayers (PSLBs(. By selectively deuterating a sub

  20. Permeation of protons, potassium ions, and small polar molecules through phospholipid bilayers as a function of membrane thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paula, S.; Volkov, A. G.; Van Hoek, A. N.; Haines, T. H.; Deamer, D. W.

    1996-01-01

    Two mechanisms have been proposed to account for solute permeation of lipid bilayers. Partitioning into the hydrophobic phase of the bilayer, followed by diffusion, is accepted by many for the permeation of water and other small neutral solutes, but transient pores have also been proposed to account for both water and ionic solute permeation. These two mechanisms make distinctively different predictions about the permeability coefficient as a function of bilayer thickness. Whereas the solubility-diffusion mechanism predicts only a modest variation related to bilayer thickness, the pore model predicts an exponential relationship. To test these models, we measured the permeability of phospholipid bilayers to protons, potassium ions, water, urea, and glycerol. Bilayers were prepared as liposomes, and thickness was varied systematically by using unsaturated lipids with chain lengths ranging from 14 to 24 carbon atoms. The permeability coefficient of water and neutral polar solutes displayed a modest dependence on bilayer thickness, with an approximately linear fivefold decrease as the carbon number varied from 14 to 24 atoms. In contrast, the permeability to protons and potassium ions decreased sharply by two orders of magnitude between 14 and 18 carbon atoms, and leveled off, when the chain length was further extended to 24 carbon atoms. The results for water and the neutral permeating solutes are best explained by the solubility-diffusion mechanism. The results for protons and potassium ions in shorter-chain lipids are consistent with the transient pore model, but better fit the theoretical line predicted by the solubility-diffusion model at longer chain lengths.

  1. Single channel evidence for innate pore-formation by Vibrio parahaemolyticus thermostable direct haemolysin (TDH) in phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Simon P; Nakano, Masayuki; Iida, Tetsuya

    2004-11-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus thermostable direct haemolysin (TDH) is widely considered to be a pore-forming toxin. The protein has no significant homology to other known pore-forming toxins and its mechanism of action in vivo remains undefined. We demonstrate single channel pore-forming activity of V. parahaemolyticus TDH in planar lipid bilayers. Channel conductance ranged between 30-450 pS in 0.5 M KCl with a calculated cation selectivity (P(K)/P(Cl)) of 2.7. Channels were formed in NaCl and choline-Cl with and without cholesterol present and in the presence of neutral or negatively charged phospholipids. Zinc ions did not block pore formation. Whilst various techniques have previously suggested that TDH is a pore-forming toxin, the data in this study provide direct single channel evidence and indicate several features of pore formation in synthetic phospholipid membranes.

  2. Phospholipid bilayer-perturbing properties underlying lysis induced by pH-sensitive cationic lysine-based surfactants in biomembranes.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Daniele Rubert; Mitjans, Montserrat; Busquets, M Antonia; Pérez, Lourdes; Vinardell, M Pilar

    2012-08-14

    Amino acid-based surfactants constitute an important class of natural surface-active biomolecules with an unpredictable number of industrial applications. To gain a better mechanistic understanding of surfactant-induced membrane destabilization, we assessed the phospholipid bilayer-perturbing properties of new cationic lysine-based surfactants. We used erythrocytes as biomembrane models to study the hemolytic activity of surfactants and their effects on cells' osmotic resistance and morphology, as well as on membrane fluidity and membrane protein profile with varying pH. The antihemolytic capacity of amphiphiles correlated negatively with the length of the alkyl chain. Anisotropy measurements showed that the pH-sensitive surfactants, with the positive charge on the α-amino group of lysine, significantly increased membrane fluidity at acidic conditions. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that surfactants induced significant degradation of membrane proteins in hypo-osmotic medium and at pH 5.4. By scanning electron microscopy examinations, we corroborated the interaction of surfactants with lipid bilayer. We found that varying the surfactant chemical structure is a way to modulate the positioning of the molecule inside bilayer and, thus, the overall effect on the membrane. Our work showed that pH-sensitive lysine-based surfactants significantly disturb the lipid bilayer of biomembranes especially at acidic conditions, which suggests that these compounds are promising as a new class of multifunctional bioactive excipients for active intracellular drug delivery.

  3. Interaction of beta-lactoglobulin with phospholipid bilayers: a molecular level elucidation as revealed by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, T; Subirade, M

    2000-10-10

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to study, at a molecular level, the interactions between beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), the most abundant globular protein in milk, and some lipids (sphingomyelin, SM; dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, DMPC; dipalmytoylphosphatidylcholine, DPPC; dimyristoylphosphatidylserine-sodium salt, DMPS; dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine-sodium salt, DPPS) constituting the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM). The interactions were monitored with respect to alteration in the secondary structure of BLG, as registered by the amide I' band, and phospholipid conformation, as revealed by the acyl chain and carbonyl bands. The results show that neither the conformation nor the thermotropism of neutral bilayers containing DMPC or DPPC is affected by BLG. Reciprocally, the secondary structure and thermal behaviour of pure BLG remain the same in the presence of PC. These results suggest that no interaction occurs between PC and BLG, in agreement with previous studies. However, it is found that BLG interacts with neutral bilayers constituted by milk SM lipids, increasing gauche conformers and thus conformational disorder of the lipid acyl chains. This perturbing effect has been attributed to a partial penetration of BLG into the hydrophobic core of the bilayer, which allows hydrophobic interactions between BLG and SM. Moreover, the fact that SM possesses the same headgroup of PC implies that the head group does not prevent the occurrence of BLG-lipid interactions and other lipid regions can control the binding of BLG to lipids. Furthermore, BLG was found to interact electrostatically with charged bilayers containing PS, leading to a rigidification of the lipid hydrocarbon chains and a dehydration of the interfacial region. This last effect suggests that the protein limits the accessibility of water molecules to the interfacial region of the phospholipids by its presence at the membrane surface.

  4. Permeation of halide anions through phospholipid bilayers occurs by the solubility-diffusion mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paula, S.; Volkov, A. G.; Deamer, D. W.

    1998-01-01

    Two alternative mechanisms are frequently used to describe ionic permeation of lipid bilayers. In the first, ions partition into the hydrophobic phase and then diffuse across (the solubility-diffusion mechanism). The second mechanism assumes that ions traverse the bilayer through transient hydrophilic defects caused by thermal fluctuations (the pore mechanism). The theoretical predictions made by both models were tested for halide anions by measuring the permeability coefficients for chloride, bromide, and iodide as a function of bilayer thickness, ionic radius, and sign of charge. To vary the bilayer thickness systematically, liposomes were prepared from monounsaturated phosphatidylcholines (PC) with chain lengths between 16 and 24 carbon atoms. The fluorescent dye MQAE (N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide) served as an indicator for halide concentration inside the liposomes and was used to follow the kinetics of halide flux across the bilayer membranes. The observed permeability coefficients ranged from 10(-9) to 10(-7) cm/s and increased as the bilayer thickness was reduced. Bromide was found to permeate approximately six times faster than chloride through bilayers of identical thickness, and iodide permeated three to four times faster than bromide. The dependence of the halide permeability coefficients on bilayer thickness and on ionic size were consistent with permeation of hydrated ions by a solubility-diffusion mechanism rather than through transient pores. Halide permeation therefore differs from that of a monovalent cation such as potassium, which has been accounted for by a combination of the two mechanisms depending on bilayer thickness.

  5. Interactions stabilizing the C-terminal helix of human phospholipid scramblase 1 in lipid bilayers: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Venken, Tom; Schillinger, Anne-Sophie; Fuglebakk, Edvin; Reuter, Nathalie

    2017-03-31

    The human phospholipid scramblase 1 (SCR) distributes lipids non-selectively between the cellular membrane leaflets. SCR has long been thought to be mostly localized in the cytoplasm (amino acids 1-287) and anchored to the membrane via the insertion of a 19 amino acid long transmembrane C-terminal helix (CTH, 288-306), which further extends to the exoplasmic side with a 12 amino acid long tail (307-318). Little is known about the structure of this protein, but recent experimental data on two CTH peptides (288-306 and 288-318) show that they insert through phospholipid bilayers and that the presence of cholesterol improves their affinity for lipid vesicles. Yet the sequence of the CTH ((288)KMKAVMIGACFLIDFMFFE(306)) contains an aspartic acid (D301), which is not exactly a prototypical amino acid for single-pass transmembrane helices. In this study, we investigate how the polar aspartate residue is accommodated in lipid bilayers containing POPC with and without cholesterol, using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We identify two cholesterol-binding sites: (i) A291, F298 and L299 and (ii) L299, F302 and E306 and suggest that cholesterol plays a role in stabilizing the helix in a transmembrane position. We suggest that the presence of the aspartate could be functionally relevant for the scramblase protein activity.

  6. On the application of the MARTINI coarse-grained model to immersion of a protein in a phospholipid bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafa, Ghulam E-mail: rebecca.wade@h-its.org; Nandekar, Prajwal P.; Yu, Xiaofeng; Wade, Rebecca C. E-mail: rebecca.wade@h-its.org

    2015-12-28

    An important step in the simulation of a membrane protein in a phospholipid bilayer is the correct immersion of the protein in the bilayer. Crystal structures are determined without the bilayer. Particularly for proteins with monotopic domains, it can be unclear how deeply and in which orientation the protein is being inserted in the membrane. We have previously developed a procedure combining coarse-grain (CG) with all-atom (AA) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to insert and simulate a cytochrome P450 (CYP) possessing an N-terminal transmembrane helix connected by a flexible linker region to a globular domain that dips into the membrane. The CG simulations provide a computationally efficient means to explore different orientations and conformations of the CYP in the membrane. Converged configurations obtained in the CG simulations are then refined in AA simulations. Here, we tested different variants of the MARTINI CG model, differing in the water model, the treatment of long-range non-bonded interactions, and the implementation (GROMACS 4.5.5 vs 5.0.4), for this purpose. We examined the behavior of the models for simulating a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer in water and for the immersion of CYP3A4 in a POPC bilayer, and compared the CG-MD results with the previously reported experimental and simulation results. We also tested the methodology on a set of four other CYPs. Finally, we propose an optimized protocol for modeling such protein-membrane systems that provides the most plausible configurations and is computationally efficient; this incorporates the standard non-polar water model and the GROMACS 5.0.4 implementation with a reaction field treatment of long-range interactions.

  7. On the application of the MARTINI coarse-grained model to immersion of a protein in a phospholipid bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Ghulam; Nandekar, Prajwal P.; Yu, Xiaofeng; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2015-12-01

    An important step in the simulation of a membrane protein in a phospholipid bilayer is the correct immersion of the protein in the bilayer. Crystal structures are determined without the bilayer. Particularly for proteins with monotopic domains, it can be unclear how deeply and in which orientation the protein is being inserted in the membrane. We have previously developed a procedure combining coarse-grain (CG) with all-atom (AA) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to insert and simulate a cytochrome P450 (CYP) possessing an N-terminal transmembrane helix connected by a flexible linker region to a globular domain that dips into the membrane. The CG simulations provide a computationally efficient means to explore different orientations and conformations of the CYP in the membrane. Converged configurations obtained in the CG simulations are then refined in AA simulations. Here, we tested different variants of the MARTINI CG model, differing in the water model, the treatment of long-range non-bonded interactions, and the implementation (GROMACS 4.5.5 vs 5.0.4), for this purpose. We examined the behavior of the models for simulating a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer in water and for the immersion of CYP3A4 in a POPC bilayer, and compared the CG-MD results with the previously reported experimental and simulation results. We also tested the methodology on a set of four other CYPs. Finally, we propose an optimized protocol for modeling such protein-membrane systems that provides the most plausible configurations and is computationally efficient; this incorporates the standard non-polar water model and the GROMACS 5.0.4 implementation with a reaction field treatment of long-range interactions.

  8. Direct proof of spontaneous translocation of lipid-covered hydrophobic nanoparticles through a phospholipid bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yachong; Terazzi, Emmanuel; Seemann, Ralf; Fleury, Jean Baptiste; Baulin, Vladimir A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic nanoparticles introduced into living systems may lead to increased toxicity, can activate immune cells, or can be used as nanocarriers for drug or gene delivery. It is generally accepted that small hydrophobic nanoparticles are blocked by lipid bilayers and accumulate in the bilayer core, whereas big nanoparticles can only penetrate cells through slow energy-dependent processes, such as endocytosis, lasting minutes. In contrast to expectations, we demonstrate that lipid-covered hydrophobic nanoparticles may translocate through lipid membranes by direct penetration within milliseconds. We identified the threshold size for translocation: nanoparticles with diameters smaller than 5 nm stay trapped in the bilayer, whereas those with diameters larger than 5 nm insert into the bilayer, opening pores in the bilayer. The direct proof of this size-dependent translocation was provided by an in situ observation of a single event of a nanoparticle quitting the bilayer. This was achieved with a specially designed microfluidic device combining optical fluorescence microscopy with simultaneous electrophysiological measurements. A quantitative analysis of the kinetic pathway of a single nanoparticle translocation event demonstrated that the translocation is irreversible and that the nanoparticle can translocate only once. This newly discovered one-way translocation mechanism provides numerous opportunities for biotechnological applications, ranging from targeted biomaterial elimination and/or delivery to precise and controlled trapping of nanoparticles. PMID:27847863

  9. Probing the Huntingtin 1-17 membrane anchor on a phospholipid bilayer by using all-atom simulations.

    PubMed

    Côté, Sébastien; Binette, Vincent; Salnikov, Evgeniy S; Bechinger, Burkhard; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-03-10

    Mislocalization and aggregation of the huntingtin protein are related to Huntington's disease. Its first exon-more specifically the first 17 amino acids (Htt17)-is crucial for the physiological and pathological functions of huntingtin. It regulates huntingtin's activity through posttranslational modifications and serves as an anchor to membrane-containing organelles of the cell. Recently, structure and orientation of the Htt17 membrane anchor were determined using a combined solution and solid-state NMR approach. This prompted us to refine this model by investigating the dynamics and thermodynamics of this membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer using all-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics and Hamiltonian replica exchange. Our simulations are combined with various experimental measurements to generate a high-resolution atomistic model for the huntingtin Htt17 membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer. More precisely, we observe that the single α-helix structure is more stable in the phospholipid membrane than the NMR model obtained in the presence of dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles. The resulting Htt17 monomer has its hydrophobic plane oriented parallel to the bilayer surface. Our results further unveil the key residues interacting with the membrane in terms of hydrogen bonds, salt-bridges, and nonpolar contributions. We also observe that Htt17 equilibrates at a well-defined insertion depth and that it perturbs the physical properties-order parameter, thickness, and area per lipid-of the bilayer in a manner that could favor its dimerization. Overall, our observations reinforce and refine the NMR measurements on the Htt17 membrane anchor segment of huntingtin that is of fundamental importance to its biological functions.

  10. Insulation of the conduction pathway of muscle transverse tubule calcium channels from the surface charge of bilayer phospholipid

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Functional calcium channels present in purified skeletal muscle transverse tubules were inserted into planar phospholipid bilayers composed of the neutral lipid phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), the negatively charged lipid phosphatidylserine (PS), and mixtures of both. The lengthening of the mean open time and stabilization of single channel fluctuations under constant holding potentials was accomplished by the use of the agonist Bay K8644. It was found that the barium current carried through the channel saturates as a function of the BaCl2 concentration at a maximum current of 0.6 pA (at a holding potential of 0 mV) and a half-saturation value of 40 mM. Under saturation, the slope conductance of the channel is 20 pS at voltages more negative than -50 mV and 13 pS at a holding potential of 0 mV. At barium concentrations above and below the half-saturation point, the open channel currents were independent of the bilayer mole fraction of PS from XPS = 0 (pure PE) to XPS = 1.0 (pure PS). It is shown that in the absence of barium, the calcium channel transports sodium or potassium ions (P Na/PK = 1.4) at saturating rates higher than those for barium alone. The sodium conductance in pure PE bilayers saturates as a function of NaCl concentration, following a curve that can be described as a rectangular hyperbola with a half-saturation value of 200 mM and a maximum conductance of 68 pS (slope conductance at a holding potential of 0 mV). In pure PS bilayers, the sodium conductance is about twice that measured in PE at concentrations below 100 mM NaCl. The maximum channel conductance at high ionic strength is unaffected by the lipid charge. This effect at low ionic strength was analyzed according to J. Bell and C. Miller (1984. Biophysical Journal. 45:279- 287) and interpreted as if the conduction pathway of the calcium channel were separated from the bilayer lipid by approximately 20 A. This distance thereby effectively insulates the ion entry to the channel from the bulk of

  11. Structure and dynamics of a hydrated phospholipid bilayer in the presence of a silica substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCune, Matthew; Kosztin, Ioan

    We study the structure and dynamics of a hydrated diyristoyl-phosphatidycholine (DMPC) lipid bilayer supported on a silica substrate using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. A similar MD simulation of a freestanding DMPC bilayer is used as a reference to determine changes to both lipid and hydration water properties due to the introduction of the substrate. Long time (0.1 microsecond) MD trajectories were used to investigate the effect of the substrate on the structure and dynamics of the lipid bilayer by determining (i) the spatial distribution of water molecules and selected lipid atoms; (ii) the out of plane fluctuations of the lipid molecules; (iii) the dipole moment orientation of hydration waters; and (iv) the lateral mean-square-displacement of both lipid and water molecules. The obtained results suggest that (i) at equilibrium the space between the substrate and lipid bilayer is filled by only hydration water; (ii) the presence of the substrate has no major influence on the structure of hydration water layers and on the out-of-plane fluctuations of the lipids; and (iii) the silica substrate alters considerably the lateral diffusion of the lipids in the closest bilayer leaflet and the hydration waters between the substrate and DMPC membrane. The reported results appear to be consistent with previous MD and neutron scattering studies. Work supported by National Science Foundation Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (DGE-1069091). The computations were performed on the HPC resources at the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium (UMBC).

  12. Membrane skeleton-bilayer interaction is not the major determinant of membrane phospholipid asymmetry in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gudi, S R; Kumar, A; Bhakuni, V; Gokhale, S M; Gupta, C M

    1990-03-30

    Transbilayer phospholipid distribution, membrane skeleton dissociation/association, and spectrin structure have been analysed in human erythrocytes after subjecting them to heating at 50 degrees C for 15 min. The membrane skeleton dissociation/association was determined by measuring the Tris-induced dissociation of Triton-insoluble membrane skeletons (Triton shells), the spectrin-actin extractability under low ionic conditions, and the binding of spectrin-actin with normal erythrocyte membrane inside-out vesicles (IOVs). The spectrin structure was ascertained by measuring the spectrin dimer-to-tetramer ratio as well as the spectrin tryptophan fluorescence. Both the Tris-induced Triton shell dissociation and the spectrin-actin extractability under low ionic conditions were considerably reduced by the heat treatment. Also, the binding of heated erythrocyte spectrin-actin to IOVs was significantly smaller than that observed with the normal cell spectrin-actin. Further, the quantity of spectrin dimers was appreciably increased in heat-treated erythrocytes as compared to the normal cells. This change in the spectrin dimer-to-tetramer ratio was accompanied by marked changes in the spectrin tryptophan fluorescence. In spite of these heat-induced alterations in structure and bilayer interactions of the membrane skeleton, the inside-outside glycerophospholipid distribution remained virtually unaffected in the heat-treated cells, as judged by employing bee venom and pancreatic phospholipase A2, fluorescamine and Merocyanine 540 as the external membrane probes. These results strongly indicate that membrane bilayer-skeleton interaction is not the major factor in determining the transbilayer phospholipid asymmetry in human erythrocyte membrane.

  13. A new method for studying the interaction between chlorpromazine and phospholipid bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Lixue; Liu Jiyang; Wang Erkang

    2008-08-22

    The spectroscopic and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of interaction between chlorpromazine (CPZ) and dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) bilayer by using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as probes are reported. The DMPG bilayer-protected AuNPs were prepared by a simple one-step method. The DMPG bilayer tethered on the AuNPs was considered as a biomembrane model. The addition of CPZ affected the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and morphology of the prepared AuNPs, and this effect was monitored by UV-vis spectroscopy and TEM. The interaction between CPZ and DMPG bialyer was CPZ concentration-dependent, and the possible mechanism was discussed. This simple and facile method may be quite general and work for other surface active drug-biomembrane or protein-biomembrane interactions.

  14. Raman identification of edge alignment of bilayer graphene down to the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Li, Qiao-Qiao; Han, Wen-Peng; Lu, Yan; Shi, Wei; Wu, Jiang-Bin; Mikhaylushkin, Arkady S; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2014-07-07

    The ideal edges of bilayer graphene (BLG) are that the edges of the top and bottom graphene layers (GLs) of BLG are well-aligned. Actually, the alignment distance between the edges of the top and bottom GLs of a real BLG can be as large as the submicrometer scale or as small as zero, which cannot be distinguished using an optical microscope. Here, we present a detailed Raman study on BLG at its edges. If the alignment distance of the top and bottom GLs of BLG is larger than the laser spot, the measured D mode at the edge of the top GL of BLG shows a similar spectral profile to that of disordered BLG. If the alignment distance is smaller than the laser spot, the D mode at a real BLG edge shows three typical spectral profiles similar to that at the edge of SLG, that of the well-aligned edge of BLG, or a combination of both. We show the sensitivity and ability of Raman spectroscopy to acquire the alignment distance between two edges of top and bottom GLs of BLG as small as several nanometers, which is far beyond the diffraction limit of a laser spot. This work opens the possibility to probe the edge alignment of multi-layer graphene.

  15. Sorption of Cationic Surfactants to Artificial Cell Membranes: Comparing Phospholipid Bilayers with Monolayer Coatings and Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Timmer, Niels; Droge, Steven T J

    2017-03-07

    This study reports the distribution coefficient between phospholipid bilayer membranes and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) medium (DMW,PBS) for 19 cationic surfactants. The method used a sorbent dilution series with solid supported lipid membranes (SSLMs). The existing SSLM protocol, applying a 96 well plate setup, was adapted to use 1.5 mL glass autosampler vials instead, which facilitated sampling and circumvented several confounding loss processes for some of the cationic surfactants. About 1% of the phospholipids were found to be detached from the SSLM beads, resulting in nonlinear sorption isotherms for compounds with log DMW values above 4. Renewal of the medium resulted in linear sorption isotherms. DMW values determined at pH 5.4 demonstrated that cationic surfactant species account for the observed DMW,PBS. Log DMW,PBS values above 5.5 are only experimentally feasible with lower LC-MS/MS detection limits and/or concentrated extracts of the aqueous samples. Based on the number of carbon atoms, dialkylamines showed a considerably lower sorption affinity than linear alkylamine analogues. These SSLM results closely overlapped with measurements on a chromatographic tool based on immobilized artificial membranes (IAM-HPLC) and with quantum-chemistry based calculations with COSMOmic. The SSLM data suggest that IAM-HPLC underestimates the DMW of ionized primary and secondary alkylamines by 0.8 and 0.5 log units, respectively.

  16. Sorption of Cationic Surfactants to Artificial Cell Membranes: Comparing Phospholipid Bilayers with Monolayer Coatings and Molecular Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This study reports the distribution coefficient between phospholipid bilayer membranes and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) medium (DMW,PBS) for 19 cationic surfactants. The method used a sorbent dilution series with solid supported lipid membranes (SSLMs). The existing SSLM protocol, applying a 96 well plate setup, was adapted to use 1.5 mL glass autosampler vials instead, which facilitated sampling and circumvented several confounding loss processes for some of the cationic surfactants. About 1% of the phospholipids were found to be detached from the SSLM beads, resulting in nonlinear sorption isotherms for compounds with log DMW values above 4. Renewal of the medium resulted in linear sorption isotherms. DMW values determined at pH 5.4 demonstrated that cationic surfactant species account for the observed DMW,PBS. Log DMW,PBS values above 5.5 are only experimentally feasible with lower LC-MS/MS detection limits and/or concentrated extracts of the aqueous samples. Based on the number of carbon atoms, dialkylamines showed a considerably lower sorption affinity than linear alkylamine analogues. These SSLM results closely overlapped with measurements on a chromatographic tool based on immobilized artificial membranes (IAM-HPLC) and with quantum-chemistry based calculations with COSMOmic. The SSLM data suggest that IAM-HPLC underestimates the DMW of ionized primary and secondary alkylamines by 0.8 and 0.5 log units, respectively. PMID:28187261

  17. Retardance of bilayer anisotropic samples consisting of well-aligned cylindrical scatterers and birefringent media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yihong; Zeng, Nan; He, Honghui; Liu, Celong; Du, E.; He, Yonghong; Ma, Hui

    2016-05-01

    Both cylindrical scatterers and birefringent media may contribute to the anisotropy of tissue, where anisotropy can be characterized using polarization techniques. Our previous studies have shown that a layer of well-aligned cylindrical scatterers displays anisotropic properties similar to those of a piece of birefringent media, whose equivalent extraordinary axis is along the axial direction of the cylinders. We focused on a sample consisting of two layers of anisotropic media, with each layer having a different orientation; the characteristics of this sample were representative of the properties of multilayer fibrous tissues. Using a Mueller matrix decomposition method, we examined in detail how the total retardance and the equivalent extraordinary axis of the bilayered sample varied with changes in the retardance of the two layers and the direction of the extraordinary axis. The results of this study showed that, in such bilayer samples, a layer of well-aligned cylindrical scatterers generated a retardance that behaved exactly like the retardance generated by a piece of birefringent media. The simulated results were also confirmed by the results of experiments using aligned glass fibers.

  18. Structure of (KIAGKIA)3 aggregates in phospholipid bilayers by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Toke, Orsolya; O'Connor, R D; Weldeghiorghis, Thomas K; Maloy, W Lee; Glaser, Ralf W; Ulrich, Anne S; Schaefer, Jacob

    2004-07-01

    The interchain (13)C-(19)F dipolar coupling measured in a rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) experiment performed on mixtures of differently labeled KIAGKIA-KIAGKIA-KIAGKIA (K3) peptides (one specifically (13)C labeled, and the other specifically (19)F labeled) in multilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (1:1) shows that K3 forms close-packed clusters, primarily dimers, in bilayers at a lipid/peptide molar ratio (L/P) of 20. Dipolar coupling to additional peptides is weaker than that within the dimers, consistent with aggregates of monomers and dimers. Analysis of the sideband dephasing rates indicates a preferred orientation between the peptide chains of the dimers. The combination of the distance and orientation information from REDOR is consistent with a parallel (N-N) dimer structure in which two K3 helices intersect at a cross-angle of approximately 20 degrees. Static (19)F NMR experiments performed on K3 in oriented lipid bilayers show that between L/P = 200 and L/P = 20, K3 chains change their absolute orientation with respect to the membrane normal. This result suggests that the K3 dimers detected by REDOR at L/P = 20 are not on the surface of the bilayer but are in a membrane pore.

  19. Molecular order and dynamics in bilayers consisting of highly polyunsaturated phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, D C; Litman, B J

    1998-01-01

    The time-resolved fluorescence emission and decay of fluorescence anisotropy of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) was used to characterize equilibrium and dynamic bilayer structural properties of symmetrically substituted phosphatidylcholines (PCs) with acyl chains containing no, one, four, or six double bonds and mixed-chain phosphatidylcholines with a saturated sn-1 chain and one, four, or six double bonds in the sn-2 chain. Both the Brownian rotational diffusion (BRD) model and the wobble-in-cone model were fit to all differential polarization data, and the descriptions of the data provided by the BRD model were found to be statistically superior. Global analysis of differential polarization data revealed two statistically equivalent solutions. The solution corresponding to a bimodal orientational distribution function, f(theta), was selected based on the effects of temperature on f(theta) and previous measurements on fixed, oriented bilayers. The overall equilibrium acyl chain order in these bilayers was analyzed by comparing the orientational probability distribution for DPH, f(theta) sin theta, with a random orientational distribution. Orientational order decreased and probe dynamics increased in mixed-chain species as the unsaturation of the sn-2 chain was increased. The degree of orientational order dropped dramatically in the dipolyunsaturated species compared with the mixed-chain phosphatidylcholines, which contained a polyunsaturated sn-2 chain. In terms of both orientational order and probe dynamics, the differences between the highly polyunsaturated species and the monounsaturated species were much greater than the differences between the monounsaturated species and a disaturated PC. PMID:9533699

  20. Evidence for a regular distribution of cholesterol in phospholipid bilayers from diphenylhexatriene fluorescence.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, D; Wieb van der Meer, B; Chen, S Y

    1995-01-01

    Cholesterol/dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) multilamellar vesicles were studied by steady-state fluorescence using diphenylhexatriene (DPH) as a probe. A series of dips were found in the plot of DPH fluorescence intensity versus cholesterol concentration at certain specific cholesterol concentrations. This observation indicates that there are dominant domains in which cholesterol molecules are regularly distributed on a hexagonal superlattice in the acyl chain matrix of DMPC at critical cholesterol concentrations. These concentrations can be predicted by an equation or a mathematical series, except the one at 33 mol %. These dips of DPH fluorescence intensity are temperature dependent. The excellent agreement between experimental data and calculated values as well as similar previous findings of dips and/or kinks in the excimer-over-monomer fluorescence in pyrenephosphatidylcholine/phospholipid mixtures confirm our conclusion about lateral organizations of cholesterol and acyl lipid chains in cholesterol/phospholipid multilamellar vesicles. The regular distribution model at critical concentration is consistent with the phase diagram of cholesterol/DMPC. Using the model of regular distribution, the physical origin of the liquid-disordered (Ld) phase, liquid-ordered phase (Lo), and coexistence of liquid-disordered phase and Lo phase (Lo + Ld) is discussed on the molecular level. Images FIGURE 5 PMID:7612836

  1. Solubilization of lipid bilayers by myristyl sucrose ester: effect of cholesterol and phospholipid head group size.

    PubMed

    Toro, C; Sanchez, S A; Zanocco, A; Lemp, E; Gratton, E; Gunther, G

    2009-02-01

    The solubilization of biological membranes by detergents has been used as a major method for the isolation and purification of membrane proteins and other constituents. Considerable interest in this field has resulted from the finding that different components can be solubilized selectively. Certain membrane constituents are incorporated into small micelles, whereas others remain in the so-called detergent-resistant membrane domains that are large enough to be separated by centrifugation. The detergent-resistant fractions contain an elevated percentage of cholesterol, and thus its interaction with specific lipids and proteins may be key for membrane organization and regulation of cellular signaling events. This report focuses on the solubilization process induced by the sucrose monoester of myristic acid, beta-D-fructofuranosyl-6-O-myristyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside (MMS), a nonionic detergent. We studied the effect of the head group and the cholesterol content on the process. 1-Palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and dioctadecyl-dimethyl-ammonium chloride (DODAC) vesicles were used, and the solubilization process was followed using Laurdan (6-dodecanoyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene) generalized polarization (GP) measurements, carried out in the cuvette and in the 2-photon microscope. Our results indicate that: (i) localization of the MMS moieties in the lipid bilayer depends on the characteristics of the lipid polar head group and influences the solubilization process. (ii) Insertion of cholesterol molecules into the lipid bilayer protects it from solubilizaton and (iii) the microscopic mechanism of solubilization by MMS implies the decrease in size of the individual liposomes.

  2. Solubilization of lipid bilayers by myristyl sucrose ester: effect of cholesterol and phospholipid head group size

    PubMed Central

    Toro, C.; Sanchez, S. A.; Zanocco, A.; Lemp, E.; Gratton, E.

    2010-01-01

    The solubilization of biological membranes by detergents has been used as a major method for the isolation and purification of membrane proteins and other constituents. Considerable interest in this field has resulted from the finding that different components can be solubilized selectively. Certain membrane constituents are incorporated into small micelles, whereas others remain in the so-called detergent-resistant membrane domains that are large enough to be separated by centrifugation. The detergent resistant fractions contain an elevated percentage of cholesterol, and thus its interaction with specific lipids and proteins may be key for membrane organization and regulation of cellular signaling events. This report focuses on the solubilization process induced by the sucrose monoester of myristic acid, β-D-Fructofuranosyl-6-O-myristyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (MMS), a nonionic detergent. We studied the effect of the head group and the cholesterol content on the process. 1-Palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and Dioctadecyl dimethylammonium chloride (DODAC) vesicles were used, and the solubilization process was followed using Laurdan (6-Dodecanoyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene) Generalized Polarization (GP) measurements, carried out in the cuvette and in the 2-photon microscope. Our results indicate that: (i) Localization of the MMS moieties in the lipid bilayer depend on the characteristics of the lipid polar head group and influence the solubilization process. (ii) Insertion of cholesterol molecules into the lipid bilayer protects it from solubilizaton and (iii) the microscopic mechanism of solubilization by MMS implies the decrease in size of the individual liposomes. PMID:19071100

  3. Antimicrobial peptides temporins B and L induce formation of tubular lipid protrusions from supported phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Domanov, Yegor A; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2006-12-15

    The binding of the antimicrobial peptides temporins B and L to supported lipid bilayer (SLB) model membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol (4:1, mol/mol) caused the formation of fibrillar protrusions, visible by fluorescent microscopy of both a fluorescent lipid analog and a labeled peptide. Multicolor imaging at low peptide-to-lipid ratios (P/L < approximately 1:5) revealed an initial in-plane segregation of membrane-bound peptide and partial exclusion of lipid from the peptide-enriched areas. Subsequently, at higher P/L numerous flexible lipid fibrils were seen growing from the areas enriched in lipid. The fibrils have diameters <250 nm and lengths of up to approximately 1 mm. Fibril formation reduces the in-plane heterogeneity and results in a relatively even redistribution of bound peptide over the planar bilayer and the fibrils. Physical properties of the lipid fibrils suggest that they have a tubular structure. Our data demonstrate that the peptide-lipid interactions alone can provide a driving force for the spontaneous membrane shape transformations leading to tubule outgrowth and elongation. Further experiments revealed the importance of positive curvature strain in the tubulation process as well as the sufficient positive charge on the peptide (>/=+2). The observed membrane transformations could provide a simplified in vitro model for morphogenesis of intracellular tubular structures and intercellular connections.

  4. Antimicrobial Peptides Temporins B and L Induce Formation of Tubular Lipid Protrusions from Supported Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Domanov, Yegor A.; Kinnunen, Paavo K. J.

    2006-01-01

    The binding of the antimicrobial peptides temporins B and L to supported lipid bilayer (SLB) model membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol (4:1, mol/mol) caused the formation of fibrillar protrusions, visible by fluorescent microscopy of both a fluorescent lipid analog and a labeled peptide. Multicolor imaging at low peptide-to-lipid ratios (P/L < ∼1:5) revealed an initial in-plane segregation of membrane-bound peptide and partial exclusion of lipid from the peptide-enriched areas. Subsequently, at higher P/L numerous flexible lipid fibrils were seen growing from the areas enriched in lipid. The fibrils have diameters <250 nm and lengths of up to ∼1 mm. Fibril formation reduces the in-plane heterogeneity and results in a relatively even redistribution of bound peptide over the planar bilayer and the fibrils. Physical properties of the lipid fibrils suggest that they have a tubular structure. Our data demonstrate that the peptide-lipid interactions alone can provide a driving force for the spontaneous membrane shape transformations leading to tubule outgrowth and elongation. Further experiments revealed the importance of positive curvature strain in the tubulation process as well as the sufficient positive charge on the peptide (≥+2). The observed membrane transformations could provide a simplified in vitro model for morphogenesis of intracellular tubular structures and intercellular connections. PMID:16997872

  5. Characterization of phospholipid bilayer formation on a thin film of porous SiO2 by reflective interferometric Fourier transform spectroscopy (RIFTS).

    PubMed

    Pace, Stéphanie; Seantier, Bastien; Belamie, Emmanuel; Lautrédou, Nicole; Sailor, Michael J; Milhiet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Cunin, Frédérique

    2012-05-01

    Classical methods for characterizing supported artificial phospholipid bilayers include imaging techniques such as atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. The use in the past decade of surface-sensitive methods such as surface plasmon resonance and ellipsometry, and acoustic sensors such as the quartz crystal microbalance, coupled to the imaging methods, have expanded our understanding of the formation mechanisms of phospholipid bilayers. In the present work, reflective interferometric Fourier transform spectrocopy (RIFTS) is employed to monitor the formation of a planar phospholipid bilayer on an oxidized mesoporous Si (pSiO(2)) thin film. The pSiO(2) substrates are prepared as thin films (3 μm thick) with pore dimensions of a few nanometers in diameter by the electrochemical etching of crystalline silicon, and they are passivated with a thin thermal oxide layer. A thin film of mica is used as a control. Interferometric optical measurements are used to quantify the behavior of the phospholipids at the internal (pores) and external surfaces of the substrates. The optical measurements indicate that vesicles initially adsorb to the pSiO(2) surface as a monolayer, followed by vesicle fusion and conversion to a surface-adsorbed lipid bilayer. The timescale of the process is consistent with prior measurements of vesicle fusion onto mica surfaces. Reflectance spectra calculated using a simple double-layer Fabry-Perot interference model verify the experimental results. The method provides a simple, real-time, nondestructive approach to characterizing the growth and evolution of lipid vesicle layers on the surface of an optical thin film.

  6. A modular molecular photovoltaic system based on phospholipid/alkanethiol hybrid bilayers: photocurrent generation and modulation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong; Jiang, Kai; Zhan, Wei

    2011-10-21

    Monolayer quantities of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), incorporated with either fullerenes or ruthenium tris(bipyridyl) (Ru(bpy)(3)(2+)) complexes, were formed on ferrocene-terminated C11-alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) through lipid fusion. Thus formed hybrid structures are characterized by quartz crystal microbalance, UV-vis spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and impedance analysis. In comparison to lipid monolayers deposited on C12-alkanethiol SAMs, photocurrent generation from these ferrocene-based structures is significantly modulated, displaying attenuated anodic photocurrents and enhanced cathodic photocurrents. While a similar trend was observed for the two photoagents studied, the degree of such modulations was always found to be greater in fullerene-incorporated bilayers. These findings are evaluated in the context of the film structure, energetics of the involved photo(electrochemical) species and cross-membrane electron-transfer processes.

  7. Effects of pentanol isomers on the phase behavior of phospholipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Kathryn L; Cheng, Chih-Yin; Smith, Eric A; Dea, Phoebe K

    2010-11-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to analyze the thermotropic phase behavior of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers in the presence of pentanol isomers. The concentration of each pentanol isomer needed to induce the interdigitated phase was determined by the appearance of a biphasic effect in the main transition temperatures, the onset of a hysteresis associated with the main transition from the gel-to-liquid crystalline phase, and the disappearance of the pretransition. Lower threshold concentrations were found to correlate with isomers of greater alkyl chain length while branching of the alkyl chain was found to increase biphasic behavior. The addition of a methyl group to butanol systems drastically decreased threshold concentrations. However, as demonstrated in the DPPC/neopentanol system, branching of the alkyl chain away from the -OH group lowers the threshold concentration while maintaining a biphasic effect.

  8. Acyl chain conformations in phospholipid bilayers: a comparative study of docosahexaenoic acid and saturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Feller, Scott E

    2008-05-01

    A variety of experimental methods indicate unique biophysical properties of membranes containing the highly polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). In the following we review the atomically detailed picture of DHA acyl chains structure and dynamics that has emerged from computational studies of this system in our lab. A comprehensive approach, beginning with ab-initio quantum chemical studies of model compounds representing segments of DHA and ending with large scale classical molecular dynamics simulations of DHA-containing bilayers, is described with particular attention paid to contrasting the properties of DHA with those of saturated fatty acids. Connection with experiment is made primarily through comparison with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies, particularly those that probe details of the chain structure and dynamics. Our computational results suggest that low torsional energy barriers, comparable to kT at physiological conditions, for the rotatable bonds in the DHA chain are the key to the differences observed between polyunsaturated and saturated acyl chains.

  9. Investigating the interactions of resveratrol with phospholipid vesicle bilayer and the skin: NMR studies and confocal imaging.

    PubMed

    Caddeo, Carla; Manconi, Maria; Cardia, Maria Cristina; Díez-Sales, Octavio; Fadda, Anna Maria; Sinico, Chiara

    2015-04-30

    In this work, phospholipid vesicle-based nanoformulations were developed to deliver antioxidant resveratrol (RSV) to the skin. Penetration enhancer-containing vesicles (PEVs) were prepared adding Oramix™ CG110 or Lauroglycol™ FCC to phosphatidylcholine to favor RSV diffusion through the skin, which was investigated using Franz cells. Vesicles were approximately 100 nm in size, negatively charged and fairly round in shape, as shown via transmission electron microscopy. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies were performed to investigate the RSV/vesicle interactions at the molecular scale, which revealed that RSV was deeply embedded in the bilayer, as shown by the restricted mobility of the drug. Moreover, PEVs improved drug local accumulation 1.7- to 2.1-fold, as compared to the control liposomes. Confocal imaging displayed broadened intercellular spaces in the viable epidermis of PEVs treated skin and high degree of hydration, which are presumably due to the occlusive film formed on the skin surface by the vesicles. These phenomena may be responsible for the higher RSV accumulation achieved when administering PEVs, as compared to control liposomes. Finally, the toxicity of the vesicular formulations was evaluated in vitro against 3T3 fibroblasts, showing no alteration on cell viability after 24h incubation with RSV loaded vesicles. The results from this study suggest that the proposed formulations may be a potential therapeutic alternative to treat skin disorders associated with oxidative stress.

  10. Using crosslinkable diacetylene phospholipids to construct two-dimensional packed beds in supported lipid bilayer separation platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shu-Kai; Hsiao, Sheng-Wen; Mao, Hsun-Yen; Chen, Ya-Ming; Chang, Yung; Chao, Ling

    2013-08-01

    Separating and purifying cell membrane-associated biomolecules has been a challenge owing to their amphiphilic property. Taking these species out of their native lipid membrane environment usually results in biomolecule degradation. One of the new directions is to use supported lipid bilayer (SLB) platforms to separate the membrane species while they are protected in their native environment. Here we used a type of crosslinkable diacetylene phospholipids, diynePC (1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), as a packed material to create a ‘two-dimensional (2D) packed bed’ in a SLB platform. After the diynePC SLB is exposed to UV light, some of the diynePC lipids in the SLB can crosslink and the non-crosslinked monomer lipids can be washed away, leaving a 2D porous solid matrix. We incorporated the lipid vesicle deposition method with a microfluidic device to pattern the location of the packed-bed region and the feed region with species to be separated in a SLB platform. Our atomic force microscopy result shows that the nano-scaled structure density of the ‘2D packed bed’ can be tuned by the UV dose applied to the diynePC membrane. When the model membrane biomolecules were forced to transport through the packed-bed region, their concentration front velocities were found to decrease linearly with the UV dose, indicating the successful creation of packed obstacles in these 2D lipid membrane separation platforms.

  11. Modulation of plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase by neutral phospholipids: effect of the micelle-vesicle transition and the bilayer thickness.

    PubMed

    Pignataro, María Florencia; Dodes-Traian, Martín M; González-Flecha, F Luis; Sica, Mauricio; Mangialavori, Irene C; Rossi, Juan Pablo F C

    2015-03-06

    The effects of lipids on membrane proteins are likely to be complex and unique for each membrane protein. Here we studied different detergent/phosphatidylcholine reconstitution media and tested their effects on plasma membrane Ca(2+) pump (PMCA). We found that Ca(2+)-ATPase activity shows a biphasic behavior with respect to the detergent/phosphatidylcholine ratio. Moreover, the maximal Ca(2+)-ATPase activity largely depends on the length and the unsaturation degree of the hydrocarbon chain. Using static light scattering and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we monitored the changes in hydrodynamic radius of detergent/phosphatidylcholine particles during the micelle-vesicle transition. We found that, when PMCA is reconstituted in mixed micelles, neutral phospholipids increase the enzyme turnover. The biophysical changes associated with the transition from mixed micelles to bicelles increase the time of residence of the phosphorylated intermediate (EP), decreasing the enzyme turnover. Molecular dynamics simulations analysis of the interactions between PMCA and the phospholipid bilayer in which it is embedded show that in the 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, charged residues of the protein are trapped in the hydrophobic core. Conversely, in the 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, the overall hydrophobic-hydrophilic requirements of the protein surface are fulfilled the best, reducing the thermodynamic cost of exposing charged residues to the hydrophobic core. The apparent mismatch produced by a 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine thicker bilayer could be a structural foundation to explain its functional effect on PMCA.

  12. Tyrosine Hydroxylase Binding to Phospholipid Membranes Prompts Its Amyloid Aggregation and Compromises Bilayer Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Anne; Jorge-Finnigan, Ana; Jung-KC, Kunwar; Sauter, Alexander; Horvath, Istvan; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A.; Martinez, Aurora

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of catecholamine neurotransmitters and hormones, binds to negatively charged phospholipid membranes. Binding to both large and giant unilamellar vesicles causes membrane permeabilization, as observed by efflux and influx of fluorescence dyes. Whereas the initial protein-membrane interaction involves the N-terminal tail that constitutes an extension of the regulatory ACT-domain, prolonged membrane binding induces misfolding and self-oligomerization of TH over time as shown by circular dichroism and Thioflavin T fluorescence. The gradual amyloid-like aggregation likely occurs through cross-β interactions involving aggregation-prone motives in the catalytic domains, consistent with the formation of chain and ring-like protofilaments observed by atomic force microscopy in monolayer-bound TH. PC12 cells treated with the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine displayed increased TH levels in the mitochondrial fraction, while incubation of isolated mitochondria with TH led to a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, cell-substrate impedance and viability assays showed that supplementing the culture media with TH compromises cell viability over time. Our results revealed that the disruptive effect of TH on cell membranes may be a cytotoxic and pathogenic factor if the regulation and intracellular stability of TH is compromised. PMID:28004763

  13. Islet amyloid polypeptide forms rigid lipid-protein amyloid fibrils on supported phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Domanov, Yegor A; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2008-02-08

    Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) forms fibrillar amyloid deposits in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and its misfolding and aggregation are thought to contribute to beta-cell death. Increasing evidence suggests that IAPP fibrillization is strongly influenced by lipid membranes and, vice versa, that the membrane architecture and integrity are severely affected by amyloid growth. Here, we report direct fluorescence microscopic observations of the morphological transformations accompanying IAPP fibrillization on the surface of supported lipid membranes. Within minutes of application in submicromolar concentrations, IAPP caused extensive remodeling of the membrane including formation of defects, vesiculation, and tubulation. The effects of IAPP concentration, ionic strength, and the presence of amyloid seeds on the bilayer perturbation and peptide aggregation were examined. Growth of amyloid fibrils was visualized using fluorescently labeled IAPP or thioflavin T staining. Two-color imaging of the peptide and membranes revealed that the fibrils were initially composed of the peptide only, and vesiculation occurred in the points where growing fibers touched the lipid membrane. Interestingly, after 2-5 h of incubation, IAPP fibers became "wrapped" by lipid membranes derived from the supported membrane. Progressive increase in molecular-level association between amyloid and membranes in the maturing fibers was confirmed by Förster resonance energy transfer spectroscopy.

  14. Comparison of [corrected] actin- and glass-supported phospholipid bilayer diffusion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Sarah M; Dawes, Ryan; Allgeyer, Edward S; Ashworth, Sharon L; Neivandt, David J

    2015-04-21

    The formation of biomimetic lipid membranes has the potential to provide insights into cellular lipid membrane dynamics. The construction of such membranes necessitates not only the utilization of appropriate lipids, but also physiologically relevant substrate/support materials. The substrate materials employed have been shown to have demonstrable effects on the behavior of the overlying lipid membrane, and thus must be studied before use as a model cushion support. To our knowledge, we report the formation and investigation of a novel actin protein-supported lipid membrane. Specifically, inner leaflet lateral mobility of globular actin-supported DMPC (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) bilayers, deposited via the Langmuir-Blodgett/Langmuir Schaefer methodology, was investigated by z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy across a temperature range of 20-44°C. The actin substrate was found to decrease the diffusion coefficient when compared to an identical membrane supported on glass. The depression of the diffusion coefficient occurred across all measured temperatures. These results indicated that the actin substrate exerted a direct effect on the fluidity of the lipid membrane and highlighted the fact that the choice of substrate/support is critical in studies of model lipid membranes.

  15. Lysylated phospholipids stabilize models of bacterial lipid bilayers and protect against antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Cox, Elizabeth; Michalak, Austen; Pagentine, Sarah; Seaton, Pamela; Pokorny, Antje

    2014-09-01

    Aminoacylated phosphatidylglycerols are common lipids in bacterial cytoplasmic membranes. Their presence in Staphylococcus aureus has been linked to increased resistance to a number of antibacterial agents, including antimicrobial peptides. Most commonly, the phosphatidylglycerol headgroup is esterified to lysine, which converts anionic phosphatidylglycerol into a cationic lipid with a considerably increased headgroup size. In the present work, we investigated the interactions of two well-studied antimicrobial peptides, cecropin A and mastoparan X, with lipid vesicles composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), containing varying fractions of an aminoacylated phosphatidylethanolamine, a stable analog of the corresponding phosphatidylglycerol-derivative. To differentiate between the effects of headgroup size and charge on peptide-lipid interactions, we synthesized two different derivatives. In one, the headgroup was modified by the addition of lysine, and in the other, by glutamine. The modification by glutamine results in a phospholipid with a headgroup size comparable to that of the lysylated version. However, whereas lysyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (Lys-PE) is cationic, glutaminyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (Gln-PE) is zwitterionic. We found that binding of mastoparan X and cecropin A was not significantly altered if the content of aminoacylated phosphatidylethanolamines did not exceed 20mol.%, which is the concentration found in bacterial membranes. However, a lysyl-phosphatidylethanolamine content of 20mol% significantly inhibits dye release from lipid vesicles, to a degree that depends on the peptide. In the case of mastoparan X, dye release is essentially abolished at 20mol.% lysyl-phosphatidylethanolamine, whereas cecropin A is less sensitive to the presence of lysyl-phosphatidylethanolamine. These observations are understood through the complex interplay between peptide binding and membrane

  16. Reconstitution of Cholesterol-Dependent Vaginolysin into Tethered Phospholipid Bilayers: Implications for Bioanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Budvytyte, Rima; Pleckaityte, Milda; Zvirbliene, Aurelija; Vanderah, David J.; Valincius, Gintaras

    2013-01-01

    Functional reconstitution of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin vaginolysin (VLY) from Gardnerella vaginalis into artificial tethered bilayer membranes (tBLMs) has been accomplished. The reconstitution of VLY was followed in real-time by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Changes of the EIS parameters of the tBLMs upon exposure to VLY solutions were consistent with the formation of water-filled pores in the membranes. It was found that reconstitution of VLY is a strictly cholesterol-dependent, irreversible process. At a constant cholesterol concentration reconstitution of VLY occurred in a concentration-dependent manner, thus allowing the monitoring of VLY concentration and activity in vitro and opening possibilities for tBLM utilization in bioanalysis. EIS methodology allowed us to detect VLY down to 0.5 nM (28 ng/mL) concentration. Inactivation of VLY by certain amino acid substitutions led to noticeably lesser tBLM damage. Pre-incubation of VLY with the neutralizing monoclonal antibody 9B4 inactivated the VLY membrane damage in a concentration-dependent manner, while the non-neutralizing antibody 21A5 exhibited no effect. These findings demonstrate the biological relevance of the interaction between VLY and the tBLM. The membrane-damaging interaction between VLY and tBLM was observed in the absence of the human CD59 receptor, known to strongly facilitate the hemolytic activity of VLY. Taken together, our study demonstrates the applicability of tBLMs as a bioanalytical platform for the detection of the activity of VLY and possibly other cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. PMID:24349307

  17. Structure and homogeneity of pseudo-physiological phospholipid bilayers and their deposition characteristics on carboxylic acid terminated self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Mechler, Adam; Praporski, Slavica; Piantavigna, Stefania; Heaton, Steven M; Hall, Kristopher N; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Martin, Lisandra L

    2009-02-01

    Supported phospholipid bilayers are frequently used to establish a pseudo-physiological environment required for the study of protein function or the design of enzyme-based biosensors and biocatalytic reactors. These membranes are deposited from bilayer vesicles (liposomes) that rupture and fuse into a planar membrane upon adhesion to a surface. However, the morphology and homogeneity of the resulting layer is affected by the characteristics of the precursor liposome suspension and the substrate. Here we show that two distinct liposome populations contribute to membrane formation--equilibrium liposomes and small unilamellar vesicles. Liposome deposition onto carboxylic acid terminated self-assembled monolayers resulted in planar mono- and multilayer, vesicular and composite membranes, as a function of liposome size and composition. Quartz crystal microbalance data provided estimates for layer thicknesses and sheer moduli and were used for classification of the final structure. Finally, atomic force microscopy data illustrated the inherently inhomogeneous and dynamic nature of these membranes.

  18. Structure and Thermotropic phase Behavior of Fluorinated Phospholipid Bilayers: A combined Attenuated Total Reflection FTIR Spectroscopy and Imaging Ellipsometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Schuy, Steffen; Faiss, Simon; Yoder, Nicholas C.; Kalsani, Venkateshwarlu; Kumar, Krishna; Janshoff, Andreas; Vogel, Reiner

    2008-01-01

    Lipid bilayers consisting of lipids with terminally perfluoroalkylated chains have remarkable properties. They exhibit increased stability and phase-separated nanoscale patterns in mixtures with nonfluorinated lipids. In order to understand the bilayer properties that are responsible for this behavior, we have analyzed the structure of solid-supported bilayers composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and of a DPPC analogue with 6 terminal perfluorinated methylene units (F6-DPPC). Polarized attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy indicates that for F6-DPPC, the tilt of the lipid acyl chains to the bilayer normal is increased to 39° as compared to 21° for native DPPC, for both lipids in the gel phase. This substantial increase of the tilt angle is responsible for a decrease of the bilayer thickness from 5.4 nm for DPPC to 4.5 nm for F6-DPPC, as revealed by temperature-controlled imaging ellipsometry on microstructured lipid bilayers and solution atomic force microscopy. During the main phase transition from the gel to the fluid phase, both the relative bilayer thickness change and the relative area change are substantially smaller for F6-DPPC than for DPPC. In light of these structural and thermotropic data, we propose a model in which the higher acyl-chain tilt angle in F6-DPPC is the result of a conformational rearrangement to minimize unfavorable fluorocarbon–hydrocarbon interactions in the center of the bilayer due to chain staggering. PMID:18563929

  19. Absorption and fluorescence of PRODAN in phospholipid bilayers: a combined quantum mechanics and classical molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Cwiklik, Lukasz; Aquino, Adelia J A; Vazdar, Mario; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Pittner, Jiří; Hof, Martin; Lischka, Hans

    2011-10-20

    Absorption and fluorescence spectra of PRODAN (6-propionyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene) were studied by means of the time-dependent density functional theory and the algebraic diagrammatic construction method. The influence of environment, a phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayer and water, was taken into account employing a combination of quantum chemical calculations with empirical force-field molecular dynamics simulations. Additionally, experimental absorption and emission spectra of PRODAN were measured in cyclohexane, water, and lipid vesicles. Both planar and twisted configurations of the first excited state of PRODAN were taken into account. The twisted structure is stabilized in both water and a lipid bilayer, and should be considered as an emitting state in polar environments. Orientation of the excited dye in the lipid bilayer significantly depends on configuration. In the bilayer, the fluorescence spectrum can be regarded as a combination of emission from both planar and twisted structures.

  20. Poly-l-lysines and poly-l-arginines induce leakage of negatively charged phospholipid vesicles and translocate through the lipid bilayer upon electrostatic binding to the membrane.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Marcel; Schwieger, Christian; Meister, Annette; Karlsson, Göran; Blume, Alfred

    2009-09-01

    Poly-l-lysines (PLL) and poly-l-arginines (PLA) of different polymer chain lengths interact strongly with negatively charged phospholipid vesicles mainly due to their different electrical charges. 1-Palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG), 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DPPG) and their mixtures (1/1 mol/mol) with the respective phosphatidylcholines of equivalent chain length were chosen as model membrane systems that form at room temperature either the fluid L(alpha) or the gel phase L(beta) lipid bilayer membranes, respectively. Leakage experiments revealed that the fluid POPG membranes are more perturbed compared to the gel phase DPPG membranes upon peptide binding. Furthermore, it was found that pure PG membranes are more prone to release the vesicle contents as a result of pore formation than the lipid mixtures POPG/POPC and DPPG/DPPC. For the longer polymers (>or=44 amino acids) maximal dye-release was observed when the molar ratio of the concentrations of amino acid residues to charged lipid molecules reached a value of R(P)=0.5, i.e. when the outer membrane layer was theoretically entirely covered by the polymer. At ratios lower or higher than 0.5 leakage dropped significantly. Furthermore, PLL and PLA insertions and/or translocations through lipid membranes were analyzed by using FITC-labeled polymers by monitoring their fluorescence intensity upon membrane binding. Short PLL molecules and PLA molecules of all lengths seemed to translocate through both fluid and gel phase lipid bilayers. Comparison of the PLL and PLA fluorescence assay results showed that PLA interacts stronger with phospholipid membranes compared to PLL. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements were performed to give further insight into these mechanisms and to support the findings obtained by fluorescence assays. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) was used to visualize changes in the vesicles' morphology after addition of the

  1. Cholesterol Flip-Flop Dynamics in a Phospholipid Bilayer: A 10 Microsecond All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Amit; Nomura, Ken-Ichi; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2012-02-01

    Cholesterol (CHOL) molecules play a key role in modulating the rigidity of cell membranes, and controlling intracellular transport and signal transduction. Using all-atom molecular dynamics and the parallel replica approach, we study the effect of CHOL molecules on mechanical stresses across a dipalmitoylphosphatidycholine (DPPC)-CHOL bilayer, and the mechanism by which CHOL molecules migrate from one bilayer leaflet to the other (flip-flop events). On average, we observe a CHOL flip-flop event in half-a-microsecond. Once a CHOL flip-flop event is triggered, the inter-leaflet migration occurs in about 62 nanoseconds. The energy barrier associated with flip-flop events is found to be 73 kJ/mol. Results for membrane rigidity as a function of CHOL concentration will also be presented.

  2. Cholesterol-Ceramide Interactions in Phospholipid and Sphingolipid Bilayers As Observed by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    García-Arribas, Aritz B; Axpe, Eneko; Mujika, Jon Iñaki; Mérida, David; Busto, Jon V; Sot, Jesús; Alonso, Alicia; Lopez, Xabier; García, Jose Ángel; Ugalde, Jesus M; Plazaola, Fernando; Goñi, Félix M

    2016-05-31

    Free volume voids in lipid bilayers can be measured by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). This technique has been applied, together with differential scanning calorimetry and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to study the effects of cholesterol (Chol) and ceramide (Cer) on free volume voids in sphingomyelin (SM) or dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers. Binary lipid samples with Chol were studied (DPPC:Chol 60:40, SM:Chol 60:40 mol ratio), and no phase transition was detected in the 20-60 °C range, in agreement with calorimetric data. Chol-driven liquid-ordered phase showed an intermediate free volume void size as compared to gel and fluid phases. For SM and SM:Cer (85:15 mol:mol) model membranes measured in the 20-60 °C range the gel-to-fluid phase transition could be observed with a related increase in free volume, which was more pronounced for the SM:Cer sample. MD simulations suggest a hitherto unsuspected lipid tilting in SM:Cer bilayers but not in pure SM. Ternary samples of DPPC:Cer:Chol (54:23:23) and SM:Cer:Chol (54:23:23) were measured, and a clear pattern of free volume increase was observed in the 20-60 °C because of the gel-to-fluid transition. Interestingly, MD simulations showed a tendency of Cer to change its distribution along the membrane to make room for Chol in ternary mixtures. The results suggest that the gel phase formed in these ternary mixtures is stabilized by Chol-Cer interactions.

  3. Time-of-Flight Bragg Scattering from Aligned Stacks of Lipid Bilayers using the Liquids Reflectometer at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jianjun; Heberle, Frederick A; Carmichael, Justin R; Ankner, John Francis; Katsaras, John

    2012-01-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) neutron diffraction experiments on aligned stacks of lipid bilayers using the horizontal Liquids Reflectometer at the Spallation Neutron Source are reported. Specific details are given regarding the instrumental setup, data collection and reduction, phase determination of the structure factors, and reconstruction of the one-dimensional neutron scattering length density (NSLD) profile. The validity of using TOF measurements to determine the one-dimensional NSLD profile is demonstrated by reproducing the results of two well known lipid bilayer structures. The method is then applied to show how an antimicrobial peptide affects membranes with and without cholesterol.

  4. Computer Simulation Studies of Ion Channel Gating: Characteristics of the M2 Channel of Influenza-A Virus in a Phospholipid Bilayer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweighofer, Karl J.; Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The 25 amino acids long, transmembrane fragment of the Influenza virus M2 protein forms a homotetrameric channel that transports protons across lipid bilayers. It has been postulated that high efficiency and selectivity of this process is due to gating by four histidine residues that occlude the channel lumen in the closed state. Two mechanisms of gating have been postulated. In one mechanism, the proton is "shuttled" through the gate by attaching to the delta nitrogen atom on the extracellular side of the imidazole ring, followed by the release of the proton attached to the epsilon nitrogen atom on the opposite side. In the second mechanism, the four histidines move away from each other due to electrostatic repulsion upon protonation, thus opening the gate sufficiently that a wire of water molecules can penetrate the gate. Then, protons are transported by "hopping" along the wire. In this paper, both mechanisms are evaluated in a series of molecular dynamics simulations by investigating stability of different protonation states of the channel that are involved in these mechanisms. For the shuttle mechanism, these are states with all epsilon protonated histidines, one biprotonated residue or one histidine protonated in the delta position. For the gate opening mechanism, this is the state in which all four histidines are biprotonated. In addition, a state with two biprotonated histidines is considered. For each system, composed of the protein channel embedded in phospholipid bilayer located between two water lamellae, a molecular dynamics trajectory of approximately 1.3 ns (after equilibration) was obtained. It is found that the states involved in the shuttle mechanism are stable during the simulations. Furthermore, the orientations and dynamics of water molecules near the gate are conducive to proton transfers involved in the shuttle. In contract, the fully biprotonated state, implicated in the gate opening mechanism, is not stable and the channel looses its

  5. Profile structures of the voltage-sensor domain and the voltage-gated K+-channel vectorially oriented in a single phospholipid bilayer membrane at the solid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces determined by x-ray interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Liu, J.; Strzalka, J.; Blasie, J. K.

    2011-09-01

    One subunit of the prokaryotic voltage-gated potassium ion channel from Aeropyrum pernix (KvAP) is comprised of six transmembrane α helices, of which S1-S4 form the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) and S5 and S6 contribute to the pore domain (PD) of the functional homotetramer. However, the mechanism of electromechanical coupling interconverting the closed-to-open (i.e., nonconducting-to-K+-conducting) states remains undetermined. Here, we have vectorially oriented the detergent (OG)-solubilized VSD in single monolayers by two independent approaches, namely “directed-assembly” and “self-assembly,” to achieve a high in-plane density. Both utilize Ni coordination chemistry to tether the protein to an alkylated inorganic surface via its C-terminal His6 tag. Subsequently, the detergent is replaced by phospholipid (POPC) via exchange, intended to reconstitute a phospholipid bilayer environment for the protein. X-ray interferometry, in which interference with a multilayer reference structure is used to both enhance and phase the specular x-ray reflectivity from the tethered single membrane, was used to determine directly the electron density profile structures of the VSD protein solvated by detergent versus phospholipid, and with either a moist He (moderate hydration) or bulk aqueous buffer (high hydration) environment to preserve a native structure conformation. Difference electron density profiles, with respect to the multilayer substrate itself, for the VSD-OG monolayer and VSD-POPC membranes at both the solid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces, reveal the profile structures of the VSD protein dominating these profiles and further indicate a successful reconstitution of a lipid bilayer environment. The self-assembly approach was similarly extended to the intact full-length KvAP channel for comparison. The spatial extent and asymmetry in the profile structures of both proteins confirm their unidirectional vectorial orientation within the reconstituted membrane and

  6. Alignment of druglike compounds in lipid bilayers analyzed by solid-state (19)F-NMR and molecular dynamics, based on dipolar couplings of adjacent CF3 groups.

    PubMed

    Dürr, Ulrich H N; Afonin, Sergii; Hoff, Barbara; de Luca, Giuseppina; Emsley, James W; Ulrich, Anne S

    2012-04-26

    Solid-state (19)F-NMR spectroscopy is frequently used to analyze the structure and dynamics of lipophilic drugs and peptides embedded in biomembranes. The homonuclear dipolar couplings of trifluoromethyl (CF3) labels can provide valuable parameters such as orientational constraints and/or distances. To characterize the complex dipolar patterns of multiple (19)F spin interactions, three different model compounds carrying two CF3 groups in meta-position on a phenyl ring were incorporated in macroscopically aligned DMPC bilayers. The dipolar patterns obtained with the CPMG (Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill) multipulse sequence were analyzed to yield simultaneously the intra-CF3 and intergroup dipolar coupling values. The fluorine-fluorine distances were predicted by a density functional calculation, and the alignment of the labeled molecular segment could be determined from these distances and the dipolar coupling values. The different compounds were found to align in the lipid bilayer according to their amphiphilic properties, though with a weak anisotropic preference that is typical of solutes in liquid crystals. The residual dipolar couplings were used to calculate Saupe order parameters. For the least complex molecule, (CF3)2-BA, an orientational probability function for the solute in the lipid matrix could be derived. The overall description of how (CF3)2-BA is embedded in the bilayer was independently assessed by molecular dynamics simulations, and compared in structural and dynamical terms with the results of the NMR experiments.

  7. Gel-to-fluid phase transformations in solid-supported phospholipid bilayers assembled by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique: effect of the Langmuir monolayer phase state and molecular density.

    PubMed

    Ramkaran, Mohini; Badia, Antonella

    2014-08-14

    Planar-supported phospholipid bilayers are increasingly used as synthetic membranes for scientific and practical applications. The thermotropic phase properties of supported bilayers are important for recreating biologically relevant situations. Unlike free-standing lipid membranes that undergo one gel-to-fluid or main phase transition, mica-supported single bilayers have been found to undergo two separate leaflet transitions. Although the distinctive nature of the main transition in mica-supported bilayers has been attributed to different effects, determining their relevance has been problematic because vesicle fusion, the technique most widely used to prepare solid-supported bilayer membranes, does not allow one to readily control the lipid surface coverage and molecular density. To circumvent the limitations of the vesicle fusion method and systematically investigate the effects on the individual leaflet transitions of the lipid phase state and molecular density before deposition on the substrate, mica-supported single bilayers of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) were prepared using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. The gel-to-fluid transitions of the bilayer leaflets were tracked by controlled-temperature atomic force microscopy to determine the relative fractions of the gel and fluid phases as a function of temperature. The fraction of solid versus temperature data was fit to the van't Hoff equation to determine the leaflet melting temperatures and transition enthalpies. The phase state and molecular density of the Langmuir monolayer precursor at the transfer pressure of 35 mN m(-1) was found to have a greater effect on the main transition temperature and width of the distal (upper) leaflet than that of the proximal (lower) one. The contributions of substrate-mediated condensation, asymmetric lipid densities, and surface area available for thermal expansion of the bilayer are addressed

  8. The alignment of a voltage-sensing peptide in dodecylphosphocholine micelles and in oriented lipid bilayers by nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular modeling.

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, K; Kinder, R; Bechinger, B

    1999-01-01

    The S4 segments of voltage-gated sodium channels are important parts of the voltage-sensing elements of these proteins. Furthermore, the addition of the isolated S4 polypeptide to planar lipid bilayers results in stepwise increases of ion conductivity. In order to gain insight into the mechanisms of pore formation by amphipathic peptides, the structure and orientation of the S4 segment of the first internal repeat of the rat brain II sodium channel was investigated in the presence of DPC micelles by multidimensional solution NMR spectroscopy and solid-state NMR spectroscopy on oriented phospholipid bilayers. Both the anisotropic chemical shift observed by proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy and the attenuating effects of DOXYL-stearates on TOCSY crosspeak intensities of micelle-associated S4 indicate that the central alpha-helical portion of this peptide is oriented approximately parallel to the membrane surface. Simulated annealing and molecular dynamics calculations of the peptide in a biphasic tetrachloromethane-water environment indicate that the peptide alpha-helix extends over approximately 12 residues. A less regular structure further toward the C-terminus allows for the hydrophobic residues of this part of the peptide to be positioned in the tetrachloromethane environment. The implications for possible pore-forming mechanisms are discussed. PMID:10512830

  9. Interaction of PLGA and trimethyl chitosan modified PLGA nanoparticles with mixed anionic/zwitterionic phospholipid bilayers studied using molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Brian; Astete, Carlos; Sabliov, Cristina; Moldovan, Dorel

    2012-02-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is a biodegradable polymer. Nanoparticles of PLGA are commonly used for drug delivery applications. The interaction of the nanoparticles with the cell membrane may influence the rate of their uptake by cells. Both PLGA and cell membranes are negatively charged, so adding positively charged polymers such as trimethyl chitosan (TMC) which adheres to the PLGA particles improves their cellular uptake. The interaction of 3 nm PLGA and TMC-modified-PLGA nanoparticles with lipid bilayers composed of mixtures of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine lipids was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The free energy profiles as function of nanoparticles position along the normal direction to the bilayers were calculated, the distribution of phosphatidylserine lipids as a function of distance of the particle from the bilayer was calculated, and the time scale for particle motion in the directions parallel to the bilayer surface was estimated.

  10. Intercalation of bovine serum albumin coated gold clusters between phospholipid bilayers: temperature-dependent behavior of lipid-AuQC@BSA assemblies with red emission and superlattice structure.

    PubMed

    Söptei, Balázs; Mihály, Judith; Visy, Júlia; Wacha, András; Bóta, Attila

    2014-04-10

    A method has been developed to encapsulate bovine serum albumin (BSA)-coated gold quantum clusters (AuQC@BSA) in a multilamellar system of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). Results have shown that intercalation of AuQC@BSA particles into lipid bilayers occurs in the presence of CaCl2. Intense red photoluminescence emission was observed after encapsulation of the clusters. A well-defined structure was found with periodic distances drastically larger than that in the pure DPPC/water system. Although Ca(2+) ions can change the dipole characteristics of the lipid bilayer surface, leading to unbinding between the bilayers of multilamellar DPPC/water system, the repulsion is shielded in the presence of AuQC@BSA particles. A coherent superlattice structure evolves due to mixed Ca(2+)-DPPC and Ca(2+)-AuQC@BSA interactions. Studies at different temperatures have suggested a correlation between the luminescence properties of the clusters and phase transition of the lipid layers. The temperature-dependent behavior assumes the connection between the coating and the lipid bilayer surface. Temperature-dependent features of lipid intercalated Au clusters provide new opportunities in their application.

  11. Bilayer properties of hydroxytyrosol- and tyrosol-phosphatidylcholine lipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol are the phytochemicals abundantly found in olive oil. Transphosphatidylation of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol with dioleoylphosphocholine resulted in phospholipids with antioxidant properties. The ability of these phyto-phospholipids to form liposomes and supported bilayers w...

  12. Theoretical assessment of feasibility to sequence DNA through interlayer electronic tunneling transport at aligned nanopores in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasongkit, Jariyanee; Feliciano, Gustavo T.; Rocha, Alexandre R.; He, Yuhui; Osotchan, Tanakorn; Ahuja, Rajeev; Scheicher, Ralph H.

    2015-12-01

    Fast, cost effective, single-shot DNA sequencing could be the prelude of a new era in genetics. As DNA encodes the information for the production of proteins in all known living beings on Earth, determining the nucleobase sequences is the first and necessary step in that direction. Graphene-based nanopore devices hold great promise for next-generation DNA sequencing. In this work, we develop a novel approach for sequencing DNA using bilayer graphene to read the interlayer conductance through the layers in the presence of target nucleobases. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of DNA translocation through the pore were performed to trace the nucleobase trajectories and evaluate the interaction between the nucleobases and the nanopore. This interaction stabilizes the bases in different orientations, resulting in smaller fluctuations of the nucleobases inside the pore. We assessed the performance of a bilayer graphene nanopore setup for the purpose of DNA sequencing by employing density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green’s function method to investigate the interlayer conductance of nucleobases coupling simultaneously to the top and bottom graphene layers. The obtained conductance is significantly affected by the presence of DNA in the bilayer graphene nanopore, allowing us to analyze DNA sequences.

  13. Theoretical assessment of feasibility to sequence DNA through interlayer electronic tunneling transport at aligned nanopores in bilayer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Prasongkit, Jariyanee; Feliciano, Gustavo T.; Rocha, Alexandre R.; He, Yuhui; Osotchan, Tanakorn; Ahuja, Rajeev; Scheicher, Ralph H.

    2015-01-01

    Fast, cost effective, single-shot DNA sequencing could be the prelude of a new era in genetics. As DNA encodes the information for the production of proteins in all known living beings on Earth, determining the nucleobase sequences is the first and necessary step in that direction. Graphene-based nanopore devices hold great promise for next-generation DNA sequencing. In this work, we develop a novel approach for sequencing DNA using bilayer graphene to read the interlayer conductance through the layers in the presence of target nucleobases. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of DNA translocation through the pore were performed to trace the nucleobase trajectories and evaluate the interaction between the nucleobases and the nanopore. This interaction stabilizes the bases in different orientations, resulting in smaller fluctuations of the nucleobases inside the pore. We assessed the performance of a bilayer graphene nanopore setup for the purpose of DNA sequencing by employing density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green’s function method to investigate the interlayer conductance of nucleobases coupling simultaneously to the top and bottom graphene layers. The obtained conductance is significantly affected by the presence of DNA in the bilayer graphene nanopore, allowing us to analyze DNA sequences. PMID:26634811

  14. CW Dipolar Broadening EPR Spectroscopy and Mechanically Aligned Bilayers Used to Measure Distance and Relative Orientation between Two TOAC Spin Labels on an Antimicrobial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Indra D.; Hustedt, Eric J.; Ghimire, Harishchandra; Inbaraj, Johnson J.; McCarrick, Robert M.; Lorigan, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    An EPR membrane alignment technique was applied to measure distance and relative orientations between two spin labels on a protein oriented along the surface of the membrane. Previously we demonstrated an EPR membrane alignment technique for measuring distances and relative orientations between two spin labels using a dual TOAC-labeled integral transmembrane peptide (M2δ segment of Acetylcholine receptor) as a test system. In this study we further utilized this technique and successfully measured the distance and relative orientations between two spin labels on a membrane peripheral peptide (antimicrobial peptide magainin-2). The TOAC-labeled magainin-2 peptides were mechanically aligned using DMPC lipids on a planar quartz support, and CW-EPR spectra were recorded at specific orientations. Global analysis in combination with rigorous spectral simulation was used to simultaneously analyze data from two different sample orientations for both single-and double-labeled peptides. We measured an internitroxide distance of 15.3 Å from a dual TOAC-labeled magainin-2 peptide at positions 8 and 14 that closely matches with the 13.3 Å distance obtained from a model of the labeled magainin peptide. In addition, the angles determining the relative orientations of the two nitroxides have been determined, and the results compare favorably with molecular modeling. This study demonstrates the utility of the technique for proteins oriented along the surface of the membrane in addition to the previous results for proteins situated within the membrane bilayer. PMID:25462949

  15. CW dipolar broadening EPR spectroscopy and mechanically aligned bilayers used to measure distance and relative orientation between two TOAC spin labels on an antimicrobial peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Indra D.; Hustedt, Eric J.; Ghimire, Harishchandra; Inbaraj, Johnson J.; McCarrick, Robert M.; Lorigan, Gary A.

    2014-12-01

    An EPR membrane alignment technique was applied to measure distance and relative orientations between two spin labels on a protein oriented along the surface of the membrane. Previously we demonstrated an EPR membrane alignment technique for measuring distances and relative orientations between two spin labels using a dual TOAC-labeled integral transmembrane peptide (M2δ segment of Acetylcholine receptor) as a test system. In this study we further utilized this technique and successfully measured the distance and relative orientations between two spin labels on a membrane peripheral peptide (antimicrobial peptide magainin-2). The TOAC-labeled magainin-2 peptides were mechanically aligned using DMPC lipids on a planar quartz support, and CW-EPR spectra were recorded at specific orientations. Global analysis in combination with rigorous spectral simulation was used to simultaneously analyze data from two different sample orientations for both single- and double-labeled peptides. We measured an internitroxide distance of 15.3 Å from a dual TOAC-labeled magainin-2 peptide at positions 8 and 14 that closely matches with the 13.3 Å distance obtained from a model of the labeled magainin peptide. In addition, the angles determining the relative orientations of the two nitroxides have been determined, and the results compare favorably with molecular modeling. This study demonstrates the utility of the technique for proteins oriented along the surface of the membrane in addition to the previous results for proteins situated within the membrane bilayer.

  16. Freezing point depression of water in phospholipid membranes: a solid-state NMR study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Kuk; Kwon, Byung Soo; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2008-12-02

    Lipid-water interaction plays an important role in the properties of lipid bilayers, cryoprotectants, and membrane-associated peptides and proteins. The temperature at which water bound to lipid bilayers freezes is lower than that of free water. Here, we report a solid-state NMR investigation on the freezing point depression of water in phospholipid bilayers in the presence and absence of cholesterol. Deuterium NMR spectra at different temperatures ranging from -75 to + 10 degrees C were obtained from fully (2)H2O-hydrated POPC (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine) multilamellar vesicles (MLVs), prepared with and without cholesterol, to determine the freezing temperature of water and the effect of cholesterol on the freezing temperature of water in POPC bilayers. Our 2H NMR experiments reveal the motional behavior of unfrozen water molecules in POPC bilayers even at temperatures significantly below 0 degrees C and show that the presence of cholesterol further lowered the freezing temperature of water in POPC bilayers. These results suggest that in the presence of cholesterol the fluidity and dynamics of lipid bilayers can be retained even at very low temperatures as exist in the liquid crystalline phase of the lipid. Therefore, bilayer samples prepared with a cryoprotectant like cholesterol should enable the performance of multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments to investigate the structure, dynamics, and topology of membrane proteins at a very low temperature with enhanced sample stability and possibly a better sensitivity. Phosphorus-31 NMR data suggest that lipid bilayers can be aligned at low temperatures, while 15N NMR experiments demonstrate that such aligned samples can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of is 15N chemical shift spectra of a 37-residue human antimicrobial peptide, LL-37.

  17. A molecular dynamics study of the lateral free energy profile of a pair of cholesterol molecules as a function of their distance in phospholipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Oono, Kimiko; Okazaki, Susumu; Hatta, Ichiro

    2012-04-01

    Free energy profile of a pair of cholesterol molecules in a leaflet of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers in the liquid-crystalline phase has been calculated as a function of their lateral distance using a combination of NPT-constant atomistic molecular dynamics calculations (P = 1 atm and T = 310.15 K) and the thermodynamic integration method. The calculated free energy clearly shows that the two cholesterol molecules form a dimer separated by a distance of 1.0-1.5 nm in POPC bilayers. Well depth of the free energy profile is about 3.5 kJ/mol, which is comparable to the thermal energy kBT at 310.15 K. This indicates that the aggregation of cholesterol molecules in the bilayers depends on the temperature as well as the concentration of the system. The free energy function obtained here may be used as a reference when coarse grained potential model is investigated for this two-component system. Local structure of POPC molecules around two cholesterol molecules has also been investigated.

  18. Nonenzymatic Reactions above Phospholipid Surfaces of Biological Membranes: Reactivity of Phospholipids and Their Oxidation Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Solís-Calero, Christian; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Frau, Juan; Muñoz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids play multiple and essential roles in cells, as components of biological membranes. Although phospholipid bilayers provide the supporting matrix and surface for many enzymatic reactions, their inherent reactivity and possible catalytic role have not been highlighted. As other biomolecules, phospholipids are frequent targets of nonenzymatic modifications by reactive substances including oxidants and glycating agents which conduct to the formation of advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There are some theoretical studies about the mechanisms of reactions related to these processes on phosphatidylethanolamine surfaces, which hypothesize that cell membrane phospholipids surface environment could enhance some reactions through a catalyst effect. On the other hand, the phospholipid bilayers are susceptible to oxidative damage by oxidant agents as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Molecular dynamics simulations performed on phospholipid bilayers models, which include modified phospholipids by these reactions and subsequent reactions that conduct to formation of ALEs and AGEs, have revealed changes in the molecular interactions and biophysical properties of these bilayers as consequence of these reactions. Then, more studies are desirable which could correlate the biophysics of modified phospholipids with metabolism in processes such as aging and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25977746

  19. [Phospholipids: properties and health effects].

    PubMed

    Torres García, Jairo; Durán Agüero, Samuel

    2014-09-12

    Phospholipids are amphipathic lipids, which are found in all the cell membranes, organized as a lipid bilayer. They belong to the glycerol-derived lipids, showing a similar structure as triglycerides. The current interest of them comes from its effectiveness to incorporate different fatty acids in the cell membrane, as they exhibit better absorption and utilization than triglycerides. In this paper, the bibliographical data published about the benefits of the phospholipids in inflammatory processes, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, liver disease and as an antioxidants transporter is reviewed.

  20. Tailoring the magnetic anisotropy of Py/Ni bilayer films using well aligned atomic steps on Cu(001).

    PubMed

    Ma, S; Tan, A; Deng, J X; Li, J; Zhang, Z D; Hwang, C; Qiu, Z Q

    2015-06-11

    Tailoring the spin orientation at the atomic scale has been a key task in spintronics technology. While controlling the out-of-plane to in-plane spin orientation has been achieved by a precise control of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at atomic layer thickness level, a design and control of the in-plane magnetic anisotropy has not yet been well developed. On well aligned atomic steps of a 6° vicinal Cu(001) surface with steps parallel to the [110] axis, we grow Py/Ni overlayer films epitaxially to permit a systematic exploration of the step-induced in-plane magnetic anisotropy as a function of both the Py and the Ni film thicknesses. We found that the atomic steps from the vicinal Cu(001) induce an in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy that favors both Py and Ni magnetizations perpendicular to the steps, opposite to the behavior of Co on vicinal Cu(001). In addition, thickness-dependent study shows that the Ni films exhibit different magnetic anisotropy below and above ~6 ML Ni thickness.

  1. Supported phospholipid/alkanethiol biomimetic membranes: insulating properties.

    PubMed Central

    Plant, A L; Gueguetchkeri, M; Yap, W

    1994-01-01

    A novel model lipid bilayer membrane is prepared by the addition of phospholipid vesicles to alkanethiol monolayers on gold. This supported hybrid bilayer membrane is rugged, easily and reproducibly prepared in the absence of organic solvent, and is stable for very long periods of time. We have characterized the insulating characteristics of this membrane by examining the rate of electron transfer and by impedance spectroscopy. Supported hybrid bilayers formed from phospholipids and alkanethiols are pinhole-free and demonstrate measured values of conductivity and resistivity which are within an order of magnitude of that reported for black lipid membranes. Capacitance values suggest a dielectric constant of 2.7 for phospholipid membranes in the absence of organic solvent. The protein toxin, melittin, destroys the insulating capability of the phospholipid layer without significantly altering the bilayer structure. This model membrane will allow the assessment of the effect of lipid membrane perturbants on the insulating properties of natural lipid membranes. PMID:7811924

  2. Bursting Bubbles and Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Wrenn, Steven P.; Dicker, Stephen M.; Small, Eleanor F.; Dan, Nily R.; Mleczko, Michał; Schmitz, Georg; Lewin, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses various interactions between ultrasound, phospholipid monolayer-coated gas bubbles, phospholipid bilayer vesicles, and cells. The paper begins with a review of microbubble physics models, developed to describe microbubble dynamic behavior in the presence of ultrasound, and follows this with a discussion of how such models can be used to predict inertial cavitation profiles. Predicted sensitivities of inertial cavitation to changes in the values of membrane properties, including surface tension, surface dilatational viscosity, and area expansion modulus, indicate that area expansion modulus exerts the greatest relative influence on inertial cavitation. Accordingly, the theoretical dependence of area expansion modulus on chemical composition - in particular, poly (ethylene glyclol) (PEG) - is reviewed, and predictions of inertial cavitation for different PEG molecular weights and compositions are compared with experiment. Noteworthy is the predicted dependence, or lack thereof, of inertial cavitation on PEG molecular weight and mole fraction. Specifically, inertial cavitation is predicted to be independent of PEG molecular weight and mole fraction in the so-called mushroom regime. In the “brush” regime, however, inertial cavitation is predicted to increase with PEG mole fraction but to decrease (to the inverse 3/5 power) with PEG molecular weight. While excellent agreement between experiment and theory can be achieved, it is shown that the calculated inertial cavitation profiles depend strongly on the criterion used to predict inertial cavitation. This is followed by a discussion of nesting microbubbles inside the aqueous core of microcapsules and how this significantly increases the inertial cavitation threshold. Nesting thus offers a means for avoiding unwanted inertial cavitation and cell death during imaging and other applications such as sonoporation. A review of putative sonoporation mechanisms is then presented, including those

  3. Solid-state NMR studies of a diverged microsomal amino-proximate delta12 desaturase peptide reveal causes of stability in bilayer: tyrosine anchoring and arginine snorkeling.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, William J; Karp, Ethan S; Cellar, Nick A; Minto, Robert E; Lorigan, Gary A

    2006-02-15

    This study reports the solid-state NMR spectroscopic characterization of the amino-proximate transmembrane domain (TM-A) of a diverged microsomal delta12-desaturase (CREP-1) in a phospholipid bilayer. A series of TM-A peptides were synthesized with 2H-labeled side chains (Ala-53, -56, and -63, Leu-62, Val-50), and their dynamic properties were studied in 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers at various temperatures. At 6 mol % peptide to lipid, 31P NMR spectra indicated that the peptides did not significantly disrupt the phospholipid bilayer in the L(alpha) phase. The 2H NMR spectra from Ala-53 and Ala-56 samples revealed broad Pake patterns with quadrupolar splittings of 16.9 kHz and 13.3 kHz, respectively, indicating restricted motion confined within the hydrocarbon core of the phospholipid bilayer. Conversely, the deuterated Ala-63 sample revealed a peak centered at 0 kHz with a linewidth of 1.9 kHz, indicating increased side-chain motion and solvent exposure relative to the spectra of the other Ala residues. Val-50 and Leu-62 showed Pake patterns, with quadrupolar splittings of 3.5 kHz and 3.7 kHz, respectively, intermediate to Ala-53/Ala-56 and Ala-63. This indicates partial motional averaging and supports a model with the Val and Leu residues embedded inside the lipid bilayer. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy performed on the 2H-labeled Ala-56 TM-A peptide incorporated into magnetically aligned phospholipid bilayers indicated that the peptide is tilted 8 degrees with respect to the membrane normal of the lipid bilayer. Snorkeling and anchoring interactions of Arg-44 and Tyr-60, respectively, with the polar region or polar hydrophobic interface of the lipid bilayer are suggested as control elements for insertional depth and orientation of the helix in the lipid matrix. Thus, this study defines the location of key residues in TM-A with respect to the lipid bilayer, describes the conformation of TM-A in a biomembrane mimic, presents a

  4. Lipid Bilayers Are Long-Lived on Solvent Cleaned Plasma-Oxidized poly(dimethyl)siloxane (ox-PDMS)

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jonny; Garcia, Luis; Subramaniam, Anand Bala

    2017-01-01

    Although it is well known that phospholipids self-assemble on hydrophilic plasma-oxidized PMDS surfaces (ox-PDMS) to form cell membrane mimetic bilayers, the temporal stability of phospholipid membranes on these surfaces is unknown. Here we report that phospholipid bilayers remain stable on solvent-cleaned ox-PDMS for at least 132 hours after preparation. Absent solvent cleaning, the bilayers were stable for only 36 hours. We characterized the phospholipid bilayers, i) through quantitative comparative analysis of the fluorescence intensity of phospholipid bilayers on ox-PDMS and phospholipid monolayers on native PDMS and, ii) through measurements of the diffusive mobility of the lipids through fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). The fluorescence intensity of the phospholipid layer remained consistent with that of a bilayer for 132 hours. The evolution of the diffusive mobility of the phospholipids in the bilayer on ox-PDMS over time was similar to lipids in control bilayers prepared on glass surfaces. Solvent cleaning was essential for the long-term stability of the bilayers on ox-PDMS. Without cleaning in acetone and isopropanol, phospholipid bilayers prepared on ox-PDMS surfaces peeled off in large patches within 36 hours. Importantly, we find that phospholipid bilayers supported on solvent-cleaned ox-PDMS were indistinguishable from phospholipid bilayers supported on glass for at least 36 hours after preparation. Our results provide a link between the two common surfaces used to prepare in vitro biomimetic phospholipid membranes—i) glass surfaces used predominantly in fundamental biophysical experiments, for which there is abundant physicochemical information, with ii) ox-PDMS, the dominant material used in practical, applications-oriented systems to build micro-devices, topographically-patterned surfaces, and biosensors where there is a dearth of information. PMID:28052115

  5. Effects of ion interactions with a cholesterol-rich bilayer.

    PubMed

    Mao, Lingxue; Yang, Linlin; Zhang, Qiansen; Jiang, Hualiang; Yang, Huaiyu

    Previous molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of ion-lipid interactions have focused on pure phospholipid bilayers. Many functional microdomains in membranes have a complex composition of cholesterol and phospholipids. Here, we reveal the distinctiveness of the interactions and the effects of the ions on a cholesterol-rich bilayer by performing MD simulations of a cholesterol-rich bilayer with a Na(+)/K(+) mixture or a Na(+)/K(+)/Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) mixture. The simulations reveal that Ca(2+) maintains its dominant role in the interaction with the cholesterol-rich bilayer, but the binding affinity of Mg(2+) to the cholesterol-rich bilayer is even weaker than the affinities of Na(+) and K(+), whereas its interaction with pure phospholipid bilayers is strong and is only slightly weaker than that of Ca(2+). Additionally, it was found that the presence of additional divalent cations induces the headgroups of phospholipids to be more perpendicular to the membrane surface, reducing the lateral movement of lipids and slightly altering the ordering and packing of the cholesterol-rich bilayer, different from divalent cations, which strongly influence that ordering and packing of pure phospholipid bilayers. Therefore, this study indicates that cholesterol in the membrane could affect the interactions between membrane and cations. The findings could be helpful in understanding the biological processes relevant to regulation of cations in cholesterol-rich regions.

  6. Electrical Properties of Phospholipid Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Schwan, H. P.; Takashima, S.; Miyamoto, V. K.; Stoeckenius, W.

    1970-01-01

    The capacitance of the membrane of phospholipid vesicles and the electrical properties of the vesicle interior have been determined. To this end the electrical properties of phospholipid vesicles have been investigated over a frequency range extending from 1 kHz to 100 MHz. The dielectric behavior is characterized by two dispersions, one placed between 1 kHz and 1 MHz and the other between 1 and 100 MHz. The relaxational behavior at low frequencies is explained by counterion movement tangential to the vesicle surface and a reasonable value for the fixed charge of the vesicles is calculated from the dispersion magnitude. The relaxation at high frequencies is of the Maxwell-Wagner type and appears caused by the phospholipid bilayer bounding the interior phase of the vesicles. It is consistent with the existence of a closed bilayer with a capacitance of about 2 μF/cm2 and an internal phase similar to the vesicle suspending medium. There is no indication of other than normally structured water inside the small vesicles. PMID:5471701

  7. Phosphatidyl-hydroxytyrosol and phosphatidyl-tyrosol bilayer properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol phospholipids were enzymatically synthesized and investigated for their bilayer properties. Dynamic light scattering demonstrated that hand extrusion at 100 nm consistently resulted in liposomes of nearly 85 nm diameter for both phosphatidyl-hydroxytyrosol (DOPHT) and phos...

  8. Cholesterol perturbs lipid bilayers nonuniversally.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jianjun; Mills, Thalia T; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Nagle, John F

    2008-05-16

    Cholesterol is well known to modulate the physical properties of biomembranes. Using modern x-ray scattering methods, we have studied the effects of cholesterol on the bending modulus K(C), the thickness D(HH), and the orientational order parameter S(xray) of lipid bilayers. We find that the effects are different for at least three classes of phospholipids characterized by different numbers of saturated hydrocarbon chains. Most strikingly, cholesterol strongly increases K(C) when both chains of the phospholipid are fully saturated but not at all when there are two monounsaturated chains.

  9. Cholesterol Perturbs Lipid Bilayers Nonuniversally

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Jianjun; Mills, Thalia T.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Nagle, John F.

    2008-05-16

    Cholesterol is well known to modulate the physical properties of biomembranes. Using modern x-ray scattering methods, we have studied the effects of cholesterol on the bending modulus K{sub C}, the thickness D{sub HH}, and the orientational order parameter S{sub xray} of lipid bilayers. We find that the effects are different for at least three classes of phospholipids characterized by different numbers of saturated hydrocarbon chains. Most strikingly, cholesterol strongly increases K{sub C} when both chains of the phospholipid are fully saturated but not at all when there are two monounsaturated chains.

  10. Optimization of bicelle lipid composition and temperature for EPR spectroscopy of aligned membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, Jesse E.; James, Zachary M.; Thomas, David D.

    2015-01-01

    We have optimized the magnetic alignment of phospholipid bilayered micelles (bicelles) for EPR spectroscopy, by varying lipid composition and temperature. Bicelles have been extensively used in NMR spectroscopy for several decades, in order to obtain aligned samples in a near-native membrane environment and take advantage of the intrinsic sensitivity of magnetic resonance to molecular orientation. Recently, bicelles have also seen increasing use in EPR, which offers superior sensitivity and orientational resolution. However, the low magnetic field strength (less than 1 T) of most conventional EPR spectrometers results in homogeneously oriented bicelles only at a temperature well above physiological. To optimize bicelle composition for magnetic alignment at reduced temperature, we prepared bicelles containing varying ratios of saturated (DMPC) and unsaturated (POPC) phospholipids, using EPR spectra of a spin-labeled fatty acid to assess alignment as a function of lipid composition and temperature. Spectral analysis showed that bicelles containing an equimolar mixture of DMPC and POPC homogeneously align at 298 K, 20 K lower than conventional DMPC-only bicelles. It is now possible to perform EPR studies of membrane protein structure and dynamics in well-aligned bicelles at physiological temperatures and below.

  11. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Marquardt, Drew; Kučerka, Norbert; Wassall, Stephen R.; Harroun, Thad A.; Katsaras, John

    2016-04-04

    It is well known that cholesterol modifies the physical properties of lipid bilayers. For example, the much studied liquid-ordered Lo phase contains rapidly diffusing lipids with their acyl chains in the all trans configuration, similar to gel phase bilayers. Moreover, the Lo phase is commonly associated with cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts, which are thought to serve as platforms for signaling proteins in the plasma membrane. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers has been studied extensively, and it has been shown – at least in some bilayers – to align differently from its canonical upright orientation, where its hydroxyl group is in the vicinity of the lipid–water interface. In this study we review recent works describing cholesterol's location in different model membrane systems with emphasis on results obtained from scattering, spectroscopic and molecular dynamics studies.

  12. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers

    DOE PAGES

    Marquardt, Drew; Kučerka, Norbert; Wassall, Stephen R.; ...

    2016-04-04

    It is well known that cholesterol modifies the physical properties of lipid bilayers. For example, the much studied liquid-ordered Lo phase contains rapidly diffusing lipids with their acyl chains in the all trans configuration, similar to gel phase bilayers. Moreover, the Lo phase is commonly associated with cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts, which are thought to serve as platforms for signaling proteins in the plasma membrane. Cholesterol's location in lipid bilayers has been studied extensively, and it has been shown – at least in some bilayers – to align differently from its canonical upright orientation, where its hydroxyl group is in themore » vicinity of the lipid–water interface. In this study we review recent works describing cholesterol's location in different model membrane systems with emphasis on results obtained from scattering, spectroscopic and molecular dynamics studies.« less

  13. Phospholipids at the Interface: Current Trends and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Pichot, Roman; Watson, Richard L.; Norton, Ian T.

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipids are one of the major structural elements of biological membranes. Due to their amphiphilic character, they can adopt various molecular assemblies when dispersed in water, such as bilayer vesicles or micelles, which give them unique interfacial properties and render them very attractive in terms of foam or emulsion stabilization. This article aims at reviewing the properties of phospholipids at the air/water and oil/water interfaces, as well as the recent advances in using these natural components as stabilizers, alone or in combination with other compounds such as proteins. A discussion regarding the challenges and opportunities offered by phospholipids-stabilized structure concludes the review. PMID:23736688

  14. Functional One-Dimensional Lipid Bilayers on Carbon Nanotube Templates

    SciTech Connect

    Artyukhin, A; Shestakov, A; Harper, J; Bakajin, O; Stroeve, P; Noy, A

    2004-07-23

    We present one-dimensional (1-D) lipid bilayer structures that integrate carbon nanotubes with a key biological environment-phospholipid membrane. Our structures consist of lipid bilayers wrapped around carbon nanotubes modified with a hydrophilic polymer cushion layer. Despite high bilayer curvature, the lipid membrane maintains its fluidity and can sustain repeated damage-recovery cycles. We also present the first evidence of spontaneous insertion of pore-forming proteins into 1-D lipid bilayers. These structures could lead to the development of new classes of biosensors and bioelectronic devices.

  15. Dynamics, Surface Electrostatics and Phase Properties of Nanoscale Curved Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koolivand, Amir

    Surface electrostatic potential of a lipid bilayer governs many vital functions of living cells. Several classes of proteins are known of exhibiting strong binding preferences to curved lipid bilayer surfaces. In this project we employed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of a recently introduced phospholipid (IMTSL-PTE) bearing a pH-sensitive nitroxide covalently attached to the lipid head group to measure the surface electrostatics of the lipid membrane and nanopore-confined lipid bilayers as a function of the bilayer curvature. The pKa of the ionizable group of this lipid-based spin probe is reporting on the bilayer surface electrostatics potential by changes in the EPR spectra. Specifically, both rotational dynamics and magnetic parameters of the nitroxide are affected by the probe protonation. Effect of curvature on the surface electrostatic potential and dynamics of lipid bilayer was studied for POPG and DMPG unilamellar vesicles (ULVs). It was found that the magnitude of the negative surface electrostatic potential increased upon decrease in the vesicle diameter for the bilayers in the fluid phase; however, no significant changes were observed for DMPG ULVs in a gel phase. We speculate that biologically relevant fluid bilayer phase allows for a larger variability in the lipid packing density in the lipid polar head group region than a more ordered gel phase and it is likely that the lipid flip-flop is responsible for pH equilibration of IMTSL-PTE. The kinetic EPR study of nitroxide reduction showed that the rate of flip-flop is in the order of 10-5 s-1. The flip-flop rate constant increases when vesicle size deceases. Oxygen permeability measured by X-ban EPR decreases in higher curved vesicles---an observation that is consistent with a tighter packing in smaller vesicles. Partitioning of a small nitroxide molecule TEMPO into ULVs was measured by X-band (9 GHz) and W-band (95 GHz) EPR spectroscopy. The partitioning coefficient of this probe in the lipid

  16. Phospholipid liposomes functionalized by protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Savostyanov, G. V.; Grishina, O. A.

    2015-03-01

    Finding new ways to deliver neurotrophic drugs to the brain in newborns is one of the contemporary problems of medicine and pharmaceutical industry. Modern researches in this field indicate the promising prospects of supramolecular transport systems for targeted drug delivery to the brain which can overcome the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Thus, the solution of this problem is actual not only for medicine, but also for society as a whole because it determines the health of future generations. Phospholipid liposomes due to combination of lipo- and hydrophilic properties are considered as the main future objects in medicine for drug delivery through the BBB as well as increasing their bioavailability and toxicity. Liposomes functionalized by various proteins were used as transport systems for ease of liposomes use. Designing of modification oligosaccharide of liposomes surface is promising in the last decade because it enables the delivery of liposomes to specific receptor of human cells by selecting ligand and it is widely used in pharmacology for the treatment of several diseases. The purpose of this work is creation of a coarse-grained model of bilayer of phospholipid liposomes, functionalized by specific to the structural elements of the BBB proteins, as well as prediction of the most favorable orientation and position of the molecules in the generated complex by methods of molecular docking for the formation of the structure. Investigation of activity of the ligand molecule to protein receptor of human cells by the methods of molecular dynamics was carried out.

  17. Interaction of isopropylthioxanthone with phospholipid liposomes.

    PubMed

    Momo, Federico; Fabris, Sabrina; Stevanato, Roberto

    2007-04-01

    Isopropylthioxanthone (ITX) is a highly lipophilic molecule which can be released in foods and beverages from the packages, where it is present as photoinitiator of inks in printing processes. Recently it was found in babies milk, and its toxicity cannot be excluded. The structure of the molecule suggests a possible strong interaction with the lipid moiety of biological membranes, and this is the first study of its effects on phospholipid organization, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and spin labelling techniques. The data obtained with multilamellar liposomes of saturated phospholipids of different length, with and without cholesterol, point out that the molecule changes the lipid structure; in particular, in the gel state, behaving like a disordering agent it increases the mobility of the bilayer, while, in the fluid state, tends to rigidify the membrane, in a cholesterol like way. This behavior supports the hypothesis that ITX experiences a relocation process when the lipid matrix passes from the gel to the fluid state.

  18. Ionization Properties of Phospholipids Determined by Zeta Potential Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Sathappa, Murugappan; Alder, Nathan N.

    2016-01-01

    Biological membranes are vital for diverse cellular functions such as maintaining cell and organelle structure, selective permeability, active transport, and signaling. The surface charge of the membrane bilayer plays a critical role in these myriad processes. For most biomembranes, the surface charge of anionic phospholipids contributes to the negative surface charge density within the interfacial region of the bilayer. To quantify surface charge, it is essential to understand the proton dissociation behavior of the titratable headgroups within such lipids. We describe a protocol that uses model membranes for electrokinetic zeta potential measurements coupled with data analysis using Gouy-Chapman-Stern formalism to determine the pKa value of the component lipids. A detailed example is provided for homogeneous bilayers composed of the monoanionic lipid phosphatidylglycerol. This approach can be adapted for the measurement of bilayers with a heterogeneous lipid combination, as well as for lipids with multiple titratable sites in the headgroup (e.g., cardiolipin). PMID:27928550

  19. Molecular Insights into Phospholipid -- NSAID Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu Boggara, Mohan; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2007-03-01

    Non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) e.g. Aspirin and Ibuprofen, with chronic usage cause gastro intestinal (GI) toxicity. It has been shown experimentally that NSAIDs pre-associated with phospholipids reduce the GI toxicity and also increase the therapeutic activity of these drugs compared to the unmodified ones. Using all atomistic simulations and two different methodologies, we studied the partitioning behavior of two model NSAIDs (Aspirin and Ibuprofen) as a function of pH and drug loading. The results from two methodologies are consistent in describing the equilibrium drug distribution in the bilayers. Additionally, the heterogeneity in density and polarity of the bilayer in the normal direction along with the fact that NSAIDs are amphiphilic (all of them have a carboxylic acid group and a non-polar part consisting of aromatic moieties), indicate that the diffusion mechanism in the bilayer is far different compared to the same in a bulk medium. This study summarizes the various effects of NSAIDs and their behavior inside the lipid bilayer both as a function of pH and drug concentration.

  20. Engineering plant membranes using droplet interface bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, N. E.; Smpokou, E.; Macey, R.; Gould, I. R.; Turnbull, C.; Flemming, A. J.; Brooks, N. J.; Ces, O.; Barter, L. M. C.

    2017-01-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) have become widely recognised as a robust platform for constructing model membranes and are emerging as a key technology for the bottom-up assembly of synthetic cell-like and tissue-like structures. DIBs are formed when lipid-monolayer coated water droplets are brought together inside a well of oil, which is excluded from the interface as the DIB forms. The unique features of the system, compared to traditional approaches (e.g., supported lipid bilayers, black lipid membranes, and liposomes), is the ability to engineer multi-layered bilayer networks by connecting multiple droplets together in 3D, and the capability to impart bilayer asymmetry freely within these droplet architectures by supplying droplets with different lipids. Yet despite these achievements, one potential limitation of the technology is that DIBs formed from biologically relevant components have not been well studied. This could limit the reach of the platform to biological systems where bilayer composition and asymmetry are understood to play a key role. Herein, we address this issue by reporting the assembly of asymmetric DIBs designed to replicate the plasma membrane compositions of three different plant species; Arabidopsis thaliana, tobacco, and oats, by engineering vesicles with different amounts of plant phospholipids, sterols and cerebrosides for the first time. We show that vesicles made from our plant lipid formulations are stable and can be used to assemble asymmetric plant DIBs. We verify this using a bilayer permeation assay, from which we extract values for absolute effective bilayer permeation and bilayer stability. Our results confirm that stable DIBs can be assembled from our plant membrane mimics and could lead to new approaches for assembling model systems to study membrane translocation and to screen new agrochemicals in plants.

  1. CYTOTOXIC PHOSPHOLIPID OXIDATION PRODUCTS

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Yang, Lili; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    Phospholipid oxidation products accumulate in the necrotic core of atherosclerotic lesions, in apoptotic cells, and circulate in oxidized LDL. Phospholipid oxidation generates toxic products, but little is known about which specific products are cytotoxic, their receptors, or the mechanism(s) that induces cell death. We find the most common phospholipid oxidation product of oxidized LDL, phosphatidylcholine with esterified sn-2 azelaic acid, induced apoptosis at low micromolar concentrations. The synthetic ether phospholipid hexadecyl azelaoyl phosphatidylcholine (HAzPC) was rapidly internalized, and over-expression of PLA2g7 (PAF acetylhydrolase) that specifically hydrolyzes such oxidized phospholipids suppressed apoptosis. Internalized HAzPC associated with mitochondria, and cytochrome C and apoptosis-inducing factor escaped from mitochondria to the cytoplasm and nucleus, respectively, in cells exposed to HAzPC. Isolated mitochondria exposed to HAzPC rapidly swelled, and released cytochrome C and apoptosis-inducing factor. Other phospholipid oxidation products induced swelling, but HAzPC was the most effective and was twice as effective as its diacyl homolog. Cytoplasmic cytochrome C completes the apoptosome, and activated caspase 9 and 3 were present in cells exposed to HAzPC. Irreversible inhibition of caspase 9 blocked downstream caspase 3 activation, and prevented apoptosis. Mitochondrial damage initiated this apoptotic cascade because over-expression of Bcl-XL, an anti-apoptotic protein localized to mitochondria, blocked cytochrome C escape, and apoptosis. Thus, exogenous phospholipid oxidation products target intracellular mitochondria to activate the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. PMID:17597068

  2. Effects of imidazolium-based ionic surfactants on the size and dynamics of phosphatidylcholine bilayers with saturated and unsaturated chains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwankyu

    2015-07-01

    Imidazolium-based ionic surfactants of different sizes were simulated with 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayers. Regardless of the phospholipid type, larger surfactants at higher concentrations more significantly insert into the bilayer and increase the bilayer-surface size, in agreement with experiments and previous simulations. Insertion of surfactants only slightly decreases the bilayer thickness, as also observed in experiments. Although the surfactant insertion and its effect on the bilayer size and thickness are similar in different types of bilayers, the volume fractions of surfactants in the bilayer are higher for DMPC bilayers than for POPC and DOPC bilayers. In particular, ionic surfactants with four hydrocarbons yield their volume fractions of 4.6% and 8.7%, respectively, in POPC and DMPC bilayers, in quantitative agreement with experimental values of ∼5% and ∼10%. Also, the inserted surfactants increase the lateral diffusivity of the bilayer, which depends on the bilayer type. These findings indicate that although the surfactant insertion does not depend on the bilayer type, the effects of surfactants on the volume fraction and bilayer dynamics occur more significantly in the DMPC bilayer because of the smaller area per lipid and shorter saturated tails, which helps explain the experimental observations regarding different volume fractions of surfactants in POPC and DMPC bilayers.

  3. Mechanical properties of lipid bilayers and regulation of mechanosensitive function

    PubMed Central

    Balleza, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Material properties of lipid bilayers, including thickness, intrinsic curvature and compressibility regulate the function of mechanosensitive (MS) channels. This regulation is dependent on phospholipid composition, lateral packing and organization within the membrane. Therefore, a more complete framework to understand the functioning of MS channels requires insights into bilayer structure, thermodynamics and phospholipid structure, as well as lipid-protein interactions. Phospholipids and MS channels interact with each other mainly through electrostatic forces and hydrophobic matching, which are also crucial for antimicrobial peptides. They are excellent models for studying the formation and stabilization of membrane pores. Importantly, they perform equivalent responses as MS channels: (1) tilting in response to tension and (2) dissipation of osmotic gradients. Lessons learned from pore forming peptides could enrich our knowledge of mechanisms of action and evolution of these channels. Here, the current state of the art is presented and general principles of membrane regulation of mechanosensitive function are discussed. PMID:22790280

  4. Laurdan fluorescence senses mechanical strain in the lipid bilayer membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Liang; Frangos, John A; Chachisvilis, Mirianas

    2006-09-01

    The precise molecular mechanisms by which cells transduce a mechanical stimulus into an intracellular biochemical response have not yet been established. Here, we show for the first time that the fluorescence emission of an environment-sensitive membrane probe Laurdan is modulated by mechanical strain of the lipid bilayer membrane. We have measured fluorescence emission of Laurdan in phospholipid vesicles of 30, 50, and 100 nm diameter to show that osmotically induced membrane tension leads to an increase in polarity (hydration depth) of the phospholipid bilayer interior. Our data indicate that the general polarization of Laurdan emission is linearly dependent on membrane tension. We also show that higher membrane curvature leads to higher hydration levels. We anticipate that the proposed method will facilitate future studies of mechanically induced changes in physical properties of lipid bilayer environment both in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Effect of protic ionic liquid nanostructure on phospholipid vesicle formation.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Saffron J; Wood, Kathleen; Atkin, Rob; Warr, Gregory G

    2017-02-15

    The formation of bilayer-based lyotropic liquid crystals and vesicle dispersions by phospholipids in a range of protic ionic liquids has been investigated by polarizing optical microscopy using isothermal penetration scans, differential scanning calorimetry, and small angle X-ray and neutron scattering. The stability and structure of both lamellar phases and vesicle dispersions is found to depend primarily on the underlying amphiphilic nanostructure of the ionic liquid itself. This finding has significant implications for the use of ionic liquids in soft and biological materials and for biopreservation, and demonstrates how vesicle structure and properties can be controlled through selection of cation and anion. For a given ionic liquid, systematic trends in bilayer thickness, chain-melting temperature and enthalpy increase with phospholipid acyl chain length, paralleling behaviour in aqueous systems.

  6. Phospholipid nanodisc engineering for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsuya

    2012-06-01

    Biocompatible mesoscale nanoparticles (5-100 nm in diameter) are attractive tools for drug delivery. Among them are several types of liposomes and polymer micelles already in clinical trial or use. Generally, biocompatibility of such particles is achieved by coating them with polyethylene glycol (PEG). Without PEG coating, particles are quickly trapped in the reticuloendothelial system when intravenously administered. However, recent studies have revealed several potential problems with PEG coating, including antigenicity and restriction of cellular uptake. This has motivated the development of alternative drug and gene delivery vehicles, including chemically and genetically engineered high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-like nanodiscs or "bicelles". HDL is a naturally occurring mesoscale nanoparticle that normally ferries cholesterol around in the body. Its initial "nascent" form is thought to be a simple 10 nm disc of phospholipids in a bilayer, and can be easily synthesized in vitro by mixing recombinant apoA-I proteins with various phospholipids. In this review, the use of synthetic HDL-like phospholipid nanodiscs as biocompatible drug carriers is summarized, focussing on manufacturing, size-control, drug loading and cell targeting.

  7. Sterol-Modified Phospholipids: Cholesterol and Phospholipid Chimeras with Improved Biomembrane Properties

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhaohua; Szoka, Francis C.

    2009-01-01

    We synthesized a family of sterol-modified glycerophospholipids (SML) in which the sn-1 or sn-2 position is covalently attached to cholesterol and the alternative position contains an aliphatic chain. The SML were used to explore how anchoring cholesterol to a phospholipid affects cholesterol behavior in a bilayer. Notably, cholesterol in the SML retains the membrane condensing properties of free cholesterol regardless of the chemistry or position of its attachment to the glycerol moiety of the phospholipid. SMLs by themselves formed liposomes upon hydration and in mixtures between an SML and diacylglycerophospholipids (C14 to C18 chain length) the thermotropic phase transition is eliminated at the SML equivalent of about 30 mole percent free cholesterol. Osmotic-induced contents leakage from SML (C14–C18) liposomes depends upon the linkage and position of cholesterol but in general is similar to that observed in diacylphosphatidylcholine/ cholesterol: 3/2 (mole ratio) liposomes. SML liposomes are exceptionally resistant to contents release in the presence of serum at 37 °C. This is probably due to fact that SML exchange between bilayers is more than 100 fold less than the exchange rate of free cholesterol in the same conditions. Importantly SML liposomes containing doxorubicin are as effective in treating the murine C26 colon carcinoma, as Doxil™ a commercial liposome doxorubicin formulation. SMLs stabilize bilayers but do not exchange hence provide a new tool for biophysical studies on membranes and they may improve liposomal drug delivery in organs predisposed to the extraction of free cholesterol from bilayers, such as; the skin, lung or blood. PMID:18950160

  8. Lipid bilayers covalently anchored to carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dayani, Yasaman; Malmstadt, Noah

    2012-05-29

    The unique physical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes make them an exciting material for applications in various fields such as bioelectronics and biosensing. Due to the poor water solubility of carbon nanotubes, functionalization for such applications has been a challenge. Of particular need are functionalization methods for integrating carbon nanotubes with biomolecules and constructing novel hybrid nanostructures for bionanoelectronic applications. We present a novel method for the fabrication of dispersible, biocompatible carbon nanotube-based materials. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are covalently modified with primary amine-bearing phospholipids in a carbodiimide-activated reaction. These modified carbon nanotubes have good dispersibility in nonpolar solvents. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows peaks attributable to the formation of amide bonds between lipids and the nanotube surface. Simple sonication of lipid-modified nanotubes with other lipid molecules leads to the formation of a uniform lipid bilayer coating the nanotubes. These bilayer-coated nanotubes are highly dispersible and stable in aqueous solution. Confocal fluorescence microscopy shows labeled lipids on the surface of bilayer-modified nanotubes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows the morphology of dispersed bilayer-coated MWCNTs. Fluorescence quenching of lipid-coated MWCNTs confirms the bilayer configuration of the lipids on the nanotube surface, and fluorescence anisotropy measurements show that the bilayer is fluid above the gel-to-liquid transition temperature. The membrane protein α-hemolysin spontaneously inserts into the MWCNT-supported bilayer, confirming the biomimetic membrane structure. These biomimetic nanostructures are a promising platform for the integration of carbon nanotube-based materials with biomolecules.

  9. Phospholipid flippases: building asymmetric membranes and transport vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Tessy T.; Baldridge, Ryan D.; Xu, Peng; Graham, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    Phospholipid flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase family (P4-ATPases) are essential components of the Golgi, plasma membrane and endosomal system that play critical roles in membrane biogenesis. These pumps flip phospholipid across the bilayer to create an asymmetric membrane structure with substrate phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, enriched within the cytosolic leaflet. The P4-ATPases also help form transport vesicles that bud from Golgi and endosomal membranes, thereby impacting the sorting and localization of many different proteins in the secretory and endocytic pathways. At the organismal level, P4-ATPase deficiencies are linked to liver disease, obesity, diabetes, hearing loss, neurological deficits, immune deficiency and reduced fertility. Here, we review the biochemical, cellular and physiological functions of P4-ATPases, with an emphasis on their roles in vesicle-mediated protein transport. PMID:22234261

  10. Vesicles with a double bilayer.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Zygmunt H

    2004-01-01

    A modified reverse phase evaporation method was used to prepare intermediate unilamellar vesicles coated with an additional membrane, or large vesicles in which several vesicles were coated with a common membrane. In both kinds of vesicle, the outer and inner membranes are usually of different phospholipid composition. The preparation involves the formation of a double emulsion: vesicles in a buffer are emerged in a low-boiling point organic solution of phospholipids. Then the organic solvent is evaporated during the heating and mixing process. As result large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs), about 100 nm in diameter, were coated with an additional membrane from egg lecithin or dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and cholesterol. The highest yield of the coating was about 50%. When DPPC was used for coating above the phase transition temperature Tm, the data suggested the formation of vesicles that were slightly larger than the starting LUVs. It might be concluded that many of these had a double bilayer. If the coating was done below Tm, the micrographs suggested the formation of structures resembling multi-vesicular vesicles. They looked like LUV clusters coated with a common membrane.

  11. The complex nature of calcium cation interactions with phospholipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melcrová, Adéla; Pokorna, Sarka; Pullanchery, Saranya; Kohagen, Miriam; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Hof, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel; Cremer, Paul S.; Cwiklik, Lukasz

    2016-12-01

    Understanding interactions of calcium with lipid membranes at the molecular level is of great importance in light of their involvement in calcium signaling, association of proteins with cellular membranes, and membrane fusion. We quantify these interactions in detail by employing a combination of spectroscopic methods with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Namely, time-resolved fluorescent spectroscopy of lipid vesicles and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy of lipid monolayers are used to characterize local binding sites of calcium in zwitterionic and anionic model lipid assemblies, while dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements are employed for macroscopic characterization of lipid vesicles in calcium-containing environments. To gain additional atomic-level information, the experiments are complemented by molecular simulations that utilize an accurate force field for calcium ions with scaled charges effectively accounting for electronic polarization effects. We demonstrate that lipid membranes have substantial calcium-binding capacity, with several types of binding sites present. Significantly, the binding mode depends on calcium concentration with important implications for calcium buffering, synaptic plasticity, and protein-membrane association.

  12. The complex nature of calcium cation interactions with phospholipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Melcrová, Adéla; Pokorna, Sarka; Pullanchery, Saranya; Kohagen, Miriam; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Hof, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel; Cremer, Paul S.; Cwiklik, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    Understanding interactions of calcium with lipid membranes at the molecular level is of great importance in light of their involvement in calcium signaling, association of proteins with cellular membranes, and membrane fusion. We quantify these interactions in detail by employing a combination of spectroscopic methods with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Namely, time-resolved fluorescent spectroscopy of lipid vesicles and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy of lipid monolayers are used to characterize local binding sites of calcium in zwitterionic and anionic model lipid assemblies, while dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements are employed for macroscopic characterization of lipid vesicles in calcium-containing environments. To gain additional atomic-level information, the experiments are complemented by molecular simulations that utilize an accurate force field for calcium ions with scaled charges effectively accounting for electronic polarization effects. We demonstrate that lipid membranes have substantial calcium-binding capacity, with several types of binding sites present. Significantly, the binding mode depends on calcium concentration with important implications for calcium buffering, synaptic plasticity, and protein-membrane association. PMID:27905555

  13. Self-reproducing catalyst drives repeated phospholipid synthesis and membrane growth

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Michael D.; Yang, Jun; Selimkhanov, Jangir; Cole, Christian M.; Tsimring, Lev S.; Devaraj, Neal K.

    2015-01-01

    Cell membranes are dynamic structures found in all living organisms. There have been numerous constructs that model phospholipid membranes. However, unlike natural membranes, these biomimetic systems cannot sustain growth owing to an inability to replenish phospholipid-synthesizing catalysts. Here we report on the design and synthesis of artificial membranes embedded with synthetic, self-reproducing catalysts capable of perpetuating phospholipid bilayer formation. Replacing the complex biochemical pathways used in nature with an autocatalyst that also drives lipid synthesis leads to the continual formation of triazole phospholipids and membrane-bound oligotriazole catalysts from simpler starting materials. In addition to continual phospholipid synthesis and vesicle growth, the synthetic membranes are capable of remodeling their physical composition in response to changes in the environment by preferentially incorporating specific precursors. These results demonstrate that complex membranes capable of indefinite self-synthesis can emerge when supplied with simpler chemical building blocks. PMID:26100914

  14. Specific requirements of nonbilayer phospholipids in mitochondrial respiratory chain function and formation

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Charli D.; Basu Ball, Writoban; Pryce, Erin N.; Gohil, Vishal M.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition affects mitochondrial function by influencing the assembly of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes into supercomplexes. For example, the loss of cardiolipin (CL), a signature non–bilayer-forming phospholipid of mitochondria, results in disruption of MRC supercomplexes. However, the functions of the most abundant mitochondrial phospholipids, bilayer-forming phosphatidylcholine (PC) and non–bilayer-forming phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), are not clearly defined. Using yeast mutants of PE and PC biosynthetic pathways, we show a specific requirement for mitochondrial PE in MRC complex III and IV activities but not for their formation, whereas loss of PC does not affect MRC function or formation. Unlike CL, mitochondrial PE or PC is not required for MRC supercomplex formation, emphasizing the specific requirement of CL in supercomplex assembly. Of interest, PE biosynthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can functionally substitute for the lack of mitochondrial PE biosynthesis, suggesting the existence of PE transport pathway from ER to mitochondria. To understand the mechanism of PE transport, we disrupted ER–mitochondrial contact sites formed by the ERMES complex and found that, although not essential for PE transport, ERMES facilitates the efficient rescue of mitochondrial PE deficiency. Our work highlights specific roles of non–bilayer-forming phospholipids in MRC function and formation. PMID:27226479

  15. Preservation of bilayer structure in human erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts after phospholipase treatment. A 31P-NMR study.

    PubMed

    van Meer, G; de Kruijff, B; op den Kamp, J A; van Deenen, L L

    1980-02-15

    1. Fresh human erythrocytes were treated with lytic and non-lytic combinations of phospholipases A2, C and sphingomyelinase. The 31P-NMR spectra of ghosts derived from such erythrocytes show that, in all cases, the residual phospholipids and lysophospholipids remain organized in a bilayer configuration. 2. A bilayer configuration of the (lyso)phospholipids was also observed after treatment of erythrocyte ghosts with various phospholipases even in the case that 98% of the phospholipid was converted into lysophospholipid (72%) and ceramides (26%). 3. A slightly decreased order of the phosphate group of phospholipid molecules, seen as reduced effective chemical shift anisotropy in the 31P-NMR spectra, was found following the formation of diacyglycerols and ceramides in the membrane of intact erythrocytes. Treatment of ghosts always resulted in an extensive decrease in the order of the phosphate groups. 4. The results allow the following conclusions to made: a. Hydrolysis of phospholipids in intact red cells and ghosts does not result in the formation of non-bilayer configuration of residual phospholipids and lysophospholipids. b. Haemolysis, which is obtained by subsequent treatment of intact cells with sphingomyelinase and phospholipase A2, or with phospholipase C, cannot be ascribed to the formation of non-bilayer configuration of phosphate-containing lipids. c. Preservation of bilayer structure, even after hydrolysis of all phospholipid, shows that other membrane constitutents, e.g. cholesterol and/or membrane proteins play an important role in stabilizing the structure of the erythrocyte membrane. d. A major prerequisite for the application of phospholipases in lipid localization studies, the preservation of a bilayer configuration during phospholipid hydrolysis, is met for the erythrocyte membrane.

  16. Evidence of the Key Role of H3O(+) in Phospholipid Membrane Morphology.

    PubMed

    Cranfield, Charles G; Berry, Thomas; Holt, Stephen A; Hossain, Khondker R; Le Brun, Anton P; Carne, Sonia; Al Khamici, Heba; Coster, Hans; Valenzuela, Stella M; Cornell, Bruce

    2016-10-04

    This study explains the importance of the phosphate moiety and H3O(+) in controlling the ionic flux through phospholipid membranes. We show that despite an increase in the H3O(+) concentration when the pH is decreased, the level of ionic conduction through phospholipid bilayers is reduced. By modifying the lipid structure, we show the dominant determinant of membrane conduction is the hydrogen bonding between the phosphate oxygens on adjacent phospholipids. The modulation of conduction with pH is proposed to arise from the varying H3O(+) concentrations altering the molecular area per lipid and modifying the geometry of conductive defects already present in the membrane. Given the geometrical constraints that control the lipid phase structure of membranes, these area changes predict that organisms evolving in environments with different pHs will select for different phospholipid chain lengths, as is found for organisms near highly acidic volcanic vents (short chains) or in highly alkaline salt lakes (long chains). The stabilizing effect of the hydration shells around phosphate groups also accounts for the prevalence of phospholipids across biology. Measurement of ion permeation through lipid bilayers was made tractable using sparsely tethered bilayer lipid membranes with swept frequency electrical impedance spectroscopy and ramped dc amperometry. Additional evidence of the effect of a change in pH on lipid packing density is obtained from neutron reflectometry data of tethered membranes containing perdeuterated lipids.

  17. Micro-patterning of ionic reservoirs within a double bilayer lipid membrane to fabricate a 2D array of ion-channel switch based electrochemical biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Sansinena, J. M.; Yee, C. K.; Sapuri, A.; Swanson, Basil I.; Redondo, A.; Parikh, A. N.

    2004-01-01

    We present a simple approach for the design of ionic reservoir arrays within a double phospholipid bilayer to ultimately develop a 2D array of ion-channel switch based electrochemical biosensors. As a first step, a primary bilayer lipid membrane is deposited onto an array of electrodes patterned onto a substrate surface. Subsequently, an array of microvoids is created within the bilayer by a wet photolithographic patterning of phospholipid bilayers using a deep UV light source and a quartz/chrome photomask. To ensure registry, the photomask used to pattern bilayers is designed to match up the microvoids within the primary bilayer with the array of electrodes on the substrate surface. The deposition of a secondary bilayer lipid membrane onto the primary bilayer that spans across the patterned microvoids leads to the formation of the array of ionic reservoirs within the double phospholipid bilayer. This is accomplished using giant unilamellar vesicles and by exploiting membrane electrostatics. The use of ion-channels incorporated into the secondary bilayer that covers the individual ionic reservoirs allows the construction of a 2D array of ion-channel switch based electrochemical biosensors that are able to recognize different target-agents simultaneously.

  18. Storage stability and physical characteristics of tea-polyphenol-bearing nanoliposomes prepared with milk fat globule membrane phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Gülseren, Ibrahim; Corredig, Milena

    2013-04-03

    The objective of this work was to better understand the functional properties of milk phospholipids when used as ingredients to prepare liposomes. Liposomal dispersions (10%) were prepared using high-pressure homogenization, and their physical properties as well as their ability to encapsulate tea polyphenols were investigated. The extent of encapsulation, measured by HPLC, increased with tea polyphenol concentration up to about 4 mg·mL(-1). At polyphenol concentrations ≥ 6 mg·mL(-1), the liposome dispersions were no longer stable. The influence of pH (3-7), storage temperature (room temperature or refrigeration), and addition of sugars (0-15%) were studied for liposomes containing 4 mg·mL(-1) polyphenols. The liposomal dispersions were also stable in the presence of peptides. The storage stability of the systems prepared with milk phospholipids was compared to that of liposomes made with soy phospholipids. Soy liposomes were smaller in size than milk phospholipid liposomes, the encapsulation efficiency was higher, and the extent of release of tea polyphenols during storage was lower for milk phospholipid liposomes compared to soy liposomes. The results suggest that milk phospholipids could be employed to prepare tea-polyphenol-bearing liposomes and that the tea catechins may be incorporated in the milk phospholipid bilayer more efficiently than in the case of a soy phospholipid bilayer.

  19. The topology of lysine-containing amphipathic peptides in bilayers by circular dichroism, solid-state NMR, and molecular modeling.

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, B; Ducarme, P; Schinzel, S; Brasseur, R; Bechinger, B

    2000-01-01

    In order to better understand the driving forces that determine the alignment of amphipathic helical polypeptides with respect to the surface of phospholipid bilayers, lysine-containing peptide sequences were designed, prepared by solid-phase chemical synthesis, and reconstituted into membranes. CD spectroscopy indicates that all peptides exhibit a high degree of helicity in the presence of SDS micelles or POPC small unilamellar vesicles. Proton-decoupled (31)P-NMR solid-state NMR spectroscopy demonstrates that in the presence of peptides liquid crystalline phosphatidylcholine membranes orient well along glass surfaces. The orientational distribution and dynamics of peptides labeled with (15)N at selected sites were investigated by proton-decoupled (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Polypeptides with a single lysine residue adopt a transmembrane orientation, thereby locating this polar amino acid within the core region of the bilayer. In contrast, peptides with > or = 3 lysines reside along the surface of the membrane. With 2 lysines in the center of an otherwise hydrophobic amino acid sequence the peptides assume a broad orientational distribution. The energy of lysine discharge, hydrophobic, polar, and all other interactions are estimated to quantitatively describe the polypeptide topologies observed. Furthermore, a molecular modeling algorithm based on the hydrophobicities of atoms in a continuous hydrophilic-hydrophobic-hydrophilic potential describes the experimentally observed peptide topologies well. PMID:11053137

  20. The Physical Chemistry of the Enigmatic Phospholipid Diacylglycerol Pyrophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Strawn, Liza; Babb, Amy; Testerink, Christa; Kooijman, Edgar Eduard

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidic acid (PA) is a lipid second messenger that is formed transiently in plants in response to different stress conditions, and plays a role in recruiting protein targets, ultimately enabling an adequate response. Intriguingly, this increase in PA concentration in plants is generally followed by an increase in the phospholipid diacylglycerolpyrophosphate (DGPP), via turnover of PA. Although DGPP has been shown to induce stress-related responses in plants, it is unclear to date what its molecular function is and how it exerts its effect. Here, we describe the physicochemical properties, i.e., effective molecular shape and charge, of DGPP. We find that unlike PA, which imparts a negative curvature stress to a (phospho)lipid bilayer, DGPP stabilizes the bilayer phase of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), similar to the effect of phosphatidylcholine (PC). DGPP thus has zero curvature. The pKa2 of the phosphomonoester of DGPP is 7.44 ± 0.02 in a PC bilayer, compared to a pKa2 of 7.9 for PA. Replacement of half of the PC with PE decreases the pKa2 of DGPP to 6.71 ± 0.02, similar to the behavior previously described for PA and summarized in the electrostatic–hydrogen bond switch model. Implications for the potential function of DGPP in biomembranes are discussed. PMID:22645584

  1. Effect of Cholesterol on the Structure of a Five-Component Mitochondria-Like Phospholipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Cathcart, Kelly; Patel, Amit; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.; Fradin, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Cellular membranes have a complex phospholipid composition that varies greatly depending on the organism, cell type and function. In spite of this complexity, most structural data available for phospholipid bilayers concern model systems containing only one or two different phospholipids. Here, we examine the effect of cholesterol on the structure of a complex membrane reflecting the lipid composition of mitochondrial membranes, with five different types of headgroups (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylserine (PS) and cardiolipin (CL)) and a variety of hydrocarbon tails. This particular system was chosen because elevated cholesterol contents in mitochondrial membranes have been linked to a breaking down of Bax-mediated membrane permeabilization and resistance to cancer treatments. High resolution electron density profiles were determined by X-ray reflectivity, while the area per phospholipid chain, Apc, and the chain order parameter, SX-ray, were determined by wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). We show that chain order increases upon the addition of cholesterol, resulting in both a thickening of the lipid bilayer and a reduction in the average surface area per phospholipid chain. This effect, well known as cholesterol’s condensation effect, is similar, but not as pronounced as for single-component phospholipid membranes. We conclude by discussing the relevance of these findings for the insertion of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax in mitochondrial membranes with elevated cholesterol content. PMID:26529029

  2. Amphotericin B induced interdigitation of apolipoprotein stabilized nanodisk bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T; Weers, P M; Sulchek, T; Hoeprich, P D; Ryan, R O

    2006-12-07

    Amphotericin B nanodisks (AMB-ND) are ternary complexes of AMB, phospholipid (PL) and apolipoprotein organized as discrete nanometer scale disk-shaped bilayers. In gel filtration chromatography experiments, empty ND lacking AMB elute as a single population of particles with a molecular weight in the range of 200 kDa. AMB-ND formulated at a 4:1 PL:AMB weight ratio, separated into two peaks. Peak 1 eluted at the position of control ND lacking AMB while the second peak, containing all of the AMB present in the original sample, eluted in the void volume. When ND prepared with increased AMB (1:1 phospholipid:AMB molar ratio) were subjected to gel filtration chromatography, an increased proportion of phospholipid and apolipoprotein were recovered in the void volume with the AMB. Prior to gel filtration the AMB-ND sample could be passed through a 0.22 {micro}m filter without loss of AMB while the voided material was lost. Native gel electrophoresis studies corroborated the gel permeation chromatography data. Far UV circular dichroism analyses revealed that apoA-I associated with AMB-ND denatures at a lower guanidine HCl concentration than apoA-I associated with ND lacking AMB. Atomic force microscopy revealed that AMB induces compression of the ND bilayer thickness consistent with bilayer interdigitation, a phenomenon that is likely related to the ability of AMB to induce pore formation in susceptible membranes.

  3. A Molecular Dynamics Study of the Structural and Dynamical Properties of Putative Arsenic Substituted Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hui-Hsu Gavin; Lee, Jian-Bin; Huang, Jian-Ming; Juwita, Ratna

    2013-01-01

    Cell membranes are composed mainly of phospholipids which are in turn, composed of five major chemical elements: carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, and phosphorus. Recent studies have suggested the possibility of sustaining life if the phosphorus is substituted by arsenic. Although this issue is still controversial, it is of interest to investigate the properties of arsenated-lipid bilayers to evaluate this possibility. In this study, we simulated arsenated-lipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-arsenocholine (POAC), lipid bilayers using all-atom molecular dynamics to understand basic structural and dynamical properties, in particular, the differences from analogous 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, (POPC) lipid bilayers. Our simulations showed that POAC lipid bilayers have distinct structural and dynamical properties from those of native POPC lipid bilayers. Relative to POPC lipid bilayers, POAC lipid bilayers have a more compact structure with smaller lateral areas and greater order. The compact structure of POAC lipid bilayers is due to the fact that more inter-lipid salt bridges are formed with arsenate-choline compared to the phosphate-choline of POPC lipid bilayers. These inter-lipid salt bridges bind POAC lipids together and also slow down the head group rotation and lateral diffusion of POAC lipids. Thus, it would be anticipated that POAC and POPC lipid bilayers would have different biological implications. PMID:23571494

  4. The Influence of Hydrogen Bonding on Sphingomyelin/Colipid Interactions in Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Tomokazu; Al Sazzad, Md. Abdullah; Jäntti, Niklas Z.; Pentikäinen, Olli T.; Slotte, J. Peter

    2016-01-01

    The phospholipid acyl chain composition and order, the hydrogen bonding, and properties of the phospholipid headgroup all influence cholesterol/phospholipid interactions in hydrated bilayers. In this study, we examined the influence of hydrogen bonding on sphingomyelin (SM) colipid interactions in fluid uni- and multilamellar vesicles. We have compared the properties of oleoyl or palmitoyl SM with comparable dihydro-SMs, because the hydrogen bonding properties of SM and dihydro-SM differ. The association of cholestatrienol, a fluorescent cholesterol analog, with oleoyl sphingomyelin (OSM) was significantly stronger than its association with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, in bilayers with equal acyl chain order. The association of cholestatrienol with dihydro-OSM, which lacks a trans double bond in the sphingoid base, was even stronger than the association with OSM, suggesting an important role for hydrogen bonding in stabilizing sterol/SM interactions. Furthermore, with saturated SM in the presence of 15 mol % cholesterol, cholesterol association with fluid dihydro-palmitoyl SM bilayers was stronger than seen with palmitoyl SM under similar conditions. The different hydrogen bonding properties in OSM and dihydro-OSM bilayers also influenced the segregation of palmitoyl ceramide and dipalmitoylglycerol into an ordered phase. The ordered, palmitoyl ceramide-rich phase started to form above 2 mol % in the dihydro-OSM bilayers but only above 6 mol % in the OSM bilayers. The lateral segregation of dipalmitoylglycerol was also much more pronounced in dihydro-OSM bilayers than in OSM bilayers. The results show that hydrogen bonding is important for sterol/SM and ceramide/SM interactions, as well as for the lateral segregation of a diglyceride. A possible molecular explanation for the different hydrogen bonding in SM and dihydro-SM bilayers is presented and discussed. PMID:26789766

  5. Membrane phospholipid asymmetry in human thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, F A; Yuan, J; Lewis, R A; Snyder, L M; Kiefer, C R; Bunyaratvej, A; Fucharoen, S; Ma, L; Styles, L; de Jong, K; Schrier, S L

    1998-04-15

    Phospholipid asymmetry in the red blood cell (RBC) lipid bilayer is well maintained during the life of the cell, with phosphatidylserine (PS) virtually exclusively located in the inner monolayer. Loss of phospholipid asymmetry, and consequently exposure of PS, is thought to play an important role in red cell pathology. The anemia in the human thalassemias is caused by a combination of ineffective erythropoiesis (intramedullary hemolysis) and a decreased survival of adult RBCs in the peripheral blood. This premature destruction of the thalassemic RBC could in part be due to a loss of phospholipid asymmetry, because cells that expose PS are recognized and removed by macrophages. In addition, PS exposure can play a role in the hypercoagulable state reported to exist in severe beta-thalassemia intermedia. We describe PS exposure in RBCs of 56 comparably anemic patients with different genetic backgrounds of the alpha- or beta-thalassemia phenotype. The use of fluorescently labeled annexin V allowed us to determine loss of phospholipid asymmetry in individual cells. Our data indicate that in a number of thalassemic patients, subpopulations of red cells circulate that expose PS on their outer surface. The number of such cells can vary dramatically from patient to patient, from as low as that found in normal controls (less than 0.2%) up to 20%. Analysis by fluorescent microscopy of beta-thalassemic RBCs indicates that PS on the outer leaflet is distributed either over the entire membrane or localized in areas possibly related to regions rich in membrane-bound alpha-globin chains. We hypothesize that these membrane sites in which iron carrying globin chains accumulate and cause oxidative damage, could be important in the loss of membrane lipid organization. In conclusion, we report the presence of PS-exposing subpopulations of thalassemic RBC that are most likely physiologically important, because they could provide a surface for enhancing hemostasis as recently reported

  6. Lipid bilayers suspended on microfabricated supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogier, Simon D.; Bushby, Richard J.; Cheng, Yaling; Cox, Tim I.; Evans, Stephen D.; Knowles, Peter F.; Miles, Robert E.; Pattison, Ian

    2001-03-01

    The plasma membrane, that exists as part of many animal and plant cells, is a regulator for the transport of ions and small molecules across cell boundaries. Two main components involved are the phospholipid bilayer and the transport proteins. This paper details the construction of a micromachined support for bilayers (MSB) as a first step towards the development of highly selective and highly sensitive ion-channel based biosensors. The device consists of a ~100 micrometer hole in a polymeric support above a cavity that can hold ~25 nL of electrolyte. Electrodes attached to the structure allow the resistance of the membranes to be measured using d.c. conductivity. The MSB is made in two halves, using SU8 ultra-thick resist, which are subsequently bonded together to make the final structure. A layer of gold, surrounding the aperture, enables self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols to be used to make the polymeric structure biocompatible. Lipid membranes have been formed over these holes with resistances comparable with those of natural membranes >10 MOhmcm^2. The ion-channel gramicidin has successfully been incorporated into the bilayer and its activity monitored. It is proposed that this type of device could be used not only for studying membrane transport phenomena but also as part of an ion-channel based biosensor.

  7. Surfactant phospholipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Agassandian, Marianna; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life and is comprised of a complex lipoprotein-like mixture that lines the inner surface of the lung to prevent alveolar collapse at the end of expiration. The molecular composition of surfactant depends on highly integrated and regulated processes involving its biosynthesis, remodeling, degradation, and intracellular trafficking. Despite its multicomponent composition, the study of surfactant phospholipid metabolism has focused on two predominant components, disaturated phosphatidylcholine that confers surface-tension lowering activities, and phosphatidylglycerol, recently implicated in innate immune defense. Future studies providing a better understanding of the molecular control and physiological relevance of minor surfactant lipid components are needed. PMID:23026158

  8. The mechanism of detergent solubilization of lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Dov; Ahyayauch, Hasna; Goñi, Félix M

    2013-07-16

    Multiple data are available on the self-assembly of mixtures of bilayer-forming amphiphiles, particularly phospholipids and micelle-forming amphiphiles, commonly denoted detergents. The structure of such mixed assemblies has been thoroughly investigated, described in phase diagrams, and theoretically rationalized in terms of the balance between the large spontaneous curvature of the curvophilic detergent and the curvophobic phospholipids. In this critical review, we discuss the mechanism of this process and try to explain the actual mechanism involved in solubilization. Interestingly, membrane solubilization by some detergents is relatively slow and the common attribute of these detergents is that their trans-bilayer movement, commonly denoted flip-flop, is very slow. Only detergents that can flip into the inner monolayer cause relatively rapid solubilization of detergent-saturated bilayers. This occurs via the following sequence of events: 1), relatively rapid penetration of detergent monomers into the outer monolayer; 2), trans-membrane equilibration of detergent monomers between the two monolayers; 3), saturation of the bilayer by detergents and consequent permeabilization of the membrane; and 4), transition of the whole bilayer to thread-like mixed micelles. When the detergent cannot flip to the inner monolayer, the outer monolayer becomes unstable due to mass imbalance between the monolayers and inclusion of the curvophilic detergent molecules in a flat surface. Consequently, the outer monolayer forms mixed micellar structures within the outer monolayer. Shedding of these micelles into the aqueous solution results in partial solubilization. The consequent leakage of detergent into the liposome results in trans-membrane equilibration of detergent and subsequent micellization through the rapid bilayer-saturation mechanism.

  9. Modulation of Plasma Membrane Ca2+-ATPase by Neutral Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Pignataro, María Florencia; Dodes-Traian, Martín M.; González-Flecha, F. Luis; Sica, Mauricio; Mangialavori, Irene C.; Rossi, Juan Pablo F. C.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of lipids on membrane proteins are likely to be complex and unique for each membrane protein. Here we studied different detergent/phosphatidylcholine reconstitution media and tested their effects on plasma membrane Ca2+ pump (PMCA). We found that Ca2+-ATPase activity shows a biphasic behavior with respect to the detergent/phosphatidylcholine ratio. Moreover, the maximal Ca2+-ATPase activity largely depends on the length and the unsaturation degree of the hydrocarbon chain. Using static light scattering and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we monitored the changes in hydrodynamic radius of detergent/phosphatidylcholine particles during the micelle-vesicle transition. We found that, when PMCA is reconstituted in mixed micelles, neutral phospholipids increase the enzyme turnover. The biophysical changes associated with the transition from mixed micelles to bicelles increase the time of residence of the phosphorylated intermediate (EP), decreasing the enzyme turnover. Molecular dynamics simulations analysis of the interactions between PMCA and the phospholipid bilayer in which it is embedded show that in the 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, charged residues of the protein are trapped in the hydrophobic core. Conversely, in the 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer, the overall hydrophobic-hydrophilic requirements of the protein surface are fulfilled the best, reducing the thermodynamic cost of exposing charged residues to the hydrophobic core. The apparent mismatch produced by a 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine thicker bilayer could be a structural foundation to explain its functional effect on PMCA. PMID:25605721

  10. The effect of bilayer composition on calcium ion transport facilitated by fluid shear stress.

    PubMed

    Giorgio, T D; Yek, S H

    1995-10-04

    Passive calcium ion permeability across liposome bilayers is increased during exposure to fluid shear forces attainable in the mammalian vasculature. In this study, liposomes prepared from three different lipid mixtures (phosphatidylcholine alone; phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol; a mixture of anionic and cationic phospholipids plus cholesterol) are exposed to uniform shear stress in a rotational viscometer. Liposome permeability to calcium ion is estimated from continuous measurement of free intraliposome calcium ion concentration using a fluorescence technique. Calcium ion permeability in the absence of fluid force and susceptibility to shear-induced permeability modulation are positively correlated with estimated bilayer compressibility. Fluid shear forces are presumed to influence bilayer packing and modulate defect formation in proportion to bilayer compressibility. Bilayer defects produced by fluid forces may increase liposome permeability.

  11. Carboxyl-terminated PAMAM dendrimer interaction with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphocholine bilayers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polycationic polymers and liposomes have a great potential use as individual drug delivery systems and greater potential as a combined drug delivery system. Thus, it is important to better understand the interactions of polymers with phospholipid bilayers. A mechanistic study of carboxyl-terminate...

  12. Spontaneous adsorption of coiled-coil model peptides K and E to a mixed lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Pluhackova, Kristyna; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A; Kirsch, Sonja; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2015-03-26

    A molecular description of the lipid-protein interactions underlying the adsorption of proteins to membranes is crucial for understanding, for example, the specificity of adsorption or the binding strength of a protein to a bilayer, or for characterizing protein-induced changes of membrane properties. In this paper, we extend an automated in silico assay (DAFT) for binding studies and apply it to characterize the adsorption of the model fusion peptides E and K to a mixed phospholipid/cholesterol membrane using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. In addition, we couple the coarse-grained protocol to reverse transformation to atomistic resolution, thereby allowing to study molecular interactions with high detail. The experimentally observed differential binding of the peptides E and K to membranes, as well as the increased binding affinity of helical over unstructered peptides, could be well reproduced using the polarizable Martini coarse-grained (CG) force field. Binding to neutral membranes is shown to be dominated by initial binding of the positively charged N-terminus to the phospholipid headgroup region, followed by membrane surface-aligned insertion of the peptide at the interface between the hydrophobic core of the membrane and its polar headgroup region. Both coarse-grained and atomistic simulations confirm a before hypothesized snorkeling of lysine side chains for the membrane-bound state of the peptide K. Cholesterol was found to be enriched in peptide vicinity, which is probably of importance for the mechanism of membrane fusion. The applied sequential multiscale method, using coarse-grained simulations for the slow adsorption process of peptides to membranes followed by backward transformation to atomistic detail and subsequent atomistic simulations of the preformed peptide-lipid complexes, is shown to be a versatile approach to study the interactions of peptides or proteins with biomembranes.

  13. Mechanism of the Cell-Penetrating Peptide Transportan 10 Permeation of Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Yandek, Lindsay E.; Pokorny, Antje; Florén, Anders; Knoelke, Kristina; Langel, Ülo; Almeida, Paulo F. F.

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism of the interaction between the cell-penetrating peptide transportan 10 (tp10) and phospholipid membranes was investigated. Tp10 induces graded release of the contents of phospholipid vesicles. The kinetics of peptide association with vesicles and peptide-induced dye efflux from the vesicle lumen were examined experimentally by stopped-flow fluorescence. The experimental kinetics were analyzed by directly fitting to the data the numerical solution of mathematical kinetic models. A very good global fit was obtained using a model in which tp10 binds to the membrane surface and perturbs it because of the mass imbalance thus created across the bilayer. The perturbed bilayer state allows peptide monomers to insert transiently into its hydrophobic core and cross the membrane, until the peptide mass imbalance is dissipated. In that transient state tp10 “catalyzes” dye efflux from the vesicle lumen. These conclusions are consistent with recent reports that used molecular dynamics simulations to study the interactions between peptide antimicrobials and phospholipid bilayers. A thermodynamic analysis of tp10 binding and insertion in the bilayer using water-membrane transfer hydrophobicity scales is entirely consistent with the model proposed. A small bilayer perturbation is both necessary and sufficient to achieve very good agreement with the model, indicating that the role of the lipids must be included to understand the mechanism of cell-penetrating and antimicrobial peptides. PMID:17218466

  14. Osmotic control of bilayer fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, L R; Parker, N S

    1984-01-01

    We have used photography and capacitance measurement to monitor the steps in the interaction and eventual fusion of optically black lipid bilayers (BLMs), hydrostatically bulged to approximately hemispherical shape and pushed together mechanically. A necessary first step is drainage of aqueous solution from between the bilayers to allow close contact of the bilayers. The drainage can be controlled by varying the osmotic difference across the bilayers. If the differences are such as to remove water from between the bilayers, fusion occurs after a time that depends on the net osmotic difference and the area of contact. If there is an osmotic flow of water into the space between the bilayers, fusion never occurs. In the fusion process, a single central bilayer forms from the original apposed pair of bilayers. The central bilayer may later burst to allow mixing of the two volumes originally bounded by the separate bilayer; the topological equivalent of exocytosis. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:6541065

  15. Mechanical properties of lipid bilayers and regulation of mechanosensitive function: from biological to biomimetic channels.

    PubMed

    Balleza, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Material properties of lipid bilayers, including thickness, intrinsic curvature and compressibility regulate the function of mechanosensitive (MS) channels. This regulation is dependent on phospholipid composition, lateral packing and organization within the membrane. Therefore, a more complete framework to understand the functioning of MS channels requires insights into bilayer structure, thermodynamics and phospholipid structure, as well as lipid-protein interactions. Phospholipids and MS channels interact with each other mainly through electrostatic forces and hydrophobic matching, which are also crucial for antimicrobial peptides. They are excellent models for studying the formation and stabilization of membrane pores. Importantly, they perform equivalent responses as MS channels: (1) tilting in response to tension and (2) dissipation of osmotic gradients. Lessons learned from pore forming peptides could enrich our knowledge of mechanisms of action and evolution of these channels. Here, the current state of the art is presented and general principles of membrane regulation of mechanosensitive function are discussed.

  16. Interactions of ibuprofen with hybrid lipid bilayers probed by complementary surface-enhanced vibrational spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Carly S.; Kundu, Janardan; Janesko, Benjamin G.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Raphael, Robert M.; Halas, Naomi J.

    2016-01-01

    The incorporation of small molecules into lipid bilayers is a process of biological importance and clinical relevance that can change the material properties of cell membranes and cause deleterious side effects for certain drugs. Here we report the direct observation, using surface enhanced Raman and IR spectroscopies (SERS, SEIRA), of the insertion of ibuprofen molecules into hybrid lipid bilayers. The alkanethiol-phospholipid hybrid bilayers were formed onto gold nanoshells by self-assembly, where the underlying nanoshell substrates provided the necessary enhancements for SERS and SEIRA. The spectroscopic data reveal specific interactions between ibuprofen and phospholipid moieties and indicate that the overall hydrophobicity of ibuprofen plays an important role in its intercalation in these membrane mimics. PMID:18942873

  17. Rational design of new product candidates: the next generation of highly deformable bilayer vesicles for noninvasive, targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Cevc, Gregor

    2012-06-10

    Amphipat bilayer vesicles are a subgroup of "fat-and-water" mixtures useful as drug carriers. Scrutinising amphipat aggregation in terms of the popular molecular descriptors (esp. the Israelachvili's form-factor or HLB number) is "too static" to foretell reliably and quantitatively bilayer vesicle formation. A better predictor introduced in this work is the effective area per lipid chain (cross-section of a "tail", A(c)), which also correlates, quasi-exponentially, with the ease of bilayer vesicle formation and bilayer deformability. The latter is highest near an uppermost, bilayer-compatible but nearly headgroup independent, A(c)-value reachable on different paths to bilayer solubilisation. The deformable bilayer vesicles class is thus more diverse than had previously been recognised. It includes phospholipid or phospholipid-surfactant blends (1st generation), synergistic phospholipid-amphipat or drug mixtures (2nd generation), and novel (non-phospholipid) amphipat combinations with appropriate effective tail(s) cross-section (3rd generation). Typically, vesicularisation ability and bilayer adaptability of such preparations is proportional, and arguably depends upon, the dynamic and stress-dependent molecular re-arrangement during aggregate formation and bilayer adaptation. In the previously described formulations such re-arrangement took place within or across the mixed lipid bilayer. This work shows that water-soluble molecules redistribution near a bilayer surface can be similarly effective. The new mechanism for bilayer properties modulation thus potentially avoids using harsher molecules in the adaptable vesicles, and can utilise buffers, microbicides, etc., in their stead. A plethora of amphipats can comprise hyper-adaptable vesicles of the new generation, including some that are more stable than the previously recognised ones. Encompassing well-chosen hydrophilic additive(s) and/or drug(s), such hyper-adaptable vesicles can be blended into fluid or

  18. Anionic phospholipids modulate peptide insertion into membranes.

    PubMed

    Liu, L P; Deber, C M

    1997-05-06

    While the insertion of a hydrophobic peptide or membrane protein segment into the bilayer can be spontaneous and driven mainly by the hydrophobic effect, anionic lipids, which comprise ca. 20% of biological membranes, provide a source of electrostatic attractions for binding of proteins/peptides into membranes. To unravel the interplay of hydrophobicity and electrostatics in the binding of peptides into membranes, we designed peptides de novo which possess the typical sequence Lys-Lys-Ala-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Ala-Trp-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Al a-Ala-Lys-Lys-Lys-Lys-amide, where X residues correspond to "guest" residues which encompass a range of hydrophobicity (Leu, Ile, Gly, and Ser). Circular dichroism spectra demonstrated that peptides were partially (40-90%) random in aqueous buffer but were promoted to form 100% alpha-helical structures by anionic lipid micelles. In neutral lipid micelles, only the relatively hydrophobic peptides (X = L and I) spontaneously adopted the alpha-helical conformation, but when 25% of negatively charged lipids were mixed in to mimic the content of anionic lipids in biomembranes, the less hydrophobic (X = S and G) peptides then formed alpha-helical conformations. Consistent with these findings, fluorescence quenching by the aqueous-phase quencher iodide indicated that in anionic (dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol) vesicles, the peptide Trp residue was buried in the lipid vesicle hydrophobic core, while in neutral (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) vesicles, only hydrophobic (X = L and I) peptides were shielded from the aqueous solution. Trp emission spectra of peptides in the presence of phospholipids doxyl-labeled at the 5-, 7-, 10-, 12-, and 16-fatty acid positions implied not only a transbilayer orientation for inserted peptides but also that mixed peptide populations (transbilayer + surface-associated) may arise. Overall results suggest that for hydrophobic peptides with segmental threshold hydrophobicity below that which

  19. Bilayer Graphene Electromechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, Alexandre; Storms, Matthew; Yigen, Serap; Reulet, Bertrand

    Bilayer graphene is an outstanding electromechanical system, and its electronic and mechanical properties, as well as their coupling, are widely tunable. To the best of our knowledge, simultaneous charge transport and mechanical spectroscopy (via RF mixing) has not been realized in bilayer graphene. We present data showing clear electromechanical resonances in three suspended bilayer devices whose length range from 1 to 2 microns. We first describe the low-temperature current annealing of the devices which is crucial to achieve the transconductance, I -VG , necessary to implement a RF mixing detection method. We describe our RF mixing circuit and data. We measure clear mechanical resonances ranging in frequency from 50 to 140 MHz. We show that we can smoothly tune the resonance frequencies of our bilayer resonators with mechanical strain applied via a backgate voltage. We measure quality factors up to 4000. We briefly discuss the effects of the RF driving power on the dispersion of the mechanical resonance. We aim to use these high quality mechanical resonance as a mechanical sensor of the bilayer quantum Hall phase transitions. We show initial data of a bilayer mechanical resonance as a function of magnetic field and quantum Hall phase transitions.

  20. Structure and dynamics of POPC bilayers in water solutions of room temperature ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetto, Antonio; Bingham, Richard J.; Ballone, Pietro

    2015-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations in the NPT ensemble have been carried out to investigate the effect of two room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), on stacks of phospholipid bilayers in water. We consider RTIL compounds consisting of chloride ([bmim][Cl]) and hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF{sub 6}]) salts of the 1-buthyl-3-methylimidazolium ([bmim]{sup +}) cation, while the phospholipid bilayer is made of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). Our investigations focus on structural and dynamical properties of phospholipid and water molecules that could be probed by inelastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements. The results confirm the fast incorporation of [bmim]{sup +} into the lipid phase already observed in previous simulations, driven by the Coulomb attraction of the cation for the most electronegative oxygens in the POPC head group and by sizeable dispersion forces binding the neutral hydrocarbon tails of [bmim]{sup +} and of POPC. The [bmim]{sup +} absorption into the bilayer favours the penetration of water into POPC, causes a slight but systematic thinning of the bilayer, and further stabilises hydrogen bonds at the lipid/water interface that already in pure samples (no RTIL) display a lifetime much longer than in bulk water. On the other hand, the effect of RTILs on the diffusion constant of POPC (D{sub POPC}) does not reveal a clearly identifiable trend, since D{sub POPC} increases upon addition of [bmim][Cl] and decreases in the [bmim][PF{sub 6}] case. Moreover, because of screening, the electrostatic signature of each bilayer is only moderately affected by the addition of RTIL ions in solution. The analysis of long wavelength fluctuations of the bilayers shows that RTIL sorption causes a general decrease of the lipid/water interfacial tension and bending rigidity, pointing to the destabilizing effect of RTILs on lipid bilayers.

  1. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  2. Drug-Membrane Interactions Studied in Phospholipid Monolayers Adsorbed on Non-porous Alkylated Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    LUKACOVA, VIERA; PENG, MING; FANUCCI, GAIL; TANDLICH, ROMAN; HINDERLITER, ANNE; MAITY, BIKASH; MANIVANNAN, ETHIRAJAN; COOK, GREGORY R.; BALAZ, STEFAN

    2008-01-01

    Characterization of interactions with phospholipids is an integral part of the in vitro profiling of drug candidates because of the roles the interactions play in tissue accumulation and passive diffusion. Currently used test systems may inadequately emulate the bilayer core solvation properties (immobilized artificial membranes - IAM), suffer from potentially slow transport of some chemicals (liposomes in free or immobilized forms), and require a tedious separation (if used for free liposomes). Here we introduce a well-defined system overcoming these drawbacks: nonporous octadecylsilica particles coated with a self-assembled phospholipid monolayer. The coating mimics the structure of the headgroup region, as well as the thickness and properties of the hydrocarbon core more closely than IAM. The monolayer has a similar transition temperature pattern as the corresponding bilayer. The particles can be separated by filtration or a mild centrifugation. The partitioning equilibria of 81 tested chemicals were dissected into the headgroup and core contributions, the latter using the alkane/water partition coefficients. The deconvolution allowed a successful prediction of the bilayer/water partition coefficients with the standard deviation of 0.26 log units. The plate-friendly assay is suitable for high-throughput profiling of drug candidates without sacrificing the quality of analysis or details of the drug-phospholipid interactions. PMID:17218665

  3. Local anesthetics structure-dependently interact with anionic phospholipid membranes to modify the fluidity.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Hironori; Ueno, Takahiro; Mizogami, Maki; Takakura, Ko

    2010-01-05

    While bupivacaine is more cardiotoxic than other local anesthetics, the mechanistic background for different toxic effects remains unclear. Several cardiotoxic compounds act on lipid bilayers to change the physicochemical properties of membranes. We comparatively studied the interaction of local anesthetics with lipid membranous systems which might be related to their structure-selective cardiotoxicity. Amide local anesthetics (10-300 microM) were reacted with unilamellar vesicles which were prepared with different phospholipids and cholesterol of varying lipid compositions. They were compared on the potencies to modify membrane fluidity by measuring fluorescence polarization. Local anesthetics interacted with liposomal membranes to increase the fluidity. Increasing anionic phospholipids in membranes enhanced the membrane-fluidizing effects of local anesthetics with the potency being cardiolipin>phosphatidic acid>phosphatidylglycerol>phosphatidylserine. Cardiolipin was most effective on bupivacaine, followed by ropivacaine. Local anesthetics interacted differently with biomimetic membranes consisting of 10mol% cardiolipin, 50mol% other phospholipids and 40mol% cholesterol with the potency being bupivacaine>ropivacaine>lidocaine>prilocaine, which agreed with the rank order of cardiotoxicity. Bupivacaine significantly fluidized 2.5-12.5mol% cardiolipin-containing membranes at cardiotoxicologically relevant concentrations. Bupivacaine is considered to affect lipid bilayers by interacting electrostatically with negatively charged cardiolipin head groups and hydrophobically with phospholipid acyl chains. The structure-dependent interaction with lipid membranes containing cardiolipin, which is preferentially localized in cardiomyocyte mitochondrial membranes, may be a mechanistic clue to explain the structure-selective cardiotoxicity of local anesthetics.

  4. Air-stable droplet interface bilayers on oil-infused surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Boreyko, Jonathan B.; Polizos, Georgios; Datskos, Panos G.; Sarles, Stephen A.; Collier, C. Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Droplet interface bilayers are versatile model membranes useful for synthetic biology and biosensing; however, to date they have always been confined to fluid reservoirs. Here, we demonstrate that when two or more water droplets collide on an oil-infused substrate, they exhibit noncoalescence due to the formation of a thin oil film that gets squeezed between the droplets from the bottom up. We show that when phospholipids are included in the water droplets, a stable droplet interface bilayer forms between the noncoalescing water droplets. As with traditional oil-submerged droplet interface bilayers, we were able to characterize ion channel transport by incorporating peptides into each droplet. Our findings reveal that droplet interface bilayers can function in ambient environments, which could potentially enable biosensing of airborne matter. PMID:24821774

  5. Molecular design and MD simulations of epitaxial superlattice of self-assembling ternary lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, George; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, K.

    2011-10-01

    Multicomponent lipid bilayers represent an important model system for studying cell membranes. At present, an ordered multicomponent phospholipid/cholesterol bilayer system involving charged lipid is still not available. Using a lipid superlattice (SL) model, a 13 x 15 x 15 nm^3 ternary phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine/cholesterol bilayer system in water with simultaneous headgroup SL and acyl chain SL at different depths, or epitaxial SL, of the bilayer has been designed with atomistic detail. The arrangements of this epitaxial SL system were optimized by only two molecular parameters, lattice space and rotational angle of the lipids. Using atomistic MD simulations, we demonstrated the stability of the ordered structures for more than 100 ns. A positional restrained system was also used as a control. This system will provide new insights into understanding the nanodomain structures of cell membranes at the molecular level.

  6. Polymer-cushioned bilayers. II. An investigation of interaction forces and fusion using the surface forces apparatus.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, J Y; Park, C K; Seitz, M; Israelachvili, J

    1999-01-01

    We have created phospholipid bilayers supported on soft polymer "cushions" which act as deformable substrates (see accompanying paper, Wong, J. Y., J. Majewski, M. Seitz, C. K. Park, J. N. Israelachvili, and G. S. Smith. 1999. Biophys. J. 77:1445-1457). In contrast to "solid-supported" membranes, such "soft-supported" membranes can exhibit more natural (higher) fluidity. Our bilayer system was constructed by adsorption of small unilamellar dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) vesicles onto polyethylenimine (PEI)-supported Langmuir-Blodgett lipid monolayers on mica. We used the surface forces apparatus (SFA) to investigate the long-range forces, adhesion, and fusion of two DMPC bilayers both above and below their main transition temperature (T(m) approximately 24 degrees C). Above T(m), hemi-fusion activation pressures of apposing bilayers were considerably smaller than for solid-supported bilayers, e.g., directly supported on mica. After separation, the bilayers naturally re-formed after short healing times. Also, for the first time, complete fusion of two fluid (liquid crystalline) phospholipid bilayers was observed in the SFA. Below T(m) (gel state), very high pressures were needed for hemi-fusion and the healing process became very slow. The presence of the polymer cushion significantly alters the interaction potential, e.g., long-range forces as well as fusion pressures, when compared to solid-supported systems. These fluid model membranes should allow the future study of integral membrane proteins under more physiological conditions. PMID:10465756

  7. Kinetin Increases Water Permeability of Phosphatidylcholine Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Stillwell, William; Hester, Paul

    1983-01-01

    Kinetin is shown to increase substantially the water permeability of liposomes composed of several types of phosphatidylcholines including the natural phospholipids egg lecithin and asolectin and the synthetic phospholipids dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. Kinetin effects were measured from 16.3 micromolar to 2.4 millimolar at temperatures from 10°C to 50°C and at pH 2.0, 7.0, and 11.0. Temperature studies indicate that kinetin produces a larger increase in water permeability with membranes in the more fluid liquid crystalline state. Kinetin is also shown to enhance [14C]glucose permeability and perhaps promotes membrane aggregation. From these experiments, we conclude that kinetin may produce its initial effect by altering the lipid bilayer portion of membranes. PMID:16662860

  8. Effects of diacylglycerols and Ca2+ on structure of phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, E M; Lester, D S; Borchardt, D B; Zidovetzki, R

    1994-01-01

    The combined effects of the diacylglycerols (DAGs) with the various acyl chains and Ca2+ on the structure of phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine (4:1 mole/mole) bilayers were studied using 2H- and 31P NMR. The following DAG- and Ca(2+)-induced bilayer perturbations were identified. 1) Increased tendency to form nonbilayer lipid phases was induced by diolein or stearoylarachidonoylglycerol, and was synergistically enhanced by the addition of Ca2+. 2) "Transverse" bilayer perturbation was induced by dioctanoylglycerol. The addition of this DAG caused increased ordering of the phospholipid acyl side chains in the region adjacent to the headgroup, with the concomitant decrease of the order toward the bilayer interior. 3) Separation of the phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine bilayer components was induced by combinations of relatively high (1:5 mole/mole to phosphatidylserine) Ca2+ and 25 mol% (to the phospholipids) of diolein, stearoylarachidonoylglycerol, or oleoylacetylglycerol. 4) Lateral phase separation of the bilayers on the regions of different fluidities was induced by dipalmitin. These physicochemical effects were correlated with the effects of these DAGs and Ca2+ on the activity of protein kinase C. The increased tendency to form nonbilayer lipid phases and the transverse bilayer perturbations correlated with the increased protein kinase C activity, whereas the actual presence of the nonbilayer lipid phases, as well as the separation of the phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine components, was associated with the decrease in the protein kinase C activity. The lateral phase separation of the bilayer on gel-like and liquid crystalline regions did not have an effect on the activity of the enzyme. These results demonstrate the importance of the physicochemical properties of the membranes in the process of activation of protein kinase C. PMID:8161692

  9. Interactions of amelogenin with phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Bekshe Lokappa, Sowmya; Chandrababu, Karthik Balakrishna; Dutta, Kaushik; Perovic, Iva; Evans, John Spencer; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2014-11-22

    Amelogenin protein has the potential to interact with other enamel matrix proteins, mineral, and cell surfaces. In this paper, we investigated the interactions of recombinant amelogenin rP172 with small unilamellar vesicles as model membranes, toward the goal of understanding the mechanisms of amelogenin–cell interactions during amelogenesis. Dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were used. In the presence of phospholipid vesicles, a blue shift in the Trp fluorescence emission maxima of rP172 was observed (~334 nm) and the Trp residues of rP172 were inaccessible to the aqueous quencher acrylamide. DLS studies indicated complexation of rP172 and phospholipids, although the possibility of fusion of phospholipids following amelogenin addition cannot be ruled out. NMR and CD studies revealed a disorder–order transition of rP172 in a model membrane environment. Strong fluorescence resonance energy transfer from Trp in rP172 to DNS-bound-phospholipid was observed, and fluorescence polarization studies indicated that rP172 interacted with the hydrophobic core region of model membranes. Finally, our data suggest that amelogenin has ability to interact with phospholipids and that such interactions may play key roles in enamel biomineralization as well as reported amelogenin signaling activities.

  10. Interactions of amelogenin with phospholipids

    DOE PAGES

    Bekshe Lokappa, Sowmya; Chandrababu, Karthik Balakrishna; Dutta, Kaushik; ...

    2014-11-22

    Amelogenin protein has the potential to interact with other enamel matrix proteins, mineral, and cell surfaces. In this paper, we investigated the interactions of recombinant amelogenin rP172 with small unilamellar vesicles as model membranes, toward the goal of understanding the mechanisms of amelogenin–cell interactions during amelogenesis. Dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were used. In the presence of phospholipid vesicles, a blue shift in the Trp fluorescence emission maxima of rP172 was observed (~334 nm) and the Trp residues of rP172 were inaccessible to the aqueous quencher acrylamide. DLS studies indicated complexationmore » of rP172 and phospholipids, although the possibility of fusion of phospholipids following amelogenin addition cannot be ruled out. NMR and CD studies revealed a disorder–order transition of rP172 in a model membrane environment. Strong fluorescence resonance energy transfer from Trp in rP172 to DNS-bound-phospholipid was observed, and fluorescence polarization studies indicated that rP172 interacted with the hydrophobic core region of model membranes. Finally, our data suggest that amelogenin has ability to interact with phospholipids and that such interactions may play key roles in enamel biomineralization as well as reported amelogenin signaling activities.« less

  11. Lipid Bilayer Vesicles with Numbers of Membrane-Linking Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ken-ichirou Akashi,; Hidetake Miyata,

    2010-06-01

    We report that phospholipid membranes spontaneously formed in aqueous medium giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) possessing many membranous wormhole-like structures (membrane-linking pores, MLPs). By phase contract microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy, the structures of the MLPs, consisting of lipid bilayer, were resolvable, and a variety of vesicular shapes having many MLPs (a high genus topology) were found. These vesicles were stable but easily deformed by micromanipulation with a microneedle. We also observed the size reduction of the MLPs with the increase in membrane tension, which was qualitatively consistent with a prediction from a simple dynamical model.

  12. Immobilized lipid-bilayer materials

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Loy, Douglas A.; Yamanaka, Stacey A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for preparing encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials in a silica matrix comprising preparing a silica sol, mixing a lipid-bilayer material in the silica sol and allowing the mixture to gel to form the encapsulated lipid-bilayer material. The mild processing conditions allow quantitative entrapment of pre-formed lipid-bilayer materials without modification to the material's spectral characteristics. The method allows for the immobilization of lipid membranes to surfaces. The encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials perform as sensitive optical sensors for the detection of analytes such as heavy metal ions and can be used as drug delivery systems and as separation devices.

  13. Diffusion in Single Supported Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, C. L.; Trapp, M.; Rheinstädter, M. C.

    2011-03-01

    Despite their potential relevance for the development of functionalized surfaces and biosensors, the study of single supported membranes using neutron scattering has been limited by the challenge of obtaining relevant dynamic information from a sample with minimal material. Using state of the art neutron instrumentation we have, for the first time, modeled lipid diffusion in single supported lipid bilayers. While we find that the diffusion coefficient for the single bilayer system is comparable to a multi-lamellar lipid system, the molecular mechanism for lipid motion in the single bilayer is a continuous diffusion process with no sign of the flow-like ballistic motion reported in the stacked membrane system. In the future, these membranes will be used to hold and align proteins, mimicking physiological conditions enabling the study of protein structure, function and interactions in relevant and highly topical membrane/protein systems with minimal sample material. C.L. Armstrong, M.D. Kaye, M. Zamponi, E. Mamontov, M. Tyagi, T. Jenkins and M.C. Rheinstädter, Soft Matter Communication, 2010, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C0SM00637H

  14. Bilayer Thickness Mismatch Controls Domain Size in Model Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Heberle, Frederick A; Petruzielo, Robin S; Pan, Jianjun; Drazba, Paul; Kucerka, Norbert; Feigenson, Gerald; Katsaras, John

    2013-01-01

    The observation of lateral phase separation in lipid bilayers has received considerable attention, especially in connection to lipid raft phenomena in cells. It is widely accepted that rafts play a central role in cellular processes, notably signal transduction. While micrometer-sized domains are observed with some model membrane mixtures, rafts much smaller than 100 nm beyond the reach of optical microscopy are now thought to exist, both in vitro and in vivo. We have used small-angle neutron scattering, a probe free technique, to measure the size of nanoscopic membrane domains in unilamellar vesicles with unprecedented accuracy. These experiments were performed using a four-component model system containing fixed proportions of cholesterol and the saturated phospholipid 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC), mixed with varying amounts of the unsaturated phospholipids 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1,2-dioleoylsn- glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). We find that liquid domain size increases with the extent of acyl chain unsaturation (DOPC:POPC ratio). Furthermore, we find a direct correlation between domain size and the mismatch in bilayer thickness of the coexisting liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases, suggesting a dominant role for line tension in controlling domain size. While this result is expected from line tension theories, we provide the first experimental verification in free-floating bilayers. Importantly, we also find that changes in bilayer thickness, which accompany changes in the degree of lipid chain unsaturation, are entirely confined to the disordered phase. Together, these results suggest how the size of functional domains in homeothermic cells may be regulated through changes in lipid composition.

  15. The chemistry of phospholipid binding by the saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphatidylinositol transfer protein sec14p as determined by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnova, T. I.; Chadwick, T. G.; MacArthur, R.; Poluektov, O.; Song, L.; Ryan, M. M.; Schaaf, G.; Bankaitis, V. A.; Chemistry; North Carolina State Univ.; Florida State Univ.; Univ. of North Carolina

    2006-11-17

    The major yeast phosphatidylinositol/phosphatidylcholine transfer protein Sec14p is the founding member of a large eukaryotic protein superfamily. Functional analyses indicate Sec14p integrates phospholipid metabolism with the membrane trafficking activity of yeast Golgi membranes. In this regard, the ability of Sec14p to rapidly exchange bound phospholipid with phospholipid monomers that reside in stable membrane bilayers is considered to be important for Sec14p function in cells. How Sec14p-like proteins bind phospholipids remains unclear. Herein, we describe the application of EPR spectroscopy to probe the local dynamics and the electrostatic microenvironment of phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) bound by Sec14p in a soluble protein-PtdCho complex. We demonstrate that PtdCho movement within the Sec14p binding pocket is both anisotropic and highly restricted and that the C5 region of the sn-2 acyl chain of bound PtdCho is highly shielded from solvent, whereas the distal region of that same acyl chain is more accessible. Finally, high field EPR reports on a heterogeneous polarity profile experienced by a phospholipid bound to Sec14p. Taken together, the data suggest a headgroup-out orientation of Sec14p-bound PtdCho. The data further suggest that the Sec14p phospholipid binding pocket provides a polarity gradient that we propose is a primary thermodynamic factor that powers the ability of Sec14p to abstract a phospholipid from a membrane bilayer.

  16. Interplay between alkyl chain asymmetry and cholesterol addition in the rigid ion pair amphiphile bilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fong-yin; Chiu, Chi-cheng

    2017-01-01

    Ion pair amphiphile (IPA), a molecular complex composed of a pair of cationic and anionic surfactants, has been proposed as a novel phospholipid substitute. Controlling the physical stability of IPA vesicles is important for its application developments such as cosmetic and drug deliveries. To investigate the effects of IPA alkyl chain combinations and the cholesterol additive on the structural and mechanical properties of IPA vesicular bilayers, we conducted a series of molecular dynamics studies on the hexadecyltrimethylammonium-dodecylsulfate (HTMA-DS) and dodecyltrimethylammonium-hexadecylsulfate (DTMA-HS) IPA bilayers with cholesterol. We found that both IPA bilayers are in the gel phase at 298 K, consistent with experimental observations. Compared with the HTMA-DS system, the DTMA-HS bilayer has more disordered alkyl chains in the hydrophobic region. When adding cholesterol, it induces alkyl chain ordering around its rigid sterol ring. Yet, cholesterol increases the molecular areas for all species and disturbs the molecular packing near the hydrophilic region and the bilayer core. Cholesterol also promotes the alkyl chain mismatch between the IPA moieties, especially for the DTMA-HS bilayer. The combined effects lead to non-monotonically enhancement of the membrane mechanical moduli for both IPA-cholesterol systems. Furthermore, cholesterol can form H-bonds with the alkylsulfate and thus enhance the contribution of alkylsulfate to the overall mechanical moduli. Combined results provide valuable molecular insights into the roles of each IPA component and the cholesterol on modulating the IPA bilayer properties.

  17. The effect of temperature on supported dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers: structure and lubrication performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Zander, Thomas; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Chao; Raj, Akanksha; Wieland, D C Florian; Garamus, Vasil M; Willumeit-Römer, Regine; Claesson, Per Martin; Dėdinaitė, Andra

    2015-05-01

    Phospholipids fulfill an important role in joint lubrication. They, together with hyaluronan and glycoproteins, are the biolubricants that sustain low friction between cartilage surfaces bathed in synovial fluid. In this work we have investigated how the friction force and load bearing capacity of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayers on silica surfaces are affected by temperature, covering the temperature range 25-52°C. Friction forces have been determined utilizing the AFM colloidal probe technique, which showed that DPPC bilayers are able to provide low friction forces over the whole temperature interval. However, the load bearing capacity is improved at higher temperatures. We interpret this finding as being a consequence of lower rigidity and higher self-healing capacity of the DPPC bilayer in the liquid disordered state compared to the gel state. The corresponding structure of solid supported DPPC bilayers at the silica-liquid interface has been followed using X-ray reflectivity measurements, which suggests that the DPPC bilayer is in the gel phase at 25°C and 39°C and in the liquid disordered state at 55°C. Well-defined bilayer structures were observed for both phases. The deposited DPPC bilayers were also imaged using AFM PeakForce Tapping mode, and these measurements indicated a less homogeneous layer at temperatures below 37°C.

  18. The Effects of Concentration and Temperature on Vesicle Adsorption and Bilayer Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, Kimberly; Israelachvili, Jacob; Fygenson, Deborah

    2010-03-01

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are pursued as thin surface coatings and as model systems in which to study membrane-bound processes. We investigate the adsorption of small unilamellar phospholipid vesicles onto glass and the subsequent formation of planar SLBs using temperature-controlled, time-resolved fluorescence microscopy. We report the effects of vesicle concentration and temperature on the time course of lipid adsorption. Our results suggest that isolated vesicle rupture is a rare event and that bilayer edge plays a key role in SLB formation. It enhances vesicle-surface affinity and promotes further rupture.

  19. Single-protein study of photoresistance of pigment-protein complex in lipid bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Daisuke; Hoshino, Hajime; Otomo, Kohei; Kato, Taro; Onda, Ken-ichi; Watanabe, Akira; Oikawa, Hiroyuki; Fujiyoshi, Satoru; Matsushita, Michio; Nango, Mamoru; Watanabe, Natsuko; Sumino, Ayumi; Dewa, Takehisa

    2011-07-01

    Photoresistance of a pigment-binding membrane protein, light-harvesting 2 (LH2) complex from the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, was investigated by fluorescence of single LH2 complexes at a temperature of 296 K. Before irreversibly stopping fluorescence, a single LH2 complex in phospholipid bilayer of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) emitted on average 4 times more fluorescence photons than a complex in detergent micelle of octylglucopyranoside (OG). Fluorescence-excitation spectrum of single LH2 complexes taken at 5 K showed that the LH2 complex is structurally less perturbed in DMPC bilayer than in OG micelle, suggesting that structural instability reduces photoresistance of LH2.

  20. Progression of NMR studies of membrane-active peptides from lipid bilayers to live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sani, M.-A.; Separovic, F.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the structure of membrane-active peptides faces many challenges associated with the development of appropriate model membrane systems as the peptide structure depends strongly on the lipid environment. This perspective provides a brief overview of the approach taken to study antimicrobial and amyloid peptides in phospholipid bilayers using oriented bilayers and magic angle spinning techniques. In particular, Boltzmann statistics REDOR and maximum entropy analysis of spinning side bands are used to analyse systems where multiple states of peptide or lipid molecules may co-exist. We propose that in future, rather than model membranes, structural studies in whole cells are feasible.

  1. Formation and characterization of phospholipid monolayers spontaneously assembled at interfaces between aqueous phases and thermotropic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Brake, Jeffrey M; Daschner, Maren K; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2005-03-15

    This paper reports an experimental investigation of the self-assembly of phospholipids (l-alpha-phosphatidylcholine-beta-oleoyl-gamma-palmitoyl (l-POPC), dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and l-alpha-dilauroyl phosphatidylcholine (l-DLPC)) at interfaces between aqueous phases and the nematic liquid crystal (LC) 4'-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl. Stable planar interfaces between the aqueous phases and LCs were created by hosting the LCs within gold grids (square pores with widths of 283 microm and depths of 20 microm). At these interfaces, the presence and lateral organization of the phospholipids leads to interface-driven orientational transitions within the LC. By doping the phospholipids with a fluorescently labeled lipid (Texas Red-1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (TR-DPPE)), quantitative epifluorescence microscopy revealed the saturation coverage of phospholipid at the interface to be that of a monolayer with an areal density of approximately 49 +/- 8% relative to hydrated lipid bilayers. By adsorbing phospholipids to the aqueous-LC interface from either vesicles or mixed micelles of dodecyltrimethylammonium and phospholipid, control of the areal density of phospholipid from 42 +/- 10 to 102 +/-18% of saturation monolayer coverage was demonstrated. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments performed by using laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) revealed the lateral mobility of fluorescently labeled DPPE in l-DLPC assembled at the interface with the liquid crystal to be (6 +/- 1) x 10(-12) m(2)/s for densely packed monolayers. Variation of the surface coverage and composition of phospholipid led to changes in lateral diffusivity between (0.2 +/- 0.1) x 10(-12) and (15 +/- 2) x 10(-12) m(2)/s. We also observed the phospholipid-laden interface to be compartmentalized by the gold grid, thus allowing for the creation of patterned arrays of phospholipids at the LC-aqueous interface.

  2. Alignment validation

    SciTech Connect

    ALICE; ATLAS; CMS; LHCb; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-06

    The four experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb are currently under constructionat CERN. They will study the products of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. All experiments are equipped with sophisticated tracking systems, unprecedented in size and complexity. Full exploitation of both the inner detector andthe muon system requires an accurate alignment of all detector elements. Alignmentinformation is deduced from dedicated hardware alignment systems and the reconstruction of charged particles. However, the system is degenerate which means the data is insufficient to constrain all alignment degrees of freedom, so the techniques are prone to converging on wrong geometries. This deficiency necessitates validation and monitoring of the alignment. An exhaustive discussion of means to validate is subject to this document, including examples and plans from all four LHC experiments, as well as other high energy experiments.

  3. Mammalian Glucose Transporter Activity Is Dependent upon Anionic and Conical Phospholipids*

    PubMed Central

    Hresko, Richard C.; Kraft, Thomas E.; Quigley, Andrew; Carpenter, Elisabeth P.; Hruz, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    The regulated movement of glucose across mammalian cell membranes is mediated by facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs) embedded in lipid bilayers. Despite the known importance of phospholipids in regulating protein structure and activity, the lipid-induced effects on the GLUTs remain poorly understood. We systematically examined the effects of physiologically relevant phospholipids on glucose transport in liposomes containing purified GLUT4 and GLUT3. The anionic phospholipids, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol, were found to be essential for transporter function by activating it and stabilizing its structure. Conical lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine and diacylglycerol, enhanced transporter activity up to 3-fold in the presence of anionic phospholipids but did not stabilize protein structure. Kinetic analyses revealed that both lipids increase the kcat of transport without changing the Km values. These results allowed us to elucidate the activation of GLUT by plasma membrane phospholipids and to extend the field of membrane protein-lipid interactions to the family of structurally and functionally related human solute carriers. PMID:27302065

  4. Does fluoride disrupt hydrogen bond network in cationic lipid bilayer? Time-dependent fluorescence shift of Laurdan and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Pokorna, Sarka; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Vazdar, Mario; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jungwirth, Pavel; Hof, Martin

    2014-12-14

    Time-dependent fluorescence shift (TDFS) of Laurdan embedded in phospholipid bilayers reports on hydration and mobility of the phospholipid acylgroups. Exchange of H2O with D2O prolongs the lifetime of lipid-water and lipid-water-lipid interactions, which is reflected in a significantly slower TDFS kinetics. Combining TDFS measurements in H2O and D2O hydrated bilayers with atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provides a unique tool for characterization of the hydrogen bonding at the acylgroup level of lipid bilayers. In this work, we use this approach to study the influence of fluoride anions on the properties of cationic bilayers composed of trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP). The results obtained for DOTAP are confronted with those for neutral phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers. Both in DOTAP and DOPC H2O/D2O exchange prolongs hydrogen-bonding lifetime and does not disturb bilayer structure. These results are confirmed by MD simulations. TDFS experiments show, however, that for DOTAP this effect is cancelled in the presence of fluoride ions. We interpret these results as evidence that strongly hydrated fluoride is able to steal water molecules that bridge lipid carbonyls. Consequently, when attracted to DOTAP bilayer, fluoride disrupts the local hydrogen-bonding network, and the differences in TDFS kinetics between H2O and D2O hydrated bilayers are no longer observed. A distinct behavior of fluoride is also evidenced by MD simulations, which show different lipid-ion binding for Cl(-) and F(-).

  5. Targeting Phospholipid Metabolism in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Menglin; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Glunde, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    All cancers tested so far display abnormal choline and ethanolamine phospholipid metabolism, which has been detected with numerous magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) approaches in cells, animal models of cancer, as well as the tumors of cancer patients. Since the discovery of this metabolic hallmark of cancer, many studies have been performed to elucidate the molecular origins of deregulated choline metabolism, to identify targets for cancer treatment, and to develop MRS approaches that detect choline and ethanolamine compounds for clinical use in diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Several enzymes in choline, and recently also ethanolamine, phospholipid metabolism have been identified, and their evaluation has shown that they are involved in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Several already established enzymes as well as a number of emerging enzymes in phospholipid metabolism can be used as treatment targets for anticancer therapy, either alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic approaches. This review summarizes the current knowledge of established and relatively novel targets in phospholipid metabolism of cancer, covering choline kinase α, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase D1, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C, sphingomyelinases, choline transporters, glycerophosphodiesterases, phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase, and ethanolamine kinase. These enzymes are discussed in terms of their roles in oncogenic transformation, tumor progression, and crucial cancer cell properties such as fast proliferation, migration, and invasion. Their potential as treatment targets are evaluated based on the current literature. PMID:28083512

  6. Huntingtin associates with acidic phospholipids at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Kimberly B; Sapp, Ellen; Yoder, Jennifer; Cuiffo, Benjamin; Sobin, Lindsay; Kim, Yun J; Qin, Zheng-Hong; Hayden, Michael R; Aronin, Neil; Scott, David L; Isenberg, Gerhard; Goldmann, Wolfgang H; DiFiglia, Marian

    2005-10-28

    We have identified a domain in the N terminus of huntingtin that binds to membranes. A three-dimensional homology model of the structure of the binding domain predicts helical HEAT repeats, which emanate a positive electrostatic potential, consistent with a charge-based mechanism for membrane association. An amphipathic helix capable of inserting into pure lipid bilayers may serve to anchor huntingtin to the membrane. In cells, N-terminal huntingtin fragments targeted to regions of plasma membrane enriched in phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, receptor bound-transferrin, and endogenous huntingtin. N-terminal huntingtin fragments with an expanded polyglutamine tract aberrantly localized to intracellular regions instead of plasma membrane. Our data support a new model in which huntingtin directly binds membranes through electrostatic interactions with acidic phospholipids.

  7. Irradiated bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abergel, D. S. L.; Chakraborty, Tapash

    2011-01-01

    We describe the gated bilayer graphene system when it is subjected to intense terahertz frequency electromagnetic radiation. We examine the electron band structure and density of states via exact diagonalization methods within Floquet theory. We find that dynamical states are induced which lead to modification of the band structure. We first examine the situation where there is no external magnetic field. In the unbiased case, dynamical gaps appear in the spectrum which manifest as dips in the density of states. For finite inter-layer bias (where a static gap is present in the band structure of unirradiated bilayer graphene), dynamical states may be induced in the static gap. These states can show a high degree of valley polarization. When the system is placed in a strong magnetic field, the radiation induces coupling between the Landau levels which allows dynamical levels to exist. For strong fields, this means the Landau levels are smeared to form a near-continuum of states.

  8. Phospholpid studies of marine organisms: 2.(1) Phospholipids, phospholipid-bound fatty acids and free sterols of the spongeAplysina fistularis (Pallas) formafulva (Pallas) (=Verongia thiona)(2). Isolation and structure elucidation of unprecedented branched fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Walkup, R D; Jamieson, G C; Ratcliff, M R; Djerassi, C

    1981-09-01

    The free sterols and phospholipids of the demospongeAplysina fistularis were isolated and analyzed. The free sterols consisted mainly of the unusual 26-methylated sterols aplysterol (53%) and 24(28)-dehydroaplysterol (7%) together with 7 commonly occurring sterods. The major phospholipids were phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine and diphosphatidylglycerol. The major fatty acyl components of the phospholipids consisted of 85% C14-C20 acids, including the unprecedented 2,6,10-trimethyl-5-tetradecenoic acid and 11-methyloctadecanoic acid. The remaining 15% were C27-C30 demospongic acids, including 2 novel acids tentatively assigned the structures 5,9,23-octacosatrienoic acid and 5,9,23-nonacosatrienoic acid, and 3 novel acids proven to be 5,9,21-octacosatrienoic acid, Z,Z-20-methyl-5,9-hexacosadienoic acid and Z,Z-22-methyl-5,9-octacosadienoic acid. The biosyntheses of the novel demospongic acids are proposed to occur by chain elongation of monoenoic or branched precursors followed by desaturation. The large quantities of typically bacterial phospholipids and fatty acids found implied the presence of bacteria in the sponge, in agreement with microscopic studies. Analysis of the phospholipid-bound fatty acids in a sponge cell-enriched fraction indicated that the demospongic acids, including the 2 branched structures, were the major acids of the sponge cells. The presence inA. fistularis of demospongic acids containing membrane disordering groups-methyl branches or double bonds-on the ω7 carbon is proposed to be due to the need by the sponge for membranes possessing fluidity near the middle of the phospholipid bilayer. It is also proposed that the C26 methyl group of aplysterol causes disordering of the phospholipid bilayer in the same region, and thus also evolved in response to this need.

  9. Nonsedimentable Microvesicles from Senescing Bean Cotyledons Contain Gel Phase-Forming Phospholipid Degradation Products 1

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kening; Paliyath, Gopinadhan; Thompson, John E.

    1991-01-01

    A mixture of liquid-crystalline and gel-phase lipid domains is detectable by wide angle x-ray diffraction in smooth microsomal membranes isolated from senescent 7-day-old cotyledons, whereas corresponding membranes from young 2-day-old cotyledons are exclusively liquid-crystalline. The gel-phase domains in the senescent membranes comprise phospholipid degradation products including diacylglycerols, free fatty acids, long-chain aldehydes, and long-chain hydrocarbons. The same complement of phospholipid degradation products is also present in nonsedimentable microvesicles isolated from senescent 7-day-old cotyledons by filtration of a 250,000g, 12-hour supernatant through a 300,000 dalton cut-off filter. The phospholipid degradation products in the microvesicles form gel-phase lipid domains when reconstituted into phospholipid liposomes. Nonsedimentable microvesicles of a similar size, which are again enriched in the same gel-phase-forming phospholipid degradation products, are also generated in vitro from smooth microsomal membranes isolated from 2-day-old cotyledons when Ca2+ is added to activate membrane-associated lipolytic enzymes. The Ca2+-treated membranes do not contain detectable gel-phase domains, suggesting that the phospholipid degradation products are completely removed by microvesiculation. The observations collectively indicate that these nonsedimentable microvesicles serve as a vehicle for moving phospholipid degradation products out of membrane bilayers into the cytosol. As noted previously (Yao K, Paliyath G, Humphrey RW, Hallett FR, Thompson JE [1991] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 88: 2269-2273), the term “deteriosome” connotes this putative function and would serve to distinguish these microvesicles from other cytoplasmic microvesicles unrelated to deterioration. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:16668427

  10. Solution structure and phospholipid interactions of the isolated voltage-sensor domain from KvAP.

    PubMed

    Butterwick, Joel A; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2010-11-05

    Voltage-sensor domains (VSDs) are specialized transmembrane segments that confer voltage sensitivity to many proteins such as ion channels and enzymes. The activities of these domains are highly dependent on both the chemical properties and the physical properties of the surrounding membrane environment. To learn about VSD-lipid interactions, we used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine the structure and phospholipid interface of the VSD from the voltage-dependent K(+) channel KvAP (prokaryotic Kv from Aeropyrum pernix). The solution structure of the KvAP VSD solubilized within phospholipid micelles is similar to a previously determined crystal structure solubilized by a nonionic detergent and complexed with an antibody fragment. The differences observed include a previously unidentified short amphipathic α-helix that precedes the first transmembrane helix and a subtle rigid-body repositioning of the S3-S4 voltage-sensor paddle. Using (15)N relaxation experiments, we show that much of the VSD, including the pronounced kink in S3 and the S3-S4 paddle, is relatively rigid on the picosecond-to-nanosecond timescale. In contrast, the kink in S3 is mobile on the microsecond-to-millisecond timescale and may act as a hinge in the movement of the paddle during channel gating. We characterized the VSD-phospholipid micelle interactions using nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy and showed that the micelle uniformly coats the KvAP VSD and approximates the chemical environment of a phospholipid bilayer. Using paramagnetically labeled phospholipids, we show that bilayer-forming lipids interact with the S3 and S4 helices more strongly than with S1 and S2.

  11. Bilayer Edges Catalyze Supported Lipid Bilayer Formation

    PubMed Central

    Weirich, Kimberly L.; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Fygenson, D. Kuchnir

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Supported lipid bilayers (SLB) are important for the study of membrane-based phenomena and as coatings for biosensors. Nevertheless, there is a fundamental lack of understanding of the process by which they form from vesicles in solution. We report insights into the mechanism of SLB formation by vesicle adsorption using temperature-controlled time-resolved fluorescence microscopy at low vesicle concentrations. First, lipid accumulates on the surface at a constant rate up to ∼0.8 of SLB coverage. Then, as patches of SLB nucleate and spread, the rate of accumulation increases. At a coverage of ∼1.5 × SLB, excess vesicles desorb as SLB patches rapidly coalesce into a continuous SLB. Variable surface fluorescence immediately before SLB patch formation argues against the existence of a critical vesicle density necessary for rupture. The accelerating rate of accumulation and the widespread, abrupt loss of vesicles coincide with the emergence and disappearance of patch edges. We conclude that SLB edges enhance vesicle adhesion to the surface and induce vesicle rupture, thus playing a key role in the formation of continuous SLB. PMID:20085721

  12. Proton and hydroxide ion permeability of phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Nozaki, Y; Tanford, C

    1981-01-01

    The apparent permeability of H+ through phospholipid bilayers was determined by measuring H+ efflux from large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles with internal space buffered at pH 4. The value obtained is about 10(-9) cm/sec at room temperature, five orders of magnitude lower than was recently reported for the combined permeability for H+ and OH- [Nichols, J. W. & Deamer, D. W. (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 77, 2038-2042]. The apparent permeability measured in this way is the sum of contributions from the movement of H+ and of uncharged species (HCl or HNO3) in equilibrium with anions in the solution. There is evidence that the uncharged species make the dominant contribution and that the permeability coefficient for H+ per se is no larger than 5 X 10(-12) cm/sec. An attempt to measure OH- permeability by use of vesicles buffered at pH 10 did not give a conclusive result because the vesicle walls appeared to be damaged by exposure to this pH. An apparent permeability coefficient of about 10(-7) cm/sec was estimated for undamaged membranes. PMID:6270672

  13. Mechanical properties of electrospun bilayer fibrous membranes as potential scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Pu, Juan; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos

    2014-06-01

    Bilayer fibrous membranes of poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) were fabricated by electrospinning, using a parallel-disk mandrel configuration that resulted in the sequential deposition of a layer with fibers aligned across the two parallel disks and a layer with randomly oriented fibers, both layers deposited in a single process step. Membrane structure and fiber alignment were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and two-dimensional fast Fourier transform. Because of the intricacies of the generated electric field, bilayer membranes exhibited higher porosity than single-layer membranes consisting of randomly oriented fibers fabricated with a solid-drum collector. However, despite their higher porosity, bilayer membranes demonstrated generally higher elastic modulus, yield strength and toughness than single-layer membranes with random fibers. Bilayer membrane deformation at relatively high strain rates comprised multiple abrupt microfracture events characterized by discontinuous fiber breakage. Bilayer membrane elongation yielded excessive necking of the layer with random fibers and remarkable fiber stretching (on the order of 400%) in the layer with fibers aligned in the stress direction. In addition, fibers in both layers exhibited multiple localized necking, attributed to the nonuniform distribution of crystalline phases in the fibrillar structure. The high membrane porosity, good mechanical properties, and good biocompatibility and biodegradability of PLLA (demonstrated in previous studies) make the present bilayer membranes good scaffold candidates for a wide range of tissue engineering applications.

  14. Super-resolution imaging of the natural killer cell immunological synapse on a glass-supported planar lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Peilin; Bertolet, Grant; Chen, Yuhui; Huang, Shengjian; Liu, Dongfang

    2015-02-11

    The glass-supported planar lipid bilayer system has been utilized in a variety of disciplines. One of the most useful applications of this technique has been in the study of immunological synapse formation, due to the ability of the glass-supported planar lipid bilayers to mimic the surface of a target cell while forming a horizontal interface. The recent advances in super-resolution imaging have further allowed scientists to better view the fine details of synapse structure. In this study, one of these advanced techniques, stimulated emission depletion (STED), is utilized to study the structure of natural killer (NK) cell synapses on the supported lipid bilayer. Provided herein is an easy-to-follow protocol detailing: how to prepare raw synthetic phospholipids for use in synthesizing glass-supported bilayers; how to determine how densely protein of a given concentration occupies the bilayer's attachment sites; how to construct a supported lipid bilayer containing antibodies against NK cell activating receptor CD16; and finally, how to image human NK cells on this bilayer using STED super-resolution microscopy, with a focus on distribution of perforin positive lytic granules and filamentous actin at NK synapses. Thus, combining the glass-supported planar lipid bilayer system with STED technique, we demonstrate the feasibility and application of this combined technique, as well as intracellular structures at NK immunological synapse with super-resolution.

  15. Super-resolution Imaging of the Natural Killer Cell Immunological Synapse on a Glass-supported Planar Lipid Bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuhui; Huang, Shengjian; Liu, Dongfang

    2015-01-01

    The glass-supported planar lipid bilayer system has been utilized in a variety of disciplines. One of the most useful applications of this technique has been in the study of immunological synapse formation, due to the ability of the glass-supported planar lipid bilayers to mimic the surface of a target cell while forming a horizontal interface. The recent advances in super-resolution imaging have further allowed scientists to better view the fine details of synapse structure. In this study, one of these advanced techniques, stimulated emission depletion (STED), is utilized to study the structure of natural killer (NK) cell synapses on the supported lipid bilayer. Provided herein is an easy-to-follow protocol detailing: how to prepare raw synthetic phospholipids for use in synthesizing glass-supported bilayers; how to determine how densely protein of a given concentration occupies the bilayer's attachment sites; how to construct a supported lipid bilayer containing antibodies against NK cell activating receptor CD16; and finally, how to image human NK cells on this bilayer using STED super-resolution microscopy, with a focus on distribution of perforin positive lytic granules and filamentous actin at NK synapses. Thus, combining the glass-supported planar lipid bilayer system with STED technique, we demonstrate the feasibility and application of this combined technique, as well as intracellular structures at NK immunological synapse with super-resolution. PMID:25741636

  16. Phospholipid Diffusion Coefficients of Cushioned Model Membranes determined via Z-Scan Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Sarah M.; Allgeyer, Edward S.; Fick, Jörg; Prudovsky, Igor; Mason, Michael D.; Neivandt, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Model cellular membranes enable the study of biological processes in a controlled environment and reduce the traditional challenges associated with live or fixed cell studies. However, model membrane systems based on the air/water or oil/solution interface do not allow for incorporation of transmembrane proteins, or for the study of protein transport mechanisms. Conversely, a phospholipid bilayer deposited via the Langmuir-Blodgett/Langmuir Schaefer method on a hydrogel layer is potentially an effective mimic of the cross-section of a biological membrane, and facilitates both protein incorporation and transport studies. Prior to application, however, such membranes must be fully characterized, particularly with respect to the phospholipid bilayer phase transition temperature. Here we present a detailed characterization of the phase transition temperature of the inner and outer leaflets of a chitosan supported model membrane system. Specifically, the lateral diffusion coefficient of each individual leaflet has been determined as a function of temperature. Measurements were performed utilizing z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a technique that yields calibration-free diffusion information. Analysis via the method of Wawrezinieck and coworkers, revealed that phospholipid diffusion changes from raft-like to free diffusion as the temperature is increased; an insight into the dynamic behavior of hydrogel supported membranes not previously reported. PMID:23705855

  17. Phospholipid and Hydrocarbon Interactions with a Charged Electrode Interface.

    PubMed

    Levine, Zachary A; DeNardis, Nadica Ivošević; Vernier, P Thomas

    2016-03-22

    Using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and experiments we examined the interactions of alkanes and phospholipids at charged interfaces in order to understand how interfacial charge densities affect the association of these two representative molecules with electrodes. Consistent with theory and experiment, these model systems reveal interfacial associations mediated through a combination of Coulombic and van der Waals forces. van der Waals forces, in particular, mediate rapid binding of decane to neutral electrodes. No decane binding was observed at high surface charge densities because of interfacial water polarization, which screens hydrophobic attractions. The positively charged choline moiety of the phospholipid palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) is primarily responsible for POPC attraction by a moderately negatively charged electrode. The hydrocarbon tails of POPC interact with the hydrophobic electrode interface similarly to decane. Previously reported electrochemical results confirm these findings by demonstrating bipolar displacement currents from PC vesicles adhering to moderately negatively charged interfaces, originating from the choline interactions observed in simulations. At more negatively charged interfaces, choline-to-surface binding was stronger. In both simulations and experiments the maximal interaction of anionic PS occurs with a positively charged interface, provided that the electrostatic forces outweigh local Lennard-Jones interactions. Direct comparisons between the binding affinities measured in experiments and those obtained in simulations reveal previously unobserved atomic interactions that facilitate lipid vesicle adhesion to charged interfaces. Moreover, the implementation of a charged interface in molecular dynamics simulations provides an alternative method for the generation of large electric fields across phospholipid bilayers, especially for systems with periodic boundary conditions, and may be useful for

  18. Nanomechanics of electrospun phospholipid fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Ana C.; Nikogeorgos, Nikolaos; Lee, Seunghwan; Chronakis, Ioannis S.

    2015-06-01

    Electrospun asolectin phospholipid fibers were prepared using isooctane as a solvent and had an average diameter of 6.1 ± 2.7 μm. Their mechanical properties were evaluated by nanoindentation using Atomic Force Microscopy, and their elastic modulus was found to be approximately 17.2 ± 1 MPa. At a cycle of piezo expansion-retraction (loading-unloading) of a silicon tip on a fiber, relatively high adhesion was observed during unloading. It is proposed that this was primarily due to molecular rearrangements at the utmost layers of the fiber caused by the indentation of the hydrophilic tip. The phospholipid fibers were shown to be stable in ambient conditions, preserving the modulus of elasticity up to 24 h.

  19. Bimodal distribution and fluorescence response of environment-sensitive probes in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Klymchenko, Andrey S; Duportail, Guy; Demchenko, Alexander P; Mély, Yves

    2004-05-01

    A remarkable heterogeneity is often observed in the spectroscopic properties of environment-sensitive fluorescence probes in phospholipid bilayers. To explain its origin, we provided a detailed investigation of the fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of 4'-dimethylamino-3-hydroxyflavone (probe F) in bilayer vesicles with the variations of fatty acid composition, polar heads, temperature, and cholesterol content. Probe F, due to excited-state intramolecular proton transfer, exhibits two bands in emission that are differently sensitive to intermolecular interactions-thereby allowing us to distinguish universal (dipole-dipole) and specific (H-bonding) interactions within the bilayer. Spectroscopic, quenching, and anisotropy data suggest the presence of two forms of probe F at different locations in the bilayer: an H-bond free form located below sn(1)-carbonyls and an H-bonded form located at the polar membrane interface. We provide a quantitative analysis of the distribution of the probe between these two locations as well as the polarity of these locations, and show that both the distribution and the polarity contribute to the probe response. Moreover, analysis of literature data on other environment-sensitive probes (Prodan, Laurdan, Nile Red, NBD lipids, etc.) in lipid bilayers allows us to suggest that the bimodal distribution in the lipid bilayer is probably a general feature of low-polar molecules with polar groups capable of H-bonding interactions.

  20. Bilayer thickness in unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles: small-angle neutron scattering using contrast variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučerka, N.; Uhríková, D.; Teixeira, J.; Balgavý, P.

    2004-07-01

    The thickness of the lipid bilayer in extruded unilamellar vesicles prepared from synthetic 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholines with monounsaturated acyl chains (diCn:1PC, n=14-22) was studied at 30°C in the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiment. Several contrasts of the neutron scattering length density between the aqueous phase and phospholipid bilayer of vesicles were used. The experimental data were evaluated using the small-angle form of the Kratky-Porod approximation ln[I(q)q2] vs. q2 of the SANS intensity I(q) in the appropriate range of scattering vector values q to obtain the bilayer radius of gyration Rg and its extrapolated value at infinite scattering contrast Rginf. The bilayer thickness parameter evaluated from a linear approximation of dependence of gyration radius on the inverse contrast was then obtained without using any bilayer structure model. The dependence of the thickness parameter dg≅120.5Rginf on the number n of acyl chain carbons was found to be linear with a slope of 1.8+/-0.2Å per one acyl chain carbon. This slope can be used in bilayer-protein interaction studies.

  1. Nanoparticle-lipid bilayer interactions studied with lipid bilayer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bin; Smith, Tyler; Schmidt, Jacob J.

    2015-04-01

    The widespread environmental presence and commercial use of nanoparticles have raised significant health concerns as a result of many in vitro and in vivo assays indicating toxicity of a wide range of nanoparticle species. Many of these assays have identified the ability of nanoparticles to damage cell membranes. These interactions can be studied in detail using artificial lipid bilayers, which can provide insight into the nature of the particle-membrane interaction through variation of membrane and solution properties not possible with cell-based assays. However, the scope of these studies can be limited because of the low throughput characteristic of lipid bilayer platforms. We have recently described an easy to use, parallel lipid bilayer platform which we have used to electrically investigate the activity of 60 nm diameter amine and carboxyl modified polystyrene nanoparticles (NH2-NP and COOH-NP) with over 1000 lipid bilayers while varying lipid composition, bilayer charge, ionic strength, pH, voltage, serum, particle concentration, and particle charge. Our results confirm recent studies finding activity of NH2-NP but not COOH-NP. Detailed analysis shows that NH2-NP formed pores 0.3-2.3 nm in radius, dependent on bilayer and solution composition. These interactions appear to be electrostatic, as they are regulated by NH2-NP surface charge, solution ionic strength, and bilayer charge. The ability to rapidly measure a large number of nanoparticle and membrane parameters indicates strong potential of this bilayer array platform for additional nanoparticle bilayer studies.The widespread environmental presence and commercial use of nanoparticles have raised significant health concerns as a result of many in vitro and in vivo assays indicating toxicity of a wide range of nanoparticle species. Many of these assays have identified the ability of nanoparticles to damage cell membranes. These interactions can be studied in detail using artificial lipid bilayers, which

  2. Interactions of Amelogenin with Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Lokappa, Sowmya Bekshe; Chandrababu, Karthik Balakrishna; Dutta, Kaushik; Perovic, Iva; Evans, John Spencer; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenin protein has the potential to interact with other enamel matrix proteins, mineral and cell surfaces. We investigated the interactions of recombinant amelogenin rP172 with small unilamellar vesicles as model membranes, towards the goal of understanding the mechanisms of amelogenin-cell interactions during amelogenesis. Dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were used. In the presence of phospholipid vesicles, a blue shift in the Trp fluorescence emission maxima of rP172 was observed (~334 nm) and the Trp residues of rP172 were inaccessible to the aqueous quencher acrylamide. Though in DLS studies we cannot exclude the possibility of fusion of liposomes as the result of amelogenin addition, NMR and CD studies revealed a disorder-order transition of rP172 in a model membrane environment. Strong FRET from Trp in rP172 to DNS–bound-phospholipid was observed, and fluorescence polarization studies indicated that rP172 interacted with the hydrophobic core region of model membranes. Our data suggest that amelogenin has ability to interact with phospholipids and that such interactions may play key roles in enamel biomineralization as well as reported amelogenin signaling activities. PMID:25298002

  3. Nutritional Deficiencies and Phospholipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, María S.; Oliveros, Liliana B.; Gomez, Nidia N.

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipids are important components of the cell membranes of all living species. They contribute to the physicochemical properties of the membrane and thus influence the conformation and function of membrane-bound proteins, such as receptors, ion channels, and transporters and also influence cell function by serving as precursors for prostaglandins and other signaling molecules and modulating gene expression through the transcription activation. The components of the diet are determinant for cell functionality. In this review, the effects of macro and micronutrients deficiency on the quality, quantity and metabolism of different phospholipids and their distribution in cells of different organs is presented. Alterations in the amount of both saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins A, E and folate, and other micronutrients, such as zinc and magnesium, are discussed. In all cases we observe alterations in the pattern of phospholipids, the more affected ones being phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin. The deficiency of certain nutrients, such as essential fatty acids, fat-soluble vitamins and some metals may contribute to a variety of diseases that can be irreversible even after replacement with normal amount of the nutrients. Usually, the sequelae are more important when the deficiency is present at an early age. PMID:21731449

  4. Mechanisms of interaction of pesticides with the lipid bilayer in cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, V. N.

    1993-07-01

    The available information about the mechanisms of the interaction of pesticides having different chemical structures with the lipid bilayer in cell membranes is presented. It is shown that, depending on the degree of lipophilicity, the molecular dipole moment, and certain other characteristics of the pesticide compound, its interaction with the lipid bilayer generally takes place via one of the three main mechanisms involving the incorporation of the pesticide molecules in the hydrocarbon region within the bilayer, the adsorption of these molecules in the zone of the polar membrane phospholipids, or the incorporation of the amphiphilic pesticide compounds in both the non-polar and polar regions of the membrane. The bibliography includes 109 references.

  5. Specific volume and compressibility of bilayer lipid membranes with incorporated Na,K-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Hianik, Tibor; Rybár, Peter; Krivánek, Roland; Petríková, Mária; Roudna, Milena; Apell, Hans Jürgen

    2011-06-01

    Ultrasound velocimetry and densitometry methods were used to study the interactions of the Na,K-ATPase with the lipid bilayer in large unilamellar liposomes composed of dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC). The ultrasound velocity increased and the specific volume of the phospholipids decreased with increasing concentrations of protein. These experiments allowed us to determine the reduced specific apparent compressibility of the lipid bilayer, which decreased by approx. 11% with increasing concentrations of the Na,K-ATPase up to an ATPase/DOPC molar ratio = 2 × 10⁻⁴. Assuming that ATPase induces rigidization of the surrounding lipid molecules one can obtain from the compressibility data that 3.7 to 100 times more lipid molecules are affected by the protein in comparison with annular lipids. However, this is in contradiction with the current theories of the phase transitions in lipid bilayers. It is suggested that another physical mechanisms should be involved for explanation of observed effect.

  6. Tunneling Plasmonics in Bilayer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Fei, Z; Iwinski, E G; Ni, G X; Zhang, L M; Bao, W; Rodin, A S; Lee, Y; Wagner, M; Liu, M K; Dai, S; Goldflam, M D; Thiemens, M; Keilmann, F; Lau, C N; Castro-Neto, A H; Fogler, M M; Basov, D N

    2015-08-12

    We report experimental signatures of plasmonic effects due to electron tunneling between adjacent graphene layers. At subnanometer separation, such layers can form either a strongly coupled bilayer graphene with a Bernal stacking or a weakly coupled double-layer graphene with a random stacking order. Effects due to interlayer tunneling dominate in the former case but are negligible in the latter. We found through infrared nanoimaging that bilayer graphene supports plasmons with a higher degree of confinement compared to single- and double-layer graphene, a direct consequence of interlayer tunneling. Moreover, we were able to shut off plasmons in bilayer graphene through gating within a wide voltage range. Theoretical modeling indicates that such a plasmon-off region is directly linked to a gapped insulating state of bilayer graphene, yet another implication of interlayer tunneling. Our work uncovers essential plasmonic properties in bilayer graphene and suggests a possibility to achieve novel plasmonic functionalities in graphene few-layers.

  7. Tunneling Plasmonics in Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Z.; Iwinski, E. G.; Ni, G. X.; Zhang, L. M.; Bao, W.; Rodin, A. S.; Lee, Y.; Wagner, M.; Liu, M. K.; Dai, S.; Goldflam, M. D.; Thiemens, M.; Keilmann, F.; Lau, C. N.; Castro-Neto, A. H.; Fogler, M. M.; Basov, D. N.

    2015-08-01

    We report experimental signatures of plasmonic effects due to electron tunneling between adjacent graphene layers. At sub-nanometer separation, such layers can form either a strongly coupled bilayer graphene with a Bernal stacking or a weakly coupled double-layer graphene with a random stacking order. Effects due to interlayer tunneling dominate in the former case but are negligible in the latter. We found through infrared nano-imaging that bilayer graphene supports plasmons with a higher degree of confinement compared to single- and double-layer graphene, a direct consequence of interlayer tunneling. Moreover, we were able to shut off plasmons in bilayer graphene through gating within a wide voltage range. Theoretical modeling indicates that such a plasmon-off region is directly linked to a gapped insulating state of bilayer graphene: yet another implication of interlayer tunneling. Our work uncovers essential plasmonic properties in bilayer graphene and suggests a possibility to achieve novel plasmonic functionalities in graphene few-layers.

  8. ALIGNING JIG

    DOEpatents

    Culver, J.S.; Tunnell, W.C.

    1958-08-01

    A jig or device is described for setting or aligning an opening in one member relative to another member or structure, with a predetermined offset, or it may be used for measuring the amount of offset with which the parts have previously been sct. This jig comprises two blocks rabbeted to each other, with means for securing thc upper block to the lower block. The upper block has fingers for contacting one of the members to be a1igmed, the lower block is designed to ride in grooves within the reference member, and calibration marks are provided to determine the amount of offset. This jig is specially designed to align the collimating slits of a mass spectrometer.

  9. Phospholipids as Biomarkers for Excessive Alcohol Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    S. et al. (2002). Decreased activity of brain phospholipid metabolic enzymes in human users of cocaine and methamphetamine. Drug & Alcohol ...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0497 TITLE: Phospholipids as Biomarkers for Excessive Alcohol Use...NUMBER Phospholipids as Biomarkers for Excessive Alcohol Use 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0497 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  10. Encapsulation of Living Cells within Giant Phospholipid Liposomes Formed by the Inverse-Emulsion Technique.

    PubMed

    Chowdhuri, Sampreeti; Cole, Christian M; Devaraj, Neal K

    2016-05-17

    Liposomes form spontaneously by the assimilation of phospholipids, the primary component of cell membranes. Due to their unique ability to form selectively permeable bilayers in situ, they are widely used as nanocarriers for drug and small-molecule delivery. However, there is a lack of straightforward methodologies to encapsulate living microorganisms. Here we demonstrate the successful encapsulation of whole cells in phospholipid vesicles by using the inverse-emulsion technique of generating unilamellar vesicles. This method of liposome preparation allows for a facile encapsulation of large biomaterials that previously was not easily attainable. Using Escherichia coli as a model organism, we found that liposomes can protect the bacterium against external protease degradation and from harsh biological environments. Liposomes prepared by the inverse-emulsion method were also capable of encapsulating yeast and were found to be naturally susceptible to hydrolysis by enzymes such as phospholipases, thus highlighting their potential role as cell delivery carriers.

  11. Image alignment

    DOEpatents

    Dowell, Larry Jonathan

    2014-04-22

    Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

  12. Modulation of the bilayer thickness of exocytic pathway membranes by membrane proteins rather than cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Kakoli; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban; Taguchi, Tomohiko; Warren, Graham; Engelman, Donald M.

    2004-03-01

    A biological membrane is conceptualized as a system in which membrane proteins are naturally matched to the equilibrium thickness of the lipid bilayer. Cholesterol, in addition to lipid composition, has been suggested to be a major regulator of bilayer thickness in vivo because measurements in vitro have shown that cholesterol can increase the thickness of simple phospholipid/cholesterol bilayers. Using solution x-ray scattering, we have directly measured the average bilayer thickness of exocytic pathway membranes, which contain increasing amounts of cholesterol. The bilayer thickness of membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi, and the basolateral and apical plasma membranes, purified from rat hepatocytes, were determined to be 37.5 ± 0.4 Å, 39.5 ± 0.4 Å, 35.6 ± 0.6 Å, and 42.5 ± 0.3 Å, respectively. After cholesterol depletion using cyclodextrins, Golgi and apical plasma membranes retained their respective bilayer thicknesses whereas the bilayer thickness of the endoplasmic reticulum and the basolateral plasma membrane decreased by 1.0 Å. Because cholesterol was shown to have a marginal effect on the thickness of these membranes, we measured whether membrane proteins could modulate thickness. Protein-depleted membranes demonstrated changes in thickness of up to 5 Å, suggesting that (i) membrane proteins rather than cholesterol modulate the average bilayer thickness of eukaryotic cell membranes, and (ii) proteins and lipids are not naturally hydrophobically matched in some biological membranes. A marked effect of membrane proteins on the thickness of Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membranes, which do not contain cholesterol, was also observed, emphasizing the generality of our findings.

  13. Salamander retina phospholipids and their localization by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry at cellular size resolution.

    PubMed

    Roy, Michael C; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Takahashi, Kazuteru; Nakanishi, Setsuko; Kajihara, Shigeki; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Ogawa, Kiyoshi; Taguchi, Ryo; Naito, Takayuki

    2011-03-01

    Salamander large cells facilitated identification and localization of lipids by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry. Salamander retina lipid extract showed similarity with rodent retina lipid extract in phospholipid content and composition. Like rodent retina section, distinct layer distributions of phospholipids were observed in the salamander retina section. Phosphatidylcholines (PCs) composing saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids (PC 32:0, PC 32:1, and PC 34:1) were detected mainly in the outer and inner plexiform layers (OPL and IPL), whereas PCs containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PC 36:4, PC 38:6, and PC 40:6) composed the inner segment (IS) and outer segment (OS). The presence of PCs containing polyunsaturated fatty acids in the OS layer implied that these phospholipids form flexible lipid bilayers, which facilitate phototransduction process occurring in the rhodopsin rich OS layer. Distinct distributions and relative signal intensities of phospholipids also indicated their relative abundance in a particular cell or a cell part. Using salamander large cells, a single cell level localization and identification of biomolecules could be achieved by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry.

  14. Reconstitution and Partial Characterization of Phospholipid Flippase Activity from Detergent Extracts of the Bacillus subtilis Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Hrafnsdóttir, Sigrún; Menon, Anant K.

    2000-01-01

    In bacteria, phospholipids are synthesized on the inner leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane and must translocate to the outer leaflet to propagate a bilayer. Transbilayer movement of phospholipids has been shown to be fast and independent of metabolic energy, and it is predicted to be facilitated by membrane proteins (flippases) since transport across protein-free membranes is negligible. However, it remains unclear as to whether proteins are required at all and, if so, whether specific proteins are needed. To determine whether bacteria contain specific proteins capable of translocating phospholipids across the cytoplasmic membrane, we reconstituted a detergent extract of Bacillus subtilis into proteoliposomes and measured import of a water-soluble phospholipid analog. We found that the proteoliposomes were capable of transporting the analog and that transport was inhibited by protease treatment. Active proteoliposome populations were also able to translocate a long-chain phospholipid, as judged by a phospholipase A2-based assay. Protein-free liposomes were inactive. We show that manipulation of the reconstitution mixture by prior chromatographic fractionation of the detergent extract, or by varying the protein/phospholipid ratio, results in populations of vesicles with different specific activities. Glycerol gradient analysis showed that the majority of the transport activity sedimented at ∼4S, correlating with the presence of specific proteins. Recovery of activity in other gradient fractions was low despite the presence of a complex mixture of proteins. We conclude that bacteria contain specific proteins capable of facilitating transbilayer translocation of phospholipids. The reconstitution methodology that we describe provides the basis for purifying a facilitator of transbilayer phospholipid translocation in bacteria. PMID:10894727

  15. Synthetic ion channels via self-assembly: a route for embedding porous polyoxometalate nanocapsules in lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Carr, Rogan; Weinstock, Ira A; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu; Müller, Achim; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2008-11-01

    Porous polyoxometalate nanocapsules of Keplerate type are known to exhibit the functionality of biological ion channels; however, their use as an artificial ion channel is tempered by the high negative charge of the capsules, which renders their spontaneous incorporation into a lipid bilayer membrane unlikely. In this Letter we report coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations that demonstrate a route for embedding negatively charged nanocapsules into lipid bilayer membranes via self-assembly. A homogeneous mixture of water, cationic detergent, and phospholipid was observed to spontaneously self-assemble around the nanocapsule into a layered, liposome-like structure, where the nanocapsule was enveloped by a layer of cationic detergent followed by a layer of phospholipid. Fusion of such a layered liposome with a lipid bilayer membrane was observed to embed the nanocapsule into the lipid bilayer. The resulting assembly was found to remain stable even after the surface of the capsule was exposed to electrolyte. In the latter conformation, water was observed to flow into and out of the capsule as Na(+) cations entered, suggesting that a polyoxometalate nanocapsule can form a functional synthetic ion channel in a lipid bilayer membrane.

  16. Synthetic Ion Channels via Self-Assembly: a Route for Embedding Porous Polyoxometalate Nanocapsules in Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Rogan; Weinstock, Ira A.; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu; Müller, Achim; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2010-01-01

    Porous polyoxometalate nanocapsules of Keplerate type are known to exhibit the functionality of biological ion channels, however, their use as artificial ion channel is tempered by the high negative charge of the capsules, which renders their spontaneous incorporation into a lipid bilayer membrane unlikely. In this letter we report coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations that demonstrate a route for embedding negatively charged nanocapsules into lipid bilayer membranes via self-assembly. A homogeneous mixture of water, cationic detergent, and phospholipid was observed to spontaneously self-assemble around the nanocapsule into a layered, liposome-like structure, where the nanocapsule was enveloped by a layer of cationic detergent followed by a layer of phospholipid. Fusion of such a layered liposome with a lipid bilayer membrane was observed to embed the nanocapsule into the lipid bilayer. The resulting assembly was found to remain stable even after the surface of the capsule was exposed to electrolyte. In the latter conformation, water was observed to flow into and out of the capsule as Na+ cations entered, suggesting that a polyoxometalate nanocapsule can form a functional synthetic ion channel in a lipid bilayer membrane. PMID:18844424

  17. Review of bilayer tablet technology.

    PubMed

    Abebe, Admassu; Akseli, Ilgaz; Sprockel, Omar; Kottala, Niranjan; Cuitiño, Alberto M

    2014-01-30

    Therapeutic strategies based on oral delivery of bilayer (and multilayer) tablets are gaining more acceptance among brand and generic products due to a confluence of factors including advanced delivery strategies, patient compliance and combination therapy. Successful manufacturing of these ever more complex systems needs to overcome a series of challenges from formulation design to tablet press monitoring and control. This article provides an overview of the state-of-the-art of bilayer tablet technology, highlighting the main benefits of this type of oral dosage forms while providing a description of current challenges and advances toward improving manufacturing practices and product quality. Several aspects relevant to bilayer tablet manufacturing are addressed including material properties, lubrication, layer ordering, layer thickness, layer weight control, as well as first and final compression forces. A section is also devoted to bilayer tablet characterization that present additional complexities associated with interfaces between layers. The available features of the manufacturing equipment for bilayer tablet production are also described indicating the different strategies for sensing and controls offered by bilayer tablet press manufacturers. Finally, a roadmap for bilayer tablet manufacturing is advanced as a guideline to formulation design and selection of process parameters and equipment.

  18. Shapes of Mixed Phospholipid Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Aranda-Espinoza, Helim; Maldonado, Amir

    2006-01-01

    We studied the shape of phospholipid vesicles prepared by hydration of a mixture of phosphatidylcholine (SOPC) and phosphatidylserine (SOPS) in different proportions. The aim of the work is to obtain some insight into the influence of the chemical composition of a biomembrane on its shape. The optical microscopy results show that the shape of the vesicles depend on the SOPC:SOPS composition. For low SOPS contents, coiled cylindrical vesicles are observed. The results suggest that specific compositions of the SOPC:SOPS vesicles produce some spontaneous curvature on the membrane and then a coiling instability. PMID:19669461

  19. Interaction of caldesmon with phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Czuryło, E A; Zborowski, J; Dabrowska, R

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of caldesmon with liposomes composed of various phospholipids has been examined by tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy. The results indicate that caldesmon makes its strongest complex with phosphatidylserine (PS) vesicles (Kass. = 1.45 x 10(5) M-1). Both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions contribute to the stability of this complex. The site for strong binding of PS seems to be located in the N-terminal part of the 34 kDa C-terminal fragment of caldesmon. Binding of PS at this site results in displacement of calmodulin from its complex with caldesmon. Images Figure 4 PMID:8484721

  20. Detection of phospholipid phase separation. A multifrequency phase fluorimetry study of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Parasassi, T; Conti, F; Glaser, M; Gratton, E

    1984-11-25

    Using multifrequency phase and modulation fluorometry and a nonlinear least-squares analysis of lifetime data, we were able to determine the complex decay of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) in synthetic phospholipid bilayers. Our results showed a monoexponential decay of DPH in the pure isotropic solvents studied, over a wide temperature range, and a double-exponential decay of DPH in phospholipids, both above and below the transition. During the transition, and in mixed-phase phospholipids, a three-component analysis was successfully accomplished, and the pre-exponential factors of the two main components have been shown to be quantitatively representative of the gel and liquid-crystalline phases of the bilayer. The fractional intensity of the shorter lifetime component depends on the modalities of the sample preparation. The factors affecting this component are discussed. From the DPH fluorescence lifetime and from the anisotropy data in L-alpha-dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine/L-alpha-dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl choline mixtures, a phase diagram was independently constructed. Conclusions about the sensitivity and the partition of the probe between gel and the liquid-crystalline phases of the bilayer are derived. Lifetime experiments on DPH in a L-alpha-dilauroyl-phosphatidylcholine/L-alpha-dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylch oline mixture suggested a general method for the determination and quantitation of the two different phases in the bilayer.

  1. Molecular photovoltaic system based on fullerenes and carotenoids co-assembled in lipid/alkanethiol hybrid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lixia; Zhan, Wei

    2012-03-13

    A hybrid molecular photovoltaic system, based on fullerene C(60) and lutein (a natural photosynthetic carotenoid pigment) that are assembled in a phospholipid/alkanethiol bilayer matrix, is described here. The assembly and photoconversion behaviors of such a system were studied by UV-vis spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy, photoelectrochemical action spectroscopy, and photocurrent generation. While lutein itself is inefficient in generating photocurrent, it can strongly modulate photocurrents produced by fullerenes when coassembled in the lipid bilayer matrix presumably via photoinduced electron transfer. Our results thus provide a successful example of combining both synthetic and natural photoactive components in building molecular photovoltaic systems.

  2. Minimal Bending Energies of Bilayer Polyhedra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haselwandter, Christoph A.; Phillips, Rob

    2010-11-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on bilayer polyhedra composed of amphiphilic molecules, we study the elastic bending energies of bilayer vesicles forming polyhedral shapes. Allowing for segregation of excess amphiphiles along the ridges of polyhedra, we find that bilayer polyhedra can indeed have lower bending energies than spherical bilayer vesicles. However, our analysis also implies that, contrary to what has been suggested on the basis of experiments, the snub dodecahedron, rather than the icosahedron, generally represents the energetically favorable shape of bilayer polyhedra.

  3. Lipid bilayers on nano-templates

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr; Artyukhin, Alexander B.; Bakajin, Olgica; Stoeve, Pieter

    2009-08-04

    A lipid bilayer on a nano-template comprising a nanotube or nanowire and a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire. One embodiment provides a method of fabricating a lipid bilayer on a nano-template comprising the steps of providing a nanotube or nanowire and forming a lipid bilayer around the polymer cushion. One embodiment provides a protein pore in the lipid bilayer. In one embodiment the protein pore is sensitive to specific agents

  4. The use of natural and synthetic phospholipids as pharmaceutical excipients.

    PubMed

    van Hoogevest, Peter; Wendel, Armin

    2014-09-01

    In pharmaceutical formulations, phospholipids obtained from plant or animal sources and synthetic phospholipids are used. Natural phospholipids are purified from, e.g., soybeans or egg yolk using non-toxic solvent extraction and chromatographic procedures with low consumption of energy and minimum possible waste. Because of the use of validated purification procedures and sourcing of raw materials with consistent quality, the resulting products differing in phosphatidylcholine content possess an excellent batch to batch reproducibility with respect to phospholipid and fatty acid composition. The natural phospholipids are described in pharmacopeias and relevant regulatory guidance documentation of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA). Synthetic phospholipids with specific polar head group, fatty acid composition can be manufactured using various synthesis routes. Synthetic phospholipids with the natural stereochemical configuration are preferably synthesized from glycerophosphocholine (GPC), which is obtained from natural phospholipids, using acylation and enzyme catalyzed reactions. Synthetic phospholipids play compared to natural phospholipid (including hydrogenated phospholipids), as derived from the number of drug products containing synthetic phospholipids, a minor role. Only in a few pharmaceutical products synthetic phospholipids are used. Natural phospholipids are used in oral, dermal, and parenteral products including liposomes. Natural phospholipids instead of synthetic phospholipids should be selected as phospholipid excipients for formulation development, whenever possible, because natural phospholipids are derived from renewable sources and produced with more ecologically friendly processes and are available in larger scale at relatively low costs compared to synthetic phospholipids. Practical applications: For selection of phospholipid excipients for pharmaceutical formulations, natural phospholipids are preferred

  5. Neutron Reflectometry reveals the interaction between functionalized SPIONs and the surface of lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Luchini, Alessandra; Gerelli, Yuri; Fragneto, Giovanna; Nylander, Tommy; Pálsson, Gunnar K; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Paduano, Luigi

    2017-03-01

    The safe application of nanotechnology devices in biomedicine requires fundamental understanding on how they interact with and affect the different components of biological systems. In this respect, the cellular membrane, the cell envelope, certainly represents an important target or barrier for nanosystems. Here we report on the interaction between functionalized SuperParamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs), promising contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and lipid bilayers that mimic the plasma membrane. Neutron Reflectometry, supported by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) experiments, was used to characterize this interaction by varying both SPION coating and lipid bilayer composition. In particular, the interaction of two different SPIONs, functionalized with a cationic surfactant and a zwitterionic phospholipid, and lipid bilayers, containing different amount of cholesterol, were compared. The obtained results were further validated by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) measurements and Cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM) images. None of the investigated functionalized SPIONs were found to disrupt the lipid membrane. However, in all case we observed the attachment of the functionalized SPIONs onto the surface of the bilayers, which was affected by the bilayer rigidity, i.e. the cholesterol concentration.

  6. Bilayer structure and physical dynamics of the cytochrome b5 dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Chester, D W; Skita, V; Young, H S; Mavromoustakos, T; Strittmatter, P

    1992-01-01

    Cytochrome b5 is a microsomal membrane protein which provides reducing potential to delta 5-, delta 6-, and delta 9-fatty acid desaturases through its interaction with cytochrome b5 reductase. Low angle x-ray diffraction has been used to determine the structure of an asymmetrically reconstituted cytochrome b5:DMPC model membrane system. Differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence anisotropy studies were performed to examine the bilayer physical dynamics of this reconstituted system. These latter studies allow us to constrain structural models to those which are consistent with physical dynamics data. Additionally, because the nonpolar peptide secondary structure remains unclear, we tested the sensitivity of our model to different nonpolar peptide domain configurations. In this modeling approach, the nonpolar peptide moiety was arranged in the membrane to meet such chemically determined criteria as protease susceptibility of carboxyl- and amino-termini, tyrosine availability for pH titration and tryptophan 109 location, et cetera. In these studies, we have obtained a reconstituted cytochrome b5:DMPC bilayer structure at approximately 6.3 A resolution and conclude that the nonpolar peptide does not penetrate beyond the bilayer midplane. Structural correlations with calorimetry, fluorescence anisotropy and acyl chain packing data suggest that asymmetric cytochrome b5 incorporation into the bilayer increases acyl chain order. Additionally, we suggest that the heme peptide:bilayer interaction facilitates a discreet heme peptide orientation which would be dependent upon phospholipid headgroup composition. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 7 PMID:1600082

  7. Autistic disorder and phospholipids: A review.

    PubMed

    Brown, Christine M; Austin, David W

    2011-01-01

    Dysregulated phospholipid metabolism has been proposed as an underlying biological component of neurodevelopmental disorders such as autistic disorder (AD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This review provides an overview of fatty acid and phospholipid metabolism and evidence for phospholipid dysregulation with reference to the membrane hypothesis of schizophrenia. While there is evidence that phospholipid metabolism is at least impaired in individuals with AD, it has not been established whether phospholipid metabolism is implicated in causal, mechanistic or epiphenomenological models. More research is needed to ascertain whether breastfeeding, and specifically, the administration of colostrum or an adequate substitute can play a preventative role by supplying the neonate with essential fatty acids (EFAs) at a critical juncture in their development. Regarding treatment, further clinical trials of EFA supplementation are essential to determine the efficacy of EFAs in reducing AD symptomatology and whether supplementation can serve as a cost-effective and readily available intervention.

  8. Multi-Stacked Supported Lipid Bilayer Micropatterning through Polymer Stencil Lift-Off.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yujie; Negmi, Ahmed; Moran-Mirabal, Jose

    2015-08-28

    Complex multi-lamellar structures play a critical role in biological systems, where they are present as lamellar bodies, and as part of biological assemblies that control energy transduction processes. Multi-lamellar lipid layers not only provide interesting systems for fundamental research on membrane structure and bilayer-associated polypeptides, but can also serve as components in bioinspired materials or devices. Although the ability to pattern stacked lipid bilayers at the micron scale is of importance for these purposes, limited work has been done in developing such patterning techniques. Here, we present a simple and direct approach to pattern stacked supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) using polymer stencil lift-off and the electrostatic interactions between cationic and anionic lipids. Both homogeneous and phase-segregated stacked SLB patterns were produced, demonstrating that the stacked lipid bilayers retain lateral diffusivity. We demonstrate patterned SLB stacks of up to four bilayers, where fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and quenching was used to probe the interactions between lipid bilayers. Furthermore, the study of lipid phase behaviour showed that gel phase domains align between adjacent layers. The proposed stacked SLB pattern platform provides a robust model for studying lipid behaviour with a controlled number of bilayers, and an attractive means towards building functional bioinspired materials or devices.

  9. Multi-Stacked Supported Lipid Bilayer Micropatterning through Polymer Stencil Lift-Off

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yujie; Negmi, Ahmed; Moran-Mirabal, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Complex multi-lamellar structures play a critical role in biological systems, where they are present as lamellar bodies, and as part of biological assemblies that control energy transduction processes. Multi-lamellar lipid layers not only provide interesting systems for fundamental research on membrane structure and bilayer-associated polypeptides, but can also serve as components in bioinspired materials or devices. Although the ability to pattern stacked lipid bilayers at the micron scale is of importance for these purposes, limited work has been done in developing such patterning techniques. Here, we present a simple and direct approach to pattern stacked supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) using polymer stencil lift-off and the electrostatic interactions between cationic and anionic lipids. Both homogeneous and phase-segregated stacked SLB patterns were produced, demonstrating that the stacked lipid bilayers retain lateral diffusivity. We demonstrate patterned SLB stacks of up to four bilayers, where fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and quenching was used to probe the interactions between lipid bilayers. Furthermore, the study of lipid phase behaviour showed that gel phase domains align between adjacent layers. The proposed stacked SLB pattern platform provides a robust model for studying lipid behaviour with a controlled number of bilayers, and an attractive means towards building functional bioinspired materials or devices. PMID:26343733

  10. Real-time Visualization of Phospholipid Degradation by Outer Membrane Phospholipase A using High-Speed Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rangl, Martina; Rima, Luca; Klement, Jessica; Miyagi, Atsushi; Keller, Sandro; Scheuring, Simon

    2017-03-07

    Phospholipases are abundant in various types of cells and compartments, where they play key roles in physiological processes as diverse as digestion, cell proliferation, and neural activation. In Gram-negative bacteria, outer membrane phospholipase A (OmpLA) is involved in outer-membrane lipid homeostasis and bacterial virulence. Although the enzymatic activity of OmpLA can be probed with an assay relying on an artificial monoacyl thioester substrate, only little is known about its activity on diacyl phospholipids. Here, we used high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) to directly image enzymatic phospholipid degradation by OmpLA in real time. In the absence of Ca(2+), reconstituted OmpLA diffused within a phospholipid bilayer without revealing any signs of phospholipase activity. Upon addition of Ca(2+), OmpLA was activated and degraded the membrane with a turnover of ~2 phospholipid molecules per second, per OmpLA dimer until most of the membrane phospholipids were hydrolyzed and the protein became tightly packed.

  11. Covalent attachment of functionalized lipid bilayers to planar waveguides for measuring protein binding to biomimetic membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Heyse, S.; Vogel, H.; Sänger, M.; Sigrist, H.

    1995-01-01

    A new method is presented for measuring sensitively the interactions between ligands and their membrane-bound receptors in situ using integrated optics, thus avoiding the need for additional labels. Phospholipid bilayers were attached covalently to waveguides by a novel protocol, which can in principle be used with any glass-like surface. In a first step, phospholipids carrying head-group thiols were covalently immobilized onto SiO2-TiO2 waveguide surfaces. This was accomplished by acylation of aminated waveguides with the heterobifunctional crosslinker N-succinimidyl-3-maleimidopropionate, followed by the formation of thioethers between the surface-grafted maleimides and the synthetic thiolipids. The surface-attached thiolipids served as hydrophobic templates and anchors for the deposition of a complete lipid bilayer either by fusion of lipid vesicles or by lipid self-assembly from mixed lipid/detergent micelles. The step-by-step lipid bilayer formation on the waveguide surface was monitored in situ by an integrated optics technique, allowing the simultaneous determination of optical thickness and one of the two refractive indices of the adsorbed organic layers. Surface coverages of 50-60% were calculated for thiolipid layers. Subsequent deposition of POPC resulted in an overall lipid layer thickness of 45-50 A, which corresponds to the thickness of a fluid bilayer membrane. Specific recognition reactions occurring at cell membrane surfaces were modeled by the incorporation of lipid-anchored receptor molecules into the supported bilayer membranes. (1) The outer POPC layer was doped with biotinylated phosphatidylethanolamine. Subsequent specific binding of streptavidin was optically monitored. (2) A lipopeptide was incorporated in the outer POPC monolayer. Membrane binding of monoclonal antibodies, which were directed against the peptide moiety of the lipopeptide, was optically detected. The specific antibody binding correlated well with the lipopepitde

  12. Phospholipid Vesicles in Materials Science

    SciTech Connect

    Granick, Steve

    2016-05-11

    The objective of this research was to develop the science basis needed to deploy phospholipid vesicles as functional materials in energy contexts. Specifically, we sought to: (1) Develop an integrated molecular-level understanding of what determines their dynamical shape, spatial organization, and responsiveness to complex, time-varying environments; and (2) Develop understanding of their active transportation in crowded environments, which our preliminary measurements in cells suggest may hold design principles for targeting improved energy efficiency in new materials systems. The methods to do this largely involved fluorescence imaging and other spectroscopy involving single particles, vesicles, particles, DNA, and endosomes. An unexpected importance outcome was a new method to image light-emitting diodes during actual operation using super-resolution spectroscopy.

  13. Egg Phospholipids and Cardiovascular Health

    PubMed Central

    Blesso, Christopher N.

    2015-01-01

    Eggs are a major source of phospholipids (PL) in the Western diet. Dietary PL have emerged as a potential source of bioactive lipids that may have widespread effects on pathways related to inflammation, cholesterol metabolism, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function. Based on pre-clinical studies, egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) and sphingomyelin appear to regulate cholesterol absorption and inflammation. In clinical studies, egg PL intake is associated with beneficial changes in biomarkers related to HDL reverse cholesterol transport. Recently, egg PC was shown to be a substrate for the generation of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), a gut microbe-dependent metabolite associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. More research is warranted to examine potential serum TMAO responses with chronic egg ingestion and in different populations, such as diabetics. In this review, the recent basic science, clinical, and epidemiological findings examining egg PL intake and risk of CVD are summarized. PMID:25871489

  14. Theoretical studies of lipid bilayer electroporation using molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Zachary Alan

    Computer simulations of physical, chemical, and biological systems have improved tremendously over the past five decades. From simple studies of liquid argon in the 1960s to fully atomistic simulations of entire viruses in the past few years, recent advances in high-performance computing have continuously enabled simulations to bridge the gap between scientific theory and experiment. Molecular dynamics simulations in particular have allowed for the direct observation of spatial and temporal events which are at present inaccessible to experiments. For this dissertation I employ all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to study the transient, electric field-induced poration (or electroporation) of phospholipid bilayers at MV/m electric fields. Phospholipid bilayers are the dominant constituents of cell membranes and act as both a barrier and gatekeeper to the cell interior. This makes their structural integrity and susceptibility to external perturbations an important topic for study, especially as the density of electromagnetic radiation in our environment is increasing steadily. The primary goal of this dissertation is to understand the specific physical and biological mechanisms which facilitate electroporation, and to connect our simulated observations to experiments with live cells and to continuum models which seek to describe the underlying biological processes of electroporation. In Chapter 1 I begin with a brief introduction to phospholipids and phospholipid bilayers, followed by an extensive overview of electroporation and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The following chapters will then focus on peer-reviewed and published work we performed, or on existing projects which are currently being prepared for submission. Chapter 2 looks at how external electric fields affect both oxidized and unoxidized lipid bilayers as a function of oxidation concentration and oxidized lipid type. Oxidative damage to cell membranes represents a physiologically relevant

  15. Phosphatidyl-hydroxytyrosol and phosphatidyl-tyrosol bilayer properties.

    PubMed

    Evans, Kervin O; Compton, David L

    2017-01-01

    Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol phospholipids were enzymatically synthesized and investigated for their bilayer properties. Dynamic light scattering demonstrated that hand extrusion at 100nm consistently resulted in liposomes of nearly 85nm diameter for both phosphatidyl-hydroxytyrosol (DOPHT) and phosphatidyl-tyrosol (DOPT). Transmission electron microscopy showed DOPT and DOPHT liposomes extruded at 100-nm to be spherical and non-distinctive from one another. Zeta potential measurements resulted in surface charges<-25mV, demonstrating both DOPT and DOPHT form highly stable liposomes. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring measurements demonstrated that liposomal adsorption was dependent on a combination of DOPT (or DOPHT) mole-percent and calcium ions concentration. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements indicated that melting temperatures of DOPT and DOPHT were below 4°C, suggesting that adsorption behavior and liposome formation was limited by electrostatic interactions and not gel-state formation.

  16. Porous Nanoparticle Supported Lipid Bilayers (Protocells) as Delivery Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juewen; Stace-Naughton, Alison; Jiang, Xingmao; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Mixing liposomes with hydrophilic particles will induce fusion of the liposome onto the particle surface. Such supported bilayers have been extensively studied as a model for the cell membrane, while its application in drug delivery has not been pursued. In this communication, we report the use of phospholipids to achieve synergistic loading and encapsulating of a fluorescent dye (calcein) in mesoporous silica nanoparticles, and its delivery into mammalian cells. We found that cationic lipid DOTAP provides the highest calcein loading with the concentration inside silica ∼110× higher than that in the solution under experimental conditions. Compared to some other nanoparticle systems, protocells provide a simple construct for loading, sealing, delivering and releasing, and should serve as a useful system in nanomedicine. PMID:19173660

  17. Phospholipid interactions in model membrane systems. II. Theory.

    PubMed Central

    Stigter, D; Mingins, J; Dill, K A

    1992-01-01

    We describe statistical thermodynamic theory for the lateral interactions among phospholipid head groups in monolayers and bilayers. Extensive monolayer experiments show that at low surface densities, PC head groups have strong lateral repulsions which increase considerably with temperature, whereas PE interactions are much weaker and have no significant temperature dependence (see the preceding paper). In previous work, we showed that the second virial coefficients for these interactions can be explained by: (a) steric repulsions among the head groups, and (b) a tilting of the P-N+ dipole of PC so that the N+ end enters the oil phase, to an extent that increases with temperature. It was also predicted that PE interactions should be weaker and less temperature dependent because the N+ terminal of the PE head-group is hydrophilic, hence, it is tilted into the water phase, so dipolar contributions among PE's are negligible due to the high dielectric constant of water. In the present work, we broaden the theory to treat phospholipid interactions up to higher lateral surface densities. We generalize the Hill interfacial virial expansion to account for dipoles and to include the third virial term. We show that to account for the large third virial coefficients for both PC and PE requires that the short range lateral attractions among the head groups also be taken into account. In addition, the third virial coefficient includes fluctuating head group dipoles, computed by Monte Carlo integration assuming pairwise additivity of the instantaneous pair potentials. We find that because the dipole fluctuations are correlated, the average triplet interactions do not equal the sum of the average dipole pair potentials. This is important for predicting, the magnitude and the independence of temperature of the third virial coefficients for PC. The consistency of the theory with data of both the second and the third virial coefficients extends the applicability of the head

  18. Erythrocyte membrane model with explicit description of the lipid bilayer and the spectrin network.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Lykotrafitis, George

    2014-08-05

    The membrane of the red blood cell (RBC) consists of spectrin tetramers connected at actin junctional complexes, forming a two-dimensional (2D) sixfold triangular network anchored to the lipid bilayer. Better understanding of the erythrocyte mechanics in hereditary blood disorders such as spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and especially, sickle cell disease requires the development of a detailed membrane model. In this study, we introduce a mesoscale implicit-solvent coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) model of the erythrocyte membrane that explicitly describes the phospholipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton, by extending a previously developed two-component RBC membrane model. We show that the proposed model represents RBC membrane with the appropriate bending stiffness and shear modulus. The timescale and self-consistency of the model are established by comparing our results with experimentally measured viscosity and thermal fluctuations of the RBC membrane. Furthermore, we measure the pressure exerted by the cytoskeleton on the lipid bilayer. We find that defects at the anchoring points of the cytoskeleton to the lipid bilayer (as in spherocytes) cause a reduction in the pressure compared with an intact membrane, whereas defects in the dimer-dimer association of a spectrin filament (as in elliptocytes) cause an even larger decrease in the pressure. We conjecture that this finding may explain why the experimentally measured diffusion coefficients of band-3 proteins are higher in elliptocytes than in spherocytes, and higher than in normal RBCs. Finally, we study the effects that possible attractive forces between the spectrin filaments and the lipid bilayer have on the pressure applied on the lipid bilayer by the filaments. We discover that the attractive forces cause an increase in the pressure as they diminish the effect of membrane protein defects. As this finding contradicts with experimental results, we conclude that the attractive forces are moderate and do

  19. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein and soluble CD14 catalyze exchange of phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, B; Hailman, E; Wright, S D

    1997-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) is a plasma protein known to facilitate the diffusion of bacterial LPS (endotoxin). LBP catalyzes movement of LPS monomers from LPS aggregates to HDL particles, to phospholipid bilayers, and to a binding site on a second plasma protein, soluble CD14 (sCD14). sCD14 can hasten transfer by receiving an LPS monomer from an LPS aggregate, and then surrendering it to an HDL particle, thus acting as a soluble "shuttle" for an insoluble lipid. Here we show that LBP and sCD14 shuttle not only LPS, but also phospholipids. Phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylcholine, and a fluorescently labeled derivative of phosphatidylethanolamine (R-PE) are each transferred by LBP from membranes to HDL particles. The transfer could be observed using recombinant LBP and sCD14 or whole human plasma, and the plasma-mediated transfer of PI could be blocked by anti-LBP and partially inhibited by anti-CD14. sCD14 appears to act as a soluble shuttle for phospholipids since direct binding of PI and R-PE to sCD14 was observed and because addition of sCD14 accelerated transfer of these lipids. These studies define a new function for LBP and sCD14 and describe a novel mechanism for the transfer of phospholipids in blood. In further studies, we show evidence suggesting that LBP transfers LPS and phospholipids by reciprocal exchange: LBP-catalyzed binding of R-PE to LPS x sCD14 complexes was accompanied by the exit of LPS from sCD14, and LBP-catalyzed binding of R-PE to sCD14 was accelerated by prior binding of LPS to sCD14. Binding of one lipid is thus functionally coupled with the release of a second. These results suggest that LBP acts as a lipid exchange protein. PMID:9006000

  20. Shape changes of giant liposomes induced by an asymmetric transmembrane distribution of phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Farge, E; Devaux, P F

    1992-01-01

    The influence of a phospholipid transmembrane redistribution on the shape of nonspherical flaccid vesicles was investigated at a fixed temperature by optical microscopy. In a first series of experiments, a transmembrane pH gradient was imposed on egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC)-egg phosphatidylglycerol (EPG) (100:1) giant vesicles. The delta pH induced an asymmetric distribution of EPG. Simultaneously, discoid vesicles were transformed into tubular or a series of connected small vesicles. The fraction of phospholipid transfer necessary for a shape change from discoid to two connected vesicles was of the order of 0.1% of the total phospholipids. Additional lipid redistribution was accompanied by a sequence of shape changes. In a second series of experiments, lyso phosphatidylcholine (L-PC) was added to, or subtracted from, the external leaflet of giant EPC vesicles. The addition of L-PC induced a change from discoid to a two-vesicle state without further evolution, suggesting that lipid transfer and lipid addition are not equivalent. L-PC depletion from the outer leaflet generated stomatocyte-like vesicles. Whenever possible, we have determined whether the giant vesicles undergoing shape changes were unilamellar or multilamellar by measuring the elastic area compressibility modulus, K, by the micropipette assay (Kwok and Evans, 1981). Shape transformations triggered by phospholipid modification of the most external bilayer were indeed influenced by the presence of other underlying membranes that played a role comparable to that of a passive cytoskeleton layer. It appears that in real cells, invaginations of the plasma membrane or budding of organelles could be triggered by a phospholipid transfer from one leaflet to the other caused, for instance, by the aminophospholipid translocase which is present in eukaryotic membranes. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:1547324

  1. Cholesterol-induced variations in the volume and enthalpy fluctuations of lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Halstenberg, S; Heimburg, T; Hianik, T; Kaatze, U; Krivanek, R

    1998-01-01

    The sound velocity and density of suspensions of large unilamellar liposomes from dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine with admixed cholesterol have been measured as a function of temperature around the chain melting temperature of the phospholipid. The cholesterol-to-phospholipid molar ratio xc has been varied over a wide range (0 phospholipid, and of the apparent specific adiabatic compressibility have been derived from the measured data. These data are particularly discussed with respect to the volume fluctuations within the samples. A theoretical relation between the compressibility and the excess heat capacity of the bilayer system has been derived. Comparison of the compressibilities (and sound velocity numbers) with heat capacity traces display the close correlation between these quantities for bilayer systems. This correlation appears to be very useful as it allows some of the mechanical properties of membrane systems to be calculated from the specific heat capacity data and vice versa. PMID:9649386

  2. Interaction of melittin with mixed phospholipid membranes composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dimyristoylphosphatidylserine studied by deuterium NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Dempsey, C.; Bitbol, M.; Watts, A. )

    1989-08-08

    The interaction of bee venom melittin with mixed phospholipid bilayers composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine deuterated in the {alpha}- and {beta}-methylenes of the choline head group (DMPC-d{sub 4}) and dimyristoylphosphatidylserine deuterated in the {alpha}-methylene and {beta}-CH positions of the serine head group (DMPS-d{sub 3}) was studied in ternary mixtures by using deuterium NMR spectroscopy. The changes in the deuterium quadrupole splittings of the head-group deuteriomethylenes of DMPC-d{sub 4} induced by DMPS in binary mixtures were systematically reversed by increasing concentrations of melittin, so that at a melittin concentration of 4 mol % relative to total lipid the deuterium NMR spectrum from DMPC-d{sub 4} in the ternary mixture was similar to the spectrum from pure DMPC-d{sub 4} bilayers. The absence of deuterium NMR signals arising from melittin-bound DMPS in ternary mixtures containing DMPS-d{sub 3} indicates that the reversal by melittin of the effects of DMPS on the quadrupole splittings of DMPC-d{sub 4} results from the response of the choline head group to the net surface charge rather than from phase separation of melittin-DMPS complexes. The similarity in the effects of the two cationic but otherwise dissimilar peptides indicates that the DMPS head group responds to the surface charge resulting from the presence in the bilayer of charged amphiphiles, in a manner analogous to the response of the choline head group of phosphatidylcholine to the bilayer surface charge. The presence of DMPS greatly stabilized DMPC bilayers with respect to melittin-induced micellization, indicating that the latter effect of melittin may not be important for the hemolytic activity of the peptide.

  3. Chemical potential and tunneling in bilayer graphene using double bilayer graphene heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutuc, Emanuel

    2015-03-01

    Vertical heterostructures consisting of atomic layers separated by insulators can open a window to explore the role of electron interaction in these materials, otherwise not accessible in single layer devices. We describe here one such heterostructure, consisting of two bilayer graphene flakes separated by a hexagonal boron-nitride dielectric. Using the top layer as a resistively detected Kelvin probe we map the chemical potential of the bottom bilayer graphene as a function of electron density, perpendicular magnetic field, and transverse electric field. At zero magnetic field the chemical potential reveals a strongly non-linear dependence on density, with an electric field induced energy gap at charge neutrality. The data allow a direct measurement of the electric field-induced bandgap at zero magnetic field, the orbital Landau level energies, and the broken symmetry quantum Hall state gaps in high magnetic fields. In samples where the two layers are rotationally aligned the interlayer tunneling current measured as a function of interlayer bias reveals a gate-tunable negative differential resistance thanks to momentum conserving tunneling. Remarkably, the resonance width has a weak temperature dependence in the range 1.5 K to 300 K. Work done in collaboration with K. Lee, B. Fallahazad, S. Kang, J. Xue, D. C. Dillen, K. Kim, L. F. Register, S. K. Banerjee, T. Taniguchi, and K. Watanabe. This work supported by the Office of Naval Research, the Nanoelectronics Research Initiative SWAN center, and Intel Corp.

  4. Phonons in twisted bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocemasov, Alexandr I.; Nika, Denis L.; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2013-07-01

    We theoretically investigate phonon dispersion in AA-stacked, AB-stacked, and twisted bilayer graphene with various rotation angles. The calculations are performed using the Born-von Karman model for the intralayer atomic interactions and the Lennard-Jones potential for the interlayer interactions. It is found that the stacking order affects the out-of-plane acoustic phonon modes the most. The difference in the phonon densities of states in the twisted bilayer graphene and in AA- or AB-stacked bilayer graphene appears in the phonon frequency range 90-110 cm-1. Twisting bilayer graphene leads to the emergence of different phonon branches—termed hybrid folded phonons—which originate from the mixing of phonon modes from different high-symmetry directions in the Brillouin zone. The frequencies of the hybrid folded phonons depend strongly on the rotation angle and can be used for noncontact identification of the twist angles in graphene samples. The obtained results and the tabulated frequencies of phonons in twisted bilayer graphene are important for the interpretation of experimental Raman data and in determining the thermal conductivity of these material systems.

  5. LIPID PEROXIDATION GENERATES BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE PHOSPHOLIPIDS INCLUDING OXIDATIVELY N-MODIFIED PHOSPHOLIPIDS

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Sean S.; Guo, Lilu

    2014-01-01

    Peroxidation of membranes and lipoproteins converts “inert” phospholipids into a plethora of oxidatively modified phospholipids (oxPL) that can act as signaling molecules. In this review, we will discuss four major classes of oxPL: mildly oxygenated phospholipids, phospholipids with oxidatively truncated acyl chains, phospholipids with cyclized acyl chains, and phospholipids that have been oxidatively N-modified on their headgroups by reactive lipid species. For each class of oxPL we will review the chemical mechanisms of their formation, the evidence for their formation in biological samples, the biological activities and signaling pathways associated with them, and the catabolic pathways for their elimination. We will end by briefly highlighting some of the critical questions that remain about the role of oxPL in physiology and disease. PMID:24704586

  6. Investigation of Channel-Forming Activity of Polyene Macrolide Antibiotics in Planar Lipid Bilayers in the Presence of Dipole Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Efimova, S. S.; Schagina, L. V.; Ostroumova, O. S.

    2014-01-01

    The role of membrane components, sterols, phospholipids and sphingolipids in the formation and functioning of ion-permeable nanopores formed by antifungal macrolide antibiotics, amphotericin B, nystatin and filipin in planar lipid bilayers was studied. Dipole modifiers, flavonoids and styryl dyes, were used as a tool to study the molecular mechanisms of polyene channel-forming activity. The introduction of dipole modifiers into the membrane bathing solutions was shown to change the conductance of single channels and the steadystate transmembrane current induced by polyene antibiotics in the sterol-containing phospholipid-bilayers. The conductance of single amphotericin B channels was found to depend on the dipole potential of the membrane. The experiments with various phospholipids, sterols, and polyenes led to the assumption that the shape of a phospholipid molecule, the presence of double bonds at the positions 7 and 22 of a sterol molecule, the number of conjugated double bonds, and the presence of an amino sugar in the polyene antibiotic molecule are important factors impacting the stability of polyene-lipid complexes forming ion-permeable pores. Experimental and literature data presented in the paper suggest that the channel-forming activity of polyene antibiotics is also affected by the physicochemical properties of polyene-enriched ordered membrane domains. PMID:25558397

  7. Ripples and the formation of anisotropic lipid domains: imaging two-component supported double bilayers by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Leidy, Chad; Kaasgaard, Thomas; Crowe, John H; Mouritsen, Ole G; Jørgensen, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Direct visualization of the fluid-phase/ordered-phase domain structure in mica-supported bilayers composed of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine mixtures is performed with atomic force microscopy. The system studied is a double bilayer supported on a mica surface in which the top bilayer (which is not in direct contact with the mica) is visualized as a function of temperature. Because the top bilayer is not as restricted by the interactions with the surface as single supported bilayers, its behavior is more similar to a free-standing bilayer. Intriguing straight-edged anisotropic fluid-phase domains were observed in the fluid-phase/ordered-phase coexistence temperature range, which resemble the fluid-phase/ordered-phase domain patterns observed in giant unilamellar vesicles composed of such phospholipid mixtures. With the high resolution provided by atomic force microscopy, we investigated the origin of these anisotropic lipid domain patterns, and found that ripple phase formation is directly responsible for the anisotropic nature of these domains. The nucleation and growth of fluid-phase domains are found to be directed by the presence of ripples. In particular, the fluid-phase domains elongate parallel to the ripples. The results show that ripple phase formation may have implications for domain formation in biological systems. PMID:12414696

  8. Acyl chain composition and coexisting fluid phases in lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yongwen; Bradley, Miranda; Mitchell, Drake

    2011-10-01

    At room temperature phospholipid bilayers enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol may form a solid phase as well as two coexisting fluid phases. These are the standard fluid phase, or the liquid-disordered phase, ld, and the liquid-ordered phase, lo, which is commonly associated with lipid rafts. Ternary mixtures of palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphocholine (POPC; 16:0,18:1 PC), sphingomyelin (SPM), and cholesterol (Chol) form coexisting lo, ld and solid phases over a wide range of molar ratios. We are examining the ability of two fluorescent probes to detect these 2 phases: NBD linked to di-16:0 PE which partitions strongly into the lo phase and NBD linked to di-18:1 PE which partitions strongly into the ld phase. We are also examining the effect of the highly polyunsaturated phospholipid stearoyl-docosahexanoyl-phosphocholine (SDPC; 18:0, 22:6 PC) on the ternary phase diagram of POPC/SPM/Chol with particular focus on the functionally important lo/ld coexistence region. We report on the fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay dynamics of these two fluorescent probes.

  9. PagP Crystallized from SDS/Cosolvent Reveals the Route for Phospholipid Access to the Hydrocarbon Ruler

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta-Seijo, Jose Antonio; Neale, Chris; Khan, M. Adil; Moktar, Joel; Tran, Christopher D.; Bishop, Russell E.; Pomès, Régis; Privé, Gilbert G.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Enzymatic reactions involving bilayer lipids occur in an environment with strict physical and topological constraints. The integral membrane enzyme PagP transfers a palmitoyl group from a phospholipid to lipid A in order to assist Escherichia coli in evading host immune defenses during infection. PagP measures the palmitoyl group with an internal hydrocarbon ruler that is formed in the interior of the eight-stranded antiparallel β barrel. The access and egress of the palmitoyl group is thought to take a lateral route from the bilayer phase to the barrel interior. Molecular dynamics, mutagenesis, and a 1.4 Å crystal structure of PagP in an SDS/2-methyl-2, 4-pentanediol (MPD) cosolvent system reveal that phospholipid access occurs at the crenel present between strands F and G of PagP. In this way, the phospholipid head group can remain exposed to the cell exterior while the lipid acyl chain remains in a predominantly hydrophobic environment as it translocates to the protein interior. PMID:20826347

  10. Effect of variations in the structure of a polyleucine-based alpha-helical transmembrane peptide on its interaction with phosphatidylglycerol bilayers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Lewis, Ruthven N A H; Hodges, Robert S; McElhaney, Ronald N

    2004-03-30

    High-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to study the interaction of a cationic alpha-helical transmembrane peptide, acetyl-Lys(2)-Leu(24)-Lys(2)-amide (L(24)), and members of the homologous series of anionic n-saturated diacyl phosphatidylglycerols (PGs). Analogues of L(24), in which the lysine residues were replaced by 2,3-diaminopropionic acid (L(24)DAP), or in which a leucine residue at each end of the polyleucine sequence was replaced by a tryptophan (WL(22)W), were also studied to investigate the roles of lysine side-chain snorkeling and aromatic side-chain interactions with the interfacial region of phospholipid bilayers. The gel/liquid-crystalline phase transition temperature of the host PG bilayers is altered by these peptides in a hydrophobic mismatch-dependent manner, as previously found with zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers. However, all three peptides reduce the phase transition temperature and enthalpy to a greater extent in anionic PG bilayers than in zwitterionic PC bilayers, with WL(22)W having the largest effect. All three peptides form very stable alpha-helices in PG bilayers, but small conformational changes are induced in response to a mismatch between peptide hydrophobic length and gel-state lipid bilayer hydrophobic thickness. Moreover, electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions occur between the terminal lysine residues of L(24) and L(24)DAP and the polar headgroups of PG bilayers. However, such interactions were not observed in PG/WL(22)W bilayers, suggesting that the cation-pi interactions between the tryptophan and lysine residues predominate. These results indicate that the lipid-peptide interactions are affected not only by the hydrophobic mismatch between these peptides and the host lipid bilayer, but also by the tryptophan-modulated electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions between the positively charged lysine residues at the termini of these

  11. Peptide-induced bilayer thinning structure of unilamellar vesicles and the related binding behavior as revealed by X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Su, Chun-Jen; Wu, Shiuan-Shiaou; Jeng, U-Ser; Lee, Ming-Tao; Su, An-Chung; Liao, Kuei-Fen; Lin, Wei-Yu; Huang, Yu-Shan; Chen, Chun-Yu

    2013-02-01

    We have studied the bilayer thinning structure of unilamellar vesicles (ULV) of a phospholipid 1,2-dierucoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (di22:1PC) upon binding of melittin, a water-soluble amphipathic peptide. Successive thinning of the ULV bilayers with increasing peptide concentration was monitored via small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Results suggest that the two leaflets of the ULV of closed bilayers are perturbed and thinned asymmetrically upon free peptide binding, in contrast to the centro-symmetric bilayer thinning of the substrate-oriented multilamellar membranes (MLM) with premixed melittin. Moreover, thinning of the melittin-ULV bilayer associates closely with peptide concentration in solution and saturates at ~4%, compared to the ~8% maximum thinning observed for the correspondingly premixed peptide-MLM bilayers. Linearly scaling the thinning of peptide-ULV bilayers to that of the corresponding peptide-MLM of a calibrated peptide-to-lipid ratio, we have deduced the number of bound peptides on the ULV bilayers as a function of free peptide concentration in solution. The hence derived X-ray-based binding isotherm allows extraction of a low binding constant of melittin to the ULV bilayers, on the basis of surface partition equilibrium and the Gouy-Chapman theory. Moreover, we show that the ULV and MLM bilayers of di22:1PC share a same thinning constant upon binding of a hydrophobic peptide alamethicin; this result supports the linear scaling approach used in the melittin-ULV bilayer thinning for thermodynamic binding parameters of water-soluble peptides.

  12. Electromechanical oscillations in bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Benameur, Muhammed M; Gargiulo, Fernando; Manzeli, Sajedeh; Autès, Gabriel; Tosun, Mahmut; Yazyev, Oleg V; Kis, Andras

    2015-10-20

    Nanoelectromechanical systems constitute a class of devices lying at the interface between fundamental research and technological applications. Realizing nanoelectromechanical devices based on novel materials such as graphene allows studying their mechanical and electromechanical characteristics at the nanoscale and addressing fundamental questions such as electron-phonon interaction and bandgap engineering. In this work, we realize electromechanical devices using single and bilayer graphene and probe the interplay between their mechanical and electrical properties. We show that the deflection of monolayer graphene nanoribbons results in a linear increase in their electrical resistance. Surprisingly, we observe oscillations in the electromechanical response of bilayer graphene. The proposed theoretical model suggests that these oscillations arise from quantum mechanical interference in the transition region induced by sliding of individual graphene layers with respect to each other. Our work shows that bilayer graphene conceals unexpectedly rich and novel physics with promising potential in applications based on nanoelectromechanical systems.

  13. Electromechanical oscillations in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benameur, Muhammed M.; Gargiulo, Fernando; Manzeli, Sajedeh; Autès, Gabriel; Tosun, Mahmut; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Kis, Andras

    2015-10-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems constitute a class of devices lying at the interface between fundamental research and technological applications. Realizing nanoelectromechanical devices based on novel materials such as graphene allows studying their mechanical and electromechanical characteristics at the nanoscale and addressing fundamental questions such as electron-phonon interaction and bandgap engineering. In this work, we realize electromechanical devices using single and bilayer graphene and probe the interplay between their mechanical and electrical properties. We show that the deflection of monolayer graphene nanoribbons results in a linear increase in their electrical resistance. Surprisingly, we observe oscillations in the electromechanical response of bilayer graphene. The proposed theoretical model suggests that these oscillations arise from quantum mechanical interference in the transition region induced by sliding of individual graphene layers with respect to each other. Our work shows that bilayer graphene conceals unexpectedly rich and novel physics with promising potential in applications based on nanoelectromechanical systems.

  14. Phases of dipolar bosons in a bilayer geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinti, Fabio; Wang, Daw-Wei; Boninsegni, Massimo

    2017-02-01

    We study, by first-principles computer simulations, the low-temperature phase diagram of bosonic dipolar gases in a bilayer geometry as a function of the two control parameters, i.e., the in-plane density and the interlayer distance. We observe four distinct phases, namely, paired and decoupled superfluids, as well as a crystal of dimers and one consisting of two aligned crystalline layers. A direct quantum phase transition from a dimer crystal to two independent superfluids is observed in a relatively wide range of parameters. No supersolid phase is predicted for this system.

  15. Phospholipids as Biomarkers for Excessive Alcohol Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0497 TITLE: Phospholipids as Biomarkers for Excessive Alcohol Use...SUBTITLE Phospholipids as Biomarkers for Excessive Alcohol Use 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0497 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...ability to measure alcohol quantity consumed and associated damage better than can be done with ethyl alcohol level measures and other existing

  16. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-12-31

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  17. Membrane Remodeling by a Bacterial Phospholipid-Methylating Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Danne, Linna; Aktas, Meriyem; Unger, Andreas; Linke, Wolfgang A.; Erdmann, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Membrane deformation by proteins is a universal phenomenon that has been studied extensively in eukaryotes but much less in prokaryotes. In this study, we discovered a membrane-deforming activity of the phospholipid N-methyltransferase PmtA from the plant-pathogenic bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens. PmtA catalyzes the successive three-step N-methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine to phosphatidylcholine. Here, we defined the lipid and protein requirements for the membrane-remodeling activity of PmtA by a combination of transmission electron microscopy and liposome interaction studies. Dependent on the lipid composition, PmtA changes the shape of spherical liposomes either into filaments or small vesicles. Upon overproduction of PmtA in A. tumefaciens, vesicle-like structures occur in the cytoplasm, dependent on the presence of the anionic lipid cardiolipin. The N-terminal lipid-binding α-helix (αA) is involved in membrane deformation by PmtA. Two functionally distinct and spatially separated regions in αA can be distinguished. Anionic interactions by positively charged amino acids on one face of the helix are responsible for membrane recruitment of the enzyme. The opposite hydrophobic face of the helix is required for membrane remodeling, presumably by shallow insertion into the lipid bilayer. PMID:28196959

  18. Dielectrophoresis of Functional Phospholipid Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froude, Victoria; Zhu, Yingxi Elaine

    2008-03-01

    Recently, there has been an emerging interest in using AC-dielectrophoresis (DEP) to transport and assemble phospholipid vesicles (liposomes) and nanoparticles to form functional bio-assemblies where the underlying charge polarization mechanism of colloids in AC fields strongly depends on nano-scaled surface charge. In this work, we study liposomes segregation and aggregation in the presence of nanocolloids and salts in which the biological functionality of liposomes is augmented by the physical functionality of inorganic coating and particles. Liposomes, synthesized by sonication with 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphate (DOPA), are manipulated at varied AC-field frequencies across fabricated micro-electrodes in a quadrapole configuration on glass. We observe the co-assembly of liposome and opposite-charged nanocolloids by confocal microscopy and SEM, where the smaller nanocolloids are captured in between liposome junctions to form stabilized composite vesicles at several distinct frequencies. We observe a strong dependence of the liposome DEP mobility on the number of nanoparticles present in suspension and propose a new mechanism based on charge segregation and charged nanocolloid entrainment in the double layer.

  19. Mapping phase diagrams of supported lipid bilayers by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Borrell, Jordi H; Montero, M Teresa; Domènech, Òscar

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present the method followed to construct a pseudophase diagram of two phospholipids: 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol). Two different techniques, DSC and AFM, have been used based in the determination of the onset (Tonset ) and completion (Toffset ) temperatures of the gel-to-liquid crystalline phases (Lβ →Lα ), the first from the endotherms from liposomes and the second from the topographic images of supported lipid bilayers. The features of both phase diagrams are discussed emphasizing the influence of Ca(2+) presence and the substrate (mica) on the transition undergone by the phospholipid mixture. Microsc. Res. Tech. 80:4-10, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Does fluoride disrupt hydrogen bond network in cationic lipid bilayer? Time-dependent fluorescence shift of Laurdan and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorna, Sarka; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Hof, Martin; Vazdar, Mario; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-12-14

    Time-dependent fluorescence shift (TDFS) of Laurdan embedded in phospholipid bilayers reports on hydration and mobility of the phospholipid acylgroups. Exchange of H{sub 2}O with D{sub 2}O prolongs the lifetime of lipid-water and lipid-water-lipid interactions, which is reflected in a significantly slower TDFS kinetics. Combining TDFS measurements in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O hydrated bilayers with atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provides a unique tool for characterization of the hydrogen bonding at the acylgroup level of lipid bilayers. In this work, we use this approach to study the influence of fluoride anions on the properties of cationic bilayers composed of trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP). The results obtained for DOTAP are confronted with those for neutral phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers. Both in DOTAP and DOPC H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O exchange prolongs hydrogen-bonding lifetime and does not disturb bilayer structure. These results are confirmed by MD simulations. TDFS experiments show, however, that for DOTAP this effect is cancelled in the presence of fluoride ions. We interpret these results as evidence that strongly hydrated fluoride is able to steal water molecules that bridge lipid carbonyls. Consequently, when attracted to DOTAP bilayer, fluoride disrupts the local hydrogen-bonding network, and the differences in TDFS kinetics between H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O hydrated bilayers are no longer observed. A distinct behavior of fluoride is also evidenced by MD simulations, which show different lipid-ion binding for Cl{sup −} and F{sup −}.

  1. Cholesterol Translocation in a Phospholipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Amit; Kalia, Rajiv; Malmstadt, Noah; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashistha, Priya

    2013-03-01

    Cholesterol (CHOL) molecules play a key role in modulating the rigidity of cell membranes, and controlling intracellular transport and signal transduction. Using all-atom molecular dynamics and the parallel replica approach, we study the process of CHOL interleaflet transport (flip-flop) in a dipalmitoylphosphatidycholine (DPPC)-CHOL bilayer, the effect of this process on mechanical stress across the bilayer, and the role of CHOL in inducing molecular order in the respective bilayer leaflets. The simulations are carried out at physiologically relevant CHOL concentration (30%), temperature 323 K and pressure 1 bar. CHOL flip-flop events are observed with a rate constant of 3 ×104 s-1. Once a flip-flop event is triggered, a CHOL molecule takes an average of 73 nanoseconds to migrate from one bilayer leaflet to the other.

  2. Structural restraints and heterogeneous orientation of the gramicidin A channel closed state in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Mo, Y; Cross, T A; Nerdal, W

    2004-05-01

    Although there have been several decades of literature illustrating the opening and closing of the monovalent cation selective gramicidin A channel through single channel conductance, the closed conformation has remained poorly characterized. In sharp contrast, the open-state dimer is one of the highest resolution structures yet characterized in a lipid environment. To shift the open/closed equilibrium dramatically toward the closed state, a lower peptide/lipid molar ratio and, most importantly, long-chain lipids have been used. For the first time, structural evidence for a monomeric state has been observed for the native gramicidin A peptide. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of single-site (15)N-labeled gramicidin in uniformly aligned bilayers in the L(alpha) phase have been observed. The results suggest a kinked structure with considerable orientational heterogeneity. The C-terminal domain is well structured, has a well-defined orientation in the bilayer, and appears to be in the bilayer interfacial region. On the other hand, the N-terminal domain, although appearing to be well structured and in the hydrophobic core of the bilayer, has a broad range of orientations relative to the bilayer normal. The structure is not just half of the open-state dimer, and neither is the structure restricted to the surface of the bilayer. Consequently, the monomeric or closed state appears to be a hybrid of these two models from the literature.

  3. Effect of n-alkanes on lipid bilayers depending on headgroups.

    PubMed

    Hishida, Mafumi; Endo, Asami; Nakazawa, Koyomi; Yamamura, Yasuhisa; Saito, Kazuya

    2015-05-01

    Phase behavior and structural properties were examined for phospholipid bilayers having different headgroups (DMPC, DMPS and DMPE) with added n-alkanes to study effect of flexible additives. Change in the temperatures of main transition of the lipid/alkane mixtures against the length of added alkanes depends largely on the headgroup. Theoretical analysis of the change of the temperature of transition indicates that the headgroup dependence is dominantly originated in the strong dependence of total enthalpy on the headgroups. The results of X-ray diffraction show that the enthalpic stabilization due to enhanced packing of acyl chains of the lipid by alkanes in the gel phase causes the headgroup-dependent change in the phase transition behavior. The enhanced packing in the gel phase also leads to easy emergence of the subgel phase with very short relaxation time at room temperature in the DMPE-based bilayers.

  4. On the position of the hydro-phobic/philic boundary in lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, James R.

    1989-01-01

    The sensitivity of calculated structural dimensions of hydrated lipids to the position of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic boundary is reviewed. The position of this boundary is critical in determining the extent of hydration and location of water in the bilayer. A calculation of the dimensions of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts of the phosphatidylcholine and ethanolamine bilayer from literature values of the x-ray long spacing shows that the choice of boundary in phospholipids is not arbitrary and is best placed at the average position of the first CH2 group in the hydrocarbon chains. Calculated dimensions of the hydrocarbon core and the water accessible regions agree with neutron and x-ray diffraction measurements. Hydration differences between phosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylethanolamines are readily explained from derived estimates of the layers of water which cover these headgroups. PMID:19431741

  5. Aromatic isophthalamides aggregate in lipid bilayers: evidence for a cooperative transport mechanism.

    PubMed

    Berry, Stuart N; Busschaert, Nathalie; Frankling, Charlotte L; Salter, Dale; Gale, Philip A

    2015-03-14

    The synthesis and anion transport properties of a series of transmembrane anion transporters based on an isophthalamide scaffold with phenyl, naphthyl or anthracenyl central rings are reported. Anion transport studies using POPC vesicles, showed that the compounds have Hill coefficients >1. This is indicative of higher order complex formation, evidence that leads us to suggest that the compounds are not functioning solely as mobile carriers but rather that a cooperative transport mechanism is being observed. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to show that the compounds aggregate in the phospholipid bilayer, which provides evidence that these compounds function as a self-assembled anion-conducting aggregate.

  6. Conjugated Double Bonds in Lipid Bilayers: A Molecular Dynamic Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guijun; Subbaiah, P. V.; Chiu, See-Wing; Jakobsson, Eric; Scott, H. L.

    2011-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are found naturally in dairy products. Two isomers of CLA, that differ only in the location of cis and trans double bonds, are found to have distinct and different biological effects. The cis 9 trans 11 (C9T11) isomer is attributed to have the anti-carcinogenic effects, while the trans 10 cis 12 (T10C12) isomer is believed to be responsible for the anti-obesity effects. Since dietary CLA are incorporated into membrane phospholipids, we have used Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the comparative effects of the two isomers on lipid bilayer structure. Specifically, simulations of phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers in which the sn-2 chains contained one of the two isomers of CLA were performed. Force field parameters for the torsional potential of double bonds were obtained from ab initio calculations. From the MD trajectories we calculated and compared structural properties of the two lipid bilayers, including areas per molecule, density profiles, thickness of bilayers, tilt angle of tail chains, order parameters profiles, radial distribution function (RDF) and lateral pressure profiles. The main differences found between bilayers of the two CLA isomers, are (1) the order parameter profile for C9T11 has a dip in the middle of sn-2 chain while the profile for T10C12 has a deeper dip close to terminal of sn-2 chain, and (2) the lateral pressure profiles show differences between the two isomers. Our simulation results reveal localized physical structural differences between bilayers of the two CLA isomers that may contribute to different biological effects through differential interactions with membrane proteins or cholesterol. PMID:21320475

  7. Investigation of the Effect of Bilayer Composition on PKCα-C2 Domain Docking Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Alwarawrah, Mohammad; Wereszczynski, Jeff

    2017-01-12

    The protein kinase Cα (PKCα) enzyme is a member of a broad family of serine/threonine kinases, which are involved in varied cellular signaling pathways. The initial step of PKCα activation involves the C2 subunit docking with the cell membrane, which is followed by interactions of the C1 domains with diacylglycerol (DAG) in the membrane. Notably, the molecular mechanisms of these interactions remain poorly understood, especially what effects, if any, DAG may have on the initial C2 docking. To further understand this process, we have performed a series of conventional molecular dynamics simulations to systematically investigate the interaction between PKCα-C2 domains and lipid bilayers with different compositions to examine the effects of POPS, PIP2, and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerol (POG) on domain docking. Our results show that the PKCα-C2 domain does not interact with the bilayer surface in the absence of POPS and PIP2. In contrast, the inclusion of POPS and PIP2 to the bilayer resulted in strong domain docking in both perpendicular and parallel orientations, whereas the further inclusion of POG resulted in only parallel domain docking. In addition, lysine residues in the C2 domain formed hydrogen bonds with PIP2 molecule bilayers containing POG. These effects were further explored with umbrella sampling calculations to estimate the free energy of domain docking to the lipid bilayer in the presence of one or two PIP2 molecules. The results show that the binding of one or two PIP2 molecules is thermodynamically favorable, although stronger in bilayers lacking POG. However, in POG-containing bilayers, the binding mode of the C2 domain appears to be more flexible, which may have implications for activation of full-length PKCα. Together, our results shed new insights into the process of C2 bilayer binding and suggest new mechanisms for the roles of different phospholipids in the activation process of PKCα.

  8. Surfactant transport on viscous bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, Omar; Craster, Richard; Warner, Mark

    2001-11-01

    We model the external delivery of surfactant to pulmonary airways, an integral part of Surfactant Replacement Therapy (SRT), a method of treatment of Respiratory Distress Syndrome in neonates. We examine the spreading dynamics of insoluble surfactant by Marangoni stresses along the mucus-perciliary liquid bilayers that line the inside of airways. The bilayer is modelled as a thin highly viscous mucus surface film (mucus) overlying a much less viscous perciliary liquid layer (PCL); this is appropriate for small airways. By exploiting this large viscosity constrast, a variant of standard lubrication theory is adopted wherein terms, which would have otherwise been neglected in the lubrication approximation, are promoted in order to model correctly the presence of the mucus. Inclusion of van der Waals forces in the model permit the study of the effect of this mucus 'skin' on the possibility of bilayer rupture, a potential cause of failure of SRT. We find that increasing the viscosity contrast and initial mucus layer thickness delays the onset of rupture, while increasing the relative significance of Marangoni stresses leads to more marked thinning and rapid bilayer rupture [1]. [1] O. K. Matar, R. V. Craster and M. R. Warner, submitted to J. Fluid Mech. (2001).

  9. Minimal Bending Energies of Bilayer Polyhedra

    PubMed Central

    Haselwandter, Christoph A.; Phillips, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on bilayer polyhedra composed of amphiphilic molecules, we study the elastic bending energies of bilayer vesicles forming polyhedral shapes. Allowing for segregation of excess amphiphiles along the ridges of polyhedra, we find that bilayer polyhedra can indeed have lower bending energies than spherical bilayer vesicles. However, our analysis also implies that, contrary to what has been suggested on the basis of experiments, the snub dodecahedron, rather than the icosahedron, generally represents the energetically favorable shape of bilayer polyhedra. PMID:21231425

  10. Health effects of dietary phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Küllenberg, Daniela; Taylor, Lenka A; Schneider, Michael; Massing, Ulrich

    2012-01-05

    Beneficial effects of dietary phospholipids (PLs) have been mentioned since the early 1900's in relation to different illnesses and symptoms, e.g. coronary heart disease, inflammation or cancer. This article gives a summary of the most common therapeutic uses of dietary PLs to provide an overview of their approved and proposed benefits; and to identify further investigational needs.From the majority of the studies it became evident that dietary PLs have a positive impact in several diseases, apparently without severe side effects. Furthermore, they were shown to reduce side effects of some drugs. Both effects can partially be explained by the fact that PL are highly effective in delivering their fatty acid (FA) residues for incorporation into the membranes of cells involved in different diseases, e.g. immune or cancer cells. The altered membrane composition is assumed to have effects on the activity of membrane proteins (e.g. receptors) by affecting the microstructure of membranes and, therefore, the characteristics of the cellular membrane, e.g. of lipid rafts, or by influencing the biosynthesis of FA derived lipid second messengers. However, since the FAs originally bound to the applied PLs are increased in the cellular membrane after their consumption or supplementation, the FA composition of the PL and thus the type of PL is crucial for its effect. Here, we have reviewed the effects of PL from soy, egg yolk, milk and marine sources. Most studies have been performed in vitro or in animals and only limited evidence is available for the benefit of PL supplementation in humans. More research is needed to understand the impact of PL supplementation and confirm its health benefits.

  11. Overcoming hysteresis to attain reversible equilibrium folding for outer membrane phospholipase A in phospholipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Moon, C. Preston; Kwon, Sarah; Fleming, Karen G.

    2011-01-01

    The free energy of unfolding of a membrane protein from lipids into water (ΔGw,lo) describes its equilibrium thermodynamic stability. Knowing this parameter gives insight into a membrane protein’s sequence-structure-energy relationships. However, there are few measures of membrane protein stability because of the technical difficulties associated with unfolded and partially folded states. Here, we describe experimental process that allowed us to measure the ΔGw,lo of the outer membrane phospholipase A (OmpLA) into large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) of 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC). To arrive at this reversible folding condition, we screened a large number of experimental variables: temperature, incubation time, salt concentration, pH, lipid composition as well as liposome morphology. The principal challenge we encountered under most conditions was hysteresis between folding and unfolding titrations. A second factor that compromised reversible folding was the observation that a fraction of the protein population tended to aggregate. We found that hysteresis could be completely eliminated on a feasible timescale by conducting experiments at acidic pH, by the slow dilution of the protein in the initial titration setup and by utilizing a low concentration of a detergent as a temporary “holdase” to solubilize the protein upon its initial dilution into folding conditions. We confirmed that the detergent did not disrupt the LUVs using fluorescence emission of lipid-sensitive dyes and light scattering. The results of our parameter search should be generally useful for efforts to measure of ΔGw,lo for other membrane proteins. PMID:21888919

  12. Undulating tubular liposomes through incorporation of a synthetic skin ceramide into phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Tan, Grace; Zhou, Jia; He, Jibao; Lawson, Louise B; McPherson, Gary L; John, Vijay T

    2009-09-15

    Nonspherical liposomes were prepared by doping L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine (PC) with ceramide VI (a skin lipid). Cryo-transmission electron microscopy shows the liposome shape changing from spherical to an undulating tubular morphology, when the amount of ceramide VI is increased. The formation of tubular liposomes is energetically favorable and is attributed to the association of ceramide VI with PC creating regions of lower curvature. Since ceramides are the major component of skin lipids in the stratum corneum, tubular liposomes containing ceramide may potentially serve as self-enhanced nanocarriers for transdermal delivery.

  13. Undulating tubular liposomes through incorporation of a synthetic skin ceramide into phospholipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peng; Tan, Grace; Zhou, Jia; He, Jibao; Lawson, Louise B.; McPherson, Gary L.; John, Vijay T.

    2009-01-01

    Non-spherical liposomes were prepared by doping L-α-phosphatidylcholine (PC) with ceramide VI (a skin lipid). Cryo-transmission electron microscopy shows the liposome shape changing from spherical to an undulating tubular morphology, when the amount ofceramide VI is increased. The formation of tubular liposomes is energetically favorableand is attributed to the association of ceramide VI with PC creating regions of lower curvature. Since ceramides are the major component of skin lipids inthe stratum corneum, tubular liposomes containing ceramide may potentially serve as self-enhanced nanocarriers for transdermal delivery. PMID:19694462

  14. Antioxidation behavior of milkweed oil 4-hydroxy-3-methyoxycinnamate esters in phospholipid bilayers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Milkweed (Asclepia syriaca) has seed oil that is rich in polyunsaturated triacylglycerides that contain olefinic groups. The olefinic groups can be chemically oxidized to form either epoxy or polyhydroxy triacylglycerides that can be esterified with trans-4-hydroxy-3-methoxoycinnamic acid, commonly...

  15. Fluorescence lifetimes of anthracycline drugs in phospholipid bilayers determined by frequency-domain fluorometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Thomas G.; Malak, Henryk M.; Doroshow, James H.

    1990-05-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence intensity decay data from anthracycline anticancer drugs present in model membranes were obtained using a gigahertz frequency-domain fluorometer [Lakowicz et al. (1986) Rev. Sci. Instrum. 57, 2499-2506]. Exciting light of 290 nm, modulated at multiple frequencies from 8 MHz to 400 MHz, was used to study the interactions of Adriamycin, daunomycin and related antibiotics with small unilamellar vesicles composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) at 28°C. Fluorescence decay data for drug molecules free in solution as well as bound to membranes were best fit by exponentials requiring two terms rather than by single exponential decays. For example, one-component analysis of the decay data for Adriamycin free in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution resulted in a reduced x2 value of 140 ((tau) = 0.88 ns), while a two-component fit resulted in a substantially smaller reduced x2 value of 2.6 ((tau)1 = 1.13 ns, (alpha)1 = 0.60, (tau)2 = 0.30 ns). Upon association with membranes, each of the anthracyclines studied displayed a larger r1 value while the r2 value remained the same or increased (for example, DMPC-bound Adriamycin showed r1 = 1.68 ns , a1 = 0 . 64 , r2 = 0 . 33 ns) . Analyses of the fluorescence emission decays of anthracyclines were also made assuming each decay is composed of a single Lorentzian distribution of lifetimes. Data taken on Adriamycin in PBS, when fit using one continuous component, displayed (tau), (alpha), w, and reduced x2 values of 0.68 ns, 1, 0.60 ns, and 9.1, respectively. The distribution became quite broad upon drug association with membrane (DMPCbound Adriamycin: (tau) = 0.75 ns, (alpha) = 1, w = 2.24 ns, x2 = 13). For each anthracycline studied, continuous component fits showed significant broadening in the distributions upon drug association with membrane. Relatively large shifts in lifetime values were observed for the carminomycin and 4-demethoxydaunomycin analogues upon binding model lipid membranes, making these agents good candidates to employ in future studies on anthracycline interactions with more environmentally-complex biological membranes.

  16. Emerging Roles for Anionic Non-Bilayer Phospholipids in Fortifying the Outer Membrane Permeability Barrier

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lately, researchers have been actively investigating Escherichia coli lptD mutants, which exhibit reduced transport of lipopolysaccharide to the cell surface. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Sutterlin et al. (H. A. Sutterlin, S. Zhang, and T. J. Silhavy, J. Bacteriol. 196:3214–3220, 2014) now reveal an important functional role for phosphatidic acid in fortifying the outer membrane permeability barrier in certain lptD mutant backgrounds. These findings come on the heels of the first reports of two LptD crystal structures, which now provide a structural framework for interpreting lptD genetics. PMID:25022852

  17. Quantification of phospholipids classes in human milk.

    PubMed

    Giuffrida, Francesca; Cruz-Hernandez, Cristina; Flück, Brigitte; Tavazzi, Isabelle; Thakkar, Sagar K; Destaillats, Frédéric; Braun, Marcel

    2013-10-01

    Phospholipids are integral constituents of the milk fat globule membranes and they play a central role in infants' immune and inflammatory responses. A methodology employing liquid chromatography coupled with evaporative light scattering detector has been optimized and validated to quantify the major phospholipids classes in human milk. Phospholipids were extracted using chloroform and methanol and separated on C18 column. Repeatability, intermediate reproducibility, and recovery values were calculated and a large sample set of human milk analyzed. In human milk, phospholipid classes were quantified at concentrations of 0.6 mg/100 g for phosphatidylinositol; 4.2 mg/100 g for phosphatidylethanolamine, 0.4 mg/100 g for phosphatidylserine, 2.8 mg/100 g for phosphatidylcholine, and 4.6 mg/100 g for sphingomyelin. Their relative standard deviation of repeatability and intermediate reproducibility values ranging between 0.8 and 13.4 % and between 2.4 and 25.7 %, respectively. The recovery values ranged between 67 and 112 %. Finally, the validated method was used to quantify phospholipid classes in human milk collected from 50 volunteers 4 weeks postpartum providing absolute content of these lipids in a relatively large cohort. The average content of total phospholipids was 23.8 mg/100 g that corresponds to an estimated mean intake of 140 mg phospholipids/day in a 4-week old infant when exclusively breast-fed.

  18. Correlation between fluidising effects on phospholipid membranes and mitochondrial respiration of propofol and p-nitrosophenol homologues.

    PubMed

    Momo, Federico; Fabris, Sabrina; Wisniewska, Anna; Fiore, Cristina; Bindoli, Alberto; Scutari, Guido; Stevanato, Roberto

    2003-03-25

    Nitrosopropofol (2-6-diisopropyl-4-nitrosophenol) has dramatic consequences for respiration, ATP synthesis and the transmembrane potential of isolated rat liver mitochondria at concentrations at which propofol (2-6-diisopropylphenol) does not cause any apparent effects. These results correlate well with the observation that nitrosopropofol is also a stronger perturbing agent of phospholipid membranes. In this paper we verify the possible biological activity of different phenols and nitrosophenols on mitochondrial respiration. We then discuss their interactions with phospholipid liposomes, studied with differential scanning calorimetry, spin labelling techniques and UV-Vis spectrophotometry, in order to obtain information on drug distribution and the modifications they impose on lipid bilayer. The results of the experiments performed on mitochondria and model membranes prove an interesting correlation between the effects of the molecules on both systems.

  19. Dissipative Particle Dynamics Simulations for Phospholipid Membranes Based on a Four-To-One Coarse-Grained Mapping Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoxu; Gao, Lianghui; Fang, Weihai

    2016-01-01

    In this article, a new set of parameters compatible with the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) force field is developed for phospholipids. The coarse-grained (CG) models of these molecules are constructed by mapping four heavy atoms and their attached hydrogen atoms to one bead. The beads are divided into types distinguished by charge type, polarizability, and hydrogen-bonding capacity. First, we derive the relationship between the DPD repulsive force and Flory-Huggins χ-parameters based on this four-to-one CG mapping scheme. Then, we optimize the DPD force parameters for phospholipids. The feasibility of this model is demonstrated by simulating the structural and thermodynamic properties of lipid bilayer membranes, including the membrane thickness, the area per lipid, the lipid tail orientation, the bending rigidity, the rupture behavior, and the potential of mean force for lipid flip-flop. PMID:27137463

  20. Filamentous Fungi with High Cytosolic Phospholipid Transfer Activity in the Presence of Exogenous Phospholipid

    PubMed Central

    Record, Eric; Lesage, Laurence; Cahagnier, Bernard; Marion, Didier; Asther, Marcel

    1994-01-01

    The phospholipid transfer activity of cell extracts from 15 filamentous fungus strains grown on a medium containing phospholipids as the carbon source was measured by a fluorescence assay. This assay was based on the transfer of pyrene-labeled phosphatidylcholines forming the donor vesicles to acceptor vesicles composed of egg phosphatidylcholines. The highest phosphatidylcholine transfer activity was obtained with cell extracts from Aspergillus oryzae. The presence of exogenous phospholipids in the culture medium of A. oryzae was shown to increase markedly the activity of phospholipid transfer as well as the pool of exocellular proteins during the primary phase of growth. Modifications in the biochemical marker activities of cellular organelles were observed: succinate dehydrogenase, a mitochondrial marker; inosine diphosphatase, a Golgi system marker; and cytochrome c oxidoreductase, an endoplasmic reticulum marker, were increased 7.3-, 2-, and 22-fold, respectively, when A. oryzae was grown in the presence of phospholipids. PMID:16349388

  1. Isotropic solutions of phospholipid bicelles: a new membrane mimetic for high-resolution NMR studies of polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Vold, R R; Prosser, R S; Deese, A J

    1997-04-01

    In order to illustrate the utility of phospholipid bicelles [Sanders, C.R. and Schwonek, J.P. (1992) Biochemistry, 31, 8898-8905] as a membrane mimetic for high-resolution NMR studies, we have recorded two-dimensional 1H NMR spectra of the tetradecameric peptide mastoparan Vespula lewisii in an isotropic aqueous solution of dimyristoyl and dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine. Mastoparan is largely unstructured in water, but assumes a well-defined helical conformation in association with the bilayers. A pronounced periodicity of the sequential NH chemical shifts provides strong evidence that the helix axis of this short peptide is parallel, rather than perpendicular, to the bilayer plane. The bicellar solutions still require in-depth morphological characterization, but they appear to be ideal media for NMR determination of the mode of binding and the structure of membrane-associated peptides and proteins.

  2. Membrane properties induced by anionic phospholipids and phosphatidylethanolamine are critical for the membrane binding and catalytic activity of human cytochrome P450 3A4.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keon-Hee; Ahn, Taeho; Yun, Chul-Ho

    2003-12-30

    Human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, a membrane anchoring protein, is the major CYP enzyme present in both liver and small intestine. The enzyme plays a major role in the metabolism of many drugs and procarcinogens. The roles of individual phospholipids and membrane properties in the catalytic activity, membrane binding, and insertion into the membrane of CYP3A4 are poorly understood. Here we report that the catalytic activity of testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation, membrane binding, and membrane insertion of CYP3A4 increase as a function of anionic phospholipid concentration in the order phosphatidic acid (PA) > phosphatidylserine (PS) in a binary system of phosphatidylcholine (PC)/anionic phospholipid and as a function of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) content in ternary systems of PC/PE/PA or PC/PE/PS having a fixed concentration of anionic phospholipids. These results suggest that PA and PE might help the binding of CYP3A4 to the membrane and the interaction with NPR. Cytochrome b(5) (b(5)) and apolipoprotein b(5) further enhanced the testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation activities of CYP3A4 in all tested phospholipids vesicles with various compositions. Phospholipid-dependent changes of the CYP3A4 conformation were also revealed by altered Trp fluorescence and CD spectra. We also found that PE induced the formation of anionic phospholipid-enriched domains in ternary systems using extrinsic fluorescent probes incorporated into lipid bilayers. Taken together, it can be suggested that the chemical and physical properties of membranes induced by anionic phospholipids and PE are critical for the membrane binding and catalytic activity of CYP3A4.

  3. Nanoscale investigation of the interaction of colistin with model phospholipid membranes by Langmuir technique, and combined infrared and force spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Freudenthal, Oona; Quilès, Fabienne; Francius, Grégory; Wojszko, Kamila; Gorczyca, Marcelina; Korchowiec, Beata; Rogalska, Ewa

    2016-11-01

    Colistin (Polymyxin E), an antimicrobial peptide, is increasingly put forward as salvage for severe multidrug-resistant infections. Unfortunately, colistin is potentially toxic to mammalian cells. A better understanding of the interaction with specific components of the cell membranes may be helpful in controlling the factors that may enhance toxicity. Here, we report a physico-chemical study of model phospholipid (PL) mono- and bilayers exposed to colistin at different concentrations by Langmuir technique, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). The effect of colistin on chosen PL monolayers was examined. Insights into the topographical and elastic changes in the PL bilayers within time after peptide injection are presented via AFM imaging and force spectra. Finally, changes in the PL bilayers' ATR-FTIR spectra as a function of time within three bilayer compositions, and the influence of colistin on their spectral fingerprint are examined together with the time-evolution of the Amide II and νCO band integrated intensity ratios. Our study reveals a great importance in the role of the PL composition as well as the peptide concentration on the action of colistin on PL model membranes.

  4. Influence of (phospho)lipases on properties of mica supported phospholipid layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurak, Malgorzata; Chibowski, Emil

    2010-08-01

    The effect of enzymes: lipase from Candida cylindracea (L Cc), phospholipase A 2 from hog pancreas (PLA 2) and phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus (PLC) to modulate wetting properties of solid supported phospholipid bilayers was studied via advancing and receding contact angle measurements of water, formamide and diiodomethane, and calculation of the surface free energy and its components from van Oss et al. (LWAB) and contact angle hysteresis (CAH) approaches. Simultaneously, topography of the studied layers was determined by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The investigated lipid bilayers were transferred on mica plates from subphase of pure water by means of Langmuir-Blodgett and Langmuir-Schaefer techniques. The investigated phospolipid layers were: saturated DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), unsaturated DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), and their mixture DPPC/DOPC. The obtained results revealed that the lipid membrane degradation by the enzymes caused increase in its surface free energy due to the amphiphilic hydrolysis products, which may accumulate in the lipid bilayer. In result activity of the enzymes may increase and then break down the bilayer structure takes place. It is likely that after dissolution of the hydrolysis reaction products in the bulk phase, patches of bare mica surface are accessible, which contribute to the apparent surface free energy changes. Comparison of AFM images and the free energy changes of the layers gives better insight into changes of their properties. The observed gradual increase in the layer surface free energy allows controlling of the hydrolysis process to obtain the surfaces of defined properties.

  5. Coverage-dependent changes of cytochrome c transverse location in phospholipid membranes revealed by FRET.

    PubMed

    Domanov, Yegor A; Molotkovsky, Julian G; Gorbenko, Galyna P

    2005-10-01

    The method of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) has been employed to monitor cytochrome c interaction with bilayer phospholipid membranes. Liposomes composed of phosphatidylcholine and varying amounts of anionic lipid cardiolipin (CL) were used as model membranes. Trace amount of fluorescent lipid derivative, anthrylvinyl-phosphatidylcholine was incorporated into the membranes to serve energy donor for heme moiety of cytochrome c. Energy transfer efficiency was measured at different lipid and protein concentrations to obtain extensive set of data, which were further analyzed globally in terms of adequate models of protein adsorption and energy transfer on the membrane surface. It has been found that the cytochrome c association with membranes containing 10 mol% CL can be described in terms of equilibrium binding model (yielding dissociation constant Kd = 0.2-0.4 microM and stoichiometry n = 11-13 lipid molecules per protein binding site) combined with FRET model assuming uniform acceptor distribution with the distance of 3.5-3.6 nm between the bilayer midplane and heme moiety of cytochrome c. However, increasing the CL content to 20 or 40 mol% (at low ionic strength) resulted in a different behavior of FRET profiles, inconsistent with the concepts of equilibrium adsorption of cytochrome c at the membrane surface and/or uniform acceptor distribution. To explain this fact, several possibilities are analyzed, including cytochrome c-induced formation of non-bilayer structures and clusters of charged lipids, or changes in the depth of cytochrome c penetration into the bilayer depending on the protein surface density. Additional control experiments have shown that only the latter process can explain the peculiar concentration dependences of FRET at high CL content.

  6. Interaction of three-finger toxins with phospholipid membranes: comparison of S- and P-type cytotoxins

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The CTs (cytotoxins) I and II are positively charged three-finger folded proteins from venom of Naja oxiana (the Central Asian cobra). They belong to S- and P-type respectively based on Ser-28 and Pro-30 residues within a putative phospholipid bilayer binding site. Previously, we investigated the interaction of CTII with multilamellar liposomes of dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol by wide-line 31P-NMR spectroscopy. To compare interactions of these proteins with phospholipids, we investigated the interaction of CTI with the multilamellar liposomes of dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol analogously. The effect of CTI on the chemical shielding anisotropy and deformation of the liposomes in the magnetic field was determined at different temperatures and lipid/protein ratios. It was found that both the proteins do not affect lipid organization in the gel state. In the liquid crystalline state of the bilayer they disturb lipid packing. To get insight into the interactions of the toxins with membranes, Monte Carlo simulations of CTI and CTII in the presence of the bilayer membrane were performed. It was found that both the toxins penetrate into the bilayer with the tips of all the three loops. However, the free-energy gain on membrane insertion of CTI is smaller (by ≈7 kcal/mol; 1 kcal≡4.184 kJ) when compared with CTII, because of the lower hydrophobicity of the membrane-binding site of CTI. These results clearly demonstrate that the P-type cytotoxins interact with membranes stronger than those of the S-type, although the mode of the membrane insertion is similar for both the types. PMID:15584897

  7. Heat-induced alterations in monkey erythrocyte membrane phospholipid organization and skeletal protein structure and interactions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Gudi, S R; Gokhale, S M; Bhakuni, V; Gupta, C M

    1990-12-14

    the 5-min-heated cells, as compared to normal cells, after incubating them for 4 h at 37 degrees C. These results have been discussed to analyse the role of membrane skeleton in maintaining the erythrocyte membrane phospholipid asymmetry. It has been concluded that both the ATP-dependent aminophospholipid pump and membrane bilayer-skeleton interactions are required to maintain the transbilayer phospholipid asymmetry in native erythrocyte membrane.

  8. Stability and permeability of amphiphile bilayers.

    PubMed

    Exerowa, D; Kashchiev, D; Platikanov, D

    1992-05-30

    In this review the rupture and permeability of bilayers are considered on the basis of a mechanism of the formation of microscopic holes as fluctuations in the bilayers. The hole formation is treated as a nucleation process of a new phase in a two-dimensional system with short-range intermolecular forces. Free rupture and deliberate rupture (by alpha-particles) of foam bilayers (Newtonian black films) are discussed. A comparison is made between the rupture of foam and emulsion bilayers. Experimental methods for obtaining foam and emulsion bilayers from thin liquid films are considered. Methods for investigating the stability and permeability of foam bilayers, which are based on a microscopic model allowing the use of amphiphile solutions with very low concentrations, are described. Experimental dependences of the lifetime of bilayers, the probability of observing the foam bilayer in a foam film, the gas permeability of bilayers, etc. on the concentration of amphiphile molecules in the solution are reported. The influence of temperature and external impact (e.g. alpha-particle irradiation) have also been experimentally studied. A good agreement between theory and experiment is established, allowing determination of several characteristics of foam and emulsion bilayers obtained from ionics or non-ionics: the specific edge energy of bilayer holes, equilibrium surfactant concentration below which the bilayer is thermodynamically metastable, work for the formation of a nucleus hole, number of vacancies in the nucleus hole, coefficient of gas diffusion through the bilayer, etc. On the basis of the effect of temperature on the rupture of foam bilayers the binding energy of a surfactant molecule in the bilayer is determined. The adsorption isotherm of surfactant vacancies in the foam bilayer is obtained which shows a first-order phase transition. Some applications to scientific, technological and medical problems are considered. The foam bilayer is used as a model for

  9. Enhanced photovoltaic properties in bilayer BiFeO3/Bi-Mn-O thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabartty, Joyprokash; Nechache, Riad; Harnagea, Catalin; Li, Shun; Rosei, Federico

    2016-05-01

    We report an external solar power conversion efficiency of ˜1.43% in BiFeO3(BFO)/BiMnO3(BMO) bilayer thin films. Both films are epitaxially grown on (111) oriented niobium doped SrTiO3 (NSTO) single crystal substrates by pulsed laser deposition. By illuminating the BFO/BMO films under 1 Sun (AM 1.5 G), we found a remarkably high fill factor of ˜0.72, much higher than values reported for devices based on BFO or BMO alone. In addition, we demonstrate that the photocurrent density and photovoltage are tunable by changing the polarization direction in the BFO/BMO bilayer, as confirmed by the macroscopic polarization-voltage (P-V) hysteresis loop. This effect is described in terms of a more favorable energy band alignment of the electrode/bilayer/NSTO heterostructure junction, which controls photocarrier separation.

  10. Experimental study of the bending elasticity of charged lipid bilayers in aqueous solutions with pH5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitkova, D.; Stoyanova-Ivanova, A.; Ermakov, Yu A.; Vitkova, V.

    2012-12-01

    Exposure to high concentrations of contaminations due to air polluting gases, vapours and aerosols and possibly altering the normal pH in the body could lead to undesirable changes in the properties of biological cells. Here, we study experimentally the mechanical properties of synthetic phospholipid bilayers containing increasing molar fractions (up to 0.15) of charged lipid (synthetic phosphatidylserine) in aqueous solutions with controlled ionic strength and at pH 5, which is slightly lower than the physiological values of pH. Our observations in phase contrast and fluorescence testified to the coexistence of two phases in membranes for temperatures below 29°C. Micro-sized inhomogeneities in vesicle membranes were systematically observed at temperatures lower than 29°C and for molar fractions of phosphatidylserine in the bilayer higher than 0.1. For the quantitative determination of the membrane bending rigidity, we applied thermal fluctuation analysis of the shape of quasispherical lipid vesicles. As far as the liquid-crystalline state of the bilayer is a necessary condition for the application of the experimental method, only vesicles satisfying this requirement were processed for determination of their membrane bending rigidity. The value obtained for the bending modulus of bilayers with 0.15 molar content of charged lipid is about two times higher than the bending modulus of uncharged membranes in the same bathing solution. These findings are in qualitative agreement with our previous results for the bending rigidity of charged bilayers, measured by vesicle micromanipulation.

  11. Submicrosecond phospholipid dynamics using a long-lived fluorescence emission anisotropy probe.

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, L; Targowski, P

    1996-01-01

    temperatures below the phospholipid T(C). The thermodynamic quantities are associated with the particular lipid of interest (in this case DPPC) and have been determined previously from ultrasound studies, thus representing fixed constants. Hence resolved variables are r(O), temperature-dependent gate parameters (gamma), and limiting diffusion rates (d(infinity)). This alternative distribution model is attractive because it provides a general probe-independent expression for distributed lipid fluctuation-induced probe rotational rates occurring within bilayer membranes below the phospholipid phase transition on the submicrosecond time scale. PMID:8889160

  12. How drugs get into cells: tested and testable predictions to help discriminate between transporter-mediated uptake and lipoidal bilayer diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Kell, Douglas B.; Oliver, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01

    One approach to experimental science involves creating hypotheses, then testing them by varying one or more independent variables, and assessing the effects of this variation on the processes of interest. We use this strategy to compare the intellectual status and available evidence for two models or views of mechanisms of transmembrane drug transport into intact biological cells. One (BDII) asserts that lipoidal phospholipid Bilayer Diffusion Is Important, while a second (PBIN) proposes that in normal intact cells Phospholipid Bilayer diffusion Is Negligible (i.e., may be neglected quantitatively), because evolution selected against it, and with transmembrane drug transport being effected by genetically encoded proteinaceous carriers or pores, whose “natural” biological roles, and substrates are based in intermediary metabolism. Despite a recent review elsewhere, we can find no evidence able to support BDII as we can find no experiments in intact cells in which phospholipid bilayer diffusion was either varied independently or measured directly (although there are many papers where it was inferred by seeing a covariation of other dependent variables). By contrast, we find an abundance of evidence showing cases in which changes in the activities of named and genetically identified transporters led to measurable changes in the rate or extent of drug uptake. PBIN also has considerable predictive power, and accounts readily for the large differences in drug uptake between tissues, cells and species, in accounting for the metabolite-likeness of marketed drugs, in pharmacogenomics, and in providing a straightforward explanation for the late-stage appearance of toxicity and of lack of efficacy during drug discovery programmes despite macroscopically adequate pharmacokinetics. Consequently, the view that Phospholipid Bilayer diffusion Is Negligible (PBIN) provides a starting hypothesis for assessing cellular drug uptake that is much better supported by the available

  13. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of tethered bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Valincius, Gintaras; Meškauskas, Tadas; Ivanauskas, Feliksas

    2012-01-10

    The electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) of tethered bilayer membranes (tBLMs) were analyzed, and the analytical solution for the spectral response of membranes containing natural or artificially introduced defects was derived. The analysis carried out in this work shows that the EIS features of an individual membrane defect cannot be modeled by conventional electrical elements. The primary reason for this is the complex nature of impedance of the submembrane ionic reservoir separating the phospholipid layer and the solid support. We demonstrate that its EIS response, in the case of radially symmetric defects, is described by the Hankel functions of a complex variable. Therefore, neither the impedance of the submembrane reservoir nor the total impedance of tBLMs can be modeled using the conventional elements of the equivalent electrical circuits of interfaces. There are, however, some limiting cases in which the complexity of the EIS response of the submembrane space reduces. In the high frequency limit, the EIS response of a submembrane space that surrounds the defect transforms into a response of a constant phase element (CPE) with the exponent (α) value of 0.5. The onset of this transformation is, beside other parameters, dependent on the defect size. Large-sized defects push the frequency limit lower, therefore, the EIS spectra exhibiting CPE behavior with α ≈ 0.5, can serve as a diagnostic criterion for the presence of such defects. In the low frequency limit, the response is dependent on the density of the defects, and it transforms into the capacitive impedance if the area occupied by a defect is finite. The higher the defect density, the higher the frequency edge at which the onset of the capacitive behavior is observed. Consequently, the presented analysis provides practical tools to evaluate the defect density in tBLMs, which could be utilized in tBLM-based biosensor applications. Alternatively, if the parameters of the defects, e.g., ion channels

  14. Micrometer-Scale Membrane Transition of Supported Lipid Bilayer Membrane Reconstituted with Cytosol of Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kei; Toyota, Taro

    2017-01-01

    Background: The transformation of the supported lipid bilayer (SLB) membrane by extracted cytosol from living resources, has recently drawn much attention. It enables us to address the question of whether the purified phospholipid SLB membrane, including lipids related to amoeba locomotion, which was discussed in many previous studies, exhibits membrane deformation in the presence of cytosol extracted from amoeba; Methods: In this report, a method for reconstituting a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) membrane, composed of purified phospholipids and cytosol extracted from Dictyostelium discoideum, is described. This technique is a new reconstitution method combining the artificial constitution of membranes with the reconstitution using animate cytosol (without precise purification at a molecular level), contributing to membrane deformation analysis; Results: The morphology transition of a SLB membrane composed of phosphatidylcholines, after the addition of cytosolic extract, was traced using a confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscope. As a result, pore formation in the SLB membrane was observed and phosphatidylinositides incorporated into the SLB membrane tended to suppress pore formation and expansion; Conclusions: The current findings imply that phosphatidylinositides have the potential to control cytoplasm activity and bind to a phosphoinositide-containing SLB membrane. PMID:28272354

  15. Bilayer deformation by the Kv channel voltage sensor domain revealed by self-assembly simulations.

    PubMed

    Bond, Peter J; Sansom, Mark S P

    2007-02-20

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations are used to explore the interaction with a phospholipid bilayer of the voltage sensor (VS) domain and the S4 helix from the archaebacterial voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel KvAP. Multiple 2-mus self-assembly simulations reveal that the isolated S4 helix may adopt either interfacial or transmembrane (TM) locations with approximately equal probability. In the TM state, the insertion of the voltage-sensing region of S4 is facilitated via local bilayer deformation that, combined with side chain "snorkeling," enables its Arg side chains to interact with lipid headgroups and water. Multiple 0.2-mus self-assembly simulations of the VS domain are also performed, along with simulations of MscL and KcsA, to permit comparison with more "canonical" integral membrane protein structures. All three stably adopt a TM orientation within a bilayer. For MscL and KcsA, there is no significant bilayer deformation. In contrast, for the VS, there is considerable local deformation, which is again primarily due to the lipid-exposed S4. It is shown that for both the VS and isolated S4 helix, the positively charged side chains of S4 are accommodated within the membrane through a combination of stabilizing interactions with lipid glycerol and headgroup regions, water, and anionic side chains. Our results support the possibility that bilayer deformation around key gating charge residues in Kv channels may result in "focusing" of the electrostatic field, and indicate that, when considering competing models of voltage-sensing, it is essential to consider the dynamics and structure of not only the protein but also of the local lipid environment.

  16. Magnesium-induced lipid bilayer microdomain reorganizations: implications for membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Zachary D; Pazos, Ileana M; McNeil-Watson, Fraser K; Lewis, E Neil; Levin, Ira W

    2009-07-23

    Interactions between dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine (DPPS), combined both as binary lipid bilayer assemblies and separately, under the influence of divalent Mg2+, a membrane bilayer fusogenic agent, are reported. Infrared vibrational spectroscopic analyses of the lipid acyl chain methylene symmetric stretching modes indicate that aggregates of the two phospholipid components exist as domains heterogeneously distributed throughout the binary bilayer system. In the presence of Mg2+, DPPS maintains an ordered orthorhombic subcell gel phase structure through the phase transition temperature, while the DPPC component is only minimally perturbed with respect to the gel to liquid crystalline phase change. The addition of Mg2+ induces a reorganization of the lipid domains in which the gel phase acyl chain planes rearrange from a hexagonal configuration toward a triclinic, parallel chain subcell. Examination of the acyl chain methylene deformation modes at low temperatures allows a determination of DPPS microdomain sizes, which decrease upon the addition of DPPC-d62 in the absence of Mg2+. On adding Mg2+, a uniform DPPS domain size is observed in the binary mixtures. In either the presence or absence of Mg2+, DPPC-d62 aggregates remain in a configuration for which microdomain sizes are not spectroscopically measurable. Analysis of the acyl chain methylene deformation modes for DPPC-d62 in the binary system suggests that clusters of the deuterated lipids are distributed throughout the DPPS matrix. Light scattering and fluorescence measurements indicate that Mg2+ induces both the aggregation and the fusion of the lipid assemblies as a function of the ratio of DPPS to DPPC. The structural reorganizations of the lipid microdomains within the DPPS-DPPC bilayer are interpreted in the context of current concepts regarding lipid bilayer fusion.

  17. An evaluation of serum high density lipoproteins-phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Ide, H; Tsuji, M; Shimada, M; Kondo, T; Fujiya, S; Asanuma, Y; Agishi, Y

    1988-07-01

    Phospholipids in high density lipoproteins (HDL) is being used as a negative risk indicator of atherosclerosis. Phospholipids in HDL may not demonstrate the actual level of HDL-phospholipids when determined by the precipitation or ultracentrifugal methods, because HDL fractions contain very high density lipoproteins (VHDL) and albumin. In the present study, the true level of phospholipids in HDL was estimated using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and it was compared with the level of phospholipids in HDL determined by the precipitation method. Sera from 18 healthy subjects were used as materials. In the HPLC method, the HDL fraction was extracted making sure that it contained no free albumin, which is albumin not bound to phospholipids. The HDL fraction was separated into subfractions. It was found that phospholipids in the VHDL fraction make a 20.2 +/- 7.3% (mean +/- S.D.) part of the total HDL-phospholipids. A large part of the VHDL fraction was constituted of albumin-bound phospholipids. A significant correlation was observed between HDL-phospholipids determined by the precipitation method, which contain albumin, and the actual HDL fraction phospholipids determined by HPLC, which do not contain VHDL (r = 0.903, p less than 0.01). These results suggest that HDL-phospholipids values determined by the precipitation method give useful clinical data.

  18. PLA2-responsive and SPIO-loaded phospholipid micelles

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiang; Yan, Lesan; Chiorazzo, Michael; Delikatny, E. James; Tsourkas, Andrew; Cheng, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    A PLA2-responsive and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle-loaded phospholipid micelle was developed. The release of phospholipid-conjugated dye from these micelles was triggered due to phospholipid degradation by phospholipase A2. High relaxivity of the encapsulated SPIO could enable non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26139589

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of model trans-membrane peptides in lipid bilayers: a systematic investigation of hydrophobic mismatch.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Senthil K; Larson, Ronald G

    2006-04-01

    Hydrophobic mismatch, which is the difference between the hydrophobic length of trans-membrane segments of a protein and the hydrophobic width of the surrounding lipid bilayer, is known to play a role in membrane protein function. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of trans-membrane KALP peptides (sequence: GKK(LA)nLKKA) in phospholipid bilayers to investigate hydrophobic mismatch alleviation mechanisms. By varying systematically the length of the peptide (KALP15, KALP19, KALP23, KALP27, and KALP31) and the lipid hydrophobic length (DLPC, DMPC, and DPPC), a wide range of mismatch conditions were studied. Simulations of durations of 50-200 ns show that under positive mismatch, the system alleviates the mismatch predominantly by tilting the peptide and to a smaller extent by increased lipid ordering in the immediate vicinity of the peptide. Under negative mismatch, alleviation takes place by a combination of local bilayer bending and the snorkeling of the lysine residues of the peptide. Simulations performed at a higher peptide/lipid molar ratio (1:25) reveal slower dynamics of both the peptide and lipid relative to those at a lower peptide/lipid ratio (1:128). The lysine residues have favorable interactions with specific oxygen atoms of the phospholipid headgroups, indicating the preferred localization of these residues at the lipid/water interface.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Model Trans-Membrane Peptides in Lipid Bilayers: A Systematic Investigation of Hydrophobic Mismatch

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Senthil K.; Larson, Ronald G.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrophobic mismatch, which is the difference between the hydrophobic length of trans-membrane segments of a protein and the hydrophobic width of the surrounding lipid bilayer, is known to play a role in membrane protein function. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of trans-membrane KALP peptides (sequence: GKK(LA)nLKKA) in phospholipid bilayers to investigate hydrophobic mismatch alleviation mechanisms. By varying systematically the length of the peptide (KALP15, KALP19, KALP23, KALP27, and KALP31) and the lipid hydrophobic length (DLPC, DMPC, and DPPC), a wide range of mismatch conditions were studied. Simulations of durations of 50–200 ns show that under positive mismatch, the system alleviates the mismatch predominantly by tilting the peptide and to a smaller extent by increased lipid ordering in the immediate vicinity of the peptide. Under negative mismatch, alleviation takes place by a combination of local bilayer bending and the snorkeling of the lysine residues of the peptide. Simulations performed at a higher peptide/lipid molar ratio (1:25) reveal slower dynamics of both the peptide and lipid relative to those at a lower peptide/lipid ratio (1:128). The lysine residues have favorable interactions with specific oxygen atoms of the phospholipid headgroups, indicating the preferred localization of these residues at the lipid/water interface. PMID:16428278

  1. Structure of phospholipid monolayers containing poly(ethylene glycol) lipids at the air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, J.; Smith, G.S.; Kuhl, T.L.; Israelachvili, J.N.; Gerstenberg, M.C.

    1997-04-17

    The density distribution of a lipid monolayer at the air-water interface mixed with varying amounts of lipid with poly(ethylene glycol)polymer headgroups (polymer-lipid or PEG-lipid) was measured using neutron reflectometry. The structure of the monolayer at the interface was greatly perturbed by the presence of the bulky polymer-lipid headgroups resulting in a large increase in the thickness of the headgroup region normal to the interface and a systematic roughening of the interface with increasing polymer-lipid content. These results show how bulky hydrophilic moieties cause significant deformations and out-of-place protrusions of phospholipid monolayers and presumably bilayers, vesicles and biological membranes. In terms of polymer physics, very short polymer chains tethered to the air-water interface follow scaling behavior with a mushroom to brush transition with increasing polymer grafting density. 34 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Tetanus toxin is labeled with photoactivatable phospholipids at low pH

    SciTech Connect

    Montecucco, C.; Schiavo, G.; Brunner, J.; Duflot, E.; Boquet, P.; Roa, M.

    1986-02-25

    The mechanism of cell penetration by tetanus toxin is unknown; it has been suggested that the toxin may penetrate into the lipid bilayer from a low-pH vesicular compartment. In this work, the interaction of tetanus toxin with liposomal model membranes has been studied by following its photoinduced cross-linking with either a nitrene or a carbene photolytically generated from corresponding light-sensitive phosphatidylcholine analogues. The toxin was labeled only at pHs lower than 5.5. The low pH acquired hydrophobicity of tetanus toxin appears to be confined to its light chain and to the 45-kDa NH2-terminal fragment of the heavy chain. Negatively charged lipids promote the interaction of this toxin with the hydrocarbon chain of phospholipids. The relevance of the present findings to the possible mechanism of nerve cell penetration by tetanus toxin is discussed.

  3. Effect of the barometric phase transition of a DMPA bilayer on the lipid/water interface. An atomistic description by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Casares, J J Giner; Camacho, L; Romero, M T Martín; Cascales, J J López

    2007-12-13

    Understanding the structure and dynamics of phospholipid bilayers is of fundamental relevance in biophysics, biochemistry, and chemical physics. Lipid Langmuir monolayers are used as a model of lipid bilayers, because they are much more easily studied experimentally, although some authors question the validity of this model. With the aim of throwing light on this debate, we used molecular dynamics simulations to obtain an atomistic description of a membrane of dimyristoylphosphatidic acid under different surface pressures. Our results show that at low surface pressure the interdigitation between opposite lipids (that is, back-to-back interactions) controls the system structure. In this setting and due to the absence of this effect in the Langmuir monolayers, the behavior between these two systems differs considerably. However, when the surface pressure increases the lipid interdigitation diminishes and so monolayer and bilayer behavior converges. In this work, four computer simulations were carried out, subjecting the phospholipids to lateral pressures ranging from 0.17 to 40 mN/m. The phospholipids were studied in their charged state because this approach is closer to the experimental situation. Special attention was paid to validating our simulation results by comparison with available experimental data, therebeing in general excellent agreement between experimental and simulation data. In addition, the properties of the lipid/solution interface associated with the lipid barometric phase transition were studied.

  4. Simple, generalizable route to highly aligned block copolymer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Zhe; Cavicchi, Kevin; Vogt, Bryan; University of Akron Team

    Macroscopic alignment of block copolymer domains in thin films is desired for many applications, such as cell responsive surfaces or optical polarizers. Alignment generally requires specialized tools that apply external fields, shear force gradient, or produce topological patterned substrates. This requirement limits the broad academic application of aligned BCPs. Here, we describe a simple modification of commonly utilized solvent vapor annealing (SVA) process for macroscopic alignment of BCPs. Adhering a flat, crosslinked elastomer pad to the BCP film leads to differential swelling between the elastomer pad and BCP to produce a shear force that aligns the ordered BCP domains. The role of elastomer properties, solvent quality, drying rate and degree of segregation of the block copolymer will be discussed to provide generalized rules for alignment with this technique. Cylindrical nanostructures formed in polystyrene-block-polydimethylsiloxane can be transformed into arrays of silica lines and increasing the thickness from a monolayer to bilayer can effectively halve the spacing of the lines. These results illustrate a generalized method for BCP alignment and a potential route for the generation of complex hierarchical assembled structures. A generalized method for block copolymer thin film alignment: solvent vapor annealing with shear.

  5. Flexibility of phospholipids with saturated and unsaturated chains studied by Raman scattering: The effect of cholesterol on dynamical and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surovtsev, N. V.; Dzuba, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    Raman scattering spectra were obtained at 25-320 K for bilayers prepared from saturated 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and mono-unsaturated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) phospholipids, with and without cholesterol. Raman intensities were measured at modes sensitive to lipid inter-chain interactions and/or intra-chain torsional motion (asymmetric CH2 stretching at 2880 cm-1) and to the conformational state of lipids (C-C stretching at 1130 cm-1). These intensities decreased with temperature, which could be ascribed to increased lipid flexibility. For cholesterol-free and cholesterol-containing DPPC bilayers, the decrease of Raman intensities observed above ˜200 K could be related to the phenomenon of dynamical transition known for biological systems near these temperatures. For a cholesterol-free POPC bilayer, the decrease of intensity for the asymmetric CH2 stretching mode started at a lower temperature, above 100 K, while the addition of cholesterol shifted this starting temperature to a more normal ˜200 K value. The low-temperature lipid flexibility in the case of POPC was related to the abundance of free-volume holes, which disappeared in presence of cholesterol. Near gel-fluid phase transitions, Raman intensities for cholesterol-free bilayers dropped sharply, while for cholesterol-containing bilayers, they changed smoothly.

  6. Shock-induced poration, cholesterol flip-flop and small interfering RNA transfection in a phospholipid membrane: Multimillion atom, microsecond molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Amit

    Biological cell membranes provide mechanical stability to cells and understanding their structure, dynamics and mechanics are important biophysics problems. Experiments coupled with computational methods such as molecular dynamics (MD) have provided insight into the physics of membranes. We use long-time and large-scale MD simulations to study the structure, dynamics and mechanical behavior of membranes. We investigate shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles in water using MD simulations based on a reactive force field. We observe a focused jet at the onset of bubble shrinkage and a secondary shock wave upon bubble collapse. The jet length scales linearly with the nanobubble radius, as observed in experiments on micron-to-millimeter size bubbles. Shock induces dramatic structural changes, including an ice-VII-like structural motif at a particle velocity of 1 km/s. The incipient ice VII formation and the calculated Hugoniot curve are in good agreement with experimental results. We also investigate molecular mechanisms of poration in lipid bilayers due to shock-induced collapse of nanobubbles. Our multimillion-atom MD simulations reveal that the jet impact generates shear flow of water on bilayer leaflets and pressure gradients across them. This transiently enhances the bilayer permeability by creating nanopores through which water molecules translocate rapidly across the bilayer. Effects of nanobubble size and temperature on the porosity of lipid bilayers are examined. The second research project focuses on cholesterol (CHOL) dynamics in phospholipid bilayers. Several experimental and computational studies have been performed on lipid bilayers consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and CHOL molecules. CHOL interleaflet transport (flip-flop) plays an important role in interleaflet coupling and determining CHOL flip-flop rate has been elusive. Various studies report that the rate ranges between milliseconds to seconds. We calculate CHOL flip-flop rates by

  7. Nanoparticle self-assembly in mixtures of phospholipids with styrene/maleic acid copolymers or fluorinated surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Carolyn; Arenas, Rodrigo Cuevas; Frotscher, Erik; Keller, Sandro

    2015-12-01

    Self-assembling nanostructures in aqueous mixtures of bilayer-forming lipids and micelle-forming surfactants are relevant to in vitro studies on biological and synthetic membranes and membrane proteins. Considerable efforts are currently underway to replace conventional detergents by milder alternatives such as styrene/maleic acid (SMA) copolymers and fluorinated surfactants. However, these compounds and their nanosized assemblies remain poorly understood as regards their interactions with lipid membranes, particularly, the thermodynamics of membrane partitioning and solubilisation. Using 19F and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, static and dynamic light scattering, and isothermal titration calorimetry, we have systematically investigated the aggregational state of a zwitterionic bilayer-forming phospholipid upon exposure to an SMA polymer with a styrene/maleic acid ratio of 3 : 1 or to a fluorinated octyl phosphocholine derivative called F6OPC. The lipid interactions of SMA(3 : 1) and F6OPC can be thermodynamically conceptualised within the framework of a three-stage model that treats bilayer vesicles, discoidal or micellar nanostructures, and the aqueous solution as distinct pseudophases. The exceptional solubilising power of SMA(3 : 1) is reflected in very low membrane-saturating and solubilising polymer/lipid molar ratios of 0.10 and 0.15, respectively. Although F6OPC saturates bilayers at an even lower molar ratio of 0.031, this nondetergent does not solubilise lipids even at >1000-fold molar excess, thus highlighting fundamental differences between these two types of mild membrane-mimetic systems. We rationalise these findings in terms of a new classification of surfactants based on bilayer-to-micelle transfer free energies and discuss practical implications for membrane-protein research.Self-assembling nanostructures in aqueous mixtures of bilayer-forming lipids and micelle-forming surfactants are relevant to in vitro studies on biological and

  8. Bilayered vascular graft derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells with biomimetic structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Karina H; Joshi, Prajakta A; Lai, Edwina S; Gujar, Prachi; Joubert, Lydia-M; Chen, Bertha; Huang, Ngan F

    2015-01-01

    Background: We developed an aligned bi-layered vascular graft derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that recapitulates the cellular composition, orientation, and anti-inflammatory function of blood vessels. Materials & methods: The luminal layer consisted of longitudinal-aligned nanofibrillar collagen containing primary endothelial cells (ECs) or iPSC-derived ECs (iPSC-ECs). The outer layer contained circumferentially oriented nanofibrillar collagen with primary smooth muscle cells (SMCs) or iPSC-derived SMCs(iPSC-SMCs). Results: On the aligned scaffolds, cells organized F-actin assembly within 8º from the direction of nanofibrils. When compared to randomly-oriented scaffolds, EC-seeded aligned scaffolds had significant reduced inflammatory response, based on adhesivity to monocytes. Conclusion: This study highlights the importance of anisotropic scaffolds in directing cell form and function, and has therapeutic significance as physiologically relevant blood vessels. PMID:26440211

  9. Ionizable Nitroxides for Studying Local Electrostatic Properties of Lipid Bilayers and Protein Systems by EPR

    PubMed Central

    Voinov, Maxim A.; Smirnov, Alex I.

    2016-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions are known to play one of the major roles in the myriad of biochemical and biophysical processes. In this Chapter we describe biophysical methods to probe local electrostatic potentials of proteins and lipid bilayer systems that is based on an observation of reversible protonation of nitroxides by EPR. Two types of the electrostatic probes are discussed. The first one includes methanethiosulfonate derivatives of protonatable nitroxides that could be used for highly specific covalent modification of the cysteine’s sulfhydryl groups. Such spin labels are very similar in magnetic parameters and chemical properties to conventional MTSL making them suitable for studying local electrostatic properties of protein-lipid interfaces. The second type of EPR probes is designed as spin-labeled phospholipids having a protonatable nitroxide tethered to the polar head group. The probes of both types report on their ionization state through changes in magnetic parameters and a degree of rotational averaging, thus, allowing one to determine the electrostatic contribution to the interfacial pKa of the nitroxide, and, therefore, determining the local electrostatic potential. Due to their small molecular volume these probes cause a minimal perturbation to the protein or lipid system while covalent attachment secure the position of the reporter nitroxides. Experimental procedures to characterize and calibrate these probes by EPR and also the methods to analyze the EPR spectra by least-squares simulations are also outlined. The ionizable nitroxide labels and the nitroxide-labeled phospholipids described so far cover an exceptionally wide pH range from ca. 2.5 to 7.0 pH units making them suitable to study a broad range of biophysical phenomena especially at the negatively charged lipid bilayer surfaces. The rationale for selecting proper electrostatically neutral interface for calibrating such probes and example of studying surface potential of lipid bilayer is

  10. Differential scanning calorimetric and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies of the effects of cholesterol on the thermotropic phase behavior and organization of a homologous series of linear saturated phosphatidylserine bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    McMullen, T P; Lewis, R N; McElhaney, R N

    2000-10-01

    miscibility of cholesterol in phosphatidylserine bilayers reported previously to a fractional crystallization of the cholesterol and phospholipid phases during the removal of organic solvent from the binary mixture before the hydration of the sample. In general, the results of our studies to date indicate that the magnitude of the effect of cholesterol on the thermotropic phase behavior of the host phospholipid bilayer, and its miscibility in phospholipid dispersions generally, depend on the strength of the attractive interactions between the polar headgroups and the hydrocarbon chains of the phospholipid molecule, and not on the charge of the polar headgroups per se.

  11. The herpes simplex virus 1 U{sub S}3 regulates phospholipid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, Peter; Oliveira, Anna Paula de; Sonda, Sabrina; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Ackermann, Mathias; Tobler, Kurt

    2012-10-25

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear and Golgi membranes for envelopment by phospholipid bilayers. In the absence of U{sub S}3, nuclear membranes form multiple folds harboring virions that suggests disturbance in membrane turnover. Therefore, we investigated phospholipid metabolism in cells infected with the U{sub S}3 deletion mutant R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3), and quantified membranes involved in viral envelopment. We report that (i) [{sup 3}H]-choline incorporation into nuclear membranes and cytoplasmic membranes was enhanced peaking at 12 or 20 h post inoculation with wild type HSV-1 and R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3), respectively, (ii) the surface area of nuclear membranes increased until 24 h of R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) infection forming folds that equaled {approx}45% of the nuclear surface, (iii) the surface area of viral envelopes between nuclear membranes equaled {approx}2400 R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) virions per cell, and (iv) during R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) infection, the Golgi complex expanded dramatically. The data indicate that U{sub S}3 plays a significant role in regulation of membrane biosynthesis.

  12. MP-Align: alignment of metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Comparing the metabolic pathways of different species is useful for understanding metabolic functions and can help in studying diseases and engineering drugs. Several comparison techniques for metabolic pathways have been introduced in the literature as a first attempt in this direction. The approaches are based on some simplified representation of metabolic pathways and on a related definition of a similarity score (or distance measure) between two pathways. More recent comparative research focuses on alignment techniques that can identify similar parts between pathways. Results We propose a methodology for the pairwise comparison and alignment of metabolic pathways that aims at providing the largest conserved substructure of the pathways under consideration. The proposed methodology has been implemented in a tool called MP-Align, which has been used to perform several validation tests. The results showed that our similarity score makes it possible to discriminate between different domains and to reconstruct a meaningful phylogeny from metabolic data. The results further demonstrate that our alignment algorithm correctly identifies subpathways sharing a common biological function. Conclusion The results of the validation tests performed with MP-Align are encouraging. A comparison with another proposal in the literature showed that our alignment algorithm is particularly well-suited to finding the largest conserved subpathway of the pathways under examination. PMID:24886436

  13. Girder Alignment Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zackary; Ruland, Robert; LeCocq, Catherine; Lundahl, Eric; Levashov, Yurii; Reese, Ed; Rago, Carl; Poling, Ben; Schafer, Donald; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Wienands, Uli; /SLAC

    2010-11-18

    The girders for the LCLS undulator system contain components which must be aligned with high accuracy relative to each other. The alignment is one of the last steps before the girders go into the tunnel, so the alignment must be done efficiently, on a tight schedule. This note documents the alignment plan which includes efficiency and high accuracy. The motivation for girder alignment involves the following considerations. Using beam based alignment, the girder position will be adjusted until the beam goes through the center of the quadrupole and beam finder wire. For the machine to work properly, the undulator axis must be on this line and the center of the undulator beam pipe must be on this line. The physics reasons for the undulator axis and undulator beam pipe axis to be centered on the beam are different, but the alignment tolerance for both are similar. In addition, the beam position monitor must be centered on the beam to preserve its calibration. Thus, the undulator, undulator beam pipe, quadrupole, beam finder wire, and beam position monitor axes must all be aligned to a common line. All relative alignments are equally important, not just, for example, between quadrupole and undulator. We begin by making the common axis the nominal beam axis in the girder coordinate system. All components will be initially aligned to this axis. A more accurate alignment will then position the components relative to each other, without incorporating the girder itself.

  14. Nanoscale, electric field-driven water bridges in vacuum gaps and lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming-Chak; Levine, Zachary A; Vernier, P Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Formation of a water bridge across the lipid bilayer is the first stage of pore formation in molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of electroporation, suggesting that the intrusion of individual water molecules into the membrane interior is the initiation event in a sequence that leads to the formation of a conductive membrane pore. To delineate more clearly the role of water in membrane permeabilization, we conducted extensive MD simulations of water bridge formation, stabilization, and collapse in palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers and in water-vacuum-water systems, in which two groups of water molecules are separated by a 2.8 nm vacuum gap, a simple analog of a phospholipid bilayer. Certain features, such as the exponential decrease in water bridge initiation time with increased external electric field, are similar in both systems. Other features, such as the relationship between water bridge lifetime and the diameter of the water bridge, are quite different between the two systems. Data such as these contribute to a better and more quantitative understanding of the relative roles of water and lipid in membrane electropore creation and annihilation, facilitating a mechanism-driven development of electroporation protocols. These methods can be extended to more complex, heterogeneous systems that include membrane proteins and intracellular and extracellular membrane attachments, leading to more accurate models of living cells in electric fields.

  15. Formation of supported lipid bilayers containing phase-segregated domains and their interaction with gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Melby, Eric S.; Mensch, Arielle C.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Murphy, Catherine J.; Hamers, Robert J.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    The cell membrane represents an important biological interface that nanoparticles may encounter after being released into the environment. Interaction of nanoparticles with cellular membranes may alter membrane structure and function, lead to their uptake into cells, and elicit adverse biological responses. Supported lipid bilayers have proven to be valuable ex vivo models for biological membranes, allowing investigation of their mechanisms of interaction with nanoparticles with a degree of control impossible in living cells. To date, the majority of research on nanoparticle interaction with supported lipid bilayers has employed membranes composed of single or binary mixtures of phospholipids. Cellular membranes contain a wide variety of lipids and exhibit lateral organization. Ordered membrane domains enriched in specific membrane components are referred to as lipid rafts and have not been explored with respect to their interaction with nanoparticles. Here we develop model lipid raft-containing membranes amenable to investigation by a variety of surface-sensitive analytical techniques and demonstrate that lipid rafts influence the extent of nanoparticle attachment to model membranes. We determined conditions that allow reliable formation of bilayers containing rafts enriched in sphingomyelin and cholesterol and confirmed their morphology by structured illumination and atomic force microscopies. We demonstrate that lipid rafts increase attachment of cationic gold nanoparticles to model membranes under near physiological ionic strength conditions (0.1 M NaCl) at pH 7.4. We anticipate that these results will serve as the foundation for and motivate further study of nanoparticle interaction with compositionally varied lipid rafts.

  16. Supported lipid bilayer nanosystems: stabilization by undulatory-protrusion forces and destabilization by lipid bridging.

    PubMed

    Savarala, Sushma; Monson, Frederick; Ilies, Marc A; Wunder, Stephanie L

    2011-05-17

    Control of the stabilization/destabilization of supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) on nanoparticles is important for promotion of their organized assembly and for their use as delivery vehicles. At the same time, understanding the mechanism of these processes can yield insight into nanoparticle-cell interactions and nanoparticle toxicity. In this study, the suspension/precipitation process of zwitterionic lipid/SiO(2) nanosystems was analyzed as a function of ionic strength and as a function of the ratio of lipid/SiO(2) surface areas, at pH = 7.6. Salt is necessary to induce supported lipid bilayer (SLB) formation for zwitterionic lipids on silica (SiO(2)) (Seantier, B.; Kasemo, B., Influence of Mono- and Divalent Ions on the Formation of Supported Phospholipid Bilayers via Vesicle Adsorption. Langmuir 2009, 25 (10), 5767-5772). However, for zwitterionic SLBs on SiO(2) nanoparticles, addition of salt can cause precipitation of the SLBs, due to electrostatic shielding by both the lipid and the salt and to the suppression of thermal undulation/protrusion repulsive forces for lipids on solid surfaces. At ionic strengths that cause precipitation of SLBs, it was found that addition of excess SUVs, at ratios where there were equal populations of SUVs and SLBs, restored the undulation/protrusion repulsive forces and restabilized the suspensions. We suggest that SUVs separate SLBs in the suspension, as observed by TEM, and that SLB-SLB interactions are replaced by SLB-SUV interactions. Decreasing the relative amount of lipid, to the extent that there was less lipid available than the amount required for complete bilayer coverage of the SiO(2), resulted in precipitation of the nanosystem by a process of nanoparticle lipid bridging. For this case, we postulate a process in which lipid bilayer patches on one nanoparticle collide with bare silica patches on another SiO(2) nanoparticle, forming a single bilayer bridge between them. TEM data confirmed these findings, thus

  17. Substrate-Supported Phospholipid Membranes Studied by Surface Plasmon Resonance and Surface Plasmon Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tawa, Keiko; Morigaki, Kenichi

    2005-01-01

    Substrate-supported planar lipid bilayer membranes are attractive model cellular membranes for biotechnological applications such as biochips and sensors. However, reliable fabrication of the lipid membranes on solid surfaces still poses significant technological challenges. In this study, simultaneous surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) measurements were applied to the monitoring of adsorption and subsequent reorganization of phospholipid vesicles on solid substrates. The fluorescence intensity of SPFS depends very sensitively on the distance between the gold substrate and the fluorophore because of the excitation energy transfer to gold. By utilizing this distance dependency, we could obtain information about the topography of the adsorbed membranes: Adsorbed vesicles could be clearly distinguished from planar bilayers due to the high fluorescence intensity. SPSF can also incorporate various analytical techniques to evaluate the physicochemical properties of the adsorbed membranes. As an example, we demonstrated that the lateral mobility of lipid molecules could be estimated by observing the recovery of fluorescence after photobleaching. Combined with the film thickness information obtained by SPR, SPR-SPFS proved to be a highly informative technique to monitor the lipid membrane assembly processes on solid substrates. PMID:16040759

  18. Biomimetic Phospholipid Membrane Organization on Graphene and Graphene Oxide Surfaces: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Willems, Nathalie; Urtizberea, Ainhoa; Verre, Andrea F; Iliut, Maria; Lelimousin, Mickael; Hirtz, Michael; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind; Sansom, Mark S P

    2017-02-28

    Supported phospholipid membrane patches stabilized on graphene surfaces have shown potential in sensor device functionalization, including biosensors and biocatalysis. Lipid dip-pen nanolithography (L-DPN) is a method useful in generating supported membrane structures that maintain lipid functionality, such as exhibiting specific interactions with protein molecules. Here, we have integrated L-DPN, atomic force microscopy, and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation methods to characterize the molecular properties of supported lipid membranes (SLMs) on graphene and graphene oxide supports. We observed substantial differences in the topologies of the stabilized lipid structures depending on the nature of the surface (polar graphene oxide vs nonpolar graphene). Furthermore, the addition of water to SLM systems resulted in large-scale reorganization of the lipid structures, with measurable effects on lipid lateral mobility within the supported membranes. We also observed reduced lipid ordering within the supported structures relative to free-standing lipid bilayers, attributed to the strong hydrophobic interactions between the lipids and support. Together, our results provide insight into the molecular effects of graphene and graphene oxide surfaces on lipid bilayer membranes. This will be important in the design of these surfaces for applications such as biosensor devices.

  19. Voltage-dependent insertion of alamethicin at phospholipid/water and octane/water interfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Tieleman, D P; Berendsen, H J; Sansom, M S

    2001-01-01

    Understanding the binding and insertion of peptides in lipid bilayers is a prerequisite for understanding phenomena such as antimicrobial activity and membrane-protein folding. We describe molecular dynamics simulations of the antimicrobial peptide alamethicin in lipid/water and octane/water environments, taking into account an external electric field to mimic the membrane potential. At cis-positive potentials, alamethicin does not insert into a phospholipid bilayer in 10 ns of simulation, due to the slow dynamics of the peptide and lipids. However, in octane N-terminal insertion occurs at field strengths from 0.33 V/nm and higher, in simulations of up to 100 ns duration. Insertion of alamethicin occurs in two steps, corresponding to desolvation of the Gln7 side chain, and the backbone of Aib10 and Gly11. The proline induced helix kink angle does not change significantly during insertion. Polyalanine and alamethicin form stable helices both when inserted in octane and at the water/octane interface, where they partition in the same location. In water, both polyalanine and alamethicin partially unfold in multiple simulations. We present a detailed analysis of the insertion of alamethicin into the octane slab and the influence of the external field on the peptide structure. Our findings give new insight into the mechanism of channel formation by alamethicin and the structure and dynamics of membrane-associated helices. PMID:11159406

  20. Substrate-supported phospholipid membranes studied by surface plasmon resonance and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tawa, Keiko; Morigaki, Kenichi

    2005-10-01

    Substrate-supported planar lipid bilayer membranes are attractive model cellular membranes for biotechnological applications such as biochips and sensors. However, reliable fabrication of the lipid membranes on solid surfaces still poses significant technological challenges. In this study, simultaneous surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) measurements were applied to the monitoring of adsorption and subsequent reorganization of phospholipid vesicles on solid substrates. The fluorescence intensity of SPFS depends very sensitively on the distance between the gold substrate and the fluorophore because of the excitation energy transfer to gold. By utilizing this distance dependency, we could obtain information about the topography of the adsorbed membranes: Adsorbed vesicles could be clearly distinguished from planar bilayers due to the high fluorescence intensity. SPSF can also incorporate various analytical techniques to evaluate the physicochemical properties of the adsorbed membranes. As an example, we demonstrated that the lateral mobility of lipid molecules could be estimated by observing the recovery of fluorescence after photobleaching. Combined with the film thickness information obtained by SPR, SPR-SPFS proved to be a highly informative technique to monitor the lipid membrane assembly processes on solid substrates.

  1. Structural Thermodynamics of myr-Src(2–19) Binding to Phospholipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Scheidt, Holger A.; Klingler, Johannes; Huster, Daniel; Keller, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins are anchored to lipid bilayer membranes through a combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. In the case of the membrane-bound nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Src from Rous sarcoma virus, these interactions are mediated by an N-terminal myristoyl chain and an adjacent cluster of six basic amino-acid residues, respectively. In contrast with the acyl modifications of other lipid-anchored proteins, the myristoyl chain of Src does not match the host lipid bilayer in terms of chain conformation and dynamics, which is attributed to a tradeoff between hydrophobic burial of the myristoyl chain and repulsion of the peptidic moiety from the phospholipid headgroup region. Here, we combine thermodynamic information obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry with structural data derived from 2H, 13C, and 31P solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to decipher the hydrophobic and electrostatic contributions governing the interactions of a myristoylated Src peptide with zwitterionic and anionic membranes made from lauroyl (C12:0) or myristoyl (C14:0) lipids. Although the latter are expected to enable better hydrophobic matching, the Src peptide partitions more avidly into the shorter-chain lipid analog because this does not require the myristoyl chain to stretch extensively to avoid unfavorable peptide/headgroup interactions. Moreover, we find that Coulombic and intrinsic contributions to membrane binding are not additive, because the presence of anionic lipids enhances membrane binding more strongly than would be expected on the basis of simple Coulombic attraction. PMID:26244740

  2. Self-assembly of gold nanorods coated with phospholipids: a coarse-grained molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Mingwei; Li, Xiaoxu; Gao, Lianghui; Fang, Weihai

    2016-11-01

    The self-assembly of phospholipid-coated gold nanorods (GNRs) was investigated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. We predict that in addition to the formation of deformed vesicles encapsulating GNRs with diverse orientations, the lipid-coated GNRs can form a semi-ring attached to an excess vesicle phase, a branch with excess vesicle phase, a ring phase, a branch phase, a stack phase, and a vortex phase. The morphologies of the lipid-GNR complexes depend on the lipid/GNR molar ratio and the interaction strength between the nanorod surface and the lipid head groups. At given lipid-nanorod interactions, removing the lipid induces a phase transition from an isolated ring or branch phase to an aggregated vortex or stack phase and vice versa. As the lipid-coated GNRs transit from an isolated phase to an aggregated phase, the structure of the lipid at the nanorod surface converts from a bilayer state to a non-bilayer state.

  3. Aligned Carbon Nanotubes for Highly Efficient Energy Generation and Storage Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-24

    Nanotubes, graphene, functionalization, aligned arrays, energy-related devices 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18...4 1.3 Soluble P3HT-Grafted CNTs for Efficient Bilayer-heterojunction Photovoltaic Devices.............. 6 1.4 Highly-Efficient Metal...heterojunction Photovoltaic Devices

  4. Thermal conductivity of twisted bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongyang; Ying, Hao; Chen, Xiangping; Nika, Denis L.; Cocemasov, Alexandr I.; Cai, Weiwei; Balandin, Alexander A.; Chen, Shanshan

    2014-10-01

    We have investigated experimentally the thermal conductivity of suspended twisted bilayer graphene. The measurements were performed using an optothermal Raman technique. It was found that the thermal conductivity of twisted bilayer graphene is lower than that of monolayer graphene and the reference, Bernal stacked bilayer graphene in the entire temperature range examined (~300-700 K). This finding indicates that the heat carriers - phonons - in twisted bilayer graphene do not behave in the same manner as that observed in individual graphene layers. The decrease in the thermal conductivity found in twisted bilayer graphene was explained by the modification of the Brillouin zone due to plane rotation and the emergence of numerous folded phonon branches that enhance the phonon Umklapp and normal scattering. The results obtained are important for understanding thermal transport in two-dimensional systems.

  5. sup 31 P and sup 2 H NMR studies of structure and motion in bilayers of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, R. )

    1988-10-04

    The structural and motional properties of mixed bilayers of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) have been examined by using wide-line {sup 31}P, {sup 14}N, and {sup 2H} NMR. {sup 2}H and {sup 14}N NMR data showed that in mixed bilayers containing both PC and PE the conformations of the head-group moieties are essentially identical with those observed for bilayers containing a single phospholipid species. Equimolar amounts of cholesterol induce also only a small change in head-group conformation. For all phospholipid mixtures studied, the {sup 31}P T{sub 1} relaxation was homogeneous over the whole powder spectrum and could be fitted to a single-exponential decay. The {sup 31}P vs temperature profiles were analyzed by a simple correlation model. The presence of equimolar amounts of PE containing either the same (POPE) or a different (Escherichia coli PE) fatty acid composition had essentially no effect on the rate of rotational diffusion of the phosphate groups, with the correlation time being found to be 0.68 ns at 20{degree}C. The presence of equimolar amounts of cholesterol decreased the correlation time to 0.65 ns, and also the activation energy was reduced to 22.6 kJ mol{sup {minus}1}. The authors interpret the decrease in activation energy as being due to the spacing effect of cholesterol which reduces the H-bonding interactions between head-groups, allowing them to rotate more freely. For all cases examined, the rotational diffusion of the phosphate moieties was slower than that observed for the rigid glycerol backbone of the molecule, the latter probably corresponding to overall phospholipid rotation.

  6. "Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis"

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Huo, Ziyang; E.Habas, Susan E; Soejima, Tetsuro; Aliaga, Cesar E; Samorjai, Gabor A; Yang, Peidong

    2011-01-24

    Supported catalysts are widely used in industry and can be optimized by tuning the composition and interface of the metal nanoparticles and oxide supports. Rational design of metal-metal oxide interfaces in nanostructured catalysts is critical to achieve better reaction activities and selectivities. We introduce here a new class of nanocrystal tandem catalysts that have multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. We utilized a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers of less than 10 nm on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO2-Pt and Pt-SiO2, can be used to catalyse two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO2-Pt interface catalysed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H2, which were subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalysed by the nearby Pt-SiO2 interface. Consequently, propanal was produced selectively from methanol and ethylene on the nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst. This new concept of nanocrystal tandem catalysis represents a powerful approach towards designing high-performance, multifunctional nanostructured catalysts

  7. Antiferromagnetic state in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharitonov, Maxim

    2012-11-01

    Motivated by the recent experiment of Velasco Jr. [J. Velasco Jr. , Nat. Nanotechnology1748-338710.1038/nnano.2011.251 7, 156 (2012)], we develop a mean-field theory of the interaction-induced antiferromagnetic (AF) state in bilayer graphene at charge neutrality point at arbitrary perpendicular magnetic field B. We demonstrate that the AF state can persist at all B. At higher B, the state continuously crosses over to the AF phase of the ν=0 quantum Hall ferromagnet, recently argued to be realized in the insulating ν=0 state. The mean-field quasiparticle gap is finite at B=0 and grows with increasing B, becoming quasilinear in the quantum Hall regime, in accord with the reported behavior of the transport gap. By adjusting the two free parameters of the model, we obtain a simultaneous quantitative agreement between the experimental and theoretical values of the key parameters of the gap dependence—its zero-field value and slope at higher fields. Our findings suggest that the insulating state observed in bilayer graphene in Ref. is antiferromagnetic (canted, once the Zeeman effect is taken into account) at all magnetic fields.

  8. Colorimetric estimation of phospholipids in aqueous dispersions.

    PubMed

    Hallen, R M

    1980-05-01

    A method for the estimation of phospholipids in aqueous dispersions is described. The method is based on the formation of a lipid-molybdenum blue complex, which is extracted into chloroform from the aqueous phase. Phosphate ions, detergents, proteins, neutral lipids and various other ions do not interfere in the lipid estimation. The method is sensitive down to a lipid concentration of 0.1 mumol/ml, with an accuracy better than +/- 3%.

  9. /sup 31/P NMR analysis of membrane phospholipid organization in viable, reversibly electropermeabilized Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.; Rols, M.P.; Teissie, J.

    1988-02-23

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were reversibly permeabilized by submitting them to short, high-intensity, square wave pulses (1.8 kV/cm, 100 ..mu..s). The cells remained in a permeable state without loss of viability for several hours at 4/sup 0/C. A new anisotropic peak with respect to control cells was observed on /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopic analysis of the phospholipid components. This peak is only present when the cells are permeable, and normal anisotropy is recovered after resealing. Taking into account the fusogenicity of electropermeabilized cells, comparative studies were performed on 5% poly(ethylene glycol) treated cells. The /sup 31/P NMR spectra of the phospholipids displayed the same anisotropic peak as in the case of the electropermeabilized cells. In the two cases, this anisotropic peak was located downfield from the main peak associated to the phospholipids when organized in bilayers. The localization of this anisotropic peak is very different from the one of a hexagonal phase. The authors proposed a reorganization of the polar head group region leading to a weakening of the hydration layer to account for these observations. This was also thought to explain the electric field induced fusogenicity of these cells.

  10. Surface-active phospholipid: a Pandora's box of clinical applications. Part I. The lung and air spaces.

    PubMed

    Hills, B A

    2002-04-01

    Almost everywhere in the body there are phospholipids, not only comprising the lipid bilayer of membranes, but also in the free state. What is seldom appreciated, except in respirology, is that these 'free' phospholipids are unusual in that many are highly surface active. Surface activity is a property of certain substances (surfactants), conferred by their molecular constitution and configuration, which predisposes them to locate at interfaces because, in doing so, they reduce interfacial energy. When adsorbed (reversibly bound) to solid surfaces, surfactants can impart many highly desirable properties that have been widely studied and long accepted in the physical sciences, while their commercial applications have withstood the test of time. These desirable properties include lubricity (boundary lubrication), release (antistick) and dewatering, while providing a barrier to corrosion, abrasion, solute transmission and to biological microorganisms. Many of these offer obvious roles for surface-active phospholipid (SAPL), ranging from a corrosion inhibitor in the stomach to a load-bearing lubricant in the joints. This opens a veritable 'Pandora's box' of potential clinical applications. Part I of this review challenges traditional beliefs in respirology that 'surfactant' is unique to the lung and, moreover, that its actions are confined to the liquid-air interface. Evidence is discussed that, by binding to alveolar epithelium, SAPL imparts semi-permeability needed before channels pumping ions can also pump water vital for maintaining fluid balance. Evidence is also reviewed for a lining to upper airways, sinuses and Eustachian tube where it can act like a standard release agent.

  11. Solubilization of Membrane Proteins into Functional Lipid‐Bilayer Nanodiscs Using a Diisobutylene/Maleic Acid Copolymer

    PubMed Central

    Oluwole, Abraham Olusegun; Danielczak, Bartholomäus; Meister, Annette; Babalola, Jonathan Oyebamiji; Vargas, Carolyn

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Once removed from their natural environment, membrane proteins depend on membrane‐mimetic systems to retain their native structures and functions. To this end, lipid‐bilayer nanodiscs that are bounded by scaffold proteins or amphiphilic polymers such as styrene/maleic acid (SMA) copolymers have been introduced as alternatives to detergent micelles and liposomes for in vitro membrane‐protein research. Herein, we show that an alternating diisobutylene/maleic acid (DIBMA) copolymer shows equal performance to SMA in solubilizing phospholipids, stabilizes an integral membrane enzyme in functional bilayer nanodiscs, and extracts proteins of various sizes directly from cellular membranes. Unlike aromatic SMA, aliphatic DIBMA has only a mild effect on lipid acyl‐chain order, does not interfere with optical spectroscopy in the far‐UV range, and does not precipitate in the presence of low millimolar concentrations of divalent cations. PMID:28079955

  12. Phylogenomic investigation of phospholipid synthesis in archaea.

    PubMed

    Lombard, Jonathan; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David

    2012-01-01

    Archaea have idiosyncratic cell membranes usually based on phospholipids containing glycerol-1-phosphate linked by ether bonds to isoprenoid lateral chains. Since these phospholipids strongly differ from those of bacteria and eukaryotes, the origin of the archaeal membranes (and by extension, of all cellular membranes) was enigmatic and called for accurate evolutionary studies. In this paper we review some recent phylogenomic studies that have revealed a modified mevalonate pathway for the synthesis of isoprenoid precursors in archaea and suggested that this domain uses an atypical pathway of synthesis of fatty acids devoid of any acyl carrier protein, which is essential for this activity in bacteria and eukaryotes. In addition, we show new or updated phylogenetic analyses of enzymes likely responsible for the isoprenoid chain synthesis from their precursors and the phospholipid synthesis from glycerol phosphate, isoprenoids, and polar head groups. These results support that most of these enzymes can be traced back to the last archaeal common ancestor and, in many cases, even to the last common ancestor of all living organisms.

  13. Simple, generalizable route to highly aligned block copolymer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Zhe; Cavicchi, Kevin; Vogt, Bryan

    2015-03-01

    Macroscopic alignment of block copolymer domains in thin films is desired for many applications, such as cell responsive surfaces or optical polarizers. Alignment generally requires specialized tools that apply external fields, shear force gradient, or produce topological patterned substrates. This requirement limits the broad academic application of aligned BCPs. Here, we describe a simple modification of commonly utilized solvent vapor annealing (SVA) process for macroscopic alignment of BCPs. Adhering a flat, crosslinked elastomer pad to the BCP film leads to differential swelling between the elastomer pad and BCP to produce a shear force that aligns the ordered BCP domains. The role of elastomer properties, solvent quality, drying rate and degree of segregation of the block copolymer will be discussed to provide generalized rules for alignment with this technique. Cylindrical nanostructures formed in polystyrene-block-polydimethylsiloxane can be transformed into arrays of silica lines and increasing the thickness from a monolayer to bilayer can effectively halve the spacing of the lines. These results illustrate a generalized method for BCP alignment and a potential route for the generation of complex hierarchical assembled structures.

  14. Ethanol effects on binary and ternary supported lipid bilayers with gel/fluid domains and lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Marquês, Joaquim T; Viana, Ana S; De Almeida, Rodrigo F M

    2011-01-01

    Ethanol-lipid bilayer interactions have been a recurrent theme in membrane biophysics, due to their contribution to the understanding of membrane structure and dynamics. The main purpose of this study was to assess the interplay between membrane lateral heterogeneity and ethanol effects. This was achieved by in situ atomic force microscopy, following the changes induced by sequential ethanol additions on supported lipid bilayers formed in the absence of alcohol. Binary phospholipid mixtures with a single gel phase, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/cholesterol, gel/fluid phase coexistence DPPC/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and ternary lipid mixtures containing cholesterol, mimicking lipid rafts (DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol and DOPC/sphingomyelin/cholesterol), i.e., with liquid ordered/liquid disordered (ld/lo) phase separation, were investigated. For all compositions studied, and in two different solid supports, mica and silicon, domain formation or rearrangement accompanied by lipid bilayer thinning and expansion was observed. In the case of gel/fluid coexistence, low ethanol concentrations lead to a marked thinning of the fluid but not of the gel domains. In the case of ld/lo all the bilayer thins simultaneously by a similar extent. In both cases, only the more disordered phase expanded significantly, indicating that ethanol increases the proportion of disordered domains. Water/bilayer interfacial tension variation and freezing point depression, inducing acyl chain disordering (including opening and looping), tilting, and interdigitation, are probably the main cause for the observed changes. The results presented herein demonstrate that ethanol influences the bilayer properties according to membrane lateral organization.

  15. Stacking transition in bilayer graphene caused by thermally activated rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mengjian; Ghazaryan, Davit; Son, Seok-Kyun; Woods, Colin R.; Misra, Abhishek; He, Lin; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Cao, Yang; Mishchenko, Artem

    2017-03-01

    Crystallographic alignment between two-dimensional crystals in van der Waals heterostructures brought a number of profound physical phenomena, including observation of Hofstadter butterfly and topological currents, and promising novel applications, such as resonant tunnelling transistors. Here, by probing the electronic density of states in graphene using graphene-hexagonal boron nitride-graphene tunnelling transistors, we demonstrate a structural transition of bilayer graphene from incommensurate twisted stacking state into a commensurate AB stacking due to a macroscopic graphene self-rotation. This structural transition is accompanied by a topological transition in the reciprocal space and by pseudospin texturing. The stacking transition is driven by van der Waals interaction energy of the two graphene layers and is thermally activated by unpinning the microscopic chemical adsorbents which are then removed by the self-cleaning of graphene.

  16. Effect of variations in the structure of a polyleucine-based alpha-helical transmembrane peptide on its interaction with phosphatidylethanolamine Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Lewis, Ruthven N A H; Hodges, Robert S; McElhaney, Ronald N

    2004-10-01

    High-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to study the interaction of a cationic alpha-helical transmembrane peptide, acetyl-Lys2-Leu24-Lys2-amide (L24), and members of the homologous series of zwitterionic n-saturated diacyl phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs). Analogs of L24, in which the lysine residues were replaced by 2,3-diaminopropionic acid (acetyl-DAP2-Leu24-DAP2-amide (L24DAP)) or in which a leucine residue at each end of the polyleucine sequence was replaced by a tryptophan (Ac-K2-W-L22-W-K2-amide (WL22W)), were also studied to investigate the roles of lysine side-chain snorkeling and aromatic side-chain interactions with the interfacial region of phospholipid bilayers. The gel/liquid-crystalline phase transition temperature of the PE bilayers is altered by these peptides in a hydrophobic mismatch-independent manner, in contrast to the hydrophobic mismatch-dependent manner observed previously with zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) and anionic phosphatidylglycerol (PG) bilayers. Moreover, all three peptides reduce the phase transition temperature to a greater extent in PE bilayers than in PC and PG bilayers, indicating a greater disruption of PE gel-phase bilayer organization. Moreover, the lysine-anchored L24 reduces the phase transition temperature, enthalpy, and the cooperativity of PE bilayers to a much greater extent than DAP-anchored L24DAP, whereas replacement of the terminal leucines by tryptophan residues (Ac-K2-W-L22-W-K2-amide) only slightly attenuates the effects of this peptide on the chain-melting phase transition of the host PE bilayers. All three peptides form very stable alpha-helices in PE bilayers, but small conformational changes occur in response to mismatch between peptide hydrophobic length and gel-state lipid bilayer hydrophobic thickness. These results suggest that the lysine snorkeling plays a significant role in the peptide-PE interactions and that cation

  17. High coverage fluid-phase floating lipid bilayers supported by ω-thiolipid self-assembled monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Arwel V.; Holt, Stephen A.; Daulton, Emma; Soliakov, Andrei; Charlton, Timothy R.; Roser, Steven J.; Lakey, Jeremy H.

    2014-01-01

    Large area lipid bilayers, on solid surfaces, are useful in physical studies of biological membranes. It is advantageous to minimize the interactions of these bilayers with the substrate and this can be achieved via the formation of a floating supported bilayer (FSB) upon either a surface bound phospholipid bilayer or monolayer. The FSB's independence is enabled by the continuous water layer (greater than 15 Å) that remains between the two. However, previous FSBs have had limited stability and low density. Here, we demonstrate by surface plasmon resonance and neutron reflectivity, the formation of a complete self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold surfaces by a synthetic phosphatidylcholine bearing a thiol group at the end of one fatty acyl chain. Furthermore, a very dense FSB (more than 96%) of saturated phosphatidylcholine can be formed on this SAM by sequential Langmuir–Blodgett and Langmuir–Schaefer procedures. Neutron reflectivity used both isotopic and magnetic contrast to enhance the accuracy of the data fits. This system offers the means to study transmembrane proteins, membrane potential effects (using the gold as an electrode) and even model bacterial outer membranes. Using unsaturated phosphatidylcholines, which have previously failed to form stable FSBs, we achieved a coverage of 73%. PMID:25030385

  18. Orientation and dynamics of an antimicrobial peptide in the lipid bilayer by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, S; Huster, D; Waring, A; Lehrer, R I; Kearney, W; Tack, B F; Hong, M

    2001-01-01

    The orientation and dynamics of an 18-residue antimicrobial peptide, ovispirin, has been investigated using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Ovispirin is a cathelicidin-like model peptide (NH(2)-KNLRRIIRKIIHIIKKYG-COOH) with potent, broad-spectrum bactericidal activity. (15)N NMR spectra of oriented ovispirin reconstituted into synthetic phospholipids show that the helical peptide is predominantly oriented in the plane of the lipid bilayer, except for a small portion of the helix, possibly at the C-terminus, which deviates from the surface orientation. This suggests differential insertion of the peptide backbone into the lipid bilayer. (15)N spectra of both oriented and unoriented peptides show a reduced (15)N chemical shift anisotropy at room temperature compared with that of rigid proteins, indicating that the peptide undergoes uniaxial rotational diffusion around the bilayer normal with correlation times shorter than 10(-4) s. This motion is frozen below the gel-to-liquid crystalline transition temperature of the lipids. Ovispirin interacts strongly with the lipid bilayer, as manifested by the significantly reduced (2)H quadrupolar splittings of perdeuterated palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine acyl chains upon peptide binding. Therefore, ovispirin is a curved helix residing in the membrane-water interface that executes rapid uniaxial rotation. These structural and dynamic features are important for understanding the antimicrobial function of this peptide. PMID:11566791

  19. Monolayer and bilayer structures in ionic liquids and their mixtures confined to nano-films.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alexander M; Lovelock, Kevin R J; Perkin, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The confinement of liquids to thin films can lead to dramatic changes in their structural arrangement and dynamic properties. Ionic liquids display nano-structures in the bulk of the liquid, consisting of polar and non-polar domains, whereas a solid surface can induce layered structures in the near-surface liquid. Here we compare and contrast the layer structures in a series of imidazolium and pyrrolidinium-based ionic liquids upon confinement of the liquids to films of approximately 0-20 nm between two negatively charged mica surfaces. Using a surface force balance (SFB) we measured the force between the two atomically smooth mica surfaces with ionic liquid between, directly revealing the ion packing and dimensions of layered structures for each liquid. The ionic liquids with shorter alkyl chain substituents form alternating cation-anion monolayer structures on confinement, whilst a longer alkyl chain leads to alignment of the cations in bilayer formation. The crossover from monolayers to bilayers, however, occurs at different alkyl chain lengths for imidazolium- and pyrrolidinium-based ionic liquids with a common anion. In addition, we find that imidazolium cation bilayers are arranged in toe-to-toe orientation, whereas pyrrolidinium cations form bilayers consisting of fully interdigitated alkyl chains. Results for a mixture of monolayer-preferring (i.e. short alkyl chain) and bilayer-preferring (i.e. long alkyl chain) liquids indicate alkyl chain segregation and bilayer-like structures. We discuss the driving forces for these self-assembly effects, and the contrasting behaviour of the imidazolium and pyrrolidinium-type ionic liquids.

  20. Antidiabetic phospholipid-nuclear receptor complex reveals the mechanism for phospholipid-driven gene regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Musille, Paul M; Pathak, Manish C; Lauer, Janelle L; Hudson, William H; Griffin, Patrick R; Ortlund, Eric A

    2013-01-31

    The human nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) has an important role in controlling lipid and cholesterol homeostasis and is a potential target for the treatment of diabetes and hepatic diseases. LRH-1 is known to bind phospholipids, but the role of phospholipids in controlling LRH-1 activation remains highly debated. Here we describe the structure of both apo LRH-1 and LRH-1 in complex with the antidiabetic phospholipid dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC). Together with hydrogen-deuterium exchange MS and functional data, our studies show that DLPC binding is a dynamic process that alters co-regulator selectivity. We show that the lipid-free receptor undergoes previously unrecognized structural fluctuations, allowing it to interact with widely expressed co-repressors. These observations enhance our understanding of LRH-1 regulation and highlight its importance as a new therapeutic target for controlling diabetes.

  1. Evidence for phospholipid microdomain formation in liquid crystalline liposomes reconstituted with Escherichia coli lactose permease.

    PubMed Central

    Lehtonen, J Y; Kinnunen, P K

    1997-01-01

    The well-characterized integral membrane protein lactose (lac) permease from Escherichia coli was reconstituted together with trace amounts (molar fraction X = 0.005 of the total phospholipid) of different pyrene-labeled phospholipid analogs into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac'-glycerol (POPG) liposomes. Effects of lac permease on bilayer lipid dynamics were investigated by measuring the excimer-to-monomer fluorescence intensity ratio IE/IM. Compared to control vesicles, the presence of lac permease (at a protein:phospholipid stoichiometry P/L of 1:4.000) increased the rate of excimer formation by 1-palmitoyl-2[6-(pyren-1-yl)]decanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PPDPC) by approximately fivefold. Decreasing P/L from approximately 1:4.000 to 1:7.600 decreased the IE/IM for PPDPC from 0.16 to 0.05, respectively. An increase in bilayer fluidity due to permease is unlikely, thus implying that the augmented IE/IM should arise from partial lateral segregation of PPDPC in the vesicles. This notion is supported by the further 38% increase in IE/IM observed for the pyrene-labeled Cys-148 lac permease reconstituted into POPG vesicles at P/L 1:4000. The importance of the length of the lipid-protein boundary is implicated by the reduction in IE/IM resulting from the aggregation of the lac permease in vesicles by a monoclonal antibody. Interestingly, excimer formation by 1-palmitoyl-2[6-(pyren-1-yl)hexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PPHPC) was enhanced only fourfold in the presence of lac permease. Results obtained with the corresponding pyrenyl phosphatidylglycerols and -methanols were qualitatively similar to those above, thus indicating that lipid headgroup-protein interactions are not involved. Inclusion of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamino-N-(5-fluoresce inthio- carbamoyl) (DPPF, X = 0.005) into reconstituted lactose permease vesicles containing PPDPC caused a nearly 90% decrease in excimer fluorescence, whereas in control

  2. Tidal alignment of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, Jonathan; Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš

    2015-08-01

    We develop an analytic model for galaxy intrinsic alignments (IA) based on the theory of tidal alignment. We calculate all relevant nonlinear corrections at one-loop order, including effects from nonlinear density evolution, galaxy biasing, and source density weighting. Contributions from density weighting are found to be particularly important and lead to bias dependence of the IA amplitude, even on large scales. This effect may be responsible for much of the luminosity dependence in IA observations. The increase in IA amplitude for more highly biased galaxies reflects their locations in regions with large tidal fields. We also consider the impact of smoothing the tidal field on halo scales. We compare the performance of this consistent nonlinear model in describing the observed alignment of luminous red galaxies with the linear model as well as the frequently used "nonlinear alignment model," finding a significant improvement on small and intermediate scales. We also show that the cross-correlation between density and IA (the "GI" term) can be effectively separated into source alignment and source clustering, and we accurately model the observed alignment down to the one-halo regime using the tidal field from the fully nonlinear halo-matter cross correlation. Inside the one-halo regime, the average alignment of galaxies with density tracers no longer follows the tidal alignment prediction, likely reflecting nonlinear processes that must be considered when modeling IA on these scales. Finally, we discuss tidal alignment in the context of cosmic shear measurements.

  3. Tidal alignment of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, Jonathan; Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš E-mail: zvlah@stanford.edu

    2015-08-01

    We develop an analytic model for galaxy intrinsic alignments (IA) based on the theory of tidal alignment. We calculate all relevant nonlinear corrections at one-loop order, including effects from nonlinear density evolution, galaxy biasing, and source density weighting. Contributions from density weighting are found to be particularly important and lead to bias dependence of the IA amplitude, even on large scales. This effect may be responsible for much of the luminosity dependence in IA observations. The increase in IA amplitude for more highly biased galaxies reflects their locations in regions with large tidal fields. We also consider the impact of smoothing the tidal field on halo scales. We compare the performance of this consistent nonlinear model in describing the observed alignment of luminous red galaxies with the linear model as well as the frequently used 'nonlinear alignment model,' finding a significant improvement on small and intermediate scales. We also show that the cross-correlation between density and IA (the 'GI' term) can be effectively separated into source alignment and source clustering, and we accurately model the observed alignment down to the one-halo regime using the tidal field from the fully nonlinear halo-matter cross correlation. Inside the one-halo regime, the average alignment of galaxies with density tracers no longer follows the tidal alignment prediction, likely reflecting nonlinear processes that must be considered when modeling IA on these scales. Finally, we discuss tidal alignment in the context of cosmic shear measurements.

  4. Elastic energy of polyhedral bilayer vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haselwandter, Christoph A.; Phillips, Rob

    2011-06-01

    In recent experiments [M. Dubois, B. Demé, T. Gulik-Krzywicki, J.-C. Dedieu, C. Vautrin, S. Désert, E. Perez, and T. Zemb, Nature (London)NATUAS0028-083610.1038/35079541 411, 672 (2001)] the spontaneous formation of hollow bilayer vesicles with polyhedral symmetry has been observed. On the basis of the experimental phenomenology it was suggested [M. Dubois, V. Lizunov, A. Meister, T. Gulik-Krzywicki, J. M. Verbavatz, E. Perez, J. Zimmerberg, and T. Zemb, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USAPNASA60027-842410.1073/pnas.0400837101 101, 15082 (2004)] that the mechanism for the formation of bilayer polyhedra is minimization of elastic bending energy. Motivated by these experiments, we study the elastic bending energy of polyhedral bilayer vesicles. In agreement with experiments, and provided that excess amphiphiles exhibiting spontaneous curvature are present in sufficient quantity, we find that polyhedral bilayer vesicles can indeed be energetically favorable compared to spherical bilayer vesicles. Consistent with experimental observations we also find that the bending energy associated with the vertices of bilayer polyhedra can be locally reduced through the formation of pores. However, the stabilization of polyhedral bilayer vesicles over spherical bilayer vesicles relies crucially on molecular segregation of excess amphiphiles along the ridges rather than the vertices of bilayer polyhedra. Furthermore, our analysis implies that, contrary to what has been suggested on the basis of experiments, the icosahedron does not minimize elastic bending energy among arbitrary polyhedral shapes and sizes. Instead, we find that, for large polyhedron sizes, the snub dodecahedron and the snub cube both have lower total bending energies than the icosahedron.

  5. Energy transfer in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Estep, T N; Thompson, T E

    1979-01-01

    The quenching of fluorescence due to energy transfer between a dilute, random array of donor and acceptor chromophores in lipid bilayer was measured and compared to theoretical expressions developed to predict the decrease in emission intensity under these circumstances. The observed intensity was found to be the same function of quencher concentration in both planar, multilamellar dispersions and small, spherical vesicles. The degree of quenching was accurately predicted by a simple relation derived in this paper, as well as a more complex equation previously developed by Tweet, et al. The results suggest that significant quenching may be observed even when the average donor-acceptor separation exceeds the Förster critical distance by severalfold. Application of these results to problems of current interest in membrane research are discussed. PMID:262415

  6. Interaction of alpha-latroinsectotoxin from Latrodectus mactans venom with bilayer lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Shatursky OYa; Pashkov, V N; Bulgacov, O V; Grishin, E V

    1995-01-26

    alpha-Latroinsectotoxin (LIT) from Latrodectus mactans venom increased the conductance of bilayer lipid membranes (BLM) by inducing channel like activity. The channels formed had a maximal single channel conductance of 5 pS in 10 mM CaCl2 solution. This process occurred more rapidly in symmetrical 10 mM CaCl2 solution than in equimolar KCl or NaCl. The LIT induced conductance showed pronounced rectification, that was dependent upon the face of the BLM to which the LIT was applied. This suggests that the LIT molecules incorporate into the bilayer lipid membrane in an oriented manner. The ion channels formed in bilayer phospholipid membrane by LIT are cation selective. The permeability of divalent cations decreased in the order Ba2+ > Ca2+ > Mg2+ > Cd2+ > Zn2+ (Zn2+ and Cd2+ blocked effectively LIT channels with the ratio of Ca2+trans and Cd2+cis or Zn2+cis of 1:1). Selectivity of LIT to monovalent cations was not high and was Ca2+ sensitive. Our data suggest that LIT has at least two Ca(2+)-binding sites, a high affinity site and low one (pK of binding is 2.4). As a result, the binding kinetics of Ca2+ with the toxin shows a high positive cooperativity (Hill coefficient, (h) = 5.95) and that dimerization might be a prerequisite to channel formation. Temperature dependence of conductance of LIT treated lipid bilayers in 100 mM KCl and 10 mM CaCl2 solutions was also determined: 18.9 +/- 2.11 kJ/mol and 28.537 +/- 1.678 kJ/mol, respectively.

  7. Water Permeability of Aquaporin-4 Channel Depends on Bilayer Composition, Thickness, and Elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jihong; Briggs, Margaret M.; McIntosh, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is the primary water channel in the mammalian brain, particularly abundant in astrocytes, whose plasma membranes normally contain high concentrations of cholesterol. Here we test the hypothesis that the water permeabilities of two naturally occurring isoforms (AQP4-M1 and AQP4-M23) depend on bilayer mechanical/structural properties modulated by cholesterol and phospholipid composition. Osmotic stress measurements were performed with proteoliposomes containing AQP4 and three different lipid mixtures: 1), phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG); 2), PC, PG, with 40 mol % cholesterol; and 3), sphingomyelin (SM), PG, with 40 mol % cholesterol. The unit permeabilities of AQP4-M1 were 3.3 ± 0.4 × 10−13 cm3/s (mean ± SE), 1.2 ± 0.1 × 10−13 cm3/s, and 0.4 ± 0.1 × 10−13 cm3/s in PC:PG, PC:PG:cholesterol, and SM:PG:cholesterol, respectively. The unit permeabilities of AQP4-M23 were 2.1 ± 0.2 × 10−13 cm3/s, 0.8 ± 0.1 × 10−13 cm3/s, and 0.3 ± 0.1 × 10−13 cm3/s in PC:PG, PC:PG:cholesterol, and SM:PG:cholesterol, respectively. Thus, for each isoform the unit permeabilities strongly depended on bilayer composition and systematically decreased with increasing bilayer compressibility modulus and bilayer thickness. These observations suggest that altering lipid environment provides a means of regulating water channel permeability. Such permeability changes could have physiological consequences, because AQP4 water permeability would be reduced by its sequestration into SM:cholesterol-enriched raft microdomains. Conversely, under ischemic conditions astrocyte membrane cholesterol content decreases, which could increase AQP4 permeability. PMID:23199918

  8. Water permeability of aquaporin-4 channel depends on bilayer composition, thickness, and elasticity.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jihong; Briggs, Margaret M; McIntosh, Thomas J

    2012-11-07

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is the primary water channel in the mammalian brain, particularly abundant in astrocytes, whose plasma membranes normally contain high concentrations of cholesterol. Here we test the hypothesis that the water permeabilities of two naturally occurring isoforms (AQP4-M1 and AQP4-M23) depend on bilayer mechanical/structural properties modulated by cholesterol and phospholipid composition. Osmotic stress measurements were performed with proteoliposomes containing AQP4 and three different lipid mixtures: 1), phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG); 2), PC, PG, with 40 mol % cholesterol; and 3), sphingomyelin (SM), PG, with 40 mol % cholesterol. The unit permeabilities of AQP4-M1 were 3.3 ± 0.4 × 10(-13) cm(3)/s (mean ± SE), 1.2 ± 0.1 × 10(-13) cm(3)/s, and 0.4 ± 0.1 × 10(-13) cm(3)/s in PC:PG, PC:PG:cholesterol, and SM:PG:cholesterol, respectively. The unit permeabilities of AQP4-M23 were 2.1 ± 0.2 × 10(-13) cm(3)/s, 0.8 ± 0.1 × 10(-13) cm(3)/s, and 0.3 ± 0.1 × 10(-13) cm(3)/s in PC:PG, PC:PG:cholesterol, and SM:PG:cholesterol, respectively. Thus, for each isoform the unit permeabilities strongly depended on bilayer composition and systematically decreased with increasing bilayer compressibility modulus and bilayer thickness. These observations suggest that altering lipid environment provides a means of regulating water channel permeability. Such permeability changes could have physiological consequences, because AQP4 water permeability would be reduced by its sequestration into SM:cholesterol-enriched raft microdomains. Conversely, under ischemic conditions astrocyte membrane cholesterol content decreases, which could increase AQP4 permeability.

  9. Recording ion channels across soy-extracted lecithin bilayer generated by water-soluble quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Runjun; Mohanta, Dambarudhar

    2014-02-01

    We report on the quantum dot (QD)-induced ion channels across a soya-derived lecithin bilayer supported on a laser drilled of ~100 μm aperture of cellulose acetate substrate that separates two electrolytic chambers. Adequate current bursts were observed when the bilayer was subjected to a gating voltage. The voltage-dependent current fluctuation, across the bilayer, was attributed to the insertion of ~20 nm sized water-soluble CdSe QDs, forming nanopores due to their spontaneous aggregation. Apart from a closed state, the first observable conductance levels were found as 6.3 and 11 nS, as for the respective biasing voltages of -10 and -20 mV. The highest observable conductance states, at corresponding voltages were ~14.3 and 21.1 nS. Considering two simplified models, we predict that the non-spherical pores (dnspore) can be a better approximation over spherical nanopores (dspore) for exhibiting a definite conductance level. At times, even dnspore ≤ 4dspore and that the non-spherical nanopores were associated with a smaller No. of QDs than the case for spherical nanopores, for a definite conductance state. It seems like the current events are partly stochastic, possibly due to thermal effects on the aggregated QDs that would form nanopores. The dwell time of the states was predicted in the range of 384-411 μs. The ion channel mechanism in natural phospholipid bilayers over artificial ones will provide a closer account to understand ion transport mechanism in live cells and signaling activity including labelling with fluorescent QDs.

  10. Effect of acute thioacetamide administration on rat brain phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Osada, J.; Aylagas, H.; Miro-Obradors, M.J.; Arce, C.; Palacios-Alaiz, E.; Cascales, M. )

    1990-09-01

    Brain phospholipid composition and the ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate incorporation into brain phospholipids of control and rats treated for 3 days with thioacetamide were studied. Brain phospholipid content, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, lysolecithin and phosphatidic acid did not show any significant change by the effect of thioacetamide. In contrast, thioacetamide induced a significant decrease in the levels of phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylinositol and diphosphatidylglycerol. After 75 minutes of intraperitoneal label injection, specific radioactivity of all the above phospholipids with the exception of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine significantly increased. After 13 hours of isotope administration the specific radioactivity of almost all studied phospholipid classes was elevated, except for phosphatidic acid, the specific radioactivity of which did not change and for diphosphatidylglycerol which showed a decrease in specific radioactivity. These results suggest that under thioacetamide treatment brain phospholipids undergo metabolic transformations that may contribute to the hepatic encephalopathy induced by thioacetamide.

  11. Regulation of Phospholipid Synthesis in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Carman, George M.; Han, Gil-Soo

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with its full complement of organelles, synthesizes membrane phospholipids by pathways that are generally common to those found in higher eukaryotes. Phospholipid synthesis in yeast is regulated in response to a variety of growth conditions (e.g., inositol supplementation, zinc depletion, and growth stage) by a coordination of genetic (e.g., transcriptional activation and repression) and biochemical (e.g., activity modulation and localization) mechanisms. Phosphatidate (PA), whose cellular levels are controlled by the activities of key phospholipid synthesis enzymes, plays a central role in the transcriptional regulation of phospholipid synthesis genes. In addition to the regulation of gene expression, phosphorylation of key phospholipid synthesis catalytic and regulatory proteins controls the metabolism of phospholipid precursors and products. PMID:21275641

  12. Resonance energy transfer imaging of phospholipid vesicle interaction with a planar phospholipid membrane: undulations and attachment sites in the region of calcium-mediated membrane--membrane adhesion

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Membrane fusion of a phospholipid vesicle with a planar lipid bilayer is preceded by an initial prefusion stage in which a region of the vesicle membrane adheres to the planar membrane. A resonance energy transfer (RET) imaging microscope, with measured spectral transfer functions and a pair of radiometrically calibrated video cameras, was used to determine both the area of the contact region and the distances between the membranes within this zone. Large vesicles (5-20 microns diam) were labeled with the donor fluorophore coumarin- phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), while the planar membrane was labeled with the acceptor rhodamine-PE. The donor was excited with 390 nm light, and separate images of donor and acceptor emission were formed by the microscope. Distances between the membranes at each location in the image were determined from the RET rate constant (kt) computed from the acceptor:donor emission intensity ratio. In the absence of an osmotic gradient, the vesicles stably adhered to the planar membrane, and the dyes did not migrate between membranes. The region of contact was detected as an area of planar membrane, coincident with the vesicle image, over which rhodamine fluorescence was sensitized by RET. The total area of the contact region depended biphasically on the Ca2+ concentration, but the distance between the bilayers in this zone decreased with increasing [Ca2+]. The changes in area and separation were probably related to divalent cation effects on electrostatic screening and binding to charged membranes. At each [Ca2+], the intermembrane separation varied between 1 and 6 nm within each contact region, indicating membrane undulation prior to adhesion. Intermembrane separation distances < or = 2 nm were localized to discrete sites that formed in an ordered arrangement throughout the contact region. The area of the contact region occupied by these punctate attachment sites was increased at high [Ca2+]. Membrane fusion may be initiated at these sites of

  13. Phospholipid methylation in starfish spermatozoa is linked to sperm chemoattraction.

    PubMed Central

    Tezon, J; Miller, R L; Bardin, C W

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism whereby ovarian peptides cause sperm attraction was studied in the starfish. Phospholipid methylation and protein-O-carboxyl methylation, reactions linked to chemotactic responses in a variety of systems, were studied in starfish sperm. When sperm were preincubated with [methyl-3H]methionine and then exposed to the attractant, a rapid drop in radioactivity occurred in the phospholipid fraction. Methylated phospholipids decreased by 90% in the first 2 sec; however, no change was observed in endogenous methylation of protein carboxyl groups. The effect on phospholipid methylation was dose dependent, with a 40% reduction in radioactive phospholipids in sperm occurring with the minimal amount of attractant necessary to obtain a positive response in a sperm attraction bioassay. Attractants from species of starfish with little or no cross-reactivity in the bioassay had a limited effect on phospholipid methylation. The transmethylase inhibitor, homocysteine, caused a marked decrease in the accumulation of methylated phospholipids under basal conditions, which was correlated with as much as a 50-fold increase in sperm sensitivity to the attractant. The addition of chemoattractant resulted in a reduction in the amount of all individual methylated phospholipids, but the amount of phosphatidylmono[3H]methylethanolamine relative to the other methylated phospholipid decreased by a factor of 4 after stimulation. Homocysteine had the same effect. The reduction in methylated phospholipids by attractants suggests that phospholipid methylation is linked to the mechanism of action of these peptides. Methylation of phospholipids may play a role in the rapid desensitization of sperm cells to the attractant, which would be required for the orientation of the spermatozoa in the gradient of ovarian peptide. PMID:3459145

  14. Imaging the oxidation effects of the Fenton reaction on phospholipids at the interface between aqueous phase and thermotropic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minmin; Jang, Chang-Hyun

    2015-08-01

    The lipid peroxidation process has attracted much attention because of the growing evidence of its involvement in the pathogenesis of age-related diseases. Herein, we report a simple, label-free method to study the oxidation of phospholipids by the Fenton reaction at the interface between an aqueous phase and immiscible liquid crystals (LCs). The different images produced by the orientation of 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) corresponded to the presence or absence of oxidized 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-(1-glycerol) sodium salt (DOPG). The oxidation effects of the Fenton reaction on DOPG were evaluated by monitoring the orientational response of liquid crystals upon contact with the oxidized DOPG solutions. DOPG was oxidized into chain-changed products containing hydroxy, carbonyl, or aldehyde groups, resulting in the rearrangement of the phospholipid layer. This induced the orientational transition of LCs from homeotropic to planar states; therefore, a dark to bright optical shift was observed. This shift was due to the Fenton reaction preventing DOPG to induce the orientational alignment of LCs at the aqueous/LC interface. We also used an ultraviolet spectrophotometer to confirm the effects of oxidation on phospholipids by the Fenton reaction. Using this simple method, a new approach for investigating phospholipid oxidation was established with high resolution and easy accessibility.

  15. Platelet activating factor activity in the phospholipids of bovine spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, J.E.; Hough, S.; Elrod, C. )

    1990-11-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has been detected in sperm from several mammalian species and can affect sperm motility and fertilization. Because bovine sperm contain a high percentage of ether-linked phospholipid precursors required for PAF synthesis, a study was undertaken to determine the PAF activity of bovine sperm phospholipids. Total lipids of washed, ejaculated bull sperm were extracted, and phospholipids were fractionated by thin-layer chromatography. Individual phospholipid fractions were assayed for PAF activity on the basis of (3H)serotonin release from equine platelets. PAF activity was detected in the PAF fraction (1.84 pmol/mumol total phospholipid) and in serine/inositol (PS/PI), choline (CP), and ethanolamine phosphoglyceride (EP) and cardiolipin (CA) fractions. Activity was highest in the CP fraction (8.05 pmol/mumol total phospholipid). Incomplete resolution of PAF and neutral lipids may have contributed to the activity in the PS/PI and CA fractions, respectively. Phospholipids from nonsperm sources did not stimulate serotonin release. Platelet activation by purified PAF and by sperm phospholipid fractions was inhibited by the receptor antagonist SRI 63-675. These results indicate that bovine sperm contain PAF and that other sperm phospholipids, especially CP and EP, which are high in glycerylether components, are capable of receptor-mediated platelet activation.

  16. Phospholipid biosynthesis and solvent tolerance in Pseudomonas putida strains.

    PubMed Central

    Pinkart, H C; White, D C

    1997-01-01

    The role of the cell envelope in the solvent tolerance mechanisms of Pseudomonas putida was investigated. The responses of a solvent-tolerant strain, P. putida Idaho, and a solvent-sensitive strain, P. putida MW1200, were examined in terms of phospholipid content and composition and of phospholipid biosynthetic rate following exposure to a nonmetabolizable solvent, o-xylene. Following o-xylene exposure, P. putida MW1200 exhibited a decrease in total phospholipid content. In contrast, P. putida Idaho demonstrated an increase in phospholipid content 1 to 6 h after exposure. Analysis of phospholipid biosynthesis showed P. putida Idaho to have a higher basal rate of phospholipid synthesis than MW1200. This rate increased significantly following exposure to xylene. Both strains showed little significant turnover of phospholipid in the absence of xylene. In the presence of xylene, both strains showed increased phospholipid turnover. The rate of turnover was significantly greater in P. putida Idaho than in P. putida MW1200. These results suggest that P. putida Idaho has a greater ability than the solvent-sensitive strain MW1200 to repair damaged membranes through efficient turnover and increased phospholipid biosynthesis. PMID:9209036

  17. Interaction of elaiophylin with model bilayer membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, J.; Dencheva-Zarkova, M.

    2017-01-01

    Elaiophylin is a new macrodiolide antibiotic, which is produced by the Streptomyces strains [1]. It displays biological activities against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. The mode of action of this antibiotic has been attributed to an alteration of the membrane permeability. When this antibiotic is inserted into the bilayer membranes destabilization of the membrane and formation of ion-penetrable channels is observed. The macrodiolide antibiotic forms stable cation selective ion channels in synthetic lipid bilayer membranes. The aim of this work was to study the interactions of Elaiophylin with model bilayer membranes and to get information on the mechanical properties of lipid bilayers in presence of this antibiotic. Patch-clamp technique [2] were used in the study

  18. Phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes in human brain.

    PubMed

    Ross, B M; Moszczynska, A; Blusztajn, J K; Sherwin, A; Lozano, A; Kish, S J

    1997-04-01

    Growing evidence suggests an involvement of brain membrane phospholipid metabolism in a variety of neurodegenerative and psychiatric conditions. This has prompted the use of drugs (e.g., CDPcholine) aimed at elevating the rate of neural membrane synthesis. However, no information is available regarding the human brain enzymes of phospholipid synthesis which these drugs affect. Thus, the objective of our study was to characterize the enzymes involved, in particular, whether differences existed in the relative affinity of substrates for the enzymes of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) compared to those of phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis. The concentration of choline in rapidly frozen human brain biopsies ranged from 32-186 nmol/g tissue, a concentration similar to that determined previously for ethanolamine. Since human brain ethanolamine kinase possessed a much lower affinity for ethanolamine (Km = 460 microM) than choline kinase did for choline (Km = 17 microM), the activity of ethanolamine kinase in vivo may be more dependent on substrate availability than that of choline kinase. In addition, whereas ethanolamine kinase was inhibited by choline, and to a lesser extent by phosphocholine, choline kinase activity was unaffected by the presence of ethanolamine, or phosphoethanolamine, and only weakly inhibited by phosphocholine. Phosphoethanolamine cytidylyltransferase (PECT) and phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (PCCT) also displayed dissimilar characteristics, with PECT and PCCT being located predominantly in the cytosolic and particulate fractions, respectively. Both PECT and PCCT exhibited a low affinity for CTP (Km approximately 1.2 mM), suggesting that the activities of these enzymes, and by implication, the rate of phospholipid synthesis, are highly dependent upon the cellular concentration of CTP. In conclusion our data indicate different regulatory properties of PE and PC synthesis in human brain, and suggest that the rate of PE synthesis may be more

  19. Phospholipid and sphingolipid metabolism in Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Beverley, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    In many eukaryotes, phospholipids (PLs) and sphingolipids (SLs) are abundant membrane components and reservoirs for important signaling molecules. In Leishmania, the composition, metabolism, and function of PLs and SLs differ significantly from those in mammalian cells. Although only a handful of enzymes have been experimentally characterized, available data suggest many steps of PL/SL metabolism are critical for Leishmania viability and/or virulence, and could be a source for new drug targets. Further studies of genes involved in the synthesis (de novo and salvage) and degradation of PLs and SLs will reveal their diverse effects on Leishmania pathogenesis. PMID:20026359

  20. Dietary Phospholipids and Intestinal Cholesterol Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Jeffrey S.; Kamili, Alvin; Wat, Elaine; Chung, Rosanna W. S.; Tandy, Sally

    2010-01-01

    Experiments carried out with cultured cells and in experimental animals have consistently shown that phospholipids (PLs) can inhibit intestinal cholesterol absorption. Limited evidence from clinical studies suggests that dietary PL supplementation has a similar effect in man. A number of biological mechanisms have been proposed in order to explain how PL in the gut lumen is able to affect cholesterol uptake by the gut mucosa. Further research is however required to establish whether the ability of PLs to inhibit cholesterol absorption is of therapeutic benefit. PMID:22254012

  1. Controlling the Electronic Structure of Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Taisuke; Bostwick, Aaron; Seyller, Thomas; Horn, Karsten; Rotenberg, Eli

    2006-08-01

    We describe the synthesis of bilayer graphene thin films deposited on insulating silicon carbide and report the characterization of their electronic band structure using angle-resolved photoemission. By selectively adjusting the carrier concentration in each layer, changes in the Coulomb potential led to control of the gap between valence and conduction bands. This control over the band structure suggests the potential application of bilayer graphene to switching functions in atomic-scale electronic devices.

  2. α-Tocopherol Is Well Designed to Protect Polyunsaturated Phospholipids: MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Xiaoling; Kinnun, Jacob J.; Marquardt, Drew; Ghefli, Mikel; Kučerka, Norbert; Katsaras, John; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Harroun, Thad A.; Feller, Scott E.; Wassall, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    The presumptive function for alpha-tocopherol (αtoc) in membranes is to protect polyunsaturated lipids against oxidation. Although the chemistry of the process is well established, the role played by molecular structure that we address here with atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations remains controversial. The simulations were run in the constant particle NPT ensemble on hydrated lipid bilayers composed of SDPC (1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoylphosphatidylcholine, 18:0-22:6PC) and SOPC (1-stearoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine, 18:0-18:1PC) in the presence of 20 mol % αtoc at 37°C. SDPC with SA (stearic acid) for the sn-1 chain and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) for the sn-2 chain is representative of polyunsaturated phospholipids, while SOPC with OA (oleic acid) substituted for the sn-2 chain serves as a monounsaturated control. Solid-state 2H nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron diffraction experiments provide validation. The simulations demonstrate that high disorder enhances the probability that DHA chains at the sn-2 position in SDPC rise up to the bilayer surface, whereby they encounter the chromanol group on αtoc molecules. This behavior is reflected in the van der Waals energy of interaction between αtoc and acyl chains, and illustrated by density maps of distribution for acyl chains around αtoc molecules that were constructed. An ability to more easily penetrate deep into the bilayer is another attribute conferred upon the chromanol group in αtoc by the high disorder possessed by DHA. By examining the trajectory of single molecules, we found that αtoc flip-flops across the SDPC bilayer on a submicrosecond timescale that is an order-of-magnitude greater than in SOPC. Our results reveal mechanisms by which the sacrificial hydroxyl group on the chromanol group can trap lipid peroxyl radicals within the interior and near the surface of a polyunsaturated membrane. At the same time, water-soluble reducing agents that regenerate αtoc can access the chromanol

  3. Role of protein-phospholipid interactions in the activation of ARF1 by the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Arno.

    PubMed

    Paris, S; Béraud-Dufour, S; Robineau, S; Bigay, J; Antonny, B; Chabre, M; Chardin, P

    1997-08-29

    Arno is a 47-kDa human protein recently identified as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for ADP ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) with a central Sec7 domain responsible for the exchange activity and a carboxyl-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain (Chardin, P., Paris, S., Antonny, B., Robineau, S., Béraud-Dufour, S., Jackson, C. L., and Chabre, M. (1996) Nature 384, 481-484). Binding of the PH domain to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) greatly enhances Arno-mediated activation of myristoylated ARF1. We show here that in the absence of phospholipids, Arno promotes nucleotide exchange on [Delta17]ARF1, a soluble mutant of ARF1 lacking the first 17 amino acids. This reaction is unaffected by PIP2, which suggests that the PIP2-PH domain interaction does not directly regulate the catalytic activity of Arno but rather serves to recruit Arno to membranes. Arno catalyzes the release of GDP more efficiently than that of GTP from [Delta17]ARF1, and a stable complex between Arno Sec7 domain and nucleotide-free [Delta17]ARF1 can be isolated. In contrast to [Delta17]ARF1, full-length unmyristoylated ARF1 is not readily activated by Arno in solution. Its activation requires the presence of phospholipids and a reduction of ionic strength and Mg2+ concentration. PIP2 is strongly stimulatory, indicating that binding of Arno to phospholipids is involved, but in addition, electrostatic interactions between phospholipids and the amino-terminal portion of unmyristoylated ARF1GDP seem to be important. We conclude that efficient activation of full-length ARF1 by Arno requires a membrane surface and two distinct protein-phospholipid interactions: one between the PH domain of Arno and PIP2, and the other between amino-terminal cationic residues of ARF1 and anionic phospholipids. The latter interaction is normally induced by insertion of the amino-terminal myristate into the bilayer but can also be artificially facilitated by decreasing Mg2+ and salt concentrations.

  4. Dynamic Morphologies of Microscale Droplet Interface Bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Mruetusatorn, Prachya; Boreyko, Jonathan B; Sarles, Stephen A; Venkatesan, Guru; Hayes, Douglas G; Collier, Pat

    2014-01-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) are a powerful platform for studying the dynamics of synthetic cellular membranes; however, very little has been done to exploit the unique dynamical features of DIBs. Here, we generate microscale droplet interface bilayers ( DIBs) by bringing together femtoliter-volume water droplets in a microfluidic oil channel, and characterize morphological changes of the DIBs as the droplets shrink due to evaporation. By varying the initial conditions of the system, we identify three distinct classes of dynamic morphology. (1) Buckling and Fission: When forming DIBs using the lipid-out method (lipids in oil phase), lipids in the shrinking monolayers continually pair together and slide into the bilayer to conserve their mass. As the bilayer continues to grow, it becomes confined, buckles, and eventually fissions one or more vesicles. (2) Uniform Shrinking: When using the lipid-in method (lipids in water phase) to form DIBs, lipids uniformly transfer from the monolayers and bilayer into vesicles contained inside the water droplets. (3) Stretching and Unzipping: Finally, when the droplets are pinned to the wall(s) of the microfluidic channel, the droplets become stretched during evaporation, culminating in the unzipping of the bilayer and droplet separation. These findings offer a better understanding of the dynamics of coupled lipid interfaces.

  5. Systematic study of electronic structure and band alignment of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides in Van der Waals heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chenxi; Gong, Cheng; Nie, Yifan; Min, Kyung-Ah; Liang, Chaoping; Oh, Young Jun; Zhang, Hengji; Wang, Weihua; Hong, Suklyun; Colombo, Luigi; Wallace, Robert M.; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2017-03-01

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are promising low-dimensional materials which can produce diverse electronic properties and band alignment in van der Waals heterostructures. Systematic density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed for 24 different TMD monolayers and their bilayer heterostacks. DFT calculations show that monolayer TMDs can behave as semiconducting, metallic or semimetallic depending on their structures; we also calculated the band alignment of the TMDs to predict their alignment in van der Waals heterostacks. We have applied the charge equilibration model (CEM) to obtain a quantitative formula predicting the highest occupied state of any type of bilayer TMD heterostacks (552 pairs for 24 TMDs). The CEM predicted values agree quite well with the selected DFT simulation results. The quantitative prediction of the band alignment in the TMD heterostructures can provide an insightful guidance to the development of TMD-based devices.

  6. Phospholipid imprinted polymers as selective endotoxin scavengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulc, Robert; Szekely, Gyorgy; Shinde, Sudhirkumar; Wierzbicka, Celina; Vilela, Filipe; Bauer, David; Sellergren, Börje

    2017-03-01

    Herein we explore phospholipid imprinting as a means to design receptors for complex glycolipids comprising the toxic lipopolysaccharide endotoxin. A series of polymerizable bis-imidazolium and urea hosts were evaluated as cationic and neutral hosts for phosphates and phosphonates, the latter used as mimics of the phospholipid head groups. The bis-imidazolium hosts interacted with the guests in a cooperative manner leading to the presence of tight and well defined 1:2 ternary complexes. Optimized monomer combinations were subsequently used for imprinting of phosphatidic acid as an endotoxin dummy template. Presence of the aforementioned ternary complexes during polymerization resulted in imprinting of lipid dimers – the latter believed to crudely mimic the endotoxin Lipid A motif. The polymers were characterized with respect to template rebinding, binding affinity, capacity and common structural properties, leading to the identification of polymers which were thereafter subjected to an industrially validated endotoxin removal test. Two of the polymers were capable of removing endotoxin down to levels well below the accepted threshold (0.005 EU/mg API) in pharmaceutical production.

  7. Phospholipid imprinted polymers as selective endotoxin scavengers

    PubMed Central

    Sulc, Robert; Szekely, Gyorgy; Shinde, Sudhirkumar; Wierzbicka, Celina; Vilela, Filipe; Bauer, David; Sellergren, Börje

    2017-01-01

    Herein we explore phospholipid imprinting as a means to design receptors for complex glycolipids comprising the toxic lipopolysaccharide endotoxin. A series of polymerizable bis-imidazolium and urea hosts were evaluated as cationic and neutral hosts for phosphates and phosphonates, the latter used as mimics of the phospholipid head groups. The bis-imidazolium hosts interacted with the guests in a cooperative manner leading to the presence of tight and well defined 1:2 ternary complexes. Optimized monomer combinations were subsequently used for imprinting of phosphatidic acid as an endotoxin dummy template. Presence of the aforementioned ternary complexes during polymerization resulted in imprinting of lipid dimers – the latter believed to crudely mimic the endotoxin Lipid A motif. The polymers were characterized with respect to template rebinding, binding affinity, capacity and common structural properties, leading to the identification of polymers which were thereafter subjected to an industrially validated endotoxin removal test. Two of the polymers were capable of removing endotoxin down to levels well below the accepted threshold (0.005 EU/mg API) in pharmaceutical production. PMID:28303896

  8. Dihydrolipoyl dioleoylglycerol antioxidant capacity in phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Laszlo, Joseph A; Evans, Kervin O; Compton, David L; Appell, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Antioxidants have critical roles in maintaining cellular homeostasis and disease-state prevention. The multi-functional agent α-lipoic acid offers numerous beneficial effects to oxidatively stressed tissues. α-Lipoic acid was enzymatically incorporated into a triglyceride in conjunction with oleic acid, creating lipoyl dioleoylglycerol, and chemically reduced to form dihydrolipoyl dioleoylglycerol. The triglyceride forms of lipoic acid stabilized dioleoylphosphatidylcholine unilamellar liposomal vesicles, as judged by calcein-cobalt leakage. Stabilization resulted from increased packing density of phospholipid acyl chains. Scavenging activity against the 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) radical was monitored by oxidation of 4,4-difluoro-5-(4-phenyl-1,3-butadienyl)-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-undecanoic acid (C(11)-Bodipy). Dihydrolipoyl dioleoylglycerol in vesicles demonstrated strong antioxidant capacity in comparison to the conventional Trolox standard. Fluorescence quenching measurements indicated the lipoyl moiety of dihydrolipoyl dioleoylglycerol is positioned near the vesicle aqueous/lipid boundary. Treatment of intact vesicles with a nonpenetrating sulfhydryl reagent indicated that 80% of the dihydrolipoyl dioleoylglycerol was available for reaction. Molecular modeling of lipoyl dioleoylglycerol and dihydrolipoyl dioleoylglycerol in a phospholipid layer confirmed the existence of an extended configuration for the molecules that accounts for the interfacial location of the lipoyl moiety, which may allow the antioxidant to readily react with radical species approaching membranes from the aqueous phase.

  9. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, N.E.

    1988-03-10

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam. 5 figs.

  10. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Nelson E.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam.

  11. Hybrid vehicle motor alignment

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Michael Benjamin

    2001-07-03

    A rotor of an electric motor for a motor vehicle is aligned to an axis of rotation for a crankshaft of an internal combustion engine having an internal combustion engine and an electric motor. A locator is provided on the crankshaft, a piloting tool is located radially by the first locator to the crankshaft. A stator of the electric motor is aligned to a second locator provided on the piloting tool. The stator is secured to the engine block. The rotor is aligned to the crankshaft and secured thereto.

  12. Exploring the Effects on Lipid Bilayer Induced by Noble Gases via Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junlang; Chen, Liang; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiaogang; Zeng, Songwei

    2015-11-01

    Noble gases seem to have no significant effect on the anesthetic targets due to their simple, spherical shape. However, xenon has strong narcotic efficacy and can be used clinically, while other noble gases cannot. The mechanism remains unclear. Here, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on phospholipid bilayers with four kinds of noble gases to elucidate the difference of their effects on the membrane. Our results showed that the sequence of effects on membrane exerted by noble gases from weak to strong was Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe, the same order as their relative narcotic potencies as well as their lipid/water partition percentages. Compared with the other three kinds of noble gases, more xenon molecules were distributed between the lipid tails and headgroups, resulting in membrane’s lateral expansion and lipid tail disorder. It may contribute to xenon’s strong anesthetic potency. The results are well consistent with the membrane mediated mechanism of general anesthesia.

  13. RKKY interaction in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Yawar; Moradian, Rostam

    2015-12-01

    We study the RKKY interaction between two magnetic impurities located on the same layer (intralayer case) or on different layers (interlayer case) in undoped bilayer graphene (BLG) in the four-bands model, by directly calculating the Green functions in the eigenvalues and eigenvectors representation. Our results show that both intra- and interlayer RKKY interactions between two magnetic impurities located on the same (opposite) sublattice are always ferromagnetic (antiferromagnetic). Furthermore we find unusual long-distance decay of the RKKY interaction in BLG. The intralyer RKKY interactions between two magnetic impurities located on the same sublattice, J AnAn(R) and J BnBn(R), decay closely as 1 /R6 and 1 /R2 at large impurity distances respectively, but when they are located on opposite sublattices the RKKY interactions exhibit 1 /R4 decays approximately. In the interlayer case, the RKKY interactions between two magnetic impurities located on the same sublattice show a decay close to 1 /R4 at large impurity distances, but if two magnetic impurities be on opposite sublattices the RKKY interactions, J A1B2(R) and J B1A2(R), decay closely as 1 /R6 and 1 /R2 respectively. Both intra- and interlayer RKKY interactions have anisotropic oscillatory factors which for intralayer case is equal to that for single layer graphene (SLG). Our results at weak and strong interlayer coupling limits reduce to the RKKY interaction of SLG and that of BLG in the two-bands approximation respectively.

  14. Emergent Electromagnetism in Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Roland; Zülicke, Ulrich

    2013-03-01

    Recently atomically flat layers of carbon known as graphene have become the rising star in spintronics as their electrons carry not only the ordinary spin degree of freedom, but they also have a pseudospin degree of freedom tied to the electrons' orbital motion which could enable new routes for spintronics. Here we focus on bilayer graphene (BLG). Using group theory we have established a complete description of how electrons in BLG interact with electric and magnetic fields. We show that electrons in BLG experience an unusual type of matter-field interactions where magnetic and electric fields are virtually equivalent: every coupling of an electron's degrees of freedom to a magnetic field is matched by an analogous coupling of the same degrees of freedom to an electric field. This counter-intuitive duality of matter-field interactions allows novel ways to create and manipulate spin and pseudo-spin polarizations via external fields that are not available in other materials. See arXiv:1206.4761. This work was supported by Marsden Fund contract no. VUW0719, administered by the Royal Society of New Zealand. Work at Argonne was supported by DOE BES under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  15. Phospholipid synthesis rates in the eastern subtropical South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Mooy, B. A. S.; Moutin, T.; Duhamel, S.; Rimmelin, P.; van Wambeke, F.

    2008-02-01

    Membrane lipid molecules are a major component of planktonic organisms and this is particularly true of the microbial picoplankton that dominate the open ocean; with their high surface-area to volume ratios, the synthesis of membrane lipids places a major demand on their overall cell metabolism. Specifically, the synthesis of cell membrane phospholipids creates a demand for the nutrient phosphorus, and we sought to refine our understanding of the role of phospholipids in the upper ocean phosphorus cycle. We measured the rates of phospholipid synthesis in a transect of the eastern subtropical South Pacific from Easter Island to Concepcion, Chile as part of the BIOSOPE program. Our approach combined standard phosphorus radiotracer incubations and lipid extraction methods. We found that phospholipid synthesis rates varied from less than 1 to greater than 200 pmol P L-1 h-1, and that phospholipid synthesis contributed between less than 5% to greater than 22% of the total PO43- incorporation rate. Changes in the percentage that phospholipid synthesis contributed to total PO43- uptake were strongly correlated with the ratio of primary production to bacterial production, which supported our hypothesis that heterotrophic bacteria were the primary agents of phospholipid synthesis. The spatial variation in phospholipid synthesis rates underscored the importance of heterotrophic bacteria in the phosphorus cycle of the eastern subtropical South Pacific, particularly the hyperoligotrophic South Pacific subtropical gyre.

  16. Phospholipid synthesis rates in the eastern subtropical South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Mooy, B. A. S.; Moutin, T.; Duhamel, S.; Rimmelin, P.; van Wambeke, F.

    2007-08-01

    Membrane lipid molecules are a major component of planktonic organisms and this is particularly true of the microbial picoplankton that dominate the open ocean; with their high surface-area to volume ratios, the synthesis of membrane lipids places a major demand on their overall cell metabolism. The synthesis of one class of membrane lipids, the phospholipids, also creates a demand for the nutrient phosphorus, and we sought to refine our understanding of the role of phospholipids in the upper ocean phosphorus cycle. We measured the rates of phospholipid synthesis in a transect of the eastern subtropical South Pacific from Easter Island to Concepcion, Chile as part of the BIOSOPE program. Our approach combined standard phosphorus radiotracer incubations and lipid extraction methods. We found that phospholipid synthesis rates varied from less than 1 to greater than 200 pmol P L-1 h-1, and that phospholipid synthesis contributed between less than 5% to greater than 22% of the total PO43- incorporation rate. Changes in the percentage that phospholipid synthesis contributed to total PO43- incorporation were strongly correlated with the ratio of primary production to bacterial production, which supported our hypothesis that heterotrophic bacteria were the primary agents of phospholipid synthesis. The spatial variation in phospholipid synthesis rates underscored the importance of heterotrophic bacteria in the phosphorus cycle of the eastern subtropical South Pacific, particularly the hyperoligotrophic South Pacific subtropical gyre.

  17. Aldose Reductase-catalyzed Reduction of Aldehyde Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sanjay; Spite, Matthew; Trent, John O.; West, Matthew B.; Ahmed, Yonis; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Oxidation of unsaturated phospholipids results in the generation of aldehyde side chains that remain esterified to the phospholipid backbone. Such “core” aldehydes elicit immune responses and promote inflammation. However, the biochemical mechanisms by which phospholipid aldehydes are metabolized or detoxified are not well understood. In the studies reported here, we examined whether aldose reductase (AR), which reduces hydrophobic aldehydes, metabolizes phospholipid aldehydes. Incubation with AR led to the reduction of 5-oxovaleroyl, 7-oxo-5-heptenoyl, 5-hydroxy-6-oxo-caproyl, and 5-hydroxy-8-oxo-6-octenoyl phospholipids generated upon oxidation of 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PAPC). The enzyme also catalyzed the reduction of phospholipid aldehydes generated from the oxidation of 1-alkyl, and 1-alkenyl analogs of PAPC, and 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl phosphatidic acid or phosphoglycerol. Aldose reductase catalyzed the reduction of chemically synthesized 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POVPC) with a Km of 10 μM. Addition of POVPC to the culture medium led to incorporation and reduction of the aldehyde in COS-7 and THP-1 cells. Reduction of POVPC in these cells was prevented by the AR inhibitors sorbinil and tolrestat and was increased in COS-7 cells overexpressing AR. Together, these observations suggest that AR may be a significant participant in the metabolism of several structurally diverse phospholipid aldehydes. This metabolism may be a critical regulator of the pro-inflammatory and immunogenic effects of oxidized phospholipids. PMID:15465833

  18. Insertion and self-diffusion of a monotopic protein, the Aquifex aeolicus sulfide quinone reductase, in supported lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Harb, Frédéric; Prunetti, Laurence; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Guiral, Marianne; Tinland, Bernard

    2015-10-01

    Monotopic proteins constitute a class of membrane proteins that bind tightly to cell membranes, but do not span them. We present a FRAPP (Fluorescence Recovery After Patterned Photobleaching) study of the dynamics of a bacterial monotopic protein, SQR (sulfide quinone oxidoreductase) from the thermophilic bacteria Aquifex aeolicus, inserted into two different types of lipid bilayers (EggPC: L-α-phosphatidylcholine (Egg, Chicken) and DMPC: 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) supported on two different types of support (mica or glass). It sheds light on the behavior of a monotopic protein inside the bilayer. The insertion of SQR is more efficient when the bilayer is in the fluid phase than in the gel phase. We observed diffusion of the protein, with no immobile fraction, and deduced from the diffusion coefficient measurements that the resulting inserted object is the same whatever the incubation conditions, i.e. homogeneous in terms of oligomerization state. As expected, the diffusion coefficient of the SQR is smaller in the gel phase than in the fluid phase. In the supported lipid bilayer, the diffusion coefficient of the SQR is smaller than the diffusion coefficient of phospholipids in both gel and fluid phase. SQR shows a diffusion behavior different from the transmembrane protein α-hemolysin, and consistent with its monotopic character. Preliminary experiments in the presence of the substrate of SQR, DecylUbiquinone, an analogue of quinone, component of transmembrane electrons transport systems of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, have been carried out. Finally, we studied the behavior of SQR, in terms of insertion and diffusion, in bilayers formed with lipids from Aquifex aeolicus. All the conclusions that we have found in the biomimetic systems applied to the biological system.

  19. Peptide Aggregation and Pore Formation in a Lipid Bilayer: A Combined Coarse-Grained and All Atom Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Thøgersen, Lea; Schiøtt, Birgit; Vosegaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2008-01-01

    We present a simulation study where different resolutions, namely coarse-grained (CG) and all-atom (AA) molecular dynamics simulations, are used sequentially to combine the long timescale reachable by CG simulations with the high resolution of AA simulations, to describe the complete processes of peptide aggregation and pore formation by alamethicin peptides in a hydrated lipid bilayer. In the 1-μs CG simulations the peptides spontaneously aggregate in the lipid bilayer and exhibit occasional transitions between the membrane-spanning and the surface-bound configurations. One of the CG systems at t = 1 μs is reverted to an AA representation and subjected to AA simulation for 50 ns, during which water molecules penetrate the lipid bilayer through interactions with the peptide aggregates, and the membrane starts leaking water. During the AA simulation significant deviations from the α-helical structure of the peptides are observed, however, the size and arrangement of the clusters are not affected within the studied time frame. Solid-state NMR experiments designed to match closely the setup used in the molecular dynamics simulations provide strong support for our finding that alamethicin peptides adopt a diverse set of configurations in a lipid bilayer, which is in sharp contrast to the prevailing view of alamethicin oligomers formed by perfectly aligned helical alamethicin peptides in a lipid bilayer. PMID:18676652

  20. Alignment of CEBAF cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, W.J.; Bisognano, J.J.; Fischer, J.

    1993-06-01

    CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, when completed, will house a 4 GeV recirculating accelerator. Each of the accelerator`s two linacs contains 160 superconducting radio frequency (SRF) 1497 MHz niobium cavities in 20 cryomodules. Alignments of the cavities within the cryomodule with respect to beam axis is critical to achieving the optimum accelerator performance. This paper discusses the rationale for the current specification on cavity mechanical alignment: 2 mrad (rms) applied to the 0.5 m active length cavities. We describe the tooling that was developed to achieve the tolerance at the time of cavity pair assembly, to preserve and integrate alignment during cryomodule assembly, and to translate alignment to appropriate installation in the beam line.

  1. Homogeneous PCBM layers fabricated by horizontal-dip coating for efficient bilayer heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Huh, Yoon Ho; Bae, In-Gon; Jeon, Hong Goo; Park, Byoungchoo

    2016-10-31

    We herein report a homogeneous [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) layer, produced by a solution process of horizontal-dipping (H-dipping) to improve the photovoltaic (PV) effects of bilayer heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) based on a bi-stacked poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) electron donor layer and a PCBM electron acceptor layer (P3HT/PCBM). It was shown that a homogeneous and uniform coating of PCBM layers in the P3HT/PCBM bilayer OPVs resulted in reliable and reproducible device performance. We recorded a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 2.89%, which is higher than that (2.00%) of bilayer OPVs with a spin-coated PCBM layer. Moreover, introducing surfactant additives of poly(oxyethylene tridecyl ether) (PTE) into the homogeneous P3HT/PCBM PV layers resulted in the bilayer OPVs showing a PCE value of 3.95%, which is comparable to those of conventional bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) OPVs (3.57-4.13%) fabricated by conventional spin-coating. This improved device performance may be attributed to the selective collection of charge carriers at the interfaces among the active layers and electrodes due to the PTE additives as well as the homogeneous formation of the functional PCBM layer on the P3HT layer. Furthermore, H-dip-coated PCBM layers were deposited onto aligned P3HT layers by a rubbing technique, and the rubbed bilayer OPV exhibited improved in-plane anisotropic PV effects with PCE anisotropy as high as 1.81, which is also higher than that (1.54) of conventional rubbed BHJ OPVs. Our results suggest that the use of the H-dip-coating process in the fabrication of PCBM layers with the PTE interface-engineering additive could be of considerable interest to those seeking to improve PCBM-based opto-electrical organic thin-film devices.

  2. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Daily, PNNL

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprint that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.

  3. Bilayer Graphene-Hexagonal Boron Nitride Heterostructure Negative Differential Resistance Interlayer Tunnel FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sangwoo; Fallahazad, Babak; Lee, Kayoung; Movva, Hema; Kim, Kyounghwan; Corbet, Chris; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Colombo, Luigi; Register, Leonard; Tutuc, Emanuel; Banerjee, Sanjay

    2015-03-01

    We present the operation of a vertical tunneling field effect transistor using a stacked double bilayer graphene (BLG) and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) heterostructure. The device is fabricated with the so-called Van der Waals transfer method with the edges of the top and bottom BLG flakes being rotationally aligned to roughly 60°. The device shows multiple negative differential resistance (NDR) peaks which can be adjusted through the gate bias. Temperature dependent measurements show that the peak width of the differential conductance broadens and the height lowered when the temperature is increased, which is indicative of resonant tunneling. Through electrostatic calculations, it is shown that the multiple peaks occur when the two conduction bands at the K-point of the top and bottom bilayer graphene become aligned at certain bias conditions. It is also shown that by adjusting the rotational alignment of the bands of the top and bottom BLG through an in-plane magnetic field, the conductance peaks can be broadened. In addition, utilizing the NDR characteristic of the device, one-transistor latch or SRAM operation is demonstrated.

  4. Further NMR-spectroscopic studies of interaction of phospholipid liposomes with methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) in dental adhesives.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, S; Komoda, Y

    1993-06-01

    To determine how MDP interacts with liposomes, the chemical shifts of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/MDP and dilauroylphosphatidylethanolamine (DLEA)/cholesterol (CS)/MDP liposomes were studied by NMR spectroscopy using a D2O buffer solution at pH 7.0 as a model for biological membranes. Proton chemical shifts of MDP enhanced shielding in DPPC liposomes together with an increase in the mobility of DPPC. However, MDP signals were not observed in DLEA/CS liposomes due to saturation. It is known that an ionized chemical does not lead to increased permeability of cell membranes composed of a lipid bilayer. However, MDP, which is ionized at pH 7.0, had a large interaction with the liposome systems. This appeared to arise from hydrophobic interaction between deca methylene groups of MDP and acyl chains of phospholipid.

  5. Photon correlation spectroscopy of bilayer lipid membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Crilly, J F; Earnshaw, J C

    1983-01-01

    Light scattering by thermal fluctuations on simple monoglyceride bilayer membranes has been used to investigate the viscoelastic properties of these structures. Spectroscopic analysis of these fluctuations (capillary waves) permits the nonperturbative measurement of the interfacial tension and a shear interfacial viscosity acting normal to the membrane plane. The methods were established by studies of solvent and nonsolvent bilayers of glycerol monooleate (GMO). Changes in the tension of GMO/n-decane membranes induced by altering the composition of the parent solution were detected and quantified. In a test of the reliability of the technique controlled variations of the viscosity of the aqueous bathing solution were accurately monitored. The technique was applied to solvent-free bilayers formed from dispersions of GMO in squalane. The lower tensions observed attested to the comparative absence of solvent in such bilayers. In contrast to the solvent case, the solvent-free membranes exhibited a significant transverse shear viscosity, indicative of the enhanced intermolecular interactions within the bilayer. PMID:6838962

  6. Cyclic phosphatidic acid - a unique bioactive phospholipid.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yuko

    2008-09-01

    Cyclic phosphatidic acid (CPA) is a naturally occurring analog of the growth factor-like phospholipid mediator, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). The sn-2 hydroxy group of CPA forms a 5-membered ring with the sn-3 phosphate. CPA affects numerous cellular functions, including anti-mitogenic regulation of the cell cycle, induction of stress fiber formation, inhibition of tumor cell invasion and metastasis, and regulation of differentiation and survival of neuronal cells. Interestingly, many of these cellular responses caused by CPA oppose those of LPA despite the activation of apparently overlapping receptor populations. Since the early 1990s, studies on CPA actions gradually developed, and we are now beginning to understand the importance of this lipid. In this review, we focus on the current knowledge about CPA, including enzymatic formation of CPA, unique biological activities and biological targets of CPA, and we also explore metabolically stabilized CPA analogs.

  7. Langmuir films containing ibuprofen and phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraldo, Vananélia P. N.; Pavinatto, Felippe J.; Nobre, Thatyane M.; Caseli, Luciano; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.

    2013-02-01

    This study shows the incorporation of ibuprofen, an anti-inflammatory drug, in Langmuir monolayers as cell membrane models. Significant effects were observed for dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC) monolayers with relevant changes in the elasticity of the monolayer. Dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl glycerol (DPPG) monolayers were affected by small concentrations of ibuprofen, from 1 to 5 mol%. For both types of monolayer, ibuprofen could penetrate into the hydrophobic part of the monolayer, which was confirmed with polarization-modulated infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) images showed that ibuprofen prevents the formation of large domains of DPPC. The pharmacological action should occur primarily with penetration of ibuprofen via electrically neutral phospholipid headgroups of the membrane.

  8. Phospholipid monolayers between fluid and solid states.

    PubMed Central

    Helm, C A; Möhwald, H; Kjaer, K; Als-Nielsen, J

    1987-01-01

    Monolayers of the phospholipid dimyristoyl phosphatidic acid on the surface of water have been studied by a combination of the new techniques of synchrotron x-ray diffraction and fluorescence microscopy with classical surface pressure data. The pressure vs. area isotherm changes slope at the surface pressures pi c and pi s. The optical technique demonstrates that between pi c and pi s the fluid phase coexists with a denser "gel" phase. Electron diffraction data have shown that the gel phase has bond orientational order over tens of micrometers. However, the x-ray data demonstrate that positional correlations extend only over tens of angstroms. Thus, the gel phase is not crystalline. Above pi s a solid phase is formed with a positional correlation range that is eight times longer for the chemically purest films. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:3651557

  9. Phospholipids in mitochondrial dysfunction during hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Leskova, Galina F

    2016-12-20

    Energy deficiency plays a key role in the development of irreversible shock conditions. Therefore, identifying mitochondrial functional disturbances during hemorrhagic shock should be considered a prospective direction for studying its pathogenesis. Phospholipid (PL)-dependent mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction in the brain (i.e., in the frontal lobes of the cerebral hemispheres and medulla oblongata) and liver, which, when damaged, leads to an encephalopathy, are examined in this review. These mechanisms show strong regional specificity. Analyzing the data presented in this review suggests that the basis for mitochondrial functional disturbances is cholinergic hyperactivation, accompanied by a choline deficiency and membrane phosphatidylcholine (PC) depletion. Stabilization of the PL composition in mitochondrial membranes using "empty" PC liposomes could be one of the most important methods for eliminating energy deficiency during massive blood loss.

  10. Effects of cholesterol on conformational disorder in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers. A quantitative IR study of the depth dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, M.A.; Schuster, H.F.; Brauner, J.W.; Mendelsohn, R. )

    1990-05-08

    A method originally proposed by Snyder and Poore as a specific probe of trans-gauche isomerization in hydrocarbon chains and recently applied to the quantitative determination of phospholipid acyl chain conformational order is utilized to monitor the effects of cholesterol at various depths in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers. The method is based on the observation that the CD2 rocking modes from the acyl chains of specifically deuterated phospholipids occur at frequencies in the Fourier transform infrared spectrum which depend upon the local geometry (trans or gauche) of the C-C-C skeleton surrounding a central CD2 group. Three specifically deuterated derivatives of DPPC, namely, 4,4,4',4'-d4 DPPC (4-d4 DPPC), 6,6,6',6'-d4 DPPC (6-d4 DPPC), and 12,12,12',12'-d4 DPPC (12-d4 DPPC), have been synthesized, and the effects of cholesterol addition at 2:1 DPPC/cholesterol (mol:mol) on acyl chain order at various temperatures have been determined. At 48 degrees C, cholesterol inhibits gauche rotamer formation by factors of approximately 9 and approximately 6 at positions 6 and 4, respectively, of the acyl chains, thus demonstrating a strong ordering effect in regions of the bilayer where the sterol rings are presumed to insert parallel to the DPPC acyl chains. In contrast, the ability of the sterol to order the acyl chains is much reduced at the 12-position. The sterol demonstrates only a slight disordering of phospholipid gel phases. Finally, the contributions of different classes of gauche conformers to the spectra have been determined.

  11. Phospholipid composition modulates carbon nanodiamond-induced alterations in phospholipid domain formation.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Aishik; Mucci, Nicolas J; Tan, Ming Li; Steckley, Ashleigh; Zhang, Ti; Forrest, M Laird; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2015-05-12

    The focus of this work is to elucidate how phospholipid composition can modulate lipid nanoparticle interactions in phospholipid monolayer systems. We report on alterations in lipid domain formation induced by anionically engineered carbon nanodiamonds (ECNs) as a function of lipid headgroup charge and alkyl chain saturation. Using surface pressure vs area isotherms, monolayer compressibility, and fluorescence microscopy, we found that anionic ECNs induced domain shape alterations in zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine lipids, irrespective of the lipid alkyl chain saturation, even when the surface pressure vs area isotherms did not show any significant changes. Bean-shaped structures characteristic of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) were converted to multilobed, fractal, or spiral domains as a result of exposure to ECNs, indicating that ECNs lower the line tension between domains in the case of zwitterionic lipids. For membrane systems containing anionic phospholipids, ECN-induced changes in domain packing were related to the electrostatic interactions between the anionic ECNs and the anionic lipid headgroups, even when zwitterionic lipids are present in excess. By comparing the measured size distributions with our recently developed theory derived by minimizing the free energy associated with the domain energy and mixing entropy, we found that the change in line tension induced by anionic ECNs is dominated by the charge in the condensed lipid domains. Atomic force microscopy images of the transferred anionic films confirm that the location of the anionic ECNs in the lipid monolayers is also modulated by the charge on the condensed lipid domains. Because biological membranes such as lung surfactants contain both saturated and unsaturated phospholipids with different lipid headgroup charges, our results suggest that when studying potential adverse effects of nanoparticles on biological systems the role of lipid compositions cannot be neglected.

  12. Lateral diffusion of bilayer lipids measured via (31)P CODEX NMR.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Qasim; Lai, Angel; Morales, Hannah H; Macdonald, Peter M

    2012-10-01

    We have employed (31)P CODEX (centre-band-only-detection-of-exchange) NMR to measure lateral diffusion coefficients of phospholipids in unilamellar lipid bilayer vesicles consisting of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), alone or in mixtures with 30 mol% 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) or cholesterol (CHOL). The lateral diffusion coefficients of POPC and POPG were extracted from experimental CODEX signal decays as a function of increasing mixing time, after accounting for the vesicle's size and size distribution, as determined via dynamic light scattering, and the viscosity of the vesicular suspension, as determined via (1)H pulsed field gradient NMR. Lateral diffusion coefficients for POPC and POPG determined in this fashion fell in the range 1.0-3.2 × 10(-12) m(2) s(-1) at 10 °C, depending on the vesicular composition, in good agreement with accepted values. Thus, two advantages of (31)P CODEX NMR for phospholipid lateral diffusion measurements are demonstrated: no labelling of the molecule of interest is necessary, and multiple lateral diffusion coefficients can be measured simultaneously. It is expected that this approach will prove particularly useful in diagnosing heterogeneities in lateral diffusion behaviours, such as might be expected for specific lipid-lipid or lipid-protein interactions, and thermotropic or electrostatically induced phase inhomogeneities.

  13. Hydration and hydrogen bonding of carbonyls in dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine bilayer.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Victor V; Nuti, Francesca; Takaoka, Yuji; Chelli, Riccardo; Papini, Anna Maria; Righini, Roberto

    2006-07-26

    We combine two-color ultrafast infrared spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the hydration of carbonyl moieties in a dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine bilayer. Excitation with femtosecond infrared pulses of the OD stretching mode of heavy water produces a time dependent change of the absorption band of the phospholipid carbonyl groups. This intermolecular vibrational coupling affects the entire C=O band, thus suggesting that the optical inhomogeneity of the infrared response of carbonyl in phospholipid membranes cannot be attributed to the variance in hydration. Both the experimental and the theoretical results demonstrate that sn-1 carbonyl has a higher propensity to form hydrogen bonds with water in comparison to sn-2. The time-resolved experiment allows following the evolution of the system from a nonequilibrium localization of energy in the OD stretching mode to a thermally equilibrated condition and provides the characteristic time constants of the process. The approach opens a new opportunity for investigation of intermolecular structural relations in complex systems, like membranes, polymers, proteins, and glasses.

  14. Curriculum Alignment Research Suggests that Alignment Can Improve Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squires, David

    2012-01-01

    Curriculum alignment research has developed showing the relationship among three alignment categories: the taught curriculum, the tested curriculum and the written curriculum. Each pair (for example, the taught and the written curriculum) shows a positive impact for aligning those results. Following this, alignment results from the Third…

  15. Influence of pH and phospholipid species on release of acetaminophen from tablets containing phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Fujii, M; Moriyama, J; Hamazumi, N; Matsumoto, M

    1998-02-01

    The release of acetaminophen (AAP) from tablets containing phospholipids was examined using hydrogenated soybean phospholipid (HSL) and its main components, phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylinositol (PI), although the PI was not well purified (PI rich). Tablets compressed with 400 kgf had about 9% porosity and 2-4 kgf hardness. The release patterns of AAP from the tablets were fitted to Higuchi's square root of time law. The release rate was influenced by the pH of the medium, though solubility of AAP did not change with pH. PC tablets showed faster release at pH of less than 3 than that at pH of above 3, whereas PI rich and HSL tablets showed faster release at pH of above 3 than that at pH of less than 3. The release rate from PE tablets was little affected by pH. A linear relationship exists between the release rate of AAP and the rate of water absorption by the tablet. The ionization state of the phospholipids changes with the pH of the medium, and affects the hydration characteristics. The fully ionized state, at pH of less than 3 in the case of PC and above 3 in the case of PI is most effective on hydration. PE does not fully ionize because of intermolecular hydrogen bonding.

  16. Phospholipid monolayers probed by vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy: instability of unsaturated phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Liljeblad, Jonathan F D; Bulone, Vincent; Tyrode, Eric; Rutland, Mark W; Johnson, C Magnus

    2010-05-19

    The surface specific technique vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy has been applied to in situ studies of the degradation of Langmuir monolayers of 1,2-diacyl-phosphocholines with various degrees of unsaturation in the aliphatic chains. To monitor the degradation of the phospholipids, the time-dependent change of the monolayer area at constant surface pressure and the sum frequency intensity of the vinyl CH stretch at the carbon-carbon double bonds were measured. The data show a rapid degradation of monolayers of phospholipids carrying unsaturated aliphatic chains compared to the stable lipids carrying fully saturated chains when exposed to the ambient laboratory air. In addition, the degradation of the phospholipids can be inhibited by purging the ambient air with nitrogen. This instability may be attributed to spontaneous degradation by oxidation mediated by various reactive species in the air. To further elucidate the process of lipid oxidation in biological membranes artificial Langmuir monolayers probed by a surface specific spectroscopic technique as in this study can serve as a model system for studying the degradation/oxidation of cell membrane constituents.

  17. Low-temperature molecular motions in lipid bilayers in the presence of sugars: insights into cryoprotective mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Konov, Konstantin B; Isaev, Nikolay P; Dzuba, Sergei A

    2014-10-30

    Sugars and sugar alcohols can stabilize biological systems under extreme conditions of desiccation and freezing. Phospholipid bilayers solvated by aqueous solutions of sucrose, trehalose, and sorbitol at concentrations of 0.2 and 1 M and containing incorporated spin-labeled stearic acids were studied by electron spin echo (ESE) spectroscopy, a pulsed version of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The phospholipids were 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), and the stearic acids were labeled with nitroxide 4,4-dimethyl-oxazolidine-1-oxyl (DOXYL) attached rigidly at either the 5th or 16th carbon positions. The ratio of the echo time traces for the two field positions in the EPR spectrum possessing the largest and smallest anisotropies gave the anisotropic contribution to the echo decay, which obeys exponential time dependence with good accuracy. At low temperatures, the anisotropic contribution is induced by stochastic (or diffusive) orientational vibrations of the molecule as a whole (i.e., stochastic molecular librations), with the exponential decay rate Wanis proportional to <α(2)>τc, where <α(2)> is the mean angular amplitude of the motion and τc is the correlation time. In all cases, it was found that Wanis begins to increase sharply above 170-200 K, which was ascribed to the dynamical transition known for biological systems at these temperatures. For hydration by the sucrose and trehalose solutions, Wanis was found to increase noticeably also above ∼120 K, which was explained by bilayer expansion due to direct bonding of sugar molecules to the bilayer surface. The Wanis temperature dependencies were found to be close to those obtained for the simple systems of the nitroxide spin probe TEMPONE in aqueous sorbitol and sugar 1 M solutions. This correlation suggests a possible mechanism of cryoprotective action of sorbitol and sugars due to the similarity of low-temperature motions in the membrane and in the cryoprotectant

  18. Eicosapentaenoic acid reduces membrane fluidity, inhibits cholesterol domain formation, and normalizes bilayer width in atherosclerotic-like model membranes.

    PubMed

    Mason, R Preston; Jacob, Robert F; Shrivastava, Sandeep; Sherratt, Samuel C R; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-12-01

    Cholesterol crystalline domains characterize atherosclerotic membranes, altering vascular signaling and function. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce membrane lipid peroxidation and subsequent cholesterol domain formation. We evaluated non-peroxidation-mediated effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), other TG-lowering agents, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and other long-chain fatty acids on membrane fluidity, bilayer width, and cholesterol domain formation in model membranes. In membranes prepared at 1.5:1 cholesterol-to-phospholipid (C/P) mole ratio (creating pre-existing domains), EPA, glycyrrhizin, arachidonic acid, and alpha linolenic acid promoted the greatest reductions in cholesterol domains (by 65.5%, 54.9%, 46.8%, and 45.2%, respectively) compared to controls; other treatments had modest effects. EPA effects on cholesterol domain formation were dose-dependent. In membranes with 1:1 C/P (predisposing domain formation), DHA, but not EPA, dose-dependently increased membrane fluidity. DHA also induced cholesterol domain formation without affecting temperature-induced changes in-bilayer unit cell periodicity relative to controls (d-space; 57Å-55Å over 15-30°C). Together, these data suggest simultaneous formation of distinct cholesterol-rich ordered domains and cholesterol-poor disordered domains in the presence of DHA. By contrast, EPA had no effect on cholesterol domain formation and produced larger d-space values relative to controls (60Å-57Å; p<0.05) over the same temperature range, suggesting a more uniform maintenance of lipid dynamics despite the presence of cholesterol. These data indicate that EPA and DHA had different effects on membrane bilayer width, membrane fluidity, and cholesterol crystalline domain formation; suggesting omega-3 fatty acids with differing chain length or unsaturation may differentially influence membrane lipid dynamics and structural organization as a result of distinct phospholipid/sterol interactions.

  19. Specific phospholipid binding to Na,K-ATPase at two distinct sites.

    PubMed

    Habeck, Michael; Kapri-Pardes, Einat; Sharon, Michal; Karlish, Steven J D

    2017-03-14

    Membrane protein function can be affected by the physical state of the lipid bilayer and specific lipid-protein interactions. For Na,K-ATPase, bilayer properties can modulate pump activity, and, as observed in crystal structures, several lipids are bound within the transmembrane domain. Furthermore, Na,K-ATPase activity depends on phosphatidylserine (PS) and cholesterol, which stabilize the protein, and polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine (PC) or phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), known to stimulate Na,K-ATPase activity. Based on lipid structural specificity and kinetic mechanisms, specific interactions of both PS and PC/PE have been inferred. Nevertheless, specific binding sites have not been identified definitively. We address this question with native mass spectrometry (MS) and site-directed mutagenesis. Native MS shows directly that one molecule each of 18:0/18:1 PS and 18:0/20:4 PC can bind specifically to purified human Na,K-ATPase (α1β1). By replacing lysine residues at proposed phospholipid-binding sites with glutamines, the two sites have been identified. Mutations in the cytoplasmic αL8-9 loop destabilize the protein but do not affect Na,K-ATPase activity, whereas mutations in transmembrane helices (TM), αTM2 and αTM4, abolish the stimulation of activity by 18:0/20:4 PC but do not affect stability. When these data are linked to crystal structures, the underlying mechanism of PS and PC/PE effects emerges. PS (and cholesterol) bind between αTM 8, 9, 10, near the FXYD subunit, and maintain topological integrity of the labile C terminus of the α subunit (site A). PC/PE binds between αTM2, 4, 6, and 9 and accelerates the rate-limiting E1P-E2P conformational transition (site B). We discuss the potential physiological implications.

  20. Effects of the cannabinoids on physical properties of brain membranes and phospholipid vesicles: fluorescence studies.

    PubMed

    Hillard, C J; Harris, R A; Bloom, A S

    1985-03-01

    The effects of four cannabinoids on the physical properties of brain synaptic plasma membranes (SPM), lipid extracts of SPM and phospholipid vesicles were evaluated using fluorescence probes. In vitro, the psychoactive cannabinoids, delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) and 11-hydroxyl-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-delta 9-THC) at concentrations of 1 and 3 microM decreased polarization of the fluorescence emission of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) in SPM. At the same concentrations, cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol, cannabinoids devoid of marijuana-like psychoactivity, had no effect on DPH polarization. The effects of 11-OH-delta 9-THC and CBD on vesicles made from lipids extracted from SPM were identical to their effects on intact SPM. These changes in DPH polarization were not due to changes in fluorescence lifetime and indicate that, at low concentrations, the psychoactive cannabinoids increase the rotational mobility of DPH in the membrane core. In contrast, in SPM-extracted lipids, both 11-OH-delta 9-THC and CBD decreased the mobility of stearic acid with an anthroyloxy label at both the second (2-AS) and twelfth (12-AS) carbon atoms. Studies of DPH polarization in various phosphatidylcholines (PC) demonstrated that the actions of the cannabinoids were dependent on initial bilayer fluidity. 11-OH-delta 9-THC was less effective at decreasing polarization of trimethylammonium DPH (TMA-DPH), a probe of the bilayer surface, than of DPH whereas CBD affected mobility of the two probes equally. Neither CBD nor 11-OH-delta 9-THC altered DPH mobility in phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine vesicles. These findings indicate that the psychoactive cannabinoids increase fluidity in the hydrophobic core of brain membranes and support a membrane perturbant hypothesis of the mechanism of delta 9-THC action.

  1. Interaction of blood coagulation factor Va with phospholipid vesicles examined by using lipophilic photoreagents

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, U.C.; Isaacs, B.S.; Yemul, S.S.; Esmon, C.T.; Bayley, H.; Johnson, A.E.

    1987-01-13

    Two different lipophilic photoreagents, (/sup 3/H)adamantane diazirine and 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-(/sup 125/I)iodophenyl)diazirine (TID), have been utilized to examine the interactions of blood coagulation factor Va with calcium, prothrombin, factor Xa, and, in particular, phospholipid vesicles. With each of these structurally dissimilar reagents, the extent of photolabeling of factor Va was greater when the protein was bound to a membrane surface than when it was free in solution. Specifically, the covalent photoreaction with Vl, the smaller subunit of factor Va, was 2-fold higher in the presence of phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine (PC/PS, 3:1) vesicles, to which factor Va binds, than in the presence of 100% PC vesicles, to which the protein does not bind. However, the magnitude of the PC/PS-dependent photolabeling was much less than has been observed previously with integral membrane proteins. It therefore appears that the binding of factor Va to the membrane surface exposes Vl to the lipid core of the bilayer, but that only a small portion of the Vl polypeptide is exposed to, or embedded in, the bilayer core. Addition of either prothrombin or active-site-blocked factor Xa to PC/PS-bound factor Va had little effect on the photolabeling of Vl with TID, but reduced substantially the covalent labeling of Vh, the larger subunit of factor Va. This indicates that prothrombin and factor Xa each cover nonpolar surfaces on Vh when the macromolecules associate on the PC/PS surface. It therefore seems likely that the formation of the prothrombinase complex involves a direct interaction between Vh and factor Xa and between Vh and prothrombin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Possible Domain Formation In PE/PC Bilayers Containing High Cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Matthew; Hussain, Fazle; Huang, Juyang

    2015-03-01

    Cholesterol is a significant component of animal cell membranes, and its presence has the effects of not only adding rigidity to the lipid bilayer, but also leading to the formation of lipid domains. Two other lipids of interest are phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), which constitutes about 45 percent of the phospholipids found in human nervous tissues, and phosphatidylcholine (PC), which is found in every cell of the human body. The maximum solubility of cholesterol is the highest mole fraction of cholesterol that the lipid bilayer can retain, at which point cholesterol begins to precipitate out to form cholesterol monohydrate crystals. We have measured the maximum solubility of cholesterol in mixtures of 16:0-18:1PE and 16:0-18:1PC using a new light scattering technique, which utilizes the anisotropic nature of light scattering by cholesterol crystals. This new method is highly accurate and reproducible. Our results show that the maximum solubility of cholesterol increases linearly as a function of the molar ratio POPC/(POPE+POPC), which suggests possible domain formation in mixtures of PE and PC containing maximum amount of cholesterol.

  3. Refined OPLS all-atom force field for saturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers at full hydration.

    PubMed

    Maciejewski, Arkadiusz; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Cramariuc, Oana; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Rog, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    We report parametrization of dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in the framework of the Optimized Parameters for Liquid Simulations all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field. We chose DPPC as it is one of the most studied phospholipid species and thus has plenty of experimental data necessary for model validation, and it is also one of the highly important and abundant lipid types, e.g., in lung surfactant. Overall, PCs have not been previously parametrized in the OPLS-AA force field; thus, there is a need to derive its bonding and nonbonding parameters for both the polar and nonpolar parts of the molecule. In the present study, we determined the parameters for torsion angles in the phosphatidylcholine and glycerol moieties and in the acyl chains, as well the partial atomic charges. In these calculations, we used three methods: (1) Hartree-Fock (HF), (2) second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), and (3) density functional theory (DFT). We also tested the effect of the polar environment by using the polarizable continuum model (PCM), and for acyl chains the van der Waals parameters were also adjusted. In effect, six parameter sets were generated and tested on a DPPC bilayer. Out of these six sets, only one was found to be able to satisfactorily reproduce experimental data for the lipid bilayer. The successful DPPC model was obtained from MP2 calculations in an implicit polar environment (PCM).

  4. Atomic force microscope studies on the interactions of Candida rugosa lipase and supported lipidic bilayers.

    PubMed

    Prim, Nuria; Iversen, Lars; Diaz, Pilar; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2006-10-01

    Using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique we prepared substrate supported well-defined lipid/phospholipid (1-mono-palmitoyl-rac-glycerol (MPG)/l,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine (DPPC)) bilayers in which the MPG lipid leaflet was exposed to the aqueous phase. Hydrolysis of MPG performed by Candida rugosa lipase (CRL) on the upper MPG layer of these supported bilayers on mica was imaged by real time atomic force microscope (AFM) using a liquid cell, so that the area increase of the initial structural defects could be followed over time. Our data strongly suggest that the edges of the initial structural defects are the preferred activation sites for CRL once the enzyme is adsorbed onto these interfaces. When a 2.5nM bulk concentration of CRL was assayed on this planar lipid substrate, we found a long lag phase before a sharp increase of catalytic activity. The lag-burst kinetic behaviour was related to the interfacial activation phenomenon although we propose that it is also dependent on the gel-phase state of this interface.

  5. Microelectrophoresis of a bilayer-coated silica bead in an optical trap: application to enzymology.

    PubMed Central

    Galneder, R; Kahl, V; Arbuzova, A; Rebecchi, M; Rädler, J O; McLaughlin, S

    2001-01-01

    We describe an apparatus that combines microelectrophoresis and laser trap technologies to monitor the activity of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C-delta1 (PLC-delta) on a single bilayer-coated silica bead with a time resolution of approximately 1 s. A 1-microm-diameter bead was coated with a phospholipid bilayer composed of electrically neutral phosphatidylcholine (PC) and negatively charged phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (2% PIP2) and captured in a laser trap. When an AC field was applied (160 Hz, 20 V/cm), the electrophoretic force produced a displacement of the bead, Delta(x), from its equilibrium position in the trap; Delta(x), which was measured using a fast quadrant diode detector, is proportional to the zeta potential and thus to the number of PIP2 molecules on the outer leaflet (initially, approximately 10(5)). When a solution containing PLC-delta flows past the bead, the enzyme adsorbs to the surface and hydrolyzes PIP2 to form the neutral lipid diacylglycerol. We observed a nonexponential decay of PIP2 on the bead with time that is consistent with a model based on the known structural properties of PLC-delta. PMID:11325731

  6. Microelectrophoresis of a bilayer-coated silica bead in an optical trap: application to enzymology.

    PubMed

    Galneder, R; Kahl, V; Arbuzova, A; Rebecchi, M; Rädler, J O; McLaughlin, S

    2001-05-01

    We describe an apparatus that combines microelectrophoresis and laser trap technologies to monitor the activity of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C-delta1 (PLC-delta) on a single bilayer-coated silica bead with a time resolution of approximately 1 s. A 1-microm-diameter bead was coated with a phospholipid bilayer composed of electrically neutral phosphatidylcholine (PC) and negatively charged phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (2% PIP2) and captured in a laser trap. When an AC field was applied (160 Hz, 20 V/cm), the electrophoretic force produced a displacement of the bead, Delta(x), from its equilibrium position in the trap; Delta(x), which was measured using a fast quadrant diode detector, is proportional to the zeta potential and thus to the number of PIP2 molecules on the outer leaflet (initially, approximately 10(5)). When a solution containing PLC-delta flows past the bead, the enzyme adsorbs to the surface and hydrolyzes PIP2 to form the neutral lipid diacylglycerol. We observed a nonexponential decay of PIP2 on the bead with time that is consistent with a model based on the known structural properties of PLC-delta.

  7. Circumferentially aligned fibers guided functional neoartery regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Meifeng; Wang, Zhihong; Zhang, Jiamin; Wang, Lina; Yang, Xiaohu; Chen, Jingrui; Fan, Guanwei; Ji, Shenglu; Xing, Cheng; Wang, Kai; Zhao, Qiang; Zhu, Yan; Kong, Deling; Wang, Lianyong

    2015-08-01

    An ideal vascular graft should have the ability to guide the regeneration of neovessels with structure and function similar to those of the native blood vessels. Regeneration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) with circumferential orientation within the grafts is crucial for functional vascular reconstruction in vivo. To date, designing and fabricating a vascular graft with well-defined geometric cues to facilitate simultaneously VSMCs infiltration and their circumferential alignment remains a great challenge and scarcely reported in vivo. Thus, we have designed a bi-layered vascular graft, of which the internal layer is composed of circumferentially aligned microfibers prepared by wet-spinning and an external layer composed of random nanofibers prepared by electrospinning. While the internal circumferentially aligned microfibers provide topographic guidance for in vivo regeneration of circumferentially aligned VSMCs, the external random nanofibers can offer enhanced mechanical property and prevent bleeding during and after graft implantation. VSMCs infiltration and alignment within the scaffold was then evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrated that the circumferentially oriented VSMCs and longitudinally aligned ECs were successfully regenerated in vivo after the bi-layered vascular grafts were implanted in rat abdominal aorta. No formation of thrombosis or intimal hyperplasia was observed up to 3 month post implantation. Further, the regenerated neoartery exhibited contraction and relaxation property in response to vasoactive agents. This new strategy may bring cell-free small diameter vascular grafts closer to clinical application.

  8. Edge states in twisted bilayer graphene: quantum spin Hall and electron-hole bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Yamagishi, Javier D.; Luo, Jason; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo

    2015-03-01

    Twisted bilayer graphene offers a unique platform for studying 1d edge states in a bilayer 2-dimensional electron gas. Despite being spaced by only 0.34 nm, a large interlayer twist decouples the layers in the bulk, while opening the door for interesting interactions at the edges. To probe this physics, we study the electronic transport through quantum Hall edge modes in twisted bilayer graphene devices. Using dual electrostatic gates, we independently control the filling factor of each layer to form different combinations of bilayer edge states while measuring their conductance. The most dramatic transport effects are observed when the layers are doped to have edge states of opposite chiralities, resulting in coexisting electron- and hole-like states. We will present evidence that, in this regime, the twisted bilayer graphene can form a quantum spin Hall state where edge states in each layer counter-propagate in opposite directions with opposite spin polarizations. This bilayer realization offers a flexible system to study quantum spin Hall edge transport as well as to build more complex 1d circuits. We will also discuss the possibility for fractional generalizations of this edge physics and our measurements of the fractional QHE in twisted bilayer graphene.

  9. Magnetic ratchet effect in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheirabadi, Narjes; McCann, Edward; Fal'ko, Vladimir I.

    2016-10-01

    We consider the orbital effect of an in-plane magnetic field on electrons in bilayer graphene, deriving linear-in-field contributions to the low-energy Hamiltonian arising from the presence of either skew interlayer coupling or interlayer potential asymmetry, the latter being tunable by an external metallic gate. To illustrate the relevance of such terms, we consider the ratchet effect in which a dc current results from the application of an alternating electric field in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field and inversion-symmetry breaking. By comparison with recent experimental observations in monolayer graphene [C. Drexler et al., Nat. Nanotechnol. 8, 104 (2013), 10.1038/nnano.2012.231], we estimate that the effect in bilayer graphene can be two orders of magnitude greater than that in monolayer graphene, illustrating that the bilayer is an ideal material for the realization of optoelectronic effects that rely on inversion-symmetry breaking.

  10. Layer resolved capacitive probing of graphene bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibrov, Alexander; Parmentier, François; Li, Jia; Wang, Lei; Hunt, Benjamin; Dean, Cory; Hone, James; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Young, Andrea

    Compared to single layer graphene, graphene bilayers have an additional ``which-layer'' degree of freedom that can be controlled by an external electric field in a dual-gated device geometry. We describe capacitance measurements capable of directly probing this degree of freedom. By performing top gate, bottom gate, and penetration field capacitance measurements, we directly extract layer polarization of both Bernal and twisted bilayers. We will present measurements of hBN encapsulated bilayers at both zero and high magnetic field, focusing on the physics of the highly degenerate zero-energy Landau level in the high magnetic field limit where spin, valley, and layer degeneracy are all lifted by electronic interactions.

  11. Spin precession modulation in a magnetic bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakiewicz, A.; Maziewski, A.; Pashkevich, M.; Stognij, A.; Novitskii, N.

    2012-12-24

    We report on modulation of the spin precession in a Co/garnet bilayer by femtosecond laser excitation using time-resolved magneto-optical tools. Damped oscillations in the Faraday rotation transients representing precessional motion of the magnetization vector are observed in both the 2 nm Co layer and 1.8 {mu}m garnet of the bilayer with distinct frequencies differing by about a factor of two. The excitation efficiency of these precessions strongly depends on the out-of-plane magnetic field. The modulation effect with the coupling in a magnetic bilayer can be useful for non-thermally controlling the magnetization of nanomagnets and ultrafast switching in magnetic nanodevices.

  12. Supported lipid bilayer/carbon nanotube hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M.; Craighead, Harold G.; McEuen, Paul L.

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotube transistors combine molecular-scale dimensions with excellent electronic properties, offering unique opportunities for chemical and biological sensing. Here, we form supported lipid bilayers over single-walled carbon nanotube transistors. We first study the physical properties of the nanotube/supported lipid bilayer structure using fluorescence techniques. Whereas lipid molecules can diffuse freely across the nanotube, a membrane-bound protein (tetanus toxin) sees the nanotube as a barrier. Moreover, the size of the barrier depends on the diameter of the nanotube-with larger nanotubes presenting bigger obstacles to diffusion. We then demonstrate detection of protein binding (streptavidin) to the supported lipid bilayer using the nanotube transistor as a charge sensor. This system can be used as a platform to examine the interactions of single molecules with carbon nanotubes and has many potential applications for the study of molecular recognition and other biological processes occurring at cell membranes.

  13. Abscisic acid-lipid interactions: a phospholipid monolayer study.

    PubMed

    Bürner, H; Benz, R; Gimmler, H; Hartung, W; Stillwell, W

    1993-08-15

    Lipid monolayer studies were performed on a Langmuir trough in the absence and in the presence of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA). The ABA-induced effects on the lipid monolayers can be summarized as follows: (i) ABA as the free acid (pH below 5.3) increased the molecular area and slightly decreased the surface pressure in the collapse points of monolayers made of saturated, unsaturated and of mixed lipids; ABA as the anion showed only minor effects. (ii) The ABA-induced area increase of the lipid monolayers decreased when the surface pressure increased, but some ABA remained in the monolayers made of unsaturated phospholipids even at collapse pressure. (iii) The incorporation of ABA into the monolayers could be inhibited by adding the plant sterol beta-sitosterol to the monolayer forming phospholipids. (iv) There was no substantial difference of ABA action on plant phospholipids as compared with other phospholipids. (v) ABA had a much stronger influence on unsaturated phospholipids than on saturated ones. (vi) ABA decreased the phase-transition temperature of saturated phospholipids. These results, which agree with those obtained from phospholipid vesicle studies, indicate that the physical state of the lipid is important for the ability of ABA penetrating into the lipid monolayer. Finally, a possible relevance of these results is discussed in terms of the action of ABA on guard cell membranes of plants.

  14. Phospholipid-nucleic acid recognition: energetics of DNA-Mg2+-phosphatidylcholine ternary complex formation and its further compaction as a gene delivery formulation.

    PubMed

    Süleymanoglu, Erhan

    2006-01-01

    Thermodynamic features related to the preparation and use of self-assemblies formed between multilamellar and unilamellar zwitterionic liposomes and polynucleotides with various conformation and sizes are presented. The divalent metal cation-induced adsorption, aggregation, and adhesion between single- and double-stranded polyribonucleotides and phosphatidylcholine vesicles was followed by differential adiabatic scanning microcalorimetry. Nucleic acid condensation and compaction mediated by Mg2+ was followed, with regard to interfacial interaction with unilamellar vesicles. Microcalorimetric measurements of synthetic phospholipid vesicles and poly(ribo)nucleotides and their ternary complexes with inorganic cations were used to build the thermodynamic model of their structural transitions. The increased thermal stability of the phospholipid bilayers is achieved by affecting their melting transition temperature by nucleic acid-induced electrostatic charge screening. Measurements give evidence for the stabilization of polynucleotide helices upon their association with liposomes in the presence of divalent metal cations. Such an induced aggregation of vesicles leads either to heterogeneous multilamellar DNA-lipid arrangements or to DNA-induced bilayer destabilization and lipid fusion. The further employment of these polyelectrolyte nanostructures as improved formulations in therapeutic gene delivery trials, as well as in DNA chromatography, is discussed.

  15. Magnetic coupling in ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As/(Al,Ga,Mn)As bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Wadley, P.; Campion, R. P.; Rushforth, A. W.; Edmonds, K. W.; Gallagher, B. L.; Charlton, T. R.; Kinane, C. J.; Langridge, S.

    2015-08-07

    We report on a study of ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As/(Al,Ga,Mn)As bilayers using magnetometry and polarized neutron reflectivity (PNR). From depth-resolved characterization of the magnetic structure obtained by PNR, we concluded that the (Ga,Mn)As and (Al,Ga,Mn)As layers have in-plane and perpendicular-to-plane magnetic easy axes, respectively, with weak interlayer coupling. Therefore, the layer magnetizations align perpendicular to each other under low magnetic fields and parallel at high fields.

  16. Effects of oriented surface dipole on photoconversion efficiency in an alkane/lipid-hybrid-bilayer-based photovoltaic model system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lixia; Xie, Hong; Bostic, Heidi E; Jin, Limei; Best, Michael D; Zhang, X Peter; Zhan, Wei

    2013-08-26

    When a phospholipid monolayer containing a zinc-coordinated porphyrin species formed atop a self-assembled monolayer of heptadecafluoro-1-decanethiol (CF3(CF2)7(CH2)2SH) is subjected to photoelectrochemical current generation, a significant modulation effect is observed. Compared with devices that contain similar photoactive lipid monolayers but formed on 1-dodecanethiol SAMs, these fluorinated hybrid bilayers produce a >60% increase in cathodic currents and a similar decrease in anodic currents. Photovoltages recorded from these hybrid bilayers are found to vary in the same fashion. The modulation of photovoltaic responses in these hybrid-bilayer-based devices is explained by the opposite surface dipoles associated with the thiols employed in this study, which in one case (fluorothiol) increase and in another (alkanethiol) decrease the work function of the underlying gold substrates. A similar trend of photovoltage/photocurrent modulation is also observed if fullerene is used as the photoagent in these devices. Our results reveal the intricacy of orientated surface dipole in influencing the photovoltaic processes, and its subtle interplay with other factors related to the photoagents, such as their location and orientation within the organic matrix.

  17. Normal mode gating motions of a ligand-gated ion channel persist in a fully hydrated lipid bilayer model.

    PubMed

    Bertaccini, Edward J; Trudell, James R; Lindahl, Erik

    2010-08-18

    We have previously used molecular modeling and normal-mode analyses combined with experimental data to visualize a plausible model of a transmembrane ligand-gated ion channel. We also postulated how the gating motion of the channel may be affected by the presence of various ligands, especially anesthetics. As is typical for normal-mode analyses, those studies were performed in vacuo to reduce the computational complexity of the problem. While such calculations constitute an efficient way to model the large scale structural flexibility of transmembrane proteins, they can be criticized for neglecting the effects of an explicit phospholipid bilayer or hydrated environment. Here, we show the successful calculation of normal-mode motions for our model of a glycine α-1 receptor, now suspended in a fully hydrated lipid bilayer. Despite the almost uniform atomic density, the introduction of water and lipid does not grossly distort the overall gating motion. Normal-mode analysis revealed that even a fully immersed glycine α-1 receptor continues to demonstrate an iris-like channel gating motion as a low-frequency, high-amplitude natural harmonic vibration consistent with channel gating. Furthermore, the introduction of periodic boundary conditions allows the examination of simultaneous harmonic vibrations of lipid in synchrony with the protein gating motions that are compatible with reasonable lipid bilayer perturbations. While these perturbations tend to influence the overall protein motion, this work provides continued support for the iris-like motion model that characterizes gating within the family of ligand-gated ion channels.

  18. The Effect of Lidocaine · HCl on the Fluidity of Native and Model Membrane Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun-Seop; Jung, Tae-Sang; Noh, Yang-Ho; Kim, Woo-Sung; Park, Won-Ick; Kim, Young-Soo; Chung, In-Kyo; Sohn, Uy Dong; Bae, Soo-Kyung

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigated the mechanism of pharmacological action of local anesthetic and provide the basic information about the development of new effective local anesthetics. Fluorescent probe techniques were used to evaluate the effect of lidocaine·HCl on the physical properties (transbilayer asymmetric lateral and rotational mobility, annular lipid fluidity and protein distribution) of synaptosomal plasma membrane vesicles (SPMV) isolated from bovine cerebral cortex, and liposomes of total lipids (SPMVTL) and phospholipids (SPMVPL) extracted from the SPMV. An experimental procedure was used based on selective quenching of 1,3-di(1-pyrenyl)propane (Py-3-Py) and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) by trinitrophenyl groups, and radiationless energy transfer from the tryptophans of membrane proteins to Py-3-Py. Lidocaine·HCl increased the bulk lateral and rotational mobility of neuronal and model membrane lipid bilayes, and had a greater fluidizing effect on the inner monolayer than the outer monolayer. Lidocaine·HCl increased annular lipid fluidity in SPMV lipid bilayers. It also caused membrane proteins to cluster. The most important finding of this study is that there is far greater increase in annular lipid fluidity than that in lateral and rotational mobilities by lidocaine·HCl. Lidocaine·HCl alters the stereo or dynamics of the proteins in the lipid bilayers by combining with lipids, especially with the annular lipids. In conclusion, the present data suggest that lidocaine, in addition to its direct interaction with proteins, concurrently interacts with membrane lipids, fluidizing the membrane, and thus inducing conformational changes of proteins known to be intimately associated with membrane lipid. PMID:23269904

  19. Diffusion coefficients in leaflets of bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Seki, Kazuhiko; Mogre, Saurabh; Komura, Shigeyuki

    2014-02-01

    We study diffusion coefficients of liquid domains by explicitly taking into account the two-layered structure called leaflets of the bilayer membrane. In general, the velocity fields associated with each leaflet are different and the layers sliding past each other cause frictional coupling. We obtain analytical results of diffusion coefficients for a circular liquid domain in a leaflet, and quantitatively study their dependence on the interleaflet friction. We also show that the diffusion coefficients diverge in the absence of coupling between the bilayer and solvents, even when the interleaflet friction is taken into account. In order to corroborate our theory, the effect of the interleaflet friction on the correlated diffusion is examined.

  20. Temperature effect on plasmons in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Digish K.; Sharma, A. C.; Ashraf, S. S. Z.; Ambavale, S. K.

    2015-06-01

    We have theoretically investigated the plasmon dispersion and damping rate of doped bilayer graphene (BLG) at finite temperatures within the random phase approximation. Our computed results on plasmon dispersion show that plasmon frequency enhances with increasing temperatures in contrast to single layer graphene where it is suppressed. This can be attributed to the fact that the dynamic response of the electron gas or screening in bilayer graphene is different from that of single layer graphene. Further the temperature effect on damping rate is also discussed.

  1. Magnetically Aligned Supramolecular Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Matthew; Cardoso, Andre Zamith; Frith, William J; Iggo, Jonathan A; Adams, Dave J

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic-field-induced alignment of the fibrillar structures present in an aqueous solution of a dipeptide gelator, and the subsequent retention of this alignment upon transformation to a hydrogel upon the addition of CaCl2 or upon a reduction in solution pH is reported. Utilising the switchable nature of the magnetic field coupled with the slow diffusion of CaCl2, it is possible to precisely control the extent of anisotropy across a hydrogel, something that is generally very difficult to do using alternative methods. The approach is readily extended to other compounds that form viscous solutions at high pH. It is expected that this work will greatly expand the utility of such low-molecular-weight gelators (LMWG) in areas where alignment is key. PMID:25345918

  2. Improved docking alignment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, Leo G. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Improved techniques are provided for the alignment of two objects. The present invention is particularly suited for 3-D translation and 3-D rotational alignment of objects in outer space. A camera is affixed to one object, such as a remote manipulator arm of the spacecraft, while the planar reflective surface is affixed to the other object, such as a grapple fixture. A monitor displays in real-time images from the camera such that the monitor displays both the reflected image of the camera and visible marking on the planar reflective surface when the objects are in proper alignment. The monitor may thus be viewed by the operator and the arm manipulated so that the reflective surface is perpendicular to the optical axis of the camera, the roll of the reflective surface is at a selected angle with respect to the camera, and the camera is spaced a pre-selected distance from the reflective surface.

  3. Simulated microgravity impacts the plant plasmalemma lipid bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedukha, Olena; Berkovich, Yuliy A.; Vorobyeva, Tamara; Grakhov, Volodimir; Klimenko, Elena; Zhupanov, Ivan; Jadko, Sergiy

    unsaturated fatty acids, that maintains the plasmalemma fluidity in the normal limits, and it may be considered as an adaptive pattern. This assumption was directly confirmed by the data on plasmalemma fluidity in control and under clinorotation defined by electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer Bruker Elexsys E 580 (Germany). It was in the first established a significant increase in the sterol content under clinorotation. It is of much interest because sterols along with glyco- and phospholipids and mainly saturated fatty acids form “rafts” that are membrane certain domains, where a lipid bilayer is in the dense, highly ordered state. As rafts include the protein complexes, which are necessary for perception and transduction of exogenous signals, stress protection, pathogenesis, vesicular transport also, a significant increase of sterols under clinorotation may indicate the changes in both membrane permeability and protein activity. On the basis of obtained data, the future researches of components of signaling pathways and regulation of certain plasmalemma membranous proteins activity are grounded and planned.

  4. MUSE optical alignment procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Loupias, Magali; Kosmalski, Johan; Anwand, Heiko; Bacon, Roland; Boudon, Didier; Caillier, Patrick; Daguisé, Eric; Dubois, Jean-Pierre; Dupuy, Christophe; Kelz, Andreas; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Nicklas, Harald; Parès, Laurent; Remillieux, Alban; Seifert, Walter; Valentin, Hervé; Xu, Wenli

    2012-09-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation VLT integral field spectrograph (1x1arcmin² Field of View) developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO), operating in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently assembling and testing MUSE in the Integration Hall of the Observatoire de Lyon for the Preliminary Acceptance in Europe, scheduled for 2013. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic instrument mechanical structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2011, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested independently in each institute. After validations, the systems were shipped to the P.I. institute at Lyon and were assembled in the Integration Hall This paper describes the end-to-end optical alignment procedure of the MUSE instrument. The design strategy, mixing an optical alignment by manufacturing (plug and play approach) and few adjustments on key components, is presented. We depict the alignment method for identifying the optical axis using several references located in pupil and image planes. All tools required to perform the global alignment between each subsystem are described. The success of this alignment approach is demonstrated by the good results for the MUSE image quality. MUSE commissioning at the VLT (Very Large Telescope) is planned for 2013.

  5. Characterization of the channel properties of tetanus toxin in planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Gambale, F; Montal, M

    1988-01-01

    A detailed characterization of the properties of the channel formed by tetanus toxin in planar lipid bilayers is presented. Channel formation proceeds at neutral pH. However, an acidic pH is required to detect the presence of channels in the membrane rapidly and effectively. Acid pH markedly lowers the single-channel conductance, for phosphatidylserine at 0.5 M KCl gamma = 89 pS at pH 7.0 while at pH 4.8, gamma = 30 pS. The toxin channel is cation selective without significant selectivity between potassium and sodium (gamma [K+]/gamma [Na+] greater than or equal to 1.35). In all the lipids studied gamma is larger at positive than at negative voltages. The toxin channel is voltage dependent both at neutral and acidic pH: for phosphatidylserine membranes, the probability of the channel being open is much greater at positive than at negative voltage. In different phospholipids the channel exhibits different voltage dependence. In phosphatidylserine membranes the channel is inactivated at negative voltages, whereas in diphytanoylphosphatidylcholine membranes channels are more active at negative voltages than at positive. The presence of acidic phospholipids in the bilayers increases both the single-channel conductance as well as the probability of the channel being open at positive voltage. A subconductance state is readily identifiable in the single-channel recordings. Accordingly, single-channel conductance histograms are best fitted with a sum of 3 Gaussian distributions corresponding to the closed state, the open subconductance state and the full open state. Channel activity occurs in bursts of openings separated by long closings. Probability density analysis of the open dwell times of the toxin channel indicate the existence of a single open state with a lifetime greater than or equal to 1 ms in all lipids studied. Analysis of intra-bursts closing lifetimes reveals the existence of two components; the slow component is of the order of 1 ms, the fast one is less

  6. PILOT optical alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longval, Y.; Mot, B.; Ade, P.; André, Y.; Aumont, J.; Baustista, L.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Bray, N.; de Bernardis, P.; Boulade, O.; Bousquet, F.; Bouzit, M.; Buttice, V.; Caillat, A.; Charra, M.; Chaigneau, M.; Crane, B.; Crussaire, J.-P.; Douchin, F.; Doumayrou, E.; Dubois, J.-P.; Engel, C.; Etcheto, P.; Gélot, P.; Griffin, M.; Foenard, G.; Grabarnik, S.; Hargrave, P..; Hughes, A.; Laureijs, R.; Lepennec, Y.; Leriche, B.; Maestre, S.; Maffei, B.; Martignac, J.; Marty, C.; Marty, W.; Masi, S.; Mirc, F.; Misawa, R.; Montel, J.; Montier, L.; Narbonne, J.; Nicot, J.-M.; Pajot, F.; Parot, G.; Pérot, E.; Pimentao, J.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rodriguez, L.; Roudil, G.; Salatino, M.; Savini, G.; Simonella, O.; Saccoccio, M.; Tapie, P.; Tauber, J.; Torre, J.-P.; Tucker, C.

    2016-07-01

    PILOT is a balloon-borne astronomy experiment designed to study the polarization of dust emission in the diffuse interstellar medium in our Galaxy at wavelengths 240 μm with an angular resolution about two arcminutes. Pilot optics is composed an off-axis Gregorian type telescope and a refractive re-imager system. All optical elements, except the primary mirror, are in a cryostat cooled to 3K. We combined the optical, 3D dimensional measurement methods and thermo-elastic modeling to perform the optical alignment. The talk describes the system analysis, the alignment procedure, and finally the performances obtained during the first flight in September 2015.

  7. The phospholipid flippase ATP9A is required for the recycling pathway from the endosomes to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yoshiki; Ono, Natsuki; Shima, Takahiro; Tanaka, Gaku; Katoh, Yohei; Nakayama, Kazuhisa; Takatsu, Hiroyuki; Shin, Hye-Won

    2016-01-01

    Type IV P-type ATPases (P4-ATPases) are phospholipid flippases that translocate phospholipids from the exoplasmic (or luminal) to the cytoplasmic leaflet of lipid bilayers. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, P4-ATPases are localized to specific subcellular compartments and play roles in compartment-mediated membrane trafficking; however, roles of mammalian P4-ATPases in membrane trafficking are poorly understood. We previously reported that ATP9A, one of 14 human P4-ATPases, is localized to endosomal compartments and the Golgi complex. In this study, we found that ATP9A is localized to phosphatidylserine (PS)-positive early and recycling endosomes, but not late endosomes, in HeLa cells. Depletion of ATP9A delayed the recycling of transferrin from endosomes to the plasma membrane, although it did not affect the morphology of endosomal structures. Moreover, depletion of ATP9A caused accumulation of glucose transporter 1 in endosomes, probably by inhibiting their recycling. By contrast, depletion of ATP9A affected neither the early/late endosomal transport and degradation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) nor the transport of Shiga toxin B fragment from early/recycling endosomes to the Golgi complex. Therefore ATP9A plays a crucial role in recycling from endosomes to the plasma membrane. PMID:27733620

  8. Identification and characterization of two phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase genes from Apis cerana cerana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mian; Kang, Mingjiang; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2010-06-01

    Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPX) plays a crucial role in maintaining the integrity of membrane by reducing hydroperoxides of phospholipids. Here, we report the identification and characterization of two genes, designated AccGtpx-1 and AccGtpx-2, encoding PHGPX proteins from the Chinese honeybees, Apis cerana cerana. Alignment analysis showed that AccGtpx-1 and AccGtpx-2 shared high similarity with other known PHGPXs, which show similar structure to thioredoxin. These single copy genes showed complex exon-intron structures. The mRNA of AccGtpx-1 was detected in larvae, pupae and adults and that AccGtpx-2 was only found in adult worker bees. Furthermore, the expression of AccGtpx-1 could be induced by H(2)O(2), ultraviolet (UV) light, heat shock (37 degrees C), HgCl(2), imidacloprid, cyhalothrin, pyriproxyfen and methomyl. In contrast, AccGtpx-2 expression could only be induced by UV. These results indicated for the first time that the AccGtpx-1 and AccGtpx-2 genes encoding A. cerana cerana PHGPXs are regulated differently in response to environmental stressors.

  9. Cholesterol Promotes Interaction of the Protein CLIC1 with Phospholipid Monolayers at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Khondker R; Al Khamici, Heba; Holt, Stephen A; Valenzuela, Stella M

    2016-02-11

    CLIC1 is a Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel protein that exists either in a soluble state in the cytoplasm or as a membrane bound protein. Members of the CLIC family are largely soluble proteins that possess the intriguing property of spontaneous insertion into phospholipid bilayers to form integral membrane ion channels. The regulatory role of cholesterol in the ion-channel activity of CLIC1 in tethered lipid bilayers was previously assessed using impedance spectroscopy. Here we extend this investigation by evaluating the influence of cholesterol on the spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 into Langmuir film monolayers prepared using 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine alone or in combination with cholesterol. The spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 was shown to be dependent on the presence of cholesterol in the membrane. Furthermore, pre-incubation of CLIC1 with cholesterol prior to its addition to the Langmuir film, showed no membrane insertion even in monolayers containing cholesterol, suggesting the formation of a CLIC1-cholesterol pre-complex. Our results therefore suggest that CLIC1 membrane interaction involves CLIC1 binding to cholesterol located in the membrane for its initial docking followed by insertion. Subsequent structural rearrangements of the protein would likely also be required along with oligomerisation to form functional ion channels.

  10. Cholesterol Promotes Interaction of the Protein CLIC1 with Phospholipid Monolayers at the Air–Water Interface

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Khondker R.; Al Khamici, Heba; Holt, Stephen A.; Valenzuela, Stella M.

    2016-01-01

    CLIC1 is a Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel protein that exists either in a soluble state in the cytoplasm or as a membrane bound protein. Members of the CLIC family are largely soluble proteins that possess the intriguing property of spontaneous insertion into phospholipid bilayers to form integral membrane ion channels. The regulatory role of cholesterol in the ion-channel activity of CLIC1 in tethered lipid bilayers was previously assessed using impedance spectroscopy. Here we extend this investigation by evaluating the influence of cholesterol on the spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 into Langmuir film monolayers prepared using 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine alone or in combination with cholesterol. The spontaneous membrane insertion of CLIC1 was shown to be dependent on the presence of cholesterol in the membrane. Furthermore, pre-incubation of CLIC1 with cholesterol prior to its addition to the Langmuir film, showed no membrane insertion even in monolayers containing cholesterol, suggesting the formation of a CLIC1-cholesterol pre-complex. Our results therefore suggest that CLIC1 membrane interaction involves CLIC1 binding to cholesterol located in the membrane for its initial docking followed by insertion. Subsequent structural rearrangements of the protein would likely also be required along with oligomerisation to form functional ion channels. PMID:26875987

  11. Differential affinities of MinD and MinE to anionic phospholipid influence Min Patterning dynamics in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Vecchiarelli, Anthony G.; Li, Min; Mizuuchi, Michiyo; Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The E. coli Min system forms a cell-pole-to-cell-pole oscillator that positions the divisome at mid-cell. The MinD ATPase binds the membrane and recruits the cell division inhibitor MinC. MinE interacts with and releases MinD (and MinC) from the membrane. The chase of MinD by MinE creates the in vivo oscillator that maintains a low level of the division inhibitor at mid-cell. In vitro reconstitution and visualization of Min proteins on a supported lipid bilayer has provided significant advances in understanding Min patterns in vivo. Here we studied the effects of flow, lipid composition, and salt concentration on Min patterning. Flow and no-flow conditions both supported Min protein patterns with somewhat different characteristics. Without flow, MinD and MinE formed spiraling waves. MinD and, to a greater extent MinE, have stronger affinities for anionic phospholipid. MinD-independent binding of MinE to anionic lipid resulted in slower and narrower waves. MinE binding to the bilayer was also more susceptible to changes in ionic strength than MinD. We find that modulating protein diffusion with flow, or membrane binding affinities with changes in lipid composition or salt concentration, can differentially affect the retention time of MinD and MinE, leading to spatiotemporal changes in Min patterning. PMID:24930948

  12. Interaction of Local Anesthetics with Biomembranes Consisting of Phospholipids and Cholesterol: Mechanistic and Clinical Implications for Anesthetic and Cardiotoxic Effects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite a long history in medical and dental application, the molecular mechanism and precise site of action are still arguable for local anesthetics. Their effects are considered to be induced by acting on functional proteins, on membrane lipids, or on both. Local anesthetics primarily interact with sodium channels embedded in cell membranes to reduce the excitability of nerve cells and cardiomyocytes or produce a malfunction of the cardiovascular system. However, the membrane protein-interacting theory cannot explain all of the pharmacological and toxicological features of local anesthetics. The administered drug molecules must diffuse through the lipid barriers of nerve sheaths and penetrate into or across the lipid bilayers of cell membranes to reach the acting site on transmembrane proteins. Amphiphilic local anesthetics interact hydrophobically and electrostatically with lipid bilayers and modify their physicochemical property, with the direct inhibition of membrane functions, and with the resultant alteration of the membrane lipid environments surrounding transmembrane proteins and the subsequent protein conformational change, leading to the inhibition of channel functions. We review recent studies on the interaction of local anesthetics with biomembranes consisting of phospholipids and cholesterol. Understanding the membrane interactivity of local anesthetics would provide novel insights into their anesthetic and cardiotoxic effects. PMID:24174934

  13. The conformation of human phospholipid scramblase 1, as studied by infrared spectroscopy. Effects of calcium and detergent.

    PubMed

    Andraka, Nagore; Sánchez-Magraner, Lissete; García-Pacios, Marcos; Goñi, Félix M; Arrondo, José L R

    2017-05-01

    Human phospholipid scramblase 1 (SCR) is a membrane protein that catalyzes the transmembrane (flip-flop) motion of phospholipids. It can also exist in a non membrane-bound form in the nucleus, where it modulates several aspects of gene expression. Catalysis of phospholipid flip-flop requires the presence of millimolar Ca(2+), and occurs in the absence of ATP. Membrane-bound SCR contains a C-terminal α-helical domain embedded in the membrane bilayer. The latter domain can be removed giving rise to a stable truncated mutant SCRΔ that is devoid of scramblase activity. In order to improve our understanding of SCR structure infrared spectra have been recorded of both the native and truncated forms, and the effects of adding Ca(2+), or removing detergent, or thermally denaturing the protein have been observed. Under all conditions the main structural component of SCR/SCRΔ is a β-sheet. Removing the C-terminal 28 aa residues, which anchor SCR to the membrane, leads to a change in tertiary structure and an increased structural flexibility. The main effect of Ca(2+) is an increase in the α/β ratio of secondary structure components, with a concomitant increase in the proportion of non-periodic structures. At least in SCRΔ, detergent (Zwittergent 3-12) decreases the structural flexibility, an effect somewhat opposite to that of increasing temperature. Thermal denaturation is affected by Ca(2+), detergent, and by the presence or absence of the C-terminal domain, each of them influencing in different ways the denaturation pattern.

  14. Interactions between phospholipids and titanium dioxide particles.

    PubMed

    Le, Quoc-Chon; Ropers, Marie-Hélène; Terrisse, Hélène; Humbert, Bernard

    2014-11-01

    A systematic study was carried out on monolayer films and lipid vesicles to elucidate the interactions between membrane lipids and commercial particles of titanium dioxide TiO2 (TiO2-P25). Pressure-area isotherms of lipids at various pH values were recorded on a Langmuir trough with or without TiO2-P25 and NaCl in the subphase. Electrophoretic mobilities of lipid vesicles and TiO2-P25 particles were measured to identify the pH range where attractive electrostatic interactions between lipids and TiO2-P25 could take place. The results show that (i) the surface of TiO2-P25 particles interacts only with some phospholipids, (ii) the driving forces are electrostatic and (iii) non-electrostatic interactions were also observed, depending on the molecular structure. More precisely, the phospholipids 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate monosodium salt (DMPA), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-1-glycerol (DMPG) and 1',3'-bis[1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho]-sn-glycerol (TMCL) interacted strongly with the TiO2-P25 surface through electrostatic interactions, providing they were oppositely charged, i.e. for pH between 2 and 6.6. For TMCL and DMPG, interactions with the surface of TiO2-P25 in non-favourable electrostatic conditions, suggested another kind of binding, probably through the hydroxyl groups of the terminal glycerol. Weaker attractive interactions were demonstrated for 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine (DMPS) and the synthetic lipid dihexadecyl phosphate (DHP). For DMPS, the carboxylate group is involved in the adsorption onto TiO2. The other membrane lipids such as 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DMPE) and sphingomyelin (SM) did not interact with TiO2-P25 regardless of pH.

  15. Biomolecular interactions at phospholipid-decorated surfaces of liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Brake, Jeffrey M; Daschner, Maren K; Luk, Yan-Yeung; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2003-12-19

    The spontaneous assembly of phospholipids at planar interfaces between thermotropic liquid crystals and aqueous phases gives rise to patterned orientations of the liquid crystals that reflect the spatial and temporal organization of the phospholipids. Strong and weak specific-binding events involving proteins at these interfaces drive the reorganization of the phospholipids and trigger orientational transitions in the liquid crystals. Because these interfaces are fluid, processes involving the lateral organization of proteins (such as the formation of protein- and phospholipid-rich domains) are also readily imaged by the orientational response of the liquid crystal, as are stereospecific enzymatic events. These results provide principles for label-free monitoring of aqueous streams for molecular and biomolecular species without the need for complex instrumentation.

  16. Phospholipids of the lung in normal, toxic, and diseased states

    SciTech Connect

    Akino, T.; Ohno, K.

    1981-01-01

    The highly pulmonary concentration of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphorylcholine (dipalmitoyllecithin) and its implication as an important component of lung surfactant have promoted investigation of phospholipid metabolism in the lung. This review will set the contents including recent informations for better understanding of phospholipid metabolism of the lung in normal state (physiological significances of lung phospholipids, characteristics of phospholipids in lung tissue and alveolar washing, biosynthetic pathways of dipalmitoyllecithin, etc.) as well as in toxic states (pulmonary oxygen toxicity, etc.) and in diseased states (idiopathic respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, etc.) Since our main concern has been to clarify the most important route for supplying dipalmitoyllecithin, this review will be focused upon the various biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of different molecular species of lecithin and their potential significance in the normal, toxic, and diseased lungs.

  17. Herpes simplex virus 1 induces de novo phospholipid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, Esther; Oliveira, Anna Paula de; Tobler, Kurt; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Sonda, Sabrina; Kaech, Andres; Lucas, Miriam S.; Ackermann, Mathias; Wild, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes acquiring an envelope composed of phospholipids. Hence, we measured incorporation of phospholipid precursors into these membranes, and quantified changes in size of cellular compartments by morphometric analysis. Incorporation of [{sup 3}H]-choline into both nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes was significantly enhanced upon infection. [{sup 3}H]-choline was also part of isolated virions even grown in the presence of brefeldin A. Nuclei expanded early in infection. The Golgi complex and vacuoles increased substantially whereas the endoplasmic reticulum enlarged only temporarily. The data suggest that HSV-1 stimulates phospholipid synthesis, and that de novo synthesized phospholipids are inserted into nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes to i) maintain membrane integrity in the course of nuclear and cellular expansion, ii) to supply membrane constituents for envelopment of capsids by budding at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes, and iii) to provide membranes for formation of transport vacuoles.

  18. A phospholipid uptake system in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Lisbeth R; López-Marqués, Rosa L; Pedas, Pai R; McDowell, Stephen C; Brown, Elizabeth; Kunze, Reinhard; Harper, Jeffrey F; Pomorski, Thomas G; Palmgren, Michael

    2015-07-27

    Plants use solar energy to produce lipids directly from inorganic elements and are not thought to require molecular systems for lipid uptake from the environment. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana Aminophospholipid ATPase10 (ALA10) is a P4-type ATPase flippase that internalizes exogenous phospholipids across the plasma membrane, after which they are rapidly metabolized. ALA10 expression and phospholipid uptake are high in the epidermal cells of the root tip and in guard cells, the latter of which regulate the size of stomatal apertures to modulate gas exchange. ALA10-knockout mutants exhibit reduced phospholipid uptake at the root tips and guard cells and are affected in growth and transpiration. The presence of a phospholipid uptake system in plants is surprising. Our results suggest that one possible physiological role of this system is to internalize lysophosphatidylcholine, a signalling lipid involved in root development and stomatal control.

  19. Aligned-or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseman, Jo Ellen; Koppal, Mary

    2015-01-01

    When state leaders and national partners in the development of the Next Generation Science Standards met to consider implementation strategies, states and school districts wanted to know which materials were aligned to the new standards. The answer from the developers was short but not sweet: You won't find much now, and it's going to…

  20. Optically Aligned Drill Press

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adderholdt, Bruce M.

    1994-01-01

    Precise drill press equipped with rotary-indexing microscope. Microscope and drill exchange places when turret rotated. Microscope axis first aligned over future hole, then rotated out of way so drill axis assumes its precise position. New procedure takes less time to locate drilling positions and produces more accurate results. Apparatus adapted to such other machine tools as milling and measuring machines.

  1. Curriculum Alignment: Establishing Coherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagné, Philippe; Dumont, Laurence; Brunet, Sabine; Boucher, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a step-by-step guide to implement a curricular alignment project, directed at professional development and student support, and developed in a higher education French as a second language department. We outline best practices and preliminary results from our experience and provide ways to adapt our experience to other…

  2. Finite element modeling of lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Feng; Klug, William S.

    2006-12-01

    A numerical simulation framework is presented for the study of biological membranes composed of lipid bilayers based on the finite element method. The classic model for these membranes employs a two-dimensional-fluid-like elastic constitutive law which is sensitive to curvature, and subjects vesicles to physically imposed constraints on surface area and volume. This model is implemented numerically via the use of C1-conforming triangular Loop subdivision finite elements. The validity of the framework is tested by computing equilibrium shapes from previously-determined axisymmetric shape-phase diagram of lipid bilayer vesicles with homogeneous material properties. Some of the benefits and challenges of finite element modeling of lipid bilayer systems are discussed, and it is indicated how this framework is natural for future investigation of biologically realistic bilayer structures involving nonaxisymmetric geometries, binding and adhesive interactions, heterogeneous mechanical properties, cytoskeletal interactions, and complex loading arrangements. These biologically relevant features have important consequences for the shape mechanics of nonidealized vesicles and cells, and their study requires not simply advances in theory, but also advances in numerical simulation techniques, such as those presented here.

  3. Simulation Studies of Alamethicin-Bilayer Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Biggin, P. C.; Breed, J.; Son, H. S.; Sansom, M. S. P.

    1997-01-01

    Alamethicin is an α-helical peptide that forms voltage-activated ion channels. Experimental data suggest that channel formation occurs via voltage-dependent insertion of alamethicin helices into lipid bilayers, followed by self-assembly of inserted helices to form a parallel helix bundle. Changes in the kink angle of the alamethicin helix about its central proline residue have also been suggested to play a role in channel gating. Alamethicin helices generated by simulated annealing and restrained molecular dynamics adopt a kink angle similar to that in the x-ray crystal structure, even if such simulations start with an idealized unkinked helix. This suggests that the kinked helix represents a stable conformation of the molecule. Molecular dynamics simulations in the presence of a simple bilayer model and a transbilayer voltage difference are used to explore possible mechanisms of helix insertion. The bilayer is represented by a hydrophobicity potential. An alamethicin helix inserts spontaneously in the absence of a transbilayer voltage. Application of a cis positive voltage decreases the time to insertion. The helix kink angle fluctuates during the simulations. Insertion of the helix is associated with a decrease in the mean kink angle, thus helping the alamethicin molecule to span the bilayer. The simulation results are discussed in terms of models of alamethicin channel gating. ImagesFIGURE 1FIGURE 6 PMID:9017192

  4. electric dipole superconductor in bilayer exciton system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qing-Feng; Jiang, Qing-Dong; Bao, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, X. C.

    Recently, it was reported that the bilayer exciton systems could exhibit many new phenomena, including the large bilayer counterflow conductivity, the Coulomb drag, etc. These phenomena imply the formation of exciton condensate superfluid state. On the other hand, it is now well known that the superconductor is the condensate superfluid state of the Cooper pairs, which can be viewed as electric monopoles. In other words, the superconductor state is the electric monopole condensate superfluid state. Thus, one may wonder whether there exists electric dipole superfluid state. In this talk, we point out that the exciton in a bilayer system can be considered as a charge neutral electric dipole. And we derive the London-type and Ginzburg-Landau-type equations of electric dipole superconductivity. From these equations, we discover the Meissner-type effect (against spatial variation of magnetic fields), and the dipole current Josephson effect. The frequency in the AC Josephson effect of the dipole current is equal to that in the normal (monopole) superconductor. These results can provide direct evidence for the formation of exciton superfluid state in the bilayer systems and pave new ways to obtain the electric dipole current. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support by NBRP of China (2012CB921303 and 2015CB921102) and NSF-China under Grants Nos. 11274364 and 11574007.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine bilayer with Na+ counterions.

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Sagar A; Berkowitz, Max L

    2002-01-01

    We performed a molecular dynamics simulation of dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine (DPPS) bilayer with Na+ counterions. We found that hydrogen bonding between the NH group and the phosphate group leads to a reduction in the area per headgroup when compared to the area in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer. The Na+ ions bind to the oxygen in the carboxyl group of serine, thus giving rise to a dipolar bilayer similar to dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine bilayer. The results of the simulation show that counterions play a crucial role in determining the structural and electrostatic properties of DPPS bilayer. PMID:11916841

  6. Electronic properties of graphene-based bilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhkov, A. V.; Sboychakov, A. O.; Rakhmanov, A. L.; Nori, Franco

    2016-08-01

    This article reviews the theoretical and experimental work related to the electronic properties of bilayer graphene systems. Three types of bilayer stackings are discussed: the AA, AB, and twisted bilayer graphene. This review covers single-electron properties, effects of static electric and magnetic fields, bilayer-based mesoscopic systems, spin-orbit coupling, dc transport and optical response, as well as spontaneous symmetry violation and other interaction effects. The selection of the material aims to introduce the reader to the most commonly studied topics of theoretical and experimental research in bilayer graphene.

  7. Transport properties of monolayer and bilayer graphene supported by hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Zou, Ke; Seiwell, Donald; Zhu, Jun

    2013-03-01

    We present transport studies on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) supported monolayer and bilayer graphene. Fol