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Sample records for aligned single walled

  1. Magnetic Fractionation and Alignment of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M. F.; Milkie, D. E.; Yodh, A. G.; Kikkawa, J. M.

    2004-03-01

    We study mechanisms of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) alignment in a magnetic field. Through magnetic fractionation, we create SWNT suspensions with varying quantities of magnetic catalyst particles. The degree of tube alignment in magnetic fields up to 9 Tesla is quantified using polarized optical absorbance anisotropy. Continuous measurements of the nematic order parameter of these suspensions in variable magnetic fields provides a way to identify the origin of magnetic torques giving rise to nanotube alignment. Initial data suggests a transition from catalyst-driven to nanotube-anisotropy driven orientation as the catalyst fraction is reduced. We relate these results to observations of nanotube aggregation. This work has been supported by NSF through DMR-0203378, DMR-079909 and DGE-0221664, NASA through NAG8-2172, DARPA/ONR through N00014-01-1-0831, and SENS.

  2. Alignment enhanced photoconductivity in single wall carbon nanotube films.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Lu, Shaoxin; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2009-01-21

    In this paper we report, for the first time, the alignment enhanced photoconductivity of single wall carbon nanotube films upon laser illumination. The photoconductivity exhibited an increase, decrease or even 'negative' values when the laser spot was on different positions between contact electrodes, showing a 'position' dependent photoconductivity of partially aligned films of carbon nanotubes. Photon induced charge carrier generation in single wall carbon nanotubes and subsequent charge separation across the metal-carbon nanotube contacts is believed to cause the photoconductivity changes. A net photovoltage of approximately 4 mV and a photocurrent of approximately 10 microA were produced under the laser intensity of approximately 273 mW with a quantum efficiency of approximately 7.8% in vacuum. The photocurrent was observed to be in the direction of nanotube alignment. Finally, there was a strong dependence of the polarization of the incident light on the photocurrent and the orientation of the films influenced the dynamics of the rise and fall of the photocurrent. All of these phenomena clearly have significance in the area of design and fabrication of solar cells, micro-opto-mechanical systems and photodetectors based on carbon nanotubes.

  3. Structural anisotropy of magnetically aligned single wall carbon nanotube films

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B. W.; Benes, Z.; Luzzi, D. E.; Fischer, J. E.; Walters, D. A.; Casavant, M. J.; Schmidt, J.; Smalley, R. E.

    2000-07-31

    Thick films of aligned single wall carbon nanotubes and ropes have been produced by filtration/deposition from suspension in strong magnetic fields. We measured mosaic distributions of rope orientations in the film plane, for samples of different thicknesses. For an {approx}1 {mu}m film the full width at half maximum (FWHM) derived from electron diffraction is 25 degree sign -28 degree sign . The FWHM of a thicker film ({approx}7 {mu}m) measured by x-ray diffraction is slightly broader, 35{+-}3 degree sign . Aligned films are denser than ordinary filter-deposited ones, and much denser than as-grown material. Optimization of the process is expected to yield smaller FWHMs and higher densities. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Aligned arrays of single walled carbon nanotubes for transparent electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Frank; Rogers, John A.

    2013-06-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes have garnered substantial interest in the electronic materials research community due to their unparalleled intrinsic electrical properties. In addition, their mechanical robustness and thin geometries make SWNTs ideal candidates for transparent electronics. Aligned arrays of SWNTs grown via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on quartz enable device uniformity and wafer scale integration with existing commercial semiconductor processing methods. A crucial roadblock in incorporation of SWNTs in commercial electronics has been the co-existence of metallic and semiconducting SWNTs. Demanding device metrics in high performance and complex integrated electrical devices, sensors, and other applications dictate the necessity of pristine, purely semiconducting arrays of SWNTs. By exploiting a novel process in nanoscale flow of thin film organic coatings, we have demonstrated a method to purify as-grown aligned arrays to produce such as result. Comparison with single nanotube statistics, characterization using a novel thermal scanning probe microscopy technique, as well as corroboration with thermal modeling validated the result. Thin film field effect transistors exhibiting mobilities exceeding ~1000cm2/Vs and on/off ratios exceeding 10,000 were fabricated using the purified semiconducting SWNTs. This manuscript reviews some of these results, which represent the first successful demonstration of purification of aligned arrays of SWNTs, in a robust and scalable scheme that allows integration of aligned arrays into complex, high performance electrical devices. We separately also describe new results on the advanced development of soft lithography techniques with the ability to transfer print aligned arrays of SWNTs onto transparent substrates after synthesis and processing, thereby completing a direct pathway to achieve complex, high performance, and highly integrated transparent SWNTs electronics, sensors, or other devices.

  5. Superemission in vertically-aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelinskii, Igor; Makarov, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    Presently we used two samples of vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes (VA SWCNTs) with parallelepiped geometry, sized 0.02 cm × 0.2 cm × 1.0 cm and 0.2 cm × 0.2 cm × 1.0 cm. We report absorption and emission properties of the VA SWCNTs, including strong anisotropy in both their absorption and emission spectra. We found that the emission spectra extend from the middle-IR range to the near-IR range, with such extended spectra being reported for the first time. Pumping the VA SWCNTs in the direction normal to their axis, superemission (SE) was observed in the direction along their axis. The SE band maximum is located at 7206 ± 0.4 cm-1. The energy and the power density of the superemission were estimated, along with the diffraction-limited divergence. At the pumping energy of 3 mJ/pulse, the SE energy measured by the detector was 0.74 mJ/pulse, corresponding to the total SE energy of 1.48 mJ/pulse, with the energy density of 18.5 mJ cm-2/pulse and the SE power density of 1.2 × 105 W cm-2/pulse. We report that a bundle of VA SWCNTs is an emitter with a relatively small divergence, not exceeding 3.9 × 10-3 rad. We developed a theoretical approach to explain such absorption and emission spectra. The developed theory is based on the earlier proposed SSH theory, which we extended to include the exchange interactions between the closest SWCNT neighbors. The developed theoretical ideas were implemented in a homemade FORTRAN code. This code was successfully used to calculate and reproduce the experimental spectra and to determine the SWCNT species that originate the respective absorption bands, with acceptable agreement between theory and experiment.

  6. Enhanced cold wall CVD reactor growth of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Wei; Kwak, Eun-Hye; Chen, Bingan; Huang, Shirong; Edwards, Michael; Fu, Yifeng; Jeppson, Kjell; Teo, Kenneth; Jeong, Goo-Hwan; Liu, Johan

    2016-05-01

    HASynthesis of horizontally-aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (HA-SWCNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) directly on quartz seems very promising for the fabrication of future nanoelectronic devices. In comparison to hot-wall CVD, synthesis of HA-SWCNTs in a cold-wall CVD chamber not only means shorter heating, cooling and growth periods, but also prevents contamination of the chamber. However, since most synthesis of HA-SWCNTs is performed in hot-wall reactors, adapting this well-established process to a cold-wall chamber becomes extremely crucial. Here, in order to transfer the CVD growth technology from a hot-wall to a cold-wall chamber, a systematic investigation has been conducted to determine the influence of process parameters on the HA-SWCNT's growth. For two reasons, the cold-wall CVD chamber was upgraded with a top heater to complement the bottom substrate heater; the first reason to maintain a more uniform temperature profile during HA-SWCNTs growth, and the second reason to preheat the precursor gas flow before projecting it onto the catalyst. Our results show that the addition of a top heater had a significant effect on the synthesis. Characterization of the CNTs shows that the average density of HA-SWCNTs is around 1 - 2 tubes/ μm with high growth quality as shown by Raman analysis. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Structure and Characterization of Vertically Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundles

    DOE PAGES

    Márquez, Francisco; López, Vicente; Morant, Carmen; ...

    2010-01-01

    Arrmore » ays of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube bundles, SWCNTs, have been synthesized by simple alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition process, carried out at 800°C. The formed SWCNTs are organized in small groups perpendicularly aligned and attached to the substrate. These small bundles show a constant diameter of ca. 30 nm and are formed by the adhesion of no more than twenty individual SWCNTs perfectly aligned along their length.« less

  8. Growth of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes on anisotropically etched silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orofeo, Carlo M.; Ago, Hiroki; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Takahasi, Koji; Tsuji, Masaharu

    2010-09-01

    Directional controllability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is an important issue for future nanoelectronics applications. For direct integration of carbon nanotubes with modern electronics, aligned growth of carbon nanotubes on SiO2/Si is desirable. We developed a new method to horizontally align SWNTs directly on SiO2/Si substrate by creating trenches on Si(100) through anisotropic etching followed by thermal oxidation. The V-shaped trenches highly improved the alignment of SWNTs and the degree of alignment is comparable to the step-templated alignment of carbon nanotubes on crystals. The trenches also improved the density of aligned nanotubes due to the combination of ``trench-guided'' and gas-flow guided alignment. Our new insights on carbon nanotube alignment on SiO2/Si will greatly contribute to future large-scale nanoelectronic applications.Directional controllability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is an important issue for future nanoelectronics applications. For direct integration of carbon nanotubes with modern electronics, aligned growth of carbon nanotubes on SiO2/Si is desirable. We developed a new method to horizontally align SWNTs directly on SiO2/Si substrate by creating trenches on Si(100) through anisotropic etching followed by thermal oxidation. The V-shaped trenches highly improved the alignment of SWNTs and the degree of alignment is comparable to the step-templated alignment of carbon nanotubes on crystals. The trenches also improved the density of aligned nanotubes due to the combination of ``trench-guided'' and gas-flow guided alignment. Our new insights on carbon nanotube alignment on SiO2/Si will greatly contribute to future large-scale nanoelectronic applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SEM images of SWNTs grown under different CVD conditions. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00170h

  9. Aligned Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composites Using an Electric Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol; Wiklinson, John; Banda, Sumanth; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Wise, Kristopher E.; Sauti, Godfrey; Lillehei, Peter T.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.

    2005-01-01

    While high shear alignment has been shown to improve the mechanical properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT)-polymer composites, it is difficult to control and often results in degradation of the electrical and dielectric properties of the composite. Here, we report a novel method to actively align SWNTs in a polymer matrix, which allows for control over the degree of alignment of SWNTs without the side effects of shear alignment. In this process, SWNTs are aligned via field-induced dipolar interactions among the nanotubes under an AC electric field in a liquid matrix followed by immobilization by photopolymerization while maintaining the electric field. Alignment of SWNTs was controlled as a function of magnitude, frequency, and application time of the applied electric field. The degree of SWNT alignment was assessed using optical microscopy and polarized Raman spectroscopy and the morphology of the aligned nanocomposites was investigated by high resolution scanning electron microscopy. The structure of the field induced aligned SWNTs is intrinsically different from that of shear aligned SWNTs. In the present work, SWNTs are not only aligned along the field, but also migrate laterally to form thick, aligned SWNT percolative columns between the electrodes. The actively aligned SWNTs amplify the electrical and dielectric properties in addition to improving the mechanical properties of the composite. All of these properties of the aligned nanocomposites exhibited anisotropic characteristics, which were controllable by tuning the applied field conditions.

  10. Purification and alignment of arc-synthesis single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Houjin; Kajiura, Hisashi; Yamada, Atsuo; Ata, Masafumi

    2002-04-01

    We report here a scalable method for purification and alignment of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) in an aqueous solution. Arc-synthesis soot containing SWNTs is first treated with a concentrated nitric acid. After removal of most of the impurities and water, macroscopic and well-aligned SWNT bundles up to several centimeters long are formed in a rotary evaporator. Alignment of the SWNT bundles is ascribed to the liquid flow induced by rotary evaporation and van der Waals interactions among the bundles. The aligned SWNT bundles are further purified by ultrasonic Soxhlet extraction and annealing.

  11. Heating-Enhanced Dielectrophoresis for Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Film of Ultrahigh Density.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qingyuan; Guezo, Maud; Folliot, Hervé; Batte, Thomas; Loualiche, Slimane; Stervinou, Julie

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that the alignment density of individualized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be greatly improved by heating-enhanced dielectrophoresis (HE-DEP) process. The observations by scanning electron microscope (SEM) suggest ultrahigh alignment density and good alignment quality of SWCNTs. The intuitive alignment density of individualized SWCNTs is much higher than the currently reported best results. The reason of this HE-DEP process is explained by simulation work and ascribed to the heating-enhanced convection process, and the "convection force" induced by the heating effect is assessed in a novel way.

  12. Aligned, ultralong single-walled carbon nanotubes: from synthesis, sorting, to electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongfan; Jiao, Liying; Yao, Yagang; Xian, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jin

    2010-06-04

    Aligned, ultralong single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) represent attractive building blocks for nanoelectronics. The structural uniformity along their tube axis and well-ordered two-dimensional architectures on wafer surfaces may provide a straightforward platform for fabricating high-performance SWNT-based integrated circuits. On the way towards future nanoelectronic devices, many challenges for such a specific system also exist. This Review summarizes the recent advances in the synthesis, identification and sorting, transfer printing and manipulation, device fabrication and integration of aligned, ultralong SWNTs in detail together with discussion on their major challenges and opportunities for their practical application.

  13. A black body absorber from vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kohei; Ishii, Juntaro; Kishida, Hideo; Hayamizu, Yuhei; Yasuda, Satoshi; Futaba, Don N.; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Among all known materials, we found that a forest of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes behaves most similarly to a black body, a theoretical material that absorbs all incident light. A requirement for an object to behave as a black body is to perfectly absorb light of all wavelengths. This important feature has not been observed for real materials because materials intrinsically have specific absorption bands because of their structure and composition. We found a material that can absorb light almost perfectly across a very wide spectral range (0.2–200 μm). We attribute this black body behavior to stem from the sparseness and imperfect alignment of the vertical single-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:19339498

  14. Wafer-scale monodomain films of spontaneously aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaowei; Gao, Weilu; Xie, Lijuan; Li, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Lei, Sidong; Robinson, John M; Hároz, Erik H; Doorn, Stephen K; Wang, Weipeng; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Adams, W Wade; Hauge, Robert H; Kono, Junichiro

    2016-07-01

    The one-dimensional character of electrons, phonons and excitons in individual single-walled carbon nanotubes leads to extremely anisotropic electronic, thermal and optical properties. However, despite significant efforts to develop ways to produce large-scale architectures of aligned nanotubes, macroscopic manifestations of such properties remain limited. Here, we show that large (>cm(2)) monodomain films of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes can be prepared using slow vacuum filtration. The produced films are globally aligned within ±1.5° (a nematic order parameter of ∼1) and are highly packed, containing 1 × 10(6) nanotubes in a cross-sectional area of 1 μm(2). The method works for nanotubes synthesized by various methods, and film thickness is controllable from a few nanometres to ∼100 nm. We use the approach to create ideal polarizers in the terahertz frequency range and, by combining the method with recently developed sorting techniques, highly aligned and chirality-enriched nanotube thin-film devices. Semiconductor-enriched devices exhibit polarized light emission and polarization-dependent photocurrent, as well as anisotropic conductivities and transistor action with high on/off ratios.

  15. Wafer-scale monodomain films of spontaneously aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaowei; Gao, Weilu; Xie, Lijuan; Li, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Lei, Sidong; Robinson, John M.; Hároz, Erik H.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Wang, Weipeng; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Adams, W. Wade; Hauge, Robert H.; Kono, Junichiro

    2016-07-01

    The one-dimensional character of electrons, phonons and excitons in individual single-walled carbon nanotubes leads to extremely anisotropic electronic, thermal and optical properties. However, despite significant efforts to develop ways to produce large-scale architectures of aligned nanotubes, macroscopic manifestations of such properties remain limited. Here, we show that large (>cm2) monodomain films of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes can be prepared using slow vacuum filtration. The produced films are globally aligned within ±1.5° (a nematic order parameter of ∼1) and are highly packed, containing 1 × 106 nanotubes in a cross-sectional area of 1 μm2. The method works for nanotubes synthesized by various methods, and film thickness is controllable from a few nanometres to ∼100 nm. We use the approach to create ideal polarizers in the terahertz frequency range and, by combining the method with recently developed sorting techniques, highly aligned and chirality-enriched nanotube thin-film devices. Semiconductor-enriched devices exhibit polarized light emission and polarization-dependent photocurrent, as well as anisotropic conductivities and transistor action with high on/off ratios.

  16. Zipping, entanglement, and the elastic modulus of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube films

    PubMed Central

    Won, Yoonjin; Gao, Yuan; Panzer, Matthew A.; Xiang, Rong; Maruyama, Shigeo; Kenny, Thomas W.; Cai, Wei; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Reliably routing heat to and from conversion materials is a daunting challenge for a variety of innovative energy technologies––from thermal solar to automotive waste heat recovery systems––whose efficiencies degrade due to massive thermomechanical stresses at interfaces. This problem may soon be addressed by adhesives based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, which promise the revolutionary combination of high through-plane thermal conductivity and vanishing in-plane mechanical stiffness. Here, we report the data for the in-plane modulus of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube films using a microfabricated resonator method. Molecular simulations and electron microscopy identify the nanoscale mechanisms responsible for this property. The zipping and unzipping of adjacent nanotubes and the degree of alignment and entanglement are shown to govern the spatially varying local modulus, thereby providing the route to engineered materials with outstanding combinations of mechanical and thermal properties. PMID:24309375

  17. Highly dense and perfectly aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes fabricated by diamond wire drawing dies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangtong; Zhao, Yuanchun; Deng, Ke; Liu, Zheng; Chu, Weiguo; Chen, Jingran; Yang, Yanlian; Zheng, Kaihong; Huang, Haibo; Ma, Wenjun; Song, Li; Yang, Haifang; Gu, Changzhi; Rao, Guanghui; Wang, Chen; Xie, Sishen; Sun, Lianfeng

    2008-04-01

    We have developed a low-cost and effective method to align single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using a series of diamond wire drawing dies. The obtained SWNTs are highly dense and perfectly aligned. X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicates that the highly dense and perfectly aligned SWNTs (HDPA-SWNTs) form a two-dimensional triangular lattice with a lattice constant of 19.62 A. We observe a sharp (002) reflection in the XRD pattern, which should be ascribed to an intertube spacing 3.39 A of adjacent SWNTs. Raman spectra reveal that the radical breath mode (RBM) of SWNTs with larger diameter in the HDPA-SWNTs is suppressed compared with that of as-grown SWNTs. The HDPA-SWNTs have a large density, approximately 1.09 g/cm 3, and a low resistivity, approximately 2 m Omega cm, at room temperature, as well as a large response to light illumination.

  18. Magnetic alignment of Ni-coated single wall carbon nanotubes in heat transfer nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Mark; Hong, Haiping; Li, Chen; Shi, Bo; Peterson, G. P.; Jin, Sungho

    2010-05-01

    Thermal conductivity (TC) of heat transfer nanofluids containing magnetic-metal-coated carbon nanotubes can be significantly enhanced (>60%) by applied magnetic field. In this paper, we report the observed real images of Ni-coated single wall carbon nanotubes in water and oils (polyalphaolefin, polyol ester) under magnetic field by high speed microscopy, and correlate them with TC measurements. Initially, the nanotubes are randomly dispersed in the fluid, however, on longer holding in magnetic field the nanotubes gradually stretch and are finally aligned. The chain length in the images is found to be around 30˜150 μm, which is much longer than the real length of individual nanotubes (5˜40 μm), indicating that nanotubes are aligned and form some chains and clusters. Because of the semicontinuous nature of Ni magnetic nanoparticles, as well as the viscosity resistance of the fluid itself, it takes some time for the Ni-coated nanotubes to respond to the applied magnetic field and align. Time dependent TC experiments indicate that alignment process dominates the TC enhancement rather than microconvection. Finally, scanning electron microscopy images also show that the Ni coated nanotubes are aligned well under the influence of a magnetic field. Transmission electron microscopy images indicate that nickel remains stable and attached onto the nanotubes after the magnetic field exposure and movements.

  19. Cyclohexane triggers staged growth of pure and vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, P.; Grüneis, A.; Grimm, D.; Kramberger, C.; Engelhard, R.; Rümmeli, M.; Schumann, J.; Kaltofen, R.; Büchner, B.; Schaman, C.; Kuzmany, H.; Gemming, T.; Barreiro, A.; Pichler, T.

    2008-03-01

    An innovative staged chemical vapor deposition (SCVD) approach providing flexible control over the feedstock type during single wall carbon nanotube (SWNTs) growth is proposed. The efficiency of staged growth by means of a cyclohexane/methane system using thin film catalysts is here illustrated. The mechanism involves the nucleation stage efficiently triggered by cyclohexane, followed by methane assisting a growth stage yielding high purity SWNTs vertically aligned with lengths of several hundred μm. In addition, SCVD also facilitates catalyst free SWNT detachment enabling repeated growth.

  20. Charge trapping in aligned single-walled carbon nanotube arrays induced by ionizing radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Esqueda, Ivan S.; Cress, Cory D.; Che, Yuchi; Cao, Yu; Zhou, Chongwu

    2014-02-07

    The effects of near-interfacial trapping induced by ionizing radiation exposure of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) arrays are investigated via measurements of gate hysteresis in the transfer characteristics of aligned SWCNT field-effect transistors. Gate hysteresis is attributed to charge injection (i.e., trapping) from the SWCNTs into radiation-induced traps in regions near the SWCNT/dielectric interface. Self-consistent calculations of surface-potential, carrier density, and trapped charge are used to describe hysteresis as a function of ionizing radiation exposure. Hysteresis width (h) and its dependence on gate sweep range are investigated analytically. The effects of non-uniform trap energy distributions on the relationship between hysteresis, gate sweep range, and total ionizing dose are demonstrated with simulations and verified experimentally.

  1. Printed multilayer superstructures of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes for electronic applications.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seong Jun; Kocabas, Coskun; Kim, Hoon-Sik; Cao, Qing; Meitl, Matthew A; Khang, Dahl-Young; Rogers, John A

    2007-11-01

    We developed means to form multilayer superstructures of large collections of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) configured in horizontally aligned arrays, random networks, and complex geometries of arrays and networks on a wide range of substrates. The approach involves guided growth of SWNTs on crystalline and amorphous substrates followed by sequential, multiple step transfer of the resulting collections of tubes to target substrates, such as high-k thin dielectrics on silicon wafers, transparent plates of glass, cylindrical tubes and other curved surfaces, and thin, flexible sheets of plastic. Electrical measurements on dense, bilayer superstructures, including crossbars, random networks, and aligned arrays on networks of SWNTs reveal some important characteristics of representative systems. These and other layouts of SWNTs might find applications not only in electronics but also in areas such as optoelectronics, sensors, nanomechanical systems, and microfluidics.

  2. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Properties of Vertically-Aligned Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadi, K.; Tripon-Canseliet, C.; Hivin, Q.; Ducournau, G.; Teo, E.; Coquet, P.; Tay, B. K.; Lepilliet, S.; Avramovic, V.; Chazelas, J.; Decoster, D.

    2016-05-01

    We present the experimental determination of the complex permittivity of vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) films grown on quartz substrates in the microwave regime from 10 MHz up to 67 GHz, with the electrical field perpendicular to the main axis of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), based on coplanar waveguide transmission line approach together with the measurement of the microwave impedance of top metalized vertically—aligned SWCNTs grown on conductive silicon substrates up to 26 GHz. From coplanar waveguide measurements, we obtain a real part of the permittivity almost equal to unity, which is interpreted in terms of low carbon atom density (3 × 1019 at/cm3) associated with a very low imaginary part of permittivity (<10-3) in the frequency range considered due to a very small perpendicular conductivity. The microwave impedance of a vertically aligned CNTs bundle equivalent to a low resistance reveals a good conductivity (3 S/cm) parallel to the CNTs axis. From these two kinds of data, we experimentally demonstrate the tensor nature of the vertically grown CNTs bundles.

  3. Horizontally aligned single walled carbon nanotube arrays on quartz for electrochemical biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuehai; Wang, Xuewen; Li, Wenzhi; He, Jin

    2014-03-01

    We have fabricated and characterized a simple and high performance electrochemical sensor using horizontally aligned single walled carbon nanotube arrays on transparent single crystal quartz substrates grown by chemical vapor deposition. The electrochemical activities of redox probes Fe(CN)63- / 4 - , Ru(NH3) 6 3 + and protein cytochrome c on these pristine SWCNT thin films have been studied. Because the surface coverage of CNTs is extremely low and aligned, the shape of cyclic voltammograms of these molecules in stationary solution is strongly affected by the mass transport rate of molecules and the interactions between molecules and the SWCNT surface. We also studied the electrochemical flow sensing capability of the device for detecting neurotransmitter dopamine at physiological conditions with the presence of Bovine serum albumin. Good sensitivity, fast response, high stability and anti-fouling capability are observed. Therefore, this device shows great potential for sensing applications in complex solution. This work was supported by a start-up fund (J. H.), NSF (CMMI-1334417) and the American Chemical Society under grant PRF #51766-ND10.

  4. Photoluminescence enhancement of aligned arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes by polymer transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweiger, Manuel; Zakharko, Yuriy; Gannott, Florentina; Grimm, Stefan B.; Zaumseil, Jana

    2015-10-01

    The photoluminescence of as-grown, aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on quartz is strongly quenched and barely detectable. Here we show that transferring these SWNTs to another substrate such as clean quartz or glass increases their emission efficiency by up to two orders of magnitude. By statistical analysis of large nanotube arrays we show at what point of the transfer process the emission enhancement occurs and how it depends on the receiving substrate and the employed transfer polymer. We find that hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) as the transfer polymer results in higher photoluminescence enhancement than the more hydrophilic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Possible mechanisms for this enhancement such as strain relief, disruption of the strong interaction of SWNTs with the substrate and localized emissive states are discussed.The photoluminescence of as-grown, aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on quartz is strongly quenched and barely detectable. Here we show that transferring these SWNTs to another substrate such as clean quartz or glass increases their emission efficiency by up to two orders of magnitude. By statistical analysis of large nanotube arrays we show at what point of the transfer process the emission enhancement occurs and how it depends on the receiving substrate and the employed transfer polymer. We find that hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) as the transfer polymer results in higher photoluminescence enhancement than the more hydrophilic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Possible mechanisms for this enhancement such as strain relief, disruption of the strong interaction of SWNTs with the substrate and localized emissive states are discussed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05163k

  5. Alignment controlled growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes on quartz substrates.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianliang; Dunham, Simon; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Yongwei; Kocabas, Coskun; Moh, Lionel; Huang, Yonggang; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Lu, Chun; Huang, Wei; Rogers, John A

    2009-12-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess extraordinary electrical properties, with many possible applications in electronics. Dense, horizontally aligned arrays of linearly configured SWNTs represent perhaps the most attractive and scalable way to implement this class of nanomaterial in practical systems. Recent work shows that templated growth of tubes on certain crystalline substrates yields arrays with the necessary levels of perfection, as demonstrated by the formation of devices and full systems on quartz. This paper examines advanced implementations of this process on crystalline quartz substrates with different orientations, to yield strategies for forming diverse, but well-defined horizontal configurations of SWNTs. Combined experimental and theoretical studies indicate that angle-dependent van der Waals interactions can account for nearly all aspects of alignment on quartz with X, Y, Z, and ST cuts, as well as quartz with disordered surface layers. These findings provide important insights into methods for guided growth of SWNTs, and possibly other classes of nanomaterials, for applications in electronics, sensing, photodetection, light emission, and other areas.

  6. High Electrocatalytic Activity of Vertically Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes towards Sulfide Redox Shuttles

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Feng; Dong, Pei; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yongchang; Loya, Phillip E.; Hauge, Robert H.; Li, Jianbao; Lou, Jun; Lin, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VASWCNTs) have been successfully transferred onto transparent conducting oxide glass and implemented as efficient low-cost, platinum-free counter electrode in sulfide –mediated dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs), featuring notably improved electrocatalytic activity toward thiolate/disulfide redox shuttle over conventional Pt counter electrodes. Impressively, device with VASWCNTs counter electrode demonstrates a high fill factor of 0.68 and power conversion efficiency up to 5.25%, which is significantly higher than 0.56 and 3.49% for that with a conventional Pt electrode. Moreover, VASWCNTs counter electrode produces a charge transfer resistance of only 21.22 Ω towards aqueous polysulfide electrolyte commonly applied in quantum dots-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs), which is several orders of magnitude lower than that of a typical Pt electrode. Therefore, VASWCNTs counter electrodes are believed to be a versatile candidate for further improvement of the power conversion efficiency of other iodine-free redox couple based DSCs and polysulfide electrolyte based QDSCs. PMID:22509466

  7. Nanoscale optical and electrical characterization of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Raul D.; Toader, Marius; Hermann, Sascha; Sheremet, Evgeniya; Müller, Susanne; Gordan, Ovidiu D.; Yu, Haibo; Schulz, Stefan E.; Hietschold, Michael; Zahn, Dietrich RT

    2012-12-01

    During the recent years, a significant amount of research has been performed on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a channel material in thin-film transistors (Pham et al. IEEE Trans Nanotechnol 11:44-50, 2012). This has prompted the application of advanced characterization techniques based on combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy studies (Mureau et al. Electrophoresis 29:2266-2271, 2008). In this context, we use confocal Raman microscopy and current sensing atomic force microscopy (CS-AFM) to study phonons and the electronic transport in semiconducting SWCNTs, which were aligned between palladium electrodes using dielectrophoresis (Kuzyk Electrophoresis 32:2307-2313, 2011). Raman imaging was performed in the region around the electrodes on the suspended CNTs using several laser excitation wavelengths. Analysis of the G+/G- splitting in the Raman spectra (Sgobba and Guldi Chem Soc Rev 38:165-184, 2009) shows CNT diameters of 2.5 ± 0.3 nm. Neither surface modification nor increase in defect density or stress at the CNT-electrode contact could be detected, but rather a shift in G+ and G- peak positions in regions with high CNT density between the electrodes. Simultaneous topographical and electrical characterization of the CNT transistor by CS-AFM confirms the presence of CNT bundles having a stable electrical contact with the transistor electrodes. For a similar load force, reproducible current-voltage ( I/ V) curves for the same CNT regions verify the stability of the electrical contact between the nanotube and the electrodes as well as the nanotube and the AFM tip over different experimental sessions using different AFM tips. Strong variations observed in the I/ V response at different regions of the CNT transistor are discussed.

  8. Nanoscale optical and electrical characterization of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    During the recent years, a significant amount of research has been performed on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a channel material in thin-film transistors (Pham et al. IEEE Trans Nanotechnol 11:44–50, 2012). This has prompted the application of advanced characterization techniques based on combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy studies (Mureau et al. Electrophoresis 29:2266–2271, 2008). In this context, we use confocal Raman microscopy and current sensing atomic force microscopy (CS-AFM) to study phonons and the electronic transport in semiconducting SWCNTs, which were aligned between palladium electrodes using dielectrophoresis (Kuzyk Electrophoresis 32:2307–2313, 2011). Raman imaging was performed in the region around the electrodes on the suspended CNTs using several laser excitation wavelengths. Analysis of the G+/G− splitting in the Raman spectra (Sgobba and Guldi Chem Soc Rev 38:165–184, 2009) shows CNT diameters of 2.5 ± 0.3 nm. Neither surface modification nor increase in defect density or stress at the CNT-electrode contact could be detected, but rather a shift in G+ and G− peak positions in regions with high CNT density between the electrodes. Simultaneous topographical and electrical characterization of the CNT transistor by CS-AFM confirms the presence of CNT bundles having a stable electrical contact with the transistor electrodes. For a similar load force, reproducible current–voltage (I/V) curves for the same CNT regions verify the stability of the electrical contact between the nanotube and the electrodes as well as the nanotube and the AFM tip over different experimental sessions using different AFM tips. Strong variations observed in the I/V response at different regions of the CNT transistor are discussed. PMID:23259903

  9. Nanoscale optical and electrical characterization of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Raul D; Toader, Marius; Hermann, Sascha; Sheremet, Evgeniya; Müller, Susanne; Gordan, Ovidiu D; Yu, Haibo; Schulz, Stefan E; Hietschold, Michael; Zahn, Dietrich Rt

    2012-12-21

    During the recent years, a significant amount of research has been performed on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a channel material in thin-film transistors (Pham et al. IEEE Trans Nanotechnol 11:44-50, 2012). This has prompted the application of advanced characterization techniques based on combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy studies (Mureau et al. Electrophoresis 29:2266-2271, 2008). In this context, we use confocal Raman microscopy and current sensing atomic force microscopy (CS-AFM) to study phonons and the electronic transport in semiconducting SWCNTs, which were aligned between palladium electrodes using dielectrophoresis (Kuzyk Electrophoresis 32:2307-2313, 2011). Raman imaging was performed in the region around the electrodes on the suspended CNTs using several laser excitation wavelengths. Analysis of the G+/G- splitting in the Raman spectra (Sgobba and Guldi Chem Soc Rev 38:165-184, 2009) shows CNT diameters of 2.5 ± 0.3 nm. Neither surface modification nor increase in defect density or stress at the CNT-electrode contact could be detected, but rather a shift in G+ and G- peak positions in regions with high CNT density between the electrodes. Simultaneous topographical and electrical characterization of the CNT transistor by CS-AFM confirms the presence of CNT bundles having a stable electrical contact with the transistor electrodes. For a similar load force, reproducible current-voltage (I/V) curves for the same CNT regions verify the stability of the electrical contact between the nanotube and the electrodes as well as the nanotube and the AFM tip over different experimental sessions using different AFM tips. Strong variations observed in the I/V response at different regions of the CNT transistor are discussed.

  10. Quality of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes: Is methane as carbon source better than ethanol?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fenglei; Zhang, Lijie; Yang, Yun; Huang, Shaoming

    2010-03-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was studied using two representative carbon source sources: ethanol and methane. The resulting SWNTs were compared for similar reaction conditions which were based on the formation of Ni metal nanoparticles selective electrochemical deposition (SED) on the defect sites of SWNTs. The products were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and SEM. The results demonstrate that methane was much better carbon source for growing high quality horizontal alignment of SWNTs than ethanol due to the etching effects of OH radicals on the SWNTs.

  11. Growth of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes with metallic chirality through faceted FePt-Au catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Toshiyuki; Iwama, Hiroki; Shima, Toshiyuki

    2016-02-01

    Direct synthesis of vertically aligned metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (m-SWCNT forests) is a difficult challenge. We have successfully synthesized m-SWCNT forests using faceted iron platinum-gold catalysts epitaxially grown on a single crystalline magnesium oxide substrate. The metallic content of the forests estimated by Raman spectroscopy reaches 90%. From the standpoint of growth rate of the forests, the growth mechanism is probably based on the catalyst of solid state. It is suggested that preferential growth of m-SWCNTs is achieved when both factors are satisfied, namely, {111} dominant octahedral facet and ideal size (fine particles) of FePt particles.

  12. Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Alignment Mechanisms for Non-Destructive Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Seunghun

    2002-01-01

    As proposed in our original proposal, we developed a new innovative method to assemble millions of single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based circuit components as fast as conventional microfabrication processes. This method is based on surface template assembly strategy. The new method solves one of the major bottlenecks in carbon nanotube based electrical applications and, potentially, may allow us to mass produce a large number of SWCNT-based integrated devices of critical interests to NASA.

  13. Vertical Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Nanostructure Fabricated by Atomic Force Microscope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-16

    Kobayashi Y, Yamashita T, Ueno Y, Niwa O, Homma Y, Ogino T. Extremely intense Raman signals from single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended between Si...carbon nanotube field effect transistors with carbon nanotube electrodes. Appl Phys Lett. 2008;92(4):043110-3. [13] Jung YJ, Homma Y, Ogino T...Homma Y, Yamashita T, Kobayashi Y, Ogino T. Interconnection of nanostructures using carbon nanotubes. Physica B. 2002;323(1-4):122-3. [23] Searson

  14. Direct current injection and thermocapillary flow for purification of aligned arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xu; Islam, Ahmad E.; Seabron, Eric; Dunham, Simon N.; Du, Frank; Lin, Jonathan; Wilson, William L.; Rogers, John A.; Wahab, Muhammad A.; Alam, Muhammad A.; Li, Yuhang; Tomic, Bojan; Huang, Jiyuan; Burns, Branden; Song, Jizhou; Huang, Yonggang

    2015-04-07

    Aligned arrays of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) represent ideal configurations for use of this class of material in high performance electronics. Development of means for removing the metallic SWNTs (m-SWNTs) in as-grown arrays represents an essential challenge. Here, we introduce a simple scheme that achieves this type of purification using direct, selective current injection through interdigitated electrodes into the m-SWNTs, to allow their complete removal using processes of thermocapillarity and dry etching. Experiments and numerical simulations establish the fundamental aspects that lead to selectivity in this process, thereby setting design rules for optimization. Single-step purification of arrays that include thousands of SWNTs demonstrates the effectiveness and simplicity of the procedures. The result is a practical route to large-area aligned arrays of purely s-SWNTs with low-cost experimental setups.

  15. Sheet resistance characterization of locally anisotropic transparent conductive films made of aligned metal-enriched single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hosung; Kim, Duckjong; Baik, Seunghyun

    2014-09-21

    One-dimensional conductive fillers such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be aggregated and aligned during transparent conductive film (TCF) formation by the vacuum filtration method. The potential error of analysing the average sheet resistance of these anisotropic films, using the four-point probe in-line method and the conversion formula developed assuming uniform isotropic material properties, was systematically investigated by finite element analysis and experiments. The finite element analysis of anisotropic stripe-patterned TCFs with alternating low (ρ1) and high (ρ2) resistivities revealed that the estimated average sheet resistance approached ρ1/t when the probes were parallel to the aligned nanotubes. The thickness of the film is t. It was more close to ρ2/t when the probes were perpendicular to the aligned tubes. Indeed, TCFs fabricated by the vacuum filtration method using metal-enriched SWNTs exhibited highly anisotropic local regions where tubes were aggregated and aligned. The local sheet resistances of randomly oriented, aligned, and perpendicular tube regions of the TCF at a transmittance of 89.9% were 5000, 2.4, and 12 300 Ω □(-1), respectively. Resistivities of the aggregated and aligned tube region (ρ1 = 1.2 × 10(-5) Ω cm) and the region between tubes (ρ2 = 6.2 × 10(-2) Ω cm) could be approximated with the aid of finite element analysis. This work demonstrates the potential error of characterizing the average sheet resistance of anisotropic TCFs using the four-point probe in-line method since surprisingly high or low values could be obtained depending on the measurement angle. On the other hand, a better control of aggregation and alignment of nanotubes would realize TCFs with a very small anisotropic resistivity and a high transparency.

  16. Self-formation of highly aligned metallic, semiconducting and single chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes assemblies via a crystal template method

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Hideki; Hasegawa, Kai; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Oyane, Ayako; Naitoh, Yasuhisa

    2014-09-01

    The fabrication of an aligned array of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a single chiral state has been a significant challenge for SWCNT applications as well as for basic science research. Here, we developed a simple, unique technique to produce assemblies in which metallic, semiconducting, and single chiral state SWCNTs were densely and highly aligned. We utilized a crystal of surfactant as a template on which mono-dispersed SWCNTs in solution self-assembled. Micro-Raman measurements and scanning electron microscopy measurements clearly showed that the SWCNTs were highly and densely aligned parallel to the crystal axis, indicating that approximately 70% of the SWCNTs were within 7° of being parallel. Moreover, the assemblies exhibited good field effect transistor characteristics with an on/off ratio of 1.3 × 10{sup 5}.

  17. Mediated Electron Transfer at Vertically Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Electrodes During Detection of DNA Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallen, Rachel; Gokarn, Nirmal; Bercea, Priscila; Grzincic, Elissa; Bandyopadhyay, Krisanu

    2015-06-01

    Vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (VASWCNT) assemblies are generated on cysteamine and 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME)-functionalized gold surfaces through amide bond formation between carboxylic groups generated at the end of acid-shortened single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and amine groups present on the gold surfaces. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging confirms the vertical alignment mode of SWCNT attachment through significant changes in surface roughness compared to bare gold surfaces and the lack of any horizontally aligned SWCNTs present. These SWCNT assemblies are further modified with an amine-terminated single-stranded probe-DNA. Subsequent hybridization of the surface-bound probe-DNA in the presence of complementary strands in solution is followed using impedance measurements in the presence of Fe(CN)6 3-/4- as the redox probe in solution, which show changes in the interfacial electrochemical properties, specifically the charge-transfer resistance, due to hybridization. In addition, hybridization of the probe-DNA is also compared when it is attached directly to the gold surfaces without any intermediary SWCNTs. Contrary to our expectations, impedance measurements show a decrease in charge-transfer resistance with time due to hybridization with 300 nM complementary DNA in solution with the probe-DNA attached to SWCNTs. In contrast, an increase in charge-transfer resistance is observed with time during hybridization when the probe-DNA is attached directly to the gold surfaces. The decrease in charge-transfer resistance during hybridization in the presence of VASWCNTs indicates an enhancement in the electron transfer process of the redox probe at the VASWCNT-modified electrode. The results suggest that VASWCNTs are acting as mediators of electron transfer, which facilitate the charge transfer of the redox probe at the electrode-solution interface.

  18. Dendron growth from vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube thin layer arrays for photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Bissett, Mark Alexander; Köper, Ingo; Quinton, Jamie Scott; Shapter, Joe George

    2011-04-07

    Single-walled carbon nanotube arrays attached to conductive transparent electrodes have previously shown promise for use in photovoltaic devices, whilst still retaining light transmission. Here, chemical modification of these thin (<200 nm) arrays with PAMAM-type dendrons has been undertaken to enhance the photoresponse of these devices. The effect of modification on the electrode was measured by differential pulse voltammetry to detect the dendrons, and the effect on the nanotubes was measured by Raman spectroscopy. Solar simulator illumination of the cells was performed to measure the effect of the nanotube modification on the cell power, and determine the optimal modification. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was also used to investigate the equivalent electronic circuit elements of the cells. The optimal dendron modification occurred with the second generation (G-2.0), which gave a 70% increase in power over the unmodified nanotube array.

  19. Realizing one-dimensional quantum and high-frequency transport features in aligned single-walled carbon nanotube ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ncube, Siphephile; Chimowa, George; Chiguvare, Zivayi; Bhattacharyya, Somnath

    2014-07-01

    The superiority of the electronic transport properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) ropes over SWNT mats is verified from low temperature and frequency-dependent transport. The overall change of resistance versus in nanotube mats shows that 3D variable range hopping is the dominant conduction mechanism within the 2-300 K range. The magneto-resistance (MR) is found to be predominantly negative with a parabolic nature, which can also be described by the hopping model. Although the positive upturn of the MR at low temperatures establishes the contribution from quantum interference, the inherent quantum transport in individual tubes is suppressed at elevated temperatures. Therefore, to minimize multi-channel effects from inter-tube interactions and other defects, two-terminal devices were fabricated from aligned SWNT (extracted from a mat) for low temperature transport as well as high-frequency measurements. In contrast to the mat, the aligned ropes exhibit step-like features in the differential conductance within the 80-300 K temperature range. The effects of plasmon propagation, unique to one dimension, were identified in electronic transport as a non-universal power-law dependence of the differential conductance on temperature and source-drain voltage. The complex impedance showed high power transmission capabilities up to 65 GHz as well as oscillations in the frequency range up to 30 GHz. The measurements suggest that aligned SWNT ropes have a realistic potential for high-speed device applications.

  20. Realizing one-dimensional quantum and high-frequency transport features in aligned single-walled carbon nanotube ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Ncube, Siphephile; Chimowa, George; Chiguvare, Zivayi; Bhattacharyya, Somnath

    2014-07-14

    The superiority of the electronic transport properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) ropes over SWNT mats is verified from low temperature and frequency-dependent transport. The overall change of resistance versus in nanotube mats shows that 3D variable range hopping is the dominant conduction mechanism within the 2–300 K range. The magneto-resistance (MR) is found to be predominantly negative with a parabolic nature, which can also be described by the hopping model. Although the positive upturn of the MR at low temperatures establishes the contribution from quantum interference, the inherent quantum transport in individual tubes is suppressed at elevated temperatures. Therefore, to minimize multi-channel effects from inter-tube interactions and other defects, two-terminal devices were fabricated from aligned SWNT (extracted from a mat) for low temperature transport as well as high-frequency measurements. In contrast to the mat, the aligned ropes exhibit step-like features in the differential conductance within the 80–300 K temperature range. The effects of plasmon propagation, unique to one dimension, were identified in electronic transport as a non-universal power-law dependence of the differential conductance on temperature and source-drain voltage. The complex impedance showed high power transmission capabilities up to 65 GHz as well as oscillations in the frequency range up to 30 GHz. The measurements suggest that aligned SWNT ropes have a realistic potential for high-speed device applications.

  1. High-performance partially aligned semiconductive single-walled carbon nanotube transistors achieved with a parallel technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilei; Pillai, Suresh Kumar Raman; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2013-09-09

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are widely thought to be a strong contender for next-generation printed electronic transistor materials. However, large-scale solution-based parallel assembly of SWNTs to obtain high-performance transistor devices is challenging. SWNTs have anisotropic properties and, although partial alignment of the nanotubes has been theoretically predicted to achieve optimum transistor device performance, thus far no parallel solution-based technique can achieve this. Herein a novel solution-based technique, the immersion-cum-shake method, is reported to achieve partially aligned SWNT networks using semiconductive (99% enriched) SWNTs (s-SWNTs). By immersing an aminosilane-treated wafer into a solution of nanotubes placed on a rotary shaker, the repetitive flow of the nanotube solution over the wafer surface during the deposition process orients the nanotubes toward the fluid flow direction. By adjusting the nanotube concentration in the solution, the nanotube density of the partially aligned network can be controlled; linear densities ranging from 5 to 45 SWNTs/μm are observed. Through control of the linear SWNT density and channel length, the optimum SWNT-based field-effect transistor devices achieve outstanding performance metrics (with an on/off ratio of ~3.2 × 10(4) and mobility 46.5 cm(2) /Vs). Atomic force microscopy shows that the partial alignment is uniform over an area of 20 × 20 mm(2) and confirms that the orientation of the nanotubes is mostly along the fluid flow direction, with a narrow orientation scatter characterized by a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of <15° for all but the densest film, which is 35°. This parallel process is large-scale applicable and exploits the anisotropic properties of the SWNTs, presenting a viable path forward for industrial adoption of SWNTs in printed, flexible, and large-area electronics.

  2. Energy accommodation of gas molecules with free-standing films of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, K.; Harada, Y.; Kinefuchi, I.; Ishikawa, K.; Shiomi, J.; Takagi, S.; Maruyama, S.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2011-05-20

    The scattering process of gas molecules on vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) was investigated by the molecular beam technique. To investigate interactions between VA-SWNT films themselves and helium gas molecules without the presence of substrates, free-standing films were used. The scattered molecules are divided into three components; reflected molecules, diffusively transmitted molecules, and directly transmitted molecules without interaction with SWNTs. Even with the thin film, most molecules have interacted with the films, which suggests that most molecules have interacted at the randomly oriented layer at the topmost of the films. Because of low accommodation coefficients of helium gas, VA-SWNTs films are thought to be useful as a surface modification to enhance energy accommodation.

  3. Device study, chemical doping, and logic circuits based on transferred aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuan; Ryu, Koungmin; Badmaev, Alexander; Patil, Nishant; Lin, Albert; Mitra, Subhasish; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Zhou, Chongwu

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, high-performance back-gated carbon nanotube field-effect transistors based on transferred aligned carbon nanotubes were fabricated and studies found that the on/off ratio can reach 107 and the current density can reach 1.6μA/μm after electrical breakdown. In addition, chemical doping with hydrazine was used to convert the p-type aligned nanotube devices into n-type. These devices were further utilized to demonstrate various logic circuits, including p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor inverters, diode-loaded inverters, complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor inverters, NAND, and NOR gates. This approach could work as the platform for future nanotube-based nanoelectronics.

  4. Stacking dependent electronic properties of the nanofilms composing of super-aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jie; He, Xiujie; Qu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Xiangdong; Zhao, Mingwen

    2015-06-01

    Films composed of super-aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been widely used in electronic devices. Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the energetically most favorable stacking patterns and the electronic structures of SWCNT monolayers and bilayers formed by super-aligned (5, 5) and (7, 0) SWCNTs. It is found that the (5, 5) SWCNT monolayer prefers a ‘face-by-face’ stacking pattern with the binding energy of 13.90 meV/atom, whereas the (7, 0) SWCNT monolayer favors an ‘edge-by-edge’ pattern with the binding energy of 10.82 meV/atom. The (5, 5) SWCNT arrays are semiconducting with a band gap up to 114 meV for the bilayer, while the (7, 0) SWCNT arrays are metallic with a tiny overlap between valence and conduction bands, in sharp contrast to the cases of isolated (5, 5) and (7, 0) SWCNTs. This implies that weak van der Waals interactions between SWCNTs play an important role in applications of SWCNT films in electronic devices.

  5. Transport phenomena in an anisotropically aligned single-wall carbon nanotube film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Dong Jae; Kim, Keun Soo; Park, Young Soo; Suh, Eun Kyoung; An, Kay Hyeok; Moon, Jeong-Mi; Lim, Seong Chu; Park, Soo Hyeon; Jeong, Yoon Hee; Lee, Young Hee

    2001-12-01

    Thin films of aligned carbon nanotubes were prepared by a simple mechanical rubbing from a singlewalled carbon nanotube powder, which was synthesized by the catalytic arc discharge. The measured electrical resistivity shows high anisotropy (ρN/ρP) ranging from 5 to 15. The annealed samples show a monotonic decrease in the resistivity with increasing temperature. Carbon nanotubes in the mat act as strong Luttinger liquids with g values ranging from 0.18 to 0.26, similar to an isolated nanotube. We propose that the transport is dominantly governed by the formation of metal-metal crossed junctions of nanotubes in the mat.

  6. Relationship of lower extremity alignment during the wall squat and single-leg jump: assessment of single-leg landing using three-dimensional motion analysis

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Manabu; Matsumoto, Takaaki; Ono, Susumu; Koseki, Hirohisa; Watarai, Koji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between malalignment and lower-extremity injury and to determine the optimal dynamic alignment of the lower extremity with wall squats. [Subjects and Methods] Healthy individuals from one therapy school were enrolled and assigned to a wall squat normal or abnormal group based on their forms during wall squats. The abnormal group was found to be more prone to lower-extremity injury on three-dimensional motion analysis. Eight students from each group were randomly chosen for the study. The effects of single-leg landing movements were assessed using three-dimensional motion analysis. [Results] In the sagittal plane, significant flexion of the hip and knee joints occurred 0.02 and 0.04 seconds after initial foot contact with the ground in the normal and abnormal groups, respectively. In the frontal plane, significant adduction of the hip joint occurred at 0.07 seconds in the abnormal group. [Conclusion] The abnormal group tended to display later flexion of the hip and knee joints and narrower hip, knee, and ankle range of motion than the normal group, suggesting that dynamic alignment of the lower extremity in the abnormal group likely made them susceptible to injury. PMID:27390393

  7. Synthesis of subnanometer-diameter vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes with copper-anchored cobalt catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Kehang; Kumamoto, Akihito; Xiang, Rong; An, Hua; Wang, Benjamin; Inoue, Taiki; Chiashi, Shohei; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    We synthesize vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) with subnanometer diameters on quartz (and SiO2/Si) substrates by alcohol CVD using Cu-anchored Co catalysts. The uniform VA-SWNTs with a nanotube diameter of 1 nm are synthesized at a CVD temperature of 800 °C and have a thickness of several tens of μm. The diameter of SWNTs was reduced to 0.75 nm at 650 °C with the G/D ratio maintained above 24. Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS-STEM) and high angle annular dark field (HAADF-STEM) imaging of the Co/Cu bimetallic catalyst system showed that Co catalysts were captured and anchored by adjacent Cu nanoparticles, and thus were prevented from coalescing into a larger size, which contributed to the small diameter of SWNTs. The correlation between the catalyst size and the SWNT diameter was experimentally clarified. The subnanometer-diameter and high-quality SWNTs are expected to pave the way to replace silicon for next-generation optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices.We synthesize vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) with subnanometer diameters on quartz (and SiO2/Si) substrates by alcohol CVD using Cu-anchored Co catalysts. The uniform VA-SWNTs with a nanotube diameter of 1 nm are synthesized at a CVD temperature of 800 °C and have a thickness of several tens of μm. The diameter of SWNTs was reduced to 0.75 nm at 650 °C with the G/D ratio maintained above 24. Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS-STEM) and high angle annular dark field (HAADF-STEM) imaging of the Co/Cu bimetallic catalyst system showed that Co catalysts were captured and anchored by adjacent Cu nanoparticles, and thus were prevented from coalescing into a larger size, which contributed to the small diameter of SWNTs. The correlation between the catalyst size and the SWNT diameter was experimentally clarified. The subnanometer-diameter and high

  8. Electrical transport properties of small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes aligned on ST-cut quartz substrates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A method is introduced to isolate and measure the electrical transport properties of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) aligned on an ST-cut quartz, from room temperature down to 2 K. The diameter and chirality of the measured SWNTs are accurately defined from Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A significant up-shift in the G-band of the resonance Raman spectra of the SWNTs is observed, which increases with increasing SWNTs diameter, and indicates a strong interaction with the quartz substrate. A semiconducting SWNT, with diameter 0.84 nm, shows Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid and Coulomb blockade behaviors at low temperatures. Another semiconducting SWNT, with a thinner diameter of 0.68 nm, exhibits a transition from the semiconducting state to an insulating state at low temperatures. These results elucidate some of the electrical properties of SWNTs in this unique configuration and help pave the way towards prospective device applications. PMID:25170326

  9. Synthesis of subnanometer-diameter vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes with copper-anchored cobalt catalysts.

    PubMed

    Cui, Kehang; Kumamoto, Akihito; Xiang, Rong; An, Hua; Wang, Benjamin; Inoue, Taiki; Chiashi, Shohei; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2016-01-21

    We synthesize vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) with subnanometer diameters on quartz (and SiO2/Si) substrates by alcohol CVD using Cu-anchored Co catalysts. The uniform VA-SWNTs with a nanotube diameter of 1 nm are synthesized at a CVD temperature of 800 °C and have a thickness of several tens of μm. The diameter of SWNTs was reduced to 0.75 nm at 650 °C with the G/D ratio maintained above 24. Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS-STEM) and high angle annular dark field (HAADF-STEM) imaging of the Co/Cu bimetallic catalyst system showed that Co catalysts were captured and anchored by adjacent Cu nanoparticles, and thus were prevented from coalescing into a larger size, which contributed to the small diameter of SWNTs. The correlation between the catalyst size and the SWNT diameter was experimentally clarified. The subnanometer-diameter and high-quality SWNTs are expected to pave the way to replace silicon for next-generation optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices.

  10. Engineering highly organized and aligned single walled carbon nanotube networks for electronic device applications: Interconnects, chemical sensor, and optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Lae

    For 20 years, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been studied actively due to their unique one-dimensional nanostructure and superior electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. For these reasons, they offer the potential to serve as building blocks for future electronic devices such as field effect transistors (FETs), electromechanical devices, and various sensors. In order to realize these applications, it is crucial to develop a simple, scalable, and reliable nanomanufacturing process that controllably places aligned SWNTs in desired locations, orientations, and dimensions. Also electronic properties (semiconducting/metallic) of SWNTs and their organized networks must be controlled for the desired performance of devices and systems. These fundamental challenges are significantly limiting the use of SWNTs for future electronic device applications. Here, we demonstrate a strategy to fabricate highly controlled micro/nanoscale SWNT network structures and present the related assembly mechanism to engineer the SWNT network topology and its electrical transport properties. A method designed to evaluate the electrical reliability of such nano- and microscale SWNT networks is also presented. Moreover, we develop and investigate a robust SWNT based multifunctional selective chemical sensor and a range of multifunctional optoelectronic switches, photo-transistors, optoelectronic logic gates and complex optoelectronic digital circuits.

  11. The fabrication of single-walled carbon nanotube/polyelectrolyte multilayer composites by layer-by-layer assembly and magnetic field assisted alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ying; Park, Jin Gyu; Cheng, Qunfeng; Liang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Chuck; Wang, Ben

    2009-08-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/polymer composites are widely studied because of their potential for high mechanical performance and multifunctional applications. In order to realize highly ordered multilayer nanostructures, we combined the layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly method with magnetic force-induced alignment to fabricate SWNT/poly(ethylamine) (PEI) multilayer composites. The SWNTs were functionalized with the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (NaDDBS) to realize negative charge at pH>7, while the PEI is positively charged at pH<7. The LBL method is based on the electrostatic absorption between the charged SWNTs and PEI resin to form multilayer composites on a solid substrate polydimethylsiloxane. Since the fabricated thickness of each SWNT-NaDDBS/PEI bilayer is uniform (~150 nm), the multilayer film thickness can be strictly controlled via the number of deposition cycles. A high magnetic field (8.5 Tesla) was used to align the SWNTs during the LBL process. The resultant LBL composite samples demonstrated high SWNT loading of approximately 50 wt% and uniform distribution of SWNTs in the multilayer structures, which was verified using a quartz crystal microbalance. Good alignment was also realized and observed through using high magnetic fields to align the nanotubes during the LBL deposition process. The results indicate that the LBL/magnetic alignment approach has potential for fabricating nanotube composites with highly ordered nanostructures for multifunctional materials and device applications.

  12. Size engineering of metal nanoparticles to diameter-specified growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes with horizontal alignment on quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Ju; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Jeong, Goo-Hwan

    2012-03-01

    The electronic, physical and optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are governed by their diameter and chirality, and thus much research has been focused on controlling the diameter and chirality of SWNTs. To date, control of the catalyst particle size has been thought to be one of the most promising approaches to control the diameter or chirality of SWNTs owing to the correlation between catalyst particle size and tube diameter. In this study, we demonstrate the size engineering of catalytic nanoparticles for the controlled growth of diameter-specified and horizontally aligned SWNTs on quartz substrates. Uniformly sized iron nanoparticles derived from ferritin molecules were used as a catalyst, and their size was intentionally decreased via thermal heat treatment at 900 °C under atmospheric Ar ambient. ST-cut quartz wafers were used as growth substrates in order to elucidate the effect of the size of the nanoparticles on the tube diameter and the effect of catalyst size on the degree of parallel alignment on the quartz substrates. SWNTs grown by chemical vapor deposition using methane as feedstock exhibited a high degree of horizontal alignment when the particle density was low enough to produce individual SWNTs without bundling. Annealing for 60 min at 900 °C produced a reduction of nanoparticle diameter from 2.6 to 1.8 nm and a decrease in the mean tube diameter from 1.2 to 0.8 nm, respectively. Raman spectroscopy results corroborated the observation that prolonged heat treatment of nanoparticles yields thinner tubes with narrower size distributions. The results of this work suggest that straightforward thermal annealing can be a facile way to obtain uniform-sized SWNTs as well as catalytic nanoparticles.

  13. Effect of ion bombardment on the synthesis of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhiqiang; Lim, Sanhua; You, Yumeng; Miao, Jianmin; Gong, Hao; Zhang, Jixuan; Wang, Shanzhong; Lin, Jianyi; Shen, Zexiang

    2008-06-25

    The synthesis of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) was achieved at 500-600 °C, using ethylene as the carbon source and 1 nm Fe film as the catalyst. For growth of high-quality VA-SWNTs in a plasma sheath, it is crucial to alleviate the undesirable ion bombardment etching effects by the optimization of plasma input power and gas pressure. The resistibility of synthesized VA-SWNTs against ion bombardment etching was found to be closely related to the growth temperature. At relatively low temperature (500 °C), the VA-SWNTs were very susceptible to ion bombardments, which could induce structural defects, and even resulted in a structural transition to few-walled nanotubes. For capacitively coupled radio frequency (rf) PECVD operating at moderate gas pressure (0.3-10 Torr), the ion bombardment etching effect is mainly dependent on the ion flux, which is related to the plasma input power and gas pressure.

  14. Synthesis of high-density, large-diameter, and aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes by multiple-cycle growth methods.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiwei; Ding, Lei; Yang, Sungwoo; Liu, Jie

    2011-05-24

    A dense array of parallel single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as the device channel can carry higher current, be more robust, and have smaller device-to-device variation, thus is more desirable for and compatible with applications in future highly integrated circuits when compared with single-tube devices. The density of the parallel SWNT arrays and the diameter of SWNTs both are key factors in the determination of the device performance. In this paper, we present a new multiple-cycle chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method to synthesize horizontally aligned arrays of SWNTs with densities of 20-40 SWNT/μm over large area and a diameter distribution of 2.4 ± 0.5 nm on the quartz surface based on a methanol/ethanol CVD method. The high nucleation efficiency of catalyst particles in multiple-cycle CVD processes has been demonstrated to be the main reason for the improvements in the density of SWNT arrays. More interestingly, we confirmed the existence of an etching effect, which strongly affects the final products in the multiple-cycle growth. This etching effect is likely the reason that only large-diameter SWNTs were obtained in the multiple-cycle CVD growth. Using these high-density and large-diameter nanotube arrays, two-terminal devices with back-gates were fabricated. The performances of these devices have been greatly improved in overall resistance and on-state current, which indicates these SWNT arrays have high potential for applications such as interconnects, high-frequency devices, and high-current transistors in future micro- or nanoelectronics.

  15. Understanding high-yield catalyst-free growth of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes nucleated by activated C60 species.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Imad; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Grimm, Daniel; Popov, Alexey; Makharza, Sami; Knupfer, Martin; Büchner, Bernd; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2012-12-21

    Our understanding of the catalyst-free growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition is limited. Toward improving our knowledge base, we conducted systematic investigations into the initial preparation of C(60) fullerenes as nucleation precursors for single-wall and even double-wall carbon nanotube fabrication. The role of the dispersing media is shown to be crucial and is related to the initial fullerene cluster size. Oxygen-based groups, in particular, epoxy groups, are shown to be vital prior to actual growth. Moreover, the presence of oxygen groups during the growth phase is necessary for tube development. We also demonstrate the possibility of fabricating the tubes in crossbar configurations with bespoke crossing angles in a single synthesis step, unlike other routes which require at least two synthesis steps. The systematic studies significantly advance our understanding of the growth mechanisms involved in all-carbon catalyst-free growth of single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes.

  16. Ultralong aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube for electrochemical sensing.

    PubMed

    Punbusayakul, Niramol; Ci, Lijie; Talapatra, Saikat; Surareungchai, Werasak; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2008-04-01

    We have investigated electrochemical sensing properties of electrodes fabricated with ultralong aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) bundles synthesized using water-assisted chemical vapor deposition on aluminum (Al) and iron (Fe) coated silicon wafer with ethylene and argon/hydrogen gas as carbon source and buffer gas respectively. Cyclic voltammograms performed on these electrodes show diffusion-controlled-reversible reaction. The dominance of radial diffusion mass transport at these electrodes was also indicated by sigmoidal-shaped voltammograms obtained at various scan rates. These electrodes were able to sense very low concentration of ascorbic acid (approximately 0.7 microM) and dopamine (approximately 1.87 microM), two model species often used in electro-analysis. The excellent electrochemical properties along with good single species detection ability suggest that these MWNTs are promising electrode materials for developing very sensitive chemical and/or biological sensors.

  17. Scanning Probe Microwave Reflectivity of Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Imaging of Electronic Structure and Quantum Behavior at the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Seabron, Eric; MacLaren, Scott; Xie, Xu; Rotkin, Slava V; Rogers, John A; Wilson, William L

    2016-01-26

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are 1-dimensional nanomaterials with unique electronic properties that make them excellent candidates for next-generation device technologies. While nanotube growth and processing methods have progressed steadily, significant opportunities remain in advanced methods for their characterization, inspection, and metrology. Microwave near-field imaging offers an extremely versatile "nondestructive" tool for nanomaterials characterization. Herein, we report the application of nanoscale microwave reflectivity to study SWNT electronic properties. Using microwave impedance microscopy (MIM) combined with microwave impedance modulation microscopy (MIM(2)), we imaged horizontal SWNT arrays, showing the microwave reflectivity from individual nanotubes is extremely sensitive to their electronic properties and dependent on the nanotube quantum capacitance under proper experimental conditions. It is shown experimentally that MIM can be a direct probe of the nanotube-free carrier density and the details of their electronic band structure. We demonstrate spatial mapping of local SWNT impedance (MIM), the density of states (MIM(2)), and the nanotube structural morphology (AFM) simultaneously and with lateral resolution down to <50 nm. Nanoscale microwave reflectivity could have tremendous impact, enabling optimization of enriched growth processes and postgrowth purification of SWNT arrays while aiding in the analysis of the quantum physics of these important 1D materials.

  18. Field emission and anode etching during formation of length-controlled nanogaps in electrical breakdown of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Keigo; Inoue, Taiki; Shimomura, Yuki; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2016-09-15

    We observe field emission between nanogaps and voltage-driven gap extension of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on substrates during the electrical breakdown process. Experimental results show that the gap size is dependent on the applied voltage and humidity, which indicates high controllability of the gap size by appropriate adjustment of these parameters in accordance with the application. We propose a mechanism for the gap formation during electrical breakdown as follows. After small gaps are formed by Joule heating-induced oxidation, SWNTs on the anode side are electrochemically etched due to physically-adsorbed water from the air and the enhanced electric field at the SWNT tips. Field emission is measured in a vacuum as a possible mechanism for charge transfer at SWNT gaps. The relationship between the field enhancement factor and geometric features of SWNTs explains both the voltage dependence of the extended gap size and the field emission properties of the SWNT gaps. In addition, the similar field-induced etching can cause damage to adjacent SWNTs, which possibly deteriorates the selectivity for cutting metallic pathways in the presence of water vapor.

  19. In- and out-of-plane dynamic flexural behaviors of two-dimensional ensembles of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, Keivan

    2014-09-01

    Useful nonlocal discrete and continuous models are developed to explain free vibration of two-dimensional (2D) ensembles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in bending. For this purpose, the models are constructed based on the nonlocal Rayleigh, Timoshenko, and higher-order beam theories. In contrast to an individual SWCNT exhibits identical bending behavior in different directions, for 2D ensemble networks of SWCNTs, it is shown that such a fact is completely dissimilar. Such an important issue leads to the definition of in-plane and out-of-plane flexural behaviors for such nanostructures. Subsequently, their corresponding fundamental frequencies are evaluated based on the proposed nonlocal models. The capabilities of the proposed nonlocal continuous models in predicting flexural frequencies of SWCNTs' ensembles with different numbers of SWCNTs as well as various levels of slenderness ratios are then explained. Such investigations confirm the high efficiency of the proposed continuous models. This matter would be of great importance in vibration analysis of highly populated ensembles of SWCNTs in which the discrete models may suffer from the size of the governing equations. The roles of the number of SWCNTs, slenderness ratio, intertube distance, small-scale parameter, and radius of the SWCNT on both in-plane and out-of-plane fundamental frequencies are addressed.

  20. Photoluminescence enhancement of aligned arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes by polymer transfer† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05163k Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Schweiger, Manuel; Zakharko, Yuriy; Gannott, Florentina; Grimm, Stefan B.

    2015-01-01

    The photoluminescence of as-grown, aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on quartz is strongly quenched and barely detectable. Here we show that transferring these SWNTs to another substrate such as clean quartz or glass increases their emission efficiency by up to two orders of magnitude. By statistical analysis of large nanotube arrays we show at what point of the transfer process the emission enhancement occurs and how it depends on the receiving substrate and the employed transfer polymer. We find that hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) as the transfer polymer results in higher photoluminescence enhancement than the more hydrophilic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Possible mechanisms for this enhancement such as strain relief, disruption of the strong interaction of SWNTs with the substrate and localized emissive states are discussed. PMID:26400227

  1. Single wall penetration equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashida, K. B.; Robinson, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    Five single plate penetration equations are compared for accuracy and effectiveness. These five equations are two well-known equations (Fish-Summers and Schmidt-Holsapple), two equations developed by the Apollo project (Rockwell and Johnson Space Center (JSC), and one recently revised from JSC (Cour-Palais). They were derived from test results, with velocities ranging up to 8 km/s. Microsoft Excel software was used to construct a spreadsheet to calculate the diameters and masses of projectiles for various velocities, varying the material properties of both projectile and target for the five single plate penetration equations. The results were plotted on diameter versus velocity graphs for ballistic and spallation limits using Cricket Graph software, for velocities ranging from 2 to 15 km/s defined for the orbital debris. First, these equations were compared to each other, then each equation was compared with various aluminum projectile densities. Finally, these equations were compared with test results performed at JSC for the Marshall Space Flight Center. These equations predict a wide variety of projectile diameters at a given velocity. Thus, it is very difficult to choose the 'right' prediction equation. The thickness of a single plate could have a large variation by choosing a different penetration equation. Even though all five equations are empirically developed with various materials, especially for aluminum alloys, one cannot be confident in the shield design with the predictions obtained by the penetration equations without verifying by tests.

  2. Direct Synthesis of Long Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H. W.; Xu, C. L.; Wu, D. H.; Wei, B. Q.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2002-05-01

    In the processes that are used to produce single-walled nanotubes (electric arc, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition), the typical lengths of tangled nanotube bundles reach several tens of micrometers. We report that long nanotube strands, up to several centimeters in length, consisting of aligned single-walled nanotubes can be synthesized by the catalytic pyrolysis of n-hexane with an enhanced vertical floating technique. The long strands of nanotubes assemble continuously from arrays of nanotubes, which are intrinsically long.

  3. Prediction of the critical point of pressure-induced deformation-related phase transitions in aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes on the basis of extreme-low-frequency-shift Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanting; Zerulla, Dominic

    2017-05-01

    Experimental evidence investigating the high-pressure response (0-9 GPa) of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) arrays in the extreme low Raman shift region (10-100 cm-1, squash mode region) is provided to verify a predictive model for deformation-related phase transitions. In addition to the well-known radial breathing mode (RBM) and despite the technical challenges associated with the detection of Raman signals very close to the exciting laser frequency, clear SWNT squash mode peaks were identified and used to refine the predictive model. Furthermore, this paper investigates and proposes explanations for the detailed behavior of the pressure dependent cross-sectional transition. The results demonstrate experimentally, and confirm earlier theoretical models, that the critical pressure scales ∝1 /O (dt3) against the chirality dependent nanotube diameter dt. Finally, the pressure and chirality dependent Raman upshifts of the squash mode, characterizing the phase transition, are found to be larger than those of the RBM, respectively, confirming the general theoretical prediction of greater environmental sensitivity of squash modes.

  4. A novel H2O2 sensor based on the enzymatically induced deposition of polyaniline at a horseradish peroxide/aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes modified Au electrode.

    PubMed

    Tang, Na; Zheng, Jianbin; Sheng, Qinglin; Zhang, Hongfang; Liu, Ruixiao

    2011-02-21

    A novel H(2)O(2) sensor based on enzymatically induced deposition of electroactive polyaniline (PANI) at a horseradish peroxide (HRP)/aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) modified Au electrode is fabricated, and its electrochemical behaviors are investigated. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the sensor confirmed the formation of PANI on SWCNTs through the HRP catalytic reaction. Cyclic voltammograms of PANI/HRP/SWCNTs modified Au electrodes showed a pair of well-defined redox peaks of PANI with reduction peak potentials of 0.211 and oxidation peak potentials of 0.293 V in 0.1 M HOAc-NaOAc (pH 4.3) solution. The oxidation peak current response of PANI is linearly related to H(2)O(2) concentration from 2.5 μM to 50.0 μM with a correlation coefficient of 0.9923 and a sensitivity of 200 μA mM(-1). The detection limit is determined to be 0.9 μM with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Thus, the synergistic performance of the enzyme, the highly efficient polymerization of PANI, and the templated deposition of SWCNTs provided an extensive platform for the design of novel electrochemical biosensors.

  5. Oxygen-promoted catalyst sintering influences number density, alignment, and wall number of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    DOE PAGES

    Shi, Wenbo; Li, Jinjing; Polsen, Erik S.; ...

    2017-04-11

    A lack of synthetic control and reproducibility during vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) synthesis has stifled many promising applications of organic nanomaterials. Oxygen-containing species are particularly precarious in that they have both beneficial and deleterious effects and are notoriously difficult to control. In this paper, we demonstrated diatomic oxygen's ability, independent of water, to tune oxide-supported catalyst thin film dewetting and influence nanoscale (diameter and wall number) and macro-scale (alignment and density) properties for as-grown vertically aligned CNTs. In particular, single- or few-walled CNT forests were achieved at very low oxygen loading, with single-to-multi-walled CNT diameters ranging from 4.8 ±more » 1.3 nm to 6.4 ± 1.1 nm over 0–800 ppm O2, and an expected variation in alignment, where both were related to the annealed catalyst morphology. Morphological differences were not the result of subsurface diffusion, but instead occurred via Ostwald ripening under several hundred ppm O2, and this effect was mitigated by high H2 concentrations and not due to water vapor (as confirmed in O2-free water addition experiments), supporting the importance of O2 specifically. Further characterization of the interface between the Fe catalyst and Al2O3 support revealed that either oxygen-deficit metal oxide or oxygen-adsorption on metals could be functional mechanisms for the observed catalyst nanoparticle evolution. Finally, taken as a whole, our results suggest that the impacts of O2 and H2 on the catalyst evolution have been underappreciated and underleveraged in CNT synthesis, and these could present a route toward facile manipulation of CNT forest morphology through control of the reactive gaseous atmosphere alone.« less

  6. Oxygen-promoted catalyst sintering influences number density, alignment, and wall number of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Wenbo; Li, Jinjing; Polsen, Erik S.; Oliver, C. Ryan; Zhao, Yikun; Meshot, Eric R.; Barclay, Michael; Fairbrother, D. Howard; Hart, A. John; Plata, Desiree L.

    2017-01-01

    A lack of synthetic control and reproducibility during vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) synthesis has stifled many promising applications of organic nanomaterials. Oxygen-containing species are particularly precarious in that they have both beneficial and deleterious effects and are notoriously difficult to control. Here, we demonstrated diatomic oxygen's ability, independent of water, to tune oxide-supported catalyst thin film dewetting and influence nanoscale (diameter and wall number) and macro-scale (alignment and density) properties for as-grown vertically aligned CNTs. In particular, single- or few-walled CNT forests were achieved at very low oxygen loading, with single-to-multi-walled CNT diameters ranging from 4.8 ± 1.3 nm to 6.4 ± 1.1 nm over 0–800 ppm O2, and an expected variation in alignment, where both were related to the annealed catalyst morphology. Morphological differences were not the result of subsurface diffusion, but instead occurred via Ostwald ripening under several hundred ppm O2, and this effect was mitigated by high H2 concentrations and not due to water vapor (as confirmed in O2-free water addition experiments), supporting the importance of O2 specifically. Further characterization of the interface between the Fe catalyst and Al2O3 support revealed that either oxygen-deficit metal oxide or oxygen-adsorption on metals could be functional mechanisms for the observed catalyst nanoparticle evolution. Taken as a whole, our results suggest that the impacts of O2 and H2 on the catalyst evolution have been underappreciated and underleveraged in CNT synthesis, and these could present a route toward facile manipulation of CNT forest morphology through control of the reactive gaseous atmosphere alone.

  7. Oxygen-promoted catalyst sintering influences number density, alignment, and wall number of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenbo; Li, Jinjing; Polsen, Erik S; Oliver, C Ryan; Zhao, Yikun; Meshot, Eric R; Barclay, Michael; Fairbrother, D Howard; Hart, A John; Plata, Desiree L

    2017-04-11

    A lack of synthetic control and reproducibility during vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) synthesis has stifled many promising applications of organic nanomaterials. Oxygen-containing species are particularly precarious in that they have both beneficial and deleterious effects and are notoriously difficult to control. Here, we demonstrated diatomic oxygen's ability, independent of water, to tune oxide-supported catalyst thin film dewetting and influence nanoscale (diameter and wall number) and macro-scale (alignment and density) properties for as-grown vertically aligned CNTs. In particular, single- or few-walled CNT forests were achieved at very low oxygen loading, with single-to-multi-walled CNT diameters ranging from 4.8 ± 1.3 nm to 6.4 ± 1.1 nm over 0-800 ppm O2, and an expected variation in alignment, where both were related to the annealed catalyst morphology. Morphological differences were not the result of subsurface diffusion, but instead occurred via Ostwald ripening under several hundred ppm O2, and this effect was mitigated by high H2 concentrations and not due to water vapor (as confirmed in O2-free water addition experiments), supporting the importance of O2 specifically. Further characterization of the interface between the Fe catalyst and Al2O3 support revealed that either oxygen-deficit metal oxide or oxygen-adsorption on metals could be functional mechanisms for the observed catalyst nanoparticle evolution. Taken as a whole, our results suggest that the impacts of O2 and H2 on the catalyst evolution have been underappreciated and underleveraged in CNT synthesis, and these could present a route toward facile manipulation of CNT forest morphology through control of the reactive gaseous atmosphere alone.

  8. A single beam laser tracker as an alignment tool

    SciTech Connect

    Wand, B.T.; LeCocq, C.; Gaydosh, M.; Ruland, R.E.

    1992-07-01

    In December 1991 the Survey and Alignment team of the Stanford Liner Accelerator Center (SLAC) purchased a Chesapeake single beam laser tracker. This paper will discuss first experiences and applications with this new type of an alignment instrument.

  9. Freestanding Aligned Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, João Vitor Silva; Corat, Evaldo José; May, Paul William; Cardoso, Lays Dias Ribeiro; Lelis, Pedro Almeida; Zanin, Hudson

    2016-11-01

    We report on the synthesis and electrochemical properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for supercapacitor devices. Freestanding vertically-aligned MWCNTs and MWCNT powder were grown concomitantly in a one-step chemical vapour deposition process. Samples were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopies and Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopies. At similar film thicknesses and surface areas, the freestanding MWCNT electrodes showed higher electrochemical capacitance and gravimetric specific energy and power than the randomly-packed nanoparticle-based electrodes. This suggests that more ordered electrode film architectures facilitate faster electron and ion transport during the charge-discharge processes. Energy storage and supply or supercapacitor devices made from these materials could bridge the gap between rechargeable batteries and conventional high-power electrostatic capacitors.

  10. Ballistic Limit Equation for Single Wall Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratliff, J. M.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Bryant, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests and hydrocode simulations were used to determine the ballistic limit equation (BLE) for perforation of a titanium wall, as a function of wall thickness. Two titanium alloys were considered, and separate BLEs were derived for each. Tested wall thicknesses ranged from 0.5mm to 2.0mm. The single-wall damage equation of Cour-Palais [ref. 1] was used to analyze the Ti wall's shielding effectiveness. It was concluded that the Cour-Palais single-wall equation produced a non-conservative prediction of the ballistic limit for the Ti shield. The inaccurate prediction was not a particularly surprising result; the Cour-Palais single-wall BLE contains shield material properties as parameters, but it was formulated only from tests of different aluminum alloys. Single-wall Ti shield tests were run (thicknesses of 2.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 1.0 mm, and 0.5 mm) on Ti 15-3-3-3 material custom cut from rod stock. Hypervelocity impact (HVI) tests were used to establish the failure threshold empirically, using the additional constraint that the damage scales with impact energy, as was indicated by hydrocode simulations. The criterion for shield failure was defined as no detached spall from the shield back surface during HVI. Based on the test results, which confirmed an approximately energy-dependent shield effectiveness, the Cour-Palais equation was modified.

  11. Strain Sensitivity in Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Multifunctional Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. M. (Technical Monitor); Smits, Jan M., VI

    2005-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes represent the future of structural aerospace vehicle systems due to their unparalleled strength characteristics and demonstrated multifunctionality. This multifunctionality rises from the CNT's unique capabilities for both metallic and semiconducting electron transport, electron spin polarizability, and band gap modulation under strain. By incorporating the use of electric field alignment and various lithography techniques, a single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) test bed for measurement of conductivity/strain relationships has been developed. Nanotubes are deposited at specified locations through dielectrophoresis. The circuit is designed such that the central, current carrying section of the nanotube is exposed to enable atomic force microscopy and manipulation in situ while the transport properties of the junction are monitored. By applying this methodology to sensor development a flexible single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) based strain sensitive device has been developed. Studies of tensile testing of the flexible SWNT device vs conductivity are also presented, demonstrating the feasibility of using single walled HiPCO (high-pressure carbon monoxide) carbon nanotubes as strain sensing agents in a multi-functional materials system.

  12. Air ventilation impacts of the "wall effect" resulting from the alignment of high-rise buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, S. H. L.; Fung, J. C. H.; Lau, A. K. H.; Kot, S. C.

    The objective of this study is to investigate the air ventilation impacts of the so called "wall effect" caused by the alignment of high-rise buildings in complex building clusters. The research method employs the numerical algorithm of computational fluid dynamics (CFD - FLUENT) to simulate the steady-state wind field in a typical Hong Kong urban setting and investigate pollutant dispersion inside the street canyon utilizing a pollutant transport model. The model settings of validation study were accomplished by comparing the simulation wind field around a single building block to wind tunnel data. The results revealed that our model simulation is fairly close to the wind tunnel measurements. In this paper, a typical dense building distribution in Hong Kong with 2 incident wind directions (0° and 22.5°) is studied. Two performance indicators are used to quantify the air ventilation impacts, namely the velocity ratio ( VR) and the retention time ( T r) of pollutants at the street level. The results indicated that the velocity ratio at 2 m above ground was reduced 40% and retention time of pollutants increased 80% inside the street canyon when high-rise buildings with 4 times height of the street canyon were aligned as a "wall" upstream. While this reduction of air ventilation was anticipated, the magnitude is significant and this result clearly has important implications for building and urban planning.

  13. Assembling techniques for micellar dispersed carbon single-walled nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghard, M.; Muster, J.; Duesberg, G.; Philipp, G.; Krstic, V.; Roth, S.

    1998-08-01

    Surfactant-stabilised aqueous dispersions of carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) provide attractive possibilities for different types of assembling processes. The adsorption behaviour of chromatographically purified, micellar suspended SWNTs on silica substrates and metal electrodes is presented. Chemical modifications of the substrate surface allow to control the adsorption kinetics and the fraction between adsorbed individual SWNTs and bundles of SWNTs. Tube alignment occurs presumably due to flow effects upon removal of the surfactant. As a second assembling technique, we describe the preparation of Langmuir-Blodgett films consisting of SWNTs embedded in a surfactant matrix.

  14. Dielectrophoretic manipulation of fluorescing single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mureau, Natacha; Mendoza, Ernest; Silva, S Ravi P

    2007-05-01

    We investigate the behavior of fluorescing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) under dielectrophoretic conditions and demonstrate their collection with fluorescence microscopy. SWCNTs are dispersed in water with the aid of a nonionic surfactant, Triton X-100, and labeled through noncovalent binding with the dye 3,3'-dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide (diOC(6)). The chromophore's affinity to the SWCNTs is due to pi-stacking interactions. Carbon nanotube (CNT) localization is clearly identified on the fluorescence images, showing that the nanotubes concentrate between the electrodes and align along the electric field lines.

  15. Single-wall-carbon-nanotube/single-carbon-chain molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börrnert, Felix; Börrnert, Carina; Gorantla, Sandeep; Liu, Xianjie; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Joswig, Jan-Ole; Wagner, Frank R.; Schäffel, Franziska; Warner, Jamie H.; Schönfelder, Ronny; Rellinghaus, Bernd; Gemming, Thomas; Thomas, Jürgen; Knupfer, Martin; Büchner, Bernd; Rümmeli, Mark H.

    2010-02-01

    Stable junctions between a single carbon chain and two single-wall carbon nanotubes were produced via coalescence of functionalized fullerenes filled into a single-wall carbon nanotube and directly imaged by in situ transmission electron microscopy. First principles quantum chemical calculations support the observed stability of such molecular junctions. They also show that short carbon chains bound to other carbon structures are cumulenes and stable semiconductors due to Peierls-like distortion. Junctions like this can be regarded as archetypical building blocks for all-carbon molecular electronics.

  16. Terahertz Conductivity of Single Walled Nanotube Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jia-Guang; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan; He, Feng; Liao, Yi; Wang, Zhen-Xia; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Li-Ping; Sun, Li-Tao; Wang, Ting-Tai

    2003-09-01

    The conductivity of single walled nanotube films is investigated with a combination of the Maxwell-Garnett (MG) model and the Drude-Lorentzian (DL) model in the Terahertz region. A theoretical fit for Jeon's experiment is given and a decrease of the real conductivity with increasing frequency is predicted. Meanwhile, the MG and DL models are also discussed for different samples.

  17. Conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Gets, A. V.; Krainov, V. P.

    2016-12-15

    The conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes at low temperatures is calculated. It is shown that it is much higher than the well-known conductivity of a model 1D Fermi system. This is a purely quantum-mechanical effect.

  18. Shuttle orbit IMU alignment. Single-precision computation error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    The source of computational error in the inertial measurement unit (IMU) onorbit alignment software was investigated. Simulation runs were made on the IBM 360/70 computer with the IMU orbit alignment software coded in hal/s. The results indicate that for small IMU misalignment angles (less than 600 arc seconds), single precision computations in combination with the arc cosine method of eigen rotation angle extraction introduces an additional misalignment error of up to 230 arc seconds per axis. Use of the arc sine method, however, produced negligible misalignment error. As a result of this study, the arc sine method was recommended for use in the IMU onorbit alignment software.

  19. Optical modulation of single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strano, Michael S.

    2007-03-01

    Recent advances in the spectroscopy of single walled carbon nanotubes have significantly enhanced our ability to understand and control their surface chemistry, both covalently and non-covalently. Our work has focused on modulating the optical properties of semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes as near infrared photoluminescent sensors for chemical analysis. Molecular detection using near-infrared light between 0.9 and 1.3 eV has important biomedical applications because of greater tissue penetration and reduced auto-fluorescent background in thick tissue or whole-blood media. In one system, the transition of DNA secondary structure modulates the dielectric environment of the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) around which it is adsorbed. The SWNT band-gap fluorescence undergoes a red shift when an encapsulating 30-nucleotide oligomer is exposed to counter ions that screen the charged backbone. We demonstrate the detection of the mercuric ions in whole blood, tissue, and from within living mammalian cells using this technology. Similar results are obtained for DNA hybridization and the detection of single nucleotide polymorphism. We also report the synthesis and successful testing of near-infrared β-D-glucose sensors2 that utilize a different mechanism: a photoluminescence modulation via charge transfer. The results demonstrate new opportunities for nanoparticle optical sensors that operate in strongly absorbing media of relevance to medicine or biology.

  20. The impact of single substitutions on multiple sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Klaere, Steffen; Gesell, Tanja; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2008-12-27

    We introduce another view of sequence evolution. Contrary to other approaches, we model the substitution process in two steps. First we assume (arbitrary) scaled branch lengths on a given phylogenetic tree. Second we allocate a Poisson distributed number of substitutions on the branches. The probability to place a mutation on a branch is proportional to its relative branch length. More importantly, the action of a single mutation on an alignment column is described by a doubly stochastic matrix, the so-called one-step mutation matrix. This matrix leads to analytical formulae for the posterior probability distribution of the number of substitutions for an alignment column.

  1. Self-Assembly of Ultralong Aligned Dipeptide Single Crystals.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bingbing; Li, Qi; Riegler, Hans; Eickelmann, Stephan; Dai, Luru; Yang, Yang; Perez-Garcia, Rodrigo; Jia, Yi; Chen, Guoxiang; Fei, Jinbo; Holmberg, Krister; Li, Junbai

    2017-09-25

    Oriented arrangement of single crystal plays a key role in improving the performance of their functional devices. Herein we describe a method for the exceptionally fast fabrication (mm/min) of ultralong aligned dipeptide single crystals (several centimeters). It combines an induced nucleation step with a continuous withdrawal of substrate, leading to specific evaporation/composition conditions at three phase contact line, which makes the growth process controllable. These aligned dipeptide fibers possess uniform cross section with active optical waveguiding properties that can be used as waveguiding materials. The approach provides a guidance for the controlled arrangement of organic single crystals, a family of materials with considerable potential applications in large-scale functional devices.

  2. Volumetric hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Yang, Q. H.; Tong, Y.; Cong, H. T.; Cheng, H. M.

    2002-04-01

    Macroscopically long ropes of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), synthesized by a hydrogen and argon arc discharge method, were cold pressed into tablets without any binder for measurements of their volumetric hydrogen storage capacity. The typical apparent density of the tablets was measured to be around 1.7 g/cm3 with respect to a molding pressure of 0.75 Gpa. A volumetric and mass hydrogen storage capacity of 68 kg H2/m3 and 4.0 wt %, respectively, was achieved at room temperature under a pressure of 11 MPa for suitably pretreated SWNT tablets, and more than 70% of the hydrogen adsorbed can be released under ambient pressure at room temperature. Pore structure analysis indicated that the molding process diminished the mesopore volume of the SWNT ropes, but exerts little influence on their intrinsic pore textures.

  3. Single Wall Carbon Nanotube-Based Structural Health Sensing Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Ingram, JoAnne L.; Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Smits, Jan M.; Williams, Phillip A.

    2004-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based materials represent the future aerospace vehicle construction material of choice based primarily on predicted strength-to-weight advantages and inherent multifunctionality. The multifunctionality of SWCNTs arises from the ability of the nanotubes to be either metallic or semi-conducting based on their chirality. Furthermore, simply changing the environment around a SWCNT can change its conducting behavior. This phenomenon is being exploited to create sensors capable of measuring several parameters related to vehicle structural health (i.e. strain, pressure, temperature, etc.) The structural health monitor is constructed using conventional electron-beam lithographic and photolithographic techniques to place specific electrode patterns on a surface. SWCNTs are then deposited between the electrodes using a dielectrophoretic alignment technique. Prototypes have been constructed on both silicon and polyimide substrates, demonstrating that surface-mountable and multifunctional devices based on SWCNTs can be realized.

  4. Single-walled carbon nanotubes for high-performance electronics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qing; Han, Shu-jen

    2013-10-07

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) could replace silicon in high-performance electronics with their exceptional electrical properties and intrinsic ultra-thin body. During the past five years, the major focus of this field is gradually shifting from proof-of-concept prototyping in academia to technology development in industry with emphasis on manufacturability and integration issues. This article reviews recent advances, starting with experimental and modeling works that evaluate the potential of adopting SWNTs in ultimately scaled transistors. Techniques to separate nanotubes according to their electronic types and assemble them into aligned arrays are then discussed, followed by a description of the engineering aspects in their implementation in integrated circuits and systems. A concluding discussion provides some perspectives on future challenges and research opportunities.

  5. Dust Grain Alignment and Magnetic Field Strength in the Wall of the Local Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, B.-G.; Medan, Ilija

    2017-01-01

    We use archival data on polarization (Berdyugin 2014) and extinction in the wall of the Local Bubble to study the grain alignment efficiency and the magnetic field strength. We find that the grain alignment efficiency variations can be directly tied to the location of the known OB-associations within 200pc from the Sun, strongly supporting modern, radiation-driven dust grain alignment. Based on the Davis-Chandrasekhar-Fermi method, we find a bimodal magnetic field-strength distribution, where the locations of the strongest fields correlate with the directions towards the near-by OB associations. We hypothesize that this strengthening is due to compression of the bubble wall by the opposing outflows in the Local Bubble and from the surrounding OB associations.

  6. Aligning Arrays of Lenses and Single-Mode Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Duncan

    2004-01-01

    A procedure now under development is intended to enable the precise alignment of sheet arrays of microscopic lenses with the end faces of a coherent bundle of as many as 1,000 single-mode optical fibers packed closely in a regular array (see Figure 1). In the original application that prompted this development, the precise assembly of lenses and optical fibers serves as a single-mode spatial filter for a visible-light nulling interferometer. The precision of alignment must be sufficient to limit any remaining wavefront error to a root-mean-square value of less than 1/10 of a wavelength of light. This wavefront-error limit translates to requirements to (1) ensure uniformity of both the lens and fiber arrays, (2) ensure that the lateral distance from the central axis of each lens and the corresponding optical fiber is no more than a fraction of a micron, (3) angularly align the lens-sheet planes and the fiber-bundle end faces to within a few arc seconds, and (4) axially align the lenses and the fiber-bundle end faces to within tens of microns of the focal distance. Figure 2 depicts the apparatus used in the alignment procedure. The beam of light from a Zygo (or equivalent) interferometer is first compressed by a ratio of 20:1 so that upon its return to the interferometer, the beam will be magnified enough to enable measurement of wavefront quality. The apparatus includes relay lenses that enable imaging of the arrays of microscopic lenses in a charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera that is part of the interferometer. One of the arrays of microscopic lenses is mounted on a 6-axis stage, in proximity to the front face of the bundle of optical fibers. The bundle is mounted on a separate stage. A mirror is attached to the back face of the bundle of optical fibers for retroreflection of light. When a microscopic lens and a fiber are aligned with each other, the affected portion of the light is reflected back by the mirror, recollimated by the microscopic lens, transmitted

  7. Structural and mechanical properties of single-wall carbon nanotube fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichot, V.; Badaire, S.; Albouy, P. A.; Zakri, C.; Poulin, P.; Launois, P.

    2006-12-01

    We report quantitative experimental study correlating the structure and mechanical properties of fibers made from single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). A post-synthesis solvent drawing treatment is used to vary nanotube alignment, whose detailed understanding is a prerequisite for fiber development. Quantitative analysis of nanotube alignment within the fibers with different draw ratios is performed using x-ray scattering. The method is described in detail, and we also show that the improvement of nanotube alignment with draw ratio can be understood within a model of induced orientation at constant volume. Young’s modulus and tensile strength increase with nanotube alignment. This is modeled using continuum mechanics in qualitative agreement with experiment, however quantitative differences show that nanotube alignment is not the only parameter controlling the fiber mechanical properties. We suggest that interaction between the SWNTs and PVA chains should also play a significant role.

  8. Structural and mechanical properties of single-wall carbon nanotube fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Pichot, V.; Albouy, P. A.; Launois, P.; Badaire, S.; Zakri, C.; Poulin, P.

    2006-12-15

    We report quantitative experimental study correlating the structure and mechanical properties of fibers made from single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). A post-synthesis solvent drawing treatment is used to vary nanotube alignment, whose detailed understanding is a prerequisite for fiber development. Quantitative analysis of nanotube alignment within the fibers with different draw ratios is performed using x-ray scattering. The method is described in detail, and we also show that the improvement of nanotube alignment with draw ratio can be understood within a model of induced orientation at constant volume. Young's modulus and tensile strength increase with nanotube alignment. This is modeled using continuum mechanics in qualitative agreement with experiment, however quantitative differences show that nanotube alignment is not the only parameter controlling the fiber mechanical properties. We suggest that interaction between the SWNTs and PVA chains should also play a significant role.

  9. Toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ong, Li-Chu; Chung, Felicia Fei-Lei; Tan, Yuen-Fen; Leong, Chee-Onn

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an important class of nanomaterials, which have numerous novel properties that make them useful in technology and industry. Generally, there are two types of CNTs: single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-walled nanotubes. SWNTs, in particular, possess unique electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties, allowing for a wide range of applications in various fields, including the electronic, computer, aerospace, and biomedical industries. However, the use of SWNTs has come under scrutiny, not only due to their peculiar nanotoxicological profile, but also due to the forecasted increase in SWNT production in the near future. As such, the risk of human exposure is likely to be increased substantially. Yet, our understanding of the toxicological risk of SWNTs in human biology remains limited. This review seeks to examine representative data on the nanotoxicity of SWNTs by first considering how SWNTs are absorbed, distributed, accumulated and excreted in a biological system, and how SWNTs induce organ-specific toxicity in the body. The contradictory findings of numerous studies with regards to the potential hazards of SWNT exposure are discussed in this review. The possible mechanisms and molecular pathways associated with SWNT nanotoxicity in target organs and specific cell types are presented. We hope that this review will stimulate further research into the fundamental aspects of CNTs, especially the biological interactions which arise due to the unique intrinsic characteristics of CNTs.

  10. Synthesis, assembly, and applications of single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Koungmin

    This dissertation presents the synthesis and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, and their applications in both nano-electronics such as transistor and integrated circuits and macro-electronics in energy conversion devices as transparent conducting electrodes. Also, the high performance chemical sensor using metal oxide nanowire has been demonstrated. Chapter 1 presents a brief introduction of carbon nanotube, followed by discussion of a new synthesis technique using nanosphere lithography to grow highly aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes atop quartz and sapphire substrates. This method offers great potential to produce carbon nanotube arrays with simultaneous control over the nanotube orientation, position, density, diameter and even chirality. Chapter 3 introduces the wafer-scale integration and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, including full-wafer scale synthesis and transfer of massively aligned carbon nanotube arrays, and nanotube device fabrication on 4 inch Si/SiO2 wafer to yield submicron channel transistors with high on-current density ˜ 20 muA/mum and good on/off ratio and CMOS integrated circuits. In addition, various chemical doping methods for n-type nanotube transistors are studied to fabricate CMOS integrated nanotube circuits such as inverter, NAND and NOR logic devices. Furthermore, defect-tolerant circuit design for NAND and NOR is proposed and demonstrated to guarantee the correct operation of logic circuit, regardless of the presence of mis-aligned or mis-positioned nanotubes. Carbon nanotube flexible electronics and smart textiles for ubiquitous computing and sensing are demonstrated in chapter 4. A facile transfer printing technique has been introduced to transfer massively aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes from the original sapphire/quartz substrates to virtually any other substrates, including glass, silicon, polymer sheets, and even fabrics. The characterization of transferred nanotubes reveals that the transferred

  11. Deterministically Polarized Fluorescence from Single Dye Molecules Aligned in Liquid Crystal Host

    SciTech Connect

    Lukishova, S.G.; Schmid, A.W.; Knox, R.; Freivald, P.; Boyd, R. W.; Stroud, Jr., C. R.; Marshall, K.L.

    2005-09-30

    We demonstrated for the first time to our konwledge deterministically polarized fluorescence from single dye molecules. Planar aligned nematic liquid crystal hosts provide deterministic alignment of single dye molecules in a preferred direction.

  12. G-quartet type self-assembly of guanine functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Prabhpreet; Venkatesh, V.; Nagapradeep, N.; Verma, Sandeep; Bianco, Alberto

    2012-03-01

    The simple strategy of linking guanine to single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through covalent functionalization permitted generation of the alignment of the nanotubes into lozenges reminiscent of guanine quartets (G-quartets) in the presence of potassium ions as observed by atomic force microscopy.The simple strategy of linking guanine to single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through covalent functionalization permitted generation of the alignment of the nanotubes into lozenges reminiscent of guanine quartets (G-quartets) in the presence of potassium ions as observed by atomic force microscopy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures for the synthesis and characterization of the precursors and MWCNT conjugates. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11849a

  13. Growth and characterization of high-density mats of single-walled carbon nanotubes for interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.; Zhong, G.; Telg, H.; Thomsen, C.; Warner, J. H.; Briggs, G. A. D.; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Roth, S.

    2008-10-20

    We grow high-density, aligned single wall carbon nanotube mats for use as interconnects in integrated circuits by remote plasma chemical vapor deposition from a Fe-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film catalyst. We carry out extensive Raman characterization of the resulting mats, and find that this catalyst system gives rise to a broad range of nanotube diameters, with no preferential selectivity of semiconducting tubes, but with at least 1/3 of metallic tubes.

  14. Sorting centimetre-long single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Woo Jong; Chae, Sang Hoon; Vu, Quoc An; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-08-01

    While several approaches have been developed for sorting metallic (m) or semiconducting (s) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), the length of SWCNTs is limited within a micrometer, which restricts excellent electrical performances of SWCNTs for macro-scale applications. Here, we demonstrate a simple sorting method of centimetre-long aligned m- and s-SWCNTs. Ni particles were selectively and uniformly coated along the 1-cm-long m-SWCNTs by applying positive gate bias during electrochemical deposition with continuous electrolyte injection. To sort s-SWCNTs, the Ni coating was oxidized to form insulator outer for blocking of current flow through inner m-SWCNTs. Sorting of m-SWCNTs were demonstrated by selective etching of s-SWCNTs via oxygen plasma, while the protected m-SWCNTs by Ni coating remained intact. The series of source-drain pairs were patterned along the 1-cm-long sorted SWCNTs, which confirmed high on/off ratio of 104–108 for s-SWCNTs and nearly 1 for m-SWCNTs.

  15. Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Based Cryogenic Temperature Sensor Platforms.

    PubMed

    Monea, Bogdan Florian; Ionete, Eusebiu Ilarian; Spiridon, Stefan Ionut; Leca, Aurel; Stanciu, Anda; Petre, Emil; Vaseashta, Ashok

    2017-09-10

    We present an investigation consisting of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) based cryogenic temperature sensors, capable of measuring temperatures in the range of 2-77 K. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) due to their extremely small size, superior thermal and electrical properties have suggested that it is possible to create devices that will meet necessary requirements for miniaturization and better performance, by comparison to temperature sensors currently available on the market. Starting from SWCNTs, as starting material, a resistive structure was designed. Employing dropcast method, the carbon nanotubes were deposited over pairs of gold electrodes and in between the structure electrodes from a solution. The procedure was followed by an alignment process between the electrodes using a dielectrophoretic method. Two sensor structures were tested in cryogenic field down to 2 K, and the resistance was measured using a standard four-point method. The measurement results suggest that, at temperatures below 20 K, the temperature coefficient of resistance average for sensor 1 is 1.473%/K and for sensor 2 is 0.365%/K. From the experimental data, it can be concluded that the dependence of electrical resistance versus temperature can be approximated by an exponential equation and, correspondingly, a set of coefficients are calculated. It is further concluded that the proposed approach described here offers several advantages, which can be employed in the fabrication of a microsensors for cryogenic applications.

  16. Sorting centimetre-long single-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Woo Jong; Chae, Sang Hoon; Vu, Quoc An; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    While several approaches have been developed for sorting metallic (m) or semiconducting (s) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), the length of SWCNTs is limited within a micrometer, which restricts excellent electrical performances of SWCNTs for macro-scale applications. Here, we demonstrate a simple sorting method of centimetre-long aligned m- and s-SWCNTs. Ni particles were selectively and uniformly coated along the 1-cm-long m-SWCNTs by applying positive gate bias during electrochemical deposition with continuous electrolyte injection. To sort s-SWCNTs, the Ni coating was oxidized to form insulator outer for blocking of current flow through inner m-SWCNTs. Sorting of m-SWCNTs were demonstrated by selective etching of s-SWCNTs via oxygen plasma, while the protected m-SWCNTs by Ni coating remained intact. The series of source-drain pairs were patterned along the 1-cm-long sorted SWCNTs, which confirmed high on/off ratio of 104–108 for s-SWCNTs and nearly 1 for m-SWCNTs. PMID:27476909

  17. Macroporous Polymers with Aligned Microporous Walls from Pickering High Internal Phase Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun; Zhang, Ranran; Zhang, Shengmiao; Chu, Yeqian; Chen, Jianding

    2016-06-21

    A novel class of macroporous polymers, open macroporous polymers with aligned microporous void walls, were prepared by combining particle-stabilized high internal phase emulsion (Pickering HIPE) and unidirectional freezing technique. These Pickering HIPEs were prepared by utilizing poly(urethane urea)/(vinyl ester resin) nanoparticles as the sole stabilizer, and this nanoparticles also acted as building blocks for the resulting macroporous polymers. Moreover, the morphology and compression modulus of the resulting porous materials could be tuned easily. This means now Pickering-HIPE templated open-cell foams can be prepared, and this route was normally achieved with surfactant and/or chemical reaction involved.

  18. Standard Reference Material (SRM 1990) For Single Crystal Diffractometer Alignment.

    PubMed

    Wong-Ng, W; Siegrist, T; DeTitta, G T; Finger, L W; Evans, H T; Gabe, E J; Enright, G D; Armstrong, J T; Levenson, M; Cook, L P; Hubbard, C R

    2001-01-01

    An international project was successfully completed which involved two major undertakings: (1) a round-robin to demonstrate the viability of the selected standard and (2) the certification of the lattice parameters of the SRM 1990, a Standard Reference Material(®) for single crystal diffractometer alignment. This SRM is a set of ≈3500 units of Cr-doped Al2O3, or ruby spheres [(0.420.011 mole fraction % Cr (expanded uncertainty)]. The round-robin consisted of determination of lattice parameters of a pair of crystals: the ruby sphere as a standard, and a zeolite reference to serve as an unknown. Fifty pairs of crystals were dispatched from Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute to volunteers in x-ray laboratories world-wide. A total of 45 sets of data was received from 32 laboratories. The mean unit cell parameters of the ruby spheres was found to be a=4.7608 ű0.0062 Å, and c=12.9979 ű0.020 Å (95 % intervals of the laboratory means). The source of errors of outlier data was identified. The SRM project involved the certification of lattice parameters using four well-aligned single crystal diffractometers at (Bell Laboratories) Lucent Technologies and at NRC of Canada (39 ruby spheres), the quantification of the Cr content using a combined microprobe and SEM/EDS technique, and the evaluation of the mosaicity of the ruby spheres using a double-crystal spectrometry method. A confirmation of the lattice parameters was also conducted using a Guinier-Hägg camera. Systematic corrections of thermal expansion and refraction corrections were applied. These rubies- are rhombohedral, with space group [Formula: see text]. The certified mean unit cell parameters are a=4.76080±0.00029 Å, and c=12.99568 ű0.00087 Å (expanded uncertainty). These certified lattice parameters fall well within the results of those obtained from the international round-robin study. The Guinier-Hägg transmission measurements on five samples of powdered rubies (a=4.7610 ű0.0013

  19. Standard Reference Material (SRM 1990) For Single Crystal Diffractometer Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Ng, W.; Siegrist, T.; DeTitta, G. T.; Finger, L. W.; Evans, H. T.; Gabe, E. J.; Enright, G. D.; Armstrong, J. T.; Levenson, M.; Cook, L. P.; Hubbard, C. R.

    2001-01-01

    An international project was successfully completed which involved two major undertakings: (1) a round-robin to demonstrate the viability of the selected standard and (2) the certification of the lattice parameters of the SRM 1990, a Standard Reference Material® for single crystal diffractometer alignment. This SRM is a set of ≈3500 units of Cr-doped Al2O3, or ruby spheres [(0.420.011 mole fraction % Cr (expanded uncertainty)]. The round-robin consisted of determination of lattice parameters of a pair of crystals: the ruby sphere as a standard, and a zeolite reference to serve as an unknown. Fifty pairs of crystals were dispatched from Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute to volunteers in x-ray laboratories world-wide. A total of 45 sets of data was received from 32 laboratories. The mean unit cell parameters of the ruby spheres was found to be a=4.7608 ű0.0062 Å, and c=12.9979 ű0.020 Å (95 % intervals of the laboratory means). The source of errors of outlier data was identified. The SRM project involved the certification of lattice parameters using four well-aligned single crystal diffractometers at (Bell Laboratories) Lucent Technologies and at NRC of Canada (39 ruby spheres), the quantification of the Cr content using a combined microprobe and SEM/EDS technique, and the evaluation of the mosaicity of the ruby spheres using a double-crystal spectrometry method. A confirmation of the lattice parameters was also conducted using a Guinier-Hägg camera. Systematic corrections of thermal expansion and refraction corrections were applied. These rubies– are rhombohedral, with space group R3¯c. The certified mean unit cell parameters are a=4.76080±0.00029 Å, and c=12.99568 ű0.00087 Å (expanded uncertainty). These certified lattice parameters fall well within the results of those obtained from the international round-robin study. The Guinier-Hägg transmission measurements on five samples of powdered rubies (a=4.7610 ű0.0013 Å, and c = 12

  20. Standard Reference Material (SRM 1990) for Single Crystal Diffractometer Alignment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong-Ng, W.; Siegrist, T.; DeTitta, G.T.; Finger, L.W.; Evans, H.T.; Gabe, E.J.; Enright, G.D.; Armstrong, J.T.; Levenson, M.; Cook, L.P.; Hubbard, C.R.

    2001-01-01

    An international project was successfully completed which involved two major undertakings: (1) a round-robin to demonstrate the viability of the selected standard and (2) the certification of the lattice parameters of the SRM 1990, a Standard Reference Material?? for single crystal diffractometer alignment. This SRM is a set of ???3500 units of Cr-doped Al2O3, or ruby spheres [(0 420.011 mole fraction % Cr (expanded uncertainty)]. The round-robin consisted of determination of lattice parameters of a pair of crystals' the ruby sphere as a standard, and a zeolite reference to serve as an unknown. Fifty pairs of crystals were dispatched from Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute to volunteers in x-ray laboratories world-wide. A total of 45 sets of data was received from 32 laboratories. The mean unit cell parameters of the ruby spheres was found to be a=4.7608 A?? ?? 0.0062 A??, and c=12.9979 A?? ?? 0.020 A?? (95 % intervals of the laboratory means). The source of errors of outlier data was identified. The SRM project involved the certification of lattice parameters using four well-aligned single crystal diffractometers at (Bell Laboratories) Lucent Technologies and at NRC of Canada (39 ruby spheres), the quantification of the Cr content using a combined microprobe and SEM/EDS technique, and the evaluation of the mosaicity of the ruby spheres using a double-crystal spectrometry method. A confirmation of the lattice parameters was also conducted using a Guinier-Ha??gg camera. Systematic corrections of thermal expansion and refraction corrections were applied. These rubies_ are rhombohedral, with space group R3c. The certified mean unit cell parameters are a=4.76080 ?? 0.00029 A??, and c=12 99568 A?? ?? 0.00087 A?? (expanded uncertainty). These certified lattice parameters fall well within the results of those obtained from the international round-robin study. The Guinier-Ha??gg transmission measurements on five samples of powdered rubies (a=4.7610 A?? ?? 0

  1. Oxidative biodegradation of single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russier, Julie; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Venturelli, Enrica; Gravel, Edmond; Marcolongo, Gabriele; Meneghetti, Moreno; Doris, Eric; Bianco, Alberto

    2011-03-01

    In this study we compare the biodegradation of both single-walled (SWCNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using two different oxidative conditions. In particular, we demonstrate that oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes are highly degraded, although not to completeness when treated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide.In this study we compare the biodegradation of both single-walled (SWCNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using two different oxidative conditions. In particular, we demonstrate that oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes are highly degraded, although not to completeness when treated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, additional TEM images and DLS diagrams. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00779j

  2. Reinforcement of epoxy-based composites by magnetically aligned multi walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xianjuan; Lin, Song; Li, Moyu; Li, Wusheng; Jia, Xiaolong; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping

    2015-07-01

    Multi walled carbon nanotubes decorated with ferriferrous oxide nanoparticle (MWCNTs-Fe3O4) complex was used as an effective reinforcement in the polymer composites. The MWCNTs-Fe3O4 with various grafting contents of Fe3O4 nanoparticles were successfully prepared by combining in situ atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and coprecipitation process, which was characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The MWCNTs-Fe3O4 complex showed the strong magnetic response behavior, which could be easily aligned in an external magnetic field. The alignment state of MWCNTs-Fe3O4 complex could be modulated by adjusting the intensity of external magnetic field, grafting content of Fe3O4 nanoparticles and viscosity of the solvent. Moreover, with the addition of MWCNTs-Fe3O4, tensile strength and modulus of epoxy composites were enhanced by 12.3 and 10.9%, respectively, which was due to the reinforcing effect of the aligned MWCNTs-Fe3O4 within magnetic field.

  3. 5. VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING REAR WALL, CLEAT AND SINGLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING REAR WALL, CLEAT AND SINGLE BIT ON STERN DECK OF VESSEL 37 Edward Larrabee, photographer, December 1984 - Shooters Island, Ships Graveyard, Vessel No. 37, Newark Bay, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  4. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  5. Theoretical studies on lattice-oriented growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes on sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengwei; Meng, Xianhong; Xiao, Jianliang

    2017-09-01

    Due to their excellent mechanical and electrical properties, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can find broad applications in many areas, such as field-effect transistors, logic circuits, sensors and flexible electronics. High-density, horizontally aligned arrays of SWNTs are essential for high performance electronics. Many experimental studies have demonstrated that chemical vapor deposition growth of nanotubes on crystalline substrates such as sapphire offers a promising route to achieve such dense, perfectly aligned arrays. In this work, a theoretical study is performed to quantitatively understand the van der Waals interactions between SWNTs and sapphire substrates. The energetically preferred alignment directions of SWNTs on A-, R- and M-planes and the random alignment on the C-plane predicted by this study are all in good agreement with experiments. It is also shown that smaller SWNTs have better alignment than larger SWNTs due to their stronger interaction with sapphire substrate. The strong vdW interactions along preferred alignment directions can be intuitively explained by the nanoscale ‘grooves’ formed by atomic lattice structures on the surface of sapphire. This study provides important insights to the controlled growth of nanotubes and potentially other nanomaterials.

  6. Theoretical studies on lattice-oriented growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes on sapphire.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengwei; Meng, Xianhong; Xiao, Jianliang

    2017-09-20

    Due to their excellent mechanical and electrical properties, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can find broad applications in many areas, such as field-effect transistors, logic circuits, sensors and flexible electronics. High-density, horizontally aligned arrays of SWNTs are essential for high performance electronics. Many experimental studies have demonstrated that chemical vapor deposition growth of nanotubes on crystalline substrates such as sapphire offers a promising route to achieve such dense, perfectly aligned arrays. In this work, a theoretical study is performed to quantitatively understand the van der Waals interactions between SWNTs and sapphire substrates. The energetically preferred alignment directions of SWNTs on A-, R- and M-planes and the random alignment on the C-plane predicted by this study are all in good agreement with experiments. It is also shown that smaller SWNTs have better alignment than larger SWNTs due to their stronger interaction with sapphire substrate. The strong vdW interactions along preferred alignment directions can be intuitively explained by the nanoscale 'grooves' formed by atomic lattice structures on the surface of sapphire. This study provides important insights to the controlled growth of nanotubes and potentially other nanomaterials.

  7. Fabrication and electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube channel and graphene electrode based transistors arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y. H.; Yun, H.; McAllister, K.; Lee, S. W.; Na, J.; Kim, G. T.; Lee, B. J.; Kim, J. J.; Jeong, G. H.; Lee, I.; Kim, K. S.

    2015-07-20

    A transistor structure composed of an individual single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) channel with a graphene electrode was demonstrated. The integrated arrays of transistor devices were prepared by transferring patterned graphene electrode patterns on top of the aligned SWNT along one direction. Both single and multi layer graphene were used for the electrode materials; typical p-type transistor and Schottky diode behavior were observed, respectively. Based on our fabrication method and device performances, several issues are suggested and discussed to improve the device reliability and finally to realize all carbon based future electronic systems.

  8. 40 CFR 721.10277 - Single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (generic) (P-10-40).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... chemical substance identified generically as single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (PMN P-10-40... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (generic) (P-10-40). 721.10277 Section 721.10277 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  9. Controlled growth and assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes for nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omrane, Badr

    Carbon nanotubes are promising candidates for enhancing electronic devices in the future at the nanoscale level. Their integration into today's electronics has however been challenging due to the difficulties in controlling their orientation, location, chirality and diameter during formation. This thesis investigates and develops new techniques for the controlled growth and assembly of carbon nanotubes as a way to address some of these challenges. Colloidal lithography using nanospheres of 450 nm in diameter, acting as a shadow mask during metal evaporation, has been used to pattern thin films of single-walled carbon nanotube multilayer catalysts on Si and Si/SiO2 substrates. Large areas of periodic hexagonal catalyst islands were formed and chemical vapor deposition resulted in aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes on Si substrates within the hexagonal array of catalyst islands. On silicon dioxide, single-walled carbon nanotubes connecting the hexagonal catalyst islands were observed. To help explain these observations, a growth model based on experimental data has been used. Electrostatic interaction, van der Waals interaction and gas flow appear to be the main forces contributing to single-walled carbon nanotube alignment on Si/SiO2. Although the alignment of single-walled carbon nanotubes on Si substrates is still not fully understood, it may be due to a combination of the above factors, in addition to silicide-nanotube interaction. Atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy of the post-growth samples show single-walled carbon nanotubes of 1-2 nm in diameter. Based on the atomic force microscopy data and Raman spectra, a mixture of individual and bundles of metallic and semiconducting nanotubes were inferred to be present. A novel technique based on direct nanowriting of carbon nanotube catalysts in liquid form has also been developed. The reliability of this method to produce nanoscale catalyst geometries in a highly controlled manner, as required for

  10. Tunneling phenomena in aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube sheets: conductivity and Raman correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Corro, E.; Castillo-Martínez, E.; Taravillo, M.; Baonza, V. G.

    2014-12-01

    We performed simultaneous Raman spectroscopy and electrical conductivity measurements on self-standing aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes sheets at varying inter-tube distances. A sapphire anvil cell is used here to modulate the inter-tube distance and promote the subsequent electronic tunneling phenomena. We observe a singular correlation between the intensity of the so called defect bands of carbon materials and their conductivity. This indicates that the conditions of the resonant processes that originate these bands are modified by the tunneling phenomena. Such an issue has never been reported before and has potential technological applications. Additionally, the provided AFM images evidence the debundling of the carbon nanotubes that had been described to occur after small compression.

  11. Anisotropic polarizability of single wall carbon nanotubes measured via the electro-optical effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, Jeffrey A.; Bauer, Barry J.; Hobbie, Erik K.

    2007-03-01

    The electro-optical response of 400 nm long single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) suspended in water with single stranded DNA was measured in response to high frequency electric fields. Specifically, the dichroism of the SWNTs at their chirality dependent optical transitions was recorded, allowing for calculation of the induced alignment of the SWNTs by the applied field. The anisotropic polarizability of an individual SWNT chirality can be clearly assigned from this data. Strong alignment with nematic order parameters above 0.5 was achieved at high field strengths. We find anisotropic polarizabilities a factor of five larger than that previously measured for gold colloidal rods and an order of magnitude larger than that previously measured for tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). The characterization of the anisotropic polarizability is a large step towards exploiting this property for the directed manipulation of specific nanotubes.

  12. Magnetic domain wall conduits for single cell applications.

    PubMed

    Donolato, M; Torti, A; Kostesha, N; Deryabina, M; Sogne, E; Vavassori, P; Hansen, M F; Bertacco, R

    2011-09-07

    The ability to trap, manipulate and release single cells on a surface is important both for fundamental studies of cellular processes and for the development of novel lab-on-chip miniaturized tools for biological and medical applications. In this paper we demonstrate how magnetic domain walls generated in micro- and nano-structures fabricated on a chip surface can be used to handle single yeast cells labeled with magnetic beads. In detail, first we show that the proposed approach maintains the microorganism viable, as proven by monitoring the division of labeled yeast cells trapped by domain walls over 16 hours. Moreover, we demonstrate the controlled transport and release of individual yeast cells via displacement and annihilation of individual domain walls in micro- and nano-sized magnetic structures. These results pave the way to the implementation of magnetic devices based on domain walls technology in lab-on-chip systems devoted to accurate individual cell trapping and manipulation.

  13. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Mimics of Biological Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Hasti; Shepard, Kenneth L; Nuckolls, Colin; Hernández Sánchez, Raúl

    2017-02-08

    Here we report on the ion conductance through individual, small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes. We find that they are mimics of ion channels found in natural systems. We explore the factors governing the ion selectivity and permeation through single-walled carbon nanotubes by considering an electrostatic mechanism built around a simplified version of the Gouy-Chapman theory. We find that the single-walled carbon nanotubes preferentially transported cations and that the cation permeability is size-dependent. The ionic conductance increases as the absolute hydration enthalpy decreases for monovalent cations with similar solid-state radii, hydrated radii, and bulk mobility. Charge screening experiments using either the addition of cationic or anionic polymers, divalent metal cations, or changes in pH reveal the enormous impact of the negatively charged carboxylates at the entrance of the single-walled carbon nanotubes. These observations were modeled in the low-to-medium concentration range (0.1-2.0 M) by an electrostatic mechanism that mimics the behavior observed in many biological ion channel-forming proteins. Moreover, multi-ion conduction in the high concentration range (>2.0 M) further reinforces the similarity between single-walled carbon nanotubes and protein ion channels.

  14. Thermoelectric power of a single-walled carbon nanotubes rope.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang; Hu, Lijun; Zhou, Haiqing; Qiu, Caiyu; Yang, Huaichao; Chen, Minjiang; Lu, Jianglei; Sun, Lianfeng

    2013-02-01

    In this work, a rope of single-walled carbon nanotubes is prepared by using a diamond wire drawing die. At atmospheric condition, the electrical conductance and the thermoelectric voltage of single-walled carbon nanotubes rope have been investigated with the hot-side temperature ranging from 292 to 380 K, and cold-side temperature at 292 K. For different temperatures in the range of 292 to 380 K at hot-side, the current-voltage curves are almost parallel to each other, indicating that the electrical conductance does not change. The dynamic characteristics of voltage at positive, zero and negative current bias demonstrate that a thermoelectric voltage is induced with a direction from hot- to cold-side. The induced thermoelectric voltage shows linear dependence on the temperature difference between hot- and cold-side. The thermoelectric power of single-walled carbon nanotubes rope is found to be positive and has a value about 17.8 +/- 1.0 microV/K. This result suggests the hole-like carriers in single-walled carbon nanotubes rope. This study will pave the way for single-walled carbon nanotubes based thermoelectric devices.

  15. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Mimics of Biological Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Here we report on the ion conductance through individual, small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes. We find that they are mimics of ion channels found in natural systems. We explore the factors governing the ion selectivity and permeation through single-walled carbon nanotubes by considering an electrostatic mechanism built around a simplified version of the Gouy–Chapman theory. We find that the single-walled carbon nanotubes preferentially transported cations and that the cation permeability is size-dependent. The ionic conductance increases as the absolute hydration enthalpy decreases for monovalent cations with similar solid-state radii, hydrated radii, and bulk mobility. Charge screening experiments using either the addition of cationic or anionic polymers, divalent metal cations, or changes in pH reveal the enormous impact of the negatively charged carboxylates at the entrance of the single-walled carbon nanotubes. These observations were modeled in the low-to-medium concentration range (0.1–2.0 M) by an electrostatic mechanism that mimics the behavior observed in many biological ion channel-forming proteins. Moreover, multi-ion conduction in the high concentration range (>2.0 M) further reinforces the similarity between single-walled carbon nanotubes and protein ion channels. PMID:28103039

  16. Controlled Patterning and Growth of Single Wall and Multi-wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Method and system for producing a selected pattern or array of at least one of a single wall nanotube and/or a multi-wall nanotube containing primarily carbon. A substrate is coated with a first layer (optional) of a first selected metal (e.g., Al and/or Ir) and with a second layer of a catalyst (e.g., Fe, Co, Ni and/or Mo), having selected first and second layer thicknesses provided by ion sputtering, arc discharge, laser ablation, evaporation or CVD. The first layer and/or the second layer may be formed in a desired non-uniform pattern, using a mask with suitable aperture(s), to promote growth of carbon nanotubes in a corresponding pattern. A selected heated feed gas (primarily CH4 or C2Hn with n=2 and/or 4) is passed over the coated substrate and forms primarily single wall nanotubes or multiple wall nanotubes, depending upon the selected feed gas and its temperature. Nanofibers, as well as single wall and multi-wall nanotubes, are produced using plasma-aided growth from the second (catalyst) layer. An overcoating of a selected metal or alloy can be deposited, over the second layer, to provide a coating for the carbon nanotubes grown in this manner.

  17. The detonation cylinder test: Determination of full wall velocity and shape from a single velocimetry probe with an arbitrary angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Laser velocimetry probes are used for measuring wall velocity in cylinder test expansion experiments. Previously, a method was developed to determine the full wall velocity, angle and case shape from a single probe aligned with the initial cylinder wall normal (S.I. Jackson, Proc. Combust. Inst., Vol. 35, 2015, pg.1997-2004). However, probes are often positioned at arbitrary (non-normal) angles to optimize light return from the cylinder surface. This work extends the prior method to accommodate arbitrary probe angles and allows solution of the full cylinder wall motion and shape from a single probe, using only the assumption of steady flow in the shock frame. When used in conjunction with the prior method, it can also be used to approximate the detonation product isentrope analytically from a single velocimetry probe at any angle.

  18. Photodynamic Action of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy is achieved by the combination of photosensitizers, harmless visible or near-infrared (NIR) light, and molecular oxygen (O2). Photosensitizers transfer their absorbed light energy to O2 to generate a major active species in photodynamic therapy, singlet oxygen. In this review, I will discuss the possibility of single-walled carbon nanotubes as NIR photosensitizers, while explaining the general photophysics and photochemistry underlying photodynamic therapy as well as summarizing recent advances in the purification technologies for single-walled carbon nanotubes to reduce their toxicity concerns.

  19. Electromechanical transducers based on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampfer, C.; Jungen, A.; Helbling, T.; Durrer, L.; Hierold, C.

    2008-08-01

    Carbon Nanotubes are intensively studied as a new functional material for nanoelectronics and nano electromechanical systems, including nanosensor devices. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) show unique mechanical and electromechanical properties and they change electronic properties by interacting with the environment (this can be e.g. used for chemical and biochemical sensing). Therefore nanotubes are very promising candidates for active elements in future nanoscaled transducers. Concepts for carbon nanotube sensors for mechanical and chemical detection schemes are presented. We focus on single-walled carbon nanotubes as natural macro molecular functional structures with an option for low scale integration in micro and nano electromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS).

  20. The effects of wall slide and sling slide exercises on scapular alignment and pain in subjects with scapular downward rotation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Ho; Lim, Jin-Yong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study was performed to evaluate the changes in the scapular alignment, pressure pain threshold and pain in subjects with scapular downward rotation after 4 weeks of wall slide exercise or sling slide exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-two subjects with scapular downward rotation participated in this study. The alignment of the scapula was measured using radiographic analysis (X-ray). Pain and pressure pain threshold were assessed using visual analogue scale and digital algometer. Patients were assessed before and after a 4 weeks of exercise. [Results] In the within-group comparison, the wall slide exercise group showed significant differences in the resting scapular alignment, pressure pain threshold, and pain after four weeks. The between-group comparison showed that there were significant differences between the wall slide group and the sling slide group after four weeks. [Conclusion] The results of this study found that the wall slide exercise may be effective at reducing pain and improving scapular alignment in subjects with scapular downward rotation. PMID:27799716

  1. Effective permittivity of single-walled carbon nanotube composites: Two-fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Afshin; Zangeneh, Hamid Reza; Moghadam, Firoozeh Karimi

    2015-12-01

    We develop an effective medium theory to obtain effective permittivity of a composite of two-dimensional (2D) aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. Electronic excitations on each nanotube surface are modeled by an infinitesimally thin layer of a 2D electron gas represented by two interacting fluids, which takes into account different nature of the σ and π electrons. Calculations of both real and imaginary parts of the effective dielectric function of the system are presented, for different values of the filling factor and radius of carbon nanotubes.

  2. Effective permittivity of single-walled carbon nanotube composites: Two-fluid model

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin; Zangeneh, Hamid Reza; Moghadam, Firoozeh Karimi

    2015-12-15

    We develop an effective medium theory to obtain effective permittivity of a composite of two-dimensional (2D) aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. Electronic excitations on each nanotube surface are modeled by an infinitesimally thin layer of a 2D electron gas represented by two interacting fluids, which takes into account different nature of the σ and π electrons. Calculations of both real and imaginary parts of the effective dielectric function of the system are presented, for different values of the filling factor and radius of carbon nanotubes.

  3. En route toward high performance electronics based on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qing

    2014-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) could replace silicon in high-performance electronics with their exceptional electrical properties and intrinsic ultra-thin body. During the past five years, the major focus of this field is gradually shifting from proof-of-concept prototyping in academia to technology development in industry with emphasis on manufacturability and integration issues. Here we will review some most significant recent advances, with focus on assembling high purity semiconducting SWNTs into well aligned arrays. Future challenges and research opportunities in this field will also be discussed.

  4. Stamping single wall nanotubes for circuit quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Viennot, J. J. Kontos, T.; Palomo, J.

    2014-03-17

    We report on a dry transfer technique for single wall carbon nanotube devices, which allows to embed them in high finesse microwave cavity. We demonstrate the ground state charge readout and a quality factor of about 3000 down to the single photon regime. This technique allows to make devices such as double quantum dots, which could be instrumental for achieving the strong spin photon coupling. It can easily be extended to generic carbon nanotube based microwave devices.

  5. A Computational Experiment on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Scott; Lonie, David C.; Chen, Jiechen; Zurek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    A computational experiment that investigates single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been developed and employed in an upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. Computations were carried out to determine the electronic structure, radial breathing modes, and the influence of the nanotube's diameter on the…

  6. A Computational Experiment on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Scott; Lonie, David C.; Chen, Jiechen; Zurek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    A computational experiment that investigates single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been developed and employed in an upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. Computations were carried out to determine the electronic structure, radial breathing modes, and the influence of the nanotube's diameter on the…

  7. Chemical Sensing with Polyaniline Coated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Mengning; Tang, Yifan; Gou, Pingping; Reber, Michael J; Star, Alexander

    2011-01-25

    Single-walled carbon nanotube/polyaniline (SWNT/PAni) nanocomposite with controlled core/shell morphology was synthesized by a noncovalent functionalization approach. Unique electron interactions between the SWNT core and the PAni shell were studied electrochemically and spectroscopically, and superior sensor performance to chemical gases and vapors was demonstrated.

  8. Current Methods for Automated Filtering of Multiple Sequence Alignments Frequently Worsen Single-Gene Phylogenetic Inference

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ge; Muffato, Matthieu; Ledergerber, Christian; Herrero, Javier; Goldman, Nick; Gil, Manuel; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic inference is generally performed on the basis of multiple sequence alignments (MSA). Because errors in an alignment can lead to errors in tree estimation, there is a strong interest in identifying and removing unreliable parts of the alignment. In recent years several automated filtering approaches have been proposed, but despite their popularity, a systematic and comprehensive comparison of different alignment filtering methods on real data has been lacking. Here, we extend and apply recently introduced phylogenetic tests of alignment accuracy on a large number of gene families and contrast the performance of unfiltered versus filtered alignments in the context of single-gene phylogeny reconstruction. Based on multiple genome-wide empirical and simulated data sets, we show that the trees obtained from filtered MSAs are on average worse than those obtained from unfiltered MSAs. Furthermore, alignment filtering often leads to an increase in the proportion of well-supported branches that are actually wrong. We confirm that our findings hold for a wide range of parameters and methods. Although our results suggest that light filtering (up to 20% of alignment positions) has little impact on tree accuracy and may save some computation time, contrary to widespread practice, we do not generally recommend the use of current alignment filtering methods for phylogenetic inference. By providing a way to rigorously and systematically measure the impact of filtering on alignments, the methodology set forth here will guide the development of better filtering algorithms. PMID:26031838

  9. Dynamics of capillary infiltration of liquids into a highly aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube film.

    PubMed

    Boncel, Sławomir; Walczak, Krzysztof Z; Koziol, Krzysztof K K

    2011-01-01

    The physical compatibility of a highly aligned carbon nanotube (HACNT) film with liquids was established using a fast and convenient experimental protocol. Two parameters were found to be decisive for the infiltration process. For a given density of nanotube packing, the thermodynamics of the infiltration process (wettability) were described by the contact angle between the nanotube wall and a liquid meniscus (θ). Once the wettability criterion (θ < 90°) was met, the HACNT film (of free volume equal to 91%) was penetrated gradually by the liquid in a rate that can be linearly correlated to dynamic viscosity of the liquid (η). The experimental results follow the classical theory of capillarity for a steady process (Lucas-Washburn law), where the nanoscale capillary force, here supported by gravity, is compensated by viscous drag. This most general theory of capillarity can be applied in a prediction of both wettability of HACNT films and the dynamics of capillary rise in the intertube space in various technological applications.

  10. Dynamics of capillary infiltration of liquids into a highly aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube film

    PubMed Central

    Walczak, Krzysztof Z; Koziol, Krzysztof K K

    2011-01-01

    Summary The physical compatibility of a highly aligned carbon nanotube (HACNT) film with liquids was established using a fast and convenient experimental protocol. Two parameters were found to be decisive for the infiltration process. For a given density of nanotube packing, the thermodynamics of the infiltration process (wettability) were described by the contact angle between the nanotube wall and a liquid meniscus (θ). Once the wettability criterion (θ < 90°) was met, the HACNT film (of free volume equal to 91%) was penetrated gradually by the liquid in a rate that can be linearly correlated to dynamic viscosity of the liquid (η). The experimental results follow the classical theory of capillarity for a steady process (Lucas–Washburn law), where the nanoscale capillary force, here supported by gravity, is compensated by viscous drag. This most general theory of capillarity can be applied in a prediction of both wettability of HACNT films and the dynamics of capillary rise in the intertube space in various technological applications. PMID:21977444

  11. Observation of transient alignment-inversion walls in nematics of phenyl benzoates in the presence of a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Hinov, Hristo P; Vistin', Leonard K; Marinov, Yordan G

    2014-04-17

    Formation of new transient walls by a constant magnetic field at the Fréedericsz critical value has been observed. They are oriented along the initial alignment of the nematic phase of phenyl benzoates and appeared only in relatively thick samples with a thickness between 50 and 100 μm of the cells. The excellent planarity of the liquid crystal orientation is considered to be the most important condition for their presence These magnetic walls are transient as they disappear either after a few seconds for 100 μm thick nematic cells or after parts of a second for thinner (50 μm) nematic cells. Nonregular stable magnetic walls, incorporating disclinations with core, appear immediately after the relaxation of the transient walls, when the planarity of the nematic orientation is not perfect. In thinner nematic cells of 20 μm or less, a Fréedericksz transition has only been observed. The formation of transient magnetic walls can be described by a model taking into account alignment-inversion, twisted along Y regions. The transient walls accompanied by a system of Becke lines relax by going through three-dimensional twist-splay-bend deformations.

  12. Aligned deposition and electrical measurements on single DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidelshtein, Gennady; Kotlyar, Alexander; Hashemi, Mohtadin; Gurevich, Leonid

    2015-11-01

    A reliable method of deposition of aligned individual dsDNA molecules on mica, silicon, and micro/nanofabricated circuits is presented. Complexes of biotinylated double stranded poly(dG)-poly(dC) DNA with avidin were prepared and deposited on mica and silicon surfaces in the absence of Mg2+ ions. Due to its positive charge, the avidin attached to one end of the DNA anchors the complex to negatively charged substrates. Subsequent drying with a directional gas flow yields DNA molecules perfectly aligned on the surface. In the avidin-DNA complex only the avidin moiety is strongly and irreversibly bound to the surface, while the DNA counterpart interacts with the substrates much more weakly and can be lifted from the surface and realigned in any direction. Using this technique, avidin-DNA complexes were deposited across platinum electrodes on a silicon substrate. Electrical measurements on the deposited DNA molecules revealed linear IV-characteristics and exponential dependence on relative humidity.

  13. Field-Effect Modulation of Ambipolar Doping and Domain Wall Band Alignment in P-type Vanadium Dioxide Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yasen; Peng, Xingyue; Yang, Yiming; Yu, Dong

    The sub-picosecond metal-insulator phase transition in vanadium dioxide (VO2) has attracted extensive attention with potential applications in ultrafast Mott transistors. However, the development of VO2-based transistors lags behind, owing to the lack of an efficient and hysteresis-free electrostatic doping control. Here we report the first synthesis of p-type single crystalline VO2nanowires via catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition. The p-type doping was unambiguously confirmed by both solid and electrochemical gating methods, and further evidenced by the scanning photocurrent microscopic measurements. Interestingly, we observed that the photocurrent spot polarity at the metal-insulator domain walls was reversibly switched by electrochemical gating, which indicates a band bending flipping. Furthermore, we eliminated the common hysteresis in gate sweep and greatly shortened the transistor response time via a hybrid gating method, which combines the merits of liquid ionic and solid gating. The capability of efficient field effect modulation of ambipolar conduction and band alignment offers new opportunities on understanding the phase transition mechanism and enables novel electronic applications based on VO2.

  14. MIMO radar for through-wall target identification in single and two wall scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, Evan T.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Broderick, Sean P.

    2016-05-01

    MIMO radar provides improvement over traditional phased array radars for through wall imaging. By transmitting independent waveforms from a transmit array to a receive array an effective virtual array is created. This array has improved degrees of freedom over phased arrays and mono-static MIMO systems. This virtual array allows us to achieve the same effective aperture length as a phased array with less elements because the virtual array can be described as the convolution of transmit and receive array positions. In addition, data from multiple walls of the same room can be used to collect target information. If two walls are perpendicular to each other and the geometry of transmit and receive arrays is known, then data can be processed independently of each other. Since the geometry of the arrays is known, a target scene can be created where the two data sets overlap. The overlapped scene can then be processed so that image artifacts that do not correlate between the data sets can be excised. The result gives improved target detection, reduction in false alarms, robustness to noise, and robustness against errors such as improperly aligned antennas.

  15. Storage of Hydrogen in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, A. C.; Jones, K. M.; Bekkedahl, T. A.; Kiang, C. H.; Bethune, D. S.; Heben, M. J.

    1997-03-27

    Pores of molecular dimensions can adsorb large quantities of gases owing to the enhanced density of the adsorbed material inside the pores, a consequence of the attractive potential of the pore walls. Pederson and Broughton have suggested that carbon nanotubes, which have diameters of typically a few nanometres, should be able to draw up liquids by capillarity, and this effect has been seen for low-surface-tension liquids in large-diameter, multi-walled nanotubes. Here we show that a gas can condense to high density inside narrow, single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs). Temperature-programmed desorption spectroscopy shows that hydrogen will condense inside SWNTs under conditions that do not induce adsorption within a standard mesoporous activated carbon. The very high hydrogen uptake in these materials suggests that they might be effective as a hydrogen-storage material for fuel-cell electric vehicles.

  16. High field magneto-optical spectroscopy of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaver, Jonah

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) present an ideal system for study of one dimensional physics. Classically speaking, their long persistence lengths, i.e. the length over which they do not bend, result in rigid-rod-like behavior in the solution-phase. Quantum mechanically speaking, extreme confinement in the radial direction result in interesting properties for optically excited correlated electron-hole pairs, or excitons. In addition, their hollow crystalline structure presents a controllable way to modify the circumferential boundary conditions on their electronic wavefunctions resulting in changes to the electronic band structure via threading a magnetic field through the diameter. An applied magnetic field also aligns SWNTs due to their magnetic susceptibility anisotropy. We have measured the dynamic alignment properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) suspensions in pulsed high magnetic fields through linear dichroism spectroscopy. Millisecond-duration pulsed high magnetic fields up to 55 T as well as microsecond-duration pulsed ultrahigh magnetic fields up to 166 T were used. Due to their anisotropic magnetic properties, SWNTs align in an applied magnetic field, and due to their anisotropic optical properties, aligned SWNTs show linear dichroism. The characteristics of their overall alignment depend on several factors, including the viscosity and temperature of the suspending solvent, the degree of anisotropy of nanotube magnetic susceptibilities, the nanotube length distribution, the degree of nanotube bundling, and the strength and duration of the applied magnetic field. In order to explain our data, we have developed a theoretical model based on the time-dependent Smoluchowski equation for rigid rods that accurately reproduces the salient features of the experimental data. We have also investigated excitons in SWNTs in stretch aligned polyacrylic acid films, direction of stretch (n̂), through optical spectroscopy at low temperature (1.5 K

  17. Thermionic Emission of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Measured

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Krainsky, Isay L.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Elich, Jeffrey M.; Landi, Brian J.; Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2004-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center, in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology, have investigated the thermionic properties of high-purity, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for use as electron-emitting electrodes. Carbon nanotubes are a recently discovered material made from carbon atoms bonded into nanometer-scale hollow tubes. Such nanotubes have remarkable properties. An extremely high aspect ratio, as well as unique mechanical and electronic properties, make single-wall nanotubes ideal for use in a vast array of applications. Carbon nanotubes typically have diameters on the order of 1 to 2 nm. As a result, the ends have a small radius of curvature. It is these characteristics, therefore, that indicate they might be excellent potential candidates for both thermionic and field emission.

  18. Magnetic correlations in ferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Bin-Zhou; Wang, Huai-Yu

    2015-09-01

    The magnetic correlations, including transverse magnetic correlation (TMC) and longitudinal magnetic correlation (LMC), of ferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes are comprehensively investigated by use of the double-time Green's function method. The influence of temperature, spin quantum number, diameter of the tube, anisotropy strength and external magnetic field to magnetic correlations are carefully calculated. An interesting result is that for the two smallest spin quantum numbers S=1, and 3/2, the LMC around the Curie point is negative, demonstrating that the neighboring spins in ferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes are antiparallel to each other along the tube axis direction in spite of the ferromagnetic exchanges between them, while it is not so along the transverse direction. This is due to the fact that the quantum spin fluctuation is believed anisotropic. The effect of the LMC is always in contrary to that of the TMC effect: if one is stronger, the other is weaker.

  19. Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Rachel M; Voy, Brynn H; Glass-Mattie, Dana F; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Saxton, Arnold; Donnel, Robert L.; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 {micro}g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs or an equal volume of vehicle control by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post-exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post-exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes in gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.

  20. Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Rachel M; Voy, Brynn H; Glass-Mattie, Dana F; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Saxton, Arnold; Donnel, Robert L.; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may be pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes in gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.

  1. Electrochemical hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotube paper.

    PubMed

    Guo, Z P; Ng, S H; Wang, J Z; Huang, Z G; Liu, H K; Too, C O; Wallace, G G

    2006-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) papers were successfully prepared by dispersing SWNTs in Triton X-100 solution, then filtered by PVDF membrane (0.22 microm pore size). The electrochemical behavior and the reversible hydrogen storage capacity of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) papers have been investigated in alkaline electrolytic solutions (6 N KOH) by cyclic voltammetry, linear micropolarization, and constant current charge/discharge measurements. The effect of thickness and the addition of carbon black on hydrogen adsorption/desorption were also investigated. It was found that the electrochemical charge-discharge mechanism occurring in SWNT paper electrodes is somewhere between that of carbon nanotubes (physical process) and that of metal hydride electrodes (chemical process), and consists of a charge-transfer reaction (Reduction/Oxidation) and a diffusion step (Diffusion).

  2. Synthesis of Large Quantities of Single-Walled Aluminogermanante Nanotube

    SciTech Connect

    Levard,C.; Rose, J.; Mision, A.; Doelsch, E.; Borschneck, D.; Olivi, L.; Dominic, C.; Grauby, O.; Woicik, J.; Bottero, J.

    2008-01-01

    A simple aqueous synthesis yielded about 100 times more structurally well-organized single-walled aluminogermanate nanotubes than previously reported 'standard' procedures. The structure analyses using XRD, IRTF, TEM, and XAS were greatly facilitated by the high concentrations available, and they ascertained the imogolite-like structure of the nanotubes. Simplicity and yield of the synthesis protocol are likely to favor commercial applications of theses materials as well as simplified syntheses of other nanophases.

  3. Thermogravimetric Analysis of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga

    2010-01-01

    An improved protocol for thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of samples of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) material has been developed to increase the degree of consistency among results so that meaningful comparisons can be made among different samples. This improved TGA protocol is suitable for incorporation into the protocol for characterization of carbon nanotube material. In most cases, TGA of carbon nanotube materials is performed in gas mixtures that contain oxygen at various concentrations. The improved protocol is summarized.

  4. Modified Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes for Reinforce Thermoplastic Polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron-COlon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    A significant improvement in the mechanical properties of the thermoplastic polyimide film was obtained by the addition of noncovalently functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Polyimide films were reinforced using pristine SWNTs and functionalized SWNTs (F-SWNTs). The tensile strengths of the polyimide films containing F-SWNTs were found to be approximately 1.4 times higher than those prepared from pristine SWNTs.

  5. Length-dependent extraction of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Kirk J; Schmidt, Daniel J; Rauwald, Urs; Shah, Kunal N; Flor, Erica L; Hauge, Robert H; Smalley, Richard E

    2005-12-01

    A two-phase liquid-liquid extraction process is presented which is capable of extracting water-soluble single-walled carbon nanotubes into an organic phase. The extraction utilizes electrostatic interactions between a common phase transfer agent and the sidewall functional groups on the nanotubes. Large length-dependent van der Waals forces for nanotubes allow the ability to control the length of nanotubes extracted into the organic phase as demonstrated by atomic force microscopy.

  6. Titanium dioxide, single-walled carbon nanotube composites

    DOEpatents

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Gonghu; Gray, Kimberly; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-07-14

    The present invention provides titanium dioxide/single-walled carbon nanotube composites (TiO.sub.2/SWCNTs), articles of manufacture, and methods of making and using such composites. In certain embodiments, the present invention provides membrane filters and ceramic articles that are coated with TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material. In other embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material to purify a sample, such as a water or air sample.

  7. Production of single-walled carbon nanotube grids

    DOEpatents

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong; Pheasant, Sean

    2013-12-03

    A method of forming a nanotube grid includes placing a plurality of catalyst nanoparticles on a grid framework, contacting the catalyst nanoparticles with a gas mixture that includes hydrogen and a carbon source in a reaction chamber, forming an activated gas from the gas mixture, heating the grid framework and activated gas, and controlling a growth time to generate a single-wall carbon nanotube array radially about the grid framework. A filter membrane may be produced by this method.

  8. Single-walled hollow nanospheres assembled from the aluminogermanate precursors.

    PubMed

    Bac, Bui Hoang; Song, Yungoo; Kim, Myung Hun; Lee, Young-Boo; Kang, Il Mo

    2009-10-14

    Ordered single-walled hollow aluminogermanate (ALGE) nanospheres (NSs) with average monodisperse diameters of 5 nm have been synthesized for the first time using simple pH control. This involved basification of the ALGE precursors (having an Al/Ge ratio of 1.33) to a pH value of 13, followed by immediate acidification to a pH value of 9.

  9. Investigation of Chirality Selection Mechanism of Single Walled Carbon Nanotube

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-13

    research involved investigation of two fundamental mechanisms of carbon nanotube (CNT) growth : chirality selection of single-walled CNT (SWCNT) and... growth improvement of CNT arrays. For the chirality selection mechanism, attempts to use thin membrane TEM samples to clearly observe CNT/catalyst...particle interfaces under optimized growth conditions was unsuccessful. Instead, in-situ CNT growth array experiments on rational design of catalyst

  10. Improvements in Production of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balzano, Leandro; Resasco, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    A continuing program of research and development has been directed toward improvement of a prior batch process in which single-walled carbon nanotubes are formed by catalytic disproportionation of carbon monoxide in a fluidized-bed reactor. The overall effect of the improvements has been to make progress toward converting the process from a batch mode to a continuous mode and to scaling of production to larger quantities. Efforts have also been made to optimize associated purification and dispersion post processes to make them effective at large scales and to investigate means of incorporating the purified products into composite materials. The ultimate purpose of the program is to enable the production of high-quality single-walled carbon nanotubes in quantities large enough and at costs low enough to foster the further development of practical applications. The fluidized bed used in this process contains mixed-metal catalyst particles. The choice of the catalyst and the operating conditions is such that the yield of single-walled carbon nanotubes, relative to all forms of carbon (including carbon fibers, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and graphite) produced in the disproportionation reaction is more than 90 weight percent. After the reaction, the nanotubes are dispersed in various solvents in preparation for end use, which typically involves blending into a plastic, ceramic, or other matrix to form a composite material. Notwithstanding the batch nature of the unmodified prior fluidized-bed process, the fluidized-bed reactor operates in a continuous mode during the process. The operation is almost entirely automated, utilizing mass flow controllers, a control computer running software specific to the process, and other equipment. Moreover, an important inherent advantage of fluidized- bed reactors in general is that solid particles can be added to and removed from fluidized beds during operation. For these reasons, the process and equipment were amenable to

  11. Angular dependent anisotropic terahertz response of vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays with spatial dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yixuan; Yiwen, E.; Xu, Xinlong; Li, Weilong; Wang, Huan; Zhu, Lipeng; Bai, Jintao; Ren, Zhaoyu; Wang, Li

    2016-12-01

    Spatial dispersion effect of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the terahertz (THz) region has significance for both theoretical and applied consideration due to the unique intrinsically anisotropic physical properties of CNTs. Herein, we report the angular dependent reflection of p-polarized THz wave from vertically aligned multi-walled CNT arrays in both experiment and theory. The spectra indicate that the reflection depends on the film thickness of vertically aligned CNTs, the incident angle, and the frequency. The calculation model is based on the spatial dispersion effect of aligned CNTs and performed with effective impedance method and the Maxwell-Garnett approximation. The results fit well with the experiment when the thickness of CNT film is thin, which reveals a coherent superposition mechanism of the CNT surface reflection and CNTs/Si interface reflection. For thick CNT films, the CNTs/Si interface response determines the reflection at small incident angles, while the CNTs surface effect dominates at large incident angles. This work investigates the spatial dispersion effect of vertically aligned CNT arrays in the THz region, and paves a way for potential anisotropic THz applications based on CNTs with oblique incidence requirements.

  12. Angular dependent anisotropic terahertz response of vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays with spatial dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yixuan; E., Yiwen; Xu, Xinlong; Li, Weilong; Wang, Huan; Zhu, Lipeng; Bai, Jintao; Ren, Zhaoyu; Wang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Spatial dispersion effect of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the terahertz (THz) region has significance for both theoretical and applied consideration due to the unique intrinsically anisotropic physical properties of CNTs. Herein, we report the angular dependent reflection of p-polarized THz wave from vertically aligned multi-walled CNT arrays in both experiment and theory. The spectra indicate that the reflection depends on the film thickness of vertically aligned CNTs, the incident angle, and the frequency. The calculation model is based on the spatial dispersion effect of aligned CNTs and performed with effective impedance method and the Maxwell-Garnett approximation. The results fit well with the experiment when the thickness of CNT film is thin, which reveals a coherent superposition mechanism of the CNT surface reflection and CNTs/Si interface reflection. For thick CNT films, the CNTs/Si interface response determines the reflection at small incident angles, while the CNTs surface effect dominates at large incident angles. This work investigates the spatial dispersion effect of vertically aligned CNT arrays in the THz region, and paves a way for potential anisotropic THz applications based on CNTs with oblique incidence requirements. PMID:27966549

  13. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Magnetic Anisotropies of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikkawa, J. M.

    2005-03-01

    Interpretation of bulk magnetization measurements of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is often complicated by the presence of ferromagnetic (FM) catalyst impurities. I will discuss how magnetic alignment of SWNTs in suspension can be used to detect FM impurities attached to nanotubes. A combination of Raman scattering and polarized absorbance is first used to determine the bare optical polarized absorbance cross-sections for light parallel and perpendicular to the nanotube axis. Next, these spectra serve as a benchmark for performing quantitative and high-resolution studies of SWNT alignment in suspensions. These studies reveal that even after chemical purification FM moments significantly enhance SWNT alignment and have an easy axis along the SWNT axis. Lowering the FM impurity content using magnetic gradient fractionation produces a concomitant reduction in the number of SWNTs whose alignment is dominated by FM anisotropy. These studies permit an estimate of the tethered FM moment size for both laser-oven and HiPCO SWNTs, and give an accurate measure of SWNT diamagnetic anisotropy. Studies of DNA-wrapped SWNTs available from DuPont show essentially no FM impurity moment. Since the latter samples can be selectively enriched with single SWNT species, we are able to compare diamagnetic responses for different wrapping vectors (m,n). Work done in collaboration with M.F. Islam, D. E. Milkie, O.N. Torrens, C. L. Kane and A. G. Yodh at PENN and M. Zheng, G.B. Onoa, T. Gierke at DuPont CR&D. Support NSF through DMR-0203378, DMR-079909 and DGE-0221664, NASA through NAG8-2172, DARPA/ONR through N00014-01-1-0831, and SENS.

  14. Current Methods for Automated Filtering of Multiple Sequence Alignments Frequently Worsen Single-Gene Phylogenetic Inference.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ge; Muffato, Matthieu; Ledergerber, Christian; Herrero, Javier; Goldman, Nick; Gil, Manuel; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2015-09-01

    Phylogenetic inference is generally performed on the basis of multiple sequence alignments (MSA). Because errors in an alignment can lead to errors in tree estimation, there is a strong interest in identifying and removing unreliable parts of the alignment. In recent years several automated filtering approaches have been proposed, but despite their popularity, a systematic and comprehensive comparison of different alignment filtering methods on real data has been lacking. Here, we extend and apply recently introduced phylogenetic tests of alignment accuracy on a large number of gene families and contrast the performance of unfiltered versus filtered alignments in the context of single-gene phylogeny reconstruction. Based on multiple genome-wide empirical and simulated data sets, we show that the trees obtained from filtered MSAs are on average worse than those obtained from unfiltered MSAs. Furthermore, alignment filtering often leads to an increase in the proportion of well-supported branches that are actually wrong. We confirm that our findings hold for a wide range of parameters and methods. Although our results suggest that light filtering (up to 20% of alignment positions) has little impact on tree accuracy and may save some computation time, contrary to widespread practice, we do not generally recommend the use of current alignment filtering methods for phylogenetic inference. By providing a way to rigorously and systematically measure the impact of filtering on alignments, the methodology set forth here will guide the development of better filtering algorithms. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Systematic Biologists.

  15. General synthesis of inorganic single-walled nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Bing; Liu, Huiling; Wang, Peng-peng; He, Jie; Wang, Xun

    2015-01-01

    The single-walled nanotube (SWNT) is an interesting nanostructure for fundamental research and potential applications. However, very few inorganic SWNTs are available to date due to the lack of efficient fabrication methods. Here we synthesize four types of SWNT: sulfide; hydroxide; phosphate; and polyoxometalate. Each type of SWNT possesses essentially uniform diameters. Detailed studies illustrate that the formation of SWNTs is initiated by the self-coiling of the corresponding ultrathin nanostructure embryo/building blocks on the base of weak interactions between them, which is not limited to specific compounds or crystal structures. The interactions between building blocks can be modulated by varying the solvents used, thus multi-walled tubes can also be obtained. Our results reveal that the generalized synthesis of inorganic SWNTs can be achieved by the self-coiling of ultrathin building blocks under the proper weak interactions. PMID:26510862

  16. General synthesis of inorganic single-walled nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Bing; Liu, Huiling; Wang, Peng-Peng; He, Jie; Wang, Xun

    2015-10-01

    The single-walled nanotube (SWNT) is an interesting nanostructure for fundamental research and potential applications. However, very few inorganic SWNTs are available to date due to the lack of efficient fabrication methods. Here we synthesize four types of SWNT: sulfide; hydroxide; phosphate; and polyoxometalate. Each type of SWNT possesses essentially uniform diameters. Detailed studies illustrate that the formation of SWNTs is initiated by the self-coiling of the corresponding ultrathin nanostructure embryo/building blocks on the base of weak interactions between them, which is not limited to specific compounds or crystal structures. The interactions between building blocks can be modulated by varying the solvents used, thus multi-walled tubes can also be obtained. Our results reveal that the generalized synthesis of inorganic SWNTs can be achieved by the self-coiling of ultrathin building blocks under the proper weak interactions.

  17. Metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes and production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Dillon, Anne C.; Heben, Michael J.; Gennett, Thomas; Parilla, Philip A.

    2007-01-09

    Metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes and production thereof. The metal-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes may be produced according to one embodiment of the invention by combining single-walled carbon nanotube precursor material and metal in a solution, and mixing the solution to incorporate at least a portion of the metal with the single-walled carbon nanotube precursor material. Other embodiments may comprise sputter deposition, evaporation, and other mixing techniques.

  18. Structure-Controlled Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) present structure-determined outstanding properties and SWNTs with a single (n, m) type are needed in many advanced applications. However, the chirality-specific growth of SWNTs is always a great challenge. Carbon nanotubes and their caps or catalysts can all act as the structural templates to guide the formation of SWNTs with a specified chirality. SWNT growth via a catalyzed chemical vapor deposition CVD process is normally more efficient and therefore of great interest. We developed a new family of catalyst, tungsten-based intermetallic nanocrystals, to grow SWNTs with specified chiral structures. Such intermetallic nanocrystals present unique structure and atomic arrangements, which are distinctly different from the normal alloy nanoparticles or simple metal nanocrystals, therefore can act as the template to grow SWNTs with designed (n, m) structures. Using W6Co7 catalysts, we realized the selective growth of (12, 6), (16, 0), (14, 4) and other chiralities. By the cooperation of thermodynamic and kinetic factors, SWNTs with high chirality purity can be obtained. . Structure-Controlled Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

  19. 40 CFR 721.10156 - Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Single-walled carbon nanotubes... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10156 Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic). (a) Chemical substance... single-walled carbon nanotubes (PMN P-08-328) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10156 - Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Single-walled carbon nanotubes... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10156 Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic). (a) Chemical substance... single-walled carbon nanotubes (PMN P-08-328) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10156 - Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Single-walled carbon nanotubes... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10156 Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic). (a) Chemical substance... single-walled carbon nanotubes (PMN P-08-328) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10156 - Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Single-walled carbon nanotubes... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10156 Single-walled carbon nanotubes (generic). (a) Chemical substance... single-walled carbon nanotubes (PMN P-08-328) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. Chemical approaches towards single-species single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cai-Hong; Zhang, Hao-Li

    2010-10-01

    Small variations in diameter and chirality could bring striking changes in the electronic and optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Therefore, SWCNTs of a specific diameter/chirality are required for many applications. In this review we provide an overview of the recent progress in various chemical approaches towards producing specific nanotubes. Issues regarding the structure of SWCNTs, characterization tools and various separation techniques are presented in this article. The benefits and limits of current chemical approaches are discussed and the perspectives of emerging strategies for achieving identical single-walled carbon nanotubes are highlighted.

  4. Raman scattering test of single-wall carbon nanotube composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjiev, V. G.; Iliev, M. N.; Arepalli, S.; Nikolaev, P.; Files, B. S.

    2001-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to infer elastic properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in composites. This letter presents strain-induced frequency shift of tangential Raman active modes of SWNTs embedded in epoxy resin subjected to bending. Epoxy curing and sample extension in the tensile strength test are found to create residual strains on the SWNT ropes. We demonstrate that specimen compression in combination with the Raman microprobe technique provides a means for determining of these strains and hence load transfer effectiveness.

  5. Raman intensity of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, R.; Takeya, T.; Kimura, T.; Dresselhaus, G.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    1998-02-01

    Using nonresonant bond-polarization theory, the Raman intensity of a single-wall carbon nanotube is calculated as a function of the polarization of light and the chirality of the carbon nanotube. The force-constant tensor for calculating phonon dispersion relations in the nanotubes is scaled from those for two-dimensional graphite. The calculated Raman spectra do not depend much on the chirality, while their frequencies clearly depend on the nanotube diameter. The polarization and sample orientation dependence of the Raman intensity shows that the symmetry of the Raman modes can be obtained by varying the direction of the nanotube axis, keeping the polarization vectors of the light fixed.

  6. Phonon Dispersion in Chiral Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Weihua; Vamivakas, Anthony Nickolas; Fang, Yan; Wang, Bolin

    The method to obtain phonon dispersion of achiral single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from 6×6 matrix proposed by Mahan and Jeon7 has been extended to chiral SWNTs. The number of calculated phonon modes of a chiral SWNT (10, 1) is much larger than that of a zigzag one (10, 0) because the number of atoms in the translational unit cell of chiral SWNT is larger than that of an achiral one even though they have relative similar radius. The possible application of our approach to other models with more phonon potential terms beyond Mahan and Jeon's model is discussed.

  7. Rectifying diodes from asymmetrically functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhong; Kondratenko, Mykola; Dao, Lê H; Perepichka, Dmitrii F

    2006-03-15

    Asymmetrically functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been prepared by a covalent reaction of an 11-mercaptoundecanol-modified Au surface with oxidized SWNT cylinders. While one end of the tubes is attached to gold substrate via ester groups, the free carboxylic substituents on the other end can be either ionized (CO2-) or esterified (CO2Et), creating a donor-acceptor asymmetric and acceptor-acceptor symmetric SWNT, respectively. Study of the SWNT monolayer conductance in Hg drop junction experiments reveals a pronounced diode-like behavior for donor-SWNT-acceptor junctions, while acceptor-SWNT-acceptor junctions are electrically symmetric.

  8. Phonon density of states of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    PubMed

    Rols; Benes; Anglaret; Sauvajol; Papanek; Fischer; Coddens; Schober; Dianoux

    2000-12-11

    The vibrational density of states of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) was obtained from inelastic neutron scattering data from 0 to 225 meV. The spectrum is similar to that of graphite above 40 meV, while intratube features are clearly observed at 22 and 36 meV. An unusual energy dependence below 10 meV is assigned to contributions from intertube modes in the 2D triangular lattice of SWNT bundles, and from intertube coupling to intratube excitations. Good agreement between experiment and a calculated density of states for the SWNT lattice is found over the entire energy range.

  9. Single Wall Nanotube Type-Specific Functionalization and Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boul, Peter; Nikolaev, Pavel; Sosa, Edward; Arepalli, Sivaram; Yowell, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    Metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes were selectively solubilized in THF and separated from semiconducting nanotubes. Once separated, the functionalized metallic tubes were de-functionalized to restore their metallic band structure. Absorption and Raman spectroscopy of the enriched samples support conclusions of the enrichment of nanotube samples by metallic type. A scalable method for enriching nanotube conductive type has been developed. Raman and UV-Vis data indicate SWCNT reaction with dodecylbenzenediazonium results in metallic enrichment. It is expected that further refinement of this techniques will lead to more dramatic separations of types and diameters.

  10. Reaction of folic acid with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Mark D.; Chorney, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    The oxygen-containing functional groups on oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are used to covalently bond folic acid molecules to the SWNTs. Infrared spectroscopy confirms intact molecular binding to the SWNTs through the formation of an amide bond between a carboxylic acid group on an SWNT and the primary amine group of folic acid. The folic acid-functionalized SWNTs are readily dispersible in water and phosphate-buffered saline, and the dispersions are stable for a period of two weeks or longer. These folic acid-functionalized SWNTs offer potential for use as biocompatible SWNTs.

  11. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes "on water".

    PubMed

    Price, B Katherine; Tour, James M

    2006-10-04

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are exfoliated and functionalized into small bundles and individuals by vigorous stirring "on water" in the presence of a substituted aniline and an oxidizing agent. This is an example of an "on water" reaction that leads to functionalized SWNTs, and it represents a "green", or environmentally friendly, process. A variety of reaction conditions were explored. The products were analyzed with Raman, UV-vis-NIR, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, atomic force and transmission electron microscopies, and thermogravimetric analysis.

  12. Superconductivity in 4 angstrom single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Z K; Zhang, L; Wang, N; Zhang, X X; Wen, G H; Li, G D; Wang, J N; Chan, C T; Sheng, P

    2001-06-29

    Investigation of the magnetic and transport properties of single-walled small-diameter carbon nanotubes embedded in a zeolite matrix revealed that at temperatures below 20 kelvin, 4 angstrom tubes exhibit superconducting behavior manifest as an anisotropic Meissner effect, with a superconducting gap and fluctuation supercurrent. The measured superconducting characteristics display smooth temperature variations owing to one-dimensional fluctuations, with a mean-field superconducting transition temperature of 15 kelvin. Statistical mechanic calculations based on the Ginzburg-Landau free-energy functional yield predictions that are in excellent agreement with the experiments.

  13. Production of carbon single wall nanotubes versus experimental parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Journet, C.; Micholet, V.; Bernier, P.; Maser, W. K.; Loiseau, A.; Lamy de la Chapelle, M.; Lefrant, S.; Lee, R.; Fischer, J. E.

    1998-08-01

    Bundles of carbon single wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are produced by sublimating selected metal mixtures and carbon in an inert atmosphere during an electric arc [1]. Various experimental parameters such as the nature and relative proportions of metallic catalysts [1] or the kind and pressure of gas can influence the quantity and geometry of bundles produced by the arc process. In this paper, we particularly focus on the role of the nature and pressure of gas used. Systematic studies have been made and we present the results obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and High Resolution Raman Spectroscopy (HRRS).

  14. Simple and efficient purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Roth, S.

    2001-11-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) produced by arc-discharge and laser ablation were purified by selective oxidation in air at 350°C and subsequent HCl treatment at 120°C. Raw soot and purified samples were analyzed with X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), chemical analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The optimized purification temperature of SWNTs in air, 350°C, has been determined from TGA curves. Repetition of the oxidation and acid treatment, larger than 95 wt.% purity of SWNTs has been obtained.

  15. Insertion kinetics of small nucleotides through single walled carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Clavier, A; Kraszewski, S; Ramseyer, C; Picaud, F

    2013-03-10

    We report molecular dynamic simulations showing that a DNA molecule constituted by five unique bases can be spontaneously inserted into single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) in normal conditions (P, T and water environment) depending on the tube radius value. The van der Waals and electrostatic interactions play a central role for the rapid insertion process. Our study shows also that the Guanine molecule inserts the fastest compared to thymine, adenine and cytosine bases, respectively. The differences of insertion time could be exploited for applications concerning for example DNA sequencing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Deformation of isolated single-wall carbon nanotubes in electrospun polymer nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Prabhakaran; Eichhorn, Stephen J.; Young, Robert J.

    2007-06-01

    Electrospinning has been used to prepare poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofibres, with diameters ranging from 1 µm down to 20 nm, that contain dispersions of isolated, well-aligned, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The nanofibres were characterized by electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Single Raman radial breathing modes (RBMs) were found for the SWNTs in the nanofibres which allowed the identification of particular nanotubes and indicated debundling/separation of the original SWNT ropes. Moreover the results of polarized Raman spectroscopy were consistent with the presence of isolated SWNTs, well-aligned along the nanofibre axes. The nanofibres were subjected to deformation and the position of the G and G' bands was followed as a function of strain. It was found that large band shifts were obtained, indicating that there was good stress transfer from the PVA matrix to the nanotubes. A band shift of up to 40 cm-1 for 1% strain was found for the G' band which is similar to that reported for the deformation of isolated nanotubes. This indicates that the Young's modulus of SWNTs is in excess of 800 GPa.

  17. Generalizing thermodynamic properties of bulk single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Kenneth R. Nanney, Warren A.; Maddux, Cassandra J.A.; Martínez, Hernán L.; Malone, Marvin A.; Coe, James V.

    2014-12-15

    The enthalpy and Gibbs free energy thermodynamical potentials of single walled carbon nanotubes were studied of all types (armchairs, zig-zags, chirals (n>m), and chiral (nsingle equation for the thermodynamical potential of ΔH{sub AB}{sup 298 K} or ΔG{sub AB}{sup 298 K} (assembly of nanotubes from atoms) versus the chiral vector indexes n and m for any given nanotube. The equations show a good level of accuracy in predicting thermodynamic potentials for practical applications.

  18. Fitting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Optical Spectra.

    PubMed

    Pfohl, Moritz; Tune, Daniel D; Graf, Arko; Zaumseil, Jana; Krupke, Ralph; Flavel, Benjamin S

    2017-03-31

    In this work, a comprehensive methodology for the fitting of single-walled carbon nanotube absorption spectra is presented. Different approaches to background subtraction, choice of line profile, and calculation of full width at half-maximum are discussed both in the context of previous literature and the contemporary understanding of carbon nanotube photophysics. The fitting is improved by the inclusion of exciton-phonon sidebands, and new techniques to improve the individualization of overlapped nanotube spectra by exploiting correlations between the first- and second-order optical transitions and the exciton-phonon sidebands are presented. Consideration of metallic nanotubes allows an analysis of the metallic/semiconducting content, and a process of constraining the fit of highly congested spectra of carbon nanotube solid films according to the spectral weights of each (n, m) species in solution is also presented, allowing for more reliable resolution of overlapping peaks into single (n, m) species contributions.

  19. Fitting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Optical Spectra

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a comprehensive methodology for the fitting of single-walled carbon nanotube absorption spectra is presented. Different approaches to background subtraction, choice of line profile, and calculation of full width at half-maximum are discussed both in the context of previous literature and the contemporary understanding of carbon nanotube photophysics. The fitting is improved by the inclusion of exciton–phonon sidebands, and new techniques to improve the individualization of overlapped nanotube spectra by exploiting correlations between the first- and second-order optical transitions and the exciton–phonon sidebands are presented. Consideration of metallic nanotubes allows an analysis of the metallic/semiconducting content, and a process of constraining the fit of highly congested spectra of carbon nanotube solid films according to the spectral weights of each (n, m) species in solution is also presented, allowing for more reliable resolution of overlapping peaks into single (n, m) species contributions. PMID:28393134

  20. Generalizing thermodynamic properties of bulk single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Kenneth R; Malone, Marvin A; Nanney, Warren A; A Maddux, Cassandra J; Coe, James V; Martínez, Hernán L

    2014-12-01

    The enthalpy and Gibbs free energy thermodynamical potentials of single walled carbon nanotubes were studied of all types (armchairs, zig-zags, chirals (n>m), and chiral (nsingle equation for the thermodynamical potential of [Formula: see text] or [Formula: see text] (assembly of nanotubes from atoms) versus the chiral vector indexes n and m for any given nanotube. The equations show a good level of accuracy in predicting thermodynamic potentials for practical applications.

  1. Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns for Energy Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhichao; Han, Shuang; Wang, Chao; Li, Jianping; Xu, Guobao

    2015-01-01

    With the growth of the global economy and population, the demand for energy is increasing sharply. The development of environmentally a benign and reliable energy supply is very important and urgent. Single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), which have a horn-shaped tip at the top of single-walled nanotube, have emerged as exceptionally promising nanomaterials due to their unique physical and chemical properties since 1999. The high purity and thermal stability, combined with microporosity and mesoporosity, high surface area, internal pore accessibility, and multiform functionalization make SWCNHs promising candidates in many applications, such as environment restoration, gas storage, catalyst support or catalyst, electrochemical biosensors, drug carrier systems, magnetic resonance analysis and so on. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of SWCNHs in energy applications, including energy conversion and storage. The commonly adopted method to access SWCNHs, their structural modifications, and their basic properties are included, and the emphasis is on their application in different devices such as fuel cells, dye-sensitized solar cells, supercapacitors, Li-ion batteries, Li-S batteries, hydrogen storage, biofuel cells and so forth. Finally, a perspective on SWCNHs’ application in energy is presented. PMID:28347092

  2. Photophysics of covalently functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes with verteporfin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staicu, Angela; Smarandache, Adriana; Pascu, Alexandru; Pascu, Mihail Lucian

    2017-09-01

    Covalently functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) with the photosensitizer verteporfin (VP) were synthesized and studied. Photophysical properties of the obtained compounds like optical absorption, laser-induced fluorescence and generated singlet oxygen were investigated. In order to highlight the features of the conjugated compound, its photophysical characteristics were compared with those of the mixtures of the initial components. The optical absorption data evidenced a compound that combines features of the primary SWCNTs and VP. This is the also the case of the laser induced fluorescence of the synthesized product. Moreover, fluorescence quantum yield (Φf) of the compound (Φf = 2.4%) is smaller than for the mixture of SWCNT and VP in (Φf = 3.2%). The behavior is expected, because linked VP (carrying the fluorescent moiety) transfers easier a part of its excitation energy to the SWCNT in the covalent structure. Relative to the quantum yield of singlet oxygen generation (ΦΔ) by Methylene Blue, it was found that the ΦΔ for the conjugated VP-SWCNT is 51% while for the mixture ΦΔ is 23%. The results indicate covalently functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes with verteporfin as potential compounds of interest in targeted drug delivery and photodynamic therapy.

  3. One-step direct transfer of pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes for functional nanoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chung Chiang; Liu, Chang Hua; Zhong, Zhaohui

    2010-03-10

    We report a one-step direct transfer technique for the fabrication of functional nanoelectronic devices using pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Suspended SWNTs grown by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method are aligned and directly transferred onto prepatterned device electrodes at ambient temperature. Using this technique, we successfully fabricated SWNT electromechanical resonators with gate-tunable resonance frequencies. A fully suspended SWNT p-n diode has also been demonstrated with the diode ideality factor equal to 1. Our method eliminates the organic residues on SWNTs resulting from conventional lithography and solution processing. The results open up opportunities for the fundamental study of electron transport physics in ultraclean SWNTs and for room temperature fabrication of novel functional devices based on pristine SWNTs.

  4. Improved field emission stability from single-walled carbon nanotubes chemically attached to silicon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate the simple fabrication of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field emission electrode which shows excellent field emission characteristics and remarkable field emission stability without requiring posttreatment. Chemically functionalized SWCNTs were chemically attached to a silicon substrate. The chemical attachment led to vertical alignment of SWCNTs on the surface. Field emission sweeps and Fowler-Nordheim plots showed that the Si-SWCNT electrodes field emit with a low turn-on electric field of 1.5 V μm−1 and high electric field enhancement factor of 3,965. The Si-SWCNT electrodes were shown to maintain a current density of >740 μA cm−2 for 15 h with negligible change in applied voltage. The results indicate that adhesion strength between the SWCNTs and substrate is a much greater factor in field emission stability than previously reported. PMID:22853557

  5. Growth of single wall carbon nanotubes using PECVD technique: An efficient chemiresistor gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lone, Mohd Yaseen; Kumar, Avshish; Husain, Samina; Zulfequar, M.; Harsh; Husain, Mushahid

    2017-03-01

    In this work, the uniform and vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been grown on Iron (Fe) deposited Silicon (Si) substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique at very low temperature of 550 °C. The as-grown samples of SWCNTS were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and Raman spectrometer. SWCNT based chemiresistor gas sensing device was fabricated by making the proper gold contacts on the as-grown SWCNTs. The electrical conductance and sensor response of grown SWCNTs have been investigated. The fabricated SWCNT sensor was exposed to ammonia (NH3) gas at 200 ppm in a self assembled apparatus. The sensor response was measured at room temperature which was discussed in terms of adsorption of NH3 gas molecules on the surface of SWCNTs. The achieved results are used to develope a miniaturized gas sensor device for monitoring and control of environment pollutants.

  6. High-sensitivity bolometers from self-oriented single-walled carbon nanotube composites.

    PubMed

    Vera-Reveles, Gustavo; Simmons, Trevor J; Bravo-Sánchez, Mariela; Vidal, M A; Navarro-Contreras, Hugo; González, Francisco J

    2011-08-01

    In this work, films of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes were thermally and electrically characterized in order to determine the bolometric performance. An average thermal time constant of τ = 420 μs along with a temperature coefficient of resistance of TCR = -2.94% K(-1) were obtained. The maximum voltage responsivity and detectivity obtained were R(V) =230 V/W and D* = 1.22 × 10(8) cm Hz(1/2)/W, respectively. These values are higher than the maximum voltage responsivity (150 V/W) and maximum temperature coefficient of resistance (1.0% K(-1)) previously reported for carbon nanotube films at room temperature. The maximum detectivity was obtained at a frequency of operation of 1.25 kHz.

  7. Improved field emission stability from single-walled carbon nanotubes chemically attached to silicon.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Cameron J; Fahy, Adam; Barr, Matthew; Dastoor, Paul C; Shapter, Joseph G

    2012-08-01

    Here, we demonstrate the simple fabrication of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field emission electrode which shows excellent field emission characteristics and remarkable field emission stability without requiring posttreatment. Chemically functionalized SWCNTs were chemically attached to a silicon substrate. The chemical attachment led to vertical alignment of SWCNTs on the surface. Field emission sweeps and Fowler-Nordheim plots showed that the Si-SWCNT electrodes field emit with a low turn-on electric field of 1.5 V μm-1 and high electric field enhancement factor of 3,965. The Si-SWCNT electrodes were shown to maintain a current density of >740 μA cm-2 for 15 h with negligible change in applied voltage. The results indicate that adhesion strength between the SWCNTs and substrate is a much greater factor in field emission stability than previously reported.

  8. Investigation of Aromatic/Aliphatic Polyimides as Dispersants for Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delozier, Donavon M.; Watson, Kent A.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Clancy, Thomas C.; Connell, John W.

    2006-01-01

    Novel aromatic/aliphatic polyimides were prepared from 2,7-diamino-9,9'- dioctylfluorene (AFDA) and aromatic dianhydrides. Upon investigating the effectiveness of these polyimides for dispersing single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in solution, three were discovered to disperse SWNTs in N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc). Two of these polyimides, one from 3,3',4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride (ODPA) and one from symmetric 3,3',4,4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride (s-BPDA), were used to prepare nanocomposites. Homogeneous polyimide/SWNT suspensions from both polymers were used in the preparation of films and fibers containing up to 1 wt% SWNTs. The samples were thermally treated to remove residual solvent and the films were characterized for SWNT dispersion by optical and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM). Electrical and mechanical properties of the films were also determined. Electrospun fibers were examined by HRSEM to characterize SWNT alignment and orientation.

  9. Reorientation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in negative anisotropy liquid crystals by an electric field

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Amanda; Vergaz, Ricardo; Algorri, José F; Zito, Gianluigi; Cacace, Teresa; Marino, Antigone; Otón, José M

    2016-01-01

    Summary Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are anisotropic nanoparticles that can cause modifications in the electrical and electro-optical properties of liquid crystals. The control of the SWCNT concentration, distribution and reorientation in such self-organized fluids allows for the possibility of tuning the liquid crystal properties. The alignment and reorientation of CNTs are studied in a system where the liquid crystal orientation effect has been isolated. Complementary studies including Raman spectroscopy, microscopic inspection and impedance studies were carried out. The results reveal an ordered reorientation of the CNTs induced by an electric field, which does not alter the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy suggests a nonnegligible anchoring force between the CNTs and the liquid crystal molecules. PMID:27547599

  10. Fabrication and performance of contamination free individual single-walled carbon nanotube optical devices.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuxiu; Cheng, Rong; Liu, Jianqiang; Li, Tie

    2014-06-01

    Contamination free individual single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) optical devices are fabricated using a hybrid method in the purpose of increase sensitivity as well as further understanding the sensing mechanism. The devices were tested in vacuum to avoid contamination. Three typical devices are discussed comparatively. Under infrared lamp illumination, photovoltaic and photoconductive properties are revealed in device A and B respectively, while device C shows no detectable signal. The photoresponse of device B reaches 108% at 78 K, much larger than that of horizontally aligned or network carbon nanotube devices, indicating priority of the individual nanotube device structure. Interestingly, the temperature characteristics of device A and B are just the opposite. The individual SWCNT devices hold promise in high performance and low cost optical sensors as well as nano-scale solar cells.

  11. Vertically oriented single-wall carbon nanotube/enzyme on silicon as biosensor electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yubing; Iqbal, Zafar

    2005-06-01

    Thin films of vertically aligned individual single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were deposited on silicon using a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Oriented SWNT growth was achieved by employing two methods of catalyst precursor self-assembly followed by ethanol CVD. Using the silicon substrate as the working electrode in an electrochemical cell and the enzyme β-NAD (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) synthetase dissolved in a buffered electrolyte solution, the enzyme was attached at the nanotube ends. This was shown using scanning electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Enzyme immobilization on the 1 nm to 2 nm diameter tube ends of the individual SWNTs will allow for dense packing of the enzyme and utilization of the electrode as an enzymatic sensor in a biofuel cell configuration.

  12. Quantitative thermal imaging of single-walled carbon nanotube devices by scanning Joule expansion microscopy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xu; Grosse, Kyle L; Song, Jizhou; Lu, Chaofeng; Dunham, Simon; Du, Frank; Islam, Ahmad E; Li, Yuhang; Zhang, Yihui; Pop, Eric; Huang, Yonggang; King, William P; Rogers, John A

    2012-11-27

    Electrical generation of heat in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and subsequent thermal transport into the surroundings can critically affect the design, operation, and reliability of electronic and optoelectronic devices based on these materials. Here we investigate such heat generation and transport characteristics in perfectly aligned, horizontal arrays of SWNTs integrated into transistor structures. We present quantitative assessments of local thermometry at individual SWNTs in these arrays, evaluated using scanning Joule expansion microscopy. Measurements at different applied voltages reveal electronic behaviors, including metallic and semiconducting responses, spatial variations in diameter or chirality, and localized defect sites. Analytical models, validated by measurements performed on different device structures at various conditions, enable accurate, quantitative extraction of temperature distributions at the level of individual SWNTs. Using current equipment, the spatial resolution and temperature precision are as good as ∼100 nm and ∼0.7 K, respectively.

  13. Haldane State Formed by Oxygen Molecules Encapsulated in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Masayuki; Ikeda, Masami; Kida, Takanori; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Tadera, Shin; Kyakuno, Haruka; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Maniwa, Yutaka; Okunishi, Kouichi

    2014-11-01

    We report on the results of X-ray diffraction (XRD), magnetic susceptibility, and high-field magnetization measurements of oxygen molecules, which are unique magnetic homonuclear diatomic molecules with spin-1, encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with diameters of about 0.8 nm. Antiferromagnetic interactions between neighboring oxygen molecules are expected in SWCNTs, resulting in the formation of a spin-1 one-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnet, known as a Haldane magnet. The XRD pattern can be predicted accurately by considering the expected oxygen molecule alignment. The temperature evolution of the magnetic susceptibility and the high-field magnetization curve are typical of those for a Haldane magnet with spin-1. The results indicate that the Haldane state has been realized in a nanospaced material for the first time. This provides an alternative to the conventional condensed matter approach to forming quantum spin systems.

  14. Structural stability of transparent conducting films assembled from length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Harris; G. R. S. Iyer; D. O. Simien; J. A. Fagan; J. Y. Huh; J. Y. Chung; S. D. Hudson; J. Obrzut; J. F. Douglas; C. M. Stafford; E. K. Hobbie

    2011-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films show significant promise for transparent electronics applications that demand mechanical flexibility, but durability remains an outstanding issue. In this work, thin membranes of length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are uniaxially and isotropically compressed by depositing them on prestrained polymer substrates. Upon release of the strain, the topography, microstructure, and conductivity of the films are characterized using a combination of optical/fluorescence microscopy, light scattering, force microscopy, electron microscopy, and impedance spectroscopy. Above a critical surface mass density, films assembled from nanotubes of well-defined length exhibit a strongly nonlinear mechanical response. The measured strain dependence reveals a dramatic softening that occurs through an alignment of the SWCNTs normal to the direction of prestrain, which at small strains is also apparent as an anisotropic increase in sheet resistance along the same direction. At higher strains, the membrane conductivities increase due to a compression-induced restoration of conductive pathways. Our measurements reveal the fundamental mode of elasto-plastic deformation in these films and suggest how it might be suppressed.

  15. Single wall carbon nanotubes: Separation and applications to biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Nyon

    Single wall carbon nanotubes uniquely exhibit one-dimensional quantum confined properties by being either semiconducting (sem-) or metallic (met-) depending on their atomic arrangements. The stochastic nature of SWNT growth renders met-:sem- ratio being 1:2 and diameter range being distributed in 0.4-2nm with a close-packed bundle configuration. For many high-performance devices using SWNTs, acquiring well-separated and/or isolated single-diameter, metallicity and/or chirality nanotubes is greatly in demand. Recently, the bulk separation and/or enrichment of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) according to type (or otherwise termed "metallicity") and diameter (dt) has become possible. This thesis presents a route to probe mechanisms in diameter and metallicity dependent separation of SWNTs. A systematic analysis tool, that enables the quantitative examination of resonance Raman spectra, is established from nanotube samples that have been separated according to metallicity and d t via an octadecylamine mediated protocol. This protocol uses the relative changes in the integrated intensities of the radial-breathing mode region for the quantitative evaluation. By further establishing the physicochemical properties of charge-stabilized SWNT dispersions in polar aprotic media (i.e. N,N-dimethylformide) a more detailed description of the underlying separation mechanism is given. Here, I use resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) as a tool to probe SWNT redox chemistry. The Gibbs free energy, modeled by calculating the charge-loss from the (n,m)-dependent integrated density of states across the corresponding jump in the redox potential, is utilized to support the separation mechanism. Additionally, the evaluation of SWNT forest platforms for amperometric protein immunoassays is presented. Horseradish peroxidase is used as the label and the sensing signals are acquired from electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide. Specific studies on human serum albumin and prostate

  16. Fabrication of Single, Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes in 3D Nanoscale Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Megerian, Krikor G.; Von Allmen, Paul A.; Baron, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and high-throughput manufacturing techniques for integrating single, aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into novel 3D nanoscale architectures have been developed. First, the PECVD growth technique ensures excellent alignment of the tubes, since the tubes align in the direction of the electric field in the plasma as they are growing. Second, the tubes generated with this technique are all metallic, so their chirality is predetermined, which is important for electronic applications. Third, a wafer-scale manufacturing process was developed that is high-throughput and low-cost, and yet enables the integration of just single, aligned tubes with nanoscale 3D architectures with unprecedented placement accuracy and does not rely on e-beam lithography. Such techniques should lend themselves to the integration of PECVD grown tubes for applications ranging from interconnects, nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), sensors, bioprobes, or other 3D electronic devices. Chemically amplified polyhydroxystyrene-resin-based deep UV resists were used in conjunction with excimer laser-based (lambda = 248 nm) step-and-repeat lithography to form Ni catalyst dots = 300 nm in diameter that nucleated single, vertically aligned tubes with high yield using dc PECVD growth. This is the first time such chemically amplified resists have been used, resulting in the nucleation of single, vertically aligned tubes. In addition, novel 3D nanoscale architectures have been created using topdown techniques that integrate single, vertically aligned tubes. These were enabled by implementing techniques that use deep-UV chemically amplified resists for small-feature-size resolution; optical lithography units that allow unprecedented control over layer-to-layer registration; and ICP (inductively coupled plasma) etching techniques that result in near-vertical, high-aspect-ratio, 3D nanoscale architectures, in conjunction with the use of materials that are

  17. Reconstruction from a single diffraction pattern of azimuthally projected electron density of molecules aligned parallel to a single axis.

    PubMed

    Saldin, D K; Shneerson, V L; Starodub, D; Spence, J C H

    2010-01-01

    Diffraction from the individual molecules of a molecular beam, aligned parallel to a single axis by a strong electric field or other means, has been proposed as a means of structure determination of individual molecules. As in fiber diffraction, all the information extractable is contained in a diffraction pattern from incidence of the diffracting beam normal to the molecular alignment axis. The limited size of the object results in continuous diffraction patterns characterized by neither Bragg spots nor layer lines. Equations relating the scattered amplitudes to the molecular electron density may be conveniently formulated in terms of cylindrical harmonics. For simulated diffraction patterns from short C nanotubes aligned along their axes, iterative solution of the equation for the zeroth-order cylindrical harmonic and its inverse with appropriate constraints in real and reciprocal space enables the phasing of the measured amplitudes, and hence a reconstruction of the azimuthal projection of the molecule.

  18. Sequence-independent helical wrapping of single-walled carbon nanotubes by long genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Gigliotti, Brittany; Sakizzie, Brenda; Bethune, Donald S; Shelby, Robert M; Cha, Jennifer N

    2006-02-01

    Because of their nanometer sizes and molecular recognition capabilities, biological systems have garnered much attention as vehicles for the directed assembly of nanoscale materials.(1-6) One of the greatest challenges of this research has been to successfully interface biological systems with electronic materials, such as semiconductors and metals. As a means to address some of these issues, Sarikaya, Belcher, and others have used a combinatorial technique called phage display(7-9) to discover new families of peptides that showed binding affinities to various substrates. More recently, Zheng and co-workers used combinatorial DNA libraries to isolate short DNA oligomers (30-90 bases) that could disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) in water.(10) Through a systematic analysis, they found that short oligonucleotides having repeating sequences of gunanines and thymines (dGdT)(n) could wrap in a helical manner around a CNT with periodic pitch.(11) Although helix formation around SWCNTs having regular pitches is an effective method for dispersing and separating CNTs, the need for specific repeating sequences limits use to non-natural DNA that must be synthesized with optimal lengths of less than 150 bases. In contrast, we demonstrate here that long genomic single-stranded DNA (>100 bases) of a completely random sequence of bases can be used to disperse CNTs efficiently through the single-stranded DNA's (ssDNA) ability to form tight helices around the CNTs with distinct periodic pitches. Although this process occurs irrespective of the DNA sequence, we show that this process is highly dependent on the removal of complementary strands. We also demonstrate that although the helix pitch-to-pitch distances remain constant down the length of a single CNT, the distances are variable from one DNA-CNT to another. Finally, we report initial work that shows that methods developed to align long dsDNA can be applied in a similar fashion to produce highly dense arrays of

  19. Potassium-Decorated, Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, A. M.; Richter, E.; Menon, M.; Subbaswamy, K. R.; Eklund, P. C.; Thess, A.; Smalley, R. E.

    1997-03-01

    Crystalline ropes of single-wall carbon nanotubes have been reacted in sealed glass tubes with potassium vapor and Raman scattering has been used to monitor the vibrational modes as a function of reaction time. An overall broadening and downshifting of the Raman bands is observed. For example, huge downshifts (40 cm-1) in the high frequency tangential modes observed near 1593 cm-1 in the pristine tubes are detected. These downshifts are attributed to significant charge transfer of K 4s electrons into antibonding pz states of the nanotube which should expand the tube diameter and soften the lattice. Presumably, the potassium ions are chemisorbed onto the walls of the nanotubes, rather than inside the nanotube, although no structural information to support this model has yet been collected. Theoretical results on electron doped armchair symmetry nanotubes using the Generalized Tight Binding Molecular Dynamics model will also be presented to help explain experimental results. The Kentucky group was supported by the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and NSF Grant No. OSR-94-52895 and DOE Contract No. DE-F22-90PC90029. The work at Rice was supported by the Office of Naval Research Contract N0014-91-J1794.

  20. MINIMAL INFLAMMOGENICITY OF PRISTINE SINGLE-WALL CARBON NANOTUBES

    PubMed Central

    TOYOKUNI, SHINYA; JIANG, LI; KITAURA, RYO; SHINOHARA, HISANORI

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a novel synthetic material comprising only carbon atoms. Based on its rigidity, its electrical and heat conductivity and its applicability to surface manufacturing, this material is expected to have numerous applications in industry. However, due to the material’s dimensional similarity to asbestos fibers, its carcinogenicity was hypothesized during the last decade, and indeed, we have shown that multi-wall CNTs (MWCNTs) of 50 nm in diameter are potently carcinogenic to mesothelial cells after intraperitoneal injection. Additionally, we suggested that inflammogenicity after intraperitoneal injection can predict mesothelial carcinogenesis. However, few data have been published on the intraperitoneal inflammogenicity of single-wall CNTs (SWCNTs). Here, we conducted a series of studies on SWCNTs using both intraperitoneal injection into rats and MeT5A mesothelial cells. Intraperitoneal injection of 10 mg SWCNTs caused no remarkable inflammation in the abdominal cavity, and the exposure of MeT5A cells to up to 25 μg/cm2 SWCNTs did not alter proliferation. MWCNTs of 50 nm in diameter were used as a positive control, and tangled MWCNTs of 15 nm in diameter were used as a negative control. The results suggest that SWCNTs are a low-risk material with respect to mesothelial carcinogenesis. PMID:25797984

  1. Charging and defects in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Khoi Thi

    2011-12-01

    Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been one of the most intensively studied materials. Because of their single-atomic-layer structure, SWCNTs are extremely sensitive to environmental interactions, in which charge transfer and defect formation are the most notable effects. Among a number of microscopic and spectroscopic methods, Raman spectroscopy is a widely used technique to characterize physics and chemistry of CNTs. By utilizing simultaneous Raman and electron transport measurements along with polymer electrolyte gating, this dissertation focuses on studying charging and defects in SWCNTs at single nanotube level and in single layer graphene, the building block of SWCNTs. By controllably charging metallic SWCNTs (m-CNTs), the intrinsic nature of the broad and asymmetric Fano lineshape in Raman G band of m-CNTs was first time evidenced. The observation that Fano component is most broadened and downshifted when Fermi level is close to the Dirac point (DP) reveals its origin as the consequence of coupling of phonon to vertical electronic transitions. Furthermore, we have systematically introduced covalent defects to m-CNTs to study how phonon softening and electrical characteristics are affected by disorders. In addition to decreasing electrical conductance with increasing on/off current ratio eventually leading to semiconducting behavior, adding covalent defects reduces the degree of softening and broadening of longitudinal optical (LO) phonon mode but enhances the softening of transverse optical (TO) mode of the G-band near the DP. Charging and defect effects in semiconducting SWCNTs and single layer graphene, a closely related material to SWCNTs, have also been discussed.

  2. Investigation of Hydrogen Adsorption on Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Sang-Hun; Jeong, Seong Hun; Lee, Soon-Bo; Boo, Jin-Hyo

    We have investigated adsorption and desorption condition of atomic hydrogen on single-walled nanotubes (SWCNTs) using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The SWCNTs were made by the high pressure carbon monoxide (HiPCO) method. In our results, we observe from UPS data absorptive states reduce with increasing hydrogen doses and a new peak is developed near 8.6 eV and other points. But this peak is gradually diminished with pumping time. The TDS data show two characteristic peaks at 640 and 790K. By comparing with density functional calculations, we propose these peaks to be related to the presence of atomic hydrogen. Therefore, we can know that there are two adsorption sites on SWCNTs. Also we observed physisorption and chemisorption site by pumping time. We note that the UPS data are fully recoverable after hydrogen desorption at 1200K.

  3. Metallic single-walled carbon nanotube for ionized radiation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banadaki, Yaser M.; Srivastava, Ashok; Sharifi, Safura

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we have explored the feasibility of a metallic single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as a radiation detector. The effect of SWCNTs' exposure to different ion irradiations is considered with the displacement damage dose (DDD) methodology. The analytical model of the irradiated resistance of metallic SWCNT has been developed and verified by the experimental data for increasing DDD from 1012 MeV/g to 1017 MeV/g. It has been found that the resistance variation of SWCNT by increasing DDD can be significant depending on the length and diameter of SWCNT, such that the DDD as low as 1012 (MeV/g) can be detected using the SWCNT with 1cm length and 5nm diameter. Increasing the length and diameter of SWCNT can result in both the higher radiation sensitivity of resistance and the extension of detection range to lower DDD.

  4. The electrochemical properties of bundles of single-walled nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Haridoss, P.; Uribe, F.A.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors studied electrochemical properties of single-walled fullerene nanotube bundles. The materials exhibited a highly anisotropic conductivity. Electrochemical cycling in solutions of alkyl ammonium salts in propylene carbonate revealed that the nanotubes are stable to at least {+-}1.5 V and have a fairly high accessible surface area. Double-layer charging currents of approximately 30 farads per gram were observed. This is on the same order of magnitude, though somewhat lower, than state-of-the-art values for ultra-capacitor materials. Electrochemical insertion of lithium was attempted. Though several features were observed in a slow cyclic voltammetric scan, these features were not reversible, indicating little reversible insertion. Several possible reasons for this behavior are discussed.

  5. Laser ablation process for single-walled carbon nanotube production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2004-01-01

    Different types of lasers are now routinely used to prepare single-walled carbon nanotubes. The original method developed by researchers at Rice University used a "double-pulse laser oven" process. Several researchers have used variations of the lasers to include one-laser pulse (green or infrared), different pulse widths (ns to micros as well as continuous wave), and different laser wavelengths (e.g., CO2, or free electron lasers in the near to far infrared). Some of these variations are tried with different combinations and concentrations of metal catalysts, buffer gases (e.g., helium), oven temperatures, flow conditions, and even different porosities of the graphite targets. This article is an attempt to cover all these variations and their relative merits. Possible growth mechanisms under these different conditions will also be discussed.

  6. Shaping single walled nanotubes with an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zobelli, A.; Gloter, A.; Colliex, C.; Ewels, C. P.

    2008-01-15

    We show that electron irradiation in a dedicated scanning transmission microscope can be used as a nano-electron-lithography technique allowing the controlled reshaping of single walled carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. The required irradiation conditions have been optimized on the basis of total knock-on cross sections calculated within density functional based methods. It is then possible to induce morphological modifications, such as a local change of the tube chirality, by sequentially removing several tens of atoms with a nanometrical spatial resolution. We show that electron beam heating effects are limited. Thus, electron beam induced vacancy migration and nucleation might be excluded. These irradiation techniques could open new opportunities for nanoengineering a large variety of nanostructured materials.

  7. Radiation Protection Using Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M.; Lu, Meng; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca; Leonard, Ashley; Doyle, Condell Dewayne; Kosynkin, Dimitry V.; Price, Brandi Katherine

    2011-01-01

    This invention is a means of radiation protection, or cellular oxidative stress mitigation, via a sequence of quenching radical species using nano-engineered scaffolds, specifically single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and their derivatives. The material can be used as a means of radiation protection by reducing the number of free radicals within, or nearby, organelles, cells, tissue, organs, or living organisms, thereby reducing the risk of damage to DNA and other cellular components (i.e., RNA, mitochondria, membranes, etc.) that can lead to chronic and/or acute pathologies, including but not limited to cancer, cardiovascular disease, immuno-suppression, and disorders of the central nervous system. In addition, this innovation could be used as a prophylactic or antidote for accidental radiation exposure, during high-altitude or space travel where exposure to radiation is anticipated, or to protect from exposure from deliberate terrorist or wartime use of radiation- containing weapons.

  8. Single Wall Carbon Nanotube-polymer Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Landi, Brian J.; Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer solar cells has been conducted towards developing alternative lightweight, flexible devices for space power applications. Photovoltaic devices were constructed with regioregular poly(3-octylthiophene)-(P3OT) and purified, >95% w/w, laser-generated SWNTs. The P3OT composites were deposited on ITO-coated polyethylene terapthalate (PET) and I-V characterization was performed under simulated AM0 illumination. Fabricated devices for the 1.0% w/w SWNT-P3OT composites showed a photoresponse with an open-circuit voltage (V(sub oc)) of 0.98 V and a short-circuit current density (I(sub sc)) of 0.12 mA/sq cm. Optimization of carrier transport within these novel photovoltaic systems is proposed, specifically development of nanostructure-SWNT complexes to enhance exciton dissociation.

  9. Phonon sidebands of photoluminescence in single wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guili; Liang, Qifeng; Jia, Yonglei; Dong, Jinming

    2010-01-01

    The multiphonon-assisted photoluminescence (PL) of the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been studied by solving the Schrödinger equation, showing a set of phonon sidebands, both the Stokes and anti-Stokes lines, which are induced by the longitudinal optical phonon and radial breathing mode phonon. All the calculated results are in a good agreement with the recent experimental PL spectra of the SWNTs [F. Plentz, H. B. Ribeiro, A. Jorio, M. S. Strano, and M. A. Pimenta, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 247401 (2005)] and J. Lefebvre and P. Finnie, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 167406 (2007)]. In addition, it is very interesting to find in the calculated PL several additional phonon sidebands with rather weak intensities, which are caused by the exciton's coupling with two kinds of phonons, and expected to be observed in future experiments.

  10. Supramolecular functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Baris

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess extraordinary mechanical strength, thermal and electrical conductivity. These properties make them very attractive in many applications in the fields of nanotechnology, electronics, and optics. However, most of the SWNT syntheses methods result in different types of chiralities, which determine the electronic and optical properties of the sample. Thus, it is important to selectively solubilize and purify carbon nanotubes if one wants to use them in technological applications. Selective separation of SWNTs by chirality has been the research focus of many scientists. Here, a comparative study for the solubility of SWNTs with polyaromatic hydrocarbons and conjugated polymers was conducted. PEGylated corannulene derivative has been shown to disperse more metallic nanotubes than the commonly used sodium dodecyl sulfate dispersant. Phthalimide containing conjugated materials were found to be effective in solubilizing SWNTs. In addition, the structural and mechanistic implications for high solubility power were discussed for all dispersants.

  11. Photoluminescence Brightening of Isolated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    DOE PAGES

    Hou, Zhentao; Krauss, Todd D.

    2017-09-22

    Addition of dithiothreitol (DTT) to a suspension consisting of either DNA or sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) caused significant photoluminescence (PL) brightening from the SWCNTs, while PL quenching to different extents was observed for other surfactant-SWCNT suspensions. PL lifetime studies with high temporal resolution show that addition of DTT mitigates non-radiative decay processes, but also surprisingly increases the radiative decay rate for DNA- and SDS-SWCNTs. There are completely opposite effects on the decay rates found for the other surfactant-SWCNTs and show PL quenching. Here, we propose that the PL brightening results from a surfactant reorganization uponmore » DTT addition. TOC« less

  12. Single Wall Carbon Nano Tube Films and Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekumar, T. V.; Kumar, Satish; Ericson, Lars M.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2002-03-01

    Purified single wall carbon nano tubes (SWNTs) produced from the high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPCO) process have been dissolved /dispersed in oleum. These solutions /dispersions were optically homogeneous and have been used to form stand-alone SWNT films. The washed, dried, and heat-treated films are isotropic. The scanning electron micrographs of the film surface shows that the nanotube ropes (or fibrils) of about 20 nm diameters are arranged just like macroscopic fibers in a non-woven fabric. Polarized Raman spectroscopy of the SWNT film confirms the isotropic nature of these films. The films are being characterized for their thermal, mechanical as well electrical properties. Thin nano tube coatings, including optically transparent coatings, have also been made on a variety of substrates such as glass, polyethylene, polystyrene, polypropylene, silicon wafer, as well as stainless steel.

  13. Laser ablation process for single-walled carbon nanotube production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2004-01-01

    Different types of lasers are now routinely used to prepare single-walled carbon nanotubes. The original method developed by researchers at Rice University used a "double-pulse laser oven" process. Several researchers have used variations of the lasers to include one-laser pulse (green or infrared), different pulse widths (ns to micros as well as continuous wave), and different laser wavelengths (e.g., CO2, or free electron lasers in the near to far infrared). Some of these variations are tried with different combinations and concentrations of metal catalysts, buffer gases (e.g., helium), oven temperatures, flow conditions, and even different porosities of the graphite targets. This article is an attempt to cover all these variations and their relative merits. Possible growth mechanisms under these different conditions will also be discussed.

  14. Characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes for environmental implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Agnihotri, S.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Rood, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Adsorption capacities of N2 and various organic vapors (methyl-ethyl ketone (MEK), toluene, and cyclohexane) on select electric-arc and HiPco produced single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) were measured at 77 and 298 K, respectively. The amount of N2 adsorbed on a SWNT sample depended on the sample purity, methodology, and on the sample age. Adsorption capacities of organic vapors (100-1000 ppm vol) on SWNT in humid conditions were much higher than those for microporous activated carbons. These results established a foundation for additional studies related to potential environmental applications of SWNT. The MEK adsorption capacities of samples EA95 and CVD80 and mesoporous tire-derived activated carbon in humid conditions were lower than in dry conditions. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the AIChE Annual Meeting (Austin, TX 11/7-12/2004).

  15. Molecular Imaging with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hao; Gao, Ting; Cai, Weibo

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based molecular imaging has emerged as an interdisciplinary field which involves physics, chemistry, engineering, biology, and medicine. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have unique properties which make them suitable for applications in a variety of imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance, near-infrared fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, photoacoustic tomography, and radionuclide-based imaging. In this review, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art of SWCNTs in molecular imaging applications. Multifunctionality is the key advantage of nanoparticles over traditional approaches. Targeting ligands, imaging labels, therapeutic drugs, and many other agents can all be integrated into the nanoparticle to allow for targeted molecular imaging and molecular therapy by encompassing many biological and biophysical barriers. A multifunctional, SWCNT-based nanoplatform holds great potential for clinical applications in the future. PMID:21754949

  16. Chemical Detection with a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, E. S.; Perkins, F. K.; Houser, E. J.; Badescu, S. C.; Reinecke, T. L.

    2005-03-01

    We show that the capacitance of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is highly sensitive to a broad class of chemical vapors and that this transduction mechanism can form the basis for a fast, low-power sorption-based chemical sensor. In the presence of a dilute chemical vapor, molecular adsorbates are polarized by the fringing electric fields radiating from the surface of a SWNT electrode, which causes an increase in its capacitance. We use this effect to construct a high-performance chemical sensor by thinly coating the SWNTs with chemoselective materials that provide a large, class-specific gain to the capacitance response. Such SWNT chemicapacitors are fast, highly sensitive, and completely reversible.

  17. Fluorescent single walled nanotube/silica composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Dattelbaum, Andrew M.; Gupta, Gautam; Duque, Juan G.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; DeFriend Obrey, Kimberly A.

    2013-03-12

    Fluorescent composites of surfactant-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared by exposing suspensions of surfactant-wrapped carbon nanotubes to tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) vapor. Sodium deoxycholate (DOC) and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) were the surfactants. No loss in emission intensity was observed when the suspension of DOC-wrapped SWNTs were exposed to the TMOS vapors, but about a 50% decrease in the emission signal was observed from the SDS-wrapped SWNTs nanotubes. The decrease in emission was minimal by buffering the SDS/SWNT suspension prior to forming the composite. Fluorescent xerogels were prepared by adding glycerol to the SWNT suspensions prior to TMOS vapor exposure, followed by drying the gels. Fluorescent aerogels were prepared by replacing water in the gels with methanol and then exposing them to supercritical fluid drying conditions. The aerogels can be used for gas sensing.

  18. Review of Electronics Based on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu; Cong, Sen; Cao, Xuan; Wu, Fanqi; Liu, Qingzhou; Amer, Moh R; Zhou, Chongwu

    2017-08-14

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are extremely promising materials for building next-generation electronics due to their unique physical and electronic properties. In this article, we will review the research efforts and achievements of SWNTs in three electronic fields, namely analog radio-frequency electronics, digital electronics, and macroelectronics. In each SWNT-based electronic field, we will present the major challenges, the evolutions of the methods to overcome these challenges, and the state-of-the-art of the achievements. At last, we will discuss future directions which could lead to the broad applications of SWNTs. We hope this review could inspire more research on SWNT-based electronics, and accelerate the applications of SWNTs.

  19. Ordering in rolled-up single-walled ferromagnetic nanomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janutka, Andrzej

    2016-12-01

    Magnetization of soft-ferromagnetic nano- and microtubes of nanometer-thin walls (a single-widening rolled-up nanomembranes) is theoretically studied using analytical and numerical approaches including different stress-induced anisotropies. Within the analytical study, we consider magnetostatic effects qualitatively, with an effective anisotropy, while they are fully treated in the micromagnetic simulations (limited to the tubes of submicrometer diameters however). Basic types of the periodic ordering have been established and their presence in nanotubes of polycrystalline Permalloy and cobalt has been verified within the simulations. The domain structure is basically determined by a material-deposition-induced helical stress or a cooling-induced axial stress via the volume magnetostriction while it is influenced by the distribution of magnetic charges as well. Also, it is dependent on the initial state of the magnetization process.

  20. Surface oxidation study of single wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrón-Colón, M.; Meador, M. A.; Lukco, D.; Solá, F.; Santos-Pérez, J.; McCorkle, L. S.

    2011-11-01

    Functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is desirable to enhance their ability to be incorporated into polymers and enhance their bonding with the matrix. One approach to carbon nanotube functionalization is by oxidation via a strong oxidizing agent or refluxing in strong acids. However, this approach can damage the nanotubes, leading to the introduction of defects and/or shorter nanotubes. Such damage can adversely affect the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties. A more benign approach to nanotube functionalization has been developed involving photo-oxidation. Chemical analysis by XPS revealed that the oxygen content of the photo-oxidized SWCNTs was 11.3 at.% compared to 6.7 at.% for SWCNTs oxidized by acid treatment. The photo-oxidized SWCNTs produced by this method can be used directly in various polymer matrices or can be further modified by additional chemical reactions.

  1. Printable thin film supercapacitors using single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kaempgen, Martti; Chan, Candace K; Ma, J; Cui, Yi; Gruner, George

    2009-05-01

    Thin film supercapacitors were fabricated using printable materials to make flexible devices on plastic. The active electrodes were made from sprayed networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) serving as both electrodes and charge collectors. Using a printable aqueous gel electrolyte as well as an organic liquid electrolyte, the performances of the devices show very high energy and power densities (6 W h/kg for both electrolytes and 23 and 70 kW/kg for aqueous gel electrolyte and organic electrolyte, respectively) which is comparable to performance in other SWCNT-based supercapacitor devices fabricated using different methods. The results underline the potential of printable thin film supercapacitors. The simplified architecture and the sole use of printable materials may lead to a new class of entirely printable charge storage devices allowing for full integration with the emerging field of printed electronics.

  2. Topological Phase Transition in Metallic Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Rin; Izumida, Wataru; Eto, Mikio

    2017-01-01

    The topological phase transition is theoretically studied in a metallic single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) by applying a magnetic field B parallel to the tube. The Z topological invariant, winding number, is changed discontinuously when a small band gap is closed at a critical value of B, which can be observed as a change in the number of edge states owing to the bulk-edge correspondence. This is confirmed by numerical calculations for finite SWNTs of ˜1 µm length, using a one-dimensional lattice model to effectively describe the mixing between σ and π orbitals and spin-orbit interaction, which are relevant to the formation of the band gap in metallic SWNTs.

  3. Bandgap renormalization in single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chunhui; Liu, Yujie; Xu, Jieying; Nie, Zhonghui; Li, Yao; Xu, Yongbing; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Fengqiu

    2017-09-11

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been extensively explored as an ultrafast nonlinear optical material. However, due to the numerous electronic and morphological arrangements, a simple and self-contained physical model that can unambiguously account for the rich photocarrier dynamics in SWNTs is still absent. Here, by performing broadband degenerate and non-degenerate pump-probe experiments on SWNTs of different chiralities and morphologies, we reveal strong evidences for the existence of bandgap renormalization in SWNTs. In particularly, it is found that the broadband transient response of SWNTs can be well explained by the combined effects of Pauli blocking and bandgap renormalization, and the distinct dynamics is further influenced by the different sensitivity of degenerate and non-degenerate measurements to these two concurrent effects. Furthermore, we attribute optical-phonon bath thermalization as an underlying mechanism for the observed bandgap renormalization. Our findings provide new guidelines for interpreting the broadband optical response of carbon nanotubes.

  4. Chaotic region of elastically restrained single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Weipeng; Song, Mingzhe; Deng, Zichen; Zou, Hailin; Wei, Bingqing

    2017-02-01

    The occurrence of chaos in the transverse oscillation of the carbon nanotube in all of the precise micro-nano mechanical systems has a strong impact on the stability and the precision of the micro-nano systems, the conditions of which are related with the boundary restraints of the carbon nanotube. To generalize some transverse oscillation problems of the carbon nanotube studied in current references, the elastic restraints at both ends of the single-walled carbon nanotube are considered by means of rotational and translational springs to investigate the effects of the boundary restraints on the chaotic properties of the carbon nanotube in this paper. Based on the generalized multi-symplectic theory, both the generalized multi-symplectic formulations for the governing equation describing the transverse oscillation of the single-walled carbon nanotube subjected to the transverse load and the constraint equations resulting from the elastic restraints are presented firstly. Then, the structure-preserving scheme with discrete constraint equations is constructed to simulate the transverse oscillation process of the carbon nanotube. Finally, the chaotic region of the carbon nanotube is captured, and the oscillations of the two extreme cases (including simply supported and cantilever) are investigated in the numerical investigations. From the numerical results, it can be concluded that the relative bending stiffness coefficient and the absolute bending stiffness coefficients at both ends of the carbon nanotube are two important factors that affect the chaotic region of the carbon nanotube, which provides guidance on the design and manufacture of precise micro-nano mechanical systems. In addition, the different routes to the chaos of the carbon nanotube in two extreme cases are revealed.

  5. Extracellular entrapment and degradation of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrera, Consol; Bhattacharya, Kunal; Lazzaretto, Beatrice; Andón, Fernando T.; Hultenby, Kjell; Kotchey, Gregg P.; Star, Alexander; Fadeel, Bengt

    2014-05-01

    Neutrophils extrude neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) consisting of a network of chromatin decorated with antimicrobial proteins to enable non-phagocytic killing of microorganisms. Here, utilizing a model of ex vivo activated human neutrophils, we present evidence of entrapment and degradation of carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in NETs. The degradation of SWCNTs was catalyzed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) present in purified NETs and the reaction was facilitated by the addition of H2O2 and NaBr. These results show that SWCNTs can undergo acellular, MPO-mediated biodegradation and imply that the immune system may deploy similar strategies to rid the body of offending microorganisms and engineered nanomaterials.Neutrophils extrude neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) consisting of a network of chromatin decorated with antimicrobial proteins to enable non-phagocytic killing of microorganisms. Here, utilizing a model of ex vivo activated human neutrophils, we present evidence of entrapment and degradation of carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in NETs. The degradation of SWCNTs was catalyzed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) present in purified NETs and the reaction was facilitated by the addition of H2O2 and NaBr. These results show that SWCNTs can undergo acellular, MPO-mediated biodegradation and imply that the immune system may deploy similar strategies to rid the body of offending microorganisms and engineered nanomaterials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Suppl. Fig. 1 - length distribution of SWCNTs; suppl. Fig. 2 - characterization of pristine vs. oxidized SWCNTs; suppl. Fig. 3 - endotoxin evaluation; suppl. Fig. 4 - NET characterization; suppl. Fig. 5 - UV-Vis/NIR analysis of biodegradation of oxidized SWCNTs; suppl. Fig. 6 - cytotoxicity of partially degraded SWCNTs. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06047k

  6. Center for Applications of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Resasco, Daniel E

    2008-02-21

    This report describes the activities conducted under a Congressional Direction project whose goal was to develop applications for Single-walled carbon nanotubes, under the Carbon Nanotube Technology Center (CANTEC), a multi-investigator program that capitalizes on OU’s advantageous position of having available high quality carbon nanotubes. During the first phase of CANTEC, 11 faculty members and their students from the College of Engineering developed applications for carbon nanotubes by applying their expertise in a number of areas: Catalysis, Reaction Engineering, Nanotube synthesis, Surfactants, Colloid Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Spectroscopy, Tissue Engineering, Biosensors, Biochemical Engineering, Cell Biology, Thermal Transport, Composite Materials, Protein synthesis and purification, Molecular Modeling, Computational Simulations. In particular, during this phase, the different research groups involved in CANTEC made advances in the tailoring of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT) of controlled diameter and chirality by Modifying Reaction Conditions and the Nature of the catalyst; developed kinetic models that quantitatively describe the SWNT growth, created vertically oriented forests of SWNT by varying the density of metal nanoparticles catalyst particles, and developed novel nanostructured SWNT towers that exhibit superhydrophobic behavior. They also developed molecular simulations of the growth of Metal Nanoparticles on the surface of SWNT, which may have applications in the field of fuell cells. In the area of biomedical applications, CANTEC researchers fabricated SWNT Biosensors by a novel electrostatic layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition method, which may have an impact in the control of diabetes. They also functionalized SWNT with proteins that retained the protein’s biological activity and also retained the near-infrared light absorbance, which finds applications in the treatment of cancer.

  7. Chaotic region of elastically restrained single-walled carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weipeng; Song, Mingzhe; Deng, Zichen; Zou, Hailin; Wei, Bingqing

    2017-02-01

    The occurrence of chaos in the transverse oscillation of the carbon nanotube in all of the precise micro-nano mechanical systems has a strong impact on the stability and the precision of the micro-nano systems, the conditions of which are related with the boundary restraints of the carbon nanotube. To generalize some transverse oscillation problems of the carbon nanotube studied in current references, the elastic restraints at both ends of the single-walled carbon nanotube are considered by means of rotational and translational springs to investigate the effects of the boundary restraints on the chaotic properties of the carbon nanotube in this paper. Based on the generalized multi-symplectic theory, both the generalized multi-symplectic formulations for the governing equation describing the transverse oscillation of the single-walled carbon nanotube subjected to the transverse load and the constraint equations resulting from the elastic restraints are presented firstly. Then, the structure-preserving scheme with discrete constraint equations is constructed to simulate the transverse oscillation process of the carbon nanotube. Finally, the chaotic region of the carbon nanotube is captured, and the oscillations of the two extreme cases (including simply supported and cantilever) are investigated in the numerical investigations. From the numerical results, it can be concluded that the relative bending stiffness coefficient and the absolute bending stiffness coefficients at both ends of the carbon nanotube are two important factors that affect the chaotic region of the carbon nanotube, which provides guidance on the design and manufacture of precise micro-nano mechanical systems. In addition, the different routes to the chaos of the carbon nanotube in two extreme cases are revealed.

  8. Faster single-end alignment generation utilizing multi-thread for BWA.

    PubMed

    Jo, Heeseung; Koh, Gunhwan

    2015-01-01

    Due to next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, genome sequencing is able to process much more data at low cost. In NGS data analysis, the mapping of sequences into a reference genome takes the largest amount of time to process. Although the Burrows-Wheeler Aligner (BWA) tool is one of the most widely used open-source software tools to align read sequences, it is still limited in that it does not fully support multi-thread mechanisms during the alignment steps. In this paper, we propose a BWA-MT tool, evolved from BWA but supporting multi-thread computation, designed to fully utilize the underlying multi-core architecture of computing resources. By using multi-thread computation, BWA-MT can significantly shorten the time needed to generate an alignment for single-end read sequences. Meanwhile, it generates an identical Sequence Alignment Map (SAM) result file as BWA. To evaluate BWA-MT, we use an evaluation system equipped with twelve cores and 32 GB memory. As a workload, we used the hg19 human genome reference sequence and various numbers of read sequences from 1M to 40M. In our evaluation, BWA-MT displays up to 3.7 times faster performance and generates an identical SAM result file to BWA. Although the increased speed might be dependent on computing resources, we confirm that BWA-MT is highly efficient and effective.

  9. Random networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes promote mesenchymal stem cell's proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Shim, Wooyoung; Choolakadavil Khalid, Najeeb; Kang, Won-Seok; Lee, Minsu; Kim, Hyo-Sop; Choi, Je; Lee, Gwang; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2015-01-28

    Studies on the interaction of cells with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been receiving increasing attention owing to their potential for various cellular applications. In this report, we investigated the interactions between biological cells and nanostructured SWCNTs films and focused on how morphological structures of SWCNT films affected cellular behavior such as cell proliferation and differentiation. One directionally aligned SWCNT Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film and random network SWCNT film were fabricated by LB and vacuum filteration methods, respectively. We demonstrate that our SWCNT LB and network film based scaffolds do not show any cytotoxicity, while on the other hand, these scaffolds promote differentiation property of rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) when compared with that on conventional tissue culture polystyrene substrates. Especially, the SWCNT network film with average thickness and roughness values of 95 ± 5 and 9.81 nm, respectively, demonstrated faster growth rate and higher cell thickness for rMSCs. These results suggest that systematic manipulation of the thickness, roughness, and directional alignment of SWCNT films would provide the convenient strategy for controlling the growth and maintenance of the differentiation property of stem cells. The SWCNT film could be an alternative culture substrate for various stem cells, which often require close control of the growth and differentiation properties.

  10. Arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes with full surface coverage for high-performance electronics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qing; Han, Shu-jen; Tulevski, George S; Zhu, Yu; Lu, Darsen D; Haensch, Wilfried

    2013-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes have exceptional electronic properties and have been proposed as a replacement for silicon in applications such as low-cost thin-film transistors and high-performance logic devices. However, practical devices will require dense, aligned arrays of electronically pure nanotubes to optimize performance, maximize device packing density and provide sufficient drive current (or power output) for each transistor. Here, we show that aligned arrays of semiconducting carbon nanotubes can be assembled using the Langmuir-Schaefer method. The arrays have a semiconducting nanotube purity of 99% and can fully cover a surface with a nanotube density of more than 500 tubes/µm. The nanotube pitch is self-limited by the diameter of the nanotube plus the van der Waals separation, and the intrinsic mobility of the nanotubes is preserved after array assembly. Transistors fabricated using this approach exhibit significant device performance characteristics with a drive current density of more than 120 µA µm(-1), transconductance greater than 40 µS µm(-1) and on/off ratios of ∼1 × 10(3).

  11. Wafer-Scale Fabrication of Suspended Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Arrays by Silver Liquid Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Liu, Siyu; Nshimiyimana, Jean Pierre; Deng, Ya; Hou, Gu; Chi, Xiannian; Hu, Xiao; Zhang, Zongzhi; Wu, Pei; Wang, Gongtang; Chu, Weiguo; Sun, Lianfeng

    2017-08-21

    Suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have advantages in mechanical resonators and highly sensitive sensors. Large-scale fabrication of suspended SWNTs array devices and uniformity among SWNTs devices remain a great challenge. This study demonstrates an effective, fast, and wafer-scale technique to fabricate suspended SWNT arrays, which is based on a dynamic motion of silver liquid to suspend and align the SWNTs between the prefabricated palladium electrodes in high temperature annealing treatment. Suspended, strained, and aligned SWNTs are synthesized on a 2 × 2 cm(2) substrate with an average density of 10 tubes per micrometer. Under the optimal conditions, almost all SWNTs become suspended. A promising formation model of suspended SWNTs is established. The Kelvin four-terminal resistance measurement shows that these SWNT array devices have extreme low contact resistance. Meanwhile, the suspended SWNT array field effect transistors are fabricated by selective etching of metallic SWNTs using electrical breakdown. This method of large-scale fabrication of suspended architectures pushes the study of nanoscale materials into a new stage related to the electrical physics and industrial applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Selective Growth of Subnanometer Diameter Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Arrays in Hydrogen-Free CVD.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lixing; Deng, Shibin; Zhang, Shuchen; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Jin

    2016-10-05

    Small diameter single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) arrays with larger bandgap are more desirable as near-infrared optical absorbers for the fabrication of high performance photovoltaic and photodetector devices. We report herein a rational approach to selective growth of well-aligned subnanometer diameter (∼84% between 0.75 and 0.95 nm) SWNT arrays with a density of 0.3-0.5 tubes/μm on quartz surfaces using solid Mo2C catalysts for short-time growth by low carbon feeding in hydrogen-free CVD. These subnanometer diameter SWNTs have a narrow chirality distribution (the ratio of (8,4), (8,5) and (7,6) is higher than 73%). During nanotube growth, only small size Mo nanoparticles are carbonized into stable Mo2C for catalyzing the growth of SWNTs through low carbon feeding rate over short time in the hydrogen-free environment, whereas larger catalysts are inactive due to underfeeding. Meanwhile, solid Mo2C catalysts are effective in reducing the chirality distributions of the as-grown SWNTs. Additionally, combining an annealing process after loading catalyst on the sapphire substrates, the average density is increased to ∼15 tubes/μm while maintaining small diameter and narrow chirality distribution. Our results offer more choices for structurally controlled growth of aligned-SWNTs, with potential applications in nanoelectronics.

  13. Adsorption of diuron, fluridone and norflurazon on single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ke; Zhang, Zheyun; Gao, Bo; Wang, Ziying; Xu, Dongyu; Jin, Jie; Liu, Xitao

    2012-11-15

    The sorption behaviors of diuron (DIU), fluridone (FLU) and norflurazon (NOR) by a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and three multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) samples including MWCNT10 (<10nm, outer diameter), MWCNT20 (10-20 nm), and MWCNT40 (20-40 nm) were investigated. All adsorption isotherms were nonlinear and were well fitted with the Freundlich model and Dubinin Ashtakhov (DA) model. The linear relationships between the organic carbon (OC)-normalized saturated adsorption capacity (Q(0)(OC)) and surface area (SA) suggest that SA is presumably responsible for the adsorption of DIU and NOR on CNTs. While FLU, DIU, and NOR OC-normalized distribution coefficients (logK(OC)) of CNTs increased with increasing their hydrophobicity (logK(OW)) and the positive relationships between the logK(OW)-normalized logK(OC) (i.e., logK(OC)/logK(OW)) of FLU, DIU, and NOR and their hydrogen bonding ability indicate that the adsorption of FLU, DIU and NOR was mainly controlled by the hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding. The higher logK(OC) or Q(0)(OC) values of MWCNT10 and SWCNT relative to other large MWCNTs and carbonaceous adsorbents suggest that MWCNT10 has the potential to serve as an adsorbent used to reduce the mobility of herbicides in agricultural and environmental applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Electrical Properties of Single-Walled/Multi-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes Filled Polycarbonate Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sain, P. K.; Goyal, R. K.; Prasad, Y. V. S. S.; Bhargava, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    The work focused on development of flexible and light weight polycarbonate based nanocomposites containing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) prepared by solution method for electronic applications. X-ray diffractometry (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used for the characterization. XRD confirmed the presence of CNTs in the nanocomposites. TEM and SEM both revealed the dispersion of CNTs in the matrix. Percolation threshold was found to occur at 0.5 vol.% for SWCNTs and 4 vol.% for MWCNTs filled polycarbonate nanocomposites. The electrical conductivity, relative dielectric constant and dissipation factor of the nanocomposites were increased abruptly above percolation threshold. The maximum achieved electrical conductivity and the relative dielectric constant of the nanocomposites was found 10-4 S/cm and 108, respectively in both the nanocomposites. The best achieved combination of relative dielectric constant and dissipation factor was found in 1 vol.% SWCNT-PC nanocomposite. The relative dielectric constant of the nanocomposites was almost temperature independent from room temperature to 200°C.

  15. Synthesis of aligned symmetrical multifaceted monolayer hexagonal boron nitride single crystals on resolidified copper.

    PubMed

    Tay, Roland Yingjie; Park, Hyo Ju; Ryu, Gyeong Hee; Tan, Dunlin; Tsang, Siu Hon; Li, Hongling; Liu, Wenwen; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong; Lee, Zonghoon; Lifshitz, Yeshayahu; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2016-01-28

    Atomically smooth hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) films are considered as a nearly ideal dielectric interface for two-dimensional (2D) heterostructure devices. Reported mono- to few-layer 2D h-BN films, however, are mostly small grain-sized, polycrystalline and randomly oriented. Here we report the growth of centimetre-sized atomically thin h-BN films composed of aligned domains on resolidified Cu. The films consist of monolayer single crystalline triangular and hexagonal domains with size of up to ∼10 μm. The domains converge to symmetrical multifaceted shapes such as "butterfly" and "6-apex-star" and exhibit ∼75% grain alignment for over millimetre distances as verified through transmission electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy images reveal that these domains are aligned for over centimetre distances. Defect lines are generated along the grain boundaries of mirroring h-BN domains due to the two different polarities (BN and NB) and edges with the same termination. The observed triangular domains with truncated edges and alternatively hexagonal domains are in accordance with Wulff shapes that have minimum edge energy. This work provides an extensive study on the aligned growth of h-BN single crystals over large distances and highlights the obstacles that are needed to be overcome for a 2D material with a binary configuration.

  16. Stable single helical C- and I-chains inside single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Z.; Liu, C. J.; Li, Y.; Jing, X. D.; Meng, F. S.; Zheng, S. P.; Zhao, X.; Li, J. H.; Qiu, Z. Y.; Yuan, Q.; Wang, W. X.; Bi, L.; Liu, H.; Zhang, Y. P.; Liu, B. B.

    2016-09-01

    The helicity of stable single helical carbon chains and iodine chains inside single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is studied by calculating the systematic van der Waals interaction energy. The results show that the optimal helical radius increases linearly with increasing tube radius, which produces a constant separation between the chain structure and the tube wall. The helical angle exhibits a ladder-like decrease with increasing tube radius, indicating that a large tube can produce a small helicity in the helical structures. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB808200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11504150 and 51320105007), and the Cheung Kong Scholars Program of China.

  17. Bacterial Cell Wall Peptidoglycan at Single Molecule Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touhami, Ahmed; Jericho, Manfred; Matias, Valerio; Clarke, Anthony; Beveridge, Terry; Dutcher, John

    2009-03-01

    The major structural component of bacterial cell walls is the peptidoglycan sacculus, which is one of nature's strongest and largest macromolecules that maintains the large internal pressure within the cell while allowing the transport of molecules into and out of the cell and cell growth. The three-dimensional structure of this unique biopolymer is controversial, and two models have been proposed: the planar model, in which the glycan strands lie in the plane of the cell surface, and the scaffold model, in which the glycan strands lie perpendicular to the cell surface. We have used atomic force microscopy to investigate the high resolution structure of isolated, intact sacculi of Escherichia coli K12 bacteria. Atomic force microscopy-single molecule force spectroscopy was performed on single sacculi exposed to the tAmiB enzyme which cleaves the peptide-glycan bonds. Surprisingly, the measurements revealed individual strands of up to 250 nm in length. This finding combined with high resolution AFM images recorded on hydrated sacculi provide evidence for the validity of the planar model for the peptidoglycan structure in Gram-negative bacteria.

  18. Directed Assembly of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Penzo, Erika; Palma, Matteo; Chenet, Daniel A; Ao, Geyou; Zheng, Ming; Hone, James C; Wind, Shalom J

    2016-02-23

    The outstanding electronic properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have made them prime candidates for future nanoelectronics technologies. One of the main obstacles to the implementation of advanced SWCNT electronics to date is the inability to arrange them in a manner suitable for complex circuits. Directed assembly of SWCNT segments onto lithographically patterned and chemically functionalized substrates is a promising way to organize SWCNTs in topologies that are amenable to integration for advanced applications, but the placement and orientational control required have not yet been demonstrated. We have developed a technique for assembling length sorted and chirality monodisperse DNA-wrapped SWCNT segments on hydrophilic lines patterned on a passivated oxidized silicon substrate. Placement of individual SWCNT segments at predetermined locations was achieved with nanometer accuracy. Three terminal electronic devices, consisting of a single SWCNT segment placed either beneath or on top of metallic source/drain electrodes were fabricated. Devices made with semiconducting nanotubes behaved as typical p-type field effect transistors (FETs), whereas devices made with metallic nanotubes had a finite resistance with little or no gate modulation. This scalable, high resolution approach represents an important step forward toward the potential implementation of complex SWCNT devices and circuits.

  19. Ionic Covalent Organic Frameworks: Design of a Charged Interface Aligned on 1D Channel Walls and Its Unusual Electrostatic Functions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ning; Wang, Ping; Addicoat, Matthew A; Heine, Thomas; Jiang, Donglin

    2017-04-24

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) have emerged as a tailor-made platform for designing layered two-dimensional polymers. However, most of them are obtained as neutral porous materials. Here, we report the construction of ionic crystalline porous COFs with positively charged walls that enable the creation of well aligned yet spatially confined ionic interface. The unconventional reversed AA-stacking mode alternately orientates the cationic centers to both sides of the walls; the ionic interface endows COFs with unusual electrostatic functions. Because all of the walls are decorated with electric dipoles, the uptake of CO2 is enhanced by three fold compared to the neutral analog. By virtue of sufficient open space between cations, the ionic interface exhibits exceptional accessibility, efficiency, and selectivity in ion exchange to trap anionic pollutants. These findings suggest that construction of the ionic interface of COFs offers a new way to structural and functional designs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Elastomer Filled With Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Files, Bradley S.; Forest, Craig R.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments have shown that composites of a silicone elastomer with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are significantly stronger and stiffer than is the unfilled elastomer. The large strengthening and stiffening effect observed in these experiments stands in contrast to the much smaller strengthening effect observed in related prior efforts to reinforce epoxies with SWNTs and to reinforce a variety of polymers with multiple-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). The relative largeness of the effect in the case of the silicone-elastomer/SWNT composites appears to be attributable to (1) a better match between the ductility of the fibers and the elasticity of the matrix and (2) the greater tensile strengths of SWNTs, relative to MWNTs. For the experiments, several composites were formulated by mixing various proportions of SWNTs and other filling materials into uncured RTV-560, which is a silicone adhesive commonly used in aerospace applications. Specimens of a standard "dog-bone" size and shape for tensile testing were made by casting the uncured elastomer/filler mixtures into molds, curing the elastomer, then pressing the specimens from a "cookie-cutter" die. The results of tensile tests of the specimens showed that small percentages of SWNT filler led to large increases in stiffness and tensile strength, and that these increases were greater than those afforded by other fillers. For example, the incorporation of SWNTs in a proportion of 1 percent increased the tensile strength by 44 percent and the modulus of elasticity (see figure) by 75 percent. However, the relative magnitudes of the increases decreased with increasing nanotube percentages because more nanotubes made the elastomer/nanotube composites more brittle. At an SWNT content of 10 percent, the tensile strength and modulus of elasticity were 125 percent and 562 percent, respectively, greater than the corresponding values for the unfilled elastomer.

  1. Decarboxylation of oxidized single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Vieira, H S; Andrada, D M; Mendonça, R; Santos, A P; Martins, M D; Macedo, W A A; Gorgulho, H F; Pimenta, L P S; Moreira, R L; Jorio, A; Pimenta, M A; Furtado, C A

    2007-10-01

    A classical protocol widely used in organic chemistry of aromatic and polyaromatic molecules has been successfully applied in this work for the decarboxylation of oxidized single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) to rend C-H SWNT derivatives. SWNT produced by arc discharge method have been oxidized during a purification process using strongly oxidant agents, such as hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid. The decarboxylation of oxidized SWNT has been conduced with copper(I) oxide in a 50:50 solution of N-methylpyrrolidone and quinoline. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and acid-base potentiometric titration analyses were carried out to characterize quali and quantitatively the changes in the chemical environment on the SWNT surface in each step of the purification and the decarboxylation process. Those techniques showed the appearance of mainly carboxylic and phenolic groups after the purification process and the disappearance of the carboxylic groups after the decarboxylation reaction. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis indicated also the formation of aliphatic and aromatic C-H groups. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and potentiometric titration results determined an efficiency higher than 90% for our decarboxylation procedure. The purity and structural quality of the SWNT sample used in the decarboxylation process were evaluated by thermogravimetry and Raman spectroscopy. Thermogravimetric analysis identified a purified sample with approximately 80 wt% of SWNT, in fractions distributed in highly structured SWNTs (25 wt%), with distribution in composition, length and structural quality (35 wt%) and with very defective and short tubes (25 wt%). The damages on the purified SWNT walls were characterized by the Raman scattering analysis.

  2. Coherent injection and control of ballistic charge currents in single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newson, R. W.; Green, A. A.; Hersam, M. C.; van Driel, H. M.

    2011-03-01

    We report results from a comprehensive set of experiments to study coherently controlled electrical current injection in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphite. Photocurrents were injected at room temperature through the quantum interference of single- and two-photon absorption pathways induced by 150-fs optical pulses with 660-980 and 1320-1960-nm central wavelengths, respectively, and with maximum intensities of 10 and 0.15 GW cm-2, respectively. Detection of the photocurrents was achieved via the emitted terahertz radiation. For bulk graphite samples and collinearly polarized 750- and 1500-nm pulses incident along the c axis, injected current densities up to 12 kA cm-2 have been observed just under the surface, independent of crystal azimuthal orientation and comparable to those generated in InP or GaAs. Current densities are ˜5 times smaller for cross-polarized pulses. A vertically aligned forest of carbon nanotubes (tube diameters ˜2.5 ± 1.5 nm) illuminated with 700- and 1400-nm pulses collinearly polarized along the alignment direction yields a maximum current of 8 nA per tube (current density of 35 kA cm-2). Terahertz emission drops by only 3.5 times after 90° sample rotation about the normal, which is explained in terms of an imperfect alignment distribution (angular spread ˜19.5°) and sample birefringence. Unaligned arc discharge and HiPco SWNTs with diameters of 1.44 ± 0.15 and 0.96 ± 0.15 nm, respectively, were sorted into semiconducting and metallic tubes. Photocurrents injected with collinearly polarized 750- and 1500-nm pulses in such semiconducting SWNTs showed peak current magnitudes similar to those in the aligned nanotubes, while metallic tubes yielded currents at least ten times smaller. Semiconducting SWNT currents showed spectral features as the second-harmonic wavelength varied from 660 to 980 nm, which were more consistent with current injection based on band-band transitions than on excitonic absorption effects.

  3. Chemical vapor deposition growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes with controlled structures for nanodevice applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yabin; Zhang, Jin

    2014-08-19

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), a promising substitute to engineer prospective nanoelectronics, have attracted much attention because of their superb structures and physical properties. The unique properties of SWNTs rely sensitively on their specific chiral structures, including the diameters, chiral angles, and handedness. Furthermore, high-performance and integrated circuits essentially require SWNT samples with well-aligned arrays, of single conductive type and of pure chirality. Although much effort has been devoted to chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of SWNTs, their structure control, growth mechanism, and structural characterizations are still the primary obstacles for the fabrication and application of SWNT-based nanodevices. In this Account, we focus on our established CVD growth methodology to fulfill the requirements of nanodevice applications. A rational strategy was successfully exploited to construct complex architectures, selectively enrich semiconducting (s) or metallic (m) SWNTs, and control chirality. First, well-aligned and highly dense SWNT arrays are beneficial for nanodevice integration. For the directed growth mode, anisotropic interactions between the SWNTs and the crystallographic structure of substrate are crucial for their growth orientation. Just as crystals possess various symmetries, SWNTs with controlled geometries have the corresponding turning angles. Their complex architectures come from the synergetic effect of lattice and gas flow directed modes. Especially, the aligned orientations of SWNTs on graphite are chirality-selective, and their chiral angles, handedness, and (n,m) index have been conveniently and accurately determined. Second, UV irradiation and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) washing-off methods have been explored to selectively remove m-SWNTs, leaving only s-SWNT arrays on the surface. Moreover, the UV-assisted technique takes the advantages of low cost and high efficiency and it directly produces a high

  4. Synthesis of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Arrays and Their Application in Single Molecular electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Yuyao

    Molecular electronics utilize molecular as building blocks to fabricate electronic components. Due to the advantage of its size, molecular electronics has been an attractive candidate for future electronics for a long time. However, there are major challenges to be solved before single molecular electronic device could be used widely. One of these challenges is the lack of high yield, low cost fabrication technique. Carbon nanotubes are new materials with great electronic conductivity and small diameter, etc. They are great candidate for the electrode of single molecular electronic devices. A great effort of this thesis has been devoted into the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) synthesis of carbon nanotube, especially the surface aligned carbon nanotube array on miscut quartz surface. A state of art recipe to synthesize carbon nanotube array on quartz with promising cleanliness, density, alignment and nanotube length has been developed. Two novel fabrication processes were proposed and tested to fabricate electrode for single molecule electronic devices with carbon nanotube array. In addition, a fabrication process to create large amount of identical length of carbon nanotubes was introduced and studied.

  5. Investigation of Hydrogen Storage in Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Fuel Cells-2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-11

    1 Final Report Title: Investigation of hydrogen storage in Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for fuel cells - 2 AFOSR/AOARD...SUBTITLE Investigation of hydrogen storage in single walled carbon nanotubes for fuel cells-2 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA23860914157 5b. GRANT NUMBER...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) dispersed in 2-propanol are deposited on the alumina substrate using drop caste

  6. Suspended single-walled carbon nanotube fluidic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, B. H.; Park, Ji-Yong; Lee, Soonil; Ahn, Y. H.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the fabrication of liquid flow sensors employing partially suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). We have found that the sign of the conductance change in SWNT flow sensors is not influenced by the direction of water flow for both supported and suspended devices. Therefore, the streaming potential is not the principal mechanism of the SWNT sensor response. Instead, the conductance change is more likely due to a reduction in the cation density in the electrical double layer, whose equilibrium conditions are determined by the liquid flow rate. More importantly, we have found that the sensitivity of suspended SWNT devices is more than 10 times greater than that of supported SWNT devices. A reduced screening effect and an increase in effective sensing volume are responsible for the enhanced sensitivity, which is consistent with the ion depletion model. We also have measured conductance as a function of gate bias at different flow rates and have determined the flow-rate dependent effective charge density, which influences the electrostatic configuration around SWNT devices.In this paper, we demonstrate the fabrication of liquid flow sensors employing partially suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). We have found that the sign of the conductance change in SWNT flow sensors is not influenced by the direction of water flow for both supported and suspended devices. Therefore, the streaming potential is not the principal mechanism of the SWNT sensor response. Instead, the conductance change is more likely due to a reduction in the cation density in the electrical double layer, whose equilibrium conditions are determined by the liquid flow rate. More importantly, we have found that the sensitivity of suspended SWNT devices is more than 10 times greater than that of supported SWNT devices. A reduced screening effect and an increase in effective sensing volume are responsible for the enhanced sensitivity, which is consistent

  7. Morphology and Properties of Melt-Spun Polycarbonate Fibers Containing Single- and Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Fornes,T.; Baur, J.; Sabba, Y.; Thomas, E.

    2006-01-01

    Polycarbonate fibers based single wall and multi-wall nanotubes (SWNT and MWNT) were prepared by first dispersing the nanotubes via solvent blending and/or melt extrusion followed by melt spinning the composites to facilitate nanotube alignment along the fiber axis. Morphological studies involving polarized Raman spectroscopy and wide angle X-ray scattering using a synchrotron radiation source show that reasonable levels of nanotube alignment are achievable. Detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations on the polymer-extracted composite fibers reveal that MWNT more readily disperse within the PC matrix and have higher aspect ratios than do SWNT; extraction of the polymer from the composite prior to TEM imaging helps overcome the common issue of poor atomic contrast between the CNT and the organic matrix. Stress-strain analysis on the composites fibers show that MWNT, in general, provide greater stiffness and strength than those based on SWNT. Despite significant reinforcement of the polycarbonate, the level of reinforcement is far below what could be achieved if the nanotubes were completely dispersed and aligned along the fiber axis as predicted by composite theory.

  8. Polymer grafted single-walled carbon nanotube composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Gunaranjan

    The quasi one-dimensional structure, aspect ratio, mechanical strength and electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes make them ideal fillers for incorporation into composite systems for the development of advanced multifunctional materials. But several issues, including dispersion of nanotubes within the matrix, exfoliation of nanotube bundles and interaction of nanotubes with the host polymer, have to be addressed in order to realize the true potential of these composites. Especially for applications as structural reinforcements, the interface between the nanotubes and the polymer has to be engineered in order to maximize load transfer. The best way of ensuring favorable matrix-nanotube interactions is by chemical functionalization of the nanotube surface with suitable groups to promote adhesion with the polymer matrix. Functionalizing nanotubes with the polymer of the matrix provides the ideal case scenario by offering the best possible interface with the host polymer. The work presented in this thesis involves the development of a novel methodology based on an anionic polymerization approach, for the synthesis of polymer-grafted nanotube based composites, with the aim of improving the dispersion of nanotubes and the interfacial adhesion between the nanotubes and the matrix polymer. This technique enables single-step synthesis, requires no nanotube pretreatment and preserves the original nanotube structure. Significant improvements in the mechanical properties of composites containing polymer-grafted nanotubes (when compared to both pure polymer and composites containing unfunctionalized nanotubes) were observed even at low nanotube loadings (1 wt.%). Melt-state rheological studies revealed changes in the terminal and entanglement plateau regions due to interactions between the free and grafted polymer chains. The improved load transfer across the fiber-matrix interface was confirmed using Raman spectroscopy.

  9. Hypergolic fuel detection using individual single walled carbon nanotube networks

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, S. C.; Willitsford, A. H.; Sumanasekera, G. U.; Yu, M.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.; Tian, W. Q.

    2010-06-15

    Accurate and reliable detection of hypergolic fuels such as hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) and its derivatives is vital to missile defense, aviation, homeland security, and the chemical industry. More importantly these sensors need to be capable of operation at low temperatures (below room temperature) as most of the widely used chemical sensors operate at high temperatures (above 300 deg. C). In this research a simple and highly sensitive single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network sensor was developed for real time monitoring of hydrazine leaks to concentrations at parts per million levels. Upon exposure to hydrazine vapor, the resistance of the air exposed nanotubes (p-type) is observed to increase rapidly while that of the vacuum-degassed nanotubes (n-type) is observed to decrease. It was found that the resistance of the sample can be recovered through vacuum pumping and exposure to ultraviolet light. The experimental results support the electrochemical charge transfer mechanism between the oxygen redox couple of the ambient and the Fermi level of the SWNT. Theoretical results of the hydrazine-SWNT interaction are compared with the experimental observations. It was found that a monolayer of water molecules on the SWNT is necessary to induce strong interactions between hydrazine and the SWNT by way of introducing new occupied states near the bottom of the conduction band of the SWNT.

  10. Optical properties of armchair (7, 7) single walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Gharbavi, K.; Badehian, H.

    2015-07-15

    Full potential linearized augmented plane waves method with the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation potential was applied to calculate the optical properties of (7, 7) single walled carbon nanotubes. The both x and z directions of the incident photons were applied to estimate optical gaps, dielectric function, electron energy loss spectroscopies, optical conductivity, optical extinction, optical refractive index and optical absorption coefficient. The results predict that dielectric function, ε (ω), is anisotropic since it has higher peaks along z-direction than x-direction. The static optical refractive constant were calculated about 1.4 (z-direction) and 1.1 (x- direction). Moreover, the electron energy loss spectroscopy showed a sharp π electron plasmon peaks at about 6 eV and 5 eV for z and x-directions respectively. The calculated reflection spectra show that directions perpendicular to the tube axis have further optical reflection. Moreover, z-direction indicates higher peaks at absorption spectra in low range energies. Totally, increasing the diameter of armchair carbon nanotubes cause the optical band gap, static optical refractive constant and optical reflectivity to decrease. On the other hand, increasing the diameter cause the optical absorption and the optical conductivity to increase. Moreover, the sharp peaks being illustrated at optical spectrum are related to the 1D structure of CNTs which confirm the accuracy of the calculations.

  11. Buckling of single-walled carbon nanotubes using two criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shakti S.; Agrawal, Pranav; Batra, Romesh C.

    2016-06-01

    We use molecular mechanics simulations with the MM3 potential to study instabilities in clamped-clamped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) deformed in torsion and axial compression. The following are the two criteria employed to find the critical buckling strain: (i) a sudden drop in the potential energy and (ii) an eigenvalue of the mass weighted Hessian of the deformed configuration becoming zero. The instability under axial compression is investigated for zigzag and armchair SWCNTs, and that under torsional deformations is also studied for chiral tubes. In general, values of critical strains from the 2nd criterion are found to be substantially less than those from the 1st criterion. For chiral SWCNTs, the critical strains from the 2nd criterion and the potential energies at the onset of instability markedly depend upon the twisting direction. Values of buckling strains predicted from the column and the shell buckling theories are found to agree well with those obtained using the 2nd criterion.

  12. A Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Network Gas Sensing Device

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Chun; Tang, Kea-Tiong; Teng, I-Ju; Kuo, Cheng-Tzu; Ho, Cheng-Long; Kuo, Han-Wen; Su, Tseng-Hsiung; Yang, Shang-Ren; Shi, Gia-Nan; Chang, Chang-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this research was to develop a chemical gas sensing device based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks. The SWCNT networks are synthesized on Al2O3-deposted SiO2/Si substrates with 10 nm-thick Fe as the catalyst precursor layer using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). The development of interconnected SWCNT networks can be exploited to recognize the identities of different chemical gases by the strength of their particular surface adsorptive and desorptive responses to various types of chemical vapors. The physical responses on the surface of the SWCNT networks cause superficial changes in the electric charge that can be converted into electronic signals for identification. In this study, we tested NO2 and NH3 vapors at ppm levels at room temperature with our self-made gas sensing device, which was able to obtain responses to sensitivity changes with a concentration of 10 ppm for NO2 and 24 ppm for NH3. PMID:22164044

  13. Enhanced Raman Microprobe Imaging of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadjiev, V. G.; Arepalli, S.; Nikolaev, P.; Jandl, S.; Yowell, L.

    2003-01-01

    We explore Raman microprobe capabilities to visualize single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Although this technique is limited to a micron scale, we demonstrate that images of individual SWCNTs, bundles or their agglomerates can be generated by mapping Raman active elementary excitations. We measured the Raman response from carbon vibrations in SWCNTs excited by confocal scanning of a focused laser beam. Carbon vibrations reveal key characteristics of SWCNTs as nanotube diameter distribution (radial breathing modes, RBM, 100-300 cm(exp -1)), presence of defects and functional groups (D-mode, 1300-1350 cm(exp -1)), strain and oxidation states of SWCNTs, as well as metallic or semiconducting character of the tubes encoded in the lineshape of the G-modes at 1520-1600 cm(exp - 1). In addition, SWCNTs are highly anisotropic scatterers. The Raman response from a SWCNT is maximal for incident light polarization parallel to the tube axis and vanishing for perpendicular directions. We show that the SWCNT bundle shape or direction can be determined, with some limitations, from a set of Raman images taken at two orthogonal directions of the incident light polarization.

  14. Observation and Modeling of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Bend Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Anantram, M. P.; Jaffe, R. L.; Kong, J.; Dai, H.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) bends, with diameters from approx. 1.0 to 2.5 nm and bend angles from 18 deg. to 34 deg., are observed in catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons at 600 - 1200 C. An algorithm using molecular dynamics simulation (MD) techniques is developed to model these structures that are considered to be SWNT junctions formed by topological defects (i.e. pentagon-heptagon pairs). The algorithm is used to predict the tube helicities and defect configurations for bend junctions using the observed tube diameters and bend angles. The number and arrangement of the defects at the junction interfaces are found to depend on the tube helicities and bend angle. The structural and energetic calculations using the Brenner potential show a number of stable junction configurations for each bend angle with the 34 deg. bends being more stable than the others. Tight binding calculations for local density of state (LDOS) and transmission coefficients are carried out to investigate electrical properties of the bend junctions.

  15. Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Anodes for Lithium Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Raffaelle, Ryne; Gennett, Tom; Kumta, Prashant; Maranchi, Jeff; Heben, Mike

    2006-01-01

    In recent experiments, highly purified batches of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have shown promise as superior alternatives to the graphitic carbon-black anode materials heretofore used in rechargeable thin-film lithium power cells. The basic idea underlying the experiments is that relative to a given mass of graphitic carbon-black anode material, an equal mass of SWCNTs can be expected to have greater lithium-storage and charge/discharge capacities. The reason for this expectation is that whereas the microstructure and nanostructure of a graphitic carbon black is such as to make most of the interior of the material inaccessible for intercalation of lithium, a batch of SWCNTs can be made to have a much more open microstructure and nanostructure, such that most of the interior of the material is accessible for intercalation of lithium. Moreover, the greater accessibility of SWCNT structures can be expected to translate to greater mobilities for ion-exchange processes and, hence, an ability to sustain greater charge and discharge current densities.

  16. Transport and localization in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrer, M.S.; Varadarajan, U.; Holmes, W.; Richards, P.L.; Delaney, P.; Louie, S.G.; Zettl, A.

    1998-08-01

    We have measured the electrical transport properties of mats of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) as a function of applied electric and magnetic fields. We find that at low temperatures the resistance as a function of temperature R(T) follows the Mott variable range hopping (VRH) formula for hopping in three dimensions. Measurement of the electric field dependence of the resistance R(E) allows for the determination of the Bohr radius of a localized state a{approx}650 nm. The magnetoresistance (MR) of SWNT mat samples is large and negative at all temperatures and fields studied, and can be qualitatively described by theories of MR for VRH systems. The Hall coefficient R{sub H} is positive and nearly temperature-independent. The sign of R{sub H} agrees with the sign of the thermopower. The small magnitude of R{sub H} suggests a large carrier density, but may be the result of cancellation of electron and hole terms. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Purification and fractionation of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibe, Blazej; Borowiak-Palen, Ewa; Kalenczuk, Ryszard J.

    2011-11-01

    This study presents the approach to the purification and subsequent metallic/semiconductive (M/S) fractionation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with diameter from 1.04 to 1.60 nm produced via laser ablation. SWCNTs were purified through 3-fold refluxing processes in nitric acid followed by the multiple washings with sodium hydroxide and hydrochloric acid. The purified-annealed SWCNTs sample was divided into seven batches. One batch was dispersed in acetone as a reference sample. Each of the remaining batches were dispersed in one of the following surface agents: sodium dodecyl sulfate, sodium cholate acid (SCA), sodium deoxycholate, cetrimonium bromide, cetylpyridinium chloride, and benzalkonium chloride (BKC). SWCNT suspensions were fractionated via free solution electrophoresis technique. The recovered fractions from electrode and control areas were analyzed via optical absorption spectroscopy in UV-Vis-NIR range to evaluate the efficiency of the separation process. Raman spectroscopy was applied to analyze the purity of the samples. The catalyst content was estimated by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The morphology of the investigated samples was observed via high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. This contribution clearly shows that among the investigated surfactants there are two promising candidates (SCA and BKC) which can efficiently enrich the bulk sample in one electronic type of carbon nanotubes when FSE is applied.

  18. Effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on lysozyme gelation.

    PubMed

    Tardani, Franco; La Mesa, Camillo

    2014-09-01

    The possibility to disperse carbon nanotubes in biocompatible matrices has got substantial interest from the scientific community. Along this research line, the inclusion of single walled carbon nanotubes in lysozyme-based hydrogels was investigated. Experiments were performed at different nanotube/lysozyme weight ratios. Carbon nanotubes were dispersed in protein solutions, in conditions suitable for thermal gelation. The state of the dispersions was determined before and after thermal treatment. Rheology, dynamic light scattering and different microscopies investigated the effect that carbon nanotubes exert on gelation. The gelation kinetics and changes in gelation temperature were determined. The effect of carbon and lysozyme content on the gel properties was, therefore, determined. At fixed lysozyme content, moderate amounts of carbon nanotubes do not disturb the properties of hydrogel composites. At moderately high volume fractions in carbon nanotubes, the gels become continuous in both lysozyme and nanotubes. This is because percolating networks are presumably formed. Support to the above statements comes by rheology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Suspended single-walled carbon nanotube fluidic sensors.

    PubMed

    Son, B H; Park, Ji-Yong; Lee, Soonil; Ahn, Y H

    2015-10-07

    In this paper, we demonstrate the fabrication of liquid flow sensors employing partially suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). We have found that the sign of the conductance change in SWNT flow sensors is not influenced by the direction of water flow for both supported and suspended devices. Therefore, the streaming potential is not the principal mechanism of the SWNT sensor response. Instead, the conductance change is more likely due to a reduction in the cation density in the electrical double layer, whose equilibrium conditions are determined by the liquid flow rate. More importantly, we have found that the sensitivity of suspended SWNT devices is more than 10 times greater than that of supported SWNT devices. A reduced screening effect and an increase in effective sensing volume are responsible for the enhanced sensitivity, which is consistent with the ion depletion model. We also have measured conductance as a function of gate bias at different flow rates and have determined the flow-rate dependent effective charge density, which influences the electrostatic configuration around SWNT devices.

  20. Endohedral Volume Control for Improved Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Jochen; Fagan, Jeffrey

    Liquid-phase processing of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) generally results in the exposure of their core volumes to the environment (opening) due to energy input necessary for purification and solubilization. For aqueous processing this results in SWCNTs routinely getting filled with water, which is detrimental to several properties. Importantly, water filling leads to significant redshifts to, and inhomogeneous broadening of, the electronic transitions of the SWCNTs, as well as a substantial decrease to their fluorescence quantum efficiency. Selection of (remaining) empty (end-capped) SWCNTs to avoid these adverse effects is possible by means of ultracentrifugation, but is a natively low yield process. In this work, SWCNTs are prefilled with linear alkanes or similar organic compounds, serving as a passive, highly homogeneous spacer, blocking the ingestion of water and hence preventing the detrimental consequences. Moreover, the low dielectric nature of the alkane core only weakly affects the local electronic wavefunction of the SWCNTs, effectively simulating empty core conditions and hence yielding much more resolved optical spectra with blue shifted peak positions compared to water filled SWCNTs. It is demonstrated that a wide variety of linear as well as cyclic alkanes can be applied for this purpose, in combination with various SWCNT materials.

  1. Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Solar Energy Harvesting

    DOE PAGES

    Blackburn, Jeffrey L.

    2017-06-14

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) represent a tunable model one-dimensional system with exceptional optical and electronic properties. High-throughput separation and purification strategies have enabled the integration of s-SWCNTs into a number of optoelectronic applications, including photovoltaics (PVs). In this Perspective, we discuss the fundamental underpinnings of two model PV interfaces involving s-SWCNTs. We first discuss s-SWCNT-fullerene heterojunctions where exciton dissociation at the donor-acceptor interface drives solar energy conversion. Next, we discuss charge extraction at the interface between s-SWCNTs and a photoexcited perovskite active layer. In each case, the use of highly enriched semiconducting SWCNT samples enables fundamental insights into themore » thermodynamic and kinetic mechanisms that drive the efficient conversion of solar photons into long-lived separated charges. As a result, these model systems help to establish design rules for next-generation PV devices containing well-defined organic semiconductor layers and help to frame a number of important outstanding questions that can guide future studies.« less

  2. On the Stability and Abundance of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedman, Daniel; Reza Barzegar, Hamid; Rosén, Arne; Wågberg, Thomas; Andreas Larsson, J.

    2015-11-01

    Many nanotechnological applications, using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), are only possible with a uniform product. Thus, direct control over the product during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of SWNT is desirable, and much effort has been made towards the ultimate goal of chirality-controlled growth of SWNTs. We have used density functional theory (DFT) to compute the stability of SWNT fragments of all chiralities in the series representing the targeted products for such applications, which we compare to the chiralities of the actual CVD products from all properly analyzed experiments. From this comparison we find that in 84% of the cases the experimental product represents chiralities among the most stable SWNT fragments (within 0.2 eV) from the computations. Our analysis shows that the diameter of the SWNT product is governed by the well-known relation to size of the catalytic nanoparticles, and the specific chirality is normally determined by the product’s relative stability, suggesting thermodynamic control at the early stage of product formation. Based on our findings, we discuss the effect of other experimental parameters on the chirality of the product. Furthermore, we highlight the possibility to produce any tube chirality in the context of recent published work on seeded-controlled growth.

  3. A single-walled carbon nanotube network gas sensing device.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Chun; Tang, Kea-Tiong; Teng, I-Ju; Kuo, Cheng-Tzu; Ho, Cheng-Long; Kuo, Han-Wen; Su, Tseng-Hsiung; Yang, Shang-Ren; Shi, Gia-Nan; Chang, Chang-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this research was to develop a chemical gas sensing device based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks. The SWCNT networks are synthesized on Al(2)O(3)-deposted SiO(2)/Si substrates with 10 nm-thick Fe as the catalyst precursor layer using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). The development of interconnected SWCNT networks can be exploited to recognize the identities of different chemical gases by the strength of their particular surface adsorptive and desorptive responses to various types of chemical vapors. The physical responses on the surface of the SWCNT networks cause superficial changes in the electric charge that can be converted into electronic signals for identification. In this study, we tested NO(2) and NH(3) vapors at ppm levels at room temperature with our self-made gas sensing device, which was able to obtain responses to sensitivity changes with a concentration of 10 ppm for NO(2) and 24 ppm for NH(3).

  4. Reinforced Thermoplastic Polyimide with Dispersed Functionalized Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.; Gaier, James R.; Sola, Francisco; Scheiman, Daniel A.; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular pi-complexes were formed from pristine HiPCO single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and 1-pyrene- N-(4- N'-(5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxyimido)phenyl butanamide, 1. Polyimide films were prepared with these complexes as well as uncomplexed SWCNTs and the effects of nanoadditive addition on mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of these films were evaluated. Although these properties were enhanced by both nanoadditives, larger increases in tensile strength and thermal and electrical conductivities were obtained when the SWCNT/1 complexes were used. At a loading level of 5.5 wt %, the Tg of the polyimide increased from 169 to 197 C and the storage modulus increased 20-fold (from 142 to 3045 MPa). The addition of 3.5 wt % SWCNT/1 complexes increased the tensile strength of the polyimide from 61.4 to 129 MPa; higher loading levels led to embrittlement and lower tensile strengths. The electrical conductivities (DC surface) of the polyimides increased to 1 x 10(exp -4) Scm(exp -1) (SWCNT/1 complexes loading level of 9 wt %). Details of the preparation of these complexes and their effects on polyimide film properties are discussed.

  5. Nonlinear resonances of a single-wall carbon nanotube cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I. K.; Lee, S. I.

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics of an electrostatically actuated carbon nanotube (CNT) cantilever are discussed by theoretical and numerical approaches. Electrostatic and intermolecular forces between the single-walled CNT and a graphene electrode are considered. The CNT cantilever is analyzed by the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, including its geometric and inertial nonlinearities, and a one-mode projection based on the Galerkin approximation and numerical integration. Static pull-in and pull-out behaviors are adequately represented by an asymmetric two-well potential with the total potential energy consisting of the CNT elastic energy, electrostatic energy, and the Lennard-Jones potential energy. Nonlinear dynamics of the cantilever are simulated under DC and AC voltage excitations and examined in the frequency and time domains. Under AC-only excitation, a superharmonic resonance of order 2 occurs near half of the primary frequency. Under both DC and AC loads, the cantilever exhibits linear and nonlinear primary and secondary resonances depending on the strength of the excitation voltages. In addition, the cantilever has dynamic instabilities such as periodic or chaotic tapping motions, with a variation of excitation frequency at the resonance branches. High electrostatic excitation leads to complex nonlinear responses such as softening, multiple stability changes at saddle nodes, or period-doubling bifurcation points in the primary and secondary resonance branches.

  6. Economic assessment of single-walled carbon nanotube processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacs, J. A.; Tanwani, A.; Healy, M. L.; Dahlben, L. J.

    2010-02-01

    The carbon nanotube market is steadily growing and projected to reach 1.9 billion by 2010. This study examines the economics of manufacturing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) using process-based cost models developed for arc, CVD, and HiPco processes. Using assumed input parameters, manufacturing costs are calculated for 1 g SWNT for arc, CVD, and HiPco, totaling 1,906, 1,706, and 485, respectively. For each SWNT process, the synthesis and filtration steps showed the highest costs, with direct labor as a primary cost driver. Reductions in production costs are calculated for increased working hours per day and for increased synthesis reaction yield (SRY) in each process. The process-based cost models offer a means for exploring opportunities for cost reductions, and provide a structured system for comparisons among alternative SWNT manufacturing processes. Further, the models can be used to comprehensively evaluate additional scenarios on the economics of environmental, health, and safety best manufacturing practices.

  7. Interaction between alkyl radicals and single wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Denis, Pablo A

    2012-06-30

    The addition of primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl radicals to single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was studied by means of dispersion corrected density functional theory. The PBE, B97-D, M06-L, and M06-2X functionals were used. Consideration of Van der Waals interactions is essential to obtain accurate addition energies. In effect, the enthalpy changes at 298 K, for the addition of methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, and tert-butyl radicals onto a (5,5) SWCNT are: -25.7, -25.1, -22.4, and -16.6 kcal/mol, at the M06-2X level, respectively, whereas at PBE/6-31G* level they are significantly lower: -25.0, -19.0, -16.7, and -5.0 kcal/mol respectively. Although the binding energies are small, the attached alkyl radicals are expected to be stable because of the large desorption barriers. The importance of nonbonded interactions was more noticeable as we moved from primary to tertiary alkyl radicals. Indeed, for the tert-butyl radical, physisorption onto the (11,0) SWCNT is preferred rather than chemisorption. The bond dissociation energies determined for alkyl radicals and SWCNT follow the trend suggested by the consideration of radical stabilization energies. However, they are in disagreement with some degrees of functionalization observed in recent experiments. This discrepancy would stem from the fact that for some HiPco nanotubes, nonbonded interactions with alkyl radicals are stronger than covalent bonds.

  8. Complexation of aromatic drugs with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchelnikov, Anatoly S.; Voronin, Dmitry P.; Kostjukov, Viktor V.; Deryabina, Tatyana A.; Khrapatiy, Sergii V.; Prylutskyy, Yuriy I.; Ritter, Uwe; Evstigneev, Maxim P.

    2014-07-01

    We report a detailed study of the complexation of aromatic molecules and drugs with the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, the diameter and the length ranges are 0.5-2 nm and 1-5 μm, respectively) in terms of equilibrium binding constants, K. It is found that the binding constants have magnitudes of the order of 104-105 M-1 and that there is some ligand specificity to the SWCNT surface depending on the structure of the aromatic molecule. The observed specificity is strongly governed by the curvature of the ligand chromophore and the type of side chains, resulting in the highest K for methylene blue which closely matches the curvature of the SWCNT surface. Stabilization of the drug-SWCNT complexes is found to be mainly due to intermolecular van der Waals forces and to a lesser extent by hydrophobic interactions. The approach suggested for determination of the binding parameters may be used as an alternative, or complementary, to standard Langmuir analysis.

  9. Coarse-grained potentials of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junhua; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Wang, Lifeng; Guo, Wanlin; Rabczuk, Timon

    2014-11-01

    We develop the coarse-grained (CG) potentials of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in CNT bundles and buckypaper for the study of the static and dynamic behaviors. The explicit expressions of the CG stretching, bending and torsion potentials for the nanotubes are obtained by the stick-spiral and the beam models, respectively. The non-bonded CG potentials between two different CG beads are derived from analytical results based on the cohesive energy between two parallel and crossing SWCNTs from the van der Waals interactions. We show that the CG model is applicable to large deformations of complex CNT systems by combining the bonded potentials with non-bonded potentials. Checking against full atom molecular dynamics calculations and our analytical results shows that the present CG potentials have high accuracy. The established CG potentials are used to study the mechanical properties of the CNT bundles and buckypaper efficiently at minor computational cost, which shows great potential for the design of micro- and nanomechanical devices and systems.

  10. Dielectric properties of water inside single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Fuminori; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Kataura, Hiromichi; Maniwa, Yutaka

    2009-05-26

    In this paper, we report novel ferroelectric properties of a new form of ice inside single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). These are called "ice nanotubes" (ice NTs) and they consist of polygonal water rings stacked one-dimensionally along the SWCNT axis. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for the ice NTs under an external electric field and in a temperature range between 100 and 350 K. It is revealed that ice NTs show stepwise polarization with a significant hysteresis loop as a function of the external field strength. In particular, pentagonal and heptagonal ice NTs are found to be the world's smallest ferroelectrics with spontaneous polarization of around 1 microC/cm(2). The n-gonal ice NT, where n = 5, 6, or 7, has (n + 1)-polarized structures with different polarizations. These findings suggest potential applications of SWCNTs encapsulating dielectric materials for the fabrication of the smallest ferroelectric devices. Experimental evidence for the presence of ice NTs inside SWCNTs is also discussed in great detail.

  11. Tuning Thermoelectric Properties of Chirality Selected Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Oshima, Yuki; Kitamura, Yoshimasa; Maniwa, Yutaka

    Thermoelectrics are a very important technology for efficiently converting waste heat into electric power. Hicks and Dresselhaus proposed an important approach to innovate the performance of thermoelectric devices, which involves using one-dimensional materials and properly tuning their Fermi level (PRB 1993). Therefore, understanding the relationship between the thermoelectric performance and the Fermi level of one-dimensional materials is of great importance to maximize their thermoelectric performance. Single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is an ideal model for one-dimensional materials. Previously we reported continuous p-type and n-type control over the Seebeck coefficients of semiconducting SWCNT networks with diameter of 1.4 nm through an electric double layer transistor setup using an ionic liquid as the electrolyte (Yanagi et al., Nano Lett. 14, 6437 2014). We clarified the thermoelectric properties of semiconducting SWCNTs with diameter of 1.4 nm as a function of Fermi level. In this study, we investigated how the chiralities or electronic structures of SWCNTs influence on the thermoelectric properties. We found the significant difference in the line-shape of Seebeck coefficient as a function of gate voltage between the different electronic structures of SWCNTs.

  12. Purity Evaluation of Bulk Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Wang, J.; Liang, J.; Hornbostel, B.; Cech, J.; Roth, S.

    2005-09-01

    We report on our experience using a preliminary protocol for quality control of bulk single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) materials produced by the electric arc-discharge and laser ablation method. The first step in the characterization of the bulk material is mechanical homogenization. Quantitative evaluation of purity has been performed using a previously reported procedure based on solution phase near-infrared spectroscopy. Our results confirm that this method is reliable in determining the nanotube content in the arc-discharge sample containing carbonaceous impurities (amorphous carbon and graphitic particles). However, the application of this method to laser ablation samples gives a relative purity value over 100 %. The possible reason for that might be different extinction coefficient meaning different oscillator strength of the laser ablation tubes. At the present time, a 100 % pure reference sample of laser ablation SWNT is not available, so we chose to adopt the sample showing the highest purity as a new reference sample for a quantitative purity evaluation of laser ablation materials. The graphitic part of the carbonaceous impurities has been estimated using X-ray diffraction of 1:1 mixture of nanotube material and C60 as an internal reference. To evaluate the metallic impurities in the as prepared and homogenized carbon nanotube soot inductive coupled plasma (ICP) has been used.

  13. Hypergolic fuel detection using individual single walled carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, S. C.; Willitsford, A. H.; Sumanasekera, G. U.; Yu, M.; Tian, W. Q.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.

    2010-06-01

    Accurate and reliable detection of hypergolic fuels such as hydrazine (N2H4) and its derivatives is vital to missile defense, aviation, homeland security, and the chemical industry. More importantly these sensors need to be capable of operation at low temperatures (below room temperature) as most of the widely used chemical sensors operate at high temperatures (above 300 °C). In this research a simple and highly sensitive single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network sensor was developed for real time monitoring of hydrazine leaks to concentrations at parts per million levels. Upon exposure to hydrazine vapor, the resistance of the air exposed nanotubes (p-type) is observed to increase rapidly while that of the vacuum-degassed nanotubes (n-type) is observed to decrease. It was found that the resistance of the sample can be recovered through vacuum pumping and exposure to ultraviolet light. The experimental results support the electrochemical charge transfer mechanism between the oxygen redox couple of the ambient and the Fermi level of the SWNT. Theoretical results of the hydrazine-SWNT interaction are compared with the experimental observations. It was found that a monolayer of water molecules on the SWNT is necessary to induce strong interactions between hydrazine and the SWNT by way of introducing new occupied states near the bottom of the conduction band of the SWNT.

  14. Electrical characterization of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berliocchi, Marco; Brunetti, Francesca; Di Carlo, Aldo; Lugli, Paolo; Orlanducci, Silvia; Terranova, Maria Letizia

    2003-04-01

    Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) based nanotechnology appears to be promising for future nanoelectronics. The SWCNT may be either metallic or semiconducting and both metallic and semiconducting types of SWCNTs have been observed experimentally. This gives rise to intriguing possibilities to put together semiconductor-semiconductor and semiconductor-metal junctions for diodes and transistors. The potential for nanotubes in nanoelectronics devices, displays and nanosensors is enormous. However, in order to realize the potential of SWCNTs, it is critical to understand the properties of charge transport and to control phase purity, elicity and arrangement according to specific architectures. We have investigated the electrical properties of various SWCNTs samples whit different organization: bundles of SWCNTs, SWCNT fibres and different membranes and tablets obtained using SWCNTs purified and characterized. Electrical characterizations were carried out by a 4155B Agilent Semiconductor Parameter Analyser. In order to give a mechanical stability to SWCNTs fibres and bundles we have used a nafion matrix coating, so an electrical characterization has been performed on samples with and without this layer. I-V measurements were performed in vacuum and in air using aluminium interdigitated coplanar-electrodes (width=20mm or 40mm) on glass substrates. The behaviour observed is generally supralinear with currents of the order of mA in vacuum and lower values in air with the exception of the tablet samples where the behaviour is ohmic, the currents are higher and similar values of current are detected in air and vacuum.

  15. Improved cellular uptake of functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, A.; Serafini, S.; Menotta, M.; Sfara, C.; Pierigé, F.; Giorgi, L.; Ambrosi, G.; Rossi, L.; Magnani, M.

    2010-10-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) due to their unique structural and physicochemical properties, have been proposed as delivery systems for a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic agents. However, SWNTs have proven difficult to solubilize in aqueous solution, limiting their use in biological applications. In an attempt to improve SWNTs' solubility, biocompatibility, and to increase cell penetration we have thoroughly investigated the construction of carbon scaffolds coated with aliphatic carbon chains and phospholipids to obtain micelle-like structures. At first, oxidized SWNTs (2370 ± 30 nmol mg - 1 of SWNTs) were covalently coupled with an alcoholic chain (stearyl alcohol, C18H37OH; 816 nmol mg - 1 of SWNTs). Subsequently, SWNTs-COOC18H37 derivatives were coated with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) or -serine (PS) phospholipids obtaining micelle-like structures. We found that cellular uptake of these constructs by phagocytic cells occurs via an endocytotic mechanism for constructs larger than 400 nm while occurs via diffusion through the cell membrane for constructs up to 400 nm. The material that enters the cell by phagocytosis is actively internalized by macrophages and localizes inside endocytotic vesicles. In contrast the material that enters the cells by diffusion is found in the cell cytosol. In conclusion, we have realized new biomimetic constructs based on alkylated SWNTs coated with phospholipids that are efficiently internalized by different cell types only if their size is lower than 400 nm. These constructs are not toxic to the cells and could now be explored as delivery systems for non-permeant cargoes.

  16. Selective etching of thin single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kalbác, Martin; Kavan, Ladislav; Dunsch, Lothar

    2009-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy and in situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry were applied to study the selective etching of thin tubes by lithium vapor in doped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A strong doping of SWCNTs after the reaction with Li vapor was confirmed by the vanishing of the radial breathing mode (RBM) and by a strong attenuation of the tangential displacement (TG) band in the Raman spectra. The Raman spectra of the Li-vapor-treated SWCNTs after subsequent reaction with water showed changes in the diameter distribution compared with that of a pristine sample (nanotubes with diameters of <1 nm disappeared from the Raman spectra). The samples were tested by the Raman pattern with five different laser lines, and a removal of narrower tubes was confirmed. The remaining wider tubes were not significantly damaged by the treatment with Li, as indicated by the D line in the Raman spectra. Furthermore, the small-diameter tubes are converted not into amorphous carbon but into lithium carbide, which could easily be removed by hydrolysis. The treated samples were further charged electrochemically. It was shown by spectroelectrochemistry that anodic charging may lead to removal of the residual chemical doping from the thicker nanotubes in the sample, but the thin nanotubes did not appear in the spectra. This is a further confirmation of the removal of the small-diameter tubes.

  17. Bulk Mechanical Properties of Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giarra, Matthew; Landi, Brian; Cress, Cory; Raffaelle, Ryne

    2007-03-01

    The unique properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) make them especially well suited for use as electrodes in power devices such as lithium ion batteries, hydrogen fuel cells, solar cells, and supercapacitors. The performances of such devices are expected to be influenced, at least in part, by the mechanical properties of the SWNTs used in composites or in stand alone ``papers.'' Therefore, the elastic moduli and ultimate tensile strengths of SWNT papers were measured as functions of temperature, SWNT purity, SWNT length, and SWNT bundling. The SWNTs used to produce the papers were synthesized in an alexandrite laser vaporization reactor at 1100^oC and purified using conventional acid-reflux conditions. Characterization of the SWNTs was performed using SEM, BET, TGA, and optical and Raman spectroscopy. The purified material was filtered and dried to yield papers of bundled SWNTs which were analyzed using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). It was observed that the mechanical properties of acid-refluxed SWNT papers were significantly improved by controlled thermal oxidation and strain-hardening. Elastic moduli of SWNT papers were measured between 3 and 6 GPa. Ultimate (breaking) tensile stresses were measured between 45 and 90 MPa at 1-3% strain. These results and their implications in regard to potential applications in power devices will be discussed.

  18. On the Stability and Abundance of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Hedman, Daniel; Reza Barzegar, Hamid; Rosén, Arne; Wågberg, Thomas; Andreas Larsson, J.

    2015-01-01

    Many nanotechnological applications, using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), are only possible with a uniform product. Thus, direct control over the product during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of SWNT is desirable, and much effort has been made towards the ultimate goal of chirality-controlled growth of SWNTs. We have used density functional theory (DFT) to compute the stability of SWNT fragments of all chiralities in the series representing the targeted products for such applications, which we compare to the chiralities of the actual CVD products from all properly analyzed experiments. From this comparison we find that in 84% of the cases the experimental product represents chiralities among the most stable SWNT fragments (within 0.2 eV) from the computations. Our analysis shows that the diameter of the SWNT product is governed by the well-known relation to size of the catalytic nanoparticles, and the specific chirality is normally determined by the product’s relative stability, suggesting thermodynamic control at the early stage of product formation. Based on our findings, we discuss the effect of other experimental parameters on the chirality of the product. Furthermore, we highlight the possibility to produce any tube chirality in the context of recent published work on seeded-controlled growth. PMID:26581125

  19. Circular dichroism of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Naomichi; Tatsumi, Yuki; Saito, Riichiro

    2017-04-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) of a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) is calculated as a function of the wavelength of light. Because of the symmetry between the K and K' points in the hexagonal Brillouin zone, the conventional theory for CD intensity gives a zero value in which the absorption probability near the K point for right-handed circular polarized light and that near the K' point for left-handed circular polarized light cancel each other. Considering the phase differences of the light for carbon atoms of a nanotube, which are beyond so-called dipole approximation, a formulation of CD for a SWNT is presented. Analytic and numerical calculations show (1) the alternating sign of the CD intensity at Ei i (i =1 ,2 ,3 ,... ) van Hove singular energies and (2) opposite sign of the CD values as a function of wavelength of the light for different types and handedness of nanotubes, which reproduce the experimental results. In the metallic SWNTs, we predict the opposite sign of CD values for split Eii + and Eii -.

  20. Fluorescent single walled carbon nanotube/silica composite materials.

    PubMed

    Satishkumar, B C; Doorn, Stephen K; Baker, Gary A; Dattelbaum, Andrew M

    2008-11-25

    We present a new approach for the preparation of single walled carbon nanotube silica composite materials that retain the intrinsic fluorescence characteristics of the encapsulated nanotubes. Incorporation of isolated nanotubes into optically transparent matrices, such as sol-gel prepared silica, to take advantage of their near-infrared emission properties for applications like sensing has been a challenging task. In general, the alcohol solvents and acidic conditions required for typical sol-gel preparations disrupt the nanotube/surfactant assembly and cause the isolated nanotubes to aggregate leading to degradation of their fluorescence properties. To overcome these issues, we have used a sugar alcohol modified silica precursor molecule, diglycerylsilane, for encapsulation of nanotubes in silica under aqueous conditions and at neutral pH. The silica/nanotube composite materials have been prepared as monoliths, at least 5 mm thick, or as films (<1 mm) and were characterized using fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. In the present work we have investigated the fluorescence characteristics of the silica encapsulated carbon nanotubes by means of redox doping studies as well as demonstrated their potential for biosensing applications. Such nanotube/silica composite systems may allow for new sensing and imaging applications that are not currently achievable.

  1. Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes-Based Organic Memory Structures.

    PubMed

    Fakher, Sundes; Nejm, Razan; Ayesh, Ahmad; Al-Ghaferi, Amal; Zeze, Dagou; Mabrook, Mohammed

    2016-09-02

    The electrical behaviour of organic memory structures, based on single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs), metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) and thin film transistor (TFT) structures, using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as the gate dielectric, are reported. The drain and source electrodes were fabricated by evaporating 50 nm gold, and the gate electrode was made from 50 nm-evaporated aluminium on a clean glass substrate. Thin films of SWCNTs, embedded within the insulating layer, were used as the floating gate. SWCNTs-based memory devices exhibited clear hysteresis in their electrical characteristics (capacitance-voltage (C-V) for MIS structures, as well as output and transfer characteristics for transistors). Both structures were shown to produce reliable and large memory windows by virtue of high capacity and reduced charge leakage. The hysteresis in the output and transfer characteristics, the shifts in the threshold voltage of the transfer characteristics, and the flat-band voltage shift in the MIS structures were attributed to the charging and discharging of the SWCNTs floating gate. Under an appropriate gate bias (1 s pulses), the floating gate is charged and discharged, resulting in significant threshold voltage shifts. Pulses as low as 1 V resulted in clear write and erase states.

  2. Purification Procedures for Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorelik, Olga P.; Nikolaev, Pavel; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the comparison of a variety of procedures used to purify carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotube material is produced by the arc process and laser oven process. Most of the procedures are tested using laser-grown, single-wall nanotube (SWNT) material. The material is characterized at each step of the purification procedures by using different techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The identified impurities are amorphous and graphitic carbon, catalyst particle aggregates, fullerenes, and hydrocarbons. Solvent extraction and low-temperature annealing are used to reduce the amount of volatile hydrocarbons and dissolve fullerenes. Metal catalysts and amorphous as well as graphitic carbon are oxidized by reflux in acids including HCl, HNO3 and HF and other oxidizers such as H2O2. High-temperature annealing in vacuum and in inert atmosphere helps to improve the quality of SWNTs by increasing crystallinity and reducing intercalation.

  3. Interactions between single-walled carbon nanotubes and lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Bomboi, F; Bonincontro, A; La Mesa, C; Tardani, F

    2011-03-15

    Dispersions of single-walled and non-associated carbon nanotubes in aqueous lysozyme solution were investigated by analyzing the stabilizing effect of both protein concentration and pH. It was inferred that the medium pH, which significantly modifies the protein net charge and (presumably) conformation, modulates the mutual interactions with carbon nanotubes. At fixed pH, in addition, the formation of protein/nanotube complexes scales with increasing lysozyme concentration. Electrophoretic mobility, dielectric relaxation and circular dichroism were used to determine the above features. According to circular dichroism, lysozyme adsorbed onto nanotubes could essentially retain its native conformation, but the significant amount of free protein does not allow drawing definitive conclusions on this regard. The state of charge and charge distribution around nanotubes was inferred by combining electrophoretic mobility and dielectric relaxation methods. The former gives information on changes in the surface charge density of the complexes, the latter on modifications in the electrical double layer thickness around them. Such results are complementary each other and univocally indicate that some LYS molecules take part to binding. Above a critical protein/nanotube mass ratio, depletion phenomena were observed. They counteract the stabilization mechanism, with subsequent nanotube/nanotube aggregation and phase separation. Protein-based depletion phenomena are similar to formerly reported effects, observed in aqueous surfactant systems containing carbon nanotubes.

  4. Optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostojic, Gordana

    2012-02-01

    A network of connected single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) is created by a novel DNA-protein complex directed assembly. Due to a point-like nature of connectors, the SWNT aerogel represents a network of self-suspended nanotubes with a record ultra-low density of less 0.75 mg/cm^3. The assembly method and low density enables a direct comparison of optical properties of nanotubes in solvent and air to surfactant solubilized nanotubes. Optical properties of SWNT gels are investigated using optical absorption, photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy. Gelled nanotubes in water and in the low population regime behave similar to solubilized nanotubes. In contrast, photoluminescence of SWNT aerogels exhibit nonlinear effects and a phonon-induced broadening. In addition, aerogels show a previously unobserved photoluminescence peak at 1.3 eV that corresponds to a phonon-assisted recombination of photoexcited charges. Raman spectra of carbon nanotube aerogels display narrow peaks due to the phonon decoupling of suspended SWNTs in air and a redistribution of G phonon population due to nonlinear effects.

  5. Reinforced Thermoplastic Polyimide with Dispersed Functionalized Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.; Gaier, James R.; Sola, Francisco; Scheiman, Daniel A.; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular pi-complexes were formed from pristine HiPCO single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and 1-pyrene- N-(4- N'-(5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxyimido)phenyl butanamide, 1. Polyimide films were prepared with these complexes as well as uncomplexed SWCNTs and the effects of nanoadditive addition on mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of these films were evaluated. Although these properties were enhanced by both nanoadditives, larger increases in tensile strength and thermal and electrical conductivities were obtained when the SWCNT/1 complexes were used. At a loading level of 5.5 wt %, the Tg of the polyimide increased from 169 to 197 C and the storage modulus increased 20-fold (from 142 to 3045 MPa). The addition of 3.5 wt % SWCNT/1 complexes increased the tensile strength of the polyimide from 61.4 to 129 MPa; higher loading levels led to embrittlement and lower tensile strengths. The electrical conductivities (DC surface) of the polyimides increased to 1 x 10(exp -4) Scm(exp -1) (SWCNT/1 complexes loading level of 9 wt %). Details of the preparation of these complexes and their effects on polyimide film properties are discussed.

  6. Single walled carbon nanotube composites for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashim; Woods, Mia D; Illingworth, Kenneth David; Niemeier, Ryan; Schafer, Isaac; Cady, Craig; Filip, Peter; El-Amin, Saadiq F

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLAGA) composites for orthopedic applications and to evaluate the interaction of human stem cells (hBMSCs) and osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1 cells) via cell growth, proliferation, gene expression, extracellular matrix production and mineralization. PLAGA and SWCNT/PLAGA composites were fabricated with various amounts of SWCNT (5, 10, 20, 40, and 100 mg), characterized and degradation studies were performed. Cells were seeded and cell adhesion/morphology, growth/survival, proliferation and gene expression analysis were performed to evaluate biocompatibility. Imaging studies demonstrated uniform incorporation of SWCNT into the PLAGA matrix and addition of SWCNT did not affect the degradation rate. Imaging studies revealed that MC3T3-E1 and hBMSCs cells exhibited normal, non-stressed morphology on the composites and all were biocompatible. Composites with 10 mg SWCNT resulted in highest rate of cell proliferation (p < 0.05) among all composites. Gene expression of alkaline phosphatase, collagen I, osteocalcin, osteopontin, Runx-2, and Bone Sialoprotein was observed on all composites. In conclusion, SWCNT/PLAGA composites imparted beneficial cellular growth capabilities and gene expression, and mineralization abilities were well established. These results demonstrate the potential of SWCNT/PLAGA composites for musculoskeletal regeneration and bone tissue engineering (BTE) and are promising for orthopedic applications.

  7. Chirality Characterization of Dispersed Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Williams, Phillip A.; Mayweather, Candis D.; Wincheski, Buzz; Park, Cheol; Namkung, Juock S.

    2005-01-01

    Raman scattering and optical absorption spectroscopy are used for the chirality characterization of HiPco single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) dispersed in aqueous solution with the surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate. Radial breathing mode (RBM) Raman peaks for semiconducting and metallic SWNTs are identified by directly comparing the Raman spectra with the Kataura plot. The SWNT diameters are calculated from these resonant peak positions. Next, a list of (n, m) pairs, yielding the SWNT diameters within a few percent of that obtained from each resonant peak position, is established. The interband transition energies for the list of SWNT (n, m) pairs are calculated based on the tight binding energy expression for each list of the (n, m) pairs, and the pairs yielding the closest values to the corresponding experimental optical absorption peaks are selected. The results reveal that (1, 11), (4, 11), and (0, 11) as the most probable chiralities of the semiconducting nanotubes. The results also reveal that (4, 16), (6, 12) and (8, 8) are the most probable chiralities for the metallic nanotubes. Directly relating the Raman scattering data to the optical absorption spectra, the present method is considered the simplest technique currently available. Another advantage of this technique is the use of the E(sup 8)(sub 11) peaks in the optical absorption spectrum in the analysis to enhance the accuracy in the results.

  8. Multiple structure single parameter: analysis of a single protein nano environment descriptor characterizing a shared loci on structurally aligned proteins.

    PubMed

    Salim, José Augusto; Borro, Luiz; Mazoni, Ivan; Yano, Inácio; Jardine, José G; Neshich, Goran

    2016-06-15

    A graphical representation of physicochemical and structural descriptors attributed to amino acid residues occupying the same topological position in different, structurally aligned proteins can provide a more intuitive way to associate possible functional implications to identified variations in structural characteristics. This could be achieved by observing selected characteristics of amino acids and of their corresponding nano environments, described by the numerical value of matching descriptor. For this purpose, a web-based tool called multiple structure single parameter (MSSP) was developed and here presented. MSSP produces a two-dimensional plot of a single protein descriptor for a number of structurally aligned protein chains. From a total of 150 protein descriptors available in MSSP, selected of >1500 parameters stored in the STING database, it is possible to create easily readable and highly informative XY-plots, where X-axis contains the amino acid position in the multiple structural alignment, and Y-axis contains the descriptor's numerical values for each aligned structure. To illustrate one of possible MSSP contributions to the investigation of changes in physicochemical and structural properties of mutants, comparing them with the cognate wild-type structure, the oncogenic mutation of M918T in RET kinase is presented. The comparative analysis of wild-type and mutant structures shows great changes in their electrostatic potential. These variations are easily depicted at the MSSP-generated XY-plot. The web server is freely available at http://www.cbi.cnptia.embrapa.br/SMS/STINGm/MPA/index.html Web server implemented in Perl, Java and JavaScript and JMol or Protein Viewer as structure visualizers. goran.neshich@embrapa.br or gneshich@gmail.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Flame Synthesis Of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes And Nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wal, Randy L. Vander; Berger, Gordon M.; Ticich, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are widely sought for a variety of applications including gas storage, intercalation media, catalyst support and composite reinforcing material [1]. Each of these applications will require large scale quantities of CNTs. A second consideration is that some of these applications may require redispersal of the collected CNTs and attachment to a support structure. If the CNTs could be synthesized directly upon the support to be used in the end application, a tremendous savings in post-synthesis processing could be realized. Therein we have pursued both aerosol and supported catalyst synthesis of CNTs. Given space limitations, only the aerosol portion of the work is outlined here though results from both thrusts will be presented during the talk. Aerosol methods of SWNT, MWNT or nanofiber synthesis hold promise of large-scale production to supply the tonnage quantities these applications will require. Aerosol methods may potentially permit control of the catalyst particle size, offer continuous processing, provide highest product purity and most importantly, are scaleable. Only via economy of scale will the cost of CNTs be sufficient to realize the large-scale structural and power applications on both earth and in space. Present aerosol methods for SWNT synthesis include laser ablation of composite metalgraphite targets or thermal decomposition/pyrolysis of a sublimed or vaporized organometallic [2]. Both approaches, conducted within a high temperature furnace, have produced single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs). The former method requires sophisticated hardware and is inherently limited by the energy deposition that can be realized using pulsed laser light. The latter method, using expensive organometallics is difficult to control for SWNT synthesis given a range of gasparticle mixing conditions along variable temperature gradients; multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs) are a far more likely end products. Both approaches require large energy expenditures and

  10. Alignment, rotation, and spinning of single plasmonic nanoparticles and nanowires using polarization dependent optical forces.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lianming; Miljković, Vladimir D; Käll, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate optical alignment and rotation of individual plasmonic nanostructures with lengths from tens of nanometers to several micrometers using a single beam of linearly polarized near-infrared laser light. Silver nanorods and dimers of gold nanoparticles align parallel to the laser polarization because of the high long-axis dipole polarizability. Silver nanowires, in contrast, spontaneously turn perpendicular to the incident polarization and predominantly attach at the wire ends, in agreement with electrodynamics simulations. Wires, rods, and dimers all rotate if the incident polarization is turned. In the case of nanowires, we demonstrate spinning at an angular frequency of approximately 1 Hz due to transfer of spin angular momentum from circularly polarized light.

  11. Polypyrrole-Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Gas Sensor Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakoullis, James, Jr.

    The overall objective of this work is to fabricate and evaluate polypyrrole-single-walled carbon nanotubes hybrid structures based chemiresistive sensor arrays for sensitive, selective and discriminative sensing at room temperature of emissions from automobiles and industrial manufacturing. To conceive the sensor arrays single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) networks were aligned to bridge a 3 mum gap between a pair of prefabricated microelectrodes followed by coating with polypyrrole (PPY) with different dopants by electrochemical polymerization. Initially, the sensor¡¦s synthesis conditions in terms of PPY thickness on SWNTs networks by varying the electropolymerization charge of the monomer pyrrole in presence of LiClO4 dopant for the sensing of NH3 was optimized. Using the optimized polymerization charge of 1 muC determined previously, arrays of SWNTs-PPY hybrid sensors were fabricated by replacing dopant LiClO4 by L-camphor sulfonic acid, D-camphor sulfonic acid, p-toluene sulfonic acid and sodium dodecyl sulfonate. Room temperature gas sensing performance of the PPY coated SWNTs network arrays to gases of environmental significance such as NH3, NO 2, H2S, SO2, CO and CO2 and volatile organic compounds such as benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, p-xylene, methanol, n-hexane and acetone and humidity, was evaluated. Several folds enhancement in sensing performance was observed towards all the tested analytesfor hybrid devices when compared to bare SWNTs network devices. Differences in sensing performance were noticed for PPY coating with different dopants demonstrating the potential of using the array for discrimination of the tested analytes in a mixture by using chemometric techniques. The underlying sensing mechanism was also investigated by using the devices in chemFET mode configuration.

  12. Effects of Gases on Field Emission from Single and Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhawan, A.; Stephens, K.; Stallcup, R., II; Perez, J.; Physics Department Collaboration

    2001-03-01

    We report the effects of O_2, H_2, and Ar exposure on the field emission properties of single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes. The field emission current vs. voltage curves and field emission current vs. time were measured as a function of gas exposure at 10-8 Torr over a period of approximately 8 hours. The data were collected using an automated system running under Labview. We find that H2 and Ar exposure do not significantly affect the field emission properties of either single or multi-walled carbon nanotubes. However, O2 exposure degrades the field emission properties of multi-wall tubes more than those of single-wall tubes. After O2 exposure, the turn-on voltage for multi-wall tubes increased fromm 300 to 500 volts, while the turn-on voltage for single-wall tubes increased from 200 to 250 volts. An explanation of these results will be discussed.

  13. Single wall carbon nanotubes as viscosity modifiers in polypropylene matrix nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simien, Daneesh Olivia

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were studied as low shear rate viscosity modifiers in the polypropylene matrix of nanocomposites. To create nanocomposites which did not demonstrate increased low shear rate viscosity when nanotubes were added into the polymer melt, this work focused on modifying the sidewall profile of the SWNTs and manipulating their configuration in the polymer matrix before subjecting them to rheological testing. Fluorinated single-walled nanotubes (F-SWNTs) played a critical part in evaluating how functionalizations could affect the viscosity of the polymer melt. Fibers made from weight percents ranging from 2.5wt% to 10wt% of F-SWNTs in isotactic polypropylene, with Mw = 250,000 g/mol (iPP250,000), were shown to have lower complex viscosity profiles than the neat iPP250,000 sample at low shear rates. These fibers demonstrated decreases in the complex viscosities, in the low frequency range, of 36.5%, 27.8% and 37.5%, for the 2.5wt.%, 5wt.% and 10wt.% fiber samples respectively. F-SWNTs were shown to stimulate in situ initiated reactions in the polymer melt where free radials generated, as a result of spontaneously dissociated fluorine atoms which scavenge hydrogen from the surrounding polymer chains, facilitate the covalent bonding of nanotubes directly to the polypropylene chains. These covalently bonded nanotubes were then forced to align themselves, along with the polymer chains when the bulk composite is spun into a small diameter fiber (dia.130mum). Another method used to create low shear rate viscosity nanocomposites was to capitalize on the low viscosity properties of low molecular weight isotactic polypropylene (Mw = 12,000g/mol) by creating a hybrid nanocomposite system in the iPP250,000 matrix. In these systems, benzoyl peroxide was used as the free radical initiator which could facilitate the covalent bonding of single walled nanotubes to the polymer chains in the melt. Both non-functionalized and functionalized hybrid

  14. Modelling of side-wall angle for optical proximity correction for self-aligned double patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulis, Sylvain; Farys, Vincent; Belledent, Jérôme; Foucher, Johann

    2012-03-01

    The pursuit of even smaller transistors has pushed some technological innovations in the field of lithography. In order to continue following the path of Moore's law, several solutions were proposed: EUV, e-beam and double patterning lithography. As EUV and e-beam lithography are still not ready for mass production for 20nm and 14nm nodes, double patterning lithography will play an important role for these nodes. In this work, we had focused on Self- Aligned Double-Patterning processes which consist in depositing a spacer material on each side of a mandrel exposed during a first lithography stepmaking the pitch to be divided by two after transfer into the substrate, the cutting of unwanted patterns being addressed through a second lithography exposure. In the specific case where spacers are deposited directly on the flanks of the resist, it is crucial to control its profiles as it could induce final CD errors or even spacer collapse. In this work, we will first study with a simple model the influence of the resist profile on the post-etch spacer CD. Then we will show that the placement of Sub-Resolution Assist Features (SRAF) can influence the resist profile and finally, we will see how much control of the spacer and inter-spacer CD we can achieve by tuning SRAF placement.

  15. Wiring-up hydrogenase with single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Timothy J; Svedruzic, Drazenka; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Zhang, S B; King, Paul W; Heben, Michael J

    2007-11-01

    Many envision a future where hydrogen is the centerpiece of a sustainable, carbon-free energy supply. For example, the energy in sunlight may be stored by splitting water into H2 and O2 using inorganic semiconductors and photoelectrochemical approaches or with artificial photosynthetic systems that seek to mimic the light absorption, energy transfer, electron transfer, and redox catalysis that occurs in green plants. Unfortunately, large scale deployment of artificial water-splitting technologies may be impeded by the need for the large amounts of precious metals required to catalyze the multielectron water-splitting reactions. Nature provides a variety of microbes that can activate the dihydrogen bond through the catalytic activity of [NiFe] and [FeFe] hydrogenases, and photobiological approaches to water splitting have been advanced. One may also consider a biohybrid approach; however, it is difficult to interface these sensitive, metalloenzymes to other materials and systems. Here we show that surfactant-suspended carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) spontaneously self-assemble with [FeFe] hydrogenases in solution to form catalytically active biohybrids. Photoluminescence excitation and Raman spectroscopy studies show that SWNTs act as molecular wires to make electrical contact to the biocatalytic region of hydrogenase. Hydrogenase mediates electron injection into nanotubes having appropriately positioned lowest occupied molecular orbital levels when the H2 partial pressure is varied. The hydrogenase is strongly attached to the SWNTs, so mass transport effects are eliminated and the absolute potential of the electronic levels of the nanotubes can be unambiguously measured. Our findings reveal new nanotube physics and represent the first example of "wiring-up" an hydrogenase with another nanoscale material. This latter advance offers a nonprecious metal route to the design of new biohybrid architectures and building blocks for hydrogen-related technologies.

  16. Chirality affects aggregation kinetics of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Khan, Iftheker A; Afrooz, A R M Nabiul; Flora, Joseph R V; Schierz, P Ariette; Ferguson, P Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Saleh, Navid B

    2013-02-19

    Aggregation kinetics of chiral-specific semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was systematically studied through time-resolved dynamic light scattering. Varied monovalent (NaCl) and divalent (CaCl(2)) electrolyte composition was used as background solution chemistry. Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) was used to study the effects of natural organic matter on chirally separated SWNT aggregation. Increasing salt concentration and introduction of divalent cations caused aggregation of SWNT clusters by suppressing the electrostatic repulsive interaction from the oxidized surfaces. The (6,5) SWNTs, i.e., SG65, with relatively lower diameter tubes compared to (7,6), i.e., SG76, showed substantially higher stability (7- and 5-fold for NaCl and CaCl(2), respectively). The critical coagulation concentration (CCC) values were 96 and 13 mM NaCl in the case of NaCl and 2.8 and 0.6 mM CaCl(2) for SG65 and SG76, respectively. The increased tube diameter for (7,6) armchair SWNTs likely presented with higher van der Waals interaction and thus increased the aggregation propensity substantially. The presence of SRHA enhanced SWNT stability in divalent CaCl(2) environment through steric interaction from adsorbed humic molecules; however showed little or no effects for monovalent NaCl. The mechanism of aggregation-describing favorable interaction tendencies for (7,6) SWNTs-is probed through ab initio molecular modeling. The results suggest that SWNT stability can be chirality dependent in typical aquatic environment.

  17. Extinction coefficients and purity of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, B; Itkis, M E; Niyogi, S; Hu, H; Perea, D E; Haddon, R C

    2004-11-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) hold great promise for advanced applications in aerospace, electronics and medicine, yet these industries require materials with rigorous quality control. There are currently no accepted standards for quality assurance or quality control among the commercial suppliers of SWNTs. We briefly discuss the applicability of various techniques to measure SWNT purity and review, in detail, the advantages of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for the quantitative assessment of the bulk carbonaceous purity of SWNTs. We review the use of solution phase NIR spectroscopy for the analysis and characterization of a variety of carbon materials, emphasizing SWNTs produced by the electric arc (EA), laser oven (LO) and HiPco (HC) methods. We consider the applicability of Beer's law to carbon materials dispersed in dimethylformamide (DMF) and the effective extinction coefficients that are obtained from such dispersions. Analysis of the areal absorptivities of the second interband transition of semiconducting EA-produced SWNTs for a number of samples of differing purities has lead to an absolute molar extinction coefficient for the carbonaceous impurities in EA-produced SWNT samples. We conclude that NIR spectroscopy is the clear method of choice for the assessment of the bulk carbonaceous purity of EA-produced SWNTs, and we suggest that an absolute determination of the purity of SWNTs is within reach. Continued work in this area is expected to lead to a universal method for the assessment of the absolute bulk purity of SWNTs from all sources--such a development will be of great importance for nanotube science and for future customers for this product.

  18. Effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on soil microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Chung, H.; Son, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are novel materials that have the potential to be used in various commercial fields due to their unique physicochemical properties. As a result of commercial development of nanotechnology, SWCNTs may be discharged to the soil environment with unknown consequences. However, there are as yet no data in the scientific literature that demonstrate the effects of SWCNTs on microbial function in soils. Therefore, we aimed to determine the effects of SWCNTs on soil microbial activity through a 2-week incubation study on urban soils supplemented with different concentrations of SWCNTs ranging from 0 to 1000 μg CNT/g soil. Fluorometric test using fluorogenic substrates were employed for the measurement of several enzyme activities in soil samples. More specifically, we determined the changes in the activities of cellobiohydrolase, β-1,4-glucosidase, β-1,4-xylosidase, β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase, L-leucine aminopeptidase and acid phosphatase which play important roles in the carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles in response to the addition of SWCNTs. We found that microbial enzyme activities decreased as the concentrations of SWCNT added increased. The lowest enzyme activities were observed under 1000 μg CNT/g soil. The overall pattern shows that enzyme activities decreased slightly in the first 2-3 days and increased in the later stage of the incubation. Our results suggest that relatively high concentrations of SWCNTs can inhibit microbial activities, and this may be due to microbial cell membrane damage caused by SWCNTs. However, further study needs to be conducted to determine the mechanism responsible for inhibitory effect of SWCNTs on soil microbial activity. It can be concluded that changes in the activities of extracellular enzymes can indicate the effect of SWCNTs on soil microorganisms and nutrient cycling.

  19. Toroidal Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Fullerene Crop Circles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We investigate energetics and structure of circular and polygonal single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using large scale molecular simulations on NAS SP2, motivated by their unusual electronic and magnetic properties. The circular tori are formed by bending tube (no net whereas the polygonal tori are constructed by turning the joint of two tubes of (n, n), (n+1, n-1) and (n+2, n-2) with topological pentagon-heptagon defect, in which n =5, 8 and 10. The strain energy of circular tori relative to straight tube decreases by I/D(sup 2) where D is torus diameter. As D increases, these tori change from buckling to an energetically stable state. The stable tori are perfect circular in both toroidal and tubular geometry with strain less than 0. 03 eV/atom when D greater than 10, 20 and 40 nm for torus (5,5), (8,8) and (10, 10). Polygonal tori, whose strain is proportional to the number of defects and I/D are energetically stable even for D less than 10 nm. However, their strain is higher than that of perfect circular tori. In addition, the local maximum strain of polygonal tori is much higher than that of perfect circular tori. It is approx. 0.03 eV/atom or less for perfect circular torus (5,5), but 0.13 and 0.21 eV/atom for polygonal tori (6,4)/(5,5) and (7,3)/(5,5). Therefore, we conclude that the circular tori with no topological defects are more energetically stable and kinetically accessible than the polygonal tori containing the pentagon-heptagon defects for the laser-grown SWNTs and Fullerene crop circles.

  20. Spectroscopy-Based Characterization of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Namkung, Juock S.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Seo, J.; Park, Cheol

    2003-01-01

    We present the initial results of our combined investigation of Raman scattering and optical absorption spectroscopy in a batch of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The SWNT diameters are first estimated from the four radial breathing mode (RBM) peaks using a simple relation of omega(sub RBM) = 248/cm nm/d(sub t)(nm). The calculated diameter values are related to the optical absorption peaks through the expressions of first interband transition energies, i.e., E(sup S)(sub 11) = 2a gamma/d(sub t) for semiconducting and E(sup S)(sub 11) = 6a gamma/d(sub t) for metallic SWNTs, respectively, where a is the carbon-carbon bond length (0.144 nm) and gamma is the energy of overlapping electrons from nearest neighbor atoms, which is 2.9 eV for a SWNT. This analysis indicates that three RBM peaks are from semiconducting tubes, and the remaining one is from metallic tubes. The detailed analysis in the present study is focused on these three peaks of the first absorption band by determining the values of the representative (n,m) pairs. The first step of analysis is to construct a list of possible (n,m) pairs from the diameters calculated from the positions of the RBM peaks. The second step is to compute the first interband transition energy, E(sub 11), by substituting the constructed list of (n,m) into the expression of Reich and Thomsen, and Saito et al. Finally, the pairs with the energies closest to the experimental values are selected.

  1. Photovoltaic device using single wall carbon nanotubes and method of fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    Biris, Alexandru S.; Li, Zhongrui

    2012-11-06

    A photovoltaic device and methods for forming the same. In one embodiment, the photovoltaic device has a silicon substrate, and a film comprising a plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes disposed on the silicon substrate, wherein the plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes forms a plurality of heterojunctions with the silicon in the substrate.

  2. Study on the Microwave Permittivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiaolai; Zhao, Donglin

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we studied the microwave permittivity of the complex of the single-walled carbon nanotube and paraffin in 2-18GHz. In the range, the dielectric loss of single-walled carbon nanotube is higher, and the real part and the imaginary part of the dielectric constant decrease with the increase of frequency, and the dielectric constant…

  3. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as near-infrared optical biosensors for life sciences and biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Jain, Astha; Homayoun, Aida; Bannister, Christopher W; Yum, Kyungsuk

    2015-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes that emit photostable near-infrared fluorescence have emerged as near-infrared optical biosensors for life sciences and biomedicine. Since the discovery of their near-infrared fluorescence, researchers have engineered single-walled carbon nanotubes to function as an optical biosensor that selectively modulates its fluorescence upon binding of target molecules. Here we review the recent advances in the single-walled carbon nanotube-based optical sensing technology for life sciences and biomedicine. We discuss the structure and optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes, the mechanisms for molecular recognition and signal transduction in single-walled carbon nanotube complexes, and the recent development of various single-walled carbon nanotube-based optical biosensors. We also discuss the opportunities and challenges to translate this emerging technology into biomedical research and clinical use, including the biological safety of single-walled carbon nanotubes. The advances in single-walled carbon nanotube-based near-infrared optical sensing technology open up a new avenue for in vitro and in vivo biosensing with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution, beneficial for many areas of life sciences and biomedicine. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Controlling exciton photophysics in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarpkaya, Ibrahim

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been studied extensively by scientists and engineers due to their unique mechanical, optical, electronic and thermal properties that make them attractive for both fundamental research and device applications. Specifically, important optical properties of SWCNTs such as formation of strongly bound excitons (electron-hole pairs), being stable at room temperature, and bandgap-tunable light emission from visible to telecom wavelengths make them a promising material for optoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. However, the photophysics of excitons in SWCNTs is not yet fully understood and is largely affected by detrimental extrinsic effects, which give rise to strongly reduced device performance. This dissertation demonstrates novel methods and techniques to better understand and to control the photophysics of excitons in SWCNTs. The first part presents novel ways to completely remove detrimental spectral diffusion and blinking in the optical emission of surfactant dispersed SWCNTs on millisecond time scales and also demonstrates 50-fold enhanced exciton emission. Furthermore, pronounced photon antibunching is observed for the first time under resonant excitation. The demonstrated single photon emission is promising for applications in quantum cryptography, while the achieved stable long term emission is important for optoelectronic devices. The second part demonstrates a new regime of intrinsic exciton photophysics in ultra-clean SWCNTs that is characterized by ultra-narrow exciton linewidth and prolonged emission times up to 18 ns. These lifetimes are two orders of magnitude better than prior measurements and in agreement with values predicted by theorists a decade ago. Moreover, I measure for the first time exciton decoherence times of individual nanotubes in the time-domain and demonstrate fourfold prolonged values up to 2 ps compared to previous ensemble studies. Finally, I demonstrate a novel method which controls

  5. Developing Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes into an Industrial Material through the Super-Growth CVD Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futaba, Don

    2013-03-01

    Since the discovery of the carbon nanotube (CNT) 20 years ago, extensive effort has been made to utilize their exceptional intrinsic properties toward industrial applications. However, availability has significantly thwarted these endeavors. In one section of my presentation, I will describe our efforts toward the economical mass-production of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) based on the water-assisted chemical vapor deposition technique, from which highly efficient synthesis of vertically aligned SWCNTs grow from substrates (SWCNT forests). Further, I will discuss our work to promote the industrial use of SWCNTs as a member of the Technology Research Association for Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (TASC) (A consortium of five companies and AIST founded for the specific purpose of developing SWCNT industrial technology.) Specifically, I will present our progress on developing the technology for the synthetic control of SWCNTs and the development of standardized evaluation techniques for the purpose of understanding the relationship between the SWCNT forest structure, e.g. length, density, crystallinity, etc and the targeted property, e.g. conductivity, mechanical reinforcement, etc. Finally, I will present several examples of applications from composites to CNT-based devices. Technology Research Association for Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (TASC), Japan

  6. Cadmium-catalyzed surface growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes with high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yong; Lu, Shunbao; Gao, Fenglei

    2011-06-15

    Graphical abstract: The Cd nanocatalysts, prepared using a diblock copolymer templating method, were uniformly spaced over a large deposition area with an average diameter of 1.9 nm and narrow size distribution. By using the normal-heating method, high density SWNTs can be generated. Research highlights: {yields} We demonstrate that cadmium (Cd) can catalyze the growth of SWNTs with high efficiency. {yields} The PVP capped-Cd nanocatalysts were uniformly spaced over a large deposition area with an average diameter of 1.9 nm. {yields} By using the normal-heating and fast-heating method, random and horizontally aligned arrays of SWNTs can be generated. {yields} The high percentage of SWNTs with Ag deposition from Cd indicates that the SWNTs have better conductivity and structural uniformity. -- Abstract: We demonstrate that cadmium (Cd) can catalyze the growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with high efficiency. The Cd nanocatalysts, prepared using a diblock copolymer templating method, were uniformly spaced over a large deposition area with an average diameter of 1.9 nm and narrow size distribution. By using the normal-heating and fast-heating method, random and horizontally aligned arrays of SWNTs can be generated. The density of the SWNTs can be altered by the chemical vapor deposition conditions. The morphology and microstructure of the SWNTs characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed that the grown nanotubes do not have carbonaceous particles and have good crystallinity. In addition, after careful check with superlong nanotubes 735 out of 790 nanotubes were found to be deposited with Ag (93%) and only 7% SWNTs without Ag deposition. While for superlong SWNT arrays from Fe, 32% long SWNTs without Ag deposition was found, the high percentage of SWNTs with Ag deposition from Cd indicates that the SWNTs have better conductivity and better

  7. Kondo-correlated transport in single molecule ferromagnetic break junction devices with controllable electrode magnetization alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Gavin; Hu, Ting-Chen

    A quantum dot attached to electrodes with magnetizations that can be switched between parallel and anti-parallel alignment has been proposed as a platform for investigating quantum criticality associated with the destruction of Kondo entanglement. We have fabricated single molecule break junction devices with elliptical ferromagnetic electrodes designed to suit this purpose. Low temperature transport measurements, supported by micromagnetic simulations, were used to investigate the magnetoresistance response on control samples during the magnetization reversal process. We show results of Kondo-correlated transport as the source and drain contacts are switched between parallel and anti-parallel magnetization configurations.

  8. Single-step total fractionation of single-wall carbon nanotubes by countercurrent chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Khripin, Constantine Y; Fagan, Jeffrey A.; McPhie, Peter; Ito, Yoichiro; Zheng, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Development of simple processes to fractionate synthetic mixtures of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) into individual species is crucial to many applications. Existing methods for single-chirality SWCNT purification are cumbersome, often requiring multiple steps and different conditions for different species. Here, we report a method to achieve total fractionation of a synthetic SWCNT mixture by countercurrent chromatography, resulting in purification of many single-chirality SWCNT species in a single run. This method is based on tunable partition of sodium deoxycholate dispersed SWCNTs in polyethylene glycol / dextran aqueous two-phase system. By running the mobile phase with 0.02% of sodium deoxycholate and a gradient of sodium dodecyl sulfate from 0.1% to 0.7% (w/w), we observe clear diameter-dependent elution, with ~ 90% total recovery. Among all the fractions collected, a number of them are enriched in single-chirality (9,4), (7,5), (7,6), (8,3), (6,5) species, while most of the remaining ones contain no more than 2-3 major species. We also observe strong (n,m)-dependent elution peak width due to enantiomer-resolved partition. These results demonstrate CCC as an effective way to obtain high purity (n, m) species, and suggest the potential of CCC as an analytical tool for chirality distribution mapping of synthetic SWCNT mixtures. PMID:24673411

  9. Hot wire production of single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Dillon, Anne C.; Mahan, Archie H.; Alleman, Jeffrey L.

    2010-10-26

    Apparatus (210) for producing a multi-wall carbon nanotube (213) may comprise a process chamber (216), a furnace (217) operatively associated with the process chamber (216), and at least one filament (218) positioned within the process chamber (216). At least one power supply (220) operatively associated with the at least one filament (218) heats the at least one filament (218) to a process temperature. A gaseous carbon precursor material (214) operatively associated with the process chamber (216) provides carbon for forming the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213). A metal catalyst material (224) operatively associated with the process (216) catalyzes the formation of the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213).

  10. Design And Construction Problems Connected With Ensuring Even Thermal Insulation Of Single-Layer Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stawiski, Bohdan

    2015-09-01

    The design of single-layer walls appears to be extremely simple. In the opinion of many designers, the additional insulation of tie beams and balconies continues to solve all problems. However, tests on single-layer walls show that the expressed opinion is not valid. The study quotes the results of tests on single-layer walls with strong signs of freezing. The conducted analysis of the design solution and calculation of the fRsi temperature factor on the internal surface and its comparison with fRsi determined empirically enabled reasons behind failure in the construction of the tested walls to be identified. The study presents problems connected with ensuring uniformity of the temperature field in walls, possibilities for detecting areas susceptible to the development of mold, and protection of partitions from the occurrence of this phenomenon by performing appropriate repair works preceding necessary renovations of the building which takes place after the occurrence of mold on walls and ceilings.

  11. Mould insert fabrication of a single-mode fibre connector alignment structure optimized by justified partial metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissmann, Markus; Barié, Nicole; Guttmann, Markus; Schneider, Marc; Kolew, Alexander; Besser, Heino; Pfleging, Wilhelm; Hofmann, Andreas; Van Erps, Jürgen; Beri, Stefano; Watté, Jan

    2015-03-01

    For mass production of multiscale-optical components, microstructured moulding tools are needed. Metal tools are used for hot embossing or injection moulding of microcomponents made of a thermoplastic polymer. Microstructures with extremely tight specifications, e.g. low side wall roughness and high aspect ratios are generally made by lithographic procedures such as x-ray lithography or deep proton writing. However, these processes are unsuitable for low-cost mass production. An alternative manufacturing method of moulding tools has been developed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). This article describes a mould insert fabrication and a new replication process for self-centring fibre alignment structures for low loss field installable single-mode fibre connectors, developed and fabricated by the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) in collaboration with TE Connectivity. These components are to be used in fibre-to-the-home networks and support the deployment and maintenance of fibre optic links. The special feature of this particular fibre connector is a self-centring fibre alignment, achieved by means of a through hole with deflectable cantilevers acting as micro-springs. The particular challenge is the electroforming of through holes with a centre hole diameter smaller than 125 µm. The fibre connector structure is prototyped by deep proton writing in polymethylmethacrylate and used as a sacrificial part. Using joining, physical vapour deposition and electroforming technology, a negative copy of the prototyped connector is transferred into nickel to be used as a moulding tool. The benefits of this replication technique are a rapid and economical fabrication of moulding tools with high-precision microstructures and a long tool life. With these moulding tools low-cost mass production is possible. We present the manufacturing chain we have established. Each individual manufacturing step of the mould insert fabrication will be shown in this report. The

  12. Single walled carbon nanotube networks as substrates for bone cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutak, Wojtek

    A central effort in biomedical research concerns the development of materials for sustaining and controlling cell growth. Carbon nanotube based substrates have been shown to support the growth of different kinds of cells. However the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly defined. To address the fundamental question of mechanisms by which nanotubes promote bone mitosis and histogenesis, primary calvariae osteoblastic cells were grown on single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network substrates. Using a combination of biochemical and optical techniques, we demonstrate here that SWNT networks promote cell development through two distinct steps. Initially, SWNTs are absorbed in a process that resembles endocytosis, inducing acute toxicity. Nanotube mediated cell destruction, however, induces a release of endogenous factors that act to boost the activity of the surviving cells by stimulating the synthesis of extracellular matrix. In the second part of the research, minimally invasive SWNT matrices were used to further investigate network properties for biomedical applications without extensive presence of cytotoxicity. In the literature, carbon nanotube based substrates have been shown to support the growth of different cell types and, as such, have raised considerable interest in their possible use in biomedical applications. Nanotube matrices that are embedded in polymers cause inherent changes in nanotube chemical and physical film properties. Thus, it is critical to understand how the physical properties of the pristine networks affect the biology of the host tissue. Here, we investigated how the physical and chemical properties of SWNT networks impact the response of MC3T3-E1 bone osteoblasts. We found that two fundamental steps in cell growth: initial attachment to the substrate and proliferation, are strongly dependent on the energy and roughness of the surface, respectively. Thus, fine-tuning the properties of the film may represent a strategy to optimize

  13. Antimicrobial Biomaterials based on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, Seyma

    Biomaterials that inactivate bacteria are needed to eliminate medical device infections. We investigate the antimicrobial nature of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) incorporated within biomedical polymers. In the first part, we focus on SWNT dispersed in the common biomedical polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) as a potential antimicrobial biomaterial. We find Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis viability and metabolic activity to be significantly diminished in the presence of SWNT-PLGA, and to correlate with SWNT length and concentration. Up to 98 % of bacteria die within one hour of SWNT-PLGA versus 15-20% on pure PLGA. Shorter SWNT are found to be more toxic, possibly due to an increased density of open tube ends. In the second part, we investigate the antimicrobial activity of SWNT layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled with the polyelectrolytes poly(L-lysine) (PLL) and poly(L-glutamic acid) (PGA). The dispersibility of SWNT in aqueous solution is significantly improved via the biocompatible nonionic surfactant polyoxyethylene(20)sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20) and the amphiphilic polymer phospholipid-poly(ethylene glycol) (PL-PEG). Absorbance spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show SWNT with either Tween 20 or PL-PEG in aqueous solution to be well dispersed. Quartz crystal microgravimetry with dissipation (QCMD) measurements show both SWNT-Tween and SWNT-PL-PEG to LbL assemble with PLL and PGA into multilayer films, with the PL-PEG system yielding the greater final SWNT content. Bacterial inactivation rates are significantly higher (up to 90%) upon 24 hour incubation with SWNT containing films, compared to control films (ca. 20%). In the third part, we study the influence of bundling on the LbL assembly of SWNT with charged polymers, and on the antimicrobial properties of the assembled film. QCMD measurements show the bundled SWNT system to adsorb in an unusually strong fashion—to an extent three times greater than that

  14. Optical and vibrational properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, W. Joshua

    This work is a study of the optical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using continuous wave (CW) modulation spectroscopy and resonant Raman scattering. SWNTs comprise a nanoscale, quasi-1D system in which the electrons are strongly interacting, resulting in the photo-generation of excitons. Our optical studies have revealed the behavior of these excitons under a number of different perturbations to the system. We have used absorption, reflectance, electro-absorption (EA), photo-induced absorption (PA), charge-induced absorption (CIA), and resonant Raman scattering (RRS) on films of SWNTs. Our EA results provide strong evidence for the dominance of excitons in the optical absorption spectra of SWNT films. The absence of Franz-Keldysh oscillations and the presence of a derivative-like structure of the EA spectra indicate that the oscillator strength goes to the generation of excitons and not to interband electronic transitions. Furthermore, some of the photo-generated excitons are long-lived due to charge trapping in individual tubes within bundles, and this leads to a PA spectrum that is extraordinarily similar to the EA signal. When SWNTs are electrochemically doped we see that the exciton absorption is bleached due to k-space filling and screening of the excitons by the modified local dielectric, while there is very little shift in the exciton transition energies due to band-gap renormalization. Simultaneously the infrared absorption, which is due to Drude free-carriers absorption, is enhanced. A similar behavior is observed in the case of direct charge injection. The RRS of doped SWNT samples shows a frequency shift of many of the Raman-active modes that is commensurate with the macroscopic actuation observed in nanotube-based electrochemical devices. This indicates that doping-induced changes in the lattice are connected with softening and stiffening of the vibrational modes. Our results impact many proposed technologies that exploit the unique

  15. Processing of single walled carbon nanotubes for nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Angela M.

    An existing electric arc discharge (EAD) apparatus was found to produce only small quantities of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), therefore an in depth evaluation of the various parameters was performed in order to optimize the SWNT yield. A systematic study on the current applied (48-116 A) and morphology of the arc during EAD experiments was performed, a study of this type has not been previously reported in literature. Our findings include that the current being applied to the electrodes, as controlled by a commercial software program, was ˜ 20 A lower than expected. Currents in the range of 70-90 A appear to be optimal for this EAD system as the yield of SWNT is consistent with commercially produced SWNT also fabricated with an EAD system. During the experiments, the current was not constant, but fluctuated over a range of values, 7-20 A ranges were not uncommon. Concurrently, the gap between the electrodes was also non-constant, a gap of less than 1 mm or contact as the anode "stabs" the cathode was witnessed. Subsequent analysis of the yield of SVVNT, as a function of the current as well as the physical location in the EAD chamber where the yield was greatest, was performed with simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. Significant differences in the concentration of metal catalysts used to fabricate the SWNT were observed between sample areas in the chamber. Moreover, an anomalous peak was observed in the differential thermal analysis trace between the 350-400°C. Subsequent analysis of relevant constituent materials was investigated to identify the cause of this anomaly. Static and dynamic mechanical analysis was performed on highly drawn fibers of neat polystyrene and its composites containing 0.3 wt.% of a commercial SWNT containing soot. Though the dynamic and static measurements of fibers in the 130-150 mum did not show improvement with the addition of the filler, composite fibers of 20-50 mum were statistically

  16. Ultrafast optical spectroscopy of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostojic, Gordana

    Wavelength-dependent, near-infrared pump-probe study of micelle-suspended Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) whose linear absorption spectra show chirality-assigned peaks is presented. Two distinct relaxation regimes were observed: fast (0.3--1.2 ps) and slow (5--20 ps). The slow component, which has previously been unobserved in pump-probe measurements of bundled tubes, was resonantly enhanced whenever the pump photon energy matched with an interband absorption peak, and it is attributed to interband carrier recombination. It represents the lower limit of the intrinsic radiative recombination time of photoexcited carriers in SWCNTs since the exact value of this parameter depends on the presence of possible nonradiative recombination channels. The slow decay component was highly dependent on the pH of the solution, suggesting that the surrounding H+ ions strongly affect electronic states in nanotubes through the Burnstein-Moss effect. The effect was bandgap energy dependent, affecting the smaller bandgap tubes more significantly. To elucidate carrier dynamics in more detail, nondegenerate pump-probe experiments with wide and continuum probing throughout the lowest and second lowest energy transition ranges of SWCNTs were used. Complex signals were revealed with photoinduced absorption and bleaching, both of which were strongly wavelength dependent. Due to the high optical quality of unbundled SWCNT samples, clear signs of band filling and broadening of the exciton absorption peaks were found to be the main nonlinear mechanisms. The identification of these nonlinear mechanisms presents a novel explanation of the observed nonlinear behavior of nanotubes in general and helps clarify the controversial issues presented in previously published work. This explanation is also consistent with the previously observed pump-probe signals in bundled nanotube samples. Another novel and important conclusion drawn from the nondegenerate pump-probe experiments is that the

  17. Fracture resistance of zigzag single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qiang; Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    2006-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are known to possess extraordinary strength, stiffness and ductility properties. Their fracture resistance is an important issue from the perspective of durability and reliability of CNT-based materials and devices. According to existing studies, brittle fracture is one of the important failure modes of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) failure due to mechanical loading. However, based on the authors' knowledge, the fracture resistance of CNTs has not been quantified so far. In this paper, the fracture resistance of zigzag SWNTs with preexisting defects is calculated using fracture mechanics concepts based on atomistic simulations. The interatomic forces are modelled with a modified Morse potential; the Anderson thermostat is used for temperature control. The problem of unstable crack growth at finite temperature, presumably caused by the lattice trapping effect, is circumvented by computing the strain energy release rate through a series of displacement-controlled tensile loading of SWNTs (applied through moving the outermost layer of atoms at one end at constant strain rate of 9.4 × 10-4 ps-1) with pre-existing crack-like defects of various lengths. The strain energy release rate, G, is computed for (17, 0), (28, 0) and (35, 0) SWNTs (each with aspect ratio 4) with pre-existing cracks up to 29.5 Å long. The fracture resistance, Gc, is determined as a function of crack length for each tube at three different temperatures (1, 300 and 500 K). A significant dependence of Gc on crack length is observed, reminiscent of the rising R curve behaviour of metals at the macroscale: for the zigzag nanotubes Gc increases with crack length at small length, and tends to reach a constant value if the tube diameter is large enough. We suspect that the lattice trapping effect plays the role of crack tip plasticity at the atomic scale. For example, at 300 K, Gc for the (35, 0) tube with aspect ratio 4 converges to 6 J m-2 as the crack length exceeds 20

  18. Fluctuation theory of single-walled carbon nanotube formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosel, Sergey V.; Onischuk, Andrei A.; Purtov, Peter A.; Nasibulin, Albert G.

    2013-11-01

    In the framework of classical fluctuation theory an analytical formula is derived for the reversible work of formation of just detached carbon cap on the surface of catalyst nanoparticle (NP). This cap is considered as single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) formation center. The work of cap formation depends on the source carbon chemical potential μC. Using the derived formula for this work an expression for the rate of SWCNT formation is determined. From this expression the SWCNT diameter distributions can be obtained. The obtained distributions have sharp maxima. It is found that the modal SWCNT diameter dm increases weakly with μC being in the narrow window of 1.0 < dm < 1.8 nm when changing the source carbon chemical potential in a wide range. The determined diameter distributions proved to be in a good agreement with the typical values of the SWCNT diameters as experimentally measured in the chemical vapor deposition process. The increase of dm is accompanied by the increase of the distribution width Δd. The selectivity dm/Δd is a function of μC, the higher values of μC the worse selectivity is observed. Although the value of the SWCNT formation rate I cannot be calculated precisely the relationship between I and the system parameters, such as the NP radius RS, can be obtained. This relationship is derived for the solid-liquid-solid system. To determine the function I(RS) for nanotubes of a certain diameter d, formulas for catalyst/amorphous carbon mutual solubilities as functions of NP radius are derived in the framework of the rigorous Gibbs theory of interface. Using the derived formulas an expression giving the dependence I(RS) is obtained. The expression predicts an increase of I with the radius RS. The estimations carried out for the metal/carbon interface surface tension of 1000 mN/m show that the SWCNT formation rate increases by a few orders of magnitude with the radius increase from 1 to 10 nm.

  19. Single Walled Carbon Nanohorns as Photothermal Cancer Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, John; Sarkar, Saugata; Zhang, Jianfei; Do, Thao; Manson, Mary kyle; Campbell, Tom; Puretzky, Alexander A; Rouleau, Christopher M; More, Karren Leslie; Geohegan, David B; Rylander, Christopher; Dorn, Harry C; Rylander, Nichole M

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles have significant potential as selective photo-absorbing agents for laser based cancer treatment. This study investigates the use of single walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) as thermal enhancers when excited by near infrared (NIR) light for tumor cell destruction. Absorption spectra of SWNHs in deionized water at concentrations of 0, 0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.085, and 0.1 mg/ml were measured using a spectrophotometer for the wavelength range of 200-1,400 nm. Mass attenuation coefficients were calculated using spectrophotometer transmittance data. Cell culture media containing 0, 0.01, 0.085, and 0.333 mg/ml SWNHs was laser irradiated at 1,064 nm wavelength with an irradiance of 40 W/cm{sup 2} for 0-5 minutes. Temperature elevations of these solutions during laser irradiation were measured with a thermocouple 8 mm away from the incident laser beam. Cell viability of murine kidney cancer cells (RENCA) was measured 24 hours following laser treatment with the previously mentioned laser parameters alone or with SWNHs. Cell viability as a function of radial position was determined qualitatively using trypan blue staining and bright field microscopy for samples exposed to heating durations of 2 and 6 minutes alone or with 0.085 mg/ml SWNHs. A Beckman Coulter Vi-Cell instrument quantified cell viability of samples treated with varying SWNH concentration (0, 0.01, 0.085, and 0.333 mg/ml) and heating durations of 0-6 minutes. Spectrophotometer measurements indicated inclusion of SWNHs increased light absorption and attenuation across all wavelengths. Utilizing SWNHs with laser irradiation increased temperature elevation compared to laser heating alone. Greater absorption and higher temperature elevations were observed with increasing SWNH concentration. No inherent toxicity was observed with SWNH inclusion. A more rapid and substantial viability decline was observed over time in samples exposed to SWNHs with laser treatment compared with samples experiencing laser

  20. van der Waals interaction between a microparticle and a single-walled carbon nanotube

    SciTech Connect

    Blagov, E. V.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.

    2007-06-15

    The Lifshitz-type formulas describing the free energy and the force of the van der Waals interaction between an atom (molecule) and a single-walled carbon nanotube are obtained. The single-walled nanotube is considered as a cylindrical sheet carrying a two-dimensional free-electron gas with appropriate boundary conditions on the electromagnetic field. The obtained formulas are used to calculate the van der Waals free energy and force between a hydrogen atom (molecule) and single-walled carbon nanotubes of different radii. Comparison studies of the van der Waals interaction of hydrogen atoms with single-walled and multiwalled carbon nanotubes show that depending on atom-nanotube separation distance, the idealization of graphite dielectric permittivity is already applicable to nanotubes with only two or three walls.

  1. Bimodal Latex Effect on Spin-Coated Thin Conductive Polymer-Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Layers.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Mohammad-Amin; Larrakoetxea Angoitia, Katalin; van Berkel, Stefan; Gnanasekaran, Karthikeyan; Friedrich, Heiner; Heuts, Johan P A; van der Schoot, Paul; van Herk, Alex M

    2015-11-10

    We synthesize two differently sized poly(methyl methacrylate-co-tert-butyl acrylate) latexes by emulsion polymerization and mix these with a sonicated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dispersion, in order to prepare 3% SWCNT composite mixtures. We spin-coat these mixtures at various spin-speed rates and spin times over a glass substrate, producing a thin, transparent, solid, conductive layer. Keeping the amount of SWCNTs constant, we vary the weight fraction of our smaller 30-nm latex particles relative to the larger 70-nm-sized ones. We find a maximum in the electrical conductivity up to 370 S/m as a function of the weight fraction of smaller particles, depending on the overall solid content, the spin speed, and the spin time. This maximum occurs at 3-5% of the smaller latex particles. We also find a more than 2-fold increase in conductivity parallel to the radius of spin-coating than perpendicular to it. Atomic force microscopy points at the existence of lanes of latex particles in the spin-coated thin layer, while large-area transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that the SWCNTs are aligned over a grid fixed on the glass substrate during the spin-coating process. We extract the conductivity distribution on the surface of the thin film and translate this into the direction of the SWCNTs in it.

  2. Wet-spinning of neat single-walled carbon nanotube fiber from 100+% sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Fan

    Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT) have been found to have excellent solubility in super acids such as 100+% H2SO4, and chlorsulfonic acid. The solutions display liquid crystalline behavior at high concentrations in super acids. Traditional wet-spinning method has been applied to SWNTs to make fibers from SWNTs only with the assistance of 100+% H2SO 4 (neat SWNT fibers). Extensive conditions, including concentrations, coagulation, and operation temperature, have been explored with Daca mixer and other custom-designed apparatuses (SBM and Refined Mixer). Fibers' properties have been tremendously improved through the research. Different characterizations have been done and all of them confirmed the neat SWNT fibers have the best alignment to-date among any macroscopic neat SWNT articles, as well as electrical conductivities. Meanwhile, neat SWNT fibers were used for X-ray diffraction study. For the first time, direct evidence has been provided to support the strong intercalation between SWNTs and super acids. Interestingly, for the first time, it has been reported that liquid sulfuric acid forms shell structure while exposed to SWNTs.

  3. Extraction of (9,8) single-walled carbon nanotubes by fluorene-based polymers.

    PubMed

    Si, Rongmei; Wei, Li; Wang, Hong; Su, Dingdian; Mushrif, Samir H; Chen, Yuan

    2014-03-01

    Selective polymer wrapping is a promising approach to obtain high-chiral-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) needed in technical applications and scientific studies. We showed that among three fluorene-based polymers with different side-chain lengths and backbones, poly[(9,9-dihexylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-co-(9,10-anthracene)] (PFH-A) can selectively extract SWCNTs synthesized from the CoSO4 /SiO2 catalyst, which results in enrichment of 78.3 % (9,8) and 12.2 % (9,7) nanotubes among all semiconducting species. These high-chiral-purity SWCNTs may find potential applications in electronics, optoelectronics, and photovoltaics. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the extraction selectivity of PFH-A relates to the bending and alignment of its alkyl chains and the twisting of its two aromatic backbone units (biphenyl and anthracene) relative to SWCNTs. The strong π-π interaction between polymers and SWCNTs would increase the extraction yield, but it is not beneficial for chiral selectivity. Our findings suggest that the matching between the curvature of SWCNTs and the flexibility of the polymer side chains and the aromatic backbone units is essential in designing novel polymers for selective extraction of (n,m) species. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. In-situ preparation and characterization of acid functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes with polyimide nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Dhakshnamoorthy, M; Ramakrishnan, S; Vikram, S; Kothurkar, Nikhil K; Rangarajan, Murali; Vasanthakumari, R

    2014-07-01

    Nanofiber composites (Polyimide/f-SWCNT) of Pyromellitic dianhydride, 4,4'-Oxydianiline, and 4,4'-(4,4'-isopropylidene diphenyl-1,1'-diyl dioxy) dianiline (PMDA-ODA/IDDA) and surface-functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (f-SWCNT) were made by electrospinning a solution of poly(amic acid) (PAA) containing 0-2 wt% f-SWCNT followed by thermal imidization. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra verified the oxidation of SWCNT surface after acid treatment, and indicated possible hydrogen bonding interactions between the f-SWCNTs and polyamic acid. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy images showed the average diameter of nanofibers to be below 150 nm, and transmission electron microscopy images showed that SWCNTs were aligned inside the polymer nanofiber. In thermogravimetric analysis, all composites showed increased thermal stability with increasing f-SWCNT content compared to neat PI. Storage modulus also increased from 124 MPa to 229 MPa from neat PI to 2% f-SWCNT composite.

  5. Single walled carbon nanotube-based stochastic resonance device with molecular self-noise source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hayato; Setiadi, Agung; Kuwahara, Yuji; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi

    2017-09-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is an intrinsic noise usage system for small-signal sensing found in various living creatures. The noise-enhanced signal transmission and detection system, which is probabilistic but consumes low power, has not been used in modern electronics. We demonstrated SR in a summing network based on a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) device that detects small subthreshold signals with very low current flow. The nonlinear current-voltage characteristics of this SWNT device, which incorporated Cr electrodes, were used as the threshold level of signal detection. The adsorption of redox-active polyoxometalate molecules on SWNTs generated additional noise, which was utilized as a self-noise source. To form a summing network SR device, a large number of SWNTs were aligned parallel to each other between the electrodes, which increased the signal detection ability. The functional capabilities of the present small-size summing network SR device, which rely on dense nanomaterials and exploit intrinsic spontaneous noise at room temperature, offer a glimpse of future bio-inspired electronic devices.

  6. Molecular doping of single-walled carbon nanotube transistors: optoelectronic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiangbin; Emelianov, Aleksei V.; Bakulin, Artem A.; Bobrinetskiy, Ivan I.

    2016-09-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are a promising material for future optoelectronic applications, including flexible electrodes and field-effect transistors. Molecular doping of carbon nanotube surface can be an effective way to control the electronic structure and charge dynamics of these material systems. Herein, two organic semiconductors with different energy level alignment in respect to SWCNT are used to dope the channel of the SWCNT-based transistor. The effects of doping on the device performance are studied with a set of optoelectronic measurements. For the studied system, we observed an opposite change in photo-resistance, depending on the type (electron donor vs electron acceptor) of the dopants. We attribute this effect to interplay between two effects: (i) the change in the carrier concentration and (ii) the formation of trapping states at the SWCNT surface. We also observed a modest 4 pA photocurrent generation in the doped systems, which indicates that the studied system could be used as a platform for multi-pulse optoelectronic experiments with photocurrent detection.

  7. Double wall versus single wall incubator for reducing heat loss in very low birth weight infants in incubators.

    PubMed

    Laroia, N; Phelps, D L; Roy, J

    2007-04-18

    Studies have shown improved survival of newborn infants maintained in the thermoneutral range. The concept of an incubator with additional insulation, a double plexiglass wall, is appealing for very low birth weight infants as it may help to provide a thermoneutral environment. To assess the effects of double walled incubator versus a single wall incubator on insensible water loss, rate of oxygen consumption, episodes of hypothermia, time to regain birth weight, duration of hospitalization and infant mortality in premature infants. The standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group was used. This included searches of electronic databases: Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2006), MEDLINE (1966 - 2006), EMBASE, previous reviews including cross references, abstracts, conference and symposia proceedings, expert informants in all published languages, and CINAHL (1982 - 2006). Only studies using random or quasi-random methods of allocation were considered for this review. Eligible studies assessed at least one of the outcome variables identified as important to this topic. Independent data extraction and quality assessment of included trials was conducted by the review authors. Data were analyzed using generic inverse variance methodology and weighted mean difference (WMD). Results are presented with 95% confidence intervals. Meta-analysis was undertaken using a fixed effect model. Three studies met the criteria. Four other studies were excluded, as they did not compare double versus single wall incubators (details of the studies are given in the included and excluded studies section). Double wall incubators have the advantage of decreasing heat loss, decreasing heat production and decreasing radiant heat loss when compared to single wall incubators. There is also the advantage of reduced oxygen consumption. A minimal increase in conductive heat loss was noted when

  8. Thermoplastic-based conductive composites containing multi-wall carbon nanotubes aligned under the application of external electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osazuwa, Osayuki

    The objective of this thesis is to prepare thermoplastic/multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and to apply external alternating current (AC) electric fields to achieve enhanced conductivity and dielectric properties. The first part of the thesis focuses on preparing polyolefin-based composites containing welldispersed MWCNTs. MWCNTs are functionalized with a hyperbranched polyethylene (HBPE) using a non-covalent, non-specific functionalization approach and melt compounded with an ethylene-octene copolymer (EOC) matrix. The improved filler dispersion in the functionalized EOC/MWCNT composite results in higher elongation at break compared to the non-functionalized composite. However, the electrical percolation threshold and the ultimate conductivity of the composites are not affected considerably, suggesting that this functionalization approach leaves the inherent properties of the nanotubes intact. EOC/HBPE-functionalized MWCNT composites are further subjected to external AC electric fields (35 -- 212 kV/m), which induce the formation of aligned columnar structures, as evidenced by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Experimentally acquired resistivity data are used to derive correlations between the characteristic insulator-to-conductor transition times of the composites and the electric field strength (E), polymer viscosity (eta) and MWCNT volume fraction (φ). A criterion for the selection of (eta, E, φ) conditions that enable MWCNT assembly under an electric field controlled regime (minimal Brownian motion-driven aggregation effects) is developed. The dielectric properties of the solidified aligned EOC/MWCNT composites are further studied using dielectric spectroscopy. Annealing of the composites at 160 °C results in the formation of interconnected structures, whereas electrification, using AC field of 71 and 212 kV/m induces the formation of aligned columnar structures. The electrified and annealed composites have increased real and imaginary permittivity compared

  9. Catalytic growth of single-, double-, and multi-walled carbon nanotubes and studies of their potential applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayastha, Vijaya Kumar

    Catalytic growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was investigated, and role of various growth parameters on the CNT growth rate, density and structures was identified. A unified growth model was proposed which involves dissociative adsorption of acetylene on catalyst particles, and vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. According to it, balance between decomposition of C2H2 molecules on the catalyst surface, and diffusion of released carbon atoms into the catalyst particles is the key step towards the continuous growth of CNTs. Guided by our growth model, we demonstrated the growth of ultra-high dense vertically aligned multi-walled as well as rarely reported vertically aligned single-walled and double-walled CNTs. Post-growth manipulation and purification of CNTs by using AC electric field (dielectrophoresis) were investigated. Deeper understanding on the roles of the applied field strength and AC frequency was achieved. Increasing the electric field enhances the density of aligned nanotubes while increasing frequency enhances the dispersion, and hence the degree of alignment of CNTs, but reduces the nanotube density. CNTs were placed across a pair of electrodes with control of density and degree of alignment. Individual CNTs were successfully placed on an AFM tip. We investigated electron field emission from various types of CNT films and found that graphitic order of the CNTs is a major intrinsic factor which affects the emission current stability. Due to superior structural order, MWCNTs grown by thermal CVD have better emission stability than those grown by plasma enhanced CVD. These findings were explained by introducing a concept of emission current-induced dislocation and electron trapping effects, in which the dislocations induced in CNTs, and thus the electron transport along the CNTs prior to electron tunneling through them depend on the graphitic order of the CNTs. MWCNTs were successfully integrated into 2D and 3D carbon

  10. Processing, spinning, and fabrication of continuous fibers of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booker, Richard Delane

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) show great promise for use in a wide range of applications. One of the most promising avenues for attaining these applications is the dispersion of SWNTs at high concentrations in superacids and processing into macroscopic articles such as fibers or films. Fibers spun from SWNT/superacid dispersions indicate that the morphology of the starting SWNT material influences the final morphology of the as-spun fiber. Here, we describe a method (termed disentanglement) of dispersing SWNTs in superacids and treating them using a high-shear, rotor/stator homogenizer, followed by coagulation to recover the solid SWNT material for use in fiber spinning. Several lines of experimental evidence (rheology and optical microscopy of the SWNTs in solution, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the coagulated material, and SEM of fibers spun from the coagulated material) show that this disentanglement treatment radically improves the degree of alignment in the SWNTs' morphology, which in turn improves the dispersibility and processability. Raman microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) before and after homogenization show that the treatment does not damage the SWNTs. Although this technique is particularly important as a pre-processing step for fiber spinning of neat SWNT fibers, it is also useful for neat SWNT films, SWNT/polymer composites, and surfactant- or polymer-stabilized SWNT dispersions. Macroscopic neat SWNT fibers were successfully produced and characterized. Studies on coagulated fiber morphology suggest that slow acid removal is crucial to minimizing voids. Better SWNT coalescence and alignment were obtained by using appropriate coagulant and dope concentration. SWNTs were disentangled and dissolved at high concentrations (8 - 10 wt%) in 102% sulfuric acid. Fibers were subsequently extruded by dry-jet wet spinning into ice water and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) / ice water. Drawing the fiber continuously while spinning further

  11. Direct imaging the subcellular localization of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feifan; Xing, Da; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-03-01

    The development of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for various biomedical applications is an area of great promise. However, the contradictory data on the interaction of single-walled carbon nanotubes with cells highlight the need to study their uptake and cytotoxic effects in cells. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the translocation of single-walled carbon nanotubes into cells and localization on the subcellular organelle. We also observe that single-walled carbon nanotubes do not affect the cellular condition and mitochondrial membrane potential. One intrinsic property of single-walled carbon nanotubes is their strong optical absorbance in the near-infrared (NIR) region. It could be used to selectively increase the thermal destructions in the target tumors. A specific type of SWNT by the CoMoCAT method has an intense absorption band at 980 nm. When irradiated with a 980-nm laser, the single-walled carbon nanotubes affect the cellular oxidation and destroy the mitochondrial membrane potential, and induce cell apoptosis. Thus, the single-walled carbon nanotubes appear to enter the cytoplasm without cytotoxic effects in cells, and can be used as effective and selective nanomaterials for cancer photothermal therapy.

  12. Vertical devices from single-walled carbon nanotubes templated in porous anodic alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Aaron D.

    Over the past decade, tremendous progress has been realized in the fabrication and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) electronic devices. For example, with advantages such as ballistic transport and the absence of surface states, CNTs have been proposed as an ideal 1D channel material for next generation field-effect transistors (FETs). However, the literature is replete with reports of individual high-performance devices that lack the demonstration or feasibility of being fabricated at a large scale. One of the primary obstacles to fabricating highly integrated CNT devices is the placement of the nanotubes at a defined spacing and in precise locations. Nearly all CNT devices to date have been configured in a planar geometry (with the CNT supported horizontally on a substrate) and have primarily relied on random processes for dispersing/growing and contacting the CNTs. Ideally, a high-performance CNTFET would consist of multiple, densely packed CNTs that are aligned, having surround gates, low-barrier contacts, and a sub-100 nm channel length. Such multi-nanotube CNTFETs should further be fabricated in a manner that can be scaled for high-level integration and that is compatible with modern CMOS processing. This dissertation describes the development of a platform based on vertically aligned CNTs templated in porous anodic alumina (PAA) for the scalable fabrication of multi-nanotube CNTFETs with surround gates as well as several other nanoelectronic devices. PAA is a template consisting of hexagonally ordered pores that result from the anodization of an Al film. By embedding a catalyst layer within PAA, single-walled CNTs are synthesized from the nanoscale vertical pores (pore diameter ≈20 nm, spacing ≈100 nm) at a yield of no more than one nanotube per pore. After synthesis, the CNTs are contacted within the pores by electrodepositing Pd, a known low-barrier contact metal for CNTs, to form nanowires that electrically address the CNTs near

  13. Ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes in a lipid bilayer as a new nanopore sensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Yang, Chun; Zhao, Kai; Li, Jingyuan; Wu, Hai-Chen

    2013-01-01

    An important issue in nanopore sensing is to construct stable and versatile sensors that can discriminate analytes with minute differences. Here we report a means of creating nanopores that comprise ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes inserted into a lipid bilayer. We investigate the ion transport and DNA translocation through single-walled carbon nanotube nanopores and find that our results are fundamentally different from previous studies using much longer single-walled carbon nanotubes. Furthermore, we utilize the new single-walled carbon nanotube nanopores to selectively detect modified 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in single-stranded DNA, which may have implications in screening specific genomic DNA sequences. This new nanopore platform can be integrated with many unique properties of carbon nanotubes and might be useful in molecular sensing such as DNA-damage detection, nanopore DNA sequencing and other nanopore-based applications.

  14. Ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes in a lipid bilayer as a new nanopore sensor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Yang, Chun; Zhao, Kai; Li, Jingyuan; Wu, Hai-Chen

    2013-01-01

    An important issue in nanopore sensing is to construct stable and versatile sensors that can discriminate analytes with minute differences. Here we report a means of creating nanopores that comprise ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes inserted into a lipid bilayer. We investigate the ion transport and DNA translocation through single-walled carbon nanotube nanopores and find that our results are fundamentally different from previous studies using much longer single-walled carbon nanotubes. Furthermore, we utilize the new single-walled carbon nanotube nanopores to selectively detect modified 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in single-stranded DNA, which may have implications in screening specific genomic DNA sequences. This new nanopore platform can be integrated with many unique properties of carbon nanotubes and might be useful in molecular sensing such as DNA-damage detection, nanopore DNA sequencing and other nanopore-based applications. PMID:24352224

  15. Ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes in a lipid bilayer as a new nanopore sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Yang, Chun; Zhao, Kai; Li, Jingyuan; Wu, Hai-Chen

    2013-12-01

    An important issue in nanopore sensing is to construct stable and versatile sensors that can discriminate analytes with minute differences. Here we report a means of creating nanopores that comprise ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes inserted into a lipid bilayer. We investigate the ion transport and DNA translocation through single-walled carbon nanotube nanopores and find that our results are fundamentally different from previous studies using much longer single-walled carbon nanotubes. Furthermore, we utilize the new single-walled carbon nanotube nanopores to selectively detect modified 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in single-stranded DNA, which may have implications in screening specific genomic DNA sequences. This new nanopore platform can be integrated with many unique properties of carbon nanotubes and might be useful in molecular sensing such as DNA-damage detection, nanopore DNA sequencing and other nanopore-based applications.

  16. Single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes based drug delivery system: Cancer therapy: A review.

    PubMed

    Dineshkumar, B; Krishnakumar, K; Bhatt, A R; Paul, D; Cherian, J; John, A; Suresh, S

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are advanced nano-carrier for delivery of drugs especially anti-cancer drugs. In the field of CNT-based drug delivery system, both single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multi-walled nanotubes (MWCNTs) can be used for targeting anticancer drugs in tissues and organs, where the high therapeutic effect is necessary. Benefits of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in drug delivery systems are; avoiding solvent usage and reducing the side effects. Therefore, the present review article described about achievement of SWCNTs and MWCNTs to deliver the anticancer drugs with different cancerous cell lines.

  17. Single-molecule electrical biosensors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuefeng

    2013-07-05

    Interactions between biological molecules are fundamental to biology. Probing the complex behaviors of biological systems at the molecular level provides new opportunities to uncover the wealth of molecular information that is usually hidden in conventional ensemble experiments and address the "unanswerable" questions in the physical, chemical and biological sciences. Nanometer-scale materials are particularly well matched with biomolecular interactions due to their biocompatibility, size comparability, and remarkable electrical properties, thus setting the basis for biological sensing with ultrahigh sensitivity. This brief review aims to highlight the recent progress of the burgeoning field of single-molecule electrical biosensors based on nanomaterials, with a particular focus on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), for better understanding of the molecular structure, interacting dynamics, and molecular functions. The perspectives and key issues that will be critical to the success of next-generation single-molecule biosensors toward practical applications are also discussed, such as the device reproducibility, system integration, and theoretical simulation. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Molecular-basis of single-walled carbon nanotube recognition by single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Roxbury, Daniel; Mittal, Jeetain; Jagota, Anand

    2012-03-14

    Hybrids of biological molecules and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) have proven useful for SWCNT sorting and are enabling several biomedical applications in sensing, imaging, and drug delivery. In the DNA-SWCNT system, certain short (10-20mer) sequences of single-stranded DNA recognize specific SWCNT, allowing the latter to be sorted from a chirality diverse mixture. (1) However, little is known about the DNA secondary structures that underlie their recognition of SWCNTs. Using replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) of multiple strands on a single SWCNT, we report that DNA forms ordered structures on SWCNTs that are strongly DNA sequence and SWCNT dependent. DNA sequence (TAT)(4) on its recognition partner, the (6,5) SWCNT, (1) forms an ordered right-handed helically wrapped barrel, stabilized by intrastrand, self-stitching hydrogen bonds and interstrand hydrogen bonding. The same sequence on the larger diameter (8,7)-SWCNT forms a different and less-stable structure, demonstrating SWCNT selectivity. In contrast, homopolymer (T)(12), with weaker tendency for intrastrand hydrogen bonding, forms a distinctly left-handed wrap on the (6,5)-SWCNT, demonstrating DNA sequence specificity. Experimental measurements show that (TAT)(4) selectively disperses smaller diameter SWCNTs more efficiently than (T)(12), establishing a relationship between recognition motifs and binding strength. The developing understanding of DNA secondary structure on nanomaterials can shed light on a number of issues involving hybrids of nanomaterials and biological molecules, including nanomedicine, health-effects of nanomaterials, and nanomaterial processing.

  19. Sequestration of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in a Polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bley, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Sequestration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) in a suitably chosen polymer is under investigation as a means of promoting the dissolution of the nanotubes into epoxies. The purpose of this investigation is to make it possible to utilize SWCNs as the reinforcing fibers in strong, lightweight epoxy-matrix/carbon-fiber composite materials. SWCNs are especially attractive for use as reinforcing fibers because of their stiffness and strength-to-weight ratio: Their Young s modulus has been calculated to be 1.2 TPa, their strength has been calculated to be as much as 100 times that of steel, and their mass density is only one-sixth that of steel. Bare SWCNs cannot be incorporated directly into composite materials of the types envisioned because they are not soluble in epoxies. Heretofore, SWCNS have been rendered soluble by chemically attaching various molecular chains to them, but such chemical attachments compromise their structural integrity. In the method now under investigation, carbon nanotubes are sequestered in molecules of poly(m-phenylenevinylene-co-2,5-dioctyloxy-p-phenylenevinylene) [PmPV]. The strength of the carbon nanotubes is preserved because they are not chemically bonded to the PmPV. This method exploits the tendency of PmPV molecules to wrap themselves around carbon nanotubes: the wrapping occurs partly because there exists a favorable interface between the conjugated face of a nanotube and the conjugated backbone of the polymer and partly because of the helical molecular structure of PmPV. The constituents attached to the polymer backbones (the side chains) render the PmPV-wrapped carbon nanotubes PmPV soluble in organic materials that, in turn, could be used to suspend the carbon nanotubes in epoxy precursors. At present, this method is being optimized: The side chains on the currently available form of PmPV are very nonpolar and unable to react with the epoxy resins and/or hardeners; as a consequence, SWCN/PmPV composites have been

  20. Electrical probing of magnetic phase transition and domain wall motion in single-crystalline Mn₅Ge₃ nanowire.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jianshi; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Jiang, Wanjun; Chang, Li-Te; Fan, Yabin; Chan, Michael; Wu, Can; Hung, Min-Hsiu; Liu, Pei-Hsuan; Yang, Hong-Jie; Tuan, Hsing-Yu; Chen, Lih-Juann; Wang, Kang L

    2012-12-12

    In this Letter, the magnetic phase transition and domain wall motion in a single-crystalline Mn(5)Ge(3) nanowire were investigated by temperature-dependent magneto-transport measurements. The ferromagnetic Mn(5)Ge(3) nanowire was fabricated by fully germaniding a single-crystalline Ge nanowire through the solid-state reaction with Mn contacts upon thermal annealing at 450 °C. Temperature-dependent four-probe resistance measurements on the Mn(5)Ge(3) nanowire showed a clear slope change near 300 K accompanied by a magnetic phase transition from ferromagnetism to paramagnetism. The transition temperature was able to be controlled by both axial and radial magnetic fields as the external magnetic field helped maintain the magnetization aligned in the Mn(5)Ge(3) nanowire. Near the magnetic phase transition, the critical behavior in the 1D system was characterized by a power-law relation with a critical exponent of α = 0.07 ± 0.01. Besides, another interesting feature was revealed as a cusp at about 67 K in the first-order derivative of the nanowire resistance, which was attributed to a possible magnetic transition between two noncollinear and collinear ferromagnetic states in the Mn(5)Ge(3) lattice. Furthermore, temperature-dependent magneto-transport measurements demonstrated a hysteretic, symmetric, and stepwise axial magnetoresistance of the Mn(5)Ge(3) nanowire. The interesting features of abrupt jumps indicated the presence of multiple domain walls in the Mn(5)Ge(3) nanowire and the annihilation of domain walls driven by the magnetic field. The Kurkijärvi model was used to describe the domain wall depinning as thermally assisted escape from a single energy barrier, and the fitting on the temperature-dependent depinning magnetic fields yielded an energy barrier of 0.166 eV.

  1. A single, continuous spiraling suture for uterine wall reconstruction after laparoscopic enucleation of intramural myomas.

    PubMed

    Barisic, D; Bagovic, D

    2001-08-01

    After laparoscopic enucleation of intramural myomas in eight women, the uterine wall defect was reconstructed with a single continuous spiraling suture. The procedure contained cost and reduced operating time. No patients had postoperative intramural hematoma. Although this is a reproducible method of laparoscopic uterine wall reconstruction, long-term results must be obtained to determine safety in pregnancy and extent of postoperative adhesions.

  2. Design and prototyping of self-centering optical single-mode fiber alignment structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebraert, Evert; Gao, Fei; Beri, Stefano; Watté, Jan; Thienpont, Hugo; Van Erps, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    The European Commission’s goal of providing each European household with at least a 30 Mb s-1 Internet connection by 2020 would be facilitated by a widespread deployment of fibre-to-the-home, which would in turn be sped up by the development of connector essential components, such as high-precision alignment features. Currently, the performance of state-of-the-art physical contact optical fiber connectors is limited by the tolerance on the cladding of standard telecom-grade single-mode fiber (SMF), which is typically smaller than  ±1 μm. We propose to overcome this limit by developing micro-spring-based self-centering alignment structures (SCAS) for SMF-connectors. We design these alignment structures with robustness and low-cost replication in mind, allowing for large-scale deployment. Both theoretical and finite element analysis (FEA) models are used to determine the optimal dimensions of the beams of which the micro-springs of the SCAS are comprised. Two topologies of the SCAS, consisting of three and four micro-springs respectively, are investigated for two materials: polysulfone (PSU) and polyetherimide (PEI). These materials hold great potential for high-performance fiber connectors while being compatible with low-cost production and with the harsh environmental operation conditions of those connectors. The theory and FEA agree well (<3% difference) for a simple micro-spring. When including a pedestal on the micro-spring (to bring it further away from the fiber) and for shorter spring lengths the agreement worsens. This is due to spring compression effects not being taken into account in our theoretical model. Prototypes are successfully fabricated using deep proton writing and subsequently characterized. The controlled insertion of an SMF in the SCAS is investigated and we determine that a force of 0.11 N is required. The fiber insertion also causes an out-of-plane deformation of the micro-springs in the SCAS of about 7 μm, which is no problem for

  3. Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in a Glow Discharge Fine Particle Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Imazato, N.; Imano, M.; Hayashi, Y.

    2008-09-07

    Carbon fine particles were synthesized being negatively charged and confined in a glow discharge plasma. The deposited fine particles were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and were confirmed to include single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  4. Binding of hydroxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes to two hemoproteins, hemoglobin and myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Cao, Jian

    2014-12-01

    Herein, we studied the binding interactions between hydroxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes and hemoglobin and myoglobin by the use of multi-spectral techniques and molecular modeling. The ultraviolet-vis absorbance and circular dichroism spectral results indicated that the binding interactions existed between hydroxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes and hemoglobin/myoglobin. These binding interactions partially affected the soret/heme bands of hemoglobin and myoglobin. The secondary structures of hemoproteins were partially destroyed by hydroxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes. Fluorescence studies suggested that the complexes formed between hydroxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes and hemoglobin/myoglobin by hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic, and π-π stacking interactions. In addition, molecular modeling analysis well supported the experimental results.

  5. Phototransformation-Induced Aggregation of Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: The Importance of Amorphous Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with proper functionalization are desirable for applications that require dispersion in aqueous and biological environments, and functionalized SWCNTs also serve as building blocks for conjugation with specific molecules in these applicatio...

  6. Controlling the crystalline three-dimensional order in bulk materials by single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Andarias, Javier; López, Juan Luis; Atienza, Carmen; Brunetti, Fulvio G.; Romero-Nieto, Carlos; Guldi, Dirk M.; Martín, Nazario

    2014-04-01

    The construction of ordered single-wall carbon nanotube soft-materials at the nanoscale is currently an important challenge in science. Here we use single-wall carbon nanotubes as a tool to gain control over the crystalline ordering of three-dimensional bulk materials composed of suitably functionalized molecular building blocks. We prepare p-type nanofibres from tripeptide and pentapeptide-containing small molecules, which are covalently connected to both carboxylic and electron-donating 9,10-di(1,3-dithiol-2-ylidene)-9,10-dihydroanthracene termini. Adding small amounts of single-wall carbon nanotubes to the so-prepared p-nanofibres together with the externally controlled self assembly by charge screening by means of Ca2+ results in new and stable single-wall carbon nanotube-based supramolecular gels featuring remarkably long-range internal order.

  7. Phototransformation-Induced Aggregation of Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: The Importance of Amorphous Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with proper functionalization are desirable for applications that require dispersion in aqueous and biological environments, and functionalized SWCNTs also serve as building blocks for conjugation with specific molecules in these applicatio...

  8. Change in the electrical characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotube networks under photoresist treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Mi-Suk; Kim, Ju-Jin; Choi, Won Jin; Lee, Jeong-O.

    2016-08-01

    The electrical properties of a single-walled carbon nanotube network were investigated after photoresist treatment with the pristine device. Atomic force microscopy found that the diameters of the single-walled carbon nanotubes were increased after photoresist treatment and that the photoresist could not be completely removed from nanotube surfaces by using a simple cleaning process with an organic solvent. Although the presence of a residual photoresist had no noticeable effects on the Raman spectrum of single-walled carbon nanotubes in our devices, the charge carrier mobilities and the on/off ratios of the single-walled carbon nanotube devices were lowered due to the photoresist treatment, and the gate-hysteresis behavior in the devices that had undergone photoresist treatment was found to be different from that of pristine devices.

  9. Self-aligned single-mask fabrication process for electro-thermal microactuators using ICP-RIE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamin Dow, Ali B.; Gougam, Adel; Kherani, Nazir P.; Rangelow, I. W.

    2013-05-01

    Advances in the miniaturization of semiconductor devices have been made possible by new methods of microfabrication techniques . These advances have stimulated the birth of Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology which enable the fabrication of a wide variety of sensing and actuating devices of microscopic dimensions . Of particular interest are thermal microactuators which provide large deflections and are compatible with existing IC technologies. In MEMS technology, a well controlled etching process is critical for the fabrication of structures with specific geometry and properties. Increasing demand for intricate semiconductor devices has fueled and motivated researches to develop high precision micromachining techniques . Inductively coupled plasma- Reactive ion etching (ICP-RIE) is capable of producing features with high aspect ratio as high as 90:1. Taking advantage of the notching effect when making a structure from silicon on insulator (SOI), structure release without the use of HF acid has been demonstrated. We report on the development of a self-aligned single-mask process for the fabrication of released and movable MEMS devices. ICP-RIE was used to realize the structures directly out of single crystal silicon. Applying side wall passivation, controlling the ratio of ion flux and radical flux, smooth etching profile can be obtained with high aspect ratio. No wet etching process is required to release the structures as is the case with SOI wafers. This approach overcomes the stiction limitation associated with wet etching and yields good thickness uniformity over the entire structure. Electrothermal microactuators with integrated microgrippers were designed, fabricated and characterized. harvesters.

  10. A clustering approach to multireference alignment of single-particle projections in electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sorzano, C.O.S.; Bilbao-Castro, J.R.; Shkolnisky, Y.; Alcorlo, M.; Melero, R.; Caffarena-Fernández, G.; Li, M.; Xu, G.; Marabini, R.; Carazo, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional analysis of projections of single particles acquired by an electron microscope is a useful tool to help identifying the different kinds of projections present in a dataset and their different projection directions. Such analysis is also useful to distinguish between different kinds of particles or different particle conformations. In this paper we introduce a new algorithm for performing two-dimensional multireference alignment and classification that is based on a Hierarchical clustering approach using correntropy (instead of the more traditional correlation) and a modified criterion for the definition of the clusters specially suited for cases in which the Signal-to-Noise Ratio of the differences between classes is low. We show that our algorithm offers an improved sensitivity over current methods in use for distinguishing between different projection orientations and different particle conformations. This algorithm is publicly available through the software package Xmipp. PMID:20362059

  11. Single strand DNA functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes as sensitive electrochemical labels for arsenite detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonghong; Wang, Ping; Wang, Yiqiang; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin

    2015-08-15

    In this work, a simple and sensitive electrochemical strategy for arsenite detection based on the ability of arsenite bound to single-strand DNA (ssDNA) and the signal transduction of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is developed. To realize this purpose, the ssDNA/SWCNTs complexes were formed at first by making ssDNA wrapped around SWCNTs via π-stacking. In the presence of arsenite, the arsenite could strongly bind with the G/T bases of ssDNA and decrease the π-π interaction between ssDNA and SWCNTs, resulting in a certain amount of ssDNA dissociating from the complexes. The separated SWCNTs were selectively assembled on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) modified Au electrode. Then the SWCNTs onto the SAM-modified Au electrode substantially restored heterogeneous electron transfer that was almost totally blocked by the SAM. The assembled SWCNTs could generate a considerably sensitive and specific tactic for signal transduction, which was related to the concentration of the arsenite. Through detecting the currents mediated by SWCNTs, a linear response to concentration of arsenite ranging from 0.5 to 10ppb and a detection limit of 0.5ppb was readily achieved with desirable specificity and sensitivity. Such a SWCNTs-based biosensor creates a simple, sensitive, nonradioactive route for detection of arsenite. In addition, this demonstration provides a new approach to fabrication of stable biosensors with favorable electrochemical properties believed to be appealing to electroanalytical applications.

  12. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as a multimodal — thermoacoustic and photoacoustic — contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Pramanik, Manojit; Swierczewska, Magdalena; Green, Danielle; Sitharaman, Balaji; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a novel carbon nanotube-based contrast agent for both thermoacoustic and photoacoustic tomography. In comparison with de-ionized water, single-walled carbon nanotubes exhibited more than two-fold signal enhancement for thermoacoustic tomography at 3 GHz. In comparison with blood, they exhibited more than six-fold signal enhancement for photoacoustic tomography at 1064 nm wavelength. The large contrast enhancement of single-walled carbon nanotubes was further corroborated by tissue phantom imaging studies. PMID:19566311

  13. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as a multimodal-thermoacoustic and photoacoustic-contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Manojit; Swierczewska, Magdalena; Green, Danielle; Sitharaman, Balaji; Wang, Lihong V

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a novel carbon nanotube-based contrast agent for both thermoacoustic and photoacoustic tomography. In comparison to deionized water, single-walled carbon nanotubes exhibited more than twofold signal enhancement for thermoacoustic tomography at 3 GHz. In comparison to blood, they exhibited more than sixfold signal enhancement for photoacoustic tomography at 1064 nm wavelength. The large contrast enhancement of single-walled carbon nanotubes was further corroborated by tissue phantom imaging studies.

  14. Electron transport study of single wall nanotubes based on group 14 elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivasathya, S.; Thiruvadigal, D. John

    2012-06-01

    By applying non-equilibrium Green's functions in combination with density functional theory, we investigate the transport behaviours of single wall nanotubes based on group14 elements. The transmission spectrum and density of states for single wall nanotubes such as Lead nanotube(PbNT), Germanium nanotube(GeNT), Silicon nanotube(SiNT), Tin nanotube(SnNT) and Carbon nanotube(CNT) are compared.

  15. Solution coating of large-area organic semiconductor thin films with aligned single-crystalline domains.

    PubMed

    Diao, Ying; Tee, Benjamin C-K; Giri, Gaurav; Xu, Jie; Kim, Do Hwan; Becerril, Hector A; Stoltenberg, Randall M; Lee, Tae Hoon; Xue, Gi; Mannsfeld, Stefan C B; Bao, Zhenan

    2013-07-01

    Solution coating of organic semiconductors offers great potential for achieving low-cost manufacturing of large-area and flexible electronics. However, the rapid coating speed needed for industrial-scale production poses challenges to the control of thin-film morphology. Here, we report an approach--termed fluid-enhanced crystal engineering (FLUENCE)--that allows for a high degree of morphological control of solution-printed thin films. We designed a micropillar-patterned printing blade to induce recirculation in the ink for enhancing crystal growth, and engineered the curvature of the ink meniscus to control crystal nucleation. Using FLUENCE, we demonstrate the fast coating and patterning of millimetre-wide, centimetre-long, highly aligned single-crystalline organic semiconductor thin films. In particular, we fabricated thin films of 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene having non-equilibrium single-crystalline domains and an unprecedented average and maximum mobilities of 8.1±1.2 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and 11 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). FLUENCE of organic semiconductors with non-equilibrium single-crystalline domains may find use in the fabrication of high-performance, large-area printed electronics.

  16. Solution coating of large-area organic semiconductor thin films with aligned single-crystalline domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Ying; Tee, Benjamin C.-K.; Giri, Gaurav; Xu, Jie; Kim, Do Hwan; Becerril, Hector A.; Stoltenberg, Randall M.; Lee, Tae Hoon; Xue, Gi; Mannsfeld, Stefan C. B.; Bao, Zhenan

    2013-07-01

    Solution coating of organic semiconductors offers great potential for achieving low-cost manufacturing of large-area and flexible electronics. However, the rapid coating speed needed for industrial-scale production poses challenges to the control of thin-film morphology. Here, we report an approach—termed fluid-enhanced crystal engineering (FLUENCE)—that allows for a high degree of morphological control of solution-printed thin films. We designed a micropillar-patterned printing blade to induce recirculation in the ink for enhancing crystal growth, and engineered the curvature of the ink meniscus to control crystal nucleation. Using FLUENCE, we demonstrate the fast coating and patterning of millimetre-wide, centimetre-long, highly aligned single-crystalline organic semiconductor thin films. In particular, we fabricated thin films of 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene having non-equilibrium single-crystalline domains and an unprecedented average and maximum mobilities of 8.1±1.2 cm2 V-1 s-1 and 11 cm2 V-1 s-1. FLUENCE of organic semiconductors with non-equilibrium single-crystalline domains may find use in the fabrication of high-performance, large-area printed electronics.

  17. The forced sound transmission of finite single leaf walls using a variational technique.

    PubMed

    Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-09-01

    The single wall is the simplest element of concern in building acoustics, but there still remain some open questions regarding the sound insulation of this simple case. The two main reasons for this are the effects on the excitation and sound radiation of the wall when it has a finite size, and the fact that the wave field in the wall is consisting of two types of waves, namely forced waves due to the exciting acoustic field, and free bending waves due to reflections in the boundary. The aim of the present paper is to derive simple analytical formulas for the forced part of the airborne sound insulation of a single homogeneous wall of finite size, using a variational technique based on the integral-differential equation of the fluid loaded wall. The so derived formulas are valid in the entire audible frequency range. The results are compared with full numerical calculations, measurements and alternative theory, with reasonable agreement.

  18. Polarised spectroscopy of individual single-wall nanotubes: Radial-breathing mode study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, J.; Débarre, A.; Richard, A.; Tchénio, P.; Bandow, S.; Iijima, S.

    2001-02-01

    Polarised Raman spectroscopy is performed in a randomly distributed single-wall carbon tube (SWNT) sample at the scale of an individual single-wall nanotube. A detailed analysis in the radial-breathing mode (RBM) domain is presented. Selection of either a single tiny rope of SWNTs or of a single SWNT results from the conjugated high spatial selection of confocal microscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and sample dilution. The drastic modifications observed in the low-frequency Raman spectra as a function of the polarisation configuration confirm the theoretical results.

  19. Piezoresistivity of mechanically drawn single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin films-: mechanism and optimizing principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obitayo, Waris

    The individual carbon nanotube (CNT) based strain sensors have been found to have excellent piezoresistive properties with a reported gauge factor (GF) of up to 3000. This GF on the other hand, has been shown to be structurally dependent on the nanotubes. In contrast, to individual CNT based strain sensors, the ensemble CNT based strain sensors have very low GFs e.g. for a single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin film strain sensor, GF is ~1. As a result, studies which are mostly numerical/analytical have revealed the dependence of piezoresistivity on key parameters like concentration, orientation, length and diameter, aspect ratio, energy barrier height and Poisson ratio of polymer matrix. The fundamental understanding of the piezoresistive mechanism in an ensemble CNT based strain sensor still remains unclear, largely due to discrepancies in the outcomes of these numerical studies. Besides, there have been little or no experimental confirmation of these studies. The goal of my PhD is to study the mechanism and the optimizing principle of a SWCNT thin film strain sensor and provide experimental validation of the numerical/analytical investigations. The dependence of the piezoresistivity on key parameters like orientation, network density, bundle diameter (effective tunneling area), and length is studied, and how one can effectively optimize the piezoresistive behavior of a SWCNT thin film strain sensors. To reach this goal, my first research accomplishment involves the study of orientation of SWCNTs and its effect on the piezoresistivity of mechanically drawn SWCNT thin film based piezoresistive sensors. Using polarized Raman spectroscopy analysis and coupled electrical-mechanical test, a quantitative relationship between the strain sensitivity and SWCNT alignment order parameter was established. As compared to randomly oriented SWCNT thin films, the one with draw ratio of 3.2 exhibited ~6x increase on the GF. My second accomplishment involves studying the

  20. Direct synthesis of single-walled aminoaluminosilicate nanotubes with enhanced molecular adsorption selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dun-Yen; Brunelli, Nicholas A.; Yucelen, G. Ipek; Venkatasubramanian, Anandram; Zang, Ji; Leisen, Johannes; Hesketh, Peter J.; Jones, Christopher W.; Nair, Sankar

    2014-02-01

    Internal functionalization of single-walled nanotubes is an attractive, yet difficult challenge in nanotube materials chemistry. Here we report single-walled metal oxide nanotubes with covalently bonded primary amine moieties on their inner wall, synthesized through a one-step approach. Conclusive molecular-level structural information on the amine-functionalized nanotubes is obtained through multiple solid-state techniques. The amine-functionalized nanotubes maintain a high carbon dioxide adsorption capacity while significantly suppressing the adsorption of methane and nitrogen, thereby leading to a large enhancement in adsorption selectivity over unfunctionalized nanotubes (up to four-fold for carbon dioxide/methane and ten-fold for carbon dioxide/nitrogen). The successful synthesis of single-walled nanotubes with functional, covalently-bound organic moieties may open up possibilities for new nanotube-based applications that are currently inaccessible to carbon nanotubes and other related materials.

  1. Shape transition of unstrained flattest single-walled carbon nanotubes under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Weihua E-mail: muwh@itp.ac.cn; Cao, Jianshu; Ou-Yang, Zhong-can

    2014-01-28

    Single walled carbon nanotube's (SWCNT's) cross section can be flattened under hydrostatic pressure. One example is the cross section of a single walled carbon nanotube successively deforms from the original round shape to oval shape, then to peanut-like shape. At the transition point of reversible deformation between convex shape and concave shape, the side wall of nanotube is flattest. This flattest tube has many attractive properties. In the present work, an approximate approach is developed to determine the equilibrium shape of this unstrained flattest tube and the curvature distribution of this tube. Our results are in good agreement with recent numerical results, and can be applied to the study of pressure controlled electric properties of single walled carbon nanotubes. The present method can also be used to study other deformed inorganic and organic tube-like structures.

  2. Cellulose derivatives as excellent dispersants for single-wall carbon nanotubes as demonstrated by absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Nobutsugu; Kim, Yeji; Miyashita, Kanae; Kazaoui, Said; Nalini, Balakrishnan

    2006-02-01

    Sodium carboxymethylcellulose, an etherified derivative of cellulose, has been found to realize stable aqueous dispersion of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) that is twenty times more concentrated than when a surfactant is used under the same condition. The dispersion as well as thin films prepared from it exhibits well-resolved near-infrared photoluminescence peaks originating from band-gap transitions in semiconducting SWNTs, a sign of isolated individual tubes. Mechanical stretching of the film strongly aligns the tubes, as demonstrated by considerable dichroism in their absorption spectra. Possessing high optical quality and uniformity, these densely dispersed SWNT films are expected to serve as an important platform for SWNTs' optical, electrical, and optoelectronic applications, especially because cellulose derivatives are cheap, mass-produced, safe, water-processable, and environmentally benign.

  3. Conducting polymer functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube based chemiresistive biosensor for the detection of human cardiac myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Puri, Nidhi; Niazi, Asad; Biradar, Ashok M.; Rajesh E-mail: adani@engr.ucr.edu; Mulchandani, Ashok E-mail: adani@engr.ucr.edu

    2014-10-13

    We report the fabrication of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) based ultrasensitive label-free chemiresistive biosensor for the detection of human cardiac biomarker, myoglobin (Ag-cMb). Poly(pyrrole-co-pyrrolepropylic acid) with pendant carboxyl groups was electrochemically deposited on electrophoretically aligned SWNT channel, as a conducting linker, for biomolecular immobilization of highly specific cardiac myoglobin antibody. The device was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, source-drain current-voltage (I-V), and charge-transfer characteristic studies. The device exhibited a linear response with a change in conductance in SWNT channel towards the target, Ag-cMb, over the concentration range of 1.0 to 1000 ng ml{sup −1} with a sensitivity of ∼118% per decade with high specificity.

  4. Post-Tensioned Single Wythe Concrete Masonry Walls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    wall thickness to be U ; C Z Ř .-. .---.- ,- : .- ,’’:/ -’’ .. ,- , .,.:-’- ..... "- . , ,... .... .. . : .: . ., . . -,-,- ,-... decreased when...34 . -, , ••. . . o , . . . .. 23 0200 Q) 0 ’o % r- en (nO u Ln IV Ln >-4-4 a 01 CD C ) ( U2 .0 E r- e0) ~ 0 -4 -%4041 En r. U- -- C4 s E-1 -4 > Q...E a) () c X 4 r- u1 m e - r -4 uaE4 r, (N N a -4 -4 -4’- .) Q)E- > C L r o4 4j - - -* -4 l o) (1w2n %D k o) rk.~ Wr I) LA) 02~ *-.- LA LJ r a).-4 *N

  5. Self-aligned lithography and in-situ assembly of chemically responsive single-molecule transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jinyao; Klare, Jennifer; Wang, Yiliang; de Poortere, Etienne; Nuckolls, Colin; Wind, Shalom

    2006-03-01

    We report the fabrication and assembly of single-molecule transistors comprising ultrathin metal electrodes separated by a nanoscale gap, which is bridged by a single molecule or a small number of molecules. The electrodes sit upon a conductive substrate, which serves as a gate, separated by a thin gate dielectric, and the gap is defined by a completely self-aligned process involving the lateral oxidation of a sacrificial thin film of Al. Devices with gaps ranging from ˜ 2 - 10 nm are fabricated with yields approaching 80%. Highly conjugated bis-oxazole molecules are assembled within the gaps in a sequential fashion, relying upon individually designed end-group chemistry to control the attachment of molecular units to the metal electrodes and the modular assembly of the bis-oxazole units, respectively. In addition, metal ion complexes are used to reversibly attach and detach terpyridyl molecular units from one another. Fully assembled devices display distinctive electrical response, which is strongly modulated by the molecular assembly and attachment.

  6. Single-particle selection and alignment with heavy atom cluster-antibody conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Grant J.; Kornberg, Roger D.

    1998-01-01

    A method is proposed for selecting and aligning images of single biological particles to obtain high-resolution structural information by cryoelectron microscopy. The particles will be labeled with multiple heavy atom clusters to permit the precise determination of particle locations and relative orientations even when imaged close to focus with a low electron dose, conditions optimal for recording high-resolution detail. Heavy atom clusters should also allow selection of images free from many kinds of defects, including specimen movement and particle inhomogeneity. Heavy atom clusters may be introduced in a general way by the construction of “adaptor” molecules based on single-chain Fv antibody fragments, consisting of a constant framework region engineered for optimal cluster binding and a variable antigen binding region selected for a specific target. The success of the method depends on the mobility of the heavy atom cluster on the particle, on the precision to which clusters can be located in an image, and on the sufficiency of cluster projections alone to orient and select particles for averaging. The necessary computational algorithms were developed and implemented in simulations that address the feasibility of the method. PMID:9689068

  7. Cloning single wall carbon nanotubes for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Tour, James M; Kittrell, Carter

    2012-08-30

    The purpose of this research is to development the technology required for producing 3-D nano-engineered frameworks for hydrogen storage based on sp2 carbon media, which will have high gravimetric and especially high volumetric uptake of hydrogen, and in an aligned fibrous array that will take advantage of the exceptionally high thermal conductivity of sp2 carbon materials to speed up the fueling process while minimizing or eliminating the need for internal cooling systems. A limitation for nearly all storage media using physisorption of the hydrogen molecule is the large amount of surface area (SA) occupied by each H2 molecule due to its large zero-point vibrational energy. This creates a conundrum that in order to maximize SA, the physisorption media is made more tenuous and the density is decreased, usually well below 1 kg/L, so that there comes a tradeoff between volumetric and gravimetric uptake. Our major goal was to develop a new type of media with high density H2 uptake, which favors volumetric storage and which, in turn, has the capability to meet the ultimate DoE H2 goals.

  8. AC field-induced polymer electroluminescence with single wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jinwoo; Choi, Yeon Sik; Kang, Seok Ju; Cho, Sung Hwan; Lee, Tae-Woo; Park, Cheolmin

    2011-03-09

    We developed a high-performance field-induced polymer electroluminescence (FPEL) device consisting of four stacked layers: a top metal electrode/thin solution-processed nanocomposite film of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and a fluorescent polymer/insulator/transparent bottom electrode working under an alternating current (AC) electric field. A small amount of SWNTs that were highly dispersed in the fluorescent polymer matrix by a conjugate block copolymer dispersant significantly enhanced EL, and we were able to realize an SWNT-FPEL device with a light emission of approximately 350 cd/m(2) at an applied voltage of ±25 V and an AC frequency of 300 kHz. The brightness of the SWNT-FPEL device is much greater than those of other AC-based organic or even inorganic ELs that generally require at least a few hundred volts. Light is emitted from our SWNT-FPEL device because of the sequential injection of field-induced holes and then electron carriers through ambipolar carbon nanotubes under an AC field, followed by exciton formation in the conjugated organic layer. Field-induced bipolar charge injection provides great material design freedom for our devices; the energy level does not have to be aligned between the electrode and the emission layer, and the balance of the carrier injected and transported can be altered in contrast to that in conventional organic light-emitting diodes, leading to an extremely cost-effective and unified device architecture that is applicable to all red-green-blue fluorescent polymers.

  9. Second-order nonlinear optical response of zigzag BN single-walled nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulis, Vl. A.; Muryumin, E. E.; Gaiduk, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    A theory based on the two-band tight-binding approximation for π electrons is developed to describe the second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of arrays of uniformly sized and well-aligned boron-nitride single-walled nanotubes (BN-SWNTs) with a zigzag achiral structure. It is assumed that the coherent light beam at frequency ω , incident upon the nanotube sample, is linearly polarized along the symmetry axis of the nanotubes. The long-axis NLO susceptibility χ(2)(ω) of those nanotubes is calculated within the independent nanotube approximation and in neglecting local-field effects. Using the perturbation-theory formalism in the crystal-momentum representation, we derive an explicit analytic expression for the χ(2)(ω) and apply it to study three distinct second-order NLO effects possible in the BN-SWNTs due to their noncentrosymmetric structure—namely, second-harmonic generation (SHG), linear electro-optical (LEO) effect, and nonlinear optical rectification (NOR). The theory is illustrated by numerical model calculations of the SHG, LEO, and NOR susceptibility spectra for several representative BN-SWNT ensembles consisting of large-diameter nanotubes. The calculated SHG spectra are found to be dominated by the highly peaked 2ω resonance at half the band-gap energy of the BN-SWNTs, where the absorption of light is negligible. Distinct features are also found in the LEO and NOR susceptibility spectra, e.g., a sudden switching of the susceptibility from a positive peak value to a negative peak one in the near vicinity of the fundamental absorption edge. A fairly large magnitude of those susceptibilities, reaching the order of 10-7esu under off-resonant conditions and up to 10-6esu in the resonant case, suggests that BN-SWNTs are a promising material for various electro-optical device applications.

  10. Single-handed helical wrapping of single-walled carbon nanotubes by chiral, ionic, semiconducting polymers.

    PubMed

    Deria, Pravas; Von Bargen, Christopher D; Olivier, Jean-Hubert; Kumbhar, Amar S; Saven, Jeffery G; Therien, Michael J

    2013-10-30

    We establish the requisite design for aryleneethynylene polymers that give rise to single-handed helical wrapping of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Highly charged semiconducting polymers that utilize either an (R)- or (S)-1,1'-bi-2-naphthol component in their respective conjugated backbones manifest HRTEM and AFM images of single-chain-wrapped SWNTs that reveal significant preferences for the anticipated helical wrapping handedness; statistical analysis of these images, however, indicates that ∼20% of the helical structures are formed with the "unexpected" handedness. CD spectroscopic data, coupled with TDDFT-based computational studies that correlate the spectral signatures of semiconducting polymer-wrapped SWNT assemblies with the structural properties of the chiral 1,1'-binaphthyl unit, suggest strongly that two distinct binaphthalene SWNT binding modes, cisoid-facial and cisoid-side, are possible for these polymers, with the latter mode responsible for inversion of helical chirality and the population of polymer-SWNT superstructures that feature the unexpected polymer helical wrapping chirality at the nanotube surface. Analogous aryleneethynylene polymers were synthesized that feature a 2,2'-(1,3-benzyloxy)-bridged (b)-1,1'-bi-2-naphthol unit: this 1,1'-bi-2-naphthol derivative is characterized by a bridging 2,2'-1,3 benzyloxy tether that restricts the torsional angle between the two naphthalene subunits along its C1-C1' chirality axis to larger, oblique angles that facilitate more extensive van der Waals contact of the naphthyl subunits with the nanotube. Similar microscopic, spectroscopic, and computational studies determine that chiral polymers based on conformationally restricted transoid binaphthyl units direct preferential facial binding of the polymer with the SWNT and thereby guarantee helically wrapped polymer-nanotube superstructures of fixed helical chirality. Molecular dynamics simulations provide an integrated picture tying together the

  11. Single Chirality (6,4) Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Fluorescence Imaging with Silicon Detectors.

    PubMed

    Antaris, Alexander L; Yaghi, Omar K; Hong, Guosong; Diao, Shuo; Zhang, Bo; Yang, Jiang; Chew, Leila; Dai, Hongjie

    2015-12-16

    Postsynthetic single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) sorting methods such as density gradient ultracentrifugation, gel chromatography, and electrophoresis have all been inspired by established biochemistry separation techniques designed to separate subcellular components. Biochemistry separation techniques have been refined to the degree that parameters such as pH, salt concentration, and temperature are necessary for a successful separation, yet these conditions are only now being applied to SWCNT separation methodologies. Slight changes in pH produce radically different behaviors of SWCNTs inside a density gradient, allowing for the facile separation of ultrahigh purity (6,4) SWCNTs from as-synthesized carbon nanotubes. The (6,4) SWCNTs are novel fluorophores emitting below ≈900 nm and can be easily detected with conventional silicon-based charge-coupled device detectors without the need for specialized InGaAs cameras. The (6,4) SWCNTs are used to demonstrate their potential as a clinically relevant NIR-I fluorescence stain for the immunohistochemical staining of cells and cancer tissue sections displaying high endothelial growth factor receptor levels.

  12. Polarised Raman spectroscopy on a single class of single-wall nanotubes by nano surface-enhanced scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, J.; Débarre, A.; Richard, A.; Tchénio, P.; Bandow, S.; Iijima, S.

    2000-12-01

    We report on the opportunity of performing polarised Raman spectroscopy on nanotubes by using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) mechanisms at the scale of a single hot site. In conjunction with the opportunity of selecting a single class of single wall nanotubes (SWNTs), it opens the way to fine spectroscopic studies of carbon nanotubes. Results obtained on a single class of nanotubes demonstrate first that polarised Raman spectroscopy is possible when a single hot site of a SERS substrate is selected and second that in this situation, unambiguous assignment of the modes is possible.

  13. Selective synthesis and device applications of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes using isopropyl alcohol as feedstock.

    PubMed

    Che, Yuchi; Wang, Chuan; Liu, Jia; Liu, Bilu; Lin, Xue; Parker, Jason; Beasley, Cara; Wong, H-S Philip; Zhou, Chongwu

    2012-08-28

    The development of guided chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a great platform for wafer-scale integration of aligned nanotubes into circuits and functional electronic systems. However, the coexistence of metallic and semiconducting nanotubes is still a major obstacle for the development of carbon-nanotube-based nanoelectronics. To address this problem, we have developed a method to obtain predominantly semiconducting nanotubes from direct CVD growth. By using isopropyl alcohol (IPA) as the carbon feedstock, a semiconducting nanotube purity of above 90% is achieved, which is unambiguously confirmed by both electrical and micro-Raman measurements. Mass spectrometric study was performed to elucidate the underlying chemical mechanism. Furthermore, high performance thin-film transistors with an on/off ratio above 10(4) and mobility up to 116 cm(2)/(V·s) have been achieved using the IPA-synthesized nanotube networks grown on silicon substrate. The method reported in this contribution is easy to operate and the results are highly reproducible. Therefore, such semiconducting predominated single-walled carbon nanotubes could serve as an important building block for future practical and scalable carbon nanotube electronics.

  14. Effects of functionalization on thermal properties of single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Gulotty, Richard; Castellino, Micaela; Jagdale, Pravin; Tagliaferro, Alberto; Balandin, Alexander A

    2013-06-25

    Carboxylic functionalization (-COOH groups) of carbon nanotubes is known to improve their dispersion properties and increase the electrical conductivity of carbon-nanotube-polymer nanocomposites. We have studied experimentally the effects of this type of functionalization on the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites. It was found that while even small quantities of carbon nanotubes (~1 wt %) can increase the electrical conductivity, a larger loading fraction (~3 wt %) is required to enhance the thermal conductivity of nanocomposites. Functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotubes performed the best as filler material leading to a simultaneous improvement of the electrical and thermal properties of the composites. Functionalization of the single-wall carbon nanotubes reduced the thermal conductivity enhancement. The observed trends were explained by the fact that while surface functionalization increases the coupling between carbon nanotube and polymer matrix, it also leads to formation of defects, which impede the acoustic phonon transport in the single-wall carbon nanotubes. The obtained results are important for applications of carbon nanotubes and graphene flakes as fillers for improving thermal, electrical and mechanical properties of composites.

  15. Synthesis and enhanced field-emission of thin-walled, open-ended, and well-aligned N-doped carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Tongxiang; Lv, Ruitao; Kang, Feiyu; Hu, Qiang; Gu, Jialin; Wang, Kunlin; Wu, Dehai

    2010-03-31

    Thin-walled, open-ended, and well-aligned N-doped carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the quartz slides were synthesized by using acetonitrile as carbon sources. As-obtained products possess large thin-walled index (TWI, defined as the ratio of inner diameter and wall thickness of a CNT). The effect of temperature on the growth of CNTs using acetonitrile as the carbon source was also investigated. It is found that the diameter, the TWI of CNTs increase and the Fe encapsulation in CNTs decreases as the growth temperature rises in the range of 780-860°C. When the growth temperature is kept at 860°C, CNTs with TWI = 6.2 can be obtained. It was found that the filed-emission properties became better as CNT growth temperatures increased from 780 to 860°C. The lowest turn-on and threshold field was 0.27 and 0.49 V/μm, respectively. And the best field-enhancement factors reached 1.09 × 105, which is significantly improved about an order of magnitude compared with previous reports. In this study, about 30 × 50 mm2 free-standing film of thin-walled open-ended well-aligned N-doped carbon nanotubes was also prepared. The free-standing film can be transferred easily to other substrates, which would promote their applications in different fields.

  16. Synthesis and Enhanced Field-Emission of Thin-Walled, Open-Ended, and Well-Aligned N-Doped Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Thin-walled, open-ended, and well-aligned N-doped carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the quartz slides were synthesized by using acetonitrile as carbon sources. As-obtained products possess large thin-walled index (TWI, defined as the ratio of inner diameter and wall thickness of a CNT). The effect of temperature on the growth of CNTs using acetonitrile as the carbon source was also investigated. It is found that the diameter, the TWI of CNTs increase and the Fe encapsulation in CNTs decreases as the growth temperature rises in the range of 780–860°C. When the growth temperature is kept at 860°C, CNTs with TWI = 6.2 can be obtained. It was found that the filed-emission properties became better as CNT growth temperatures increased from 780 to 860°C. The lowest turn-on and threshold field was 0.27 and 0.49 V/μm, respectively. And the best field-enhancement factors reached 1.09 × 105, which is significantly improved about an order of magnitude compared with previous reports. In this study, about 30 × 50 mm2 free-standing film of thin-walled open-ended well-aligned N-doped carbon nanotubes was also prepared. The free-standing film can be transferred easily to other substrates, which would promote their applications in different fields. PMID:20672122

  17. Vertical Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Nanostructure Fabricated by Atomic Force Microscope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-16

    functionalize SWNTs and to attach the SWNTs on modified templates. The carboxyl group of shortened SWNTs were modified with SOCl2 and cysteamine to...patterns of CNTs via nanosphere lithography on the surface modified with cysteamine by applying electrodeposition to a CNT suspension. The vertical...3. Schematic for patterning CNT films via nanosphere lithography on the surface modified with cysteamine SAM using electrodeposition. (a

  18. Vertical Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Nanostructure Fabricated by Atomic Force Microscope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    shortened SWNTs were modified with SOCl2 and cysteamine to change the functional group from carboxyl group to acyl chloride (-COCl) and thiol (-CONH...lithography. Scheme 3 shows the schematic for forming the patterns of CNTs via nanosphere lithography on the surface modified with cysteamine by...with cysteamine SAM using electrodeposition. (a) (b) (c) Figure 10. SEM images of experimental

  19. Vertical Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Nanostructure Fabricated by Atomic Force Microscope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-30

    poor adhesion. On the contrary, COCl-SWNTs were deposited robustly on the cathode either of a bare gold or of a gold modified with cysteamine . In...SWNT films were fab- ricated at 50 V of an electric field applied for 10 min on a bare gold and on a cysteamine -modified gold, respectively. Then...films were obtained either on a bare gold (physisorption) or on a cysteamine -modified gold (chemisorption) by applying a DC field of 50 V for 10 min

  20. Random Networks and Aligned Arrays of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Electronic Device Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-08

    gate designs, the best performance, as measured by transconductance , operating voltage, and hysteresis, is achieved with high capacitance gate...levels of integration approaching 100 transistors and in analog radio frequency (RF) systems with operating frequencies up to several gigahertz...compatible with a variety of substrates due to its open air, room temperature operation . A major disadvantage is that the solubilization procedures often

  1. Thermal transpiration through single walled carbon nanotubes and graphene channels

    SciTech Connect

    Thekkethala, Joe Francis; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2013-11-07

    Thermal transpiration through carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene channels is studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The system consists of two reservoirs connected by a CNT. It is observed that a flow is developed inside the CNT from the low temperature reservoir to the high temperature reservoir when the two reservoirs are maintained at different temperatures. The influence of channel size and temperature gradient on the mean velocity is analysed by varying the CNT diameter and the temperature of one of the reservoirs. Larger flow rate is observed in the smaller diameter CNTs showing an increase in the mean velocity with increase in the temperature gradient. For the flow developed inside the CNTs, slip boundaries occur and the slip length is calculated using the velocity profile. We examine the effect of fluid-wall interaction strength (ε{sub fw}), diffusivity (D), and viscosity of the fluid (μ) on the temperature induced fluid transport through the CNTs. Similar investigations are also carried out by replacing the CNT with a graphene channel. Results show that the mean velocity of the fluid atoms in the graphene channel is lower than that through the CNTs. This can be attributed to the higher degree of confinement observed in the CNTs.

  2. Passive fiber alignment to single-mode plastic waveguides fabricated by injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompe, Guido; Lehmacher, Stefan; Rudolph, Stefan; Kalveram, Stefan; Joenck, Matthias; Neyer, Andreas

    1998-04-01

    Passive fibre-waveguide coupling is a promising alternative to expensive active coupling in single-mode fibre-optics. The idea to utilize replication techniques in transparent polymeric materials for waveguide and alignment structure fabrication has led to the SIGA-process (Silizium, Galvanik und Abformung) which allows a cost effective production of low loss polymer waveguides in the near IR. Major difficulties in passive fibre coupling are caused by the high lateral alignment accuracy (of about 1 micrometer) in fibre positioning. In the SIGA process, the exact position of the V- grooves relative to the waveguide trenches is defined by the etch mask for the silicon master wafer. The width of the V- grooves is determined by the KOH etching time. It is controlled precisely at various stages in the etching process by means of a microscope based piezo driven measurement system with a resolution better than 0.5 micrometer, thus allowing a final vertical precision of fibre positioning of 350 nm. In order to specify the capability of our technology we have measured the position of dozens of fibres glued into V- grooves. The result was that an amount of 55% of the fibre cores was closer than 1.5 micrometer to the waveguide centre. As the experience has shown, a two-step process for the fabrication of passively fibre coupled waveguides is necessary. First, the waveguides are produced by filling the waveguide trenches with an IR-transparent monomer and by polymerizing it using UV curing. The waveguides are inspected with visible and IR light by clamping a fibre ribbon mechanically into the integrated plastic V-grooves. In a second step the fibre ribbon is fixed irreversibly in the V- grooves. By that way we have reached an insertion loss of 3.5 dB at 1300nm and 1550nm for passively coupled 22mm single mode waveguides. Most of the losses are attributed to waveguide imperfections. More details concerning the coupling losses and the device performances will be reported at the

  3. A single plan solution to chest wall radiotherapy with bolus?

    PubMed Central

    Ordonez-Sanz, C; Bowles, S; Hirst, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Radiotherapy treatments of post-mastectomy chest walls are complex, requiring treatment close to skin, necessitating bolus use. Commonly used 5- and 10-mm-thick boluses develop full skin dose, needing removal for the latter half of treatment and requiring two treatment plans to be generated. Can a thinner bolus be used for all treatment fractions, requiring only one plan? Methods: Investigation of doses received using (A) a half-time 10-mm-thick Vaseline® bolus (current situation); (B) a brass mesh (Whiting & Davis, Attleboro Falls, MA) and (C) 3- and 5-mm Superflab™ (Mick Radio-Nuclear Instruments, Mount Vernon, NY) for 6 and 15 MV. Dosimetric measurements in Barts WT1 solid water and an anthropomorphic phantom, using ionization chambers and thermoluminescent dosemeters, were used to study the effect of different bolus regimes on the photon depth–dose curves (DDCs) and skin doses. Results: Measured skin doses for the current 10-mm-thick Vaseline bolus, brass mesh and 3-mm bolus were compared (5 mm bolus has been rejected). The brass mesh has the least effect on the DDC, with changes <0.7% for depths greater than dmax. Brass mesh conforms superiorly to skin surfaces. Measurements on an anthropomorphic phantom demonstrate an increased skin dose compared with our current treatment protocol. Conclusion: Brass mesh has the smallest effect on the DDC, whilst sufficiently increasing surface dose. It can be removed at any fraction, based on a clinical decision, without the need for generating a new plan. Treating with one plan significantly reduces planning times. Advances in knowledge: Quantification of skin doses required and achieved from wax-on/wax-off treatment compared with alternative available breast boluses. PMID:24646288

  4. Mitigating the Dangers of a Single Story: Creating Large-Scale Writing Assessments Aligned with Sociocultural Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behizadeh, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    The dangers of a single story in current U.S. large-scale writing assessment are that assessment practice does not align with theory and this practice has negative effects on instruction and students. In this article, I analyze the connections or lack of connections among writing theory, writing assessment, and writing instruction, critique the…

  5. Mitigating the Dangers of a Single Story: Creating Large-Scale Writing Assessments Aligned with Sociocultural Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behizadeh, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    The dangers of a single story in current U.S. large-scale writing assessment are that assessment practice does not align with theory and this practice has negative effects on instruction and students. In this article, I analyze the connections or lack of connections among writing theory, writing assessment, and writing instruction, critique the…

  6. Ferromagnetism induced by intrinsic defects and boron substitution in single-wall SiC nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjia; Qin, Hongwei; Cao, Ensi; Gao, Feng; Liu, Hua; Hu, Jifan

    2011-09-08

    On the basis of density functional theory (DFT) methods, we study the magnetic properties and electronic structures of the armchair (4, 4) and zigzag (8, 0) single-wall SiC nanotubes with various vacancies and boron substitution. The calculation results indicate that a Si vacancy could induce the magnetic moments in both armchair (4, 4) and zigzag (8, 0) single-wall SiC nanotubes, which mainly arise from the p orbital of C atoms surrounding Si vacancy, leading to the ferromagnetic coupling. However, a C vacancy could only bring about the magnetic moment in armchair (4, 4) single-wall SiC nanotube, which mainly originates from the polarization of Si p electrons, leading to the antiferromagnetic coupling. In addition, for both kinds of single-wall SiC nanotubes, magnetic moments can be induced by a boron atom substituting for C atom. When two boron atoms locate nearest neighbored, both kinds of single-wall Si(C, B) nanotubes exhibit antiferromagnetic coupling.

  7. Selection, characterisation and mapping of complex electrochemical processes at individual single-walled carbon nanotubes: the case of serotonin oxidation.

    PubMed

    Güell, Aleix G; Meadows, Katherine E; Dudin, Petr V; Ebejer, Neil; Byers, Joshua C; Macpherson, Julie V; Unwin, Patrick R

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical (EC) oxidation of the neurotransmitter, serotonin, at individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is investigated at high resolution using a novel platform that combines flow-aligned SWNTs with atomic force microscopy, Raman microscopy, electronic conductance measurements, individual SWNT electrochemistry and high-resolution scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM). SECCM has been used to visualise the EC activity along side-wall sections of metallic SWNTs to assess the extent to which side-walls promote the electrochemistry of this complex multi-step process. Uniform and high EC activity is observed that is consistent with significant reaction at the side-wall, rather than electrochemistry being driven by defects alone. By scanning forward and reverse (trace and retrace) over the same region of a SWNT, it is also possible to assess any blocking of EC activity by serotonin oxidation reaction products. At a physiologically relevant concentration (5 μM), there is no detectable blocking of SWNTs, which can be attributed, at least in part, to the high diffusion rate to an individual, isolated SWNT in the SECCM format. At higher serotonin concentration (2 mM), oligomer formation from oxidation products is much more significant and major blocking of the EC process is observed from line profiles recorded as the SECCM meniscus moves over an SWNT. The SECCM line profile morphology is shown to be highly diagnostic of whether blocking occurs during EC processes. The studies herein add to a growing body of evidence that various EC processes at SWNTs, from simple outer sphere redox reactions to complex multi-step processes, occur readily at pristine SWNTs. The platform described is of general applicability to various types of nanostructures and nanowires.

  8. The excitonic effects in single and double-walled boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shudong; Li, Yunhai; Wang, Jinlan; Yip, Joanne

    2014-06-28

    The electronic structures and excitonic optical properties of single- and double-walled armchair boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) [e.g., (5,5) and (10,10), and (5,5)@(10,10)] are investigated within many-body Green's function and Bethe-Salpeter equation formalism. The first absorption peak of the double-walled nanotube has almost no shift compared with the single-walled (5,5) tube due to the strong optical transition in the double-walled tube that occurs within the inner (5,5) one. Dark and semi-dark excitonic states are detected in the lower energy region, stemming from the charge transfer between inner and outer tubes in the double-walled structure. Most interestingly, the charge transfer makes the electron and the hole reside in different tubes. Moreover, the excited electrons in the double-walled BNNT are able to transfer from the outer tube to the inner one, opposite to that which has been observed in double-walled carbon nanotubes.

  9. The excitonic effects in single and double-walled boron nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shudong; Li, Yunhai; Yip, Joanne; Wang, Jinlan

    2014-06-28

    The electronic structures and excitonic optical properties of single- and double-walled armchair boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) [e.g., (5,5) and (10,10), and (5,5)@(10,10)] are investigated within many-body Green's function and Bethe-Salpeter equation formalism. The first absorption peak of the double-walled nanotube has almost no shift compared with the single-walled (5,5) tube due to the strong optical transition in the double-walled tube that occurs within the inner (5,5) one. Dark and semi-dark excitonic states are detected in the lower energy region, stemming from the charge transfer between inner and outer tubes in the double-walled structure. Most interestingly, the charge transfer makes the electron and the hole reside in different tubes. Moreover, the excited electrons in the double-walled BNNT are able to transfer from the outer tube to the inner one, opposite to that which has been observed in double-walled carbon nanotubes.

  10. Trapping and injecting single domain walls in magnetic wire by local fields.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Manuel; Basheed, G A; Infante, Germán; Del Real, Rafael P

    2012-01-20

    A single domain wall (DW) moves at linearly increasing velocity under an increasing homogeneous drive magnetic field. Present experiments show that the DW is braked and finally trapped at a given position when an additional antiparallel local magnetic field is applied. That position and its velocity are further controlled by suitable tuning of the local field. In turn, the parallel local field of small amplitude does not significantly affect the effective wall speed at long distance, although it generates tail-to-tail and head-to-head pairs of walls moving along opposite directions when that field is strong enough.

  11. Electronic and Optical Properties of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Saito, R; Nugraha, A R T; Hasdeo, E H; Hung, N T; Izumida, W

    2017-02-01

    In this article, we overview our recent theoretical works on electronic and optical properties of carbon nanotubes by going from the background to the perspectives. Electronic Raman spectra of metallic carbon nanotubes give a new picture of Raman processes. Thermoelectricity of semiconducting nanotubes gives a general concept of the confinement effect on the thermoelectric power factor. Selective excitation of only a single phonon mode is proposed by the pulsed train technique of coherent phonon spectroscopy. Occurrence of both two and four fold degeneracy in the carbon nanotube quantum dot is explained by difference group velocities and the intra/inter valley scattering near the hexagonal corner of the Brillouin zone.

  12. A Forest of Sub-1.5-nm-wide Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes over an Engineered Alumina Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ning; Li, Meng; Patscheider, Jörg; Youn, Seul Ki; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2017-04-01

    A precise control of the dimension of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in their vertical array could enable many promising applications in various fields. Here, we demonstrate the growth of vertically aligned, single-walled CNTs (VA-SWCNTs) with diameters in the sub-1.5-nm range (0.98 ± 0.24 nm), by engineering a catalyst support layer of alumina via thermal annealing followed by ion beam treatment. We find out that the ion beam bombardment on the alumina allows the growth of ultra-narrow nanotubes, whereas the thermal annealing promotes the vertical alignment at the expense of enlarged diameters; in an optimal combination, these two effects can cooperate to produce the ultra-narrow VA-SWCNTs. According to micro- and spectroscopic characterizations, ion beam bombardment amorphizes the alumina surface to increase the porosity, defects, and oxygen-laden functional groups on it to inhibit Ostwald ripening of catalytic Fe nanoparticles effectively, while thermal annealing can densify bulk alumina to prevent subsurface diffusion of the catalyst particles. Our findings contribute to the current efforts of precise diameter control of VA-SWCNTs, essential for applications such as membranes and energy storage devices.

  13. UHV-STM of single-walled carbon nanotubes in registration with the atomic lattices of silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Peter

    2005-03-01

    A room-temperature UHV-STM is used to elucidate the registration dependence of the electronic and mechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) adsorbed onto silicon surfaces. The SWCNTs are deposited onto the Si surface in situ using a dry contact transfer (DCT) technique [1], with the resultant pristine SWCNT-Si interface enabling a joint atomic-resolution topographic and spectroscopic study of individual SWCNTs on both clean and H-passivated Si(100)-2x1 surfaces. Pronounced variations in the I-V and dI/dV-V spectra acquired along an isolated SWCNT were found to correlate with a transition from parallel to perpendicular alignment of the tube with respect to the dimer rows of the clean Si surface. Recent theoretical work [2] suggests that SWCNT-Si alignment is indeed energetically favorable and may give rise to novel nanotube-surface interactions unobserved in previous STM studies of SWCNTs in contact with a metallic substrate. [1] P.M. Albrecht and J.W. Lyding, APL 83, 5029 (2003). [2] W. Orellana, R.H. Miwa, and A. Fazzio, PRL 91, 166802 (2003).

  14. Polar cap models of gamma-ray pulsars: Emision from single poles of nearly aligned rotators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Joseph K.; Harding, Alice K.

    1994-01-01

    We compare a new Monte Carlo simulation of polar cap models for gamma-ray pulsars with observations of sources detected above 10 MeV by the Compton Observatory (CGRO). We find that for models in which the inclination of the magnetic axis is comparable to the angular radius of the polar cap, the radiation from a single cap may exhibit a pusle with either a single broad peak as in PSR 1706-44 and PSR 1055-52, or a doubly peaked profile comparable to those observed from the Crab, Vela and Geminga pulsars. In general, double pulses are seen by observers whose line of sight penetrates into the cap interior and are due to enhanced emission near the rim. For cascades induced by culvature radiation, increased rim emission occurs even when electrons are accelerated over the entire cap, since electrons from the interior escape along magnetic field lines with less curvature and hence emit less radiation. However, we obtain better fits to the duty cycles of observed profiles if we make the empirical assumption that acceleration occurs only near the rim. In either case, the model energy spectra are consistent with most of the observed sources. The beaming factors expected from nearly aligned rotators, based on standard estimates for the cap radius, imply that their luminosities need not be as large as in the case of orthogonal rotators. However, small beam angles are also a difficutly with this model because they imply low detection probablities. In either case the polar cap radius is a critical factor, and in this context we point out that plasma loading of the field lines should make the caps larger than the usual estimates based on pure dipole fields.

  15. Polar cap models of gamma-ray pulsars: Emision from single poles of nearly aligned rotators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Joseph K.; Harding, Alice K.

    1994-01-01

    We compare a new Monte Carlo simulation of polar cap models for gamma-ray pulsars with observations of sources detected above 10 MeV by the Compton Observatory (CGRO). We find that for models in which the inclination of the magnetic axis is comparable to the angular radius of the polar cap, the radiation from a single cap may exhibit a pusle with either a single broad peak as in PSR 1706-44 and PSR 1055-52, or a doubly peaked profile comparable to those observed from the Crab, Vela and Geminga pulsars. In general, double pulses are seen by observers whose line of sight penetrates into the cap interior and are due to enhanced emission near the rim. For cascades induced by culvature radiation, increased rim emission occurs even when electrons are accelerated over the entire cap, since electrons from the interior escape along magnetic field lines with less curvature and hence emit less radiation. However, we obtain better fits to the duty cycles of observed profiles if we make the empirical assumption that acceleration occurs only near the rim. In either case, the model energy spectra are consistent with most of the observed sources. The beaming factors expected from nearly aligned rotators, based on standard estimates for the cap radius, imply that their luminosities need not be as large as in the case of orthogonal rotators. However, small beam angles are also a difficutly with this model because they imply low detection probablities. In either case the polar cap radius is a critical factor, and in this context we point out that plasma loading of the field lines should make the caps larger than the usual estimates based on pure dipole fields.

  16. Fast single-pass alignment and variant calling using sequencing data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sequencing research requires efficient computation. Few programs use already known information about DNA variants when aligning sequence data to the reference map. New program findmap.f90 reads the previous variant list before aligning sequence, calling variant alleles, and summing the allele counts...

  17. Simultaneous effects of single wall carbon nanotube and effective variable viscosity for peristaltic flow through annulus having permeable walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzadi, Iqra; Nadeem, S.; Rabiei, Faranak

    The current article deals with the combine effects of single wall carbon nanotubes and effective viscosity for the peristaltic flow of nanofluid through annulus. The nature of the walls is assumed to be permeable. The present theoretical model can be considered as mathematical representation to the motion of conductive physiological fluids in the existence of the endoscope tube which has many biomedical applications such as drug delivery system. The outer tube has a wave of sinusoidal nature that is travelling along its walls while the inner tube is rigid and uniform. Lubrication approach is used for the considered analysis. An empirical relation for the effective variable viscosity of nanofluid is proposed here interestingly. The viscosity of nanofluid is the function of radial distance and the concentration of nanoparticles. Exact solution for the resulting system of equations is displayed for various quantities of interest. The outcomes show that the maximum velocity of SWCNT-blood nanofluid enhances for larger values of viscosity parameter. The pressure gradient in the more extensive part of the annulus is likewise found to increase as a function of variable viscosity parameter. The size of the trapped bolus is also influenced by variable viscosity parameter. The present examination also revealed that the carbon nanotubes have many applications related to biomedicine.

  18. Binding energy and mechanical stability of single- and multi-walled carbon nanotube serpentines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junhua; Lu, Lixin; Rabczuk, Timon

    2014-05-01

    Recently, Geblinger et al. [Nat. Nanotechnol. 3, 195 (2008)] and Machado et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 105502 (2013)] reported the experimental and molecular dynamics realization of S-like shaped single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), the so-called CNT serpentines. We reported here results from continuum modeling of the binding energy γ between different single- and multi-walled CNT serpentines and substrates as well as the mechanical stability of the CNT serpentine formation. The critical length for the mechanical stability and adhesion of different CNT serpentines are determined in dependence of EiIi, d, and γ, where EiIi and d are the CNT bending stiffness and distance of the CNT translation period. Our continuum model is validated by comparing its solution to full-atom molecular dynamics calculations. The derived analytical solutions are of great importance for understanding the interaction mechanism between different single- and multi-walled CNT serpentines and substrates.

  19. Binding energy and mechanical stability of single- and multi-walled carbon nanotube serpentines.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junhua; Lu, Lixin; Rabczuk, Timon

    2014-05-28

    Recently, Geblinger et al. [Nat. Nanotechnol. 3, 195 (2008)] and Machado et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 105502 (2013)] reported the experimental and molecular dynamics realization of S-like shaped single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), the so-called CNT serpentines. We reported here results from continuum modeling of the binding energy γ between different single- and multi-walled CNT serpentines and substrates as well as the mechanical stability of the CNT serpentine formation. The critical length for the mechanical stability and adhesion of different CNT serpentines are determined in dependence of EiIi, d, and γ, where EiIi and d are the CNT bending stiffness and distance of the CNT translation period. Our continuum model is validated by comparing its solution to full-atom molecular dynamics calculations. The derived analytical solutions are of great importance for understanding the interaction mechanism between different single- and multi-walled CNT serpentines and substrates.

  20. Systematic Conversion of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes into n-type Thermoelectric Materials by Molecular Dopants

    PubMed Central

    Nonoguchi, Yoshiyuki; Ohashi, Kenji; Kanazawa, Rui; Ashiba, Koji; Hata, Kenji; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Adachi, Chihaya; Tanase, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Thermoelectrics is a challenging issue for modern and future energy conversion and recovery technology. Carbon nanotubes are promising active thermoelectic materials owing to their narrow bandgap energy and high charge carrier mobility, and they can be integrated into flexible thermoelectrics that can recover any waste heat. We here report air-stable n-type single walled carbon nanotubes with a variety of weak electron donors in the range of HOMO level between ca. −4.4 eV and ca. −5.6 eV, in which partial uphill electron injection from the dopant to the conduction band of single walled carbon nanotubes is dominant. We display flexible films of the doped single walled carbon nanotubes possessing significantly large thermoelectric effect, which is applicable to flexible ambient thermoelectric modules. PMID:24276090

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Thermal Conductivity of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osman, M.; Srivastava, Deepak; Govindan,T. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have very attractive electronic, mechanical. and thermal properties. Recently, measurements of thermal conductivity in single wall CNT mats showed estimated thermal conductivity magnitudes ranging from 17.5 to 58 W/cm-K at room temperature. which are better than bulk graphite. The cylinderical symmetry of CNT leads to large thermal conductivity along the tube axis, additionally, unlike graphite. CNTs can be made into ropes that can be used as heat conducting pipes for nanoscale applications. The thermal conductivity of several single wall carbon nanotubes has been calculated over temperature range from l00 K to 600 K using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics using Tersoff-Brenner potential for C-C interactions. Thermal conductivity of single wall CNTs shows a peaking behavior as a function of temperature. Dependence of the peak position on the chirality and radius of the tube will be discussed and explained in this presentation.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Thermal Conductivity of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osman, M.; Srivastava, Deepak; Govindan,T. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have very attractive electronic, mechanical. and thermal properties. Recently, measurements of thermal conductivity in single wall CNT mats showed estimated thermal conductivity magnitudes ranging from 17.5 to 58 W/cm-K at room temperature. which are better than bulk graphite. The cylinderical symmetry of CNT leads to large thermal conductivity along the tube axis, additionally, unlike graphite. CNTs can be made into ropes that can be used as heat conducting pipes for nanoscale applications. The thermal conductivity of several single wall carbon nanotubes has been calculated over temperature range from l00 K to 600 K using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics using Tersoff-Brenner potential for C-C interactions. Thermal conductivity of single wall CNTs shows a peaking behavior as a function of temperature. Dependence of the peak position on the chirality and radius of the tube will be discussed and explained in this presentation.

  3. Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grigorian, Leonid; Hornyak, Louis; Dillon, Anne C; Heben, Michael J

    2014-09-23

    The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

  4. Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grigorian, Leonid [Raymond, OH; Hornyak, Louis [Evergreen, CO; Dillon, Anne C [Boulder, CO; Heben, Michael J [Denver, CO

    2008-10-07

    The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

  5. Systematic Conversion of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes into n-type Thermoelectric Materials by Molecular Dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonoguchi, Yoshiyuki; Ohashi, Kenji; Kanazawa, Rui; Ashiba, Koji; Hata, Kenji; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Adachi, Chihaya; Tanase, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2013-11-01

    Thermoelectrics is a challenging issue for modern and future energy conversion and recovery technology. Carbon nanotubes are promising active thermoelectic materials owing to their narrow bandgap energy and high charge carrier mobility, and they can be integrated into flexible thermoelectrics that can recover any waste heat. We here report air-stable n-type single walled carbon nanotubes with a variety of weak electron donors in the range of HOMO level between ca. -4.4 eV and ca. -5.6 eV, in which partial uphill electron injection from the dopant to the conduction band of single walled carbon nanotubes is dominant. We display flexible films of the doped single walled carbon nanotubes possessing significantly large thermoelectric effect, which is applicable to flexible ambient thermoelectric modules.

  6. Fabrication of seamless electrospun collagen/PLGA conduits whose walls comprise highly longitudinal aligned nanofibers for nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Yuanming; Huang, Chen; Zhu, Yi; Fan, Cunyi; Ke, Qinfei

    2013-06-01

    An ideal nerve scaffold should supply structural guidance and trophic support to facilitate nerve regeneration. Aligned electrospun nanofibers have shown considerable promise for the precise guidance of regenerating axons in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, uniaxially aligned three-dimension (3D) nanofiberous scaffolds may allow regenerating axons to traverse large gaps to treat severe nerve injuries. However, the aligned 3D conduit was always rolled by an aligned 2-dimensional (2D) sheet in current fabrication methods, which was inconvenient for transplant due to the discontinuous joint and inconsistent size. We developed a modified one-step electrospinning technique to produce a seamless 3D nanofiberous nerve conduit (NC) with highly longitudinal aligned nanofibers that combines the biocompatibility of natural collagen and the strength of the synthetic polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed the parallel alignment of the scaffold fibers. To test the effectiveness of these scaffolds at restoring neuronal connections, they were implanted into adult rats across a 13 mm sciatic nerve defect. Tests of, motor function, nerve conduction, axonal and Schwann cell morphology, and marker expression all revealed that uniaxially aligned seamless 3D electrospun collagen/PLGA NCs were superior to randomly oriented NCs and inferior to autografts for promoting axon regeneration, myelination, action potential propagation, neuromuscular transmission, and functional recovery. These uniaxially aligned seamless 3D electrospun collagen/PLGA nerve guides can also incorporate signaling molecules and additional structural cues to guide nerve growth, and so may be a promising substitute for autogenous nerve grafts.

  7. Stereo-epitaxial growth of single-crystal Ni nanowires and nanoplates from aligned seed crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyoban; Yoo, Youngdong; Kang, Taejoon; Lee, Jiyoung; Kim, Eungwang; Fang, Xiaosheng; Lee, Sungyul; Kim, Bongsoo

    2016-05-01

    Epitaxially grown anisotropic Ni nanostructures are promising building blocks for the development of miniaturized and stereo-integrated data storage kits because they can store multiple magnetic domain walls (DWs). Here, we report stereo-epitaxially grown single-crystalline Ni nanowires (NWs) and nanoplates, and their magnetic properties. Vertical and inclined Ni NWs were grown at the center and edge regions of c-cut sapphire substrates, respectively. Vertical Ni nanoplates were grown on r-cut sapphire substrates. The morphology and growth direction of Ni nanostructures can be steered by seed crystals. Cubic Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni NWs, tetrahedral Ni seeds grow into inclined Ni NWs, and triangular Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni nanoplates. The shapes of the Ni seeds are determined by the interfacial energy between the bottom plane of the seeds and the substrates. The as-synthesized Ni NWs and nanoplates have blocking temperature values greater than 300 K at 500 Oe, verifying that these Ni nanostructures can form large magnetic DWs with high magnetic anisotropy properties. We anticipate that epitaxially grown Ni NWs and nanoplates will be used in various types of 3-dimensional magnetic devices.Epitaxially grown anisotropic Ni nanostructures are promising building blocks for the development of miniaturized and stereo-integrated data storage kits because they can store multiple magnetic domain walls (DWs). Here, we report stereo-epitaxially grown single-crystalline Ni nanowires (NWs) and nanoplates, and their magnetic properties. Vertical and inclined Ni NWs were grown at the center and edge regions of c-cut sapphire substrates, respectively. Vertical Ni nanoplates were grown on r-cut sapphire substrates. The morphology and growth direction of Ni nanostructures can be steered by seed crystals. Cubic Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni NWs, tetrahedral Ni seeds grow into inclined Ni NWs, and triangular Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni nanoplates. The shapes of the Ni

  8. Process for separating metallic from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Ya-Ping (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method for separating semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes is disclosed. The method utilizes separation agents that preferentially associate with semiconducting nanotubes due to the electrical nature of the nanotubes. The separation agents are those that have a planar orientation, .pi.-electrons available for association with the surface of the nanotubes, and also include a soluble portion of the molecule. Following preferential association of the separation agent with the semiconducting nanotubes, the agent/nanotubes complex is soluble and can be solubilized with the solution enriched in semiconducting nanotubes while the residual solid is enriched in metallic nanotubes.

  9. Phase breaking in three-terminal contacted single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstić, V.; Roth, S.; Burghard, M.

    2000-12-01

    The three-terminal electrical transport through single-walled carbon nanotube bundles with low resistive metal contacts is investigated at room temperature. After correcting for the lead resistance, two-probe resistances close to the value expected for a metallic single-walled carbon nanotube are found. Analysis of the experimental data in the frame of the Landauer-Büttiker formalism reveals the phase- and momentum-randomizing effect of the third electrode, which is at floating potential, on the quasiballistic transport. Within this model, the phase-coherence length of the charge carriers is estimated to be ~300 nm at room temperature.

  10. Dispersion of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes by in situ Polymerization Under Sonication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Watson, Kent A.; Crooks, Roy E.; Smith, Joseph, Jr.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Connell, John W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; St.Clair, Terry L.

    2002-01-01

    Single wall nanotube reinforced polyimide nanocomposites were synthesized by in situ polymerization of monomers of interest in the presence of sonication. This process enabled uniform dispersion of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundles in the polymer matrix. The resultant SWNT-polyimide nanocomposite films were electrically conductive (antistatic) and optically transparent with significant conductivity enhancement (10 orders of magnitude) at a very low loading (0.1 vol%). Mechanical properties as well as thermal stability were also improved with the incorporation of the SWNT.

  11. Dispersion of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes by in situ Polymerization Under Sonication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Watson, Kent A.; Crooks, Roy E.; Smith, Joseph, Jr.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Connell, John W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; St.Clair, Terry L.

    2002-01-01

    Single wall nanotube reinforced polyimide nanocomposites were synthesized by in situ polymerization of monomers of interest in the presence of sonication. This process enabled uniform dispersion of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundles in the polymer matrix. The resultant SWNT-polyimide nanocomposite films were electrically conductive (antistatic) and optically transparent with significant conductivity enhancement (10 orders of magnitude) at a very low loading (0.1 vol%). Mechanical properties as well as thermal stability were also improved with the incorporation of the SWNT.

  12. Collision-induced fusion of two single-walled carbon nanotubes: A quantitative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Mao, Fei; Meng, Xiang-Rui; Wang, Dong-Qi; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2016-07-01

    The coalescence processes of two (6, 0) single-walled carbon nanotubes are investigated via coaxial collision based on the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding molecular dynamics method. According to the structure characteristics of the nanotubes, five impact cases are studied to explore the coalescence processes of the nanotubes. The simulation shows that various kinds of carbon nanomaterials, such as graphene sheets, graphene nanoribbons, and single-walled carbon nanotubes with larger diameters, are created after collision. Moreover, some defects formed in the carbon nanomaterials can be eliminated, and even the final configurations which are originally fragmented can almost become intact structures by properly quenching and annealing.

  13. Optical signatures of the Aharonov-Bohm phase in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zaric, Sasa; Ostojic, Gordana N; Kono, Junichiro; Shaver, Jonah; Moore, Valerie C; Strano, Michael S; Hauge, Robert H; Smalley, Richard E; Wei, Xing

    2004-05-21

    We report interband magneto-optical spectra for single-walled carbon nanotubes in high magnetic fields up to 45 tesla, confirming theoretical predictions that the band structure of a single-walled carbon nanotube is dependent on the magnetic flux phi threading the tube. We have observed field-induced optical anisotropy as well as red shifts and splittings of absorption and photoluminescence peaks. The amounts of shifts and splittings depend on the value of phi/phi(0) and are quantitatively consistent with theories based on the Aharonov-Bohm effect. These results represent evidence of the influence of the Aharonov-Bohm phase on the band gap of a solid.

  14. Investigation on Vibration Characteristics of Fluid Conveying Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Via DTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, B. Ravi; Sankara Subramanian, H.

    2017-08-01

    In this work differential transform method (DTM) is used to study the vibration behavior of fluid conveying single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Based on the theories of elasticity mechanics and nonlocal elasticity, an elastic Bernoulli-Euler beam model is developed for thermal-mechanical vibration and instability of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) conveying fluid and resting on an elastic medium. The critical fluid velocity is being found out with different boundary conditions, i.e. Fixed-Fixed and simply supported at ends. Effects of different temperature change, nonlocal parameters on natural frequency and critical fluid velocity are being discussed.

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Newly Discovered Fibrous Aggregates of Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns.

    PubMed

    Yuge, Ryota; Nihey, Fumiyuki; Toyama, Kiyohiko; Yudasaka, Masako

    2016-09-01

    Fibrous aggregates composed of radially assembled graphene-based single-walled nanotubules are prepared, named here as fibrous aggregates of single-walled carbon nanohorns (fib-CNHs), whose structure resembles that of chenille stems. The newly discovered fib-CNHs are 30-100 nm in diameter and 1-10 μm in length. The fib-CNHs show high dispersibility and conductivity. The fib-CNHs increase the advantages of nanocarbons in various fields. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Comparison of metallic silver and copper doping effects on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlamova, M. V.; Niu, J. J.

    2012-10-01

    In this work we performed the filling of single-walled carbon nanotube channels with metallic silver and copper by means of two-step synthesis including imbuing with metal nitrate aqueous solution and further annealing. It has been shown that metal insertion into the nanotube cavities results in the Fermi level upshift and the charge transfer from metal to carbon atoms, thus donor doping of single-walled carbon nanotubes takes place. At the same time, encapsulated silver has a larger donor effect on the carbon nanotubes that has been proved by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  17. Heat-induced transformations in coronene-single-walled carbon nanotube systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, Alexander I.; Fedotov, Pavel V.; Krylov, Alexander S.; Vtyurin, Alexander N.; Obraztsova, Elena D.

    2016-03-01

    Coronene molecules are used as filler for single-walled carbon nanotubes. Variation of the synthesis temperature regimes leads to formation of different types of carbon nanostructures inside the nanotubes. Accurate determination of the structures by optical spectroscopy methods remains an important issue in composite materials. Clear distinction between adsorbed organic molecules on the surface of the tubes and filled structures may be accessed by Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopies. We perform additional heat treatment after the initial synthesis procedure and show the evolution of the optical spectral features corresponding to the filled structures and adsorbed materials on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  18. Investigation of Hydrogen Storage in Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Fuel Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-17

    four systems(NH3, AlH3 , NiH3 and BH3) theoretically investigated, the single walled Carbon Nanotube (SWCNT) functionalized with BH3 is found to be...storage medium We have taken the (5, 5) single walled carbon nanotube for our study. The AlH3 molecule is allowed to approach the CNT from large...distances, to determine the energetically preferred absorption position of AlH3 . The AlH3 molecule is attached to the SWCNT and this system is denoted

  19. Quenching of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Fluorescence by Dissolved Oxygen Reveals Selective Single-Stranded DNA Affinities.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Bachilo, Sergei M; Weisman, R Bruce

    2017-04-13

    The selective interactions between short oligomers of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and specific structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes have been exploited in powerful methods for nanotube sorting. We report here that nanotubes coated with ssDNA also display selective interactions through the selective quenching of nanotube fluorescence by dissolved oxygen. In aqueous solutions equilibrated under 1 atm of O2, emission intensity from semiconducting nanotubes is reduced by between 9 and 40%, varying with the combination of ssDNA sequence and nanotube structure. This quenching reverses promptly and completely on removal of dissolved O2 and may be due to physisorption on nanotube surfaces. Fluorescence quenching offers a simple, nondestructive approach for studying the structure-selective interactions of ssDNA with single-walled carbon nanotubes and identifying recognition sequences.

  20. Stereo-epitaxial growth of single-crystal Ni nanowires and nanoplates from aligned seed crystals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoban; Yoo, Youngdong; Kang, Taejoon; Lee, Jiyoung; Kim, Eungwang; Fang, Xiaosheng; Lee, Sungyul; Kim, Bongsoo

    2016-05-21

    Epitaxially grown anisotropic Ni nanostructures are promising building blocks for the development of miniaturized and stereo-integrated data storage kits because they can store multiple magnetic domain walls (DWs). Here, we report stereo-epitaxially grown single-crystalline Ni nanowires (NWs) and nanoplates, and their magnetic properties. Vertical and inclined Ni NWs were grown at the center and edge regions of c-cut sapphire substrates, respectively. Vertical Ni nanoplates were grown on r-cut sapphire substrates. The morphology and growth direction of Ni nanostructures can be steered by seed crystals. Cubic Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni NWs, tetrahedral Ni seeds grow into inclined Ni NWs, and triangular Ni seeds grow into vertical Ni nanoplates. The shapes of the Ni seeds are determined by the interfacial energy between the bottom plane of the seeds and the substrates. The as-synthesized Ni NWs and nanoplates have blocking temperature values greater than 300 K at 500 Oe, verifying that these Ni nanostructures can form large magnetic DWs with high magnetic anisotropy properties. We anticipate that epitaxially grown Ni NWs and nanoplates will be used in various types of 3-dimensional magnetic devices.

  1. Single-molecule imaging reveals modulation of cell wall synthesis dynamics in live bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Timothy K.; Meng, Kevin; Shi, Handuo; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2016-01-01

    The peptidoglycan cell wall is an integral organelle critical for bacterial cell shape and stability. Proper cell wall construction requires the interaction of synthesis enzymes and the cytoskeleton, but it is unclear how the activities of individual proteins are coordinated to preserve the morphology and integrity of the cell wall during growth. To elucidate this coordination, we used single-molecule imaging to follow the behaviours of the two major peptidoglycan synthases in live, elongating Escherichia coli cells and after perturbation. We observed heterogeneous localization dynamics of penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 1A, the synthase predominantly associated with cell wall elongation, with individual PBP1A molecules distributed between mobile and immobile populations. Perturbations to PBP1A activity, either directly through antibiotics or indirectly through PBP1A's interaction with its lipoprotein activator or other synthases, shifted the fraction of mobile molecules. Our results suggest that multiple levels of regulation control the activity of enzymes to coordinate peptidoglycan synthesis. PMID:27774981

  2. CFD Code Validation of Wall HeatFluxes for a GO2/GH2 Single Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Jeff; West, Jeff; Williams, Robert; Tucker, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is becoming an important component of injector design in the rocket industry. Injector designers who use CFD in the design process need to understand the accuracy level of the particular code being used for certain aspects of the design. This paper represents a recent effort to demonstrate the accuracy of two CFD codes to calculate the wall heat flux for a single element injector. The FDNS and Loci- CHEM codes currently in use at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center were evaluated. The test case was a single shear coaxial element with gaseous oxygen and hydrogen in a chamber instrumented with coaxial heat flux gauges on the chamber wall down the axis. The data were taken at Penn State University. Measured wall temperatures were used as boundary conditions for the CFD calculations. Calculations were compared to experimental data at chamber pressures of 300,450 600, and 750 psia. The accuracy level of both codes was assessed.

  3. Ultrananocrystalline diamond decoration on to the single wall carbon nano tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Bhavesh; Late, Datta; Jejurikar, Suhas M.

    2017-10-01

    We have demonstrated the decoration of the ultrananocrystalline diamonds on single walled carbon nanotubes using a hot filament assisted chemical vapor deposition. Study reveals the critical influence of the filament to substrate distance on the formation of ultrananocrystalline diamonds on to the single walled carbon nanotubes. It is also observed that etching of carbon nanotubes, due to the presence of unavoidable atomic hydrogen throughout the chemical vapor deposition processes, can be significantly reduced by adjusting the filament to substrate distance. Morphological and structural investigations performed using high resolution transmission electron microscope suggests the growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond is subsequent to the formation of crystalline sp2 carbon layer on the nanotube wall, enabling us to suggest a growth model. The composite synthesized can be thought not only to use as a fuel cell catalyst support but also as chemical sensors, bio-sensors and micro electromechanical systems (MEMS).

  4. Resistance of a single domain wall in (Co/Pt)7 multilayer nanowires.

    PubMed

    Hassel, C; Brands, M; Lo, F Y; Wieck, A D; Dumpich, G

    2006-12-01

    Single (Co/Pt)_{7} multilayer nanowires prepared by electron beam lithography with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are locally modified by means of Ga-ion implantation generating 180 degrees domain walls which are pinned at the edges of underlying thin Pt wires. Since we can exclude contributions from the anisotropic and the Lorentz magnetoresistance this allows us to determine the resistance of a single domain wall at room temperature. We find a positive relative resistance increase of DeltaR/R=1.8% inside the domain wall which agrees well with the model of Levy and Zhang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 5110 (1997)10.1103/PhysRevLett.79.5110].

  5. Experimental determination of excitonic band structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes using circular dichroism spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Tanaka, Takeshi; Yomogida, Yohei; Sato, Naomichi; Saito, Riichiro; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-10-01

    Experimental band structure analyses of single-walled carbon nanotubes have not yet been reported, to the best of our knowledge, except for a limited number of reports using scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate the experimental determination of the excitonic band structures of single-chirality single-walled carbon nanotubes using their circular dichroism spectra. In this analysis, we use gel column chromatography combining overloading selective adsorption with stepwise elution to separate 12 different single-chirality enantiomers. Our samples show higher circular dichroism intensities than the highest values reported in previous works, indicating their high enantiomeric purity. Excitonic band structure analysis is performed by assigning all observed Eii and Eij optical transitions in the circular dichroism spectra. The results reproduce the asymmetric structures of the valence and conduction bands predicted by density functional theory. Finally, we demonstrate that an extended empirical formula can estimate Eij optical transition energies for any (n,m) species.

  6. Experimental determination of excitonic band structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes using circular dichroism spectra.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaojun; Tanaka, Takeshi; Yomogida, Yohei; Sato, Naomichi; Saito, Riichiro; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-10-05

    Experimental band structure analyses of single-walled carbon nanotubes have not yet been reported, to the best of our knowledge, except for a limited number of reports using scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate the experimental determination of the excitonic band structures of single-chirality single-walled carbon nanotubes using their circular dichroism spectra. In this analysis, we use gel column chromatography combining overloading selective adsorption with stepwise elution to separate 12 different single-chirality enantiomers. Our samples show higher circular dichroism intensities than the highest values reported in previous works, indicating their high enantiomeric purity. Excitonic band structure analysis is performed by assigning all observed Eii and Eij optical transitions in the circular dichroism spectra. The results reproduce the asymmetric structures of the valence and conduction bands predicted by density functional theory. Finally, we demonstrate that an extended empirical formula can estimate Eij optical transition energies for any (n,m) species.

  7. High Weight-Fraction Surfactant Solubilization of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M. F.; Rojas, E.; Bergey, D. M.; Johnson, A. T.; Yodh, A. G.

    2003-03-01

    We report a simple process to solubilize high weight fraction single-wall carbon nanotubes in water by nonspecific physical adsorption of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate. The diameter distribution of nanotubes in the dispersion, measured by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), showed that even at 20 mg/ml, ˜ 63 5% of single-wall carbon nanotubes bundles exfoliated into single tubes. A measure of the length distribution of the nanotubes showed that our dispersion technique reduced nanotube fragmentation. New and quantitative insight about nanotube solubilization is derived from comparisons of single tube yield, measured by AFM, as a function of surfactant type, concentration, and sonication procedure. This work has been partially supported by the NSF through the MRSEC grant DMR 00-79909, DMR-0203378, and by NASA through grant NAG8-2172.

  8. Experimental determination of excitonic band structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes using circular dichroism spectra

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Tanaka, Takeshi; Yomogida, Yohei; Sato, Naomichi; Saito, Riichiro; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-01-01

    Experimental band structure analyses of single-walled carbon nanotubes have not yet been reported, to the best of our knowledge, except for a limited number of reports using scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate the experimental determination of the excitonic band structures of single-chirality single-walled carbon nanotubes using their circular dichroism spectra. In this analysis, we use gel column chromatography combining overloading selective adsorption with stepwise elution to separate 12 different single-chirality enantiomers. Our samples show higher circular dichroism intensities than the highest values reported in previous works, indicating their high enantiomeric purity. Excitonic band structure analysis is performed by assigning all observed Eii and Eij optical transitions in the circular dichroism spectra. The results reproduce the asymmetric structures of the valence and conduction bands predicted by density functional theory. Finally, we demonstrate that an extended empirical formula can estimate Eij optical transition energies for any (n,m) species. PMID:27703139

  9. Imaging Cell Wall Architecture in Single Zinnia elegans Tracheary Elements1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Lacayo, Catherine I.; Malkin, Alexander J.; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Chen, Liang; Ding, Shi-You; Hwang, Mona S.; Thelen, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    The chemical and structural organization of the plant cell wall was examined in Zinnia elegans tracheary elements (TEs), which specialize by developing prominent secondary wall thickenings underlying the primary wall during xylogenesis in vitro. Three imaging platforms were used in conjunction with chemical extraction of wall components to investigate the composition and structure of single Zinnia TEs. Using fluorescence microscopy with a green fluorescent protein-tagged Clostridium thermocellum family 3 carbohydrate-binding module specific for crystalline cellulose, we found that cellulose accessibility and binding in TEs increased significantly following an acidified chlorite treatment. Examination of chemical composition by synchrotron radiation-based Fourier-transform infrared spectromicroscopy indicated a loss of lignin and a modest loss of other polysaccharides in treated TEs. Atomic force microscopy was used to extensively characterize the topography of cell wall surfaces in TEs, revealing an outer granular matrix covering the underlying meshwork of cellulose fibrils. The internal organization of TEs was determined using secondary wall fragments generated by sonication. Atomic force microscopy revealed that the resulting rings, spirals, and reticulate structures were composed of fibrils arranged in parallel. Based on these combined results, we generated an architectural model of Zinnia TEs composed of three layers: an outermost granular layer, a middle primary wall composed of a meshwork of cellulose fibrils, and inner secondary wall thickenings containing parallel cellulose fibrils. In addition to insights in plant biology, studies using Zinnia TEs could prove especially productive in assessing cell wall responses to enzymatic and microbial degradation, thus aiding current efforts in lignocellulosic biofuel production. PMID:20592039

  10. Viscoelastic properties of cell walls of single living plant cells determined by dynamic nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Hayot, Céline M; Forouzesh, Elham; Goel, Ashwani; Avramova, Zoya; Turner, Joseph A

    2012-04-01

    Plant development results from controlled cell divisions, structural modifications, and reorganizations of the cell wall. Thereby, regulation of cell wall behaviour takes place at multiple length scales involving compositional and architectural aspects in addition to various developmental and/or environmental factors. The physical properties of the primary wall are largely determined by the nature of the complex polymer network, which exhibits time-dependent behaviour representative of viscoelastic materials. Here, a dynamic nanoindentation technique is used to measure the time-dependent response and the viscoelastic behaviour of the cell wall in single living cells at a micron or sub-micron scale. With this approach, significant changes in storage (stiffness) and loss (loss of energy) moduli are captured among the tested cells. The results reveal hitherto unknown differences in the viscoelastic parameters of the walls of same-age similarly positioned cells of the Arabidopsis ecotypes (Col 0 and Ws 2). The technique is also shown to be sensitive enough to detect changes in cell wall properties in cells deficient in the activity of the chromatin modifier ATX1. Extensive computational modelling of the experimental measurements (i.e. modelling the cell as a viscoelastic pressure vessel) is used to analyse the influence of the wall thickness, as well as the turgor pressure, at the positions of our measurements. By combining the nanoDMA technique with finite element simulations quantifiable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of plant cell walls are achieved. Such techniques are expected to find broader applications in quantifying the influence of genetic, biological, and environmental factors on the nanoscale mechanical properties of the cell wall.

  11. Viscoelastic properties of cell walls of single living plant cells determined by dynamic nanoindentation

    PubMed Central

    Hayot, Céline M.; Forouzesh, Elham; Goel, Ashwani; Avramova, Zoya; Turner, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Plant development results from controlled cell divisions, structural modifications, and reorganizations of the cell wall. Thereby, regulation of cell wall behaviour takes place at multiple length scales involving compositional and architectural aspects in addition to various developmental and/or environmental factors. The physical properties of the primary wall are largely determined by the nature of the complex polymer network, which exhibits time-dependent behaviour representative of viscoelastic materials. Here, a dynamic nanoindentation technique is used to measure the time-dependent response and the viscoelastic behaviour of the cell wall in single living cells at a micron or sub-micron scale. With this approach, significant changes in storage (stiffness) and loss (loss of energy) moduli are captured among the tested cells. The results reveal hitherto unknown differences in the viscoelastic parameters of the walls of same-age similarly positioned cells of the Arabidopsis ecotypes (Col 0 and Ws 2). The technique is also shown to be sensitive enough to detect changes in cell wall properties in cells deficient in the activity of the chromatin modifier ATX1. Extensive computational modelling of the experimental measurements (i.e. modelling the cell as a viscoelastic pressure vessel) is used to analyse the influence of the wall thickness, as well as the turgor pressure, at the positions of our measurements. By combining the nanoDMA technique with finite element simulations quantifiable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of plant cell walls are achieved. Such techniques are expected to find broader applications in quantifying the influence of genetic, biological, and environmental factors on the nanoscale mechanical properties of the cell wall. PMID:22291130

  12. Applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes and type-II quantum dots in photovoltaics and passive mode-locking saturable absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jau; Wang, Yong-Gang; Cheng, Shin-Min; Yu, Pyng; Huang, Kuo-Yen; Yuan, Chi-Tsu

    2012-10-01

    Using single-molecule confocal imaging techniques combined with time-correlated single-photon counting we investigated the electron transfer (ET) rates to the single-walled carbon nanotubes from various types of semiconductor hetero-nanocrystals of type-I or type-II band alignment. We observed significantly larger ET rate for type-II ZnSe/CdS dot-in-rod nanostructures as compared to type-I spherical CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum-dots, and to CdSe/CdS dot-in-rod structures. We demonstrated that such rapid ET dynamics can compete with both Auger and radiative recombination processes, leading to potentially more effective photovoltaic operation. In another work, we used aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes as saturable absorbers for ps laser pulse generation. Using the vertical evaporation technique we fabricated saturable absorbers by transferring the water-soluble single wall carbon nanotubes onto a hydrophilic quartz substrate. The fast recovery times of the absorber were measured to be 136 fs and 790 fs. The modulation depth of the absorber was about 1.5%. Passive mode-locked Nd: GdVO4 laser using such an absorber was demonstrated. The continuous wave mode-locked pulses with the pulse duration of 12.4 ps and the repetition of 120 MHz were achieved. The maximum average output power of the mode-locked laser is 2.4 W at the pump power of 13 W. Such a kind of absorbers has potential to be put into practical use.

  13. Three Dimensionally Interlinked, Dense, Solid Form of Single-Walled CNT Ropes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    A 3D networked, dense form of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) has been made through isotropic shrinking of a gel-like SWNT-water paste by very slow evaporation. Approximately 35 g of Raw HiPco nanotubes were cleaned by the method of soft baking (250 C for 15 hours in air saturated with water vapor) in a glass beaker followed by leaching with concentrated hydrochloric acid. Typically, one liter of concentrated hydrochloric acid was added to the soft-baked voluminous mass in the same large beaker, and allowed to digest at room temperature with stirring overnight. The acid-digested SWNT slurry was filtered through a large porcelain Buchner funnel under atmospheric pressure. The slurry was continuously flushed, while still in the funnel, with a very slow but steady stream of deionized water employing a peristaltic pump. This process, referred to as gwashing, h continued until the filtrate water dripping from the Buchner funnel was clear, colorless, and neutral to a pH paper. This took about 15 liters of water to flow through the slurry over a day. At this point, the water pump was stopped and the SWNT-water slurry was allowed to drain the excess water for about 10 hours. The resulting thick paste of SWNT-neutral water was transferred to a beaker. The beaker was covered with aluminum foil with few holes and allowed to dry very slowly in a hood at room temperature. In about eight weeks, the sample gradually dried isotropically to a cylindrical dense mass referred to as a carbon nanotube block (CNB). There was no carbonaceous matter sticking to any of the glass surface where the SWNT-water paste made contact. The approximate dimensions of the cylindrical SWNT block that weighed 28 g were 1.5 in. (.3.8 cm) in diameter and 1.25 in. (.3.2 cm) in height. The bottom portion of the cylinder that was in contact with the beaker surface was slightly wider, indicating some resistance to shrinking. The cylindrical mass also consisted of several pores. The cylindrical mass was

  14. MICROWAVE-ASSISTED SYNTHESIS OF CROSSLINKED POLY(VINYL ALCOHOL) NANOCOMPOSITES COMPRISING SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES, MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES AND BUCKMINSTERFULLERENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report a facile method to accomplish cross-linking reaction of poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT), multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNT), and Buckminsterfullerene (C-60) using microwave (MW) irradiation. Nanocomposites of PVA cross-linked with SW...

  15. MICROWAVE-ASSISTED SYNTHESIS OF CROSSLINKED POLY(VINYL ALCOHOL) NANOCOMPOSITES COMPRISING SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES, MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES AND BUCKMINSTERFULLERENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report a facile method to accomplish cross-linking reaction of poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT), multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNT), and Buckminsterfullerene (C-60) using microwave (MW) irradiation. Nanocomposites of PVA cross-linked with SW...

  16. Dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes in alcohol-cholic acid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyshin, A. A.; Eliseeva, O. V.; Bondarenko, G. V.; Kolker, A. M.; Zakharov, A. G.; Fedorov, M. V.; Kiselev, M. G.

    2013-12-01

    A procedure for dispersing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for the preparation of suspensions with high concentrations of individual nanotubes in various solvents was described. The most stable suspensions were obtained from a mixture of ethanol with cholic acid at an acid concentration of 0.018 mol/kg.

  17. Growth of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Liu, Chang; Wang, Bing-Wei; Jiang, Hua; Chen, Mao-Lin; Sun, Dong-Ming; Li, Jin-Cheng; Cong, Hong-Tao; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2016-03-01

    The growth of high-quality semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution is crucial for the fabrication of high-performance electronic devices. However, the single-wall carbon nanotubes grown from traditional metal catalysts usually have diversified structures and properties. Here we design and prepare an acorn-like, partially carbon-coated cobalt nanoparticle catalyst with a uniform size and structure by the thermal reduction of a [Co(CN)6]3- precursor adsorbed on a self-assembled block copolymer nanodomain. The inner cobalt nanoparticle functions as active catalytic phase for carbon nanotube growth, whereas the outer carbon layer prevents the aggregation of cobalt nanoparticles and ensures a perpendicular growth mode. The grown single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very narrow diameter distribution centred at 1.7 nm and a high semiconducting content of >95%. These semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very small band-gap difference of ~0.08 eV and show excellent thin-film transistor performance.

  18. Environmental Detection of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Utilizing Near-Infrared Fluorescence

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are a growing number of applications for carbon nanotubes (CNT) in modern technologies and, subsequently, growth in production of CNT has expanded rapidly. Single-walled CNT (SWCNT) consist of a graphene sheet rolled up into a tube. With growing manufacture and use, the ...

  19. Engineered carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) protein-suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes in water.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Song, Qing; Ai, Xin; McDonald, Timothy J; Long, Hai; Ding, Shi-You; Himmel, Michael E; Rumbles, Garry

    2009-01-21

    Engineered protein, CtCBM4, the first carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) protein is successfully used to debundle and suspend single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) effectively in aqueous solution, which opens up a new avenue in further functionalizing and potential selectively fractionating SWNTs for diverse biology- and/or energy-related applications.

  20. On the Likelihood of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Causing Adverse Marine Ecological Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    This brief article discusses the ecological effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)in the marine environment. Based on new research and a review of the scientific literature, the paper concludes that SWNTs are unlikely to cause adverse ecological effects in the marine ...

  1. MICROWAVE-INDUCED RAPID CHEMICAL FUNCTIONALIZATION OF SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES (R830901)

    EPA Science Inventory


    Abstract

    The microwave-induced chemical functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is reported. The major advantage of this high-energy procedure is that it reduced the reaction time to the order of minutes and the number of steps in the reac...

  2. Aggregation Kinetics and Transport of Single-Walled CarbonNanotubes at Low Surfactant Concentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known about how low levels of surfactants can affect the colloidal stability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and how surfactant-wrapping of SWNTs can impact ecological exposures in aqueous systems. In this study, SWNTs were suspended in water with sodium ...

  3. On the Likelihood of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Causing Adverse Marine Ecological Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    This brief article discusses the ecological effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)in the marine environment. Based on new research and a review of the scientific literature, the paper concludes that SWNTs are unlikely to cause adverse ecological effects in the marine ...

  4. Environmental Detection of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Utilizing Near-Infrared Fluorescence

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are a growing number of applications for carbon nanotubes (CNT) in modern technologies and, subsequently, growth in production of CNT has expanded rapidly. Single-walled CNT (SWCNT) consist of a graphene sheet rolled up into a tube. With growing manufacture and use, the ...

  5. Discotic ionic liquid crystals of triphenylene as dispersants for orienting single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeongho Jay; Yamaguchi, Akihisa; Alam, Md Akhtarul; Yamamoto, Yohei; Fukushima, Takanori; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki; Fujita, Norifumi; Aida, Takuzo

    2012-08-20

    Orient and conduct: Triphenylene-based discotic ionic liquid crystals (ILCs) with six imidazolium ion pendants can disperse pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). When the ILC is columnarly assembled, doping with SWNTs results in macroscopic homeotropic columnar orientation. Combination of shear and annealing treatments gives rise to three different orientation states, which determine the anisotropy of electrical conduction.

  6. Growth of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Liu, Chang; Wang, Bing-Wei; Jiang, Hua; Chen, Mao-Lin; Sun, Dong-Ming; Li, Jin-Cheng; Cong, Hong-Tao; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The growth of high-quality semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow band-gap distribution is crucial for the fabrication of high-performance electronic devices. However, the single-wall carbon nanotubes grown from traditional metal catalysts usually have diversified structures and properties. Here we design and prepare an acorn-like, partially carbon-coated cobalt nanoparticle catalyst with a uniform size and structure by the thermal reduction of a [Co(CN)6]3− precursor adsorbed on a self-assembled block copolymer nanodomain. The inner cobalt nanoparticle functions as active catalytic phase for carbon nanotube growth, whereas the outer carbon layer prevents the aggregation of cobalt nanoparticles and ensures a perpendicular growth mode. The grown single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very narrow diameter distribution centred at 1.7 nm and a high semiconducting content of >95%. These semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes have a very small band-gap difference of ∼0.08 eV and show excellent thin-film transistor performance. PMID:27025784

  7. Production of vertical arrays of small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong

    2013-08-13

    A hot filament chemical vapor deposition method has been developed to grow at least one vertical single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT). In general, various embodiments of the present invention disclose novel processes for growing and/or producing enhanced nanotube carpets with decreased diameters as compared to the prior art.

  8. Formaldehyde gas sensing chip based on single-walled carbon nanotubes and thin water layer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Lee, Joohyung; Hong, Seunghun; Chung, Taek Dong

    2011-03-14

    We report a unique gaseous formaldehyde sensing chip based on a combination between patterned single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistors and a precisely controlled aqueous layer with photopolymerized polyelectrolytic gels. The proposed system reliably detects 0.1 ppb level formaldehyde gas, suggesting a new type of indoor air quality monitoring device.

  9. Aggregation Kinetics and Transport of Single-Walled CarbonNanotubes at Low Surfactant Concentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known about how low levels of surfactants can affect the colloidal stability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and how surfactant-wrapping of SWNTs can impact ecological exposures in aqueous systems. In this study, SWNTs were suspended in water with sodium ...

  10. Polyethyleneimine functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes as a substrate for neuronal growth.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hui; Ni, Yingchun; Mandal, Swadhin K; Montana, Vedrana; Zhao, Bin; Haddon, Robert C; Parpura, Vladimir

    2005-03-17

    We report the synthesis of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) graft copolymer. This polymer was prepared by the functionalization of SWNTs with polyethyleneimine (PEI). We used this graft copolymer, SWNT-PEI, as a substrate for cultured neurons and found that it promotes neurite outgrowth and branching.

  11. MICROWAVE-INDUCED RAPID CHEMICAL FUNCTIONALIZATION OF SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES (R830901)

    EPA Science Inventory


    Abstract

    The microwave-induced chemical functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is reported. The major advantage of this high-energy procedure is that it reduced the reaction time to the order of minutes and the number of steps in the reac...

  12. Sidewall functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with organic peroxides.

    PubMed

    Peng, Haiqing; Reverdy, Paul; Khabashesku, Valery N; Margrave, John L

    2003-02-07

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and their fluorinated derivatives (F-SWNTs) were reacted with organic peroxides including benzoyl and lauroyl peroxide to produce phenyl and undecyl sidewall functionalized SWNTs, respectively, which were characterized by Raman, FTIR, and UV-Vis-NIR spectra as well as TGA/MS, TGA/FTIR, and TEM data.

  13. Measuring the Uniaxial Strain of Individual Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes: Resonance Raman Spectra of Atomic-Force-Microscope Modified Single-Wall Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, S. B.; Swan, A. K.; Ünlü, M. S.; Goldberg, B. B.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Tinkham, M.

    2004-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to measure the strain in individual single-wall carbon nanotubes, strained by manipulation with an atomic-force-microscope tip. Under strains varying from 0.06% 1.65%, the in-plane vibrational mode frequencies are lowered by as much as 1.5% (40 cm-1), while the radial breathing mode (RBM) remains unchanged. The RBM Stokes/anti-Stokes intensity ratio remains unchanged under strain. The elasticity of these strain deformations is demonstrated as the down-shifted Raman modes resume their prestrain frequencies after a nanotube is broken under excessive strain.

  14. SNUFER: A software for localization and presentation of single nucleotide polymorphisms using a Clustal multiple sequence alignment output file

    PubMed Central

    Mansur, Marco A B; Cardozo, Giovana P; Santos, Elaine V; Marins, Mozart

    2008-01-01

    SNUFER is a software for the automatic localization and generation of tables used for the presentation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). After input of a fasta file containing the sequences to be analyzed, a multiple sequence alignment is generated using ClustalW ran inside SNUFER. The ClustalW output file is then used to generate a table which displays the SNPs detected in the aligned sequences and their degree of similarity. This table can be exported to Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel or as a single text file, permitting further editing for publication. The software was written using Delphi 7 for programming and FireBird 2.0 for sequence database management. It is freely available for noncommercial use and can be downloaded from http://www.heranza.com.br/bioinformatica2.htm. PMID:19238196

  15. Pulmonary and pleural inflammation after intratracheal instillation of short single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Katsuhide; Fukuda, Makiko; Endoh, Shigehisa; Maru, Junko; Kato, Haruhisa; Nakamura, Ayako; Shinohara, Naohide; Uchino, Kanako; Honda, Kazumasa

    2016-08-22

    Relationships between the physical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their toxicities have been studied. However, little research has been conducted to investigate the pulmonary and pleural inflammation caused by short-fiber single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) and multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs). This study was performed to characterize differences in rat pulmonary and pleural inflammation caused by intratracheal instillation with doses of 0.15 or 1.5mg/kg of either short-sized SWCNTs or MWCNTs. Data from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid analysis, histopathological findings, and transcriptional profiling of rat lungs obtained over a 90-day period indicated that short SWCNTs caused persistent pulmonary inflammation. In addition, the short MWCNTs markedly impacted alveoli immediately after instillation, with the levels of pulmonary inflammation following MWCNT instillation being reduced in a time-dependent manner. MWCNT instillation induced greater levels of pleural inflammation than did short SWCNTs. SWCNTs and MWCNTs translocated in mediastinal lymph nodes were observed, suggesting that SWCNTs and MWCNTs underwent lymphatic drainage to the mediastinal lymph nodes after pleural penetration. Our results suggest that short SWCNTs and MWCNTs induced pulmonary and pleural inflammation and that they might be transported throughout the body after intratracheal instillation. The extent of changes in inflammation differed following SWCNT and MWCNT instillation in a time-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol adsorption on single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption characteristics of 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol (4C2NP) onto single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) from aqueous solution were investigated with respect to the changes in the contact time, pH of solution, carbon nanotubes dosage and initial 4C2NP concentration. Experimental results showed that the adsorption efficiency of 4C2NP by carbon nanotubes (both of SWCNTs and MWCNTs) increased with increasing the initial 4C2NP concentration. The maximum adsorption took place in the pH range of 2–6. The linear correlation coefficients of different isotherm models were obtained. Results revealed that the Langmuir isotherm fitted the experimental data better than the others and based on the Langmuir model equation, maximum adsorption capacity of 4C2NP onto SWCNTs and MWCNTs were 1.44 and 4.42 mg/g, respectively. The observed changes in the standard Gibbs free energy, standard enthalpy and standard entropy showed that the adsorption of 4C2NP onto SWCNTs and MWCNTs is spontaneous and exothermic in the temperature range of 298–328 K. PMID:23369489

  17. Nanostructured carbon electrocatalyst supports for intermediate-temperature fuel cells: Single-walled versus multi-walled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papandrew, Alexander B.; Elgammal, Ramez A.; Tian, Mengkun; Tennyson, Wesley D.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Geohegan, David B.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    It is unknown if nanostructured carbons possess the requisite electrochemical stability to be used as catalyst supports in the cathode of intermediate-temperature solid acid fuel cells (SAFCs) based on the CsH2PO4 electrolyte. To investigate this application, single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were used as supports for Pt catalysts in SAFCs operating at 250 °C. SWNH-based cathodes display greater maximum activity than their MWNT-based counterparts at a cell voltage of 0.8 V, but are unstable in the SAFC cathode as a consequence of electrochemical carbon corrosion. MWNT-based cells are resistant to this effect and capable of operation for at least 160 h at 0.6 V and 250 °C. Cells fabricated with nanostructured carbon supports are more active (52 mA cm-1vs. 28 mA cm-1 at 0.8 V) than state-of-the-art carbon-free formulations while simultaneously displaying enhanced Pt utilization (40 mA mgPt-1vs. 16 mA mgPt-1 at 0.8 V). These results suggest that MWNTs are a viable support material for developing stable, high-performance, low-cost air electrodes for solid-state electrochemical devices operating above 230 °C.

  18. Responses of soil ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms to repeated exposure of single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qinglin; Wang, Hui; Yang, Baoshan; He, Fei; Han, Xuemei; Song, Ziheng

    2015-02-01

    The impacts of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on soil microbial biomass and microbial community composition (especially on ammonium oxidizing microorganisms) have been evaluated. The first exposure of CNTs lowered the microbial biomass immediately, but the values recovered to the level of the control at the end of the experiment despite the repeated addition of CNTs. The abundance and diversity of ammonium-oxidizing archaea (AOA) were higher than that of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) under the exposure of CNTs. The addition of CNTs decreased Shannon-Wiener diversity index of AOB and AOA. Two-way ANOVA analysis showed that CNTs had significant effects on the abundance and diversity of AOB and AOA. Dominant terminal restriction fragments (TRFs) of AOB exhibited a positive relationship with NH4(+), while AOA was on the contrary. It implied that AOB prefer for high-NH4(+) soils whereas AOA is favored in low NH4(+) soils in the CNT-contaminated soil. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes as anode and air-cathode in single chamber microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amade, R.; Moreno, H. A.; Hussain, S.; Vila-Costa, M.; Bertran, E.

    2016-10-01

    Electrode optimization in microbial fuel cells is a key issue to improve the power output and cell performance. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) grown on low cost stainless-steel mesh present an attractive approach to increase the cell performance while avoiding the use of expensive Pt-based materials. In comparison with non-aligned carbon nanotubes (NACNTs), VACNTs increase the oxygen reduction reaction taking place at the cathode by a factor of two. In addition, vertical alignment also increases the power density up to 2.5 times with respect to NACNTs. VACNTs grown at the anode can further improve the cell performance by increasing the electrode surface area and thus the electron transfer between bacteria and the electrode. The maximum power density obtained using VACNTs was 14 mW/m2 and 160 mV output voltage.

  20. Readily reusable electrochemical DNA hybridization biosensor based on the interaction of DNA with single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuzhi; Jiao, Kui; Liu, Shufeng; Hu, Yuwei

    2009-08-01

    Carboxylic group-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were assembled vertically on the glassy carbon electrode using ethylenediamine as linking agent to fabricate an aligned electrode (SWNTE). Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) wrapped around the SWNTs to form ssDNA-wrapped SWNTE structures based on the interaction between ssDNA and SWNT. A sensitive differential pulse voltammetric (DPV) response was obtained at the ssDNA-wrapped SWNTE owing to the electrooxidation of guanine bases. Double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) was formed when ssDNA on the ssDNA-wrapped SWNTE was hybridized with complementary ssDNA (cDNA). The dsDNA was removed from the SWNTs by undergoing a process of preconditioning at -0.6 V. Consequentially, the DPV response of guanine bases decreased. The used SWNTE could be renewed easily via ultrasonically rinsing. On the basis of this mechanism, a label-free and readily reusable electrochemical DNA hybridization biosensor was designed by directly monitoring the current change of guanine bases. Under optimum conditions, the plot of the measurement signal of guanine bases versus the cDNA concentrations was a good straight line in the range of 40-110 nM with a detection limit of 20 nM (3s). The biosensor can be switched to detect different target DNAs easily.

  1. Dissociation of single-strand DNA: single-walled carbon nanotube hybrids by Watson-Crick base-pairing.

    PubMed

    Jung, Seungwon; Cha, Misun; Park, Jiyong; Jeong, Namjo; Kim, Gunn; Park, Changwon; Ihm, Jisoon; Lee, Junghoon

    2010-08-18

    It has been known that single-strand DNA wraps around a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) by pi-stacking. In this paper it is demonstrated that such DNA is dissociated from the SWNT by Watson-Crick base-pairing with a complementary sequence. Measurement of field effect transistor characteristics indicates a shift of the electrical properties as a result of this "unwrapping" event. We further confirm the suggested process through Raman spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis. Experimental results are verified in view of atomistic mechanisms with molecular dynamics simulations and binding energy analyses.

  2. Intrinsic carrier mobility of a single-layer graphene covalently bonded with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dian; Shao, Zhi-Gang; Hao, Qing; Zhao, Hongbo

    2014-06-21

    We report intrinsic carrier mobility calculations of a two-dimensional nanostructure that consists of porous single layer graphene covalently bonded with single-walled carbon nanotubes on both sides. We used first-principles calculation and found that the deformation potential of such system is about 25% of that of graphene, and the carrier mobility is about 5 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} for both electrons and holes, about one order of magnitude lower than that of graphene. This nanostructure and its three-dimensional stacking could serve as novel organic electronic materials.

  3. Transient deformation regime in bending of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kutana, A; Giapis, K P

    2006-12-15

    Pure bending of single-walled carbon nanotubes between (5,5) and (50,50) is studied using molecular dynamics based on the reactive bond order potential. Unlike smaller nanotubes, bending of (15,15) and larger ones exhibits an intermediate deformation in the transition between the buckled and fully kinked configurations. This transient bending regime is characterized by a gradual and controllable flattening of the nanotube cross section at the buckling site. Unbending of a kinked nanotube bypasses the transient bending regime, exhibiting a hysteresis due to van der Waals attraction between the tube walls at the kinked site.

  4. Photocatalysis-assisted water filtration: using TiO2-coated vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube array for removal of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Oza, Goldie; Pandey, Sunil; Gupta, Arvind; Shinde, Sachin; Mewada, Ashmi; Jagadale, Pravin; Sharon, Maheshwar; Sharon, Madhuri

    2013-10-01

    A porous ceramic was coated with vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by spray pyrolysis. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles were then coated onto this densely aligned MWCNT. The presence of TiO2/MWCNT interfacial arrays was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (SEM-EDAX) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). This is a novel report in which water loaded with a most dreadful enterohemorrhagic pathogenic strain of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was filtered through TiO2/MWCNT coated porous ceramic filter and then analysed. Bacterial removal performance was found to be significantly lower in control i.e. plain porous ceramic (P<0.05) as compared to TiO2/MWCNT coated ceramic. The photocatalytic killing rate constant for TiO2-ceramic and MWCNT/TiO2-ceramic under fluorescent light was found be 1.45×10(-2) min(-1) and 2.23×10(-2) min(-1) respectively. Further, when I-V characteristics were performed for TiO2/MWCNT composite, it was corroborated that the current under light irradiation is comparatively higher than that in dark, thus proving it to be photocatalytically efficient system. The enhanced photocatalysis may be a contribution of increased surface area and charge transfer rate as a consequence of aligned MWCNT network. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Semi-conducting single-walled carbon nanotubes are detrimental when compared to metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes for electrochemical applications.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qi; Nasir, Muhammad Zafir Mohamad; Pumera, Martin

    2017-10-03

    As-synthetized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) contain both metallic and semiconducting nanotubes. For the electronics, it is desirable to separate semiconducting SWCNTs (s-SWCNTs) from the metallic ones as s-SWCNTs provide desirable electronic properties. Here we test whether ultrapure semi-conducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) provide advantageous electrochemical properties over the as prepared SWCNTs which contain a mixture of semiconducting and metallic CNTs. We test them as a transducer platform which enhanced the detection of target analytes (ascorbic acid, dopamine, uric acid) when compared to a bare glassy carbon (GC) electrode. Despite that, the two materials exhibit significantly different electrochemical properties and performances. A mixture of m-SWCNTs and s-SWCNTs demonstrated superior performance over ultrapure s-SWCNTs with greater peak currents and pronounced shift in peak potentials to lower values in cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry for the detection of target analytes. The mixture of m- and s-SWCNTs displayed about a 4 times improved heterogeneous electron transfer rate as compared to bare GC and a 2 times greater heterogeneous electron transfer rate than s-SWCNTs, demonstrating that ultrapure SWCNTs do not provide any major enhancement over the as prepared SWCNTs.

  6. Translocation of single-wall carbon nanotubes through solid-state nanopores.

    PubMed

    Hall, Adam R; Keegstra, Johannes M; Duch, Matthew C; Hersam, Mark C; Dekker, Cees

    2011-06-08

    We report the translocation of individual single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) through solid-state nanopores. Single-strand DNA oligomers are used to both disperse the SWNTs in aqueous solution and to provide them with a net charge, allowing them to be driven through the nanopores by an applied electric field. The resulting temporary interruptions in the measured nanopore conductance provide quantitative information on the diameter and length of the translocated nanotubes at a single-molecule level. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the technique can be utilized to monitor bundling of SWNT in solution by using complementary nucleotides to induce tube-tube agglomeration.

  7. Translocation of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Through Solid-State Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Adam R.; Keegstra, Johannes M.; Duch, Matthew C.; Hersam, Mark C.; Dekker, Cees

    2011-01-01

    We report the translocation of individual single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) through solid-state nanopores. Single-strand DNA oligomers are used to both disperse the SWNTs in aqueous solution and to provide them with a net charge, allowing them to be driven through the nanopores by an applied electric field. The resulting temporary interruptions in the measured nanopore conductance provide quantitative information on the diameter and length of the translocated nanotubes at a single-molecule level. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the technique can be utilized to monitor bundling of SWNT in solution by using complimentary nucleotides to induce tube-tube agglomeration. PMID:21574581

  8. Industrial-scale separation of high-purity single-chirality single-wall carbon nanotubes for biological imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yomogida, Yohei; Tanaka, Takeshi; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Wei, Xiaojun; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-06-01

    Single-chirality, single-wall carbon nanotubes are desired due to their inherent physical properties and performance characteristics. Here, we demonstrate a chromatographic separation method based on a newly discovered chirality-selective affinity between carbon nanotubes and a gel containing a mixture of the surfactants. In this system, two different selectivities are found: chiral-angle selectivity and diameter selectivity. Since the chirality of nanotubes is determined by the chiral angle and diameter, combining these independent selectivities leads to high-resolution single-chirality separation with milligram-scale throughput and high purity. Furthermore, we present efficient vascular imaging of mice using separated single-chirality (9,4) nanotubes. Due to efficient absorption and emission, blood vessels can be recognized even with the use of ~100-fold lower injected dose than the reported value for pristine nanotubes. Thus, 1 day of separation provides material for up to 15,000 imaging experiments, which is acceptable for industrial use.

  9. Industrial-scale separation of high-purity single-chirality single-wall carbon nanotubes for biological imaging.

    PubMed

    Yomogida, Yohei; Tanaka, Takeshi; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Wei, Xiaojun; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-06-28

    Single-chirality, single-wall carbon nanotubes are desired due to their inherent physical properties and performance characteristics. Here, we demonstrate a chromatographic separation method based on a newly discovered chirality-selective affinity between carbon nanotubes and a gel containing a mixture of the surfactants. In this system, two different selectivities are found: chiral-angle selectivity and diameter selectivity. Since the chirality of nanotubes is determined by the chiral angle and diameter, combining these independent selectivities leads to high-resolution single-chirality separation with milligram-scale throughput and high purity. Furthermore, we present efficient vascular imaging of mice using separated single-chirality (9,4) nanotubes. Due to efficient absorption and emission, blood vessels can be recognized even with the use of ∼100-fold lower injected dose than the reported value for pristine nanotubes. Thus, 1 day of separation provides material for up to 15,000 imaging experiments, which is acceptable for industrial use.

  10. Selective binding of single-stranded DNA-binding proteins onto DNA molecules adsorbed on single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Nii, Daisuke; Hayashida, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Yuuki; Ikawa, Shukuko; Shibata, Takehiko; Umemura, Kazuo

    2014-09-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding (SSB) proteins were treated with hybrids of DNA and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to examine the biological function of the DNA molecules adsorbed on the SWNT surface. When single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) was used for the hybridization, significant binding of the SSB molecules to the ssDNA-SWNT hybrids was observed by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and agarose gel electrophoresis. When double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) was used, the SSB molecules did not bind to the dsDNA-SWNT hybrids in most of the conditions that we evaluated. A specifically modified electrophoresis procedure was used to monitor the locations of the DNA, SSB, and SWNT molecules. Our results clearly showed that ssDNA/dsDNA molecules on the SWNT surfaces retained their single-stranded/double-stranded structures.

  11. Single-leg squats can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements in “turnout”

    PubMed Central

    Hopper, Luke S; Sato, Nahoko; Weidemann, Andries L

    2016-01-01

    The physical assessments used in dance injury surveillance programs are often adapted from the sports and exercise domain. Bespoke physical assessments may be required for dance, particularly when ballet movements involve “turning out” or external rotation of the legs beyond that typically used in sports. This study evaluated the ability of the traditional single-leg squat to predict the leg alignment of dancers performing ballet movements with turnout. Three-dimensional kinematic data of dancers performing the single-leg squat and five ballet movements were recorded and analyzed. Reduction of the three-dimensional data into a one-dimensional variable incorporating the ankle, knee, and hip joint center positions provided the strongest predictive model between the single-leg squat and the ballet movements. The single-leg squat can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements, even in “turned out” postures. Clinicians should pay careful attention to observational positioning and rating criteria when assessing dancers performing the single-leg squat. PMID:27895518

  12. Permeability enhancement of Escherichia coli by single-walled carbon nanotube treatment.

    PubMed

    Mosleh, Abdollah; Heintz, Anna; Lim, Ki-Taek; Kim, Jin-Woo; Beitle, Robert

    2017-03-06

    This research investigated the use of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as an additive to increase the permeability of a bacterial cell wall. Recombinant Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) that expressed β-lactamase were exposed to SWNTs under various levels of concentration and agitation. Activity of β-lactamase in the culture fluid and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used to determine the amount of released protein, and visually examine the permeability enhancement of the cells. It was found that β-lactamase release in the culture fluid occurred in a dose dependent manner with treatment by SWNTs and was also dependent on agitation rate. Based on TEM, this treatment successfully caused an increase in permeability without significant damage to the cell wall. Consequently, SWNTs can be used as an enhancement agent to cause the release of intracellular proteins. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Numerical analysis of contact line dynamics passing over a single wettable defect on a wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yasufumi; Higashida, Shohei; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Wakimoto, Tatsuro; Ito, Takahiro; Katoh, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the dynamics of a contact line passing a single defect, which was represented by a locally wettable part (whose static contact angle is less than the other part, namely, chemically heterogeneous and physically flat part), was analyzed using numerical simulations employing the front-tracking method and the generalized Navier boundary condition. We observed that the contact line was distorted with a logarithmic shape far from the defect; however, the distortion was dependent on the wall velocity. The apparent (averaged) dynamic contact angle of the wall with a defect was evaluated using a macroscopic energy balance. The apparent dynamic contact angles estimated from the energy balance agree well with the arithmetic averaged angles obtained from the present simulations. The macroscopic energy balance is useful to consider the effect of heterogeneity or roughness of the wall on the relation between the dynamic contact angle and contact line speed.

  14. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study on Fe and Co catalysts during the first stages of ethanol chemical vapor deposition for single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Oida, Satoshi; McFeely, Fenton R.; Bol, Ageeth A.

    2011-03-15

    Optimized chemical vapor deposition processes for single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) can lead to the growth of dense, vertically aligned, mm-long forests of SWCNTs. Precise control of the growth process is however still difficult, mainly because of poor understanding of the interplay between catalyst, substrate and reaction gas. In this paper we use x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to study the interplay between Fe or Co catalysts, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates and ethanol during the first stages of SWCNT forest growth. With XPS we observe that ethanol oxidizes Fe catalysts at carbon nanotube (CNT) growth temperatures, which leads to reduced carbon nanotube growth. Ethanol needs to be decomposed by a hot filament or other technique to create a reducing atmosphere and reactive carbon species in order to grow vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes from Fe catalysts. Furthermore, we show that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, unlike SiO{sub 2}, plays an active role in CNT growth using ethanol CVD. From our study we conclude that metallic Fe on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is the most optimal catalyst/substrate combination for high-yield SWCNT forest growth, using hot filament CVD with ethanol as the carbon containing gas.

  15. CFD Code Validation of Wall Heat Fluxes for a G02/GH2 Single Element Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Jeff; West, Jeff S.; Williams, Robert W.; Tucker, P. Kevin

    2005-01-01

    This paper puts forth the case for the need for improved injector design tools to meet NASA s Vision for Space Exploration goals. Requirements for this improved tool are outlined and discussed. The potential for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to meet these requirements is noted along with its current shortcomings, especially relative to demonstrated solution accuracy. The concept of verification and validation is introduced as the primary process for building and quantifying the confidence necessary for CFD to be useful as an injector design tool. The verification and validation process is considered in the context of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Combustion Devices CFD Simulation Capability Roadmap via the Simulation Readiness Level (SRL) concept. The portion of the validation process which demonstrates the ability of a CFD code to simulate heat fluxes to a rocket engine combustor wall is the focus of the current effort. The FDNS and Loci-CHEM codes are used to simulate a shear coaxial single element G02/GH2 injector experiment. The experiment was conducted a t a chamber pressure of 750 psia using hot propellants from preburners. A measured wall temperature profile is used as a boundary condition to facilitate the calculations. Converged solutions, obtained from both codes by using wall functions with the K-E turbulence model and integrating to the wall using Mentor s baseline turbulence model, are compared to the experimental data. The initial solutions from both codes revealed significant issues with the wall function implementation associated with the recirculation zone between the shear coaxial jet and the chamber wall. The FDNS solution with a corrected implementation shows marked improvement in overall character and level of comparison to the data. With the FDNS code, integrating to the wall with Mentor s baseline turbulence model actually produce a degraded solution when compared to the wall function solution with the K--E model. The Loci

  16. Surface chemical functionalization of single walled carbon nanotubes with a bacteriorhodopsin mutant.

    PubMed

    Ingrosso, Chiara; Bianco, Giuseppe Valerio; Lopalco, Patrizia; Tamborra, Michela; Curri, Maria Lucia; Corcelli, Angela; Bruno, Giovanni; Agostiano, Angela; Siciliano, Pietro; Striccoli, Marinella

    2012-10-21

    In this work, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been chemically functionalized at their walls with a membrane protein, namely the mutated bacteriorhodopsin D96N, integrated in its native archaeal lipid membrane. The modification of the SWNT walls with the mutant has been carried out in different buffer solutions, at pH 5, 7.5 and 9, to investigate the anchoring process, the typical chemical and physical properties of the component materials being dependent on the pH. The SWNTs modified by interactions with bacteriorhodopsin membrane patches have been characterized by UV-vis steady state, Raman and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and by atomic force and transmission electron microscopy. The investigation shows that the membrane protein patches wrap the carbon walls by tight chemical interactions undergoing a conformational change; such chemical interactions increase the mechanical strength of the SWNTs and promote charge transfers which p-dope the nano-objects. The functionalization, as well as the SWNT doping, is favoured in acid and basic buffer conditions; such buffers make the nanotube walls more reactive, thus catalysing the anchoring of the membrane protein. The direct electron communication among the materials can be exploited for effectively interfacing the transport properties of carbon nanotubes with both molecular recognition capability and photoactivity of the cell membrane for sensing and photoconversion applications upon integration of the achieved hybrid materials in sensors or photovoltaic devices.

  17. Reflection and transmission of regular waves from/through single and double perforated thin walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chioukh, Nadji; Çevik, Esin; Yüksel, Yalçin

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, reflection and transmission coefficients of regular waves from/through perforated thin walls are investigated. Small scale laboratory tests have been performed in a wave flume firstly with single perforated thin Plexiglas plates of various porosities. The plate is placed perpendicular to the flume with the height from the flume bottom to the position above water surface. With this thin wall in the flume wave overtopping is prohibited and incident waves are able to transmit. The porosities of the walls are achieved by perforating the plates with circular holes. Model settings with double perforated walls parallel to each other forming so called chamber system, have been also examined. Several parameters have been used for correlating the laboratory tests' results. Experimental data are also compared with results from the numerical model by applying the multi-domain boundary element method (MDBEM) with linear wave theory. Wave energy dissipation due to the perforations of the thin wall has been represented by a simple yet effective porosity parameter in the model. The numerical model with the MDBEM has been further validated against the previously published data.

  18. Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Exhibit Dual-Phase Regulation to Exposed Arabidopsis Mesophyll Cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Herein we are the first to report that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) exhibit dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll cells exposed to different concentration of SWCNTs. The mesophyll protoplasts were prepared by enzyme digestion, and incubated with 15, 25, 50, 100 μg/ml SWCNTs for 48 h, and then were observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured. Partial protoplasts were stained with propidium iodide and 4'-6- diamidino-2-phenylindole, partial protoplasts were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled SWCNTs, and observed by fluorescence microscopy. Results showed that SWCNTs could traverse both the plant cell wall and cell membrane, with less than or equal to 50 μg/ml in the culture medium, SWCNTs stimulated plant cells to grow out trichome clusters on their surface, with more than 50 μg/ml SWCNTs in the culture medium, SWCNTs exhibited obvious toxic effects to the protoplasts such as increasing generation of ROS, inducing changes of protoplast morphology, changing green leaves into yellow, and inducing protoplast cells' necrosis and apoptosis. In conclusion, single walled carbon nanotubes can get through Arabidopsis mesophyll cell wall and membrane, and exhibit dose-dependent dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts such as low dose stimulating cell growth, and high dose inducing cells' ROS generation, necrosis or apoptosis. PMID:27502666

  19. Synthesis, purification and characterization of multi- and single-wall nanotubes produced by catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomer, J.-F.; Piedigrosso, P.; Willems, I.; Konya, Z.; Fonseca, A.; Nagy, J. B.

    1999-09-01

    The catalytic process is the third method, with laser evaporation and electric arc techniques, to produce carbon nanotubes. By this way, multi-wall carbon nanotubes can be synthesised by catalytic decomposition of acetylene over supported catalyst Co/Zeolite NaY. The tubes produced are purified in two steps: first, separation of nanotubes and catalyst particles are carried out by fluorhydric acid treatment; then, the amorphous carbon elimination is made following two oxidative treatments. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes are obtained quasi-pure with high yield. Recently, single-walled nanotubes can be also synthesised by the catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbons. Typical TEM images of multi- and single-wall carbon nanotubes are given: for multi-wall nanotubes, after each step of production and purification, and for single-wall nanotubes after synthesis.

  20. Single-walled carbon nanotube/polyaniline/n-silicon solar cells: fabrication, characterization, and performance measurements.

    PubMed

    Tune, Daniel D; Flavel, Benjamin S; Quinton, Jamie S; Ellis, Amanda V; Shapter, Joseph G

    2013-02-01

    Carbon nanotube-silicon solar cells are a recently investigated photovoltaic architecture with demonstrated high efficiencies. Silicon solar-cell devices fabricated with a thin film of conductive polymer (polyaniline) have been reported, but these devices can suffer from poor performance due to the limited lateral current-carrying capacity of thin polymer films. Herein, hybrid solar-cell devices of a thin film of polyaniline deposited on silicon and covered by a single-walled carbon nanotube film are fabricated and characterized. These hybrid devices combine the conformal coverage given by the polymer and the excellent electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube films and significantly outperform either of their component counterparts. Treatment of the silicon base and carbon nanotubes with hydrofluoric acid and a strong oxidizer (thionyl chloride) leads to a significant improvement in performance.

  1. Thin single-wall BN-nanotubes formed inside carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Ryo; Kitaura, Ryo; Warner, Jamie H; Yamamoto, Yuta; Arai, Shigeo; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Shinohara, Hisanori

    2013-01-01

    We report a high yield synthesis of single-wall boron nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) inside single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), a nano-templated reaction, using ammonia borane complexes (ABC) as a precursor. Transmission electron microscope (TEM), high angle annular dark field (HAADF)-scanning TEM (STEM), electron energy loss spectra (EELS) and high resolution EELS mapping using aberration-corrected TEM system clearly show the formation of thin SWBNNTs inside SWCNTs. We have found that the yield of the SWBNNT formation is high and that the most of ABC molecules decompose and fuse to form the thin BNNTs at a temperature of 1,673 K having a narrow diameter distribution of 0.7 ± 0.1 nm. Optical absorption measurements suggest that the band gap of the thin SWBNNTs is about 6.0 eV, which provide the ideal insulator nanotubes with very small diameters.

  2. Computational and experimental studies of the interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, John J.; Rozo, Ciro E.; Castillo-León, Jaime; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Svendsen, Winnie E.; Rozlosnik, Noemi; Boisen, Anja; Martínez, Fernando

    2013-03-01

    This Letter involved the preparation of a conjugate between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid that was obtained without covalent chemical functionalization using a simple 'one pot' synthesis method. Subsequently, the conjugate was investigated by a computational hybrid method: our own N-layered Integrated Molecular Orbital and Molecular Mechanics (B3LYP(6-31G(d):UFF)). The results confirmed that the interaction occurred via hydrogen bonding between protons of the glutamic moiety from folic acid and π electrons from the carbon nanotubes. The single-walled carbon nanotube-folic acid conjugate presented herein is believed to lead the way to new potential applications as carbon nanotube-based drug delivery systems.

  3. Single walled carbon nanotube network—Tetrahedral amorphous carbon composite film

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Ajai Liu, Xuwen; Koskinen, Jari; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Johansson, Leena-Sisko

    2015-06-14

    Single walled carbon nanotube network (SWCNTN) was coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) using a pulsed Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc system to form a SWCNTN—ta-C composite film. The effects of SWCNTN areal coverage density and ta-C coating thickness on the composite film properties were investigated. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements prove the presence of high quality sp{sup 3} bonded ta-C coating on the SWCNTN. Raman spectroscopy suggests that the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) forming the network survived encapsulation in the ta-C coating. Nano-mechanical testing suggests that the ta-C coated SWCNTN has superior wear performance compared to uncoated SWCNTN.

  4. Synthesis of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes by Plasma Arc: Role of Plasma Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhart, Samir; Scott, Carl D.

    2000-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are porous objects on the molecular scale and have a low density, which gives them potential applications as adsorbent for molecular hydrogen. Their H2 absorption capacity published in the literature varies from 4 to 10% by mass according to the purity of the materials and storage conditions. Optimization of production methods of SWNTs should permit improving these new materials for storage of hydrogen. In this article, we show the potential of using SWNTs in hydrogen storage. In particular, we pose problems associated with synthesis, purification, and opening up of the nanotubes. We present an electric arc process currently used at laboratory scale to produce single wall carbon nanotubes. We discuss, in particular, operating conditions that permit growth of nanotubes and some plasma parameters that assure control of the material. Analysis of the process is carried out with the aid of local measurements of temperature and scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the materials.

  5. Controlled reversible debundling of single-walled carbon nanotubes by photo-switchable dendritic surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kördel, Christian; Setaro, Antonio; Bluemmel, Pascal; Popeney, Chris S.; Reich, Stephanie; Haag, Rainer

    2012-05-01

    Stimulus responsive surfactants based on dendritic glycerol azobenzene conjugates were used to solubilize and debundle single-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous media. Their debundling property as well as their reaggregation behavior upon irradiation with light was examined and light triggered reversible bundling and precipitation are shown.Stimulus responsive surfactants based on dendritic glycerol azobenzene conjugates were used to solubilize and debundle single-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous media. Their debundling property as well as their reaggregation behavior upon irradiation with light was examined and light triggered reversible bundling and precipitation are shown. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental methods and more details about the switching process. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30305a

  6. Rings and rackets from single-wall carbon nanotubes: manifestations of mesoscopic mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuezhou; Semler, Matthew; Ostanin, Igor; Hobbie, Erik; Dumitrica, Traian

    2015-03-01

    We combine distinct element method simulations and experiments to understand the stability of rings and rackets formed by single-walled carbon nanotubes assembled into ropes. Bending remains a soft deformation mode in ropes because intra-rope sliding of the constituent nanotubes occurs with ease. Our simulations indicate that the formation of these aggregates can be attributed to the mesoscopic mechanics of entangled nanotubes and to the sliding at the contacts. Starting from the single-walled carbon nanotubes, the sizes of the rings and rackets' heads increase with the rope diameter, indicating that the stability of the experimental aggregates can be largely explained by the competition between bending and van der Waals adhesion energies. Our results and simulation method should be useful for understanding nanoscale fibers and self-assembling process in general.

  7. Rings and rackets from single-wall carbon nanotubes: manifestations of mesoscale mechanics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuezhou; Semler, Matthew R; Ostanin, Igor; Hobbie, Erik K; Dumitrică, Traian

    2014-11-21

    We combine experiments and distinct element method simulations to understand the stability of rings and rackets formed by single-walled carbon nanotubes assembled into ropes. Bending remains a soft deformation mode in ropes because intra-rope sliding of the constituent nanotubes occurs with ease. Our simulations indicate that the formation of these aggregates can be attributed to the mesoscopic mechanics of entangled nanotubes and to the sliding at the contacts. Starting from the single-walled carbon nanotubes, the sizes of the rings and rackets' heads increase with the rope diameter, indicating that the stability of the experimental aggregates can be largely explained by the competition between bending and van der Waals adhesion energies. Our results and simulation method should be useful for understanding nanoscale fibers in general.

  8. Single-wall carbon nanotubes under high pressures to 62 GPa studied using designer diamond anvils.

    PubMed

    Patterson, J R; Vohra, Y K; Weir, S T; Akella, J

    2001-06-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotube samples were studied under high pressures to 62 GPa using designer diamond anvils with buried electrical microprobes that allowed for monitoring of the four-probe electrical resistance at elevated pressure. After initial densification, the electrical resistance shows a steady increase from 3 to 42 GPa, followed by a sharp rise above 42 GPa. This sharp rise in electrical resistance at high pressures is attributed to opening of an energy band gap with compression. Nanoindentation hardness measurements on the pressure-treated carbon nanotube samples gave a hardness value of 0.50 +/- 0.03 GPa. This hardness value is approximately 2 orders of magnitude lower than the amorphous carbon phase produced in fullerenes under similar conditions. Therefore, the pressure treatment of single-wall carbon nanotubes to 62 GPa did not produce a superhard carbon phase.

  9. Aharonov-Bohm interference and beating in single-walled carbon-nanotube interferometers.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jien; Wang, Qian; Rolandi, Marco; Dai, Hongjie

    2004-11-19

    Relatively low magnetic fields applied parallel to the axis of a chiral single-walled carbon nanotube are found causing large modulations to the p channel or valence band conductance of the nanotube in the Fabry-Perot interference regime. Beating in the Aharonov-Bohm type of interference between two field-induced nondegenerate subbands of spiraling electrons is responsible for the observed modulation with a pseudoperiod much smaller than that needed to reach the flux quantum Phi0 = h/e through the nanotube cross section. We show that single-walled nanotubes represent the smallest cylinders exhibiting the Aharonov-Bohm effect with rich interference and beating phenomena arising from well-defined molecular orbitals reflective of the nanotube chirality.

  10. Dynamic elastic modulus of single-walled carbon nanotubes in different thermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. T.; Wang, X.

    2007-05-01

    This Letter reports the result of investigation on the effect of loading rate (strain rate) on mechanical properties of armchair and zigzag nanotubes in different thermal environments, based on the molecular structural mechanics model in which the primary bonds between two nearest-neighboring carbon atoms are treaded as dimensional 2-node Euler Bernoulli beam considering the effect of environmental temperature on force constant values of the bonds stretching, bonds angle bending and torsional resistance. Nanoscale finite element simulations of the dynamic Young's modulus of single-walled carbon nanotubes under different strain rates and environmental temperatures reveal that the dynamic Young's modulus of the single-walled carbon nanotubes increases with the increase of strain rate, and decreases significantly with the increase of environment temperature. It is significant that the dynamic Young's modulus of zigzag nanotubes is more sensitive to strain rate and environmental temperature due to the tube chirality.

  11. Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Reporters for the Optical Detection of Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Paul W.; Strano, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews current efforts to make glucose sensors based on the inherent optical properties of single walled carbon nanotubes. The advantages of single walled carbon nanotubes over traditional organic and nanoparticle fluorophores for in vivo-sensing applications are discussed. Two recent glucose sensors made by our group are described, with the first being an enzyme-based glucose sensor that couples a reaction mediator, which quenches nanotube fluorescence, on the surface of the nanotube with the reaction of the enzyme. The second sensor is based on competitive equilibrium binding between dextran-coated nanotubes and concanavalin A. The biocompatibility of a model sensor is examined using the chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane as a tissue model. The advantages of measuring glucose concentration directly, like most optical sensors, versus measuring the flux in glucose concentration, like most electrochemical sensors, is discussed. PMID:20144355

  12. Theoretical prediction of electronic structure and carrier mobility in single-walled MoS₂ nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jin; Long, Mengqiu; Li, Xinmei; Xu, Hui; Huang, Han; Gao, Yongli

    2014-03-10

    We have investigated the electronic structure and carrier mobility of armchair and zigzag single-walled MoS₂ nanotubes using density functional theory combined with Boltzmann transport method with relaxation time approximation. It is shown that armchair nanotubes are indirect bandgap semiconductors, while zigzag nanotubes are direct ones. The band gaps of single-walled MoS₂ nanotubes are along with the augment of their diameters. For armchair nanotubes (5 ≤ Na ≤ 14), the hole mobility raise from 98.62 ~ 740.93 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1) at room temperature, which is about six times of the electron mobility. For zigzag nanotubes (9 ≤ Na ≤ 15), the hole mobility is 56.61 ~ 91.32 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1) at room temperature, which is about half of the electron mobility.

  13. Synthesis of graphene sheets from single walled carbon nanohorns: novel conversion from cone to sheet morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan Sahu, Sumit; Rao Rikka, Vallabha; Jagannatham, M.; Haridoss, Prathap; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Gopalan, Raghavan; Prakash, Raju

    2017-03-01

    Graphene sheets have been synthesized from single walled carbon nanohorns by one-step reaction with hydrogen peroxide. The obtained graphene sheets are in pure form and shows good electrical properties. As-synthesized graphene acts as dual function of support as well as reducing agent to prepare graphene-silver nanoparticle composite having uniform particle size of 6 nm. This method can easily be scalable to prepare graphene or graphene supported metal nanoparticle composites for versatile applications.

  14. Bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based atomic-scale mass sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Akbari, H. R.; Shaat, M.; Abdelkefi, A.

    2016-08-01

    The potentials of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as mechanical resonators for atomic-scale mass sensing are presented. To this aim, a nonlocal continuum-based model is proposed to study the dynamic behavior of bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based mass nanosensors. The carbon nanotube (CNT) is considered as an elastic Euler-Bernoulli beam with von Kármán type geometric nonlinearity. Eringen's nonlocal elastic field theory is utilized to model the interatomic long-range interactions within the structure of the CNT. This developed model accounts for the arbitrary position of the deposited atomic-mass. The natural frequencies and associated mode shapes are determined based on an eigenvalue problem analysis. An atom of xenon (Xe) is first considered as a specific case where the results show that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the CNT are strongly dependent on the location of the deposited Xe and the nonlocal parameter of the CNT. It is also indicated that the first vibrational mode is the most sensitive when the mass is deposited at the middle of a single-walled carbon nanotube. However, when deposited in other locations, it is demonstrated that the second or third vibrational modes may be more sensitive. To investigate the sensitivity of bridged single-walled CNTs as mass sensors, different noble gases are considered, namely Xe, argon (Ar), and helium (He). It is shown that the sensitivity of the single-walled CNT to the Ar and He gases is much lower than the Xe gas due to the significant decrease in their masses. The derived model and performed analysis are so needed for mass sensing applications and particularly when the detected mass is randomly deposited.

  15. Below-gap excitation of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Soavi, G; Grupp, A; Budweg, A; Scotognella, F; Hefner, T; Hertel, T; Lanzani, G; Leitenstorfer, A; Cerullo, G; Brida, D

    2015-11-21

    We investigate the optoelectronic properties of the semiconducting (6,5) species of single-walled carbon nanotubes by measuring ultrafast transient transmission changes with 20 fs time resolution. We demonstrate that photons with energy below the lowest exciton resonance efficiently lead to linear excitation of electronic states. This finding challenges the established picture of a vanishing optical absorption below the fundamental excitonic resonance. Our result points towards below-gap electronic states as an intrinsic property of semiconducting nanotubes.

  16. A Comparison of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Electrochemical Capacitor Electrode Fabrication Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-24

    REPORT A comparison of single-wall carbon nanotube electrochemical capacitor electrode fabrication methods 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF... Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being widely investigated as a replacement for activated carbon in super- capacitors. A wide range of CNT specific...ORGANIZATION NAMES AND ADDRESSES U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Carbon nanotube

  17. Dispersionless propagation of electron wavepackets in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosati, Roberto; Rossi, Fausto; Dolcini, Fabrizio

    2015-06-15

    We investigate the propagation of electron wavepackets in single-walled carbon nanotubes via a Lindblad-based density-matrix approach that enables us to account for both dissipation and decoherence effects induced by various phonon modes. We show that, while in semiconducting nanotubes the wavepacket experiences the typical dispersion of conventional materials, in metallic nanotubes its shape remains essentially unaltered, even in the presence of the electron-phonon coupling, up to micron distances at room temperature.

  18. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Targeted to the Tumor Vasculature for Breast Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    plastic-immobilized phosphatidylserine ( PS ). Annexin V was conjugated with a suspension of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and carboxymethyl...of this complex to human endothelial cells with PS exposed on the cell surface showed strong binding, indicating that the covalently bound annexin V...been shown to bind to phospohatidylserine ( PS ) exposed on the surface of endothelial cells in blood vessels in tumors; PS is not exposed on the

  19. Improving the mechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube sheets by intercalation of polymeric adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Jonathan N.; Blau, Werner J.; Dalton, Alan B.; Muñoz, Edgar; Collins, Steve; Kim, Bog G.; Razal, Joselito; Selvidge, Miles; Vieiro, Guillermo; Baughman, Ray H.

    2003-03-01

    Organic polymers, such as poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), and poly(styrene), were intercalated into single-walled carbon nanotube sheets by soaking the sheets in polymer solutions. Even for short soak times, significant polymer intercalation into existing free volume was observed. Tensile tests on intercalated sheets showed that the Young's modulus, strength, and toughness increased by factors of 3, 9, and 28, respectively, indicating that the intercalated polymer enhances load transmission between nanotubes.

  20. The Effects of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes on the Shear Piezoelectricity of Biopolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, Conrad; Fitz-Gerald, James M.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Park, Cheol

    2008-01-01

    Shear piezoelectricity was investigated in a series of composites consisting of increased loadings of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in poly (gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate), or PBLG. The effects of the SWCNTs on this material property in PBLG will be discussed. Their influence on the morphology of the polymer (degree of orientation and crystallinity), and electrical and dielectric properties of the composite will be reported