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Sample records for aligned volcanic vents

  1. Spatial and Alignment Analyses for a field of Small Volcanic Vents South of Pavonis Mons Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Glaze, L. S.; Greeley, R.; Hauber, E.; Baloga, S. M.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Williams, D. A.; Glotch, T. D.

    2008-01-01

    The Tharsis province of Mars displays a variety of small volcanic vent (10s krn in diameter) morphologies. These features were identified in Mariner and Viking images [1-4], and Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data show them to be more abundant than originally observed [5,6]. Recent studies are classifying their diverse morphologies [7-9]. Building on this work, we are mapping the location of small volcanic vents (small-vents) in the Tharsis province using MOLA, Thermal Emission Imaging System, and High Resolution Stereo Camera data [10]. Here we report on a preliminary study of the spatial and alignment relationships between small-vents south of Pavonis Mons, as determined by nearest neighbor and two-point azimuth statistical analyses. Terrestrial monogenetic volcanic fields display four fundamental characteristics: 1) recurrence rates of eruptions,2 ) vent abundance, 3) vent distribution, and 4) tectonic relationships [11]. While understanding recurrence rates typically requires field measurements, insight into vent abundance, distribution, and tectonic relationships can be established by mapping of remotely sensed data, and subsequent application of spatial statistical studies [11,12], the goal of which is to link the distribution of vents to causal processes.

  2. Spatial and Alignment Analyses for a Field of Small Volcanic Vents South of Pavonis Mons and Implications for the Tharsis Province, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, Jacob E.; Glaze, Lori S.; Greeley, Ronald; Hauber, Ernst; Baloga, Stephen; Sakimoto, Susan E. H.; Williams, David A.; Glotch, Timothy D.

    2009-01-01

    A field of small volcanic vents south of Pavonis Mons was mapped with each vent assigned a two-dimensional data point. Nearest neighbor and two-point azimuth analyses were applied to the resulting location data. Nearest neighbor results show that vents within this field are spatially random in a Poisson sense, suggesting that the vents formed independently of each other without sharing a centralized magma source at shallow depth. Two-point azimuth results show that the vents display north-trending alignment relationships between one another. This trend corresponds to the trends of faults and fractures of the Noachian-aged Claritas Fossae, which might extend into our study area buried beneath more recently emplaced lava flows. However, individual elongate vent summit structures do not consistently display the same trend. The development of the volcanic field appears to display tectonic control from buried Noachian-aged structural patterns on small, ascending magma bodies while the surface orientations of the linear vents might reflect different, younger tectonic patterns. These results suggest a complex interaction between magma ascension through the crust, and multiple, older, buried Tharsis-related tectonic structures.

  3. Explosive Volcanic Eruptions from Linear Vents on Earth, Venus and Mars: Comparisons with Circular Vent Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Stephen M.; Wimert, Jesse

    2010-01-01

    Conditions required to support buoyant convective plumes are investigated for explosive volcanic eruptions from circular and linear vents on Earth, Venus, and Mars. Vent geometry (linear versus circular) plays a significant role in the ability of an explosive eruption to sustain a buoyant plume. On Earth, linear and circular vent eruptions are both capable of driving buoyant plumes to equivalent maximum rise heights, however, linear vent plumes are more sensitive to vent size. For analogous mass eruption rates, linear vent plumes surpass circular vent plumes in entrainment efficiency approximately when L(sub o) > 3r(sub o) owing to the larger entrainment area relative to the control volume. Relative to circular vents, linear vents on Venus favor column collapse and the formation of pyroclastic flows because the range of conditions required to establish and sustain buoyancy is narrow. When buoyancy can be sustained, however, maximum plume heights exceed those from circular vents. For current atmospheric conditions on Mars, linear vent eruptions are capable of injecting volcanic material slightly higher than analogous circular vent eruptions. However, both geometries are more likely to produce pyroclastic fountains, as opposed to convective plumes, owing to the low density atmosphere. Due to the atmospheric density profile and water content on Earth, explosive eruptions enjoy favorable conditions for producing sustained buoyant columns, while pyroclastic flows would be relatively more prevalent on Venus and Mars. These results have implications for the injection and dispersal of particulates into the planetary atmosphere and the ability to interpret the geologic record of planetary volcanism.

  4. In Brief: Volcanic vents found in deep Caribbean waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-04-01

    Scientists surveying the Cayman Trough in the Caribbean Sea have discovered the world's deepest undersea volcanic vents, or “black smokers,” the National Oceanography Center (NOC) in Southampton, UK, announced on 11 April. The vents were found at a depth of 5000 meters, about 800 meters deeper than any previously discovered. Jon Copley, a marine biologist at the University of Southampton's School of Ocean and Earth Science, said, “Seeing the world's deepest black-smoker vents looming out of the darkness was awe-inspiring.” Geochemist Doug Connelly of NOC, principal scientist of the expedition, noted, “We hope our discovery will yield new insights into biogeochemically important elements in one of the most extreme naturally occurring environments on our planet.” Researchers used an NOC-developed Autosub6000 robot submarine, which was remotely controlled from the Royal Research Ship James Cook. For more information, visit http://www.thesearethevoyages.net/.

  5. Volcanic field elongation, vent distribution and tectonic evolution of continental rift: The Main Ethiopian Rift example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarini, Francesco; Le Corvec, Nicolas; Isola, Ilaria; Favalli, Massimiliano

    2015-04-01

    Magmatism and faulting operate in continental rifts and interact at a variety of scales, however their relationship is complex. The African rift, being the best example for both active continental rifting and magmatism, provides the ideal location to study the interplay between the two mechanisms. The Main Ethiopian Rift (MER), which connects the Afar depression in the north with the Turkana depression and Kenya Rift to the south, consists of two distinct systems of normal faults and its floor is scattered with volcanic fields formed by tens to several hundreds monogenetic, generally basaltic, small volcanoes and composite volcanoes and small calderas. The distribution of vents defines the overall shape of the volcanic field. Previous work has shown that the distribution of volcanic vents and the shape of a field are linked to its tectonic environment and its magmatic system. In order to distinguish the impact of each mechanism, we analyzed four volcanic fields located at the boundary between the central and northern MER, three of them (Debre Zeyit, Wonji and Kone) grew in the rift valley and one (Akaki) on the western rift shoulder. The elongation and shape of the fields were analyzed based on their vent distribution using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA), the Vent-to-Vent Distance (VVD), and the two dimensional symmetric Gaussian kernel density estimate methods. We extracted from these methods several parameters characterizing the spatial distribution of points (e.g., eccentricity (e), eigenvector index (evi), angular dispersion (Da)). These parameters allow to define at least three types of shape for volcanic fields: strong elongate (line and ellipse), bimodal/medium elongate (ellipse) and dispersed (circle) shapes. Applied to the natural example, these methods well differentiate each volcanic field. For example, the elongation of the field increases from shoulder to rift axis inversely to the angular dispersion. In addition, the results show that none of

  6. Insight into vent opening probability in volcanic calderas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudicepietro, Flora; Macedonio, Giovanni; D'Auria, Luca; Martini, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    This study provides insight into the possible behavior of volcanic calderas in pre-eruptive phase and into the most probable location of the areas prone to vent opening hazard, for cases where sill emplacement is an important element of the shallow magma transport system. We consider that the evolution of the stress field is the main factor that controls the vent opening processes in volcanic calderas and we think that the intrusion of sills is one of the most common mechanism governing caldera unrest. Therefore, we have investigated the spatial and temporal evolution of the stress field due to the emplacement of a sill at shallow depth to provide insight on vent opening probability. We carried out several numerical experiments by using a physical model, to assess the role of the magma properties (viscosity), host rock characteristics (Young's modulus and thickness), and dynamics of the intrusion process (mass flow rate) in controlling the stress field. Results show that that high magma viscosity produces larger stress values, while low magma viscosity leads to lower stresses and favors the radial spreading of the sill. Also high-rock Young's modulus gives high stress intensity, whereas low values of Young's modulus produce a dramatic reduction of the stress associated with the intrusive process. The maximum intensity of tensile stress is concentrated at the front of the sill and propagates radially with it, over time. In our simulations, we find that maximum values of tensile stress occur in ring-shaped areas with radius ranging between 350m and 2500m from the injection point, depending on the model parameters. We infer that the probability of vent opening is higher in these areas.

  7. Overview of Vent Fluid Chemistry From the Marianas Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, D. A.; Roe, K. K.; Bolton, S. A.; Baross, J. A.; Lupton, J. E.; Lilley, M. D.; Embley, R. W.; Chadwick, W. W.; Resing, J. A.

    2004-12-01

    In March and April 2004, a research expedition on the R.V.T.G. Thompason with the ROV ROPOS investigated and sampled hydrothermal systems on six submarine volcanoes of the Marianas volcanic arc between 14.3 and 21.5 degrees N. In this two-year project sponsored by NOAA Ocean Exploration, dive targets were selected based on bathymetric and hydrothermal plume mapping conducted in 2003. Hydrothermal plume intesity and chemistry was used with success to target and sample a remarkable variety of volcanic and hydrothermal features. At NW Rota-1 submarine volcano, there is clear evidence of ongoing eruptive activity producing clouds of particulate and molten sulfur as well as mm to cm-size glassy volcanic ejecta. Fluids (34 deg C) sampled directly from an eruptive pit crater has pH of 2.0, with a high content of particulated sulfur, excess sulfate relative to seawater, and very low H2s content. Fluids percolating through volcaniclastic sand adjacent to the pit reached 100 deg C and had higher silica, slightly higher pH, and millimolar levels of H2s. The chemistry of both types of fluids is indicative of input of volcanic SO2 and disproportionation into sulfate and H2s (in volcaniclastic sands) and elemental sulfur (in the pit crater). Molten sulfur droplets indicate a high-temperature source at the base of the pit crater that rapidly mixes with seawater, while fluids venting through the sand remain hotter and react with volcanic glass. DNA was collected by in-situ filtration and both archaea and bacteria were amplified by PCR. Bacterial clone libraries were dominated by epsilon Proteobacteria with a high degree of relatedness to microaerophilic sulfur-, sulfide-, and hydrogen oxidizers belonging to the genera Sulfurimonas and Calderomonas. At East Diamante submarine volcano, several hydrothermal areas were found on resurgent domes within the large caldera. One of these sites hosted the only high-temperature deposits. The high volatile content of the volcanic arc

  8. Vent distribution in the Quaternary Payún Matrú Volcanic Field, western Argentina: Its relation to tectonics and crustal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando, I. R.; Franzese, J. R.; Llambías, E. J.; Petrinovic, I. A.

    2014-05-01

    The Payún Matrú Volcanic Field consists of two polygenetic and mostly trachytic volcanoes (Payún Matrú with a summit caldera and Payún Liso) along with around 220 scoria cones and basaltic lava flows. This volcanic field belongs to the Payenia Basaltic Province (33° 30‧-38° S), a Quaternary Andean back-arc basaltic province of the Southern Volcanic Zone, in western Argentina. The vent density distribution of the Payún Matrú Volcanic Field is different from the other volcanic fields within Payenia. The Payún Matrú volcano and the scoria cones are distributed in an E-W oriented fringe about 15 km wide and 70 km long, with the Payún Matrú caldera in the middle of this fringe. The structural framework in which the volcanic field is located allows to infer that this vent density distribution is strongly conditioned by pre-existing crustal anisotropies. The volcanic field is located in a transfer zone related to Jurassic extensional structures of the Neuquén Basin, which were inverted also as a transfer zone during the Miocene compressive deformation that formed the Malargüe fold and thrust belt, and, in addition, it is located in the southern margin of a Neogene syn-orogenic basin. The analysis of vent center location and vent morphology is helpful to determine basaltic vent alignments within the Payún Matrú Volcanic Field and to infer the syn-eruptive stress field. This analysis shows that vent alignments are compatible with the present-day maximum horizontal stress, as measured by break-out of oil wells.

  9. Evidence of young volcanic vents in the lunar maria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braden, S.; Robinson, M. S.; Stopar, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Images from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) contain >70 examples of small (10s of m to km), young mare features [1-4] with morphologies similar to the relatively well-studied Ina-D (18.65°N, 5.30°E) [1,5-10]. These features, here called Irregular Mare Patches (IMPs), exhibit sharp, meter-scale morphologies and are distinct from adjacent mare units. Studies of IMPs indicate two common units termed uneven units and smooth units. The uneven unit is present in each IMP and varies in reflectance, surface morphology, and boulder density. The smooth units are mare-like but are often found isolated from the mare, surrounded by the uneven unit. Sharp contacts are found at the boundaries between the uneven and smooth units, or between the uneven unit and the surrounding mare (common in smaller IMPs where there is no distinct occurrence of the smooth unit). Both uneven and smooth units within IMPs have relatively few superposed impact craters with diameters (D) >10 m, consistent with a young age. A combination of crater counts and topographic analyses of four IMPs indicate ages of <100 Ma. We used topography derived from LROC digital terrain models to compare 500x500 m areas from IMPs, impact melt deposits (4 Ma - 100 Ma), and older surfaces (1.6 - 3.6 Ga). Properties measured include the average and maximum slopes, standard deviation of slope (roughness), and relief (maximum - minimum elevation). Most of the IMPs have topographic properties similar to young impact melt deposits such as those from Giordano Bruno, Larmor Q, and Moore F. Constraints on the ages of IMPs are important for bounding the age of the youngest mare eruptions and thus improving our understanding of the lunar heat inventory over time. The morphologies and distinct flow fronts of IMPs may represent the remnants of late-stage volcanic vents. The rate of extrusion and temperature required to produce the sharp flow boundaries found in the IMPs are likely different

  10. Investigating the role of small vent volcanism during the development of Tharsis Province, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. A.; Bleacher, J. E.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Glaze, L. S.

    2014-12-01

    Clusters of tens to hundreds of small volcanic vents have recently been recognized as a major component of Tharsis Province volcanism. These volcanic fields are formed from distributed-style, possibly monogenetic, volcanism and are composed of low sloped edifices with diameters of tens of kilometers and heights of tens to hundreds of meters. We report a new catalog of these small volcanic vents, now available through the USGS Astrogeology Science Center. This catalog was created with the use of gridded topographic data from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) and images from the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) and the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC). We are now investigating isolated clusters of distributed volcanism in Tharsis with this dataset. We hypothesize that these clusters are formed from significant magmatic events that played a large role in the development of Tharsis. Currently, the catalog contains 1075 unique volcanic vents in the Tharsis Province. With the catalog, potentially isolated volcano clusters are identified with vent density estimation. Vent intensity for clusters is found to be 1 vent per 1000 sq km or less. Crater retention rates for one such cluster, Syria Planum, indicates that these distributed volcanic systems might continue as long as 700 Ma, or that monogenetic volcanic systems overprint older systems. Using a modified basal outlining algorithm with MOLA gridded data, shield volumes are found to be between 1-20 cubic km. Current results show distributed-style volcanism occuring in Tharsis orders of magnitude more dispersed than analogous volcano clusers on Earth, while individual edifices are found to be an order of magnitude larger than volcanoes in Earth clusters. Proof of concept results are reported for three identified clusters: Arsia Mons Caldera, Syria Planum, and Southern Pavonis Mons.

  11. Spatial Compilation of Holocene Volcanic Vents in the Western Conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, D. W.; Siebert, L.

    2015-12-01

    A spatial compilation of all known Holocene volcanic vents in the western conterminous United States has been assembled. This compilation records volcanic vent location (latitude/longitude coordinates), vent type (cinder cone, dome, etc.), geologic map unit description, rock type, age, numeric age and reference (if dated), geographic feature name, mapping source, and, where available, spatial database source. Primary data sources include: USGS geologic maps, USGS Data Series, the Smithsonian Global Volcanism Program (GVP) catalog, and published journal articles. A total of 726 volcanic vents have been identified from 45 volcanoes or volcanic fields spanning ten states. These vents are found along the length of the Cascade arc in the Pacific Northwest, widely around the Basin and Range province, and at the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau into New Mexico. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Volcano Early Warning System (NVEWS) identifies 28 volcanoes and volcanic centers in the western conterminous U.S. that pose moderate, high, or very high threats to surrounding communities based on their recent eruptive histories and their proximity to vulnerable people, property, and infrastructure. This compilation enhances the understanding of volcano hazards that could threaten people and property by providing the context of where Holocene eruptions have occurred and where future eruptions may occur. Locations in this compilation can be spatially compared to located earthquakes, used as generation points for numerical hazard models or hazard zonation buffering, and analyzed for recent trends in regional volcanism and localized eruptive activity.

  12. Volcanic carbon dioxide vents show ecosystem effects of ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Hall-Spencer, Jason M; Rodolfo-Metalpa, Riccardo; Martin, Sophie; Ransome, Emma; Fine, Maoz; Turner, Suzanne M; Rowley, Sonia J; Tedesco, Dario; Buia, Maria-Cristina

    2008-07-01

    The atmospheric partial pressure of carbon dioxide (p(CO(2))) will almost certainly be double that of pre-industrial levels by 2100 and will be considerably higher than at any time during the past few million years. The oceans are a principal sink for anthropogenic CO(2) where it is estimated to have caused a 30% increase in the concentration of H(+) in ocean surface waters since the early 1900s and may lead to a drop in seawater pH of up to 0.5 units by 2100 (refs 2, 3). Our understanding of how increased ocean acidity may affect marine ecosystems is at present very limited as almost all studies have been in vitro, short-term, rapid perturbation experiments on isolated elements of the ecosystem. Here we show the effects of acidification on benthic ecosystems at shallow coastal sites where volcanic CO(2) vents lower the pH of the water column. Along gradients of normal pH (8.1-8.2) to lowered pH (mean 7.8-7.9, minimum 7.4-7.5), typical rocky shore communities with abundant calcareous organisms shifted to communities lacking scleractinian corals with significant reductions in sea urchin and coralline algal abundance. To our knowledge, this is the first ecosystem-scale validation of predictions that these important groups of organisms are susceptible to elevated amounts of p(CO(2)). Sea-grass production was highest in an area at mean pH 7.6 (1,827 (mu)atm p(CO(2))) where coralline algal biomass was significantly reduced and gastropod shells were dissolving due to periods of carbonate sub-saturation. The species populating the vent sites comprise a suite of organisms that are resilient to naturally high concentrations of p(CO(2)) and indicate that ocean acidification may benefit highly invasive non-native algal species. Our results provide the first in situ insights into how shallow water marine communities might change when susceptible organisms are removed owing to ocean acidification.

  13. Distribution of late Cenozoic volcanic vents in the Cascade Range: volcanic arc segmentation and regional tectonic considerations ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guffanti, M.; Weaver, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    Spatial, temporal, and compositional distributions of c4000 volcanic vents formed since 16 Ma in Washington, Oregon, N California, and NW Nevada illustrate the evolution of volcanism related to subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate system and extension of the Basin and Range province. Vent data were obtained from published map compilations and include monogenetic and small polygenetic volcanoes in addition to major composite centers. On the basis of the distribution of 2821 vents formed since 5 Ma, the Cascade Range is divided into 5 segments, with vents of the High Lava Plains along the northern margin of the Basin and Range province in Oregon forming a sixth segment. Some aspects of the Cascade Range segmentation can be related to gross structural features of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate.-from Authors

  14. Spatial distribution and alignments of volcanic centers: Clues to the formation of monogenetic volcanic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corvec, Nicolas; Spörli, K. Bernhard; Rowland, Julie; Lindsay, Jan

    2013-09-01

    Monogenetic basaltic volcanic fields occur worldwide in tectonic environments ranging from extensional to convergent. Understanding similarities and differences between these fields may help to characterize key controls on their generation. Such volcanic fields consist of numerous volcanic centers, each of which represents a pathway of magma from its source to the surface. We analyzed the spatial distribution of volcanic centers in 37 monogenetic volcanic fields, and assuming that the distribution of volcanic centers relative to each other is matched by a similar source pattern within the mantle, applied the following methods for each: (1) the Poisson Nearest Neighbor (PNN) analysis, representing the degree to which the distribution of the volcanic centers departs from a predicted Poisson distribution, and (2) a volcanic alignment analysis to ascertain the preferential pathways, if any, used by the magma to reach the surface. This is the first comprehensive global comparison of such analyses. Magma pathways within the brittle upper crust are influenced to various degrees by two end-member situations: (1) formation of new extension fractures perpendicular to the least compressive stress (σ3) and (2) re-activation of pre-existing fractures that are near-parallel to the maximum principal stress (σ1). The results of the PNN analysis show that, independently of the tectonic environment, most volcanic fields display a clustered distribution of their volcanic centers. Alignment analysis shows that either the ambient tectonic environment exerts a strong influence on the preferential orientations of the volcanic alignments, or that it is in competition with other factors (e.g., pre-existing structures, local stress changes due to older intrusions). Overall, these results indicate that the propagation of the magma (and therefore the spatial distribution of the volcanic centers within volcanic fields) is the product of an interplay between deep level influences (i

  15. Differences in recovery between deep-sea hydrothermal vent and vent-proximate communities after a volcanic eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollner, Sabine; Govenar, Breea; Arbizu, Pedro Martinez; Mills, Susan; Le Bris, Nadine; Weinbauer, Markus; Shank, Timothy M.; Bright, Monika

    2015-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents and the surrounding basalt seafloor are subject to major natural disturbance events such as volcanic eruptions. In the near future, anthropogenic disturbance in the form of deep-sea mining could also significantly affect the faunal communities of hydrothermal vents. In this study, we monitor and compare the recovery of insular, highly productive vent communities and vent-proximate basalt communities following a volcanic eruption that destroyed almost all existing communities at the East Pacific Rise, 9°50‧N in 2006. To study the recovery patterns of the benthic communities, we placed settlement substrates at vent sites and their proximate basalt areas and measured the prokaryotic abundance and compared the meio- and macrofaunal species richness and composition at one, two and four years after the eruption. In addition, we collected samples from the overlying water column with a pelagic pump, at one and two years after the volcanic eruption, to determine the abundance of potential meiofauna colonisers. One year after eruption, mean meio- and macrofaunal abundances were not significantly different from pre-eruption values in vent habitats (meio: 8-1838 ind. 64 cm-2 in 2006; 3-6246 ind. 64 cm-2 in 2001/02; macro: 95-1600 ind. 64 cm-2 in 2006; 205-4577 ind. 64 cm-2 in 2001/02) and on non-vent basalt habitats (meio: 10-1922 ind. 64 cm-2 in 2006; 8-328 ind. 64 cm-2 in 2003/04; macro: 14-3351 ind. 64 cm-2 in 2006; 2-63 ind. 64 cm-2 in 2003/04), but species recovery patterns differed between the two habitat types. In the vent habitat, the initial community recovery was relatively quick but incomplete four years after eruption, which may be due to the good dispersal capabilities of vent endemic macrofauna and vent endemic dirivultid copepods. At vents, 42% of the pre-eruption meio- and 39% of macrofaunal species had returned. In addition, some new species not evident prior to the eruption were found. At the tubeworm site Tica, a total of 26

  16. Distribution of Late Cenozoic volcanic vents in the Cascade range: Volcanic arc segmentation and regional tectonic considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guffanti, Marianne; Weaver, Craig S.

    1988-06-01

    Spatial, temporal, and compositional distributions of approximately 4000 volcanic vents formed since 16 Ma in Washington, Oregon, northern California, and northwestern Nevada illustrate the evolution of volcanism related to subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate system and extension of the Basin and Range province. Vent data were obtained from published map compilations and include monogenetic and small polygenetic volcanoes in addition to major composite centers. On the basis of the distribution of 2821 vents formed since 5 Ma, the Cascade Range is divided into five segments, with vents of the High Lava Plains along the northern margin of the Basin and Range province in Oregon forming a sixth segment. Some aspects of the Cascade Range segmentation can be related to gross structural features of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. The orientation of the volcanic front of segments one and two changes from NW in northern Washington to NE in southern Washington, paralleling the strike of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate. Segments one and two are separated by a 90-km volcanic gap between Mount Rainier and Glacier Peak that is landward of the portion of the subducting plate having the least average dip to a depth of 60 km. A narrow, N-S trending belt of predominantly andesitic vents in Oregon constitutes a third segment, which is landward of the seismically quiet portion of the subduction zone. The narrowness of this segment may indicate steep dip of the subducting plate beneath the Cascade arc in Oregon. Vents are sparse between segment four (containing the Mount Shasta and Medicine Lake centers) and segment five (containing Lassen Peak), where the Juan de Fuca and Gorda North plates are characterized by differing age, amounts of subcrustal seismicity, and probably geometry. From the relation between seismicity at depth of 60 km and the position of the volcanic front of vents formed since 5 Ma, transitions between subducting-plate segments of varying geometry likely occur

  17. Near Vent Volcanic Plume Measurement by a Portable Multi-Gas-Sensor System to Estimate Volcanic Gas Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, H.

    2006-12-01

    Near vent plume measurement technique by the use of the Portable Multi-Gas-Sensor System was developed to obtain volcanic gas composition of the major components including H2O, CO2, SO2, H2S and H2. By the combination with the Alkaline Filter Technique, the near vent plume measurement can provide almost full set of the volcanic gas composition including also HCl and HF. The Portable Multi-Gas-Sensor System measures concentration of the volcanic gas species by pumping the atmosphere (plume) through IR H2O-CO2 gas analyzer, SO2, H2S and H2 chemical sensors. The full system weight including battery and data logger is about 5 kg and can be easily carried in a backpack to the volcano summit. Among the various advantages and disadvantages of this techniques to other techniques such as the FT-IR measurements and the air-borne plume measurements with various gas analyzers, the most important advantage of the Portable Multi-Gas-Sensor System is the ability of the near vent measurement which enables the quantitative estimate of the H2O content in the volcanic gas. Since H2O content in the atmosphere is large and variable, a large mixing ratio of the volcanic gas in the plume is necessary to quantify the H2O excess over the atmospheric content. The atmospheric H2O content commonly ranges 5,000-20,000 ppm often with about 10% fluctuation whereas the CO2 content is about 370 ppm with minor (1 ppm) changes. Therefore we can quantify the excess CO2 content even at <1 ppm level, but we need at least 500 times larger excess H2O content derived from the volcanic gas for the quantification. By the near vent plume measurements, we could obtain the volcanic gas compositions of various volcanoes including Miyakejima, Asama and Villarrica as well as Etna whose gas composition is quite H2O-poor of H2O/CO2=1. Since H2O is commonly the most abundant volatile components both in the volcanic gases and magmas, and its solubility is quantitatively well constrained, the measured composition can

  18. Response of key stress-related genes of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica in the vicinity of submarine volcanic vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauritano, C.; Ruocco, M.; Dattolo, E.; Buia, M. C.; Silva, J.; Santos, R.; Olivé, I.; Costa, M. M.; Procaccini, G.

    2015-03-01

    Submarine volcanic vents are being used as natural laboratories to assess the effects of CO2 on marine organisms and communities, as this gas is the main component of emissions. Seagrasses should positively react to increased dissolved carbon, but in vicinity of volcanic vents there may be toxic substances, that can have indirect effects on seagrasses. Here we analysed the expression of 35 stress-related genes in the Mediterranean keystone seagrass species P. oceanica in the vicinity of submerged volcanic vents located in the Islands of Ischia and Panarea, Italy, and compared them with those from control sites away from the influence of vents. Reverse Transcription-Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to characterize the expression levels of genes. Fifty one per cent of genes analysed showed significant expression changes. Metal detoxification genes were mostly down-regulated in relation to controls both in Ischia and Panarea locations, indicating that P. oceanica does not increase the synthesis of heavy metal detoxification proteins in response to the environmental conditions present at the two vents. The expression levels of genes involved in free radical detoxification indicate that, in contrast with Ischia, P. oceanica at the Panarea vent face stressors that result in the production of reactive oxygen species triggering antioxidant responses. In addition, heat shock proteins were also activated at Panarea and not at Ischia. Overall, our study reveals that P. oceanica is generally under higher stress in the vicinity of the vents at Panarea than at Ischia, possibly resulting from environmental and evolutionary differences existing between the two volcanic sites. This is the first study analysing gene responses in marine plants living near natural CO2 vents and our results call for a careful consideration of factors, other than CO2 and acidification, that can cause stress to seagrasses and other organisms near volcanic vents.

  19. The Chthonic Charging of Volcanic Flows: The Generation of Vent Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez Harper, J.; Dufek, J.

    2015-12-01

    While volcanic lightning has been reported for millennia, the physics that generate charge in plumes still require clarification. Lightning observations during the Augustine (2006) and Redoubt (2009) eruptions have revealed a new form of lightning: nearly continuous, vent discharges associated with the explosive phase of the eruption. Vent lightning is often small (10-100 m in length) and disorganized, suggesting the existence of multiple, transient charge centers proximal to the volcanic vent. Thomas et al., 2007 and Behnke et al., 2012 have postulated that this form of lightning is driven by fragmentation charging [James et al., 2008]. However, triboelectrification—frictional charging arising from particle-particle collisions as material is advected up to the vent—should also play an important role. Because tribocharging is modulated by collision rates and energies, it is within the conduit and the gas-thrust regions that this frictional process should be most efficient. Indeed, the work of Cimarelli et al., 2014 has suggested that lightning can be generated at the vent via triboelectric charging alone. Using an energy-based comparison, we investigate the relative efficiencies of fracto- and triboelectric charging. To generate charged particles via a fragmentation process, we employ Prince Rupert's Drops (PRDs), meta-stable, tadpole-shaped structures formed by quenching molten glass in water. While a PDR's head is extremely strong, even the slightest damage to the tail causes explosive disintegration of the drop [Silverman et al., 2012]. A set of PDRs are disrupted in a controlled environment and the charge on the resulting particles is measured using a set of Faraday cups. The energy density associated with the breaking of PRDs is on the order of 105-106 J/m3. Then, to investigate tribocharging at similar energies, we eject spherical particles at high velocities, producing particle-particle collisions in a novel Faraday cube sensor. Our setup allows us to

  20. Volcanic and magmatic evolution of a small trachytic vent complex, north Burro Mesa, Big Bend National Park, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, Lisa A.; Shanks, Pat

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic rocks exposed on the northern end of Burro Mesa in Big Bend National Park portray the evolution of an Oligocene central volcanic vent complex that produced two generations of welded block and ash deposits associated with 1) initial dome collapse and 2) subsequent central spine collapse. Peripheral to the vent complex, isolated breccia deposit exposures overlie ignimbrites, tephras, and lavas. These blocks are a few meters to several hundred meters long and 30 m high and consist of monolithic angular and welded trachytic lava clasts in finer-grained matrix. Rheomorphic structures in the breccia deposit show ductile deformation and suggest it formed while above the glass transition temperature.

  1. Insight into Vent Opening Probability in Volcanic Calderas in the Light of a Sill Intrusion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudicepietro, Flora; Macedonio, G.; D'Auria, L.; Martini, M.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss a novel approach to provide insights on the probability of vent opening in calderas, using a dynamic model of sill intrusion. The evolution of the stress field is the main factor that controls the vent opening processes in volcanic calderas. On the basis of previous studies, we think that the intrusion of sills is one of the most common mechanism governing caldera unrest. Therefore, we have investigated the spatial and temporal evolution of the stress field due to the emplacement of a sill at shallow depth to provide insight on vent opening probability. We carried out several numerical experiments by using a physical model, to assess the role of the magma properties (viscosity), host rock characteristics (Young's modulus and thickness), and dynamics of the intrusion process (mass flow rate) in controlling the stress field. Our experiments highlight that high magma viscosity produces larger stress values, while low magma viscosity leads to lower stresses and favors the radial spreading of the sill. Also high-rock Young's modulus gives high stress intensity, whereas low values of Young's modulus produce a dramatic reduction of the stress associated with the intrusive process. The maximum intensity of tensile stress is concentrated at the front of the sill and propagates radially with it, over time. In our simulations, we find that maximum values of tensile stress occur in ring-shaped areas with radius ranging between 350 m and 2500 m from the injection point, depending on the model parameters. The probability of vent opening is higher in these areas.

  2. A cone on Mercury: Analysis of a residual central peak encircled by an explosive volcanic vent.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchetti, Alice; Thomas, Rebecca; Cremonese, Gabriele; Rothery, David; Massironi, Matteo; Re, Cristina; Conway, Susan; Anand, Mahesh

    2015-04-01

    Images acquired by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft since it went into orbit around Mercury in 2011 have revealed an unusual landform at -136° E, -6° N: a conical peak, encircled by a trough, and surrounded by a widespread relatively bright and red anomaly of a type interpreted elsewhere on the planet as a pyroclastic deposit. The steep-sided cone-like structure is surrounded by a 7 km-wide trench. This is in turn encircled by a topographic rise, which we interpret as the rim crest of a 43-km diameter impact crater. Spectral anomalies of this type elsewhere on the planet have been attributed to pyroclastic deposition, suggesting that explosive volcanism was involved in the formation of this landform assemblage. However, volcanism is not expected to form steep-sided edifices on Mercury, throwing the origin of the cone into doubt. We make and test the hypothesis that the cone is the intrinsic central peak of an impact crater, the rim crest of which is visible beyond the cone-encircling trough, and that the trough is a vent formed through explosive volcanism that also produced the surrounding bright, red spectral anomaly. In order to assess the viability of this hypothesis, we have investigated the probable original morphology of an impact crater of this size on Mercury by i) measuring topographic cross sections across relatively fresh craters with similar diameters, and ii) performing a hydrocode simulation of the impact. We identified three 42 - 47 km diameter impact craters where MLA tracks are available that cross the central peak structure and approximately bisect the crater. These were used as a control on crater morphology and to assess the plausibility of the results of our simulations. We simulated the formation of the impact crater using the iSALE hydrocode approximating the Hermean surface as a homogeneous layered half-space made up of a jointed 5 km basalt layer overlying an intact basalt layer. We

  3. Retrieving eruptive vent conditions from dynamical properties of unsteady volcanic plume using high-speed imagery and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournigand, Pierre-Yves; Taddeucci, Jacopo; José Peña Fernandez, Juan; Gaudin, Damien; Sesterhenn, Jörn; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Del Bello, Elisabetta

    2016-04-01

    Vent conditions are key parameters controlling volcanic plume dynamics and the ensuing different hazards, such as human health issues, infrastructure damages, and air traffic disruption. Indeed, for a given magma and vent geometry, plume development and stability over time mainly depend on the mass eruption rate, function of the velocity and density of the eruptive mixture at the vent, where direct measurements are impossible. High-speed imaging of eruptive plumes and numerical jet simulations were here non-dimensionally coupled to retrieve eruptive vent conditions starting from measurable plume parameters. High-speed videos of unsteady, momentum-driven volcanic plumes (jets) from Strombolian to Vulcanian activity from three different volcanoes (Sakurajima, Japan, Stromboli, Italy, and Fuego, Guatemala) were recorded in the visible and the thermal spectral ranges by using an Optronis CR600x2 (1280x1024 pixels definition, 500 Hz frame rate) and a FLIR SC655 (640x480 pixels definition, 50 Hz frame rate) cameras. Atmospheric effects correction and pre-processing of the thermal videos were performed to increase measurement accuracy. Pre-processing consists of the extraction of the plume temperature gradient over time, combined with a temperature threshold in order to remove the image background. The velocity and the apparent surface temperature fields of the plumes, and their changes over timescales of tenths of seconds, were then measured by particle image velocimetry and thermal image analysis, respectively, of the pre-processed videos. The parameters thus obtained are representative of the outer plume surface, corresponding to its boundary shear layer at the interface with the atmosphere, and may significantly differ from conditions in the plume interior. To retrieve information on the interior of the plume, and possibly extrapolate it even at the eruptive vent level, video-derived plume parameters were non-dimensionally compared to the results of numerical

  4. Hydrothermal fluids vented at shallow depths at the Aeolian islands: relationships with volcanic and geothermal systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Italiano, Francesco; Caracausi, Antonio; Longo, Manfredi; Maugeri, Roberto; Paonita, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    Scuba diving investigations carried out over the last two decades at the Aeolian islands revealed the existence of submarine magmatic and late-magmatic hydrothermalism at all the islands, despite the absence of on-shore activity at some of the islands. The results gained by diving activities provided useful information to evaluate the volcanic and geothermal activity and to manage the volcanic crisis occurred on November 2002 off the island of Panarea. Scuba diving investigations carried out from middle 80's, had shown that despite the absence of on shore volcanic manifestations, submarine hydrothermal activity is recognizable at shallow depth around all the Aeolian islands related either to volcanic and geothermal activity. The sampled gases are CO2-dominated with low amounts of oxygen and reactive gases (H2, CO, CH4 and H2S) with concentrations ranging from a few ppm to some mole percent. Sometimes significant N2 amount are detectable together with high helium contents. Samples having low CO2 content, besides relevant N2 and He amounts, are the consequence of CO2 dissolution in sea-water due to gas-water interactions (GWI) occurred before the sample collection. The high CO2 solubility (878 ml/l, T=20°C, P=1bar) may, in fact, decrease the CO2 content in the venting gases thus increasing the concentrations of the less soluble species (e.g. He 8 ml/l, CO 23 ml/l and CH4 33.8 ml/l) in the gas mixture. Such a process might occur at any level, however, because of the slow water circulation in deep sediments, CO2 is able to saturate the circulating sea-water. The isotopic composition of carbon displays a small range of values while helium isotopes are in the range of 4.1volcanic islands in the western sector, and much

  5. Response of key stress-related genes of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica in the vicinity of submarine volcanic vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauritano, C.; Ruocco, M.; Dattolo, E.; Buia, M. C.; Silva, J.; Santos, R.; Olivé, I.; Costa, M. M.; Procaccini, G.

    2015-07-01

    Submarine volcanic vents are being used as natural laboratories to assess the effects of increased ocean acidity and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration on marine organisms and communities. However, in the vicinity of volcanic vents other factors in addition to CO2, which is the main gaseous component of the emissions, may directly or indirectly confound the biota responses to high CO2. Here we used for the first time the expression of antioxidant and stress-related genes of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica to assess the stress levels of the species. Our hypothesis is that unknown factors are causing metabolic stress that may confound the putative effects attributed to CO2 enrichment only. We analyzed the expression of 35 antioxidant and stress-related genes of P. oceanica in the vicinity of submerged volcanic vents located in the islands of Ischia and Panarea, Italy, and compared them with those from control sites away from the influence of vents. Reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to characterize gene expression patterns. Fifty-one percent of genes analyzed showed significant expression changes. Metal detoxification genes were mostly down-regulated in relation to controls at both Ischia and Panarea, indicating that P. oceanica does not increase the synthesis of heavy metal detoxification proteins in response to the environmental conditions present at the two vents. The up-regulation of genes involved in the free radical detoxification response (e.g., CAPX, SODCP and GR) indicates that, in contrast with Ischia, P. oceanica at the Panarea site faces stressors that result in the production of reactive oxygen species, triggering antioxidant responses. In addition, heat shock proteins were also activated at Panarea and not at Ischia. These proteins are activated to adjust stress-accumulated misfolded proteins and prevent their aggregation as a response to some stressors, not necessarily high temperature. This is the first

  6. Structure of the Volcanic Vent Distribution of the Cascades Arc from a New Database of Holocene and Pleistocene Volcanism, with Focus on Pre-Caldera Monogenetic Volcanism at Mount Mazana, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, L.; Karlstrom, L.; Ramsey, D. W.; Wright, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of volcanoes in the Cascades Arc, USA,reflects modulation of time-varying mantle melt influx by crustal magmatic plumbing and tectonic forces. The relative contribution of spatio-temporal source variations versus crustal focusing in generating the observed distribution of vents is poorly constrained. To identify patterns in preserved eruptive products and validate models for crustal magma transport we have assembled the most complete database of Cascades volcanism to date. Our database contains >2900 volcanic vent locations from the Holocene and Pleistocene, and includes vent types, ages, and major element geochemistry of eruptive products from the Holocene and Pleistocene. Bulk geochemistry is obtained from USGS Professional Papers and the American Volcanic and Intrusive Rock Database (NAVDAT). We also include arc-wide heat flow data, modeled ambient noise crustal seismic tomography and crust thickness interpolated to each vent. We perform spectral clustering on vent locations to define volcanic centers for the Holocene and Pleistocene. Centers found through Spectral Clustering reproduce the major loci of volcanism in the Cascades, and show time-varying structure in the number, type and distribution eruptions. There is significant North-South variation in vent type and distribution that correlates with variations in heat flow, bulk silica content and average crustal shear velocity. Although precise eruption ages for the complete dataset are not yet available, Mount Mazama, OR, has a well-resolved time/composition/volume/location history of eruptions <400 ka that allow for further analysis. The spatial distribution of Mazamaeruptive units does not follow a Poisson distribution when well resolved in time, but rather clusters around an evolved center that exhibits progressively more evolved eruptive products in time. Monogenetic eruptions preceding the 7.8 ka Crater Lake eruption define a spatial and temporal pattern that is

  7. Subsurface magma pathways inferred from statistical analysis of volcanic vent distribution and numerical model of magma ascent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germa, Aurelie; Connor, Laura; Connor, Chuck; Malservisi, Rocco

    2015-04-01

    One challenge of volcanic hazard assessment in distributed volcanic fields (large number of small-volume basaltic volcanoes along with one or more silicic central volcanoes) is to constrain the location of future activity. Although the extent of the source of melts at depth can be known using geophysical methods or the location of past eruptive vents, the location of preferential pathways and zones of higher magma flux are still unobserved. How does the spatial distribution of eruptive vents at the surface reveal the location of magma sources or focusing? When this distribution is investigated, the location of central polygenetic edifices as well as clusters of monogenetic volcanoes denote zones of high magma flux and recurrence rate, whereas areas of dispersed monogenetic vents represent zones of lower flux. Additionally, central polygenetic edifices, acting as magma filters, prevent dense mafic magmas from reaching the surface close to their central silicic system. Subsequently, the spatial distribution of mafic monogenetic vents may provide clues to the subsurface structure of a volcanic field, such as the location of magma sources, preferential magma pathways, and flux distribution across the field. Gathering such data is of highly importance in improving the assessment of volcanic hazards. We are developing a modeling framework that compares output of statistical models of vent distribution with outputs form numerical models of subsurface magma transport. Geologic data observed at the Earth's surface are used to develop statistical models of spatial intensity (vents per unit area), volume intensity (erupted volume per unit area) and volume-flux intensity (erupted volume per unit time and area). Outputs are in the form of probability density functions assumed to represent volcanic flow output at the surface. These are then compared to outputs from conceptual models of the subsurface processes of magma storage and transport. These models are using Darcy's law

  8. Carbon fluxes from hydrothermal vents off Milos, Aegean Volcanic Arc, and the influence of venting on the surrounding ecosystem.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dando, Paul; Aliani, Stefano; Bianchi, Nike; Kennedy, Hilary; Linke, Peter; Morri, Carla

    2014-05-01

    The island of Milos, in the Aegean Sea, has extensive hydrothermal fields to the east and southeast of the island with additional venting areas near the entrance to and within the central caldera. A calculation of the total area of the vent fields, based on ship and aerial surveys, suggested that the hydrothermal fields occupy 70 km2, twice the area previously estimated. The vents ranged in water depth from the intertidal to 300 m. As a result of the low depths there was abundant free gas release: in places water boiled on the seabed. The stream of gas bubbles rising through the sandy seabed drove a shallow re-circulation of bottom seawater. The majority of the water released with the gas, with a mean pH of 5.5, was re-circulated bottom water that had become acidified in contact with CO2 gas and was often diluted by admixture with the vapour phase from the deeper fluids. The major component of the free gas, 80%, was CO2, with an estimated total flux of 1.5-7.5 x 1012 g a-1. The methane flux, by comparison, was of the order of 1010 g a.-1 Using methane as a tracer it was shown that the major gas export from the vents was below the thermocline towards the southwest, in agreement with the prevailing currents. Areas of hydrothermal brine seepage occurred between the gas vents and occasional brine pools were observed in seabed depressions. Under relatively calm conditions, many of the brine seeps were covered by thick minero-bacterial mats consisting of silica and sulphur and surrounded by mats of diatoms and cyanobacteria. The minerals were not deposited in the absence of bacteria. Storms disrupted the mats, leading to an export of material to the surrounding area. Stable isotope data from sediments and sediment trap material suggested that exported POM was processed by zooplankton. The combined effects of the geothermal heating of the seabed, the large gas flux, variation in the venting and the effect of the brine seeps had a dramatic effect on the surrounding

  9. Volcanic plume vent conditions retrieved from infrared images: A forward and inverse modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerminara, Matteo; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Valade, Sébastien; Harris, Andrew J. L.

    2015-07-01

    We present a coupled fluid-dynamic and electromagnetic model for volcanic ash plumes. In a forward approach, the model is able to simulate the plume dynamics from prescribed input flow conditions and generate the corresponding synthetic thermal infrared (TIR) image, allowing a comparison with field-based observations. An inversion procedure is then developed to retrieve vent conditions from TIR images, and to independently estimate the mass eruption rate. The adopted fluid-dynamic model is based on a one-dimensional, stationary description of a self-similar turbulent plume, for which an asymptotic analytical solution is obtained. The electromagnetic emission/absorption model is based on Schwarzschild's equation and on Mie's theory for disperse particles, and we assume that particles are coarser than the radiation wavelength (about 10 μm) and that scattering is negligible. In the inversion procedure, model parameter space is sampled to find the optimal set of input conditions which minimizes the difference between the experimental and the synthetic image. Application of the inversion procedure to an ash plume at Santiaguito (Santa Maria volcano, Guatemala) has allowed us to retrieve the main plume input parameters, namely mass flow rate, initial radius, velocity, temperature, gas mass ratio, entrainment coefficient and their related uncertainty. Moreover, by coupling with the electromagnetic model we have been able to obtain a reliable estimate of the equivalent Sauter diameter of the total particle size distribution. The presented method is general and, in principle, can be applied to the spatial distribution of particle concentration and temperature obtained by any fluid-dynamic model, either integral or multidimensional, stationary or time-dependent, single or multiphase. The method discussed here is fast and robust, thus indicating potential for applications to real-time estimation of ash mass flux and particle size distribution, which is crucial for model

  10. Morphology and Distribution of Volcanic Vents in the Orientale Basin from Chandrayaan-1 Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, James; Pieters, C.; Staid, M.; Mustard, J.; Taylor, L.; McCord, T.; Isaacson, P.; Klima, R.; Petro, N.; Clark, R.; Nettles, J.; Whitten, J.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most fundamental questions in the geological and thermal evolution of the Moon is the nature and history of mantle melting and its relationship to the formation and evolution of lunar multi-ringed basins. Mare volcanic deposits provide evidence for the nature, magnitude and composition of mantle melting as a function of space and time [1]. Many argue that mantle partial melts are derived from depths well below the influence of multiringed basin impact events [1], while others postulate that the formation of these basins can cause mantle perturbations that are more directly linked to the generation ascent and eruption of mare basalts [2,3]. In any case, longer-term basin evolution will considerably influence the state and orientation of stress in the lithosphere, and the location of mare volcanic vents in basins as a function of time [4]. Thus, the location, nature and ages of volcanic vents and deposits in relation to multi-ringed impact basins provides evidence for the role that these basins played in the generation of volcanism or in the influence of the basins on surface volcanic eruption and deposit concentration. Unfortunately, most lunar multi-ringed impact basins have been eroded by impacts or filled with lunar mare deposits [5-8], with estimates of the thickness of mare fill extending up to more than six km in the central part of some basins [9-11]. The interior of most basins (e.g., Crisium, Serenitatis, Imbrium, Humorum) are almost completely covered and obscured. Although much is known about the lava filling of multi-ringed basins, and particularly the most recent deposits [5-8], little is known about initial stages of mare volcanism and its relationship to the impact event. One multi-ringed basin, Orientale, offers substantial clues to the relationships of basin interiors and mare basalt volcanism.

  11. Influence of hydrothermal venting on water column properties in the crater of the Kolumbo submarine volcano, Santorini volcanic field (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopoulou, Maria E.; Mertzimekis, Theo J.; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Carey, Steven; Mandalakis, Manolis

    2016-02-01

    The Kolumbo submarine volcano, located 7 km northeast of the island of Santorini, is part of Santorini's volcanic complex in the south Aegean Sea, Greece. Kolumbo's last eruption was in 1650 AD. However, a unique and active hydrothermal vent field has been revealed in the northern part of its crater floor during an oceanographic survey by remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) in 2006. In the present study, conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) data collected by ROV Hercules during three oceanographic surveys onboard E/V Nautilus in 2010 and 2011 have served to investigate the distribution of physicochemical properties in the water column, as well as their behavior directly over the hydrothermal field. Additional CTD measurements were carried out in volcanic cone 3 (VC3) along the same volcanic chain but located 3 km northeast of Kolumbo where no hydrothermal activity has been detected to date. CTD profiles exhibit pronounced anomalies directly above the active vents on Kolumbo's crater floor. In contrast, VC3 data revealed no such anomalies, essentially resembling open-sea (background) conditions. Steep increases of temperature (e.g., from 16 to 19 °C) and conductivity near the maximum depth (504 m) inside Kolumbo's cone show marked spatiotemporal correlation. Vertical distributions of CTD signatures suggest a strong connection to Kolumbo's morphology, with four distinct zones identified (open sea, turbid flow, invariable state, hydrothermal vent field). Additionally, overlaying the near-seafloor temperature measurements on an X-Y coordinate grid generates a detailed 2D distribution of the hydrothermal vent field and clarifies the influence of fluid discharges in its formation.

  12. Numerical recognition of alignments in monogenetic volcanic areas: Examples from the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field in Mexico and Calatrava in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebriá, J. M.; Martín-Escorza, C.; López-Ruiz, J.; Morán-Zenteno, D. J.; Martiny, B. M.

    2011-04-01

    Identification of geological lineaments using numerical methods is a useful tool to reveal structures that may not be evident to the naked eye. In this sense, monogenetic volcanic fields represent an especially suitable case for the application of such techniques, since eruptive vents can be considered as point-like features. Application of a two-point azimuth method to the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (Mexico) and the Calatrava Volcanic Province (Spain) demonstrates that the main lineaments controlling the distributions of volcanic vents (~ 322° in Calatrava and ~ 30° in Michoacán) approach the respective main compressional axes that dominate in the area (i.e. the Cocos-North America plates convergence and the main Betics compressional direction, respectively). Considering the stress fields that are present in each volcanic area and their respective geodynamic history, it seems that although volcanism may be a consequence of contemporaneous extensional regimes, the distribution of the volcanic vents in these kinds of monogenetic fields is actually controlled by reactivation of older fractures which then become more favourable for producing space for magma ascent at near-surface levels.

  13. Seagrass ecosystem response to long-term high CO2 in a Mediterranean volcanic vent.

    PubMed

    Apostolaki, Eugenia T; Vizzini, Salvatrice; Hendriks, Iris E; Olsen, Ylva S

    2014-08-01

    We examined the long-term effect of naturally acidified water on a Cymodocea nodosa meadow growing at a shallow volcanic CO2 vent in Vulcano Island (Italy). Seagrass and adjacent unvegetated habitats growing at a low pH station (pH = 7.65 ± 0.02) were compared with corresponding habitats at a control station (pH = 8.01 ± 0.01). Density and biomass showed a clear decreasing trend at the low pH station and the below- to above-ground biomass ratio was more than 10 times lower compared to the control. C content and δ(13)C of leaves and epiphytes were significantly lower at the low pH station. Photosynthetic activity of C. nodosa was stimulated by low pH as seen by the significant increase in Chla content of leaves, maximum electron transport rate and compensation irradiance. Seagrass community metabolism was intense at the low pH station, with significantly higher net community production, respiration and gross primary production than the control community, whereas metabolism of the unvegetated community did not differ between stations. Productivity was promoted by the low pH, but this was not translated into biomass, probably due to nutrient limitation, grazing or poor environmental conditions. The results indicate that seagrass response in naturally acidified conditions is dependable upon species and geochemical characteristics of the site and highlight the need for a better understanding of complex interactions in these environments. PMID:25081848

  14. Exploring the influence of vent location and eruption style on tephra fall hazard from the Okataina Volcanic Centre, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Mary Anne; Lindsay, Jan M.; Sandri, Laura; Biass, Sébastien; Bonadonna, Costanza; Jolly, Gill; Marzocchi, Warner

    2015-05-01

    Uncertainties in modelling volcanic hazards are often amplified in geographically large systems which have a diverse eruption history that comprises variable eruption styles from many different vent locations. The ~700 km2 Okataina Volcanic Centre (OVC) is a caldera complex in New Zealand which has displayed a range of eruption styles and compositions over its current phase of activity (26 ka-present), including one basaltic maar-forming eruption, one basaltic Plinian eruption and nine rhyolitic Plinian eruptions. All three of these eruption styles occurred within the past 3.5 ky, and any of these styles could occur in the event of a future eruption. The location of a future eruption is also unknown. Future vents could potentially open in one of three different areas which have been activated in the past 26 ky at the OVC: the Tarawera linear vent zone (LVZ) (five eruptions), the Haroharo LVZ (five eruptions) or outside of these LVZs (one eruption). A future rhyolitic or basaltic Plinian eruption from the OVC is likely to generate widespread tephra fall in loads that will cause significant disruption and have severe socio-economic impacts. Past OVC tephra hazard studies have focused on evaluating hazard from a rhyolitic Plinian eruption at select vent locations in the OVC's Tarawera LVZ. Here, we expand upon past studies by evaluating tephra hazard for all possible OVC eruption vent areas and for both rhyolitic and basaltic Plinian eruption styles, and explore how these parameters influence tephra hazard forecasts. Probabilistic volcanic hazard model BET_VH and advection-diffusion model TEPHRA2 were used to assess the hazard of accumulating ≥10 kg m-2 of tephra from both basaltic Plinian and rhyolitic Plinian eruption styles, occurring from within the Tarawera LVZ, the Haroharo LVZ or other potential vent areas within the caldera. Our results highlight the importance of considering all the potential vent locations of a volcanic system, in order to capture the full

  15. The NOAA/PMEL Vents Program - 1983 to 2013: A History of Deep-Sea Volcanic and Hydrothermal Exploration and Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, S. R.; Baker, E. T.; Embley, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    Inspiration for the Vents program arose from two serendipitous events: the discovery of seafloor spreading-center hydrothermal venting on the Galápagos Rift in 1977, and NOAA's deployment of the first US civilian research multibeam bathymetric sonar on the NOAA Ship Surveyor in 1979. Multibeam mapping in the NE Pacific revealed an unprecedented and revolutionary perspective of the Gorda and Juan de Fuca spreading centers, thus stimulating a successful exploration for volcanic and hydrothermal activity at numerous locations along both. After the 1986 discovery of the first "megaplume,", quickly recognized as the water column manifestation of a deep submarine volcanic eruption, the Vents program embarked on a multi-decadal effort to discover and understand local-, regional-, and, ultimately, global-scale physical, chemical, and biological ocean environmental impacts of submarine volcanism and hydrothermal venting. The Vents program made scores of scientific discoveries, many of which owed their success to the program's equally innovative and productive technological prowess. These discoveries were documented in hundreds of peer-reviewed papers by Vents researchers and their colleagues around the world. An emblematic success was the internationally recognized, first-ever detection, location, and study of an active deep volcanic eruption in 1993. To continue the Vents mission and further enhance its effectiveness in marine science and technology innovation, the program was reorganized in 2014 into two distinct, but closely linked, programs: Earth-Oceans Interactions and Acoustics. Both are currently engaged in expeditions and projects that maintain the Vents tradition of pioneering ocean exploration and research.

  16. Mafic monogenetic vents at the Descabezado Grande volcanic field (35.5°S-70.8°W): the northernmost evidence of regional primitive volcanism in the Southern Volcanic Zone of Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Pablo A.; Rabbia, Osvaldo M.; Hernández, Laura B.; Ruprecht, Philipp

    2016-06-01

    In the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ), the broad distribution of mafic compositions along the recent volcanic arc occurs mainly south of 37°S, above a comparatively thin continental crust (≤~35 km) and mostly associated with the dextral strike-slip regime of the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ). North of 36°S, mafic compositions are scarce. This would be in part related to the effect resulting from protracted periods of trapping of less evolved ascending magmas beneath a thick Meso-Cenozoic volcano-sedimentary cover that lead to more evolved compositions in volcanic rocks erupted at the surface. Here, we present whole-rock and olivine mineral chemistry data for mafic rocks from four monogenetic vents developed above a SVZ segment of thick crust (~45 km) in the Descabezado Grande volcanic field (~35.5°S). Whole-rock chemistry (MgO > 8 wt%) and compositional variations in olivine (92 ≥ Fo ≥ 88 and Ni up to ~3650 ppm) indicate that some of the basaltic products erupted through these vents (e.g., Los Hornitos monogenetic cones) represent primitive arc magmas reaching high crustal levels. The combined use of satellite images, regional data analysis and field observations allow to recognize at least 38 mafic monogenetic volcanoes dispersed over an area of about 5000 km2 between 35.5° and 36.5°S. A link between ancient structures inherited from pre-Andean tectonics and the emplacement and distribution of this mafic volcanism is suggested as a first-order structural control that may explain the widespread occurrence of mafic volcanism in this Andean arc segment with thick crust.

  17. Large phreatomagmatic vent complex at Coombs Hills, Antarctica: Wet, explosive initiation of flood basalt volcanism in the Ferrar-Karoo LIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClintock, Murray; White, James D. L.

    2006-01-01

    The Mawson Formation and correlatives in the Transantarctic Mountains and South Africa record an early eruption episode related to the onset of Ferrar-Karoo flood basalt volcanism. Mawson Formation rocks at Coombs Hills comprise mainly (≥80% vol) structureless tuff breccia and coarse lapilli tuff cut by irregular dikes and sills, within a large vent complex (>30 km2). Quenched juvenile fragments of generally low but variable vesicularity, accretionary lapilli and country rock clasts within vent-fill, and pyroclastic density current deposits point to explosive interaction of basalt with groundwater in porous country rock and wet vent filling debris. Metre-scale dikes and pods of coherent basalt in places merge imperceptibly into peperite and then into surrounding breccia. Steeply dipping to sub-vertical depositional contacts juxtapose volcaniclastic rocks of contrasting componentry and grainsize. These sub-vertical tuff breccia zones are inferred to have formed when jets of debris + steam + water passed through unconsolidated vent-filling deposits. These jets of debris may have sometimes breached the surface to form subaerial tephra jets which fed subaerial pyroclastic density currents and fall deposits. Others, however, probably died out within vent fill before reaching the surface, allowing mixing and recycling of clasts which never reached the atmosphere. Most of the ejecta that did escape the debris-filled vents was rapidly recycled as vents broadened via lateral quarrying of country rock and bedded pyroclastic vent-rim deposits, which collapsed along the margins into individual vents. The unstratified, poorly sorted deposits comprising most of the complex are capped by tuff, lapilli tuff and tuff breccia beds inferred to have been deposited on the floor of the vent complex by pyroclastic density currents. Development of the extensive Coombs Hills vent-complex involved interaction of large volumes of magma and water. We infer that recycling of water, as well

  18. Sill intrusion driven fluid flow and vent formation in volcanic basins: Modeling rates of volatile release and paleoclimate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Karthik; Schmid, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Evidence of mass extinction events in conjunction with climate change occur throughout the geological record and may be accompanied by pronounced negative carbon isotope excursions. The processes that trigger such globally destructive changes are still under considerable debate. These include mechanisms such as poisoning from trace metals released during large volcanic eruptions (Vogt, 1972), CO2 released from lava degassing during the formation of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) (Courtillot and Renne, 2003) and CH4 release during the destabilization of sub-seafloor methane (Dickens et al., 1995), to name a few. Thermogenic methane derived from contact metamorphism associated with magma emplacement and cooling in sedimentary basins has been recently gaining considerable attention as a potential mechanism that may have triggered global climate events in the past (e.g. Svensen and Jamtveit, 2010). The discovery of hydrothermal vent complexes that are spatially associated with such basins also supports the discharge of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere (e.g. Jamtveit et al., 2004; Planke et al., 2005; Svensen et al., 2006). A previous study that investigated this process using a fluid flow model (Iyer et al., 2013) suggested that although hydrothermal plume formation resulting from sill emplacement may indeed release large quantities of methane at the surface, the rate at which this methane is released into the atmosphere is too slow to trigger, by itself, some of the negative δ13C excursions observed in the fossil record over short time scales observed in the fossil record. Here, we reinvestigate the rates of gas release during sill emplacement in a case study from the Harstad Basin off-shore Norway with a special emphasis on vent formation. The presented study is based on a seismic line that crosses multiple sill structures emplaced around 55 Ma within the Lower Cretaceous sediments. A single well-defined vent complex is interpreted above the termination of the

  19. Gas venting rates from submarine hydrothermal areas around the island of Milos, Hellenic Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dando, P. R.; Hughes, J. A.; Leahy, Y.; Niven, S. J.; Taylor, L. J.; Smith, C.

    1995-07-01

    Gas seeps were located, by echo sounding, SCUBA divers and ROV observations, at hydrothermal sites around the island of Milos, in the Hellenic Volcanic Arc. Samples were collected by SCUBA divers and by a ROV from water depths between 3 and 110 m. Fifty-six flow rates from 39 individual seeps were measured and these ranged from 0.2 to 18.51 h -1 at the depth of collection. The major component, 54.9-91.9% of the gas, was carbon dioxide. Hydrogen (≤3%), methane (≤9.7%) and hydrogen sulphide (≤8.1%) were also measured. Hydrothermal free gas fluxes from the submarine hydrothermal areas around Milos were estimated to be greater than 10 10 moles y -1. It was concluded that submarine gas seeps along volcanic island arcs may be an important carbon dioxide source.

  20. Open-Vent Degassing of CO2 from Typical Andesitic Volcanoes in the Central American Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robidoux, P.; Aiuppa, A.; Rotolo, S.; Giudice, G.; Moretti, R.; Conde, V.; Galle, B.; Tamburello, G.

    2014-12-01

    The collection of H2O-CO2-SO2 volcanic gas datasets at open-vent basaltic volcanoes has increased since the introduction of electrochemical/NDIR (Multi-GAS) instruments in the field. An open problem remains to understand the degassing regime of volcanoes of intermediate compositions, which is complicated by wide range of eruption styles. We propose here to initiate the study of the degassing regime of Telica and San Cristobal (Nicaragua), two constantly monitored volcanoes in the Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA). We calculated the CO2 flux sustained by summit plume degassing at Telica and San Cristobal as the product of the CO2/SO2 ratio of Multi-GAS technique with parallel SO2 flux measurements, made by using scanning UV-DOAS instruments in 2013. At Telica, the CO2 flux was evaluated at 166±76 t/d and at San Cristobal we measured 520±260 t/d. Degassing activity at Telica volcano consists in surface gas discharges dominated by H2O (70-98 mol%; mean of 92 mol%), and by CO2 (1-23 mol%; mean of 6 mol%) and SO2 (0.5-7.4 mol%; mean of 2.9 mol%). San Cristobal gas is dominated by H2O (85-97 mol%; mean of 92 mol%), and by CO2 (2-12 mol%; mean of 6 mol%) and SO2 (3-5 mol%; mean of 3.8 mol%). These values are typical of volcanic arc regions and the volcanoes were in a stage of quiescent degassing without excess of CO2 output relatively to the other major gases. By interpreting our recent gas measurements in tandem with preliminary melt inclusion records of pre-eruptive dissolved volatile abundances, we hope to build a conceptual degassing model taking into account the active degassing regimes during past volcanic eruptions. Finally, we hope to refine the CO2 budget estimates along the CAVA.

  1. Near-vent measurements of volcanic gases and aerosols with multiple small unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieri, D. C.; Diaz, J. A.; Bland, G.; Fladeland, M. M.; Schumann, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Dynamic phenomena occurring on the earth's surface and in the atmosphere are almost always distributed over a volume or area that changes progressively over time (e.g., explosive eruption plumes, lava flows, floods, toxic materials releases, wildfires). 'Snapshot' views of such phenomena traditionally capture a small part of the area or volume of the event in successive time slices. Such time series are fundamentally limited in providing accurate boundary conditions for models of such processes, or even to create descriptions or observations at spatial scales relevant to the characteristic dimensions of the process. High spatial resolution (e.g., ~1-3m/pixel) imaging views of such spatially extended phenomena that capture the entire extent of the event are not usually possible with a single low altitude aircraft, for instance. Synoptic satellite and high altitude airborne views are often at spatial resolutions that an order of magnitude coarser. Airborne in situ sampling faces a similar problem in that point measurements are acquired along a flight line in a time-series. Source conditions changing at timescales shorter than an airborne sortie interval (typical for most dynamic phenomena) render such flight line observations incomplete. The ability to capture hi-spatial resolution, synchronous, full volume or area data over dynamically evolving (possibly hazardous) features (e.g., volcanic plumes, air pollution layers, oil slicks, wildfires) requires a distributed 2D or 3D mesh of observation platforms. Small (e.g., <25kg) unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are an emerging technology that can provide distributed formations or networks of observation platforms that can be dynamically reconfigured to encompass areas or volumes of interest for imaging or other kinds of in situ observations (e.g., SO2 or CO2 sampling of volcanic gas emissions). Such data are crucial for the calibration and validation of remotely sensed concentration retrievals (e.g., from multi

  2. Volcanic Lightning, Pyroclastic Density Currents, Ballistic Fall, Vent Tremor, and One Very Loud Blast: Acoustic Analysis of the 14 July 2013 Vulcanian Eruption at Tungurahua, Ecuador.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J.; Johnson, J. B.; Steele, A. L.; Anzieta, J. C.; Ortiz, H. D.; Hall, M. L.; Ruiz, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Acoustic recordings reveal a variety of volcanic activities during an exceptionally loud vulcanian eruption at Tungurahua. A period of several months of mild surface activity came to an abrupt end with the emission of a powerful blast wave heard at least 180 km away. Sensors 2080 m from the vent recorded a stepped rise to its maximum overpressure of 1220 Pa (corresponding to a sound pressure level of 156 dB) and its unusually long dominant period of 5.6 s. We discuss source processes that produced the blast wave, considering that wave propagation could be nonlinear near the vent because of high overpressures. More than an hour of acoustic activity was recorded after the blast wave, including sound from falling ballistics, reflections of the blast wave from nearby mountains, pyroclastic density currents, and acoustic tremor at the vent. Glitches in the acoustic records related to plume lightning were also serendipitously observed, although thunder could not be unambiguously identified. We discuss acoustic signatures of falling ballistics and pyroclastic density currents and how array-style deployments and analytic methods can be used to reveal them. Placement of sensors high on the volcano's slopes facilitated resolving these distinct processes. This study demonstrates that near-vent, array-style acoustic installations can be used to monitor various types of volcanic activity.

  3. Echinometra sea urchins acclimatized to elevated pCO2 at volcanic vents outperform those under present-day pCO2 conditions.

    PubMed

    Uthicke, Sven; Ebert, Thomas; Liddy, Michelle; Johansson, Charlotte; Fabricius, Katharina E; Lamare, Miles

    2016-07-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations will significantly reduce ocean pH during the 21st century (ocean acidification, OA). This may hamper calcification in marine organisms such as corals and echinoderms, as shown in many laboratory-based experiments. Sea urchins are considered highly vulnerable to OA. We studied an Echinometra species on natural volcanic CO2 vents in Papua New Guinea, where they are CO2 -acclimatized and also subjected to secondary ecological changes from elevated CO2 . Near the vent site, the urchins experienced large daily variations in pH (>1 unit) and pCO2 (>2000 ppm) and average pH values (pHT 7.73) much below those expected under the most pessimistic future emission scenarios. Growth was measured over a 17-month period using tetracycline tagging of the calcareous feeding lanterns. Average-sized urchins grew more than twice as fast at the vent compared with those at an adjacent control site and assumed larger sizes at the vent compared to the control site and two other sites at another reef near-by. A small reduction in gonad weight was detected at the vents, but no differences in mortality, respiration, or degree of test calcification were detected between urchins from vent and control populations. Thus, urchins did not only persist but actually 'thrived' under extreme CO2 conditions. We suggest an ecological basis for this response: Increased algal productivity under increased pCO2 provided more food at the vent, resulting in higher growth rates. The wider implication of our observation is that laboratory studies on non-acclimatized specimens, which typically do not consider ecological changes, can lead to erroneous conclusions on responses to global change.

  4. Echinometra sea urchins acclimatized to elevated pCO2 at volcanic vents outperform those under present-day pCO2 conditions.

    PubMed

    Uthicke, Sven; Ebert, Thomas; Liddy, Michelle; Johansson, Charlotte; Fabricius, Katharina E; Lamare, Miles

    2016-07-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations will significantly reduce ocean pH during the 21st century (ocean acidification, OA). This may hamper calcification in marine organisms such as corals and echinoderms, as shown in many laboratory-based experiments. Sea urchins are considered highly vulnerable to OA. We studied an Echinometra species on natural volcanic CO2 vents in Papua New Guinea, where they are CO2 -acclimatized and also subjected to secondary ecological changes from elevated CO2 . Near the vent site, the urchins experienced large daily variations in pH (>1 unit) and pCO2 (>2000 ppm) and average pH values (pHT 7.73) much below those expected under the most pessimistic future emission scenarios. Growth was measured over a 17-month period using tetracycline tagging of the calcareous feeding lanterns. Average-sized urchins grew more than twice as fast at the vent compared with those at an adjacent control site and assumed larger sizes at the vent compared to the control site and two other sites at another reef near-by. A small reduction in gonad weight was detected at the vents, but no differences in mortality, respiration, or degree of test calcification were detected between urchins from vent and control populations. Thus, urchins did not only persist but actually 'thrived' under extreme CO2 conditions. We suggest an ecological basis for this response: Increased algal productivity under increased pCO2 provided more food at the vent, resulting in higher growth rates. The wider implication of our observation is that laboratory studies on non-acclimatized specimens, which typically do not consider ecological changes, can lead to erroneous conclusions on responses to global change. PMID:26762613

  5. 40Ar/39Ar dating of tuff vents in the Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy): Toward a new chronostratigraphic reconstruction of the Holocene volcanic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fedele, L.; Insinga, D.D.; Calvert, A.T.; Morra, V.; Perrotta, A.; Scarpati, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Campi Flegrei hosts numerous monogenetic vents inferred to be younger than the 15 ka Neapolitan Yellow Tuff. Sanidine crystals from the three young Campi Flegrei vents of Fondi di Baia, Bacoli and Nisida were dated using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. These vents, together with several other young edifices, occur roughly along the inner border of the Campi Flegrei caldera, suggesting that the volcanic conduits are controlled by caldera-bounding faults. Plateau ages of ∼9.6 ka (Fondi di Baia), ∼8.6 ka (Bacoli) and ∼3.9 ka (Nisida) indicate eruptive activity during intervals previously interpreted as quiescent. A critical revision, involving calendar age correction of literature 14C data and available 40Ar/39Ar age data, is presented. A new reference chronostratigraphic framework for Holocene Phlegrean activity, which significantly differs from the previously adopted ones, is proposed. This has important implications for understanding the Campi Flegrei eruptive history and, ultimately, for the evaluation of related volcanic risk and hazard, for which the inferred history of its recent activity is generally taken into account.

  6. Periodicities in sediment temperature time-series at a marine shallow water hydrothermal vent in Milos Island (Aegean Volcanic arc, Eastern Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliani, Stefano; Meloni, Roberto; Dando, Paul R.

    2004-05-01

    Time-series data sets of total bottom pressure (tidal plus atmospheric), seawater temperature and sediment temperature from a marine shallow hydrothermal vent (Milos, Hellenic Volcanic Arc, Aegean Sea) were studied to determine factors influencing periodicity at the vents. Bottom pressure and vent temperature were mainly opposite in phase, with the main fluctuations of vent temperature occurring at tidal frequencies. Although the fluctuations in atmospheric pressure were of the same order as those due to tidal pressure, the contribution of atmospheric pressure was considerably weaker at diurnal frequencies. Some sudden discontinuities in sediment temperature were recorded, at least one of these may have been caused by seismic events. Seawater temperature changes were not reflected in the sediment temperature record. Transient loadings, such as tidal loadings, barometric pressure and earth tides, may affect the pore pressure in sediments, influencing fluid expulsion and sediment temperature as a consequence. Most of the contribution to the fluctuations in sediment temperature depends on tidal loadings. Gravitational forces, in the form of earth tides, can also be involved and barometric pressure is probably responsible for long period temperature oscillations.

  7. Hydrothermal activity on the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Tectonically- and volcanically-controlled venting at 4 5°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; Bennett, S. A.; Connelly, D. P.; Evans, A. J.; Murton, B. J.; Parson, L. M.; Prien, R. D.; Ramirez-Llodra, E.; Jakuba, M.; Shank, T. M.; Yoerger, D. R.; Baker, E. T.; Walker, S. L.; Nakamura, K.

    2008-09-01

    We report results from an investigation of the geologic processes controlling hydrothermal activity along the previously-unstudied southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (3-7°S). Our study employed the NOC (UK) deep-tow sidescan sonar instrument, TOBI, in concert with the WHOI (USA) autonomous underwater vehicle, ABE, to collect information concerning hydrothermal plume distributions in the water column co-registered with geologic investigations of the underlying seafloor. Two areas of high-temperature hydrothermal venting were identified. The first was situated in a non-transform discontinuity (NTD) between two adjacent second-order ridge-segments near 4°02'S, distant from any neovolcanic activity. This geologic setting is very similar to that of the ultramafic-hosted and tectonically-controlled Rainbow vent-site on the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The second site was located at 4°48'S at the axial-summit centre of a second-order ridge-segment. There, high-temperature venting is hosted in an ˜ 18 km 2 area of young lava flows which in some cases are observed to have flowed over and engulfed pre-existing chemosynthetic vent-fauna. In both appearance and extent, these lava flows are directly reminiscent of those emplaced in Winter 2005-06 at the East Pacific Rise, 9°50'N and reference to global seismic catalogues reveals that a swarm of large (M 4.6-5.6) seismic events was centred on the 5°S segment over a ˜ 24 h period in late June 2002, perhaps indicating the precise timing of this volcanic eruptive episode. Temperature measurements at one of the vents found directly adjacent to the fresh lava flows at 5°S MAR (Turtle Pits) have subsequently revealed vent-fluids that are actively phase separating under conditions very close to the Critical Point for seawater, at ˜ 3000 m depth and 407 °C: the hottest vent-fluids yet reported from anywhere along the global ridge crest.

  8. Fake ballistics and real explosions: field-scale experiments on the ejection and emplacement of volcanic bombs during vent-clearing explosive activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddeucci, J.; Valentine, G.; Gaudin, D.; Graettinger, A. H.; Lube, G.; Kueppers, U.; Sonder, I.; White, J. D.; Ross, P.; Bowman, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    Ballistics - bomb-sized pyroclasts that travel from volcanic source to final emplacement position along ballistic trajectories - represent a prime source of volcanic hazard, but their emplacement range, size, and density is useful to inverse model key eruption parameters related to their initial ejection velocity. Models and theory, however, have so far focused on the trajectory of ballistics after leaving the vent, neglecting the complex dynamics of their initial acceleration phase in the vent/conduit. Here, we use field-scale buried explosion experiments to study the ground-to-ground ballistic emplacement of particles through their entire acceleration-deceleration cycle. Twelve blasts were performed at the University at Buffalo Large Scale Experimental Facility with a range of scaled depths (burial depth divided by the cubic root of the energy of the explosive charge) and crater configurations. In all runs, ballistic analogs were placed on the ground surface at variable distance from the vertical projection of the buried charge, resulting in variable ejection angle. The chosen analogs are tennis and ping-pong balls filled with different materials, covering a limited range of sizes and densities. The analogs are tracked in multiple high-speed and high-definition videos, while Particle Image Velocimetry is used to detail ground motion in response to the buried blasts. In addition, after each blast the emplacement position of all analog ballistics was mapped with respect to the blast location. Preliminary results show the acceleration history of ballistics to be quite variable, from very short and relatively simple acceleration coupled with ground motion, to more complex, multi-stage accelerations possibly affected not only by the initial ground motion but also by variable coupling with the gas-particle mixture generated by the blasts. Further analysis of the experimental results is expected to provide new interpretative tools for ballistic deposits and better

  9. Tectonic and magmatic controls on the location of post-subduction monogenetic volcanoes in Baja California, Mexico, revealed through spatial analysis of eruptive vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germa, Aurélie; Connor, Laura J.; Cañon-Tapia, Edgardo; Le Corvec, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    Post-subduction (12.5 Ma to less than 1 Ma) monogenetic volcanism on the Baja California peninsula, Mexico, formed one of the densest intra-continental areas of eruptive vents on Earth. It includes about 900 vents within an area ˜700 km long (N-S) and 70 to 150 km wide (W-E). This study shows that post-subduction volcanic activity was distributed along this arc and that modes exist in the volcano distribution, indicating that productivity of the magma source region was not uniform along the length of the arc. Vent clustering, vent alignments, and cone elongations were measured within eight monogenetic volcanic fields located along the peninsula. Results indicate that on a regional scale, vent clustering varies from north to south with denser spatial clustering in the north on the order of 1.9 × 10-1 vents/km2 to less dense clustering in the south on the order of 7.8 × 10-2 vents/km2. San Quintin, San Carlos, Jaraguay, and Santa Clara are spatially distinct volcanic fields with higher eruptive vent densities suggesting the existence of individual melt columns that may have persisted over time. In contrast, the San Borja, Vizcaino, San Ignacio, and La Purisima vent fields show lower degrees of vent clustering and no obvious spatial gaps between fields, thus indicating an area of more distributed volcanism. Insight into the lithospheric stress field can be gained from vent alignments and vent elongation measurements. Within the fields located along the extinct, subduction-related volcanic arc, elongation patterns of cinder cones and fissure-fed spatter cones, vent clusters, and vent alignments trend NW-SE and N-S. Within the Santa Clara field, located more to the west within the forearc, elongation patterns of the same volcanic features trend NE-SW. These patterns suggest that magmatism was more focused in the forearc and in the northern part of Baja California than in its southern region. Within the extinct arc, magma ascent created volcano alignments and elongate

  10. Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens sp. nov., a hyperthermophilic methanogen isolated from a volcanically active deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Lucy C; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Kim, You-Tae; Kwon, Soon-Wo; Park, Cheon-Seok; Holden, James F

    2015-04-01

    A hyperthermophilic methanogen, strain JH146(T), was isolated from 26 °C hydrothermal vent fluid emanating from a crack in basaltic rock at Marker 113 vent, Axial Seamount in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. It was identified as an obligate anaerobe that uses only H2 and CO2 for growth. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strain is more than 97% similar to other species of the genus Methanocaldococcus . Therefore, overall genome relatedness index analyses were performed to establish that strain JH146(T) represents a novel species. For each analysis, strain JH146(T) was most similar to Methanocaldococcus sp. FS406-22, which can fix N2 and also comes from Marker 113 vent. However, strain JH146(T) differs from strain FS406-22 in that it cannot fix N2. The average nucleotide identity score for strain JH146(T) was 87%, the genome-to-genome direct comparison score was 33-55% and the species identification score was 93%. For each analysis, strain JH146(T) was below the species delineation cut-off. Full-genome gene synteny analysis showed that strain JH146(T) and strain FS406-22 have 97% genome synteny, but strain JH146(T) was missing the operons necessary for N2 fixation and assimilatory nitrate reduction that are present in strain FS406-22. Based on its whole genome sequence, strain JH146(T) is suggested to represent a novel species of the genus Methanocaldococcus for which the name Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens is proposed. The type strain is JH146(T) ( = DSM 27223(T) = KACC 18232(T)).

  11. Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens sp. nov., a hyperthermophilic methanogen isolated from a volcanically active deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Lucy C; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Kim, You-Tae; Kwon, Soon-Wo; Park, Cheon-Seok; Holden, James F

    2015-04-01

    A hyperthermophilic methanogen, strain JH146(T), was isolated from 26 °C hydrothermal vent fluid emanating from a crack in basaltic rock at Marker 113 vent, Axial Seamount in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. It was identified as an obligate anaerobe that uses only H2 and CO2 for growth. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strain is more than 97% similar to other species of the genus Methanocaldococcus . Therefore, overall genome relatedness index analyses were performed to establish that strain JH146(T) represents a novel species. For each analysis, strain JH146(T) was most similar to Methanocaldococcus sp. FS406-22, which can fix N2 and also comes from Marker 113 vent. However, strain JH146(T) differs from strain FS406-22 in that it cannot fix N2. The average nucleotide identity score for strain JH146(T) was 87%, the genome-to-genome direct comparison score was 33-55% and the species identification score was 93%. For each analysis, strain JH146(T) was below the species delineation cut-off. Full-genome gene synteny analysis showed that strain JH146(T) and strain FS406-22 have 97% genome synteny, but strain JH146(T) was missing the operons necessary for N2 fixation and assimilatory nitrate reduction that are present in strain FS406-22. Based on its whole genome sequence, strain JH146(T) is suggested to represent a novel species of the genus Methanocaldococcus for which the name Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens is proposed. The type strain is JH146(T) ( = DSM 27223(T) = KACC 18232(T)). PMID:25634941

  12. Effects of temperature, particle features and vent geometry on volcanic jet dynamics, a shock-tube investigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigala, Valeria; Kueppers, Ulrich; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    The lowermost part of an eruptive plume commonly shows characteristics of an underexpanded jet. The dynamics of this gas-thrust region are likely to be a direct consequence of intrinsic (magma properties, overpressure) and extrinsic (vent geometry, weather) eruption conditions. Additionally, they affect the subsequent evolution of the eruptive column and have, therefore, important hazard assessment implications for both near- and far-field. Direct observation of eruptive events is possible, but often insufficient for complete characterization. Important complementary data can be achieved using controlled and calibrated laboratory experiments. Loose natural particles were ejected from a shock-tube while controlling temperature (25° and 500°C), overpressure (15MPa), starting grain size distribution (1-2 mm, 0.5-1 mm and 0.125-0.250 mm), density (basaltic and phonolitic), gas-particle ratio and vent geometry (nozzle, cylindrical, funnel with a flaring of 15° and 30°, respectively). For each experiment, we quantified the velocity of individual particles, the jet spreading angle, the presence of electric discharges and the production of fines and analysed their dynamic evolution. Data shows velocity of up to 296 m/s and deceleration patterns following nonlinear paths. Gas spreading angles range between 21° and 41° while the particle spreading angles between 3° and 32°. Electric discharges, in the form of lightning, are observed, quantified and described. Moreover, a variation in the production of fines is recognized during the course of single experiments. This experimental investigation, which mechanistically mimics the process of pyroclast ejection, is shown to be capable of constraining the effects of input parameters and conduit/vent geometry on pyroclastic plumes. Therefore, the results should greatly enhance the ability of numerically model explosive ejecta in nature.

  13. Vent 7504 of the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF), Arizona: Sample Geochemistry and Implications for Cone Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needham, D. H.; Eppler, D. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Skinner, J. A.; Evans, C. A.; Feng, W.; Gruener, J. E.; Whitson, P. A.; Janoiko, B. A.; Mertzman, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Vent 7504 is a complex structure in the SFVF that has 3 unit classes: a central cone with exposed dikes and cinder-covered rheomorphic facies; a SE/NW-trending ridge north of the cone with cinder-covered rheomorphic facies; and three discrete lava flows that emanate to the N from the ridge and to the SW and NW from the cone. Field observations suggest the ridge was the northern crest of an initial, larger cone. The NW portion of this cone was most likely disrupted during a catastrophic breach of lava that had accumulated within the cone; this third of three lava flows carried rafted packages of the rheomorphic cone facies to the NW, forming the linear N ridge. The final phase of pyroclastic activity was concentrated in the SW portion of the original cone, covering the top of the cone with cinders and forming the more traditional conic-shaped construct observed today. This study describes the geochemistry of 9 samples collected from the mapped units (2 from the cone, 1 from the N ridge, 1 from the N lava flow, 2 from the SW lava flow, and 3 from the NW lava flow) to further constrain the formation of Vent 7504. Geochemical analyses including back-scatter electron scanning electron microscopy and laboratory X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy were conducted on the 9 collected samples to measure bulk rock and olivine phenocryst compositions. Major element concentrations in the bulk rock and olivine compositions are strongly clustered in all samples, indicating they likely originated from a single magmatic source. Bulk rock SiO2 (~47.5 wt%) and alkali (Na2O + K2O, ~2.7 wt% + 0.71 wt%) concentrations are consistent with a basaltic classification for these samples. Trends in major elements relative to MgO are observed for the olivine phenocrysts: SiO2, Al2O3, Na2O, and TiO2 remain constant relative to MgO, but strong linear trends are observed in MnO, FeO, and NiO relative to MgO. These linear trends are expected given the potential for bivalent cation exchanges in the

  14. Volcanic edifice alignment detection software in MATLAB: Test data and preliminary results for shield fields on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Bradley J.; Lang, Nicholas P.

    2016-08-01

    The scarcity of impact craters on Venus make it difficult to infer the relative ages of geologic units. Stratigraphic methods can be used to help infer the relative ordering of surface features, but the relatively coarse resolution of available radar data means ambiguity about the timing of certain features is common. Here we develop a set of statistical tools in MATLAB to help infer the relative timing between clusters of small shield volcanoes and sets of fractures in the surrounding terrain. Specifically, we employed two variants of the two-point azimuth method to detect anisotropy in the distribution of point-like features. The results of these methods are shown to successfully identify anisotropy at two spatial scales: at the whole-field level and at scales smaller than a set fraction of the mean value. Initial results on the test cases presented here are promising, at least for volcanic fields emplaced under uniform conditions. These methods could also be used for detecting anisotropy in other point-like geologic features, such as hydrothermal vents, springs, and earthquake epicenters.

  15. Statistical analysis of eruptive vent distribution from post-subduction monogenetic fields in Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germa, A.; Cañon-Tapia, E.; Connor, L.; Le Corvec, N.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanism in Baja California (BC, Mexico) was active from the end of the subduction of the Farallon plate (12.5Ma) until recently (< 1Ma). Most of this volcanism formed twelve volcanic fields, seven of them being monogenetic, delineating a ~600-km-long array parallel to the Gulf of California. Previous studies on these fields have focused on the compositional diversity of magmatic products. Although geochemistry and ages of few lava flows are constrained, only two studies investigated the spatial distribution of the eruptive vents of San Borja. Within a monogenetic volcanic field, cone alignments and linear arrays are considered to reflect the geometry of feeder dikes formed either parallel to the maximum principal stress (σ1) in the lithosphere or using pre-existing crustal fractures. These intrinsic local structures will be compared with the shape of the field, which could reflect the shape of the source at depth. Using satellite imagery to define the location of eruptive centres on four monogenetic volcanic fields from central Baja California (Jaraguay, San Borja, Santa Clara, and San Ignacio), we completed statistical analyses of their spatial distribution. Using commercially available GIS software, spatial density analysis, and statistical scripts, each volcanic field was analysed for the number and density of vents, clustering, vent spacing and alignment azimuths. Our preliminary results reveal that vent densities are within the range of 0.001 to 0.2 vents / 100 km2. Eruptive vents are generally clustered, with density higher than 0.1 vents/100 km2. A common elongation direction trends N135° to N152° in most clusters and fields. We thus propose a NW-SE direction as the preferred orientation of the maximum principal stress (σ1), direction that needs to be confirmed by azimuths of the vents alignments. Using a combination of different computational methods, this study allows to quantify the influence of tectonic stresses at the deep and shallow level within

  16. Mud Volcanism and Fluid Venting In The Eastern Mediterranean Sea: Observations From Sidescan Sonar and Submersible Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitter, T. A. C.; Huguen, C.; Woodside, J. M.; Mascle, J.; Scientific Party, Medineth/Medinaut

    Mud volcanoes in the eastern Mediterranean Sea have been identified by their distinctive acoustic signature as well as their morphology and sedimentology. They appear as circular regions of high backscatter believed to be caused principally by the clast content of the mud flows forming the mud volcano. Both the MEDINAUT and MEDINETH expeditions, conducted in 1998 and 1999 over two mud fields, the Olimpi field and the Anaximander Mountains area, in Eastern Mediterranean Sea, studied mud volcanism using a multidisciplinary approach in order to determine the relationships between the activity of the mud volcanoes (importance of degassing, associated fauna) and their geophysical signature. Mud volcanoes in Eastern Mediterranean Sea vary from conical and dome-shaped reliefs from 500m to 2km wide and 100 to 200m high to large "mud pie" types up to 6km wide. Sidescan sonar records give a very high resolution of the acoustic response, enabling to distinguish several mud flows, often flowing along tectonic lineations. A clear relationship between the occurrence of mud volcanism and cold seeps and both thrust and transcurrent faulting has been observed in both mud fields, although the tectonic settings vary from purely compressional to a more transpressional stress field. The faults are inferred to provide pathways for over- pressured fluids, and secondary faulting (transcurrent and extensional faults) may facilitate mud ascension. On the basis of sidescan sonar interpretation, other typical features have been inferred such as main feeder channels, eruptive cone centers, or brine pools. The in situ observations have been used to characterize the seafloor over numerous mud volcanoes and ground-truth the sonar data. They reveal an abundance of fluid seeps, mainly methane and methane-rich brines, as well as associated specific fauna such as tube worms, clams and chemosynthetic bacteria, and specific diagenetic phenomenon i.e. carbonate crusts. Video observations proved that

  17. Application Of Recent (2008-2013) Lunar Probe Instrumentation To The Exploration For Precambrian Protolife In Volcanic Vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Jack

    2009-12-01

    Selected recent and future lunar probes have instruments suitable for the exploration of Precambrian protolife. Fumaroles contain the ingredients for protolife. With available energy including flow charging and charge separation, amino acids and related compounds could evolve into ATP. Fischer-Tropsch reactions in hydrothermal clay could create lipid micelles as reaction chambers. Fumarolic polyphosphates and tungsten catalysts could contribute to precambrian protolife evolution . The floors of Alphonsus and Lavoisier M exhibit dark mounds which could be buried fumaroles at fracture intersections. Chang'e-1 could define regolith thickness at these mounds with microwave radiometry. The MoonLITE penetrometer could likely identify hydrothermal products in these mounds using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Regarding polar craters which may host volcanic ices, intermittent illumination of selected crater floors warmed to 220 K may create a transient tenuous atmosphere of COS, H2S, CO2, CO, HCl and CH4 which could be analyzed by near infrared spectrometry (NIMS) of SELENE or Chandrayaan-1. Prior to the 2009 impact of a polar crater by LCROSS (of the LRO mission), the Soviet LEND mission may detect water using epithermal neutrons. The impact plume proposed in the LCROSS mission at a polar crater could be analyzed by NIMS for fumarolic fluids similar the the NIMS analyses of Callisto and Ganymede moons of Jupiter. The possible identification of cyanogen in the LCROSS impact plume would support the CN2 spectrogram at Aristarchus by Kozyrev in 1969. In the Aristarchus region, lunar dawn during periods of maximum orbital flexing may accentuate release of Rn, Ar and protolife gases. These gases could possibly by identified by the Chang'e-1 gamma/x ray spectrometer, NIMS and the neutral mass spectrometer of the LADEE mission. Microwave spectrometry and radar on the LEO mission as well as LROC (LRO mission) could also be directed at verified lunar transient sites.

  18. Three thousand years of flank and central vent eruptions of the San Salvador volcanic complex (El Salvador) and their effects on El Cambio archeological site: a review based on tephrostratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrés, D.; Delgado Granados, H.; Hernández, W.; Pullinger, C.; Chávez, H.; Castillo Taracena, C. R.; Cañas-Dinarte, C.

    2011-09-01

    The volcanic events of the last 3,000 years at San Salvador volcanic complex are reviewed using detailed stratigraphic records exposed in new excavations between 2005 and 2007, at El Cambio archeological site (Zapotitán Valley, El Salvador), and in other outcrops on the northern and northwestern sectors of the complex. The sequences that overlie Tierra Blanca Joven (cal. 429 ± 107 ad), from the Ilopango caldera, comprise the Loma Caldera (cal. 590 ± 90 ad) and El Playón (1658-1671) deposits and the San Andrés Tuff (cal. 1031 ± 29 ad), related to El Boquerón Volcano. The surge deposits within the El Playón, San Andrés Tuff and overlying Talpetate II sequences indicate the significance of phreatomagmatic phases in both central vent and flank eruptions during the last 1,600 years. Newly identified volcanic deposits underlying Tierra Blanca Joven at El Cambio extend the stratigraphic record of the area to 3,000 years bp. Paleosols interstratified with those deposits contain cultural artifacts which could be associated with the Middle Preclassic period (900-400 bc). If correct, human occupation of the site during the Preclassic period was more intense than previously known and volcanic eruptions must have affected prehistoric settlements. The archeological findings provide information on how prehistoric populations dealt with volcanic hazards, thousands of years ago in the eastern Zapotitán Valley, where several housing projects are currently being developed. The new stratigraphic and volcanological data can be used as a basis for local and regional hazard assessment related to future secondary vent activity in the San Salvador Volcanic Complex.

  19. Using Spatial Density to Characterize Volcanic Fields on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, J. A.; Bleacher, J. E.; Connor, C. B.; Connor, L. J.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new tool to planetary geology for quantifying the spatial arrangement of vent fields and volcanic provinces using non parametric kernel density estimation. Unlike parametricmethods where spatial density, and thus the spatial arrangement of volcanic vents, is simplified to fit a standard statistical distribution, non parametric methods offer more objective and data driven techniques to characterize volcanic vent fields. This method is applied to Syria Planum volcanic vent catalog data as well as catalog data for a vent field south of Pavonis Mons. The spatial densities are compared to terrestrial volcanic fields.

  20. Moytirra: Discovery of the first known deep-sea hydrothermal vent field on the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge north of the Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, A. J.; Murton, B.; Copley, J.; Lim, A.; Carlsson, J.; Collins, P.; Dorschel, B.; Green, D.; Judge, M.; Nye, V.; Benzie, J.; Antoniacomi, A.; Coughlan, M.; Morris, K.

    2013-10-01

    Geological, biological, morphological, and hydrochemical data are presented for the newly discovered Moytirra vent field at 45oN. This is the only high temperature hydrothermal vent known between the Azores and Iceland, in the North Atlantic and is located on a slow to ultraslow-spreading mid-ocean ridge uniquely situated on the 300 m high fault scarp of the eastern axial wall, 3.5 km from the axial volcanic ridge crest. Furthermore, the Moytirra vent field is, unusually for tectonically controlled hydrothermal vents systems, basalt hosted and perched midway up on the median valley wall and presumably heated by an off-axis magma chamber. The Moytirra vent field consists of an alignment of four sites of venting, three actively emitting "black smoke," producing a complex of chimneys and beehive diffusers. The largest chimney is 18 m tall and vigorously venting. The vent fauna described here are the only ones documented for the North Atlantic (Azores to Reykjanes Ridge) and significantly expands our knowledge of North Atlantic biodiversity. The surfaces of the vent chimneys are occupied by aggregations of gastropods (Peltospira sp.) and populations of alvinocaridid shrimp (Mirocaris sp. with Rimicaris sp. also present). Other fauna present include bythograeid crabs (Segonzacia sp.) and zoarcid fish (Pachycara sp.), but bathymodiolin mussels and actinostolid anemones were not observed in the vent field. The discovery of the Moytirra vent field therefore expands the known latitudinal distributions of several vent-endemic genera in the north Atlantic, and reveals faunal affinities with vents south of the Azores rather than north of Iceland.

  1. Late Cenozoic volcanism, subduction, and extension in the Lassen region of California, Southern Cascade Range

    SciTech Connect

    Guffanti, M. ); Clynne, M.A.; Smith, J.G.; Muffler, L.J.P.; Bullen, T.D. )

    1990-11-10

    The authors identify 537 volcanic vents younger than 7 Ma, and they classify these into five age intervals and five compositional categories based on SiO{sub 2} content. Maps of vents by age and composition illustrate regionally representative volcanic trends. Most mafic volcanism is calcalkaline basalt and basaltic andesite. However, lesser volume of low-potassium olivine tholeiite (LKOT), a geochemically distinctive basalt type found in the northern Basin and Range province, also has erupted throughout the Lassen segment of the Cascade arc since the Pliocene. Normal faults and linear groups of vents are evidence of widespread crustal extension throughout most of the Lassen region. NNW alignments of these features indicate NNW orientation of maximum horizontal stress (ENE extension), which is similar to the stress regime in the adjacent northwestern Basin and Range and northern Sierra Nevada provinces. They interpret the western limit of the zone of NNW trending normal faults as the western boundary of the Basin and Range province where it overlaps the Lassen segment of the Cascade arc. The Lassen volcanic region occurs above the subducting Gorda North plate but also lies within a broad zone of distributed extension that occurs in the North American lithosphere east and southeast of the present Cascadia subduction zone. The scarcity of volcanic rocks older than 7 Ma suggests that a more compressive lithospheric stress regime prior to the late Miocene extensional episode may have suppressed volcanism, even though subduction probably was occurring beneath the Lassen region.

  2. Volcanic hazard management in dispersed volcanism areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, Jose Manuel; Garcia, Alicia; Ortiz, Ramon

    2014-05-01

    Traditional volcanic hazard methodologies were developed mainly to deal with the big stratovolcanoes. In such type of volcanoes, the hazard map is an important tool for decision-makers not only during a volcanic crisis but also for territorial planning. According to the past and recent eruptions of a volcano, all possible volcanic hazards are modelled and included in the hazard map. Combining the hazard map with the Event Tree the impact area can be zoned and defining the likely eruptive scenarios that will be used during a real volcanic crisis. But in areas of disperse volcanism is very complex to apply the same volcanic hazard methodologies. The event tree do not take into account unknown vents, because the spatial concepts included in it are only related with the distance reached by volcanic hazards. The volcanic hazard simulation is also difficult because the vent scatter modifies the results. The volcanic susceptibility try to solve this problem, calculating the most likely areas to have an eruption, but the differences between low and large values obtained are often very small. In these conditions the traditional hazard map effectiveness could be questioned, making necessary a change in the concept of hazard map. Instead to delimit the potential impact areas, the hazard map should show the expected behaviour of the volcanic activity and how the differences in the landscape and internal geo-structures could condition such behaviour. This approach has been carried out in La Palma (Canary Islands), combining the concept of long-term hazard map with the short-term volcanic scenario to show the expected volcanic activity behaviour. The objective is the decision-makers understand how a volcanic crisis could be and what kind of mitigation measurement and strategy could be used.

  3. Tectono-volcanic control of fissure type vents for the 28 Ma Panalillo ignimbrite in the Villa de Reyes Graben, San Luis Potosí, México.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tristán-González, Margarito; Labarthe-Hernández, Guillermo; Aguirre-Díaz, Gerardo J.; Aguillón-Robles, Alfredo

    2008-10-01

    The volcano-tectonic events at the Villa de Reyes Graben (VRG), in the southern Sierra Madre Occidental, Mexico, include 1) a regional NNE fault system developed before 32 Ma, 2) this pre-32 Ma faulting controlled the emplacement of 31.5 Ma dacitic domes, 3) NE faulting at 28 Ma that displaced the 31.5 Ma dacitic domes and formed the VRG, as well as the oblique grabens of Bledos and Enramadas oriented NW, 4) emplacement of Panalillo ignimbrite at 28 Ma filling the VRG and erupting from fissures related to the oblique grabens, and eruption of Placa basalt apparently also from fault-controlled vents.

  4. Discovery of a black smoker vent field and vent fauna at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Rolf B.; Rapp, Hans Tore; Thorseth, Ingunn H.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Barriga, Fernando J. A. S.; Baumberger, Tamara; Flesland, Kristin; Fonseca, Rita; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.; Jorgensen, Steffen L.

    2010-01-01

    The Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) represents one of the most slow-spreading ridge systems on Earth. Previous attempts to locate hydrothermal vent fields and unravel the nature of venting, as well as the provenance of vent fauna at this northern and insular termination of the global ridge system, have been unsuccessful. Here, we report the first discovery of a black smoker vent field at the AMOR. The field is located on the crest of an axial volcanic ridge (AVR) and is associated with an unusually large hydrothermal deposit, which documents that extensive venting and long-lived hydrothermal systems exist at ultraslow-spreading ridges, despite their strongly reduced volcanic activity. The vent field hosts a distinct vent fauna that differs from the fauna to the south along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The novel vent fauna seems to have developed by local specialization and by migration of fauna from cold seeps and the Pacific. PMID:21119639

  5. Discovery of a black smoker vent field and vent fauna at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Rolf B; Rapp, Hans Tore; Thorseth, Ingunn H; Lilley, Marvin D; Barriga, Fernando J A S; Baumberger, Tamara; Flesland, Kristin; Fonseca, Rita; Früh-Green, Gretchen L; Jorgensen, Steffen L

    2010-11-23

    The Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) represents one of the most slow-spreading ridge systems on Earth. Previous attempts to locate hydrothermal vent fields and unravel the nature of venting, as well as the provenance of vent fauna at this northern and insular termination of the global ridge system, have been unsuccessful. Here, we report the first discovery of a black smoker vent field at the AMOR. The field is located on the crest of an axial volcanic ridge (AVR) and is associated with an unusually large hydrothermal deposit, which documents that extensive venting and long-lived hydrothermal systems exist at ultraslow-spreading ridges, despite their strongly reduced volcanic activity. The vent field hosts a distinct vent fauna that differs from the fauna to the south along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The novel vent fauna seems to have developed by local specialization and by migration of fauna from cold seeps and the Pacific.

  6. Mapping Planetary Volcanic Deposits: Identifying Vents and Distingushing between Effects of Eruption Conditions and Local Lava Storage and Release on Flow Field Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Eppler, D. B.; Skinner, J. A.; Evans, C. A.; Feng, W.; Gruener, J. E.; Hurwitz, D. M.; Whitson, P.; Janoiko, B.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial geologic mapping techniques are regularly used for "photogeologic" mapping of other planets, but these approaches are complicated by the diverse type, areal coverage, and spatial resolution of available data sets. When available, spatially-limited in-situ human and/or robotic surface observations can sometimes introduce a level of detail that is difficult to integrate with regional or global interpretations. To assess best practices for utilizing observations acquired from orbit and on the surface, our team conducted a comparative study of geologic mapping and interpretation techniques. We compared maps generated for the same area in the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) in northern Arizona using 1) data collected for reconnaissance before and during the 2010 Desert Research And Technology Studies campaign, and 2) during a traditional, terrestrial field geology study. The operations, related results, and direct mapping comparisons are discussed in companion LPSC abstracts [1-3]. Here we present new geologic interpretations for a volcanic cone and related lava flows as derived from all approaches involved in this study. Mapping results indicate a need for caution when interpreting past eruption conditions on other planetary surfaces from orbital data alone.

  7. Mapping Planetary Volcanic Deposits: Identifying Vents and Distinguishing between Effects of Eruption Conditions and Local Storage and Release on Flow Field Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Eppler, D. B.; Skinner, J. A.; Evans, C. A.; Feng, W.; Gruener, J. E.; Hurwitz, D. M.; Whitson, P.; Janoiko, B.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial geologic mapping techniques are regularly used for "photogeologic" mapping of other planets, but these approaches are complicated by the diverse type, areal coverage, and spatial resolution of available data sets. When available, spatially-limited in-situ human and/or robotic surface observations can sometimes introduce a level of detail that is difficult to integrate with regional or global interpretations. To assess best practices for utilizing observations acquired from orbit and on the surface, our team conducted a comparative study of geologic mapping and interpretation techniques. We compared maps generated for the same area in the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) in northern Arizona using 1) data collected for reconnaissance before and during the 2010 Desert Research And Technology Studies campaign, and 2) during a traditional, terrestrial field geology study. The operations, related results, and direct mapping comparisons are discussed in companion LPSC abstracts. Here we present new geologic interpretations for a volcanic cone and related lava flows as derived from all approaches involved in this study. Mapping results indicate a need for caution when interpreting past eruption conditions on other planetary surfaces from orbital data alone.

  8. Vented Capacitor

    DOEpatents

    Brubaker, Michael Allen; Hosking, Terry Alan

    2006-04-11

    A technique of increasing the corona inception voltage (CIV), and thereby increasing the operating voltage, of film/foil capacitors is described. Intentional venting of the capacitor encapsulation improves the corona inception voltage by allowing internal voids to equilibrate with the ambient environment.

  9. Anomalous Geologic Setting of the Spencer-High Point Volcanic Field, Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwahashi, G. S.; Hughes, S. S.

    2006-12-01

    The Spencer-High Point (SHP) volcanic field comprises an ~1700 sq km mafic volcanic rift zone located near Yellowstone in the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP). SHP lava flows are both similar to and distinct from typical olivine tholeiite lavas of the ESRP. SHP has unique physical volcanic features characterized by numerous cinder cones and short lava flows; whereas, spatter ramparts, fissures and longer flows dominate in other ESRP regions. Topography and aerial photos indicate that vents are generally aligned northwest- southeast, which is sub-parallel to adjacent Basin and Range faults in much of the ESRP. Yet individual vents and other structural elements in SHP where Basin and Range, ESRP and thrust-faulted mountain belts all intersect, are elongated in a more east-west direction. Distinct structural control is manifested in an overall southward slope over the entire volcanic field. Short lava flows tend to flow north or south off of a central topographically higher zone of overlapping lava flows and smaller vents. Several smaller vents appear to be parasitic cones adjacent to larger eruptive centers. Contrary to these relations, preliminary geochemical data by Leeman (1982) and Kuntz et al. (1992) suggest SHP lavas are typical ESRP olivine tholeiite basalts, which notably have coarsely diktytaxitic texture. The central and eastern sections of the SHP field contain lavas with large (3-8cm), clear, euhedral plagioclase phenocrysts but without diktytaxitic texture. Lava flows in the central and eastern sections of SHP volcanic field are pahoehoe. These also contain crustal xenoliths implying a prolonged crustal history. Geochemical whole rock and microprobe analyses are currently being processed for petrogenetic history.

  10. Using Volcanic Lightning Measurements to Discern Variations in Explosive Volcanic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, S. A.; Thomas, R. J.; McNutt, S. R.; Edens, H. E.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.

    2013-12-01

    VHF observations of volcanic lightning have been made during the recent eruptions of Augustine Volcano (2006, Alaska, USA), Redoubt Volcano (2009, Alaska, USA), and Eyjafjallajökull (2010, Iceland). These show that electrical activity occurs both on small scales at the vent of the volcano, concurrent with an eruptive event and on large scales throughout the eruption column during and subsequent to an eruptive event. The small-scale discharges at the vent of the volcano are often referred to as 'vent discharges' and are on the order of 10-100 meters in length and occur at rates on the order of 1000 per second. The high rate of vent discharges produces a distinct VHF signature that is sometimes referred to as 'continuous RF' radiation. VHF radiation from vent discharges has been observed at sensors placed as far as 100 km from the volcano. VHF and infrasound measurements have shown that vent discharges occur simultaneously with the onset of eruption, making their detection an unambiguous indicator of explosive volcanic activity. The fact that vent discharges are observed concurrent with explosive volcanic activity indicates that volcanic ejecta are charged upon eruption. VHF observations have shown that the intensity of vent discharges varies between eruptive events, suggesting that fluctuations in eruptive processes affect the electrification processes giving rise to vent discharges. These fluctuations may be variations in eruptive vigor or variations in the type of eruption; however, the data obtained so far do not show a clear relationship between eruption parameters and the intensity or occurrence of vent discharges. Further study is needed to clarify the link between vent discharges and eruptive behavior, such as more detailed lightning observations concurrent with tephra measurements and other measures of eruptive strength. Observations of vent discharges, and volcanic lightning observations in general, are a valuable tool for volcano monitoring, providing a

  11. Volcano Vents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 5 May 2003

    This low-relief shield volcano imaged with the THEMIS visible camera has two large vents which have erupted several individual lava flows. The positions of the origins of many of the flows indicate that it is probable that the vents are secondary structures that formed only after the shield was built up by eruptions from a central caldera.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 17.6, Longitude 243.6 East (116.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Geomagnetic imprint of the Persani volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besutiu, Lucian; Seghedi, Ioan; Zlagnean, Luminita; Atanasiu, Ligia; Popa, Razvan-Gabriel; Pomeran, Mihai; Visan, Madalina

    2016-04-01

    employing various filtering techniques. Thus, the reduction-to-the-pole or pseudo-gravity operators have allowed for an improved source positioning, distorted by the inclination of the geomagnetic vector, while high-order derivatives (e.g. horizontal and vertical gradients) have better outlined the contour of the hidden magnetic bodies. Overall, the geomagnetic survey has confirmed the assumptions previously inferred by geological field work. Besides, it helped identify several unrevealed buried volcanic forms and their relation to structural elements (e.g. fault aligned vents, and larger circular structures). In-depth development of the volcanic structures has been studied along several interpretative lines by using inversion and 2D forward modelling of geomagnetic data under rock magnetic properties constraints provided by lab analyses. Acknowledgements. The research was funded through CNCS - UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-ID-PCE-2012-4-0137.

  13. Semi-automatic delimitation of volcanic edifice boundaries: Validation and application to the cinder cones of the Tancitaro-Nueva Italia region (Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Traglia, Federico; Morelli, Stefano; Casagli, Nicola; Garduño Monroy, Victor Hugo

    2014-08-01

    The shape and size of monogenetic volcanoes are the result of complex evolutions involving the interaction of eruptive activity, structural setting and degradational processes. Morphological studies of cinder cones aim to evaluate volcanic hazard on the Earth and to decipher the origins of various structures on extraterrestrial planets. Efforts have been dedicated so far to the characterization of the cinder cone morphology in a systematic and comparable manner. However, manual delimitation is time-consuming and influenced by the user subjectivity but, on the other hand, automatic boundary delimitation of volcanic terrains can be affected by irregular topography. In this work, the semi-automatic delimitation of volcanic edifice boundaries proposed by Grosse et al. (2009) for stratovolcanoes was tested for the first time over monogenetic cinder cones. The method, based on the integration of the DEM-derived slope and curvature maps, is applied here to the Tancitaro-Nueva Italia region of the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (Mexico), where 309 Plio-Quaternary cinder cones are located. The semiautomatic extraction allowed identification of 137 of the 309 cinder cones of the Tancitaro-Nueva Italia region, recognized by means of the manual extraction. This value corresponds to the 44.3% of the total number of cinder cones. Analysis on vent alignments allowed us to identify NE-SW vent alignments and cone elongations, consistent with a NE-SW σmax and a NW-SE σmin. Constructing a vent intensity map, based on computing the number of vents within a radius r centred on each vent of the data set and choosing r = 5 km, four vent intensity maxima were derived: one is positioned in the NW with respect to the Volcano Tancitaro, one in the NE, one to the S and another vent cluster located at the SE boundary of the studied area. The spacing of centroid of each cluster (24 km) can be related to the thickness of the crust (9-10 km) overlying the magma reservoir.

  14. Volcanic eruptions observed with infrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Aster, Richard C.; Kyle, Philip R.

    2004-07-01

    Infrasonic airwaves produced by active volcanoes provide valuable insight into the eruption dynamics. Because the infrasonic pressure field may be directly associated with the flux rate of gas released at a volcanic vent, infrasound also enhances the efficacy of volcanic hazard monitoring and continuous studies of conduit processes. Here we present new results from Erebus, Fuego, and Villarrica volcanoes highlighting uses of infrasound for constraining quantitative eruption parameters, such as eruption duration, source mechanism, and explosive gas flux.

  15. Gas venting system

    DOEpatents

    Khan, Amjad; Dreier, Ken Wayne; Moulthrop, Lawrence Clinton; White, Erik James

    2010-06-29

    A system to vent a moist gas stream is disclosed. The system includes an enclosure and an electrochemical cell disposed within the enclosure, the electrochemical cell productive of the moist gas stream. A first vent is in fluid communication with the electrochemical cell for venting the moist gas stream to an exterior of the enclosure, and a second vent is in fluid communication with an interior of the enclosure and in thermal communication with the first vent for discharging heated air to the exterior of the enclosure. At least a portion of the discharging heated air is for preventing freezing of the moist gas stream within the first vent.

  16. Morphology and dynamics of explosive vents through cohesive rock formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, Olivier; Gisler, Galen R.; Haug, Øystein T.

    2015-04-01

    Shallow explosive volcanic processes, such as kimberlite volcanism, phreatomagmatic and phreatic activity, produce volcanic vents exhibiting a wide variety of morphologies, including vertical pipes and V-shaped vents. In this study we report on experimental and numerical models designed to capture a range of vent morphologies in an eruptive system (Galland et al., 2014). Using dimensional analysis, we identified key governing dimensionless parameters, in particular the gravitational stress-to-fluid pressure ratio (Π2=P/rho.g.h), and the fluid pressure-to-host rock strength ratio (Π3=P/C). We used combined experimental and numerical models to test the effects of these parameters. The experiments were used to test the effect of Π2 on vent morphology and dynamics. A phase diagram demonstrates a separation between two distinct morphologies, with vertical structures occurring at high values of Π2, and diagonal ones at low values of Π2. The numerical simulations were used to test the effect of Π3 on vent morphology and dynamics. In the numerical models we see three distinct morphologies: vertical pipes are produced at high values of Π3, diagonal pipes at low values of Π3, while horizontal sills are produced for intermediate values of Π3. Our results show that vertical pipes form by plasticity-dominated yielding for high-energy systems (high Π2 and Π3), whereas diagonal and horizontal vents dominantly form by fracturing for lower-energy systems (low Π2 and Π3). Although our models are 2-dimensionnal, they suggest that circular pipes result from plastic yielding of the host rock in a high-energy regime, whereas V-shaped volcanic vents result from fracturing of the host rock in lower-energy systems. Galland, O., Gisler, G.R., Haug, Ø.T., 2014. Morphology and dynamics of explosive vents through cohesive rock formations. J. Geophys. Res. 119, 10.1002/2014JB011050.

  17. Io's volcanic and sublimation atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, Miguel A.; Schubert, Gerald; Kivelson, Margaret G.; Paige, David A.; Baumgardner, John

    1991-01-01

    Fully 3D axisymmetric gasdynamic equations simulating SO2 and H2S frost sublimation and SO2 dayside and nightside volcanic atmospheres on Io are numerically solved, using a time-explicit finite-volume formulation. Both the sublimation and volcanic atmospheres generate horizontal supersonic winds away from the subsolar point or the volcanic vent. While the sublimation atmosphere is primarily driven by horizontal pressure gradients determined by surface temperatures, the volcanic atmosphere is driven by pressure gradients that are determined by the source rate. Sublimation and condensation produce patterns of surface deposits which are characteristic of the two types of atmospheres. The volcanic model is quantitatively consistent with Voyager observations of ring deposits.

  18. Distribution and Stratigraphy of Basaltic Lavas in the Southwest Portion of the Quaternary Big Pine Volcanic Field, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolford, J.; Vazquez, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Pleistocene Big Pine Volcanic Field (BPVF), located in the Owens Valley of eastern California, is dominated by basaltic cinder cones and lavas, and poses a potential volcanic hazard to local infrastructure, in particular Highway 395 and the Los Angeles Aqueduct. However, despite numerous petrologic studies, the volcanic history and distribution of products from individual BPVF eruptions are poorly known. Using detailed field mapping and petrology, we have determined the distribution and stratigraphy of basaltic lavas in the southwest portion of the BPVF, which contains the largest number exposed vents and lava. In the Aberdeen area, individual cinder cones and fissure vents are aligned along N-S trending lineaments, with local clustering of vents and lavas. Approximately 19 cones, and at least 14 lava flows occur in the area. Two cinder cones located near the valley floor are partly buried by younger lavas and alluvium. In most cases, lavas are aa in character and traveled ca. 7 km down alluvial fans (8% gradient) towards the Owens River. On average, individual lavas cover ca. 10-12 km2, with average individual volumes of ca. 0.065 km3. Two general groups of basaltic lavas characterize the Aberdeen area: 1) xenocryst-rich and 2) xenolith-poor basalts. Xenolith-rich basalts contain variable amounts of ultramafic, mafic, granitic, and metamorphic lithologies, whereas xenolith-poor lavas are dominated by olivine phenocrysts. Overlapping flow margins define relative ages between adjacent basalts. In both north and south portions of the Aberdeen area, flows composing the base of the volcanic stratigraphy are the xenolith-rich variety, and are typically overlain by xenolith-poor flows. In general, these younger xenolith-poor lavas are approximately 25% larger in volume than the older xenolith-rich lavas. Several vents record changes in lava type during individual eruptions, suggesting transitions in magma discharge rate. At one vent cluster, pahoehoe is restricted to

  19. Volcanic Gas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hazards Tephra/Ash Lava Flows Lahars Volcanic Gas Climate Change Pyroclastic Flows Volcanic Landslides Preparedness Volcano Hazard Zones ... Please see our discussion of volcanic gases and climate change for additional information. Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is ...

  20. The effects of vent-notch area on bulging and thinning during the clad vent test closure-weld operation

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, G.B.

    1996-09-01

    The internal gas pressure during clad vent set (CVS) welding is vented through aligned vent notches in each cup. For Galileo, Ulysses, and most of Cassini CVS production, the vent-notch dimensional requirements for both cups were as follows: (1) vent-notch depth, 0.15/0.20 mm; (2) vent-notch width, 0.25/0.35 nun; (3) bottom of vent-notch comers, sharp to full radius; (4) top of vent-notch edge, 0.05 mm maximum break; and (5) maximum variation between vent notch and grit-blasted triangle centerlines, 3{degrees}. During the fuel encapsulation operation (with {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel pellets) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), excessive bulges or blowouts at the CVS closure-weld tie-in location occurred with 11.8% (27 out of 229) of the flight-quality welds made with the aforementioned standard vent-notch dimensions. These bulges and blowouts are primarily the result of inadequate venting of the increased gas pressure during the thermal cycle of the closure-weld operation. Proper venting is dependent mostly upon the weld parameters and the total vent-notch area. Because of the increased incidence of bulges/blowouts in the {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}-fueled CVS units, LANL personnel requested that consideration be given to increasing the vent-notch size to minimize further the loss of CVS hardware and the potential loss of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} pellets. Thus, increasing further the production yield of the closure-weld operation would avoid potentially severe schedule delays.

  1. Submarine radial vents on Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wanless, V. Dorsey; Garcia, M.O.; Trusdell, F.A.; Rhodes, J.M.; Norman, M.D.; Weis, Dominique; Fornari, D.J.; Kurz, M.D.; Guillou, Herve

    2006-01-01

    A 2002 multibeam sonar survey of Mauna Loa's western flank revealed ten submarine radial vents and three submarine lava flows. Only one submarine radial vent was known previously. The ages of these vents are constrained by eyewitness accounts, geologic relationships, Mn-Fe coatings, and geochemical stratigraphy; they range from 128 years B.P. to possibly 47 ka. Eight of the radial vents produced degassed lavas despite eruption in water depths sufficient to inhibit sulfur degassing. These vents formed truncated cones and short lava flows. Two vents produced undegassed lavas that created “irregular” cones and longer lava flows. Compositionally and isotopically, the submarine radial vent lavas are typical of Mauna Loa lavas, except two cones that erupted alkalic lavas. He-Sr isotopes for the radial vent lavas follow Mauna Loa's evolutionary trend. The compositional and isotopic heterogeneity of these lavas indicates most had distinct parental magmas. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter results, along with photography and sampling during four JASON2 dives, are used to produce a detailed geologic map to evaluate Mauna Loa's submarine geologic history. The new map shows that the 1877 submarine eruption was much larger than previously thought, resulting in a 10% increase for recent volcanism. Furthermore, although alkalic lavas were found at two radial vents, there is no systematic increase in alkalinity among these or other Mauna Loa lavas as expected for a dying volcano. These results refute an interpretation that Mauna Loa's volcanism is waning. The submarine radial vents and flows cover 29 km2 of seafloor and comprise a total volume of ∼2×109 m3 of lava, reinforcing the idea that submarine lava eruptions are important in the growth of oceanic island volcanoes even after they emerged above sea level.

  2. A 3D model of crustal magnetization at the Pinacate Volcanic Field, NW Sonora, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Abdeslem, Juan; Calmus, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    The Pinacate Volcanic Field (PVF) is located near the western border of the southern Basin and Range province, in the State of Sonora NW Mexico, and within the Gulf of California Extensional Province. This volcanic field contains the shield volcano Santa Clara, which mainly consists of basaltic to trachytic volcanic rocks, and reaches an altitude of ~ 1200 m. The PVF disrupts a series of discontinuous ranges of low topographic relief aligned in a NW direction, which consist mainly of Proterozoic metamorphic rocks and Proterozoic through Paleogene granitoids. The PVF covers an area of approximately 60 by 55 km, and includes more than 400 well-preserved cinder cones and vents and eight maar craters. It was active from about 1.7 Ma until about 13 ka. We have used the ages and magnetic polarities of the volcanic rocks, along with mapped magnetic anomalies and their inverse modeling to determine that the Pinacate Volcanic Field was formed during two volcanic episodes. The oldest one built the Santa Clara shield volcano of basaltic and trachytic composition, and occurred during the geomagnetic Matuyama Chron of reverse polarity, which also includes the normal polarity Jaramillo and Olduvai Subchrons, thus imprinting both normal and reverse magnetization in the volcanic products. The younger Pinacate series of basaltic composition represents monogenetic volcanic activity that extends all around the PVF and occurred during the subsequent geomagnetic Brunhes Chron of normal polarity. Magnetic anomalies toward the north of the Santa Clara volcano are the most intense in the PVF, and their inverse modeling indicates the presence of a large subsurface body magnetized in the present direction of the geomagnetic field. This suggests that the magma chambers at depth cooled below the Curie temperature during the Brunhes Chron.

  3. Recurrence rates of volcanism in basaltic volcanic fields: An example from the Springerville volcanic field, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Condit, C.D.; Connor, C.B.

    1996-10-01

    A spatio-temporal near-neighbor model is used to identify and map variations in the recurrence rate of volcanism in the Springerville volcanic field, Arizona, a large field on the Colorado Plateau boundary. Detailed mapping of individual lava flows and their associated vents, together with radiometric and paleomagnetic dating, demonstrates that 366 volcanic events have formed the Springerville volcanic field. A near-neighbor spatio-temporal recurrence-rate model using seven near-neighbor volcanoes and a 0.5 m.y. time window reveals that (1) areas of waxing and waning magmatism in the Springerville volcanic field are much more localized and (2) volcanic activity within these areas is much more intense than implied by field-wide temporal trends. Because volcanic activity is spatially and temporally clustered, forecasting subsequent activity is more successful if the spatio-temporal recurrence-rate model is used, rather than the average recurrence rates. This success indicates that spatio-temporal recurrence-rate models are useful tools for the quantification of long-term volcanic hazards in basaltic volcanic fields. 61 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Morphology and dynamics of explosive vents through cohesive rock formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, O.; Gisler, G. R.; Haug, Ø. T.

    2014-06-01

    Shallow explosive volcanic processes, such as kimberlite volcanism and phreatomagmatic and phreatic activity, produce volcanic vents exhibiting a wide variety of morphologies, including vertical pipes and V-shaped vents. In this study we report on experimental and numerical models designed to capture a range of vent morphologies in an eruptive system. Using dimensional analysis, we identified key governing dimensionless parameters, in particular the gravitational stress-to-fluid pressure ratio (Π2 = P/ρgh) and the fluid pressure-to-host rock strength ratio (Π3 = P/C). We used combined experimental and numerical models to test the effects of these parameters. The experiments were used to test the effect of Π2 on vent morphology and dynamics. A phase diagram demonstrates a separation between two distinct morphologies, with vertical structures occurring at high values of Π2 and diagonal ones at low values of Π2. The numerical simulations were used to test the effect of Π3 on vent morphology and dynamics. In the numerical models we see three distinct morphologies: vertical pipes are produced at high values of Π3, diagonal pipes at low values of Π3, and horizontal sills at intermediate values of Π3. Our results show that vertical pipes form by plasticity-dominated yielding in high-energy systems (high Π2 and Π3), whereas diagonal and horizontal vents dominantly form by fracturing in lower energy systems (low Π2 and Π3). Although our models are two-dimensional, they suggest that circular pipes result from plastic yielding of the host rock in a high-energy regime, whereas V-shaped volcanic vents result from fracturing of the host rock in lower energy systems.

  5. Vent conditions for expected eruptions at Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papale, Paolo; Longo, Antonella

    2008-12-01

    Determining consistent sets of vent conditions for next expected eruptions at Vesuvius is crucial for the simulation of the sub-aerial processes originating the volcanic hazard and the eruption impact. Here we refer to the expected eruptive scales and conditions defined in the frame of the EC Exploris project, and simulate the dynamics of magma ascent along the volcanic conduit for sub-steady phases of next eruptions characterized by intensities of the Violent Strombolian (VS), Sub-Plinian 2 (SP2), and Sub-Plinian 1 (SP1) scale. Sets of conditions for the simulations are determined on the basis of the bulk of knowledge on the past history of Vesuvius [Cioni, R., Bertagnini, A., Santacroce, R., Andronico, D., Explosive activity and eruption scenarios at Somma-Vesuvius (Italy): towards a new classification scheme. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, this issue.]. Volatile contents (H 2O and CO 2) are parameterized in order to account for the uncertainty in their expected amounts for a next eruption. In all cases the flow in the conduit is found to be choked, with velocities at the conduit exit or vent corresponding to the sonic velocity in the two-phase non-equilibrium magmatic mixture. Conduit diameters and vent mixture densities are found to display minimum overlapping between the different eruptive scales, while exit gas and particle velocities, as well as vent pressures, largely overlap. Vent diameters vary from as low as about 5 m for VS eruptions, to 35-55 m for the most violent SP1 eruption scale. Vent pressures can be as low as less than 1 MPa for the lowest volatile content employed of 2 wt.% H 2O and no CO 2, to 7-8 MPa for highest volatile contents of 5 wt.% H 2O and 2 wt.% CO 2 and large eruptive scales. Gas and particle velocities at the vent range from 100-250 m/s, with a tendency to decrease, and to increase the mechanical decoupling between the phases, with increasing eruptive scale. Except for velocities, all relevant vent quantities are

  6. Tectonic Controls on Pyroclastic Volcanism on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermann, M.; Klimczak, C.

    2015-12-01

    Over much of Mercury's geologic history the planet has contracted as a response to cooling of its interior. Such contraction is evident as landforms formed by thrust faults, which have accommodated a radius decrease of ~5 km. Stresses from global contraction imposed on the lithosphere are not favorable for and prevent volcanism. Yet, there are examples on Mercury where pyroclastic deposits superpose thrust faults, indicating that explosive volcanism has occurred after the onset of global contraction. To better understand the spatial relationships of thrust faults with the pyroclastic vents, we used MESSENGER image data to categorize 343 vents by their occurrence either (1) within 30 km, (2) within 100 km, or (3) farther than 100 km from a thrust fault, using ArcGIS. Vents were also classified by their association with impact craters. Results show that 75% of all vents are located within impact structures, with 36% of vents within 30 km of thrust faults, 41% located farther than 30 but within 100 km of thrust faults, and 23% of vents are farther than 100 km from a thrust fault. To investigate whether this geospatial relationship is tectonically controlled, three areas —representing the three categories of vents— were mapped, and the locations and orientations of vents and faults were recorded. Stress changes around these faults were then numerically modeled with the COULOMB 3.4 software, using elastic rock properties, a background stress field, and fault size- and dislocation parameters applicable to conditions of Mercury's global contractional tectonic environment. Preliminary results indicate that stress changes can locally produce conditions beneficial for volcanism. Further modeling will determine if such beneficial conditions are geospatially correlated with the pyroclastic vents and thus enable a better understanding of pyroclastic volcanism on Mercury after the onset of global contraction.

  7. Impact of atmospheric water vapor on the thermal infrared remote sensing of volcanic sufur dioxide emmisions: A case study from Pu'u 'O'o vent of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Realmuto, V. J.; Worden, H. M.

    2000-01-01

    The December 18, 1999, launch of NASA's Terra satellite put two multispectral thermal infrared imaging instruments into Earth orbit. Experiments with airborne instruments have demonstrated that the data from such instruments can be used to detect volcanic SO2 plumes and clouds.

  8. An authoritative global database for active submarine hydrothermal vent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Stace E.; Baker, Edward T.; German, Christopher R.; Maffei, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    The InterRidge Vents Database is available online as the authoritative reference for locations of active submarine hydrothermal vent fields. Here we describe the revision of the database to an open source content management system and conduct a meta-analysis of the global distribution of known active vent fields. The number of known active vent fields has almost doubled in the past decade (521 as of year 2009), with about half visually confirmed and others inferred active from physical and chemical clues. Although previously known mainly from mid-ocean ridges (MORs), active vent fields at MORs now comprise only half of the total known, with about a quarter each now known at volcanic arcs and back-arc spreading centers. Discoveries in arc and back-arc settings resulted in an increase in known vent fields within exclusive economic zones, consequently reducing the proportion known in high seas to one third. The increase in known vent fields reflects a number of factors, including increased national and commercial interests in seafloor hydrothermal deposits as mineral resources. The purpose of the database now extends beyond academic research and education and into marine policy and management, with at least 18% of known vent fields in areas granted or pending applications for mineral prospecting and 8% in marine protected areas.

  9. Battery venting system and method

    DOEpatents

    Casale, Thomas J.; Ching, Larry K. W.; Baer, Jose T.; Swan, David H.

    1999-01-05

    Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

  10. Battery Vent Mechanism And Method

    DOEpatents

    Ching, Larry K. W.

    2000-02-15

    Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

  11. Battery venting system and method

    DOEpatents

    Casale, T.J.; Ching, L.K.W.; Baer, J.T.; Swan, D.H.

    1999-01-05

    Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve. 8 figs.

  12. Vigorous vent lightning observed during Eyjafjallajökull eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-04-01

    Volcanoes do more than spew rock and magma—they also produce electrical discharges. Various mechanisms, including high-energy silicate fracturing and boiling of water upon contact with magma, can produce electrical sparks near the vent of a volcano, whereas classic thunderstorm-like mixing in volcanic plumes can induce lightning kilometers above.

  13. 24 CFR 3280.611 - Vents and venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... Link to an amendment published at 78 FR 73986, Dec. 9, 2013. (a) General. Each plumbing fixture trap... more than one fixture, or, (iii) Two or more vented drains when at least one is wet-vented, or 2-inch.... Each individually vented fixture with a 11/2 inch or smaller trap shall be provided with a vent...

  14. The Implications of Flank Vents on Olympus Mons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Flank vents are a common feature on polygenetic volcanoes. They indicate that magma has propagated away from the main conduit and/or magma chamber. Flank vents and flank eruptions have been documented and studied on a number of terrestrial volcanoes and to a lesser degree on Mars. The distribution of volcanic vents about a central caldera can provide information on radial dikes and tectonic stresses acting on the volcano, and can constrain models involving the emplacement and flexure of the edifice (e.g. Nakamura, 1976; McGovern and Solomon, 1993). In the absence of spectral data (due to optically thick dust cover) and in situ observations, morphology is a powerful tool for ascertaining the eruptive and tectonic history of Olympus Mons. Approximately 190 high-resolution CTX (Context Camera) images covering Olympus Mons have been mosaicked together. The analysis of a CTX mosaic reveals Mars's largest shield volcano in stunning detail and allows for a thorough analysis of the targeted features. Preliminary results show numerous flank vents some of which produce leveed channels on the slopes of Olympus Mons. Some vents display varying morphologies, suggesting that the style of volcanism has evolved over time. Flank vents are observed to occur over a range of elevations, although a paucity of vents is observed on the lower flank. Analyses are ongoing and include mapping the spatial and elevation distribution of flank vents on the shield. Once mapped, the distribution of flank vents will define the orientation of tectonic stresses acting on Olympus Mons and help determine whether they are influenced by underlying topography, regional scale processes or a combination of both. In addition, these vents act as a window into the subsurface which can help characterize dike emplacement within the shield. Furthermore, the morphology of flank vents will provide information on the evolution of their eruptive styles. All of this information is crucial to help understand the

  15. Volcano-tectonics of the Al Haruj Volcanic Province, Central Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshaafi, Abdelsalam; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-10-01

    The Al Haruj intra-continental Volcanic Province (AHVP), located at the south-western margin of the Sirt Basin, hosts the most extensive and recent volcanic activity in Libya - which is considered typical for plate interiors. From north to south the AHVP is divided into two subprovinces, namely Al Haruj al Aswad and Al Haruj al Abiyad. The total area of the AHVP is around 42,000 km2. Despite the great size of the AHVP, its volcano-tectonic evolution and activity have received very little attention and are poorly documented and understood. Here we present new field data, and analytical and numerical results, on the volcano-tectonics of the AHVP. The length/thickness ratio of 47 dykes and volcanic fissures were measured to estimate magmatic overpressure at the time of eruption. The average dyke (length/thickness) ratio of 421 indicates magmatic overpressures during the associate fissure eruptions of 8-19 MPa (depending on host-rock elastic properties). Spatial distributions of 432 monogenetic eruptions sites/points (lava shields, pyroclastic cones) in the AHVP reveal two main clusters, one in the south and another in the north. Aligned eruptive vents show the dominating strike of volcanic fissures/feeder-dykes as WNW-ESE to NW-SE, coinciding with the orientation of one of main fracture/fault zones. Numerical modelling and field observations suggest that some feeder-dykes may have used steeply dipping normal-fault zones as part of their paths to the surface.

  16. Catastrophic volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipman, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    Since primitive times, catastrophes due to volcanic activity have been vivid in the mind of man, who knew that his activities in many parts of the world were threatened by lava flows, mudflows, and ash falls. Within the present century, increasingly complex interactions between volcanism and the environment, on scales not previously experienced historically, have been detected or suspected from geologic observations. These include enormous hot pyroclastic flows associated with collapse at source calderas and fed by eruption columns that reached the stratosphere, relations between huge flood basalt eruptions at hotspots and the rifting of continents, devastating laterally-directed volcanic blasts and pyroclastic surges, great volcanic-generated tsunamis, climate modification from volcanic release of ash and sulfur aerosols into the upper atmosphere, modification of ocean circulation by volcanic constructs and attendent climatic implications, global pulsations in intensity of volcanic activity, and perhaps triggering of some intense terrestrial volcanism by planetary impacts. Complex feedback between volcanic activity and additional seemingly unrelated terrestrial processes likely remains unrecognized. Only recently has it become possible to begin to evaluate the degree to which such large-scale volcanic processes may have been important in triggering or modulating the tempo of faunal extinctions and other evolutionary events. In this overview, such processes are examined from the viewpoint of a field volcanologist, rather than as a previous participant in controversies concerning the interrelations between extinctions, impacts, and volcanism.

  17. Migration of volcanism in the San Francisco volcanic field, Arizona.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, K.L.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Ulrich, G.E.; Wolfe, E.W.

    1986-01-01

    The remanent magnetization of volcanic rocks has been determined at 650 sites in this volcanic field in the S part of the Colorado plateau. The polarity of remanent magnetization, combined with K/Ar age determinations, spatial and petrographic association, stratigraphic relations and state of preservation of the cinder cones, provides a basis of assignment to a known magnetic polarity epoch of 610 mafic vents and >100 intermediate to silicic flows, flow sequences and vents. Basaltic volcanism migrated NE before Matoyama time (2.48-5.0 m.y.) at a rate of approx 1.2 cm/yr and eastward over the past 2.5 m.y. at a rate of 2.9 cm/yr. Total magma production and frequency of basaltic eruption accelerated between 5 and 0.25 m.y. and have decreased thereafter; this evolutionary sequence, coupled with the Sr-isotopic composition of the rocks, can be explained by magmatism caused by shear heating at the base of the lithosphere. The eastward drift of volcanism represents the absolute westward motion of the North America plate.-L.C.H.

  18. Potential hazards from future volcanic eruptions in California

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.D.

    1989-01-01

    More than 500 volcanic vents have been identified in the State of California. At least 76 of these vents have erupted, some repeatedly, during the last 10,000 yr. Past volcanic activity has ranged in scale and type from small rhyolitic and basaltic eruptions through large catastrophic rhyolitic eruptions. Volcanoes in California will erupt again, and they could have serious impacts on the health, safety, and economy of the State's citizens as well as that of neighboring states. The nature and probable distribution of potentially hazardous volcanic phenomena and their threat to people and property is described in this bulletin.

  19. Volcanic ash: What it is and how it forms

    SciTech Connect

    Heiken, G.

    1991-09-13

    There are four basic eruption processes that produce volcanic ash: (1) decompression of rising magma, gas bubble growth, and fragmentation of the foamy magma in the volcanic vent (magmatic), (2) explosive mixing of magma with ground or surface water (hydrovolcanic), (3) fragmentation of country rock during rapid expansion of steam and/or hot water (phreatic), and (4) breakup of lava fragments during rapid transport from the vent. Variations in eruption style and the characteristics of volcanic ashes produced during explosive eruptions depend on many factors, including magmatic temperature, gas content, viscosity and crystal content of the magma before eruption, the ratio of magma to ground or surface water, and physical properties of the rock enclosing the vent. Volcanic ash is composed of rock and mineral fragments, and glass shards, which is less than 2 mm in diameter. Glass shard shapes and sizes depend upon size and shape of gas bubbles present within the magma immediately before eruption and the processes responsible for fragmentation of the magma. Shards range from slightly curved, thin glass plates, which were broken from large, thin-walled spherical bubble walls, to hollow needles broken from pumiceous melts containing gas bubbles stretched by magma flow within the volcanic vent. Pumice fragments make up the coarser-grained portions of the glass fraction. Particle sizes range from meters for large blocks expelled near the volcanic vent to nanometers for fine ash and aerosol droplets within well-dispersed eruption plumes. 18 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Geologic and geophysical investigations of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ander, M.E.; Heiken, G.; Eichelberger, J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Huestis, S.

    1981-05-01

    A positive, northeast-trending gravity anomaly, 90 km long and 30 km wide, extends southwest from the Zuni uplift, New Mexico. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, an alignment of 74 basaltic vents, is parallel to the eastern edge of the anomaly. Lavas display a bimodal distribution of tholeiitic and alkalic compositions, and were erupted over a period from 4 Myr to present. A residual gravity profile taken perpendicular to the major axis of the anomaly was analyzed using linear programming and ideal body theory to obtain bounds on the density contrast, depth, and minimum thickness of the gravity body. Two-dimensionality was assumed. The limiting case where the anomalous body reaches the surface gives 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ as the greatest lower bound on the maximum density contrast. If 0.4 g/cm/sup 3/ is taken as the geologically reasonable upper limit on the maximum density contrast, the least upper bound on the depth of burial is 3.5 km and minimum thickness is 2 km. A shallow mafic intrusion, emplaced sometime before Laramide deformation, is proposed to account for the positive gravity anomaly. Analysis of a magnetotelluric survey suggests that the intrusion is not due to recent basaltic magma associated with the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field. This large basement structure has controlled the development of the volcanic field; vent orientations have changed somewhat through time, but the trend of the volcanic chain followed the edge of the basement structure. It has also exhibited some control on deformation of the sedimentary section.

  1. Parachute having improved vent line stacking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hengel, John E.

    1994-01-01

    A parachute having an improved vent line stacking wherein the parachute is provided with a canopy having a central vent opening and a vent band secured to the canopy around the periphery of the vent opening, with a plurality of vent lines each lying on a diameter of the vent opening and having its ends secured to the vent band on opposite sides of the vent opening is described. The vent lines are sewed to the vent band in an order such that the end of a first vent line is sewed to the vent band at a starting point with the end of a second vent band then being sewed to the vent band adjacent to and counterclockwise from the first band. A third vent band is sewed to the vent band adjacent to and clockwise from the first band, with a fourth vent band being sewed to the vent band adjacent to and counterclockwise from the second vent band. It can be seen that, if the vent lines are numbered in the order of being sewed to the vent band, the odd numbered vent lines will run consecutively in a clockwise direction and the even numbered lines will run consecutively in a counterclockwise direction from the starting point. With this order of assembly, each and every vent line will be separated from adjacent vent lines by no more than one vent line in the center of the vent opening where the vent lines cross.

  2. Geology, geochronology and tectonic setting of late Cenozoic volcanism along the southwestern Gulf of Mexico: The Eastern Alkaline Province revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Luca; Tagami, Takahiro; Eguchi, Mugihiko; Orozco-Esquivel, Ma. Teresa; Petrone, Chiara M.; Jacobo-Albarrán, Jorge; López-Martínez, Margarita

    2005-09-01

    A NNW-trending belt of alkaline mafic volcanic fields parallels the Gulf of Mexico from the U.S. border southward to Veracruz state, in eastern Mexico. Previous studies grouped this volcanism into the so-called "Eastern Alkaline Province" (EAP) and suggested that it resulted from Gulf-parallel extensional faulting migrating from north to south from Oligocene to Present. On the basis of new geologic studies, forty-nine unspiked K-Ar and two 40Ar- 39Ar ages, we propose a new geodynamic model for the volcanism along the southwestern Gulf of Mexico. We studied in detail four of the six recognized fields of mafic alkaline volcanism in Veracruz state: 1) The lavas flows of Tlanchinol area (7.3-5.7 Ma), 2) the Alamo monogenetic field and Sierra de Tantima (7.6-6.6 Ma), 3) the Poza Rica and Metlatoyuca lava flows (1.6-1.3 Ma) and 4) the Chiconquiaco-Palma Sola area (6.9-3.2 Ma). Other two mafic volcanic fields may represent the continuation of alkaline volcanism to the southeast: the Middle Miocene lavas at Anegada High, offshore port of Veracruz, and the Middle to Late Miocene volcanism at the Los Tuxtlas. The existence of major Neogene extensional faults parallel to the Gulf of Mexico (i.e., ˜N-S to NNW-SSE) proposed in previous works was not confirmed by our geological studies. Elongation of volcanic necks, vent alignment, and faults mapped by subsurface data trend dominantly NE to ENE and NW to NNW. These directions are parallel to transform and normal faults that formed during the Late Jurassic opening of the Gulf of Mexico. Ascent of mafic magmas was likely facilitated and controlled by the existence of these pre-existing basement structures. Coupled with previous studies, our data demonstrate the occurrence of three magmatic episodes in Veracruz: 1) A Middle Miocene (˜15-11 Ma) episode in southern Veracruz (Palma Sola, Anegada, and Los Tuxtlas); 2) A Late Miocene to Early Pliocene (˜7.5-3 Ma) pulse of mafic alkaline volcanism throughout the study region; and 3) A

  3. Coil spring venting arrangement

    DOEpatents

    McCugh, R.M.

    1975-10-21

    A simple venting device for trapped gas pockets in hydraulic systems is inserted through a small access passages, operated remotely, and removed completely. The device comprises a small diameter, closely wound coil spring which is pushed through a guide temporarily inserted in the access passage. The guide has a central passageway which directs the coil spring radially upward into the pocket, so that, with the guide properly positioned for depth and properly oriented, the coil spring can be pushed up into the top of the pocket to vent it. By positioning a seal around the free end of the guide, the spring and guide are removed and the passage is sealed.

  4. 24 CFR 3280.611 - Vents and venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (a) General. Each plumbing fixture trap shall be protected against siphonage and back pressure, and... 2-inch wet vented drain that carries the waste of not more than one fixture, or, (iii) Two or more... § 3280.611(c)(5) for 3-inch trap arms. (2) Vent pipe areas. Each individually vented fixture with a...

  5. 24 CFR 3280.611 - Vents and venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (a) General. Each plumbing fixture trap shall be protected against siphonage and back pressure, and... 2-inch wet vented drain that carries the waste of not more than one fixture, or, (iii) Two or more... § 3280.611(c)(5) for 3-inch trap arms. (2) Vent pipe areas. Each individually vented fixture with a...

  6. 24 CFR 3280.611 - Vents and venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (a) General. Each plumbing fixture trap shall be protected against siphonage and back pressure, and... 2-inch wet vented drain that carries the waste of not more than one fixture, or, (iii) Two or more... § 3280.611(c)(5) for 3-inch trap arms. (2) Vent pipe areas. Each individually vented fixture with a...

  7. 24 CFR 3280.611 - Vents and venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (a) General. Each plumbing fixture trap shall be protected against siphonage and back pressure, and... 2-inch wet vented drain that carries the waste of not more than one fixture, or, (iii) Two or more... § 3280.611(c)(5) for 3-inch trap arms. (2) Vent pipe areas. Each individually vented fixture with a...

  8. Distribution, lithology and ages of late Cenozoic volcanism on the eastern margin of the Great Basin, West-Central Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, W.P.

    1986-01-01

    The eastern margin of the Basin and Range province in central Utah is the locus of late Cenozoic volcanic activity and has witnessed several volcanic episodes within the last three million years. The Twin Peaks volcanic center became active 2.7 m.y. ago producing rhyodacite and rhyolite from a shallow silicic magma body accompanied by voluminous eruptions of basalt. Between about 1 and 0.3 m.y. ago there were eruptions of high silica rhyolite from a deep-seated magma source beneath the Mineral Mountains together with primitive and strongly fractionated mafic magmas of the Cove Fort subprovince. Within this volcanic area are two localities, Roosevelt Hot Springs and Sulfurdale, which have high temperature waters at or near the surface. To the north in the Black Rock Desert, volcanism extended from 1.5 m.y to only several hundred years ago. The activity was dominated by basaltic eruptions, but the area contains the youngest known rhyolite body in Utah (0.4 m.y.). Volcanic vents are located along major crustal discontinuities in the Black Rock Desert, along ring fracture systems at Twin Peaks, and are aligned along trends of north-south normal faulting in the Mineral Mountains and Cove Fort areas. The localization of volcanism is consistent with high strain rates on a regional scale associated with extension of the Basin and Range. The variety of lithologies observed is consistent with a model of fundamentally basaltic magmatism which augments melting in the lower crust to produce silicic magmas. The majority of the mafic magmas that reach the surface are modified by fractionation with the most primitive varieties erupted to the west.

  9. Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Duffield, W.A.; Bacon, C.R.; Dalrymple, G.B.

    1980-05-10

    The Coso Range lies at the west edge of the Great Basin, adjacent to the southern part of the Sierra Nevada. A basement complex of pre-Cenozoic plutonic and metamorphic rocks is partly buried by approx.35 km/sup 3/ of late Cenozoic volcanic rocks that were erupted during two periods, as defined by K-Ar dating: (1) 4.0--2.5 m.y., approx.31 km/sup 3/ of basalt, rhyodacite, dacite, andesite, and rhyolite, in descending order of abundance, and (2) < or =1.1 m.y., nearly equal amounts of basalt and rhyolite, most of the rhyolite being < or =0.3 m.y. old. Vents for the volcanic rocks of the younger period are localized on and near a horst of basement rocks within a concavity defined by the distribution of vents of the older period. The alignment of many vents and the presence of a considerable number of roughly north-trending normal faults of late Cenozoic age reflect basin and range tectonics dominated by roughly east-west lithospheric extension. Fumaroles, intermittently active thermal springs, and associated altered rocks occur within and immediately east of the central part of the field of Quaternary rhyolite, in an area characterized by various geophysical anomalies that are evidently related to an active hot-water geothermal system. This system apparently is heated by a reservoir of silicic magma at > or =8-km depth, itself produced and sustained through partial melting of crustal rocks by thermal energy contained in mantle-derived basaltic magma that intrudes the crust in repsonse to lithospheric extension.

  10. Discovery of abundant hydrothermal venting on the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge in the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, H N; Michael, P J; Baker, E T; Connelly, D P; Snow, J E; Langmuir, C H; Dick, H J B; Mühe, R; German, C R; Graham, D W

    2003-01-16

    Submarine hydrothermal venting along mid-ocean ridges is an important contributor to ridge thermal structure, and the global distribution of such vents has implications for heat and mass fluxes from the Earth's crust and mantle and for the biogeography of vent-endemic organisms. Previous studies have predicted that the incidence of hydrothermal venting would be extremely low on ultraslow-spreading ridges (ridges with full spreading rates <2 cm x yr(-1)-which make up 25 per cent of the global ridge length), and that such vent systems would be hosted in ultramafic in addition to volcanic rocks. Here we present evidence for active hydrothermal venting on the Gakkel ridge, which is the slowest spreading (0.6-1.3 cm x yr(-1)) and least explored mid-ocean ridge. On the basis of water column profiles of light scattering, temperature and manganese concentration along 1,100 km of the rift valley, we identify hydrothermal plumes dispersing from at least nine to twelve discrete vent sites. Our discovery of such abundant venting, and its apparent localization near volcanic centres, requires a reassessment of the geologic conditions that control hydrothermal circulation on ultraslow-spreading ridges.

  11. Vent Relief Valve Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Shown is the disassembly, examination, refurbishment and testing of the LH2 ( liquid hydrogen) and LOX (liquid oxygen) vent and relief valves for the S-IVB-211 engine stage in support of the Constellation/Ares project. This image is extracted from high definition video and is the highest resolution available.

  12. Volcanic mesocyclones.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Pinaki; Gioia, Gustavo; Kieffer, Susan W

    2009-03-26

    A strong volcanic plume consists of a vertical column of hot gases and dust topped with a horizontal 'umbrella'. The column rises, buoyed by entrained and heated ambient air, reaches the neutral-buoyancy level, then spreads radially to form the umbrella. In classical models of strong volcanic plumes, the plume is assumed to remain always axisymmetric and non-rotating. Here we show that the updraught of the rising column induces a hydrodynamic effect not addressed to date-a 'volcanic mesocyclone'. This volcanic mesocyclone sets the entire plume rotating about its axis, as confirmed by an unprecedented analysis of satellite images from the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo. Destabilized by the rotation, the umbrella loses axial symmetry and becomes lobate in plan view, in accord with satellite records of recent eruptions on Mounts Pinatubo, Manam, Reventador, Okmok, Chaiten and Ruang. The volcanic mesocyclone spawns waterspouts or dust devils, as seen in numerous eruptions, and groups the electric charges about the plume to form the 'lightning sheath' that was so prominent in the recent eruption of Mount Chaiten. The concept of a volcanic mesocyclone provides a unified explanation for a disparate set of poorly understood phenomena in strong volcanic plumes. PMID:19325632

  13. Planetary Volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonenko, I.; Head, J. W.; Pieters, C. W.

    1998-01-01

    The final report consists of 10 journal articles concerning Planetary Volcanism. The articles discuss the following topics: (1) lunar stratigraphy; (2) cryptomare thickness measurements; (3) spherical harmonic spectra; (4) late stage activity of volcanoes on Venus; (5) stresses and calderas on Mars; (6) magma reservoir failure; (7) lunar mare basalt volcanism; (8) impact and volcanic glasses in the 79001/2 Core; (9) geology of the lunar regional dark mantle deposits; and (10) factors controlling the depths and sizes of magma reservoirs in Martian volcanoes.

  14. 14 CFR 29.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents... Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents. (a) Fuel tank vents. Each fuel tank must be vented from the... addition— (1) The vents must be arranged to avoid stoppage by dirt or ice formation; (2) The...

  15. 14 CFR 25.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents... Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents. (a) Fuel tank vents. Each fuel tank must be vented from the... addition— (1) Each vent must be arranged to avoid stoppage by dirt or ice formation; (2) The...

  16. 14 CFR 25.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents... Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents. (a) Fuel tank vents. Each fuel tank must be vented from the... hazard; or (ii) From which fumes could enter personnel compartments. (b) Carburetor vapor vents....

  17. 14 CFR 29.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents... Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents. (a) Fuel tank vents. Each fuel tank must be vented from the... during landing, ground operations, or a survivable impact. (b) Carburetor vapor vents. Each...

  18. Submarine volcanic features west of Kealakekua Bay, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fornari, D.J.; Lockwood, J.P.; Lipman, P.W.; Rawson, M.; Malahoff, A.

    1980-01-01

    Visual observations of submarine volcanic vents were made from the submersible vehicle DSV "Sea Cliff" in water depths between 1310 and 690 m, west of Kealakekua Bay, Hawaii. Glass-rich, shelly submarine lavas surround circular 1- to 3-m-diameter volcanic vents between 1050 and 690 m depth in an area west-northwest of the southernpoint (Keei Pt.) of Kealakekua Bay. Eye-witness accounts indicate that this area was the site of a submarine eruption on February 24, 1877. Chemical analyses of lavas from these possible seafloor vent areas indicate that the eruptive products are very similar in composition to volcanic rocks produced by historic eruptions of Mauna Loa volcano. ?? 1980.

  19. Comparison of Plains Volcanism in the Tempe Terra Region of Mars to the Eastern Snake River Plains, Idaho with Implications for Geochemical Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weren, S. L.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Hughes, S. S.; Gregg, T. K. P.

    2004-01-01

    The Eastern Snake River Plains (ESRP) in Idaho have long been considered a terrestrial analog for the plains volcanism like that evident in Syria Planum and Tempe Terra, Mars. Both the ESRP and Tempe Terra are sediment-blanketed volcanic fields in areas with significant extensional faulting. Similar volcanic features can be observed throughout both study areas using field analysis and DEMs of the ESRP and the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) data from Mars. These features include flow fields, low shields, shields with steep summits, and fissure eruptions. A few other volcanic features, such as cinder cones, which suggest variable compositions, volatile interactions, and multiple volcanic events can be seen in both areas. The eruptions in both the ESRP and Tempe Terra generally originate from the fissures creating elongate, multi-vent shields as well as isolated or aligned single vent shields. Many of these show evidence of radial flow patterns from summit craters as well as lava tube fed flows. The volcanoes of Tempe Terra display some of the global latitudinal parameter trends of small volcanoes on Mars. Some of these trends may be explained by the variation of volatile content and compositional variation across Mars. However, within Tempe Terra no significant local latitudinal trends can be seen in edifice attributes and not all variations are explained by global trends. This study builds upon previous studies of the Tempe Terra region and the ESRP in order to develop a more detailed representation of features and topographic data. Using these data we attempt to help constrain the composition and eruptive style of the Tempe Terra volcanoes by correlating them with the similar and quantified ESRP variations.

  20. Airbag vent valve and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Leslie D. (Inventor); Zimmermann, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An energy absorbing airbag system includes one or more vent valve assemblies for controlling the release of airbag inflation gases to maintain inflation gas pressure within an airbag at a substantially constant pressure during a ride-down of an energy absorbing event. Each vent valve assembly includes a cantilever spring that is flat in an unstressed condition and that has a free end portion. The cantilever spring is secured to an exterior surface of the airbag housing and flexed to cause the second free end portion of the cantilever spring to be pressed, with a preset force, against a vent port or a closure covering the vent port to seal the vent port until inflation gas pressure within the airbag reaches a preselected value determined by the preset force whereupon the free end portion of the cantilever spring is lifted from the vent port by the inflation gases within the airbag to vent the inflation gases from within the airbag. The resilience of the cantilever spring maintains a substantially constant pressure within the airbag during a ride-down portion of an energy absorbing event by causing the cantilever spring to vent gases through the vent port whenever the pressure of the inflation gases reaches the preselected value and by causing the cantilever spring to close the vent port whenever the pressure of the inflation gases falls below the preselected value.

  1. Recent volcanism and the stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Cronin, J F

    1971-05-21

    In the quiet years after the 1956 eruption of the Bezymianny volcano in central Kamchatka, it is doubtful that any volcano vented into the stratosphere until the 1963 eruptions of Agung (Bali), Trident (Alaska), and Surtsey (Iceland). From 1963 to the Hekla (Iceland) event in May 1970, two latitudinal belts of volcanoes have ejected ash and gases into the stratosphere. One belt is equatorial and the other is just below the Arctic Circle. The latter, where the tropopause is considerably lower, may have been the principal source of replenishment of volcanic dust and gases to the stratosphere. Submarine and phreatic volcanic eruptions may have been the sources of reported increase of water vapor in the stratosphere. PMID:17792942

  2. Recent volcanism and the stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Cronin, J F

    1971-05-21

    In the quiet years after the 1956 eruption of the Bezymianny volcano in central Kamchatka, it is doubtful that any volcano vented into the stratosphere until the 1963 eruptions of Agung (Bali), Trident (Alaska), and Surtsey (Iceland). From 1963 to the Hekla (Iceland) event in May 1970, two latitudinal belts of volcanoes have ejected ash and gases into the stratosphere. One belt is equatorial and the other is just below the Arctic Circle. The latter, where the tropopause is considerably lower, may have been the principal source of replenishment of volcanic dust and gases to the stratosphere. Submarine and phreatic volcanic eruptions may have been the sources of reported increase of water vapor in the stratosphere.

  3. Volcanic flow development at Alba Patera, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattermole, P.

    1990-02-01

    On the Alba Patera volcanic shield of Mars, a Hesperian flood-lava phase was followed by the extrusion of sheet lavas and tube-fed lavas emerging in many cases from the flanking fissures of rising domes. These events were followed by the eruption of additional sheet and tube-fed lavas from linear vents which formed complex flow fields. Later, Amazonian volcanism at Alba involved long, narrow flows from two complex summit calderas; the thermal energy outflow for some individual flows would have been substantially greater than the annual heat loss of the earth through volcanism, implying that the process of patera-building represented substantial Martian geological heat-loss during the planet's early volcanic-centralization stages.

  4. Electrification of Ash in Icelandic Volcanic Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoll, K.; Aplin, K. L.; Houghton, I.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic ash is known to charge electrically, producing some of the most spectacular displays of lightning on the planet. Lightning activity within volcanic plumes can be sensed remotely using systems such as the United Kingdom Met Office long-range lightning detection network, ATDnet, which recorded over 16 000 lightning strokes during the 2011 Grimsvötn eruption in Iceland. These remote sensing techniques can only be fully exploited if the charging mechanisms in volcanic plumes are well understood. Although the exact details of ash charging processes will vary from one eruption to another, triboelectrification, fractoemission, and the ''dirty thunderstorm'' mechanism are all thought to play a role in the electrification of ash near the vent. In addition to near-vent charging, observations show that charging can also occur in volcanic plumes up to hundreds of kilometres from the source region. The sustained nature of this charge in the presence of electrically conducting air suggests that a self-charging mechanism through the action of ash-to-ash contact charging (triboelectrification), may also play a role in the electrification of volcanic ash. This work describes a laboratory investigation into triboelectric charging of ash from the 2010 and 2011 volcanic eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull and Grímsvötn in Iceland respectively. Consistently with previous work, we find that the particle size distribution plays an important role in the magnitude of charging generated, specifically in terms of the normalized span of the particle size distribution. As well as triboelectrificiation, natural radioactivity in some volcanic ash could also contribute to self-charging of volcanic plumes, which is also examined here.

  5. Tapped-Hole Vent Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Long helical vent path cools and releases hot pyrotechnical gas that exits along its spiraling threads. Current design uses 1/4-28 threads with outer diameter of stud reduced by 0.025 in. (0.62 mm). To open or close gassampler bottle, pyrotechnic charges on either one side or other of valve cylinder are actuated. Gases vented slowly over long path are cool enough to present no ignition hazard. Vent used to meter flow in refrigeration, pneumaticcontrol, and fluid-control systems by appropriately adjusting size and length of vent path.

  6. Fissural volcanism, polygenetic volcanic fields, and crustal thickness in the Payen Volcanic Complex on the central Andes foreland (Mendoza, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarini, F.; Fornaciai, A.; Bistacchi, A.; Pasquarè, F. A.

    2008-09-01

    Shield volcanoes, caldera-bearing stratovolcanoes, and monogenetic cones compose the large fissural Payen Volcanic Complex, located in the Andes foreland between latitude 35°S and 38°S. The late Pliocene-Pleistocene and recent volcanic activity along E-W trending eruptive fissures produced basaltic lavas showing a within-plate geochemical signature. The spatial distribution of fractures and monogenetic vents is characterized by self-similar clustering with well defined power law distributions. Vents have average spacing of 1.27 km and fractal exponent D = 1.33 defined in the range 0.7-49.3 km. The fractal exponent of fractures is 1.62 in the range 1.5-48.1 km. The upper cutoffs of fractures and vent fractal distributions (about 48-49 km) scale to the crustal thickness in the area, as derived from geophysical data. This analysis determines fractured media (crust) thickness associated with basaltic retroarc eruptions. We propose that the Payen Volcanic Complex was and is still active under an E-W crustal shortening regime.

  7. Safe venting of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, W.F.; Dewart, J.M.; Edeskuty, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The disposal of hydrogen is often required in the operation of an experimental facility that contains hydrogen. Whether the vented hydrogen can be discharged to the atmosphere safely depends upon a number of factors such as the flow rate and atmospheric conditions. Calculations have been made that predict the distance a combustible mixture can extend from the point of release under some specified atmospheric conditions. Also the quantity of hydrogen in the combustible cloud is estimated. These results can be helpful in deciding of the hydrogen can be released directly to the atmosphere, or if it must be intentionally ignited. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Tornado protection by venting

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanagh, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the ability to protect a modern nuclear power plant from the effects of a tornado by the use of a system of venting in all safety-related structures outside of the containment. The paper demonstrates this by presenting a method of analysis and of equipment selection that fully complies with the intent and the letter of applicable federal regulatory guides. A report of an actual tornado in the City of Kalamazoo, Michigan, suggests that the concept of sealing a plant during a tornado may not always be applicable.

  9. Late Cenozoic volcanism, subduction, and extension in the Lassen region of California, southern Cascade Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guffanti, M.; Clynne, M.A.; Smith, James G.; Muffler, L.J.P.; Bullen, T.D.

    1990-01-01

    Some 537 volcanic vents younger than 7 Ma are identified and these are classified into five age intervals and five compositional categories based on SiO2 content. Maps of vents by age and composition illustrate regionally representative volcanic trends. By 2 Ma, the eastern limit of volcanism had contracted westward toward the late Quaternary arc. Late Quaternary volcanism is concentrated around and north of the silicic Lassen volcanic center. The belt of most recent volcanism (25-0 ka) has been active since at least 2 Ma. Most mafic volcanism is calcalkaline basalt and basaltic andesite. Normal faults and linear groups of vents are evidence of widespread crustal extension throughout most of the Lassen region. NNW orientation of maximum horizontal stress is indicated. The Lassen volcanic region is thought to occur above the subducting Gorda North plate but also within a broad zone of distributed extension that occurs in the North American lithosphere east and southeast of the present Cascadia subduction zone. The scarcity of volcanic rocks older than 7 Ma suggests that a more compressive lithospheric stress regime prior to the late Miocene extensional episode may have suppressed volcanism. -from Authors

  10. EVALUATION OF SOIL VENTING APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of soil venting to inexpensively remove large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated soils is well established. However, the time required using venting to remediate soils to low contaminant levels often required by state and federal regulators...

  11. Chemistry and Vent Pressure of Very High-Temperature Gases Emitted from Pele Volcano on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolotov, M. Y.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Galileo data for magma temperature at Pele and HST chemical data (SO2, S2, and SO) for Pele plumes were used to evaluate vent pressure (10 -4 -2 bar), the oxidation state (2-3 log fO2 units below Ni-NiO), and chemistry of volcanic gases. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. NASA/JPL hydrothermal vent bio-sampler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, J.; Behar, A.; Bruckner, J.; Matthews, J.

    pagestyle empty begin document On the bottom of the oceans with volcanic activity present hydrothermal vents can be found which spew out mineral rich superheated water from the porous seafloor crust Some of these vents are situated several thousands of meters below the surface where the sunlight never reaches Yet life thrives here on the minerals and chemical compounds that the vent water brings up with it This chemosynthetic microbial community forms the basis of some of the most interesting ecosystems on our planet and could possibly also be found on other water rich planets and moons in the solar system Perhaps under the icy surface of the moon Europa there exist hydrothermal vents with such biota thriving independently of the solar energy The Hydrothermal Vent Bio-sampler HVB is a system which will be used to collect pristine samples of the water emanating from hydrothermal vents An array of temperature and flow sensors will monitor the sampling conditions This will allow for the samples to be collected from defined locations within the plume and the diversity and distribution of the chemosynthetic communities that might live there can be accurately described The samples will have to be taken without any contamination from the surrounding water thus the pristine requirement Monitoring the flow will assure that enough water has been sampled to account for the low biomass of these environments The system will be using a series of filters down to 0 2 mu m in pore size and the samples can be directly collected from the system for both culture-

  13. Volcanic studies at Katmai

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    The Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) is a national effort supported by the Department of Energy, the US Geological Survey, and the National Science Foundation. One of the projects proposed for the CSDP consists of drilling a series of holes in Katmai National Park in Alaska to give a third dimension to the model of the 1912 eruption of Novarupta, and to investigate the processes of explosive volcanism and hydrothermal transport of metals (Eichelberger et al., 1988). The proposal for research drilling at Katmai states that ``the size, youth, elevated temperature, and simplicity of the Novarupta vent make it a truly unique scientific target.`` The National Park Service (NPS), which has jurisdiction, is sympathetic to aims of the study. However, NPS wishes to know whether Katmai is indeed uniquely suited to the research, and has asked the Interagency Coordinating Group to support an independent assessment of this claim. NPS suggested the National Academy of Sciences as an appropriate organization to conduct the assessment. In response, the National Research Council -- the working arm of the Academy -- established, under the aegis of its US Geodynamics Committee, a panel whose specific charge states: ``The proposed investigation at Katmai has been extensively reviewed for scientific merit by the three sponsoring and participating agencies. Thus, the scientific merit of the proposed drilling at Katmai is not at issue. The panel will review the proposal for scientific drilling at Katmai and prepare a short report addressing the specific question of the degree to which it is essential that the drilling be conducted at Katmai as opposed to volcanic areas elsewhere in the world.``

  14. Volcanic gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Gerlach, Terrance M.

    1995-01-01

    In Roman mythology, Vulcan, the god of fire, was said to have made tools and weapons for the other gods in his workshop at Olympus. Throughout history, volcanoes have frequently been identified with Vulcan and other mythological figures. Scientists now know that the “smoke" from volcanoes, once attributed by poets to be from Vulcan’s forge, is actually volcanic gas naturally released from both active and many inactive volcanoes. The molten rock, or magma, that lies beneath volcanoes and fuels eruptions, contains abundant gases that are released to the surface before, during, and after eruptions. These gases range from relatively benign low-temperature steam to thick hot clouds of choking sulfurous fume jetting from the earth. Water vapor is typically the most abundant volcanic gas, followed by carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Other volcanic gases are hydrogen sulfide, hydrochloric acid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrofluoric acid, and other trace gases and volatile metals. The concentrations of these gas species can vary considerably from one volcano to the next.

  15. Post-11,000-year volcanism at Medicine Lake Volcano, Cascade Range, northern California

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly-Nolan, J.M.; Champion, D.E.; Trimble, D.A. ); Miller, C.D. ); Grove, T.L. )

    1990-11-10

    Eight eruptions produced about 5.3 km{sup 3} of basaltic lava during an interval of a few hundred years about 10,500 years B.P. After a hiatus of about 6,000 years, eruptive activity resumed with a small andesite eruption at about 4,300 years B.P. Approximately 2.5 km{sup 3} of lava with compositions ranging from basalt to rhyolite vented in nine eruptions during an interval of about 3,400 years in late Holocene time. The most recent eruption occurred about 900 years B.P. A compositional gap in SiO{sub 2} values of erupted lavas occurs between 58 and 63%. The gap is spanned by chilled magmatic inclusions in late Holocene silicic lavas. Late Holocene andesitic to rhyolitic lavas were probably derived by fractionation, assimilation, and mixing from high-alumina basalt parental magma, possibly from basalt intruded into the volcano during the early mafic episode. Some eruptions have produced both tholeiitic and calc-alkaline compositions. The eruptive activity is probably driven by intrusions of basalt that occur during east-west stretching of the crust in an extensional tectonic environment. Vents are typically aligned parallel or subparallel to major structural features, most commonly within 30{degree} of north. Intruded magma should provide adequate heat for commercial geothermal development if sufficient fluids can be found. The nature and timing of future volcanic activity cannot be predicted from the observed pattern, but eruptions high on the edifice could produce high-silica products that might be accompanied by explosive activity, whereas eruptions lower on the flanks are likely to vent more fluid mafic lavas.

  16. Cryogenic Origin for Mars Analog Carbonates in the Bockfjord Volcanic Complex Svalbard (Norway)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, H. E. F.; Benning, L.; Blake, D. F.; Fogel, M.; Ming, D.; Skidmore, M.; Steele, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Sverrefjell and Sigurdfjell eruptive centers in the Bockfjord Volcanic Complex (BVC) on Svalbard (Norway) formed by subglacial eruptions ca. 1 Ma ago. These eruptive centers carry ubiquitous magnesian carbonate deposits including dolomitemagnesite globules similar to those in the Martian meteorite ALH84001. Carbonates in mantle xenoliths are dominated by ALH84001 type carbonate globules that formed during quenching of CO2-rich mantle fluids. Lava hosted carbonates include ALH84001 type carbonate globules occurring throughout lava vesicles and microfractures and massive carbonate deposits associated with vertical volcanic vents. Massive carbonates include < or equal 5 cm thick magnesite deposits protruding downwards into clear blue ice within volcanic vents and carbonate cemented lava breccias associated with volcanic vents. Carbonate cements comprise layered deposits of calcite, dolomite, huntite, magnesite and aragonite associated with ALH84001 type carbonate globules lining lava vesicles. Combined Mossbauer, XRD and VNIR data show that breccia carbonate cements at Sverrefjell are analog to Comanche carbonates at Gusev crater.

  17. Cerberus Fossae and Elysium Planitia Lavas, Mars: Source Vents, Flow Rates, Edifice Styles and Water Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Gregg, T. K. P.

    2004-01-01

    The Cerberus Fossae and Elysium Planitia regions have been suggested as some of the youngest martian surfaces since the Viking mission, although there was doubt whether the origins were predominantly volcanic or fluvial. The Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey Missions have shown that the region is certainly young in terms of the topographic preservation and the youthful crater counts (e.g. in the tens to a few hundred million yrs.). Numerous authors have shown that fluvial and volcanic features share common flow paths and vent systems, and that there is evidence for some interaction between the lava flows and underlying volatiles as well as the use by lavas and water of the same vent system. Given the youthful age and possible water-volcanism interaction environment, we'd like constraints on water and volcanic flux rates and interactions. Here, we model ranges of volcanic flow rates where we can well-constrain them, and consider the modest flow rate results results in context with local eruption styles, and track vent locations, edifice volumes, and flow sources and data.

  18. Earthquakes increase hydrothermal venting and nutrient inputs into the Aegean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dando, P. R.; Hughes, J. A.; Leahy, Y.; Taylor, L. J.; Zivanovic, S.

    1995-05-01

    Areas of submarine gas and water venting around the island of Milos, in the Hellenic volcanic island arc, were mapped. Water samples were collected from five stations in the geothermally active Paleohori Bay on 15 March 1992. Seismic events, of M s 5.0 and 4.4, occurred south of the Bay on 20 March and the sampling was repeated after these. Phosphate and manganese in the water column increased by 360% after the seismic activity. Analysis of water samples collected from gas and water seeps and of interstitial water from sediment cores showed that the hot sediment in the Bay was enriched in phosphate, to a mean concentration of 65 μmol l -1 in the interstitial water. The number of geothermally active areas in the Aegean, together with the extent of venting and the frequency of earthquakes suggests that the hydrothermal areas may be an important source of phosphate in this oligotrophic Sea.

  19. Investigating Late Amazonian Volcanotectonic Activity on Olympus Mons, Mars using Flank Vents and Arcuate Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanism, a fundamental process in shaping the Martian surface, is crucial to understanding its evolution. Olympus Mons, the largest volcano on Mars, is one of several large shield volcanoes. Previous studies were technologically limited to large features associated with these constructs. With the advent of high resolution datasets, we are now able to investigate smaller features, such as flank vents and arcuate graben. Flank vents, common on polygenetic volcanoes, indicate that magma has propagated away from the main conduit and/or magma chamber. Vent morphology allows for the characterization of magma properties and eruption rates. Graben indicate extensional deformation. The distribution of graben provides information on stresses that acted on the volcano. In lieu of geophysical, spectral and in-situ data, morphology, morphometry and spatial relationships are powerful tools. We utilized high resolution image data (CTX, HiRISE and THEMIS IR) and topographic data (HRSC DTM, MOLA) to identify and characterize flank vents and graben. We observed 60 flank vents and 84 arcuate graben on Olympus Mons. Flank vents display varying morphologies and morphometries, suggesting different eruption styles and variable magma volatility. Vents occur primarily on the lower flank. This suggests magma has propagated substantial distances from the magma chamber. Observed clustering of vents may also indicate shallow magma sources. Similarly, graben are observed on the lower flank crosscutting young lava flows that have mantled portions of the escarpment. This indicates either gravitational spreading of Olympus Mons or flexure of the lithosphere in response to the load of the edifice. Collectively, the distribution of flank vents and arcuate graben suggests a similar development to that proposed for Ascraeus Mons. Based on superposition relationships and dates from previous studies, the flank vents and graben formed in the Late Amazonian (≤500 Ma).

  20. Inferno Chasm Rift Zone, Idaho: A Terrestrial Analog for Plains-style Volcanism in Southeastern Mare Serenitatis on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garry, W. B.; Hughes, S. S.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic features aligned along a linear graben in southeastern Mare Serenitatis (19°N, 27.5°E) on the Moon resemble a series of effusive basaltic landforms erupted along the Inferno Chasm rift zone within Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve (COTM), Idaho (42°58'00"N, 113°11'25"W). This region in Idaho is the type-locale for terrestrial plains-style volcanism. Examples of lunar plains-style volcanism have previously been described within Orientale Basin at Lacus Veris and Lacus Autumni, but this eruption style has not been used to describe the site in Mare Serenitatis. The SSERVI FINESSE team (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) has documented the features along Inferno Chasm rift using a LiDAR, Differential Global Positioning Systems, and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) to compare with Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Narrow-Angle Camera images and digital terrain models. The region in southeastern Mare Serenitatis provides one of the best concentrations of features representative of lunar plains-style volcanism. On the Moon, these features include a cone (Osiris), a flat-topped dome, a rille-like channel (Isis), a vent, and a possible perched lava pond. In Idaho, the analog features include a dome (Grand View Crater), a rille-like channel (Inferno Chasm), vents (Cottrells Blowout, Horse Butte), and a perched lava pond (Papadakis). Both the scale and morphology of the features on the Moon are similar to the features in Idaho. For example, the channel in Isis is ~3 km long, 283 m-wide, and 25 m deep compared to Inferno Chasm which is ~1.7 km long, 100 m wide, and 20 m deep. The slope of the channel in Isis is -1.2°, while the channel in Inferno Chasm has a slope of -0.33°. The alignment of landforms on the Moon and Idaho are both consistent with dike emplacement. Observations of the flow stratigraphy for features in Idaho will inform the potential eruption conditions of the individual features on the Moon.

  1. Alignment validation

    SciTech Connect

    ALICE; ATLAS; CMS; LHCb; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-06

    The four experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb are currently under constructionat CERN. They will study the products of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. All experiments are equipped with sophisticated tracking systems, unprecedented in size and complexity. Full exploitation of both the inner detector andthe muon system requires an accurate alignment of all detector elements. Alignmentinformation is deduced from dedicated hardware alignment systems and the reconstruction of charged particles. However, the system is degenerate which means the data is insufficient to constrain all alignment degrees of freedom, so the techniques are prone to converging on wrong geometries. This deficiency necessitates validation and monitoring of the alignment. An exhaustive discussion of means to validate is subject to this document, including examples and plans from all four LHC experiments, as well as other high energy experiments.

  2. Global volcanic emissions: budgets, plume chemistry and impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past few decades our understanding of global volcanic degassing budgets, plume chemistry and the impacts of volcanic emissions on our atmosphere and environment has been revolutionized. Global volcanic emissions budgets are needed if we are to make effective use of regional and global atmospheric models in order to understand the consequences of volcanic degassing on global environmental evolution. Traditionally volcanic SO2 budgets have been the best constrained but recent efforts have seen improvements in the quantification of the budgets of other environmentally important chemical species such as CO2, the halogens (including Br and I) and trace metals (including measurements relevant to trace metal atmospheric lifetimes and bioavailability). Recent measurements of reactive trace gas species in volcanic plumes have offered intriguing hints at the chemistry occurring in the hot environment at volcanic vents and during electrical discharges in ash-rich volcanic plumes. These reactive trace species have important consequences for gas plume chemistry and impacts, for example, in terms of the global fixed nitrogen budget, volcanically induced ozone destruction and particle fluxes to the atmosphere. Volcanically initiated atmospheric chemistry was likely to have been particularly important before biological (and latterly anthropogenic) processes started to dominate many geochemical cycles, with important consequences in terms of the evolution of the nitrogen cycle and the role of particles in modulating the Earth's climate. There are still many challenges and open questions to be addressed in this fascinating area of science.

  3. Volcanic Catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    The big news from 20th century geophysics may not be plate tectonics but rather the surprise return of catastrophism, following its apparent 19th century defeat to uniformitarianism. Divine miracles and plagues had yielded to the logic of integrating observations of everyday change over time. Yet the brilliant interpretation of the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary iridium anomaly introduced an empirically based catastrophism. Undoubtedly, decades of contemplating our own nuclear self-destruction played a role in this. Concepts of nuclear winter, volcanic winter, and meteor impact winter are closely allied. And once the veil of threat of all-out nuclear exchange began to lift, we could begin to imagine slower routes to destruction as "global change". As a way to end our world, fire is a good one. Three-dimensional magma chambers do not have as severe a magnitude limitation as essentially two-dimensional faults. Thus, while we have experienced earthquakes that are as big as they get, we have not experienced volcanic eruptions nearly as great as those preserved in the geologic record. The range extends to events almost three orders of magnitude greater than any eruptions of the 20th century. Such a calamity now would at the very least bring society to a temporary halt globally, and cause death and destruction on a continental scale. At maximum, there is the possibility of hindering photosynthesis and threatening life more generally. It has even been speculated that the relative genetic homogeneity of humankind derives from an evolutionary "bottleneck" from near-extinction in a volcanic cataclysm. This is somewhat more palatable to contemplate than a return to a form of Original Sin, in which we arrived at homogeneity by a sort of "ethnic cleansing". Lacking a written record of truly great eruptions, our sense of human impact must necessarily be aided by archeological and anthropological investigations. For example, there is much to be learned about the influence of

  4. Genetic diversity and connectivity of deep-sea hydrothermal vent metapopulations.

    PubMed

    Vrijenhoek, Robert C

    2010-10-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents provide ephemeral habitats for animal communities that depend on chemosynthetic primary production. Sporadic volcanic and tectonic events destroy local vent fields and create new ones. Ongoing dispersal and cycles of extirpation and colonization affect the levels and distribution of genetic diversity in vent metapopulations. Several species exhibit evidence for stepping-stone dispersal along relatively linear, oceanic, ridge axes. Other species exhibit very high rates of gene flow, although natural barriers associated with variation in depth, deep-ocean currents, and lateral offsets of ridge axes often subdivide populations. Various degrees of impedance to dispersal across such boundaries are products of species-specific life histories and behaviours. Though unrelated to the size of a species range, levels of genetic diversity appear to correspond with the number of active vent localities that a species occupies within its range. Pioneer species that rapidly colonize nascent vents tend to be less subdivided and more diverse genetically than species that are slow to establish colonies at vents. Understanding the diversity and connectivity of vent metapopulations provides essential information for designing deep-sea preserves in regions that are under consideration for submarine mining of precious metals. PMID:20735735

  5. Isolated communities of Epsilonproteobacteria in hydrothermal vent fluids of the Mariana Arc seamounts.

    PubMed

    Huber, Julie A; Cantin, Holly V; Huse, Susan M; Welch, David B Mark; Sogin, Mitchell L; Butterfield, David A

    2010-09-01

    Low-temperature hydrothermal vent fluids represent access points to diverse microbial communities living in oceanic crust. This study examined the distribution, relative abundance, and diversity of Epsilonproteobacteria in 14 low-temperature vent fluids from five volcanically active seamounts of the Mariana Arc using a 454 tag sequencing approach. Most vent fluids were enriched in cell concentrations compared with background seawater, and quantitative PCR results indicated that all fluids were dominated by bacteria. Operational taxonomic unit-based statistical tools applied to 454 data show that all vents from the northern end of the Mariana Arc grouped together, to the exclusion of southern arc seamounts, which were as distinct from one another as they were from northern seamounts. Statistical analysis also showed a significant relationship between seamount and individual vent groupings, suggesting that community membership may be linked to geographical isolation and not geochemical parameters. However, while there may be large-scale geographic differences, distance is not the distinguishing factor in the microbial community composition. At the local scale, most vents host a distinct population of Epsilonproteobacteria, regardless of seamount location. This suggests that there may be barriers to exchange and dispersal for these vent endemic microorganisms at hydrothermal seamounts of the Mariana Arc. PMID:20533947

  6. Isolated communities of Epsilonproteobacteria in hydrothermal vent fluids of the Mariana Arc seamounts.

    PubMed

    Huber, Julie A; Cantin, Holly V; Huse, Susan M; Welch, David B Mark; Sogin, Mitchell L; Butterfield, David A

    2010-09-01

    Low-temperature hydrothermal vent fluids represent access points to diverse microbial communities living in oceanic crust. This study examined the distribution, relative abundance, and diversity of Epsilonproteobacteria in 14 low-temperature vent fluids from five volcanically active seamounts of the Mariana Arc using a 454 tag sequencing approach. Most vent fluids were enriched in cell concentrations compared with background seawater, and quantitative PCR results indicated that all fluids were dominated by bacteria. Operational taxonomic unit-based statistical tools applied to 454 data show that all vents from the northern end of the Mariana Arc grouped together, to the exclusion of southern arc seamounts, which were as distinct from one another as they were from northern seamounts. Statistical analysis also showed a significant relationship between seamount and individual vent groupings, suggesting that community membership may be linked to geographical isolation and not geochemical parameters. However, while there may be large-scale geographic differences, distance is not the distinguishing factor in the microbial community composition. At the local scale, most vents host a distinct population of Epsilonproteobacteria, regardless of seamount location. This suggests that there may be barriers to exchange and dispersal for these vent endemic microorganisms at hydrothermal seamounts of the Mariana Arc.

  7. Cement penetration after patella venting.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher W; Lam, Li-On; Butler, Adam; Wood, David J; Walsh, William R

    2009-01-01

    There is a high rate of patellofemoral complications following total knee arthroplasty. Optimization of the cement-bone interface by venting and suction of the tibial plateau has been shown to improve cement penetration. Our study was designed to investigate if venting the patella prior to cementing improved cement penetration. Ten paired cadaver patellae were allocated prior to resurfacing to be vented or non-vented. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by DEXA scanning. In vented specimens, a 1.6 mm Kirschner wire was used to breach the anterior cortex at the center. Specimens were resurfaced with standard Profix instrumentation and Versabond bone cement (Smith and Nephew PLC, UK). Cement penetration was assessed from Faxitron and sectioned images by a digital image software package (ImageJ V1.38, NIH, USA). Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to assess the difference in cement penetration between groups. The relationship between BMD and cement penetration was analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient. There was a strong negative correlation between peak BMD and cement penetration when analyzed independent of experimental grouping (r(2)=-0.812, p=0.004). Wilcoxon rank sum testing demonstrated no significant difference (rank sum statistic W=27, p=0.579) in cement penetration between vented (10.53%+/-4.66; mean+/-std dev) and non-vented patellae (11.51%+/-6.23; mean+/-std dev). Venting the patella using a Kirschner wire does not have a significant effect on the amount of cement penetration achieved in vitro using Profix instrumentation and Versabond cement.

  8. Cement penetration after patella venting.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher W; Lam, Li-On; Butler, Adam; Wood, David J; Walsh, William R

    2009-01-01

    There is a high rate of patellofemoral complications following total knee arthroplasty. Optimization of the cement-bone interface by venting and suction of the tibial plateau has been shown to improve cement penetration. Our study was designed to investigate if venting the patella prior to cementing improved cement penetration. Ten paired cadaver patellae were allocated prior to resurfacing to be vented or non-vented. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by DEXA scanning. In vented specimens, a 1.6 mm Kirschner wire was used to breach the anterior cortex at the center. Specimens were resurfaced with standard Profix instrumentation and Versabond bone cement (Smith and Nephew PLC, UK). Cement penetration was assessed from Faxitron and sectioned images by a digital image software package (ImageJ V1.38, NIH, USA). Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to assess the difference in cement penetration between groups. The relationship between BMD and cement penetration was analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient. There was a strong negative correlation between peak BMD and cement penetration when analyzed independent of experimental grouping (r(2)=-0.812, p=0.004). Wilcoxon rank sum testing demonstrated no significant difference (rank sum statistic W=27, p=0.579) in cement penetration between vented (10.53%+/-4.66; mean+/-std dev) and non-vented patellae (11.51%+/-6.23; mean+/-std dev). Venting the patella using a Kirschner wire does not have a significant effect on the amount of cement penetration achieved in vitro using Profix instrumentation and Versabond cement. PMID:19010682

  9. Venus volcanism

    SciTech Connect

    Head, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Eruption styles and processes on the planets are known to be strongly influenced by such factors as gravity, temperature, and atmospheric characteristics. The ascent and eruption of magma on Venus in the current Venus environment must take into account the influence of the extreme surface temperatures (650-750 K) and pressures (40-100 bars) on these processes. Conditions on Venus will reduce the subsurface exsolution of volatiles and lead to a reduction of the possible range of explosive interactions with the atmosphere. Pyroclastic eruptions will be severely inhibited and continuous magma disruption by gas bubble growth may not occur at all unless the exsolved magma volatile content exceeds several weight percent. Recent US and USSR spacecraft missions and Earth-based radar observations are beginning to provide a view of the range of Venus volcanic features, including domes, cones, calderas, shields, and flows. The nature of many lava flows suggests that numerous eruptions have effusion rates exceeding common terrestrial rates and lying more in the range inferred for lunar basaltic flood eruptions (10/sup 4/-10/sup 5/m/sup 3//s). Shield volcanoes are often wide but are low (<2 km elevation) relative to those on Mars and the Earth. Volcano height depends in part on the depth of origin of the magma and the density contrast between the lava and the rocks between the source and the surface, both of which may be different on Venus. Correlations between volcanic style and tectonic structure are emerging.

  10. Volcanic features of Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.; Masursky, H.; Strom, R.G.; Terrile, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Volcanic activity is apparently higher on Io than on any other body in the Solar System. Its volcanic landforms can be compared with features on Earth to indicate the type of volcanism present on Io. ?? 1979 Nature Publishing Group.

  11. Vents Pattern Analysis at Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brancato, Alfonso; Tusa, Giuseppina; Coltelli, Mauro; Proietti, Cristina; Branca, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    Mount Etna is a composite stratovolcano located along the Ionian coast of eastern Sicily. It is characterized by basaltic eruptions, both effusive and explosive, occurred during a complex eruptive history over the last 500 ka. Flank eruptions occur at an interval of decades, mostly concentrated along the NE, S and W rift zones. A vent clustering at various scales is a common feature in many volcanic settings. In order to identify the clusters within the studied area, a spatial point pattern analysis is undertaken using vent positions, both known and reconstructed. It reveals both clustering and spatial regularity in the Etna region at different distances. The visual inspection of the vent spatial distribution suggests a clustering on the rift zones of Etna volcano. To confirm this evidence, a coarse analysis is performed by the application of Ξ2- and t-test simple statistics. Then, a refined analysis is performed by using the Ripley K-function (Ripley, 1976), whose estimator K(d), knowing the area of the study region and the number of vents, allow us to calculate the distance among two different location of events. The above estimator can be easier transformed by using the Besag L-function (Besag, 1977); the peaks of positive L(d)=[K(d)/π]1/2 -d values indicate clustering while troughs of negative values stand for regularity for their corresponding distances d (L(d)=0 indicates complete spatial randomness). Spatial pattern of flank vents is investigated in order to model the spatial distribution of likely eruptive vents for the next event, basically in terms of relative probabilities. For this, a Gaussian kernel technique is used, and the L(d) function is adopted to generate an optimal smoothing bandwidth based on the clustering behaviour of the Etna volcano. A total of 154 vents (among which 36 are reconstructed), related to Etna flank activity of the last 4.0 ka, is used to model future vent opening. The investigated region covers an area of 850 km2, divided

  12. Influence of Geologic Setting on the Morphology, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry of Vent Deposits Along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, M. K.; Evans, G. N.; Ferrini, V. L.

    2014-12-01

    Establishment of links between lithology, vent fluid chemistry, and vent deposit characteristics along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) was made possible using deep submergence vehicles and technology. ROV Jason was used to collect ultrahigh-resolution (submeter) bathymetric data sufficient to quantify characteristics of volcanic, tectonic and hydrothermal features; differences within vent fields from north to south include a change from low-relief volcanic domes cut by faults and fissures to higher aspect ratio volcanic domes dominated by aa-type lava morphologies (Ferrini et al., G-cubed, 2008). Highest temperature fluids are associated with crosscutting faults at all but Mariner vent field where faults are not observed. The detailed maps were used to target areas within vent fields for observations and sampling. Vent deposit morphologies are similar at the northernmost vent fields (Kilo Moana, TowCam, Tahi Moana), with black smokers and diffusers present on branched edifices. Vent deposits at the more southerly ABE, Tui Malila and Mariner vent fields vary in morphology, despite similar substrate lithology. Examples include abundant flanges at ABE and Tui Malila and ~20m-tall spires and squat barite-rich edifices at Mariner. Geochemical analyses and petrographic observations document the influence of lithology, fluid temperature, pH, and extents of seawater mixing on deposit formation. Concentrations of As, which increase from north to south, reflect lithologic control. Sb, Pb, and Ba concentrations also reflect lithologic control, but are affected as well by low pH and/or extents of seawater mixing. The significant differences in Mariner deposits reflect formation from very high temperature, low pH (<3 vs >4) fluids that keep Zn in solution, combined with local subsurface mixing. Overall, results document the influence of the Tonga Subduction Zone on vent deposits through its affects on lithology and vent fluid composition.

  13. Volcanic hazards of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and adjacent areas

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1994-12-01

    Potential volcanic hazards are assessed, and hazard zone maps are developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and adjacent areas. The basis of the hazards assessment and mapping is the past volcanic history of the INEL region, and the apparent similarity of INEL volcanism with equivalent, well-studied phenomena in other regions of active volcanism, particularly Hawaii and Iceland. The most significant hazards to INEL facilities are associated with basaltic volcanism, chiefly lava flows, which move slowly and mainly threaten property by inundation or burning. Related hazards are volcanic gases and tephra, and ground disturbance associated with the ascent of magma under the volcanic zones. Several volcanic zones are identified in the INEL area. These zones contain most of the volcanic vents and fissures of the region and are inferred to be the most probable sites of future INEL volcanism. Volcanic-recurrence estimates are given for each of the volcanic zones based on geochronology of the lavas, together with the results of field and petrographic investigations concerning the cogenetic relationships of INEL volcanic deposits and associated magma intrusion. Annual probabilities of basaltic volcanism within the INEL volcanic zones range from 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} per year (average 16,000-year interval between eruptions) for the axial volcanic zone near the southern INEL boundary and the Arco volcanic-rift zone near the western INEL boundary, to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} per year (average 100,000-year interval between eruptions) for the Howe-East Butte volcanic rift zone, a geologically old and poorly defined feature of the central portion of INEL. Three volcanic hazard zone maps are developed for the INEL area: lava flow hazard zones, a tephra (volcanic ash) and gas hazard zone, and a ground-deformation hazard zone. The maps are useful in land-use planning, site selection, and safety analysis.

  14. South Arch volcanic field9d\

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Clague, D.A.; Moore, J.G.; Holcomb, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    Several young lava fields were imaged by GLORIA sidescan sonar along the Hawaiian Arch south of Hawaii. The largest, 35 by 50 km across, includes a central area characterized by high sonar backscatter and composed of several flow lobes radiating from a vent area. Reflection profiling and sea-floor photography indicate that the central lobes are flat sheet flows bounded by pillowed margins; thin surface sediment and thin palagonite rinds on lava surfaces suggest ages of 1-10 ka. Vents are localized along the arch crest near bases of Cretaceous seamounts. Two dredged flows are basanite and alkalic basalt, broadly similar to rejuvenated-stage and some pre-shield alkalic lavas on the Hawaiian Ridge. Arch volcanism represents peripheral leakage of melt from the Hawaiian hot spot over much larger areas than previously recognized. -Authors

  15. Volcanic activity: a review for health professionals.

    PubMed Central

    Newhall, C G; Fruchter, J S

    1986-01-01

    Volcanoes erupt magma (molten rock containing variable amounts of solid crystals, dissolved volatiles, and gas bubbles) along with pulverized pre-existing rock (ripped from the walls of the vent and conduit). The resulting volcanic rocks vary in their physical and chemical characteristics, e.g., degree of fragmentation, sizes and shapes of fragments, minerals present, ratio of crystals to glass, and major and trace elements composition. Variability in the properties of magma, and in the relative roles of magmatic volatiles and groundwater in driving an eruption, determine to a great extent the type of an eruption; variability in the type of an eruption in turn influences the physical characteristics and distribution of the eruption products. The principal volcanic hazards are: ash and larger fragments that rain down from an explosion cloud (airfall tephra and ballistic fragments); flows of hot ash, blocks, and gases down the slopes of a volcano (pyroclastic flows); "mudflows" (debris flows); lava flows; and concentrations of volcanic gases in topographic depressions. Progress in volcanology is bringing improved long- and short-range forecasts of volcanic activity, and thus more options for mitigation of hazards. Collaboration between health professionals and volcanologists helps to mitigate health hazards of volcanic activity. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 6a-6e FIGURE 6a-6e FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:3946726

  16. Volcanic activity: a review for health professionals

    SciTech Connect

    Newhall, C.G.; Fruchter, J.S.

    1986-03-01

    Volcanoes erupt magma (molten rock containing variable amounts of solid crystals, dissolved volatiles, and gas bubbles) along with pulverized pre-existing rock (ripped from the walls of the vent and conduit). The resulting volcanic rocks vary in their physical and chemical characteristics, e.g., degree of fragmentation, sizes and shapes of fragments, minerals present, ratio of crystals to glass, and major and trace element composition. Variability in the properties of magma, and in the relative roles of magmatic volatiles and groundwater in driving an eruption, determine to a great extent the type of an eruption; variability in the type of an eruption in turn influences the physical characteristics and distribution of the eruption products. The principal volcanic hazards are: ash and larger fragments that rain down from an explosion cloud (airfall tephra and ballistic fragments); flows of hot ash, blocks, and gases down the slopes of a volcano (pyroclastic flows); mudflows (debris flows); lava flows; and concentrations of volcanic gases in topographic depressions. Progress in volcanology is bringing improved long- and short-range forecasts of volcanic activity, and thus more options for mitigation of hazards. Collaboration between health professionals and volcanologists helps to mitigate health hazards of volcanic activity.

  17. Late Pleistocene ages for the most recent volcanism and glacial-pluvial deposits at Big Pine volcanic field, California, USA, from cosmogenic 36Cl dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, J. A.; Woolford, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The Big Pine volcanic field is one of several Quaternary volcanic fields that poses a potential volcanic hazard along the tectonically active Owens Valley of east-central California, and whose lavas are interbedded with deposits from Pleistocene glaciations in the Sierra Nevada Range. Previous geochronology indicates an ˜1.2 Ma history of volcanism, but the eruption ages and distribution of volcanic products associated with the most-recent eruptions have been poorly resolved. To delimit the timing and products of the youngest volcanism, we combine field mapping and cosmogenic 36Cl dating of basaltic lava flows in the area where lavas with youthful morphology and well-preserved flow structures are concentrated. Field mapping and petrology reveal approximately 15 vents and 6 principal flow units with variable geochemical composition and mineralogy. Cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages for lava flow units from the top, middle, and bottom of the volcanic stratigraphy indicate eruptions at ˜17, 27, and 40 ka, revealing several different and previously unrecognized episodes of late Pleistocene volcanism. Olivine to plagioclase-pyroxene phyric basalt erupted from several vents during the most recent episode of volcanism at ˜17 ka, and produced a lava flow field covering ˜35 km2. The late Pleistocene 36Cl exposure ages indicate that moraine and pluvial shoreline deposits that overlie or modify the youngest Big Pine lavas reflect Tioga stage glaciation in the Sierra Nevada and the shore of paleo-Owens Lake during the last glacial cycle.

  18. Late Pleistocene ages for the most recent volcanism and glacial-pluvial deposits at Big Pine volcanic field, California, USA, from cosmogenic 36Cl dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vazquez, Jorge A.; Woolford, Jeff M

    2015-01-01

    The Big Pine volcanic field is one of several Quaternary volcanic fields that poses a potential volcanic hazard along the tectonically active Owens Valley of east-central California, and whose lavas are interbedded with deposits from Pleistocene glaciations in the Sierra Nevada Range. Previous geochronology indicates an ∼1.2 Ma history of volcanism, but the eruption ages and distribution of volcanic products associated with the most-recent eruptions have been poorly resolved. To delimit the timing and products of the youngest volcanism, we combine field mapping and cosmogenic 36Cl dating of basaltic lava flows in the area where lavas with youthful morphology and well-preserved flow structures are concentrated. Field mapping and petrology reveal approximately 15 vents and 6 principal flow units with variable geochemical composition and mineralogy. Cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages for lava flow units from the top, middle, and bottom of the volcanic stratigraphy indicate eruptions at ∼17, 27, and 40 ka, revealing several different and previously unrecognized episodes of late Pleistocene volcanism. Olivine to plagioclase-pyroxene phyric basalt erupted from several vents during the most recent episode of volcanism at ∼17 ka, and produced a lava flow field covering ∼35 km2. The late Pleistocene 36Cl exposure ages indicate that moraine and pluvial shoreline deposits that overlie or modify the youngest Big Pine lavas reflect Tioga stage glaciation in the Sierra Nevada and the shore of paleo-Owens Lake during the last glacial cycle.

  19. Vent , Voluminous Lava Emissions, Steep Slopes and Pyroclastic Flows at Arenal Volcano, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavassi, E.; Fernández, E.; Duarte, E.; van der Laat, R.; Berrocal, M.; Barboza, V.; Hernández, E.; Marino, T.; Sáenz, W.; Hernández, L.

    2004-12-01

    voluminous lava flow, preceded the collapse of its NW rim. This rim consisted mainly of loose bombs and blocks accumulated after the period of strombolian eruptions during the late eighties and early nineties. After 1999, the south vent of crater C deflated showing a crateric depression. In contrast, the north vent of crater C became inflated and filled with lava. New vents opened on the north vent rim of crater C. They formed cones located NE and SW of the vent. Both cones have been active, nevertheless the most active vent has been the NE vent after 1999. The nature of these cones have been discussed extensively as there are evidences that small lobes have been extruded from their flanks suggesting a dome-like behavior. In parallel, after 1999, lava flows were shorter, developing blocks that cascaded the slopes of the volcano at very short distances from the vent. Several small volume, gravitational collapse pyroclastic flow events originated from the NE cone of the north vent of crater C since 1999. They represent the most important volcanic hazard for visitors of the volcano that get too close to see the volcano. Plume heights, erupted volumes and the number of daily explosions have been decreasing after 1999, suggesting an important decrement in the activity of Arenal volcano.

  20. Alignment fixture

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Grover C.; Gibson, O. Theodore

    1980-01-01

    A part alignment fixture is provided which may be used for precise variable lateral and tilt alignment relative to the fixture base of various shaped parts. The fixture may be used as a part holder for machining or inspection of parts or alignment of parts during assembly and the like. The fixture includes a precisely machined diameter disc-shaped hub adapted to receive the part to be aligned. The hub is nested in a guide plate which is adapted to carry two oppositely disposed pairs of positioning wedges so that the wedges may be reciprocatively positioned by means of respective micrometer screws. The sloping faces of the wedges contact the hub at respective quadrants of the hub periphery. The lateral position of the hub relative to the guide plate is adjusted by positioning the wedges with the associated micrometer screws. The tilt of the part is adjusted relative to a base plate, to which the guide plate is pivotally connected by means of a holding plate. Two pairs of oppositely disposed wedges are mounted for reciprocative lateral positioning by means of separate micrometer screws between flanges of the guide plate and the base plate. Once the wedges are positioned to achieve the proper tilt of the part or hub on which the part is mounted relative to the base plate, the fixture may be bolted to a machining, inspection, or assembly device.

  1. Curriculum Alignment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowell, Ronald; Tissot, Paula

    Curriculum alignment (CA) refers to the congruence of all the elements of a school's curriculum: curriculum goals; instructional program--what is taught and the materials used; and tests used to judge outcomes. CA can be a very powerful can be a very powerful factor in improving schools. Although further research is needed on CA, there is…

  2. The ˜ 1245 yr BP Asososca maar: New advances on recent volcanic stratigraphy of Managua (Nicaragua) and hazard implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, Natalia; Avellán, Denis Ramón; Macías, José Luis; Scolamacchia, Teresa; Rodríguez, Dionisio

    2008-10-01

    Asososca maar is located at the western outskirts of Managua, Nicaragua, in the central part of the active, N-S trending and right-lateral Nejapa-Miraflores fault that marks an offset of the Middle America Volcanic Arc. It constitutes one of the ˜ 21 vents aligned along the fault, between the Chiltepe Volcanic Complex to the North and Ticomo vents to the South. Asososca consists of an East-West elongated crater filled by a lake, which is currently used for supplying part of Managua with drinking water (10% of the capital city demand). The crater excavated the previous topography, allowing the observation of a detailed Holocene stratigraphic record that should be taken into account for future hazard analyses. We present a geological map together with the detailed stratigraphy exposed inside and around Asososca crater aided by radiocarbon dating of paleosols. The pre-existing volcanic sequence excavated by Asososca is younger than 12,730 + 255/- 250 yr BP and is capped by the phreato-plinian Masaya Tuff (< 2000 yr BP). The pyroclastic deposits produced by Asososca maar (Asososca Tephra, in this work) display an asymmetric distribution around the crater and overlie the Masaya Tuff. The bulk of the Asososca Tephra is made of several bedsets consisting of massive to crudely stratified beds of blocks and lapilli at the base, and superimposed thinly stratified ash and lapilli beds with dune structures and impact sags. Coarser size-fractions (>- 2 ϕ) are dominated by accidental clasts, including basaltic to basaltic-andesitic, olivine-bearing scoriae lapilli, porphyritic and hypocrystalline andesite blocks and lapilli, altered pumice lapilli and ash, and ignimbrite fragments. Juvenile fragments were only identified in size-fractions smaller than - 1 ϕ in proportions lower than 25%, and consist of black moss-like, fused-shape, and poorly vesiculated, fresh glass fragments of basaltic composition (SiO 2 ˜ 48%). The Asososca Tephra is interpreted as due to the emplacement

  3. Hydrothermal vent flow and turbulence measurements with acoustic scintillation instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Iorio, D.; Xu, G.

    2009-12-01

    Acoustically derived measurements of hydrothermal vent flow and turbulence were obtained from the active black smoker Dante in the Main Endeavour vent field, using scintillation analysis from one-way transmissions. The scintillation transmitter and receiver array formed a 93 m acoustic path through the buoyant plume 20 m above the structure. The acoustic path was parallel to the valley sidewall where the M2 tidal currents are approximately aligned along ridge due to topographic steering by the valley walls and hence most of the plume displacement is expected to occur along the acoustic path. On one deployment, data were collected for 6.5 weeks and vertical velocities range from 0.1 to 0.2 m/s showing a strong dependence on the spring/neap tidal cycle. The refractive index fluctuations which can be paramaterized in terms of the root-mean-square temperature fluctuations also shows a strong tidal modulation during spring tide.

  4. Tellurium in active volcanic environments: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milazzo, Silvia; Calabrese, Sergio; D'Alessandro, Walter; Brusca, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Sergio; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Tellurium is a toxic metalloid and, according to the Goldschmidt classification, a chalcophile element. In the last years its commercial importance has considerably increased because of its wide use in solar cells, thermoelectric and electronic devices of the last generation. Despite such large use, scientific knowledge about volcanogenic tellurium is very poor. Few previous authors report result of tellurium concentrations in volcanic plume, among with other trace metals. They recognize this element as volatile, concluding that volcanic gases and sulfur deposits are usually enriched with tellurium. Here, we present some results on tellurium concentrations in volcanic emissions (plume, fumaroles, ash leachates) and in environmental matrices (soils and plants) affected by volcanic emissions and/or deposition. Samples were collected at Etna and Vulcano (Italy), Turrialba (Costa Rica), Miyakejima, Aso, Asama (Japan), Mutnovsky (Kamchatka) at the crater rims by using common filtration techniques for aerosols (polytetrafluoroethylene filters). Filters were both eluted with Millipore water and acid microwave digested, and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Volcanic ashes emitted during explosive events on Etna and Copahue (Argentina) were analyzed for tellurium bulk composition and after leaching experiments to evaluate the soluble fraction of tellurium. Soils and leaves of vegetation were also sampled close to active volcanic vents (Etna, Vulcano, Nisyros, Nyiragongo, Turrialba, Gorely and Masaya) and investigated for tellurium contents. Preliminary results showed very high enrichments of tellurium in volcanic emissions comparing with other volatile elements like mercury, arsenic, thallium and bismuth. This suggests a primary transport in the volatile phase, probably in gaseous form (as also suggested by recent studies) and/or as soluble salts (halides and/or sulfates) adsorbed on the surface of particulate particles and ashes. First

  5. Volcanic lightning in the lab: observations from rapid decompression experiments with natural volcanic samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatorre-Ibarguengoitia, M. A.; Cimarelli, C.; Scheu, B.; Kueppers, U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions often produce spectacular volcanic lightning. Recent years have seen volcanic lightning detection used as part of a portfolio of developing techniques to monitor volcanic eruptions. Yet volcanic lightning continues to be poorly understood, because there are still few direct scientific observations of the phenomena. Lightning strikes produced during volcanic eruptions have been associated with two phases with completely different dynamics: 1) In the explosive phase, volcanic particles and gas are violently ejected producing lightning near the vent; 2) in the second phase, lightning discharges occur within the eruption plume produced by the rise of the gas-ash-mixture. Almost all the research on volcanic charging has been carried out on the second phase because the plume covers a wide area and measurements can be made at several km from the vent. Given its explosive nature, direct electric measurements on the first phase are severely restricted. We generate lightning in rapid decompression experiments with natural volcanic particles. These experiments were performed in a shock-tube apparatus that mimics the explosive phase of volcanic eruptions under controlled conditions. Upon decompression (from 5-15 MPa Argon pressure to 0,1 MPa),loose volcanic ash is ejected into a voluminous tank at atmospheric conditions. The ejection of the particles is monitored using a high-speed camera at frame rates of up to 65,000 frames per second. We performed experiments with samples from different volcanoes and with different grain-sizes. In some experiments we observe more than 120 lightning strikes of up to 5 cm in length within less than10 ms. Most of the lightning strikes are observed in only one frame, suggesting that they last less than 20 microseconds. Our observations indicate that particle charging and lightning are strongly controlled by the ejection dynamics and the sample characteristics. A fundamental advantage of the laboratory experiments is

  6. Engineering a robotic approach to mapping exposed volcanic fissures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parcheta, C. E.; Parness, A.; Mitchell, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Field geology provides a framework for advanced computer models and theoretical calculations of volcanic systems. Some field terrains, though, are poorly preserved or accessible, making documentation, quantification, and investigation impossible. Over 200 volcanologists at the 2012 Kona Chapman Conference on volcanology agreed that and important step forward in the field over the next 100 years should address the realistic size and shape of volcanic conduits. The 1969 Mauna Ulu eruption of Kīlauea provides a unique opportunity to document volcanic fissure conduits, thus, we have an ideal location to begin addressing this topic and provide data on these geometries. Exposed fissures can be mapped with robotics using machine vision. In order to test the hypothesis that fissures have irregularities with depth that will influence their fluid dynamical behavior, we must first map the fissure vents and shallow conduit to deci- or centimeter scale. We have designed, constructed, and field-tested the first version of a robotic device that will image an exposed volcanic fissure in three dimensions. The design phase included three steps: 1) create the payload harness and protective shell to prevent damage to the electronics and robot, 2) construct a circuit board to have the electronics communicate with a surface-based computer, and 3) prototype wheel shapes that can handle a variety of volcanic rock textures. The robot's mechanical parts were built using 3d printing, milling, casting and laser cutting techniques, and the electronics were assembled from off the shelf components. The testing phase took place at Mauna Ulu, Kīlauea, Hawai'i, from May 5 - 9, 2014. Many valuable design lessons were learned during the week, and the first ever 3D map from inside a volcanic fissure were successfully collected. Three vents had between 25% and 95% of their internal surfaces imaged. A fourth location, a non-eruptive crack (possibly a fault line) had two transects imaging the textures

  7. Vent for an electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.A.; Staniewicz, R.J.; Webber, B.; Allvey, G.W.

    1987-05-12

    A pressure relief vent is described for use with a container subjected to internal pressure by a fluid, the vent comprising: pressure relief means comprising a diaphragm essentially flat in shape fastened to the exterior of the container at the perimeter of the diaphragm and at a location within the perimeter of the diaphragm; an opening in the container disposed so that fluid from the container can pass between the diaphragm and the container and exert pressure on the diaphragm; and the pressure relief means being ruptured at a predetermined pressure exerted by the fluid on the diaphragm.

  8. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOEpatents

    Sawabe, James K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

  9. Modeling of zero gravity venting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, H., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The venting of cylindrical containers partially filled with initially saturated liquids was conducted under zero gravity conditions and compared with an analytical model which determined the effect of interfacial mass transfer on the ullage pressure response during venting. A model is proposed to improve the estimation of the interfacial mass transfer. Duhammel's superposition integral is incorporated in this analysis to approximate the transient temperature response of the interface, treating the liquid as a semiinfinite solid with conduction heat transfer. This approach to estimating interfacial mass transfer gives improved response when compared to previous models. The model still predicts a pressure decrease greater than those in the experiments reported.

  10. Development and relationship of monogenetic and polygenetic volcanic fields in time and space.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germa, Aurelie; Connor, Chuck; Connor, Laura; Malservisi, Rocco

    2013-04-01

    The classification of volcanic systems, developed by G. P. L. Walker and colleagues, relates volcano morphology to magma transport and eruption processes. In general, distributed monogenetic volcanic fields are characterized by infrequent eruptions, low average output rate, and a low spatial intensity of the eruptive vents. In contrast, central-vent-dominated systems, such as stratovolcanoes, central volcanoes and lava shields are characterized by frequent eruptions, higher average flux rates, and higher spatial intensity of eruptive vents. However, it has been observed that a stratovolcano is often associated to parasitic monogenetic vents on its flanks, related to the central silicic systems, and surrounded by an apron of monogenetic edifices that are part of the volcanic field but independent from the principal central system. It appears from spatial distribution and time-volume relationships that surface area of monogenetic fields reflects the lateral extent of the magma source region and the lack of magma focusing mechanisms. In contrast, magma is focused through a unique conduit system for polygenetic volcanoes, provided by a thermally and mechanically favorable pathway toward the surface that is maintained by frequent and favorable stress conditions. We plan to relate surface observations of spatio-temporal location of eruptive vents and evolution of the field area through time to processes that control magma focusing during ascent and storage in the crust. We choose to study fields that range from dispersed to central-vent dominated, through transitional fields (central felsic system with peripheral field of monogenetic vents independent from the rhyolitic system). We investigate different well-studied volcanic fields in the Western US and Western Europe in order to assess influence of the geodynamic setting and tectonic stress on the spatial distribution of magmatism. In summary, incremental spatial intensity maps should reveal how fast a central conduit

  11. Clast formation in cinder cone vents: Negro Rock, Malheur County, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, M.G. . Geology Dept.); Pasek, T.A. ); Cummings, M.L. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Negro Rock is an andesitic vent complex within the middle to late Miocene Grassy Mountain Formation. Negro Rock complex includes two central vents that intrude palagonitic tephra formed during an earlier episode of hydrovolcanic-dominated volcanism. In the southwestern vent, Negro Rock, progressive fragmentation from a chilled wall to open textured scoria is preserved. Chilled, vesicle-free andesite against contact metamorphosed palagonitic tephra forms the outer wall of the vent. Inward, strongly vertically stretched vesicles occur in crudely flow banded andesite. The stretch textures give way to isolated patches of small vesicles in a non-vesiculated, non-stretched matrix. The size and abundance of vesicles patches increases inward. The non-vesiculated portion steadily decreases to a dense rim around vesiculated incipient clasts. As clast forms become more prominent the color changes from dark gray to purple. Liberated scoria clasts are red and occur with an assortment of blocks and fusiform bombs within the vent. Clast formation is due to magmatic degassing within the base of the cinder cone. The northeastern, higher vent shows incipient clast formation near the summit.

  12. Volcanic Lightning in Eruptions of Sakurajima Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edens, Harald; Thomas, Ronald; Behnke, Sonja; McNutt, Stephen; Smith, Cassandra; Farrell, Alexandra; Van Eaton, Alexa; Cimarelli, Corrado; Cigala, Valeria; Eack, Ken; Aulich, Graydon; Michel, Christopher; Miki, Daisuke; Iguchi, Masato

    2016-04-01

    In May 2015 a field program was undertaken to study volcanic lightning at the Sakurajima volcano in southern Japan. One of the main goals of the study was to gain a better understanding of small electrical discharges in volcanic eruptions, expanding on our earlier studies of volcanic lightning at Augustine and Redoubt volcanoes in Alaska, USA, and Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland. In typical volcanic eruptions, electrical activity occurs at the onset of an eruption as a near-continual production of VHF emissions at or near to the volcanic vent. These emissions can occur at rates of up to tens of thousands of emissions per second, and are referred to as continuous RF. As the ash cloud expands, small-scale lightning flashes of several hundred meters length begin to occur while the continuous RF ceases. Later on during the eruption larger-scale lightning flashes may occur within the ash cloud that are reminiscent of regular atmospheric lightning. Whereas volcanic lightning flashes are readily observed and reasonably well understood, the nature and morphology of the events producing continuous RF are unknown. During the 2015 field program we deployed a comprehensive set of instrumentation, including a 10-station 3-D Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) that operated in 10 μs high time resolution mode, slow and fast ΔE antennas, a VHF flat-plate antenna operating in the 20-80 MHz band, log-RF waveforms within the 60-66 MHz band, an infra-red video camera, a high-sensitivity Watec video camera, two high-speed video cameras, and still cameras. We give an overview of the Sakurajima field program and present preliminary results using correlated LMA, waveforms, photographs and video recordings of volcanic lightning at Sakurajima volcano.

  13. Temporal and Spatial Analysis of Monogenetic Volcanic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyosugi, Koji

    Achieving an understanding of the nature of monogenetic volcanic fields depends on identification of the spatial and temporal patterns of volcanism in these fields, and their relationships to structures mapped in the shallow crust and inferred in the deep crust and mantle through interpretation of geochemical, radiometric and geophysical data. We investigate the spatial and temporal distributions of volcanism in the Abu Monogenetic Volcano Group, Southwest Japan. E-W elongated volcano distribution, which is identified by a nonparametric kernel method, is found to be consistent with the spatial extent of P-wave velocity anomalies in the lower crust and upper mantle, supporting the idea that the spatial density map of volcanic vents reflects the geometry of a mantle diapir. Estimated basalt supply to the lower crust is constant. This observation and the spatial distribution of volcanic vents suggest stability of magma productivity and essentially constant two-dimensional size of the source mantle diapir. We mapped conduits, dike segments, and sills in the San Rafael sub-volcanic field, Utah, where the shallowest part of a Pliocene magmatic system is exceptionally well exposed. The distribution of conduits matches the major features of dike distribution, including development of clusters and distribution of outliers. The comparison of San Rafael conduit distribution and the distributions of volcanoes in several recently active volcanic fields supports the use of statistical models, such as nonparametric kernel methods, in probabilistic hazard assessment for distributed volcanism. We developed a new recurrence rate calculation method that uses a Monte Carlo procedure to better reflect and understand the impact of uncertainties of radiometric age determinations on uncertainty of recurrence rate estimates for volcanic activity in the Abu, Yucca Mountain Region, and Izu-Tobu volcanic fields. Results suggest that the recurrence rates of volcanic fields can change by more

  14. Decline of a Hydrothermal Vent Field - Escanaba Trough 12 Years Later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierenberg, R. A.; Clague, D. A.; Davis, A. S.; Lilley, M. D.; McClain, J. S.; Olson, E. S.; Ross, S. L.; Von Damm, K. L.

    2001-12-01

    Hydrothermal venting was discovered in Escanaba Trough, the southern sediment-covered portion of the Gorda Ridge, in 1988. Large pyrrhotite-rich massive sulfide mounds are abundant at each of the volcanic/intrusive centers that have been investigated in Escanaba Trough, but the only area of known hydrothermal venting is the NESCA site along the ridge axis at 41\\deg N. Hydrothermal fluids venting at 217\\deg C and 108\\deg C were sampled in 1988 on two sulfide mounds separated by about 275 m. The end-member fluid compositions were indistinguishable within analytical errors. Several sulfide mounds were observed in 1988 which had diffusely venting low temperature (< 20\\deg C) fluids that supported extensive vent communities dominated by fields of Ridgia. Nine holes were drilled in the NESCA area in 1996 on ODP Leg 169, including Hole 1036I that penetrated to basaltic basement at 405 m below sea floor (mbsf). Surveys of the area using the drill string camera located only one area of active venting at the same mound where 217\\deg C vent fluids were sampled from two active vents in 1988. Drill hole 1036A was spudded between the two active vents on this sulfide mound (approximately 4 and 8 m away) and penetrated to 115 mbsf. The NESCA site was revisited in 2000 using MBARI's R/V Western Flyer and ROV Tiburon. The hydrothermal vents appeared essentially identical to observations made from the drill string camera in 1996 despite the presence of a drill hole within meters of the two vents. The maximum vent temperature measured in 2000 was 212\\deg C. Fluid samples have major element and isotopic compositions very similar to those collected in 1988. The vent fluids have higher methane ( ~19 mmol/kg) than those from the geologically similar Middle Valley vent field, but lower values than those at Guaymas Basin. Drill hole 1036A was weakly venting, but the diffuse hydrothermal fluids could not be sampled with the equipment available. The walls of the drill hole were

  15. ALIGNING JIG

    DOEpatents

    Culver, J.S.; Tunnell, W.C.

    1958-08-01

    A jig or device is described for setting or aligning an opening in one member relative to another member or structure, with a predetermined offset, or it may be used for measuring the amount of offset with which the parts have previously been sct. This jig comprises two blocks rabbeted to each other, with means for securing thc upper block to the lower block. The upper block has fingers for contacting one of the members to be a1igmed, the lower block is designed to ride in grooves within the reference member, and calibration marks are provided to determine the amount of offset. This jig is specially designed to align the collimating slits of a mass spectrometer.

  16. Image alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, Larry Jonathan

    2014-04-22

    Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

  17. Volcanic glass signatures in spectroscopic survey of newly proposed lunar pyroclastic deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besse, S.; Sunshine, J.M.; Gaddis, L.R.

    2014-01-01

    Moon Mineralogy Mapper spectroscopic observations are used to assess the mineralogy of five sites that have recently been proposed to include lunar dark mantle deposits (DMDs). Volcanic glasses have, for the first time, clearly been identified at the location of three of the proposed pyroclastic deposits. This is the first time that volcanic glasses have been identified at such a small scale on the lunar surface from remote sensing observations. Deposits at Birt E, Schluter, and Walther A appear to be glassy DMDs. Deposits at Birt E and Schluter show (1) morphological evidence suggesting a likely vent and (2) mineralogical evidence indicative of the presence of volcanic glasses. The Walther A deposits, although they show no morphological evidence of vents, have the spectroscopic characteristics diagnostic of volcanic glasses. The deposits of the Freundlich-Sharonov basin are separated in two areas: (1) the Buys-Ballot deposits lack mineralogical and morphological evidence and thus are found to be associated with mare volcanism not with DMDs and (2) the Anderson crater deposits, which do not exhibit glassy DMD signatures, but they appear to be associated with possible vent structures and so may be classifiable as DMDs. Finally, dark deposits near the crater Kopff are found to be associated with likely mare volcanism and not associated with DMDs. The spectral identification of volcanic glass seen in many of the potential DMDs is a strong indicator of their pyroclastic origin.

  18. Integrating geological and geophysical data to improve probabilistic hazard forecasting of Arabian Shield volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Melody G.; Bebbington, Mark S.; Cronin, Shane J.; Lindsay, Jan M.; Moufti, Mohammed R.

    2016-02-01

    During probabilistic volcanic hazard analysis of volcanic fields, a greater variety of spatial data on crustal features should help improve forecasts of future vent locations. Without further examination, however, geophysical estimations of crustal or other features may be non-informative. Here, we present a new, robust, non-parametric method to quantitatively determine the existence of any relationship between natural phenomena (e.g., volcanic eruptions) and a variety of geophysical data. This provides a new validation tool for incorporating a range of potentially hazard-diagnostic observable data into recurrence rate estimates and hazard analyses. Through this study it is shown that the location of Cenozoic volcanic fields across the Arabian Shield appear to be related to locations of major and minor faults, at higher elevations, and regions where gravity anomaly values were between - 125 mGal and 0 mGal. These findings support earlier hypotheses that the western shield uplift was related to Cenozoic volcanism. At the harrat (volcanic field)-scale, higher vent density regions are related to both elevation and gravity anomaly values. A by-product of this work is the collection of existing data on the volcanism across Saudi Arabia, with all vent locations provided herein, as well as updated maps for Harrats Kura, Khaybar, Ithnayn, Kishb, and Rahat. This work also highlights the potential dangers of assuming relationships between observed data and the occurrence of a natural phenomenon without quantitative assessment or proper consideration of the effects of data resolution.

  19. 33 CFR 159.61 - Vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vents. 159.61 Section 159.61 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.61 Vents. Vents must be designed and...

  20. 33 CFR 159.61 - Vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vents. 159.61 Section 159.61 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.61 Vents. Vents must be designed and...

  1. Volcanology, geochemistry and age of the Lausitz Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büchner, J.; Tietz, O.; Viereck, L.; Suhr, P.; Abratis, M.

    2015-11-01

    The Lausitz (Lusatia) Volcanic Field is part of the Central European Volcanic Province, and its magmas represent an alkaline trend from olivine nephelinites and basanites to trachytes and phonolites, typical for intraplate settings. Neighbouring volcanic fields are the České Středohoří Mountains to the south-west and the Fore-Sudetic Basin in Lower Silesia to the east. More than 1000 volcanic structures associated with approximately 500 vents have been located within this volcanic field. Residuals of scoria cones, lava lakes, lava flows and maar-diatreme in filling occur in situ near the level of the original syn-volcanic terrain. In more deeply eroded structures, volcanic relicts outcrop as plugs or feeders. Evolved rocks occur as monogenetic domes or intrusions in diatremes, while their volcaniclastic equivalents are rare. Twenty-three localities were dated using the 40Ar/39Ar method. The ages range from 35 to 27 Ma, with a focus around 32-29 Ma, indicating Late Eocene and mainly Oligocene volcanism for the LVF. Differentiated rocks appear to be slightly younger than less differentiated. No geographical age clusters are apparent.

  2. Halophilic Archaea determined from geothermal steam vent aerosols.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Dean G; Bizzoco, Richard W; Kelley, Scott T

    2008-06-01

    Hydrothermal vents, known as 'fumaroles', are ubiquitous features of geothermal areas. Although their geology has been extensively characterized, little is known about the subsurface microbial ecology of fumaroles largely because of the difficulty in collecting sufficient numbers of cells from boiling steam water for DNA extraction and culture isolation. Here we describe the first collection, molecular analysis and isolation of microbes from fumarole steam waters in Russia (Kamchatka) and the USA (Hawaii, New Mexico, California and Wyoming). Surprisingly, the steam vent waters from all the fumaroles contained halophilic Archaea closely related to the Haloarcula spp. found in non-geothermal salt mats, saline soils, brine pools and salt lakes around the world. Microscopic cell counting estimated the cell dispersal rate at approximately 1.6 x 10(9) cells year(-1) from a single fumarole. We also managed to enrich microbes in high-salt media from every vent sample, and to isolate Haloarcula from a Yellowstone vent in a 20% salt medium after a month-long incubation, demonstrating both salt tolerance and viability of cells collected from high-temperature steam. Laboratory tests determined that microbes enriched in salt media survived temperatures greater than 75 degrees C for between 5 and 30 min during the collection process. Hawaiian fumaroles proved to contain the greatest diversity of halophilic Archaea with four new lineages that may belong to uncultured haloarchaeal genera. This high diversity may have resulted from the leaching of salts and minerals through the highly porous volcanic rock, creating a chemically complex saline subsurface.

  3. Quantitative petrogenetic constraints on the Pliocene alkali basaltic volcanism of the SE Spain Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebriá, J. M.; López-Ruiz, J.; Carmona, J.; Doblas, M.

    2009-09-01

    Alkali basalts of Pliocene age are the last episode of volcanism in the SE Spain Volcanic Province, postdating a complex series of Miocene calc-alkaline to ultrapotassic rocks. This volcanism is represented by small outcrops and vents NW of Cartagena that has been interpreted as a volcanic episode similar to the contemporaneous monogenetic alkaline basaltic volcanism of the Iberian Peninsula and Western/Central Europe. However, their geochemical signature is characterised by relatively higher 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios as well as distinct trace element anomalies which, at different scale, are only found in the spatially related calc-alkaline to ultrapotassic volcanism. Quantitative modelling of these data demonstrate that the geochemical signature of the Pliocene alkali basalts of Cartagena can be explained by the interaction between primitive melts generated from a sublithospheric mantle source similar to that identified for other volcanic regions of Spain, and liquids derived from the overlying lithospheric mantle. This interaction implies that the alkali basalts show some geochemical features only observed in mantle lithosphere-derived melts (e.g. Sr isotope enrichment and Th-U-Pb positive anomalies), while retaining an overall geochemical signature similar to other Iberian basalts (e.g. Rb-K negative anomalies). This model also implies that beneath the SEVP, enriched (metasomatized) portions were still present within the lithospheric mantle after the Miocene magmatic episodes. Comparison of this model with those already developed for other alkaline basaltic volcanic regions of western/central Europe supports the idea that the interaction of primitive magmas derived from a common sublithospheric mantle source with liquids derived from the overlying regionally heterogeneous lithospheric mantle is a relatively frequent scenario in the European realm.

  4. Barberton greenstone belt volcanism: Succession, style and petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byerly, G. R.; Lowe, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    The Barberton Mountain Land is an early Archean greenstone belt along the eastern margin of the Kaapvaal Craton of southern Africa. Detailed mapping in the southern portion of the belt leads to the conclusion that a substantial thickness is due to original deposition of volcanics and sediments. In the area mapped, a minimum thickness of 12km of predominantly mafic and ultramafic volcanics comprise the Komati, Hooggenoeg, and Kromberg Formations of the Onverwacht Group, and at least one km of predominantly pyroclastic and epiclastic sediments derived from dacitic volcanics comprise the Fig Tree Group. The Barberton greenstone belt formed primarily by ultramafic to mafic volcanism on a shallow marine platform which underwent little or no concurrent extension. Vents for this igneous activity were probably of the non-constructional fissure type. Dacitic volcanism occurred throughout the sequence in minor amounts. Large, constructional vent complexes were formed, and explosive eruptions widely dispersed pyroclastic debris. Only in the final stages of evolution of the belt did significant thrust-faulting occur, generally after, though perhaps overlapping with, the final stage of dacitic igneous activity. A discussion follows.

  5. Controls on the evolving grain size distribution of ash in explosive eruptions and feedback in vent proximal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufek, J.

    2012-12-01

    The dispersal range of eruptive products and types of hazards they present is determined in large part by the volume and size fraction of particles that exit the volcanic vent and how this grain size distribution changes during transport. This talk will examine the physical processes that modify the grain size distribution of particles across a spectrum of energies due to eruptive processes from the conduit, multiphase interaction in the plume, and due to microscale aggregation of ash. The size distribution of volcanic particles has widely been interpreted to be associated with the initial fragmentation process, where particle size has been attributed to fragmentation style and efficiency. Here we evaluate the likelihood that pumice particles survive intact the high-energy environment of the volcanic conduit from the point of initial fragmentation to ejection into the atmosphere. We show that the probability of particles surviving intact is strongly controlled by the particles initial size and the depth of the fragmentation level, with large particles and deep fragmentation producing the most disruption events. The consequence of numerous high-energy collisions results in a more homogeneous, fine-grained mixture of particles leaving the volcanic vent for volcanoes with deep fragmentation levels. These fine particles are well coupled to the magmatic gases exiting the vent, can reduce their sound speed and influence the ability of the mixture to entrain ambient air, thus influencing eruptive style. After exiting the volcanic vent, ash is subject to a range of microphysical processes such adsorption of water and aggregation. After briefly reviewing recent experimental advances in ash microphysical phenomena we will illustrate how these processes can influence near vent dynamics by incorporating these microphysical experimental results into a high resolution Eulerian-Eulerian-Lagrangian (EEL) model. We will particularly focus on the dual roles of aggregation and

  6. Potential hazards from future volcanic eruptions in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, C. Dan

    1989-01-01

    More than 500 volcanic vents have been identified in the State of California. At least 76 of these vents have erupted, some repeatedly, during the last 10,000 years. Past volcanic activity has ranged in scale and type from small rhyolitic and basaltic eruptions through large catastrophic rhyolitic eruptions. Sooner or later, volcanoes in California will erupt again, and they could have serious impacts on the health and safety of the State\\'s citizens as well as on its economy. This report describes the nature and probable distribution of potentially hazardous volcanic phenomena and their threat to people and property. It includes hazard-zonation maps that show areas relatively likely to be affected by future eruptions in California. The potentially more hazardous eruptions in the State are those that involve explosive eruption of large volumes of silicic magma. Such eruptions could occur at vents in as many as four areas in California. They could eject pumice high into the atmosphere above the volcano, produce destructive blasts, avalanches, or pyroclastic flows that reach distances of tens of kilometers from a vent, and produce mudflows and floods that reach to distances of hundreds of kilometers. Smaller eruptions produce similar, but less severe and less extensive, phenomena. Hazards are greatest close to a volcanic vent; the slopes on or near a volcano, and valleys leading away from it, are affected most often and most severely by such eruptions. In general, risk from volcanic phenomena decreases with increasing distance from a vent and, for most flowage processes, with increasing height above valley floors or fan surfaces. Tephra (ash) from explosive eruptions can affect wide areas downwind from a vent. In California, prevailing winds cause the 180-degree sector east of the volcano to be affected most often and most severely. Risk to life from ashfall decreases rapidly with increasing distance from a vent, but thin deposits of ash could disrupt communication

  7. Investigating pyroclast ejection dynamics using shock-tube experiments: temperature, grain size and vent geometry effects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigala, V.; Kueppers, U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions eject large quantities of gas and particles into the atmosphere. The portion directly above the vent commonly shows characteristics of underexpanded jets. Understanding the factors that influence the initial pyroclast ejection dynamics is necessary in order to better assess the resulting near- and far-field hazards. Field observations are often insufficient for the characterization of volcanic explosions due to lack of safe access to such environments. Fortunately, their dynamics can be simulated in the laboratory where experiments are performed under controlled conditions. We ejected loose natural particles from a shock-tube while controlling temperature (25˚ and 500˚C), overpressure (15MPa), starting grain size distribution (1-2 mm, 0.5-1 mm and 0.125-0.250 mm), sample-to-vent distance and vent geometry. For each explosion we quantified the velocity of individual particles, the jet spreading angle and the production of fines. Further, we varied the setup to allow for different sample-to-gas ratios and deployed four different vent geometries: 1) cylindrical, 2) funnel with a flaring of 30˚, 3) funnel with a flaring of 15˚ and 4) nozzle. The results showed maximum particle velocities up to 296 m/s, gas spreading angles varying from 21˚ to 37˚ and particle spreading angles from 3˚ to 40˚. Moreover we observed dynamically evolving ejection characteristics and variations in the production of fines during the course of individual experiments. Our experiments mechanistically mimic the process of pyroclast ejection. Thus the capability for constraining the effects of input parameters (fragmentation conditions) and conduit/vent geometry on ballistic pyroclastic plumes has been clearly established. These data obtained in the presence of well-documented conduit and vent conditions, should greatly enhance our ability to numerically model explosive ejecta in nature.

  8. Space shuttle orbiter venting: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutfi, H. S.; Nieder, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    The orbiter vent system provides dedicated vent areas to permit the gases trapped inside the vehicle to escape during accent. The same vent system also repressurizes the vehicle during entry. The vent system is one of six systems that constitutes the purge, vent and drain subsystem. The orbiter active vent system has been very adaptable to the changing requirements that have occurred during the development of the Space Shuttle orbiter. Good correlation has been obtained between predicted and measured compartment pressures during the orbital flight test (OFT) program. An investigation of the flight data showed that the difference between preflight prediction and the measured values were primarily due to the difference between the baseline external pressures, which was based on subscale wind tunnel test data, and the actual vehicle local external pressures measured during the flight. The current predictions are based on flight derived vent port pressure coefficients since the wind tunnel data does not adequately define the orbiter ascent pressure environment.

  9. A probabilistic approach to determine volcanic eruption centres of degraded volcanic edifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Székely, B.; Karátson, D.

    2009-04-01

    It is often a difficult problem to determine the position of original eruption centres of degraded volcanic edifices. Beside of the destructive processes acting during the volcanic activity, subsequent erosion, mass movements and tectonic motions modify the spatial distribution of the volcanic features. The observations including dipping strata, clast orientations, lava flows, etc. made on the present surface are therefore biased by the post-eruptive processes making the reconstruction of the original volcanic pattern problematic. The different types of observations and their various error levels complicate the problem further. We propose a probabilistic approach to evaluate the different types of observations. Each observation type or even each observation may have their own error bars which can be taken into account in this scheme. The only assumption is that it is possible to determine the relative direction of the original volcanic centre based on the specific observation within a given angular accuracy. In our scheme a spatial probability density function (PDF) is assigned to each observation and the weighted sum of these PDFs results in a map. This integrated PDF map then can be evaluated to determine one or multiple eruption centres. In case of multiple centres further decision can be made on whether the various centres are only virtual, caused by subsequent tectonism or, on the contrary, the original setting had several eruption vents. This decision can be made on targeted grouping of PDFs of different types of observations or spatial selection. The resulting compound PDF maps may outline individual centres.

  10. A new volcano-structural map of the Virunga Volcanic Province, D.R.Congo and Rwanda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, Sam; Smets, Benoît; Albino, Fabien; Kervyn, François; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2013-04-01

    The Virunga Volcanic Province (VVP) is situated within the Western branch of the East African Rift system at the boundary of D.R.Congo, Rwanda and Uganda. The Western VVP comprises two active volcanoes, Nyamulagira and Nyiragongo. Six supposedly historically inactive volcanoes are present in the Central and Eastern VVP. Nyamulagira is recently the most active volcano on the African continent, with 30 eruptions since 1900, while Nyiragongo hosts a semi-permanent lava lake in its crater and fed a catastrophic lava flow in 2002. Additionally, numerous volcanic vents, fissures and cones are scattered on and around the main edifices. Except for geological maps from the colonial times and limited studies of historical eruptions, little is known about the volcano-tectonic structure and long term volcanic history of the VVP. A new Digital Elevation Model (TanDEM-X) with a resolution of 5 m, combined with SPOT and SAR images served as a base for the development of a new volcano-structural map for the entire VVP. A GIS data base was developed including the location of eruptive cones and fissures and the distribution of lava flows. The boundaries of historic and pre-historic lava flows and pyroclastic cones were traced from from interpretation of topographic and multispectral remote sensing data and re-analysis of ancient geological maps.Larger-scale lineaments interpreted as potential volcano-tectonic structures were also systematically mapped. All previously geochemically analyzed samples were localized. This GIS-based volcano-structural map will serve as a base for the quantitative characterization of recent and historic volcanic eruption products, such as pyroclastic cones and lava flows, of Nyamulagira and Nyiragongo, as well as for the assessment of potential Holocene activity in the Central and Eastern VVP. The orientation of feeder dykes inferred from cone alignments and morphology is used to identify the main volcanic structures and infer the locally dominant stress

  11. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOEpatents

    Sawabe, J.K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell. 6 figures.

  12. Characterization of the Etna volcanic emissions through an active biomonitoring technique (moss-bags): part 2--morphological and mineralogical features.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, S; D'Alessandro, W

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic emissions were studied at Mount Etna (Italy) by using moss-bags technique. Mosses were exposed around the volcano at different distances from the active vents to evaluate the impact of volcanic emissions in the atmosphere. Morphology and mineralogy of volcanic particulate intercepted by mosses were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Particles emitted during passive degassing activity from the two active vents, Bocca Nuova and North East Crater (BNC and NEC), were identified as silicates, sulfates and halide compounds. In addition to volcanic particles, we found evidences also of geogenic, anthropogenic and marine spray input. The study has shown the robustness of this active biomonitoring technique to collect particles, very useful in active volcanic areas characterized by continuous degassing and often not easily accessible to apply conventional sampling techniques.

  13. Characterization of the Etna volcanic emissions through an active biomonitoring technique (moss-bags): part 2--morphological and mineralogical features.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, S; D'Alessandro, W

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic emissions were studied at Mount Etna (Italy) by using moss-bags technique. Mosses were exposed around the volcano at different distances from the active vents to evaluate the impact of volcanic emissions in the atmosphere. Morphology and mineralogy of volcanic particulate intercepted by mosses were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Particles emitted during passive degassing activity from the two active vents, Bocca Nuova and North East Crater (BNC and NEC), were identified as silicates, sulfates and halide compounds. In addition to volcanic particles, we found evidences also of geogenic, anthropogenic and marine spray input. The study has shown the robustness of this active biomonitoring technique to collect particles, very useful in active volcanic areas characterized by continuous degassing and often not easily accessible to apply conventional sampling techniques. PMID:25311770

  14. Discovery of Nascent Vents and Recent Colonization Associated with(Re)activated Hydrothermal Vent Fields by the GALREX 2011 Expedition on the Galápagos Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shank, T. M.; Holden, J. F.; Herrera, S.; Munro, C.; Muric, T.; Lin, J.; Stuart, L.

    2011-12-01

    GALREX 2011 was a NOAA OER telepresence cruise that explored the diverse habitats and geologic settings of the deep Galápagos region. The expedition made12 Little Hercules ROV dives in July 2011.Abundant corals and a strong depth zonation of species (including deepwater coral communities) were found near 500 m depth on Paramount Seamount, likely influenced by past low sea level states, wave-cut terrace processes, and the historical presence of shallow reef structures. At fresh lava flows with associated (flocculent) hydrothermal venting near 88° W, now known as Uka Pacha and Pegasus Vent Fields, rocks were coated with white microbial mat and lacked sessile fauna, with few mobile fauna (e.g., bythograeid crabs, alvinocarid shrimp, polynoid worms, zoarcid fish, and dirivultid copepods). This suggests a recent creation of hydrothermal habitats through volcanic eruptions and/or diking events, which may have taken place over a 15 km span separating the two vent fields. The Rosebud vent field at 86°W was not observed and may have been covered with lava since last visited in 2005. A hydrothermal vent field near 86°W was discovered that is one of the largest vent fields known on the Rift (120m by 40m). Low-temperature vent habitats were colonized by low numbers of tubeworms including Riftia, Oasisia, and a potential Tevnia species (the latter not previously observed on the Galapagos Rift). Patches of tubeworms were observed with individuals less than 2cm in length, and the relatively few large Riftia had tube lengths near 70cm long. Large numbers of small (< 3cm long) bathymodiolin mussels lined cracks and crevices throughout the active part of the field. Live clams, at least four species of gastropod limpets, three species of polynoid polychaetes, juvenile and adult alvinocarid shrimp, actinostolid anemones, and white microbial communities were observed on the underside and vertical surfaces of basalt rock surfaces. There were at least 13 species of vent-endemic fauna

  15. Noachian Martian Volcanics a Water Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, A. P.; Glaze, L. S.; Baloga, S. M.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    H2O was supplied to the Noachian atmosphere by eruptions, or in association with large impacts. Most water outgassed into an extremely cold atmosphere, and condensate deposits were inevitable. High heat flow could lead to subglacial melting only if ice thicknesses were greater than 500-1000m, which is extremely unlikely. Subareal melting and flow is contingent upon temperatures periodically exceeding 273 K, and retarding evaporative loss of the flow. In still air, evaporation into a dry atmosphere is in the free convection regime, and a stream with 2 cu m/s discharge, flowing 1 m/s could persist for hundreds of days and cover distances greater than any valley reach. The zero-wind-shear condition is considered implausible however. We investigate the possibility that evaporation rates were suppressed because the atmosphere was regionally charged with H2O as it moved over snow/ice fields. Our initial concern is precipitation from volcanic plumes. A Kilauea-style eruption on the martian surface would cover a 10km circular deposit with 10cm of H2O, if all H2O could be precipitated near the vent. The characteristics of the eruption at the vent, (vent size, temperature, H2O content, etc.) are independent of the environmental conditions. The subsequent behavior of the plume, including precipitation of ash and H2O condensate depends strongly on the environment. Hence, the proximal fate of volcanic H2O is amenable to treatment in a model. A simple bulk thermodynamic model of the rise of an H2O plume through a stably stratified CO2 atmosphere, with only adiabatic cooling, produces runaway plume rise. A more complex treatment includes the effects of latent heat release, wind shear along the plume, divergence of ash and H2O, and will yield more realistic estimates of H2O transport in eruptive plumes. Results of these simulations will be presented.

  16. Impacts of anthropogenic disturbances at deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems: a review.

    PubMed

    Van Dover, Cindy Lee

    2014-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal-vent ecosystems have stimulated decades of scientific research and hold promise of mineral and genetic resources that also serve societal needs. Some endemic taxa thrive only in vent environments, and vent-associated organisms are adapted to a variety of natural disturbances, from tidal variations to earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. In this paper, physicochemical and biological impacts of a range of human activities at vents are considered. Mining is currently the only anthropogenic activity projected to have a major impact on vent ecosystems, albeit at a local scale, based on our current understanding of ecological responses to disturbance. Natural recovery from a single mining event depends on immigration and larval recruitment and colonization; understanding processes and dynamics influencing life-history stages may be a key to effective minimization and mitigation of mining impacts. Cumulative impacts on benthic communities of several mining projects in a single region, without proper management, include possible species extinctions and shifts in community structure and function.

  17. Composition and biogeography of hydrothermal vent communities in Western Pacific Back-Arc Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbruyères, Daniel; Hashimoto, Jun; Fabri, Marie-Claire

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities have been located and studied over different geological and dynamic contexts: fast to slow mid-ocean ridges, back-arc basins, volcanic arcs, and active seamounts. The associated vent faunas belong to a small set of mostly endemic taxa relying on chemoautotrophic microbial production, able to stand extreme habitat conditions and to persist in a discontinuous and ephemeral environment. Because of their obligate relations to hydrothermal venting, they disperse only along ridges, stepping from one active hydrothermal vent to another. Discontinuities of the ridges or hydrological barriers can limit along-axis dispersal and thus favor allopatric speciation. Western Pacific back-arc basins are isolated spreading centers, which remain active during a short period of geological time, in the proximity of active and passive continental margins where cold seeps are frequent. The Rim of Fire region thus represents a complex area of potential exchanges between chemosynthetic-based ecosystems. Our present knowledge is restricted to active areas situated in five back-arc basins (Lau and North Fiji Basins, Manus Basin, Mariana Trough, Okinawa Trough) and two arc volcanoes (Izu-Ogasawara, Kermadec Arc). We here review the distribution and composition of vent-associated biological communities in these basins and arcs, and discuss the faunal affinities among them and the possible migration routes between them and the mid-ocean ridges.

  18. Active Volcanic Plumes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This color image, acquired during Galileo's ninth orbit around Jupiter, shows two volcanic plumes on Io. One plume was captured on the bright limb or edge of the moon (see inset at upper right), erupting over a caldera (volcanic depression) named Pillan Patera after a South American god of thunder, fire and volcanoes. The plume seen by Galileo is 140 kilometers (86 miles) high and was also detected by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Galileo spacecraft will pass almost directly over Pillan Patera in 1999 at a range of only 600 kilometers (373 miles).

    The second plume, seen near the terminator (boundary between day and night), is called Prometheus after the Greek fire god (see inset at lower right). The shadow of the 75-kilometer (45- mile) high airborne plume can be seen extending to the right of the eruption vent. The vent is near the center of the bright and dark rings. Plumes on Io have a blue color, so the plume shadow is reddish. The Prometheus plume can be seen in every Galileo image with the appropriate geometry, as well as every such Voyager image acquired in 1979. It is possible that this plume has been continuously active for more than 18 years. In contrast, a plume has never been seen at Pillan Patera prior to the recent Galileo and Hubble Space Telescope images.

    North is toward the top of the picture. The resolution is about 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) per picture element. This composite uses images taken with the green, violet and near infrared filters of the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The images were obtained on June 28, 1997, at a range of more than 600,000 kilometers (372,000 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page

  19. The study of active submarine volcanoes and hydrothermal vents in the Southernmost Part of Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Tsai, C.; Lee, C.

    2004-12-01

    The study area is located in the Southernmost Part of Okinawa Trough (SPOT), which is a back-arc basin formed by extension of Eurasian plate. Previous research indicated two extensional stages in SPOT area. Many normal-fault structures were come into existence during both extensional processes. The SPOT is presently in an activity tectonic episode. Therefore, the area becomes a frequent earthquake and abundant magmatism. The purpose of this study is to discuss which relationship between tectonics, submarine volcanoes and hydrothermal vents in SPOT area. The investigations are continued from 1998 to 2004, we have found at least twelve active hydrothermal vents in study area. Compare the locations hydrothermal vents with fault systems, we find both of them have highly correlated. We can distinguish them into two shapes, pyramidal shape and non-pyramidal shape. According to plumes height, we are able to divide these vents into two groups near east longitude 122.5° . East of this longitude, the hydrothermal plumes are more powerful and west of it are the weaker. This is closely related to the present extensional axis (N80° E) of the southern part of the Okinawa Trough. This can be explained the reason of why the more powerful vents coming out of the east group. The east group is associated with the present back-arc spreading system. West of 122.5° , the spreading system are in a primary stage. The andesitic volcanic island, the Turtle Island, is a result of N60° E extensional tectonism with a lot of faults. Besides the pyramidal shape, this can be proved indirectly. The vents located in the west side were occurred from previous extensional faults and are weaker than the eastern. Therefore, we suggest that if last the extension keeps going on, the hydrothermal vents located at the west side of the longitude 122.5° will be intensified.

  20. Eruption processes and deposit characteristics at the monogenetic Mt. Gambier Volcanic Complex, SE Australia: implications for alternating magmatic and phreatomagmatic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Otterloo, Jozua; Cas, Raymond A. F.; Sheard, Malcolm J.

    2013-08-01

    The ˜5 ka Mt. Gambier Volcanic Complex in the Newer Volcanics Province, Australia is an extremely complex monogenetic, volcanic system that preserves at least 14 eruption points aligned along a fissure system. The complex stratigraphy can be subdivided into six main facies that record alternations between magmatic and phreatomagmatic eruption styles in a random manner. The facies are (1) coherent to vesicular fragmental alkali basalt (effusive/Hawaiian spatter and lava flows); (2) massive scoriaceous fine lapilli with coarse ash (Strombolian fallout); (3) bedded scoriaceous fine lapilli tuff (violent Strombolian fallout); (4) thin-medium bedded, undulating very fine lapilli in coarse ash (dry phreatomagmatic surge-modified fallout); (5) palagonite-altered, cross-bedded, medium lapilli to fine ash (wet phreatomagmatic base surges); and (6) massive, palagonite-altered, very poorly sorted tuff breccia and lapilli tuff (phreato-Vulcanian pyroclastic flows). Since most deposits are lithified, to quantify the grain size distributions (GSDs), image analysis was performed. The facies are distinct based on their GSDs and the fine ash to coarse+fine ash ratios. These provide insights into the fragmentation intensities and water-magma interaction efficiencies for each facies. The eruption chronology indicates a random spatial and temporal sequence of occurrence of eruption styles, except for a "magmatic horizon" of effusive activity occurring at both ends of the volcanic complex simultaneously. The eruption foci are located along NW-SE trending lineaments, indicating that the complex was fed by multiple dykes following the subsurface structures related to the Tartwaup Fault System. Possible factors causing vent migration along these dykes and changes in eruption styles include differences in magma ascent rates, viscosity, crystallinity, degassing and magma discharge rate, as well as hydrological parameters.

  1. On the global distribution of hydrothermal vent fields: One decade later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, S. E.; Baker, E. T.; German, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Since the last global compilation one decade ago, the known number of active submarine hydrothermal vent fields has almost doubled. At the end of 2009, a total of 518 active vent fields was catalogued, with about half (245) visually confirmed and others (273) inferred active at the seafloor. About half (52%) of these vent fields are at mid-ocean ridges (MORs), 25% at volcanic arcs, 21% at back-arc spreading centers (BASCs), and 2% at intra-plate volcanoes and other settings. One third are in high seas, and the nations with the most known active vent fields within EEZs are Tonga, USA, Japan, and New Zealand. The increase in known vent fields reflects a number of factors, including increased national and commercial interests in seafloor hydrothermal deposits as mineral resources. Here, we have comprehensively documented the percentage of strike length at MORs and BASCs that has been systematically explored for hydrothermal activity. As of the end of 2009, almost 30% of the ~60,000 km of MORs had been surveyed at least with spaced vertical profiles to detect hydrothermal plumes. A majority of the vents discovered at MORs in the past decade occurred at segments with < 60 mm/yr full spreading rate. Discoveries at ultra-slow MORs in the past decade included the deepest known vent (Beebe at Mid-Cayman Rise) and high-temperature black smoker vents (e.g., Dragon at SWIR and Loki's Castle at Mohns Ridge), and the highest temperature vent was measured at the slow-spreading S MAR (Turtle Pits). Using a previously published equation for the linear relationship between the number of active vent fields per 100 km strike length (F_s) vs. weighted-average full spreading rate (u_s), we predicted 676 vent fields remaining to be discovered at MORs. Even accounting for the lower F_s at slower spreading rates, almost half of the vents that are predicted remaining to be discovered at MORs are at ultra-slow to slow spreading rates (< 40 mm/yr) and about 1/3 at intermediate rates (40-80 mm

  2. Global alignment: Finding rearrangements during alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Brudno, Michael; Malde, Sanket; Poliakov, Alexander; Do, Chuong B.; Couronne, Olivier; Dubchak, Inna; Batzoglou, Serafim

    2003-01-06

    Motivation: To compare entire genomes from different species, biologists increasingly need alignment methods that are efficient enough to handle long sequences, and accurate enough to correctly align the conserved biological features between distant species. The two main classes of pairwise alignments are global alignment, where one string is transformed into the other, and local alignment, where all locations of similarity between the two strings are returned. Global alignments are less prone to demonstrating false homology as each letter of one sequence is constrained to being aligned to only one letter of the other. Local alignments, on the other hand, can cope with rearrangements between non-syntenic, orthologous sequences by identifying similar regions in sequences; this, however, comes at the expense of a higher false positive rate due to the inability of local aligners to take into account overall conservation maps.

  3. California's potential volcanic hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgenson, P. )

    1989-01-01

    Although volcanic eruptions have occurred infrequently in California during the last few thousand years, the potential danger to life and property from volcanoes in the state is great enough to be of concern, according to a recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publication. The 17-page bulletin, Potential Hazards from Future Volcanic Eruptions in California, gives a brief history of volcanic activity in California during the past 100,000 years, descriptions of the types of volcanoes in the state, the types of potentially hazardous volcanic events that could occur, and hazard-zonation maps and tables depicting six areas of the state where volcanic eruptions might occur. The six areas and brief descriptions of their past volcanic history and potential for future volcanic hazards are briefly summarized here.

  4. Eruption Conditions of Pele Volcano on Io Inferred from Chemistry of Its Volcanic Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolotov, M. Yu.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    We used thermodynamic models and HST observations of Pele plume to calculate the temperature (1430 K) and oxidation state (log fO2 = -11.7) of volcanic gases and magmas of Pele. Our estimated vent pressure is 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -5) bars.

  5. Chemical signatures from hydrothermal venting on slow spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, Henrietta N.

    At least 24 sites of active venting have been confirmed on slow and ultraslow spreading ridges, with dozens more indicated on the basis of hydrothermal plume distributions and/or dredge recovery of massive sulfides. Fluid chemistry data have been published for 13 sites: 8 on the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 3 on the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and 2 on the Central Indian Ridge. Three of these 13 sites (Rainbow, Logatchev, and Lost City) are known to be hosted in ultramafic terrain, and their fluid chemistries reflect the influence of serpentinization reactions, including elevated hydrogen and methane, and low silica concentrations. This brief review presents the published fluid chemistry for all 13 sites, including time series where available, and demonstrates the diversity of chemical compositions engendered by the myriad settings (near and off axis, young volcanic to ultramafic terrain, and depths up to 4100 m) of hydrothermal systems on slow and ultraslow spreading ridges.

  6. Database for potential hazards from future volcanic eruptions in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Melissa N.; Ramsey, David W.; Miller, C. Dan

    2011-01-01

    More than 500 volcanic vents have been identified in the State of California. At least 76 of these vents have erupted, some repeatedly, during the past 10,000 yr. Past volcanic activity has ranged in scale and type from small rhyolitic and basaltic eruptions through large catastrophic rhyolitic eruptions. Sooner or later, volcanoes in California will erupt again, and they could have serious impacts on the health and safety of the State's citizens as well as on its economy. This report describes the nature and probable distribution of potentially hazardous volcanic phenomena and their threat to people and property. It includes hazard-zonation maps that show areas relatively likely to be affected by future eruptions in California. This digital release contains information from maps of potential hazards from future volcanic eruptions in the state of California, published as Plate 1 in U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1847. The main component of this digital release is a spatial database prepared using geographic information systems (GIS) applications. This release also contains links to files to view or print the map plate, main report text, and accompanying hazard tables from Bulletin 1847. It should be noted that much has been learned about the ages of eruptive events in the State of California since the publication of Bulletin 1847 in 1989. For the most up to date information on the status of California volcanoes, please refer to the U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program website.

  7. Laboratory studies of volcanic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieffer, Susan Werner; Sturtevant, Bradford

    1984-09-01

    produces a compression wave. The strength of this wave depends primarily on the sound speed of the fluid in the reservoir but also, secondarily with opposite effect, on the density: helium produces a relatively strong atmospheric shock while the Freons do not produce any optically observable wave front. Well-formed N waves are detected with a microphone far from the reservoir. Barrel shocks, Mach disks, and other familiar features of steady underexpanded supersonic jets form inside the jet almost immediately after passage of the flow head. These features are maintained until the pressure in the reservoir decays to sonic conditions. At low pressures the jets are relatively structureless. Gas-particle jets from volcanic eruptions may behave as pseudogases if particle concentrations and mass and momentum exchange between the components are sufficiently small. The sound speed of volcanic pseudogases can be as large as 1000 m s-1 or as small as a few tens of meters per second depending on the mass loading and initial temperature. Fluids of high sound speed produce stronger atmospheric shock waves than do those of low sound speed. Therefore eruption of a hot gas lightly laden with particulates should produce a stronger shock than eruption of a cooler or heavily laden fluid. An empirical expression suggests that the initial velocity of the head of supersonic volcanic jets is controlled by the sound speed and the ratio of the density of the erupting fluid to that of the atmosphere. The duration of gas or pseudogas eruptions is controlled by the sound speed of the fluid and the ratio of reservoir volume to vent area.

  8. An Approach to In-Situ Observations of Volcanic Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smythe, W. D.; Lopes, M. C.; Pieri, D. C.; Hall, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    Volcanoes have long been recognized as playing a dominant role in the birth, and possibly the death, of biological populations. They are possible sources of primordial gases, provide conditions sufficient for creating amino acids, strongly affect the heat balance in the atmosphere, and have been shown to sustain life (in oceanic vents.) Eruptions can have profound effects on local flora and fauna, and for very large eruptions, may alter global weather patterns and cause entire species to fail. Measurements of particulates, gases, and dynamics within a volcanic plume are critical to understanding both how volcanoes work and how plumes affect populations, environment, and aviation. Volcanic plumes and associated eruption columns are a miasma of toxic gases, corrosive condensates, and abrasive particulates that makes them hazardous to nearby populations and poses a significant risk to all forms of aviation. Plumes also provide a mechanism for sampling the volcanic interior, which, for hydrothermal environments, may host unique biological populations.

  9. Intrusive Magmatism and Explosive Volcanism on the Moon and Mercury: Insights from Floor-Fractured Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jozwiak, L.; Head, J. W., III; Wilson, L.

    2015-12-01

    Lunar floor-fractured craters are a class of 170 craters characterized by shallow, deformed, and heavily fractured floors, with associated volcanic features commonly including deposits of mare material, pyroclastic deposits, and vents. The fracturing is interpreted to form in response to the stalling of a dike underneath the crater; resultant sill formation deforms the overlying crater floor. Morphologic measurements of these craters can be used to estimate sill dimensions, and from this we estimate the total volume of magma contained in all floor-fractured crater sills to be approximately 3 106 km3, 30% of the total lunar mare volume. Thus floor-fractured craters represent a unique window into intrusive magmatic processes on the Moon, including magma degassing and explosive volcanism. On the Moon, explosive volcanism is frequently associated with the degassing of floor-fractured crater intrusions; the morphologies associated with this process include small vents commonly located along fractures, and dark halos, which are low albedo deposits surrounding vents and are interpreted to be pyroclastic in origin. Other explosive volcanic morphologies include regional-scale pyroclastic deposits for which no vents have yet been identified, and large vent structures, such as Sulpicius Gallus. In contrast to the numerous floor-fractured craters on the Moon, there have been no conclusively identified floor-fractured craters on Mercury. Instead, Mercury exhibits a large number of what are interpreted to be explosive volcanic deposits, on the basis of the orange/red color of the inferred pyroclastic material identified in color images. These deposits are often much more areally extensive than their lunar counter parts, and surround a wide range of large pit and vent-like morphologies, themselves up to 10s of km in diameter. Using existing databases of these features, we have divided the spectrally identified volcanic deposits into 6 initial morphologic subclasses. Using the

  10. Structure of the Tongariro Volcanic system: Insights from magnetotelluric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Graham J.; Bibby, Hugh M.; Ogawa, Yasuo; Wallin, Erin L.; Bennie, Stewart L.; Caldwell, T. Grant; Keys, Harry; Bertrand, Edward A.; Heise, Wiebke

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of magma reservoirs (the main repositories for eruptible magma) play a fundamental role in the style and behaviour of volcanic systems. A key first step in understanding these systems is to identify their location and size accurately. We present results from a broadband magnetotelluric study of the Tongariro Volcanic system and discuss how the results fit within current petrological models. The Tongariro Volcanic system is a composite andesitic cone complex, located at the southern end of the Taupo Volcanic Zone in the central North Island of New Zealand. We use data from 136 broadband magnetotelluric soundings within a 25 × 35 km area covering the volcanic system to construct a 3D image of the magmatic system of the Tongariro Volcanic Complex including Mount Ngauruhoe. The structure of the Tongariro magmatic system has been determined from 3D forward and inverse modelling of the magnetotelluric data and allowed for an estimation of the melt fraction present within the system. 3D inverse modelling of the magnetotelluric data shows: a well-developed shallow low resistivity zone outlining the geothermal system; a zone of even lower resistivity representing a shallow crustal magma accumulation zone located at a depth of ˜4-12 km offset to the east of the Tongariro vent system; and a zone with a slightly higher resistivity connecting these two components of the magmatic system providing the path for magmatic fluids from the deeper source region to reach the surface during eruptive events.

  11. Implications of historical eruptive-vent migration on the northeast rift zone of Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, J.P. )

    1990-07-01

    Five times within the past 138 yr (1852, 1855-1856, 1880-1881, 1942, and 1984), lava flows from vents on the northeast rift zone of Mauna Loa Volcano have reached within a few kilometres of Hilo (the largest city on the Island of Hawaii). Most lavas erupted on this right zone in historical time have traveled northeastward (toward Hilo), because their eruptive vents have been concentrated north of the rift zone's broad topographic axis. However, with few exceptions each successive historical eruption on the northeast rift zone has occurred farther southeast than the preceding one. Had the 1984 eruptive vents (the most southeasterly yet) opened less than 200 m farther southeast, the bulk of the 1984 lavas would have flowed away from Hilo. If this historical vent-migration pattern continues, the next eruption on the northeast rift zone could send lavas to the southeast, toward less populated areas. The historical Mauna Loa vent-migration patterns mimic southeastern younging of the Hawaiian-Emperor volcanic chain and may be cryptically related to northwestward movement of the Pacific plate. Systematic temporal-spatial vent-migration patterns may characterize eruptive activity at other volcanoes with flank activity and should be considered as an aid to long-term prediction of eruption sites.

  12. 46 CFR 151.15-5 - Venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Pressure-vacuum venting. A normally closed venting system fitted with a device to automatically limit the pressure or vacuum in the tank to design limits. Pressure-vacuum relief valves shall comply with the... devices in accordance with the requirements of § 54.15-13 of this chapter. (2) When a...

  13. Silicate volcanism on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1986-03-01

    This paper is mainly concerned with the nature of volcanic eruptions on Io, taking into account questions regarding the presence of silicates or sulfur as principal component. Attention is given to the generation of silicate magma, the viscous dissipation in the melt zone, thermal anomalies at eruption sites, and Ionian volcanism. According to the information available about Io, it appears that its volcanism and hence its surface materials are dominantly silicic. Several percent of volatile materials such as sulfur, but also including sodium- and potassium-rich materials, may also be present. The volatile materials at the surface are continually vaporized and melted as a result of the high rates of silicate volcanism.

  14. 3D structure and formation of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Møre Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjoberg, Sigurd; Schmiedel, Tobias; Planke, Sverre; Svensen, Henrik H.; Galland, Oliver; Jerram, Dougal A.

    2016-04-01

    The mid-Norwegian Møre margin is regarded as a type example of a volcanic rifted margin, with its formation usually related to the influence of the Icelandic plume activity. The area is characterized by the presence of voluminous basaltic complexes such as extrusive lava sequences, intrusive sills and dikes, and hydrothermal vent complexes within the Møre Basin. Emplacement of hydrothermal vent complexes is accommodated by deformation of the host rock. The edges of igneous intrusions mobilize fluids by heat transfer into the sedimentary host rock (aureoles). Fluid expansion may lead to formation of piercing structures due to upward fluid migration. Hydrothermal vent complexes induce bending of overlying strata, leading to the formation of dome structures at the paleo-surface. These dome structures are important as they indicate the accommodation created for the intrusions by deformation of the upper layers of the stratigraphy, and may form important structures in many volcanic margins. Both the morphological characteristics of the upper part and the underlying feeder-structure (conduit-zone) can be imaged and studied on 3D seismic data. Seismic data from the Tulipan prospect located in the western part of the Møre Basin have been used in this study. The investigation focusses on (1) the vent complex geometries, (2) the induced surface deformation patterns, (3) the relation to the intrusions (heat source), as well as (4) the emplacement depth of the hydrothermal vent complexes. We approach this by doing a detailed 3D seismic interpretation of the Tulipan seismic data cube. The complexes formed during the initial Eocene, and are believed to be a key factor behind the rapid warming event called the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). The newly derived understanding of age, eruptive deposits, and formation of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Møre Basin enables us to contribute to the general understanding of the igneous plumbing system in volcanic basins and

  15. Eruption probabilities for the Lassen Volcanic Center and regional volcanism, northern California, and probabilities for large explosive eruptions in the Cascade Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, Manuel; Clynne, Michael A.; Muffler, L.J. Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Chronologies for eruptive activity of the Lassen Volcanic Center and for eruptions from the regional mafic vents in the surrounding area of the Lassen segment of the Cascade Range are here used to estimate probabilities of future eruptions. For the regional mafic volcanism, the ages of many vents are known only within broad ranges, and two models are developed that should bracket the actual eruptive ages. These chronologies are used with exponential, Weibull, and mixed-exponential probability distributions to match the data for time intervals between eruptions. For the Lassen Volcanic Center, the probability of an eruption in the next year is 1.4x10-4 for the exponential distribution and 2.3x10-4 for the mixed exponential distribution. For the regional mafic vents, the exponential distribution gives a probability of an eruption in the next year of 6.5x10-4, but the mixed exponential distribution indicates that the current probability, 12,000 years after the last event, could be significantly lower. For the exponential distribution, the highest probability is for an eruption from a regional mafic vent. Data on areas and volumes of lava flows and domes of the Lassen Volcanic Center and of eruptions from the regional mafic vents provide constraints on the probable sizes of future eruptions. Probabilities of lava-flow coverage are similar for the Lassen Volcanic Center and for regional mafic vents, whereas the probable eruptive volumes for the mafic vents are generally smaller. Data have been compiled for large explosive eruptions (>≈ 5 km3 in deposit volume) in the Cascade Range during the past 1.2 m.y. in order to estimate probabilities of eruption. For erupted volumes >≈5 km3, the rate of occurrence since 13.6 ka is much higher than for the entire period, and we use these data to calculate the annual probability of a large eruption at 4.6x10-4. For erupted volumes ≥10 km3, the rate of occurrence has been reasonably constant from 630 ka to the present, giving

  16. Developing International Guidelines on Volcanic Hazard Assessments for Nuclear Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Charles

    2014-05-01

    tremendous challenge in quantitative volcanic hazard assessments to encompass alternative conceptual models, and to create models that are robust to evolving understanding of specific volcanic systems by the scientific community. A central question in volcanic hazards forecasts is quantifying rates of volcanic activity. Especially for long-dormant volcanic systems, data from the geologic record may be sparse, individual events may be missing or unrecognized in the geologic record, patterns of activity may be episodic or otherwise nonstationary. This leads to uncertainty in forecasting long-term rates of activity. Hazard assessments strive to quantify such uncertainty, for example by comparing observed rates of activity with alternative parametric and nonparametric models. Numerical models are presented that characterize the spatial distribution of potential volcanic events. These spatial density models serve as the basis for application of numerical models of specific phenomena such as development of lava flow, tephra fallout, and a host of other volcanic phenomena. Monte Carlo techniques (random sampling, stratified sampling, importance sampling) are methods used to sample vent location and other key eruption parameters, such as eruption volume, magma rheology, and eruption column height for probabilistic models. The development of coupled scenarios (e.g., the probability of tephra accumulation on a slope resulting in subsequent debris flows) is also assessed through these methods, usually with the aid of event trees. The primary products of long-term forecasts are a statistical model of the conditional probability of the potential effects of volcanism, should an eruption occur, and the probability of such activity occurring. It is emphasized that hazard forecasting is an iterative process, and board consideration must be given to alternative conceptual models of volcanism, weighting of volcanological data in the analyses, and alternative statistical and numerical models

  17. Submarine hydrothermal activity along the mid-Kermadec Arc, New Zealand: Large-scale effects on venting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ronde, C. E. J.; Baker, E. T.; Massoth, G. J.; Lupton, J. E.; Wright, I. C.; Sparks, R. J.; Bannister, S. C.; Reyners, M. E.; Walker, S. L.; Greene, R. R.; Ishibashi, J.; Faure, K.; Resing, J. A.; Lebon, G. T.

    2007-07-01

    The 2,500-km Kermadec-Tonga arc is the longest submarine arc on the planet. Here, we report on the second of a series of cruises designed to investigate large-scale controls on active hydrothermal venting on this arc. The 2002 NZAPLUME II cruise surveyed 12 submarine volcanic centers along ~580 km of the middle Kermadec arc (MKA), extending a 1999 cruise that surveyed 260 km of the southern Kermadec arc (SKA). Average spacing between volcanic centers increases northward from 30 km on backarc crust along the SKA, to 45 km on backarc crust along the southern MKA, to 58 km where the MKA joins the Kermadec Ridge. Volcanic cones dominate in the backarc, and calderas dominate the Kermadec Ridge. The incidence of venting is higher along the MKA (83%, 10 of 12 volcanic centers) than the SKA (67%, 8 of 12), but the relative intensity of venting, as given by plume thickness, areal extent, and concentration of dissolved gases and ionic species, is generally weaker in the MKA. This pattern may reflect subduction of the ~17-km-thick oceanic Hikurangi Plateau beneath the SKA. Subduction of this basaltic mass should greatly increase fluid loss from the downgoing slab, initiating extensive melting in the upper mantle wedge and invigorating the hydrothermal systems of the SKA. Conversely, volcanic centers in the southern MKA are starved of magma replenishment and so their hydrothermal systems are waning. Farther north, where the MKA centers merge with the Kermadec Ridge, fewer but larger magma bodies accumulate in the thicker (older) crust, ensuring more widely separated, caldera-dominated volcanic centers.

  18. Video Observations by Telepresence Reveal Two Types of Hydrothermal Venting on Kawio Barat Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, D. A.; Holden, J. F.; Shank, T. M.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Sherrin, J.; Herrera, S.; Baker, E. T.; Lovalvo, D.; Makarim, S.; Malik, M. A.; Wirasantosa, S.; Hammond, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    The INDEX-SATAL 2010 expedition began an international exploration of the seafloor in Indonesian waters using the methodology of telepresence, conducting EM302 multibeam mapping, water column CTD, and ROV high-definition video operations and sending data back to Exploration Command Centers in Indonesia and Seattle. Science observers in other locations in the US and Canada were engaged in real-time observations and interpretation of results. One mission goal was to locate hydrothermal or volcanic activity. Intense light scattering and redox potential measurements in the water column over Kawio Barat (KB)indicated a high level of hydrothermal activity, and direct video observations confirmed venting near the summit. None of the other volcanic features west of the Sangihe arc that were investigated during the mission had confirmed hydrothermal activity. ROV capabilities did not include physical sampling or temperature measurement, so our interpretation is based on visual comparison to other known sites. The steep western flank of KB from 2000 m depth to the summit (1850 m) has many areas of white and orange staining on exposed rocks, with some elemental sulfur, and broad areas covered with dark volcaniclastic sand, but no active venting was seen. KB has a summit ridge running WNW-ESE, with a major cross-cutting ridge on the western portion of the summit. Hydrothermal activity is concentrated near the eastern side of this intersection, on both the northern and southern sides of the summit ridge. Venting on the northern side of the summit ridge is characterized by intense white particle-rich fluids emanating directly from the rocky substrate with frozen flows of elemental sulfur down slope. This type of venting is visually very similar to the venting seen on NW Rota-1, an actively erupting volcano in the Mariana arc, and suggests that KB is actively releasing magmatic gases rich in sulfur dioxide to produce the elemental sulfur flows, inferred fine particulate sulfur

  19. Volcanism on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard

    2014-03-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Io, 1610 to 1995: Galileo to Galileo: 1. Io, 1610-1979; 2. Between Voyager and Galileo: 1979-95; 3. Galileo at Io; Part II. Planetary Volcanism: Evolution and Composition: 4. Io and Earth: formation, evolution, and interior structure; 5. Magmas and volatiles; Part III. Observing and Modeling Volcanic Activity: 6. Observations: thermal remote sensing of volcanic activity; 7. Models of effusive eruption processes; 8. Thermal evolution of volcanic eruptions; Part IV. Galileo at Io: the Volcanic Bestiary: 9. The view from Galileo; 10. The lava lake at Pele; 11. Pillan and Tvashtar: lava fountains and flows; 12. Prometheus and Amirani: Effusive activity and insulated flows; 13. Loki Patera: Io's powerhouse; 14. Other volcanoes and eruptions; Part V. Volcanism on Io: The Global View: 15. Geomorphology: paterae, shields, flows and mountains; 16. Volcanic plumes; 17. Hot spots; Part VI. Io after Galileo: 18. Volcanism on Io: a post-Galileo view; 19. The future of Io observations; Appendix 1; Appendix 2; References; Index.

  20. A newly discovered Pliocene volcanic field on the western Sardinia continental margin (western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conforti, Alessandro; Budillon, Francesca; Tonielli, Renato; De Falco, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    A previously unknown submerged volcanic field offshore western Sardinia (western Mediterranean Sea), has been identified based on swath bathymetric data collected in 2009, 2010 and 2013, and high-resolution seismic profiles collected in 2011 and 2013. About 40 conical-shaped volcanic edifices (maximum width of about 1600 m and maximum height of about 180 m) and several lava outcrops (up to 1,200 m wide) were recognized at 20 to 150 m water depth over an area of 800 km2. The volcanic edifices are mainly eruptive monogenic vents, mostly isolated with a rather distinct shape, or grouped to form a coalescent volcanic body in which single elements are often still recognizable. High-resolution seismics enabled identifying relationships between the volcanic bodies and continental margin successions. The edifices overlie a major erosional surface related to the margin exposure following the Messinian salinity crisis, and are overlain by or interbedded with an early Pliocene marine unit. This seismo-stratigraphic pattern dates the volcanic activity to the early Pliocene, in agreement with the radiometric age of the Catalano island lavas (4.7 Ma) reported in earlier studies. The morphometry of the volcanic bodies suggests that cone erosion was higher at shallow water depths. Indeed, most of the shallow edifices are strongly eroded and flattened at 125 to 130 m water depth, plausibly explained by recurrent sub-aerial exposure during Pleistocene sea-level lowstands, whereas cones in deeper water are much better preserved. Volcanic vents and lava deposits, hereafter named the Catalano volcanic field (CVF), are emplaced along lineaments corresponding to the main directions of the normal fault system, which lowered the Sinis Basin and the western Sardinia continental margin. The CVF represents a volumetrically relevant phase of the late Miocene - Quaternary anorogenic volcanic cycle of Sardinia, which is related to the first stage of the extensional tectonics affecting the island

  1. Microbial Communities at Non-Volcanic and Volcanic Sites of the Gakkel Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmke, E.; Juergens, J.; Tausendfreund, M.; Wollenburg, J.; Shank, T.; Edmonds, H.; Humphris, S.; Nakamura, K.; Liljebladh, B.; Winsor, P.; Singh, H.; Reves-Sohn, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge in the eastern Arctic Ocean is the slowest spreading, deepest, and most isolated portion of the global mid-ocean ridge system and therefore predestined for comparative investigations on deep-sea vent communities. However, the perennial cover of thick sea ice has made this area largely inaccessible to science. The Arctic Gakkel Vents Expedition (AGAVE) utilized the icebreaker ODEN and newly developed vehicles for exploration and sampling in connection with a CTD/rosette equipped with different sensors and a high-resolution multi-beam bathymetry system. We focused our studies on the peridotite-hosted region at 85°N, 7°E and on the basaltic volcanism area at 85°N, 85°E. Water, sediment, and rock samples were taken to describe the microbial communities in different zones of these two sites. Sampling was guided by anomalies of backscattering, temperature, Eh, as well as by high-resolution seafloor imagery. Samples were preserved or processed on board immediately after sampling. Molecular analyses, cultural methods, total bacterial counts, and activity measurements were employed to describe the structure of the microbial communities, their phylogeny, potential adaptations, and possible role in biogeochemical cycles. The first molecular biological results of the bacterial communities of the 85°E site indicated atypical of deep- sea venting communities. These preliminary results were supported by the images of the under-ice vehicle "Camper" which showed thick yellow "fluffy" mats (often > 5cm thick) and orange "pebbly" material without any smell of H2S markedly different than the white, consolidated Beggiatoa mats often observable at deep venting sites. Foraminifera occurred regularly on top of basalt rocks as well as within the bacterial mats.

  2. A new CO2 vent for the study of ocean acidification in the Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Hernández, C A; Sangil, C; Hernández, J C

    2016-08-15

    Natural CO2 vents are considered the gold standard of ocean acidification (OA) studies. In coastal areas these rare vents have only been investigated at the Mediterranean temperate rocky reefs and at Indo-Pacific coral reefs, although there should be more at other volcanic shores around the world. Substantial scientific efforts on investigating OA effects have been mostly performed by laboratory experiments. However, there is a debate on how acute this kind of approach truly represents the responses to OA scenarios, since it generally involves short-term, rapid perturbation and single variable and species experiments. Due to these limitations, world areas with natural CO2 vents are essential to understand long-term marine ecosystem responses to rising human derived atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Here, we presented a new vent found in the subtropical North East Atlantic reefs (28°N, La Palma Island) that shows moderate CO2 emission (900ppm), reducing pH values to an annual average of 7.86±0.16.

  3. A new CO2 vent for the study of ocean acidification in the Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Hernández, C A; Sangil, C; Hernández, J C

    2016-08-15

    Natural CO2 vents are considered the gold standard of ocean acidification (OA) studies. In coastal areas these rare vents have only been investigated at the Mediterranean temperate rocky reefs and at Indo-Pacific coral reefs, although there should be more at other volcanic shores around the world. Substantial scientific efforts on investigating OA effects have been mostly performed by laboratory experiments. However, there is a debate on how acute this kind of approach truly represents the responses to OA scenarios, since it generally involves short-term, rapid perturbation and single variable and species experiments. Due to these limitations, world areas with natural CO2 vents are essential to understand long-term marine ecosystem responses to rising human derived atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Here, we presented a new vent found in the subtropical North East Atlantic reefs (28°N, La Palma Island) that shows moderate CO2 emission (900ppm), reducing pH values to an annual average of 7.86±0.16. PMID:27210563

  4. Mercury accumulation in hydrothermal vent mollusks from the southern Tonga Arc, southwestern Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seyong; Kim, Se-Joo; Ju, Se-Jong; Pak, Sang-Joon; Son, Seung-Kyu; Yang, Jisook; Han, Seunghee

    2015-05-01

    We provide the mercury (Hg) and monomethylmercury (MMHg) levels of the plume water, sulfide ore, sediment, and mollusks located at the hydrothermal vent fields of the southern Tonga Arc, where active volcanism and intense seismic activity occur frequently. Our objectives were: (1) to address the potential release of Hg from hydrothermal fluids and (2) to examine the distribution of Hg and MMHg levels in hydrothermal mollusks (mussels and snails) harboring chemotrophic bacteria. While high concentrations of Hg in the sediment and Hg, As, and Sb in the sulfide ore indicates that their source is likely hydrothermal fluids, the MMHg concentration in the sediment was orders of magnitude lower than the Hg (<0.001%). It suggests that Hg methylation may have not been favorable in the vent field sediment. In addition, Hg concentrations in the mollusks were much higher (10-100 times) than in other hydrothermal vent environments, indicating that organisms located at the Tonga Arc are exposed to exceedingly high Hg levels. While Hg concentration was higher in the gills and digestive glands than in the mantles and residues of snails and mussels, the MMHg concentrations in the gills and digestive glands were orders of magnitude lower (0.004-0.04%) than Hg concentrations. In summary, our results suggest that the release of Hg from the hydrothermal vent fields of the Tonga Arc and subsequent bioaccumulation are substantial, but not for MMHg. PMID:25748345

  5. Mercury accumulation in hydrothermal vent mollusks from the southern Tonga Arc, southwestern Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seyong; Kim, Se-Joo; Ju, Se-Jong; Pak, Sang-Joon; Son, Seung-Kyu; Yang, Jisook; Han, Seunghee

    2015-05-01

    We provide the mercury (Hg) and monomethylmercury (MMHg) levels of the plume water, sulfide ore, sediment, and mollusks located at the hydrothermal vent fields of the southern Tonga Arc, where active volcanism and intense seismic activity occur frequently. Our objectives were: (1) to address the potential release of Hg from hydrothermal fluids and (2) to examine the distribution of Hg and MMHg levels in hydrothermal mollusks (mussels and snails) harboring chemotrophic bacteria. While high concentrations of Hg in the sediment and Hg, As, and Sb in the sulfide ore indicates that their source is likely hydrothermal fluids, the MMHg concentration in the sediment was orders of magnitude lower than the Hg (<0.001%). It suggests that Hg methylation may have not been favorable in the vent field sediment. In addition, Hg concentrations in the mollusks were much higher (10-100 times) than in other hydrothermal vent environments, indicating that organisms located at the Tonga Arc are exposed to exceedingly high Hg levels. While Hg concentration was higher in the gills and digestive glands than in the mantles and residues of snails and mussels, the MMHg concentrations in the gills and digestive glands were orders of magnitude lower (0.004-0.04%) than Hg concentrations. In summary, our results suggest that the release of Hg from the hydrothermal vent fields of the Tonga Arc and subsequent bioaccumulation are substantial, but not for MMHg.

  6. Volcanic activity within the Vestmannaeyjar archipelago, south of Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskuldsson, A.; Kjartansson, E.; Hey, R.; Driscoll, N.

    2006-12-01

    Bathymetric research with multibeam techniques and chirp profiles reveal the volcanic topography of the Vestmannaeyjar archipelago just off the south coast of Iceland. Within the archipelago two historic eruptions have occurred, Surtsey 1963-1967 and the one of Heimaey in 1973. Five other eruptive vents have been identified as Holocene, Storhöfdi ~8000 BP, Sæfell ~6220 BP, Helgafell ~5900 BP and the islands Bjarnarey and Ellirey ~4500 BP. High precision multibeam data reveal several other eruptive vents and their geometry in the area. From the geometry it can be concluded that prehistoric volcanic activity in the area is dominated by phreatomagmatic activity. Tuff cones up to 2 km in diameter are observed in the area of Heimaey. Eustatic sea level changes can be inferred from these volcanic formations (Rofubodi vent) , indicating that a rise of up to 80 m has occurred since late Pleistocene times (~12000 years BP). Further our data show that sea level rise occurred in steps, as is manifested by the Alsey reef, now submerged and extending north of that island. The data also allow us to identify four major submarine lava flows in the area. One from the Eldfell eruption in 1973, one from the Helgafell eruption 5900 BP, one from the Storhofdi eruption ~8000BP and finally a lava flow that is extending from Faxasker towards the north west. The Vestmannaeyjar archipelago is forming a ridge extending NE to SW. The ridge is about 5 km wide and 30 km long. The ridge rises from a depth of some 72 m in the west but falls off to about 130 m in the east. The eastern border is more prominent than the western one. The Vestmannaeyjar ridge ends abruptly in the north, just prior to reaching the main outwash delta from the main island Iceland. A narrow trough has been formed in the area, Allinn, as the outwash delta propagates towards the ridge. Our data also allow for interpretation on relative timing of the volcanic formations. It has been shown that the LGM ice sheet extended to

  7. Active and Recent Volcanism and Hydrogeothermal Activity on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.; Cantor, B. A.; Harrison, T. N.; Kennedy, M. R.; Lipkaman, L. J.; Malin, M. C.; Posiolova, L. V.; Shean, D. E.

    2010-10-01

    There are no active volcanoes or geysers on Mars today, nor in the very recent past. Since 1997, we have sought evidence from targeted narrow angle camera images and daily, global wide angle images for active or very recent (decades to < 10 Ma) volcanism or hydrogeothermal events on Mars. Despite > 11 years of daily global imaging and coverage of > 60% of Mars at ≤ 6 m/pixel (with the remaining < 40% largely outside of volcanic regions), we have found no such evidence, although one lava field in Aeolis (5°N, 220°W) stands out as possibly the site of the most recent volcanism. Authors of impact crater size-frequency studies suggest some volcanic landforms on Mars are as young as tens to hundreds of Ma. This interpreted youth has implications for understanding the internal geophysical state of Mars and has encouraged those seeking sources for trace gases (methane) in the atmosphere and those seeking "warm havens for life” (Jakosky 1996, New Scientist 150, 38-42). We targeted thousands of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) MOC and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) CTX (and HiRISE) images to examine volcanic regions; we also studied every MGS MOC and MRO MARCI wide angle image. For evidence of active volcanism, we sought eruption plumes, new vents, new tephra deposits, and new volcanogenic flows not observed in earlier images. For recent volcanism, we sought volcanogenic flows with zero or few superposed impact craters and minimal regolith development or superposed eolian sediment. Targets included all volcanic landforms identified in research papers as "recent” as well as areas speculated to have exhibited eruptive plumes. An independent search for endogenic heat sources, a key Mars Odyssey THEMIS objective, has also not produced a positive result (Christensen et al. 2005, P24A-01, Eos, Trans. Am. Geophys. Union 86/52).

  8. Easy Volcanic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toohey, Matthew; Stevens, Bjorn; Schmidt, Hauke; Timmreck, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Radiative forcing by stratospheric sulfate aerosol of volcanic origin is one of the strongest drivers of natural climate variability. Transient model simulations attempting to match observed climate variability, such as the CMIP historical simulations, rely on volcanic forcing reconstructions based on observations of a small sample of recent eruptions and coarse proxy data for eruptions before the satellite era. Volcanic forcing data sets used in CMIP5 were provided either in terms of optical properties, or in terms of sulfate aerosol mass, leading to significant inter-model spread in the actual volcanic radiative forcing produced by models and in their resulting climate responses. It remains therefore unclear to what degree inter-model spread in response to volcanic forcing represents model differences or variations in the forcing. In order to isolate model differences, Easy Volcanic Aerosol (EVA) provides an analytic representation of volcanic stratospheric aerosol forcing, based on available observations and aerosol model results, prescribing the aerosol's radiative properties and primary modes of spatial and temporal variability. In contrast to regriddings of observational data, EVA allows for the production of physically consistent forcing for historic and hypothetical eruptions of varying magnitude, source latitude, and season. Within CMIP6, EVA will be used to reconstruct volcanic forcing over the past 2000 years for use in the Paleo-Modeling Intercomparison Project (PMIP), and will provide forcing sets for VolMIP experiments aiming to quantify model uncertainty in the response to volcanic forcing. Here, the functional form of EVA will be introduced, along with illustrative examples including the EVA-based reconstruction of volcanic forcing over the historical period, and that of the 1815 Tambora eruption.

  9. Spatial and temporal variations of diffuse CO_{2} degassing at the N-S volcanic rift-zone of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) during 2002-2015 period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Mar; Ingman, Dylan; Alexander, Scott; Barrancos, José; Rodríguez, Fátima; Melián, Gladys; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2016-04-01

    Tenerife is the largest of the Canary Islands and, together with Gran Canaria Island, is the only one with a central volcanic complex that started to grow at about 3.5 Ma. Nowadays the central complex is formed by Las Cañadas caldera, a volcanic depression measuring 16×9 km that resulted from multiple vertical collapses and was partially filled by post-caldera volcanic products. Up to 297 mafic monogenetic cones have been recognized on Tenerife, and they represent the most common eruptive activity occurring on the island during the last 1 Ma (Dóniz et al., 2008). Most of the monogenetic cones are aligned following a triple junction-shaped rift system, as result of inflation produced by the concentration of emission vents and dykes in bands at 120o to one another as a result of minimum stress fracturing of the crust by a mantle upwelling. The main structural characteristic of the southern volcanic rift (N-S) of the island is an apparent absence of a distinct ridge, and a fan shaped distribution of monogenetic cones. Four main volcanic successions in the southern volcanic rift zone of Tenerife, temporally separated by longer periods (˜70 - 250 ka) without volcanic activity, have been identified (Kröchert and Buchner, 2008). Since there are currently no visible gas emissions at the N-S rift, diffuse degassing surveys have become an important geochemical tool for the surveillance of this volcanic system. We report here the last results of diffuse CO2 efflux survey at the N-S rift of Tenerife, performed using the accumulation chamber method in the summer period of 2015. The objectives of the surveys were: (i) to constrain the total CO2 output from the studied area and (ii) to evaluate occasional CO2 efflux surveys as a volcanic surveillance tool for the N-S rift of Tenerife. Soil CO2 efflux values ranged from non-detectable up to 31.7 g m-2 d-1. A spatial distribution map, constructed following the sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) procedure, did not show an

  10. Spatial and temporal variations of diffuse CO_{2} degassing at the N-S volcanic rift-zone of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) during 2002-2015 period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Mar; Ingman, Dylan; Alexander, Scott; Barrancos, José; Rodríguez, Fátima; Melián, Gladys; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2016-04-01

    Tenerife is the largest of the Canary Islands and, together with Gran Canaria Island, is the only one with a central volcanic complex that started to grow at about 3.5 Ma. Nowadays the central complex is formed by Las Cañadas caldera, a volcanic depression measuring 16×9 km that resulted from multiple vertical collapses and was partially filled by post-caldera volcanic products. Up to 297 mafic monogenetic cones have been recognized on Tenerife, and they represent the most common eruptive activity occurring on the island during the last 1 Ma (Dóniz et al., 2008). Most of the monogenetic cones are aligned following a triple junction-shaped rift system, as result of inflation produced by the concentration of emission vents and dykes in bands at 120o to one another as a result of minimum stress fracturing of the crust by a mantle upwelling. The main structural characteristic of the southern volcanic rift (N-S) of the island is an apparent absence of a distinct ridge, and a fan shaped distribution of monogenetic cones. Four main volcanic successions in the southern volcanic rift zone of Tenerife, temporally separated by longer periods (˜70 - 250 ka) without volcanic activity, have been identified (Kröchert and Buchner, 2008). Since there are currently no visible gas emissions at the N-S rift, diffuse degassing surveys have become an important geochemical tool for the surveillance of this volcanic system. We report here the last results of diffuse CO2 efflux survey at the N-S rift of Tenerife, performed using the accumulation chamber method in the summer period of 2015. The objectives of the surveys were: (i) to constrain the total CO2 output from the studied area and (ii) to evaluate occasional CO2 efflux surveys as a volcanic surveillance tool for the N-S rift of Tenerife. Soil CO2 efflux values ranged from non-detectable up to 31.7 g m‑2 d‑1. A spatial distribution map, constructed following the sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) procedure, did not show an

  11. Late Holocene volcanism at Medicine Lake Volcano, northern California Cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Champion, Duane E.; Grove, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    accessibility and good exposure of lavas, combined with physical and petrologic evidence for multiple and varied mafic inputs, has created an unusual opportunity to understand the workings of this large magmatic system. A combined total of more than 25 intrusive and extrusive events are indicated for late Holocene time. Plutonic inclusions, some with ages as young as Holocene, were also brought to the surface in five of the eruptions. All eruptions took place along northwest- to northeast-trending alignments of vents, reflecting the overall east-west extensional tectonic environment. The interaction of tectonism and volcanism is a dominant influence at this subduction-related volcano, located where the west edge of the extensional Basin and Range Province impinges on the Cascades arc. Ongoing subsidence focused at the central caldera has been documented along with geophysical evidence for a small magma body. This evidence, combined with the frequency of eruptive and intrusive activity in late Holocene time, an active geothermal system, and intermittent long-period seismic events indicate that the volcano is likely to erupt again.

  12. Late Holocene volcanism at Medicine Lake Volcano, northern California Cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Champion, Duane E.; Grove, Timothy L.

    2016-05-23

    accessibility and good exposure of lavas, combined with physical and petrologic evidence for multiple and varied mafic inputs, has created an unusual opportunity to understand the workings of this large magmatic system. A combined total of more than 25 intrusive and extrusive events are indicated for late Holocene time. Plutonic inclusions, some with ages as young as Holocene, were also brought to the surface in five of the eruptions. All eruptions took place along northwest- to northeast-trending alignments of vents, reflecting the overall east-west extensional tectonic environment. The interaction of tectonism and volcanism is a dominant influence at this subduction-related volcano, located where the west edge of the extensional Basin and Range Province impinges on the Cascades arc. Ongoing subsidence focused at the central caldera has been documented along with geophysical evidence for a small magma body. This evidence, combined with the frequency of eruptive and intrusive activity in late Holocene time, an active geothermal system, and intermittent long-period seismic events indicate that the volcano is likely to erupt again.

  13. Monitoring arrangement for vented nuclear fuel elements

    DOEpatents

    Campana, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel reactor core, fuel elements are arranged in a closely packed hexagonal configuration, each fuel element having diametrically opposed vents permitting 180.degree. rotation of the fuel elements to counteract bowing. A grid plate engages the fuel elements and forms passages for communicating sets of three, four or six individual vents with respective monitor lines in order to communicate vented radioactive gases from the fuel elements to suitable monitor means in a manner readily permitting detection of leakage in individual fuel elements.

  14. Volcanism-sedimentation interaction in the Campo de Calatrava Volcanic Field (Spain): a magnetostratigraphic and geochronological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Hernández, Antonio; López-Moro, Francisco Javier; Gallardo-Millán, José Luis; Martín-Serrano, Ángel; Gómez-Fernández, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on the influence of Cenozoic volcanism of the Campo de Calatrava volcanic field on the sedimentation of two small continental basins in Spain (Argamasilla and Calzada-Moral basins). The volcanism in this area was mainly monogenetic, according to the small-volume volcanic edifices of scoria cones that were generated and the occurrence of tuff rings and maars. A sedimentological analysis of the volcaniclastic deposits led to the identification of facies close to the vents, low-density (dilute) pyroclastic surges, secondary volcanic deposits and typical maar deposits. Whole-rock K/Ar dating, together with palaeomagnetic constraints, yielded an age of 3.11-3.22 Ma for the onset of maar formation, the deposition finished in the Late Gauss-Early Matuyana. Using both techniques and previous paleontological data allowed it to be inferred that the maar formation and the re-sedimentation stage that occurred in Argamasilla and Calzada-Moral basins were roughly coeval. The occurrence of syn-eruption volcaniclastic deposits with small thicknesses that were separated by longer inter-eruption periods, where fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation was prevalent, together with the presence of small-volume volcanic edifices indicated that there were short periods of volcanic activity in this area. The volcanic activity was strongly controlled by previous basement faults that favoured magma feeding, and the faults also controlled the location of volcanoes themselves. The occurrence of the volcanoes in the continental basins led to the creation of shallow lakes that were related to the maar formation and the modification of sedimentological intra-basinal features, specifically, valley slope and sediment load.

  15. Two Vent Fields Discovered at the Ultraslow Spreading Arctic Ridge System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, R. B.; Thorseth, I. H.; Hellevang, B.; Schultz, A.; Taylor, P.; Knudsen, H. P.; Steinsbu, B. O.

    2005-12-01

    seawater, and may have formed from fluids composed of 90 percent seawater and 10 percent of an end-member hydrothermal fluid. Nd-concentrations suggest Fe-precipitate/fluid ratio of one to a million (ie. that 1 kg of Fe-deposits scavenged neodymium from one million litres of fluids). A second vent field was discovered 5 km southwest of "Gallionella Garden" at ~700 mbsl. The "Soria Moria" field is located at a volcanic ridge composed of recent lava flows and is about 100 meters across. The field consists of numerous chimneys emitting buoyant white smoker fluids, as well as irregular shaped mounds with flange structures discharging fluids of higher density then the ambient waters. White bacterial mats cover the seafloor and chimneys at both fields, and shrimp, sea spiders and colonies of sea anemones, crinoids and hydroids are associated with the vent fields. The hydrothermal plumes were detected acoustically using the exceptionally sensitive scientific echo sounders on "G.O.Sars". The acoustic backscatters images show that the hydrothermal plume above "Gallionella Garden" perturb the upper hydrographical layers, implying that this shallow vent field may "fertilize" the productive hydrographical layers in the area.

  16. 46 CFR 153.358 - Venting system flow capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Venting system flow capacity. 153.358 Section 153.358... Venting Systems § 153.358 Venting system flow capacity. (a) The cross-sectional flow area of any vent system segment, including any PV or SR valve, must at no point be less than that of a pipe whose...

  17. 40 CFR 65.62 - Process vent group determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Process vent group determination. 65... (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Process Vents § 65.62 Process vent group determination. (a) Group status. The owner or operator of a process vent shall determine the group status (i.e., Group 1, Group...

  18. 14 CFR 125.159 - Vent and drain lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vent and drain lines. 125.159 Section 125... Requirements § 125.159 Vent and drain lines. All vent and drain lines, and their fittings, that are located in... Administrator finds that the rupture or breakage of any vent or drain line may result in a fire hazard....

  19. 40 CFR 63.1321 - Batch process vents provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... vent streams except as specified in paragraphs (b)(1) through (b)(2) of this section. For continuous... and aggregate batch vent streams, the control requirements for individual batch process vents or aggregate batch vent streams (e.g., 90 percent emission reduction) as specified in § 63.1322(a)(1),...

  20. Volcanic Plume Chemistry: Models, Observations and Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Tjarda; Martin, Robert; Oppenheimer, Clive; Griffiths, Paul; Braban, Christine; Cox, Tony; Jones, Rod; Durant, Adam; Kelly, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Volcanic plumes are highly chemically reactive; both in the hot, near-vent plume, and also at ambient temperatures in the downwind plume, as the volcanic gases and aerosol disperse into the background atmosphere. In particular, DOAS (Differential Optical Absortpion Spectroscopy) observations have identified BrO (Bromine Monoxide) in several volcanic plumes degassing into the troposphere. These observations are explained by rapid in-plume autocatalytic BrO-chemistry that occurs whilst the plume disperses, enabling oxidants such as ozone from background air to mix with the acid gases and aerosol. Computer modelling tools have recently been developed to interpret the observed BrO and predict that substantial ozone depletion occurs downwind. Alongside these modelling developments, advances in in-situ and remote sensing techniques have also improved our observational understanding of volcanic plumes. We present simulations using the model, PlumeChem, that predict the spatial distribution of gases in volcanic plumes, including formation of reactive halogens BrO, ClO and OClO that are enhanced nearer the plume edges, and depletion of ozone within the plume core. The simulations also show that in-plume chemistry rapidly converts NOx into nitric acid, providing a mechanism to explain observed elevated in-plume HNO3. This highlights the importance of coupled BrO-NOx chemistry, both for BrO-formation and as a production mechanism for HNO3 in BrO-influenced regions of the atmosphere. Studies of coupled halogen-H2S-chemistry are consistent with in-situ Alphasense electrochemical sensor observations of H2S at a range of volcanoes, and only predict H2S-depletion if Cl is additionally elevated. Initial studies regarding the transformations of mercury within volcanic plumes suggest that significant in-plume conversion of Hg0 to Hg2+ can occur in the downwind plume. Such Hg2+ may impact downwind ecology through enhanced Hg-deposition, and causing enhanced biological uptake of

  1. The geochemical controls on vent fluids from the Lucky Strike vent field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Damm, K. L.; Bray, A. M.; Buttermore, L. G.; Oosting, S. E.

    1998-08-01

    Hydrothermal vent fluids were collected from the Lucky Strike site at 37°17'N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in both 1993 and 1996. Seven vents were sampled with the DSV Alvin in 1993 and six vents were sampled in 1996 using the ROV Jason during the LUSTRE '96 Cruise. As three of the vents were sampled in both 1993 and in 1996, a time series of vent fluid chemistry is also reported. Measured temperatures ranged from 202 to 333°C at the 1618-1726 m depth of the vent field, which is located on Lucky Strike Seamount. These fluids are either equal to or less than the local bottom seawater in chlorinity. While the range in fluid compositions at Lucky Strike is generally within that observed elsewhere, the unusual aspects of the fluid chemistries are the relatively high pH and low Fe, Mn, Li and Zn. We attribute this, as well as an usually low Sr/Ca ratio, to reaction with a highly altered substrate. The high Si and Cu contents suggest a deep, as well as hot, source for these fluids. The fluid compositions therefore suggest formation by super-critical phase separation at a depth not less than 1300 m below the seafloor, and reaction with a relatively oxic, and previously altered, substrate. There is temporal variability in some of the vent fluid compositions as Li, K, Ca and Fe concentrations have increased in some of the vents, as has the Fe/Mn (molar) ratio, although the chlorinities have remained essentially constant from 1993 to 1996. While there is not a simple relationship between vent fluid compositions (or temperatures) and distance from the lava lake at the summit of the seamount, the vent fluids from many of the vents can be shown to be related to others, often at distances >200 m. The most southeasterly vents (Eiffel Tower and the Marker/Mounds vents) are distinct in chlorinity and other chemical parameters from the rest of the vents, although closely related to each other within the southeastern area. Similarly all of the vents not in this one area, appear

  2. Volcanism in response to plate flexure.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Naoto; Takahashi, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Junji; Abe, Natsue; Ingle, Stephanie P; Kaneoka, Ichiro; Hirata, Takafumi; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Ishii, Teruaki; Ogawa, Yujiro; Machida, Shiki; Suyehiro, Kiyoshi

    2006-09-01

    Volcanism on Earth is known to occur in three tectonic settings: divergent plate boundaries (such as mid-ocean ridges), convergent plate boundaries (such as island arcs), and hot spots. We report volcanism on the 135 million-year-old Pacific Plate not belonging to any of these categories. Small alkalic volcanoes form from small percent melts and originate in the asthenosphere, as implied by their trace element geochemistry and noble gas isotopic compositions. We propose that these small volcanoes erupt along lithospheric fractures in response to plate flexure during subduction. Minor extents of asthenospheric melting and the volcanoes' tectonic alignment and age progression in the direction opposite to that of plate motion provide evidence for the presence of a small percent melt in the asthenosphere. PMID:16873612

  3. Bacterial diversity and successional patterns during biofilm formation on freshly exposed basalt surfaces at diffuse-flow deep-sea vents

    PubMed Central

    Gulmann, Lara K.; Beaulieu, Stace E.; Shank, Timothy M.; Ding, Kang; Seyfried, William E.; Sievert, Stefan M.

    2015-01-01

    Many deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems are regularly impacted by volcanic eruptions, leaving fresh basalt where abundant animal and microbial communities once thrived. After an eruption, microbial biofilms are often the first visible evidence of biotic re-colonization. The present study is the first to investigate microbial colonization of newly exposed basalt surfaces in the context of vent fluid chemistry over an extended period of time (4–293 days) by deploying basalt blocks within an established diffuse-flow vent at the 9°50′ N vent field on the East Pacific Rise. Additionally, samples obtained after a recent eruption at the same vent field allowed for comparison between experimental results and those from natural microbial re-colonization. Over 9 months, the community changed from being composed almost exclusively of Epsilonproteobacteria to a more diverse assemblage, corresponding with a potential expansion of metabolic capabilities. The process of biofilm formation appears to generate similar surface-associated communities within and across sites by selecting for a subset of fluid-associated microbes, via species sorting. Furthermore, the high incidence of shared operational taxonomic units over time and across different vent sites suggests that the microbial communities colonizing new surfaces at diffuse-flow vent sites might follow a predictable successional pattern. PMID:26441852

  4. Bacterial diversity and successional patterns during biofilm formation on freshly exposed basalt surfaces at diffuse-flow deep-sea vents.

    PubMed

    Gulmann, Lara K; Beaulieu, Stace E; Shank, Timothy M; Ding, Kang; Seyfried, William E; Sievert, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    Many deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems are regularly impacted by volcanic eruptions, leaving fresh basalt where abundant animal and microbial communities once thrived. After an eruption, microbial biofilms are often the first visible evidence of biotic re-colonization. The present study is the first to investigate microbial colonization of newly exposed basalt surfaces in the context of vent fluid chemistry over an extended period of time (4-293 days) by deploying basalt blocks within an established diffuse-flow vent at the 9°50' N vent field on the East Pacific Rise. Additionally, samples obtained after a recent eruption at the same vent field allowed for comparison between experimental results and those from natural microbial re-colonization. Over 9 months, the community changed from being composed almost exclusively of Epsilonproteobacteria to a more diverse assemblage, corresponding with a potential expansion of metabolic capabilities. The process of biofilm formation appears to generate similar surface-associated communities within and across sites by selecting for a subset of fluid-associated microbes, via species sorting. Furthermore, the high incidence of shared operational taxonomic units over time and across different vent sites suggests that the microbial communities colonizing new surfaces at diffuse-flow vent sites might follow a predictable successional pattern.

  5. Bacterial diversity and successional patterns during biofilm formation on freshly exposed basalt surfaces at diffuse-flow deep-sea vents.

    PubMed

    Gulmann, Lara K; Beaulieu, Stace E; Shank, Timothy M; Ding, Kang; Seyfried, William E; Sievert, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    Many deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems are regularly impacted by volcanic eruptions, leaving fresh basalt where abundant animal and microbial communities once thrived. After an eruption, microbial biofilms are often the first visible evidence of biotic re-colonization. The present study is the first to investigate microbial colonization of newly exposed basalt surfaces in the context of vent fluid chemistry over an extended period of time (4-293 days) by deploying basalt blocks within an established diffuse-flow vent at the 9°50' N vent field on the East Pacific Rise. Additionally, samples obtained after a recent eruption at the same vent field allowed for comparison between experimental results and those from natural microbial re-colonization. Over 9 months, the community changed from being composed almost exclusively of Epsilonproteobacteria to a more diverse assemblage, corresponding with a potential expansion of metabolic capabilities. The process of biofilm formation appears to generate similar surface-associated communities within and across sites by selecting for a subset of fluid-associated microbes, via species sorting. Furthermore, the high incidence of shared operational taxonomic units over time and across different vent sites suggests that the microbial communities colonizing new surfaces at diffuse-flow vent sites might follow a predictable successional pattern. PMID:26441852

  6. A probabilistic spatial-temporal model for vent opening clustering at Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevilacqua, A.; Isaia, R.; Flandoli, F.; Neri, A.; Quaranta, D.

    2014-12-01

    Campi Flegrei (CF) is a densely urbanized caldera with a very high volcanic risk. Its more recent volcanic activity was characterized in the last 15 kyrs by more than 70 explosive events of variable scale and vent location. The sequence of eruptive events at CF is remarkably inhomogeneous, both in space and time. Eruptions concentred over periods from a few centuries to a few millennia, and were alternated by periods of quiescence lasting up to several millennia. As a consequence, activity has been subdivided into three distinct epochs, i.e. Epoch I, 15 - 9.5 kyrs, Epoch II, 8.6 - 8.2 kyrs, and Epoch III, 4.8 - 3.7 kyrs BP [e.g. Orsi et al., 2004; Smith et al., 2011]. The eruptive record also shows the presence of clusters of events in space-time, i.e. the opening of a new vent in a particular location and at a specific time seems to increase the probability of another vent opening in the nearby area and in the next decades-centuries (self-exciting effect). Probabilistic vent opening mapping conditional the occurrence of a new event and able to account for some of the intrinsic uncertainties affecting the system, has been investigated in some recent studies [e.g. Selva et al. 2011, Bevilacqua et al. 2014, in preparation], but a spatial-temporal model of the sequence of volcanic activity remains an open issue. Hence we have developed a time-space mathematical model that takes into account both the self-exciting behaviour of the system and the significant uncertainty affecting the eruptive record. Based on the past eruptive record of the volcano, the model allows to simulate sequences of future events as well as to better understand the spatial and temporal evolution of the system. In addition, based on the assumption that the last eruptive event occurred in 1538 AD (Monte Nuovo eruption) is the first event of a new epoch of activity, the model can estimate the probability of new vent opening at CF in the next decades.

  7. Unraveling the volcanic and post-volcanic history at Upsal Hogback, Fallon, Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, E.; Cousens, B.

    2013-12-01

    Upsal Hogback is a < 25 ka phreatomagmatic volcanic center situated near Fallon, Nevada. The volcano neighbors two other young volcanic complexes: the Holocene Soda Lakes maars and Rattlesnake Hill, a ~ 1 Ma volcanic neck (Shevenell et al., 2005). These volcanoes lie on the transition between the Sierra Nevada and the Basin and Range province, as well as on the edge of the Walker Lane. Upsal Hogback includes two to four vents, fewer than mapped by Morrison (1964), and can be divided into north (one vent) and south (three potential vents) complexes. The vents all produced phreatomagmatic eruptions resulting in tuff rings composed primarily of coarse, indurated lapilli tuffs with abundant volcanic bombs. Ash tuffs are infrequent, as are structures such as crossbedding. The bombs and lapilli include olivine and plagioclase phenocrysts. The basalts are alkaline and have intraplate-type normalized incompatible element patterns. Both complexes are enriched in LREE compared to HREE, though the north complex overall has lower concentrations of the REE. The flat HREE pattern is indicative of spinel peridotite mantle source. Epsilon Nd values for the north complex are +2.50+/-0.02 and for the south complex are +2.83+/-0.02. The magmas appear to have an enriched asthenospheric mantle source. Bomb samples show that eruptions from the two complexes are geochemically distinguishable both in major and trace elements, suggesting that the two complexes tapped different magma types during eruptions that likely occurred at slightly different times. The proximity of Upsal Hogback to Fallon makes constraining its age important to characterize the hazard to the city. It lies above the Wono ash bed, dated at 25,000 years (Fultz et al., 1983), and tufa deposited over the edifice is dated at 11,100 +/- 100 and 8,600 +/- 200 years (Benson et al., 1992; Broecker and Kaufman, 1965). 40Ar/39Ar total gas age by Shevenell et al. (2005) dated the volcano at 0.60 +/- 0.09 Ma, but with no plateau

  8. Effusive and explosive volcanism on the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel Ridge, 85°E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontbriand, Claire W.; Soule, S. Adam; Sohn, Robert A.; Humphris, Susan E.; Kunz, Clayton; Singh, Hanumant; Nakamura, Ko-Ichi; Jakobsson, Martin; Shank, Timothy

    2012-10-01

    We use high-definition seafloor digital imagery and multibeam bathymetric data acquired during the 2007 Arctic Gakkel Vents Expedition (AGAVE) to evaluate the volcanic characteristics of the 85°E segment of the ultraslow spreading Gakkel Ridge (9 mm yr-1full rate). Our seafloor imagery reveals that the axial valley is covered by numerous, small-volume (order ˜1000 m3) lava flows displaying a range of ages and morphologies as well as unconsolidated volcaniclastic deposits with thicknesses up to 10 cm. The valley floor contains two prominent volcanic lineaments made up of axis-parallel ridges and small, cratered volcanic cones. The lava flows appear to have erupted from a number of distinct source vents within the ˜12-15 km-wide axial valley. Only a few of these flows are fresh enough to have potentially erupted during the 1999 seismic swarm at this site, and these are associated with the Oden and Loke volcanic cones. We model the widespread volcaniclastic deposits we observed on the seafloor as having been generated by the explosive discharge of CO2 that accumulated in (possibly deep) crustal melt reservoirs. The energy released during explosive discharge, combined with the buoyant rise of hot fluid, lofted fragmented clasts of rapidly cooling magma into the water column, and they subsequently settled onto the seafloor as fall deposits surrounding the source vent.

  9. Geochemistry of high-potassium rocks from the mid-Tertiary Guffey volcanic center, Thirtynine Mile volcanic field, central Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Wobus, R.A.; Mochel, D.W. ); Mertzman, S.A.; Eide, E.A.; Rothwarf, M.T. ); Loeffler, B.M.; Johnson, D.A. ); Keating, G.N.; Sultz, K. ); Benjamin, A.E. ); Venzke, E.A. ); Filson, T. )

    1990-07-01

    The Guffey volcanic center is the largest within the 2000 km{sup 2} mid-Tertiary Thirtynine Mile volcanic field of central Colorado. This study is the first to provide extensive chemical data for these alkalic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, which present the eroded remnants of a large stratovolcano of Oligocene age. Formation of early domes and flows of latite and trachyte within the Guffey center was followed by extrusion of a thick series of basalt, trachybasalt, and shoshonite flows and lahars. Plugs, dikes, and vents ranging from basalt to rhyolite cut the thick mafic deposits, and felsic tuffs breccias chemically identical to the small rhyolitic plutons are locally preserved. Whole-rack major and trace element analyses of 80 samples, ranging almost continuously from 47% to 78% SiO{sub 2}, indicate that the rocks of the Guffey center are among the most highly enriched in K{sub 2}O (up to 6%) and rare earth elements (typically 200-300 ppm) of any volcanic rocks in Colorado. These observations, along with the relatively high concentrations of Ba and Rb and the depletion of Cr and Ni, suggest an appreciable contribution of lower crustal material to the magmas that produced the Thirtynine Mile volcanic rocks.

  10. The vent microbiome: patterns and drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachiadaki, M.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial processes within deep-sea hydrothermal vents affect the global biogeochemical cycles. Still, there are significant gaps in our understanding of the microbiology and the biogeochemistry of deep-sea hydrothermal systems. Vents differ in temperature, host rock composition and fluid chemistry; factors that are hypothesized to shape the distribution of the microbial communities, their metabolic capabilities and their activities. Using large-scale single cell genomics, we obtained insights into the genomic content of several linkages of a diffuse flow vent. The genomes show high metabolic versatility. Sulfur oxidation appears to be predominant but there is the potential of using a variety of e- donors and acceptors to obtain energy. To further assess the ecological importance of the vent auto- and heterotrophs, the global biogeography of the analyzed lineages will be investigated by fragment recruitment of metagenomes produced from the same site as well as other hydrothermal systems. Metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic data will be integrated to examine the expression of the predominant metabolic pathways and thus the main energy sources driving chemoautotrophic production. The comparative analysis of the key players and associated pathways among various vent sites that differ in physicochemical characteristics is anticipated to decipher the patterns and drivers of the global dispersion and the local diversification of the vent microbiome.

  11. Volcanic Aerosol Radiative Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Large sporadic volcanic eruptions inject large amounts of sulfur bearing gases into the stratosphere which then get photochemically converted to sulfuric acid aerosol droplets that exert a radiative cooling effect on the global climate system lasting for several years.

  12. Geophysical expression of caldera related volcanism, structures and mineralization in the McDermitt volcanic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rytuba, J. J.; Blakely, R. J.; Moring, B.; Miller, R.

    2013-12-01

    30 km trend that then arcs NE into the caldera. These anomalies reflect near surface rhyolite intrusions that underlie the caldera-fill sediments that have been altered to K-feldpar and clay minerals. K gamma ray anomalies also delineate this zone of alteration. The last phase of volcanism occurs in the central part of the caldera and is associated with a broad aeromagnetic high with individual high-amplitude aeromagnetic highs coincident with three large volcanic vents. No hydrothermal alteration is associated with this last phase of volcanism. On the SW side of the McDermitt volcanic field a 10 km wide, 60 km long, NNW-trending zone of late Miocene normal faults developed after cessation of volcanism and prior to Basin and Range faulting. We propose that this extensional fault zone is the eastern continuation of the NW trending Brothers Fault Zone, but changes to a NNW trend where it is deflected by the plutons that underlies the McDermitt volcanic field. Plutons that underlie all three of these Mid Miocene volcanic fields have minimized post-caldera extensional faulting. Thus only caldera ring fracture faults were available for the development of hydrothermal systems in areas where post caldera intrusive activity was localized.

  13. Hydrothermal Activity and Volcanism on the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, K. M.; Scientific Party, M.

    2005-12-01

    In April 2005 four recently discovered different hydrothermal fields on the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) south of the Equator were studied and sampled using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) during cruise METEOR 64/1. Three of these hydrothermally active fields (called Turtle Pits, Red Lion, and Wideawake) occur at about 3000 m water depth in the centre of a MAR segment at 4° 48'S which appears to be volcanically very active. The youngest lava flow partly covers the low-temperature, diffuse flow Wideawake mussel field and is thus probably only a few years old. The high-temperature Turtle Pits hydrothermal field with four active vent structures lies some 300 m west of the diffuse vent field and is characterized by boiling fluids with temperatures close to 400° C. The mineral assemblage recovered from inactive hydrothermal mounds includes massive magnetite+hematite+sulfate and differs from that of the presently active vents and indicates more oxidizing conditions during the earlier activity. The vent fluids at Turtle Pits contain relatively high contents of hydrogen which may have formed during iron oxidation processes when basaltic magmas crystallized. The high fluid temperatures, the change to more reducing conditions, and the relatively high hydrogen contents in the fluids are most likely due to the ascent of magmas from the mantle that fed the very recent eruption. The high-temperature Red Lion hydrothermal field lies some 2 km north of the Turtle Pits field and consists of at least four active black smokers surrounded by several inactive sulfide mounds. The composition of the Red Lion fluids differs significantly from the Turtle Pits fluids, possibly owing largely to a difference in the temperature of the two systems. The fourth hydrothermally active field on the southern MAR, the Liliput field, was discovered near 9° 33'S in a water depth of 1500 m and consists of several low-temperature vents. A shallow hydrothermal plume in the water column

  14. Ancient Tectonic and Volcanic Activity in the Tharsis Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, S. C.; Kronberg, P.; Hauber, E.; Grott, M.; Steinberger, B.; Torsvik, T. H.; Neukum, G.

    The two topographically dominating volcanic provinces on Mars are the Tharsis and the Elysium regions, situated close to the equator on the dichotomy boundary between the heavily cratered (older) highlands and the northern lowlands (about 100 degrees apart). The regions are characterized by volcanoes whose morphologies are analogous to volcanic landforms on Earth, and the huge volcanoes in the Tharsis region (Olympus Mons and Tharsis Montes) are prime examples resembling many characteristics of Hawaiian shield volcanoes. The main difference between the Martian and terrestrial volcanoes are their size and the length of the flows, possibly due to higher eruption rates, the "stationary" character of the source (no plate tectonics) and the lower gravity. The Tharsis plateau is the topographically most prominent region on Mars, and associated with an areoid high. On Earth, large geoid highs are related to longlived heterogeneities near the core-mantle boundary that are sources for large igneous provinces. The Tharsis' volcanic vent structures were active at least episodically over the past 4 billion years (based on crater count statistics), which indicates long-lived volcanic and magmatic activity. Two major groups of tectonic features are related to the Tharsis bulge: a concentric set of wrinkle ridges indicating compression radial to Tharsis,and several sets of extensional structures that radiate outward from different centers within Tharsis, indicating tension circumferential to Tharsis. No landforms imply ancient plate tectonics. Here, we present surface ages associated with volcanic and tectonic landforms with a special focus on the ancient magma-tectonic environment (see Grott et al. 2006, this volume). We will examine the long-lived volcanism and tectonic surface expressions and discuss whether Mars volcanism could represent deep mantle plumes.

  15. Building Better Volcanic Hazard Maps Through Scientific and Stakeholder Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M. A.; Lindsay, J. M.; Calder, E.

    2015-12-01

    All across the world information about natural hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and tsunami is shared and communicated using maps that show which locations are potentially exposed to hazards of varying intensities. Unlike earthquakes and tsunami, which typically produce one dominant hazardous phenomenon (ground shaking and inundation, respectively) volcanic eruptions can produce a wide variety of phenomena that range from near-vent (e.g. pyroclastic flows, ground shaking) to distal (e.g. volcanic ash, inundation via tsunami), and that vary in intensity depending on the type and location of the volcano. This complexity poses challenges in depicting volcanic hazard on a map, and to date there has been no consistent approach, with a wide range of hazard maps produced and little evaluation of their relative efficacy. Moreover, in traditional hazard mapping practice, scientists analyse data about a hazard, and then display the results on a map that is then presented to stakeholders. This one-way, top-down approach to hazard communication does not necessarily translate into effective hazard education, or, as tragically demonstrated by Nevado del Ruiz, Columbia in 1985, its use in risk mitigation by civil authorities. Furthermore, messages taken away from a hazard map can be strongly influenced by its visual design. Thus, hazard maps are more likely to be useful, usable and used if relevant stakeholders are engaged during the hazard map process to ensure a) the map is designed in a relevant way and b) the map takes into account how users interpret and read different map features and designs. The IAVCEI Commission on Volcanic Hazards and Risk has recently launched a Hazard Mapping Working Group to collate some of these experiences in graphically depicting volcanic hazard from around the world, including Latin America and the Caribbean, with the aim of preparing some Considerations for Producing Volcanic Hazard Maps that may help map makers in the future.

  16. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  17. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-22

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  18. MAVID multiple alignment server.

    PubMed

    Bray, Nicolas; Pachter, Lior

    2003-07-01

    MAVID is a multiple alignment program suitable for many large genomic regions. The MAVID web server allows biomedical researchers to quickly obtain multiple alignments for genomic sequences and to subsequently analyse the alignments for conserved regions. MAVID has been successfully used for the alignment of closely related species such as primates and also for the alignment of more distant organisms such as human and fugu. The server is fast, capable of aligning hundreds of kilobases in less than a minute. The multiple alignment is used to build a phylogenetic tree for the sequences, which is subsequently used as a basis for identifying conserved regions in the alignment. The server can be accessed at http://baboon.math.berkeley.edu/mavid/.

  19. Nearest Alignment Space Termination

    2006-07-13

    Near Alignment Space Termination (NAST) is the Greengenes algorithm that matches up submitted sequences with the Greengenes database to look for similarities and align the submitted sequences based on those similarities.

  20. Eruptive vents for the Burro Mesa Rhyolite, Big Bend National Park, Trans-Pecos Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, G.S.; Parker, D.F. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-02-01

    Detailed mapping of field relations and flow direction of the Burro Mesa Rhyolite (BMR) have identified vent localities at Burro Mesa, Kit Mountain, Cerro Castellan, Trap Mountain, and Goat Mountain, and the suggest the presence of additional, as yet unlocated, centers of eruption. This work confirms recent interpretations that BMR rocks were not erupted from the Pine Canyon caldera, but were instead erupted from isolated feeder localities in the Burro Mesa-Cerro Castellan area. At the Burro Mesa locality, the BMR contains a lower sparsely-porphyritic lava, a central porphyritic ash-flow tuff, and an upper abundantly-porphyritic lava. At all other mapped localities, only sparsely-porphyritic lava and Wasp Springs Flow Breccia (WSFB) are present. Two vents at Burro Mesa represent sources for separate BMR flows, as well as WSFB, which consists of numerous surge deposits with interbedded ash-flow tuff. Flow directional data suggests a third unlocated vent for abundantly-porphyritic lava in the SE region of Burro Mesa. Flow direction data also suggest that the SW end of Kit Mountain was a source for sparsely-porphyritic lava. A feeder dike at Cerro Castellan cuts up through the WSFB, flaring near the top into a volcanic dome of sparsely-porphyritic lava at the top of the mountain. This cross-cutting relationship was present at most vent localities. Mapping and flow direction data of BMR from vents and other localities suggest that the BMR consists of a discontinuous belt of individual domes, which trend in a southwesterly direction from Burro Mesa to Cerro Castellan.

  1. Microbial colonization of post eruptive vents on the EPR at 9N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetriani, C.

    2008-12-01

    The overarching goal of this project is to understand the role of microbial colonists at newly formed vents as "mediators" in the transfer of energy from the geothermal source to the higher trophic levels, and their role in altering fluid chemistry and in "conditioning" the vent environment for metazoans to settle. Following the 2005-06 volcanic eruption along the East Pacific Rise (EPR) ridge crest between 9°N and 9°N, we had several opportunities to investigate the microbial colonization of the post-eruptive vents: in 2006 (about six months after the eruption), in January 2007 (one year after the eruption), and in December 2007/January 2008 (two years after the eruption). In order to investigate microbial colonization, we designed and deployed several experimental microbial colonizers on active diffuse flow vents characterized by different temperatures (approximate range 20-60°C) chemical (different redox conditions), and biological (e.g., presence or absence of metazoan colonists) regimes. Analyses of the 16S rRNA and fuctional gene transcripts from the colonizing communities indicated that Epsilonproteobacteria represented the dominant and active fraction of the chemosynthetic early microbial colonists, and that they expressed in-situ the genes involved in carbon dioxide fixation and nitrate respiration. However, data from our semi quantitative culture experiments indicated that Epsilonproteobacteria were not the only microorganisms that attached to basalts or to the experimental colonizers during the early phases of colonization. Sulfur dependent, chemosynthetic members of the Gamma- and Alphaproteobacteria were isolated from up to 10-5 dilutions of original samples along with heterotrophic Gammaproteobacteria capable of growth on n-alkanes as their sole carbon source. We propose a model that links the chemistry of hydrothermal fluids to the colonization of newly formed vents and suggests a role for chemosynthetic and heterotrophic bacteria in the

  2. New insights into the initiation and venting of the Bronze-Age eruption of Santorini (Greece), from component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druitt, T. H.

    2014-02-01

    The late-seventeenth century BC Minoan eruption of Santorini discharged 30-60 km3 of magma, and caldera collapse deepened and widened the existing 22 ka caldera. A study of juvenile, cognate, and accidental components in the eruption products provides new constraints on vent development during the five eruptive phases, and on the processes that initiated the eruption. The eruption began with subplinian (phase 0) and plinian (phase 1) phases from a vent on a NE-SW fault line that bisects the volcanic field. During phase 1, the magma fragmentation level dropped from the surface to the level of subvolcanic basement and magmatic intrusions. The fragmentation level shallowed again, and the vent migrated northwards (during phase 2) into the flooded 22 ka caldera. The eruption then became strongly phreatomagmatic and discharged low-temperature ignimbrite containing abundant fragments of post-22 ka, pre-Minoan intracaldera lavas (phase 3). Phase 4 discharged hot, fluidized pyroclastic flows from subaerial vents and constructed three main ignimbrite fans (northwestern, eastern, and southern) around the volcano. The first phase-4 flows were discharged from a vent, or vents, in the northern half of the volcanic field, and laid down lithic-block-rich ignimbrite and lag breccias across much of the NW fan. About a tenth of the lithic debris in these flows was subvolcanic basement. New subaerial vents then opened up, probably across much of the volcanic field, and finer-grained ignimbrite was discharged to form the E and S fans. If major caldera collapse took place during the eruption, it probably occurred during phase 4. Three juvenile components were discharged during the eruption—a volumetrically dominant rhyodacitic pumice and two andesitic components: microphenocryst-rich andesitic pumices and quenched andesitic enclaves. The microphenocryst-rich pumices form a textural, mineralogical, chemical, and thermal continuum with co-erupted hornblende diorite nodules, and together

  3. Classifying the Infrasonic Fingerprints of a Dynamic Volcanic System: A Quantitative Comparison of Optical and Infrasound Records at Villarrica Volcano, Chile.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. J. C.; Palma, J.; Keller, W.; Johnson, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    On March 3, 2015 Villarrica Volcano underwent an abrupt change in volcanic behavior that culminated in a large fire fountaining event lasting 30 minutes that prompted the evacuation of residents within 9 km from the vent. This paroxysm was the first in 30 years and changed summit morphology by temporarily capping the previously stable lava lake with volcanic material. After March 3, Villarrica exhibited a period of quiescence before reactivating with various levels of ash venting associated with strombolian style activity. Ten infrasound arrays, each comprising three pressure transducers, were deployed in January and February that recorded until mid June and serendipitously chronicled the awakening, paroxysm, and recovery to a more open vent system typical to Villarrica. Coincidentally, several optical datasets were gathered. Time lapse photography, provided by Proyecto Observacion Villarrica Internet (POVI), recorded vent activity at an interval of ~15 seconds with a 240 mm zoom lens at 16 km from the vent, starting December 2014 until March 12, 2015. Additionally, video footage of the vent was recorded at 30 frames per second (fps) with a 50 mm lensed surveillance camera between March 4 and June of 2015 at a distance of 16 km from the vent. The combined infrasound and image processing approach offers novel insight into the various acoustic signatures of a dynamic and violent volcanic system. Video parameters, including plume color, ascent rate, and duration of venting are synthesized as time series. These video metrics of vent activity are then quantitatively compared to the corresponding infrasound waveform. The result is the classification of several different infrasound modes of activity during the diverse eruptive sequence of Villarrica between January and June of 2015.

  4. ANALYSIS OF VENTING OF A RESIN SLURRY

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.; Hensel, S.

    2012-03-27

    A resin slurry venting analysis was conducted to address safety issues associated with overpressurization of ion exchange columns used in the Purex process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). If flow to these columns were inadvertently interrupted, an exothermic runaway reaction could occur between the ion exchange resin and the nitric acid used in the feed stream. The nitric acid-resin reaction generates significant quantities of noncondensable gases, which would pressurize the column. To prevent the column from rupturing during such events, rupture disks are installed on the column vent lines. The venting analysis models accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) tests and data from tests that were performed in a vented test vessel with a rupture disk. The tests showed that the pressure inside the test vessel continued to increase after the rupture disk opened, though at a slower rate than prior to the rupture. Calculated maximum discharge rates for the resin venting tests exceeded the measured rates of gas generation, so the vent size was sufficient to relieve the pressure in the test vessel if the vent flow rate was constant. The increase in the vessel pressure is modeled as a transient phenomenon associated with expansion of the resin slurry/gas mixture upon rupture of the disk. It is postulated that the maximum pressure at the end of this expansion is limited by energy minimization to approximately 1.5 times the rupture disk burst pressure. The magnitude of this pressure increase is consistent with the measured pressure transients. The results of this analysis demonstrate the need to allow for a margin between the design pressure and the rupture disk burst pressure in similar applications.

  5. Analysis of Surface Volcanism on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, P. K.; Klimczak, C.; Denevi, B. W.; Solomon, S. C.; Nittler, L. R.; Watters, T. R.; Enns, A. C.; Head, J. W.; Hurwitz, D. M.; Baker, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    Since the confirmation of widespread volcanism on Mercury by MESSENGER spacecraft observations, a key objective has been to understand how volcanic deposits were emplaced, what volume of lava was erupted, and over what timescale volcanism occurred in a given area. Many of Mercury's smooth plains, including a broad expanse of such plains at high northern latitudes well imaged for the first time, show evidence for a volcanic origin. Using orbital images from MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS), we have identified a set of flow features proximal to these northern smooth plains deposits that provide a framework for understanding how smooth plains are emplaced across Mercury. Here, several channels cut through intercrater plains material, and strongly resemble channelized surface flow landforms on Earth and Mars. The channels exhibit the braided textures, deltas, and elongate, teardrop-shaped "islands" characteristic of erosion by the above-ground movement of a low-viscosity liquid - consistent with high-temperature lavas with komatiite-like compositions reported by MESSENGER's X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) team. One channel links a set of candidate volcanic vents with a peak-ring basin that hosts smooth plains deposits, possibly representing a complete extrusive system from eruption to emplacement. Additionally, the surrounding intercrater plains display a range of topographic expressions, from rough to almost entirely smooth, implying flooding to various depths by lavas. These observations suggest that Mercury's smooth plains were emplaced, at least in part, by many discrete, low-viscosity, komatiite-like lavas that reshaped the surface over which they flowed. We use the linear textures in the channels to determine flow directions and to place constraints on the local paleotopography, and by mapping the area of flooded terrain in a geographical information system (GIS), we give a minimum value for the amount of material erupted in this region. Together with

  6. Examination of frit vent from Sixty-Watt Heat Source simulant fueled clad vent set

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, G.B.

    1995-11-01

    The flow rate and the metallurgical condition of a frit vent from a simulant-fueled clad vent set (CVS) that had been hot isostatically pressed (HIP) for the Sixty-Watt Heat Source program were evaluated. The flow rate form the defueled vent cup subassembly was reduced approximately 25% from the original flow rate. No obstructions were found to account for the reduced flow rate. Measurements indicate that the frit vent powder thickness was reduced about 30%. Most likely, the powder was compressed during the HIP operation, which increased the density of the powder layer and thus reduced the flow rate of the assembly. All other observed manufacturing attributes appeared to be normal, but the vent hole activation technique needs further refinement before it is used in applications requiring maximum CVS integrity.

  7. Loki's Castle: Discovery and geology of a black smoker vent field at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, R.; Thorseth, I. H.; Lilley, M. D.; Barriga, F. J.; Früh-Green, G.; Nakamura, K.

    2010-12-01

    Previous attempts to locate hydrothermal vent fields and unravel the nature of venting at the ultraslow spreading and magma starved parts of the Arctic Mid Ocean Ridge (AMOR) have been unsuccessful. A black smoker vent field was eventually discovered at the Mohns-Knipovich bend at 73.5°N in 2008, and the field was revisited in 2009 and 2010. The Loki’s Castle vent field is located on the crest of an axial volcanic ridge that is bordered by a tectonic terrain dominated by core complexes to the NW, and a ridge flank that is buried by sediments from the Bear Island Fan to the SE. Fluid compositions are anomalous to other basalt-hosted fields and indicate interactions with sediments at depths. The vent field is associated with an unusually large hydrothermal deposit, which documents that extensive venting occurs at ultraslow spreading ridges despite the strongly reduced magmatic heat budget. ROV surveys have shown that venting occurs in two areas separated by around 100 m. Micro-bathymetry acquired by a Hugin AUV documents that two 20-30 tall mounds that coalesce at the base have developed around the vent sites. The micro-bathymetry also shows that the venting is located above two normal faults that define the NW margin of a rift that runs along the crest of the volcano. The black smoker fluids reach 317 °C, with an end-member SiO2 content of 16 mmol/kg. End-member chlorinity is around 85% of seawater suggesting that the fluids have phase-separated at depth. The fluid compositions indicate that the rock-water reactions occur around 2 km below the seafloor. The crustal thickness is estimated to be 4 +/- 0.5 km in the area. Whereas the depth of the reaction zone is comparable with faster spreading ridges, the fraction of crust cooled convectively by hydrothermal circulation is two times that of vent fields at ridges with normal crustal thickness.

  8. Evidence for young volcanism on Mercury from the third MESSENGER flyby.

    PubMed

    Prockter, Louise M; Ernst, Carolyn M; Denevi, Brett W; Chapman, Clark R; Head, James W; Fassett, Caleb I; Merline, William J; Solomon, Sean C; Watters, Thomas R; Strom, Robert G; Cremonese, Gabriele; Marchi, Simone; Massironi, Matteo

    2010-08-01

    During its first two flybys of Mercury, the MESSENGER spacecraft acquired images confirming that pervasive volcanism occurred early in the planet's history. MESSENGER's third Mercury flyby revealed a 290-kilometer-diameter peak-ring impact basin, among the youngest basins yet seen, having an inner floor filled with spectrally distinct smooth plains. These plains are sparsely cratered, postdate the formation of the basin, apparently formed from material that once flowed across the surface, and are therefore interpreted to be volcanic in origin. An irregular depression surrounded by a halo of bright deposits northeast of the basin marks a candidate explosive volcanic vent larger than any previously identified on Mercury. Volcanism on the planet thus spanned a considerable duration, perhaps extending well into the second half of solar system history. PMID:20647421

  9. 1891 Submarine eruption of Foerstner volcano (Pantelleria, Sicily) : insights into the vent structure of basaltic balloon eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, J. T.; Carey, S.; Bell, K. L.; Rosi, M.; Marani, M.; Roman, C.; Pistolesi, M.; Baker, E. T.

    2012-12-01

    Numerous shallow water basaltic eruptions have produced abundant floating scoria up to several meters in diameter, yet little is known about the conditions that give rise to this unusual style of volcanism. On October 17, 1891, a submarine eruption began 4 kilometers northwest of the island of Pantelleria, Sicily. The eruptive vent was located at a depth of 250 meters along the NW-SE trending Sicily Channel Rift Zone. Evidence for the eruption was provided by the occurrence of hot, scoriaceous lava "balloons" floating on the sea surface along a narrow line about 850-1000 meters long trending along the rift. These extremely vesicular fragments were spherical to ellipsoidal in shape and ranged from <50 to 250 cm in diameter. Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) and existing bathymetric maps have been used to conduct the first detailed investigation of a vent site associated with this unique style of volcanism. In 2011 the ROV Hercules, deployed from the E/V Nautilus, explored the 1891 Foerstner vent using high definition video cameras and produced a high resolution bathymetric map of the area using a BlueView multibeam imaging sonar. Light backscattering and oxidation-reduction potential sensors (MAPRs) were added to Hercules to detect discharge from active venting. ROV video footage has been used in conjunction with the high resolution bathymetric data to construct a geologic map of the vent area based on a variety of facies descriptors, such as abundance of scoria bombs, occurrence of pillow or scoria flow lobes, extent of sediment cover, and presence of spatter-like deposits. Initial results of the mapping have shown that there are two main vents that erupted within the observed area of floating scoria and most likely erupted at the same time as evidenced by similar bulk chemical compositions of recovered samples. Scoria bomb beds and some scoria flow lobes largely cover the suspected main vent, located at a depth of 250 meters. Distinct pillow flow lobes cover the

  10. Girder Alignment Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zackary; Ruland, Robert; LeCocq, Catherine; Lundahl, Eric; Levashov, Yurii; Reese, Ed; Rago, Carl; Poling, Ben; Schafer, Donald; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Wienands, Uli; /SLAC

    2010-11-18

    The girders for the LCLS undulator system contain components which must be aligned with high accuracy relative to each other. The alignment is one of the last steps before the girders go into the tunnel, so the alignment must be done efficiently, on a tight schedule. This note documents the alignment plan which includes efficiency and high accuracy. The motivation for girder alignment involves the following considerations. Using beam based alignment, the girder position will be adjusted until the beam goes through the center of the quadrupole and beam finder wire. For the machine to work properly, the undulator axis must be on this line and the center of the undulator beam pipe must be on this line. The physics reasons for the undulator axis and undulator beam pipe axis to be centered on the beam are different, but the alignment tolerance for both are similar. In addition, the beam position monitor must be centered on the beam to preserve its calibration. Thus, the undulator, undulator beam pipe, quadrupole, beam finder wire, and beam position monitor axes must all be aligned to a common line. All relative alignments are equally important, not just, for example, between quadrupole and undulator. We begin by making the common axis the nominal beam axis in the girder coordinate system. All components will be initially aligned to this axis. A more accurate alignment will then position the components relative to each other, without incorporating the girder itself.

  11. Interstellar Dust Grain Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, B.-G.; Lazarian, A.; Vaillancourt, John E.

    2015-08-01

    Interstellar polarization at optical-to-infrared wavelengths is known to arise from asymmetric dust grains aligned with the magnetic field. This effect provides a potentially powerful probe of magnetic field structure and strength if the details of the grain alignment can be reliably understood. Theory and observations have recently converged on a quantitative, predictive description of interstellar grain alignment based on radiative processes. The development of a general, analytical model for this radiative alignment torque (RAT) theory has allowed specific, testable predictions for realistic interstellar conditions. We outline the theoretical and observational arguments in favor of RAT alignment, as well as reasons the "classical" paramagnetic alignment mechanism is unlikely to work, except possibly for the very smallest grains. With further detailed characterization of the RAT mechanism, grain alignment and polarimetry promise to not only better constrain the interstellar magnetic field but also provide new information on the dust characteristics.

  12. Volcanic hazards to airports

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guffanti, M.; Mayberry, G.C.; Casadevall, T.J.; Wunderman, R.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic activity has caused significant hazards to numerous airports worldwide, with local to far-ranging effects on travelers and commerce. Analysis of a new compilation of incidents of airports impacted by volcanic activity from 1944 through 2006 reveals that, at a minimum, 101 airports in 28 countries were affected on 171 occasions by eruptions at 46 volcanoes. Since 1980, five airports per year on average have been affected by volcanic activity, which indicates that volcanic hazards to airports are not rare on a worldwide basis. The main hazard to airports is ashfall, with accumulations of only a few millimeters sufficient to force temporary closures of some airports. A substantial portion of incidents has been caused by ash in airspace in the vicinity of airports, without accumulation of ash on the ground. On a few occasions, airports have been impacted by hazards other than ash (pyroclastic flow, lava flow, gas emission, and phreatic explosion). Several airports have been affected repeatedly by volcanic hazards. Four airports have been affected the most often and likely will continue to be among the most vulnerable owing to continued nearby volcanic activity: Fontanarossa International Airport in Catania, Italy; Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in Alaska, USA; Mariscal Sucre International Airport in Quito, Ecuador; and Tokua Airport in Kokopo, Papua New Guinea. The USA has the most airports affected by volcanic activity (17) on the most occasions (33) and hosts the second highest number of volcanoes that have caused the disruptions (5, after Indonesia with 7). One-fifth of the affected airports are within 30 km of the source volcanoes, approximately half are located within 150 km of the source volcanoes, and about three-quarters are within 300 km; nearly one-fifth are located more than 500 km away from the source volcanoes. The volcanoes that have caused the most impacts are Soufriere Hills on the island of Montserrat in the British West Indies

  13. When do Volcanic Eruptions make Lightning? Observations from Sakurajima, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, S. A.; McNutt, S. R.; Thomas, R. J.; Smith, C. M.; Edens, H. E.; Van Eaton, A. R.; Cimarelli, C.; Cigala, V.; Michel, C. W.; Miki, D.; Iguchi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Previous radio frequency (RF) observations of volcanic lightning have revealed that electrical activity frequently occurs concurrent with the onset of an explosive volcanic event. Typically, a myriad of electrical impulses originating from directly above the vent are observed first and the ensemble has durations of several seconds. The impulses are distinct from those produced by typical types of thunderstorm lightning, and have earned the moniker "continuous RF" due to their high rate and long-lasting nature . Several seconds after the onset of these impulses, small (100s of meters to several kilometers) lightning discharges occur in the plume and near the vent, and have electrical signatures similar to typical thunderstorm lightning. In eruptions with plume heights reaching 8-10 km or more, large scale (10s of kilometers) lightning discharges are observed throughout the plume several minutes after the onset of an explosive event.In May 2015, a campaign began to study the various types of small-scale electrical activity, including continuous RF, during explosive eruptions of Sakurajima volcano in Kyushu, Japan. The volcano was instrumented with two seismometers, two infrasound arrays, a high sensitivity video camera, an infrared camera, two high speed video cameras, still cameras, a 10-station Lightning Mapping Array, slow and fast electric field change sensors, and a broadband very high frequency (VHF) antenna. With these instruments, a robust data set of both the volcanic activity and electrical activity was collected. The preliminary data have revealed brief (1-2 seconds) bursts of continuous RF simultaneous with the onset of the more energetic explosions. Occurrence of continuous RF may be linked to mass eruption rate, explosivity, or grain size. Due to its unique nature, detection of continuous RF is an unambiguous indicator of explosive volcanic activity and is therefore useful for real-time volcano monitoring.

  14. Volcanism in Eastern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauthen, Clay; Coombs, Cassandra R.

    1996-01-01

    In 1891, the Virunga Mountains of Eastern Zaire were first acknowledged as volcanoes, and since then, the Virunga Mountain chain has demonstrated its potentially violent volcanic nature. The Virunga Mountains lie across the Eastern African Rift in an E-W direction located north of Lake Kivu. Mt. Nyamuragira and Mt. Nyiragongo present the most hazard of the eight mountains making up Virunga volcanic field, with the most recent activity during the 1970-90's. In 1977, after almost eighty years of moderate activity and periods of quiescence, Mt. Nyamuragira became highly active with lava flows that extruded from fissures on flanks circumscribing the volcano. The flows destroyed vast areas of vegetation and Zairian National Park areas, but no casualties were reported. Mt. Nyiragongo exhibited the same type volcanic activity, in association with regional tectonics that effected Mt. Nyamuragira, with variations of lava lake levels, lava fountains, and lava flows that resided in Lake Kivu. Mt. Nyiragongo, recently named a Decade volcano, presents both a direct and an indirect hazard to the inhabitants and properties located near the volcano. The Virunga volcanoes pose four major threats: volcanic eruptions, lava flows, toxic gas emission (CH4 and CO2), and earthquakes. Thus, the volcanoes of the Eastern African volcanic field emanate harm to the surrounding area by the forecast of volcanic eruptions. During the JSC Summer Fellowship program, we will acquire and collate remote sensing, photographic (Space Shuttle images), topographic and field data. In addition, maps of the extent and morphology(ies) of the features will be constructed using digital image information. The database generated will serve to create a Geographic Information System for easy access of information of the Eastem African volcanic field. The analysis of volcanism in Eastern Africa will permit a comparison for those areas from which we have field data. Results from this summer's work will permit

  15. Automatic venting valve for gas storage tank

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, H.

    1986-12-02

    A control valve is described for blocking atmospheric venting of gas fumes contained within a gasoline storage tank during tanker refill operations. The gasoline tank includes a venting tube coupled to open space within the top of the tank to provide air intake for pressure equalization as gasoline is gradually removed from the tank, the control valve comprising: a. a rigid, tubular valve casing having a top opening, a bottom opening and a flow channel therebetween; b. means for attaching the bottom end of the casing to an upper end of the venting tube such that the valve flow channel forms a continuation venting path for the venting tube; c. first and second valve seats and an intermediate seating member coupled to the casing and at least partially contained within the flow channel. The seating member is configured in shape and size to form restricted air space between the seating member and a surrounding wall of the flow channel to be reversibly displaceable in response to fume exhaust expelled during refill operations.

  16. Pre-eruptive storage conditions and eruption dynamics of a small rhyolite dome: Douglas Knob, Yellowstone volcanic field, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befus, Kenneth S.; Zinke, Robert W.; Jordan, Jacob S.; Manga, Michael; Gardner, James E.

    2014-03-01

    The properties and processes that control the size, duration, and style of eruption of rhyolite magma are poorly constrained because of a paucity of direct observations. Here, we investigate the small-volume, nonexplosive end-member. In particular, we determine the pre-eruptive storage conditions and eruption dynamics of Douglas Knob, a 0.011-km3 obsidian dome that erupted from a 500-m-long fissure in the Yellowstone volcanic system. To determine pre-eruptive storage conditions, we analyzed compositions of phenocrysts, matrix glass, and quartz-hosted glass inclusions by electron microprobe and Fourier-transform infrared analyses. The pre-eruptive melt is a high-silica rhyolite (˜75 wt.% SiO2) and was stored at 760 ± 30 °C and 50 ± 25 MPa prior to eruption, assuming vapor saturation at depth. To investigate emplacement dynamics and kinematics, we measured number densities and orientations of microlites at various locations across the lava dome. Microlites in samples closest to the inferred fissure vent are the most aligned. Alignment does not increase with distance traveled away from the vent, suggesting microlites record conduit processes. Strains of <5 accumulated in the conduit during ascent after microlite formation, imparted by a combination of pure and simple shear. Average microlite number density in samples varies from 104.9 to 105.7 mm-3. Using the magma ascent model of Toramaru et al. (J Volcanol Geotherm Res 175:156-157, 2008), microlite number densities imply decompression rates ranging from 0.03 to 0.11 MPa h-1 (˜0.4-1.3 mm s-1 ascent rates). Such slow ascent would allow time for passive degassing at depth in the conduit, thus resulting in an effusive eruption. Using calculated melt viscosity, we infer that the dike that fed the eruption was 4-8 m in width. Magma flux through this dike, assuming fissure dimensions at the surface represent its geometry at depth, implies an eruption duration of 17-210 days. That duration is also consistent with the

  17. Volcanic Lightning: in nature and in the lab.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimarelli, Corrado; Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, Miguel A.; Aizawa, Koki; Díaz Marina, Ana I.; Yokoo, Akihiko; Kueppers, Ulrich; Mueller, Sebastian; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-04-01

    Ash-rich volcanic plumes that are responsible for injecting large quantities of aerosols into the atmosphere are often associated with intense electrical activity and the generation of volcanic lightning. Although the hazard of volcanic lightning is mostly confined to the area proximal to the vent, monitoring electrical discharges associated with explosive eruptions can provide crucial information on the dynamics and structure of the plume as well as on the mass eruption rate and cargo of erupted fine ash. Nevertheless, our understanding of volcanic lightning is still limited due to lacking of both i) systematic instrumental observation of electric activity in volcanic plumes and ii) the limited number of experimental investigations on the electrical properties of volcanic materials and the opportunity of replicating volcanic plume conditions in the lab. We recently contributed to the understanding of both these aspects by performing multi-parametric observation of volcanic lightning at Sakurajima volcano in Japan and by achieving volcanic lightning in particle-laden jets generated in the lab. At Sakurajima volcano we combined high-speed imaging with magnetotelluric and acoustic measurements of ash-rich plumes generating electrical discharges and compare our observation with maximum plume height measurement and atmospheric soundings. Our observations at Sakurajima allow the measurement of flash properties with respect to the plume evolution as well as magnetic and electric field variation and associated transferred current. In addition, weather-balloon soundings rule out the contribution of hydrometeors in the electrification of the plume. We complement the field observation by performing rapid decompression experiments of well-constrained (composition and granulometry) ash samples and analogue materials (micrometric glass beads). The experiments have a similar character to the cannon-like vulcanian explosions observed at Sakurajima and show many similarities with

  18. Volcanic Glasses: Construction Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskowitz, Samuel E.

    1998-01-01

    Natural glass is the product of rapidly cooled molten rock. Two natural sources of the melt are volcanic eruption and meteoritic impact. Pure glass is an amorphous aggregate. Volcanic glass is a material that could be utilized in the construction of extraterrestrial outposts. Pumice and perlite are volcanic glasses currently used in the building industry. Samples of natural volcanic glass found in the lunar regolith were returned to Earth as part of the Apollo and Luna programs. An alpha proton X-ray spectrometer onboard the Pathfinder recently examined martian rocks located in the vicinity of the lander craft. Preliminary results of chemical composition by weight of SiO2 50-55%, Al203 11-13%, K20 1-2%, Na20 2-5%, CaO 4-6%, MgO 3-7%, FeO 12-14%, S03 2-5%, and MnO <1% were given for two rocks. Parenthetically, the values for K and Mn were perhaps too high, and the analysis was based on X-ray data only. The appreciable amount of silica already found on Mars and empirical evidence to support the hypothesis that the planet once had water sufficient to rapidly cool magma imply the possibility of discovering natural glass of volcanic origin in subsequent missions.

  19. Volcanic passive margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geoffroy, Laurent

    2005-12-01

    Compared to non-volcanic ones, volcanic passive margins mark continental break-up over a hotter mantle, probably subject to small-scale convection. They present distinctive genetic and structural features. High-rate extension of the lithosphere is associated with catastrophic mantle melting responsible for the accretion of a thick igneous crust. Distinctive structural features of volcanic margins are syn-magmatic and continentward-dipping crustal faults accommodating the seaward flexure of the igneous crust. Volcanic margins present along-axis a magmatic and tectonic segmentation with wavelength similar to adjacent slow-spreading ridges. Their 3D organisation suggests a connection between loci of mantle melting at depths and zones of strain concentration within the lithosphere. Break-up would start and propagate from localized thermally-softened lithospheric zones. These 'soft points' could be localized over small-scale convection cells found at the bottom of the lithosphere, where adiabatic mantle melting would specifically occur. The particular structure of the brittle crust at volcanic passive margins could be interpreted by active and sudden oceanward flow of both the unstable hot mantle and the ductile part of the lithosphere during the break-up stage. To cite this article: L. Geoffroy, C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  20. Water and gas geochemistry of the Calatrava Volcanic Province (CVP) hydrothermal system (Ciudad Real, central Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaselli, Orlando; Nisi, Barbara; Tassi, Franco; Giannini, Luciano; Grandia, Fidel; Darrah, Tom; Capecchiacci, Francesco; del Villar, Pèrez

    2013-04-01

    An extensive geochemical and isotopic investigation was carried out in the water and gas discharges of the Late Miocene-Quaternary Calatrava Volcanic Province (CVP) (Ciudad Real, Spain) with the aim reconstruct the fluid circulation in the area. CVP consists of a series of scattered (monogenetic) vents from where alkaline lava flows and pyroclastic deposits formed in two different periods. The first stage (8.7-6.4 Ma) mainly included ultra-potassic mafic extrusives, whilst the second stage (4.7-1.75 Ma) prevalently originated alkaline and ultra-alkaline volcanics. Both stages were followed by a volcanic activity that extended up to 1.3 and 0.7 Ma, respectively. This area can likely be regarded as one of the most important emitting zones of CO2 in the whole Peninsular Spain along with that of Selva-Emporda in northeastern Spain (Cataluña) and it can be assumed as one of the best examples of natural analogues of CO2 leakages in Spain. This latter aspect is further evidenced by the relatively common water-gas blast events that characterize the CCVF. In the last few years the presence of a CO2-pressurized reservoir at a relatively shallow level as indeed caused several small-sized explosion particularly during the drilling of domestic wells. The fluid discharging sites are apparently aligned along well-defined directions: NW-SE and NNW-SSE and subordinately, ENE-WSW, indicating a clear relationship between the thermal discharges and the volcanic centers that also distribute along these lineaments. The CVP waters are mostly hypothermal (up to 33 °C) and are generally Mg(Ca)-HCO3 in composition and occasionally show relatively high concentrations of Fe and Mn, with pH and electrical conductivity down to 5.5 and up to 6.5 mS/cm, respectively. The oxygen and hydrogen isotopes suggest a meteoric origin for these waters. The mantle source of these volcanic products is apparently preserved in the many CO2-rich (up to 990,000 mmol/mol) gas discharges that characterize CVP

  1. Constraints on Martian Surface Material from a Study of Volcanic Alteration in Iceland and Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Schiffman, P.; Southard, R. J.; Drief, A.; Verosub, K. L.

    2003-01-01

    Subaerial volcanic activity on Hawaii and subglacial volcanic activity on Iceland has led to the formation of a variety of silicate and iron oxiderich alteration products that may serve as models for chemical alteration on Mars. Multiple samples have been collected from palagonitic tuffs, altered pillow lavas, altered tephra, and S-rich vents for study in the lab. Variations in the kinds of alteration products have been observed depending on the alteration environment of the sample. We are working on building associations between the alteration products and formation conditions that can be used to provide information about environmental conditions on Mars.

  2. The geology and petrology of Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii; a study of postshield volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, Edward W.; Wise, William S.; Dalrymple, G. Brent

    1997-01-01

    Mauna Kea Volcano, on the Island of Hawaii, is capped by lavas of alkalic and transitional basalt (Hamakua Volcanics) erupted between approximately 250-200 and 70-65 ka and hawaiite, mugearite, and benmoreite (Laupahoehoe Volcanics) erupted between approximately 65 and 4 ka. These lavas, which form the entire subaerial surface of the volcano, issued from numerous scattered vents and are intercalated on the upper slopes with glacial deposits. The lavas record diminishing magma-supply rate and degree of partial melting from the shield stage through the postshield stage. Much of the compositional variation apparently reflects fractionation of basaltic magma in reservoirs within and beneath the volcano.

  3. Hydrothermal Mineralization Along the Volcanically Active Mariana Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ronde, C. E.; Hein, J. R.; Embley, R. W.; Stern, R. J.

    2004-12-01

    In March and April, 2004, ROPOS ROV dives took place from the R/V T.G. Thompson along the volcanically active Mariana arc to ground truth CTD data collected a year earlier that indicated hydrothermal activity. Dives took place on seven volcanoes, six of which showed hydrothermal activity. We present data on samples collected from NW Rota-1 (14° , 36'N, 144° , 46'E), E. Diamante (15° , 56'N, 145° , 41'E), and NW Eifuku (21° , 29'N, 144° , 03'E), the three sites most studied. All the hydrothermal systems found are associated with volcano summits, or with resurgent domes inside a caldera. Brimstone vent at NW Rota-1 provided a dramatic display of thick, bellowing, yellow plumes that contained ash and molten sulfur. This site occurs at 500 m water depth and clearly shows closely associated magmatic-hydrothermal discharge. Sulfur was the dominant hydrothermal mineral deposited around the vent and occurs as spheres in the surrounding volcaniclastic sediment, fracture fill and veins, and massive deposits. The Black Forest vent field at E Diamante consists of a sulfide-sulfate chimney system developed at about 650 m water depth. This is the only mature system discovered and consists of numerous tall (up to 9 m) chimneys. The measured fluid temperature of 240° C produces boiling at the depth of the vents. The chimneys and mounds are composed of varying amounts of pyrite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, barite, and anhydrite. Hydrothermal Mn oxides occur on the surface of inactive chimneys. This mineralogy contrasts with the other two systems, which deposit sulfur as the dominant hydrothermal product. The Cu-Zn-Fe-Ba mineralization is perhaps largely controlled by water/rock interaction. A unique hydrothermal field (Champagne field) was found at NW Eifuku where liquid CO2 is discharging from focused- and diffuse-flow vents at 1600 m water depth. The focused-flow vents consist of small chimneys and mounds up to a meter high that are composed of sulfur and yet to be

  4. Medium Fidelity Simulation of Oxygen Tank Venting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, Adam; Kurien, James; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The item to he cleared is a medium-fidelity software simulation model of a vented cryogenic tank. Such tanks are commonly used to transport cryogenic liquids such as liquid oxygen via truck, and have appeared on liquid-fueled rockets for decades. This simulation model works with the HCC simulation system that was developed by Xerox PARC and NASA Ames Research Center. HCC has been previously cleared for distribution. When used with the HCC software, the model generates simulated readings for the tank pressure and temperature as the simulated cryogenic liquid boils off and is vented. Failures (such as a broken vent valve) can be injected into the simulation to produce readings corresponding to the failure. Release of this simulation will allow researchers to test their software diagnosis systems by attempting to diagnose the simulated failure from the simulated readings. This model does not contain any encryption software nor can it perform any control tasks that might be export controlled.

  5. On Small Disturbance Ascent Vent Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    As a spacecraft undergoes ascent in a launch vehicle, its ambient pressure environment transitions from one atmosphere to high vacuum in a matter of a few minutes. Venting of internal cavities is necessary to prevent the buildup of pressure differentials across cavity walls. These pressure differentials are often restricted to low levels to prevent violation of container integrity. Such vents usually consist of fixed orifices, ducts, or combinations of both. Duct conductance behavior is fundamentally different from that for orifices in pressure driven flows governing the launch vehicle ascent depressurization environment. Duct conductance is governed by the average pressure across its length, while orifice conductance is dictated by a pressure ratio. Hence, one cannot define a valid equivalent orifice for a given duct across a range of pressure levels. This presentation discusses development of expressions for these two types of vent elements in the limit of small pressure differentials, explores conditions for their validity, and compares their features regarding ascent depressurization performance.

  6. Bioremediated soil venting of light hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ostendorf, D.W.; Kampbell, D.H.

    1990-01-01

    The effectiveness and feasibility of bioremediated soil venting of light hydrocarbons in the unsaturated zone was investigated. Degradation mechanics were considered as a one dimensional balance of storage, linear sorption, vertical advection, and Michaelis-Menton kinetics. The resulting analytical solution was tested successfully against field performance data of an unsaturated clay soil bioreactor for a propellant waste gas mixture of propane, n-butane, and isobutane. A series of venting simulations was run to assess the biodegradation of vapors above an aviation gasoline spill in sandy soil at Traverse City, Michigan, based on field and microcosm estimates of the kinetic parameters. Acclimated, nutrient rich soil effectively and feasibly reduced effluent vapor concentration from the strong influent concentration associated with dispersed residual gasoline in the contaminated capillary fringe. Aggregated residual contamination required a stronger airflow for a longer duration while natural kinetics were too slow for feasible and effective treatment by bioremediated soil venting at Traverse City.

  7. Explosive Volcanic Activity at Extreme Depths: Evidence from the Charles Darwin Volcanic Field, Cape Verdes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasnitschka, T.; Devey, C. W.; Hansteen, T. H.; Freundt, A.; Kutterolf, S.

    2013-12-01

    diameters of up to 20 cm, probably abraded by fluidization within the vent, that were laterally transported for hundreds of meters through water. In spite of the great depth, both edifices feature dense but highly fragmented volcanic deposits with an unexpected combination of large clast sizes and wide clast dispersal. This suggests an energetic eruptive environment, which may have similarities with that seen in pyroclastic eruptions on land.

  8. Seasonality of volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. G.; Pyle, D. M.; Dade, W. B.; Jupp, T.

    2004-04-01

    An analysis of volcanic activity during the last three hundred years reveals that volcanic eruptions exhibit seasonality to a statistically significant degree. This remarkable pattern is observed primarily along the Pacific "Ring of Fire" and locally at some individual volcanoes. Globally, seasonal fluctuations amount to 18% of the historical average monthly eruption rate. In some regions, seasonal fluctuations amount to as much as 50% of the average eruption rate. Seasonality principally reflects the temporal distribution of the smaller, dated eruptions (volcanic explosivity index of 0-2) that dominate the eruption catalog. We suggest that the pattern of seasonality correlates with the annual Earth surface deformation that accompanies the movement of surface water mass during the annual hydrological cycle and illustrate this with respect to global models of surface deformation and regional measurements of annual sea level change. For example, seasonal peaks in the eruption rate of volcanoes in Central America, the Alaskan Peninsula, and Kamchatka coincide with periods of falling regional sea level. In Melanesia, in contrast, peak numbers of volcanic eruptions occur during months of maximal regional sea level and falling regional atmospheric pressure. We suggest that the well-documented slow deformation of Earth's surface that accompanies the annual movements of water mass from oceans to continents acts to impose a fluctuating boundary condition on volcanoes, such that volcanic eruptions tend to be concentrated during periods of local or regional surface change rather than simply being distributed randomly throughout the year. Our findings have important ramifications for volcanic risk assessment and volcanoclimate feedback mechanisms.

  9. Spatio-volumetric hazard estimation in the Auckland volcanic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebbington, Mark S.

    2015-05-01

    The idea of a volcanic field `boundary' is prevalent in the literature, but ill-defined at best. We use the elliptically constrained vents in the Auckland Volcanic Field to examine how spatial intensity models can be tested to assess whether they are consistent with such features. A means of modifying the anisotropic Gaussian kernel density estimate to reflect the existence of a `hard' boundary is then suggested, and the result shown to reproduce the observed elliptical distribution. A new idea, that of a spatio-volumetric model, is introduced as being more relevant to hazard in a monogenetic volcanic field than the spatiotemporal hazard model due to the low temporal rates in volcanic fields. Significant dependencies between the locations and erupted volumes of the observed centres are deduced, and expressed in the form of a spatially-varying probability density. In the future, larger volumes are to be expected in the `gaps' between existing centres, with the location of the greatest forecast volume lying in the shipping channel between Rangitoto and Castor Bay. The results argue for tectonic control over location and magmatic control over erupted volume. The spatio-volumetric model is consistent with the hypothesis of a flat elliptical area in the mantle where tensional stresses, related to the local tectonics and geology, allow decompressional melting.

  10. Precambrian lunar volcanic protolife.

    PubMed

    Green, Jack

    2009-06-01

    Five representative terrestrial analogs of lunar craters are detailed relevant to Precambrian fumarolic activity. Fumarolic fluids contain the ingredients for protolife. Energy sources to derive formaldehyde, amino acids and related compounds could be by flow charging, charge separation and volcanic shock. With no photodecomposition in shadow, most fumarolic fluids at 40 K would persist over geologically long time periods. Relatively abundant tungsten would permit creation of critical enzymes, Fischer-Tropsch reactions could form polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soluble volcanic polyphosphates would enable assembly of nucleic acids. Fumarolic stimuli factors are described. Orbital and lander sensors specific to protolife exploration including combined Raman/laser-induced breakdown spectrocsopy are evaluated.

  11. Mercurian volcanism questioned

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilhelms, D.E.

    1976-01-01

    The Mariner 10 television team has argued that extensive plains on Mercury were formed by volcanism and compared them with the demonstrably lunar maria. I believe, however, that in stratigraphic relations, surface morphology, and albedo contrast, the Mercurian plains more closely resemble the lunar light plains. These lunar plains were interpreted as volcanic on the basis of data comparable to that available to the Mariner 10 investigators but have been shown by the Apollo missions to be of impact origin. The plains on Mercury might also be formed of impact materials, perhaps of impact melt or other basin ejecta that behaved more like a fluid when emplaced that did lunar basin ejecta. ?? 1976.

  12. Precambrian Lunar Volcanic Protolife

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Five representative terrestrial analogs of lunar craters are detailed relevant to Precambrian fumarolic activity. Fumarolic fluids contain the ingredients for protolife. Energy sources to derive formaldehyde, amino acids and related compounds could be by flow charging, charge separation and volcanic shock. With no photodecomposition in shadow, most fumarolic fluids at 40 K would persist over geologically long time periods. Relatively abundant tungsten would permit creation of critical enzymes, Fischer-Tropsch reactions could form polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soluble volcanic polyphosphates would enable assembly of nucleic acids. Fumarolic stimuli factors are described. Orbital and lander sensors specific to protolife exploration including combined Raman/laser-induced breakdown spectrocsopy are evaluated. PMID:19582224

  13. Precambrian lunar volcanic protolife.

    PubMed

    Green, Jack

    2009-06-01

    Five representative terrestrial analogs of lunar craters are detailed relevant to Precambrian fumarolic activity. Fumarolic fluids contain the ingredients for protolife. Energy sources to derive formaldehyde, amino acids and related compounds could be by flow charging, charge separation and volcanic shock. With no photodecomposition in shadow, most fumarolic fluids at 40 K would persist over geologically long time periods. Relatively abundant tungsten would permit creation of critical enzymes, Fischer-Tropsch reactions could form polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soluble volcanic polyphosphates would enable assembly of nucleic acids. Fumarolic stimuli factors are described. Orbital and lander sensors specific to protolife exploration including combined Raman/laser-induced breakdown spectrocsopy are evaluated. PMID:19582224

  14. The Extremes of Volcanic Activity: Earth and Jupiter's Moon Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowes, L. L.; Lopes, R.

    2004-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Io is the solar system's most volcanically active body, and the only place that magmatic volcanic eruptions have been observed beyond Earth. One of the first images of Io obtained by NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft in 1979 shows a plume above one of its volcanoes. The NASA Voyager and Galileo spacecraft imaged many explosive eruptions of plumes and deposits - which travel hundreds of kilometers (farther than on the Earth or the Moon). Very hot lavas that are erupting from volcanic vents on Io may be similar to lavas that erupted on Earth billions of years ago. Understanding the physical processes driving volcanic eruptions is important for the understanding of terrestrial volcanoes, not only because of their potential hazards, but also as geologic resources, biologic environments, and for their role in shaping the surface of Earth and other planets. Volcanic eruptions are perhaps the most dramatic events on Earth, and are of intrinsic interest to students, youth, and adults. Topics involving volcanoes are a part of the national science education benchmarks for understanding the Earth's composition and structure for grades 6-8 (the process of creating landforms) and grades 9-12 (the effects of movement of crustal plates). Natural events on Earth coupled with exciting discoveries in space can serve to heighten the awareness of these phenomena and provide learning opportunities for real world applications of science. Educational applications for youth to compare volcanic activity on Io and Earth have been done through NASA-sponsored field trip workshops to places such as Yellowstone National Park (allowing educators to experience environments similar to those on other worlds), targeted classroom and hands-on activities, special interest books, and other resources. A sampling of such activities will be presented, and discussion invited on other related developmentally appropriate resources and activities.

  15. Evidence for volcanism in NW Ishtar Terra, Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddis, L.; Greeley, Ronald

    1989-01-01

    Venera 15/16 radar data for an area in NW Ishtar Terra, Venus, show an area with moderate radar return and a smooth textured surface which embays low lying areas of the surrounding mountainous terrain. Although this unit may be an extension of the lava plains of Lakshmi Planum to the southeast, detailed study suggests a separate volcanic center in NW Ishtar Terra. Lakshmi Planum, on the Ishtar Terra highland, exhibits major volcanic and tectonic features. On the Venera radar image radar brightness is influenced by slope and roughness; radar-facing slopes (east-facing) and rough surfaces (approx. 8 cm average relief) are bright, while west-facing slopes and smooth surfaces are dark. A series of semi-circular features, apparently topographic depressions, do not conform in orientation to major structural trends in this region of NW Ishtar Terra. The large depression in NW Ishtar Terra is similar to the calderas of Colette and Sacajawea Paterae, as all three structures are large irregular depressions. NW Ishtar Terra appears to be the site of a volcanic center with a complex caldera structure, possibly more than one eruptive vent, and associated lobed flows at lower elevations. The morphologic similarity between this volcanic center and those of Colette and Sacajawea suggests that centralized eruptions have been the dominant form of volcanism in Ishtar. The location of this volcanic center at the intersection of two major compressional mountain belts and the large size of the calders (with an inferred larg/deep magma source) support a crustal thickening/melting rather than a hot-spot origin for these magmas.

  16. Active Volcanism on Io as Seen by Galileo SSI

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, A.S.; Keszthelyi, L.; Geissler, P.; Simonelli, D.P.; Carr, M.H.; Johnson, T.V.; Klaasen, K.P.; Breneman, H.H.; Jones, T.J.; Kaufman, J.M.; Magee, K.P.; Senske, D.A.; Belton, M.J.S.; Schubert, G.

    1998-01-01

    Active volcanism on Io has been monitored during the nominal Galileo satellite tour from mid 1996 through late 1997. The Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment was able to observe many manifestations of this active volcanism, including (1) changes in the color and albedo of the surface, (2) active airborne plumes, and (3) glowing vents seen in eclipse. About 30 large-scale (tens of kilometers) surface changes are obvious from comparison of the SSI images to those acquired by Voyager in 1979. These include new pyroclastic deposits of several colors, bright and dark flows, and caldera-floor materials. There have also been significant surface changes on Io during the Galileo mission itself, such as a new 400-km-diameter dark pyroclastic deposit around Pillan Patera. While these surface changes are impressive, the number of large-scale changes observed in the four months between the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 flybys in 1979 suggested that over 17 years the cumulative changes would have been much more impressive. There are two reasons why this was not actually the case. First, it appears that the most widespread plume deposits are ephemeral and seem to disappear within a few years. Second, it appears that a large fraction of the volcanic activity is confined to repeated resurfacing of dark calderas and flow fields that cover only a few percent of Io's surface. The plume monitoring has revealed 10 active plumes, comparable to the 9 plumes observed by Voyager. One of these plumes was visible only in the first orbit and three became active in the later orbits. Only the Prometheus plume has been consistently active and easy to detect. Observations of the Pele plume have been particularly intriguing since it was detected only once by SSI, despite repeated attempts, but has been detected several times by the Hubble Space Telescope at 255 nm. Pele's plume is much taller (460 km) than during Voyager 1 (300 km) and much fainter at visible wavelengths. Prometheus-type plumes (50

  17. Active Volcanism on Io as Seen by Galileo SSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Alfred S.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo; Geissler, Paul; Simonelli, Damon P.; Carr, Michael H.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Klaasen, Kenneth P.; Breneman, H. Herbert; Jones, Todd J.; Kaufman, James M.; Magee, Kari P.; Senske, David A.; Belton, Michael J. S.; Schubert, Gerald

    1998-09-01

    Active volcanism on Io has been monitored during the nominal Galileo satellite tour from mid 1996 through late 1997. The Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment was able to observe many manifestations of this active volcanism, including (1) changes in the color and albedo of the surface, (2) active airborne plumes, and (3) glowing vents seen in eclipse. About 30 large-scale (tens of kilometers) surface changes are obvious from comparison of the SSI images to those acquired by Voyager in 1979. These include new pyroclastic deposits of several colors, bright and dark flows, and caldera-floor materials. There have also been significant surface changes on Io during the Galileo mission itself, such as a new 400-km-diameter dark pyroclastic deposit around Pillan Patera. While these surface changes are impressive, the number of large-scale changes observed in the four months between the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 flybys in 1979 suggested that over 17 years the cumulative changes would have been much more impressive. There are two reasons why this was not actually the case. First, it appears that the most widespread plume deposits are ephemeral and seem to disappear within a few years. Second, it appears that a large fraction of the volcanic activity is confined to repeated resurfacing of dark calderas and flow fields that cover only a few percent of Io's surface. The plume monitoring has revealed 10 active plumes, comparable to the 9 plumes observed by Voyager. One of these plumes was visible only in the first orbit and three became active in the later orbits. Only the Prometheus plume has been consistently active and easy to detect. Observations of the Pele plume have been particularly intriguing since it was detected only once by SSI, despite repeated attempts, but has been detected several times by the Hubble Space Telescope at 255 nm. Pele's plume is much taller (460 km) than during Voyager 1 (300 km) and much fainter at visible wavelengths. Prometheus-type plumes (50

  18. Vented Cavity Radiant Barrier Assembly And Method

    DOEpatents

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.; Jackaway, Adam D.

    2000-05-16

    A vented cavity radiant barrier assembly (2) includes a barrier (12), typically a PV module, having inner and outer surfaces (18, 22). A support assembly (14) is secured to the barrier and extends inwardly from the inner surface of the barrier to a building surface (14) creating a vented cavity (24) between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. A low emissivity element (20) is mounted at or between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. At least part of the cavity exit (30) is higher than the cavity entrance (28) to promote cooling air flow through the cavity.

  19. Genetic diversity and demographic instability in Riftia pachyptila tubeworms from eastern Pacific hydrothermal vents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coykendall, D.K.; Johnson, S.B.; Karl, S.A.; Lutz, R.A.; Vrijenhoek, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Deep-sea hydrothermal vent animals occupy patchy and ephemeral habitats supported by chemosynthetic primary production. Volcanic and tectonic activities controlling the turnover of these habitats contribute to demographic instability that erodes genetic variation within and among colonies of these animals. We examined DNA sequences from one mitochondrial and three nuclear gene loci to assess genetic diversity in the siboglinid tubeworm, Riftia pachyptila, a widely distributed constituent of vents along the East Pacific Rise and Galpagos Rift. Results: Genetic differentiation (FST) among populations increased with geographical distances, as expected under a linear stepping-stone model of dispersal. Low levels of DNA sequence diversity occurred at all four loci, allowing us to exclude the hypothesis that an idiosyncratic selective sweep eliminated mitochondrial diversity alone. Total gene diversity declined with tectonic spreading rates. The southernmost populations, which are subjected to superfast spreading rates and high probabilities of extinction, are relatively homogenous genetically. Conclusions: Compared to other vent species, DNA sequence diversity is extremely low in R. pachyptila. Though its dispersal abilities appear to be effective, the low diversity, particularly in southern hemisphere populations, is consistent with frequent local extinction and (re)colonization events. ?? 2011 Coykendall et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  20. Genetic diversity and demographic instability in Riftia pachyptila tubeworms from eastern Pacific hydrothermal vents

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Deep-sea hydrothermal vent animals occupy patchy and ephemeral habitats supported by chemosynthetic primary production. Volcanic and tectonic activities controlling the turnover of these habitats contribute to demographic instability that erodes genetic variation within and among colonies of these animals. We examined DNA sequences from one mitochondrial and three nuclear gene loci to assess genetic diversity in the siboglinid tubeworm, Riftia pachyptila, a widely distributed constituent of vents along the East Pacific Rise and Galápagos Rift. Results Genetic differentiation (FST) among populations increased with geographical distances, as expected under a linear stepping-stone model of dispersal. Low levels of DNA sequence diversity occurred at all four loci, allowing us to exclude the hypothesis that an idiosyncratic selective sweep eliminated mitochondrial diversity alone. Total gene diversity declined with tectonic spreading rates. The southernmost populations, which are subjected to superfast spreading rates and high probabilities of extinction, are relatively homogenous genetically. Conclusions Compared to other vent species, DNA sequence diversity is extremely low in R. pachyptila. Though its dispersal abilities appear to be effective, the low diversity, particularly in southern hemisphere populations, is consistent with frequent local extinction and (re)colonization events. PMID:21489281

  1. Mapping the Piccard Hydrothermal Field - The World's Deepest Known Vent Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, J. C.; German, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    We report the recent mapping and exploration of the Piccard Hydrothermal Field on the Mid-Cayman Rise. Two previous expeditions in 2009 and 2010 led to the discovery of the site, which at 5000m hosts the world's deepest known vents. The site was mapped and explored in January 2012 and the Piccard Field was found to be larger than previously appreciated. The site includes 3 separate currently active hydrothermal mounts together with 4 additional extinct depo-centers. The 3 active centers are the Beebe Vents, Beebe Woods, and Beebe Sea sites. Beebe Vents is an active black smoker system with maximum temperatures of 400-403 degrees Celsius. Beebe Woods contains a set of tall beehive smokers with temperatures of approximately 353 degrees Celsius. Beebe Sea, the largest sulfide mound in the field, contains diffuse venting together with numerous extinct chimneys that indicate significant past active focused flow. Observations of the 4 extinct mounds indicate differences in their apparent ages based on the texture and morphology of the extinct sulfides at the summit of each mound. The entire field is located on top of an axial volcanic ridge with extrusive pillow mounds prominent. A major fault traverses the mound along its long axis, from Southwest to Northeast. Beebe Woods, Beebe Sea, and extinct Beebe mound D abut this fault directly with an apparent monotonic age progression from youngest (Beebe Woods) in the SW to relict mound 'D' in the NE. Similarly, the Beebe Vents site and mound is located at the SW limit of a parallel set of mounds, offset from the fault by approximately 100m, which also ages progressively through extinct Beebe Mounds 'E', 'F' and 'G'. The major fault that bisects the axial volcanic ridge at Piccard evidently serves as a controlling mechanism for the mounds abutting that fault however the mechanism for the second line of mounds remains to be determined. Bathymetry suggests the presence of a second, smaller fault which may serve as the control

  2. Quantifying diffuse and discrete venting at the Tour Eiffel vent site, Lucky Strike hydrothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelstaedt, Eric; EscartíN, Javier; Gracias, Nuno; Olive, Jean-Arthur; Barreyre, Thibaut; Davaille, Anne; Cannat, Mathilde; Garcia, Rafael

    2012-04-01

    The relative heat carried by diffuse versus discrete venting of hydrothermal fluids at mid-ocean ridges is poorly constrained and likely varies among vent sites. Estimates of the proportion of heat carried by diffuse flow range from 0% to 100% of the total axial heat flux. Here, we present an approach that integrates imagery, video, and temperature measurements to accurately estimate this partitioning at a single vent site, Tour Eiffel in the Lucky Strike hydrothermal field along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Fluid temperatures, photographic mosaics of the vent site, and video sequences of fluid flow were acquired during the Bathyluck'09 cruise (Fall, 2009) and the Momarsat'10 cruise (Summer, 2010) to the Lucky Strike hydrothermal field by the ROV Victor6000 aboard the French research vessel the "Pourquoi Pas"? (IFREMER, France). We use two optical methods to calculate the velocities of imaged hydrothermal fluids: (1) for diffuse venting, Diffuse Flow Velocimetry tracks the displacement of refractive index anomalies through time, and (2) for discrete jets, Particle Image Velocimetry tracks eddies by cross-correlation of pixel intensities between subsequent images. To circumvent video blurring associated with rapid velocities at vent orifices, exit velocities at discrete vents are calculated from the best fit of the observed velocity field to a model of a steady state turbulent plume where we vary the model vent radius and fluid exit velocity. Our results yield vertical velocities of diffuse effluent between 0.9 cm s-1 and 11.1 cm s-1 for fluid temperatures between 3°C and 33.5°C above that of ambient seawater, and exit velocities of discrete jets between 22 cm s-1 and 119 cm s-1 for fluid temperatures between 200°C and 301°C above ambient seawater. Using the calculated fluid velocities, temperature measurements, and photo mosaics of the actively venting areas, we calculate a heat flux due to diffuse venting from thin fractures of 3.15 ± 2.22 MW, discrete venting of

  3. Lung problems and volcanic smog

    MedlinePlus

    ... a volcano erupts and releases gases into the atmosphere. Volcanic smog can irritate the lungs and make ... react with oxygen, moisture, and sunlight in the atmosphere, volcanic smog forms. This smog is a type ...

  4. 30 CFR 77.304 - Explosion release vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Dryers § 77.304 Explosion release vents. Drying chambers, dry-dust collectors, ductwork connecting dryers to dust collectors, and ductwork between dust collectors and discharge stacks shall be protected with... vent dry dust collectors....

  5. 46 CFR 38.20-1 - Venting-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Vents and headers shall be so installed as to prevent excessive stresses on safety relief valve... entrance of rain or snow. (g) No valve of any type shall be fitted in the vent pipe between the...

  6. 46 CFR 153.463 - Vent system discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.463 Vent system discharges. The discharge of a venting... to carry a flammable or combustible cargo; and (b) Table 1 requires the cargo to have a PV...

  7. 46 CFR 153.463 - Vent system discharges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.463 Vent system discharges. The discharge of a venting... to carry a flammable or combustible cargo; and (b) Table 1 requires the cargo to have a PV...

  8. Shallow Submarine Hydrothermal Systems in the Aeolian Volcanic Arc, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monecke, Thomas; Petersen, Sven; Lackschewitz, Klas; Hügler, Michael; Hannington, Mark D.; Gemmell, J. Bruce

    2009-03-01

    The majority of known high-temperature hydrothermal vents occur at mid-ocean ridges and back-arc spreading centers, typically at water depths from 2000 to 4000 meters. Compared with 30 years of hydrothermal research along spreading centers in the deep parts of the ocean, exploration of the approximately 700 submarine arc volcanoes is relatively recent [de Ronde et al., 2003]. At these submarine arc volcanoes, active hydrothermal vents are located at unexpectedly shallow water depth (95% at <1600-meter depth), which has important consequences for the style of venting, the nature of associated mineral deposits, and the local biological communities. As part of an ongoing multinational research effort to study shallow submarine volcanic arcs, two hydrothermal systems in the submerged part of the Aeolian arc have been investigated in detail during research cruises by R/V Poseidon (July 2006) and R/V Meteor (August 2007). Comprehensive seafloor video surveys were conducted using a remotely operated vehicle, and drilling to a depth of 5 meters was carried out using a lander-type submersible drill. This research has resulted in the first detailed, three-dimensional documentation of shallow submarine hydrothermal systems on arc volcanoes.

  9. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies. PMID:27546174

  10. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies.

  11. Orthodontics and Aligners

    MedlinePlus

    ... Repairing Chipped Teeth Teeth Whitening Tooth-Colored Fillings Orthodontics and Aligners Straighten teeth for a healthier smile. Orthodontics When consumers think about orthodontics, braces are the ...

  12. Tidal alignment of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazek, Jonathan; Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš

    2015-08-01

    We develop an analytic model for galaxy intrinsic alignments (IA) based on the theory of tidal alignment. We calculate all relevant nonlinear corrections at one-loop order, including effects from nonlinear density evolution, galaxy biasing, and source density weighting. Contributions from density weighting are found to be particularly important and lead to bias dependence of the IA amplitude, even on large scales. This effect may be responsible for much of the luminosity dependence in IA observations. The increase in IA amplitude for more highly biased galaxies reflects their locations in regions with large tidal fields. We also consider the impact of smoothing the tidal field on halo scales. We compare the performance of this consistent nonlinear model in describing the observed alignment of luminous red galaxies with the linear model as well as the frequently used "nonlinear alignment model," finding a significant improvement on small and intermediate scales. We also show that the cross-correlation between density and IA (the "GI" term) can be effectively separated into source alignment and source clustering, and we accurately model the observed alignment down to the one-halo regime using the tidal field from the fully nonlinear halo-matter cross correlation. Inside the one-halo regime, the average alignment of galaxies with density tracers no longer follows the tidal alignment prediction, likely reflecting nonlinear processes that must be considered when modeling IA on these scales. Finally, we discuss tidal alignment in the context of cosmic shear measurements.

  13. Alignability of Optical Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, Russell Scott

    With the continuing drive towards higher speed, density, and functionality in electronics, electrical interconnects become inadequate. Due to optics' high speed and bandwidth, freedom from capacitive loading effects, and freedom from crosstalk, optical interconnects can meet more stringent interconnect requirements. But, an optical interconnect requires additional components, such as an optical source and detector, lenses, holographic elements, etc. Fabrication and assembly of an optical interconnect requires precise alignment of these components. The successful development and deployment of optical interconnects depend on how easily the interconnect components can be aligned and/or how tolerant the interconnect is to misalignments. In this thesis, a method of quantitatively specifying the relative difficulty of properly aligning an optical interconnect is described. Ways of using this theory of alignment to obtain design and packaging guidelines for optical interconnects are examined. The measure of the ease with which an optical interconnect can be aligned, called the alignability, uses the efficiency of power transfer as a measure of alignment quality. The alignability is related to interconnect package design through the overall cost measure, which depends upon various physical parameters of the interconnect, such as the cost of the components and the time required for fabrication and alignment. Through a mutual dependence on detector size, the relationship between an interconnect's alignability and its bandwidth, signal-to-noise ratio, and bit-error -rate is examined. The results indicate that a range of device sizes exists for which given performance threshold values are satisfied. Next, the alignability of integrated planar-optic backplanes is analyzed in detail. The resulting data show that the alignability can be optimized by varying the substrate thickness or the angle of reflection. By including the effects of crosstalk, in a multi-channel backplane, the

  14. Understanding the dynamics of volcanic jet through laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigala, Valeria; Kueppers, Ulrich; Dingwell, Donald Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions pose great hazards in both the near- and far-field. Understanding the factors controlling the dynamics of pyroclast ejection is essential for better assessment of related hazards. The dynamics of volcanic explosions, which can be observed and characterized in the field only in a very incomplete manner due to their inaccessibility and hazards, can be simulated in the laboratory where experiments can be performed in their immediate proximity under controlled conditions. Using a shock-tube we ejected loose particles while controlling parameters such as temperature, applied overpressure, starting grain size distribution, conduit length and exit vent geometry. We recorded each explosion with a high-speed camera and collected the sample after deposition, thereby quantifying the velocity of individual particles, the jet spreading angle and the production of fines. The experiments were performed at 500°C and 15MPa using materials of two different densities ("Schaumlava" and "Laacher See Bims") and three grain size ranges (1-2 mm, 0.5-1 mm and 0.125-0.250 mm). Additionally, we varied the setup to allow for different sample-to-gas ratios and varying fragmentation depth at start of each experiment. We also deployed four different exit vents: a cylindrical continuation of the shock-tube, a funnel with a flaring of 30°, a funnel with a flaring of 15° and a nozzle. All vents are characterized by the same height and bottom diameter. The results of the current investigation together with comparison with other experimental campaigns showed particle velocities ranging from 130 to 290 m/s, gas spreading angles varying from 14 to 37° and particles spreading angles from 12° to 2°. Moreover we observed dynamically evolving ejection characteristics (speed and spreading angle) and strong variations in the production of fines (up to a factor of 2) during the course of individual experiments. We further qualitatively present the impact of experimental

  15. Prolonged eruptive history of a compound volcano on Mercury: Volcanic and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothery, David A.; Thomas, Rebecca J.; Kerber, Laura

    2014-01-01

    A 27×13 km ‘rimless depression’ 100 km inside the southwest rim of the Caloris basin is revealed by high resolution orbital imaging under a variety of illuminations to consist of at least nine overlapping volcanic vents, each individually up to 8 km in diameter. It is thus a ‘compound’ volcano, indicative of localised migration of the site of the active vent. The vent floors are at a least 1 km below their brinks, but lack the flat shape characteristically produced by piston-like subsidence of a caldera floor or by flooding of a crater bottom by a lava lake. They bear a closer resemblance to volcanic craters sculpted by explosive eruptions and/or modified by collapse into void spaces created by magma withdrawal back down into a conduit. This complex of overlapping vents is at the summit of a subtle edifice at least 100 km across, with flank slopes of about only 0.2 degrees, after correction for the regional slope. This is consistent with previous interpretation as a locus of pyroclastic eruptions. Construction of the edifice could have been contributed to by effusion of very low viscosity lava, but high resolution images show that the vent-facing rim of a nearby impact crater is not heavily embayed as previously supposed on the basis of lower resolution flyby imaging. Contrasts in morphology (sharpness versus blurredness of the texture) and different densities of superposed sub-km impact craters inside each vent are consistent with (but do not prove) substantial differences in the age of the most recent activity at each vent. This suggests a long duration of episodic magmagenesis at a restricted locus. The age range cannot be quantified, but could be of the order of a billion years. If each vent was fed from the same point source, geometric considerations suggest a source depth of at least 50 km. However, the migration of the active vent may be partly controlled by a deep-seated fault that is radial to the Caloris basin. Other rimless depressions in this

  16. Prolonged eruptive history of a compound volcano on Mercury: volcanic and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothery, D. A.; . T. Thomas, R.; Kerber, L.

    2013-09-01

    High resolution orbital imaging by MESSENGER under a variety of illuminations reveals that a 27 × 13 km rimless depression 100 km inside the southwest rim of the Caloris basin consists of at least nine overlapping volcanic vents, each individually up to 8 km in diameter. This is thus a 'compound' volcano, indicative of localised migration of the site of the active vent. The vent floors are at a least 1 km below their brinks, but lack the flat shape that is characteristically produced by piston-like subsidence of a caldera floor or by flooding of a crater bottom by a lava lake. They bear a closer resemblance to volcanic craters sculpted by explosive eruptions and/or modified by collapse into void spaces created by magma withdrawal back down into a conduit. This complex of overlapping vents is at the summit of a subtle edifice at least 100 km across, with flank slopes of about 0.2 degrees, after correction for the regional slope. This is consistent with previous interpretation as a locus of pyroclastic eruptions. Construction of the edifice could have been contributed to by effusion of very low viscosity lava, but high resolution images show that the vent-facing rim of a nearby impact crater is not heavily embayed as previously supposed. Contrasts in morphology (sharpness versus blurredness of the texture) and different densities of superposed sub-km impact craters inside each vent suggest significant differences in the age of the most recent activity at each vent. This implies a long duration of episodic magmagenesis at a restricted locus. The age range is hard to quantify, but could be of the order of a billion years. If each vent was fed from the same source, geometric considerations suggest a source depth of at least 50 km. The migration of the active vent may be partly controlled by a deep-seated fault that is radial to the Caloris basin. Other rimless depressions in this part of the Caloris basin fall on or close to radial lines, suggesting that elements of

  17. Volcanism in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albin, Edward F.

    1993-01-01

    Presents activities to familiarize junior high school students with the processes behind and reasons for volcanism, which is generally a planet's way of releasing excessive internal heat and pressure. Students participate in the creation of four important volcano-related simulations: a lava flow, a shield volcano, a cinder-cone volcano, and a…

  18. Shallow Subsurface Structures of Volcanic Fissures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parcheta, C. E.; Nash, J.; Mitchell, K. L.; Parness, A.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic fissure vents are a difficult geologic feature to quantify. They are often too thin to document in detail with seismology or remote geophysical methods. Additionally, lava flows, lava drain back, or collapsed rampart blocks typically conceal a fissure's surface expression. For exposed fissures, quantifying the surface (let along sub0surface) geometric expression can become an overwhelming and time-consuming task given the non-uniform distribution of wall irregularities, drain back textures, and the larger scale sinuosity of the whole fissure system. We developed (and previously presented) VolcanoBot to acquire robust characteristic data of fissure geometries by going inside accessible fissures after an eruption ends and the fissure cools off to <50 C. Data from VolcanoBot documents the fissure conduit geometry with a near-IR structured light sensor, and reproduces the 3d structures to cm-scale accuracy. Here we present a comparison of shallow subsurface structures (<30 m depth) within the Mauna Ulu fissure system and their counterpart features at the vent-to-ground-surface interface. While we have not mapped enough length of the fissure to document sinuosity at depth, we see a self-similar pattern of irregularities on the fissure walls throughout the entire shallow subsurface, implying a fracture mechanical origin similar to faults. These irregularities are, on average, 1 m across and protrude 30 cm into the drained fissure. This is significantly larger than the 10% wall roughness addressed in the engineering literature on fluid dynamics, and implies that magma fluid dynamics during fissure eruptions are probably not as passive nor as simple as previously thought. In some locations, it is possible to match piercing points across the fissure walls, where the dike broke the wall rock in order to propagate upwards, yet in other locations there are erosional cavities, again, implying complex fluid dynamics in the shallow sub-surface during fissure eruptions.

  19. 40 CFR 63.1321 - Batch process vents provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Batch process vents provisions. 63... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins § 63.1321 Batch process vents provisions. (a) Batch process vents. Except as specified in paragraphs (b) through (d) of this...

  20. 40 CFR 63.1406 - Reactor batch process vent provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Reactor batch process vent provisions... § 63.1406 Reactor batch process vent provisions. (a) Emission standards. Owners or operators of reactor batch process vents located at new or existing affected sources shall comply with paragraph (a)(1) or...

  1. 40 CFR 63.1406 - Reactor batch process vent provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reactor batch process vent provisions... Resins § 63.1406 Reactor batch process vent provisions. (a) Emission standards. Owners or operators of reactor batch process vents located at new or existing affected sources shall comply with paragraph...

  2. 40 CFR 63.1321 - Batch process vents provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Batch process vents provisions. 63... Batch process vents provisions. (a) Batch process vents. Except as specified in paragraphs (b) through (d) of this section, owners and operators of new and existing affected sources with batch...

  3. 40 CFR 63.1406 - Reactor batch process vent provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Reactor batch process vent provisions... § 63.1406 Reactor batch process vent provisions. (a) Emission standards. Owners or operators of reactor batch process vents located at new or existing affected sources shall comply with paragraph (a)(1) or...

  4. 40 CFR 63.1321 - Batch process vents provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Batch process vents provisions. 63.1321... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins § 63.1321 Batch process vents provisions. (a) Batch process vents. Except as specified in paragraphs (b) through (d) of this...

  5. 40 CFR 63.1406 - Reactor batch process vent provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reactor batch process vent provisions... § 63.1406 Reactor batch process vent provisions. (a) Emission standards. Owners or operators of reactor batch process vents located at new or existing affected sources shall comply with paragraph (a)(1) or...

  6. 40 CFR 63.1321 - Batch process vents provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Batch process vents provisions. 63.1321... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins § 63.1321 Batch process vents provisions. (a) Batch process vents. Except as specified in paragraphs (b) through (d) of this...

  7. 40 CFR 63.1406 - Reactor batch process vent provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reactor batch process vent provisions... Resins § 63.1406 Reactor batch process vent provisions. (a) Emission standards. Owners or operators of reactor batch process vents located at new or existing affected sources shall comply with paragraph...

  8. "Venting" in the Workplace: An Ethnographic Study among Resident Assistants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burchard, Brendon

    The term "venting" has been used interchangeably with negatively-connotated words like "outburst,""bitching,""complaining," and with more functional words like "disclosing." A literature review of venting showed that researchers have approached the term from multiple perspectives. Because of the ambiguity of what venting is or is not, why it is…

  9. 24 CFR 3280.710 - Venting, ventilation and combustion air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... manufactured home. (d) Venting system terminations shall be not less than three feet from any motor-driven air... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Heating, Cooling and Fuel Burning Systems § 3280.710 Venting, ventilation and combustion air. (a) The venting as required...

  10. 24 CFR 3280.710 - Venting, ventilation and combustion air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... manufactured home. (d) Venting system terminations shall be not less than three feet from any motor-driven air... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Heating, Cooling and Fuel Burning Systems § 3280.710 Venting, ventilation and combustion air. (a) The venting as required...

  11. 24 CFR 3280.710 - Venting, ventilation and combustion air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... manufactured home. (d) Venting system terminations shall be not less than three feet from any motor-driven air... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Heating, Cooling and Fuel Burning Systems § 3280.710 Venting, ventilation and combustion air. (a) The venting as required...

  12. 24 CFR 3280.710 - Venting, ventilation and combustion air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... manufactured home. (d) Venting system terminations shall be not less than three feet from any motor-driven air... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Heating, Cooling and Fuel Burning Systems § 3280.710 Venting, ventilation and combustion air. (a) The venting as required...

  13. 24 CFR 3280.710 - Venting, ventilation and combustion air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... manufactured home. (d) Venting system terminations shall be not less than three feet from any motor-driven air... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Heating, Cooling and Fuel Burning Systems § 3280.710 Venting, ventilation and combustion air. (a) The venting as required...

  14. 46 CFR 153.358 - Venting system flow capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Venting system flow capacity. 153.358 Section 153.358 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS... Venting Systems § 153.358 Venting system flow capacity. (a) The cross-sectional flow area of any...

  15. 46 CFR 153.358 - Venting system flow capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Venting system flow capacity. 153.358 Section 153.358 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS... Venting Systems § 153.358 Venting system flow capacity. (a) The cross-sectional flow area of any...

  16. 46 CFR 153.358 - Venting system flow capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Venting system flow capacity. 153.358 Section 153.358 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS... Venting Systems § 153.358 Venting system flow capacity. (a) The cross-sectional flow area of any...

  17. 46 CFR 153.358 - Venting system flow capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Venting system flow capacity. 153.358 Section 153.358 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.358 Venting system...

  18. 46 CFR 56.50-85 - Tank-vent piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... applies to vents for all independent, fixed, non-pressure tanks or containers or for spaces in which... liquids, such as lubricating oil, may terminate in the machinery space, provided— (i) The vents are... combustible liquids are not heated; and (iii) The vents terminate above the deep load waterline if the...

  19. 46 CFR 56.50-85 - Tank-vent piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... applies to vents for all independent, fixed, non-pressure tanks or containers or for spaces in which... liquids, such as lubricating oil, may terminate in the machinery space, provided— (i) The vents are... combustible liquids are not heated; and (iii) The vents terminate above the deep load waterline if the...

  20. 46 CFR 56.50-85 - Tank-vent piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... applies to vents for all independent, fixed, non-pressure tanks or containers or for spaces in which... liquids, such as lubricating oil, may terminate in the machinery space, provided— (i) The vents are... combustible liquids are not heated; and (iii) The vents terminate above the deep load waterline if the...

  1. 46 CFR 56.50-85 - Tank-vent piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... applies to vents for all independent, fixed, non-pressure tanks or containers or for spaces in which... liquids, such as lubricating oil, may terminate in the machinery space, provided— (i) The vents are... combustible liquids are not heated; and (iii) The vents terminate above the deep load waterline if the...

  2. 14 CFR 121.261 - Vent and drain lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vent and drain lines. 121.261 Section 121... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements § 121.261 Vent and drain lines. All vent and drain lines and their fittings, that are located in a designated fire...

  3. 14 CFR 27.975 - Fuel tank vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank vents. 27.975 Section 27.975... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.975 Fuel tank vents. (a) Each fuel tank... flight conditions. Each vent must minimize the probability of stoppage by dirt or ice. (b) The...

  4. 40 CFR 65.143 - Closed vent systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Process § 65.143 Closed vent systems. (a) Closed vent system equipment and operating requirements. The... storage vessel, process vent, transfer rack, or equipment leaks. (1) Collection of emissions. Each closed... operate a flow indicator that takes a reading at least once every 15 minutes. Records shall be...

  5. 14 CFR 34.11 - Standard for fuel venting emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Engine Fuel Venting Emissions (New and In-Use Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.11 Standard for fuel venting emissions. (a) No... turbine engine subject to the subpart. This paragraph is directed at the elimination of...

  6. 14 CFR 34.11 - Standard for fuel venting emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Engine Fuel Venting Emissions (New and In-Use Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.11 Standard for fuel venting emissions. (a) No... turbine engine subject to the subpart. This paragraph is directed at the elimination of...

  7. 14 CFR 34.11 - Standard for fuel venting emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Engine Fuel Venting Emissions (New and In-Use Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.11 Standard for fuel venting emissions. (a) No... turbine engine subject to the subpart. This paragraph is directed at the elimination of...

  8. 40 CFR 63.1408 - Aggregate batch vent stream provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aggregate batch vent stream provisions... Resins § 63.1408 Aggregate batch vent stream provisions. (a) Emission standards. Owners or operators of aggregate batch vent streams at a new or existing affected source shall comply with either paragraph...

  9. 40 CFR 63.1408 - Aggregate batch vent stream provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aggregate batch vent stream provisions... § 63.1408 Aggregate batch vent stream provisions. (a) Emission standards. Owners or operators of aggregate batch vent streams at a new or existing affected source shall comply with either paragraph...

  10. 40 CFR 63.1408 - Aggregate batch vent stream provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aggregate batch vent stream provisions... Resins § 63.1408 Aggregate batch vent stream provisions. (a) Emission standards. Owners or operators of aggregate batch vent streams at a new or existing affected source shall comply with either paragraph...

  11. 40 CFR 63.1408 - Aggregate batch vent stream provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Aggregate batch vent stream provisions... § 63.1408 Aggregate batch vent stream provisions. (a) Emission standards. Owners or operators of aggregate batch vent streams at a new or existing affected source shall comply with either paragraph...

  12. 40 CFR 63.1408 - Aggregate batch vent stream provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Aggregate batch vent stream provisions... § 63.1408 Aggregate batch vent stream provisions. (a) Emission standards. Owners or operators of aggregate batch vent streams at a new or existing affected source shall comply with either paragraph...

  13. 14 CFR 34.11 - Standard for fuel venting emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Engine Fuel Venting Emissions (New and In-Use Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.11 Standard for fuel venting emissions. (a) No... discharge to the atmosphere of fuel drained from fuel nozzle manifolds after engines are shut down and...

  14. 14 CFR 27.975 - Fuel tank vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel tank vents. 27.975 Section 27.975... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.975 Fuel tank vents. (a) Each fuel tank... system must be designed to minimize spillage of fuel through the vents to an ignition source in the...

  15. 40 CFR 63.983 - Closed vent systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... bypass lines that could divert a vent stream to the atmosphere. (i) Properly install, maintain, and... loading arm in the rack to the atmosphere. (5) Pressure relief devices in a transfer rack's closed vent... that no pressure relief device in the transfer rack's closed vent system shall open to the...

  16. 40 CFR 63.983 - Closed vent systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... bypass lines that could divert a vent stream to the atmosphere. (i) Properly install, maintain, and... loading arm in the rack to the atmosphere. (5) Pressure relief devices in a transfer rack's closed vent... that no pressure relief device in the transfer rack's closed vent system shall open to the...

  17. 33 CFR 183.520 - Fuel tank vent systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel tank vent systems. 183.520...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.520 Fuel tank vent systems. (a) Each fuel tank must have a vent system that prevents pressure in the tank from exceeding...

  18. Rapid response of a hydrologic system to volcanic activity: Masaya volcano, Nicaragua

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, S.C.P.; Connor, C.B.; Sanford, W.E.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrologic systems change in response to volcanic activity, and in turn may be sensitive indicators of volcanic activity. Here we investigate the coupled nature of magmatic and hydrologic systems using continuous multichannel time series of soil temperature collected on the flanks of Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, one of the most active volcanoes in Central America. The soil temperatures were measured in a low-temperature fumarole field located 3.5 km down the flanks of the volcano. Analysis of these time series reveals that they respond extremely rapidly, on a time scale of minutes, to changes in volcanic activity also manifested at the summit vent. These rapid temperature changes are caused by increased flow of water vapor through flank fumaroles during volcanism. The soil temperature response, ~5 °C, is repetitive and complex, with as many as 13 pulses during a single volcanic episode. Analysis of the frequency spectrum of these temperature time series shows that these anomalies are characterized by broad frequency content during volcanic activity. They are thus easily distinguished from seasonal trends, diurnal variations, or individual rainfall events, which triggered rapid transient increases in temperature during 5% of events. We suggest that the mechanism responsible for the distinctive temperature signals is rapid change in pore pressure in response to magmatism, a response that can be enhanced by meteoric water infiltration. Monitoring of distal fumaroles can therefore provide insight into coupled volcanic-hydrologic-meteorologic systems, and has potential as an inexpensive monitoring tool.

  19. The role of impact structures in localizing explosive volcanism on a contracting planet: Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rothery, D. A.; Conway, S. J.; Anand, M.

    2015-10-01

    A long history of global contraction on Mercury is attested to by thousands of ridges and scarps, thought to be the surface expression of thrust faults[1]. The resulting compressive crustal stress presents an obstacle to surface volcanism on the planet, inhibiting magma ascent from depth. Nevertheless, volcanic vents and deposits indicate that explosive volcanism persisted on the planet until as recently as 1 Ga[2]. The common localization of this volcanism within impact craters and inwards of the rims of large impact basins [3]indicates that impact structures play a role in allowing volcanic eruption on this contracting body.By making a comparison with explosive volcanism within impact craters on the Moon, we investigate how ascending magma and impact structures interact on a local scale to facilitate such eruptions on Mercury. Additionally, in light of the surprisingly low number of large impact basins on Mercury[4], we investigate whether the detection of clusters of sites of explosive volcanism can provide evidence for the location of ancient impact basins that are no longer detectable morphologically.

  20. Monogenetic volcanoes fed by interconnected dikes and sills in the Hopi Buttes volcanic field, Navajo Nation, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muirhead, James D.; Van Eaton, Alexa R.; Re, Giuseppe; White, James D. L.; Ort, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Although monogenetic volcanic fields pose hazards to major cities worldwide, their shallow magma feeders (<500 m depth) are rarely exposed and, therefore, poorly understood. Here, we investigate exposures of dikes and sills in the Hopi Buttes volcanic field, Arizona, to shed light on the nature of its magma feeder system. Shallow exposures reveal a transition zone between intrusion and eruption within 350 m of the syn-eruptive surface. Using a combination of field- and satellite-based observations, we have identified three types of shallow magma systems: (1) dike-dominated, (2) sill-dominated, and (3) interconnected dike-sill networks. Analysis of vent alignments using the pyroclastic massifs and other eruptive centers (e.g., maar-diatremes) shows a NW-SE trend, parallel to that of dikes in the region. We therefore infer that dikes fed many of the eruptions. Dikes are also observed in places transforming to transgressive (ramping) sills. Estimates of the observable volume of dikes (maximum volume of 1.90 × 106 m3) and sills (minimum volume of 8.47 × 105 m3) in this study reveal that sills at Hopi Buttes make up at least 30 % of the shallow intruded volume (∼2.75 × 106 m3 total) within 350 m of the paeosurface. We have also identified saucer-shaped sills, which are not traditionally associated with monogenetic volcanic fields. Our study demonstrates that shallow feeders in monogenetic fields can form geometrically complex networks, particularly those intruding poorly consolidated sedimentary rocks. We conclude that the Hopi Buttes eruptions were primarily fed by NW-SE-striking dikes. However, saucer-shaped sills also played an important role in modulating eruptions by transporting magma toward and away from eruptive conduits. Sill development could have been accompanied by surface uplifts on the order of decimeters. We infer that the characteristic feeder systems described here for the Hopi Buttes may underlie monogenetic fields elsewhere

  1. Monogenetic volcanoes fed by interconnected dikes and sills in the Hopi Buttes volcanic field, Navajo Nation, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirhead, James D.; Van Eaton, Alexa R.; Re, Giuseppe; White, James D. L.; Ort, Michael H.

    2016-02-01

    Although monogenetic volcanic fields pose hazards to major cities worldwide, their shallow magma feeders (<500 m depth) are rarely exposed and, therefore, poorly understood. Here, we investigate exposures of dikes and sills in the Hopi Buttes volcanic field, Arizona, to shed light on the nature of its magma feeder system. Shallow exposures reveal a transition zone between intrusion and eruption within 350 m of the syn-eruptive surface. Using a combination of field- and satellite-based observations, we have identified three types of shallow magma systems: (1) dike-dominated, (2) sill-dominated, and (3) interconnected dike-sill networks. Analysis of vent alignments using the pyroclastic massifs and other eruptive centers (e.g., maar-diatremes) shows a NW-SE trend, parallel to that of dikes in the region. We therefore infer that dikes fed many of the eruptions. Dikes are also observed in places transforming to transgressive (ramping) sills. Estimates of the observable volume of dikes (maximum volume of 1.90 × 106 m3) and sills (minimum volume of 8.47 × 105 m3) in this study reveal that sills at Hopi Buttes make up at least 30 % of the shallow intruded volume (˜2.75 × 106 m3 total) within 350 m of the paeosurface. We have also identified saucer-shaped sills, which are not traditionally associated with monogenetic volcanic fields. Our study demonstrates that shallow feeders in monogenetic fields can form geometrically complex networks, particularly those intruding poorly consolidated sedimentary rocks. We conclude that the Hopi Buttes eruptions were primarily fed by NW-SE-striking dikes. However, saucer-shaped sills also played an important role in modulating eruptions by transporting magma toward and away from eruptive conduits. Sill development could have been accompanied by surface uplifts on the order of decimeters. We infer that the characteristic feeder systems described here for the Hopi Buttes may underlie monogenetic fields elsewhere, particularly where

  2. Electrochemical cell having improved pressure vent

    DOEpatents

    Dean, Kevin; Holland, Arthur; Fillmore, Donn

    1993-01-01

    The electrochemical cell of the instant invention includes a case having a gas outlet, one or more positive electrodes positioned within the case, one or more negative electrodes positioned within the case electrode separators positioned between the positive and negative electrodes, electrolyte positioned within the case, and a pressure vent for releasing internal pressure occurring in the case to the surrounding atmosphere. The pressure vent is affixed to the case covering the gas outlet, the pressure vent includes a vent housing having a hollow interior area in gaseous communication with the surrounding atmosphere and the interior of the case via the gas outlet, a pressure release piston positioned within the hollow interior area, the pressure release piston sized to surround the gas outlet and having a seal groove configured to encapsulate all but one surface of a seal mounted within the seal groove, leaving the non-encapsulated surface of the seal exposed, and a compression spring positioned to urge the pressure release piston to compress the seal in the seal groove and block the gas outlet in the case.

  3. Flow fields of low pressure vent exhausts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.

    1989-01-01

    The flow field produced by low pressure gas vents are described based on experimental data obtained from tests in a large vacuum chamber. The gas density, pressure, and flux at any location in the flow field are calculated based on the vent plume description and the knowledge of the flow rate and velocity of the venting gas. The same parameters and the column densities along a specified line of sight traversing the plume are also obtained and shown by a computer-generated graphical representation. The fields obtained with a radially scanning Pitot probe within the exhausting gas are described by a power of the cosine function, the mass rate and the distance from the exit port. The field measurements were made for gas at pressures ranging from 2 to 50 torr venting from pipe fittings with diameters of 3/16 inch to 1-1/2 inches I.D. (4.76 mm to 38.1 mm). The N(2) mass flow rates ranged from 2E-4 to 3.7E-1 g/s.

  4. 46 CFR 98.25-70 - Venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Venting. 98.25-70 Section 98.25-70 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk §...

  5. 46 CFR 98.25-70 - Venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Venting. 98.25-70 Section 98.25-70 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk §...

  6. 46 CFR 98.25-70 - Venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Venting. 98.25-70 Section 98.25-70 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk §...

  7. 46 CFR 98.25-70 - Venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Venting. 98.25-70 Section 98.25-70 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk §...

  8. 46 CFR 98.25-70 - Venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Venting. 98.25-70 Section 98.25-70 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk §...

  9. 49 CFR 229.95 - Venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Venting. 229.95 Section 229.95 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Internal Combustion Equipment §...

  10. 49 CFR 229.95 - Venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Venting. 229.95 Section 229.95 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Internal Combustion Equipment §...

  11. 49 CFR 229.95 - Venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Venting. 229.95 Section 229.95 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Internal Combustion Equipment §...

  12. 49 CFR 229.95 - Venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Venting. 229.95 Section 229.95 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Internal Combustion Equipment §...

  13. 49 CFR 229.95 - Venting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Venting. 229.95 Section 229.95 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Safety Requirements Internal Combustion Equipment §...

  14. Preoperational test report, vent building ventilation system

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Vent Building Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) for the W-030 Ventilation Building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  15. Evidence for Hydrothermal Vents as "Biogeobatteries" (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, M. E.; Girguis, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrothermal vents are unique systems that play an important role in oceanic biogeochemical cycles. As chemically reduced hydrothermal fluid mixes with cold oxic seawater, minerals precipitate out of solution resulting in chimney structures composed largely of metal sulfides and anhydrite. Pyrite, which is a natural semi-conductor, is the primary sulfide mineral, but other minerals within chimneys are also conductive (e.g. chalcopyrite, wurtzite, and some iron oxides). Sulfide chimneys are also known to host an extensive endolithic microbial community. Accordingly, submarine hydrothermal systems appear to be examples of biogeobatteries, wherein conductive mineral assemblages span naturally occuring redox gradients and enable anaerobic microbes to access oxygen as an oxidant via extracellular electron transfer (or EET). To test this hypothesis, we ran a series of electrochemical laboratory experiments in which pyrite was used as an anode (in a vessel flushed with hydrothermal-like fluid). When placed in continuity with a carbon fiber cathode, pyrite was found to accept and conduct electrons from both abiotic and biological processes (microbial EET). Specifically, electrical current increased 4-fold (5 nA/m2 to 20 nA/m2) in response to inoculation with a slurry prepared from a hydrothermal vent sample. Inspection of the pyrite anode with SEM revealed ubiquitous coverage by microbes. DNA was extracted from the anodes and the inoculum, and was subjected to pyrosequencing to examine prokaryotic diversity. These data suggest that key microbial phylotypes were enriched upon the pyrite, implicating them in EET. In addition, we deployed an in situ experiment based on microbial fuel cell architecture with a graphite anode inserted into a vent wall coupled to a carbon fiber cathode outside the vent. We observed current production over the course of one year, implying microbial EET in situ. Via pyrosequencing, we observed that the microbial community on the anode was

  16. Structural lineaments and neogene volcanism in southwestern Luzon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, John A.; Self, Stephen

    The Philippine Islands have at least 15 active composite volcanoes and as many more that are fumarolic or dormant. About 20 calderas of Pleistocene age are known so far. Southwestern Luzon, one of the major volcanic districts of the country, contains three young composite volcanoes, four in a fumarolic stage, and over 200 vents of Pliocene-Pleistocene age within 150 km of Manila. There are three large calderas in this zone with a fourth a short distance south on Mindoro Island, plus four summit calderas. One of the most striking features is the Bataan Lineament, a chain of 27 volcanic vents, only one at present active, which marks the western side of the district. The main segment extends from Naujan caldera in the south (on Mindoro Island) on a strike of N31°W through Batangas Bay caldera, Mataas Na Gulod (a summit caldera), Corregidor Island (a small caldera), to Mount Mariveles and Mount Natib on the Bataan peninsula. With a bend of 30° at Mount Natib, the lineament continues northward for another 100 km, giving a total length of 320 km. Here it includes Mount Pinatubo, which is active, and several other vents. The Bataan Lineament is a volcanic arc, with perhaps some extensional element, above the subduction zone of the Manila Trench, dipping eastward under Luzon. Another major volcanic element is the Verde Island transform, which forms a zone across southwest Luzon, including 10 or more volcanoes. Activity extended from the lower Miocene with periodic eruptions until the late Pleistocene. Two volcanoes may be in a waning (fumarolic) stage and have thermal areas. Near the western end of this lineament, recent rifting may have occurred, and presently it is a zone of intense seismic activity. In the zone between the Bataan and Verde Island lineaments, several major volcanoes have developed including Laguna de Bay and Taal volcano-tectonic depressions. Large volume ignimbrite-forming eruptions may have taken place from Laguna de Bay caldera approximately 1.0 m

  17. Geochemical characteristics of sinking particles in the Tonga arc hydrothermal vent field, southwestern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Jeek; Kim, Jonguk; Pak, Sang Joon; Ju, Se-Jong; Yoo, Chan Min; Kim, Hyun Sub; Lee, Kyeong Yong; Hwang, Jeomshik

    2016-10-01

    Studies of sinking particles associated with hydrothermal vent fluids may help us to quantify mass transformation processes between hydrothermal vent plumes and deposits. Such studies may also help us understand how various types of hydrothermal systems influence particle flux and composition. However, the nature of particle precipitation out of hydrothermal vent plumes in the volcanic arcs of convergent plate boundaries has not been well studied, nor have the characteristics of such particles been compared with the characteristics of sinking particles at divergent boundaries. We examined sinking particles collected by sediment traps for about 10 days at two sites, each within 200 m of identified hydrothermal vents in the south Tonga arc of the southwestern Pacific. The total mass flux was several-fold higher than in the non-hydrothermal southwest tropical Pacific. The contribution of non-biogenic materials was dominant (over 72%) and the contribution of metals such as Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn was very high compared to their average levels in the upper continental crust. The particle flux and composition indicate that hydrothermal authigenic particles are the dominant source of the collected sinking particles. Overall, our elemental ratios are similar to observations of particles at the divergent plate boundary in the East Pacific Rise (EPR). Thus, the nature of the hydrothermal particles collected in the south Tonga arc is probably not drastically different from particles in the EPR region. However, we observed consistent differences between the two sites within the Tonga arc, in terms of the contribution of non-biogenic material, the radiocarbon content of sinking particulate organic carbon, the ratios of iron to other metals (e.g. Cu/Fe and Zn/Fe), and plume maturity indices (e.g. S/Fe). This heterogeneity within the Tonga arc is likely caused by differences in physical environment such as water depth, phase separation due to subcritical boiling and associated sub

  18. Discovery of New Hydrothermal Venting Sites in the Lau Basin, Tonga Back Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowhurst, P. V.; Arculus, R. J.; Massoth, G. J.; Baptista, L.; Stevenson, I.; Angus, R.; Baker, E. T.; Walker, S. L.; Nakamura, K.

    2009-12-01

    Between 22 April and 25 June 2009, a systematic search for hydrothermal venting along 1340 km of back-arc features was conducted throughout the Lau Basin aboard the CSIRO owned RV Southern Surveyor. The selection of survey areas was based on bathymetry, sidescan and water column anomaly datasets collected during previous marine science research and commercial exploration voyages. During 54 operational days, 76 CTD tows were completed using real-time plume mapping protocols, augmented with mini autonomous plume recorders, to discern anomalies in light scattering, and oxidation-reduction potential with water samples collected within the peak anomalies. Coincident with CTD towing at an average speed of 1.1 knots high resolution EM300 bathymetry and backscatter data was collected which significantly enhanced geological interpretation of possible source sites for follow up cross tows. 32 venting sites were detected, 24 of which are believed to be new discoveries. 13 dredge operations were conducted on 7 of these sites. Sulfides were recovered from 2 sites, one being a new discovery on the NE Lau spreading centre, ~14 km north of the commercial discovery by Teck and ~7km north of the eruption site discovery during a RV Thompson NOAA survey, both during 2008. The new venting field discoveries at North Mata, northern extent of the CLSC and far southern Valu Fa ridge are beyond any previously known areas of hydrothermal activity and further enhances the reputation of the Lau Basin as one of the most productive back arc regions for hydrothermally active spreading centers. A significant number of filter residue samples collected from the vent sites yielded greater than background values for metals including Cu and Zn, which is interpreted to imply they were sourced from active seafloor massive sulfide systems rather than volcanic activity.

  19. Safety Testing of Left Ventricular Vent Valves.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Caroline; Coblentz, John; Acsell, Jeffrey R; Shackelford, Anthony G; Sistino, Joseph J

    2015-03-01

    Vent vacuum relief valves (VRVs) are used to limit the negative pressure at the ventricular vent catheter tip as well as prevent reversal of blood flow and prevention of air embolism. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of three commercially available ventricular vent valves. The negative pressure at which the vent valve opened was measured at the valve inlet using high-fidelity pressure transducers. Also, the flow rate at which air entrainment occurred due to valve opening was recorded. Using a 51.5 cm column of saline, the resistance for each valve was calculated. The mean ± SD opening negative pressures were -231.3 ± 35.2 mmHg for the Quest Medical valve, -219.8 mmHg ± 17.2 for the Sorin valve, and -329.6 · 38.0 mmHg for the Terumo valve. The red Quest Medical valve opened at a lower flow (1.44 ± .03 L/min) than the dark blue Sorin valve (2.93 ± .01 L/min) and light blue LH130 Terumo valve (2.36 ± .02 L/min). The Sorin valve had the least resistance of 34.1 dyn-s/cm, followed by the Terumo LH130 valve resistance of 58.1 dyn·s/cm5, and the Quest Medical VRV-II valve with a resistance of 66.5 dyn·s/cm. We found that the valves are significantly different in the negative pressure generated. Understanding the limitations of these devices is important to reduce the occurrence of adverse events associated with venting and to select the best device for a specific clinical application.

  20. Geology and geochemistry characteristics of the Chiapanecan Volcanic Arc (Central Area), Chiapas Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, J. C.; Jaimes-Viera, M. C.; Garduño-Monroy, V. H.; Layer, P. W.; Pompa-Mera, V.; Godinez, M. L.

    2007-04-01

    The Chiapanecan Volcanic Arc (CVA), located in the central portion of the State of Chiapas, is a 150 km stretch of volcanoes irregularly aligned in the northwest direction between two great volcanic features: the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt to the northwest and the Central American Volcanic Arc to the southeast. The CVA is located in a complex zone marking the interaction of the North American, Caribbean and Cocos plates, near the Motagua-Polochic fault system, the boundary between North American and Caribbean plates. The central part of the CVA is composed of an irregular northwest alignment of at least 10 volcanic structures generally lying along NNW-SSE-trending faults splayed from the Motagua-Polochic system. Among the structures there are seven volcanic domes (Huitepec, Amahuitz, La Iglesia, Mispía, La Lanza, Venustiano Carranza and Santotón), one explosion crater (Navenchauc), one collapse structure (Apas), and one dome complex (Tzontehuitz). In the majority of the structures there is a clear resurgence with the formation of several domes in the same structure, with the destruction of previous domes (Navenchauc) or with the formation of new explosion craters or collapse structures (Apas). The volcanic activity in the CVA was mainly effusive accompanied by explosive and phreatomagmatic events and is characterized by volcanic domes accompanied by block-and-ash-flows, ash flows with accretionary lapilli, falls, and pumice flows. The volcanic structures and deposits are calcalkaline in composition with a medium to high content of potassium. CVA volcanic rocks vary from andesite to dacite with SiO 2 between 57 and 66 wt.%, show low concentrations of Ti, P, Nb and Ta, are enriched in Light Rare Earths, depleted in Heavy Rare Earths, and show a small Eu anomaly; all indicative of arc-related volcanism associated with subduction of the Cocos plate under the North American plate, but complicated by the geometry of the plate boundary fault system.

  1. Hole-Aligning Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Frank A.; Saude, Frank; Sep, Martin J.

    1996-01-01

    Tool designed for use in aligning holes in plates or other structural members to be joined by bolt through holes. Holes aligned without exerting forces perpendicular to planes of holes. Tool features screw-driven-wedge design similar to (but simpler than) that of some automotive exhaust-pipe-expanding tools.

  2. Scientific Scope and Summary of the Arctic Gakkel Vents (AGAVE) Expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reves-Sohn, R. A.; Edmonds, H.; Humphris, S.; Shank, T.; Singh, H.; Ericsson, B.; Hedman, U.; Helmke, E.; Jakuba, M.; Kunz, C.; Larsson, B.; Liljebladh, B.; Linder, J.; Murphy, C.; Nakamura, K.; Pontbriand, C.; Sato, T.; Schlindwein, V.; Stranne, C.; Tausendfreund, M.; Upchurch, L.; Willis, C.; Winsor, P.

    2007-12-01

    The AGAVE project is an international collaboration between scientists in the United States, Sweden, Japan, and Germany with the overarching scientific objective of studying the geological, chemical, and biological characteristics of hydrothermal venting on the Gakkel Ridge, the most slowly diverging tectonic plate boundary on Earth. The AGAVE expedition took place on the IB Oden from July 1 - August 10, 2007, and occupied two field sites where evidence of hydrothermal venting had been detected in the water column during the 2001 Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge Experiment (AMORE). The first site (~85N, 7.5E) is characterized by peridotite outcrops on normal fault scarps, while the second site (~85.5N, 85E) is characterized by constructional basaltic volcanism, thereby allowing for a comparative study of hydrothermal processes at two segments of an ultra-slow spreading ridge with contrasting geological and tectonic settings. Five primary oceanographic assets were employed during the expedition; a high-resolution, ship-mounted multi-beam bathymetry system, a CTD-rosette system for surveying and sampling the water column, the PUMA autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) for fine-scale water column surveys, the JAGUAR AUV for near-bottom geophysical and photographic surveys, and the CAMPER wireline system for acquiring digital images and samples of the deep seafloor. The combined results from the expedition are significantly expanding our understanding of volcanic and hydrothermal processes on the Gakkel Ridge. Important initial results include the discovery of the Asgard volcanic chain at the 85E segment, the discovery of extensive microbial mats covering these volcanoes, the discovery of basaltic glass fragments covering large portions of the seafloor near the volcanoes, and detailed mapping and sampling of water column plumes.

  3. Paleomagnetic results from Cenozoic volcanics of Lusatia, NW Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabl, P.; Cajz, V.; Tietz, O.; Buechner, J.; Suhr, P.; Pecskay, Z.; Cizkova, K.

    2013-05-01

    Lusatia is situated in the NE continuation of the Ohre Rift (OR) behind Lusatian Overtrust. Compared to the neighbouring volcanic complex of the České stredohorí Mts. (CS) inside the OR. The scattered occurrences of basaltic bodies in Lusatia are spread on wider area. This can be caused by different tectonic development of the regions and from derived erosional conditions. The Lusatian Overtrust, high-order tectonic structure running across the course of the OR, separates Lusatian region into two different geological areas where Cretaceous sediments or granodiorites of Lusatian Massif represent the country rock of the Cenozoic volcanism, respectively. The age of volcanic activity ranges from 19 to 33 Ma, it's proved by newly obtained Ar-Ar data from Freiberg and K-Ar data from Debrecen. Forty two scattered remnants of Cenozoic volcanic products were sampled to get paleomagnetic data. The superficial volcanics with detectable geological position and volcanology were chosen preferentially, several dykes and separate vents were sampled as well. Paleomagnetic research was processed on more than 500 samples which were demagnetized using alternate field in the range 0-80 mT. Q-ratio was counted to prevent the lightning influence - solitary volcanic occurrences build positive morphology and thus, they are prone to be targeted by lightnings. The values of Q-ratio predominantly span from 0.1 to 7.0; those samples having the value over 10, were excluded for evaluation. The mean paleomagnetic direction (MPD) was acquired from several samples on each sampling site. Declination and Inclination show values of 11.8 deg and 62.7 deg (α95 = 9.3 deg) for normal polarity, or 182.1 deg and -59.2 deg (α95 = 6.1 deg) for reverse polarity, respectively,The corresponding paleolatitude of 41.9 deg was counted from the Inclination. This is 1000 km to the South, compared to recent position. The dispersions of the MPD are relatively wide. This coincides well with the idea of long

  4. Geologic map and geothermal assessment of the Mount Adams volcanic field, Cascade Range of southern Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, Wes; Fierstein, Judy

    1990-01-01

    More than 60 Quaternary vents make up the basalt-to-rhyodacite Mount Adams volcanic field and have erupted scoriae and lavas with a total volume of >370 km3. The Mount Adams andesite-dacite stratocone itself is a compound edifice that includes the high cone above 2300 m (20-10 ka), remnants of at least two earlier andesite-dacite cones as old as 0.5 Ma, and 7 Holocene flank vents. Four other Holocene vents and tens of vents contemporaneous with Mount Adams are peripheral to the stratocone. All of these vents, including Mount Adams, lie within a N-S eruptive zone 55 km long and 5 km wide. The age of all known Mount Adams silicic products (>100 ka) and the heterogeneous mafic compositions of the summit cone and Holocene lavas make it unlikely that the stratocone is underlain by an upper-crustal reservoir. Rather, the stratocone at the focus is built up of fractionated hybrid magmas that rise from MASH zones (melting-assimilation-storage-homogenization). The pyroclastic core of breccia and scoria at Mount Adams has undergone acid-sulfate leaching and deposition of alunite, kaolinite, silica, gypsum, sulfur, and Fe-oxides and has been a constant source of avalanches and debris flows. Most heat supplied from depth to the fumarolically altered core is dispersed by the high precipitation rate and high permeability of the rubbly lava flows so that a hydrothermal convection pattern is not maintained. Summit-restricted fumaroles are weak and diffuse.

  5. Preliminary Numerical Simulations of Nozzle Formation in the Host Rock of Supersonic Volcanic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohletz, K. H.; Ogden, D. E.; Glatzmaier, G. A.

    2006-12-01

    Recognizing the difficulty in quantitatively predicting how a vent changes during an explosive eruption, Kieffer (Kieffer, S.W., Rev. Geophys. 27, 1989) developed the theory of fluid dynamic nozzles for volcanism, utilizing a highly developed predictive scheme used extensively in aerodynamics for design of jet and rocket nozzles. Kieffer's work shows that explosive eruptions involve flow from sub to supersonic conditions through the vent and that these conditions control the erosion of the vent to nozzle shapes and sizes that maximize mass flux. The question remains how to predict the failure and erosion of vent host rocks by a high-speed, multiphase, compressible fluid that represents an eruption column. Clearly, in order to have a quantitative model of vent dynamics one needs a robust computational method for a turbulent, compressible, multiphase fluid. Here we present preliminary simulations of fluid flowing from a high-pressure reservoir through an eroding conduit and into the atmosphere. The eruptive fluid is modeled as an ideal gas, the host rock as a simple incompressible fluid with sandstone properties. Although these simulations do not yet include the multiphase dynamics of the eruptive fluid or the solid mechanics of the host rock, the evolution of the host rock into a supersonic nozzle is clearly seen. Our simulations show shock fronts both above the conduit, where the gas has expanded into the atmosphere, and within the conduit itself, thereby influencing the dynamics of the jet decompression.

  6. Geology of Volcan Las Navajas, a pleistocene trachyte/peralkaline rhyolite volcanic center in Nayarit, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hegre, J.A.; Nelson, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Volcan Las Navajas, located in the northwestern portion of the Mexican Volcanic Belt has produced a sequence of volcanic rocks with compositions in marked contrast to the predominantly calc-alkaline volcanoes which predominate in this part of Mexico. The oldest exposed lavas consist of trachytes with 63% SiO/sub 2/, 6% FeO*, and 500 ppm Zr along with comenditic rhyolites with 68% SiO/sub 2/, 5% FeO*, 800 ppm Zr, and an agpaitic index of 1.0. These lavas were followed by the eruption of a comenditic ash-flow tuff and the formation of a caldera 2.7 km in diameter. This caldera was subsequently filled by eruptions of pantelleritic rhyolite obsidian lava flows with 72% SiO/sub 2/, 8% FeO*, 1100 ppm Zr, and an agpaitic index of 1.5 to 1.9. A second caldera was then formed which is offset to the south of the main eruptive vents for previous eruptions. This younger caldera has a diameter of about 4.8 km and its southern walls have been covered by calc-alkaline andesitic lavas erupted from nearby Sanganguey volcano. Volcanoclastic sediments in the floor of the younger caldera have been tilted and faulted in a manner suggestive of late stage resurgence. Subsequent eruptions within the caldera, however, have been restricted to calc-alkaline andesites. Tectonically, the area in which this volcano occurs appears to have been undergoing a crustal rifting event since the Pliocene. The occurrence of these peralkaline rocks lends further support to such a hypothesis.

  7. Mitigating the consequences of extreme events on strategic facilities: evaluation of volcanic and seismic risk affecting the Caspian oil and gas pipelines in the Republic of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Pasquarè, F A; Tormey, D; Vezzoli, L; Okrostsvaridze, A; Tutberidze, B

    2011-07-01

    In this work we identify and quantify new seismic and volcanic risks threatening the strategic Caspian oil and gas pipelines through the Republic of Georgia, in the vicinity of the recent Abuli Samsari Volcanic Ridge, and evaluate risk reduction measures, mitigation measures, and monitoring. As regards seismic risk, we identified a major, NW-SE trending strike-slip fault; based on the analysis of fault planes along this major transcurrent structure, an about N-S trend of the maximum, horizontal compressive stress (σ1) was determined, which is in good agreement with data instrumentally derived after the 1986, M 5.6 Paravani earthquake and its aftershock. Particularly notable is the strong alignment of volcanic vents along an about N-S trend that suggests a magma rising controlled by the about N-S-directed σ1. The original pipeline design included mitigation measures for seismic risk and other geohazards, including burial of the pipeline for its entire length, increased wall thickness, block valve spacing near recognized hazards, and monitoring of known landslide hazards. However, the design did not consider volcanic risk or the specific seismic hazards revealed by this study. The result of our analysis is that the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan (BTC) oil pipeline, as well as the Baku-Tbilisi-Erzerum South Caucasian natural gas pipeline (SCP) were designed in such a way that they significantly reduce the risk posed by the newly-identified geohazards in the vicinity of the Abuli-Samsari Ridge. No new measures are recommended for the pipeline itself as a result of this study. However, since the consequences of long-term shut-down would be very damaging to the economies of Western Europe, we conclude that the regionally significant BTC and SCP warrant greater protections, described in the final section of or work. The overall objective of our effort is to present the results in a matrix framework that allows the technical information to be used further in the decision

  8. The Arctic Gakkel Vents (AGAVE) Expedition: Technology Development and the Search for Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Fields Under the Arctic Ice Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reves-Sohn, R. A.; Singh, H.; Humphris, S.; Shank, T.; Jakuba, M.; Kunz, C.; Murphy, C.; Willis, C.

    2007-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal fields on the Gakkel Ridge beneath the Arctic ice cap provide perhaps the best terrestrial analogue for volcanically-hosted chemosynthetic biological communities that may exist beneath the ice-covered ocean of Europa. In both cases the key enabling technologies are robotic (untethered) vehicles that can swim freely under the ice and the supporting hardware and software. The development of robotic technology for deep- sea research beneath ice-covered oceans thus has relevance to both polar oceanography and future astrobiological missions to Europa. These considerations motivated a technology development effort under the auspices of NASA's ASTEP program and NSF's Office of Polar Programs that culminated in the AGAVE expedition aboard the icebreaker Oden from July 1 - August 10, 2007. The scientific objective was to study hydrothermal processes on the Gakkel Ridge, which is a key target for global studies of deep-sea vent fields. We developed two new autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) for the project, and deployed them to search for vent fields beneath the ice. We conducted eight AUV missions (four to completion) during the 40-day long expedition, which also included ship-based bathymetric surveys, CTD/rosette water column surveys, and wireline photographic and sampling surveys of remote sections of the Gakkel Ridge. The AUV missions, which lasted 16 hours on average and achieved operational depths of 4200 meters, returned sensor data that showed clear evidence of hydrothermal venting, but for a combination of technical reasons and time constraints, the AUVs did not ultimately return images of deep-sea vent fields. Nevertheless we used our wireline system to obtain images and samples of extensive microbial mats that covered fresh volcanic surfaces on a newly discovered set of volcanoes. The microbes appear to be living in regions where reducing and slightly warm fluids are seeping through cracks in the fresh volcanic terrain. These discoveries

  9. Spatial vent opening probability map of El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerril, Laura; Cappello, Annalisa; Galindo, Inés; Neri, Marco; Del Negro, Ciro

    2013-04-01

    The assessment of the probable spatial distribution of new eruptions is useful to manage and reduce the volcanic risk. It can be achieved in different ways, but it becomes especially hard when dealing with volcanic areas less studied, poorly monitored and characterized by a low frequent activity, as El Hierro. Even though it is the youngest of the Canary Islands, before the 2011 eruption in the "Las Calmas Sea", El Hierro had been the least studied volcanic Island of the Canaries, with more historically devoted attention to La Palma, Tenerife and Lanzarote. We propose a probabilistic method to build the susceptibility map of El Hierro, i.e. the spatial distribution of vent opening for future eruptions, based on the mathematical analysis of the volcano-structural data collected mostly on the Island and, secondly, on the submerged part of the volcano, up to a distance of ~10-20 km from the coast. The volcano-structural data were collected through new fieldwork measurements, bathymetric information, and analysis of geological maps, orthophotos and aerial photographs. They have been divided in different datasets and converted into separate and weighted probability density functions, which were then included in a non-homogeneous Poisson process to produce the volcanic susceptibility map. Future eruptive events on El Hierro is mainly concentrated on the rifts zones, extending also beyond the shoreline. The major probabilities to host new eruptions are located on the distal parts of the South and West rifts, with the highest probability reached in the south-western area of the West rift. High probabilities are also observed in the Northeast and South rifts, and the submarine parts of the rifts. This map represents the first effort to deal with the volcanic hazard at El Hierro and can be a support tool for decision makers in land planning, emergency plans and civil defence actions.

  10. Preliminary geologic map of the Sleeping Butte volcanic centers

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.M.; Perry, F.V.

    1991-07-01

    The Sleeping Butte volcanic centers comprise two, spatially separate, small-volume (<0.1 km{sup 3}) basaltic centers. The centers were formed by mildly explosive Strombolian eruptions. The Little Black Peak cone consists of a main scoria cone, two small satellitic scoria mounds, and associated lobate lava flows that vented from sites at the base of the scoria cone. The Hidden Cone center consists of a main scoria cone that developed on the north-facing slope of Sleeping Butte. The center formed during two episodes. The first included the formation of the main scoria cone, and venting of aa lava flows from radial dikes at the northeast base of the cone. The second included eruption of scoria-fall deposits from the summit crater. The ages of the Little Black Peak and the Hidden Cone are estimated to be between 200 to 400 ka based on the whole-rock K-Ar age determinations with large analytical undertainty. This age assignment is consistent with qualitative observations of the degree of soil development and geomorphic degradation of volcanic landforms. The younger episode of the Hidden Cone is inferred to be significantly younger and probably of Late Pleistocene or Holocene age. This is based on the absence of cone slope rilling, the absence of cone-slope apron deposits, and erosional unconformity between the two episodes, the poor horizon- development of soils, and the presence of fall deposits on modern alluvial surfaces. Paleomagnetic data show that the centers record similar but not identical directions of remanent magnetization. Paleomagnetic data have not been obtained for the youngest deposits of the Hidden Cone center. Further geochronology, soils, geomorphic, and petrology studies are planned of the Sleeping Butte volcanic centers 20 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Volcanism-Climate Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Louis S. (Editor); Desilva, Shanaka (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The range of disciplines in the study of volcanism-climate interactions includes paleoclimate, volcanology, petrology, tectonics, cloud physics and chemistry, and climate and radiation modeling. Questions encountered in understanding the interactions include: the source and evolution of sulfur and sulfur-gaseous species in magmas; their entrainment in volcanic plumes and injection into the stratosphere; their dissipation rates; and their radiative effects. Other issues include modeling and measuring regional and global effects of such large, dense clouds. A broad-range plan of research designed to answer these questions was defined. The plan includes observations of volcanoes, rocks, trees, and ice cores, as well as satellite and aircraft observations of erupting volcanoes and resulting lumes and clouds.

  12. Exploring Hawaiian volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.; Okubo, Paul G.; Hon, Ken

    2013-01-01

    In 1912 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Thomas A. Jaggar Jr. on the island of Hawaii. Driven by the devastation he observed while investigating the volcanic disasters of 1902 at Montagne Pelée in the Caribbean, Jaggar conducted a worldwide search and decided that Hawai‘i provided an excellent natural laboratory for systematic study of earthquake and volcano processes toward better understanding of seismic and volcanic hazards. In the 100 years since HVO’s founding, surveillance and investigation of Hawaiian volcanoes have spurred advances in volcano and seismic monitoring techniques, extended scientists’ understanding of eruptive activity and processes, and contributed to development of global theories about hot spots and mantle plumes.

  13. Ecology of deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, R.A.; Kennish, M.J. )

    1993-08-01

    The present article reviews studies of the past 15 years of active and inactive hydrothermal vents. The focus of the discussion is on the ecology of the biological communities inhabiting hydrothermal vents. These communities exhibit high densities and biomass, low species diversity, rapid growth rates, and high metabolic rates. The authors attempt to relate the biology of hydrothermal vent systems to geology. Future directions for hydrothermal vent research are suggested. Since many vent populations are dependent on hydrothermal fluids and are consequently unstable, both short- and long-term aspects of the ecology of the vent organisms and the influence of chemical and geological factors on the biology of vent systems need to be established. 200 refs., 28 figs.

  14. The Geologic Setting of Hydrothermal Vents at Mariana Arc Submarine Volcanoes: High-Resolution Bathymetry and ROV Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, W. W.; Embley, R. W.; de Ronde, C. E.; Stern, R. J.; Hein, J.; Merle, S.; Ristau, S.

    2004-12-01

    below the summit, and is characterized by focused flow of CO2-rich fluids, whereas the summit has extensive areas of diffuse venting and is covered with thick bacterial mats. (3) Some of the most remarkable vent sites are deep, narrow volcanic craters at NW Rota-1 and Daikoku volcanoes. The crater at NW Rota-1 volcano (named "Brimstone Pit") is 15-m wide, 20-m deep, funnel shaped, and was actively erupting ash, lapilli, and molten sulfur. The rim of Brimstone Pit is composed of welded spatter and is located at 550 m depth, about 30 m below the summit. Other diffuse hydrothermal sites at NW Rota-1 are located along the rocky summit ridge. At Daikoku volcano, an extraordinary crater emitting cloudy hydrothermal fluid was found at 375 m depth on the north shoulder of the volcano, about 75 m below the summit. This crater was at least 135 m deep and had a remarkably cylindrical cross-section with a diameter of ~50 m. ROPOS descended 75 m into the crater and was still at least 60 m above the bottom, according to the altimeter, when we were forced to cease operations due to weather. In addition, diffuse hydrothermal fluids seep from large areas of the summit and upper slopes of Daikoku.

  15. Reducing volcanic risk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Decker, R.; Decker, B.

    1991-01-01

    The last two decades have brought major advances in research on how volcanoes work and how to monitor their changing habits. Geologic mapping as well as studies of earthquake patterns and surface deformation associated with underground movement of magma have given scientists a better view of the inner structure and dynamics of active volcanoes. With the next decade, the time has come to focuses more on applying this knowledge toward reducing the risk from volcanic activity on a worldwide basis. 

  16. Volcanic alert in antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan

    1992-01-01

    On January 14, members of the Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programs (COMNAP) were alerted to possible volcanic activity on Deception Island, Antarctica. The island, located at latitude 62%57‧S, longitude 60'40‧W, attracts many tourists.COMNAP is a group of national program managers of 25 countries that have government programs in the Antarctic. Its function is to implement measures adopted by the Antarctic Treaty parties, including fostering international cooperation in scientific research.

  17. Volcanic effects on climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robock, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions which inject large amounts of sulfur-rich gas into the stratosphere produce dust veils which last years and cool the earth's surface. At the same time, these dust veils absorb enough solar radiation to warm the stratosphere. Since these temperature changes at the earth's surface and in the stratosphere are both in the opposite direction of hypothesized effects from greenhouse gases, they act to delay and mask the detection of greenhouse effects on the climate system. Tantalizing recent research results have suggested regional effects of volcanic eruptions, including effects on El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In addition, a large portion of the global climate change of the past 100 years may be due to the effects of volcanoes, but a definite answer is not yet clear. While effects of several years were demonstrated with both data studies and numerical models, long-term effects, while found in climate model calculations, await confirmation with more realistic models. Extremely large explosive prehistoric eruptions may have produced severe weather and climate effects, sometimes called a 'volcanic winter'. Complete understanding of the above effects of volcanoes is hampered by inadequacies of data sets on volcanic dust veils and on climate change. Space observations can play an increasingly important role in an observing program in the future. The effects of volcanoes are not adequately separated from ENSO events, and climate modeling of the effects of volcanoes is in its infancy. Specific suggestions are made for future work to improve the knowledge of this important component of the climate system.

  18. California's potential volcanic hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorgenson, P.

    1989-01-01

    This is a summary of "Potential Hazards from Future Volcanic Eruptions in California' (USGS Bulletin No. 1847: price $4.75). The chief areas of danger are Lassen Peak, Mount Shasta and Medicine Lake Highland in the north; Clear Lake, Mono Lake and Long Valley in the centre; and Owen's River-Death Valley, Amboy Crater and the Saltan Butter in the south of the State. -A.Scarth

  19. Volcanic tremor at Pavlof Volcano, Alaska, October 1973 April 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Stephen R.

    1987-11-01

    In thirteen years (1973 1986) of seismic monitoring of Pavlof Volcano, 488 episodes of volcanic tremor have been recorded, only 26 of which have been previously described in the literature. This paper tabulates and describes all the tremor episodes and reports on the results of all analyses to date. Pavlof tremor durations range from 2 minutes to greater than 1 week; episodes accompanying magmatic eruptions have durations greater than 1 hour, and sustained amplitudes of greater than 6 mm P-P (=54 nanometers at 1.5 Hz) on station PVV, 8.5 km from the vent. Digital data provide much better amplitude resolution than helicorders do. Helicorders, however, provide continuous coverage, whereas digital data are intermittent. Correlations of tremor with visual eruption observations shows that tremor amplitudes are roughly correlated with heights of lava fountains, but the correlation of tremor amplitudes with plume heights is more problematic. Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) spectra show that Pavlof tremor is quite statinary for the entire time period, 1973 1983. All principal spectral peaks lie between 0.8 and 3.0 Hz, and may be caused by resonance of magma and gas, and resonance of the volcanic pile. Preliminary analysis of 2-and 3-component data shows that P, S, PL, and Rayleigh waves may be present in Pavlof volcanic tremor. Other waveforms can be misidentified as tremor, most commonly those caused by storms or S-waves of regional earthquakes. A strategy is proposed to distinguish tremor from noise using automatic seismic data acquisition and analysis systems. Pavlof's volcanic tremor is briefly compared with a preliminary sample of over 1100 cases of tremor from 84 volcanoes worldwide. Finally, several recommendations for monitoring and reporting volcanic tremor are discussed.

  20. SO2 flux and the thermal power of volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henley, Richard W.; Hughes, Graham O.

    2016-09-01

    A description of the dynamics, chemistry and energetics governing a volcanic system can be greatly simplified if the expansion of magmatic gas can be assumed to be adiabatic as it rises towards the surface. The conditions under which this assumption is valid are clarified by analysis of the transfer of thermal energy into the low conductivity wallrocks traversed by fractures and vents from a gas phase expanding over a range of mass flux rates. Adiabatic behavior is predicted to be approached typically within a month after perturbations in the release of source gas have stabilized, this timescale being dependent upon only the characteristic length scale on which the host rock is fractured and the thermal diffusivity of the rock. This analysis then enables the thermal energy transport due to gas release from volcanoes to be evaluated using observations of SO2 flux with reference values for the H2O:SO2 ratio of volcanic gas mixtures discharging through high temperature fumaroles in arc and mantle-related volcanic systems. Thermal power estimates for gas discharge are 101.8 to 104.1 MWH during quiescent, continuous degassing of arc volcanoes and 103.7 to 107.3 MWH for their eruptive stages, the higher value being the Plinean Pinatubo eruption in 1991. Fewer data are available for quiescent stage mantle-related volcanoes (Kilauea 102.1 MWH) but for eruptive events power estimates range from 102.8 MWH to 105.5 MWH. These estimates of thermal power and mass of gas discharges are commensurate with power estimates based on the total mass of gas ejected during eruptions. The sustained discharge of volcanic gas during quiescent and short-lived eruptive stages can be related to the hydrodynamic structure of volcanic systems with large scale gaseous mass transfer from deep in the crust coupled with episodes of high level intrusive activity and gas release.

  1. Timeline of Martian Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L. M. V.

    2011-05-01

    A recent study of Martian volcanism presents a timeline of the last major eruptions from 20 large volcanoes, based on the relative ages of caldera surfaces determined by crater counting. Stuart Robbins, Gaetano Di Achille, and Brian Hynek (University of Colorado) counted craters on high-resolution images from the the Context Camera (CTX) on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to date individual calderas, or terraces within calderas, on the 20 major Martian volcanoes. Based on their timeline and mapping, rates and durations of eruptions and transitions from explosive to effusive activity varied from volcano to volcano. The work confirms previous findings by others that volcanism was continuous throughout Martian geologic history until about one to two hundred million years ago, the final volcanic events were not synchronous across the planet, and the latest large-scale caldera activity ended about 150 million years ago in the Tharsis province. This timing correlates well with the crystallization ages (~165-170 million years) determined for the youngest basaltic Martian meteorites.

  2. Volcanic eruptions on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, R. G.; Schneider, N. M.; Terrile, R. J.; Cook, A. F.; Hansen, C.

    1981-09-01

    Nine eruption plumes which were observed during the Voyager 1 encounter with Io are discussed. During the Voyager 2 encounter, four months later, eight of the eruptions were still active although the largest became inactive sometime between the two encounters. Plumes range in height from 60 to over 300 km with corresponding ejection velocities of 0.5 to 1.0 km/s and plume sources are located on several plains and consist of fissures or calderas. The shape and brightness distribution together with the pattern of the surface deposition on a plume 3 is simulated by a ballistic model with a constant ejection velocity of 0.5 km/s and ejection angles which vary from 0-55 deg. The distribution of active and recent eruptions is concentrated in the equatorial regions and indicates that volcanic activity is more frequent and intense in the equatorial regions than in the polar regions. Due to the geologic setting of certain plume sources and large reservoirs of volatiles required for the active eruptions, it is concluded that sulfur volcanism rather than silicate volcanism is the most likely driving mechanism for the eruption plumes.

  3. 3-D Numerical Modeling Perspectives on Lightning Generation in Volcanic Eruption Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eaton, A. R.; Behnke, S. A.; Herzog, M.

    2014-12-01

    Although numerous charging mechanisms have been implicated in the formation of volcanic lightning, recent insights from lightning mapping arrays indicate that vent charging (produced at or near the volcanic source) creates electrical discharges that are distinct from lightning initiated in the airborne plume during transport away from the vent. Previous work has suggested that turbulent structure and formation of hydrometeors, including rain, graupel and ash aggregates, are likely to play important roles in the plume charging process. We examine these phenomena with 3D large-eddy simulations of volcanic plume development that include cloud microphysics, using the Active Tracer High-resolution Atmospheric Model (ATHAM). Three relatively recent eruptions are targeted, each with different plume heights, degrees of wind interaction, and amounts of surface water interaction. We have compared the simulated evolution of turbulence and precipitation formation with data from lightning mapping arrays to address the following question - what can lightning tell us about the initiation and development of a volcanic plume in near-real time?

  4. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Nelson E.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam.

  5. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, N.E.

    1988-03-10

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam. 5 figs.

  6. Galaxy Alignments: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachimi, Benjamin; Cacciato, Marcello; Kitching, Thomas D.; Leonard, Adrienne; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Schäfer, Björn Malte; Sifón, Cristóbal; Hoekstra, Henk; Kiessling, Alina; Kirk, Donnacha; Rassat, Anais

    2015-11-01

    The alignments between galaxies, their underlying matter structures, and the cosmic web constitute vital ingredients for a comprehensive understanding of gravity, the nature of matter, and structure formation in the Universe. We provide an overview on the state of the art in the study of these alignment processes and their observational signatures, aimed at a non-specialist audience. The development of the field over the past one hundred years is briefly reviewed. We also discuss the impact of galaxy alignments on measurements of weak gravitational lensing, and discuss avenues for making theoretical and observational progress over the coming decade.

  7. Radiative Grain Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, B. G.

    2015-12-01

    Polarization due to aligned dust grains was discovered in the interstellar medium more than 60 years ago. A quantitative, observationally well tested theory of the phenomenon has finally emerged in the last decade, promising not only an improved understanding of interstellar magnetic fields, but new tools for studying the dust environments and grain characteristics. This Radiative Alignment Torque (RAT) theory also has many potential applications in solar system physics, including for comet dust characteristics. I will review the main aspects of the theory and the observational tests performed to date, as well as some of the new possibilities for using polarization as a tool to study dust and its environment, with RAT alignment.

  8. Hybrid vehicle motor alignment

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Michael Benjamin

    2001-07-03

    A rotor of an electric motor for a motor vehicle is aligned to an axis of rotation for a crankshaft of an internal combustion engine having an internal combustion engine and an electric motor. A locator is provided on the crankshaft, a piloting tool is located radially by the first locator to the crankshaft. A stator of the electric motor is aligned to a second locator provided on the piloting tool. The stator is secured to the engine block. The rotor is aligned to the crankshaft and secured thereto.

  9. Why does a mature volcano need new vents? The case of the New Southeast Crater at Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acocella, Valerio; Neri, Marco; Behncke, Boris; Bonforte, Alessandro; Del Negro, Ciro; Ganci, Gaetana

    2016-06-01

    Mature volcanoes usually erupt from a persistent summit crater. Permanent shifts in vent location are expected to occur after significant structural variations and are seldom documented. Here we provide such an example that recently occurred at Etna. Eruptive activity at Mount Etna during 2007 focused at the Southeast Crater (SEC), the youngest (formed in 1971) and most active of the four summit craters, and consisted of six paroxysmal episodes. The related erupted volumes, determined by field-based measurements and radiant heat flux curves measured by satellite, totalled 8.67 x 106 m3. The first four episodes occurred, between late-March and early-May, from the summit of the SEC and short fissures on its flanks. The last two episodes occurred, in September and November, from a new vent ("pit crater" or "proto-NSEC") at the SE base of the SEC cone; this marked the definitive demise of the old SEC and the shift to the new vent. The latter, fed by NW-SE striking dikes propagating from the SEC conduit, formed since early 2011 an independent cone (the New Southeast Crater, or "NSEC") at the base of the SEC. Detailed geodetic reconstruction and structural field observations allow defining the surface deformation pattern of Mount Etna in the last decade. These suggest that the NSEC developed under the NE-SW trending tensile stresses on the volcano summit promoted by accelerated instability of the NE flank of the volcano during inflation periods. The development of the NSEC is not only important from a structural point of view, as its formation may also lead to an increase in volcanic hazard. The case of the NSEC at Etna here reported shows how flank instability may control the distribution and impact of volcanism, including the prolonged shift of the summit vent activity in a mature volcano.

  10. Visual Observations and Geologic Settings of the Newly-Discovered Black Smoker Vent Sites Across the Galapagos Ridge-Hotspot Intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P.; Haymon, R.; MacDonald, K.; White, S.

    2006-12-01

    Nearly one-fifth of the global mid-ocean ridge is hotspot-affected, yet very little is known about how hotspots affect quantity and distribution of high-temperature hydrothermal vents along the ridge. During the 2005-06 GalAPAGoS expedition, acoustic and plume sensor surveys were conducted across the Galapagos ridge- hotspot intersection, lon. 94.5ºW- lon. 89.5ºW, to map fine scale geologic features and locate hydrothermal plumes emanating from the ridge crest. Where significant plumes were detected, the Medea fiber-optic camera sled was used successfully to find and image high-temperature vents on the seafloor. With Medea we discovered and imaged the first active and recently extinct black smokers known along the entire Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC), and documented the geologic setting of these vents. The Medea survey imaged numerous inactive vents as well as 3 active high-temperature vent fields along the ridge at 94º 04.5'W (Navidad Site), 91º56.2'W (Iguanas Site) and 91º54.3'W (Pinguinos Site). Two recently extinct vent fields also were identified at 91º23.4'-23.7'W and 91º13.8'W. All of the high-temperature vent sites that we identified along the GSC are found above relatively shallow AMC reflectors and are located in the middle 20% of ridge segments. Without exception the vent sites are located along fissures atop constructional axial volcanic ridges (AVR's) composed of relatively young pillow basalts. In some cases, the vents were associated with collapses adjacent to the fissures. The fissures appear to be eruptive sources of the pillow lavas comprising the AVR's. Video images of the chimneys show mature, cylindrical structures, up to 14m high; little diffuse flow; few animals; and some worm casts and dead clam shells, suggesting prior habitation. We conclude that distribution of the vents is controlled by magmatic processes, (i.e., by locations of shallow AMC magma reservoirs and eruptive fissures above dike intrusions), and that there is

  11. Probability hazard map for future vent opening at Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brancato, Alfonso; Tusa, Giuseppina; Coltelli, Mauro; Proietti, Cristina

    2014-05-01

    Mount Etna is a composite stratovolcano located along the Ionian coast of eastern Sicily. The frequent flank eruptions occurrence (at an interval of years, mostly concentrated along the NE, S and W rift zones) lead to a high volcanic hazard that, linked with intense urbanization, poses a high volcanic risk. A long-term volcanic hazard assessment, mainly based on the past behaviour of the Etna volcano, is the basic tool for the evaluation of this risk. Then, a reliable forecast where the next eruption will occur is needed. A computer-assisted analysis and probabilistic evaluations will provide the relative map, thus allowing identification of the areas prone to the highest hazard. Based on these grounds, the use of a code such BET_EF (Bayesian Event Tree_Eruption Forecasting) showed that a suitable analysis can be explored (Selva et al., 2012). Following an analysis we are performing, a total of 6886 point-vents referring to the last 4.0 ka of Etna flank activity, and spread over an area of 744 km2 (divided into N=2976 squared cell, with side of 500 m), allowed us to estimate a pdf by applying a Gaussian kernel. The probability values represent a complete set of outcomes mutually exclusive and the relative sum is normalized to one over the investigated area; then, the basic assumptions of a Dirichlet distribution (the prior distribution set in the BET_EF code (Marzocchi et al., 2004, 2008)) still hold. One fundamental parameter is the the equivalent number of data, that depicts our confidence on the best guess probability. The BET_EF code also works with a likelihood function. This is modelled by a Multinomial distribution, with parameters representing the number of vents in each cell and the total number of past data (i.e. the 6886 point-vents). Given the grid of N cells, the final posterior distribution will be evaluated by multiplying the a priori Dirichlet probability distribution with the past data in each cell through the likelihood. The probability hazard map

  12. Provisions for containment venting in Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, J.G.

    1997-08-01

    In this short paper an overlook is given of the systems developed in Germany for filtered containment venting and their implementation in nuclear power plants. More information on the development can be found in the Proceedings of the DOE/NRC Aircleaning Conferences. In Germany, 28.8 % of the electric energy is produced by 19 nuclear power reactors. No new power reactor is expected to be built at least within the next ten years, but France and Germany cooperate in the development of a future European Power Reactor (ERP). This reactor type will be fitted with a core catcher and passive cooling in order to avoid serious consequences of a hypothetical core meltdown accident so that provisions for containment venting are not required. 3 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. How the differential load induced by normal fault scarps controls the distribution of monogenic volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccaferri, F.; Acocella, V.; Rivalta, E.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding shallow magma transfer and the related vent distribution is crucial for volcanic hazard. Here we investigate how the stress induced by topographic scarps linked to normal faults affects the distribution of monogenic volcanoes at divergent plate boundaries. Our numerical models of dyke propagation below a fault scarp show that the dykes tend to propagate toward and erupt on the footwall side. This effect, increasing with the scarp height, is stronger for dykes propagating underneath the hanging wall side and decreases with the distance from the scarp. A comparison to the East African Rift System, Afar and Iceland shows that (1) the inner rift structure, which shapes the topography, controls shallow dyke propagation; (2) differential loading due to mass redistribution affects magma propagation over a broad scale range (100-105 m). Our results find application to any volcanic field with tectonics- or erosion-induced topographic variations and should be considered in any volcanic hazard assessment.

  14. Base surge in recent volcanic eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.

    1967-01-01

    A base surge, first identified at the Bikini thermonuclear undersea explosion, is a ring-shaped basal cloud that sweeps outward as a density flow from the base of a vertical explosion column. Base surges are also common in shallow underground test explosions and are formed by expanding gases which first vent vertically and then with continued expansion rush over the crater lip (represented by a large solitary wave in an underwater explosion), tear ejecta from it, and feed a gas-charged density flow, which is the surge cloud. This horizontally moving cloud commonly has an initial velocity of more than 50 meters per second and can carry clastic material many kilometers. Base surges are a common feature of many recent shallow, submarine and phreatic volcanic eruptions. They transport ash, mud, lapilli, and blocks with great velocity and commonly sandblast and knock down trees and houses, coat the blast side with mud, and deposit ejecta at distances beyond the limits of throw-out trajectories. Close to the eruption center, the base surge can erode radial channels and deposit material with dune-type bedding. ?? 1967 Stabilimento Tipografico Francesco Giannini & Figli.

  15. The evolution of an island-arc volcanic system: records of volcanic processes at Montserrat, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, Sebastian; Talling, Peter; Coussens, Maya; Cassidy, Michael; Palmer, Martin; Jutzeler, Martin; Le Friant, Anne; Berndt, Christian

    2014-05-01

    different times. This includes southerly vents of Centre-Hills age, submerged seamounts off the island flanks, and the South Soufriere Hills basaltic volcanism. Each volcano has also produced large-scale landslides during the mature stage of edifice growth. Such landslides transport substantial volumes of material offshore. Indeed, volcaniclastic sediment distribution, via processes operating across a range of scales, is a major process in growth of the island flanks and surrounding arc-crust. The largest landslides are relatively rare in the life cycle of an individual volcano, but appear to be ubiquitous in the Lesser Antilles and elsewhere. Our results point to complex landslide processes, involving multiple phases and incorporating seafloor material, all of which are significant for understanding their potential for tsunami generation. The largest collapse at Soufriere Hills coincides with an episode of mafic volcanism at South Soufriere Hills, and may have induced the ascent of these magmas following unloading of the magma storage system. Together, our records point to a complex range of eruption styles, which can be used to investigate how and why the style of volcanism, and associated hazards, vary as a volcano develops.

  16. Active Volcanic and Hydrothermal Processes at NW Rota-1 Submarine Volcano: Mariana Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, R. W.; Baker, E. T.; Butterfield, D. A.; Chadwick, W. W.; de Ronde, C.; Dower, J.; Evans, L.; Hein, J.; Juniper, K.; Lebon, G.; Lupton, J. E.; Merle, S.; Metaxas, A.; Nakamura, K.; Resing, J. E.; Roe, K.; Stern, R.; Tunnicliffe, V.

    2004-12-01

    Dives with the remotely operated vehicle ROPOS in March/April 2004 documented a volcanic eruption at NW Rota-1, a submarine volcano of basaltic composition located at 14\\deg 36.0'N, 144\\deg 46.5'E lying 65 km northwest of Rota Island in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. The site was chosen as a dive target because of the of the high concentrations of H2S and alunite in the hydrothermal plume overlying its summit in February 2003. The summit of the volcano is composed of curvilinear volcanic ridge oriented NW-SE bounded by NE-SW trending normal faults. Lavas collected on the upper part of the edifice are primitive to moderately fractionated basalts (Mg# = 51-66). The eruptive activity is occurring within a small crater (Brimstone Pit) located on the upper south flank of the volcano at 550 m, about 30 m below the summit. The crater is approximately 15 m wide and at least 20 meters deep. The ROPOS's cameras observed billowing clouds of sulfur-rich fluid rising out of the crater, punctuated by frequent bursts of several minutes duration that entrained glassy volcanic ejecta up to at least 2 cm in diameter. ROPOS recorded a temperature of 38\\degC within the plume. The volcanic activity had substantial temporal variability on the scale of minutes. ROPOS was sometimes completely enveloped by the plume while on the rim of the crater, and its surfaces were coated with large sulfur droplets. Black glassy fragments were entrained in the plume up to least 50 m above the crater and deposits of this material were on ledges and tops of outcrops up to several hundred meters from Brimstone Pit. The pit crater fluids have an extremely high content of particulate sulfur and extremely acidic, with pH around 2.0. This strongly implicates magmatic degassing of SO2 and disproportionation into elemental S and sulfuric acid. Diffuse venting of clear fluids was also present on the summit of the volcano, with temperatures exceeding 100\\degC in volcaniclastic sands

  17. Bioindication of volcanic mercury (Hg) deposition around Mt Etna (Sicily)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R.; Witt, M. L.; Sawyer, G. M.; Watt, S.; Bagnato, E.; Calabrese, S.; Aiuppa, A.; Delmelle, P.; Pyle, D. M.; Mather, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    Mt. Etna is a major natural source of Hg to the Mediterranean region. Total mercury concentrations, [Hg]tot, in Castanea sativa (sweet chestnut) leaves sampled 7-13 km from Etna's vents (during six campaigns in 2005-2011) were determined using atomic absorption spectroscopy. [Hg]tot in C. sativa was greatest on Etna's SE flank reflecting Hg deposition from the typically overhead volcanic plume. When adjusted for leaf age, [Hg]tot in C. sativa also increased with recent eruptive activity. [Hg]tot in C. sativa was not controlled by [Hg]tot in soils, which instead was greatest on the (upwind) NW flank and correlated strongly with soil organic matter (% Org). Our results suggest that at least ~1% of Hg emitted from Etna is deposited proximally, supporting recent measurement and model results which indicate that GEM (Hg0; the dominant form of Hg in high temperature magmatic gases) is oxidised rapidly to RGM and Hgp in ambient temperature volcanic plumes. Samples of C. sativa and soils were also collected in July and September 2012 alongside SO2 and acid gas diffusion tube samples. These new samples will enable us to investigate Hg accumulation over a single growth season with reference to the exposure of vegetation to volcanic gases and particles.

  18. Comparative Study of Vented vs. Unvented Crawlspaces

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; Christian, Jeffrey E; Gehl, Anthony C

    2011-10-01

    There has been a significant amount of research in the area of building energy efficiency and durability. However, well-documented quantitative information on the impact of crawlspaces on the performance of residential structures is lacking. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the effects of two crawlspace strategies on the whole-house performance of a pair of houses in a mixed humid climate. These houses were built with advanced envelope systems to provide energy savings of 50% or more compared to traditional 2010 new construction. One crawlspace contains insulated walls and is sealed and semi-conditioned. The other is a traditional vented crawlspace with insulation in the crawlspace ceiling. The vented (traditional) crawlspace contains fiberglass batts installed in the floor chase cavities above the crawl, while the sealed and insulated crawlspace contains foil-faced polyisocyanurate foam insulation on the interior side of the masonry walls. Various sensors to measure temperatures, heat flux through crawlspace walls and ceiling, and relative humidity were installed in the two crawlspaces. Data from these sensors have been analyzed to compare the performance of the two crawlspace designs. The analysis results indicated that the sealed and insulated crawlspace design is better than the traditional vented crawlspace in the mixed humid climate.

  19. Characterization of volcanic activity using observations of infrasound, volcanic emissions, and thermal imagery at Karymsky Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, T.; Fee, D.; Prata, F.

    2012-04-01

    Karymsky Volcano is one of the most active and dynamic volcanoes in Kamchatka, with activity ranging from vigorous degassing, frequent ash emissions, and apparent vent sealing, all punctuated by daily to weekly explosive magmatic eruptions. Recent studies have highlighted the strengths in using complementary infrasound measurements and remote volcanic emission measurements to characterize volcanic activity, with the potential to discriminate emission-type, approximate ash-cloud height, and estimate SO2 emission mass. Here we use coincident measurements of infrasound, SO2, ash, and thermal radiation collected over a ten day period at Karymsky Volcano in August 2011 to characterize the observed activity and elucidate vent processes. The ultimate goal of this project is to enable different types of volcanic activity to be identified using only infrasound data, which would significantly improve our ability to continuously monitor remote volcanoes. Four types of activity were observed. Type 1 activity is characterized by discrete ash emissions occurring every 1 - 5 minutes that either jet or roil out of the vent, by plumes from 500 - 1500 m (above vent) altitudes, and by impulsive infrasonic onsets. Type 2 activity is characterized by periodic pulses of gas emission, little or no ash, low altitude (100 - 200 m) plumes, and strong audible jetting or roaring. Type 3 activity is characterized by sustained emissions of ash and gas, with multiple pulses lasting from ~1 - 3 minutes, and by plumes from 300 - 1500 m. Type 4 activity is characterized by periods of relatively long duration (~30 minutes to >1 hour) quiescence, no visible plume and weak SO2 emissions at or near the detection limit, followed by an explosive, magmatic eruption, producing ash-rich plumes to >2000 m, and centimeter to meter (or greater) sized pyroclastic bombs that roll down the flanks of the edifice. Eruption onset is accompanied by high-amplitude infrasound and occasionally visible shock

  20. Quantitative volcanic susceptibility analysis of Lanzarote and Chinijo Islands based on kernel density estimation via a linear diffusion process.

    PubMed

    Galindo, I; Romero, M C; Sánchez, N; Morales, J M

    2016-01-01

    Risk management stakeholders in high-populated volcanic islands should be provided with the latest high-quality volcanic information. We present here the first volcanic susceptibility map of Lanzarote and Chinijo Islands and their submarine flanks based on updated chronostratigraphical and volcano structural data, as well as on the geomorphological analysis of the bathymetric data of the submarine flanks. The role of the structural elements in the volcanic susceptibility analysis has been reviewed: vents have been considered since they indicate where previous eruptions took place; eruptive fissures provide information about the stress field as they are the superficial expression of the dyke conduit; eroded dykes have been discarded since they are single non-feeder dykes intruded in deep parts of Miocene-Pliocene volcanic edifices; main faults have been taken into account only in those cases where they could modified the superficial movement of magma. The application of kernel density estimation via a linear diffusion process for the volcanic susceptibility assessment has been applied successfully to Lanzarote and could be applied to other fissure volcanic fields worldwide since the results provide information about the probable area where an eruption could take place but also about the main direction of the probable volcanic fissures. PMID:27265878

  1. Quantitative volcanic susceptibility analysis of Lanzarote and Chinijo Islands based on kernel density estimation via a linear diffusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo, I.; Romero, M. C.; Sánchez, N.; Morales, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    Risk management stakeholders in high-populated volcanic islands should be provided with the latest high-quality volcanic information. We present here the first volcanic susceptibility map of Lanzarote and Chinijo Islands and their submarine flanks based on updated chronostratigraphical and volcano structural data, as well as on the geomorphological analysis of the bathymetric data of the submarine flanks. The role of the structural elements in the volcanic susceptibility analysis has been reviewed: vents have been considered since they indicate where previous eruptions took place; eruptive fissures provide information about the stress field as they are the superficial expression of the dyke conduit; eroded dykes have been discarded since they are single non-feeder dykes intruded in deep parts of Miocene-Pliocene volcanic edifices; main faults have been taken into account only in those cases where they could modified the superficial movement of magma. The application of kernel density estimation via a linear diffusion process for the volcanic susceptibility assessment has been applied successfully to Lanzarote and could be applied to other fissure volcanic fields worldwide since the results provide information about the probable area where an eruption could take place but also about the main direction of the probable volcanic fissures.

  2. Quantitative volcanic susceptibility analysis of Lanzarote and Chinijo Islands based on kernel density estimation via a linear diffusion process

    PubMed Central

    Galindo, I.; Romero, M. C.; Sánchez, N.; Morales, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Risk management stakeholders in high-populated volcanic islands should be provided with the latest high-quality volcanic information. We present here the first volcanic susceptibility map of Lanzarote and Chinijo Islands and their submarine flanks based on updated chronostratigraphical and volcano structural data, as well as on the geomorphological analysis of the bathymetric data of the submarine flanks. The role of the structural elements in the volcanic susceptibility analysis has been reviewed: vents have been considered since they indicate where previous eruptions took place; eruptive fissures provide information about the stress field as they are the superficial expression of the dyke conduit; eroded dykes have been discarded since they are single non-feeder dykes intruded in deep parts of Miocene-Pliocene volcanic edifices; main faults have been taken into account only in those cases where they could modified the superficial movement of magma. The application of kernel density estimation via a linear diffusion process for the volcanic susceptibility assessment has been applied successfully to Lanzarote and could be applied to other fissure volcanic fields worldwide since the results provide information about the probable area where an eruption could take place but also about the main direction of the probable volcanic fissures. PMID:27265878

  3. Quantitative volcanic susceptibility analysis of Lanzarote and Chinijo Islands based on kernel density estimation via a linear diffusion process.

    PubMed

    Galindo, I; Romero, M C; Sánchez, N; Morales, J M

    2016-06-06

    Risk management stakeholders in high-populated volcanic islands should be provided with the latest high-quality volcanic information. We present here the first volcanic susceptibility map of Lanzarote and Chinijo Islands and their submarine flanks based on updated chronostratigraphical and volcano structural data, as well as on the geomorphological analysis of the bathymetric data of the submarine flanks. The role of the structural elements in the volcanic susceptibility analysis has been reviewed: vents have been considered since they indicate where previous eruptions took place; eruptive fissures provide information about the stress field as they are the superficial expression of the dyke conduit; eroded dykes have been discarded since they are single non-feeder dykes intruded in deep parts of Miocene-Pliocene volcanic edifices; main faults have been taken into account only in those cases where they could modified the superficial movement of magma. The application of kernel density estimation via a linear diffusion process for the volcanic susceptibility assessment has been applied successfully to Lanzarote and could be applied to other fissure volcanic fields worldwide since the results provide information about the probable area where an eruption could take place but also about the main direction of the probable volcanic fissures.

  4. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Daily, PNNL

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprint that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.

  5. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprintmore » that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.« less

  6. Ecology of deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Richard A.; Kennish, Michael J.

    1993-08-01

    Studies of the many active and inactive hydrothermal vents found during the past 15 years have radically altered views of biological and geological processes in the deep sea. The biological communities occupying the vast and relatively stable soft bottom habitats of the deep sea are characterized by low population densities, high species diversity, and low biomass. In contrast, those inhabiting the generally unstable conditions of hydrothermal vent environments exhibit high densities and biomass, low species diversity, rapid growth rates, and high metabolic rates. Biological processes, such as rates of metabolism and growth, in vent organisms are comparable to those observed in organisms from shallow-water ecosystems. An abundant energy source is provided by chemosynthetic bacteria that constitute the primary producers sustaining the lush communities at the hydrothermal sites. Fluxes in vent flow and fluid chemistry cause changes in growth rates, reproduction, mortality, and/or colonization of vent fauna, leading to temporal and spatial variation of the vent communities. Vent populations that cannot adapt to modified flow rates are adversely affected, as is evidenced by high mortality or lower rates of colonization, growth, or reproduction. Substantial changes in biota have been witnessed at several vents, and successional cycles have been proposed for the Galapagos vent fields. Dramatic temporal and spatial variations in vent community structure may also relate to variations in larval dispersal and chance recruitment, as well as biotic interactions.

  7. Geophysical exploration on the subsurface geology of La Garrotxa monogenetic volcanic field (NE Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolós, Xavier; Barde-Cabusson, Stéphanie; Pedrazzi, Dario; Martí, Joan; Casas, Albert; Lovera, Raúl; Nadal-Sala, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    We applied self-potential (SP) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) to the exploration of the uppermost part of the substrate geology and shallow structure of La Garrotxa monogenetic volcanic field, part of the European Neogene-Quaternary volcanic province. The aim of the study was to improve knowledge of the shallowest part of the feeding system of these monogenetic volcanoes and of its relationship with the subsurface geology. This study complements previous geophysical studies carried out at a less detailed scale and aimed at identifying deeper structures, and together will constitute the basis to establish volcanic susceptibility in La Garrotxa. SP study complemented previous smaller-scale studies and targeted key areas where ERT could be conducted. The main new results include the generation of resistivity models identifying dykes and faults associated with several monogenetic cones. The combined results confirm that shallow tectonics controlling the distribution of the foci of eruptive activity in this volcanic zone mainly correspond to NNW-SSE and accessorily by NNE-SSW Neogene extensional fissures and faults and concretely show the associated magmatic intrusions. These structures coincide with the deeper ones identified in previous studies, and show that previous Alpine tectonic structures played no apparent role in controlling the loci of this volcanism. Moreover, the results obtained show that the changes in eruption dynamics occurring at different vents located at relatively short distances in this volcanic area are controlled by shallow stratigraphical, structural and hydrogeological differences underneath these monogenetic volcanoes.

  8. Ground-based analysis of volcanic ash plumes using a new multispectral thermal infrared camera approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic plumes are complex mixtures of mineral, lithic and glass fragments of varying size, together with multiple gas species. These plumes vary in size dependent on a number of factors, including vent diameter, magma composition and the quantity of volatiles within a melt. However, determining the chemical and mineralogical properties of a volcanic plume immediately after an eruption is a great challenge. Thermal infrared (TIR) satellite remote sensing of these plumes is routinely used to calculate the volcanic ash particle size variations and sulfur dioxide concentration. These analyses are commonly performed using high temporal, low spatial resolution satellites, which can only reveal large scale trends. What is lacking is a high spatial resolution study specifically of the properties of the proximal plumes. Using the emissive properties of volcanic ash, a new method has been developed to determine the plume's particle size and petrology in spaceborne and ground-based TIR data. A multispectral adaptation of a FLIR TIR camera has been developed that simulates the TIR channels found on several current orbital instruments. Using this instrument, data of volcanic plumes from Fuego and Santiaguito volcanoes in Guatemala were recently obtained Preliminary results indicate that the camera is capable of detecting silicate absorption features in the emissivity spectra over the TIR wavelength range, which can be linked to both mineral chemistry and particle size. It is hoped that this technique can be expanded to isolate different volcanic species within a plume, validate the orbital data, and ultimately to use the results to better inform eruption dynamics modelling.

  9. Volcanism on Mars. Chapter 41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Garry, W. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Crown, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration has revealed abundant evidence that Mars possesses some of the most dramatic volcanic landforms found anywhere within the solar system. How did a planet half the size of Earth produce volcanoes like Olympus Mons, which is several times the size of the largest volcanoes on Earth? This question is an example of the kinds of issues currently being investigated as part of the space-age scientific endeavor called "comparative planetology." This chapter summarizes the basic information currently known about volcanism on Mars. The volcanoes on Mars appear to be broadly similar in overall morphology (although, often quite different in scale) to volcanic features on Earth, which suggests that Martian eruptive processes are not significantly different from the volcanic styles and processes on Earth. Martian volcanoes are found on terrains of different age, and Martian volcanic rocks are estimated to comprise more than 50% of the Martian surface. This is in contrast to volcanism on smaller bodies such as Earth's Moon, where volcanic activity was mainly confined to the first half of lunar history (see "Volcanism on the Moon"). Comparative planetology supports the concept that volcanism is the primary mechanism for a planetary body to get rid of its internal heat; smaller bodies tend to lose their internal heat more rapidly than larger bodies (although, Jupiter's moon Io appears to contradict this trend; Io's intense volcanic activity is powered by unique gravitational tidal forces within the Jovian system; see "Volcanism on Io"), so that volcanic activity on Mars would be expected to differ considerably from that found on Earth and the Moon.

  10. Quantitative Studies in Planetary Volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baloga, Stephen M.

    2004-01-01

    Proxemy Research has a research grant to perform scientific investigations of volcanism and volcanic-related process on other planets. Part of this research involves mathematical modeling of specific volcanic transport processes and the use of terrestrial analogs. This report contains a summary of activities conducted over the time period indicated. In addition, a synopsis of science research conducted during the period is given. A complete listing of publications and scientific abstracts that were presented at scientific conferences is contained in the report.

  11. Laboratory studies of volcanic jets.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, S.W.; Sturtevant, B.

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory experiments to study the fluid dynamics of violent volcanic eruptions employed pure gases erupted from small reservoirs. The gases used were Freon 12 and Freon 22, both of high molecular weight and high density, to model heavy, particulate- laden volcanic gases; nitrogen, a moderate molecular weight and density gas with well known thermodynamic properties; and He, a low molecular weight and density gas used as an analogue of steam, the dominant gas of most volcanic eruptions.-W.H.B.

  12. Multiple episodes of hydrothermal activity and epithermal mineralization in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and their relations to magmatic activity, volcanism and regional extension

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, S.I.; Noble, D.C.; Jackson, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    Volcanic rocks of middle Miocene age and underlying pre-Mesozoic sedimentary rocks host widely distributed zones of hydrothermal alteration and epithermal precious metal, fluorite and mercury deposits within and peripheral to major volcanic and intrusive centers of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field (SWNVF) in southern Nevada, near the southwestern margin of the Great Basin of the western United States. Radiometric ages indicate that episodes of hydrothermal activity mainly coincided with and closely followed major magmatic pulses during the development of the field and together spanned more than 4.5 m.y. Rocks of the SWNVF consist largely of rhyolitic ash-flow sheets and intercalated silicic lava domes, flows and near-vent pyroclastic deposits erupted between 15.2 and 10 Ma from vent areas in the vicinity of the Timber Mountain calderas, and between about 9.5 and 7 Ma from the outlying Black Mountain and Stonewall Mountain centers. Three magmatic stages can be recognized: the main magmatic stage, Mountain magmatic stage (11.7 to 10.0 Ma), and the late magmatic stage (9.4 to 7.5 Ma).

  13. A model for eruption behavior of a volcanic vent in eastern Mare Serenitatis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiken, G.; Mckay, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    The origin is considered of droplets of ultramafic composition which are present in all soils collected from the mare surface at the Apollo 17 landing site. The droplets consist of homogeneous orange glass or their partially crystallized equivalent, the black droplets. These clastic deposits have a mean grain size of 40 micrometers. The droplet formation ages range from 3.5 to 3.83 b.y. It has been proposed that the droplets formed as a spray of low viscosity melt during lava fountaining. Based upon the thermal history as determined by studying olivine and particle shapes, two models for the formation of the sequence of droplets represented by samples 74001 and 74220 are presented. Both models assume, as proposed by Heiken et al. (1974), that the droplets were formed as a spray from a lava fountain and the compound forms were evidence for 'recycling' of solid, cooler droplets back into the fountain, encountering molten droplets before being deposited.

  14. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, A.

    2012-12-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of these aerosol clouds produce responses in the climate system. Observations and numerical models of the climate system show that volcanic eruptions produce global cooling and were the dominant natural cause of climate change for the past millennium, on timescales from annual to century. Major tropical eruptions produce winter warming of Northern Hemisphere continents for one or two years, while high latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere weaken the Asian and African summer monsoon. The Toba supereruption 74,000 years ago caused very large climate changes, affecting human evolution. However, the effects did not last long enough to produce widespread glaciation. An episode of four large decadally-spaced eruptions at the end of the 13th century C.E. started the Little Ice Age. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade had a small effect on global temperature trends. The June 13, 2011 Nabro eruption in Eritrea produced the largest stratospheric aerosol cloud since Pinatubo, and the most of the sulfur entered the stratosphere not by direct injection, but by slow lofting in the Asian summer monsoon circulation. Volcanic eruptions warn us that while stratospheric geoengineering could cool the surface, reducing ice melt and sea level rise, producing pretty sunsets, and increasing the CO2 sink, it could also reduce summer monsoon precipitation, destroy ozone, allowing more harmful UV at the surface, produce rapid warming when stopped, make the sky white, reduce solar power, perturb the ecology with more diffuse radiation, damage airplanes flying in the stratosphere, degrade astronomical observations, affect remote sensing, and affect

  15. PDV Probe Alignment Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, T L; May, C M; Strand, O T

    2007-10-26

    This alignment technique was developed while performing heterodyne velocimetry measurements at LLNL. There are a few minor items needed, such as a white card with aperture in center, visible alignment laser, IR back reflection meter, and a microscope to view the bridge surface. The work was performed on KCP flyers that were 6 and 8 mils wide. The probes used were Oz Optics manufactured with focal distances of 42mm and 26mm. Both probes provide a spot size of approximately 80?m at 1550nm. The 42mm probes were specified to provide an internal back reflection of -35 to -40dB, and the probe back reflections were measured to be -37dB and -33dB. The 26mm probes were specified as -30dB and both measured -30.5dB. The probe is initially aligned normal to the flyer/bridge surface. This provides a very high return signal, up to -2dB, due to the bridge reflectivity. A white card with a hole in the center as an aperture can be used to check the reflected beam position relative to the probe and launch beam, and the alignment laser spot centered on the bridge, see Figure 1 and Figure 2. The IR back reflection meter is used to measure the dB return from the probe and surface, and a white card or similar object is inserted between the probe and surface to block surface reflection. It may take several iterations between the visible alignment laser and the IR back reflection meter to complete this alignment procedure. Once aligned normal to the surface, the probe should be tilted to position the visible alignment beam as shown in Figure 3, and the flyer should be translated in the X and Y axis to reposition the alignment beam onto the flyer as shown in Figure 4. This tilting of the probe minimizes the amount of light from the bridge reflection into the fiber within the probe while maintaining the alignment as near normal to the flyer surface as possible. When the back reflection is measured after the tilt adjustment, the level should be about -3dB to -6dB higher than the probes

  16. Magma mixing in the San Francisco Volcanic Field, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, Anne L.; Arculus, Richard J.

    1989-08-01

    A wide variety of rock types are present in the O'Leary Peak and Strawberry Crater volcanics of the Pliocene to Recent San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF), AZ. The O'Leary Peak flows range from andesite to rhyolite (56 72 wt % SiO2) and the Strawberry Crater flows range from basalt to dacite (49 64 wt % SiO2). Our interpretation of the chemical data is that both magma mixing and crustal melting are important in the genesis of the intermediate composition lavas of both suites. Observed chemical variations in major and trace elements can be modeled as binary mixtures between a crustal melt similar to the O'Leary dome rhyolite and two different mafic end-members. The mafic end-member of the Strawberry suite may be a primary mantle-derived melt. Similar basalts have also been erupted from many other vents in the SFVF. In the O'Leary Peak suite, the mafic end-member is an evolved (low Mg/(Mg+ Fe)) basalt that is chemically distinct from the Strawberry Crater and other vent basalts as it is richer in total Fe, TiO2, Al2O3, MnO, Na2O, K2O, and Zr and poorer in MgO, CaO, P2O5, Ni, Sc, Cr, and V. The derivative basalt probably results from fractional crystallization of the more primitive, vent basalt type of magma. This evolved basalt occurs as xenolithic (but originally magmatic) inclusions in the O'Leary domes and andesite porphyry flow. The most mafic xenolith may represent melt that mixed with the O'Leary dome rhyolite resulting in andesite preserved as other xenoliths, a pyroclastic unit (Qoap), porphyry flow (Qoaf) and dacite (Darton Dome) magmas. Thermal constraints on the capacity of a melt to assimilate (and melt) a volume of solid material require that melt mixing and not assimilation has produced the observed intermediate lavas at both Strawberry Crater and O'Leary Peak. Textures, petrography, and mineral chemistry support the magma mixing model. Some of the inclusions have quenched rims where in contact with the host. The intermediate rocks, including the

  17. Volcanism at rifts

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.S.; McKenzie, D.P.

    1989-07-01

    The earth's outer shell rifts continuously, stretching and splitting both on the ocean's floor and on continents. Every 30 million years or so the rifting becomes cataclysmic, releasing continent-size floods of magma. This paper explains that the same mechanism is at work in both cases, the difference being in the slightly hotter temperature of the parent mantle for spectacular volcanic outbursts. Two kinds of evidence are described: quantitative descriptions of rock melting and a wide range of observations made on the rifted edges of continents and in the oceans that have opened between them.

  18. Curriculum Alignment Research Suggests that Alignment Can Improve Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squires, David

    2012-01-01

    Curriculum alignment research has developed showing the relationship among three alignment categories: the taught curriculum, the tested curriculum and the written curriculum. Each pair (for example, the taught and the written curriculum) shows a positive impact for aligning those results. Following this, alignment results from the Third…

  19. Sizing an emergency venting system for a cryogenic dewar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. K.; Naes, L. G.; Manikowski, A. F., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    If the vacuum vessel that insulates a cryogenic dewar for a spaceborne experiment prior to launch is damaged, air will leak into the vacuum insulation space. As the sudden heat load causes the pressure to rise in the dewar, a safety disk in the emergency vent line will burst at the design pressure differential to allow vaporized cryogenic fluid to escape. The emergency vent line should be sized such that sufficient gaseous cryogen will be vented to keep the pressure inside the dewar below the design limit. On the other hand, the line should not be so large as to impose an unnecessary heat load on the dewar filled with cryogenic fluid. A vent-line computer program was generated to compute the maximum flow rate allowed for a proposed vent-line system. Parametric studies have been carried out for different burst disk pressure differentials, liquid cryogen ullage, and vent-line sizes.

  20. Bathymodiolus growth dynamics in relation to environmental fluctuations in vent habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedoncelle, K.; Lartaud, F.; Contreira Pereira, L.; Yücel, M.; Thurnherr, A. M.; Mullineaux, L.; Le Bris, N.

    2015-12-01

    The deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus thermophilus is a dominant species in the East Pacific Rise (EPR) hydrothermal vent fields. On the EPR volcanically unstable area, this late colonizer reaches high biomass within 4-5 years on new habitats created by lava flows. The environmental conditions and growth rates characterizing the reestablishment of B. thermophilus populations are however largely unknown, leaving unconstrained the role of this foundation species in the ecosystem dynamics. A typical example from the vent field at 9°50'N that was affected by the last massive eruption was the Bio-9 hydrothermal vent site. Here, six years later, a large mussel population had reestablished. The von Bertalanffy growth model estimates the oldest B. thermophilus specimens to be 1.3 year-old in March 2012, consistent with the observation of scarce juveniles among tubeworms in 2010. Younger cohorts were also observed in 2012 but the low number of individuals, relatively to older cohorts, suggests limited survival or growth of new recruits at this site, that could reflect unsuitable habitat conditions. To further explore this asumption, we investigated the relationships between mussel growth dynamics and habitat properties. The approach combined sclerochronology analyses of daily shell growth with continuous habitat monitoring for two mussel assemblages; one from the Bio-9 new settlement and a second from the V-vent site unreached by the lava flow. At both vent sites, semi-diurnal fluctuations of abiotic conditions were recorded using sensors deployed in the mussel bed over 5 to 10 days. These data depict steep transitions from well oxygenated to oxygen-depleted conditions and from alkaline to acidic pH, combined with intermittent sulfide exposure. These semi-diurnal fluctuations exhibited marked changes in amplitude over time, exposing mussels to distinct regimes of abiotic constraints. The V-vent samples allowed growth patterns to be examined at the scale of individual life and

  1. Sensitivity to volcanic field boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Melody; Bebbington, Mark; Cronin, Shane; Lindsay, Jan; Rashad Moufti, Mohammed

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic hazard analyses are desirable where there is potential for future volcanic activity to affect a proximal population. This is frequently the case for volcanic fields (regions of distributed volcanism) where low eruption rates, fertile soil, and attractive landscapes draw populations to live close by. Forecasting future activity in volcanic fields almost invariably uses spatial or spatio-temporal point processes with model selection and development based on exploratory analyses of previous eruption data. For identifiability reasons, spatio-temporal processes, and practically also spatial processes, the definition of a spatial region is required to which volcanism is confined. However, due to the complex and predominantly unknown sub-surface processes driving volcanic eruptions, definition of a region based solely on geological information is currently impossible. Thus, the current approach is to fit a shape to the known previous eruption sites. The class of boundary shape is an unavoidable subjective decision taken by the forecaster that is often overlooked during subsequent analysis of results. This study shows the substantial effect that this choice may have on even the simplest exploratory methods for hazard forecasting, illustrated using four commonly used exploratory statistical methods and two very different regions: the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand, and Harrat Rahat, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. For Harrat Rahat, sensitivity of results to boundary definition is substantial. For the Auckland Volcanic Field, the range of options resulted in similar shapes, nevertheless, some of the statistical tests still showed substantial variation in results. This work highlights the fact that when carrying out any hazard analysis on volcanic fields, it is vital to specify how the volcanic field boundary has been defined, assess the sensitivity of boundary choice, and to carry these assumptions and related uncertainties through to estimates of future activity and

  2. Volcanic and Hydrothermal Activity of the North Su Volcano: New Insights from Repeated Bathymetric Surveys and ROV Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thal, J.; Bach, W.; Tivey, M.; Yoerger, D.

    2013-12-01

    Bathymetric data from cruises in 2002, 2006, and 2011 were combined and compared to determine the evolution of volcanic activity, seafloor structures, erosional features and to identify and document the distribution of hydrothermal vents on North Su volcano, SuSu Knolls, eastern Manus Basin (Papua New Guinea). Geologic mapping based on ROV observations from 2006 (WHOI Jason-2) and 2011 (MARUM Quest-4000) combined with repeated bathymetric surveys from 2002 and 2011 are used to identify morphologic features on the slopes of North Su and to track temporal changes. ROV MARUM Quest-4000 bathymetry was used to develop a 10 m grid of the top of North Su to precisely depict recent changes. In 2006, the south slope of North Su was steeply sloped and featured numerous white smoker vents discharging acid sulfate waters. These vents were covered by several tens of meters of sand- to gravel-sized volcanic material in 2011. The growth of this new cone changed the bathymetry of the south flank of North Su up to ~50 m and emplaced ~0.014 km3 of clastic volcanic material. This material is primarily comprised of fractured altered dacite and massive fresh dacite as well as crystals of opx, cpx, olivine and plagioclase. There is no evidence for pyroclastic fragmentation, so we hypothesize that the fragmentation is likely related to hydrothermal explosions. Hydrothermal activity varies over a short (~50 m) lateral distance from 'flashing' black smokers to acidic white smoker vents. Within 2 weeks of observation time in 2011, the white smoker vents varied markedly in activity suggesting a highly episodic hydrothermal system. Based on ROV video recordings, we identified steeply sloping (up to 30°) slopes exposing pillars and walls of hydrothermal cemented volcaniclastic material representing former fluid upflow zones. These features show that hydrothermal activity has increased slope stability as hydrothermal cementation has prevented slope collapse. Additionally, in some places

  3. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeGrande, Allegra N.; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions represent some of the most climatically important and societally disruptive short-term events in human history. Large eruptions inject ash, dust, sulfurous gases (e.g. SO2, H2S), halogens (e.g. Hcl and Hbr), and water vapor into the Earth's atmosphere. Sulfurous emissions principally interact with the climate by converting into sulfate aerosols that reduce incoming solar radiation, warming the stratosphere and altering ozone creation, reducing global mean surface temperature, and suppressing the hydrological cycle. In this issue, we focus on the history, processes, and consequences of these large eruptions that inject enough material into the stratosphere to significantly affect the climate system. In terms of the changes wrought on the energy balance of the Earth System, these transient events can temporarily have a radiative forcing magnitude larger than the range of solar, greenhouse gas, and land use variability over the last millennium. In simulations as well as modern and paleoclimate observations, volcanic eruptions cause large inter-annual to decadal-scale changes in climate. Active debates persist concerning their role in longer-term (multi-decadal to centennial) modification of the Earth System, however.

  4. Uranium series, volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Application of U-series dating to volcanic rocks provides unique and valuable information about the absolute timing of crystallization and differentiation of magmas prior to eruption. The 238U–230Th and 230Th-226Ra methods are the most commonly employed for dating the crystallization of mafic to silicic magmas that erupt at volcanoes. Dates derived from the U–Th and Ra–Th methods reflect crystallization because diffusion of these elements at magmatic temperatures is sluggish (Cherniak 2010) and diffusive re-equilibration is insignificant over the timescales (less than or equal to 10^5 years) typically associated with pre-eruptive storage of nearly all magma compositions (Cooper and Reid 2008). Other dating methods based on elements that diffuse rapidly at magmatic temperatures, such as the 40Ar/39Ar and (U–Th)/He methods, yield dates for the cooling of magma at the time of eruption. Disequilibrium of some short-lived daughters of the uranium series such as 210Po may be fractionated by saturation of a volatile phase and can be employed to date magmatic gas loss that is synchronous with volcanic eruption (e.g., Rubin et al. 1994).

  5. Volcan Reventador's Unusual Umbrella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, P.; Gioia, G.; Kieffer, S. W.

    2005-12-01

    In the past two decades, field observations of the deposits of volcanoes have been supplemented by systemmatic, and sometimes, opportunistic photographic documentation. Two photographs of the umbrella of the December 3, 2002 eruption of Volcan Reventador, Ecuador, reveal a prominently scalloped umbrella that is unlike any umbrella previously documented on a volcanic column. The material in the umbrella was being swept off a descending pyroclastic flow, and was, therefore, a co-ignimbrite cloud. We propose that the scallops are the result of a turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability with no precedents in volcanology. We ascribe the rare loss of buoyancy that drives this instability to the fact that the Reventador column fed on a cool co-ignimbrite cloud. On the basis of the observed wavelength of the scallops, we estimate a value for the eddy viscosity of the umbrella of 4000 ~m2/s. This value is consistent with a previously obtained lower bound (200 ~m2/s, K. Wohletz, priv. comm., 2005). We do not know the fate of the material in the umbrella subsequent to the photos. The analysis suggests that the umbrella was negatively buoyant. Field work on the co-ignimbrite deposits might reveal whether or not the material reimpacted, and if so, where and whether or not this material was involved in the hazardous flows that affected the main oil pipeline across Ecuador.

  6. Experimental investigation of external explosion in the venting process*

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhi-min; Jin, Xin-qiao; Cui, Dong-ming; Ye, Jing-fang

    2005-01-01

    Experimental investigations were conducted on the process of combustion and explosion vent in a 200 mm (diameter)×400 mm (length) vertical cylindrical vessel. When CH4-air mixture gases were used and the vent diameter was 55 mm, conditions of Φ (equivalent ratio)=0.8, Φ=1.0 and Φ=1.3 and two ignition positions (at the cylinder center and bottom) were selected. The venting processes and the correlated factors are discussed in this paper. PMID:15822147

  7. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  8. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  9. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  10. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  11. 46 CFR 153.353 - High velocity vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false High velocity vents. 153.353 Section 153.353 Shipping... Systems § 153.353 High velocity vents. The discharge point of a B/3 or 4m venting system must be located..., unimpeded jet; (b) The jet has a minimum exit velocity of 30 m/sec (approx. 98.4 ft/sec); and (c) The...

  12. First volcanic CO2 budget estimate for three actively degassing volcanoes in the Central American Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robidoux, Philippe; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Conde, Vladimir; Galle, Bo; Giudice, Gaetano; Avard, Geoffroy; Muñoz, Angélica

    2014-05-01

    CO2 is a key chemical tracer for exploring volcanic degassing mechanisms of basaltic magmatic systems (1). The rate of CO2 release from sub-aerial volcanism is monitored via studies on volcanic plumes and fumaroles, but information is still sparse and incomplete for many regions of the globe, including the majority of the volcanoes in the Central American Volcanic Arc (2). Here, we use a combination of remote sensing techniques and in-situ measurements of volcanic gas plumes to provide a first estimate of the CO2 output from three degassing volcanoes in Central America: Turrialba, in Costa Rica, and Telica and San Cristobal, in Nicaragua. During a field campaign in March-April 2013, we obtained (for the three volcanoes) a simultaneous record of SO2 fluxes (from the NOVAC network (3)) and CO2 vs. SO2 concentrations in the near-vent plumes (obtained via a temporary installed fully-automated Multi-GAS instrument (4)). The Multi-GAS time-series allowed to calculate the plume CO2/SO2 ratios for different intervals of time, showing relatively stable gas compositions. Distinct CO2 - SO2 - H2O proportions were observed at the three volcanoes, but still within the range of volcanic arc gas (5). The CO2/SO2 ratios were then multiplied by the SO2 flux in order to derive the CO2 output. At Turrialba, CO2/SO2 ratios fluctuated, between March 12 and 19, between 1.1 and 5.7, and the CO2flux was evaluated at ~1000-1350 t/d (6). At Telica, between March 23 and April 8, a somewhat higher CO2/SO2 ratio was observed (3.3 ± 1.0), although the CO2 flux was evaluated at only ~100-500 t/d (6). At San Cristobal, where observations were taken between April 11 and 15, the CO2/SO2 ratio ranged between 1.8 and 7.4, with a mean CO2 flux of 753 t/d. These measurements contribute refining the current estimates of the total CO2 output from the Central American Volcanic Arc (7). Symonds, R.B. et al., (2001). J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res., 108, 303-341 Burton, M. R. et al. (2013). Reviews in

  13. Deriving spatial patterns from a novel database of volcanic rock geochemistry in the Virunga Volcanic Province, East African Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, Sam; Barette, Florian; Smets, Benoît; Benbakkar, Mhammed; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    eruption of 1957 belongs to these primitive clusters and is the only known to have erupted outside the current rift valley in historical times. We thus infer there is a distributed hazard of vent opening susceptibility additional to the susceptibility associated with the main Virunga edifices. This study suggests that the statistical analysis of such geochemical database may help to understand complex volcanic plumbing systems and the spatial distribution of volcanic hazards in active and poorly known volcanic areas such as the Virunga Volcanic Province.

  14. Terrestrial volcanism in space and time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simkin, Tom

    1993-01-01

    A survey is presented of current volcanic activity around the world and of dated volcanism over the past 10,000 yrs. The patterns in the data are described. The hazard presented by volcanism is briefly examined.

  15. Jointing around magmatic dikes as a precursor to the development of volcanic plugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Meredith; Pollard, David D.; Johnson, Kendra; Culha, Cansu

    2015-10-01

    Basaltic volcanic eruptions typically initiate as fissures fed by dikes. In some cases, eruptions become localized through discrete vents, until the flow is sustained through a single vent underlain by a volcanic plug, at which point, the eruption is capable of delivering much greater volumes of magma to the surface. Existing theories to explain flow localization focus on the relationship between non-uniform dike thickness and variations in magma flow rates. Here, we propose a mechanism for conduit widening that precedes flow localization, and we present geologic evidence from an Oligocene-aged dike-plug system at Ship Rock, New Mexico. We use techniques of structure from motion to map 621 joints in the sedimentary rock adjacent to the intrusions and find that these joints are part of a systematic set oriented perpendicular to the dikes and localized to within a meter of the dike contacts. This joint set, along with a set of dike-parallel joints and the bedding planes, divides the strata into rectangular blocks that subsequently are entrained in the flowing magma to widen the dikes. Using field and lab data and a stress analysis, we show that the dike-perpendicular joints are intimately associated with the emplacement of magma and thermal pressurization of pore fluids in the host rock. This fracturing process is a precursor to entrainment of the host rock and sustained flow through discrete vents.

  16. Scientists as stakeholders in conservation of hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Godet, Laurent; Zelnio, Kevin A; VAN Dover, Cindy L

    2011-04-01

    Hydrothermal vents are deep-sea ecosystems that are almost exclusively known and explored by scientists rather than the general public. Continuing scientific discoveries arising from study of hydrothermal vents are concommitant with the increased number of scientific cruises visiting and sampling vent ecosystems. Through a bibliometric analysis, we assessed the scientific value of hydrothermal vents relative to two of the most well-studied marine ecosystems, coral reefs and seagrass beds. Scientific literature on hydrothermal vents is abundant, of high impact, international, and interdisciplinary and is comparable in these regards with literature on coral reefs and seagrass beds. Scientists may affect hydrothermal vents because their activities are intense and spatially and temporally concentrated in these small systems. The potential for undesirable effects from scientific enterprise motivated the creation of a code of conduct for environmentally and scientifically benign use of hydrothermal vents for research. We surveyed scientists worldwide engaged in deep-sea research and found that scientists were aware of the code of conduct and thought it was relevant to conservation, but they did not feel informed or confident about the respect other researchers have for the code. Although this code may serve as a reminder of scientists' environmental responsibilities, conservation of particular vents (e.g., closures to human activity, specific human management) may effectively ensure sustainable use of vent ecosystems for all stakeholders.

  17. Optics Alignment Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    The Optics Alignment Panel (OAP) was commissioned by the HST Science Working Group to determine the optimum alignment of the OTA optics. The goal was to find the position of the secondary mirror (SM) for which there is no coma or astigmatism in the camera images due to misaligned optics, either tilt or decenter. The despace position was reviewed of the SM and the optimum focus was sought. The results of these efforts are as follows: (1) the best estimate of the aligned position of the SM in the notation of HDOS is (DZ,DY,TZ,TY) = (+248 microns, +8 microns, +53 arcsec, -79 arcsec), and (2) the best focus, defined to be that despace which maximizes the fractional energy at 486 nm in a 0.1 arcsec radius of a stellar image, is 12.2 mm beyond paraxial focus. The data leading to these conclusions, and the estimated uncertainties in the final results, are presented.

  18. Barrel alignment fixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheeley, J. D.

    1981-04-01

    Fabrication of slapper type detonator cables requires bonding of a thin barrel over a bridge. Location of the barrel hole with respect to the bridge is critical: the barrel hole must be centered over the bridge uniform spacing on each side. An alignment fixture which permits rapid adjustment of the barrel position with respect to the bridge is described. The barrel is manipulated by pincer-type fingers which are mounted on a small x-y table equipped with micrometer adjustments. Barrel positioning, performed under a binocular microscopy, is rapid and accurate. After alignment, the microscope is moved out of position and an infrared (IR) heat source is aimed at the barrel. A 5-second pulse of infrared heat flows the adhesive under the barrel and bonds it to the cable. Sapphire and Fotoform glass barrels were bonded successfully with the alignment fixture.

  19. Magnetically aligned supramolecular hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Matthew; Cardoso, Andre Zamith; Frith, William J; Iggo, Jonathan A; Adams, Dave J

    2014-12-01

    The magnetic-field-induced alignment of the fibrillar structures present in an aqueous solution of a dipeptide gelator, and the subsequent retention of this alignment upon transformation to a hydrogel upon the addition of CaCl2 or upon a reduction in solution pH is reported. Utilising the switchable nature of the magnetic field coupled with the slow diffusion of CaCl2 , it is possible to precisely control the extent of anisotropy across a hydrogel, something that is generally very difficult to do using alternative methods. The approach is readily extended to other compounds that form viscous solutions at high pH. It is expected that this work will greatly expand the utility of such low-molecular-weight gelators (LMWG) in areas where alignment is key. PMID:25345918

  20. MUSE optical alignment procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Loupias, Magali; Kosmalski, Johan; Anwand, Heiko; Bacon, Roland; Boudon, Didier; Caillier, Patrick; Daguisé, Eric; Dubois, Jean-Pierre; Dupuy, Christophe; Kelz, Andreas; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Nicklas, Harald; Parès, Laurent; Remillieux, Alban; Seifert, Walter; Valentin, Hervé; Xu, Wenli

    2012-09-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation VLT integral field spectrograph (1x1arcmin² Field of View) developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO), operating in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently assembling and testing MUSE in the Integration Hall of the Observatoire de Lyon for the Preliminary Acceptance in Europe, scheduled for 2013. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic instrument mechanical structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2011, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested independently in each institute. After validations, the systems were shipped to the P.I. institute at Lyon and were assembled in the Integration Hall This paper describes the end-to-end optical alignment procedure of the MUSE instrument. The design strategy, mixing an optical alignment by manufacturing (plug and play approach) and few adjustments on key components, is presented. We depict the alignment method for identifying the optical axis using several references located in pupil and image planes. All tools required to perform the global alignment between each subsystem are described. The success of this alignment approach is demonstrated by the good results for the MUSE image quality. MUSE commissioning at the VLT (Very Large Telescope) is planned for 2013.

  1. Geology and geothermal potential of Alid Volcanic Center, Eritrea, Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Clynne, M.A.; Duffield, W.A.; Fournier, R.O.; Janik, C.J.

    1996-12-31

    Alid volcanic center is a 700-meter-tall mountain in Eritrea, northeast Africa. This mountain straddles the axis of an active crustal-spreading center called the Danakil Depression. Though volcanism associated with this crustal spreading is predominantly basaltic, centers of silicic volcanism, including Alid, are present locally. Silicic centers imply a magma reservoir in the crust and thus a possible potent shallow heat source for a hydrothermal-convection system. Boiling-temperature fumaroles are common on Alid, and their gas compositions indicate a reservoir temperature of at least 250{degrees}C. Alid is a 7-km x 5-km structural dome. The domed rocks, in decreasing age, are Precambrian schist and granite, a sequence of intercalated sedimentary rocks and basaltic lavas, and a sequence of basaltic and rhyolitic lava flows. Though isotopic ages are not yet determined, the domed volcanic rocks of Alid appear to be late Tertiary and/or Quaternary. Doming was likely caused by intrusion of relatively low density silicic magma into the upper crust. Subsequent to dome formation, a substantial volume of this magma was erupted from a vent near the west end of the summit area of the dome. This eruption produced a blanket of plinian rhyolite pumice over most, if not all, of the dome and fed pyroclastic flows that covered the part of the Danakil Depression around the base of the dome. The pumice deposits contain abundant inclusions of granophyric, miarolitic pyroxene granite, chemically indistinguishable from the pumice. This granite likely represents the uppermost part of the magma reservoir, which crystallized just prior to the pumice eruption.

  2. Segment alignment control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubrun, JEAN-N.; Lorell, Ken R.

    1988-01-01

    The segmented primary mirror for the LDR will require a special segment alignment control system to precisely control the orientation of each of the segments so that the resulting composite reflector behaves like a monolith. The W.M. Keck Ten Meter Telescope will utilize a primary mirror made up of 36 actively controlled segments. Thus the primary mirror and its segment alignment control system are directly analogous to the LDR. The problems of controlling the segments in the face of disturbances and control/structures interaction, as analyzed for the TMT, are virtually identical to those for the LDR. The two systems are briefly compared.

  3. PILOT optical alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longval, Y.; Mot, B.; Ade, P.; André, Y.; Aumont, J.; Baustista, L.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Bray, N.; de Bernardis, P.; Boulade, O.; Bousquet, F.; Bouzit, M.; Buttice, V.; Caillat, A.; Charra, M.; Chaigneau, M.; Crane, B.; Crussaire, J.-P.; Douchin, F.; Doumayrou, E.; Dubois, J.-P.; Engel, C.; Etcheto, P.; Gélot, P.; Griffin, M.; Foenard, G.; Grabarnik, S.; Hargrave, P..; Hughes, A.; Laureijs, R.; Lepennec, Y.; Leriche, B.; Maestre, S.; Maffei, B.; Martignac, J.; Marty, C.; Marty, W.; Masi, S.; Mirc, F.; Misawa, R.; Montel, J.; Montier, L.; Narbonne, J.; Nicot, J.-M.; Pajot, F.; Parot, G.; Pérot, E.; Pimentao, J.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rodriguez, L.; Roudil, G.; Salatino, M.; Savini, G.; Simonella, O.; Saccoccio, M.; Tapie, P.; Tauber, J.; Torre, J.-P.; Tucker, C.

    2016-07-01

    PILOT is a balloon-borne astronomy experiment designed to study the polarization of dust emission in the diffuse interstellar medium in our Galaxy at wavelengths 240 μm with an angular resolution about two arcminutes. Pilot optics is composed an off-axis Gregorian type telescope and a refractive re-imager system. All optical elements, except the primary mirror, are in a cryostat cooled to 3K. We combined the optical, 3D dimensional measurement methods and thermo-elastic modeling to perform the optical alignment. The talk describes the system analysis, the alignment procedure, and finally the performances obtained during the first flight in September 2015.

  4. Effect of shallow-water hydrothermal venting on the biota of Matupi Harbour (Rabaul Caldera, New Britain Island, Papua New Guinea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, V. G.; Gebruk, A. V.; Shulkin, V. M.; Kamenev, G. M.; Fadeev, V. I.; Kosmynin, V. N.; Malakhov, V. V.; Starynin, D. A.; Obzhirov, A. I.

    1999-01-01

    Coastal hydrothermal vents in the depth range 0-27 m were studied in Matupi Harbour, a marine bight that is partly isolated from the open sea on the north-east coast of New Britain, Papua New Guinea, where volcanoes are active. Planktonic and benthic communities (including bacteria) in the Harbour were compared with adjacent fully marine areas. The environmental parameters assessed included temperature, salinity, O 2, H 2, hydrocarbons, metals, some species of nitrogen and sulphur, inorganic phosphate, silicate and chlorophyll a. There was pronounced stratification of the waters in the Harbour as a result of inflow of heated volcanic fluids, most evident in the surface 0-3 m layer. The volcanic fluids are rich in phytoplankton nutrients and reduced compounds which stimulate growth of bacterial plankton, bacterial production and enhance primary production. The highest values of photosynthetic fixation (almost 100 mg C m 3 d) and bacterial production (216 mg C m 3 d) found in the Harbour are much greater than previously reported for marine ecosystems. The chemosynthetic fraction of bacterial production varied from 15 to 60%, with highest values in the surface and the near-bottom layers. The zooplankton in the Harbour was dominated by cyclopoid copepods and was low in diversity. Bacterial mats were very evident at the areas of venting, dominated by Thiodendron-like species, but both epifauna and infauna were sparse at the vents. However, areas adjacent to the hydrothermal vents showed the richest benthic communities, with epifauna dominated by corals and sponges and infauna by nematodes. It appeared that benthic community development was inhibited by the hot sediment, rapid sedimentation, lack of hard substratum and large numbers of sponge spicules in the sediment. From dating of the last major volcanic eruption (1943), the Harbour provides an excellent model for studying processes of succession and adaptation in marine communities stressed by shallow

  5. Explosive volcanic activity on Venus: The roles of volatile contribution, degassing, and external environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airey, M. W.; Mather, T. A.; Pyle, D. M.; Glaze, L. S.; Ghail, R. C.; Wilson, C. F.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the conditions that will promote explosive volcanic activity on Venus. Conduit processes were simulated using a steady-state, isothermal, homogeneous flow model in tandem with a degassing model. The response of exit pressure, exit velocity, and degree of volatile exsolution was explored over a range of volatile concentrations (H2O and CO2), magma temperatures, vent altitudes, and conduit geometries relevant to the Venusian environment. We find that the addition of CO2 to an H2O-driven eruption increases the final pressure, velocity, and volume fraction gas. Increasing vent elevation leads to a greater degree of magma fragmentation, due to the decrease in the final pressure at the vent, resulting in a greater likelihood of explosive activity. Increasing the magmatic temperature generates higher final pressures, greater velocities, and lower final volume fraction gas values with a correspondingly lower chance of explosive volcanism. Cross-sectionally smaller, and/or deeper, conduits were more conducive to explosive activity. Model runs show that for an explosive eruption to occur at Scathach Fluctus, at Venus' mean planetary radius (MPR), 4.5% H2O or 3% H2O with 3% CO2 (from a 25 m radius conduit) would be required to initiate fragmentation; at Ma'at Mons (~9 km above MPR) only ~2% H2O is required. A buoyant plume model was used to investigate plume behaviour. It was found that it was not possible to achieve a buoyant column from a 25 m radius conduit at Scathach Fluctus, but a buoyant column reaching up to ~20 km above the vent could be generated at Ma'at Mons with an H2O concentration of 4.7% (at 1300 K) or a mixed volatile concentration of 3% H2O with 3% CO2 (at 1200 K). We also estimate the flux of volcanic gases to the lower atmosphere of Venus, should explosive volcanism occur. Model results suggest explosive activity at Scathach Fluctus would result in an H2O flux of ~107 kg s-1. Were Scathach Fluctus emplaced in a single event, our model

  6. Preliminary volcano hazard assessment for the Emmons Lake volcanic center, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher; Miller, Thomas P.; Mangan, Margaret T.

    2006-01-01

    The Emmons Lake volcanic center is a large stratovolcano complex on the Alaska Peninsula near Cold Bay, Alaska. The volcanic center includes several ice- and snow-clad volcanoes within a nested caldera structure that hosts Emmons Lake and truncates a shield-like ancestral Mount Emmons edifice. From northeast to southwest, the main stratovolcanoes of the center are: Pavlof Sister, Pavlof, Little Pavlof, Double Crater, Mount Hague, and Mount Emmons. Several small cinder cones and vents are located on the floor of the caldera and on the south flank of Pavlof Volcano. Pavlof Volcano, in the northeastern part of the center, is the most historically active volcano in Alaska (Miller and others, 1998) and eruptions of Pavlof pose the greatest hazards to the region. Historical eruptions of Pavlof Volcano have been small to moderate Strombolian eruptions that produced moderate amounts of near vent lapilli tephra fallout, and diffuse ash plumes that drifted several hundreds of kilometers from the vent. Cold Bay, King Cove, Nelson Lagoon, and Sand Point have reported ash fallout from Pavlof eruptions. Drifting clouds of volcanic ash produced by eruptions of Pavlof would be a major hazard to local aircraft and could interfere with trans-Pacific air travel if the ash plume achieved flight levels. During most historical eruptions of Pavlof, pyroclastic material erupted from the volcano has interacted with the snow and ice on the volcano producing volcanic mudflows or lahars. Lahars have inundated most of the drainages heading on the volcano and filled stream valleys with variable amounts of coarse sand, gravel, and boulders. The lahars are often hot and would alter or destroy stream habitat for many years following the eruption. Other stratocones and vents within the Emmons Lake volcanic center are not known to have erupted in the past 300 years. However, young appearing deposits and lava flows suggest there may have been small explosions and minor effusive eruptive activity

  7. 14 CFR 23.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... from the top part of the expansion space. In addition— (1) Each vent outlet must be located and... or level flight attitudes, unless drainage is provided. Any drain valve installed must be accessible... be arranged to prevent the loss of fuel, except fuel discharged because of thermal expansion,...

  8. 14 CFR 23.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... from the top part of the expansion space. In addition— (1) Each vent outlet must be located and... or level flight attitudes, unless drainage is provided. Any drain valve installed must be accessible... be arranged to prevent the loss of fuel, except fuel discharged because of thermal expansion,...

  9. Wisely use emergency scrubbers with vent systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bravo, F.; Cooper, R.S.; Contreras, D.

    1997-08-01

    Addressing the control of the gas stream constituents from emergency vents and their final disposal is an important consideration for chemical process industries (CPI) plant design and operation. Emergency scrubbing is a practical means of dealing with toxic, dangerous, or corrosive chemical products. The number of scrubber references is considerable and covers particulate and gaseous emissions. Applying scrubbers to mitigate the release of hazardous substances during emergency circumstances has been less well documented. This article reviews both the design and the operational considerations of scrubbers in emergency service.

  10. Friction in volcanic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic landscapes are amongst the most dynamic on Earth and, as such, are particularly susceptible to failure and frictional processes. In rocks, damage accumulation is frequently accompanied by the release of seismic energy, which has been shown to accelerate in the approach to failure on both a field and laboratory scale. The point at which failure occurs is highly dependent upon strain-rate, which also dictates the slip-zone properties that pertain beyond failure, in scenarios such as sector collapse and pyroclastic flows as well as the ascent of viscous magma. High-velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments have provided new opportunities to overcome the grand challenge of understanding faulting processes during volcanic phenomena. Work on granular ash material demonstrates that at ambient temperatures, ash gouge behaves according to Byerlee's rule at low slip velocities, but is slip-weakening, becoming increasingly lubricating as slip ensues. In absence of ash along a slip plane, rock-rock friction induces cataclasis and heating which, if sufficient, may induce melting (producing pseudotachylyte) and importantly, vesiculation. The viscosity of the melt, so generated, controls the subsequent lubrication or resistance to slip along the fault plane thanks to non-Newtonian suspension rheology. The shear-thinning behaviour and viscoelasticity of frictional melts yield a tendency for extremely unstable slip, and occurrence of frictional melt fragmentation. This velocity-dependence acts as an important feedback mechanism on the slip plane, in addition to the bulk composition, mineralogy and glass content of the magma, that all influence frictional behaviour. During sector collapse events and in pyroclastic density currents it is the frictional properties of the rocks and ash that, in-part, control the run-out distance and associated risk. In addition, friction plays an important role in the eruption of viscous magmas: In the conduit, the rheology of magma is integral

  11. Explosive volcanism on Hecates Tholus, Mars - Investigation of eruption conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Head, J. W., III; Wilson, L.

    1982-01-01

    From a reexamination of the medium and high-resolution Viking images of Amazonian and Hesperian age volcanic centers on Mars, it is believed that an excellent example of well-preserved explosive activity does indeed exist close to the summit of Hecates Tholus. A mantled region to the west of the summit caldera is seen as an example of a geologically very recent plinian air fall ash deposit. Morphological evidence is presented for describing this as explosively generated material, and numerical models of magma ascent and eruption in the Martian environment are used to estimate the physical characteristics (eruption cloud height, magma discharge rate, magma volatile content, duration of activity, and vent size) for this event. Attention is also given to the implication of this eruptive style for the composition of the erupted magma.

  12. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Mars Tectonism and Volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Mars Tectonism and Volcanism", included the following reports:Structural Attitudes of Large Scale Layering in Valles Marineris, Mars, Calculated from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter Data and Mars Orbiter Camera Imagery; Stratigraphy of Eastern Coprates Chasma, Mars; Temporal Variability in Tharsis Stress State Based on Wrinkle Ridges and Strike-Slip Faulting; State of Stress in the Martian Lithosphere; Displacement-Length Scaling of Faults on Earth, Mars, and Beyond; Topographic Analysis of Quasi-Circular Depressions Around the Utopia Basin, Mars; The Olympus Mons Aureole Deposits: New Evidence for a Flank-failure Origin; Cerberus Fossae and Elysium Planitia Lavas, Mars: Source Vents, Flow Rates, Edifice Styles and Water Interactions; and Topographic Evidence for Eruptive Style Changes and Magma Evolution of Small Plains.

  13. Hot, shallow mantle melting under the Cascades volcanic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins Tanton, Linda T.; Grove, Timothy L.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie

    2001-07-01

    Melting occurs at progressively greater depths and higher temperatures from west to east across the Cascades volcanic arc in northern California, as demonstrated by compositional variations observed in high-alumina olivine tholeiites. The lavas studied erupted from seven vents defining a 75-km-long, east-west transect across the arc, from near Mount Shasta to east of Medicine Lake volcano. The increase in melting depth across the arc parallels modeled isotherms in the mantle wedge and does not parallel the inferred dip of the slab. The depth of mantle melting at which the high-alumina olivine tholeiites were created is ˜36 km at the western end of the transect and 66 km at the eastern end. The very high temperatures of dry melting so close to the crust indicate a transitory condition of the mantle.

  14. Hot, shallow mantle melting under the Cascades volcanic arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elkins Tanton, Linda T.; Grove, Timothy L.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie

    2001-01-01

    Melting occurs at progressively greater depths and higher temperatures from west to east across the Cascades volcanic arc in northern California, as demonstrated by compositional variations observed in high-alumina olivine tholeiites. The lavas studied erupted from seven vents defining a 75-km-long, east-west transect across the arc, from near Mount Shasta to east of Medicine Lake volcano. The increase in melting depth across the arc parallels modeled isotherms in the mantle wedge and does not parallel the inferred dip of the slab. The depth of mantle melting at which the high-alumina olivine tholeiites were created is ∼36 km at the western end of the transect and 66 km at the eastern end. The very high temperatures of dry melting so close to the crust indicate a transitory condition of the mantle.

  15. Hydrothermal venting within a coral reef ecosystem, Ambitle Island, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, Thomas; Dix, George R.

    1996-05-01

    Shallow-water (5 10 m) hydrothermal venting in a nearshore coral reef environment at Ambitle Island in the Tabar-Feni island arc, east of Papua New Guinea, occurs as focused discharge of boiling fluid from discrete ports 10 15 cm in diameter, and as dispersed discharge of diffuse bubble streams that issue through the sandy mixed carbonate-volcaniclastic sea floor. Abiotic aragonite and microcrystalline ferroan, low-Mg calcite, interlaminated with Fe-oxyhydroxides, are the prominent hydrothermal precipitates. Geochemical attributes of aragonite (δ18O, δ13C, and fluid inclusions) suggest that cements formed from a solution with salinities <5‰ at temperatures of ˜100 °C, with probable contribution of hydrothermal CO2. Sr isotope ratios in abiotic (hydrothermal) aragonite (˜ 0.704 15) are similar to those in island-arc basalt and denote considerable subsurface water-rock interaction of meteoric water derived from the adjacent volcanic island. The Sr isotope ratio of a coral sample (0.707 46) collected adjacent to a vent portal suggests coral growth within a mixed seawater-hydrothermal environment.

  16. Characteristics and origin of Continental and Oceanic Intraplate Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. I.; Conrad, C. P.; Johnsen, R. L.; Tibbetts, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    Intraplate volcanism not clearly associated with plate margin tectonics or mantle plumes occurs in both continental and oceanic environments. A compilation of intraplate volcanic fields indicates several common traits: (1) volcanoes are predominately alkali basalt although tholeiitic, bimodal rhyolite basalt and calc-alkaline magma types occur in the Basin and Range and Utah Transition Zone in the western US; (2) volcanoes are monogenetic and occur in separate volcanic fields that rarely display time migration; (3) intraplate continental volcanic fields form by repeated episodic eruptions over a long period of time (10 m.y. or longer) in a limited geographic area; (4) extended or fractured intraplate areas tend to localize volcanism and (5) in oceanic environments, intraplate volcanism may produce island chains, but chains lack the time progression expected in plume related volcanism. Although intraplate volcanoes have been studied for decades there is little agreement on a mechanism that explains their formation. A selection of recently proposed mechanisms include “hot fingers or mini plumes” (eastern Australia), melting of fertile lithospheric mantle (Jordan, Basin and Range USA), mantle diapirs and crustal extension (Calatrava Spain), “petit spot” volcanoes formed along fractures related to plate flexure (northwestern Pacific Plate), hot line or tectono-magmatic alignment (Cameroon west Africa), upwelling of hot asthenosphere associated with deep subduction and a stagnant slab (Changbai volcano China), rifting of foreland uplifts associated with distant subduction (Rhine Graben), mantle plumes (Eifel Germany), small scale sublithospheric convection (SSC) (Gilbert and Pukapuka ridges Pacific Plate) and shear driven asthenospheric upwelling (SDU) (Basin and Range USA). Although all of these mechanisms have their merits, few explain the longevity of intraplate volcanism and repeated eruptions in the same geographic area. SSC [1] invokes the slow replacement

  17. Carbon Release in Italy through Volcanic, Tectonic and Other Styles of Degassing: Implication for Carbon Dioxide Sequestration and Storage.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigi, S.; Lombardi, S.; Beaubien, S.; Graziani, S.; Tartarello, M. C.; Ruggiero, L.; Ciotoli, G.; Sacco, P.; De Angelis, D.; Annunziatellis, A.

    2014-12-01

    One of the key criteria for successful geological storage of CO2 is that the target reservoir must not leak the stored gases over extended periods. Due to the peculiarity of its geological and geodynamic setting, which results in the production, accumulation, and leakage of large volumes of natural CO2, the Italian peninsula can be used as a natural laboratory as it provides to study gas migration mechanisms in large-scale geological systems, as well as to determine whether and how much sequestered CO2 could hypothetically leak from a subsurface reservoir. Moving from west to east, the Italian peninsula includes several geodynamic settings: the Tyrrhenian back arc basin and associated volcanic arcs, the Apennines fold and thrust belt, and the Adriatic foredeep. All of them are characterized by a diffuse and/or massive degassing of deeply derived CO2, which is usually emitted by vents or dissolved and transported by large aquifers. In the volcanic islands, in the south of the Tyrrhenian Sea, large areas are characterized by leakage from the sea floor. Based on the statistical and geo-spatial interpretation of more than 40,000 soil gas samples collected in central and southern Italy by the Fluid Chemistry Laboratory of "La Sapienza" University of Rome over more than 30 years of activity, different migration patterns related to the different geodynamic settings are distinguished and described. This very large database has been organised and managed in a GIS environment that allows the calculation of fundamental statistical parameters, the analysis of distribution patterns, the study of spatial autocorrelation and spatial heterogeneity, and the elaboration of maps. The interpretation of these data allow us to define background values of CO2, strongly related to geological setting, and other minor (CH4) and trace gases (He and Rn), that characterise the different geological scenarios. A common feature is that anomalous gas concentrations occur in restricted zones, both

  18. Curriculum Alignment: Establishing Coherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagné, Philippe; Dumont, Laurence; Brunet, Sabine; Boucher, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a step-by-step guide to implement a curricular alignment project, directed at professional development and student support, and developed in a higher education French as a second language department. We outline best practices and preliminary results from our experience and provide ways to adapt our experience to other…

  19. Optically Aligned Drill Press

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adderholdt, Bruce M.

    1994-01-01

    Precise drill press equipped with rotary-indexing microscope. Microscope and drill exchange places when turret rotated. Microscope axis first aligned over future hole, then rotated out of way so drill axis assumes its precise position. New procedure takes less time to locate drilling positions and produces more accurate results. Apparatus adapted to such other machine tools as milling and measuring machines.

  20. Aligning brains and minds

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Frank

    2012-01-01

    In this issue of Neuron, Haxby and colleagues describe a new method for aligning functional brain activity patterns across participants. Their study demonstrates that objects are similarly represented across different brains, allowing for reliable classification of one person’s brain activity based on another’s. PMID:22017984

  1. Aligned-or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseman, Jo Ellen; Koppal, Mary

    2015-01-01

    When state leaders and national partners in the development of the Next Generation Science Standards met to consider implementation strategies, states and school districts wanted to know which materials were aligned to the new standards. The answer from the developers was short but not sweet: You won't find much now, and it's going to…

  2. Recent and Hazardous Volcanic Activity Along the NW Rift Zone of Piton De La Fournaise Volcano, La Réunion Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, G.; Frese, I.; Di Muro, A.; Kueppers, U.; Michon, L.; Metrich, N.

    2014-12-01

    Shield volcanoes are a common feature of basaltic volcanism. Their volcanic activity is often confined to a summit crater area and rift systems, both characterized by constructive (scoria and cinder cones; lava flows) and destructive (pit craters; caldera collapse) phenomena. Piton de la Fournaise (PdF) shield volcano (La Réunion Island, Indian Ocean) is an ideal place to study these differences in eruptive behaviour. Besides the frequent eruptions in the central Enclos Fouqué caldera, hundreds of eruptive vents opened along three main rift zones cutting the edifice during the last 50 kyrs. Two short rift zones are characterized by weak seismicity and lateral magma transport at shallow depth (above sea level). Here we focus on the third and largest rift zone (15km wide, 20 km long), which extends in a north-westerly direction between PdF and nearby Piton des Neiges volcanic complex. It is typified by deep seismicity (up to 30 km), emitting mostly primitive magmas, testifying of high fluid pressures (up to 5 kbar) and large-volume eruptions. We present new field data (including stratigraphic logs, a geological map of the area, C-14 dating and geochemical analyses of the eruption products) on one of the youngest (~6kyrs) and largest lava field (Trous Blancs eruption). It extends for 24km from a height of 1800 m asl, passing Le Tampon and Saint Pierre cities, until reaching the coast. The source area of this huge lava flow has been identified in an alignment of four previously unidentified pit craters. The eruption initiated with intense fountaining activity, producing a m-thick bed of loose black scoria, which becomes densely welded in its upper part; followed by an alternation of volume rich lava effusions and strombolian activity, resulting in the emplacement of meter-thick, massive units of olivine-basalt alternating with coarse scoria beds in the proximal area. Activity ended with the emplacement of a dm-thick bed of glassy, dense scoria and a stratified lithic

  3. First airborne samples of a volcanic plume for δ13C of CO2 determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Tobias P.; Lopez, Taryn M.

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic degassing is one of the main natural sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. Carbon isotopes of volcanic gases enable the determination of CO2 sources including mantle, organic or carbonate sediments, and atmosphere. Until recently, this work required sample collection from vents followed by laboratory analyses. Isotope ratio infrared analyzers now enable rapid analyses of plume δ13C-CO2, in situ and in real time. Here we report the first analyses of δ13C-CO2 from airborne samples. These data combined with plume samples from the vent area enable extrapolation to the volcanic source δ13C. We performed our experiment at the previously unsampled and remote Kanaga Volcano in the Western Aleutians. We find a δ13C source composition of -4.4‰, suggesting that CO2 from Kanaga is primarily sourced from the upper mantle with minimal contributions from subducted components. Our method is widely applicable to volcanoes where remote location or activity level precludes sampling using traditional methods.

  4. What happened at the start of the Siberian Traps? Understanding the onset of flood volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerram, D. A.; Svensen, H.; Planke, S.; Polozov, A. G.; Faleide, J.; Sokalska, E.

    2013-12-01

    The Siberian Traps Large Igneous Province was formed during the end-Permian, about 251 million years ago. Basaltic melt was injected into the organic and salt rich Tunguska sedimentary basin, forming interconnected sill complexes and associated hydrothermal vent complexes. We have conducted field work in Siberia during 2004 to 2010 to study the formation and implications of the SiberianTraps volcanism. Thick deposits of basaltic tuff and tephra have been reported as widespread in the lower succession of the Siberian Traps, commonly taken as direct evidence for the explosive nature of the initial phase of volcanism. The field work in this study revealed that tuffs are virtually absent along a 125 km long transect along the Dyupkun lake, even though tuff is shown on available geological maps. Towards the south and west, the transition between the end-Permian sediments and the flood basalts is either characterized by minor (<2 meters) to no tephra deposits (Khantaika area), hyaloclastites and associated lake-deposited tephra (Kureika area), or massive tephra deposits from local eruptive centers (Severnaya area). Within the intrusive complexes beneath the volcanics, contact metamorphism of the sedimentary rocks around dolerite sills and dikes generated greenhouse gases and halocarbons to such an extent that the process could be responsible for both the end-Permian carbon isotope excursion and the mass extinction. The key processes include 1) metamorphism of oil-saturated rock salt sequences (halocarbon production), 2) methane generation from metamorphism of organic-rich shales (methane production), and 3) decarbonation of dolostones (carbon dioxide production). The new results questions the notion of province-scale explosive volcanism in Siberia during the onset of flood volcanism, with more specific impact coming from vent complexes associated with the intrusions.

  5. Geomicrobiology of Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannasch, Holger W.; Mottl, Michael J.

    1985-08-01

    During the cycling of seawater through the earth's crust along the midocean ridge system, geothermal energy is transferred into chemical energy in the form of reduced inorganic compounds. These compounds are derived from the reaction of seawater with crustal rocks at high temperatures and are emitted from warm (<= 25 degrees C) and hot (~ 350 degrees C) submarine vents at depths of 2000 to 3000 meters. Chemolithotrophic bacteria use these reduced chemical species as sources of energy for the reduction of carbon dioxide (assimilation) to organic carbon. These bacteria form the base of the food chain, which permits copious populations of certain specifically adapted invertebrates to grow in the immediate vicinity of the vents. Such highly prolific, although narrowly localized, deep-sea communities are thus maintained primarily by terrestrial rather than by solar energy. Reduced sulfur compounds appear to represent the major electron donors for aerobic microbial metabolism, but methane-, hydrogen-, iron-, and manganese-oxidizing bacteria have also been found. Methanogenic, sulfur-respiring, and extremely thermophilic isolates carry out anaerobic chemosynthesis. Bacteria grow most abundantly in the shallow crust where upwelling hot, reducing hydrothermal fluid mixes with downwelling cold, oxygenated seawater. The predominant production of biomass, however, is the result of symbiotic associations between chemolithotrophic bacteria and certain invertebrates, which have also been found as fossils in Cretaceous sulfide ores of ophiolite deposits.

  6. Diffuse flow from hydrothermal vents. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Trivett, D.A.

    1991-08-01

    The effluent from a collection of diffuse hydrothermal vents was modelled to determine the fate of the source of flow under typical environmental conditions at seafloor spreading centers. A laboratory simulation was conducted to test an analytic model of diffuse plume rise. The results showed that diffuse plumes are likely to remain near the seafloor, with their maximum rise height scaled with the diameter of the source of diffuse flow. The entrainment of ambient seawater into these plumes is limited by the proximity to the seafloor, thus slowing the rate of dilution. The model of diffuse plume behaviour was used to guide the design and implementation of a scheme for monitoring the flow from diffuse hydrothermal vents in the ocean. A deployment of an array at the Southern Juan de Fuca Ridge yielded measurements of a variety of diffuse plume properties, including total heat output. Two distinct sources of hydrothermal flow were detected during the field deployment. The larger source was 1-1.5km north of the instrument array, and its energy output was 450 + or - 270MW. A smaller source was located 100m east of one instrument in the array. The energy output of the source was 12 + or - 8MW. The rise heights of the centerlines of these plumes were 45m and 10m, respectively.

  7. Geomicrobiology of deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Jannasch, H W; Mottl, M J

    1985-08-23

    During the cycling of seawater through the earth's crust along the mid-ocean ridge system, geothermal energy is transferred into chemical energy in the form of reduced inorganic compounds. These compounds are derived from the reaction of seawater with crustal rocks at high temperatures and are emitted from warm (vents at depths of 2000 to 3000 meters. Chemolithotrophic bacteria use these reduced chemical species as sources of energy for the reduction of carbon dioxide (assimilation) to organic carbon. These bacteria form the base of the food chain, which permits copious populations of certain specifically adapted invertebrates to grow in the immediate vicinity of the vents. Such highly prolific, although narrowly localized, deep-sea communities are thus maintained primarily by terrestrial rather than by solar energy. Reduced sulfur compounds appear to represent the major electron donors for aerobic microbial metabolism, but methane-, hydrogen-, iron-, and manganese-oxidizing bacteria have also been found. Methanogenic, sulfur-respiring, and extremely thermophilic isolates carry out anaerobic chemosynthesis. Bacteria grow most abundantly in the shallow crust where upwelling hot, reducing hydrothermal fluid mixes with downwelling cold, oxygenated seawater. The predominant production of biomass, however, is the result of symbiotic associations between chemolithotrophic bacteria and certain invertebrates, which have also been found as fossils in Cretaceous sulfide ores of ophiolite deposits.

  8. MAVEN Contamination Venting and Outgassing Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Elaine M.; Hughes, David W.; Secunda, Mark S.; Chen, Philip T.; Morrissey, James R.; Riegle, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) is the first mission to focus its study on the Mars upper atmosphere. MAVEN will study the evolution of the Mars atmosphere and climate, by examining the conduit through which the atmosphere has to pass as it is lost to the upper atmosphere. An analysis was performed for the MAVEN mission to address two distinct concerns. The first goal of the analysis was to perform an outgassing study to determine where species outgassed from spacecraft materials would redistribute to and how much of the released material might accumulate on sensitive surfaces. The second portion of the analysis serves to predict what effect, if any, Mars atmospheric gases trapped within the spacecraft could have on instrument measurements when re-released through vents. The re-release of atmospheric gases is of interest to this mission because vented gases from a higher pressure spacecraft interior could bias instrument measurements of the Mars atmosphere depending on the flow rates and directions.

  9. Conceptual design of soil venting systems

    SciTech Connect

    DePaoli, D.W.; Wilson, J.H.; Thomas, C.O.

    1996-05-01

    A method for economically based conceptual design of soil venting systems is described. The objective of this method is to provide a means of estimating the cost and schedule of site cleanup for the purposes of technology selection and for focusing detailed system design. Idealized treatments of contaminant volatilization and flow of gas in the soil are employed to obtain estimates of transient off-gas concentration and the vacuum required at the extraction vents for a given set of site and system design conditions. Capital and operating costs of blowers and emissions control devices are estimated using standard techniques, allowing comparison of the required processing cost for cleanup under various design strategies. The utility of this technique is illustrated for an example case of a 95,000-L (25,000-gal) JP-4 jet fuel spill. The results for this test case indicate that emissions control predictably increases cleanup cost, with carbon adsorption being more costly than catalytic oxidation. This treatment predicts that an optimum flow rate and system size exist for each design strategy at a particular site.

  10. New insights into hydrothermal vent processes in the unique shallow-submarine arc-volcano, Kolumbo (Santorini), Greece

    PubMed Central

    Kilias, Stephanos P.; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N.; Godelitsas, Athanasios; Argyraki, Ariadne; Carey, Steven; Gamaletsos, Platon; Mertzimekis, Theo J.; Stathopoulou, Eleni; Goettlicher, Joerg; Steininger, Ralph; Betzelou, Konstantina; Livanos, Isidoros; Christakis, Christos; Bell, Katherine Croff; Scoullos, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We report on integrated geomorphological, mineralogical, geochemical and biological investigations of the hydrothermal vent field located on the floor of the density-stratified acidic (pH ~ 5) crater of the Kolumbo shallow-submarine arc-volcano, near Santorini. Kolumbo features rare geodynamic setting at convergent boundaries, where arc-volcanism and seafloor hydrothermal activity are occurring in thinned continental crust. Special focus is given to unique enrichments of polymetallic spires in Sb and Tl (±Hg, As, Au, Ag, Zn) indicating a new hybrid seafloor analogue of epithermal-to-volcanic-hosted-massive-sulphide deposits. Iron microbial-mat analyses reveal dominating ferrihydrite-type phases, and high-proportion of microbial sequences akin to "Nitrosopumilus maritimus", a mesophilic Thaumarchaeota strain capable of chemoautotrophic growth on hydrothermal ammonia and CO2. Our findings highlight that acidic shallow-submarine hydrothermal vents nourish marine ecosystems in which nitrifying Archaea are important and suggest ferrihydrite-type Fe3+-(hydrated)-oxyhydroxides in associated low-temperature iron mats are formed by anaerobic Fe2+-oxidation, dependent on microbially produced nitrate. PMID:23939372

  11. New insights into hydrothermal vent processes in the unique shallow-submarine arc-volcano, Kolumbo (Santorini), Greece.

    PubMed

    Kilias, Stephanos P; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Godelitsas, Athanasios; Argyraki, Ariadne; Carey, Steven; Gamaletsos, Platon; Mertzimekis, Theo J; Stathopoulou, Eleni; Goettlicher, Joerg; Steininger, Ralph; Betzelou, Konstantina; Livanos, Isidoros; Christakis, Christos; Bell, Katherine Croff; Scoullos, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We report on integrated geomorphological, mineralogical, geochemical and biological investigations of the hydrothermal vent field located on the floor of the density-stratified acidic (pH ~ 5) crater of the Kolumbo shallow-submarine arc-volcano, near Santorini. Kolumbo features rare geodynamic setting at convergent boundaries, where arc-volcanism and seafloor hydrothermal activity are occurring in thinned continental crust. Special focus is given to unique enrichments of polymetallic spires in Sb and Tl (±Hg, As, Au, Ag, Zn) indicating a new hybrid seafloor analogue of epithermal-to-volcanic-hosted-massive-sulphide deposits. Iron microbial-mat analyses reveal dominating ferrihydrite-type phases, and high-proportion of microbial sequences akin to "Nitrosopumilus maritimus", a mesophilic Thaumarchaeota strain capable of chemoautotrophic growth on hydrothermal ammonia and CO2. Our findings highlight that acidic shallow-submarine hydrothermal vents nourish marine ecosystems in which nitrifying Archaea are important and suggest ferrihydrite-type Fe(3+)-(hydrated)-oxyhydroxides in associated low-temperature iron mats are formed by anaerobic Fe(2+)-oxidation, dependent on microbially produced nitrate.

  12. New insights into hydrothermal vent processes in the unique shallow-submarine arc-volcano, Kolumbo (Santorini), Greece.

    PubMed

    Kilias, Stephanos P; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Godelitsas, Athanasios; Argyraki, Ariadne; Carey, Steven; Gamaletsos, Platon; Mertzimekis, Theo J; Stathopoulou, Eleni; Goettlicher, Joerg; Steininger, Ralph; Betzelou, Konstantina; Livanos, Isidoros; Christakis, Christos; Bell, Katherine Croff; Scoullos, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We report on integrated geomorphological, mineralogical, geochemical and biological investigations of the hydrothermal vent field located on the floor of the density-stratified acidic (pH ~ 5) crater of the Kolumbo shallow-submarine arc-volcano, near Santorini. Kolumbo features rare geodynamic setting at convergent boundaries, where arc-volcanism and seafloor hydrothermal activity are occurring in thinned continental crust. Special focus is given to unique enrichments of polymetallic spires in Sb and Tl (±Hg, As, Au, Ag, Zn) indicating a new hybrid seafloor analogue of epithermal-to-volcanic-hosted-massive-sulphide deposits. Iron microbial-mat analyses reveal dominating ferrihydrite-type phases, and high-proportion of microbial sequences akin to "Nitrosopumilus maritimus", a mesophilic Thaumarchaeota strain capable of chemoautotrophic growth on hydrothermal ammonia and CO2. Our findings highlight that acidic shallow-submarine hydrothermal vents nourish marine ecosystems in which nitrifying Archaea are important and suggest ferrihydrite-type Fe(3+)-(hydrated)-oxyhydroxides in associated low-temperature iron mats are formed by anaerobic Fe(2+)-oxidation, dependent on microbially produced nitrate. PMID:23939372

  13. Volcanics oil bearing in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Lukman, K.A.; Nyak, B.R.; Anditya, I.M. )

    1996-01-01

    The volcanic rock is seldom considered as good reservoir rocks. However, in Indonesia there is a volcanic layer called the Jatibarang Formation in Jatibarang Field, West Java, that has proven to be a producer of oil and gas of adequate amount. The lateral development of this rock extent along the whole of the basin, about 400 km over a Tertiary block-faulting system of the North West Java Basin. It is estimated that the volume of the spread is about 2360 km[sup 3]. Beside from the primary volcanic rock, the developing reservoir rock could also resulted from rework of massive volcanics or agglomerate, and other volcanic product resedimented as clastic deposits. The hydrocarbon is sourced from the younger Talang Aker Formation that is in direct contact with the reservoir rock. It migrated through the faults. Present cumulative production has reached 1.2 BBC and 2.7 TCFG, while speculative reserve is estimated at 4.0 BBO and 3 TCFG. Regionally, the volcanic rock of the Jatibarang Formation where the hydrocarbon is found is the result of eruptions along the magmatic trend during Late Cretaceous. In North West Java Basin, the trapping system includes both the structural and stratigraphic traps. Reservoir analysis yields pororsity values of around 16-25% and permeability of around 10 Darcies. It is concluded that there are good opportunities still left for hydrocarbon exploration in volcanic rocks. The study is discussed in detail, supported by data from cores and laboratories.

  14. Volcanics oil bearing in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Lukman, K.A.; Nyak, B.R.; Anditya, I.M.

    1996-12-31

    The volcanic rock is seldom considered as good reservoir rocks. However, in Indonesia there is a volcanic layer called the Jatibarang Formation in Jatibarang Field, West Java, that has proven to be a producer of oil and gas of adequate amount. The lateral development of this rock extent along the whole of the basin, about 400 km over a Tertiary block-faulting system of the North West Java Basin. It is estimated that the volume of the spread is about 2360 km{sup 3}. Beside from the primary volcanic rock, the developing reservoir rock could also resulted from rework of massive volcanics or agglomerate, and other volcanic product resedimented as clastic deposits. The hydrocarbon is sourced from the younger Talang Aker Formation that is in direct contact with the reservoir rock. It migrated through the faults. Present cumulative production has reached 1.2 BBC and 2.7 TCFG, while speculative reserve is estimated at 4.0 BBO and 3 TCFG. Regionally, the volcanic rock of the Jatibarang Formation where the hydrocarbon is found is the result of eruptions along the magmatic trend during Late Cretaceous. In North West Java Basin, the trapping system includes both the structural and stratigraphic traps. Reservoir analysis yields pororsity values of around 16-25% and permeability of around 10 Darcies. It is concluded that there are good opportunities still left for hydrocarbon exploration in volcanic rocks. The study is discussed in detail, supported by data from cores and laboratories.

  15. Characterization of fine volcanic ash from explosive eruption from Sakurajima volcano, South Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanayama, F.; Furukawa, R.; Ishizuka, Y.; Yamamoto, T.; Geshi, N.; Oishi, M.

    2013-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions can affect infrastructure and ecosystem by their dispersion of the volcanic particle. Characterization of volcanic particle expelled by explosive eruption is crucial for evaluating for quantitative hazard assessment by future volcanic eruption. Especially for fine volcanic ash less than 64 micron in diameter, it can disperse vast area from the source volcano and be easily remobilized by surface wind and precipitation after the deposition. As fine volcanic ash is not preserved well at the earth surface and in strata except for enormously large scale volcanic eruption. In order to quantify quantitative characteristics of fine volcanic ash particle, we sampled volcanic ash directly falling from the eruption cloud from Showa crater, the most active vent of Sakurajima volcano, just before landing on ground. We newly adopted high precision digital microscope and particle grain size analyzer to develop hazard evaluation method of fine volcanic ash particle. Field survey was performed 5 sequential days in January, 2013 to take tamper-proof volcanic ash samples directly obtained from the eruption cloud of the Sakurajima volcano using disposable paper dishes and plastic pails. Samples were taken twice a day with time-stamp in 40 localities from 2.5 km to 43 km distant from the volcano. Japan Meteorological Agency reported 16 explosive eruptions of vulcanian style occurred during our survey and we took 140 samples of volcanic ash. Grain size distribution of volcanic ash was measured by particle grain size analyzer (Mophologi G3S) detecting each grain with parameters of particle diameter (0.3 micron - 1 mm), perimeter, length, area, circularity, convexity, solidity, and intensity. Component of volcanic ash was analyzed by CCD optical microscope (VHX-2000) which can take high resolution optical image with magnifying power of 100-2500. We discriminated each volcanic ash particle by color, texture of surface, and internal structure. Grain size

  16. 46 CFR 38.20-1 - Venting-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Venting-T/ALL. 38.20-1 Section 38.20-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS LIQUEFIED FLAMMABLE GASES Venting and Ventilation § 38.20-1 Venting—T/ALL. (a) Each safety relief valve installed on a cargo tank shall be connected to...

  17. 46 CFR 38.20-5 - Venting-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Venting-T/ALL. 38.20-5 Section 38.20-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS LIQUEFIED FLAMMABLE GASES Venting and Ventilation § 38.20-5 Venting—T/ALL. (a) Safety relief valves on cargo tanks in barges may be connected...

  18. 40 CFR 264.1032 - Standards: Process vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Air Emission Standards for Process Vents § 264.1032 Standards: Process vents. (a) The owner or... evaporation, solvent extraction, or air or steam stripping operations managing hazardous wastes with...

  19. 40 CFR 264.1032 - Standards: Process vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Air Emission Standards for Process Vents § 264.1032 Standards: Process vents. (a) The owner or... evaporation, solvent extraction, or air or steam stripping operations managing hazardous wastes with...

  20. 40 CFR 264.1032 - Standards: Process vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Air Emission Standards for Process Vents § 264.1032 Standards: Process vents. (a) The owner or... evaporation, solvent extraction, or air or steam stripping operations managing hazardous wastes with...