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Sample records for alignment angle error

  1. Littrow angle method to remove alignment errors in grating pulse compressors.

    PubMed

    Guardalben, M J

    2008-09-20

    An alignment method for pulse-compression gratings that obviates the need to place the gratings at normal incidence to remove grating-tip error is proposed. Grating-tip and groove-orientation errors are removed using two alignment wavelengths in a manner analogous to a laser-beam pointing and centering procedure entirely at the respective Littrow angles for the two wavelengths. By choosing wavelengths with Littrow angles close to the use angle of the grating, the residual tip and groove-orientation errors that may be introduced when the grating mount is tilted to its use angle are reduced. This method has greatly facilitated the alignment of the OMEGA Extended Performance (EP) large-aperture pulse compressors, thereby reducing residual pulse-front tilt caused by nonparallel gratings. OMEGA EP is a high-energy, petawatt-class laser at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. A numerical simulation of the alignment procedure is presented. PMID:18806858

  2. Littrow Angle Method to Remove Alignment Errors in Grating Pulse Compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Guardalben, M.J.

    2008-09-16

    An alignment method for pulse-compression gratings that obviates the need to place the gratings at normal incidence to remove grating-tip error is proposed. Grating-tip and groove-orientation errors are removed using two alignment wavelengths in a manner analogous to a laser-beam pointing and centering procedure entirely at the respective Littrow angles for the two wavelengths. By choosing wavelengths with Littrow angles close to the use angle of the grating, the residual tip and groove-orientation errors that may be introduced when the grating mount is tilted to its use angle are reduced. This method has greatly facilitated the alignment of the OMEGA Extended Performance (EP) large-aperture pulse compressors, thereby reducing residual pulse-front tilt caused by nonparallel gratings. OMEGA EP is a highenergy, petawatt-class laser at the University of Rochester’s Laboratory for Laser Energetics. A numerical simulation of the alignment procedure is presented.

  3. Littrow angle method to remove alignment errors in grating pulse compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Guardalben, M. J

    2008-09-20

    An alignment method for pulse-compression gratings that obviates the need to place the gratings at normal incidence to remove grating-tip error is proposed. Grating-tip and groove-orientation errors are removed using two alignment wavelengths in a manner analogous to a laser-beam pointing and centering procedure entirely at the respective Littrow angles for the two wavelengths. By choosing wavelengths with Littrow angles close to the use angle of the grating, the residual tip and groove-orientation errors that may be introduced when the grating mount is tilted to its use angle are reduced. This method has greatly facilitated the alignment of the OMEGA Extended Performance (EP) large-aperture pulse compressors, thereby reducing residual pulse-front tilt caused by nonparallel gratings. OMEGA EP is a high-energy, petawatt-class laser at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. A numerical simulation of the alignment procedure is presented.

  4. Compensation method for the alignment angle error in pitch deviation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yongsheng; Fang, Suping; Wang, Huiyi; Taguchi, Tetsuya; Takeda, Ryohei

    2016-05-01

    When measuring the tooth flank of an involute helical gear by gear measuring center (GMC), the alignment angle error of a gear axis, which was caused by the assembly error and manufacturing error of the GMC, will affect the measurement accuracy of pitch deviation of the gear tooth flank. Based on the model of the involute helical gear and the tooth flank measurement theory, a method is proposed to compensate the alignment angle error that is included in the measurement results of pitch deviation, without changing the initial measurement method of the GMC. Simulation experiments are done to verify the compensation method and the results show that after compensation, the alignment angle error of the gear axis included in measurement results of pitch deviation declines significantly, more than 90% of the alignment angle errors are compensated, and the residual alignment angle errors in pitch deviation measurement results are less than 0.1 μm. It shows that the proposed method can improve the measurement accuracy of the GMC when measuring the pitch deviation of involute helical gear.

  5. Orbit IMU alignment: Error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive accuracy analysis of orbit inertial measurement unit (IMU) alignments using the shuttle star trackers was completed and the results are presented. Monte Carlo techniques were used in a computer simulation of the IMU alignment hardware and software systems to: (1) determine the expected Space Transportation System 1 Flight (STS-1) manual mode IMU alignment accuracy; (2) investigate the accuracy of alignments in later shuttle flights when the automatic mode of star acquisition may be used; and (3) verify that an analytical model previously used for estimating the alignment error is a valid model. The analysis results do not differ significantly from expectations. The standard deviation in the IMU alignment error for STS-1 alignments was determined to the 68 arc seconds per axis. This corresponds to a 99.7% probability that the magnitude of the total alignment error is less than 258 arc seconds.

  6. Onorbit IMU alignment error budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The Star Tracker, Crew Optical Alignment Sight (COAS), and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) from a complex navigation system with a multitude of error sources were combined. A complete list of the system errors is presented. The errors were combined in a rational way to yield an estimate of the IMU alignment accuracy for STS-1. The expected standard deviation in the IMU alignment error for STS-1 type alignments was determined to be 72 arc seconds per axis for star tracker alignments and 188 arc seconds per axis for COAS alignments. These estimates are based on current knowledge of the star tracker, COAS, IMU, and navigation base error specifications, and were partially verified by preliminary Monte Carlo analysis.

  7. Angle interferometer cross axis errors

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, J.B.; Carter, D.L.; Thompson, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    Angle interferometers are commonly used to measure surface plate flatness. An error can exist when the centerline of the double comer cube mirror assembly is not square to the surface plate and the guide bar for the mirror sled is curved. Typical errors can be one to two microns per meter. A similar error can exist in the calibration of rotary tables when the centerline of the double comer cube mirror assembly is not square to the axes of rotation of the angle calibrator and the calibrator axis is not parallel to the rotary table axis. Commercial double comer cube assemblies typically have non-parallelism errors of ten milli-radians between their centerlines and their sides and similar values for non-squareness between their centerlines and end surfaces. The authors have developed a simple method for measuring these errors and correcting them by remachining the reference surfaces.

  8. Shuttle orbit IMU alignment. Single-precision computation error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    The source of computational error in the inertial measurement unit (IMU) onorbit alignment software was investigated. Simulation runs were made on the IBM 360/70 computer with the IMU orbit alignment software coded in hal/s. The results indicate that for small IMU misalignment angles (less than 600 arc seconds), single precision computations in combination with the arc cosine method of eigen rotation angle extraction introduces an additional misalignment error of up to 230 arc seconds per axis. Use of the arc sine method, however, produced negligible misalignment error. As a result of this study, the arc sine method was recommended for use in the IMU onorbit alignment software.

  9. PROCESSING AND ANALYSIS OF THE MEASURED ALIGNMENT ERRORS FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    PILAT,F.; HEMMER,M.; PTITSIN,V.; TEPIKIAN,S.; TRBOJEVIC,D.

    1999-03-29

    All elements of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) have been installed in ideal survey locations, which are defined as the optimum locations of the fiducials with respect to the positions generated by the design. The alignment process included the presurvey of all elements which could affect the beams. During this procedure a special attention was paid to the precise determination of the quadrupole centers as well as the roll angles of the quadrupoles and dipoles. After installation the machine has been surveyed and the resulting as-built measured position of the fiducials have been stored and structured in the survey database. We describe how the alignment errors, inferred by comparison of ideal and as-built data, have been processed and analyzed by including them in the RHIC modeling software. The RHIC model, which also includes individual measured errors for all magnets in the machine and is automatically generated from databases, allows the study of the impact of the measured alignment errors on the machine.

  10. AXAF Alignment Test System Autocollimating Flat Error Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Timothy S.

    1995-01-01

    The alignment test system for the advanced x ray astrophysics facility (AXAF) high-resolution mirror assembly (HRMA) determines the misalignment of the HRMA by measuring the displacement of a beam of light reflected by the HRMA mirrors and an autocollimating flat (ACF). This report shows how to calibrate the system to compensate for errors introduced by the ACF, using measurements taken with the ACF in different positions. It also shows what information can be obtained from alignment test data regarding errors in the shapes of the HRMA mirrors. Simulated results based on measured ACF surface data are presented.

  11. Alignment error analysis of the snapshot imaging polarimeter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Yang, Wei-Feng; Ye, Qing-Hao; Hong, Jin; Gong, Guan-Yuan; Zheng, Xiao-Bing

    2016-03-10

    A snapshot imaging polarimeter (SIP) system is able to reconstruct two-dimensional spatial polarization information through a single interferogram. In this system, the alignment errors of the half-wave plate (HWP) and the analyzer have a predominant impact on the accuracies of reconstructed complete Stokes parameters. A theoretical model for analyzing the alignment errors in the SIP system is presented in this paper. Based on this model, the accuracy of the reconstructed Stokes parameters has been evaluated by using different incident states of polarization. An optimum thickness of the Savart plate for alleviating the perturbation introduced by the alignment error of the HWP is found by using the condition number of the system measurement matrix as an objective function in a minimization procedure. The result shows that when the thickness of a Savart plate is 23 mm, corresponding to the condition number 2.06, the precision of the SIP system can reach to 0.21% at 1° alignment tolerance of the HWP. PMID:26974785

  12. Initial Alignment of Large Azimuth Misalignment Angles in SINS Based on Adaptive UPF

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jin; Xu, Xiao-Su; Liu, Yi-Ting; Zhang, Tao; Li, Yao

    2015-01-01

    The case of large azimuth misalignment angles in a strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) is analyzed, and a method of using the adaptive UPF for the initial alignment is proposed. The filter is based on the idea of a strong tracking filter; through the introduction of the attenuation memory factor to effectively enhance the corrections of the current information residual error on the system, it reduces the influence on the system due to the system simplification, and the uncertainty of noise statistical properties to a certain extent; meanwhile, the UPF particle degradation phenomenon is better overcome. Finally, two kinds of non-linear filters, UPF and adaptive UPF, are adopted in the initial alignment of large azimuth misalignment angles in SINS, and the filtering effects of the two kinds of nonlinear filter on the initial alignment were compared by simulation and turntable experiments. The simulation and turntable experiment results show that the speed and precision of the initial alignment using adaptive UPF for a large azimuth misalignment angle in SINS under the circumstance that the statistical properties of the system noise are certain or not have been improved to some extent. PMID:26334277

  13. Initial Alignment of Large Azimuth Misalignment Angles in SINS Based on Adaptive UPF.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin; Xu, Xiao-Su; Liu, Yi-Ting; Zhang, Tao; Li, Yao

    2015-01-01

    The case of large azimuth misalignment angles in a strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) is analyzed, and a method of using the adaptive UPF for the initial alignment is proposed. The filter is based on the idea of a strong tracking filter; through the introduction of the attenuation memory factor to effectively enhance the corrections of the current information residual error on the system, it reduces the influence on the system due to the system simplification, and the uncertainty of noise statistical properties to a certain extent; meanwhile, the UPF particle degradation phenomenon is better overcome. Finally, two kinds of non-linear filters, UPF and adaptive UPF, are adopted in the initial alignment of large azimuth misalignment angles in SINS, and the filtering effects of the two kinds of nonlinear filter on the initial alignment were compared by simulation and turntable experiments. The simulation and turntable experiment results show that the speed and precision of the initial alignment using adaptive UPF for a large azimuth misalignment angle in SINS under the circumstance that the statistical properties of the system noise are certain or not have been improved to some extent. PMID:26334277

  14. Ultrasonic anemometer angle of attack errors under turbulent conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, T.

    2009-12-01

    Measurements of eddy fluxes are premised on the assumption that wind speeds are measured accurately by an ultrasonic anemometer. Recently, ultrasonic anemometers have been shown to suffer errors depending on the angle of attack, which is the angle between the wind vector and the horizontal. The correction of these errors resulted in general increases in eddy fluxes. However, since the check of the angle of attack dependent error was carried out in the wind tunnel experiment, which would be under the condition of nearly laminar flow, the applicability of this correction to the field data under turbulent conditions has been questioned. In this study, angle of attack dependencies of wind speeds measured by Gill Windmaster ultrasonic anemometers were assessed by field experiment over meadow, considered to be turbulent conditions. By using five identical anemometers, two pairs of systems were prepared: two anemometers for references and one between them for tilt. The dependencies of (co)sine responses of anemometers on angles of attack of 0 to -90 degrees in 10-degree steps and 45 degrees were checked, and clarified that the angle of attack dependent errors occur also under turbulent conditions, with results similar to the wind tunnel experiments. Sine responses of vertical wind speeds depended not only on vertical angle of attack but also on horizontal wind direction, which had not been considered in previous studies. For more robust correction, alternative calibration functions were obtained empirically so as to reasonably explain our field experimental results. Applying this new correction, eddy fluxes increased substantially even over meadow, which is somewhat aerodynamically smooth compared with forests or agricultural fields.

  15. Mitigation of Angle Tracking Errors Due to Color Dependent Centroid Shifts in SIM-Lite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemati, Bijan; An, Xin; Goullioud, Renaud; Shao, Michael; Shen, Tsae-Pyng; Wehmeier, Udo J.; Weilert, Mark A.; Wang, Xu; Werne, Thomas A.; Wu, Janet P.; Zhai, Chengxing

    2010-01-01

    The SIM-Lite astrometric interferometer will search for Earth-size planets in the habitable zones of nearby stars. In this search the interferometer will monitor the astrometric position of candidate stars relative to nearby reference stars over the course of a 5 year mission. The elemental measurement is the angle between a target star and a reference star. This is a two-step process, in which the interferometer will each time need to use its controllable optics to align the starlight in the two arms with each other and with the metrology beams. The sensor for this alignment is an angle tracking CCD camera. Various constraints in the design of the camera subject it to systematic alignment errors when observing a star of one spectrum compared with a start of a different spectrum. This effect is called a Color Dependent Centroid Shift (CDCS) and has been studied extensively with SIM-Lite's SCDU testbed. Here we describe results from the simulation and testing of this error in the SCDU testbed, as well as effective ways that it can be reduced to acceptable levels.

  16. Starlight emergence angle error analysis of star simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Guo-yu

    2015-10-01

    With continuous development of the key technologies of star sensor, the precision of star simulator have been to be further improved, for it directly affects the accuracy of star sensor laboratory calibration. For improving the accuracy level of the star simulator, a theoretical accuracy analysis model need to be proposed. According the ideal imaging model of star simulator, the theoretical accuracy analysis model can be established. Based on theoretically analyzing the theoretical accuracy analysis model we can get that the starlight emergent angle deviation is primarily affected by star position deviation, main point position deviation, focal length deviation, distortion deviation and object plane tilt deviation. Based on the above affecting factors, a comprehensive deviation model can be established. According to the model, the formula of each factors deviation model separately and the comprehensive deviation model can be summarized and concluded out. By analyzing the properties of each factors deviation model and the comprehensive deviation model formula, concluding the characteristics of each factors respectively and the weight relationship among them. According the result of analysis of the comprehensive deviation model, a reasonable designing indexes can be given by considering the star simulator optical system requirements and the precision of machining and adjustment. So, starlight emergence angle error analysis of star simulator is very significant to guide the direction of determining and demonstrating the index of star simulator, analyzing and compensating the error of star simulator for improving the accuracy of star simulator and establishing a theoretical basis for further improving the starlight angle precision of the star simulator can effectively solve the problem.

  17. Magnetic prism alignment system for measuring large-angle strabismus.

    PubMed

    Bishop, John Edward

    2014-02-01

    Prismatic measurement of large-angle strabismus requires the simultaneous use of two or more prisms for neutralization. To facilitate the clinical measurement of large-angle strabismus a new prism system was designed utilizing a flat plate and a ferrous metal surface coupled with prisms containing rare earth magnets implanted in their base and bottom surfaces. PMID:24569000

  18. Magnetic prism alignment system for measuring large-angle strabismus.

    PubMed

    Bishop, John Edward

    2014-02-01

    Prismatic measurement of large-angle strabismus requires the simultaneous use of two or more prisms for neutralization. To facilitate the clinical measurement of large-angle strabismus a new prism system was designed utilizing a flat plate and a ferrous metal surface coupled with prisms containing rare earth magnets implanted in their base and bottom surfaces.

  19. Influence of alignment errors on contact pressure during straight bevel gear meshing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xinghui; Hua, Lin; Deng, Song; Luo, Qiuping

    2015-11-01

    Straight bevel gears are widely applied in automotive, aerospace, chemical and many other fields as one of the most common type of gears. Currently, the researches on straight bevel gears have focused on the fields of fatigue, wear, noise and vibration, while little attention is paid to the effect of multiple alignment errors on the gear tooth wear. To study the influence of alignment errors on the gear tooth wear, a simulated model of a straight bevel gear pair is established. Then, the contact pressure on the tooth surface is analyzed under the various alignment errors according to the Archard wear relationship. The main combinations of alignment errors played vital roles on the tooth wear are investigated. The result shows that under the single alignment error, the contact pressure moves to the tooth heel and increases greatly at here when Δ P=0.1 or Δ G=0.1; when Δ E=-0.03, the contact pressure greatly increases at the tooth heel, but it obviously increases at the tooth toe when Δ E=0.03; the alignment error Δ γ=1 has little effect on the contact pressure on the tooth surface. Moreover, the combination of Δ P, Δ G, Δ E<0 and Δ γ is the most dangerous type among the multiple alignment errors. This research provides valuable guidelines for predicting the tooth wear under various alignment errors.

  20. Fuzzy adaptive strong tracking scaled unscented Kalman filter for initial alignment of large misalignment angles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Song, Ningfang; Yang, Gongliu; Jiang, Rui

    2016-07-01

    In the initial alignment process of strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS), large misalignment angles always bring nonlinear problem, which can usually be processed using the scaled unscented Kalman filter (SUKF). In this paper, the problem of large misalignment angles in SINS alignment is further investigated, and the strong tracking scaled unscented Kalman filter (STSUKF) is proposed with fixed parameters to improve convergence speed, while these parameters are artificially constructed and uncertain in real application. To further improve the alignment stability and reduce the parameters selection, this paper proposes a fuzzy adaptive strategy combined with STSUKF (FUZZY-STSUKF). As a result, initial alignment scheme of large misalignment angles based on FUZZY-STSUKF is designed and verified by simulations and turntable experiment. The results show that the scheme improves the accuracy and convergence speed of SINS initial alignment compared with those based on SUKF and STSUKF. PMID:27475606

  1. Fuzzy adaptive strong tracking scaled unscented Kalman filter for initial alignment of large misalignment angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Song, Ningfang; Yang, Gongliu; Jiang, Rui

    2016-07-01

    In the initial alignment process of strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS), large misalignment angles always bring nonlinear problem, which can usually be processed using the scaled unscented Kalman filter (SUKF). In this paper, the problem of large misalignment angles in SINS alignment is further investigated, and the strong tracking scaled unscented Kalman filter (STSUKF) is proposed with fixed parameters to improve convergence speed, while these parameters are artificially constructed and uncertain in real application. To further improve the alignment stability and reduce the parameters selection, this paper proposes a fuzzy adaptive strategy combined with STSUKF (FUZZY-STSUKF). As a result, initial alignment scheme of large misalignment angles based on FUZZY-STSUKF is designed and verified by simulations and turntable experiment. The results show that the scheme improves the accuracy and convergence speed of SINS initial alignment compared with those based on SUKF and STSUKF.

  2. Fuzzy adaptive strong tracking scaled unscented Kalman filter for initial alignment of large misalignment angles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Song, Ningfang; Yang, Gongliu; Jiang, Rui

    2016-07-01

    In the initial alignment process of strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS), large misalignment angles always bring nonlinear problem, which can usually be processed using the scaled unscented Kalman filter (SUKF). In this paper, the problem of large misalignment angles in SINS alignment is further investigated, and the strong tracking scaled unscented Kalman filter (STSUKF) is proposed with fixed parameters to improve convergence speed, while these parameters are artificially constructed and uncertain in real application. To further improve the alignment stability and reduce the parameters selection, this paper proposes a fuzzy adaptive strategy combined with STSUKF (FUZZY-STSUKF). As a result, initial alignment scheme of large misalignment angles based on FUZZY-STSUKF is designed and verified by simulations and turntable experiment. The results show that the scheme improves the accuracy and convergence speed of SINS initial alignment compared with those based on SUKF and STSUKF.

  3. Contact-angle measurements as a means of probing the surface alignment characteristics of liquid crystal materials on photoalignment layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, K. L.; Didovets, O.; Saulnier, D.

    2014-10-01

    The exceptionally high 1054-nm laser-damage resistance of photoalignment materials (approaching that of fused silica) has made it possible to fabricate a wide variety of photoaligned liquid crystal (LC) devices for high-peak-power laser applications. Despite these advances, materials selection and photoalignment exposure conditions are still determined using costly and time-consuming "trial-and-error" methods. The contact angle of a fluid droplet on an alignment layer yields important information about LC-surface physicochemical interactions, and as such, it has potential as a rapid and convenient metric for optimizing photoaligned device quality. To this end, we report on efforts to correlate fluid contact angle with surface energy and azimuthal-anchoring energy to aid in the assessment of alignment quality in photoalignment materials systems.

  4. Cluster Position Angle Alignments in the CLASH Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Melissa; de Propris, Roberto; West, Michael

    2016-01-01

    There exists strong evidence for nearby brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) to exhibit preferential orientation with respect to their surroundings. Primarily, we see these bright member galaxies aligning themselves with the cluster's principal axis. We have examined the orientations of the 25 CLASH Survey galaxy clusters to see whether this tendency for BCGs to share the same major axis orientation as their host cluster extends to galaxy clusters at redshifts up to 0.9. We find evidence of preferential orientations existing in clusters at these redshifts. The significance of this finding for theories of the formation of clusters are discussed. Supported by NSF Grant #1358980 and the MA Space Grant Consortium.

  5. Angle-dependent radiative grain alignment. Confirmation of a magnetic field - radiation anisotropy angle dependence on the efficiency of interstellar grain alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, B.-G.; Pintado, O.; Potter, S. B.; Straižys, V.; Charcos-Llorens, M.

    2011-10-01

    Context. Interstellar grain alignment studies are currently experiencing a renaissance due to the development of a new quantitative theory based on radiative alignment torques (RAT). One of the distinguishing predictions of this theory is a dependence of the grain alignment efficiency on the relative angle (Ψ) between the magnetic field and the anisotropy direction of the radiation field. In an earlier study we found observational evidence for such an effect from observations of the polarization around the star HD 97300 in the Chamaeleon I cloud. However, due to the large uncertainties in the measured visual extinctions, the result was uncertain. Aims: By acquiring explicit spectral classification of the polarization targets, we have sought to perform a more precise reanalysis of the existing polarimetry data. Methods: We have obtained new spectral types for the stars in our for our polarization sample, which we combine with photometric data from the literature to derive accurate visual extinctions for our sample of background field stars. This allows a high accuracy test of the grain alignment efficiency as a function of Ψ. Results: We confirm and improve the measured accuracy of the variability of the grain alignment efficiency with Ψ, seen in the earlier study. We note that the grain temperature (heating) also shows a dependence on Ψ which we interpret as a natural effect of the projection of the grain surface to the illuminating radiation source. This dependence also allows us to derive an estimate of the fraction of aligned grains in the cloud.

  6. SU-E-T-195: Gantry Angle Dependency of MLC Leaf Position Error

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, S; Hong, C; Kim, M; Chung, K; Kim, J; Han, Y; Ahn, S; Chung, S; Shin, E; Shin, J; Kim, H; Kim, D; Choi, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the gantry angle dependency of the multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf position error. Methods: An automatic MLC quality assurance system (AutoMLCQA) was developed to evaluate the gantry angle dependency of the MLC leaf position error using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). To eliminate the EPID position error due to gantry rotation, we designed a reference maker (RM) that could be inserted into the wedge mount. After setting up the EPID, a reference image was taken of the RM using an open field. Next, an EPID-based picket-fence test (PFT) was performed without the RM. These procedures were repeated at every 45° intervals of the gantry angle. A total of eight reference images and PFT image sets were analyzed using in-house software. The average MLC leaf position error was calculated at five pickets (-10, -5, 0, 5, and 10 cm) in accordance with general PFT guidelines using in-house software. This test was carried out for four linear accelerators. Results: The average MLC leaf position errors were within the set criterion of <1 mm (actual errors ranged from -0.7 to 0.8 mm) for all gantry angles, but significant gantry angle dependency was observed in all machines. The error was smaller at a gantry angle of 0° but increased toward the positive direction with gantry angle increments in the clockwise direction. The error reached a maximum value at a gantry angle of 90° and then gradually decreased until 180°. In the counter-clockwise rotation of the gantry, the same pattern of error was observed but the error increased in the negative direction. Conclusion: The AutoMLCQA system was useful to evaluate the MLC leaf position error for various gantry angles without the EPID position error. The Gantry angle dependency should be considered during MLC leaf position error analysis.

  7. Liquid crystal pretilt angle control using adjustable wetting properties of alignment layers

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Han Jin; Kim, Jong Bok; Kim, Kyung Chan; Hwang, Byoung Har; Kim, Jong Tae; Baik, Hong Koo; Park, Jin Seol; Kang, Daeseung

    2007-06-18

    The authors demonstrate the production of amorphous fluorinated carbon (a-C:F) thin film with adjustable wetting properties, inducing variable liquid crystal (LC) pretilt angles. To control the surface wetting properties, they apply a dual radio frequency magnetron system with a controlled power ratio of targets. In this manner we obtain various compositional surfaces with fluorine and carbon components and adjust the surface energy with regard to the various compositions. Whereas the fluorine-rich a-C:F layer shows a preference for homeotropic (vertical) LC alignment, the carbon-rich a-C:F layer shows a planar LC alignment. To achieve uniform LC alignment with a proper pretilt angle, an accelerated Ar{sup +} ion beam irradiates the films after the deposition process. The ion beam selectively destroys the surface bonding of the a-C:F films, yielding an intermediate pretilt angle.

  8. Liquid crystal pretilt angle control using adjustable wetting properties of alignment layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Han Jin; Kim, Jong Bok; Kim, Kyung Chan; Hwang, Byoung Har; Kim, Jong Tae; Baik, Hong Koo; Park, Jin Seol; Kang, Daeseung

    2007-06-01

    The authors demonstrate the production of amorphous fluorinated carbon (a-C:F) thin film with adjustable wetting properties, inducing variable liquid crystal (LC) pretilt angles. To control the surface wetting properties, they apply a dual radio frequency magnetron system with a controlled power ratio of targets. In this manner we obtain various compositional surfaces with fluorine and carbon components and adjust the surface energy with regard to the various compositions. Whereas the fluorine-rich a-C :F layer shows a preference for homeotropic (vertical) LC alignment, the carbon-rich a-C :F layer shows a planar LC alignment. To achieve uniform LC alignment with a proper pretilt angle, an accelerated Ar+ ion beam irradiates the films after the deposition process. The ion beam selectively destroys the surface bonding of the a-C :F films, yielding an intermediate pretilt angle.

  9. Elevation angle alignment of quasi optical receiver mirrors of collective Thomson scattering diagnostic by sawtooth measurementsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseev, D.; Meo, F.; Korsholm, S. B.; Bindslev, H.; Furtula, V.; Kantor, M.; Leipold, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Nielsen, S. K.; Salewski, M.; Stejner, M.

    2012-10-01

    Localized measurements of the fast ion velocity distribution function and the plasma composition measurements are of significant interest for the fusion community. Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostics allow such measurements with spatial and temporal resolution. Localized measurements require a good alignment of the optical path in the transmission line. Monitoring the alignment during the experiment greatly benefits the confidence in the CTS measurements. An in situ technique for the assessment of the elevation angle alignment of the receiver is developed. Using the CTS diagnostic on TEXTOR without a source of probing radiation in discharges with sawtooth oscillations, an elevation angle misalignment of 0.9° was found with an accuracy of 0.25°.

  10. Anchoring energy enhancement and pretilt angle control of liquid crystal alignment on polymerized surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Libo; Liao, Pei-Chun; Lin, Chen-Chun; Ting, Tien-Lun; Hsu, Wen-Hao; Su, Jenn-Jia; Chien, Liang-Chy

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate enhanced surface anchoring energy and control of pretilt angle in a nematic liquid crystal cell with vertical alignment and polymerized surfaces (PS-VA). The polymerized surfaces are formed by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation-induced phase separation of a minute amount of a reactive monomer in the vertical-aligned nematic liquid crystal. By introducing a bias voltage during UV curing, surface-localized polymer protrusions with a dimension of 100nm and a field-induced pretilt angle are observed. Experimental evidences and theoretical analyses validate that PS-VA has increased surface anchoring strength by two folds and pretilt angle has been changed from 89° to 86° compared to those of a VA cell. The enabling PS-VA cell technique with excel electro-optical properties such as very good dark state, high optical contrast, and fast rise and decay times may lead to development of a wide range of applications.

  11. Anchoring energy enhancement and pretilt angle control of liquid crystal alignment on polymerized surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Libo; Chien, Liang-Chy; Liao, Pei-Chun; Lin, Chen-Chun; Ting, Tien-Lun; Hsu, Wen-Hao; Su, Jenn-Jia

    2015-09-15

    We demonstrate enhanced surface anchoring energy and control of pretilt angle in a nematic liquid crystal cell with vertical alignment and polymerized surfaces (PS-VA). The polymerized surfaces are formed by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation-induced phase separation of a minute amount of a reactive monomer in the vertical-aligned nematic liquid crystal. By introducing a bias voltage during UV curing, surface-localized polymer protrusions with a dimension of 100nm and a field-induced pretilt angle are observed. Experimental evidences and theoretical analyses validate that PS-VA has increased surface anchoring strength by two folds and pretilt angle has been changed from 89° to 86° compared to those of a VA cell. The enabling PS-VA cell technique with excel electro-optical properties such as very good dark state, high optical contrast, and fast rise and decay times may lead to development of a wide range of applications.

  12. Broadband wide-angle dispersion measurements: Instrumental setup, alignment, and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Farhang, A.; Abasahl, B.; Dutta-Gupta, S.; Lovera, A.; Martin, O. J. F.; Mandracci, P.; Descrovi, E.

    2013-03-15

    The construction, alignment, and performance of a setup for broadband wide-angle dispersion measurements, with emphasis on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements, are presented in comprehensive detail. In contrast with most SPR instruments working with a monochromatic source, this setup takes advantage of a broadband/white light source and has full capability for automated angle vs. wavelength dispersion measurements for any arbitrary nanostructure array. A cylindrical prism is used rather than a triangular one in order to mitigate refraction induced effects and allow for such measurements. Although seemingly simple, this instrument requires use of many non-trivial methods in order to achieve proper alignment over all angles of incidence. Here we describe the alignment procedure for such a setup, the pitfalls introduced from the finite beam width incident onto the cylindrical prism, and deviations in the reflected/transmitted beam resulting from the finite thickness of the sample substrate. We address every one of these issues and provide experimental evidences on the success of this instrument and the alignment procedure used.

  13. Large-scale spatial angle measurement and the pointing error analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wen-jian; Chen, Zhi-bin; Ma, Dong-xi; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xian-hong; Qin, Meng-ze

    2016-05-01

    A large-scale spatial angle measurement method is proposed based on inertial reference. Common measurement reference is established in inertial space, and the spatial vector coordinates of each measured axis in inertial space are measured by using autocollimation tracking and inertial measurement technology. According to the spatial coordinates of each test vector axis, the measurement of large-scale spatial angle is easily realized. The pointing error of tracking device based on the two mirrors in the measurement system is studied, and the influence of different installation errors to the pointing error is analyzed. This research can lay a foundation for error allocation, calibration and compensation for the measurement system.

  14. Calibration method of tilt and azimuth angles for alignment of TEM tomographic tilt series.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Misa; Terauchi, Shinya; Fujimoto, Toshiyuki

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes the calibration method of the tilt and azimuth angles of specimen using a digital protractor and a laser autocollimator for alignment of electron tomography. It also suggests an easy method to check whether the specimen is tilted by 180.0°, and whether the azimuth angle is 0.0°; the method involves the use of two images of a rod-shaped specimen collected before and after a 180.0° tilt. The method is based on the assumption that these images are symmetric about the tilt axis when the azimuth angle is 0.0°. In addition, we used an experiment to demonstrate the effect of the incorrect angles on reconstructed images and simulated the image quality against distance away from tilt axis.

  15. Calibration method of tilt and azimuth angles for alignment of TEM tomographic tilt series

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashida, Misa; Terauchi, Shinya; Fujimoto, Toshiyuki

    2011-10-15

    This paper describes the calibration method of the tilt and azimuth angles of specimen using a digital protractor and a laser autocollimator for alignment of electron tomography. It also suggests an easy method to check whether the specimen is tilted by 180.0 deg., and whether the azimuth angle is 0.0 deg.; the method involves the use of two images of a rod-shaped specimen collected before and after a 180.0 deg. The method is based on the assumption that these images are symmetric about the tilt axis when the azimuth angle is 0.0 deg. In addition, we used an experiment to demonstrate the effect of the incorrect angles on reconstructed images and simulated the image quality against distance away from tilt axis.

  16. New novel method for solving ASML alignment fail (model error) in color filter process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Fu-Tien; Hsiung, Chung-Sheng; Hsiao, Yu-Kung; Pang, Sheng-Liang; Lu, Kuo-Liang

    2001-04-01

    For better resolution and throughput concern on color filter process, we use ASML5500/100 for color filter production instead of 1X CANON, but it often suffered alignment fail (error code: model error) at the green layer. Some items have been studied: (1) pattern close to ASML PM mark; (2) level sensor issue (level sensor contamination, plate tilt, level lens contamination); (3) different process sequence; (4) open the clear-out window at passivation layer to reduce interference effect. All of these items are proved no obviously influence to induce model error. By checking the spectrum of the green photo-resist, we found that it is low transmittance at 633 nm1 (the wavelength that the ASML alignment laser uses). Raising the transmittance by reducing the thickness of green resist is proved useful to eliminate the occurrence of model error. On the other hand, the ATHENATM provided by ASML which use red and green lights for alignment will get rid of the alignment failure.

  17. Measurement error analysis of the 3D four-wheel aligner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Yang, Tianlong; Huang, Dongzhao; Ding, Xun

    2013-10-01

    Positioning parameters of four-wheel have significant effects on maneuverabilities, securities and energy saving abilities of automobiles. Aiming at this issue, the error factors of 3D four-wheel aligner, which exist in extracting image feature points, calibrating internal and exeternal parameters of cameras, calculating positional parameters and measuring target pose, are analyzed respectively based on the elaborations of structure and measurement principle of 3D four-wheel aligner, as well as toe-in and camber of four-wheel, kingpin inclination and caster, and other major positional parameters. After that, some technical solutions are proposed for reducing the above error factors, and on this basis, a new type of aligner is developed and marketed, it's highly estimated among customers because the technical indicators meet requirements well.

  18. Post-trial anatomical frame alignment procedure for comparison of 3D joint angle measurement from magnetic/inertial measurement units and camera-based systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingguo; Zhang, Jun-Tian

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic and inertial measurement units (MIMUs) have been widely used as an alternative to traditional camera-based motion capture systems for 3D joint kinematics measurement. Since these sensors do not directly measure position, a pre-trial anatomical calibration, either with the assistance of a special protocol/apparatus or with another motion capture system is required to establish the transformation matrices between the local sensor frame and the anatomical frame (AF) of each body segment on which the sensors are attached. Because the axes of AFs are often used as the rotational axes in the joint angle calculation, any difference in the AF determination will cause discrepancies in the calculated joint angles. Therefore, a direct comparison of joint angles between MIMU systems and camera-based systems is less meaningful because the calculated joint angles contain a systemic error due to the differences in the AF determination. To solve this problem a new post-trial AF alignment procedure is proposed. By correcting the AF misalignments, the joint angle differences caused by the difference in AF determination are eliminated and the remaining discrepancies are mainly from the measurement accuracy of the systems themselves. Lower limb joint angles from 30 walking trials were used to validate the effectiveness of the proposed AF alignment procedure. This technique could serve as a new means for calibrating magnetic/inertial sensor-based motion capture systems and correcting for AF misalignment in scenarios where joint angles are compared directly.

  19. Optical pupil relay design for SILEX - Optimising wavefront error and transmit/receive beams co-alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, Reginald P.

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes some of the key parameters that have been considered for the European Satellite Interorbital Link EXperiment (SILEX) optical relay lens design. Particular attention has been given to the specific requirement of transmit/receive beams co-alignment. The method of evaluating co-alignment errors is described and the effect of manufacturing tolerances and environmental long term stability on the co-alignment error investigated.

  20. Effect of MLC leaf position, collimator rotation angle, and gantry rotation angle errors on intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Sen; Li, Guangjun; Wang, Maojie; Jiang, Qinfeng; Zhang, Yingjie; Wei, Yuquan

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf position, collimator rotation angle, and accelerator gantry rotation angle errors on intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. To compare dosimetric differences between the simulating plans and the clinical plans with evaluation parameters, 6 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were selected for simulation of systematic and random MLC leaf position errors, collimator rotation angle errors, and accelerator gantry rotation angle errors. There was a high sensitivity to dose distribution for systematic MLC leaf position errors in response to field size. When the systematic MLC position errors were 0.5, 1, and 2 mm, respectively, the maximum values of the mean dose deviation, observed in parotid glands, were 4.63%, 8.69%, and 18.32%, respectively. The dosimetric effect was comparatively small for systematic MLC shift errors. For random MLC errors up to 2 mm and collimator and gantry rotation angle errors up to 0.5°, the dosimetric effect was negligible. We suggest that quality control be regularly conducted for MLC leaves, so as to ensure that systematic MLC leaf position errors are within 0.5 mm. Because the dosimetric effect of 0.5° collimator and gantry rotation angle errors is negligible, it can be concluded that setting a proper threshold for allowed errors of collimator and gantry rotation angle may increase treatment efficacy and reduce treatment time.

  1. Skin movement errors in measurement of sagittal lumbar and hip angles in young and elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yi-Liang; Tully, Elizabeth A; Galea, Mary P

    2008-02-01

    Errors in measurement of sagittal lumbar and hip angles due to skin movement on the pelvis and/or lateral thigh were measured in young (n = 21, age = 18.6 +/- 2.1 years) and older (n = 23, age = 70.9 +/- 6.4 years) age groups. Skin reference markers were attached over specific landmarks of healthy young and elderly subjects, who were videotaped in three static positions of hip flexion using the 2D PEAK Motus video analysis system. Sagittal lumbar and hip angles were calculated from skin reference markers and manually palpated landmarks. The elderly subjects demonstrated greater errors in lumbar angle due to skin movement on the pelvis only in the maximal hip flexion position. The traditional model (ASIS-PSIS-GT-LFE) underestimated sagittal hip angle and the revised model (ASIS-PSIS-2/3Th-1/4Th) provided more accurate measurement of sagittal hip angle throughout the full available range of hip flexion. Skin movement on the pelvis had a small counterbalancing effect on the larger errors from lateral thigh markers (GT-LFE), thereby decreasing hip angle error.

  2. Empirical Evaluation of Visual Fatigue from Display Alignment Errors Using Cerebral Hemodynamic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wiyor, Hanniebey D.; Ntuen, Celestine A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of stereoscopic display alignment errors on visual fatigue and prefrontal cortical tissue hemodynamic responses. We collected hemodynamic data and perceptual ratings of visual fatigue while participants performed visual display tasks on 8 ft × 6 ft NEC LT silver screen with NEC LT 245 DLP projectors. There was statistical significant difference between subjective measures of visual fatigue before air traffic control task (BATC) and after air traffic control task (ATC 3), (P < 0.05). Statistical significance was observed between left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex oxygenated hemoglobin (l DLPFC-HbO2), left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex deoxygenated hemoglobin (l DLPFC-Hbb), and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex deoxygenated hemoglobin (r DLPFC-Hbb) on stereoscopic alignment errors (P < 0.05). Thus, cortical tissue oxygenation requirement in the left hemisphere indicates that the effect of visual fatigue is more pronounced in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. PMID:27006917

  3. Step angles to reduce the north-finding error caused by rate random walk with fiber optic gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Xie, Jun; Yang, Chuanchuan; He, Changhong; Wang, Xinyue; Wang, Ziyu

    2015-10-20

    We study the relationship between the step angles and the accuracy of north finding with fiber optic gyroscopes. A north-finding method with optimized step angles is proposed to reduce the errors caused by rate random walk (RRW). Based on this method, the errors caused by both angle random walk and RRW are reduced by increasing the number of positions. For when the number of positions is even, we proposed a north-finding method with symmetric step angles that can reduce the error caused by RRW and is not affected by the azimuth angles. Experimental results show that, compared with the traditional north-finding method, the proposed methods with the optimized step angles and the symmetric step angles can reduce the north-finding errors by 67.5% and 62.5%, respectively. The method with symmetric step angles is not affected by the azimuth angles and can offer consistent high accuracy for any azimuth angles.

  4. A Technique for determining the director pretilt angle in cells with hybrid or homeotropic alignment of a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakulin, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    A new technique for determining the director pretilt angle in cells with hybrid or homeotropic alignment of a nematic liquid crystal has been developed. To use this technique, it is necessary to experimentally determine the transmission of an optical system in parallel polarizers and maximum transmission of a cell in crossed polarizers. The technique makes it possible to locally control the liquid crystal director alignment on an aligning surface.

  5. Dependences of ultrasonic properties on the propagation angle with respect to the trabecular alignment in trabecular bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kang Il

    2014-06-01

    The present study aims to investigate the dependences of ultrasonic properties on the propagation angle with respect to the trabecular alignment in 12 bovine femoral trabecular bone samples. The phase velocity and the attenuation coefficient of the fast wave measured at 0.5 MHz were found to decrease significantly with increasing angle and had their maximum values at 0°, i.e., for wave propagation in a direction parallel to the predominant trabecular alignment. The present study applied the angle-dependent Biot model by introducing anisotropy into the Biot model through the angle-dependent Young's, bulk, and shear moduli of the skeletal frame for trabecular bone to predict the measurements. Good agreement between the measurements and the prediction of the fast wave velocity suggests that the anisotropic fast wave velocity as a function of the propagation angle is mainly due to the variation in the elastic moduli of the skeletal frame with respect to the trabecular alignment.

  6. Spin-orbit angle distribution and the origin of (mis)aligned hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crida, A.; Batygin, K.

    2014-07-01

    Context. For 61 transiting hot Jupiters, the projection of the angle between the orbital plane and the stellar equator (called the spin-orbit angle) has been measured. For about half of them, a significant misalignment is detected, and retrograde planets have been observed. This challenges scenarios of the formation of hot Jupiters. Aims: In order to better constrain formation models, we relate the distribution of the real spin-orbit angle Ψ to the projected one β. Then, a comparison with the observations is relevant. Methods: We analyse the geometry of the problem to link analytically the projected angle β to the real spin-orbit angle Ψ. The distribution of Ψ expected in various models is taken from the literature, or derived with a simplified model and Monte Carlo simulations in the case of the disk-torquing mechanism. Results: An easy formula to compute the probability density function (PDF) of β knowing the PDF of Ψ is provided. All models tested here look compatible with the observed distribution beyond 40 degrees, which is so far poorly constrained by only 18 observations. But only the disk-torquing mechanism can account for the excess of aligned hot Jupiters, provided that the torquing is not always efficient. This is the case if the exciting binaries have semi-major axes as large as ~104 AU. Conclusions: Based on comparison with the set of observations available today, scattering models and the Kozai cycle with tidal friction models can not be solely responsible for the production of all hot Jupiters. Conversely, the presently observed distribution of the spin-orbit angles is compatible with most hot Jupiters having been transported by smooth migration inside a proto-planetary disk, itself possibly torqued by a companion.

  7. Flight Test Results of an Angle of Attack and Angle of Sideslip Calibration Method Using Output-Error Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siu, Marie-Michele; Martos, Borja; Foster, John V.

    2013-01-01

    As part of a joint partnership between the NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) and the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI), research on advanced air data calibration methods has been in progress. This research was initiated to expand a novel pitot-static calibration method that was developed to allow rapid in-flight calibration for the NASA Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) facility. This approach uses Global Positioning System (GPS) technology coupled with modern system identification methods that rapidly computes optimal pressure error models over a range of airspeed with defined confidence bounds. Subscale flight tests demonstrated small 2-s error bounds with significant reduction in test time compared to other methods. Recent UTSI full scale flight tests have shown airspeed calibrations with the same accuracy or better as the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) accepted GPS 'four-leg' method in a smaller test area and in less time. The current research was motivated by the desire to extend this method for inflight calibration of angle of attack (AOA) and angle of sideslip (AOS) flow vanes. An instrumented Piper Saratoga research aircraft from the UTSI was used to collect the flight test data and evaluate flight test maneuvers. Results showed that the output-error approach produces good results for flow vane calibration. In addition, maneuvers for pitot-static and flow vane calibration can be integrated to enable simultaneous and efficient testing of each system.

  8. Influence of both angle and position error of pentaprism on accuracy of pentaprism scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kun; Han, Sen; Zhang, Qiyuan; Wu, Quanying

    2014-11-01

    Pentaprism scanning system has been widely used in the measurement of large flat and wavefront, based on its property that the deviated beam will have no motion in the pitch direction. But the manufacturing and position errors of pentaprisms will bring error to the measurement and so a good error analysis method is indispensable. In this paper, we propose a new method of building mathematic models of pentaprism and through which the size and angle errors of a pentaprism can be put into the model as parameters. 4 size parameters are selected to determine the size and 11 angle parameters are selected to determine the angles of a pentaprism. Yaw, Roll and Pitch are used to describe the position error of a pentaprism and an autocollimator. A pentaprism scanning system of wavefront test is simulated by ray tracing using matlab. We design a method of separating the constant from the measurement results which will improve the measurement accuracy and analyze the system error by Monte Carlo method. This method is simple, rapid, accurate and convenient for computer programming.

  9. Multi-object Feature Detection and Error Correction for NIF Automatic Optical Alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Awwal, A S

    2006-07-17

    Fiducials imprinted on laser beams are used to perform video image based alignment of the beams in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In any laser beam alignment operation, a beam needs to be aligned to a reference location. Generally, the beam and reference fiducials are composed of separate beams, as a result only a single feature of each beam needs to be identified for determining the position of the beam or reference. However, it is possible to have the same beam image contain both the beam and reference fiducials. In such instances, it is essential to separately identify these features. In the absence of wavefront correction or when image quality is poor, the features of such beams may get distorted making it difficult to distinguish between different fiducials. Error checking and correction mechanism must be implemented to avoid misidentification of one type of feature as the other. This work presents the algorithm for multi-object detection and error correction implemented for such a beam line image in the NIF facility. Additionally, we show how when the original algorithm fails a secondary algorithm takes over and provides required location outputs.

  10. A measurement methodology for dynamic angle of sight errors in hardware-in-the-loop simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-pan; Wu, Jun-hui; Gan, Lin; Zhao, Hong-peng; Liang, Wei-wei

    2015-10-01

    In order to precisely measure dynamic angle of sight for hardware-in-the-loop simulation, a dynamic measurement methodology was established and a set of measurement system was built. The errors and drifts, such as synchronization delay, CCD measurement error and drift, laser spot error on diffuse reflection plane and optics axis drift of laser, were measured and analyzed. First, by analyzing and measuring synchronization time between laser and time of controlling data, an error control method was devised and lowered synchronization delay to 21μs. Then, the relationship between CCD device and laser spot position was calibrated precisely and fitted by two-dimension surface fitting. CCD measurement error and drift were controlled below 0.26mrad. Next, angular resolution was calculated, and laser spot error on diffuse reflection plane was estimated to be 0.065mrad. Finally, optics axis drift of laser was analyzed and measured which did not exceed 0.06mrad. The measurement results indicate that the maximum of errors and drifts of the measurement methodology is less than 0.275mrad. The methodology can satisfy the measurement on dynamic angle of sight of higher precision and lager scale.

  11. Image defects from surface and alignment errors in grazing incidence telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.

    1989-01-01

    The rigid body motions and low frequency surface errors of grazing incidence Wolter telescopes are studied. The analysis is based on surface error descriptors proposed by Paul Glenn. In his analysis, the alignment and surface errors are expressed in terms of Legendre-Fourier polynomials. Individual terms in the expression correspond to rigid body motions (decenter and tilt) and low spatial frequency surface errors of mirrors. With the help of the Legendre-Fourier polynomials and the geometry of grazing incidence telescopes, exact and approximated first order equations are derived in this paper for the components of the ray intercepts at the image plane. These equations are then used to calculate the sensitivities of Wolter type I and II telescopes for the rigid body motions and surface deformations. The rms spot diameters calculated from this theory and OSAC ray tracing code agree very well. This theory also provides a tool to predict how rigid body motions and surface errors of the mirrors compensate each other.

  12. A new angle for probing field-aligned irregularities with the Murchison Widefield Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Murphy, Tara; Cairns, Iver H.; Trott, Cathryn M.; Hurley-Walker, Natasha; Feng, Lu; Hancock, Paul J.; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-06-01

    Electron density irregularities in the ionosphere are known to be magnetically anisotropic, preferentially elongated along the lines of force. While many studies of their morphology have been undertaken by topside sounding and whistler measurements, it is only recently that detailed regional-scale reconstructions have become possible, enabled by the advent of widefield radio telescopes. Here we present a new approach for visualizing and studying field-aligned irregularities (FAIs), which involves transforming interferometric measurements of total electron content gradients onto a magnetic shell tangent plane. This removes the perspective distortion associated with the oblique viewing angle of the irregularities from the ground, facilitating the decomposition of dynamics along and across magnetic field lines. We apply this transformation to the data set of Loi et al. (2015a), obtained on 15 October 2013 by the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) radio telescope and displaying prominent FAIs. We study these FAIs in the new reference frame, quantifying field-aligned and field-transverse behavior, examining time and altitude dependencies, and extending the analysis to FAIs on subarray scales. We show that the inclination of the plane can be derived solely from the data and verify that the best fit value is consistent with the known magnetic inclination. The ability of the model to concentrate the fluctuations along a single spatial direction may find practical application to future calibration strategies for widefield interferometry, by providing a compact representation of FAI-induced distortions.

  13. NanoOK: multi-reference alignment analysis of nanopore sequencing data, quality and error profiles

    PubMed Central

    Leggett, Richard M.; Heavens, Darren; Caccamo, Mario; Clark, Matthew D.; Davey, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The Oxford Nanopore MinION sequencer, currently in pre-release testing through the MinION Access Programme (MAP), promises long reads in real-time from an inexpensive, compact, USB device. Tools have been released to extract FASTA/Q from the MinION base calling output and to provide basic yield statistics. However, no single tool yet exists to provide comprehensive alignment-based quality control and error profile analysis—something that is extremely important given the speed with which the platform is evolving. Results: NanoOK generates detailed tabular and graphical output plus an in-depth multi-page PDF report including error profile, quality and yield data. NanoOK is multi-reference, enabling detailed analysis of metagenomic or multiplexed samples. Four popular Nanopore aligners are supported and it is easily extensible to include others. Availability and implementation: NanoOK is an open-source software, implemented in Java with supporting R scripts. It has been tested on Linux and Mac OS X and can be downloaded from https://github.com/TGAC/NanoOK. A VirtualBox VM containing all dependencies and the DH10B read set used in this article is available from http://opendata.tgac.ac.uk/nanook/. A Docker image is also available from Docker Hub—see program documentation https://documentation.tgac.ac.uk/display/NANOOK. Contact: richard.leggett@tgac.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26382197

  14. Foreshortening produces errors in the perception of angles pictured as on the ground.

    PubMed

    Wnuczko, Marta; Singh, Karan; Kennedy, John M

    2016-01-01

    Observers viewed pictures of a simulated ground plane and judged the orientation of lines pictured as lying on the ground. We presented three lines at a time and manipulated three factors: (1) the declination of the lines below the horizon (depicting distance to the target angles), (2) their length, and (3) whether or not they converged to a point on the horizon. Only the first factor had a substantial effect on these errors. We conclude that perspective foreshortening in pictures produces errors in perceived 3-D orientation. Our explanation is based on the different rates of change of elevation and azimuth with distance.

  15. Photo-Rubbing: A General Method to Induce Durable Liquid-Crystal Pretilt Angle on Photo-Alignment Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Masayuki; Nakata, Shoichi; Makita, Yutaka; Matsuki, Yasuo; Kumano, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Yasumasa; Yokoyama, Hiroshi

    2002-12-01

    A normal-incidence single-exposure scheme to obtain a stable pretilted alignment of nematic liquid crystals on photo-alignment polymer layers is proposed. The new scheme consists in periodically modulating the intensity of the normally incident linearly polarized near-ultraviolet light and unidirectionally scanning it on the photosensitive alignment layer. By properly choosing the relative directions of scan and polarization, this scheme works for any types of photo-alignment materials regardless of the resultant alignment direction relative to the polarization direction of the UV light. The pretilt appears in such a way that the nematic director is lifted up in the scan direction, similar to the case of the conventional cloth rubbing. This “photo-rubbing” method allows a fairly accurate control of the pretilt angle by way of the scan speed.

  16. Error estimates of triangular finite elements under a weak angle condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Shipeng; Shi, Zhongci

    2009-08-01

    In this note, by analyzing the interpolation operator of Girault and Raviart given in [V. Girault, P.A. Raviart, Finite element methods for Navier-Stokes equations, Theory and algorithms, in: Springer Series in Computational Mathematics, Springer-Verlag, Berlin,1986] over triangular meshes, we prove optimal interpolation error estimates for Lagrange triangular finite elements of arbitrary order under the maximal angle condition in a unified and simple way. The key estimate is only an application of the Bramble-Hilbert lemma.

  17. Treatment of systematic errors in the processing of wide angle sonar sensor data for robotic navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Beckerman, M.; Oblow, E.M.

    1988-04-01

    A methodology has been developed for the treatment of systematic errors which arise in the processing of sparse sensor data. We present a detailed application of this methodology to the construction from wide-angle sonar sensor data of navigation maps for use in autonomous robotic navigation. In the methodology we introduce a four-valued labelling scheme and a simple logic for label combination. The four labels, conflict, occupied, empty and unknown, are used to mark the cells of the navigation maps; the logic allows for the rapid updating of these maps as new information is acquired. The systematic errors are treated by relabelling conflicting pixel assignments. Most of the new labels are obtained from analyses of the characteristic patterns of conflict which arise during the information processing. The remaining labels are determined by imposing an elementary consistent-labelling condition. 26 refs., 9 figs.

  18. The Residual Setup Errors of Different IGRT Alignment Procedures for Head and Neck IMRT and the Resulting Dosimetric Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Graff, Pierre; Kirby, Neil; Weinberg, Vivian; Chen, Josephine; Yom, Sue S.; Lambert, Louise; Pouliot, Jean

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To assess residual setup errors during head and neck radiation therapy and the resulting consequences for the delivered dose for various patient alignment procedures. Methods and Materials: Megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) scans from 11 head and neck patients who underwent intensity modulated radiation therapy were used to assess setup errors. Each MVCBCT scan was registered to its reference planning kVCT, with seven different alignment procedures: automatic alignment and manual registration to 6 separate bony landmarks (sphenoid, left/right maxillary sinuses, mandible, cervical 1 [C1]-C2, and C7-thoracic 1 [T1] vertebrae). Shifts in the different alignments were compared with each other to determine whether there were any statistically significant differences. Then, the dose distribution was recalculated on 3 MVCBCT images per patient for every alignment procedure. The resulting dose-volume histograms for targets and organs at risk (OARs) were compared to those from the planning kVCTs. Results: The registration procedures produced statistically significant global differences in patient alignment and actual dose distribution, calling for a need for standardization of patient positioning. Vertically, the automatic, sphenoid, and maxillary sinuses alignments mainly generated posterior shifts and resulted in mean increases in maximal dose to OARs of >3% of the planned dose. The suggested choice of C1-C2 as a reference landmark appears valid, combining both OAR sparing and target coverage. Assuming this choice, relevant margins to apply around volumes of interest at the time of planning to take into account for the relative mobility of other regions are discussed. Conclusions: Use of different alignment procedures for treating head and neck patients produced variations in patient setup and dose distribution. With concern for standardizing practice, C1-C2 reference alignment with relevant margins around planning volumes seems to be a valid

  19. A basic study on variable-gain Kalman filter based on angle error calculated from acceleration signals for lower limb angle measurement with inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Teruyama, Yuta; Watanabe, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, development of wearable motion measurement system using inertial sensors has been focused with the aim of rehabilitation support. For measurement of lower limb joint angles with inertial sensors, Kalman-filtering-based angle measurement method was developed. However, it was required to reduce variation of measurement errors that depended on movement speeds or subjects. In this report, variable-gain Kalman filter based on the difference between the estimated angle by the Kalman filter and the angle calculated from acceleration signals was tested. From angle measurement during treadmill walking with healthy subjects, it was shown that measurement accuracy of the foot inclination angle was significantly improved with the proposed method compared to the method of fixed parameter value. PMID:24110464

  20. Effectiveness of variable-gain Kalman filter based on angle error calculated from acceleration signals in lower limb angle measurement with inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Teruyama, Yuta; Watanabe, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The wearable sensor system developed by our group, which measured lower limb angles using Kalman-filtering-based method, was suggested to be useful in evaluation of gait function for rehabilitation support. However, it was expected to reduce variations of measurement errors. In this paper, a variable-Kalman-gain method based on angle error that was calculated from acceleration signals was proposed to improve measurement accuracy. The proposed method was tested comparing to fixed-gain Kalman filter and a variable-Kalman-gain method that was based on acceleration magnitude used in previous studies. First, in angle measurement in treadmill walking, the proposed method measured lower limb angles with the highest measurement accuracy and improved significantly foot inclination angle measurement, while it improved slightly shank and thigh inclination angles. The variable-gain method based on acceleration magnitude was not effective for our Kalman filter system. Then, in angle measurement of a rigid body model, it was shown that the proposed method had measurement accuracy similar to or higher than results seen in other studies that used markers of camera-based motion measurement system fixing on a rigid plate together with a sensor or on the sensor directly. The proposed method was found to be effective in angle measurement with inertial sensors.

  1. Effectiveness of Variable-Gain Kalman Filter Based on Angle Error Calculated from Acceleration Signals in Lower Limb Angle Measurement with Inertial Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The wearable sensor system developed by our group, which measured lower limb angles using Kalman-filtering-based method, was suggested to be useful in evaluation of gait function for rehabilitation support. However, it was expected to reduce variations of measurement errors. In this paper, a variable-Kalman-gain method based on angle error that was calculated from acceleration signals was proposed to improve measurement accuracy. The proposed method was tested comparing to fixed-gain Kalman filter and a variable-Kalman-gain method that was based on acceleration magnitude used in previous studies. First, in angle measurement in treadmill walking, the proposed method measured lower limb angles with the highest measurement accuracy and improved significantly foot inclination angle measurement, while it improved slightly shank and thigh inclination angles. The variable-gain method based on acceleration magnitude was not effective for our Kalman filter system. Then, in angle measurement of a rigid body model, it was shown that the proposed method had measurement accuracy similar to or higher than results seen in other studies that used markers of camera-based motion measurement system fixing on a rigid plate together with a sensor or on the sensor directly. The proposed method was found to be effective in angle measurement with inertial sensors. PMID:24282442

  2. Application of advanced shearing techniques to the calibration of autocollimators with small angle generators and investigation of error sources.

    PubMed

    Yandayan, T; Geckeler, R D; Aksulu, M; Akgoz, S A; Ozgur, B

    2016-05-01

    The application of advanced error-separating shearing techniques to the precise calibration of autocollimators with Small Angle Generators (SAGs) was carried out for the first time. The experimental realization was achieved using the High Precision Small Angle Generator (HPSAG) of TUBITAK UME under classical dimensional metrology laboratory environmental conditions. The standard uncertainty value of 5 mas (24.2 nrad) reached by classical calibration method was improved to the level of 1.38 mas (6.7 nrad). Shearing techniques, which offer a unique opportunity to separate the errors of devices without recourse to any external standard, were first adapted by Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) to the calibration of autocollimators with angle encoders. It has been demonstrated experimentally in a clean room environment using the primary angle standard of PTB (WMT 220). The application of the technique to a different type of angle measurement system extends the range of the shearing technique further and reveals other advantages. For example, the angular scales of the SAGs are based on linear measurement systems (e.g., capacitive nanosensors for the HPSAG). Therefore, SAGs show different systematic errors when compared to angle encoders. In addition to the error-separation of HPSAG and the autocollimator, detailed investigations on error sources were carried out. Apart from determination of the systematic errors of the capacitive sensor used in the HPSAG, it was also demonstrated that the shearing method enables the unique opportunity to characterize other error sources such as errors due to temperature drift in long term measurements. This proves that the shearing technique is a very powerful method for investigating angle measuring systems, for their improvement, and for specifying precautions to be taken during the measurements.

  3. Alignment of bicelles studied with high-field magnetic birefringence and small-angle neutron scattering measurements.

    PubMed

    Liebi, Marianne; van Rhee, Peter G; Christianen, Peter C M; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Fischer, Peter; Walde, Peter; Windhab, Erich J

    2013-03-12

    Birefringence measurements at high magnetic field strength of up to 33 T were used to detect magnetically induced alignment of bicelles composed of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), cholesterol, and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DMPE-DTPA) with complexed lanthanide ions. These birefringence measurements together with a small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis in a magnetic field showed parallel alignment of the bicelles if the lanthanide was thulium (Tm(3+)), and perpendicular alignment with dysprosium (Dy(3+)). With the birefringence measurements, the order parameter S can be determined as a function of the magnetic field strength, if the magnetic alignment reaches saturation. Additional structural information can be obtained if the maximum induced birefringence is considered. The degree of alignment of the studied bicelles increased with decreasing temperature from 40 to 5 °C and showed a new bicellar structure comprising a transient hole formation at intermediate temperatures (20 °C) during heating from 5 to 40 °C.

  4. Impact of pitch angle setup error and setup error correction on dose distribution in volumetric modulated arc therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Akihiro; Togawa, Kumiko; Yokoi, Tomohiro; Ueda, Shinichi; Noto, Kimiya; Kojima, Hironori; Isomura, Naoki; Kumano, Tomoyasu

    2016-07-01

    In volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for prostate cancer, a positional and rotational error correction is performed according to the position and angle of the prostate. The correction often involves body leaning, and there is concern regarding variation in the dose distribution. Our purpose in this study was to evaluate the impact of body pitch rotation on the dose distribution regarding VMAT. Treatment plans were obtained retrospectively from eight patients with prostate cancer. The body in the computed tomography images for the original VMAT plan was shifted to create VMAT plans with virtual pitch angle errors of ±1.5° and ±3°. Dose distributions for the tilted plans were recalculated with use of the same beam arrangement as that used for the original VMAT plan. The mean value of the maximum dose differences in the dose distributions between the original VMAT plan and the tilted plans was 2.98 ± 0.96 %. The value of the homogeneity index for the planning target volume (PTV) had an increasing trend according to the pitch angle error, and the values of the D 95 for the PTV and D 2ml, V 50, V 60, and V 70 for the rectum had decreasing trends (p < 0.05). However, there was no correlation between differences in these indexes and the maximum dose difference. The pitch angle error caused by body leaning had little effect on the dose distribution; in contrast, the pitch angle correction reduced the effects of organ displacement and improved these indexes. Thus, the pitch angle setup error in VMAT for prostate cancer should be corrected.

  5. Estimates of the error caused by atmospheric turbulence in optical determination of the orientation angle of a series of reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, M. T.; Dudorov, V. V.; Kolosov, V. V.; Filimonov, G. A.

    2006-11-01

    The error caused by atmospheric turbulence, in determining the orientation angle of an object (a series of reflectors) has been studied. The orientation angle was determined by studying the image of the object. Numerical modeling was performed involving construction of the image of a series of reflectors as if they were observed through a turbulent medium, calculation of the coordinates of reflector mass centers, finding of the line closest to the reflector mass centers, and determination of its slope angle. Variance of the slope angle fluctuations is calculated.

  6. Helicity-dependent single-walled carbon nanotube alignment on graphite for helical angle and handedness recognition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yabin; Shen, Ziyong; Xu, Ziwei; Hu, Yue; Xu, Haitao; Wang, Sheng; Guo, Xiaolei; Zhang, Yanfeng; Peng, Lianmao; Ding, Feng; Liu, Zhongfan; Zhang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Aligned single-walled carbon nanotube arrays provide a great potential for the carbon-based nanodevices and circuit integration. Aligning single-walled carbon nanotubes with selected helicities and identifying their helical structures remain a daunting issue. The widely used gas-directed and surface-directed growth modes generally suffer the drawbacks of mixed and unknown helicities of the aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. Here we develop a rational approach to anchor the single-walled carbon nanotubes on graphite surfaces, on which the orientation of each single-walled carbon nanotube sensitively depends on its helical angle and handedness. This approach can be exploited to conveniently measure both the helical angle and handedness of the single-walled carbon nanotube simultaneously at a low cost. In addition, by combining with the resonant Raman spectroscopy, the (n,m) index of anchored single-walled carbon nanotube can be further determined from the (d,θ) plot, and the assigned (n,m) values by this approach are validated by both the electronic transition energy Eii measurement and nanodevice application. PMID:23892334

  7. Mineral crystal alignment in mineralized fracture callus determined by 3D small-angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yifei; Manjubala, Inderchand; Roschger, Paul; Schell, Hanna; Duda, Georg N.; Fratzl, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Callus tissue formed during bone fracture healing is a mixture of different tissue types as revealed by histological analysis. But the structural characteristics of mineral crystals within the healing callus are not well known. Since two-dimensional (2D) scanning small-angle X-ray scattering (sSAXS) patterns showed that the size and orientation of callus crystals vary both spatially and temporally [1] and 2D electron microscopic analysis implies an anisotropic property of the callus morphology, the mineral crystals within the callus are also expected to vary in size and orientation in 3D. Three-dimensional small-angle X-ray scattering (3D SAXS), which combines 2D SAXS patterns collected at different angles of sample tilting, has been previously applied to investigate bone minerals in horse radius [2] and oim/oim mouse femur/tibia [3]. We implement a similar 3D SAXS method but with a different way of data analysis to gather information on the mineral alignment in fracture callus. With the proposed accurate yet fast assessment of 3D SAXS information, it was shown that the plate shaped mineral particles in the healing callus were aligned in groups with their predominant orientations occurring as a fiber texture.

  8. Spin-Orbit angle distribution and the origin of (mis)aligned hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crida, A.; Batygin, K.

    2014-12-01

    The angle between the orbital plane and the stellar equator (called the spin-orbit angle) has been measured for about 60 hot Jupiters, half of them showing significant misalignment. This challenges scenarios of the formation of hot Jupiters. Recently, it has been proposed that misalignment could be a consequence of the torquing of the proto-planetary disk by a transcient binary companion of the host star Here, we analyse the geometry of the problem, and compare the probability density function (PDF) of the projected spin-orbit angle expected in various mechanisms, with the observed one. Scattering models and the Kozai cycle with tidal friction models can not be solely responsible for the production of all hot Jupiters. Conversely, the presently observed distribution of the spin-orbit angles is compatible with most hot Jupiters having been transported by smooth migration inside a proto-planetary disk, itself possibly torqued by a companion.

  9. SU-E-J-94: Positioning Errors Resulting From Using Bony Anatomy Alignment for Treating SBRT Lung Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, C; Ding, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify patient setups errors based on bony anatomy registration rather than 3D tumor alignment for SBRT lung treatments. Method: A retrospective study was performed for patients treated with lung SBRT and imaged with kV cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) image-guidance. Daily CBCT images were registered to treatment planning CTs based on bony anatomy alignment and then inter-fraction tumor movement was evaluated by comparing shift in the tumor center in the medial-lateral, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions. The PTV V100% was evaluated for each patient based on the average daily tumor displacement to assess the impact of the positioning error on the target coverage when the registrations were based on bony anatomy. Of the 35 patients studied, 15 were free-breathing treatments, 10 used abdominal compression with a stereotactic body frame, and the remaining 10 were performed with BodyFIX vacuum bags. Results: For free-breathing treatments, the range of tumor displacement error is between 1–6 mm in the medial-lateral, 1–13 mm in the anterior-posterior, and 1–7 mm in the superior-inferior directions. These positioning errors lead to 6–22% underdose coverage for PTV - V100% . Patients treated with abdominal compression immobilization showed positional errors of 0–4mm mediallaterally, 0–3mm anterior-posteriorly, and 0–2 mm inferior-superiorly with PTV - V100% underdose ranging between 6–17%. For patients immobilized with the vacuum bags, the positional errors were found to be 0–1 mm medial-laterally, 0–1mm anterior-posteriorly, and 0–2 mm inferior-superiorly with PTV - V100% under dose ranging between 5–6% only. Conclusion: It is necessary to align the tumor target by using 3D image guidance to ensure adequate tumor coverage before performing SBRT lung treatments. The BodyFIX vacuum bag immobilization method has the least positioning errors among the three methods studied when bony anatomy is used for

  10. Effect of measurement error on tests of density dependence of catchability for walleyes in northern Wisconsin angling and spearing fisheries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, M.J.; Beard, T.D.; Hewett, S.W.

    2005-01-01

    We sought to determine how much measurement errors affected tests of density dependence of spearing and angling catchability for walleye Sander vitreus by quantifying relationships between spearing and angling catch rates (catch/h) and walleye population density (number/acre) in northern Wisconsin lakes. The mean measurement error of spearing catch rates was 43.5 times greater than the mean measurement error of adult walleye population densities, whereas the mean measurement error of angling catch rates was only 5.6 times greater than the mean measurement error of adult walleye population densities. The bias-corrected estimate of the relationship between spearing catch rate and adult walleye population density was similar to the ordinary-least-squares regression estimate but differed significantly from the geometric mean (GM) functional regression estimate. In contrast, the bias-corrected estimate of the relationship between angling catch rate and total walleye population density was intermediate between ordinary-least-squares and GM functional regression estimates. Catch rates of walleyes in both spearing and angling fisheries were not linearly related to walleye population density, which indicated that catch rates in both fisheries were hyperstable in relation to walleye population density. For both fisheries, GM functional regression overestimated the degree of hyperdepletion in catch rates and ordinary-least-squares regression overestimated the degree of hyperstability in catch rates. However, ordinary-least-squares regression induced significantly less bias in tests of density dependence than GM functional regression, so it may be suitable for testing the degree of density dependence in fisheries for which fish population density is estimated with mark-recapture methods similar to those used in our study. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  11. Multifield optimization intensity-modulated proton therapy (MFO-IMPT) for prostate cancer: Robustness analysis through simulation of rotational and translational alignment errors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, Thomas J.; Amos, Richard A.; John Baptiste, Sandra; Choi, Seungtaek; Nhu Nguyen, Quyhn; Ronald Zhu, X.; Palmer, Matthew B.; Lee, Andrew K.

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the dosimetric consequences of rotational and translational alignment errors in patients receiving intensity-modulated proton therapy with multifield optimization (MFO-IMPT) for prostate cancer. Ten control patients with localized prostate cancer underwent treatment planning for MFO-IMPT. Rotational and translation errors were simulated along each of 3 axes: anterior-posterior (A-P), superior-inferior (S-I), and left-right. Clinical target-volume (CTV) coverage remained high with all alignment errors simulated. Rotational errors did not result in significant rectum or bladder dose perturbations. Translational errors resulted in larger dose perturbations to the bladder and rectum. Perturbations in rectum and bladder doses were minimal for rotational errors and larger for translational errors. Rectum V45 and V70 increased most with A-P misalignment, whereas bladder V45 and V70 changed most with S-I misalignment. The bladder and rectum V45 and V70 remained acceptable even with extreme alignment errors. Even with S-I and A-P translational errors of up to 5 mm, the dosimetric profile of MFO-IMPT remained favorable. MFO-IMPT for localized prostate cancer results in robust coverage of the CTV without clinically meaningful dose perturbations to normal tissue despite extreme rotational and translational alignment errors.

  12. Self-Noise of the STS-2 and sensitivity of its computation to errors in alignment of sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerner, Andreas; Sleeman, Reinoud; Grasemann, Bernhard; Lenhardt, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    The assessment of a seismometer's self-noise is an important part of establishing its health, quality, and suitability. A spectral coherence technique proposed by Sleeman et al. (2006) using synchronously recorded data of triples of collocated and co-aligned seismometers has shown to be a very robust and reliable way to estimate the self-noise of modern broadband seismic sensors. It has been demonstrated in previous works that the resulting self-noise spectra, primarily in the frequency range of Earth's microseisms, are considerably affected by small errors in the alignment of sensors. Further, due to the sensitivity of the 3-channel correlation technique to misalignment, numerical rotation of the recorded traces prior to self-noise computation can be performed to find best possible alignment by searching for minimum self-noise values. In this study we focus on the sensitivity of the 3-channel correlation technique to misalignment, and investigate the possibility of complete removal of the microseism signal from self-noise estimates for the sensors' three components separately. Data from a long-term installation of four STS-2 sensors, specifically intended for self-noise studies, at the Conrad Observatory (Austria) in a collaboration between the KNMI (Netherlands) and the ZAMG (Austria) provides a reliable basis for an accurate sensitivity analysis and self-noise assessment. Our work resulted in undisturbed self-noise estimates for the vertical components, and our current focus is on improving alignment of horizontal axes, and verification of the manufacturer's specification regarding orthogonality of all three components. The tools and methods developed within this research can help to quickly establish consistent self-noise models, including estimates of orthogonality and alignment, which facilitates comparison of different models and provides us with a means to test quality and accuracy of a seismic sensor over its life span.

  13. Pitch-Angle Distribution for Electrons at Dipolarization Sites: Field Aligned Anisotropy and Isotropization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Lin, C. H.; Hada, T.; Nishimura, T.; Angelopoulos, V.; Lee, W. J.; Lang, Z. R.

    2015-12-01

    Investigation of Earth's radiation environment is important not only because of its geophysical significance but also because it can inform the design of future satellites. The observed dipolarization effects on pitch-angle distributions (PAD) of electrons at the tailside in the inner plasmasheet during geomagnetic activity identified by AL index has been studied via analyzing data from THEMIS mission. We have shown that cigar distributions below about 1keV tend to become isotropized at the fronts at the dipolarization sites whereas isotropic distributions above 1keV tend to become more cigar-shaped (i.e., fluxes peak at pitch-angle of 0o and 180o). We have previously suggested that the ineffectiveness of Fermi acceleration below 1keV could be the factor causing this difference. We examine the dependence of this effect on radial distance from Earth taking place at or near dipolarization sites during times of geomagnetic activity. Because both the field line length and the properties of dipolarizations vary with radial distance. We anticipate significant dependence of this effect on radial distance. Our study contributes to our understanding of the electron environment during dipolarizations in Earth's magnetosphere.

  14. Determination of Steering Wheel Angles during CAR Alignment by Image Analysis Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, M.; Voegtle, T.

    2016-06-01

    Optical systems for automatic visual inspections are of increasing importance in the field of automation in the industrial domain. A new application is the determination of steering wheel angles during wheel track setting of the final inspection of car manufacturing. The camera has to be positioned outside the car to avoid interruptions of the processes and therefore, oblique images of the steering wheel must be acquired. Three different approaches of computer vision are considered in this paper, i.e. a 2D shape-based matching (by means of a plane to plane rectification of the oblique images and detection of a shape model with a particular rotation), a 3D shape-based matching approach (by means of a series of different perspectives of the spatial shape of the steering wheel derived from a CAD design model) and a point-to-point matching (by means of the extraction of significant elements (e.g. multifunctional buttons) of a steering wheel and a pairwise connection of these points to straight lines). The HALCON system (HALCON, 2016) was used for all software developments and necessary adaptions. As reference a mechanical balance with an accuracy of 0.1° was used. The quality assessment was based on two different approaches, a laboratory test and a test during production process. In the laboratory a standard deviation of ±0.035° (2D shape-based matching), ±0.12° (3D approach) and ±0.029° (point-to-point matching) could be obtained. The field test of 291 measurements (27 cars with varying poses and angles of the steering wheel) results in a detection rate of 100% and ±0.48° (2D matching) and ±0.24° (point-to-point matching). Both methods also fulfil the request of real time processing (three measurements per second).

  15. Accurate Determination of Interstrand Distances and Alignment in Amyloid Fibrils by Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    PubMed Central

    Caporini, Marc A.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Veshtort, Mikhail; Fitzpatrick, Anthony; MacPhee, Cait E; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are structurally ordered aggregates of proteins whose formation is associated with many neurodegenerative and other diseases. For that reason, their high resolution structures are of considerable interest and have been studied using a wide range of techniques, notably electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. Because of the excellent resolution in the spectra, MAS NMR is uniquely capable of delivering site-specific, atomic resolution information about all levels of amyloid structure: (1) the monomer, which packs into several (2) protofilaments that in turn associate to form a (3) fibril. Building upon our high resolution structure of the monomer of an amyloid-forming peptide from transthyretin (TTR105-115), we introduce single 1-13C labeled amino acids at seven different sites in the peptide and measure intermolecular carbonyl-carbonyl distances with an accuracy of ~0.11 A. Our results conclusively establish a parallel, in register, topology for the packing of this peptide into a β-sheet and provide constraints essential for the determination of an atomic resolution structure of the fibril. Furthermore, the approach we employ, based on a combination of a double-quantum filtered variant of the DRAWS recoupling sequence and multispin numerical simulations in SPINEVOLUTION, is general and should be applicable to a wide range of systems. PMID:20925357

  16. Detection and alignment of 3D domain swapping proteins using angle-distance image-based secondary structural matching techniques.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia-Han; Lo, Wei-Cheng; Wang, Hsin-Wei; Hsu, Yen-Chu; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Pai, Tun-Wen; Tang, Chuan Yi

    2010-10-14

    This work presents a novel detection method for three-dimensional domain swapping (DS), a mechanism for forming protein quaternary structures that can be visualized as if monomers had "opened" their "closed" structures and exchanged the opened portion to form intertwined oligomers. Since the first report of DS in the mid 1990s, an increasing number of identified cases has led to the postulation that DS might occur in a protein with an unconstrained terminus under appropriate conditions. DS may play important roles in the molecular evolution and functional regulation of proteins and the formation of depositions in Alzheimer's and prion diseases. Moreover, it is promising for designing auto-assembling biomaterials. Despite the increasing interest in DS, related bioinformatics methods are rarely available. Owing to a dramatic conformational difference between the monomeric/closed and oligomeric/open forms, conventional structural comparison methods are inadequate for detecting DS. Hence, there is also a lack of comprehensive datasets for studying DS. Based on angle-distance (A-D) image transformations of secondary structural elements (SSEs), specific patterns within A-D images can be recognized and classified for structural similarities. In this work, a matching algorithm to extract corresponding SSE pairs from A-D images and a novel DS score have been designed and demonstrated to be applicable to the detection of DS relationships. The Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) and sensitivity of the proposed DS-detecting method were higher than 0.81 even when the sequence identities of the proteins examined were lower than 10%. On average, the alignment percentage and root-mean-square distance (RMSD) computed by the proposed method were 90% and 1.8Å for a set of 1,211 DS-related pairs of proteins. The performances of structural alignments remain high and stable for DS-related homologs with less than 10% sequence identities. In addition, the quality of its hinge loop

  17. SU-C-18C-02: Specifcation of X-Ray Projection Angles Which Are Aligned with the Aortic Valve Plane From a Planar Image of a Valvuloplasty Balloon Inflated Across the Aortic Valve

    SciTech Connect

    Fetterly, K; Mathew, V

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures provide a method to implant a prosthetic aortic valve via a minimallyinvasive, catheter-based procedure. TAVR procedures require use of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane to minimize prosthetic valve positioning error due to x-ray imaging parallax. The purpose of this work is to calculate the continuous range of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane from a single planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve. Methods: Computational methods to measure the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve were developed. Required inputs include a planar x-ray image of a known valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and specifications of x-ray imaging geometry from the DICOM header of the image. A-priori knowledge of the species-specific typical range of aortic orientation is required to specify the sign of the angle of the long axis of the balloon with respect to the x-ray beam. The methods were validated ex-vivo and in a live pig. Results: Ex-vivo experiments demonstrated that the angular orientation of a stationary inflated valvuloplasty balloon can be measured with precision less than 1 degree. In-vivo pig experiments demonstrated that cardiac motion contributed to measurement variability, with precision less than 3 degrees. Error in specification of x-ray geometry directly influences measurement accuracy. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve can be calculated precisely from a planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and known x-ray geometry. This method could be used to determine appropriate c-arm angular projections during TAVR procedures to minimize x-ray imaging parallax and thereby minimize prosthetic valve positioning errors.

  18. Collagen fibril alignment and deformation during tensile strain of leather: a small-angle X-ray scattering study.

    PubMed

    Basil-Jones, Melissa M; Edmonds, Richard L; Norris, Gillian E; Haverkamp, Richard G

    2012-02-01

    The distribution and effect of applied strain on the collagen fibrils that make up leather may have an important bearing on the ultimate strength and other physical properties of the material. While sections of ovine and bovine leather were being subjected to tensile strain up to rupture, synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) spectra were recorded edge-on to the leather at points from the corium to the grain. Measurements of both fibril orientation and collagen d spacing showed that, initially, the fibers reorient under strain, becoming more aligned. As the strain increases (5-10% strain), further fibril reorientation diminishes until, at 37% strain, the d spacing increases by up to 0.56%, indicating that significant tensile forces are being transmitted to individual fibrils. These changes, however, are not uniform through the cross-section of leather and differ between leathers of different strengths. The stresses are taken up more evenly through the leather cross-section in stronger leathers in comparison to weaker leathers, where stresses tended to be concentrated during strain. These observations contribute to our understanding of the internal strains and structural changes that take place in leather under stress.

  19. Accurate Alignment of Plasma Channels Based on Laser Centroid Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Osterhoff, Jens; Shiraishi, Satomi; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Toth, Csaba; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2011-03-23

    A technique has been developed to accurately align a laser beam through a plasma channel by minimizing the shift in laser centroid and angle at the channel outptut. If only the shift in centroid or angle is measured, then accurate alignment is provided by minimizing laser centroid motion at the channel exit as the channel properties are scanned. The improvement in alignment accuracy provided by this technique is important for minimizing electron beam pointing errors in laser plasma accelerators.

  20. A simple method for high-precision calibration of long-range errors in an angle encoder using an electronic nulling autocollimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinnane, Mark N.; Hudson, Lawrence T.; Henins, Albert; Mendenhall, Marcus H.

    2015-04-01

    We describe a simple method for high-precision rotary angle encoder calibration for long-range angular errors. By using a redesigned electronic nulling autocollimator, an optical-polygon artifact is calibrated simultaneously with determining the encoder error function over a rotation of 2π rad. The technique is applied to the NIST vacuum double crystal spectrometer, which depends on precise measurement of diffraction angles to determine absolute x-ray wavelengths. By oversampling, the method returned the encoder error function with an expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of 0.004 s of plane angle. Knowledge of the error function permits the instrument to make individual encoder readings with an accuracy of 0.06 s (k = 2), which is limited primarily by the least count and noise of the encoder electronics. While the error function lay within the nominal specifications, it differed from the intrinsic factory curve, indicating the need for in situ calibration in high-precision applications.

  1. A method for quantitatively analyzing the angle of direction for arbitral c-axis alignment with retardation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoi, Norihiro; Tanaka, Yasumitsu

    2015-01-01

    c-axis alignment in a polymer or crystal structure has drawn attention in numerous scientific and technological applications, including crystals, thin film growth, electro-optic devices, and phase difference optics. We here demonstrate a new approach based on retardation measurement that can obtain the direction of the c-axis alignment. This is employed to visualize the three-dimensional direction of continuous crystals as a thin optical film utilizing a liquid crystal panel, using retardation analysis equipment with high resolution measurement capability. The direction of the c-axis alignment is shown so as to allow a detailed characterization of the direction perpendicular to the plane. In this analysis, the direction of the c-axis alignment is identified, and differences between molecules at inequivalent sites are quantified. The results suggest that the excellent lubrication properties of the c-axis alignment may be due to a significant localization in lateral directions.

  2. Results from 1984 airborne Doppler lidar wind measurement program. Flight 6: Analysis of line-of-sight elevation angle errors and apparent Doppler velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry

    1987-01-01

    During the summer of 1984 the Marshall Space Flight Center's Airborne Doppler Lidar System (ADLS) made a series of wind measurements in the California Central Valley. This study quantifies the lidar beam angle errors and velocity errors through analysis of ground return signals. Line-of-sight elevation (LOSE) angle errors are under 1 deg. Apparent Doppler ground velocities, as large as 2m/s, are considerably less than in a previous flight experiment in 1981. No evidence was found of a Schuler resonance phenomenon common to inertial navigation systems (INS), however the aperiodic nature of the apparent velocities implies an error in the INS-derived ground speeds. Certain features and subtleties in the ground returns are explained in terms of atmospheric structure and characteristics of the ADLS hardware and software. Finally, least squares and low-pass filtering techniques are suggested for eliminating errors during post-processing.

  3. Alignment technology for backside integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, J.; Kulse, P.; Haak, U.; Old, G.; Scheuring, G.; Döbereiner, St.; Hillmann, F.; Brück, H.-J.; Kaynak, M.; Ehwald, K.-E.; Marschmeyer, St.; Birkholz, M.; Schulz, K.

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a backside-to-frontside alignment technique for the backside processing of Si wafers. Integrated MEMS components like BiCMOS-embedded RF-MEMS switches require accurate (1-2μm) alignment. We demonstrate an alignment technique providing overlay values of less than 500 nm by using a backside alignment layer. The approach is enabled by a new non-contact wafer pre-alignment system of the Nikon Scanner S207D allowing precise loading (<5μm) of the wafer onto the exposure stage. Before starting the back-side MEMS process, the misalignment between frontside devices and backside alignment layer has to be measured. The alignment errors are applied as lithography overlay corrections to the backside MEMS process. For the specific application of deep Si etching (Bosch process), moreover, one has to consider the etch profile angle deviation across the wafer (tilting), which turned out in our experiments to amount up to 8 μm. During initial experiments with a Nikon i-line stepper NSR-2205 i- 11D the overlay has been corrected by the stepper offset parameters. These parameters have been obtained by summing up both the wafer and intra-field scaling errors caused by deep Si etching and backside-to-frontside alignment errors. Misalignments and tilting errors were all measured with a MueTec MT 3000 IR optical metrology system using overlay marks. The developed alignment technique is applied to BiCMOS-embedded MEMS devices, i.e. mm-wave RF switches and a viscosity sensor chip based on the IHP's high-speed SiGe technology. It turned out to be very promising for backside processed MEMS components with critical alignment requirements.

  4. Alignability of Optical Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, Russell Scott

    With the continuing drive towards higher speed, density, and functionality in electronics, electrical interconnects become inadequate. Due to optics' high speed and bandwidth, freedom from capacitive loading effects, and freedom from crosstalk, optical interconnects can meet more stringent interconnect requirements. But, an optical interconnect requires additional components, such as an optical source and detector, lenses, holographic elements, etc. Fabrication and assembly of an optical interconnect requires precise alignment of these components. The successful development and deployment of optical interconnects depend on how easily the interconnect components can be aligned and/or how tolerant the interconnect is to misalignments. In this thesis, a method of quantitatively specifying the relative difficulty of properly aligning an optical interconnect is described. Ways of using this theory of alignment to obtain design and packaging guidelines for optical interconnects are examined. The measure of the ease with which an optical interconnect can be aligned, called the alignability, uses the efficiency of power transfer as a measure of alignment quality. The alignability is related to interconnect package design through the overall cost measure, which depends upon various physical parameters of the interconnect, such as the cost of the components and the time required for fabrication and alignment. Through a mutual dependence on detector size, the relationship between an interconnect's alignability and its bandwidth, signal-to-noise ratio, and bit-error -rate is examined. The results indicate that a range of device sizes exists for which given performance threshold values are satisfied. Next, the alignability of integrated planar-optic backplanes is analyzed in detail. The resulting data show that the alignability can be optimized by varying the substrate thickness or the angle of reflection. By including the effects of crosstalk, in a multi-channel backplane, the

  5. Pretilt Angles of Vertically Aligned Nematic Liquid Crystal (NLC) with the Application of Copolymers Possessing Chalconyl and Cholesteryl Moieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jeoung-Yeon; Seo, Dae-Shik; Son, Jong Ho; Suh, Dong Hack

    2000-11-01

    We performed the synthesis of a new copoly (M4Ch-ChMA), copoly ((4-methacryloyloxy) chalcone-cholestery methacrylate), with chalconyl and cholesteryl moiety characteristics for photoalignment materials. Good thermal stabilities of the synthesized copolymers are confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) measurement. The pretilt angles of the nematic liquid crystal (NLC) are reduced as UV exposure time is increased on the copolymer surfaces. A pretilt angle of 81° in NLC was observed with UV exposure of 3 min on the copolymer-3 surface. The NLCs pretilt angle is attributed to increased chalcone with increasing the UV exposure time.

  6. Alignment as a consequence of expectation adaptation: syntactic priming is affected by the prime's prediction error given both prior and recent experience.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, T Florian; Snider, Neal E

    2013-04-01

    Speakers show a remarkable tendency to align their productions with their interlocutors'. Focusing on sentence production, we investigate the cognitive systems underlying such alignment (syntactic priming). Our guiding hypothesis is that syntactic priming is a consequence of a language processing system that is organized to achieve efficient communication in an ever-changing (subjectively non-stationary) environment. We build on recent work suggesting that comprehenders adapt to the statistics of the current environment. If such adaptation is rational or near-rational, the extent to which speakers adapt their expectations for a syntactic structure after processing a prime sentence should be sensitive to the prediction error experienced while processing the prime. This prediction is shared by certain error-based implicit learning accounts, but not by most other accounts of syntactic priming. In three studies, we test this prediction against data from conversational speech, speech during picture description, and written production during sentence completion. All three studies find stronger syntactic priming for primes associated with a larger prediction error (primes with higher syntactic surprisal). We find that the relevant prediction error is sensitive to both prior and recent experience within the experiment. Together with other findings, this supports accounts that attribute syntactic priming to expectation adaptation.

  7. Measuring Scale Errors in a Laser Tracker’s Horizontal Angle Encoder Through Simple Length Measurement and Two-Face System Tests

    PubMed Central

    Muralikrishnan, B.; Blackburn, C.; Sawyer, D.; Phillips, S.; Bridges, R.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a method to estimate the scale errors in the horizontal angle encoder of a laser tracker in this paper. The method does not require expensive instrumentation such as a rotary stage or even a calibrated artifact. An uncalibrated but stable length is realized between two targets mounted on stands that are at tracker height. The tracker measures the distance between these two targets from different azimuthal positions (say, in intervals of 20° over 360°). Each target is measured in both front face and back face. Low order harmonic scale errors can be estimated from this data and may then be used to correct the encoder’s error map to improve the tracker’s angle measurement accuracy. We have demonstrated this for the second order harmonic in this paper. It is important to compensate for even order harmonics as their influence cannot be removed by averaging front face and back face measurements whereas odd orders can be removed by averaging. We tested six trackers from three different manufacturers. Two of those trackers are newer models introduced at the time of writing of this paper. For older trackers from two manufacturers, the length errors in a 7.75 m horizontal length placed 7 m away from a tracker were of the order of ± 65 μm before correcting the error map. They reduced to less than ± 25 μm after correcting the error map for second order scale errors. Newer trackers from the same manufacturers did not show this error. An older tracker from a third manufacturer also did not show this error. PMID:27134789

  8. Does Assessing Eye Alignment along with Refractive Error or Visual Acuity Increase Sensitivity for Detection of Strabismus in Preschool Vision Screening?

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Preschool vision screenings often include refractive error or visual acuity (VA) testing to detect amblyopia, as well as alignment testing to detect strabismus. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of combining screening for eye alignment with screening for refractive error or reduced VA on sensitivity for detection of strabismus, with specificity set at 90% and 94%. Methods Over 3 years, 4040 preschool children were screened in the Vision in Preschoolers (VIP) Study, with different screening tests administered each year. Examinations were performed to identify children with strabismus. The best screening tests for detecting children with any targeted condition were noncycloplegic retinoscopy (NCR), Retinomax autorefractor (Right Manufacturing, Virginia Beach, VA), SureSight Vision Screener (Welch-Allyn, Inc., Skaneateles, NY), and Lea Symbols (Precision Vision, LaSalle, IL and Good-Lite Co., Elgin, IL) and HOTV optotypes VA tests. Analyses were conducted with these tests of refractive error or VA paired with the best tests for detecting strabismus (unilateral cover testing, Random Dot “E” [RDE] and Stereo Smile Test II [Stereo Optical, Inc., Chicago, IL]; and MTI PhotoScreener [PhotoScreener, Inc., Palm Beach, FL]). The change in sensitivity that resulted from combining a test of eye alignment with a test of refractive error or VA was determined with specificity set at 90% and 94%. Results Among the 4040 children, 157 were identified as having strabismus. For screening tests conducted by eye care professionals, the addition of a unilateral cover test to a test of refraction generally resulted in a statistically significant increase (range, 15%–25%) in detection of strabismus. For screening tests administered by trained lay screeners, the addition of Stereo Smile II to SureSight resulted in a statistically significant increase (21%) in sensitivity for detection of strabismus. Conclusions The most efficient and low-cost ways to achieve

  9. Quantifying residual ionospheric errors in GNSS radio occultation bending angles based on ensembles of profiles from end-to-end simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. L.; Kirchengast, G.; Zhang, K.; Norman, R.; Li, Y.; Zhang, S. C.; Fritzer, J.; Schwaerz, M.; Wu, S. Q.; Tan, Z. X.

    2015-01-01

    The radio occultation (RO) technique using signals from the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), in particular from the Global Positioning System (GPS) so far, is meanwhile widely used to observe the atmosphere for applications such as numerical weather prediction and global climate monitoring. The ionosphere is a major error source in RO measurements at stratospheric altitudes and a linear ionospheric correction of dual-frequency RO bending angles is commonly used to remove the first-order ionospheric effect. However, the residual ionopheric error (RIE) can still be significant so that it needs to be further mitigated for high accuracy applications, especially above about 30 km altitude where the RIE is most relevant compared to the magnitude of the neutral atmospheric bending angle. Quantification and careful analyses for better understanding of the RIE is therefore important towards enabling benchmark-quality stratospheric RO retrievals. Here we present such an analysis of bending angle RIEs covering the stratosphere and mesosphere, using quasi-realistic end-to-end simulations for a full-day ensemble of RO events. Based on the ensemble simulations we assessed the variation of bending angle RIEs, both biases and SDs, with solar activity, latitudinal region, and with or without the assumption of ionospheric spherical symmetry and of co-existing observing system errors. We find that the bending angle RIE biases in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, and in all latitudinal zones from low- to high-latitudes, have a clear negative tendency and a magnitude increasing with solar activity, in line with recent empirical studies based on real RO data. The maximum RIE biases are found at low latitudes during daytime, where they amount to with in -0.03 to -0.05 μrad, the smallest at high latitudes (0 to -0.01 μrad; quiet space weather and winter conditions). Ionospheric spherical symmetry or asymmetries about the RO event location have only a minor influence on

  10. Quantifying residual ionospheric errors in GNSS radio occultation bending angles based on ensembles of profiles from end-to-end simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. L.; Kirchengast, G.; Zhang, K.; Norman, R.; Li, Y.; Zhang, S. C.; Fritzer, J.; Schwaerz, M.; Wu, S. Q.; Tan, Z. X.

    2015-07-01

    The radio occultation (RO) technique using signals from the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), in particular from the Global Positioning System (GPS) so far, is currently widely used to observe the atmosphere for applications such as numerical weather prediction and global climate monitoring. The ionosphere is a major error source in RO measurements at stratospheric altitudes, and a linear ionospheric correction of dual-frequency RO bending angles is commonly used to remove the first-order ionospheric effect. However, the residual ionospheric error (RIE) can still be significant so that it needs to be further mitigated for high-accuracy applications, especially above about 30 km altitude where the RIE is most relevant compared to the magnitude of the neutral atmospheric bending angle. Quantification and careful analyses for better understanding of the RIE is therefore important for enabling benchmark-quality stratospheric RO retrievals. Here we present such an analysis of bending angle RIEs covering the stratosphere and mesosphere, using quasi-realistic end-to-end simulations for a full-day ensemble of RO events. Based on the ensemble simulations we assessed the variation of bending angle RIEs, both biases and standard deviations, with solar activity, latitudinal region and with or without the assumption of ionospheric spherical symmetry and co-existing observing system errors. We find that the bending angle RIE biases in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, and in all latitudinal zones from low to high latitudes, have a clear negative tendency and a magnitude increasing with solar activity, which is in line with recent empirical studies based on real RO data although we find smaller bias magnitudes, deserving further study in the future. The maximum RIE biases are found at low latitudes during daytime, where they amount to within -0.03 to -0.05 μrad, the smallest at high latitudes (0 to -0.01 μrad; quiet space weather and winter conditions

  11. Rapid torque-bounded line-of-sight pointing of SCOLE with a designer's choice of initial alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Jiguan Gene

    1984-01-01

    Researchers simplified the analytical expression of the line of sight (LOS) error, discovered and proved the independence of Euler angle Psi, calculated attitude angles corresponding to 0 degrees and 20 degrees LOS errors, determined choices of initial alignment, tailored the slew maneuvers for LOS pointing, simulated numerically the LOS pointing slew of the Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE), and evaluated the pointing performance.

  12. Inversion of vegetation canopy reflectance models for estimating agronomic variables. II - Use of angle transforms and error analysis as illustrated by Suits' model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, N. S.; Thompson, R. L.; Strebel, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    The technique for inverting a vegetation canopy reflectance model described earlier (Goel and Strebel, 1983) is investigated further. The novel concept of an 'angle transform' is introduced. This concept allows the formation of functions of reflectances at different view zenith and azimuth angles, which are either sensitive or insensitive to a certain agronomic parameter. A proper combination of these functions can allow determination of all the important agronomic and spectral parameters from measured canopy reflectance data. The technique is demonstrated using Suits' (1972) model for homogeneous canopies. It is shown that leaf area index, leaf reflectance and transmittance, and average leaf angle all can be determined from the canopy reflectance at a set of selected view zenith and azimuth angles. A sensitivity analysis of the calculated values to the errors in the data is also carried out. Guidelines are formulated for the number and types of observations required to obtain the values of a particular canopy variable to within a given degree of accuracy for a given level of error in the measurement of canopy reflectance.

  13. Control of Pre-Tilt Angles of Liquid Crystal Molecules Using a Chemically Adsorbed Monomolecular Layer as an Alignment Film in Liquid Crystal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Kazufumi; Ohtake, Tadashi; Nomura, Takaiki

    2002-11-01

    Photoaligned monomolecular layers containing two materials were formed to control pre-tilt angles (θp) of liquid crystal molecules for twisted nematic (TN) type liquid crystal displays (LCDs) by a chemical adsorption (CA) technique and a photoalignment technique. One was a new chlorosilane type surfactant, 4‧-(6-trichlorosilyloxyhexyloxy) chalcone (CO), having photopolymerizablity, and the other was a surfactant having a straight carbon chain (SC). Although we tried screening six different surfectants as an additive to CO, a surfactant having a long straight hydrocarbon chain (octadecyl-trichlorosilane: C18) was the most suitable for the TN type LCDs. By changing the molecular ratio of CO and C18, pre-tilt angles of liquid crystal molecules in a test liquid crystal (LC) cell could be controlled from 0 to 8° with perfect mono-domain alignment. When surfactants having short hydrocarbon chains and those having fluorocarbon chains were used, the quality of the TN type LC cells obtained was not good.

  14. The lethal response to Cdk1 inhibition depends on sister chromatid alignment errors generated by KIF4 and isoform 1 of PRC1

    PubMed Central

    Voets, Erik; Marsman, Judith; Demmers, Jeroen; Beijersbergen, Roderick; Wolthuis, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) is absolutely essential for cell division. Complete ablation of Cdk1 precludes the entry of G2 phase cells into mitosis, and is early embryonic lethal in mice. Dampening Cdk1 activation, by reducing gene expression or upon treatment with cell-permeable Cdk1 inhibitors, is also detrimental for proliferating cells, but has been associated with defects in mitotic progression, and the formation of aneuploid daughter cells. Here, we used a large-scale RNAi screen to identify the human genes that critically determine the cellular toxicity of Cdk1 inhibition. We show that Cdk1 inhibition leads to fatal sister chromatid alignment errors and mitotic arrest in the spindle checkpoint. These problems start early in mitosis and are alleviated by depletion of isoform 1 of PRC1 (PRC1-1), by gene ablation of its binding partner KIF4, or by abrogation of KIF4 motor activity. Our results show that, normally, Cdk1 activity must rise above the level required for mitotic entry. This prevents KIF4-dependent PRC1-1 translocation to astral microtubule tips and safeguards proper chromosome congression. We conclude that cell death in response to Cdk1 inhibitors directly relates to chromosome alignment defects generated by insufficient repression of PRC1-1 and KIF4 during prometaphase. PMID:26423135

  15. The lethal response to Cdk1 inhibition depends on sister chromatid alignment errors generated by KIF4 and isoform 1 of PRC1.

    PubMed

    Voets, Erik; Marsman, Judith; Demmers, Jeroen; Beijersbergen, Roderick; Wolthuis, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) is absolutely essential for cell division. Complete ablation of Cdk1 precludes the entry of G2 phase cells into mitosis, and is early embryonic lethal in mice. Dampening Cdk1 activation, by reducing gene expression or upon treatment with cell-permeable Cdk1 inhibitors, is also detrimental for proliferating cells, but has been associated with defects in mitotic progression, and the formation of aneuploid daughter cells. Here, we used a large-scale RNAi screen to identify the human genes that critically determine the cellular toxicity of Cdk1 inhibition. We show that Cdk1 inhibition leads to fatal sister chromatid alignment errors and mitotic arrest in the spindle checkpoint. These problems start early in mitosis and are alleviated by depletion of isoform 1 of PRC1 (PRC1-1), by gene ablation of its binding partner KIF4, or by abrogation of KIF4 motor activity. Our results show that, normally, Cdk1 activity must rise above the level required for mitotic entry. This prevents KIF4-dependent PRC1-1 translocation to astral microtubule tips and safeguards proper chromosome congression. We conclude that cell death in response to Cdk1 inhibitors directly relates to chromosome alignment defects generated by insufficient repression of PRC1-1 and KIF4 during prometaphase. PMID:26423135

  16. CuPc/Au(1 1 0): Determination of the azimuthal alignment by a combination of angle-resolved photoemission and density functional theory

    PubMed Central

    Lüftner, Daniel; Milko, Matus; Huppmann, Sophia; Scholz, Markus; Ngyuen, Nam; Wießner, Michael; Schöll, Achim; Reinert, Friedrich; Puschnig, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Here we report on a combined experimental and theoretical study on the structural and electronic properties of a monolayer of Copper-Phthalocyanine (CuPc) on the Au(1 1 0) surface. Low-energy electron diffraction reveals a commensurate overlayer unit cell containing one adsorbate species. The azimuthal alignment of the CuPc molecule is revealed by comparing experimental constant binding energy (kxky)-maps using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with theoretical momentum maps of the free molecule's highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO). This structural information is confirmed by total energy calculations within the framework of van-der-Waals corrected density functional theory. The electronic structure is further analyzed by computing the molecule-projected density of states, using both a semi-local and a hybrid exchange-correlation functional. In agreement with experiment, the HOMO is located about 1.2 eV below the Fermi-level, while there is no significant charge transfer into the molecule and the CuPc LUMO remains unoccupied on the Au(1 1 0) surface. PMID:25284953

  17. CuPc/Au(1 1 0): Determination of the azimuthal alignment by a combination of angle-resolved photoemission and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Lüftner, Daniel; Milko, Matus; Huppmann, Sophia; Scholz, Markus; Ngyuen, Nam; Wießner, Michael; Schöll, Achim; Reinert, Friedrich; Puschnig, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Here we report on a combined experimental and theoretical study on the structural and electronic properties of a monolayer of Copper-Phthalocyanine (CuPc) on the Au(1 1 0) surface. Low-energy electron diffraction reveals a commensurate overlayer unit cell containing one adsorbate species. The azimuthal alignment of the CuPc molecule is revealed by comparing experimental constant binding energy (k x k y )-maps using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with theoretical momentum maps of the free molecule's highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO). This structural information is confirmed by total energy calculations within the framework of van-der-Waals corrected density functional theory. The electronic structure is further analyzed by computing the molecule-projected density of states, using both a semi-local and a hybrid exchange-correlation functional. In agreement with experiment, the HOMO is located about 1.2 eV below the Fermi-level, while there is no significant charge transfer into the molecule and the CuPc LUMO remains unoccupied on the Au(1 1 0) surface. PMID:25284953

  18. A Study of the Effect of Errors in Measurement of Velocity and Flight-Path Angle on the Guidance of a Space Vehicle Approaching the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Jack A.

    1961-01-01

    An analysis was made of the guidance of a space vehicle approaching the earth at supercircular velocity through an entrance corridor containing a desired perigee altitude. Random errors were assumed in the measurement of velocity and flight-path angle and in obtaining the desired thrust impulse. The method described in NASA Technical Note D-191 of scheduling corrections at different values of the angle between perigee and the vehicle's position vector and a slight modification of this method were investigated as a means of correcting perigee altitude when the vehicle's predicted position was at programmed correction points not within a specified deadband about the desired perigee altitude. The study showed that modifying the angular method of NASA Technical Note D-191 by adding another correction near the initial point did not improve the efficiency and accuracy of the angular method. It was found that in some cases the use of a correction procedure which included a deadband could be more costly in total corrective velocity than a procedure which neglected the deadband. This was especially true if a large degree of confidence was required in the total corrective velocity. It was apparent from the results that a correction with a deadband limit in the guidance scheme was more sensitive to the initial conditions, the corrective procedure, the deadband, and the degree of confidence required than a correction without a deadband limit.

  19. Alignment as a Consequence of Expectation Adaptation: Syntactic Priming Is Affected by the Prime's Prediction Error Given both Prior and Recent Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, T. Florian; Snider, Neal E.

    2013-01-01

    Speakers show a remarkable tendency to align their productions with their interlocutors'. Focusing on sentence production, we investigate the cognitive systems underlying such alignment (syntactic priming). Our guiding hypothesis is that syntactic priming is a consequence of a language processing system that is organized to achieve efficient…

  20. Far-field detection system for laser beams alignment and crystals alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Qin, H.; Zhu, B.

    2015-08-01

    Laser beams far-field alignment is very important for the high power laser facility as well as the frequency doubling crystals adjustment. Traditional beams alignment system and crystals alignment system are separated. That means, they use different optical image systems and CCD cameras, which will occupy larger space and use more money. A new farfield detection system of laser beams is presented with a big diffraction grating (37mm*37mm), a set of optical imaging components and a high resolution CCD camera. This detection system, which is fully demonstrated on the National Laser Facility of Israel, can align high power laser facility beams' direction as well as the frequency doubling crystals. The new system occupies small space in the spatial filter through off-axial grating sampling. The experimental results indicate that the average far-field alignment error is less than 5% of spatial filter pinhole diameter, and the average crystals' matching angle error is less than 10urad, which meet the alignment system requirements for beams and crystals.

  1. Estimation of daily interfractional larynx residual setup error after isocentric alignment for head and neck radiotherapy: Quality-assurance implications for target volume and organ-at-risk margination using daily CT-on-rails imaging

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Charles A.; Awan, Musaddiq J.; Mohamed, Abdallah S. R.; Akel, Imad; Rosenthal, David I.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Garden, Adam S.; Dyer, Brandon A.; Court, Laurence; Sevak, Parag R; Kocak-Uzel, Esengul; Fuller, Clifton D.

    2016-01-01

    Larynx may alternatively serve as a target or organ-at-risk (OAR) in head and neck cancer (HNC) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The objective of this study was to estimate IGRT parameters required for larynx positional error independent of isocentric alignment and suggest population–based compensatory margins. Ten HNC patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) with daily CT-on-rails imaging were assessed. Seven landmark points were placed on each daily scan. Taking the most superior anterior point of the C5 vertebra as a reference isocenter for each scan, residual displacement vectors to the other 6 points were calculated post-isocentric alignment. Subsequently, using the first scan as a reference, the magnitude of vector differences for all 6 points for all scans over the course of treatment were calculated. Residual systematic and random error, and the necessary compensatory CTV-to-PTV and OAR-to-PRV margins were calculated, using both observational cohort data and a bootstrap-resampled population estimator. The grand mean displacements for all anatomical points was 5.07mm, with mean systematic error of 1.1mm and mean random setup error of 2.63mm, while bootstrapped POIs grand mean displacement was 5.09mm, with mean systematic error of 1.23mm and mean random setup error of 2.61mm. Required margin for CTV-PTV expansion was 4.6mm for all cohort points, while the bootstrap estimator of the equivalent margin was 4.9mm. The calculated OAR-to-PRV expansion for the observed residual set-up error was 2.7mm, and bootstrap estimated expansion of 2.9mm. We conclude that the interfractional larynx setup error is a significant source of RT set-up/delivery error in HNC both when the larynx is considered as a CTV or OAR. We estimate the need for a uniform expansion of 5mm to compensate for set up error if the larynx is a target or 3mm if the larynx is an OAR when using a non-laryngeal bony isocenter. PMID:25679151

  2. Improved calibration of IMU biases in analytic coarse alignment for AHRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiazhen; Lei, Chaohua; Li, Baoguo; Wen, Ting

    2016-07-01

    An improved method for the inertial measurement unit (IMU) calibration of coarse alignment for the low-accuracy attitude heading reference system (AHRS) is proposed in this paper. The sensitivities of the Euler angles with respect to the inertial sensor biases are studied based on the analytic coarse alignment principle, and the errors of earth rotation rate and local gravity in the body frame caused by initial attitude error are analyzed. Then, an improved analytic coarse alignment algorithm with accelerometer and gyro bias calibration in an arbitrary three-position is proposed. Simulation and experiment results show that the novel method can calibrate accelerometer and gyro biases, reduce Euler angle attitude error, and improve navigation precision in practical applications. Moreover, this method can be applied to other low-accuracy inertial navigation systems.

  3. Design and evaluation of a new type of knee orthosis to align the mediolateral angle of the knee joint with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Esrafilian, Amir; Karimi, Mohammad Taghi; Eshraghi, Arezoo

    2012-01-01

    Background. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease which influences the performance of the knee joint. Moreover, the force and moments applied on the joint increase in contrast to normal subjects. Various types of knee orthoses have been designed to solve the mentioned problems. However, there are other problems in terms of distal migration during walking and the alignment of the orthosis which cannot be changed following the use of brace. Therefore, the main aim of the research was to design an orthosis to solve the aforementioned problems. Method. A new type of knee orthosis was designed with a modular structure. Two patients with knee OA participated in this research project. The force applied on the foot, moment transmitted through the knee joint, and spatiotemporal gait parameters were measured by use of a motion analysis system. Results. The results of the research showed that the adduction moment applied on the knee joint decreased while subjects walked with the new knee orthosis (P-value < 0.05). Conclusion. The new design of the knee brace can be used as an effective treatment to decrease the loads applied on the knee joint and to improve the alignment whilst walking.

  4. Separating weak lensing and intrinsic alignments using radio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Lee; Brown, Michael L.; Battye, Richard A.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss methods for performing weak lensing using radio observations to recover information about the intrinsic structural properties of the source galaxies. Radio surveys provide unique information that can benefit weak lensing studies, such as H I emission, which may be used to construct galaxy velocity maps, and polarized synchrotron radiation; both of which provide information about the unlensed galaxy and can be used to reduce galaxy shape noise and the contribution of intrinsic alignments. Using a proxy for the intrinsic position angle of an observed galaxy, we develop techniques for cleanly separating weak gravitational lensing signals from intrinsic alignment contamination in forthcoming radio surveys. Random errors on the intrinsic orientation estimates introduce biases into the shear and intrinsic alignment estimates. However, we show that these biases can be corrected for if the error distribution is accurately known. We demonstrate our methods using simulations, where we reconstruct the shear and intrinsic alignment auto- and cross-power spectra in three overlapping redshift bins. We find that the intrinsic position angle information can be used to successfully reconstruct both the lensing and intrinsic alignment power spectra with negligible residual bias.

  5. CCD Camera Lens Interface for Real-Time Theodolite Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wake, Shane; Scott, V. Stanley, III

    2012-01-01

    Theodolites are a common instrument in the testing, alignment, and building of various systems ranging from a single optical component to an entire instrument. They provide a precise way to measure horizontal and vertical angles. They can be used to align multiple objects in a desired way at specific angles. They can also be used to reference a specific location or orientation of an object that has moved. Some systems may require a small margin of error in position of components. A theodolite can assist with accurately measuring and/or minimizing that error. The technology is an adapter for a CCD camera with lens to attach to a Leica Wild T3000 Theodolite eyepiece that enables viewing on a connected monitor, and thus can be utilized with multiple theodolites simultaneously. This technology removes a substantial part of human error by relying on the CCD camera and monitors. It also allows image recording of the alignment, and therefore provides a quantitative means to measure such error.

  6. Band alignment of HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N determined by angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Man Hon Samuel E-mail: yeo@ieee.org; Bhuiyan, Maruf Amin; Yeo, Yee-Chia E-mail: yeo@ieee.org; Zhang, Zheng; Pan, Ji Sheng; Tok, Eng Soon

    2014-07-21

    The band-alignment of atomic layer deposited (ALD)-HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N was studied by high resolution angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The band bending near the HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N interface was investigated, and the potential variation across the interface was taken into account in the band alignment calculation. It is observed that the binding energies for N 1s and Al 2p in In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N decreases and the corresponding extracted valence band offsets increases with increasing θ (i.e., closer to the HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N interface), as a result of an upward energy band bending towards the HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N interface. The resultant valence band offset and the conduction band offset for the ALD-HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.18}Al{sub 0.82}N interface calculated was found to be 0.69 eV and 1.01 eV, respectively.

  7. Automated suppression of errors in LTP-II slope measurements of x-ray optics. Part 2: Specification for automated rotating/flipping/aligning system

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Zulfiqar; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2011-07-11

    Systematic error and instrumental drift are the major limiting factors of sub-microradian slope metrology with state-of-the-art x-ray optics. Significant suppression of the errors can be achieved by using an optimal measurement strategy suggested in [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 115101 (2009)]. With this series of LSBL Notes, we report on development of an automated, kinematic, rotational system that provides fully controlled flipping, tilting, and shifting of a surface under test. The system is integrated into the Advanced Light Source long trace profiler, LTP-II, allowing for complete realization of the advantages of the optimal measurement strategy method. We provide details of the system?s design, operational control and data acquisition. The high performance of the system is demonstrated via the results of high precision measurements with a spherical test mirror.

  8. Far-field detection system for laser beam and crystal alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiachen; Liu, Daizhong; Zhu, Baoqiang; Tang, Shunxing; Gao, Yanqi

    2016-03-01

    Laser beam far-field alignment as well as frequency-doubling and frequency-tripling crystal adjustment is very important for high-power laser facility. Separate systems for beam and crystal alignment are generally used while the proposed approach by off-axial grating sampling share common optics for these two functions, reducing both space and cost requirements. This detection system has been demonstrated on the National Laser Facility of Israel. The experimental results indicate that the average far-field alignment error is <5% of the spatial filter pinhole diameter, average autocollimation angle error of crystals is <10 μrad, and average frequency-tripling conversion efficiency is 69.3%, which meet the alignment system requirements on the beam direction and crystals.

  9. Control for stabilizing the alignment position of the rotor of the synchronous motor

    DOEpatents

    Donley, L.I.

    1985-03-12

    A method and apparatus is described for damping oscillations in the rotor load angle of a synchronous motor to provide stable rotational alignment in high precision applications. The damping method includes sensing the angular position of the rotor and utilizing the position signal to generate an error signal in response to changes in the period of rotation of the rotor. The error signal is coupled to phase shift amplifiers which shift the phase of the motor drive signal in a direction to damp out the oscillations in the rotor load angle.

  10. Control for stabilizing the alignment position of the rotor of a synchronous motor

    DOEpatents

    Donley, Lawrence I.

    1988-01-01

    A method and apparatus for damping oscillations in the rotor load angle of a synchronous motor to provide stable rotational alignment in high precision applications. The damping method includes sensing the angular position of the rotor and utilizing the position signal to generate an error signal in response to changes in the period of rotation of the rotor. The error signal is coupled to phase shift amplifiers which shift the phase of the motor drive signal in a direction to damp out the oscillations in the rotor load angle.

  11. Tracking the surface figure error of the pick off mirror throughout build and environmental testing of the focus and alignment mechanism qualification unit of the near-infrared camera of JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witherspoon, Bear; Huff, Lynn; Feller, Greg; Mammini, Paul

    2011-10-01

    The Pick Off Mirror (POM) is the business end of the Focus and Alignment Mechanism (FAM) of NIRCam. The POM harnesses the light delivered by the telescope and steers it into the Near Infrared Camera. At strategic points during the build and test of the Pick Off Mirror and its mechanism (the FAM) the surface figure error (SFE) of the mirror was monitored. This metric was used to track the health of the mirror throughout this testing regime. For example, the team ran an SFE test before and after Vibration testing the FAM. In this paper, we will provide an overview of the testing regime and the results of these periodic SFE tests. These results lead to the qualification of the POM and FAM designs for flight on the James Webb Space Telescope.

  12. Swing arm profilometer: analytical solutions of misalignment errors for testing axisymmetric optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ling; Luo, Xiao; Liu, Zhenyu; Wang, Xiaokun; Hu, Haixiang; Zhang, Feng; Zheng, Ligong; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-07-01

    The swing arm profilometer (SAP) has been playing a very important role in testing large aspheric optics. As one of most significant error sources that affects the test accuracy, misalignment error leads to low-order errors such as aspherical aberrations and coma apart from power. In order to analyze the effect of misalignment errors, the relation between alignment parameters and test results of axisymmetric optics is presented. Analytical solutions of SAP system errors from tested mirror misalignment, arm length L deviation, tilt-angle θ deviation, air-table spin error, and air-table misalignment are derived, respectively; and misalignment tolerance is given to guide surface measurement. In addition, experiments on a 2-m diameter parabolic mirror are demonstrated to verify the model; according to the error budget, we achieve the SAP test for low-order errors except power with accuracy of 0.1 μm root-mean-square.

  13. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): galaxy radial alignments in GAMA groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Michael D.; Cole, Shaun; Frenk, Carlos S.; Kelvin, Lee; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Norberg, Peder; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Driver, Simon; Hopkins, Andrew; Liske, Jochen; Loveday, Jon; Robotham, Aaron

    2013-08-01

    We constrain the distributions of projected radial alignment angles of satellite galaxy shapes within the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey group catalogue. We identify the galaxy groups using spectroscopic redshifts and measure galaxy projected ellipticities from Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging. With a sample of 3850 groups with 13 655 satellite galaxies with high quality shape measurements, we find a less than 2σ signal of radial alignments in the mean projected ellipticity components and the projected position angle when using galaxy shape estimates optimized for weak lensing measurements. Our radial alignment measurement increases to greater than 3σ significance relative to the expectation for no alignments if we use 2D Sérsic model fits to define galaxy orientations. Our weak measurement of radial alignments is in conflict with predictions from dark-matter N-body simulations, which we interpret as evidence for large misalignments of baryons and dark matter in group and cluster satellites. Within our uncertainties, that are dominated by our small sample size, we find only weak and marginally significant trends of the radial alignment angle distributions on projected distance from the group centre, host halo mass, and redshift that could be consistent with a tidal torquing mechanism for radial alignments. Using our lensing optimized shape estimators, we estimate that intrinsic alignments of galaxy group members may contribute a systematic error to the mean differential projected surface mass density of groups inferred from weak lensing observations by -1 ± 20 per cent at scales around 300 h-1 kpc from the group centre assuming a photometric redshift rms error of 10 per cent, and given our group sample with median redshift of 0.17 and median virial masses ˜1013 h-1 M⊙.

  14. Empirical angle-dependent Biot and MBA models for acoustic anisotropy in cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Il; Hughes, E R; Humphrey, V F; Leighton, T G; Choi, Min Joo

    2007-01-01

    The Biot and the modified Biot-Attenborough (MBA) models have been found useful to understand ultrasonic wave propagation in cancellous bone. However, neither of the models, as previously applied to cancellous bone, allows for the angular dependence of acoustic properties with direction. The present study aims to account for the acoustic anisotropy in cancellous bone, by introducing empirical angle-dependent input parameters, as defined for a highly oriented structure, into the Biot and the MBA models. The anisotropy of the angle-dependent Biot model is attributed to the variation in the elastic moduli of the skeletal frame with respect to the trabecular alignment. The angle-dependent MBA model employs a simple empirical way of using the parametric fit for the fast and the slow wave speeds. The angle-dependent models were used to predict both the fast and slow wave velocities as a function of propagation angle with respect to the trabecular alignment of cancellous bone. The predictions were compared with those of the Schoenberg model for anisotropy in cancellous bone and in vitro experimental measurements from the literature. The angle-dependent models successfully predicted the angular dependence of phase velocity of the fast wave with direction. The root-mean-square errors of the measured versus predicted fast wave velocities were 79.2 m s(-1) (angle-dependent Biot model) and 36.1 m s(-1) (angle-dependent MBA model). They also predicted the fact that the slow wave is nearly independent of propagation angle for angles about 50 degrees , but consistently underestimated the slow wave velocity with the root-mean-square errors of 187.2 m s(-1) (angle-dependent Biot model) and 240.8 m s(-1) (angle-dependent MBA model). The study indicates that the angle-dependent models reasonably replicate the acoustic anisotropy in cancellous bone.

  15. PREDITOR: a web server for predicting protein torsion angle restraints

    PubMed Central

    Berjanskii, Mark V.; Neal, Stephen; Wishart, David S.

    2006-01-01

    Every year between 500 and 1000 peptide and protein structures are determined by NMR and deposited into the Protein Data Bank. However, the process of NMR structure determination continues to be a manually intensive and time-consuming task. One of the most tedious and error-prone aspects of this process involves the determination of torsion angle restraints including phi, psi, omega and chi angles. Most methods require many days of additional experiments, painstaking measurements or complex calculations. Here we wish to describe a web server, called PREDITOR, which greatly accelerates and simplifies this task. PREDITOR accepts sequence and/or chemical shift data as input and generates torsion angle predictions (with predicted errors) for phi, psi, omega and chi-1 angles. PREDITOR combines sequence alignment methods with advanced chemical shift analysis techniques to generate its torsion angle predictions. The method is fast (<40 s per protein) and accurate, with 88% of phi/psi predictions being within 30° of the correct values, 84% of chi-1 predictions being correct and 99.97% of omega angles being correct. PREDITOR is 35 times faster and up to 20% more accurate than any existing method. PREDITOR also provides accurate assessments of the torsion angle errors so that the torsion angle constraints can be readily fed into standard structure refinement programs, such as CNS, XPLOR, AMBER and CYANA. Other unique features to PREDITOR include dihedral angle prediction via PDB structure mapping, automated chemical shift re-referencing (to improve accuracy), prediction of proline cis/trans states and a simple user interface. The PREDITOR website is located at: . PMID:16845087

  16. Angle-of-arrival reception for optical wireless location technology.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Ahmed; Dalmiya, Sumant; Klukas, Richard; Holzman, Jonathan F

    2015-03-23

    An optical wireless location (OWL) system is introduced for indoor positioning. The OWL system makes use of a mobile photoreceiver that facilitates triangulation by measuring angle-of-arrival (AOA) bearings from LEDs in an optical beacon grid. The photoreceiver has three photodiodes (PDs), arranged in a corner-cube, to facilitate differential photocurrent sensing of the incident light AOA, by way of azimuthal ϕ and polar θ angles. The AOA error for indoor positioning is characterized empirically. Optical AOA positioning is shown to have a fundamental advantage over known optical received signal strength (RSS) positioning, as AOA estimation is insensitive to power and alignment imbalances of the optical beacon grid. The OWL system is built, and a performance comparison is carried out between optical AOA and RSS positioning. It is shown that optical AOA positioning can achieve a mean 3-D positioning error of only 5 cm. Experimental design and future prospects of optical AOA positioning are discussed.

  17. Alignment validation

    SciTech Connect

    ALICE; ATLAS; CMS; LHCb; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-06

    The four experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb are currently under constructionat CERN. They will study the products of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. All experiments are equipped with sophisticated tracking systems, unprecedented in size and complexity. Full exploitation of both the inner detector andthe muon system requires an accurate alignment of all detector elements. Alignmentinformation is deduced from dedicated hardware alignment systems and the reconstruction of charged particles. However, the system is degenerate which means the data is insufficient to constrain all alignment degrees of freedom, so the techniques are prone to converging on wrong geometries. This deficiency necessitates validation and monitoring of the alignment. An exhaustive discussion of means to validate is subject to this document, including examples and plans from all four LHC experiments, as well as other high energy experiments.

  18. A line-source method for aligning on-board and other pinhole SPECT systems

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Susu; Bowsher, James; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In order to achieve functional and molecular imaging as patients are in position for radiation therapy, a robotic multipinhole SPECT system is being developed. Alignment of the SPECT system—to the linear accelerator (LINAC) coordinate frame and to the coordinate frames of other on-board imaging systems such as cone-beam CT (CBCT)—is essential for target localization and image reconstruction. An alignment method that utilizes line sources and one pinhole projection is proposed and investigated to achieve this goal. Potentially, this method could also be applied to the calibration of the other pinhole SPECT systems. Methods: An alignment model consisting of multiple alignment parameters was developed which maps line sources in three-dimensional (3D) space to their two-dimensional (2D) projections on the SPECT detector. In a computer-simulation study, 3D coordinates of line-sources were defined in a reference room coordinate frame, such as the LINAC coordinate frame. Corresponding 2D line-source projections were generated by computer simulation that included SPECT blurring and noise effects. The Radon transform was utilized to detect angles (α) and offsets (ρ) of the line-source projections. Alignment parameters were then estimated by a nonlinear least squares method, based on the α and ρ values and the alignment model. Alignment performance was evaluated as a function of number of line sources, Radon transform accuracy, finite line-source width, intrinsic camera resolution, Poisson noise, and acquisition geometry. Experimental evaluations were performed using a physical line-source phantom and a pinhole-collimated gamma camera attached to a robot. Results: In computer-simulation studies, when there was no error in determining angles (α) and offsets (ρ) of the measured projections, six alignment parameters (three translational and three rotational) were estimated perfectly using three line sources. When angles (α) and offsets (ρ) were provided by

  19. A line-source method for aligning on-board and other pinhole SPECT systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Susu; Bowsher, James; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: In order to achieve functional and molecular imaging as patients are in position for radiation therapy, a robotic multipinhole SPECT system is being developed. Alignment of the SPECT system—to the linear accelerator (LINAC) coordinate frame and to the coordinate frames of other on-board imaging systems such as cone-beam CT (CBCT)—is essential for target localization and image reconstruction. An alignment method that utilizes line sources and one pinhole projection is proposed and investigated to achieve this goal. Potentially, this method could also be applied to the calibration of the other pinhole SPECT systems.Methods: An alignment model consisting of multiple alignment parameters was developed which maps line sources in three-dimensional (3D) space to their two-dimensional (2D) projections on the SPECT detector. In a computer-simulation study, 3D coordinates of line-sources were defined in a reference room coordinate frame, such as the LINAC coordinate frame. Corresponding 2D line-source projections were generated by computer simulation that included SPECT blurring and noise effects. The Radon transform was utilized to detect angles (α) and offsets (ρ) of the line-source projections. Alignment parameters were then estimated by a nonlinear least squares method, based on the α and ρ values and the alignment model. Alignment performance was evaluated as a function of number of line sources, Radon transform accuracy, finite line-source width, intrinsic camera resolution, Poisson noise, and acquisition geometry. Experimental evaluations were performed using a physical line-source phantom and a pinhole-collimated gamma camera attached to a robot.Results: In computer-simulation studies, when there was no error in determining angles (α) and offsets (ρ) of the measured projections, six alignment parameters (three translational and three rotational) were estimated perfectly using three line sources. When angles (α) and offsets (ρ) were provided by

  20. Pupil Alignment Considerations for Large, Deployable Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bos, Brent J.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Kubalak, Daivd A.

    2011-01-01

    For many optical systems the properties and alignment of the internal apertures and pupils are not critical or controlled with high precision during optical system design, fabrication or assembly. In wide angle imaging systems, for instance, the entrance pupil position and orientation is typically unconstrained and varies over the system s field of view in order to optimize image quality. Aperture tolerances usually do not receive the same amount of scrutiny as optical surface aberrations or throughput characteristics because performance degradation is typically graceful with misalignment, generally only causing a slight reduction in system sensitivity due to vignetting. But for a large deployable space-based observatory like the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), we have found that pupil alignment is a key parameter. For in addition to vignetting, JWST pupil errors cause uncertainty in the wavefront sensing process that is used to construct the observatory on-orbit. Furthermore they also open stray light paths that degrade the science return from some of the telescope s instrument channels. In response to these consequences, we have developed several pupil measurement techniques for the cryogenic vacuum test where JWST science instrument pupil alignment is verified. These approaches use pupil alignment references within the JWST science instruments; pupil imaging lenses in three science instrument channels; and unique pupil characterization features in the optical test equipment. This will allow us to verify and crosscheck the lateral pupil alignment of the JWST science instruments to approximately 1-2% of their pupil diameters.

  1. Axial alignment for high-precision interferometric measurements of steeply-curved spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, Peter; Dresel, Thomas; Truax, Bruce

    2015-12-01

    Incorrect positioning of a steeply-curved sphere along the optical axis of a laser Fizeau interferometer introduces a measurement error that is proportional to the cosine of the inclination angle of the ray trace within the cavity, and directly proportional to the misalignment. The standard metrology solution is to subtract a fitted parabola from the 3D image, which corrects for most of the error, but neglects higher terms. As a consequence, measurements of steeply curved parts may have residual errors resembling spherical aberration. Here we calculate the magnitude of the error and present it in a graphical format that allows for straightforward quantification of the residual error as a function of the measured quadratic or power term in the measured 3D surface form. While our recommendation is to employ automated alignment for best results, we also consider options for higher-order software corrections for geometric misalignments.

  2. Magnetic alignment and the Poisson alignment reference system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, L. V.; Schenz, R. F.; Sommargren, G. E.

    1990-08-01

    Three distinct metrological operations are necessary to align a free-electron laser (FEL): the magnetic axis must be located, a straight line reference (SLR) must be generated, and the magnetic axis must be related to the SLR. This article begins with a review of the motivation for developing an alignment system that will assure better than 100-μm accuracy in the alignment of the magnetic axis throughout an FEL. The 100-μm accuracy is an error circle about an ideal axis for 300 m or more. The article describes techniques for identifying the magnetic axes of solenoids, quadrupoles, and wiggler poles. Propagation of a laser beam is described to the extent of revealing sources of nonlinearity in the beam. Development of a straight-line reference based on the Poisson line, a diffraction effect, is described in detail. Spheres in a large-diameter laser beam create Poisson lines and thus provide a necessary mechanism for gauging between the magnetic axis and the SLR. Procedures for installing FEL components and calibrating alignment fiducials to the magnetic axes of the components are also described. The Poisson alignment reference system should be accurate to 25 μm over 300 m, which is believed to be a factor-of-4 improvement over earlier techniques. An error budget shows that only 25% of the total budgeted tolerance is used for the alignment reference system, so the remaining tolerances should fall within the allowable range for FEL alignment.

  3. Prism Window for Optical Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Hong

    2008-01-01

    A prism window has been devised for use, with an autocollimator, in aligning optical components that are (1) required to be oriented parallel to each other and/or at a specified angle of incidence with respect to a common optical path and (2) mounted at different positions along the common optical path. The prism window can also be used to align a single optical component at a specified angle of incidence. Prism windows could be generally useful for orienting optical components in manufacture of optical instruments. "Prism window" denotes an application-specific unit comprising two beam-splitter windows that are bonded together at an angle chosen to obtain the specified angle of incidence.

  4. Target alignment in the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Vann, C.S.; Bliss, E.S.; Murray, J.E.

    1994-06-06

    Accurate placement of hundreds of focused laser beams on target is necessary to achieve success in the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The current system requirement is {le}7 {mu}rad error in output pointing and {le}1 mm error in focusing. To accommodate several system shots per day, a target alignment system must be able to align the target to chamber center, inject an alignment beam to represent each shot beam, and point and focus the alignment beams onto the target in about one hour. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we have developed a target alignment concept and built a prototype to validate the approach. The concept comprises three systems: the chamber center reference, target alignment sensor, and target alignment beams.

  5. Alignment fixture

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Grover C.; Gibson, O. Theodore

    1980-01-01

    A part alignment fixture is provided which may be used for precise variable lateral and tilt alignment relative to the fixture base of various shaped parts. The fixture may be used as a part holder for machining or inspection of parts or alignment of parts during assembly and the like. The fixture includes a precisely machined diameter disc-shaped hub adapted to receive the part to be aligned. The hub is nested in a guide plate which is adapted to carry two oppositely disposed pairs of positioning wedges so that the wedges may be reciprocatively positioned by means of respective micrometer screws. The sloping faces of the wedges contact the hub at respective quadrants of the hub periphery. The lateral position of the hub relative to the guide plate is adjusted by positioning the wedges with the associated micrometer screws. The tilt of the part is adjusted relative to a base plate, to which the guide plate is pivotally connected by means of a holding plate. Two pairs of oppositely disposed wedges are mounted for reciprocative lateral positioning by means of separate micrometer screws between flanges of the guide plate and the base plate. Once the wedges are positioned to achieve the proper tilt of the part or hub on which the part is mounted relative to the base plate, the fixture may be bolted to a machining, inspection, or assembly device.

  6. Curriculum Alignment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowell, Ronald; Tissot, Paula

    Curriculum alignment (CA) refers to the congruence of all the elements of a school's curriculum: curriculum goals; instructional program--what is taught and the materials used; and tests used to judge outcomes. CA can be a very powerful can be a very powerful factor in improving schools. Although further research is needed on CA, there is…

  7. Accelerator and transport line survey and alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    This paper summarizes the survey and alignment processes of accelerators and transport lines and discusses the propagation of errors associated with these processes. The major geodetic principles governing the survey and alignment measurement space are introduced and their relationship to a lattice coordinate system shown. The paper continues with a broad overview about the activities involved in the step sequence from initial absolute alignment to final smoothing. Emphasis is given to the relative alignment of components, in particular to the importance of incorporating methods to remove residual systematic effects in surveying and alignment operations. Various approaches to smoothing used at major laboratories are discussed. 47 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  8. ALIGNING JIG

    DOEpatents

    Culver, J.S.; Tunnell, W.C.

    1958-08-01

    A jig or device is described for setting or aligning an opening in one member relative to another member or structure, with a predetermined offset, or it may be used for measuring the amount of offset with which the parts have previously been sct. This jig comprises two blocks rabbeted to each other, with means for securing thc upper block to the lower block. The upper block has fingers for contacting one of the members to be a1igmed, the lower block is designed to ride in grooves within the reference member, and calibration marks are provided to determine the amount of offset. This jig is specially designed to align the collimating slits of a mass spectrometer.

  9. Image alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, Larry Jonathan

    2014-04-22

    Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

  10. Particle Filter with Novel Nonlinear Error Model for Miniature Gyroscope-Based Measurement While Drilling Navigation.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Yuan, Gannan; Li, Wang

    2016-03-15

    The derivation of a conventional error model for the miniature gyroscope-based measurement while drilling (MGWD) system is based on the assumption that the errors of attitude are small enough so that the direction cosine matrix (DCM) can be approximated or simplified by the errors of small-angle attitude. However, the simplification of the DCM would introduce errors to the navigation solutions of the MGWD system if the initial alignment cannot provide precise attitude, especially for the low-cost microelectromechanical system (MEMS) sensors operated in harsh multilateral horizontal downhole drilling environments. This paper proposes a novel nonlinear error model (NNEM) by the introduction of the error of DCM, and the NNEM can reduce the propagated errors under large-angle attitude error conditions. The zero velocity and zero position are the reference points and the innovations in the states estimation of particle filter (PF) and Kalman filter (KF). The experimental results illustrate that the performance of PF is better than KF and the PF with NNEM can effectively restrain the errors of system states, especially for the azimuth, velocity, and height in the quasi-stationary condition.

  11. Particle Filter with Novel Nonlinear Error Model for Miniature Gyroscope-Based Measurement While Drilling Navigation.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Yuan, Gannan; Li, Wang

    2016-01-01

    The derivation of a conventional error model for the miniature gyroscope-based measurement while drilling (MGWD) system is based on the assumption that the errors of attitude are small enough so that the direction cosine matrix (DCM) can be approximated or simplified by the errors of small-angle attitude. However, the simplification of the DCM would introduce errors to the navigation solutions of the MGWD system if the initial alignment cannot provide precise attitude, especially for the low-cost microelectromechanical system (MEMS) sensors operated in harsh multilateral horizontal downhole drilling environments. This paper proposes a novel nonlinear error model (NNEM) by the introduction of the error of DCM, and the NNEM can reduce the propagated errors under large-angle attitude error conditions. The zero velocity and zero position are the reference points and the innovations in the states estimation of particle filter (PF) and Kalman filter (KF). The experimental results illustrate that the performance of PF is better than KF and the PF with NNEM can effectively restrain the errors of system states, especially for the azimuth, velocity, and height in the quasi-stationary condition. PMID:26999130

  12. Particle Filter with Novel Nonlinear Error Model for Miniature Gyroscope-Based Measurement While Drilling Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Yuan, Gannan; Li, Wang

    2016-01-01

    The derivation of a conventional error model for the miniature gyroscope-based measurement while drilling (MGWD) system is based on the assumption that the errors of attitude are small enough so that the direction cosine matrix (DCM) can be approximated or simplified by the errors of small-angle attitude. However, the simplification of the DCM would introduce errors to the navigation solutions of the MGWD system if the initial alignment cannot provide precise attitude, especially for the low-cost microelectromechanical system (MEMS) sensors operated in harsh multilateral horizontal downhole drilling environments. This paper proposes a novel nonlinear error model (NNEM) by the introduction of the error of DCM, and the NNEM can reduce the propagated errors under large-angle attitude error conditions. The zero velocity and zero position are the reference points and the innovations in the states estimation of particle filter (PF) and Kalman filter (KF). The experimental results illustrate that the performance of PF is better than KF and the PF with NNEM can effectively restrain the errors of system states, especially for the azimuth, velocity, and height in the quasi-stationary condition. PMID:26999130

  13. Nonvisual Cues for Aligning to Cross Streets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Alan C.; Barlow, Janet M.; Guth, David A.; Bentzen, Billie Louise; Cunningham, Christopher M.; Long, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Accurately aligning to a crosswalk is an important component of safe street crossing for pedestrians who are blind. Six alignment cues were evaluated in a simulated crosswalk environment in which the angle of the crosswalk was not always in line with the slope of the ramp. The effectiveness of each cue is reported and implications are discussed.…

  14. Effects of Magnet Errors in the ILC 14 mrad Extraction Line

    SciTech Connect

    Toprek, Dragan; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

    2009-05-08

    The ILC baseline extraction line is designed for 14 mrad horizontal crossing angle between e{sup +} and e{sup -} colliding beams at Interaction Point (IP). The extraction optics in the Interaction Region (IR) includes a detector integrated dipole field (anti-DID) to reduce orbit perturbation caused by the detector solenoid and minimize detector background. This paper presents a study of random field and alignment errors in the extraction magnets, compensation of the induced orbit perturbation, and effects of errors on extraction beam power loss. The results are obtained for the baseline ILC energy of 500 GeV center-of-mass and three options of beam parameters.

  15. Testing the tidal alignment model of galaxy intrinsic alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, Jonathan; Seljak, Uroš; McQuinn, Matthew E-mail: mmcquinn@berkeley.edu

    2011-05-01

    Weak gravitational lensing has become a powerful probe of large-scale structure and cosmological parameters. Precision weak lensing measurements require an understanding of the intrinsic alignment of galaxy ellipticities, which can in turn inform models of galaxy formation. It is hypothesized that elliptical galaxies align with the background tidal field and that this alignment mechanism dominates the correlation between ellipticities on cosmological scales (in the absence of lensing). We use recent large-scale structure measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to test this picture with several statistics: (1) the correlation between ellipticity and galaxy overdensity, w{sub g+}; (2) the intrinsic alignment auto-correlation functions; (3) the correlation functions of curl-free, E, and divergence-free, B, modes, the latter of which is zero in the linear tidal alignment theory; (4) the alignment correlation function, w{sub g}(r{sub p},θ), a recently developed statistic that generalizes the galaxy correlation function to account for the angle between the galaxy separation vector and the principle axis of ellipticity. We show that recent measurements are largely consistent with the tidal alignment model and discuss dependence on galaxy luminosity. In addition, we show that at linear order the tidal alignment model predicts that the angular dependence of w{sub g}(r{sub p},θ) is simply w{sub g+}(r{sub p})cos (2θ) and that this dependence is consistent with recent measurements. We also study how stochastic nonlinear contributions to galaxy ellipticity impact these statistics. We find that a significant fraction of the observed LRG ellipticity can be explained by alignment with the tidal field on scales ∼> 10 \\hMpc. These considerations are relevant to galaxy formation and evolution.

  16. Alignment method for solar collector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Driver, Jr., Richard B

    2012-10-23

    The present invention is directed to an improved method for establishing camera fixture location for aligning mirrors on a solar collector array (SCA) comprising multiple mirror modules. The method aligns the mirrors on a module by comparing the location of the receiver image in photographs with the predicted theoretical receiver image location. To accurately align an entire SCA, a common reference is used for all of the individual module images within the SCA. The improved method can use relative pixel location information in digital photographs along with alignment fixture inclinometer data to calculate relative locations of the fixture between modules. The absolute locations are determined by minimizing alignment asymmetry for the SCA. The method inherently aligns all of the mirrors in an SCA to the receiver, even with receiver position and module-to-module alignment errors.

  17. Antares beam-alignment-system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Appert, Q.D.; Bender, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    The beam alignment system for the 24-beam-sector Antares CO/sub 2/ fusion laser automatically aligns more than 200 optical elements. A visible-wavelength alignment technique is employed which uses a telescope/TV system to view point-light sources appropriately located down the beamline. The centroids of the light spots are determined by a video tracker, which generates error signals used by the computer control system to move appropriate mirrors in a closed-loop system. Final touch-up alignment is accomplished by projecting a CO/sub 2/ alignment laser beam through the system and sensing its position at the target location. The techniques and control algorithms employed have resulted in alignment accuracies exceeding design requirements. By employing video processing to determine the centroids of diffraction images and by averaging over multiple TV frames, we achieve alignment accuracies better than 0.1 times system diffraction limits in the presence of air turbulence.

  18. Alignment microscope for rotating laser scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maciel, A., Jr.; Beck, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Microscopic assembly for alignment of rotary laser focuses on small film area along scan line at oblique angle. Suitable choice of angle and location of optical components project laser beam line as X coordinate reticle. Coordination with horizontal recticle line included microscope facilitates Y coordinate position indexing.

  19. High precision geometrical characterization and alignment of miniaturized optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langehanenberg, Patrik; Heinisch, Josef; Dumitrescu, Eugen

    2012-03-01

    Miniaturized optical systems like endoscopy or cell phone lenses systems comprise several optical elements like lenses, doublets and plane optics. To receive a good imaging quality the distances and angles between the different optical elements have to be as accurate as possible. In the first step we will describe how the distances and angles between different elements can be monitored and finally we will describe a technique to actively align small optics (diameter approx. 1mm and smaller) with respect to each other. For the measurement electronic autocollimators combined with white-light-interferometers are used. The electronic autocollimator reveals the exact centration errors between optical elements and the low coherence interferometer reveals the distances between surfaces. The accuracy of the centration error measurement is in the range of 0.1μm and the accuracy of the distance measurement is 1μm. Both methods can be applied to assembled multi-element optics. That means geometrical positions of all single surfaces of the final optical system can be analysed without loss of information. Both measurement techniques complement one another. Once the exact x,y,z - Position of each optical surface and element is known computer controlled actuators will be used to improve the alignment of the optics. For this purpose we use piezo-electric-actuators. This method had been applied to cement e.g. doublets for endoscope optics. In this case the optical axis of one lens has been aligned with respect to the optical axis of a second reference lens. Traditional techniques usually rely on an uncertain mechanical reference.

  20. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Anisotropic light emission from aligned luminophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbunt, Paul P. C.; de Jong, Ties M.; de Boer, Dick K. G.; Broer, Dirk J.; Debije, Michael G.

    2014-07-01

    The emission of aligned dichroic dyes in a luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) illuminated from one side with collimated light results in a non-isotropic light distribution. We develop a model to describe emission profiles for dichroic dyes aligned at a general tilt angle with respect to a lightguide surface (including planar and homeotropic alignments) for various order parameters. We compare calculations with experimental results, demonstrating the dichroic nature of the dyes can have significant impact on the surface loss of luminescent solar concentrators. Including this dichroic nature is essential in correctly simulating the preferred edge emissions demonstrated experimentally in dyes aligned planarly on the surface of a lightguide.

  2. A statistical algorithm for assessing cellular alignment.

    PubMed

    Nectow, Alexander R; Gil, Eun Seok; Kaplan, David L; Kilmer, Misha E

    2013-03-01

    Current statistical techniques for analyzing cellular alignment data in the fields of biomaterials and tissue engineering are limited because of heuristic and less quantitative approaches. For example, generally a cutoff degree limit (commonly 20 degrees) is arbitrarily defined within which cells are considered "aligned." The effectiveness of a patterned biomaterial in guiding the alignment of cells, such as neurons, is often critical to predict relationships between the biomaterial design and biological outcomes, both in vitro and in vivo. This becomes particularly important in the case of peripheral neurons, which require precise axon guidance to obtain successful regenerative outcomes. To address this issue, we have developed a protocol for processing cellular alignment data sets, which implicitly determines an "angle of alignment." This was accomplished as follows: cells "aligning" with an underlying, anisotropic scaffold display uniformly distributed angles up to a cutoff point determined by how effective the biomaterial is in aligning cells. Therefore, this fact was then used to determine where an alignment angle data set diverges from a uniform distribution. This was accomplished by measuring the spacing between the collected, increasingly ordered angles and analyzing their underlying distributions using a normalized cumulative periodogram criterion. The proposed protocol offers a novel way to implicitly define cellular alignment, with respect to various anisotropic biomaterials. This method may also offer an alternative to assess cellular alignment, which could offer improved predictive measures related to biological outcomes. Furthermore, the approach described can be used for a broad range of cell types grown on 2D surfaces, but would not be applicable to 3D scaffold systems in the present format.

  3. Magnetic axis alignment and the Poisson alignment reference system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Lee V.; Schenz, Richard F.; Sommargren, Gary E.

    1989-01-01

    Three distinct metrological operations are necessary to align a free-electron laser (FEL): the magnetic axis must be located, a straight line reference (SLR) must be generated, and the magnetic axis must be related to the SLR. This paper begins with a review of the motivation for developing an alignment system that will assure better than 100 micrometer accuracy in the alignment of the magnetic axis throughout an FEL. The paper describes techniques for identifying the magnetic axis of solenoids, quadrupoles, and wiggler poles. Propagation of a laser beam is described to the extent of revealing sources of nonlinearity in the beam. Development and use of the Poisson line, a diffraction effect, is described in detail. Spheres in a large-diameter laser beam create Poisson lines and thus provide a necessary mechanism for gauging between the magnetic axis and the SLR. Procedures for installing FEL components and calibrating alignment fiducials to the magnetic axes of the components are also described. An error budget shows that the Poisson alignment reference system will make it possible to meet the alignment tolerances for an FEL.

  4. Alignments between galaxies, satellite systems and haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shi; Cautun, Marius; Frenk, Carlos S.; Gao, Liang; Crain, Robert A.; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom

    2016-08-01

    The spatial distribution of the satellite populations of the Milky Way and Andromeda are puzzling in that they are nearly perpendicular to the discs of their central galaxies. To understand the origin of such configurations we study the alignment of the central galaxy, satellite system and dark matter halo in the largest of the `Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments' (EAGLE) simulation. We find that centrals and their satellite systems tend to be well aligned with their haloes, with a median misalignment angle of 33° in both cases. While the centrals are better aligned with the inner 10 kpc halo, the satellite systems are better aligned with the entire halo indicating that satellites preferentially trace the outer halo. The central-satellite alignment is weak (median misalignment angle of 52°) and we find that around 20 per cent of systems have a misalignment angle larger than 78°, which is the value for the Milky Way. The central-satellite alignment is a consequence of the tendency of both components to align with the dark matter halo. As a consequence, when the central is parallel to the satellite system, it also tends to be parallel to the halo. In contrast, if the central is perpendicular to the satellite system, as in the case of the Milky Way and Andromeda, then the central-halo alignment is much weaker. Dispersion-dominated (spheroidal) centrals have a stronger alignment with both their halo and their satellites than rotation-dominated (disc) centrals. We also found that the halo, the central galaxy and the satellite system tend to be aligned with the surrounding large-scale distribution of matter, with the halo being the better aligned of the three.

  5. Global alignment: Finding rearrangements during alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Brudno, Michael; Malde, Sanket; Poliakov, Alexander; Do, Chuong B.; Couronne, Olivier; Dubchak, Inna; Batzoglou, Serafim

    2003-01-06

    Motivation: To compare entire genomes from different species, biologists increasingly need alignment methods that are efficient enough to handle long sequences, and accurate enough to correctly align the conserved biological features between distant species. The two main classes of pairwise alignments are global alignment, where one string is transformed into the other, and local alignment, where all locations of similarity between the two strings are returned. Global alignments are less prone to demonstrating false homology as each letter of one sequence is constrained to being aligned to only one letter of the other. Local alignments, on the other hand, can cope with rearrangements between non-syntenic, orthologous sequences by identifying similar regions in sequences; this, however, comes at the expense of a higher false positive rate due to the inability of local aligners to take into account overall conservation maps.

  6. Refractive Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... and lens of your eye helps you focus. Refractive errors are vision problems that happen when the shape ... cornea, or aging of the lens. Four common refractive errors are Myopia, or nearsightedness - clear vision close up ...

  7. Alignment control study for the solar optical telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of the alignment and focus errors than can be tolerated, methods of sensing such errors, and mechanisms to make the necessary corrections were addressed. Alternate approaches and their relative merits were considered. The results of this study indicate that adequate alignment control can be achieved.

  8. He I Vector Magnetometry of Field-aligned Superpenumbral Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, T. A.; Penn, M. J.; Lin, H.

    2013-05-01

    Atomic-level polarization and Zeeman effect diagnostics in the neutral helium triplet at 10830 Å in principle allow full vector magnetometry of fine-scaled chromospheric fibrils. We present high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of superpenumbral fibrils in the He I triplet with sufficient polarimetric sensitivity to infer their full magnetic field geometry. He I observations from the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter are paired with high-resolution observations of the Hα 6563 Å and Ca II 8542 Å spectral lines from the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer from the Dunn Solar Telescope in New Mexico. Linear and circular polarization signatures in the He I triplet are measured and described, as well as analyzed with the advanced inversion capability of the "Hanle and Zeeman Light" modeling code. Our analysis provides direct evidence for the often assumed field alignment of fibril structures. The projected angle of the fibrils and the inferred magnetic field geometry align within an error of ±10°. We describe changes in the inclination angle of these features that reflect their connectivity with the photospheric magnetic field. Evidence for an accelerated flow (~40 m s-2) along an individual fibril anchored at its endpoints in the strong sunspot and weaker plage in part supports the magnetic siphon flow mechanism's role in the inverse Evershed effect. However, the connectivity of the outer endpoint of many of the fibrils cannot be established.

  9. He I VECTOR MAGNETOMETRY OF FIELD-ALIGNED SUPERPENUMBRAL FIBRILS

    SciTech Connect

    Schad, T. A.; Penn, M. J.; Lin, H.

    2013-05-10

    Atomic-level polarization and Zeeman effect diagnostics in the neutral helium triplet at 10830 A in principle allow full vector magnetometry of fine-scaled chromospheric fibrils. We present high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of superpenumbral fibrils in the He I triplet with sufficient polarimetric sensitivity to infer their full magnetic field geometry. He I observations from the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter are paired with high-resolution observations of the H{alpha} 6563 A and Ca II 8542 A spectral lines from the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer from the Dunn Solar Telescope in New Mexico. Linear and circular polarization signatures in the He I triplet are measured and described, as well as analyzed with the advanced inversion capability of the ''Hanle and Zeeman Light'' modeling code. Our analysis provides direct evidence for the often assumed field alignment of fibril structures. The projected angle of the fibrils and the inferred magnetic field geometry align within an error of {+-}10 Degree-Sign . We describe changes in the inclination angle of these features that reflect their connectivity with the photospheric magnetic field. Evidence for an accelerated flow ({approx}40 m s{sup -2}) along an individual fibril anchored at its endpoints in the strong sunspot and weaker plage in part supports the magnetic siphon flow mechanism's role in the inverse Evershed effect. However, the connectivity of the outer endpoint of many of the fibrils cannot be established.

  10. Automated interferometric alignment system for paraboloidal mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, L.C.

    1993-09-28

    A method is described for a systematic method of interpreting interference fringes obtained by using a corner cube retroreflector as an alignment aid when aligning a paraboloid to a spherical wavefront. This is applicable to any general case where such alignment is required, but is specifically applicable in the case of aligning an autocollimating test using a diverging beam wavefront. In addition, the method provides information which can be systematically interpreted such that independent information about pitch, yaw and focus errors can be obtained. Thus, the system lends itself readily to automation. Finally, although the method is developed specifically for paraboloids, it can be seen to be applicable to a variety of other aspheric optics when applied in combination with a wavefront corrector that produces a wavefront which, when reflected from the correctly aligned aspheric surface will produce a collimated wavefront like that obtained from the paraboloid when it is correctly aligned to a spherical wavefront. 14 figures.

  11. An Improved Inertial Frame Alignment Algorithm Based on Horizontal Alignment Information for Marine SINS.

    PubMed

    Che, Yanting; Wang, Qiuying; Gao, Wei; Yu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an improved inertial frame alignment algorithm for a marine SINS under mooring conditions is proposed, which significantly improves accuracy. Since the horizontal alignment is easy to complete, and a characteristic of gravity is that its component in the horizontal plane is zero, we use a clever method to improve the conventional inertial alignment algorithm. Firstly, a large misalignment angle model and a dimensionality reduction Gauss-Hermite filter are employed to establish the fine horizontal reference frame. Based on this, the projection of the gravity in the body inertial coordinate frame can be calculated easily. Then, the initial alignment algorithm is accomplished through an inertial frame alignment algorithm. The simulation and experiment results show that the improved initial alignment algorithm performs better than the conventional inertial alignment algorithm, and meets the accuracy requirements of a medium-accuracy marine SINS.

  12. An Improved Inertial Frame Alignment Algorithm Based on Horizontal Alignment Information for Marine SINS

    PubMed Central

    Che, Yanting; Wang, Qiuying; Gao, Wei; Yu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an improved inertial frame alignment algorithm for a marine SINS under mooring conditions is proposed, which significantly improves accuracy. Since the horizontal alignment is easy to complete, and a characteristic of gravity is that its component in the horizontal plane is zero, we use a clever method to improve the conventional inertial alignment algorithm. Firstly, a large misalignment angle model and a dimensionality reduction Gauss-Hermite filter are employed to establish the fine horizontal reference frame. Based on this, the projection of the gravity in the body inertial coordinate frame can be calculated easily. Then, the initial alignment algorithm is accomplished through an inertial frame alignment algorithm. The simulation and experiment results show that the improved initial alignment algorithm performs better than the conventional inertial alignment algorithm, and meets the accuracy requirements of a medium-accuracy marine SINS. PMID:26445048

  13. Wave-optical assessment of alignment tolerances in nano-focusing with ellipsoidal mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Koyama, Takahisa; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Ohashi, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    High-precision ellipsoidal mirrors, which can efficiently focus X-rays to the nanometer dimension with a mirror, have not been realized because of the difficulties in the fabrication process. The purpose of our study was to develop nano-focusing ellipsoidal mirrors in the hard X-ray region. We developed a wave-optical focusing simulator for investigating alignment tolerances in nano-focusing with a designed ellipsoidal mirror, which produce a diffraction-limited focus size of 30 × 35 nm2 in full width at half maximum at an X-ray energy of 7 keV. The simulator can calculate focusing intensity distributions around the focal point under conditions of misalignment. The wave-optical simulator enabled the calculation of interference intensity distributions, which cannot be predicted by the conventional ray-trace method. The alignment conditions with a focal length error of ≲ ±10 µm, incident angle error of ≲ ±0.5 µrad, and in-plane rotation angle error of ≲ ±0.25 µrad must be satisfied for nano-focusing.

  14. Automatic Alignment of Displacement-Measuring Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halverson, Peter; Regehr, Martin; Spero, Robert; Alvarez-Salazar, Oscar; Loya, Frank; Logan, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    A control system strives to maintain the correct alignment of a laser beam in an interferometer dedicated to measuring the displacement or distance between two fiducial corner-cube reflectors. The correct alignment of the laser beam is parallel to the line between the corner points of the corner-cube reflectors: Any deviation from parallelism changes the length of the optical path between the reflectors, thereby introducing a displacement or distance measurement error. On the basis of the geometrical optics of corner-cube reflectors, the length of the optical path can be shown to be L = L(sub 0)cos theta, where L(sub 0) is the distance between the corner points and theta is the misalignment angle. Therefore, the measurement error is given by DeltaL = L(sub 0)(cos theta - 1). In the usual case in which the misalignment is small, this error can be approximated as DeltaL approximately equal to -L(sub 0)theta sup 2/2. The control system (see figure) is implemented partly in hardware and partly in software. The control system includes three piezoelectric actuators for rapid, fine adjustment of the direction of the laser beam. The voltages applied to the piezoelectric actuators include components designed to scan the beam in a circular pattern so that the beam traces out a narrow cone (60 microradians wide in the initial application) about the direction in which it is nominally aimed. This scan is performed at a frequency (2.5 Hz in the initial application) well below the resonance frequency of any vibration of the interferometer. The laser beam makes a round trip to both corner-cube reflectors and then interferes with the launched beam. The interference is detected on a photodiode. The length of the optical path is measured by a heterodyne technique: A 100- kHz frequency shift between the launched beam and a reference beam imposes, on the detected signal, an interferometric phase shift proportional to the length of the optical path. A phase meter comprising analog

  15. Some Alignment Considerations for the Next Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, R

    2004-06-08

    Next Linear Collider type accelerators require a new level of alignment quality. The relative alignment of these machines is to be maintained in an error envelope dimensioned in micrometers and for certain parts in nanometers. In the nanometer domain our terra firma cannot be considered monolithic but compares closer to jelly. Since conventional optical alignment methods cannot deal with the dynamics and cannot approach the level of accuracy, special alignment and monitoring techniques must be pursued.

  16. Angle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, G. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An angle detector for determining a transducer's angular disposition to a capacitive pickup element is described. The transducer comprises a pendulum mounted inductive element moving past the capacitive pickup element. The capacitive pickup element divides the inductive element into two parts L sub 1 and L sub 2 which form the arms of one side of an a-c bridge. Two networks R sub 1 and R sub 2 having a plurality of binary weighted resistors and an equal number of digitally controlled switches for removing resistors from the networks form the arms of the other side of the a-c bridge. A binary counter, controlled by a phase detector, balances the bridge by adjusting the resistance of R sub 1 and R sub 2. The binary output of the counter is representative of the angle.

  17. Fiber optics welder having movable aligning mirror

    DOEpatents

    Higgins, Robert W.; Robichaud, Roger E.

    1981-01-01

    A system for welding fiber optic waveguides together. The ends of the two fibers to be joined together are accurately, collinearly aligned in a vertical orientation and subjected to a controlled, diffuse arc to effect welding and thermal conditioning. A front-surfaced mirror mounted at a 45.degree. angle to the optical axis of a stereomicroscope mounted for viewing the junction of the ends provides two orthogonal views of the interface during the alignment operation.

  18. Order in vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsin; Xu, Z; Eres, Gyula

    2006-01-01

    We report the direct measurements on the bulk morphology of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). SANS measurements at different heights of CNT arrays corresponding to different stages of the growth reveal increasing alignment order along the thickness and two distinctly different CNT morphologies. The observations suggest that the evolution of the macroscopic CNT morphologies be driven by competing collective growth and spatial constraints.

  19. Shod wear and foot alignment in clinical gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Louey, Melissa Gar Yee; Sangeux, Morgan

    2016-09-01

    Sagittal plane alignment of the foot presents challenges when the subject wears shoes during gait analysis. Typically, visual alignment is performed by positioning two markers, the heel and toe markers, aligned with the foot within the shoe. Alternatively, software alignment is possible when the sole of the shoe lies parallel to the ground, and the change in the shoe's sole thickness is measured and entered as a parameter. The aim of this technical note was to evaluate the accuracy of visual and software foot alignment during shod gait analysis. We calculated the static standing ankle angles of 8 participants (mean age: 8.7 years, SD: 2.9 years) wearing bilateral solid ankle foot orthoses (BSAFOs) with and without shoes using the visual and software alignment methods. All participants were able to stand with flat feet in both static trials and the ankle angles obtained in BSAFOs without shoes was considered the reference. We showed that the current implementation of software alignment introduces a bias towards more ankle dorsiflexion, mean=3°, SD=3.4°, p=0.006, and proposed an adjusted software alignment method. We found no statistical differences using visual alignment and adjusted software alignment between the shoe and shoeless conditions, p=0.19 for both. Visual alignment or adjusted software alignment are advised to represent foot alignment accurately.

  20. Shod wear and foot alignment in clinical gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Louey, Melissa Gar Yee; Sangeux, Morgan

    2016-09-01

    Sagittal plane alignment of the foot presents challenges when the subject wears shoes during gait analysis. Typically, visual alignment is performed by positioning two markers, the heel and toe markers, aligned with the foot within the shoe. Alternatively, software alignment is possible when the sole of the shoe lies parallel to the ground, and the change in the shoe's sole thickness is measured and entered as a parameter. The aim of this technical note was to evaluate the accuracy of visual and software foot alignment during shod gait analysis. We calculated the static standing ankle angles of 8 participants (mean age: 8.7 years, SD: 2.9 years) wearing bilateral solid ankle foot orthoses (BSAFOs) with and without shoes using the visual and software alignment methods. All participants were able to stand with flat feet in both static trials and the ankle angles obtained in BSAFOs without shoes was considered the reference. We showed that the current implementation of software alignment introduces a bias towards more ankle dorsiflexion, mean=3°, SD=3.4°, p=0.006, and proposed an adjusted software alignment method. We found no statistical differences using visual alignment and adjusted software alignment between the shoe and shoeless conditions, p=0.19 for both. Visual alignment or adjusted software alignment are advised to represent foot alignment accurately. PMID:27420611

  1. A brief history of error.

    PubMed

    Murray, Andrew W

    2011-10-01

    The spindle checkpoint monitors chromosome alignment on the mitotic and meiotic spindle. When the checkpoint detects errors, it arrests progress of the cell cycle while it attempts to correct the mistakes. This perspective will present a brief history summarizing what we know about the checkpoint, and a list of questions we must answer before we understand it. PMID:21968991

  2. Alignment and Performance of the Infrared Multi-Object Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connelly, Joseph A.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Mentzell, J. Eric; Madison, Timothy J.; Hylan, Jason E.; Mink, Ronald G.; Saha, Timo T.; Tveekrem, June L.; Sparr, Leroy M.; Chambers, V. John; Fitzgerald, Danetter; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; MacKenty, John W.

    2004-01-01

    The Infrared Multi-Object Spectrometer (IRMOS) is a principle investigator class instrument for the Kitt Peak National Observatory 4 and 2.1 meter telescopes. IRMOS is a near-IR (0.8 - 2.5 micron) spectrometer with low-to mid-resolving power (R = 300 - 3000). IRMOS produces simultaneous spectra of approximately 100 objects in its 2.8 x 2.0 arc-min field of view (4 m telescope) using a commercial Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) micro-mirror array (MMA) from Texas Instruments. The IRMOS optical design consists of two imaging subsystems. The focal reducer images the focal plane of the telescope onto the MMA field stop, and the spectrograph images the MMA onto the detector. We describe ambient breadboard subsystem alignment and imaging performance of each stage independently, and ambient imaging performance of the fully assembled instrument. Interferometric measurements of subsystem wavefront error serve as a qualitative alignment guide, and are accomplished using a commercial, modified Twyman-Green laser unequal path interferometer. Image testing provides verification of the optomechanical alignment method and a measurement of near-angle scattered light due to mirror small-scale surface error. Image testing is performed at multiple field points. A mercury-argon pencil lamp provides a spectral line at 546.1 nanometers, a blackbody source provides a line at 1550 nanometers, and a CCD camera and IR camera are used as detectors. We use commercial optical modeling software to predict the point-spread function and its effect on instrument slit transmission and resolution. Our breadboard and instrument level test results validate this prediction. We conclude with an instrument performance prediction for cryogenic operation and first light in late 2003.

  3. Alignment and performance of the Infrared Multi-Object Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelly, Joseph A.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Mentzell, J. E.; Madison, Timothy J.; Hylan, Jason E.; Mink, Ronald G.; Saha, Timo T.; Tveekrem, June L.; Sparr, Leroy M.; Chambers, Victor J.; Fitzgerald, Danette L.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; MacKenty, John W.

    2003-10-01

    The Infrared Multi-Object Spectrometer (IRMOS) is a principle investigator class instrument for the Kitt Peak National Observatory 4 and 2.1 m telescopes. IRMOS is a near-IR (0.8 2.5 μm) spectrometer with low- to mid-resolving power (R = 300 3000). IRMOS produces simultaneous spectra of ~100 objects in its 2.8 ´ 2.0 arc-min field of view (4 m telescope) using a commercial Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) micro-mirror array (MMA) from Texas Instruments. The IRMOS optical design consists of two imaging subsystems. The focal reducer images the focal plane of the telescope onto the MMA field stop, and the spectrograph images the MMA onto the detector. We describe ambient breadboard subsystem alignment and imaging performance of each stage independently, and ambient imaging performance of the fully assembled instrument. Interferometric measurements of subsystem wavefront error serve as a qualitative alignment guide, and are accomplished using a commercial, modified Twyman-Green laser unequal path interferometer. Image testing provides verification of the optomechanical alignment method and a measurement of near-angle scattered light due to mirror small-scale surface error. Image testing is performed at multiple field points. A mercury-argon pencil lamp provides a spectral line at 546.1 nm, a blackbody source provides a line at 1550 nm, and a CCD camera and IR camera are used as detectors. We use commercial optical modeling software to predict the point-spread function and its effect on instrument slit transmission and resolution. Our breadboard and instrument level test results validate this prediction. We conclude with an instrument performance prediction for cryogenic operation and first light in late 2003.

  4. Error Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Philipp O. J.

    Input data as well as the results of elementary operations have to be represented by machine numbers, the subset of real numbers which is used by the arithmetic unit of today's computers. Generally this generates rounding errors. This kind of numerical error can be avoided in principle by using arbitrary precision arithmetics or symbolic algebra programs. But this is unpractical in many cases due to the increase in computing time and memory requirements. Results from more complex operations like square roots or trigonometric functions can have even larger errors since series expansions have to be truncated and iterations accumulate the errors of the individual steps. In addition, the precision of input data from an experiment is limited. In this chapter we study the influence of numerical errors on the uncertainties of the calculated results and the stability of simple algorithms.

  5. Alignment of chirped-pulse compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, I V

    2012-11-30

    An original method of alignment of grating compressors for ultrahigh-power CPA laser systems is proposed. The use of this method for adjustment of the grating compressor of a PEARL subpetawatt laser complex made it possible to align the diffraction gratings with a second accuracy in all three angular degrees of freedom, including alignment of the grooves, and to adjust the angles of beam incidence on the grating with a high accuracy. A simple method for measuring the difference in the groove densities of gratings with accuracy better than 0.005 lines mm{sup -1} is proposed and tested. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  6. The twilight zone of cis element alignments.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Alvaro; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno

    2013-02-01

    Sequence alignment of proteins and nucleic acids is a routine task in bioinformatics. Although the comparison of complete peptides, genes or genomes can be undertaken with a great variety of tools, the alignment of short DNA sequences and motifs entails pitfalls that have not been fully addressed yet. Here we confront the structural superposition of transcription factors with the sequence alignment of their recognized cis elements. Our goals are (i) to test TFcompare (http://floresta.eead.csic.es/tfcompare), a structural alignment method for protein-DNA complexes; (ii) to benchmark the pairwise alignment of regulatory elements; (iii) to define the confidence limits and the twilight zone of such alignments and (iv) to evaluate the relevance of these thresholds with elements obtained experimentally. We find that the structure of cis elements and protein-DNA interfaces is significantly more conserved than their sequence and measures how this correlates with alignment errors when only sequence information is considered. Our results confirm that DNA motifs in the form of matrices produce better alignments than individual sequences. Finally, we report that empirical and theoretically derived twilight thresholds are useful for estimating the natural plasticity of regulatory sequences, and hence for filtering out unreliable alignments.

  7. Silicon oxides as alignment surfaces for vertically-aligned nematics in photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oton, E.; López-Andrés, S.; Bennis, N.; Otón, J. M.; Geday, M. A.

    2014-06-01

    A comparative study on alignment performance and microstructure of inorganic layers used for liquid crystal cell conditioning has been carried out. The study has focused on two specific materials, SiOx and SiO2, deposited under different conditions. The purpose was to establish a relationship between layer microstructure and liquid crystal alignment. The surface morphology has been studied by FESEM and AFM. An analysis on liquid crystal alignment, pretilt angle, response time, contrast ratio and the conditions to develop backflow effect (significant rise time increase due to pure homeotropic alignment) on vertically-aligned nematic cells has been carried out. A technique to overcome the presence of backflow has been identified. The full comparative study of SiOx and SiO2 layer properties and their influence over liquid crystal alignment and electrooptic response is presented.

  8. Automated interferometric alignment system for paraboloidal mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, L. Curtis

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for a systematic method of interpreting interference fringes obtained by using a corner cube retroreflector as an alignment aid when aigning a paraboloid to a spherical wavefront. This is applicable to any general case where such alignment is required, but is specifically applicable in the case of aligning an autocollimating test using a diverging beam wavefront. In addition, the method provides information which can be systematically interpreted such that independent information about pitch, yaw and focus errors can be obtained. Thus, the system lends itself readily to automation. Finally, although the method is developed specifically for paraboloids, it can be seen to be applicable to a variety of other aspheric optics when applied in combination with a wavefront corrector that produces a wavefront which, when reflected from the correctly aligned aspheric surface will produce a collimated wavefront like that obtained from the paraboloid when it is correctly aligned to a spherical wavefront.

  9. Rotational Alignment Altered by Source Position Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Chris S.; Heflin, M. B.; Lanyi, G. E.; Sovers, O. J.; Steppe, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    In the construction of modern Celestial Reference Frames (CRFs) the overall rotational alignment is only weakly constrained by the data. Therefore, common practice has been to apply a 3-dimensional No-Net-Rotation (NNR) constraint in order to align an under-construction frame to the ICRF. We present evidence that correlations amongst source position parameters must be accounted for in order to properly align a CRF at the 5-10 (mu)as level of uncertainty found in current work. Failure to do so creates errors at the 10-40 (mu)as level.

  10. Medication Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... to reduce the risk of medication errors to industry and others at FDA. Additionally, DMEPA prospectively reviews ... List of Abbreviations Regulations and Guidances Guidance for Industry: Safety Considerations for Product Design to Minimize Medication ...

  11. Medication Errors

    MedlinePlus

    Medicines cure infectious diseases, prevent problems from chronic diseases, and ease pain. But medicines can also cause harmful reactions if not used ... You can help prevent errors by Knowing your medicines. Keep a list of the names of your ...

  12. Error correction for rotationally asymmetric surface deviation testing based on rotational shears.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weibo; Liu, Pengfei; Xing, Yaolong; Tan, Jiubin; Liu, Jian

    2016-09-10

    We present a practical method for absolute testing of rotationally asymmetric surface deviation based on rotation averaging, additional compensation, and azimuthal errors correction. The errors of angular orders kNθ neglected in the traditional multiangle averaging method can be reconstructed and compensated with the help of least-squares fitting of Zernike polynomials by an additional rotation measurement with a suitable selection of rotation angles. The estimation algorithm adopts the least-squares technique to eliminate azimuthal errors caused by rotation inaccuracy. The unknown relative alignment of the measurements also can be estimated through the differences in measurement results at overlapping areas. The method proposed combines the advantages of the single-rotation and multiangle averaging methods and realizes a balance between the efficiency and accuracy of the measurements. Experimental results show that the method proposed can obtain high accuracy even with fewer rotation measurements. PMID:27661385

  13. Shuttle onboard IMU alignment methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The current approach to the shuttle IMU alignment is based solely on the Apollo Deterministic Method. This method is simple, fast, reliable and provides an accurate estimate for the present cluster to mean of 1,950 transformation matrix. If four or more star sightings are available, the application of least squares analysis can be utilized. The least squares method offers the next level of sophistication to the IMU alignment solution. The least squares method studied shows that a more accurate estimate for the misalignment angles is computed, and the IMU drift rates are a free by-product of the analysis. Core storage requirements are considerably more; estimated 20 to 30 times the core required for the Apollo Deterministic Method. The least squares method offers an intermediate solution utilizing as much data that is available without a complete statistical analysis as in Kalman filtering.

  14. Uncertainty in homology inferences: Assessing and improving genomic sequence alignment

    PubMed Central

    Lunter, Gerton; Rocco, Andrea; Mimouni, Naila; Heger, Andreas; Caldeira, Alexandre; Hein, Jotun

    2008-01-01

    Sequence alignment underpins all of comparative genomics, yet it remains an incompletely solved problem. In particular, the statistical uncertainty within inferred alignments is often disregarded, while parametric or phylogenetic inferences are considered meaningless without confidence estimates. Here, we report on a theoretical and simulation study of pairwise alignments of genomic DNA at human–mouse divergence. We find that >15% of aligned bases are incorrect in existing whole-genome alignments, and we identify three types of alignment error, each leading to systematic biases in all algorithms considered. Careful modeling of the evolutionary process improves alignment quality; however, these improvements are modest compared with the remaining alignment errors, even with exact knowledge of the evolutionary model, emphasizing the need for statistical approaches to account for uncertainty. We develop a new algorithm, Marginalized Posterior Decoding (MPD), which explicitly accounts for uncertainties, is less biased and more accurate than other algorithms we consider, and reduces the proportion of misaligned bases by a third compared with the best existing algorithm. To our knowledge, this is the first nonheuristic algorithm for DNA sequence alignment to show robust improvements over the classic Needleman–Wunsch algorithm. Despite this, considerable uncertainty remains even in the improved alignments. We conclude that a probabilistic treatment is essential, both to improve alignment quality and to quantify the remaining uncertainty. This is becoming increasingly relevant with the growing appreciation of the importance of noncoding DNA, whose study relies heavily on alignments. Alignment errors are inevitable, and should be considered when drawing conclusions from alignments. Software and alignments to assist researchers in doing this are provided at http://genserv.anat.ox.ac.uk/grape/. PMID:18073381

  15. Split-alignment of genomes finds orthologies more accurately.

    PubMed

    Frith, Martin C; Kawaguchi, Risa

    2015-01-01

    We present a new pair-wise genome alignment method, based on a simple concept of finding an optimal set of local alignments. It gains accuracy by not masking repeats, and by using a statistical model to quantify the (un)ambiguity of each alignment part. Compared to previous animal genome alignments, it aligns thousands of locations differently and with much higher similarity, strongly suggesting that the previous alignments are non-orthologous. The previous methods suffer from an overly-strong assumption of long un-rearranged blocks. The new alignments should help find interesting and unusual features, such as fast-evolving elements and micro-rearrangements, which are confounded by alignment errors. PMID:25994148

  16. Phylogenetic Inference From Conserved sites Alignments

    SciTech Connect

    grundy, W.N.; Naylor, G.J.P.

    1999-08-15

    Molecular sequences provide a rich source of data for inferring the phylogenetic relationships among species. However, recent work indicates that even an accurate multiple alignment of a large sequence set may yield an incorrect phylogeny and that the quality of the phylogenetic tree improves when the input consists only of the highly conserved, motif regions of the alignment. This work introduces two methods of producing multiple alignments that include only the conserved regions of the initial alignment. The first method retains conserved motifs, whereas the second retains individual conserved sites in the initial alignment. Using parsimony analysis on a mitochondrial data set containing 19 species among which the phylogenetic relationships are widely accepted, both conserved alignment methods produce better phylogenetic trees than the complete alignment. Unlike any of the 19 inference methods used before to analyze this data, both methods produce trees that are completely consistent with the known phylogeny. The motif-based method employs far fewer alignment sites for comparable error rates. For a larger data set containing mitochondrial sequences from 39 species, the site-based method produces a phylogenetic tree that is largely consistent with known phylogenetic relationships and suggests several novel placements.

  17. The relationship between pelvic alignment and dysmenorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moon-jeong; Baek, Il-hun; Goo, Bong-oh

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between pelvic alignment and dysmenorrhea in general women. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred two females participated in this study. They were divided into a dysmenorrhea group and a normal group based on the results of a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) assessment of pain and the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MDQ). The survey data was collecting from 5th July to 20th September, 2014. Formetric 4D was used to measure the pelvic alignment, including the values of Trunk Imbalance, Pelvic Tilt, Surface Rotation, Lateral Deviation, Kyphosis Angle, Lordosis Angle. [Results] There was a difference in the spine alignments of each group. The value of pelvic torsion was 2.4 ± 1.8 degree in those with dysmenorrhea, while it was 1.7 ± 1.1 degree in those without. [Conclusion] In conclusion, the results suggest that there is a relationship between menstrual pain and pelvic torsion. PMID:27134354

  18. MAVID multiple alignment server.

    PubMed

    Bray, Nicolas; Pachter, Lior

    2003-07-01

    MAVID is a multiple alignment program suitable for many large genomic regions. The MAVID web server allows biomedical researchers to quickly obtain multiple alignments for genomic sequences and to subsequently analyse the alignments for conserved regions. MAVID has been successfully used for the alignment of closely related species such as primates and also for the alignment of more distant organisms such as human and fugu. The server is fast, capable of aligning hundreds of kilobases in less than a minute. The multiple alignment is used to build a phylogenetic tree for the sequences, which is subsequently used as a basis for identifying conserved regions in the alignment. The server can be accessed at http://baboon.math.berkeley.edu/mavid/.

  19. Nearest Alignment Space Termination

    2006-07-13

    Near Alignment Space Termination (NAST) is the Greengenes algorithm that matches up submitted sequences with the Greengenes database to look for similarities and align the submitted sequences based on those similarities.

  20. Four-wheel alignment based on computer vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dongzhao; Zhao, Qiancheng; Yang, Tianlong

    2015-02-01

    A model was built for four-wheel alignment on a vehicle based on computer vision. Such parameters as toe-in angle, camber angle, kingpin inclination and kingpin caster were accurately defined and calculation formulas were formulated for the parameters, especially the calculation methods for vector N and vector E. A kind of new 3D four-wheel aligner vas developed. Simulation results and actual measurements indicated that the model and solution method were feasible and effective.

  1. The Alignment of Galaxy Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biernacka, M.; Panko, E.; Bajan, K.; Godłowski, W.; Flin, P.

    2015-11-01

    We analyzed the orientation of the sample of ACO galaxy clusters. We examined the alignment in a subsample of 1056 galaxy structures taken from the Panko-Flin (2006) Catalog with known BM morphological types. We were looking for a correlation between the orientation of the cluster and the positions of neighboring clusters. The Binggeli effect (the excess of small values of the Δθ angles between the direction toward neighboring clusters and the cluster position angle) is observed, having a range up to about 45 h-1 Mpc. The strongest effect was found for elongated BM type I clusters. This is probably connected with the origins of the supergiant galaxy and with cluster formation along a long filament or plane in a supercluster.

  2. Alignment tool facilitates pin placement on irregular horizontal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, J. V.

    1966-01-01

    Alignment tool facilitates spotting and cementing plastic pins on the true vertical to irregular concave and convex surfaces. The tool consists of a wood tripod with individually adjustable legs, a wood block with a hole for placing the pins and two spirit levels at a 90 degree angle for easy alignment.

  3. Mapping local orientation of aligned fibrous scatterers for cancerous tissues using backscattering Mueller matrix imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Honghui; Sun, Minghao; Zeng, Nan; Du, E.; Liu, Shaoxiong; Guo, Yihong; Wu, Jian; He, Yonghong; Ma, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Polarization measurements are sensitive to the microstructure of tissues and can be used to detect pathological changes. Many tissues contain anisotropic fibrous structures. We obtain the local orientation of aligned fibrous scatterers using different groups of the backscattering Mueller matrix elements. Experiments on concentrically well-aligned silk fibers and unstained human papillary thyroid carcinoma tissues show that the m22, m33, m23, and m32 elements have better contrast but higher degeneracy for the extraction of orientation angles. The m12 and m13 elements show lower contrast, but allow us to determine the orientation angle for the fibrous scatterers along all directions. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations based on the sphere-cylinder scattering model indicate that the oblique incidence of the illumination beam introduces some errors in the orientation angles obtained by both methods. Mapping the local orientation of anisotropic tissues may not only provide information on pathological changes, but can also give new leads to reduce the orientation dependence of polarization measurements.

  4. Alignment Stage for a Cryogenic Dilatometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudik, Matthew; Moore, Donald

    2005-01-01

    A three-degree-of-freedom alignment stage has been designed and built for use in a cryogenic dilatometer that is used to measure thermal strains. The alignment stage enables precise adjustments of the positions and orientations of optical components to be used in the measurements and, once adjustments have been completed, keeps the components precisely aligned during cryogenic-dilatometer operations that can last as long as several days. The alignment stage includes a case, a circular tilt/tip platform, and a variety of flexural couplings between the case and the platform, all machined from a single block of the low-thermal-expansion iron/nickel alloy Invar, in order to minimize effects of temperature gradients and to obtain couplings that are free of stiction and friction. There are three sets of flexural couplings clocked at equal angles of 120 degrees around the platform, constituting a three-point kinematic support system.

  5. Girder Alignment Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zackary; Ruland, Robert; LeCocq, Catherine; Lundahl, Eric; Levashov, Yurii; Reese, Ed; Rago, Carl; Poling, Ben; Schafer, Donald; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Wienands, Uli; /SLAC

    2010-11-18

    The girders for the LCLS undulator system contain components which must be aligned with high accuracy relative to each other. The alignment is one of the last steps before the girders go into the tunnel, so the alignment must be done efficiently, on a tight schedule. This note documents the alignment plan which includes efficiency and high accuracy. The motivation for girder alignment involves the following considerations. Using beam based alignment, the girder position will be adjusted until the beam goes through the center of the quadrupole and beam finder wire. For the machine to work properly, the undulator axis must be on this line and the center of the undulator beam pipe must be on this line. The physics reasons for the undulator axis and undulator beam pipe axis to be centered on the beam are different, but the alignment tolerance for both are similar. In addition, the beam position monitor must be centered on the beam to preserve its calibration. Thus, the undulator, undulator beam pipe, quadrupole, beam finder wire, and beam position monitor axes must all be aligned to a common line. All relative alignments are equally important, not just, for example, between quadrupole and undulator. We begin by making the common axis the nominal beam axis in the girder coordinate system. All components will be initially aligned to this axis. A more accurate alignment will then position the components relative to each other, without incorporating the girder itself.

  6. Interstellar Dust Grain Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, B.-G.; Lazarian, A.; Vaillancourt, John E.

    2015-08-01

    Interstellar polarization at optical-to-infrared wavelengths is known to arise from asymmetric dust grains aligned with the magnetic field. This effect provides a potentially powerful probe of magnetic field structure and strength if the details of the grain alignment can be reliably understood. Theory and observations have recently converged on a quantitative, predictive description of interstellar grain alignment based on radiative processes. The development of a general, analytical model for this radiative alignment torque (RAT) theory has allowed specific, testable predictions for realistic interstellar conditions. We outline the theoretical and observational arguments in favor of RAT alignment, as well as reasons the "classical" paramagnetic alignment mechanism is unlikely to work, except possibly for the very smallest grains. With further detailed characterization of the RAT mechanism, grain alignment and polarimetry promise to not only better constrain the interstellar magnetic field but also provide new information on the dust characteristics.

  7. Local alignment of two-base encoded DNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    Homer, Nils; Merriman, Barry; Nelson, Stanley F

    2009-01-01

    Background DNA sequence comparison is based on optimal local alignment of two sequences using a similarity score. However, some new DNA sequencing technologies do not directly measure the base sequence, but rather an encoded form, such as the two-base encoding considered here. In order to compare such data to a reference sequence, the data must be decoded into sequence. The decoding is deterministic, but the possibility of measurement errors requires searching among all possible error modes and resulting alignments to achieve an optimal balance of fewer errors versus greater sequence similarity. Results We present an extension of the standard dynamic programming method for local alignment, which simultaneously decodes the data and performs the alignment, maximizing a similarity score based on a weighted combination of errors and edits, and allowing an affine gap penalty. We also present simulations that demonstrate the performance characteristics of our two base encoded alignment method and contrast those with standard DNA sequence alignment under the same conditions. Conclusion The new local alignment algorithm for two-base encoded data has substantial power to properly detect and correct measurement errors while identifying underlying sequence variants, and facilitating genome re-sequencing efforts based on this form of sequence data. PMID:19508732

  8. Automated alignment of serial thoracic scans using bone structure descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrielides, Marios A.; Petrick, Nicholas; Myers, Kyle J.

    2007-03-01

    In this manuscript we present an automated algorithm for the alignment of thoracic scans using descriptors of bone structures. Bone structures were utilized because they are expected to be less susceptible to sources of errors such as patient positioning and breath hold. The algorithm employed the positioning of ribs relative to the spinal cord along with a description of the scapula. The spinal cord centroid was detected by extracting local maxima of the distance transform followed by point tracing along consecutive slices. Ribs were segmented using adaptive thresholding followed by the watershed algorithm to detach ribs from the vertebra, and by imposing requirements of rib proximity to the lung border. The angles formed between the spinal cord centroid and segmented rib centroids were used to describe rib positioning. Additionally, the length of the scapula was extracted in each slice. A cost function incorporating the difference of features from rib positioning and scapula length between two slices was derived and used to match slices. The method was evaluated on a set of 12 pairs of full and partial CT scans acquired on the same day. Evaluation was based on whether the slices showing a nodule at its maximum diameter in each scan were matched. Full-to-partial and partial-to-full alignment were performed. Results showed that the proposed metric matched nodule slices within an average distance of 1.08 and 1.17 slices from the target for full-to-partial and partial-to-full alignment respectively. These preliminary results are encouraging for using this method as a first step in an overall process of temporally analyzing CT lung nodules.

  9. Face Alignment via Regressing Local Binary Features.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shaoqing; Cao, Xudong; Wei, Yichen; Sun, Jian

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a highly efficient and accurate regression approach for face alignment. Our approach has two novel components: 1) a set of local binary features and 2) a locality principle for learning those features. The locality principle guides us to learn a set of highly discriminative local binary features for each facial landmark independently. The obtained local binary features are used to jointly learn a linear regression for the final output. This approach achieves the state-of-the-art results when tested on the most challenging benchmarks to date. Furthermore, because extracting and regressing local binary features are computationally very cheap, our system is much faster than previous methods. It achieves over 3000 frames per second (FPS) on a desktop or 300 FPS on a mobile phone for locating a few dozens of landmarks. We also study a key issue that is important but has received little attention in the previous research, which is the face detector used to initialize alignment. We investigate several face detectors and perform quantitative evaluation on how they affect alignment accuracy. We find that an alignment friendly detector can further greatly boost the accuracy of our alignment method, reducing the error up to 16% relatively. To facilitate practical usage of face detection/alignment methods, we also propose a convenient metric to measure how good a detector is for alignment initialization.

  10. Wavefront Aberrations Due to Alignment and Figure Compensation of the NASA James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes wavefront aberrations due to the alignment and improper compensation of the NASA James Webb Space Telescope. The contents include: 1) James Webb Space Telescope (JWST); 2) Optical design of JWST; 3) Alignment Observables for JWST; 4) Low order Zernike Polynomials; 5) PM SM Ability to Target Low Order Aberrations; 6) Compensator definitions and Modes; 7) Field impact from compensation; 8) PM align error compensated by PM figure; 9) PM align error compensated by SM alignment; 10) SM align error compensated by PM figure; 11) SM figure error compensated by SM alignment; 12) Worst Case Pupil Maps; 13) Worst Case Pupil Maps at BEST FOCUS; 14) Field impact from compensation (+/- 1 arcmin FOV); and 15) Concluding Remarks.

  11. Error compensation algorithm for patient positioning robotics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murty, Pilaka V.; Talpasanu, Ilie; Roz, Mugur A.

    2009-03-01

    Surgeons in various medical areas (orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery, dentistry etc.) are using motor-driven drilling tools to make perforations in hard tissues (bone, enamel, dentine, cementum etc.) When the penetration requires very precise angles and accurate alignment with respect to different targets, precision cannot be obtained by using visual estimation and hand-held tools. Robots have been designed to allow for very accurate relative positioning of the patient and the surgical tools, and in certain classes of applications the location of bone target and inclination of the surgical tool can be accurately specified with respect to an inertial frame of reference. However, patient positioning errors as well as position changes during surgery can jeopardize the precision of the operation, and drilling parameters have to be dynamically adjusted. In this paper the authors present a quantitative method to evaluate the corrected position and inclination of the drilling tool, to account for translational and rotational errors in displaced target position. The compensation algorithm applies principles of inverse kinematics wherein a faulty axis in space caused by the translational and rotational errors of the target position is identified with an imaginary true axis in space by enforcing identity through a modified trajectory. In the absence of any specific application, this algorithm is verified on Solid Works, a commercial CAD tool and found to be correct. An example problem given at the end vindicates this statement.

  12. Telemetry location error in a forested habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chu, D.S.; Hoover, B.A.; Fuller, M.R.; Geissler, P.H.; Amlaner, Charles J.

    1989-01-01

    The error associated with locations estimated by radio-telemetry triangulation can be large and variable in a hardwood forest. We assessed the magnitude and cause of telemetry location errors in a mature hardwood forest by using a 4-element Yagi antenna and compass bearings toward four transmitters, from 21 receiving sites. The distance error from the azimuth intersection to known transmitter locations ranged from 0 to 9251 meters. Ninety-five percent of the estimated locations were within 16 to 1963 meters, and 50% were within 99 to 416 meters of actual locations. Angles with 20o of parallel had larger distance errors than other angles. While angle appeared most important, greater distances and the amount of vegetation between receivers and transmitters also contributed to distance error.

  13. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies. PMID:27546174

  14. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies.

  15. Orthodontics and Aligners

    MedlinePlus

    ... Repairing Chipped Teeth Teeth Whitening Tooth-Colored Fillings Orthodontics and Aligners Straighten teeth for a healthier smile. Orthodontics When consumers think about orthodontics, braces are the ...

  16. Tidal alignment of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazek, Jonathan; Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš

    2015-08-01

    We develop an analytic model for galaxy intrinsic alignments (IA) based on the theory of tidal alignment. We calculate all relevant nonlinear corrections at one-loop order, including effects from nonlinear density evolution, galaxy biasing, and source density weighting. Contributions from density weighting are found to be particularly important and lead to bias dependence of the IA amplitude, even on large scales. This effect may be responsible for much of the luminosity dependence in IA observations. The increase in IA amplitude for more highly biased galaxies reflects their locations in regions with large tidal fields. We also consider the impact of smoothing the tidal field on halo scales. We compare the performance of this consistent nonlinear model in describing the observed alignment of luminous red galaxies with the linear model as well as the frequently used "nonlinear alignment model," finding a significant improvement on small and intermediate scales. We also show that the cross-correlation between density and IA (the "GI" term) can be effectively separated into source alignment and source clustering, and we accurately model the observed alignment down to the one-halo regime using the tidal field from the fully nonlinear halo-matter cross correlation. Inside the one-halo regime, the average alignment of galaxies with density tracers no longer follows the tidal alignment prediction, likely reflecting nonlinear processes that must be considered when modeling IA on these scales. Finally, we discuss tidal alignment in the context of cosmic shear measurements.

  17. A simple method to control over-alignment in the MAFFT multiple sequence alignment program

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Kazutaka; Standley, Daron M.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: We present a new feature of the MAFFT multiple alignment program for suppressing over-alignment (aligning unrelated segments). Conventional MAFFT is highly sensitive in aligning conserved regions in remote homologs, but the risk of over-alignment is recently becoming greater, as low-quality or noisy sequences are increasing in protein sequence databases, due, for example, to sequencing errors and difficulty in gene prediction. Results: The proposed method utilizes a variable scoring matrix for different pairs of sequences (or groups) in a single multiple sequence alignment, based on the global similarity of each pair. This method significantly increases the correctly gapped sites in real examples and in simulations under various conditions. Regarding sensitivity, the effect of the proposed method is slightly negative in real protein-based benchmarks, and mostly neutral in simulation-based benchmarks. This approach is based on natural biological reasoning and should be compatible with many methods based on dynamic programming for multiple sequence alignment. Availability and implementation: The new feature is available in MAFFT versions 7.263 and higher. http://mafft.cbrc.jp/alignment/software/ Contact: katoh@ifrec.osaka-u.ac.jp Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153688

  18. Estimating IMU heading error from SAR images.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-03-01

    Angular orientation errors of the real antenna for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) will manifest as undesired illumination gradients in SAR images. These gradients can be measured, and the pointing error can be calculated. This can be done for single images, but done more robustly using multi-image methods. Several methods are provided in this report. The pointing error can then be fed back to the navigation Kalman filter to correct for problematic heading (yaw) error drift. This can mitigate the need for uncomfortable and undesired IMU alignment maneuvers such as S-turns.

  19. Accuracy Improvement on the Measurement of Human-Joint Angles.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dai; Shoepe, Todd; Vejarano, Gustavo

    2016-03-01

    A measurement technique that decreases the root mean square error (RMSE) of measurements of human-joint angles using a personal wireless sensor network is reported. Its operation is based on virtual rotations of wireless sensors worn by the user, and it focuses on the arm, whose position is measured on 5 degree of freedom (DOF). The wireless sensors use inertial magnetic units that measure the alignment of the arm with the earth's gravity and magnetic fields. Due to the biomechanical properties of human tissue (e.g., skin's elasticity), the sensors' orientation is shifted, and this shift affects the accuracy of measurements. In the proposed technique, the change of orientation is first modeled from linear regressions of data collected from 15 participants at different arm positions. Then, out of eight body indices measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, the percentage of body fat is found to have the greatest correlation with the rate of change in sensors' orientation. This finding enables us to estimate the change in sensors' orientation from the user's body fat percentage. Finally, an algorithm virtually rotates the sensors using quaternion theory with the objective of reducing the error. The proposed technique is validated with experiments on five different participants. In the DOF, whose error decreased the most, the RMSE decreased from 2.20(°) to 0.87(°). This is an improvement of 60%, and in the DOF whose error decreased the least, the RMSE decreased from 1.64(°) to 1.37(°). This is an improvement of 16%. On an average, the RMSE improved by 44%. PMID:25622331

  20. INTRINSIC ALIGNMENT OF CLUSTER GALAXIES: THE REDSHIFT EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hao Jiangang; Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Feldmann, Robert; Annis, James; Johnston, David E.; Lin Huan; McKay, Timothy A.

    2011-10-10

    We present measurements of two types of cluster galaxy alignments based on a volume limited and highly pure ({>=}90%) sample of clusters from the GMBCG catalog derived from Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR7). We detect a clear brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) alignment (the alignment of major axis of the BCG toward the distribution of cluster satellite galaxies). We find that the BCG alignment signal becomes stronger as the redshift and BCG absolute magnitude decrease and becomes weaker as BCG stellar mass decreases. No dependence of the BCG alignment on cluster richness is found. We can detect a statistically significant ({>=}3{sigma}) satellite alignment (the alignment of the major axes of the cluster satellite galaxies toward the BCG) only when we use the isophotal fit position angles (P.A.s), and the satellite alignment depends on the apparent magnitudes rather than the absolute magnitudes of the BCGs. This suggests that the detected satellite alignment based on isophotal P.A.s from the SDSS pipeline is possibly due to the contamination from the diffuse light of nearby BCGs. We caution that this should not be simply interpreted as non-existence of the satellite alignment, but rather that we cannot detect them with our current photometric SDSS data. We perform our measurements on both SDSS r-band and i-band data, but do not observe a passband dependence of the alignments.

  1. Moments of inclination error distribution computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myler, T. R.

    1981-01-01

    A FORTRAN coded computer program is described which calculates orbital inclination error statistics using a closed-form solution. This solution uses a data base of trajectory errors from actual flights to predict the orbital inclination error statistics. The Scott flight history data base consists of orbit insertion errors in the trajectory parameters - altitude, velocity, flight path angle, flight azimuth, latitude and longitude. The methods used to generate the error statistics are of general interest since they have other applications. Program theory, user instructions, output definitions, subroutine descriptions and detailed FORTRAN coding information are included.

  2. Hole-Aligning Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Frank A.; Saude, Frank; Sep, Martin J.

    1996-01-01

    Tool designed for use in aligning holes in plates or other structural members to be joined by bolt through holes. Holes aligned without exerting forces perpendicular to planes of holes. Tool features screw-driven-wedge design similar to (but simpler than) that of some automotive exhaust-pipe-expanding tools.

  3. An implicit spatial memory alignment effect.

    PubMed

    Cerles, Mélanie; Gomez, Alice; Rousset, Stéphane

    2015-09-01

    The memory alignment effect is the advantage of reasoning from a perspective which is aligned with the frame of reference used to encode an environment in memory. It usually occurs when participants have to consciously take a perspective to perform a spatial memory task. The present experiment assesses whether the memory alignment effect can occur without requiring to consciously take a given perspective, when the misaligned perspective is only perceptively provided. In others words, does the memory alignment effect still arise when it is only implicitly prompted? Thirty participants learned a sequence of four objects' positions in a room from a north-as-up survey perspective. During the testing phase, they had to point to the direction of a target object from another object ('the reference') with a fixed north-up orientation. The background behind the reference object displayed either a uniform color (control condition) or a misaligned ground-level perspective. The latter displayed a reference object's position information which was either congruent with the studied environment (congruent misaligned condition) or incongruent (incongruent misaligned condition). Mean pointing errors were higher in the congruent misaligned condition than in the control condition, whereas the incongruent misaligned condition did not differ from the control one. The present study shows that the memory alignment effect can arise without requiring a conscious misaligned perspective taking. Moreover, the perceived misaligned perspective must share the same spatial content as the memorized spatial representation in order to induce an alignment effect. PMID:26233526

  4. Large field distributed aperture laser semiactive angle measurement system design with imaging fiber bundles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunyun; Cheng, Haobo; Feng, Yunpeng; Jing, Xiaoli

    2016-09-01

    A type of laser semiactive angle measurement system is designed for target detecting and tracking. Only one detector is used to detect target location from four distributed aperture optical systems through a 4×1 imaging fiber bundle. A telecentric optical system in image space is designed to increase the efficiency of imaging fiber bundles. According to the working principle of a four-quadrant (4Q) detector, fiber diamond alignment is adopted between an optical system and a 4Q detector. The structure of the laser semiactive angle measurement system is, we believe, novel. Tolerance analysis is carried out to determine tolerance limits of manufacture and installation errors of the optical system. The performance of the proposed method is identified by computer simulations and experiments. It is demonstrated that the linear region of the system is ±12°, with measurement error of better than 0.2°. In general, this new system can be used with large field of view and high accuracy, providing an efficient, stable, and fast method for angle measurement in practical situations. PMID:27607276

  5. Synthetic aperture interferometry: error analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Amiya; Coupland, Jeremy

    2010-07-10

    Synthetic aperture interferometry (SAI) is a novel way of testing aspherics and has a potential for in-process measurement of aspherics [Appl. Opt.42, 701 (2003)].APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.42.000701 A method to measure steep aspherics using the SAI technique has been previously reported [Appl. Opt.47, 1705 (2008)].APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.47.001705 Here we investigate the computation of surface form using the SAI technique in different configurations and discuss the computational errors. A two-pass measurement strategy is proposed to reduce the computational errors, and a detailed investigation is carried out to determine the effect of alignment errors on the measurement process.

  6. Genome alignment with graph data structures: a comparison

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent advances in rapid, low-cost sequencing have opened up the opportunity to study complete genome sequences. The computational approach of multiple genome alignment allows investigation of evolutionarily related genomes in an integrated fashion, providing a basis for downstream analyses such as rearrangement studies and phylogenetic inference. Graphs have proven to be a powerful tool for coping with the complexity of genome-scale sequence alignments. The potential of graphs to intuitively represent all aspects of genome alignments led to the development of graph-based approaches for genome alignment. These approaches construct a graph from a set of local alignments, and derive a genome alignment through identification and removal of graph substructures that indicate errors in the alignment. Results We compare the structures of commonly used graphs in terms of their abilities to represent alignment information. We describe how the graphs can be transformed into each other, and identify and classify graph substructures common to one or more graphs. Based on previous approaches, we compile a list of modifications that remove these substructures. Conclusion We show that crucial pieces of alignment information, associated with inversions and duplications, are not visible in the structure of all graphs. If we neglect vertex or edge labels, the graphs differ in their information content. Still, many ideas are shared among all graph-based approaches. Based on these findings, we outline a conceptual framework for graph-based genome alignment that can assist in the development of future genome alignment tools. PMID:24712884

  7. Lag Angle Compensation in a Space Borne Scanning Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wissinger, A. B.

    1992-01-01

    The so-called 'lag angle' is inherent in any spaceborne scanning lidar system. It is also important in systems where the scanning causes a significant pointing error during the laser interrogating pulse echo time. In a heterodyne lidar system, the lag angle, if uncompensated, will significantly reduce the signal-to-noise ratio. An investigation of lag angle is presented.

  8. Solar Tracking Error Analysis of Fresnel Reflector

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiantao; Yan, Junjie; Pei, Jie; Liu, Guanjie

    2014-01-01

    Depending on the rotational structure of Fresnel reflector, the rotation angle of the mirror was deduced under the eccentric condition. By analyzing the influence of the sun tracking rotation angle error caused by main factors, the change rule and extent of the influence were revealed. It is concluded that the tracking errors caused by the difference between the rotation axis and true north meridian, at noon, were maximum under certain conditions and reduced at morning and afternoon gradually. The tracking error caused by other deviations such as rotating eccentric, latitude, and solar altitude was positive at morning, negative at afternoon, and zero at a certain moment of noon. PMID:24895664

  9. BBMap: A Fast, Accurate, Splice-Aware Aligner

    SciTech Connect

    Bushnell, Brian

    2014-03-17

    Alignment of reads is one of the primary computational tasks in bioinformatics. Of paramount importance to resequencing, alignment is also crucial to other areas - quality control, scaffolding, string-graph assembly, homology detection, assembly evaluation, error-correction, expression quantification, and even as a tool to evaluate other tools. An optimal aligner would greatly improve virtually any sequencing process, but optimal alignment is prohibitively expensive for gigabases of data. Here, we will present BBMap [1], a fast splice-aware aligner for short and long reads. We will demonstrate that BBMap has superior speed, sensitivity, and specificity to alternative high-throughput aligners bowtie2 [2], bwa [3], smalt, [4] GSNAP [5], and BLASR [6].

  10. Effects of errors on decoupled control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamer, H. A.; Johnson, K. G.

    1978-01-01

    Various error sources in a decoupled control system are considered in connection with longitudinal control on a simulated externally blown jet-flap STOL aircraft. The system employed the throttle, horizontal tail, and flaps to decouple the forward velocity, pitch angle, and flight-path angle. The errors considered were: (1) imperfect knowledge of airplane aerodynamic and control characteristics; (2) imperfect measurements of airplane state variables; (3) change in flight conditions, and (4) lag in the airplane controls and in engine response. The effects of the various errors on the decoupling process were generally minor. Significant coupling in flight-path angle was caused by control lag during speed-command maneuvers. However, this coupling could be eliminated by including the control lag in the design of the decoupled system. Other error sources affected primarily the commanded response quantity.

  11. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Nelson E.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam.

  12. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, N.E.

    1988-03-10

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam. 5 figs.

  13. Galaxy Alignments: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachimi, Benjamin; Cacciato, Marcello; Kitching, Thomas D.; Leonard, Adrienne; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Schäfer, Björn Malte; Sifón, Cristóbal; Hoekstra, Henk; Kiessling, Alina; Kirk, Donnacha; Rassat, Anais

    2015-11-01

    The alignments between galaxies, their underlying matter structures, and the cosmic web constitute vital ingredients for a comprehensive understanding of gravity, the nature of matter, and structure formation in the Universe. We provide an overview on the state of the art in the study of these alignment processes and their observational signatures, aimed at a non-specialist audience. The development of the field over the past one hundred years is briefly reviewed. We also discuss the impact of galaxy alignments on measurements of weak gravitational lensing, and discuss avenues for making theoretical and observational progress over the coming decade.

  14. Radiative Grain Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, B. G.

    2015-12-01

    Polarization due to aligned dust grains was discovered in the interstellar medium more than 60 years ago. A quantitative, observationally well tested theory of the phenomenon has finally emerged in the last decade, promising not only an improved understanding of interstellar magnetic fields, but new tools for studying the dust environments and grain characteristics. This Radiative Alignment Torque (RAT) theory also has many potential applications in solar system physics, including for comet dust characteristics. I will review the main aspects of the theory and the observational tests performed to date, as well as some of the new possibilities for using polarization as a tool to study dust and its environment, with RAT alignment.

  15. Hybrid vehicle motor alignment

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Michael Benjamin

    2001-07-03

    A rotor of an electric motor for a motor vehicle is aligned to an axis of rotation for a crankshaft of an internal combustion engine having an internal combustion engine and an electric motor. A locator is provided on the crankshaft, a piloting tool is located radially by the first locator to the crankshaft. A stator of the electric motor is aligned to a second locator provided on the piloting tool. The stator is secured to the engine block. The rotor is aligned to the crankshaft and secured thereto.

  16. Refinement by shifting secondary structure elements improves sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jing; Pei, Jimin; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Grishin, Nick V

    2015-03-01

    Constructing a model of a query protein based on its alignment to a homolog with experimentally determined spatial structure (the template) is still the most reliable approach to structure prediction. Alignment errors are the main bottleneck for homology modeling when the query is distantly related to the template. Alignment methods often misalign secondary structural elements by a few residues. Therefore, better alignment solutions can be found within a limited set of local shifts of secondary structures. We present a refinement method to improve pairwise sequence alignments by evaluating alignment variants generated by local shifts of template-defined secondary structures. Our method SFESA is based on a novel scoring function that combines the profile-based sequence score and the structure score derived from residue contacts in a template. Such a combined score frequently selects a better alignment variant among a set of candidate alignments generated by local shifts and leads to overall increase in alignment accuracy. Evaluation of several benchmarks shows that our refinement method significantly improves alignments made by automatic methods such as PROMALS, HHpred and CNFpred. The web server is available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/sfesa. PMID:25546158

  17. Refinement by shifting secondary structure elements improves sequence alignments

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jing; Pei, Jimin; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Grishin, Nick V.

    2015-01-01

    Constructing a model of a query protein based on its alignment to a homolog with experimentally determined spatial structure (the template) is still the most reliable approach to structure prediction. Alignment errors are the main bottleneck for homology modeling when the query is distantly related to the template. Alignment methods often misalign secondary structural elements by a few residues. Therefore, better alignment solutions can be found within a limited set of local shifts of secondary structures. We present a refinement method to improve pairwise sequence alignments by evaluating alignment variants generated by local shifts of template-defined secondary structures. Our method SFESA is based on a novel scoring function that combines the profile-based sequence score and the structure score derived from residue contacts in a template. Such a combined score frequently selects a better alignment variant among a set of candidate alignments generated by local shifts and leads to overall increase in alignment accuracy. Evaluation of several benchmarks shows that our refinement method significantly improves alignments made by automatic methods such as PROMALS, HHpred and CNFpred. The web server is available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/sfesa. PMID:25546158

  18. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Daily, PNNL

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprint that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.

  19. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprintmore » that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.« less

  20. Multiple structure alignment with msTALI

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Multiple structure alignments have received increasing attention in recent years as an alternative to multiple sequence alignments. Although multiple structure alignment algorithms can potentially be applied to a number of problems, they have primarily been used for protein core identification. A method that is capable of solving a variety of problems using structure comparison is still absent. Here we introduce a program msTALI for aligning multiple protein structures. Our algorithm uses several informative features to guide its alignments: torsion angles, backbone Cα atom positions, secondary structure, residue type, surface accessibility, and properties of nearby atoms. The algorithm allows the user to weight the types of information used to generate the alignment, which expands its utility to a wide variety of problems. Results msTALI exhibits competitive results on 824 families from the Homstrad and SABmark databases when compared to Matt and Mustang. We also demonstrate success at building a database of protein cores using 341 randomly selected CATH domains and highlight the contribution of msTALI compared to the CATH classifications. Finally, we present an example applying msTALI to the problem of detecting hinges in a protein undergoing rigid-body motion. Conclusions msTALI is an effective algorithm for multiple structure alignment. In addition to its performance on standard comparison databases, it utilizes clear, informative features, allowing further customization for domain-specific applications. The C++ source code for msTALI is available for Linux on the web at http://ifestos.cse.sc.edu/mstali. PMID:22607234

  1. Effect of alignment and tolerances on reverse raytrace calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heideman, Kyle C.; Greivenkamp, John E.

    2014-07-01

    There are several sources of error in interferometry to consider when testing surfaces in a non-null configuration. A model of the interferometer is typically used to calibrate these errors, but the model differs from the actual interferometer due to the alignment and tolerance of individual components. Reverse raytrace calibration using a model that differs from the real system corrects some errors but introduces others. Reverse optimization using measurements from known test configurations or configuration changes can produce a model that better reflects the real system. This paper addresses the tolerances required to obtain calibration precision from reverse ray tracing. The sources of error can be separated in a way that allows the amount of correction to be compared to the generated errors from misalignment. These errors can be expressed in a generic way that can be applied to any arbitrary interferometer architecture or test surface shape. The simulation results of a standard interferometer with standard tolerances shows that errors corrected by reverse ray tracing can be on the same order as the errors generated by reverse ray tracing an incorrect model. The efficacy of the calibration method resides in correction of other errors such as distortion and ray intercept coordinate error. These corrections are much larger than misalignment errors for surfaces with large departures. This method can be used to determine the level of interferometer component alignment required to accurately measure large departure surfaces with reverse ray tracing.

  2. [Diagnostic Errors in Medicine].

    PubMed

    Buser, Claudia; Bankova, Andriyana

    2015-12-01

    The recognition of diagnostic errors in everyday practice can help improve patient safety. The most common diagnostic errors are the cognitive errors, followed by system-related errors and no fault errors. The cognitive errors often result from mental shortcuts, known as heuristics. The rate of cognitive errors can be reduced by a better understanding of heuristics and the use of checklists. The autopsy as a retrospective quality assessment of clinical diagnosis has a crucial role in learning from diagnostic errors. Diagnostic errors occur more often in primary care in comparison to hospital settings. On the other hand, the inpatient errors are more severe than the outpatient errors.

  3. [Diagnostic Errors in Medicine].

    PubMed

    Buser, Claudia; Bankova, Andriyana

    2015-12-01

    The recognition of diagnostic errors in everyday practice can help improve patient safety. The most common diagnostic errors are the cognitive errors, followed by system-related errors and no fault errors. The cognitive errors often result from mental shortcuts, known as heuristics. The rate of cognitive errors can be reduced by a better understanding of heuristics and the use of checklists. The autopsy as a retrospective quality assessment of clinical diagnosis has a crucial role in learning from diagnostic errors. Diagnostic errors occur more often in primary care in comparison to hospital settings. On the other hand, the inpatient errors are more severe than the outpatient errors. PMID:26649954

  4. Flow alignment phenomena in liquid crystals studied by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarman, Sten; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2009-10-01

    The flow alignment of a nematic liquid crystal has been studied as a function of temperature, beginning at high temperature in the nematic phase and down to the nematic-smectic A phase transition. The alignment angle is obtained by estimating the twist viscosities by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) methods. These estimates are cross-checked by evaluating the corresponding equilibrium fluctuation relations. As a further comparison, shear flow simulations are carried out by application of the SLLOD equations of motion (so named because of their close relationship to the Doll's equation of motion, which can be derived from the Doll's tensor Hamiltonian), whereby the alignment angle is obtained directly. All these methods give consistent results for the alignment angle. At low temperatures near the nematic-smectic A transition the system becomes flow unstable. In this region the alignment angle has been calculated as a function of time.

  5. Large Telescope Segmented Primary Mirror Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rud, Mayer

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses a broadband (white light) point source, located at the telescope Cassegrain focus, which generates a cone of light limited by the hole in the secondary mirror (SM). It propagates to the aspheric null-mirror, which is optimized to make all the reflected rays to be normal to the primary mirror (PM) upon reflection. PM retro-reflects the rays back through the system for wavefront analysis. The point source and the wavefront analysis subsystems are all located behind the PM. The PM phasing is absolute (white light) and does not involve the SM. A relatively small, aspheric null-mirror located near the PM center of curvature has been designed to deliver the high level of optical wavefront correction. The phasing of the segments is absolute due to the use of a broadband source. The segmented PM is optically aligned independently and separately from the SM alignment. The separation of the PM segments alignment from the PM to the SM, and other telescope optics alignments, may be a significant advantage, eliminating the errors coupling. The point source of this concept is fully cooperative, unlike a star or laser-generated guide-star, providing the necessary brightness for the optimal S/N ratio, the spectral content, and the stable on-axis position. This concept can be implemented in the lab for the PM initial alignment, or made to be a permanent feature of the space-based or groundbased telescope.

  6. PDV Probe Alignment Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, T L; May, C M; Strand, O T

    2007-10-26

    This alignment technique was developed while performing heterodyne velocimetry measurements at LLNL. There are a few minor items needed, such as a white card with aperture in center, visible alignment laser, IR back reflection meter, and a microscope to view the bridge surface. The work was performed on KCP flyers that were 6 and 8 mils wide. The probes used were Oz Optics manufactured with focal distances of 42mm and 26mm. Both probes provide a spot size of approximately 80?m at 1550nm. The 42mm probes were specified to provide an internal back reflection of -35 to -40dB, and the probe back reflections were measured to be -37dB and -33dB. The 26mm probes were specified as -30dB and both measured -30.5dB. The probe is initially aligned normal to the flyer/bridge surface. This provides a very high return signal, up to -2dB, due to the bridge reflectivity. A white card with a hole in the center as an aperture can be used to check the reflected beam position relative to the probe and launch beam, and the alignment laser spot centered on the bridge, see Figure 1 and Figure 2. The IR back reflection meter is used to measure the dB return from the probe and surface, and a white card or similar object is inserted between the probe and surface to block surface reflection. It may take several iterations between the visible alignment laser and the IR back reflection meter to complete this alignment procedure. Once aligned normal to the surface, the probe should be tilted to position the visible alignment beam as shown in Figure 3, and the flyer should be translated in the X and Y axis to reposition the alignment beam onto the flyer as shown in Figure 4. This tilting of the probe minimizes the amount of light from the bridge reflection into the fiber within the probe while maintaining the alignment as near normal to the flyer surface as possible. When the back reflection is measured after the tilt adjustment, the level should be about -3dB to -6dB higher than the probes

  7. Alignment of cD-galaxies with their surroundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vankampen, Eelco; Rhee, George

    1990-01-01

    For a sample of 122 rich Abell clusters the authors find a strong correlation of the position angle (orientation) of the first-ranked galaxy and its parent cluster. This alignment effect is strongest for cD-galaxies. Formation scenarios for cD galaxies, like the merging scenario, must produce such a strong alignment effect. The authors show some N-body simulations done for this purpose.

  8. Alignment of cD-galaxies with their surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Kampen, Eelco; Rhee, George

    1990-11-01

    For a sample of 122 rich Abell clusters the authors find a strong correlation of the position angle (orientation) of the first-ranked galaxy and its parent cluster. This alignment effect is strongest for cD-galaxies. Formation scenarios for cD galaxies, like the merging scenario, must produce such a strong alignment effect. The authors show some N-body simulations done for this purpose.

  9. Impact of Measurement Error on Synchrophasor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yilu; Gracia, Jose R.; Ewing, Paul D.; Zhao, Jiecheng; Tan, Jin; Wu, Ling; Zhan, Lingwei

    2015-07-01

    Phasor measurement units (PMUs), a type of synchrophasor, are powerful diagnostic tools that can help avert catastrophic failures in the power grid. Because of this, PMU measurement errors are particularly worrisome. This report examines the internal and external factors contributing to PMU phase angle and frequency measurement errors and gives a reasonable explanation for them. It also analyzes the impact of those measurement errors on several synchrophasor applications: event location detection, oscillation detection, islanding detection, and dynamic line rating. The primary finding is that dynamic line rating is more likely to be influenced by measurement error. Other findings include the possibility of reporting nonoscillatory activity as an oscillation as the result of error, failing to detect oscillations submerged by error, and the unlikely impact of error on event location and islanding detection.

  10. Curriculum Alignment Research Suggests that Alignment Can Improve Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squires, David

    2012-01-01

    Curriculum alignment research has developed showing the relationship among three alignment categories: the taught curriculum, the tested curriculum and the written curriculum. Each pair (for example, the taught and the written curriculum) shows a positive impact for aligning those results. Following this, alignment results from the Third…

  11. Optimized mirror shape tuning using beam weightings based on distance, angle of incidence, reflectivity, and power.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Kenneth A; Yashchuk, Valeriy V

    2016-05-01

    For glancing-incidence optical systems, such as short-wavelength optics used for nano-focusing, incorporating physical factors in the calculations used for shape optimization can improve performance. Wavefront metrology, including the measurement of a mirror's shape or slope, is routinely used as input for mirror figure optimization on mirrors that can be bent, actuated, positioned, or aligned. Modeling shows that when the incident power distribution, distance from focus, angle of incidence, and the spatially varying reflectivity are included in the optimization, higher Strehl ratios can be achieved. Following the works of Maréchal and Mahajan, optimization of the Strehl ratio (for peak intensity with a coherently illuminated system) occurs when the expectation value of the phase error's variance is minimized. We describe an optimization procedure based on regression analysis that incorporates these physical parameters. This approach is suitable for coherently illuminated systems of nearly diffraction-limited quality. Mathematically, this work is an enhancement of the methods commonly applied for ex situ alignment based on uniform weighting of all points on the surface (or a sub-region of the surface). It follows a similar approach to the optimization of apodized and non-uniformly illuminated optical systems. Significantly, it reaches a different conclusion than a more recent approach based on minimization of focal plane ray errors. PMID:27250372

  12. Optimized mirror shape tuning using beam weightings based on distance, angle of incidence, reflectivity, and power.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Kenneth A; Yashchuk, Valeriy V

    2016-05-01

    For glancing-incidence optical systems, such as short-wavelength optics used for nano-focusing, incorporating physical factors in the calculations used for shape optimization can improve performance. Wavefront metrology, including the measurement of a mirror's shape or slope, is routinely used as input for mirror figure optimization on mirrors that can be bent, actuated, positioned, or aligned. Modeling shows that when the incident power distribution, distance from focus, angle of incidence, and the spatially varying reflectivity are included in the optimization, higher Strehl ratios can be achieved. Following the works of Maréchal and Mahajan, optimization of the Strehl ratio (for peak intensity with a coherently illuminated system) occurs when the expectation value of the phase error's variance is minimized. We describe an optimization procedure based on regression analysis that incorporates these physical parameters. This approach is suitable for coherently illuminated systems of nearly diffraction-limited quality. Mathematically, this work is an enhancement of the methods commonly applied for ex situ alignment based on uniform weighting of all points on the surface (or a sub-region of the surface). It follows a similar approach to the optimization of apodized and non-uniformly illuminated optical systems. Significantly, it reaches a different conclusion than a more recent approach based on minimization of focal plane ray errors.

  13. Tibiofemoral alignment in posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty: Static alignment does not predict dynamic tibial plateau loading.

    PubMed

    Miller, Emily J; Pagnano, Mark W; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2014-08-01

    For total knee arthroplasty (TKA), neutral mechanical alignment produces balanced static knee loading. Dynamically, knee loading is affected by more than limb static alignment. We compared static and dynamic knee loading following TKA. Fifteen TKA patients were evaluated pre-operatively and 2 months and 2 years post-operatively. Tibiofemoral angles and medial tibial plateau loading were calculated. Pre-operatively, static medial load was greater for varus than valgus knees. Post-operatively, no relationship existed between tibiofemoral angle and static medial plateau load. Pre-operatively and post-operatively, dynamic medial load was not dependent on tibiofemoral angle. While all patients achieved equal static plateau load distributions at 2 years, only 47% had dynamic medial load distributions of 50 ± 10%. Static tibiofemoral alignment alone does not predict dynamic tibial loading.

  14. Automatic alignment of double optical paths in excimer laser amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dahui; Zhao, Xueqing; Hua, Hengqi; Zhang, Yongsheng; Hu, Yun; Yi, Aiping; Zhao, Jun

    2013-05-01

    A kind of beam automatic alignment method used for double paths amplification in the electron pumped excimer laser system is demonstrated. In this way, the beams from the amplifiers can be transferred along the designated direction and accordingly irradiate on the target with high stabilization and accuracy. However, owing to nonexistence of natural alignment references in excimer laser amplifiers, two cross-hairs structure is used to align the beams. Here, one crosshair put into the input beam is regarded as the near-field reference while the other put into output beam is regarded as the far-field reference. The two cross-hairs are transmitted onto Charge Coupled Devices (CCD) by image-relaying structures separately. The errors between intersection points of two cross-talk images and centroid coordinates of actual beam are recorded automatically and sent to closed loop feedback control mechanism. Negative feedback keeps running until preset accuracy is reached. On the basis of above-mentioned design, the alignment optical path is built and the software is compiled, whereafter the experiment of double paths automatic alignment in electron pumped excimer laser amplifier is carried through. Meanwhile, the related influencing factors and the alignment precision are analyzed. Experimental results indicate that the alignment system can achieve the aiming direction of automatic aligning beams in short time. The analysis shows that the accuracy of alignment system is 0.63μrad and the beam maximum restoration error is 13.75μm. Furthermore, the bigger distance between the two cross-hairs, the higher precision of the system is. Therefore, the automatic alignment system has been used in angular multiplexing excimer Main Oscillation Power Amplification (MOPA) system and can satisfy the requirement of beam alignment precision on the whole.

  15. Shear-induced alignment and dynamics of elongated granular particles.

    PubMed

    Börzsönyi, Tamás; Szabó, Balázs; Wegner, Sandra; Harth, Kirsten; Török, János; Somfai, Ellák; Bien, Tomasz; Stannarius, Ralf

    2012-11-01

    The alignment, ordering, and rotation of elongated granular particles was studied in shear flow. The time evolution of the orientation of a large number of particles was monitored in laboratory experiments by particle tracking using optical imaging and x-ray computed tomography. The experiments were complemented by discrete element simulations. The particles develop an orientational order. In the steady state the time- and ensemble-averaged direction of the main axis of the particles encloses a small angle with the streamlines. This shear alignment angle is independent of the applied shear rate, and it decreases with increasing grain aspect ratio. At the grain level the steady state is characterized by a net rotation of the particles, as dictated by the shear flow. The distribution of particle rotational velocities was measured both in the steady state and also during the initial transients. The average rotation speed of particles with their long axis perpendicular to the shear alignment angle is larger, while shear aligned particles rotate slower. The ratio of this fast/slow rotation increases with particle aspect ratio. During the initial transient starting from an unaligned initial condition, particles having an orientation just beyond the shear alignment angle rotate opposite to the direction dictated by the shear flow.

  16. Controlling the alignment of liquid crystals by nanoparticle-doped and UV-treated polyimide alignment films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, Shie-Chang; Hwang, Su-June; Chen, Tai-An; Liu, Han-Shiang; Chen, Mu-Zhe

    2012-03-01

    We have developed two approaches for controlling the pretilt angles of liquid crystal molecules by using conventional polyimide (PI) alignment materials either doping homogeneous PIs with Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsequioxanes (POSS) nanoparticles or treating homeotropic PIs with ultraviolet light. These techniques are very simple and are compatible with current methods familiar in the LCD industry. The characteristics of modified PI alignment films and their applications for photonic devices are demonstrated in this paper.

  17. Simple technique for the fabrication of a penta prism with high accuracy right angle deviation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sanjib; Pavan Kumar, Y

    2007-09-10

    What we believe to be a new technique for the fabrication of a penta prism (PP) with high accuracy right angle deviation of the incident beam is presented. We derive simple formulas relating to the error in right angle deviation with the errors in 45 degrees (beta) and 90 degrees (delta) angles of a PP, and we determine error in right angle deviation from the angle ((error in right angle deviation)r) between the plane wavefronts reflected from the right angled surfaces (external Fresnel reflection on the entrance surface and internal Fresnel reflection on the exit surface) of a PP and the angular error (delta) between the same surfaces. The error in right angle deviation is determined from the measurement of (error in right angle deviation)r using an autocollimator and a Fizeau interferometer, and error in right angle deviation is corrected to a high order of accuracy during the final stage of polishing one of the slanted surfaces of the PP. A new technique to determine the magnitude and direction of the small values of (error in right angle deviation)r is proposed and verified. The result for a PP is presented.

  18. Low angle resistivity anomaly in layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, A.E. |; Vinokur, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    The pinning effect of vortex lines by the layered structure (intrinsic pinning) on resistivity of high-T{sub c}, superconductors in the mixed state is investigated by means of perturbation theory. A sharp drop in the resistivity at small angles for which vortex lines are almost aligned with the ab-planes is shown to occur even in a high-temperature region where the pinning potential is reduced by thermal fluctuations.

  19. Mechanism of homeotropic alignment of ferroelectric liquid crystals doped with ferro-fluid and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Tilak; Singh, Shri; Choudhary, Amit; Pant, R. P.; Biradar, A. M.

    2013-07-01

    We report homeotropic (HT) alignment of ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) doped with various concentrations of ferro-fluid (FF) without using any type of alignment layer. The FF induced HT alignment of FLC was found to be dependent on the doping concentration as revealed by optical micrographs, contact angle, and dielectric spectroscopy studies. Higher water contact angle of FF doped FLC films with respect to pure FLC film suggests higher surface energy of FF doped FLC than the surface energy of substrate. The physico-chemical mechanism together with steric model successfully explains the HT alignment of the studied FLC on the ITO substrate.

  20. Perception of Perspective Angles.

    PubMed

    Erkelens, Casper J

    2015-06-01

    We perceive perspective angles, that is, angles that have an orientation in depth, differently from what they are in physical space. Extreme examples are angles between rails of a railway line or between lane dividers of a long and straight road. In this study, subjects judged perspective angles between bars lying on the floor of the laboratory. Perspective angles were also estimated from pictures taken from the same point of view. Converging and diverging angles were judged to test three models of visual space. Four subjects evaluated the perspective angles by matching them to nonperspective angles, that is, angles between the legs of a compass oriented in the frontal plane. All subjects judged both converging and diverging angles larger than the physical angle and smaller than the angles in the proximal stimuli. A model of shallow visual space describes the results. According to the model, lines parallel to visual lines, vanishing at infinity in physical space, converge to visual lines in visual space. The perceived shape of perspective angles is incompatible with the perceived length and width of the bars. The results have significance for models of visual perception and practical implications for driving and flying in poor visibility conditions. PMID:27433312

  1. Block Copolymer Nanocomposites in Electric Fields: Kinetics of Alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Liedel, Clemens; Pester, Christian; Ruppel, Markus A; Lewin, Christian; Pavan, Mariela J.; Urban, Volker S; Shenhar, Roy; Bosecke, Peter; Boker, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the kinetics of block copolymer/nanoparticle composite alignment in an electric field using in situ transmission small-angle X-ray scattering. As a model system, we employ a lamellae forming polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinyl pyridine) block copolymer with different contents of gold nanoparticles in thick films under solvent vapor annealing. While the alignment improves with increasing nanoparticle fraction, the kinetics slows down. This is explained by changes in the degree of phase separation and viscosity. Our findings provide extended insights into the basics of nanocomposite alignment.

  2. Cooperative liquid-crystal alignment generated by overlaid topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Youngwoo; Maclennan, Joseph E.; Clark, Noel A.

    2011-05-01

    Nematic and smectic liquid crystals were introduced into μm-scale gaps between plates coated with polymer films nanoimprinted with parallel arrays of rectangular channels. Overlaying the channels on the two plates close enough at a slight angle produces a mosaic of alternating planar and homeotropic alignments and hybrid alignment, showing that complex liquid-crystal orientation patterns can be achieved by combining two simple topographic patterns. These alignment patterns are attributed to spatial variation of surface roughness and 3D topographic structure created by a sufficient proximity of the two patterns.

  3. Cooperative liquid-crystal alignment generated by overlaid topography.

    PubMed

    Yi, Youngwoo; Maclennan, Joseph E; Clark, Noel A

    2011-05-01

    Nematic and smectic liquid crystals were introduced into μm-scale gaps between plates coated with polymer films nanoimprinted with parallel arrays of rectangular channels. Overlaying the channels on the two plates close enough at a slight angle produces a mosaic of alternating planar and homeotropic alignments and hybrid alignment, showing that complex liquid-crystal orientation patterns can be achieved by combining two simple topographic patterns. These alignment patterns are attributed to spatial variation of surface roughness and 3D topographic structure created by a sufficient proximity of the two patterns. PMID:21728557

  4. OBSERVATIONS OF ENHANCED RADIATIVE GRAIN ALIGNMENT NEAR HD 97300

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, B-G; Potter, S. B. E-mail: sbp@saao.ac.z

    2010-09-10

    We have obtained optical multi-band polarimetry toward sightlines through the Chamaeleon I cloud, particularly in the vicinity of the young B9/A0 star HD 97300. We show, in agreement with earlier studies, that the radiation field impinging on the cloud in the projected vicinity of the star is dominated by the flux from the star, as evidenced by a local enhancement in the grain heating. By comparing the differential grain heating with the differential change in the location of the peak of the polarization curve, we show that the grain alignment is enhanced by the increase in the radiation field. We also find a weak, but measurable, variation in the grain alignment with the relative angle between the radiation field anisotropy and the magnetic field direction. Such an anisotropy in the grain alignment is consistent with a unique prediction of modern radiative alignment torque theory and provides direct support for radiatively driven grain alignment.

  5. Error-compensation measurements on polarization qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhibo; Zhu, Huangjun; Xiang, Guo-Yong; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-06-01

    Systematic errors are inevitable in most measurements performed in real life because of imperfect measurement devices. Reducing systematic errors is crucial to ensuring the accuracy and reliability of measurement results. To this end, delicate error-compensation design is often necessary in addition to device calibration to reduce the dependence of the systematic error on the imperfection of the devices. The art of error-compensation design is well appreciated in nuclear magnetic resonance system by using composite pulses. In contrast, there are few works on reducing systematic errors in quantum optical systems. Here we propose an error-compensation design to reduce the systematic error in projective measurements on a polarization qubit. It can reduce the systematic error to the second order of the phase errors of both the half-wave plate (HWP) and the quarter-wave plate (QWP) as well as the angle error of the HWP. This technique is then applied to experiments on quantum state tomography on polarization qubits, leading to a 20-fold reduction in the systematic error. Our study may find applications in high-precision tasks in polarization optics and quantum optics.

  6. [Study on the Effects and Compensation Effect of Recording Parameters Error on Imaging Performance of Holographic Grating in On-Line Spectral Diagnose].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan-xiu; Bayanheshig; Yang, Shuo; Zhao, Xu-long; Wu, Na; Li, Wen-hao

    2016-03-01

    To making the high resolution grating, a numerical calculation was used to analyze the effect of recording parameters on groove density, focal curve and imaging performance of the grating and their compensation. Based on Fermat' s principle, light path function and aberration, the effect on imaging performance of the grating was analyzed. In the case of fixed using parameters, the error of the recording angle has a greater influence on imaging performance, therefore the gain of the weight of recording angle can improve the accuracy of the recording angle values in the optimization; recording distance has little influence on imaging performance; the relative errors of recording parameters cause the change of imaging performance of the grating; the results indicate that recording parameter errors can be compensated by adjusting its corresponding parameter. The study can give theoretical guidance to the fabrication for high resolution varied-line-space plane holographic grating in on-line spectral diagnostic and reduce the alignment difficulty by analyze the main error effect the imaging performance and propose the compensation method. PMID:27400538

  7. Optics Alignment Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    The Optics Alignment Panel (OAP) was commissioned by the HST Science Working Group to determine the optimum alignment of the OTA optics. The goal was to find the position of the secondary mirror (SM) for which there is no coma or astigmatism in the camera images due to misaligned optics, either tilt or decenter. The despace position was reviewed of the SM and the optimum focus was sought. The results of these efforts are as follows: (1) the best estimate of the aligned position of the SM in the notation of HDOS is (DZ,DY,TZ,TY) = (+248 microns, +8 microns, +53 arcsec, -79 arcsec), and (2) the best focus, defined to be that despace which maximizes the fractional energy at 486 nm in a 0.1 arcsec radius of a stellar image, is 12.2 mm beyond paraxial focus. The data leading to these conclusions, and the estimated uncertainties in the final results, are presented.

  8. Barrel alignment fixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheeley, J. D.

    1981-04-01

    Fabrication of slapper type detonator cables requires bonding of a thin barrel over a bridge. Location of the barrel hole with respect to the bridge is critical: the barrel hole must be centered over the bridge uniform spacing on each side. An alignment fixture which permits rapid adjustment of the barrel position with respect to the bridge is described. The barrel is manipulated by pincer-type fingers which are mounted on a small x-y table equipped with micrometer adjustments. Barrel positioning, performed under a binocular microscopy, is rapid and accurate. After alignment, the microscope is moved out of position and an infrared (IR) heat source is aimed at the barrel. A 5-second pulse of infrared heat flows the adhesive under the barrel and bonds it to the cable. Sapphire and Fotoform glass barrels were bonded successfully with the alignment fixture.

  9. Magnetically aligned supramolecular hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Matthew; Cardoso, Andre Zamith; Frith, William J; Iggo, Jonathan A; Adams, Dave J

    2014-12-01

    The magnetic-field-induced alignment of the fibrillar structures present in an aqueous solution of a dipeptide gelator, and the subsequent retention of this alignment upon transformation to a hydrogel upon the addition of CaCl2 or upon a reduction in solution pH is reported. Utilising the switchable nature of the magnetic field coupled with the slow diffusion of CaCl2 , it is possible to precisely control the extent of anisotropy across a hydrogel, something that is generally very difficult to do using alternative methods. The approach is readily extended to other compounds that form viscous solutions at high pH. It is expected that this work will greatly expand the utility of such low-molecular-weight gelators (LMWG) in areas where alignment is key. PMID:25345918

  10. Beam-pointing errors of planar-phased arrays.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, K. R.; Cooper, W. K.; Stutzman, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    Using both analytical and Monte Carlo techniques, beam-pointing errors of planar-phased arrays are analyzed. The obtained simple formulas for rms pointing errors are applicable to uniform planar arrays with both uniform and Gaussian uncorrelated phase-error distributions and for any arbitrary scan angle.

  11. Sun compass error model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blucker, T. J.; Ferry, W. W.

    1971-01-01

    An error model is described for the Apollo 15 sun compass, a contingency navigational device. Field test data are presented along with significant results of the test. The errors reported include a random error resulting from tilt in leveling the sun compass, a random error because of observer sighting inaccuracies, a bias error because of mean tilt in compass leveling, a bias error in the sun compass itself, and a bias error because the device is leveled to the local terrain slope.

  12. Design of an all-attitude flight control system to execute commanded bank angles and angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgin, G. H.; Eggleston, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    A flight control system for use in air-to-air combat simulation was designed. The input to the flight control system are commanded bank angle and angle of attack, the output are commands to the control surface actuators such that the commanded values will be achieved in near minimum time and sideslip is controlled to remain small. For the longitudinal direction, a conventional linear control system with gains scheduled as a function of dynamic pressure is employed. For the lateral direction, a novel control system, consisting of a linear portion for small bank angle errors and a bang-bang control system for large errors and error rates is employed.

  13. MUSE optical alignment procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Loupias, Magali; Kosmalski, Johan; Anwand, Heiko; Bacon, Roland; Boudon, Didier; Caillier, Patrick; Daguisé, Eric; Dubois, Jean-Pierre; Dupuy, Christophe; Kelz, Andreas; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Nicklas, Harald; Parès, Laurent; Remillieux, Alban; Seifert, Walter; Valentin, Hervé; Xu, Wenli

    2012-09-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation VLT integral field spectrograph (1x1arcmin² Field of View) developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO), operating in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently assembling and testing MUSE in the Integration Hall of the Observatoire de Lyon for the Preliminary Acceptance in Europe, scheduled for 2013. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic instrument mechanical structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2011, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested independently in each institute. After validations, the systems were shipped to the P.I. institute at Lyon and were assembled in the Integration Hall This paper describes the end-to-end optical alignment procedure of the MUSE instrument. The design strategy, mixing an optical alignment by manufacturing (plug and play approach) and few adjustments on key components, is presented. We depict the alignment method for identifying the optical axis using several references located in pupil and image planes. All tools required to perform the global alignment between each subsystem are described. The success of this alignment approach is demonstrated by the good results for the MUSE image quality. MUSE commissioning at the VLT (Very Large Telescope) is planned for 2013.

  14. Segment alignment control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubrun, JEAN-N.; Lorell, Ken R.

    1988-01-01

    The segmented primary mirror for the LDR will require a special segment alignment control system to precisely control the orientation of each of the segments so that the resulting composite reflector behaves like a monolith. The W.M. Keck Ten Meter Telescope will utilize a primary mirror made up of 36 actively controlled segments. Thus the primary mirror and its segment alignment control system are directly analogous to the LDR. The problems of controlling the segments in the face of disturbances and control/structures interaction, as analyzed for the TMT, are virtually identical to those for the LDR. The two systems are briefly compared.

  15. PILOT optical alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longval, Y.; Mot, B.; Ade, P.; André, Y.; Aumont, J.; Baustista, L.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Bray, N.; de Bernardis, P.; Boulade, O.; Bousquet, F.; Bouzit, M.; Buttice, V.; Caillat, A.; Charra, M.; Chaigneau, M.; Crane, B.; Crussaire, J.-P.; Douchin, F.; Doumayrou, E.; Dubois, J.-P.; Engel, C.; Etcheto, P.; Gélot, P.; Griffin, M.; Foenard, G.; Grabarnik, S.; Hargrave, P..; Hughes, A.; Laureijs, R.; Lepennec, Y.; Leriche, B.; Maestre, S.; Maffei, B.; Martignac, J.; Marty, C.; Marty, W.; Masi, S.; Mirc, F.; Misawa, R.; Montel, J.; Montier, L.; Narbonne, J.; Nicot, J.-M.; Pajot, F.; Parot, G.; Pérot, E.; Pimentao, J.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rodriguez, L.; Roudil, G.; Salatino, M.; Savini, G.; Simonella, O.; Saccoccio, M.; Tapie, P.; Tauber, J.; Torre, J.-P.; Tucker, C.

    2016-07-01

    PILOT is a balloon-borne astronomy experiment designed to study the polarization of dust emission in the diffuse interstellar medium in our Galaxy at wavelengths 240 μm with an angular resolution about two arcminutes. Pilot optics is composed an off-axis Gregorian type telescope and a refractive re-imager system. All optical elements, except the primary mirror, are in a cryostat cooled to 3K. We combined the optical, 3D dimensional measurement methods and thermo-elastic modeling to perform the optical alignment. The talk describes the system analysis, the alignment procedure, and finally the performances obtained during the first flight in September 2015.

  16. Sensor Tracks the Sun From Any Angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnbaum, M., M.; Bunker, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Sensor system locates Sun from any angle and generates error signals to point object toward Sun and follow its motion. Sun-sensor system includes three photodetectors, each with separate field of view defined by set of apertures. As equipment rotates about axis, detectors put out time-varying signals processed by external electronics to determine rotation rate and direction to Sun.

  17. Automation of the targeting and reflective alignment concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redfield, Robin C.

    1992-01-01

    The automated alignment system, described herein, employs a reflective, passive (requiring no power) target and includes a PC-based imaging system and one camera mounted on a six degree of freedom robot manipulator. The system detects and corrects for manipulator misalignment in three translational and three rotational directions by employing the Targeting and Reflective Alignment Concept (TRAC), which simplifies alignment by decoupling translational and rotational alignment control. The concept uses information on the camera and the target's relative position based on video feedback from the camera. These relative positions are converted into alignment errors and minimized by motions of the robot. The system is robust to exogenous lighting by virtue of a subtraction algorithm which enables the camera to only see the target. These capabilities are realized with relatively minimal complexity and expense.

  18. Absorber Alignment Measurement Tool for Solar Parabolic Trough Collectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Stynes, J. K.; Ihas, B.

    2012-04-01

    As we pursue efforts to lower the capital and installation costs of parabolic trough solar collectors, it is essential to maintain high optical performance. While there are many optical tools available to measure the reflector slope errors of parabolic trough solar collectors, there are few tools to measure the absorber alignment. A new method is presented here to measure the absorber alignment in two dimensions to within 0.5 cm. The absorber alignment is measured using a digital camera and four photogrammetric targets. Physical contact with the receiver absorber or glass is not necessary. The alignment of the absorber is measured along its full length so that sagging of the absorber can be quantified with this technique. The resulting absorber alignment measurement provides critical information required to accurately determine the intercept factor of a collector.

  19. Unforced errors and error reduction in tennis

    PubMed Central

    Brody, H

    2006-01-01

    Only at the highest level of tennis is the number of winners comparable to the number of unforced errors. As the average player loses many more points due to unforced errors than due to winners by an opponent, if the rate of unforced errors can be reduced, it should lead to an increase in points won. This article shows how players can improve their game by understanding and applying the laws of physics to reduce the number of unforced errors. PMID:16632568

  20. Correction of joint angles from Kinect for balance exercising and assessment.

    PubMed

    De Rosario, Helios; Belda-Lois, Juan Manuel; Fos, Francisco; Medina, Enrique; Poveda-Puente, Rakel; Kroll, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The new generation of videogame interfaces such as Microsoft's Kinect opens the possibility of implementing exercise programs for physical training, and of evaluating and reducing the risks of elderly people falling. However, applications such as these might require measurements of joint kinematics that are more robust and accurate than the standard output given by the available middleware. This article presents a method based on particle filters for calculating joint angles from the positions of the anatomical points detected by PrimeSense's NITE software. The application of this method to the measurement of lower limb kinematics reduced the error by one order of magnitude, to less than 10°, except for hip axial rotation, and it was advantageous over inverse kinematic analysis, in ensuring a robust and smooth solution without singularities, when the limbs are out-stretched and anatomical landmarks are aligned. PMID:23877057

  1. Correction of joint angles from Kinect for balance exercising and assessment.

    PubMed

    De Rosario, Helios; Belda-Lois, Juan Manuel; Fos, Francisco; Medina, Enrique; Poveda-Puente, Rakel; Kroll, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The new generation of videogame interfaces such as Microsoft's Kinect opens the possibility of implementing exercise programs for physical training, and of evaluating and reducing the risks of elderly people falling. However, applications such as these might require measurements of joint kinematics that are more robust and accurate than the standard output given by the available middleware. This article presents a method based on particle filters for calculating joint angles from the positions of the anatomical points detected by PrimeSense's NITE software. The application of this method to the measurement of lower limb kinematics reduced the error by one order of magnitude, to less than 10°, except for hip axial rotation, and it was advantageous over inverse kinematic analysis, in ensuring a robust and smooth solution without singularities, when the limbs are out-stretched and anatomical landmarks are aligned.

  2. Error in radiology.

    PubMed

    Goddard, P; Leslie, A; Jones, A; Wakeley, C; Kabala, J

    2001-10-01

    The level of error in radiology has been tabulated from articles on error and on "double reporting" or "double reading". The level of error varies depending on the radiological investigation, but the range is 2-20% for clinically significant or major error. The greatest reduction in error rates will come from changes in systems.

  3. Approximate protein structural alignment in polynomial time.

    PubMed

    Kolodny, Rachel; Linial, Nathan

    2004-08-17

    Alignment of protein structures is a fundamental task in computational molecular biology. Good structural alignments can help detect distant evolutionary relationships that are hard or impossible to discern from protein sequences alone. Here, we study the structural alignment problem as a family of optimization problems and develop an approximate polynomial-time algorithm to solve them. For a commonly used scoring function, the algorithm runs in O(n(10)/epsilon(6)) time, for globular protein of length n, and it detects alignments that score within an additive error of epsilon from all optima. Thus, we prove that this task is computationally feasible, although the method that we introduce is too slow to be a useful everyday tool. We argue that such approximate solutions are, in fact, of greater interest than exact ones because of the noisy nature of experimentally determined protein coordinates. The measurement of similarity between a pair of protein structures used by our algorithm involves the Euclidean distance between the structures (appropriately rigidly transformed). We show that an alternative approach, which relies on internal distance matrices, must incorporate sophisticated geometric ingredients if it is to guarantee optimality and run in polynomial time. We use these observations to visualize the scoring function for several real instances of the problem. Our investigations yield insights on the computational complexity of protein alignment under various scoring functions. These insights can be used in the design of scoring functions for which the optimum can be approximated efficiently and perhaps in the development of efficient algorithms for the multiple structural alignment problem. PMID:15304646

  4. Curriculum Alignment: Establishing Coherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagné, Philippe; Dumont, Laurence; Brunet, Sabine; Boucher, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a step-by-step guide to implement a curricular alignment project, directed at professional development and student support, and developed in a higher education French as a second language department. We outline best practices and preliminary results from our experience and provide ways to adapt our experience to other…

  5. Optically Aligned Drill Press

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adderholdt, Bruce M.

    1994-01-01

    Precise drill press equipped with rotary-indexing microscope. Microscope and drill exchange places when turret rotated. Microscope axis first aligned over future hole, then rotated out of way so drill axis assumes its precise position. New procedure takes less time to locate drilling positions and produces more accurate results. Apparatus adapted to such other machine tools as milling and measuring machines.

  6. Aligning brains and minds

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Frank

    2012-01-01

    In this issue of Neuron, Haxby and colleagues describe a new method for aligning functional brain activity patterns across participants. Their study demonstrates that objects are similarly represented across different brains, allowing for reliable classification of one person’s brain activity based on another’s. PMID:22017984

  7. Aligned-or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseman, Jo Ellen; Koppal, Mary

    2015-01-01

    When state leaders and national partners in the development of the Next Generation Science Standards met to consider implementation strategies, states and school districts wanted to know which materials were aligned to the new standards. The answer from the developers was short but not sweet: You won't find much now, and it's going to…

  8. A high sensitive roll angle interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Yanfen; Hou, Wenmei; Hu, Kai; Ju, Aisong

    2013-01-01

    A roll angle interferometer with high sensitivity is designed in this paper. Two sets of centrosymmetric beams are used to travel through the measurement and reference arms of the roll angle interferometer which contains two specific optical devices: wedge prism assembly and wedge mirror assembly. The optical path change in both arms caused by roll is converted into phase shift which can be measured by interferometer. Because of the adoption of the centrosymmetric measurement structure, the straightness errors, yaw error and pitch error can be avoided and the dead path is minimized, so that the stability and the accuracy of the measurement can be greatly enhanced. The resolution for the roll measurement is about 0.006″ with the measurement range of ±1°.

  9. Comparison between angle interferometer and angle encoder during calibration of autocollimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yao; Xue, Zi; Wang, He Yan

    2015-02-01

    An angle interferometer was set up using concept `ratio of two lengths' and an angle encoder was set up using concept `subdivision of full circle (2π rad=360°)' at the National Institute of Metrology, China (NIM). For the analysis of the systematic errors of each device, two autocollimator calibration systems were separately set up based on the angle interferometer and the angle encoder with a similar measuring uncertainty (around 0.1″). An autocollimator was calibrated using two systems in the same measurement range (+/-1000″) and the same measurement step (10″). The systematic errors of each system were found through comparison between their original calibration results. The compensation curves were calculated using the analysis results, and two systems' original calibration results were compensated according to two systems' compensation curves. The maximum difference between the compensated calibration results of two systems was 0.05″ which is lower than measuring uncertainty of each system.

  10. Surface topography and alignment of liquid crystals on rubbed oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Minoru

    1981-07-01

    For several nematic liquid crystals (LC's), the relation between alignments of the LC's on rubbed oxide surfaces and rubbing pressures of the substrates is given. When the LC's take a parallel alignment to the surfaces, good homogeneous alignment is achieved at low pressures. High pressure rubbing also produces good homogeneous alignment of LC's, although alignment is perpendicular to the nonrubbed surfaces. Fine stripes of deposited cloth fibers can be observed on the cloth-rubbed oxide surfaces. The stripes consist of asymmetric projections ranging in the rubbed direction. On the basis of the asymmetric structure formed on the surface, the tilt direction of LC's and their tilt angles are interpreted.

  11. Solar cell angle of incidence corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Dale R.; Mueller, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    Literature on solar array angle of incidence corrections was found to be sparse and contained no tabular data for support. This lack along with recent data on 27 GaAs/Ge 4 cm by 4 cm cells initiated the analysis presented in this paper. The literature cites seven possible contributors to angle of incidence effects: cosine, optical front surface, edge, shadowing, UV degradation, particulate soiling, and background color. Only the first three are covered in this paper due to lack of sufficient data. The cosine correction is commonly used but is not sufficient when the incident angle is large. Fresnel reflection calculations require knowledge of the index of refraction of the coverglass front surface. The absolute index of refraction for the coverglass front surface was not known nor was it measured due to lack of funds. However, a value for the index of refraction was obtained by examining how the prediction errors varied with different assumed indices and selecting the best fit to the set of measured values. Corrections using front surface Fresnel reflection along with the cosine correction give very good predictive results when compared to measured data, except there is a definite trend away from predicted values at the larger incident angles. This trend could be related to edge effects and is illustrated by a use of a box plot of the errors and by plotting the deviation of the mean against incidence angle. The trend is for larger deviations at larger incidence angles and there may be a fourth order effect involved in the trend. A chi-squared test was used to determine if the measurement errors were normally distributed. At 10 degrees the chi-squared test failed, probably due to the very small numbers involved or a bias from the measurement procedure. All other angles showed a good fit to the normal distribution with increasing goodness-of-fit as the angles increased which reinforces the very small numbers hypothesis. The contributed data only went to 65 degrees

  12. Use a spreadsheet for turbomachinery alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Cassolato, B.M. , Sarnia, Ontario )

    1995-01-01

    Turbomachinery shaft alignment has an impact on plant profitability and safety. A simple sign error in the alignment process may incur days of production loss to correct, or worse if the mistake is undetected. Positioning large machinery, such as a centrifugal gas compressor weighing many tons to within thousandths of an inch, is laborious time-consuming work. Overhaul plans should specify the exact techniques, tools, desired results and quality assurance checks to be used in the alignment stages. The methods must be established by proven experience and best practices. The reverse indicator method is the most common precision alignment technique. The paper presents an instructional step-by-step development of a typical spreadsheet program for the reverse indicator method. The screen interface comprised of a cell range combining formulae and graphics provides the context for spreadsheet entries described in the following discussion. The worksheet is protected to disallow over-writing formulae and graphics, except in cell ranges reserved for input data. The program is designed to be user-friendly and comply with industry accepted practices. Special programming experience is not required of the operator.

  13. Instability of Ocular Alignment in Childhood Esotropia

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective Instability of ocular alignment may cause surgeons to delay surgical correction of childhood esotropia. We investigated the stability of ocular alignment over 18 weeks in children with infantile esotropia (IET), acquired non-accommodative esotropia (ANAET), or acquired partially-accommodative esotropia (APAET). Design Prospective observational study Participants Two hundred thirty-three children aged 2 months to <5 years with IET, ANAET, or APAET of less than 6 months duration Methods Ocular alignment was measured at baseline and at six-week intervals for 18 weeks. Main Outcome Measure Using definitions derived from a nested test-retest study and computer simulation modeling, ocular alignment was classified as ‘unstable’ if there was a change of ≥ 15 prism diopters (PD) between any two of the four measurements, as ‘stable’ if all four measurements were within ≤ 5 PD of one another, or as ‘uncertain’ if neither criteria was met. Results Of those who completed all three follow-up visits within time windows for analysis, 27 (46%) of 59 subjects with IET had ocular alignment classified as unstable (95% confidence interval (CI) = 33 to 59%), 20% as stable (95% CI = 11 to 33%), and 34% as uncertain (95% CI = 22 to 47%). Thirteen (22%) of 60 subjects with ANAET had ocular alignment classified as unstable (95% confidence interval (CI) = 12 to 34%), 37% as stable (95% CI = 25 to 50%), and 42% as uncertain (95% CI = 29 to 55%). Six (15%) of 41 subjects with APAET had ocular alignment classified as unstable (95% CI = 6 to 29%), 39% as stable (95% CI = 24 to 56%), and 46% as uncertain (95% CI = 31 to 63%). For IET, subjects who were older at presentation were less likely to have unstable angles than subjects who were younger at presentation (risk ratio for unstable vs. stable per additional month of age = 0.85, 99% CI = 0.74 to 0.99). Conclusions Ocular alignment instability is common in children with IET, ANAET and APAET. The impact of this finding

  14. High precision beam alignment of electromagnetic wigglers

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Qiu, X.Z.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of Free-Electron Lasers depends critically on the quality of the alignment of the electron beam to the wiggler's magnetic axis and the deviation of this axis from a straight fine. The measurement of the electron beam position requires numerous beam position monitors in the wiggler, where space is at premium. The beam position measurement is used to set beam steerers for an orbit correction in the wiggler. The authors propose an alternative high precision alignment method in which one or two external Beam Position Monitors (BPM) are used. In this technique, the field in the electro-wiggler is modulated section by section and the beam position movement at the external BPM is detected in synchronism with the modulation. A beam offset at the modulated beam section will produce a modulation of the beam position at the detector that is a function of the of the beam offset and the absolute value of the modulation current. The wiggler errors produce a modulation that is a function of the modulation current. It will be shown that this method allows the detection and correction of the beam position at each section in the presence of wiggler errors with a good resolution. Furthermore, it allows one to measure the first and second integrals of the wiggler error over each wiggler section. Lastly, provided that wiggler sections can be degaussed effectively, one can test the deviation of the wiggler's magnetic axis from a straight line.

  15. MUSE alignment onto VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Boudon, Didier; Caillier, Patrick; Daguisé, Eric; Dupuy, Christophe; Jarno, Aurélien; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Migniau, Jean-Emmanuel; Nicklas, Harald; Piqueras, Laure

    2014-07-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation Very Large Telescope (VLT) integral field spectrograph developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO). It combines a 1' x 1' field of view sampled at 0.2 arcsec for its Wide Field Mode (WFM) and a 7.5"x7.5" field of view for its Narrow Field Mode (NFM). Both modes will operate with the improved spatial resolution provided by GALACSI (Ground Atmospheric Layer Adaptive Optics for Spectroscopic Imaging), that will use the VLT deformable secondary mirror and 4 Laser Guide Stars (LGS) foreseen in 2015. MUSE operates in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently commissioning MUSE in the Very Large Telescope for the Preliminary Acceptance in Chile, scheduled for September, 2014. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2012 and 2013, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested to the P.I. institute at Lyon. After successful PAE in September 2013, MUSE instrument was shipped to the Very Large Telescope in Chile where that was aligned and tested in ESO integration hall at Paranal. After, MUSE was directly transported, fully aligned and without any optomechanical dismounting, onto VLT telescope where the first light was overcame the 7th of February, 2014. This paper describes the alignment procedure of the whole MUSE instrument with respect to the Very Large Telescope (VLT). It describes how 6 tons could be move with accuracy better than 0.025mm and less than 0.25 arcmin in order to reach alignment requirements. The success

  16. Internal Alignment of the SLD Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.J.; Wickens, F.J.; Su, D.; /SLAC

    2007-12-03

    The tracking resolution and vertex finding capabilities of the SLD experiment depended upon a precise knowledge of the location and orientation of the elements of the SLD pixel vertex detector (VXD3) in 3D space. At the heart of the procedure described here to align the 96 CCDs is the matrix inversion technique of singular value decomposition (SVD). This tool was employed to unfold the detector geometry corrections from the track data in the VXD3. The algorithm was adapted to perform an optimal {chi}{sup 2} minimization by careful treatment of the track hit residual measurement errors. The tracking resolution obtained with the aligned geometry achieved the design performance. Comments are given on how this method could be used for other trackers.

  17. Optical-precision alignment of diffraction grating mold in moire interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joh, D.

    1992-01-01

    A high-precision optical method is presented for aligning diffraction grating molds with the edges of specimens in moire interferometry. The alignment fixture is simple and convenient to operate. The conventional method of grating-mold alignment has a wide band of uncertainty in the range of error which is not compatible with the required precision of high-sensitivity moire interferometry. Following a description of the alignment technique, both the single-edge and parallel-edge guide bar optical alignment methods are introduced and compared.

  18. Development of a method of alignment between various SOLAR MAXIMUM MISSION experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of an engineering study of the methods of alignment between various experiments for the solar maximum mission are described. The configuration studied consists of the instruments, mounts and instrument support platform located within the experiment module. Hardware design, fabrication methods and alignment techniques were studied with regard to optimizing the coalignment between the experiments and the fine sun sensor. The proposed hardware design was reviewed with regard to loads, stress, thermal distortion, alignment error budgets, fabrication techniques, alignment techniques and producibility. Methods of achieving comparable alignment accuracies on previous projects were also reviewed.

  19. Surface free energy of polyimide aligning layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borycki, Jerzy; Okulska-Bozek, Malgorzata

    2000-05-01

    Polyimides from four selected dianhydrides and seven diamines were synthesized by two-step polycondensation method. During the first step 10% solutions of poly(amic acid)s in N,N-dimethylformamide and 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone were obtained. The thin polyimide layers on soda glass were prepared by thermal cyclodehydration. Contact angles of series of standard liquids for tested polyimide films were measured. The values of surface free energy and its components were calculated accordingly to Zisman, Owens et al. and van Oss equations. Some correlation between the surface properties and the chemical structure of polyimide aligning layers were presented.

  20. Relay telescope for high power laser alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd; Harris, Fritz B.

    2006-09-19

    A laser system includes an optical path having an intracavity relay telescope with a telescope focal point for imaging an output of the gain medium between an image location at or near the gain medium and an image location at or near an output coupler for the laser system. A kinematic mount is provided within a vacuum chamber, and adapted to secure beam baffles near the telescope focal point. An access port on the vacuum chamber is adapted for allowing insertion and removal of the beam baffles. A first baffle formed using an alignment pinhole aperture is used during alignment of the laser system. A second tapered baffle replaces the alignment aperture during operation and acts as a far-field baffle in which off angle beams strike the baffle a grazing angle of incidence, reducing fluence levels at the impact areas.

  1. Inflation by alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, C.P.; Roest, Diederik

    2015-06-08

    Pseudo-Goldstone bosons (pGBs) can provide technically natural inflatons, as has been comparatively well-explored in the simplest axion examples. Although inflationary success requires trans-Planckian decay constants, f≳M{sub p}, several mechanisms have been proposed to obtain this, relying on (mis-)alignments between potential and kinetic energies in multiple-field models. We extend these mechanisms to a broader class of inflationary models, including in particular the exponential potentials that arise for pGB potentials based on noncompact groups (and so which might apply to moduli in an extra-dimensional setting). The resulting potentials provide natural large-field inflationary models and can predict a larger primordial tensor signal than is true for simpler single-field versions of these models. In so doing we provide a unified treatment of several alignment mechanisms, showing how each emerges as a limit of the more general setup.

  2. Nuclear reactor alignment plate configuration

    DOEpatents

    Altman, David A; Forsyth, David R; Smith, Richard E; Singleton, Norman R

    2014-01-28

    An alignment plate that is attached to a core barrel of a pressurized water reactor and fits within slots within a top plate of a lower core shroud and upper core plate to maintain lateral alignment of the reactor internals. The alignment plate is connected to the core barrel through two vertically-spaced dowel pins that extend from the outside surface of the core barrel through a reinforcement pad and into corresponding holes in the alignment plate. Additionally, threaded fasteners are inserted around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad and into the alignment plate to further secure the alignment plate to the core barrel. A fillet weld also is deposited around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad. To accomodate thermal growth between the alignment plate and the core barrel, a gap is left above, below and at both sides of one of the dowel pins in the alignment plate holes through with the dowel pins pass.

  3. Alignment reference device

    DOEpatents

    Patton, Gail Y.; Torgerson, Darrel D.

    1987-01-01

    An alignment reference device provides a collimated laser beam that minimizes angular deviations therein. A laser beam source outputs the beam into a single mode optical fiber. The output end of the optical fiber acts as a source of radiant energy and is positioned at the focal point of a lens system where the focal point is positioned within the lens. The output beam reflects off a mirror back to the lens that produces a collimated beam.

  4. Dynamic Alignment at SLS

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, Robert E.

    2003-04-23

    The relative alignment of components in the storage ring of the Swiss Light Source (SLS) is guaranteed by mechanical means. The magnets are rigidly fixed to 48 girders by means of alignment rails with tolerances of less than {+-}15 {micro}m. The bending magnets, supported by 3 point ball bearings, overlap adjacent girders and thus establish virtual train links between the girders, located near the bending magnet centres. Keeping the distortion of the storage ring geometry within a tolerance of {+-}100 {micro}m in order to guarantee sufficient dynamic apertures, requires continuous monitoring and correction of the girder locations. Two monitoring systems for the horizontal and the vertical direction will be installed to measure displacements of the train link between girders, which are due to ground settings and temperature effects: The hydrostatic levelling system (HLS) gives an absolute vertical reference, while the horizontal positioning system (HPS), which employs low cost linear encoders with sub-micron resolution, measures relative horizontal movements. The girder mover system based on five DC motors per girder allows a dynamic realignment of the storage ring within a working window of more than {+-}1 mm for girder translations and {+-}1 mrad for rotations. We will describe both monitoring systems (HLS and HPS) as well as the applied correction scheme based on the girder movers. We also show simulations indicating that beam based girder alignment takes care of most of the static closed orbit correction.

  5. Non-contact measurement of rotation angle with solo camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Xiaochuan; Sun, Anbin; Ye, Xin; Ma, Liqun

    2015-02-01

    For the purpose to measure a rotation angle around the axis of an object, a non-contact rotation angle measurement method based on solo camera was promoted. The intrinsic parameters of camera were calibrated using chessboard on principle of plane calibration theory. The translation matrix and rotation matrix between the object coordinate and the camera coordinate were calculated according to the relationship between the corners' position on object and their coordinates on image. Then the rotation angle between the measured object and the camera could be resolved from the rotation matrix. A precise angle dividing table (PADT) was chosen as the reference to verify the angle measurement error of this method. Test results indicated that the rotation angle measurement error of this method did not exceed +/- 0.01 degree.

  6. Laser measurement and analysis of reposition error in polishing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weisen; Wang, Junhua; Xu, Min; He, Xiaoying

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, robotic reposition error measurement method based on laser interference remote positioning is presented, the geometric error is analyzed in the polishing system based on robot and the mathematical model of the tilt error is presented. Studies show that less than 1 mm error is mainly caused by the tilt error with small incident angle. Marking spot position with interference fringe enhances greatly the error measurement precision, the measurement precision of tilt error can reach 5 um. Measurement results show that reposition error of the polishing system is mainly from the tilt error caused by the motor A, repositioning precision is greatly increased after polishing system improvement. The measurement method has important applications in the actual error measurement with low cost, simple operation.

  7. Antenna pointing systematic error model derivations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guiar, C. N.; Lansing, F. L.; Riggs, R.

    1987-01-01

    The pointing model used to represent and correct systematic errors for the Deep Space Network (DSN) antennas is presented. Analytical expressions are given in both azimuth-elevation (az-el) and hour angle-declination (ha-dec) mounts for RF axis collimation error, encoder offset, nonorthogonality of axes, axis plane tilt, and structural flexure due to gravity loading. While the residual pointing errors (rms) after correction appear to be within the ten percent of the half-power beamwidth criterion commonly set for good pointing accuracy, the DSN has embarked on an extensive pointing improvement and modeling program aiming toward an order of magnitude higher pointing precision.

  8. Alignment and alignment transition of bent core nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elamain, Omaima; Hegde, Gurumurthy; Komitov, Lachezar

    2013-07-01

    We report on the alignment of nematics consisting of bimesogen bent core molecules of chlorine substituent of benzene derivative and their binary mixture with rod like nematics. It was found that the alignment layer made from polyimide material, which is usually used for promoting vertical (homeotropic) alignment of rod like nematics, promotes instead a planar alignment of the bent core nematic and its nematic mixtures. At higher concentration of the rod like nematic component in these mixtures, a temperature driven transition from vertical to planar alignment was found near the transition to isotropic phase.

  9. Polar cap arcs: Sun-aligned or cusp-aligned?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Paxton, L. J.; Zhang, Qinghe; Xing, Zanyang

    2016-08-01

    Polar cap arcs are often called sun-aligned arcs. Satellite observations reveal that polar cap arcs join together at the cusp and are actually cusp aligned. Strong ionospheric plasma velocity shears, thus field aligned currents, were associated with polar arcs and they were likely caused by Kelvin-Helmholtz waves around the low-latitude magnetopause under a northward IMF Bz. The magnetic field lines around the magnetopause join together in the cusp region so are the field aligned currents and particle precipitation. This explains why polar arcs are cusp aligned.

  10. Improving ASM stepper alignment accuracy by alignment signal intensity simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gerald; Pushpala, Sagar M.; Bradford, Bradley; Peng, Zezhong; Gottipati, Mohan

    1993-08-01

    As photolithography technology advances into submicron regime, the requirement for alignment accuracy also becomes much tighter. The alignment accuracy is a function of the strength of the alignment signal. Therefore, a detailed alignment signal intensity simulation for 0.8 micrometers EPROM poly-1 layer on ASM stepper was done based on the process of record in the fab to reduce misalignment and improve die yield. Oxide thickness variation did not have significant impact on the alignment signal intensity. However, poly-1 thickness was the most important parameter to affect optical alignments. The real alignment intensity data versus resist thickness on production wafers was collected and it showed good agreement with the simulated results. Similar results were obtained for ONO dielectric layer at a different fab.

  11. Robust temporal alignment of multimodal cardiac sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perissinotto, Andrea; Queirós, Sandro; Morais, Pedro; Baptista, Maria J.; Monaghan, Mark; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; D'hooge, Jan; Vilaça, João. L.; Barbosa, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Given the dynamic nature of cardiac function, correct temporal alignment of pre-operative models and intraoperative images is crucial for augmented reality in cardiac image-guided interventions. As such, the current study focuses on the development of an image-based strategy for temporal alignment of multimodal cardiac imaging sequences, such as cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) or 3D Ultrasound (US). First, we derive a robust, modality-independent signal from the image sequences, estimated by computing the normalized cross-correlation between each frame in the temporal sequence and the end-diastolic frame. This signal is a resembler for the left-ventricle (LV) volume curve over time, whose variation indicates different temporal landmarks of the cardiac cycle. We then perform the temporal alignment of these surrogate signals derived from MRI and US sequences of the same patient through Dynamic Time Warping (DTW), allowing to synchronize both sequences. The proposed framework was evaluated in 98 patients, which have undergone both 3D+t MRI and US scans. The end-systolic frame could be accurately estimated as the minimum of the image-derived surrogate signal, presenting a relative error of 1.6 +/- 1.9% and 4.0 +/- 4.2% for the MRI and US sequences, respectively, thus supporting its association with key temporal instants of the cardiac cycle. The use of DTW reduces the desynchronization of the cardiac events in MRI and US sequences, allowing to temporally align multimodal cardiac imaging sequences. Overall, a generic, fast and accurate method for temporal synchronization of MRI and US sequences of the same patient was introduced. This approach could be straightforwardly used for the correct temporal alignment of pre-operative MRI information and intra-operative US images.

  12. Investigation vignetting beams in optoelectronic autocollimation angle measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyakhin, Igor; Sakhariyanova, Aiganym M.; Smekhov, Andrey

    2015-06-01

    Autocollimation systems are widely used to measure angular values, in particular, angular deformations in the critical points of large objects, angles of optical components, and for controlling the straightness and parallelism. Autocollimator measures the rotation angle of the mirror as the sensitive element at angular deformation point with a potential accuracy up to 0.005 ". In fact, the error may significantly exceed the specified value because of systematic error existence, one of which main components is the error due to vignetting of working beam. The reason of vignetting error is changing of irradiance distribution of the image on the autocollimator analyzer due to cutting of a bundle of optical beams at a mirror deviation in case of angular deformation. On the basis of a computer simulation image model was investigated the influence of vignetting error and was found compensation algorithm of this error

  13. Reading Angles in Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections…

  14. AVID: A global alignment program.

    PubMed

    Bray, Nick; Dubchak, Inna; Pachter, Lior

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we describe a new global alignment method called AVID. The method is designed to be fast, memory efficient, and practical for sequence alignments of large genomic regions up to megabases long. We present numerous applications of the method, ranging from the comparison of assemblies to alignment of large syntenic genomic regions and whole genome human/mouse alignments. We have also performed a quantitative comparison of AVID with other popular alignment tools. To this end, we have established a format for the representation of alignments and methods for their comparison. These formats and methods should be useful for future studies. The tools we have developed for the alignment comparisons, as well as the AVID program, are publicly available. See Web Site References section for AVID Web address and Web addresses for other programs discussed in this paper. PMID:12529311

  15. Engineering cell alignment in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhui; Huang, Guoyou; Zhang, Xiaohui; Wang, Lin; Du, Yanan; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Cell alignment plays a critical role in various cell behaviors including cytoskeleton reorganization, membrane protein relocation, nucleus gene expression, and ECM remodeling. Cell alignment is also known to exert significant effects on tissue regeneration (e.g., neuron) and modulate mechanical properties of tissues including skeleton, cardiac muscle and tendon. Therefore, it is essential to engineer cell alignment in vitro for biomechanics, cell biology, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. With advances in nano- and micro-scale technologies, a variety of approaches have been developed to engineer cell alignment in vitro, including mechanical loading, topographical patterning, and surface chemical treatment. In this review, we first present alignments of various cell types and their functionality in different tissues in vivo including muscle and nerve tissues. Then, we provide an overview of recent approaches for engineering cell alignment in vitro. Finally, concluding remarks and perspectives are addressed for future improvement of engineering cell alignment.

  16. AVID: A global alignment program.

    PubMed

    Bray, Nick; Dubchak, Inna; Pachter, Lior

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we describe a new global alignment method called AVID. The method is designed to be fast, memory efficient, and practical for sequence alignments of large genomic regions up to megabases long. We present numerous applications of the method, ranging from the comparison of assemblies to alignment of large syntenic genomic regions and whole genome human/mouse alignments. We have also performed a quantitative comparison of AVID with other popular alignment tools. To this end, we have established a format for the representation of alignments and methods for their comparison. These formats and methods should be useful for future studies. The tools we have developed for the alignment comparisons, as well as the AVID program, are publicly available. See Web Site References section for AVID Web address and Web addresses for other programs discussed in this paper.

  17. Modeling of Field-Aligned Guided Echoes in the Plasmasphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.; Green, James L.

    2004-01-01

    The conditions under which high frequency (f>>f(sub uh)) long-range extraordinary-mode discrete field-aligned echoes observed by the Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) on board the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite in the plasmasphere are investigated by ray tracing modeling. Field-aligned discrete echoes are most commonly observed by RPI in the plasmasphere although they are also observed over the polar cap region. The plasmasphere field-aligned echoes appearing as multiple echo traces at different virtual ranges are attributed to signals reflected successively between conjugate hemispheres that propagate along or nearly along closed geomagnetic field lines. The ray tracing simulations show that field-aligned ducts with as little as 1% density perturbations (depletions) and less than 10 wavelengths wide can guide nearly field-aligned propagating high frequency X mode waves. Effective guidance of wave at a given frequency and wave normal angle (Psi) depends on the cross-field density scale of the duct, such that ducts with stronger density depletions need to be wider in order to maintain the same gradient of refractive index across the magnetic field. While signal guidance by field aligned density gradient without ducting is possible only over the polar region, conjugate field-aligned echoes that have traversed through the equatorial region are most likely guided by ducting.

  18. Precomparator and postcomparator errors in monopulse.

    SciTech Connect

    Bickel, Douglas Lloyd

    2013-02-01

    Monopulse radar is a well-established technique for extracting accurate target location information in the presence of target scintillation. It relies on the comparison of at least two patterns being received simultaneously by the antenna. These two patterns are designed to differ in the direction in which we wish to obtain the target angle information. The two patterns are compared to each other through a standard method, typically by forming the ratio of the difference of the patterns to the sum of the patterns. The key to accurate angle information using monopulse is that the mapping function from the target angle to this ratio is well-behaved and well-known. Errors in the amplitude and phase of the signals prior and subsequent to the comparison operation affect the mapping function. The purpose of this report is to provide some intuition into these error effects upon the mapping function.

  19. Error and adjustment of reflecting prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenwei

    1997-12-01

    A manufacturing error in the orientation of the working planes of a reflecting prism, such as an angle error or an edge error, will cause the optical axis to deviate and the image to lean. So does an adjustment (position error) of a reflecting prism. A universal method to be used to calculate the optical axis deviation and the image lean caused by the manufacturing error of a reflecting prism is presented. It is suited to all types of reflecting prisms. A means to offset the position error against the manufacturing error of a reflecting prism and the changes of image orientation is discussed. For the calculation to be feasible, a surface named the 'separating surface' is introduced just in front of the real exit face of a real prism. It is the image of the entrance face formed by all reflecting surfaces of the real prism. It can be used to separate the image orientation change caused by the error of the prism's reflecting surfaces from the image orientation change caused by the error of the prism's refracting surface. Based on ray tracing, a set of simple and explicit formulas of the optical axis deviation and the image lean for a general optical wedge is derived.

  20. TSGC and JSC Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Humberto

    2013-01-01

    NASA and the SGCs are, by design, intended to work closely together and have synergistic Vision, Mission, and Goals. The TSGC affiliates and JSC have been working together, but not always in a concise, coordinated, nor strategic manner. Today we have a couple of simple ideas to present about how TSGC and JSC have started to work together in a more concise, coordinated, and strategic manner, and how JSC and non-TSG Jurisdiction members have started to collaborate: Idea I: TSGC and JSC Technical Alignment Idea II: Concept of Clusters.

  1. CELT optics Alignment Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, Terry S.; Nelson, Jerry E.; Chanan, Gary A.; Noethe, Lothar

    2003-01-01

    The California Extremely Large Telescope (CELT) is a project to build a 30-meter diameter telescope for research in astronomy at visible and infrared wavelengths. The current optical design calls for a primary, secondary, and tertiary mirror with Ritchey-Chretién foci at two Nasmyth platforms. The primary mirror is a mosaic of 1080 actively-stabilized hexagonal segments. This paper summarizes a CELT report that describes a step-by-step procedure for aligning the many degrees of freedom of the CELT optics.

  2. On the absolute alignment of GONG images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    In order to combine data from the six instruments in the GONG network the alignment of all of the images must be known to a fairly high precision (~0°.1 for GONG Classic and ~0°.01 for GONG+). The relative orientation is obtained using the angular cross-correlation method described by (Toner & Harvey, 1998). To obtain the absolute orientation the Project periodically records a day of drift scans, where the image of the Sun is allowed to drift across the CCD repeatedly throughout the day. These data are then analyzed to deduce the direction of Terrestrial East-West as a function of hour angle (i.e., time) for that instrument. The transit of Mercury on Nov. 15, 1999, which was recorded by three of the GONG instruments, provided an independent check on the current alignment procedures. Here we present a comparison of the alignment of GONG images as deduced from both drift scans and the Mercury transit for two GONG sites: Tucson (GONG+ camera) and Mauna Loa (GONG Classic camera). The agreement is within ~0°.01 for both cameras, however, the scatter is substantially larger for GONG Classic: ~0°.03 compared to ~0°.01 for GONG+.

  3. NIF pointing and centering systems and target alignment using a 351 nm laser source

    SciTech Connect

    Boege, S.J.; Bliss, E.S.; Chocol, C.J.; Holdener, F.R.; Miller, J.L.; Toeppen, J.S.; Vann, C.S.; Zacharias, R.A.

    1996-10-01

    The operational requirements of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) place tight constraints upon its alignment system. In general, the alignment system must establish and maintain the correct relationships between beam position, beam angle, laser component clear apertures, and the target. At the target, this includes adjustment of beam focus to obtain the correct spot size. This must be accomplished for all beamlines in a time consistent with planned shot rates and yet, in the front end and main laser, beam control functions cannot be initiated until the amplifiers have sufficiently cooled so as to minimize dynamic thermal distortions during and after alignment and wavefront optimization. The scope of the task dictates an automated system that implements parallel processes. We describe reticle choices and other alignment references, insertion of alignment beams, principles of operation of the Chamber Center Reference System 2048 and Target Alignment Sensor, and the anticipated alignment sequence that will occur between shots.

  4. Using doppler radar images to estimate aircraft navigational heading error

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.; Jordan, Jay D.; Kim, Theodore J.

    2012-07-03

    A yaw angle error of a motion measurement system carried on an aircraft for navigation is estimated from Doppler radar images captured using the aircraft. At least two radar pulses aimed at respectively different physical locations in a targeted area are transmitted from a radar antenna carried on the aircraft. At least two Doppler radar images that respectively correspond to the at least two transmitted radar pulses are produced. These images are used to produce an estimate of the yaw angle error.

  5. Matrix error correction for digital data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotson, Ronald S. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A technique for digital data error detection and correction is disclosed which adds alignment and checksum bytes to three sides of a matrix (24) of digital data to be protected. This technique is particularly used for the recording and storage (16,18) of digital data on video tape medium (14). The digital data is treated as a matrix block (24). Checksum and alignment bytes are added (20) to the digital data before tape storage and stripped (22) therefrom after successful alignment checks and data validation. In particular, the first column may be used to provide alignment bytes of a predetermined value for each row. The last column provides row checksum bytes for the data in each row. The last row provides column check sum bytes for each column, excluding the column of alignment bytes. The data location at the intersection of the row of column checksum bytes and the column of row checksum bytes may be used as a checksum byte for either the row or column checksum bytes.

  6. Overcoming low-alignment signal contrast induced alignment failure by alignment signal enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeong Soo; Kim, Young Ha; Hwang, Hyunwoo; Lee, Jeongjin; Kong, Jeong Heung; Kang, Young Seog; Paarhuis, Bart; Kok, Haico; de Graaf, Roelof; Weichselbaum, Stefan; Droste, Richard; Mason, Christopher; Aarts, Igor; de Boeij, Wim P.

    2016-03-01

    Overlay is one of the key factors which enables optical lithography extension to 1X node DRAM manufacturing. It is natural that accurate wafer alignment is a prerequisite for good device overlay. However, alignment failures or misalignments are commonly observed in a fab. There are many factors which could induce alignment problems. Low alignment signal contrast is one of the main issues. Alignment signal contrast can be degraded by opaque stack materials or by alignment mark degradation due to processes like CMP. This issue can be compounded by mark sub-segmentation from design rules in combination with double or quadruple spacer process. Alignment signal contrast can be improved by applying new material or process optimization, which sometimes lead to the addition of another process-step with higher costs. If we can amplify the signal components containing the position information and reduce other unwanted signal and background contributions then we can improve alignment performance without process change. In this paper we use ASML's new alignment sensor (as was introduced and released on the NXT:1980Di) and sample wafers with special stacks which can induce poor alignment signal to demonstrate alignment and overlay improvement.

  7. Field error lottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James Elliott, C.; McVey, Brian D.; Quimby, David C.

    1991-07-01

    The level of field errors in a free electron laser (FEL) is an important determinant of its performance. We have computed 3D performance of a large laser subsystem subjected to field errors of various types. These calculations have been guided by simple models such as SWOOP. The technique of choice is use of the FELEX free electron laser code that now possesses extensive engineering capabilities. Modeling includes the ability to establish tolerances of various types: fast and slow scale field bowing, field error level, beam position monitor error level, gap errors, defocusing errors, energy slew, displacement and pointing errors. Many effects of these errors on relative gain and relative power extraction are displayed and are the essential elements of determining an error budget. The random errors also depend on the particular random number seed used in the calculation. The simultaneous display of the performance versus error level of cases with multiple seeds illustrates the variations attributable to stochasticity of this model. All these errors are evaluated numerically for comprehensive engineering of the system. In particular, gap errors are found to place requirements beyond convenient mechanical tolerances of ± 25 μm, and amelioration of these may occur by a procedure using direct measurement of the magnetic fields at assembly time.

  8. Field error lottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, C. James; McVey, Brian D.; Quimby, David C.

    1990-11-01

    The level of field errors in an FEL is an important determinant of its performance. We have computed 3D performance of a large laser subsystem subjected to field errors of various types. These calculations have been guided by simple models such as SWOOP. The technique of choice is utilization of the FELEX free electron laser code that now possesses extensive engineering capabilities. Modeling includes the ability to establish tolerances of various types: fast and slow scale field bowing, field error level, beam position monitor error level, gap errors, defocusing errors, energy slew, displacement, and pointing errors. Many effects of these errors on relative gain and relative power extraction are displayed and are the essential elements of determining an error budget. The random errors also depend on the particular random number seed used in the calculation. The simultaneous display of the performance versus error level of cases with multiple seeds illustrates the variations attributable to stochasticity of this model. All these errors are evaluated numerically for comprehensive engineering of the system. In particular, gap errors are found to place requirements beyond mechanical tolerances of (plus minus)25(mu)m, and amelioration of these may occur by a procedure utilizing direct measurement of the magnetic fields at assembly time.

  9. Field error lottery

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, C.J.; McVey, B. ); Quimby, D.C. )

    1990-01-01

    The level of field errors in an FEL is an important determinant of its performance. We have computed 3D performance of a large laser subsystem subjected to field errors of various types. These calculations have been guided by simple models such as SWOOP. The technique of choice is utilization of the FELEX free electron laser code that now possesses extensive engineering capabilities. Modeling includes the ability to establish tolerances of various types: fast and slow scale field bowing, field error level, beam position monitor error level, gap errors, defocusing errors, energy slew, displacement and pointing errors. Many effects of these errors on relative gain and relative power extraction are displayed and are the essential elements of determining an error budget. The random errors also depend on the particular random number seed used in the calculation. The simultaneous display of the performance versus error level of cases with multiple seeds illustrates the variations attributable to stochasticity of this model. All these errors are evaluated numerically for comprehensive engineering of the system. In particular, gap errors are found to place requirements beyond mechanical tolerances of {plus minus}25{mu}m, and amelioration of these may occur by a procedure utilizing direct measurement of the magnetic fields at assembly time. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  10. Pareto optimal pairwise sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    DeRonne, Kevin W; Karypis, George

    2013-01-01

    Sequence alignment using evolutionary profiles is a commonly employed tool when investigating a protein. Many profile-profile scoring functions have been developed for use in such alignments, but there has not yet been a comprehensive study of Pareto optimal pairwise alignments for combining multiple such functions. We show that the problem of generating Pareto optimal pairwise alignments has an optimal substructure property, and develop an efficient algorithm for generating Pareto optimal frontiers of pairwise alignments. All possible sets of two, three, and four profile scoring functions are used from a pool of 11 functions and applied to 588 pairs of proteins in the ce_ref data set. The performance of the best objective combinations on ce_ref is also evaluated on an independent set of 913 protein pairs extracted from the BAliBASE RV11 data set. Our dynamic-programming-based heuristic approach produces approximated Pareto optimal frontiers of pairwise alignments that contain comparable alignments to those on the exact frontier, but on average in less than 1/58th the time in the case of four objectives. Our results show that the Pareto frontiers contain alignments whose quality is better than the alignments obtained by single objectives. However, the task of identifying a single high-quality alignment among those in the Pareto frontier remains challenging.

  11. Accepting error to make less error.

    PubMed

    Einhorn, H J

    1986-01-01

    In this article I argue that the clinical and statistical approaches rest on different assumptions about the nature of random error and the appropriate level of accuracy to be expected in prediction. To examine this, a case is made for each approach. The clinical approach is characterized as being deterministic, causal, and less concerned with prediction than with diagnosis and treatment. The statistical approach accepts error as inevitable and in so doing makes less error in prediction. This is illustrated using examples from probability learning and equal weighting in linear models. Thereafter, a decision analysis of the two approaches is proposed. Of particular importance are the errors that characterize each approach: myths, magic, and illusions of control in the clinical; lost opportunities and illusions of the lack of control in the statistical. Each approach represents a gamble with corresponding risks and benefits.

  12. Angles, Time, and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagni, David L.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an investigation making connections between the time on an analog clock and the angle between the minute hand and the hour hand. It was posed by a middle school mathematics teacher. (Contains 8 tables and 6 figures.)

  13. Reading angles in maps.

    PubMed

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections appeared without any relevant length or distance information. Children were able to read these map fragments and compare two-dimensional to three-dimensional angles. However, this ability appeared both variable and fragile among the youngest children of the sample. These findings suggest that 4-year-old children begin to form an abstract concept of angle that applies both to two-dimensional and three-dimensional displays and that serves to interpret novel spatial symbols. PMID:23647223

  14. Inborn errors of metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism - inborn errors of ... Bodamer OA. Approach to inborn errors of metabolism. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 205. Rezvani I, Rezvani G. An ...

  15. Alignment, reverse alignment, and wrong sign Yukawa couplings in two Higgs doublet models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Ambalika; Lahiri, Amitabha

    2016-06-01

    We consider two Higgs doublet models with a softly broken U(1) symmetry, for various limiting values of the scalar mixing angles α and β . These correspond to the Standard Model Higgs particle being the lighter C P -even scalar (alignment) or the heavier C P -even scalar (reverse alignment), and also the limit in which some of the Yukawa couplings of this particle are the opposite sign of the vector boson couplings (wrong sign). In these limits we impose a criterion for naturalness by demanding that quadratic divergences cancel at one loop. We plot the allowed masses of the remaining physical scalars based on naturalness, stability, perturbative unitarity, and constraints coming from the ρ parameter. We also calculate the h →γ γ decay width in the wrong sign limit.

  16. Can a surgeon drill accurately at a specified angle?

    PubMed Central

    Brioschi, Valentina; Cook, Jodie; Arthurs, Gareth I

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether a surgeon can drill accurately a specified angle and whether surgeon experience, task repetition, drill bit size and perceived difficulty influence drilling angle accuracy. Methods The sample population consisted of final-year students (n=25), non-specialist veterinarians (n=22) and board-certified orthopaedic surgeons (n=8). Each participant drilled a hole twice in a horizontal oak plank at 30°, 45°, 60°, 80°, 85° and 90° angles with either a 2.5  or a 3.5 mm drill bit. Participants then rated the perceived difficulty to drill each angle. The true angle of each hole was measured using a digital goniometer. Results Greater drilling accuracy was achieved at angles closer to 90°. An error of ≤±4° was achieved by 84.5 per cent of participants drilling a 90° angle compared with approximately 20 per cent of participants drilling a 30–45° angle. There was no effect of surgeon experience, task repetition or drill bit size on the mean error for intended versus achieved angle. Increased perception of difficulty was associated with the more acute angles and decreased accuracy, but not experience level. Clinical significance This study shows that surgeon ability to drill accurately (within ±4° error) is limited, particularly at angles ≤60°. In situations where drill angle is critical, use of computer-assisted navigation or custom-made drill guides may be preferable. PMID:27547423

  17. 'Magic Angle Precession'

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Bernd

    2008-01-21

    An advanced and exact geometric description of nonlinear precession dynamics modeling very accurately natural and artificial couplings showing Lorentz symmetry is derived. In the linear description it is usually ignored that the geometric phase of relativistic motion couples back to the orbital motion providing for a non-linear recursive precession dynamics. The high coupling strength in the nonlinear case is found to be a gravitomagnetic charge proportional to the precession angle and angular velocity generated by geometric phases, which are induced by high-speed relativistic rotations and are relevant to propulsion technologies but also to basic interactions. In the quantum range some magic precession angles indicating strong coupling in a phase-locked chaotic system are identified, emerging from a discrete time dynamical system known as the cosine map showing bifurcations at special precession angles relevant to heavy nuclei stability. The 'Magic Angle Precession' (MAP) dynamics can be simulated and visualized by cones rolling in or on each other, where the apex and precession angles are indexed by spin, charge or precession quantum numbers, and corresponding magic angles. The most extreme relativistic warping and twisting effect is given by the Dirac spinor half spin constellation with 'Hyperdiamond' MAP, which resembles quark confinement.

  18. Current Methods for Automated Filtering of Multiple Sequence Alignments Frequently Worsen Single-Gene Phylogenetic Inference

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ge; Muffato, Matthieu; Ledergerber, Christian; Herrero, Javier; Goldman, Nick; Gil, Manuel; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic inference is generally performed on the basis of multiple sequence alignments (MSA). Because errors in an alignment can lead to errors in tree estimation, there is a strong interest in identifying and removing unreliable parts of the alignment. In recent years several automated filtering approaches have been proposed, but despite their popularity, a systematic and comprehensive comparison of different alignment filtering methods on real data has been lacking. Here, we extend and apply recently introduced phylogenetic tests of alignment accuracy on a large number of gene families and contrast the performance of unfiltered versus filtered alignments in the context of single-gene phylogeny reconstruction. Based on multiple genome-wide empirical and simulated data sets, we show that the trees obtained from filtered MSAs are on average worse than those obtained from unfiltered MSAs. Furthermore, alignment filtering often leads to an increase in the proportion of well-supported branches that are actually wrong. We confirm that our findings hold for a wide range of parameters and methods. Although our results suggest that light filtering (up to 20% of alignment positions) has little impact on tree accuracy and may save some computation time, contrary to widespread practice, we do not generally recommend the use of current alignment filtering methods for phylogenetic inference. By providing a way to rigorously and systematically measure the impact of filtering on alignments, the methodology set forth here will guide the development of better filtering algorithms. PMID:26031838

  19. Current Methods for Automated Filtering of Multiple Sequence Alignments Frequently Worsen Single-Gene Phylogenetic Inference.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ge; Muffato, Matthieu; Ledergerber, Christian; Herrero, Javier; Goldman, Nick; Gil, Manuel; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2015-09-01

    Phylogenetic inference is generally performed on the basis of multiple sequence alignments (MSA). Because errors in an alignment can lead to errors in tree estimation, there is a strong interest in identifying and removing unreliable parts of the alignment. In recent years several automated filtering approaches have been proposed, but despite their popularity, a systematic and comprehensive comparison of different alignment filtering methods on real data has been lacking. Here, we extend and apply recently introduced phylogenetic tests of alignment accuracy on a large number of gene families and contrast the performance of unfiltered versus filtered alignments in the context of single-gene phylogeny reconstruction. Based on multiple genome-wide empirical and simulated data sets, we show that the trees obtained from filtered MSAs are on average worse than those obtained from unfiltered MSAs. Furthermore, alignment filtering often leads to an increase in the proportion of well-supported branches that are actually wrong. We confirm that our findings hold for a wide range of parameters and methods. Although our results suggest that light filtering (up to 20% of alignment positions) has little impact on tree accuracy and may save some computation time, contrary to widespread practice, we do not generally recommend the use of current alignment filtering methods for phylogenetic inference. By providing a way to rigorously and systematically measure the impact of filtering on alignments, the methodology set forth here will guide the development of better filtering algorithms. PMID:26031838

  20. Drug Errors in Anaesthesiology

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rajnish Kumar; Katiyar, Sarika

    2009-01-01

    Summary Medication errors are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. The incidence of these drug errors during anaesthesia is not certain. They impose a considerable financial burden to health care systems apart from the patient losses. Common causes of these errors and their prevention is discussed. PMID:20640103

  1. Nova laser alignment control system

    SciTech Connect

    Van Arsdall, P.J.; Holloway, F.W.; McGuigan, D.L.; Shelton, R.T.

    1984-03-29

    Alignment of the Nova laser requires control of hundreds of optical components in the ten beam paths. Extensive application of computer technology makes daily alignment practical. The control system is designed in a manner which provides both centralized and local manual operator controls integrated with automatic closed loop alignment. Menudriven operator consoles using high resolution color graphics displays overlaid with transport touch panels allow laser personnel to interact efficiently with the computer system. Automatic alignment is accomplished by using image analysis techniques to determine beam references points from video images acquired along the laser chain. A major goal of the design is to contribute substantially to rapid experimental turnaround and consistent alignment results. This paper describes the computer-based control structure and the software methods developed for aligning this large laser system.

  2. Dust alignment in astrophysical environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarian, Alex; Thiem Hoang, Chi

    Dust is known to be aligned in interstellar medium and the arising polarization is extensively used to trace magnetic fields. What process aligns dust grains was one of the most long-standing problems of astrophysics in spite of the persistent efforts to solve it. For years the Davis-Greenstein paramagnetic alignment was the primary candidate for explaining grain alignment. However, the situation is different now and the most promising mechanism is associated with radiative torques (RATs) acting on irregular grains. I shall present the analytical theory of RAT alignment, discuss the observational tests that support this theory. I shall also discuss in what situations we expect to see the dominance of paramagnetic alignment.

  3. Nuclear reactor internals alignment configuration

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Singleton, Norman R.

    2009-11-10

    An alignment system that employs jacking block assemblies and alignment posts around the periphery of the top plate of a nuclear reactor lower internals core shroud to align an upper core plate with the lower internals and the core shroud with the core barrel. The distal ends of the alignment posts are chamfered and are closely received within notches machined in the upper core plate at spaced locations around the outer circumference of the upper core plate. The jacking block assemblies are used to center the core shroud in the core barrel and the alignment posts assure the proper orientation of the upper core plate. The alignment posts may alternately be formed in the upper core plate and the notches may be formed in top plate.

  4. Detecting the limits of regulatory element conservation anddivergence estimation using pairwise and multiple alignments

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, Daniel A.; Moses, Alan M.; Iyer, Venky N.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2006-08-14

    Background: Molecular evolutionary studies of noncodingsequences rely on multiple alignments. Yet how multiple alignmentaccuracy varies across sequence types, tree topologies, divergences andtools, and further how this variation impacts specific inferences,remains unclear. Results: Here we develop a molecular evolutionsimulation platform, CisEvolver, with models of background noncoding andtranscription factor binding site evolution, and use simulated alignmentsto systematically examine multiple alignment accuracy and its impact ontwo key molecular evolutionary inferences: transcription factor bindingsite conservation and divergence estimation. We find that the accuracy ofmultiple alignments is determined almost exclusively by the pairwisedivergence distance of the two most diverged species and that additionalspecies have a negligible influence on alignment accuracy. Conservedtranscription factor binding sites align better than surroundingnoncoding DNA yet are often found to be misaligned at relatively shortdivergence distances, such that studies of binding site gain and losscould easily be confounded by alignment error. Divergence estimates frommultiple alignments tend to be overestimated at short divergencedistances but reach a tool specific divergence at which they cease toincrease, leading to underestimation at long divergences. Our moststriking finding was that overall alignment accuracy, binding sitealignment accuracy and divergence estimation accuracy vary greatly acrossbranches in a tree and are most accurate for terminal branches connectingsister taxa and least accurate for internal branches connectingsub-alignments. Conclusions: Our results suggest that variation inalignment accuracy can lead to errors in molecular evolutionaryinferences that could be construed as biological variation. Thesefindings have implications for which species to choose for analyses, whatkind of errors would be expected for a given set of species and howmultiple alignment tools and

  5. Improved astigmatic focus error detection method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.

    1992-01-01

    All easy-to-implement focus- and track-error detection methods presently used in magneto-optical (MO) disk drives using pre-grooved media suffer from a side effect known as feedthrough. Feedthrough is the unwanted focus error signal (FES) produced when the optical head is seeking a new track, and light refracted from the pre-grooved disk produces an erroneous FES. Some focus and track-error detection methods are more resistant to feedthrough, but tend to be complicated and/or difficult to keep in alignment as a result of environmental insults. The astigmatic focus/push-pull tracking method is an elegant, easy-to-align focus- and track-error detection method. Unfortunately, it is also highly susceptible to feedthrough when astigmatism is present, with the worst effects caused by astigmatism oriented such that the tangential and sagittal foci are at 45 deg to the track direction. This disclosure outlines a method to nearly completely eliminate the worst-case form of feedthrough due to astigmatism oriented 45 deg to the track direction. Feedthrough due to other primary aberrations is not improved, but performance is identical to the unimproved astigmatic method.

  6. The Stonehenge technique. A method for aligning coherent bremsstrahlung radiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, Ken

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes a technique for the alignment of crystal radiators used to produce high energy, linearly polarized photons via coherent bremsstrahlung scattering at electron beam facilities. In these experiments the crystal is mounted on a goniometer which is used to adjust its orientation relative to the electron beam. The angles and equations which relate the crystal lattice, goniometer and electron beam direction are presented here, and the method of alignment is illustrated with data taken at MAMI (the Mainz microtron). A practical guide to setting up a coherent bremsstrahlung facility and installing new crystals using this technique is also included.

  7. Major axis alignments of poor cluster dominant galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, T.; West, M.; Bridges, T.

    1996-12-01

    The MKW and AWM poor clusters are very different environments from rich Abell clusters. We obtained images with the Jacobus Kapteyn Telescope of 21 brightest cluster members (BCM) of the MKW/AWM clusters and determined that the major axis of the BCMs exhibits alignments similar to those in rich cluster dominant galaxies. Specifically, the major axes of the poor cluster BCMs point to nearby (< 20 Mpc) Abell clusters. Using the Kolmolgorov-Smirnov test, we reject the hypothesis that the position angles are randomly distributed at the 97% confidence level. The processes responsible for dominant galaxy alignments are therefore independent of cluster richness.

  8. [Alignment of malpositioned canines].

    PubMed

    Wagner, L

    1991-03-01

    This article presents a system for aligning impacted canines. The base of this system is the lingual arch, a rigid reaction unit of four teeth, molars and premolars. From this base unit an impacted canine can be extruded, moved distally, jumped over the occlusion and derotated by segment arches, coil springs and elastic ligatures. The efficiency of this appliance is due to the elimination of undesired reactive forces, the safe moving of teeth, the possibility of an exact force application and the simple manipulation; also the esthetic inconvenience is minimal. All this results in a better prognosis and an essentially shorter treatment time. This appliance can be used in the upper and the lower jaw. Schematic drawings and clinical examples demonstrate this method.

  9. Lunar Alignments - Identification and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, A. César

    Lunar alignments are difficult to establish given the apparent lack of written accounts clearly pointing toward lunar alignments for individual temples. While some individual cases are reviewed and highlighted, the weight of the proof must fall on statistical sampling. Some definitions for the lunar alignments are provided in order to clarify the targets, and thus, some new tools are provided to try to test the lunar hypothesis in several cases, especially in megalithic astronomy.

  10. Assembly and alignment of infrared refractive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lin; Lin, Jian-chun; Wang, Ya-jing; Chen, Fan-sheng

    2013-09-01

    Optical systems for scientific instrumentation frequently include lens or mirrors with critical mechanical requirements. Position issues of those components are inextricably bound to the efficiency of the instrument. The position referring to the lens system mainly means spacer and rotation of all elements concerned. Instrument could not be completed without the accuracy assembly even the previous design was top one. The alignment of infrared optical system always is a tough thing due to the IR material being opaque to visible light which hardly effect on the imaging ability of the system. In this paper a large-aperture IR refractive system was described in details and the alignment of this system was presented. The brief work describes the assembly and integration of the camera barrel in lab. First of all, all the mechanical elements must be manufactured with high accuracy requirements to meet alignment tolerances and minimum errors mostly could be ignored. The rotations relative to the optical axis were hardy restricted by the space between barrel and cells. The lens vertex displacements were determined through high accuracy titanium alloy spacer. So the actual shape data of the optical lenses were obtained by coordinate measuring machining (CMM) to calculate the real space between lenses after alignment1 done. All the measured results were critical for instruction of the practical assemble. Based on the properties and tolerances of the system, the camera barrel includes sets of six lenses with their respective supports and cells which are composed of two parts: the flied lens group and the relay lenses group. The first one was aligned by the geometry centering used CMM. And the relay lenses were integrated one by one after centered individually with a classical centering instrument. Then the two separate components were assembled under the monitor of the CMM with micron precision. Three parameters on the opti-mechanical elements which include decenter, tilt and

  11. Resolving Individual Components in Protein-RNA Complexes Using Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Experiments.

    PubMed

    Rambo, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of protein-RNA complexes has developed into an efficient and economical approach for determining low-resolution shapes of particles in solution. Here, we demonstrate a mutliphase volumetric modeling approach capable of resolving individual components within a low-resolution shape. Through three case studies, we describe the SAXS data collecting strategies, premodeling analysis, and computational methods required for deconstructing complexes into their respective components. This chapter presents an approach using the programs ScÅtter and MONSA and custom scripts for averaging and aligning of multiple independent modeling runs. The method can image small (7kDa) masses within the context of complex and is capable of visualizing ligand-induced conformational changes. Nevertheless, computational algorithms are not without error, and we describe specific considerations during SAXS data reduction and modeling to mitigate possible false positives.

  12. [Medical errors in obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Marek, Z

    1984-08-01

    Errors in medicine may fall into 3 main categories: 1) medical errors made only by physicians, 2) technical errors made by physicians and other health care specialists, and 3) organizational errors associated with mismanagement of medical facilities. This classification of medical errors, as well as the definition and treatment of them, fully applies to obstetrics. However, the difference between obstetrics and other fields of medicine stems from the fact that an obstetrician usually deals with healthy women. Conversely, professional risk in obstetrics is very high, as errors and malpractice can lead to very serious complications. Observations show that the most frequent obstetrical errors occur in induced abortions, diagnosis of pregnancy, selection of optimal delivery techniques, treatment of hemorrhages, and other complications. Therefore, the obstetrician should be prepared to use intensive care procedures similar to those used for resuscitation.

  13. Shape and alignment measurement of the heliostat by laser deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenbin; Lu, Zhenwu; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Hongxin; Ni, Zhengguo

    2008-08-01

    In the solar tower thermal power generation system, the precision of the slope angle of the heliostat is the major factor, which influences the efficiency of the system, consequently, this angle should be tested accurately. In this paper, the methods based on laser deflectometry are proposed to measure the shape error of the mirror facet and the connected error of the facets; such apparatus and corresponding software packages are developed. With the help of these two apparatus, the heliostat of 1002, consisting of 55 mirror facets of 1.8182 m2; (hexagon), for the 1MWe solar tower power plant in Beijing are measured and connected successfully.

  14. Robust angle-independent blood velocity estimation based on dual-angle plane wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Fadnes, Solveig; Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Nyrnes, Siri Ann; Torp, Hans; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional blood velocity estimation has shown potential to solve the angle-dependency of conventional ultrasound flow imaging. Clutter filtering, however, remains a major challenge for large beam-to-flow angles, leading to signal drop-outs and corrupted velocity estimates. This work presents and evaluates a compounding speckle tracking (ST) algorithm to obtain robust angle-independent 2-D blood velocity estimates for all beam-to-flow angles. A dual-angle plane wave imaging setup with full parallel receive beamforming is utilized to achieve high-frame-rate speckle tracking estimates from two scan angles, which may be compounded to obtain velocity estimates of increased robustness. The acquisition also allows direct comparison with vector Doppler (VD) imaging. Absolute velocity bias and root-mean-square (RMS) error of the compounding ST estimations were investigated using simulations of a rotating flow phantom with low velocities ranging from 0 to 20 cm/s. In a challenging region where the estimates were influenced by clutter filtering, the bias and RMS error for the compounding ST estimates were 11% and 2 cm/s, a significant reduction compared with conventional single-angle ST (22% and 4 cm/s) and VD (36% and 6 cm/s). The method was also tested in vivo for vascular and neonatal cardiac imaging. In a carotid artery bifurcation, the obtained blood velocity estimates showed that the compounded ST method was less influenced by clutter filtering than conventional ST and VD methods. In the cardiac case, it was observed that ST velocity estimation is more affected by low signal-to-noise (SNR) than VD. However, with sufficient SNR the in vivo results indicated that a more robust angle-independent blood velocity estimator is obtained using compounded speckle tracking compared with conventional ST and VD methods. PMID:26470038

  15. Robust angle-independent blood velocity estimation based on dual-angle plane wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Fadnes, Solveig; Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Nyrnes, Siri Ann; Torp, Hans; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional blood velocity estimation has shown potential to solve the angle-dependency of conventional ultrasound flow imaging. Clutter filtering, however, remains a major challenge for large beam-to-flow angles, leading to signal drop-outs and corrupted velocity estimates. This work presents and evaluates a compounding speckle tracking (ST) algorithm to obtain robust angle-independent 2-D blood velocity estimates for all beam-to-flow angles. A dual-angle plane wave imaging setup with full parallel receive beamforming is utilized to achieve high-frame-rate speckle tracking estimates from two scan angles, which may be compounded to obtain velocity estimates of increased robustness. The acquisition also allows direct comparison with vector Doppler (VD) imaging. Absolute velocity bias and root-mean-square (RMS) error of the compounding ST estimations were investigated using simulations of a rotating flow phantom with low velocities ranging from 0 to 20 cm/s. In a challenging region where the estimates were influenced by clutter filtering, the bias and RMS error for the compounding ST estimates were 11% and 2 cm/s, a significant reduction compared with conventional single-angle ST (22% and 4 cm/s) and VD (36% and 6 cm/s). The method was also tested in vivo for vascular and neonatal cardiac imaging. In a carotid artery bifurcation, the obtained blood velocity estimates showed that the compounded ST method was less influenced by clutter filtering than conventional ST and VD methods. In the cardiac case, it was observed that ST velocity estimation is more affected by low signal-to-noise (SNR) than VD. However, with sufficient SNR the in vivo results indicated that a more robust angle-independent blood velocity estimator is obtained using compounded speckle tracking compared with conventional ST and VD methods.

  16. Nanofibril Alignment in Flow Focusing: Measurements and Calculations.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Karl M O; Lundell, Fredrik; Prahl-Wittberg, Lisa; Söderberg, L Daniel

    2016-07-14

    Alignment of anisotropic supermolecular building blocks is crucial to control the properties of many novel materials. In this study, the alignment process of cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) in a flow-focusing channel has been investigated using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and modeled using the Smoluchowski equation, which requires a known flow field as input. This flow field was investigated experimentally using microparticle-tracking velocimetry and by numerically applying the two-fluid level set method. A semidilute dispersion of CNFs was modeled as a continuous phase, with a higher viscosity as compared to that of water. Furthermore, implementation of the Smoluchowski equation also needed the rotational Brownian diffusion coefficient, which was experimentally determined in a shear viscosity measurement. The order of the nanofibrils was found to increase during extension in the flow-focusing channel, after which rotational diffusion acted on the orientation distribution, driving the orientation of the fibrils toward isotropy. The main features of the alignment and dealignment processes were well predicted by the numerical model, but the model overpredicted the alignment at higher rates of extension. The apparent rotational diffusion coefficient was seen to increase steeply as the degree of alignment increased. Thus, the combination of SAXS measurements and modeling provides the necessary framework for quantified studies of hydrodynamic alignment, followed by relaxation toward isotropy. PMID:27294285

  17. Nanofibril Alignment in Flow Focusing: Measurements and Calculations.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Karl M O; Lundell, Fredrik; Prahl-Wittberg, Lisa; Söderberg, L Daniel

    2016-07-14

    Alignment of anisotropic supermolecular building blocks is crucial to control the properties of many novel materials. In this study, the alignment process of cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) in a flow-focusing channel has been investigated using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and modeled using the Smoluchowski equation, which requires a known flow field as input. This flow field was investigated experimentally using microparticle-tracking velocimetry and by numerically applying the two-fluid level set method. A semidilute dispersion of CNFs was modeled as a continuous phase, with a higher viscosity as compared to that of water. Furthermore, implementation of the Smoluchowski equation also needed the rotational Brownian diffusion coefficient, which was experimentally determined in a shear viscosity measurement. The order of the nanofibrils was found to increase during extension in the flow-focusing channel, after which rotational diffusion acted on the orientation distribution, driving the orientation of the fibrils toward isotropy. The main features of the alignment and dealignment processes were well predicted by the numerical model, but the model overpredicted the alignment at higher rates of extension. The apparent rotational diffusion coefficient was seen to increase steeply as the degree of alignment increased. Thus, the combination of SAXS measurements and modeling provides the necessary framework for quantified studies of hydrodynamic alignment, followed by relaxation toward isotropy.

  18. Aircraft system modeling error and control error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Nilesh V. (Inventor); Kaneshige, John T. (Inventor); Krishnakumar, Kalmanje S. (Inventor); Burken, John J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for modeling error-driven adaptive control of an aircraft. Normal aircraft plant dynamics is modeled, using an original plant description in which a controller responds to a tracking error e(k) to drive the component to a normal reference value according to an asymptote curve. Where the system senses that (1) at least one aircraft plant component is experiencing an excursion and (2) the return of this component value toward its reference value is not proceeding according to the expected controller characteristics, neural network (NN) modeling of aircraft plant operation may be changed. However, if (1) is satisfied but the error component is returning toward its reference value according to expected controller characteristics, the NN will continue to model operation of the aircraft plant according to an original description.

  19. Pretile angle control of liquid crystal from homogeneous to homeotropic using photocurable prepolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong-Hun; Kang, Daeseung

    2012-03-01

    We study pretilt angle control of liquid crystal from homogeneous to homeotropic using phase separation techniques of photocurable prepolymer by UV irradiation. Pretilt angle was controlled by changing the weight ratio of LC/photocurable prepolymer in homogeneous polyimide (PI) coated LC cell. Homogeneous alignment was observed in LC/photocurable prepolymer mixture of weight ratio of 99.9:0.1 after UV irradiation for 20 minutes. Tilted alignment was observed in weight ratio of 99.8:0.2. Finally homeotropic alignment was observed in weight ratio of over 99.7:0.3.

  20. Evaluation of Eight Methods for Aligning Orientation of Two Coordinate Systems.

    PubMed

    Mecheri, Hakim; Robert-Lachaine, Xavier; Larue, Christian; Plamondon, André

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate eight methods for aligning the orientation of two different local coordinate systems. Alignment is very important when combining two different systems of motion analysis. Two of the methods were developed specifically for biomechanical studies, and because there have been at least three decades of algorithm development in robotics, it was decided to include six methods from this field. To compare these methods, an Xsens sensor and two Optotrak clusters were attached to a Plexiglas plate. The first optical marker cluster was fixed on the sensor and 20 trials were recorded. The error of alignment was calculated for each trial, and the mean, the standard deviation, and the maximum values of this error over all trials were reported. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance revealed that the alignment error differed significantly across the eight methods. Post-hoc tests showed that the alignment error from the methods based on angular velocities was significantly lower than for the other methods. The method using angular velocities performed the best, with an average error of 0.17 ± 0.08 deg. We therefore recommend this method, which is easy to perform and provides accurate alignment. PMID:27245737

  1. Uncertainties in Small-Angle Measurement Systems Used to Calibrate Angle Artifacts.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jack A; Amer, Mohamed; Faust, Bryon; Zimmerman, Jay

    2004-01-01

    We have studied a number of effects that can give rise to errors in small-angle measurement systems when they are used to calibrate artifacts such as optical polygons. Of these sources of uncertainty, the most difficult to quantify are errors associated with the measurement of imperfect, non-flat faces of the artifact, causing the instrument to misinterpret the average orientation of the surface. In an attempt to shed some light on these errors, we have compared autocollimator measurements to angle measurements made with a Fizeau phase-shifting interferometer. These two instruments have very different operating principles and implement different definitions of the orientation of a surface, but (surprisingly) we have not yet seen any clear differences between results obtained with the autocollimator and with the interferometer. The interferometer is in some respects an attractive alternative to an autocollimator for small-angle measurement; it implements an unambiguous and robust definition of surface orientation in terms of the tilt of a best-fit plane, and it is easier to quantify likely errors of the interferometer measurements than to evaluate autocollimator uncertainty.

  2. Uncertainties in Small-Angle Measurement Systems Used to Calibrate Angle Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jack A.; Amer, Mohamed; Faust, Bryon; Zimmerman, Jay

    2004-01-01

    We have studied a number of effects that can give rise to errors in small-angle measurement systems when they are used to calibrate artifacts such as optical polygons. Of these sources of uncertainty, the most difficult to quantify are errors associated with the measurement of imperfect, non-flat faces of the artifact, causing the instrument to misinterpret the average orientation of the surface. In an attempt to shed some light on these errors, we have compared autocollimator measurements to angle measurements made with a Fizeau phase-shifting interferometer. These two instruments have very different operating principles and implement different definitions of the orientation of a surface, but (surprisingly) we have not yet seen any clear differences between results obtained with the autocollimator and with the interferometer. The interferometer is in some respects an attractive alternative to an autocollimator for small-angle measurement; it implements an unambiguous and robust definition of surface orientation in terms of the tilt of a best-fit plane, and it is easier to quantify likely errors of the interferometer measurements than to evaluate autocollimator uncertainty. PMID:27366616

  3. Understanding the Dynamics of Magnetic Field Alignment for Rod-Coil Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulloch, Bryan; Portale, Giuseppe; Bras, Wim; Hexemer, Alexander; Segalman, Rachel A.

    2012-02-01

    Alignment of semiconducting block copolymer nanostructures is crucial to optimize charge transport in these materials. Magnetic fields can act on the liquid crystalline conjugated polymers, inducing alignment in rod-coil block copolymers. By using a combination of small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) we have studied the magnetic field alignment of poly(alkoxy phenylene vinylene-b-isoprene) (PPV-PI) rod-coil block copolymers. In situ measurements have also shown the magnetic field leads to a stabilization of the ordered phase. Furthermore, there appear to be two distinct timescales for alignment: at short times the alignment of these materials is fast likely caused by preferential growth of aligned domains, and at long times alignment increases by the very slow process of defect annihilation. Further, there is an optimum temperature where the kinetics and thermodynamic driving forces for alignment are balanced, producing very highly aligned samples. Understanding the mechanisms by which alignment occurs has lead to knowledge helping to rationally optimize the magnetic alignment of rod-coil block copolymers.

  4. Lexical alignment in triadic communication.

    PubMed

    Foltz, Anouschka; Gaspers, Judith; Thiele, Kristina; Stenneken, Prisca; Cimiano, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Lexical alignment refers to the adoption of one's interlocutor's lexical items. Accounts of the mechanisms underlying such lexical alignment differ (among other aspects) in the role assigned to addressee-centered behavior. In this study, we used a triadic communicative situation to test which factors may modulate the extent to which participants' lexical alignment reflects addressee-centered behavior. Pairs of naïve participants played a picture matching game and received information about the order in which pictures were to be matched from a voice over headphones. On critical trials, participants did or did not hear a name for the picture to be matched next over headphones. Importantly, when the voice over headphones provided a name, it did not match the name that the interlocutor had previously used to describe the object. Participants overwhelmingly used the word that the voice over headphones provided. This result points to non-addressee-centered behavior and is discussed in terms of disrupting alignment with the interlocutor as well as in terms of establishing alignment with the voice over headphones. In addition, the type of picture (line drawing vs. tangram shape) independently modulated lexical alignment, such that participants showed more lexical alignment to their interlocutor for (more ambiguous) tangram shapes compared to line drawings. Overall, the results point to a rather large role for non-addressee-centered behavior during lexical alignment.

  5. Drive alignment pays maintenance dividends

    SciTech Connect

    Fedder, R.

    2008-12-15

    Proper alignment of the motor and gear drive on conveying and processing equipment will result in longer bearing and coupling life, along with lower maintenance costs. Selecting an alignment free drive package instead of a traditional foot mounted drive and motor is a major advancement toward these goals. 4 photos.

  6. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool.

    PubMed

    Henstock, Peter V; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow.

  7. Transformation and Alignment in Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgetts, Carl J.; Hahn, Ulrike; Chater, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This paper contrasts two structural accounts of psychological similarity: structural alignment (SA) and Representational Distortion (RD). SA proposes that similarity is determined by how readily the structures of two objects can be brought into alignment; RD measures similarity by the complexity of the transformation that "distorts" one…

  8. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool.

    PubMed

    Henstock, Peter V; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow. PMID:27459605

  9. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool

    PubMed Central

    Henstock, Peter V.; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow. PMID:27459605

  10. Lexical alignment in triadic communication

    PubMed Central

    Foltz, Anouschka; Gaspers, Judith; Thiele, Kristina; Stenneken, Prisca; Cimiano, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Lexical alignment refers to the adoption of one’s interlocutor’s lexical items. Accounts of the mechanisms underlying such lexical alignment differ (among other aspects) in the role assigned to addressee-centered behavior. In this study, we used a triadic communicative situation to test which factors may modulate the extent to which participants’ lexical alignment reflects addressee-centered behavior. Pairs of naïve participants played a picture matching game and received information about the order in which pictures were to be matched from a voice over headphones. On critical trials, participants did or did not hear a name for the picture to be matched next over headphones. Importantly, when the voice over headphones provided a name, it did not match the name that the interlocutor had previously used to describe the object. Participants overwhelmingly used the word that the voice over headphones provided. This result points to non-addressee-centered behavior and is discussed in terms of disrupting alignment with the interlocutor as well as in terms of establishing alignment with the voice over headphones. In addition, the type of picture (line drawing vs. tangram shape) independently modulated lexical alignment, such that participants showed more lexical alignment to their interlocutor for (more ambiguous) tangram shapes compared to line drawings. Overall, the results point to a rather large role for non-addressee-centered behavior during lexical alignment. PMID:25762955

  11. Curriculum Alignment: Theory to Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitzel, Thomas C.; Vogler, Daniel E.

    Curriculum alignment is the conscious congruence of three educational elements: curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Alignment is rooted in the belief that instructional plans are established through outcomes-based content goals and the goal of assuring that delivery and assessment are congruent. Platform unity, based on the Principles of…

  12. Well-pump alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1998-01-01

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping.

  13. Physically motivated global alignment method for electron tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Sanders, Toby; Prange, Micah; Akatay, Cem; Binev, Peter

    2015-04-08

    Electron tomography is widely used for nanoscale determination of 3-D structures in many areas of science. Determining the 3-D structure of a sample from electron tomography involves three major steps: acquisition of sequence of 2-D projection images of the sample with the electron microscope, alignment of the images to a common coordinate system, and 3-D reconstruction and segmentation of the sample from the aligned image data. The resolution of the 3-D reconstruction is directly influenced by the accuracy of the alignment, and therefore, it is crucial to have a robust and dependable alignment method. In this paper, we develop amore » new alignment method which avoids the use of markers and instead traces the computed paths of many identifiable ‘local’ center-of-mass points as the sample is rotated. Compared with traditional correlation schemes, the alignment method presented here is resistant to cumulative error observed from correlation techniques, has very rigorous mathematical justification, and is very robust since many points and paths are used, all of which inevitably improves the quality of the reconstruction and confidence in the scientific results.« less

  14. Physically motivated global alignment method for electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Toby; Prange, Micah; Akatay, Cem; Binev, Peter

    2015-04-08

    Electron tomography is widely used for nanoscale determination of 3-D structures in many areas of science. Determining the 3-D structure of a sample from electron tomography involves three major steps: acquisition of sequence of 2-D projection images of the sample with the electron microscope, alignment of the images to a common coordinate system, and 3-D reconstruction and segmentation of the sample from the aligned image data. The resolution of the 3-D reconstruction is directly influenced by the accuracy of the alignment, and therefore, it is crucial to have a robust and dependable alignment method. In this paper, we develop a new alignment method which avoids the use of markers and instead traces the computed paths of many identifiable ‘local’ center-of-mass points as the sample is rotated. Compared with traditional correlation schemes, the alignment method presented here is resistant to cumulative error observed from correlation techniques, has very rigorous mathematical justification, and is very robust since many points and paths are used, all of which inevitably improves the quality of the reconstruction and confidence in the scientific results.

  15. A fast cross-validation method for alignment of electron tomography images based on Beer-Lambert law.

    PubMed

    Yan, Rui; Edwards, Thomas J; Pankratz, Logan M; Kuhn, Richard J; Lanman, Jason K; Liu, Jun; Jiang, Wen

    2015-11-01

    In electron tomography, accurate alignment of tilt series is an essential step in attaining high-resolution 3D reconstructions. Nevertheless, quantitative assessment of alignment quality has remained a challenging issue, even though many alignment methods have been reported. Here, we report a fast and accurate method, tomoAlignEval, based on the Beer-Lambert law, for the evaluation of alignment quality. Our method is able to globally estimate the alignment accuracy by measuring the goodness of log-linear relationship of the beam intensity attenuations at different tilt angles. Extensive tests with experimental data demonstrated its robust performance with stained and cryo samples. Our method is not only significantly faster but also more sensitive than measurements of tomogram resolution using Fourier shell correlation method (FSCe/o). From these tests, we also conclude that while current alignment methods are sufficiently accurate for stained samples, inaccurate alignments remain a major limitation for high resolution cryo-electron tomography. PMID:26455556

  16. A fast cross-validation method for alignment of electron tomography images based on Beer-Lambert law.

    PubMed

    Yan, Rui; Edwards, Thomas J; Pankratz, Logan M; Kuhn, Richard J; Lanman, Jason K; Liu, Jun; Jiang, Wen

    2015-11-01

    In electron tomography, accurate alignment of tilt series is an essential step in attaining high-resolution 3D reconstructions. Nevertheless, quantitative assessment of alignment quality has remained a challenging issue, even though many alignment methods have been reported. Here, we report a fast and accurate method, tomoAlignEval, based on the Beer-Lambert law, for the evaluation of alignment quality. Our method is able to globally estimate the alignment accuracy by measuring the goodness of log-linear relationship of the beam intensity attenuations at different tilt angles. Extensive tests with experimental data demonstrated its robust performance with stained and cryo samples. Our method is not only significantly faster but also more sensitive than measurements of tomogram resolution using Fourier shell correlation method (FSCe/o). From these tests, we also conclude that while current alignment methods are sufficiently accurate for stained samples, inaccurate alignments remain a major limitation for high resolution cryo-electron tomography.

  17. Botulinum alignment for congenital esotropia.

    PubMed Central

    Ing, M R

    1992-01-01

    This is the first report of a group of patients with congenital esotropia examined for motor and sensory evidence of binocularity a minimum of 3 years after alignment by botulinum. Evidence for binocularity was clearly present in approximately one half of the patients. Lag time to satisfactory alignment was at least 1 month (average, 5 months) following the initial botulinum injection. The results must be considered preliminary. However, when these results are compared with those of patients with congenital esotropia aligned by incisional surgery by age 2 years and examined with the same testing devices by this same investigator, botulinum alignment appears to be less effective than surgical alignment in establishing evidence for binocularity (P < 0.005). PMID:1494828

  18. Space Mirror Alignment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.; McKinney, Colin; Smythe, Robert F.; Palmer, Dean L.

    2011-01-01

    An optical alignment mirror mechanism (AMM) has been developed with angular positioning accuracy of +/-0.2 arcsec. This requires the mirror s linear positioning actuators to have positioning resolutions of +/-112 nm to enable the mirror to meet the angular tip/tilt accuracy requirement. Demonstrated capabilities are 0.1 arc-sec angular mirror positioning accuracy, which translates into linear positioning resolutions at the actuator of 50 nm. The mechanism consists of a structure with sets of cross-directional flexures that enable the mirror s tip and tilt motion, a mirror with its kinematic mount, and two linear actuators. An actuator comprises a brushless DC motor, a linear ball screw, and a piezoelectric brake that holds the mirror s position while the unit is unpowered. An interferometric linear position sensor senses the actuator s position. The AMMs were developed for an Astrometric Beam Combiner (ABC) optical bench, which is part of an interferometer development. Custom electronics were also developed to accommodate the presence of multiple AMMs within the ABC and provide a compact, all-in-one solution to power and control the AMMs.

  19. Software error detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buechler, W.; Tucker, A. G.

    1981-01-01

    Several methods were employed to detect both the occurrence and source of errors in the operational software of the AN/SLQ-32. A large embedded real time electronic warfare command and control system for the ROLM 1606 computer are presented. The ROLM computer provides information about invalid addressing, improper use of privileged instructions, stack overflows, and unimplemented instructions. Additionally, software techniques were developed to detect invalid jumps, indices out of range, infinte loops, stack underflows, and field size errors. Finally, data are saved to provide information about the status of the system when an error is detected. This information includes I/O buffers, interrupt counts, stack contents, and recently passed locations. The various errors detected, techniques to assist in debugging problems, and segment simulation on a nontarget computer are discussed. These error detection techniques were a major factor in the success of finding the primary cause of error in 98% of over 500 system dumps.

  20. Error detection method

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Eric J.

    2013-06-11

    An apparatus, program product, and method that run an algorithm on a hardware based processor, generate a hardware error as a result of running the algorithm, generate an algorithm output for the algorithm, compare the algorithm output to another output for the algorithm, and detect the hardware error from the comparison. The algorithm is designed to cause the hardware based processor to heat to a degree that increases the likelihood of hardware errors to manifest, and the hardware error is observable in the algorithm output. As such, electronic components may be sufficiently heated and/or sufficiently stressed to create better conditions for generating hardware errors, and the output of the algorithm may be compared at the end of the run to detect a hardware error that occurred anywhere during the run that may otherwise not be detected by traditional methodologies (e.g., due to cooling, insufficient heat and/or stress, etc.).

  1. Note: O-ring stack system for electron gun alignment.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Yong; Cho, Boklae; Han, Cheolsu; Shin, Seungmin; Lee, Dongjun; Ahn, Sang Jung

    2015-01-01

    We present a reliable method for aligning an electron gun which consists of an electron source and lenses by controlling a stack of rubber O-rings in a vacuum condition. The beam direction angle is precisely tilted along two axes by adjusting the height difference of a stack of O-rings. In addition, the source position is shifted in each of three orthogonal directions. We show that the tilting angle and linear shift along the x and y axes as obtained from ten stacked O-rings are ±2.55° and ±2 mm, respectively. This study can easily be adapted to charged particle gun alignment and adjustments of the flange position in a vacuum, ensuring that its results can be useful with regard to electrical insulation between flanges with slight modifications. PMID:25638137

  2. Note: O-ring stack system for electron gun alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, In-Yong; Cho, Boklae; Han, Cheolsu; Shin, Seungmin; Lee, Dongjun; Ahn, Sang Jung

    2015-01-01

    We present a reliable method for aligning an electron gun which consists of an electron source and lenses by controlling a stack of rubber O-rings in a vacuum condition. The beam direction angle is precisely tilted along two axes by adjusting the height difference of a stack of O-rings. In addition, the source position is shifted in each of three orthogonal directions. We show that the tilting angle and linear shift along the x and y axes as obtained from ten stacked O-rings are ±2.55° and ±2 mm, respectively. This study can easily be adapted to charged particle gun alignment and adjustments of the flange position in a vacuum, ensuring that its results can be useful with regard to electrical insulation between flanges with slight modifications.

  3. Note: O-ring stack system for electron gun alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Park, In-Yong; Cho, Boklae; Han, Cheolsu; Shin, Seungmin; Lee, Dongjun; Ahn, Sang Jung

    2015-01-15

    We present a reliable method for aligning an electron gun which consists of an electron source and lenses by controlling a stack of rubber O-rings in a vacuum condition. The beam direction angle is precisely tilted along two axes by adjusting the height difference of a stack of O-rings. In addition, the source position is shifted in each of three orthogonal directions. We show that the tilting angle and linear shift along the x and y axes as obtained from ten stacked O-rings are ±2.55° and ±2 mm, respectively. This study can easily be adapted to charged particle gun alignment and adjustments of the flange position in a vacuum, ensuring that its results can be useful with regard to electrical insulation between flanges with slight modifications.

  4. The Error in Total Error Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Witnauer, James E.; Urcelay, Gonzalo P.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    Most models of human and animal learning assume that learning is proportional to the discrepancy between a delivered outcome and the outcome predicted by all cues present during that trial (i.e., total error across a stimulus compound). This total error reduction (TER) view has been implemented in connectionist and artificial neural network models to describe the conditions under which weights between units change. Electrophysiological work has revealed that the activity of dopamine neurons is correlated with the total error signal in models of reward learning. Similar neural mechanisms presumably support fear conditioning, human contingency learning, and other types of learning. Using a computational modelling approach, we compared several TER models of associative learning to an alternative model that rejects the TER assumption in favor of local error reduction (LER), which assumes that learning about each cue is proportional to the discrepancy between the delivered outcome and the outcome predicted by that specific cue on that trial. The LER model provided a better fit to the reviewed data than the TER models. Given the superiority of the LER model with the present data sets, acceptance of TER should be tempered. PMID:23891930

  5. Optimizing parameters on alignment of PCL/PGA nanofibrous scaffold: An artificial neural networks approach.

    PubMed

    Paskiabi, Farnoush Asghari; Mirzaei, Esmaeil; Amani, Amir; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Saber, Reza; Faridi-Majidi, Reza

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes an artificial neural networks approach to finding the effects of electrospinning parameters on alignment of poly(ɛ-caprolactone)/poly(glycolic acid) blend nanofibers. Four electrospinning parameters, namely total polymer concentration, working distance, drum speed and applied voltage were considered as input and the standard deviation of the angles of nanofibers, introducing fibers alignments, as the output of the model. The results demonstrated that drum speed and applied voltage are two critical factors influencing nanofibers alignment, however their effect are entirely interdependent. Their effects also are not independent of other electrospinning parameters. In obtaining aligned electrospun nanofibers, the concentration and working distance can also be effective. In vitro cell culture study on random and aligned nanofibers showed directional growth of cells on aligned fibers.

  6. Polymer-carbon nanotube composites: electrospinning, alignment and interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, A. Douglas; Larios, Eduardo; Alamgir, Faisal M.; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A.; Campo, Eva M.

    2014-09-01

    The possibility of novel nanocomposite materials with dramatically improved properties requires fundamental studies of interactions. Full elucidation of these concepts will allow the tailoring of such systems for particular applications. Using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, we investigated interactions in electrospun poly(dimethylsiloxane)-poly(methyl methacrylate)-multiwall carbon nanotube composites. This paper describes these interactions through a building-block model, addresses their dependence upon filler size, and discusses electrospinning as an alignment solution. Though alignment of filler and polymeric chains was not observed spectrally, SEM imaging confirmed uniaxial carbon nanotube alignment in composite fibres. Spectra acquired at different incidence angles revealed differences in energy and intensity of resonances, suggesting conformational configurations. These differences were more significant in composites with larger nanofiller. This supported proposed models of CH-π interactions and hydrogen bonding as adhesion mechanisms.

  7. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julian W.

    As part of a series of books and pamphlets on outdoor education, this manual consists of easy-to-follow instructions for fishing activities dealing with casting and angling. The manual may be used as a part of the regular physical education program in schools and colleges or as a club activity for the accomplished weekend fisherman or the…

  8. An Iterative Angle Trisection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muench, Donald L.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of angle trisection continues to fascinate people even though it has long been known that it can't be done with straightedge and compass alone. However, for practical purposes, a good iterative procedure can get you as close as you want. In this note, we present such a procedure. Using only straightedge and compass, our procedure…

  9. Interferometric measurement of angles.

    PubMed

    Malacara, D; Harris, O

    1970-07-01

    A new interferometric device for measuring small angles or rotations with high accuracy is described. This instrument works by counting fringes formed by the rotation of a flat-parallel plate of glass illuminated with a collimated beam from a gas laser. Some possible applications are given.

  10. Type I Error Rates and Power Estimates of Selected Parametric and Nonparametric Tests of Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olejnik, Stephen F.; Algina, James

    1987-01-01

    Estimated Type I Error rates and power are reported for the Brown-Forsythe, O'Brien, Klotz, and Siegal-Tukey procedures. The effect of aligning the data using deviations from group means or group medians is investigated. (RB)

  11. Model Error Budgets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    2008-01-01

    An error budget is a commonly used tool in design of complex aerospace systems. It represents system performance requirements in terms of allowable errors and flows these down through a hierarchical structure to lower assemblies and components. The requirements may simply be 'allocated' based upon heuristics or experience, or they may be designed through use of physics-based models. This paper presents a basis for developing an error budget for models of the system, as opposed to the system itself. The need for model error budgets arises when system models are a principle design agent as is increasingly more common for poorly testable high performance space systems.

  12. Bedform alignment in directionally varying flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, D.M.; Hunter, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Many kinds of sediment bedforms are presumed to trend either normal or parallel to the direction of sediment transport. For this reason, the trend of bedforms observed by remote sensing or by field observations is commonly used as an indicator of the direction of sediment transport. Such presumptions regarding bedform trend were tested experimentally in bidirectional flows by rotating a sand-covered board in steady winds. Transverse, oblique, and longitudinal bedforms were created by changing only two parameters: the angle between the two winds and the proportions of sand transported in the two directions. Regardless of whether the experimental bedforms were transverse, oblique, or longitudinal (as defined by the bedform trend relative to the resultant transport direction), they all had trends that yielded the maximum gross transport across the bedforms. The fact that many of the experimental bedforms were neither transverse nor parallel to the resultant transport direction suggests that transport directions cannot be accurately determined by presuming such alignment.

  13. Orientation Errors in Paleomagnetic Core Samples and Their Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, M.

    2011-12-01

    In paleomagnetic studies, samples are often obtained as cylindrical cores by the use of engine drills. Two angles measured for the core in the field (the angle P between cylindrical axis and the horizontal plane, and the angle A between a horizontal direction in the core and the true north) are needed to describe the direction of magnetic remanence in geographic coordinates. These angles can be measured with an error of about 1 degree or less. The error in paleomagnetic directions are usually given by Fisher's semi-angle of 95% confidence (α 95), which is typically a few to ten degrees. It appears therefore that the orientation errors are negligibly small. However, this it not quite correct. There is no problem about the measurement of P, but the angle in the horizontal plane (A) is often measured by a magnetic compass, which is a source of large errors. In particular, large local magnetic anomalies often accompany volcanic rock terrain because of their strong magnetization. This effect is known quite a long time, but quantitative estimate of orientation errors is not available yet. We have obtained quite a large number of data (182 lavas, 903 samples) from Lundarhals area of Iceland. For more than 200 samples of these, three independent horizontal angles have been measured to estimate A; one by sun's direction, the second by reference to some landmark, and the third is by magnetic direction. Among the rest of samples, more than 600 have reference and magnetic directions. Only 30 samples are determined by magnetic compass alone. From a detailed analysis of these data, the following conclusions were obtained. (1) The difference between sun and reference azimuths are 0.0±0.6~circ (the mean and standard deviation in degrees, for n=203). This is small enough and can be ignored compared to other errors. Consequently, if either of these angles are available, we have almost error-free data for A. (2) The differences between the sun and magnetic azimuths are 0.5±7.8o (n

  14. High-harmonic generation in aligned water molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Song; Devin, Julien; Hoffmann, Matthias; Cryan, James; Kaldun, Andreas; Bucksbaum, Philip

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the use of high harmonic generation (HHG) in aligned molecular vapors has become a powerful tool to study ultrafast dynamics of electronic and nuclear wave packets. In our new experimental setup, we are able to orient H2 O and D2 O molecules using a single cycle terahertz (THz) pulse. Aligning water is especially interesting as the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of water contains a node in the xz plane of the molecular frame, allowing us to perform HHG from second highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO-1) only, by setting the polarization of the fundamental laser along the z-axis of the aligned water molecules. We are particularly interested in the HOMO-1 state, as there is fast motion of the H-O-H angle leading to sub-wavelength dynamics. On this poster we present our all-optical alignment setup where HHG and single-cycle THz generation take place in high-vacuum, where measurements with arbitrary polarization angles between the two are possible. In addition, we discuss the effects of the molecular orientation on HHG, including symmetry breaking that could produce even harmonics and isotope effects between H2 O and D2 O due to different vibrational energies. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division.

  15. Keeping speed and distance for aligned motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, Illés J.; Kun, Jeromos; Jin, Yi; He, Gaoqi; Xu, Mingliang

    2015-01-01

    The cohesive collective motion (flocking, swarming) of autonomous agents is ubiquitously observed and exploited in both natural and man-made settings, thus, minimal models for its description are essential. In a model with continuous space and time we find that if two particles arrive symmetrically in a plane at a large angle, then (i) radial repulsion and (ii) linear self-propelling toward a fixed preferred speed are sufficient for them to depart at a smaller angle. For this local gain of momentum explicit velocity alignment is not necessary, nor are adhesion or attraction, inelasticity or anisotropy of the particles, or nonlinear drag. With many particles obeying these microscopic rules of motion we find that their spatial confinement to a square with periodic boundaries (which is an indirect form of attraction) leads to stable macroscopic ordering. As a function of the strength of added noise we see—at finite system sizes—a critical slowing down close to the order-disorder boundary and a discontinuous transition. After varying the density of particles at constant system size and varying the size of the system with constant particle density we predict that in the infinite system size (or density) limit the hysteresis loop disappears and the transition becomes continuous. We note that animals, humans, drones, etc., tend to move asynchronously and are often more responsive to motion than positions. Thus, for them velocity-based continuous models can provide higher precision than coordinate-based models. An additional characteristic and realistic feature of the model is that convergence to the ordered state is fastest at a finite density, which is in contrast to models applying (discontinuous) explicit velocity alignments and discretized time. To summarize, we find that the investigated model can provide a minimal description of flocking.

  16. Keeping speed and distance for aligned motion.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Illés J; Kun, Jeromos; Jin, Yi; He, Gaoqi; Xu, Mingliang

    2015-01-01

    The cohesive collective motion (flocking, swarming) of autonomous agents is ubiquitously observed and exploited in both natural and man-made settings, thus, minimal models for its description are essential. In a model with continuous space and time we find that if two particles arrive symmetrically in a plane at a large angle, then (i) radial repulsion and (ii) linear self-propelling toward a fixed preferred speed are sufficient for them to depart at a smaller angle. For this local gain of momentum explicit velocity alignment is not necessary, nor are adhesion or attraction, inelasticity or anisotropy of the particles, or nonlinear drag. With many particles obeying these microscopic rules of motion we find that their spatial confinement to a square with periodic boundaries (which is an indirect form of attraction) leads to stable macroscopic ordering. As a function of the strength of added noise we see--at finite system sizes--a critical slowing down close to the order-disorder boundary and a discontinuous transition. After varying the density of particles at constant system size and varying the size of the system with constant particle density we predict that in the infinite system size (or density) limit the hysteresis loop disappears and the transition becomes continuous. We note that animals, humans, drones, etc., tend to move asynchronously and are often more responsive to motion than positions. Thus, for them velocity-based continuous models can provide higher precision than coordinate-based models. An additional characteristic and realistic feature of the model is that convergence to the ordered state is fastest at a finite density, which is in contrast to models applying (discontinuous) explicit velocity alignments and discretized time. To summarize, we find that the investigated model can provide a minimal description of flocking. PMID:25679657

  17. CMP-compatible alignment strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouchouze, Eric; Darracq, Jean-Michel; Gemen, Jack

    1997-07-01

    As semiconductor technology continues its way towards smaller geometries, CMP has gained acceptance as the planarization technique for interconnect layers. Its benefits are well known, especially in terms of imaging. However, one of its major drawbacks is to make difficult the alignment of interconnect layers, since a planarized alignment mark is less visible for the stepper's alignment system. Usual workarounds include the clearing of process layers from the alignment mark before exposing the product layer. Although these workarounds provide a temporary solution, they are too costly to be viable in a mass production environment. In this experiment, a non-zero alignment strategy using new mark designs has been tested on the backend layers of a 0.35 micrometers CMOS process. New mark designs have been evaluated, where the space part of the gratings has been filled with 'segments' of various width, the purpose being to minimize the planarization effect of the metallization process. For the selection of the best mark design, several criteria have been taken into account: the stepper's built-in alignment diagnostic software provides information on the quality of the alignment signal. The most important criterion is the product overlay measurement and its repeatability. Marks cross sections using a FIB/SEM tool give indications on the mark profile after metal deposition.

  18. Galaxy Alignments: Theory, Modelling & Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiessling, Alina; Cacciato, Marcello; Joachimi, Benjamin; Kirk, Donnacha; Kitching, Thomas D.; Leonard, Adrienne; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Schäfer, Björn Malte; Sifón, Cristóbal; Brown, Michael L.; Rassat, Anais

    2015-11-01

    The shapes of galaxies are not randomly oriented on the sky. During the galaxy formation and evolution process, environment has a strong influence, as tidal gravitational fields in the large-scale structure tend to align nearby galaxies. Additionally, events such as galaxy mergers affect the relative alignments of both the shapes and angular momenta of galaxies throughout their history. These "intrinsic galaxy alignments" are known to exist, but are still poorly understood. This review will offer a pedagogical introduction to the current theories that describe intrinsic galaxy alignments, including the apparent difference in intrinsic alignment between early- and late-type galaxies and the latest efforts to model them analytically. It will then describe the ongoing efforts to simulate intrinsic alignments using both N-body and hydrodynamic simulations. Due to the relative youth of this field, there is still much to be done to understand intrinsic galaxy alignments and this review summarises the current state of the field, providing a solid basis for future work.

  19. Advanced Mask Aligner Lithography (AMALITH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard; Vogler, Uwe; Bramati, Arianna

    2015-03-01

    Mask aligner lithography is very attractive for less-critical lithography layers and is widely used for LED, display, CMOS image sensor, micro-fluidics and MEMS manufacturing. Mask aligner lithography is also a preferred choice the semiconductor back-end for 3D-IC, TSV interconnects, advanced packaging (AdP) and wafer-level-packaging (WLP). Mask aligner lithography is a mature technique based on shadow printing and has not much changed since the 1980s. In shadow printing lithography a geometric pattern is transferred by free-space propagation from a photomask to a photosensitive layer on a wafer. The inherent simplicity of the pattern transfer offers ease of operation, low maintenance, moderate capital expenditure, high wafers-per-hour (WPH) throughput, and attractive cost-of-ownership (COO). Advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) comprises different measures to improve shadow printing lithography beyond current limits. The key enabling technology for AMALITH is a novel light integrator systems, referred to as MO Exposure Optics® (MOEO). MOEO allows to fully control and shape the properties of the illumination light in a mask aligner. Full control is the base for accurate simulation and optimization of the shadow printing process (computational lithography). Now photolithography enhancement techniques like customized illumination, optical proximity correction (OPC), phase masks (AAPSM), half-tone lithography and Talbot lithography could be used in mask aligner lithography. We summarize the recent progress in advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) and discuss possible measures to further improve shadow printing lithography.

  20. Aperture alignment in autocollimator-based deflectometric profilometers.

    PubMed

    Geckeler, R D; Artemiev, N A; Barber, S K; Just, A; Lacey, I; Kranz, O; Smith, B V; Yashchuk, V V

    2016-05-01

    During the last ten years, deflectometric profilometers have become indispensable tools for the precision form measurement of optical surfaces. They have proven to be especially suitable for characterizing beam-shaping optical surfaces for x-ray beamline applications at synchrotrons and free electron lasers. Deflectometric profilometers use surface slope (angle) to assess topography and utilize commercial autocollimators for the contactless slope measurement. To this purpose, the autocollimator beam is deflected by a movable optical square (or pentaprism) towards the surface where a co-moving aperture limits and defines the beam footprint. In this paper, we focus on the precise and reproducible alignment of the aperture relative to the autocollimator's optical axis. Its alignment needs to be maintained while it is scanned across the surface under test. The reproducibility of the autocollimator's measuring conditions during calibration and during its use in the profilometer is of crucial importance to providing precise and traceable angle metrology. In the first part of the paper, we present the aperture alignment procedure developed at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA, for the use of their deflectometric profilometers. In the second part, we investigate the topic further by providing extensive ray tracing simulations and calibrations of a commercial autocollimator performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany, for evaluating the effects of the positioning of the aperture on the autocollimator's angle response. The investigations which we performed are crucial for reaching fundamental metrological limits in deflectometric profilometry. PMID:27250378

  1. Bone anatomy and rotational alignment in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Uehara, K; Kadoya, Y; Kobayashi, A; Ohashi, H; Yamano, Y

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the bone anatomy in determining the rotational alignment in total knee arthroplasty using computed tomography. Axial images of 109 knees in 83 patients with varus osteoarthritis who had total knee arthroplasty were analyzed. On the images of the distal femur and the proximal tibia, a baseline for the anteroposterior axis of each component was drawn based on the epicondylar axis for the femur and the medial (1/3) of the tibial tuberosity for the tibia. The angle between these two lines was analyzed as the rotational mismatch between the components when they were aligned to the anatomic landmarks of each bone. Fifty-four knees (49.5%) had an angle of 5 degrees or greater and 13 knees (11.9%) had an angle of 10 degrees or greater. There was a tendency to align the tibial component in external rotation relative to the femoral component. The results indicated that the landmarks of each bone were the intrinsic cause of the rotational mismatch in knees with varus osteoarthritis. Surgeons doing total knee arthroplasties should be aware of this and check the rotational mismatch between the components. When it is present, the tibial component should be realigned to match the femoral component rotation to minimize problems caused by the mismatch.

  2. Aperture alignment in autocollimator-based deflectometric profilometers.

    PubMed

    Geckeler, R D; Artemiev, N A; Barber, S K; Just, A; Lacey, I; Kranz, O; Smith, B V; Yashchuk, V V

    2016-05-01

    During the last ten years, deflectometric profilometers have become indispensable tools for the precision form measurement of optical surfaces. They have proven to be especially suitable for characterizing beam-shaping optical surfaces for x-ray beamline applications at synchrotrons and free electron lasers. Deflectometric profilometers use surface slope (angle) to assess topography and utilize commercial autocollimators for the contactless slope measurement. To this purpose, the autocollimator beam is deflected by a movable optical square (or pentaprism) towards the surface where a co-moving aperture limits and defines the beam footprint. In this paper, we focus on the precise and reproducible alignment of the aperture relative to the autocollimator's optical axis. Its alignment needs to be maintained while it is scanned across the surface under test. The reproducibility of the autocollimator's measuring conditions during calibration and during its use in the profilometer is of crucial importance to providing precise and traceable angle metrology. In the first part of the paper, we present the aperture alignment procedure developed at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA, for the use of their deflectometric profilometers. In the second part, we investigate the topic further by providing extensive ray tracing simulations and calibrations of a commercial autocollimator performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany, for evaluating the effects of the positioning of the aperture on the autocollimator's angle response. The investigations which we performed are crucial for reaching fundamental metrological limits in deflectometric profilometry.

  3. In-Flight Alignment Using H∞ Filter for Strapdown INS on Aircraft

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Fu-Jun; Liu, Xuan; Zhu, Li

    2014-01-01

    In-flight alignment is an effective way to improve the accuracy and speed of initial alignment for strapdown inertial navigation system (INS). During the aircraft flight, strapdown INS alignment was disturbed by lineal and angular movements of the aircraft. To deal with the disturbances in dynamic initial alignment, a novel alignment method for SINS is investigated in this paper. In this method, an initial alignment error model of SINS in the inertial frame is established. The observability of the system is discussed by piece-wise constant system (PWCS) theory and observable degree is computed by the singular value decomposition (SVD) theory. It is demonstrated that the system is completely observable, and all the system state parameters can be estimated by optimal filter. Then a H∞ filter was designed to resolve the uncertainty of measurement noise. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can reach a better accuracy under the dynamic disturbance condition. PMID:24511300

  4. In-flight alignment using H ∞ filter for strapdown INS on aircraft.

    PubMed

    Pei, Fu-Jun; Liu, Xuan; Zhu, Li

    2014-01-01

    In-flight alignment is an effective way to improve the accuracy and speed of initial alignment for strapdown inertial navigation system (INS). During the aircraft flight, strapdown INS alignment was disturbed by lineal and angular movements of the aircraft. To deal with the disturbances in dynamic initial alignment, a novel alignment method for SINS is investigated in this paper. In this method, an initial alignment error model of SINS in the inertial frame is established. The observability of the system is discussed by piece-wise constant system (PWCS) theory and observable degree is computed by the singular value decomposition (SVD) theory. It is demonstrated that the system is completely observable, and all the system state parameters can be estimated by optimal filter. Then a H ∞ filter was designed to resolve the uncertainty of measurement noise. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can reach a better accuracy under the dynamic disturbance condition.

  5. Aligning for Innovation - Alignment Strategy to Drive Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Hurel; Teltschik, David; Bussey, Horace, Jr.; Moy, James

    2010-01-01

    With the sudden need for innovation that will help the country achieve its long-term space exploration objectives, the question of whether NASA is aligned effectively to drive the innovation that it so desperately needs to take space exploration to the next level should be entertained. Authors such as Robert Kaplan and David North have noted that companies that use a formal system for implementing strategy consistently outperform their peers. They have outlined a six-stage management systems model for implementing strategy, which includes the aligning of the organization towards its objectives. This involves the alignment of the organization from the top down. This presentation will explore the impacts of existing U.S. industrial policy on technological innovation; assess the current NASA organizational alignment and its impacts on driving technological innovation; and finally suggest an alternative approach that may drive the innovation needed to take the world to the next level of space exploration, with NASA truly leading the way.

  6. Rigorous electromagnetic simulation applied to alignment systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yunfei; Pistor, Thomas V.; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    2001-09-01

    Rigorous electromagnetic simulation with TEMPEST is used to provide benchmark data and understanding of key parameters in the design of topographical features of alignment marks. Periodic large silicon trenches are analyzed as a function of wavelength (530-800 nm), duty cycle, depth, slope and angle of incidence. The signals are well behaved except when the trench width becomes about 1 micrometers or smaller. Segmentation of the trenches to form 3D marks shows that a segmentation period of 2-5 wavelengths makes the diffraction in the (1,1) direction about 1/3 to 1/2 of that in the main first order (1,0). Transmission alignment marks nanoimprint lithography using the difference between the +1 and -1 reflected orders showed a sensitivity of the difference signal to misalignment of 0.7%/nm for rigorous simulation and 0.5%/nm for simple ray-tracing. The sensitivity to a slanted substrate indentation was 10 nm off-set per degree of tilt from horizontal.

  7. Simulator for beam-based LHC collimator alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentino, Gianluca; Aßmann, Ralph; Redaelli, Stefano; Sammut, Nicholas

    2014-02-01

    In the CERN Large Hadron Collider, collimators need to be set up to form a multistage hierarchy to ensure efficient multiturn cleaning of halo particles. Automatic algorithms were introduced during the first run to reduce the beam time required for beam-based setup, improve the alignment accuracy, and reduce the risk of human errors. Simulating the alignment procedure would allow for off-line tests of alignment policies and algorithms. A simulator was developed based on a diffusion beam model to generate the characteristic beam loss signal spike and decay produced when a collimator jaw touches the beam, which is observed in a beam loss monitor (BLM). Empirical models derived from the available measurement data are used to simulate the steady-state beam loss and crosstalk between multiple BLMs. The simulator design is presented, together with simulation results and comparison to measurement data.

  8. Effect of Ocular Alignment on Emmetropization in Children <10 years with Amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Kulp, Marjean T.; Foster, Nicole C.; Holmes, Jonathan M.; Kraker, Raymond T.; Melia, B. Michele; Repka, Michael X.; Tien, D. Robbins

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether change in refractive error is associated with ocular alignment in 105 children 3 to <7 years of age who previously participated in a randomized trial comparing atropine and patching for moderate amblyopia. Design Prospective cohort study Methods One hundred five children 3 to <7 years of age previously participated in a randomized trial comparing atropine with patching for moderate amblyopia. Cycloplegic refraction was measured at baseline and 10 years of age. Ocular alignment at baseline was categorized as orthotropic, microtropic (1–8Δ horizontal tropia), or heterotropic (>8Δ horizontal tropia). Multivariate regression models evaluated whether change in spherical equivalent refractive error was associated with alignment category, after adjusting for age, baseline spherical equivalent refractive error, and type of amblyopia treatment. Results Between enrollment and the age 10-year exam there was a decrease in spherical equivalent refractive error from hyperopia to less hyperopia (amblyopic eye: − 0.65D, 95%CI −0.85, −0.46; fellow eye: −0.39D, 95%CI −0.58, −0.20). A greater decrease in amblyopic eye refractive error was associated with better ocular alignment category (p=0.004), with the greatest decrease occurring in orthotropic patients. There was no relationship between ocular alignment category and change in fellow-eye refractive error. Conclusions Among children treated for anisometropic, strabismic, or combined mechanism amblyopia, there is a decrease in amblyopic eye spherical equivalent refractive error to less hyperopia after controlling for baseline refractive error. This negative shift toward emmetropia is associated with ocular alignment, which supports the suggestion that better motor and sensory fusion promote emmetropization. PMID:22633344

  9. A Different Angle on Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Marc

    2012-01-01

    When a plane figure is photographed from different viewpoints, lengths and angles appear distorted. Hence it is often assumed that lengths, angles, protractors, and compasses have no place in projective geometry. Here we describe a sense in which certain angles are preserved by projective transformations. These angles can be constructed with…

  10. Angle Sense: A Valuable Connector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenstein, Rheta N.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Proposes angle sense as a fundamental connector between mathematical concepts for middle grade students. Introduces the use of pattern blocks and a goniometer, a tool to measure angles, to help students develop angle sense. Discusses connections between angle measurement and the concepts of rational numbers, circles, area, number theory,…

  11. Runout error correction in tomographic reconstruction by intensity summation method.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ik Hwan; Lim, Jun; Hong, Chung Ki

    2016-09-01

    An alignment method for correction of the axial and radial runout errors of the rotation stage in X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography has been developed. Only intensity information was used, without extra hardware or complicated calculation. Notably, the method, as demonstrated herein, can utilize the halo artifact to determine displacement. PMID:27577781

  12. Fusion bonding and alignment fixture

    DOEpatents

    Ackler, Harold D.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Tarte, Lisa A.; Hicks, Randall K.

    2000-01-01

    An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all the components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

  13. Multiple sequence alignment with DIALIGN.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    DIALIGN is a software tool for multiple sequence alignment by combining global and local alignment features. It composes multiple alignments from local pairwise sequence similarities. This approach is particularly useful to discover conserved functional regions in sequences that share only local homologies but are otherwise unrelated. An anchoring option allows to use external information and expert knowledge in addition to primary-sequence similarity alone. The latest version of DIALIGN optionally uses matches to the PFAM database to detect weak homologies. Various versions of the program are available through Göttingen Bioinformatics Compute Server (GOBICS) at http://www.gobics.de/department/software.

  14. Microwave characterization of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsounaros, Anestis; Rajab, Khalid Z.; Hao, Yang; Mann, Mark; Milne, William I.

    2011-05-01

    Vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube (VACNT) films have been characterized by rectangular waveguide measurements. The complex scattering parameters (S-parameters) are measured by a vector network analyzer at X-band frequencies. The effective complex permittivity and permeability of the VACNT films have been extracted. The extracted parameters are verified by full wave simulations and very good agreement has been obtained. The results of the systematic error analysis are presented and the errors are within the acceptable range. The performance of VACNT films as an absorber is examined, and comparison with the conventional carbon loaded materials shows that a 90% size reduction is possible while maintaining the same absorption level.

  15. Preventing errors in laterality.

    PubMed

    Landau, Elliot; Hirschorn, David; Koutras, Iakovos; Malek, Alexander; Demissie, Seleshie

    2015-04-01

    An error in laterality is the reporting of a finding that is present on the right side as on the left or vice versa. While different medical and surgical specialties have implemented protocols to help prevent such errors, very few studies have been published that describe these errors in radiology reports and ways to prevent them. We devised a system that allows the radiologist to view reports in a separate window, displayed in a simple font and with all terms of laterality highlighted in separate colors. This allows the radiologist to correlate all detected laterality terms of the report with the images open in PACS and correct them before the report is finalized. The system is monitored every time an error in laterality was detected. The system detected 32 errors in laterality over a 7-month period (rate of 0.0007 %), with CT containing the highest error detection rate of all modalities. Significantly, more errors were detected in male patients compared with female patients. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that with our system, laterality errors can be detected and corrected prior to finalizing reports.

  16. Refractive error blindness.

    PubMed Central

    Dandona, R.; Dandona, L.

    2001-01-01

    Recent data suggest that a large number of people are blind in different parts of the world due to high refractive error because they are not using appropriate refractive correction. Refractive error as a cause of blindness has been recognized only recently with the increasing use of presenting visual acuity for defining blindness. In addition to blindness due to naturally occurring high refractive error, inadequate refractive correction of aphakia after cataract surgery is also a significant cause of blindness in developing countries. Blindness due to refractive error in any population suggests that eye care services in general in that population are inadequate since treatment of refractive error is perhaps the simplest and most effective form of eye care. Strategies such as vision screening programmes need to be implemented on a large scale to detect individuals suffering from refractive error blindness. Sufficient numbers of personnel to perform reasonable quality refraction need to be trained in developing countries. Also adequate infrastructure has to be developed in underserved areas of the world to facilitate the logistics of providing affordable reasonable-quality spectacles to individuals suffering from refractive error blindness. Long-term success in reducing refractive error blindness worldwide will require attention to these issues within the context of comprehensive approaches to reduce all causes of avoidable blindness. PMID:11285669

  17. Everyday Scale Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Elizabeth A.; Uttal, David H.; DeLoache, Judy S.

    2010-01-01

    Young children occasionally make "scale errors"--they attempt to fit their bodies into extremely small objects or attempt to fit a larger object into another, tiny, object. For example, a child might try to sit in a dollhouse-sized chair or try to stuff a large doll into it. Scale error research was originally motivated by parents' and…

  18. Action errors, error management, and learning in organizations.

    PubMed

    Frese, Michael; Keith, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Every organization is confronted with errors. Most errors are corrected easily, but some may lead to negative consequences. Organizations often focus on error prevention as a single strategy for dealing with errors. Our review suggests that error prevention needs to be supplemented by error management--an approach directed at effectively dealing with errors after they have occurred, with the goal of minimizing negative and maximizing positive error consequences (examples of the latter are learning and innovations). After defining errors and related concepts, we review research on error-related processes affected by error management (error detection, damage control). Empirical evidence on positive effects of error management in individuals and organizations is then discussed, along with emotional, motivational, cognitive, and behavioral pathways of these effects. Learning from errors is central, but like other positive consequences, learning occurs under certain circumstances--one being the development of a mind-set of acceptance of human error.

  19. A robust, automated alignment concept for robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, L.J.; Redfield, R.C. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    A video-based pose sensor is presented that overcomes some of the common problems with typical robotic pose sensors. The Targeting and Reflective Alignment Concept (TRAC) sensor operates using the optics of reflection. TRAC is a robust sensor capable of both continuous and discrete pose sensing in the presence of a class of disturbance inputs (extraneous lighting). Key features of the sensor are its high sensitivity to orientation error, its decoupled handling of orientation and translation (without calibration transformations), and its ability to provide intuitive feedback to a human operator for tele-operation. The sensor has been shown successful at target tracking with a PUMA manipulator in the laboratory and in automatic positioning of NASA-JSC's Manipulator Development Facility (MDF) telemanipulator arm used for shuttle astronaut training.

  20. Effect of prosthetic alignment changes on socket reaction moment impulse during walking in transtibial amputees

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Toshiki; Orendurff, Michael S.; Arabian, Adam K.; Rosenbaum-Chou, Teri G.; Boone, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The alignment of a lower limb prosthesis affects the way load is transferred to the residual limb through the socket, and this load is critically important for the comfort and function of the prosthesis. Both magnitude and duration of the moment are important factors that may affect the residual limb health. Moment impulse is a well-accepted measurement that incorporates both factors via moment–time integrals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of alignment changes on the socket reaction moment impulse in transtibial prostheses. Ten amputees with transtibial prostheses participated in this study. The socket reaction moment impulse was measured at a self-selected walking speed using a Smart Pyramid™ in 25 alignment conditions, including a nominal alignment (clinically aligned by a prosthetist), as well as angle malalignments of 2°, 4° and 6° (abduction, adduction, extension and flexion) and translation malalignments of 5 mm, 10 mm and 15 mm (lateral, medial, anterior and posterior). The socket reaction moment impulse of the nominal alignment was compared for each condition. The relationship between the alignment and the socket reaction moment impulse was clearly observed in the coronal angle, coronal translation and sagittal translation alignment changes. However, this relationship was not evident in the sagittal angle alignment changes. The results of this study suggested that the socket reaction moment impulse could potentially serve as a valuable parameter to assist the alignment tuning process for transtibial prostheses. Further study is needed to investigate the influence of the socket reaction moment impulse on the residual limb health. PMID:24612718

  1. Effect of prosthetic alignment changes on socket reaction moment impulse during walking in transtibial amputees.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toshiki; Orendurff, Michael S; Arabian, Adam K; Rosenbaum-Chou, Teri G; Boone, David A

    2014-04-11

    The alignment of a lower limb prosthesis affects the way load is transferred to the residual limb through the socket, and this load is critically important for the comfort and function of the prosthesis. Both magnitude and duration of the moment are important factors that may affect the residual limb health. Moment impulse is a well-accepted measurement that incorporates both factors via moment-time integrals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of alignment changes on the socket reaction moment impulse in transtibial prostheses. Ten amputees with transtibial prostheses participated in this study. The socket reaction moment impulse was measured at a self-selected walking speed using a Smart Pyramid in 25 alignment conditions, including a nominal alignment (clinically aligned by a prosthetist), as well as angle malalignments of 2°, 4° and 6° (abduction, adduction, extension and flexion) and translation malalignments of 5 mm, 10 mm and 15 mm (lateral, medial, anterior and posterior). The socket reaction moment impulse of the nominal alignment was compared for each condition. The relationship between the alignment and the socket reaction moment impulse was clearly observed in the coronal angle, coronal translation and sagittal translation alignment changes. However, this relationship was not evident in the sagittal angle alignment changes. The results of this study suggested that the socket reaction moment impulse could potentially serve as a valuable parameter to assist the alignment tuning process for transtibial prostheses. Further study is needed to investigate the influence of the socket reaction moment impulse on the residual limb health.

  2. Proofreading for word errors.

    PubMed

    Pilotti, Maura; Chodorow, Martin; Agpawa, Ian; Krajniak, Marta; Mahamane, Salif

    2012-04-01

    Proofreading (i.e., reading text for the purpose of detecting and correcting typographical errors) is viewed as a component of the activity of revising text and thus is a necessary (albeit not sufficient) procedural step for enhancing the quality of a written product. The purpose of the present research was to test competing accounts of word-error detection which predict factors that may influence reading and proofreading differently. Word errors, which change a word into another word (e.g., from --> form), were selected for examination because they are unlikely to be detected by automatic spell-checking functions. Consequently, their detection still rests mostly in the hands of the human proofreader. Findings highlighted the weaknesses of existing accounts of proofreading and identified factors, such as length and frequency of the error in the English language relative to frequency of the correct word, which might play a key role in detection of word errors.

  3. Angles in the Sky?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Bradford

    2005-09-01

    Tycho Brahe lived and worked in the late 1500s before the telescope was invented. He made highly accurate observations of the positions of planets, stars, and comets using large angle-measuring devices of his own design. You can use his techniques to observe the sky as well. For example, the degree, a common unit of measurement in astronomy, can be measured by holding your fist at arm's length up to the sky. Open your fist and observe the distance across the sky covered by the width of your pinky fingernail. That is, roughly, a degree! After some practice, and knowing that one degree equals four minutes, you can measure elapsed time by measuring the angle of the distance that the Moon appears to have moved and multiplying that number by four. You can also figure distances and sizes of things. These are not precise measurements, but rough estimates that can give you a "close-enough" answer.

  4. Visual attitude orientation and alignment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beam, R. A.; Morris, D. B.

    1967-01-01

    Active vehicle optical alignment aid and a passive vehicle three-dimensional alignment target ensure proper orientation and alignment plus control of the closure range and rate between two bodies, one in controlled motion and one at rest.

  5. Laser beam alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Gruhn, Charles R.; Hammond, Robert B.

    1981-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

  6. Theory of grain alignment in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Wayne G.

    1993-01-01

    Research accomplishments are presented and include the following: (1) mathematical theory of grain alignment; (2) super-paramagnetic alignment of molecular cloud grains; and (3) theory of grain alignment by ambipolar diffusion.

  7. Laser beam alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Gruhn, C.R.; Hammond, R.B.

    The disclosure related to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

  8. Protein structure alignment beyond spatial proximity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Ma, Jianzhu; Peng, Jian; Xu, Jinbo

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure alignment is a fundamental problem in computational structure biology. Many programs have been developed for automatic protein structure alignment, but most of them align two protein structures purely based upon geometric similarity without considering evolutionary and functional relationship. As such, these programs may generate structure alignments which are not very biologically meaningful from the evolutionary perspective. This paper presents a novel method DeepAlign for automatic pairwise protein structure alignment. DeepAlign aligns two protein structures using not only spatial proximity of equivalent residues (after rigid-body superposition), but also evolutionary relationship and hydrogen-bonding similarity. Experimental results show that DeepAlign can generate structure alignments much more consistent with manually-curated alignments than other automatic tools especially when proteins under consideration are remote homologs. These results imply that in addition to geometric similarity, evolutionary information and hydrogen-bonding similarity are essential to aligning two protein structures.

  9. Quadrupole Beam-Based Alignment in the RHIC Interaction Regions

    SciTech Connect

    T. Satogata, J. Ziegler

    2011-03-01

    Continued beam-based alignment (BBA) efforts have provided significant benefit to both heavy ion and polarized proton operations at RHIC. Recent studies demonstrated previously unknown systematic beam position monitor (BPM) offset errors and produced accurate measurements of individual BPM offsets in the experiment interaction regions. Here we describe the algorithm used to collect and analyze data during the 2010 and early 2011 RHIC runs and the results of these measurements.

  10. LSST Telescope Alignment Plan Based on Nodal Aberration Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebag, J.; Gressler, W.; Schmid, T.; Rolland, J. P.; Thompson, K. P.

    2012-04-01

    The optical alignment of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is potentially challenging, due to its fast three-mirror optical design and its large 3.5° field of view (FOV). It is highly advantageous to align the three-mirror optical system prior to the integration of the complex science camera on the telescope, which corrects the FOV via three refractive elements and includes the operational wavefront sensors. A telescope alignment method based on nodal aberration theory (NAT) is presented here to address this challenge. Without the science camera installed on the telescope, the on-axis imaging performance of the telescope is diffraction-limited, but the field of view is not corrected. The nodal properties of the three-mirror telescope design have been analyzed and an alignment approach has been developed using the intrinsically linear nodal behavior, which is linked via sensitivities to the misalignment parameters. Since mirror figure errors will exist in any real application, a methodology to introduce primary-mirror figure errors into the analysis has been developed and is also presented.

  11. Optical alignment of Centaur's inertial guidance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordan, Andrew L.

    1987-01-01

    During Centaur launch operations the launch azimuth of the inertial platform's U-accelerometer input axis must be accurately established and maintained. This is accomplished by using an optically closed loop system with a long-range autotheodolite whose line of sight was established by a first-order survey. A collimated light beam from the autotheodolite intercepts a reflecting Porro prism mounted on the platform azimuth gimbal. Thus, any deviation of the Porro prism from its predetermined heading is optically detected by the autotheodolite. The error signal produced is used to torque the azimuth gimbal back to its required launch azimuth. The heading of the U-accelerometer input axis is therefore maintained automatically. Previously, the autotheodolite system could not distinguish between vehicle sway and rotational motion of the inertial platform unless at least three prisms were used. One prism was mounted on the inertial platform to maintain azimuth alignment, and two prisms were mounted externally on the vehicle to track sway. For example, the automatic azimuth-laying theodolite (AALT-SV-M2) on the Saturn vehilce used three prisms. The results of testing and modifying the AALT-SV-M2 autotheodolite to simultaneously monitor and maintain alignment of the inertial platform and track the sway of the vehicle from a single Porro prism.

  12. Alignment-free protein interaction network comparison

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Waqar; Rito, Tiago; Reinert, Gesine; Sun, Fengzhu; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Biological network comparison software largely relies on the concept of alignment where close matches between the nodes of two or more networks are sought. These node matches are based on sequence similarity and/or interaction patterns. However, because of the incomplete and error-prone datasets currently available, such methods have had limited success. Moreover, the results of network alignment are in general not amenable for distance-based evolutionary analysis of sets of networks. In this article, we describe Netdis, a topology-based distance measure between networks, which offers the possibility of network phylogeny reconstruction. Results: We first demonstrate that Netdis is able to correctly separate different random graph model types independent of network size and density. The biological applicability of the method is then shown by its ability to build the correct phylogenetic tree of species based solely on the topology of current protein interaction networks. Our results provide new evidence that the topology of protein interaction networks contains information about evolutionary processes, despite the lack of conservation of individual interactions. As Netdis is applicable to all networks because of its speed and simplicity, we apply it to a large collection of biological and non-biological networks where it clusters diverse networks by type. Availability and implementation: The source code of the program is freely available at http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/research/proteins/resources. Contact: w.ali@stats.ox.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25161230

  13. Laser angle sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, C. R.; Texeira, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    A laser angle measurement system was designed and fabricated for NASA Langley Research Center. The instrument is a fringe counting interferometer that monitors the pitch attitude of a model in a wind tunnel. A laser source and detector are mounted above the model. Interference fringes are generated by a small passive element on the model. The fringe count is accumulated and displayed by a processor in the wind tunnel control room. This report includes optical and electrical schematics, system maintenance and operation procedures.

  14. Mapping of low flip angles in magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balezeau, Fabien; Eliat, Pierre-Antoine; Bordelois Cayamo, Alejandro; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé

    2011-10-01

    Errors in the flip angle have to be corrected in many magnetic resonance imaging applications, especially for T1 quantification. However, the existing methods of B1 mapping fail to measure lower values of the flip angle despite the fact that these are extensively used in dynamic acquisition and 3D imaging. In this study, the nonlinearity of the radiofrequency (RF) transmit chain, especially for very low flip angles, is investigated and a simple method is proposed to accurately determine both the gain of the RF transmitter and the B1 field map for low flip angles. The method makes use of the spoiled gradient echo sequence with long repetition time (TR), such as applied in the double-angle method. It uses an image acquired with a flip angle of 90° as a reference image that is robust to B1 inhomogeneity. The ratio of the image at flip angle alpha to the image at a flip angle of 90° enables us to calculate the actual value of alpha. This study was carried out at 1.5 and 4.7 T, showing that the linearity of the RF supply system is highly dependent on the hardware. The method proposed here allows us to measure the flip angle from 1° to 60° with a maximal uncertainty of 10% and to correct T1 maps based on the variable flip angle method.

  15. A highly accurate dynamic contact angle algorithm for drops on inclined surface based on ellipse-fitting.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z N; Wang, S Y

    2015-02-01

    To improve the accuracy in the calculation of dynamic contact angle for drops on the inclined surface, a significant number of numerical drop profiles on the inclined surface with different inclination angles, drop volumes, and contact angles are generated based on the finite difference method, a least-squares ellipse-fitting algorithm is used to calculate the dynamic contact angle. The influences of the above three factors are systematically investigated. The results reveal that the dynamic contact angle errors, including the errors of the left and right contact angles, evaluated by the ellipse-fitting algorithm tend to increase with inclination angle/drop volume/contact angle. If the drop volume and the solid substrate are fixed, the errors of the left and right contact angles increase with inclination angle. After performing a tremendous amount of computation, the critical dimensionless drop volumes corresponding to the critical contact angle error are obtained. Based on the values of the critical volumes, a highly accurate dynamic contact angle algorithm is proposed and fully validated. Within nearly the whole hydrophobicity range, it can decrease the dynamic contact angle error in the inclined plane method to less than a certain value even for different types of liquids.

  16. Fixture for aligning motor assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shervington, Roger M.; Vaghani, Vallabh V.; Vanek, Laurence D.; Christensen, Scott A.

    2009-12-08

    An alignment fixture includes a rotor fixture, a stator fixture and a sensor system which measures a rotational displacement therebetween. The fixture precisely measures rotation of a generator stator assembly away from a NULL position referenced by a unique reference spline on the rotor shaft. By providing an adjustable location of the stator assembly within the housing, the magnetic axes within each generator shall be aligned to a predetermined and controlled tolerance between the generator interface mounting pin and the reference spline on the rotor shaft. Once magnetically aligned, each generator is essentially a line replaceable unit which may be readily mounted to any input of a multi-generator gearbox assembly with the assurance that the magnetic alignment will be within a predetermined tolerance.

  17. Magnetic alignment study of rare-earth-containing liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Galyametdinov, Yury G; Haase, Wolfgang; Goderis, Bart; Moors, Dries; Driesen, Kris; Van Deun, Rik; Binnemans, Koen

    2007-12-20

    The liquid-crystalline rare-earth complexes of the type [Ln(LH)3(DOS)3]-where Ln is Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, or Yb; LH is the Schiff base N-octadecyl-4-tetradecyloxysalicylaldimine; and DOS is dodecylsulfate-exhibit a smectic A phase. Because of the presence of rare-earth ions with a large magnetic anisotropy, the smectic A phase of these liquid crystals can be easier aligned in an external magnetic field than smectic A phases of conventional liquid crystals. The magnetic anisotropy of the [Ln(LH)3(DOS)3] complexes was determined by measurement of the temperature-dependence of the magnetic susceptibility using a Faraday balance. The highest value for the magnetic anisotropy was found for the dysprosium(III) complex. The magnetic alignment of these liquid crystals was studied by time-resolved synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering experiments. Depending on the sign of the magnetic anisotropy, the director of the liquid-crystalline molecules was aligned parallel or perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. A positive value of the magnetic anisotropy (and parallel alignment) was found for the thulium(III) and the ytterbium(III) complexes, whereas a negative value of the magnetic anisotropy (and perpendicular alignment) was observed for the terbium(III) and dysprosium(III) complexes. PMID:18044875

  18. CLEMAPS: multiple alignment of protein structures based on conformational letters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zhao, Ya-Pu; Zheng, Wei-Mou

    2008-05-01

    CLEMAPS is a tool for multiple alignment of protein structures. It distinguishes itself from other existing algorithms for multiple structure alignment by the use of conformational letters, which are discretized states of 3D segmental structural states. A letter corresponds to a cluster of combinations of three angles formed by C(alpha) pseudobonds of four contiguous residues. A substitution matrix called CLESUM is available to measure the similarity between any two such letters. The input 3D structures are first converted to sequences of conformational letters. Each string of a fixed length is then taken as the center seed to search other sequences for neighbors of the seed, which are strings similar to the seed. A seed and its neighbors form a center-star, which corresponds to a fragment set of local structural similarity shared by many proteins. The detection of center-stars using CLESUM is extremely efficient. Local similarity is a necessary, but insufficient, condition for structural alignment. Once center-stars are found, the spatial consistency between any two stars are examined to find consistent star duads using atomic coordinates. Consistent duads are later joined to create a core for multiple alignment, which is further polished to produce the final alignment. The utility of CLEMAPS is tested on various protein structure ensembles.

  19. Optimal alignment of mirror based pentaprisms for scanning deflectometric devices

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, Samuel K.; Geckeler, Ralf D.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Buchheim, Jana; Siewert, Frank; Zeschke, Thomas

    2011-03-04

    In the recent work [Proc. of SPIE 7801, 7801-2/1-12 (2010), Opt. Eng. 50(5) (2011), in press], we have reported on improvement of the Developmental Long Trace Profiler (DLTP), a slope measuring profiler available at the Advanced Light Source Optical Metrology Laboratory, achieved by replacing the bulk pentaprism with a mirror based pentaprism (MBPP). An original experimental procedure for optimal mutual alignment of the MBPP mirrors has been suggested and verified with numerical ray tracing simulations. It has been experimentally shown that the optimally aligned MBPP allows the elimination of systematic errors introduced by inhomogeneity of the optical material and fabrication imperfections of the bulk pentaprism. In the present article, we provide the analytical derivation and verification of easily executed optimal alignment algorithms for two different designs of mirror based pentaprisms. We also provide an analytical description for the mechanism for reduction of the systematic errors introduced by a typical high quality bulk pentaprism. It is also shown that residual misalignments of an MBPP introduce entirely negligible systematic errors in surface slope measurements with scanning deflectometric devices.

  20. Well-pump alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1998-10-20

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

  1. Errors in neuroradiology.

    PubMed

    Caranci, Ferdinando; Tedeschi, Enrico; Leone, Giuseppe; Reginelli, Alfonso; Gatta, Gianluca; Pinto, Antonio; Squillaci, Ettore; Briganti, Francesco; Brunese, Luca

    2015-09-01

    Approximately 4 % of radiologic interpretation in daily practice contains errors and discrepancies that should occur in 2-20 % of reports. Fortunately, most of them are minor degree errors, or if serious, are found and corrected with sufficient promptness; obviously, diagnostic errors become critical when misinterpretation or misidentification should significantly delay medical or surgical treatments. Errors can be summarized into four main categories: observer errors, errors in interpretation, failure to suggest the next appropriate procedure, failure to communicate in a timely and a clinically appropriate manner. Misdiagnosis/misinterpretation percentage should rise up in emergency setting and in the first moments of the learning curve, as in residency. Para-physiological and pathological pitfalls in neuroradiology include calcification and brain stones, pseudofractures, and enlargement of subarachnoid or epidural spaces, ventricular system abnormalities, vascular system abnormalities, intracranial lesions or pseudolesions, and finally neuroradiological emergencies. In order to minimize the possibility of error, it is important to be aware of various presentations of pathology, obtain clinical information, know current practice guidelines, review after interpreting a diagnostic study, suggest follow-up studies when appropriate, communicate significant abnormal findings appropriately and in a timely fashion directly with the treatment team.

  2. Uncorrected refractive errors.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Kovin S; Jaggernath, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Global estimates indicate that more than 2.3 billion people in the world suffer from poor vision due to refractive error; of which 670 million people are considered visually impaired because they do not have access to corrective treatment. Refractive errors, if uncorrected, results in an impaired quality of life for millions of people worldwide, irrespective of their age, sex and ethnicity. Over the past decade, a series of studies using a survey methodology, referred to as Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC), were performed in populations with different ethnic origins and cultural settings. These studies confirmed that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors is considerably high for children in low-and-middle-income countries. Furthermore, uncorrected refractive error has been noted to have extensive social and economic impacts, such as limiting educational and employment opportunities of economically active persons, healthy individuals and communities. The key public health challenges presented by uncorrected refractive errors, the leading cause of vision impairment across the world, require urgent attention. To address these issues, it is critical to focus on the development of human resources and sustainable methods of service delivery. This paper discusses three core pillars to addressing the challenges posed by uncorrected refractive errors: Human Resource (HR) Development, Service Development and Social Entrepreneurship. PMID:22944755

  3. CORRELATED ERRORS IN EARTH POINTING MISSIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanow, Steve; Patt, Frederick S.

    2005-01-01

    Two different Earth-pointing missions dealing with attitude control and dynamics changes illustrate concerns with correlated error sources and coupled effects that can occur. On the OrbView-2 (OV-2) spacecraft, the assumption of a nearly-inertially-fixed momentum axis was called into question when a residual dipole bias apparently changed magnitude. The possibility that alignment adjustments and/or sensor calibration errors may compensate for actual motions of the spacecraft is discussed, and uncertainties in the dynamics are considered. Particular consideration is given to basic orbit frequency and twice orbit frequency effects and their high correlation over the short science observation data span. On the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft, the switch to a contingency Kalman filter control mode created changes in the pointing error patterns. Results from independent checks on the TRMM attitude using science instrument data are reported, and bias shifts and error correlations are discussed. Various orbit frequency effects are common with the flight geometry for Earth pointing instruments. In both dual-spin momentum stabilized spacecraft (like OV-2) and three axis stabilized spacecraft with gyros (like TRMM under Kalman filter control), changes in the initial attitude state propagate into orbit frequency variations in attitude and some sensor measurements. At the same time, orbit frequency measurement effects can arise from dynamics assumptions, environment variations, attitude sensor calibrations, or ephemeris errors. Also, constant environment torques for dual spin spacecraft have similar effects to gyro biases on three axis stabilized spacecraft, effectively shifting the one-revolution-per-orbit (1-RPO) body rotation axis. Highly correlated effects can create a risk for estimation errors particularly when a mission switches an operating mode or changes its normal flight environment. Some error effects will not be obvious from attitude sensor

  4. BinAligner: a heuristic method to align biological networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The advances in high throughput omics technologies have made it possible to characterize molecular interactions within and across various species. Alignments and comparison of molecular networks across species will help detect orthologs and conserved functional modules and provide insights on the evolutionary relationships of the compared species. However, such analyses are not trivial due to the complexity of network and high computational cost. Here we develop a mixture of global and local algorithm, BinAligner, for network alignments. Based on the hypotheses that the similarity between two vertices across networks would be context dependent and that the information from the edges and the structures of subnetworks can be more informative than vertices alone, two scoring schema, 1-neighborhood subnetwork and graphlet, were introduced to derive the scoring matrices between networks, besides the commonly used scoring scheme from vertices. Then the alignment problem is formulated as an assignment problem, which is solved by the combinatorial optimization algorithm, such as the Hungarian method. The proposed algorithm was applied and validated in aligning the protein-protein interaction network of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and that of varicella zoster virus (VZV). Interestingly, we identified several putative functional orthologous proteins with similar functions but very low sequence similarity between the two viruses. For example, KSHV open reading frame 56 (ORF56) and VZV ORF55 are helicase-primase subunits with sequence identity 14.6%, and KSHV ORF75 and VZV ORF44 are tegument proteins with sequence identity 15.3%. These functional pairs can not be identified if one restricts the alignment into orthologous protein pairs. In addition, BinAligner identified a conserved pathway between two viruses, which consists of 7 orthologous protein pairs and these proteins are connected by conserved links. This pathway might be crucial for virus packing and

  5. Error Prevention Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    In a complex computer environment there is ample opportunity for error, a mistake by a programmer, or a software-induced undesirable side effect. In insurance, errors can cost a company heavily, so protection against inadvertent change is a must for the efficient firm. The data processing center at Transport Life Insurance Company has taken a step to guard against accidental changes by adopting a software package called EQNINT (Equations Interpreter Program). EQNINT cross checks the basic formulas in a program against the formulas that make up the major production system. EQNINT assures that formulas are coded correctly and helps catch errors before they affect the customer service or its profitability.

  6. Alignment of a three-mirror anastigmatic telescope using nodal aberration theory.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhiyuan; Yan, Changxiang; Wang, Yang

    2015-09-21

    Most computer-aided alignment methods for optical systems are based on numerical algorithms at present, which omit aberration theory. This paper presents a novel alignment algorithm for three-mirror anastigmatic (TMA) telescopes using Nodal Aberration Theory (NAT). The aberration field decenter vectors and boresight error of misaligned TMA telescopes are derived. Two alignment models based on 3rd and 5th order NAT are established successively and compared in the same alignment example. It is found that the average and the maximum RMS wavefront errors in the whole field of view of 0.3° × 0.15° are 0.063 λ (λ = 1 μm) and 0.068 λ respectively after the 4th alignment action with the 3rd order model, and 0.011 λ and 0.025 λ (nominal values) respectively after the 3rd alignment action with the 5th order model. Monte-Carlo alignment simulations are carried out with the 5th order model. It shows that the 5th order model still has good performance even when the misalignment variables are large (-1 mm≤linear misalignment≤1 mm, -0.1°≤angular misalignment≤0.1°), and multiple iterative alignments are needed when the misalignment variables increase. PMID:26406716

  7. Optical alignment and tuning system for the HUST THz-FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xu; Liu, Kaifeng; Qin, Bin; Tan, Ping; Fu, Qiang; Wang, Wei; Pei, Yuanji

    2016-11-01

    A compact FEL oscillator with a radiation wavelength of 30 - 100 μm is proposed by HUST and NSRL. The optical cavity is very sensitive to misalignment errors of the mirror, due to its near-concentric and symmetric structure. The magnetic axis of the undulator, the optical axis of the resonator, and the electron beam propagation axis must all be aligned with high precision for achieving saturated lasing. This paper introduces a high-precision, multi-degree-of-freedom controlled optical alignment system, which has the ability to align in the transverse and longitudinal directions. The alignment tolerances are given by theoretical analysis and numerical simulations with three-dimensional FEL code GENESIS and optical propagation code (OPC). To accomplish optical alignment, two auxiliary HeNe laser systems were introduced. By adjusting the HeNe laser beam spot on the wedge, the optical axis can be aligned to the magnetic axis, and the estimated errors meet the tolerances. Finally, the electron beam will be guided through the hole in the central wedge to complete the transverse alignment. The longitudinal alignment and tuning methods are also described.

  8. Alignment of a three-mirror anastigmatic telescope using nodal aberration theory.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhiyuan; Yan, Changxiang; Wang, Yang

    2015-09-21

    Most computer-aided alignment methods for optical systems are based on numerical algorithms at present, which omit aberration theory. This paper presents a novel alignment algorithm for three-mirror anastigmatic (TMA) telescopes using Nodal Aberration Theory (NAT). The aberration field decenter vectors and boresight error of misaligned TMA telescopes are derived. Two alignment models based on 3rd and 5th order NAT are established successively and compared in the same alignment example. It is found that the average and the maximum RMS wavefront errors in the whole field of view of 0.3° × 0.15° are 0.063 λ (λ = 1 μm) and 0.068 λ respectively after the 4th alignment action with the 3rd order model, and 0.011 λ and 0.025 λ (nominal values) respectively after the 3rd alignment action with the 5th order model. Monte-Carlo alignment simulations are carried out with the 5th order model. It shows that the 5th order model still has good performance even when the misalignment variables are large (-1 mm≤linear misalignment≤1 mm, -0.1°≤angular misalignment≤0.1°), and multiple iterative alignments are needed when the misalignment variables increase.

  9. Note: high precision angle generator using multiple ultrasonic motors and a self-calibratable encoder.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Ahn; Kim, Jae Wan; Kang, Chu-Shik; Jin, Jonghan; Eom, Tae Bong

    2011-11-01

    We present an angle generator with high resolution and accuracy, which uses multiple ultrasonic motors and a self-calibratable encoder. A cylindrical air bearing guides a rotational motion, and the ultrasonic motors achieve high resolution over the full circle range with a simple configuration. The self-calibratable encoder can compensate the scale error of a divided circle (signal period: 20") effectively by applying the equal-division-averaged method. The angle generator configures a position feedback control loop using the readout of the encoder. By combining the ac and dc operation mode, the angle generator produced stepwise angular motion with 0.005" resolution. We also evaluated the performance of the angle generator using a precision angle encoder and an autocollimator. The expanded uncertainty (k = 2) in the angle generation was estimated less than 0.03", which included the calibrated scale error and the nonlinearity error.

  10. Ischemia detection from morphological QRS angle changes.

    PubMed

    Romero, Daniel; Martínez, Juan Pablo; Laguna, Pablo; Pueyo, Esther

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, an ischemia detector is presented based on the analysis of QRS-derived angles. The detector has been developed by modeling ischemic effects on the QRS angles as a gradual change with a certain transition time and assuming a Laplacian additive modeling error contaminating the angle series. Both standard and non-standard leads were used for analysis. Non-standard leads were obtained by applying the PCA technique over specific lead subsets to represent different potential locations of the ischemic zone. The performance of the proposed detector was tested over a population of 79 patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in one of the major coronary arteries (LAD (n  =  25), RCA (n  =  16) and LCX (n  =  38)). The best detection performance, obtained for standard ECG leads, was achieved in the LAD group with values of sensitivity and specificity of [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], followed by the RCA group with [Formula: see text], Sp  =  94.4 and the LCX group with [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], notably outperforming detection based on the ST series in all cases, with the same detector structure. The timing of the detected ischemic events ranged from 30 s up to 150 s (mean  =  66.8 s) following the start of occlusion. We conclude that changes in the QRS angles can be used to detect acute myocardial ischemia. PMID:27243441

  11. 25 Gbps silicon photonics multi-mode fiber link with highly alignment tolerant vertically illuminated germanium photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Tadashi; Wakayama, Yuki; Matsuoka, Yasunobu; Oda, Katsuya; Sagawa, Misuzu; Takemoto, Takashi; Nomoto, Etsuko; Arimoto, Hideo; Tanaka, Shigehisa

    2015-02-01

    For a multi mode fiber optical link, a high speed silicon photonics receiver based on a highly alignment tolerant vertically illuminated germanium photodiode was developed. The germanium photodiode has 20 GHz bandwidth and responsivity of 0.5 A/W with highly alignment tolerance for passive optical assembly. The receiver achieves 25 Gbps error free operation after 100 m multi mode fiber transmission.

  12. Slope Error Measurement Tool for Solar Parabolic Trough Collectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Stynes, J. K.; Ihas, B.

    2012-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed an optical measurement tool for parabolic solar collectors that measures the combined errors due to absorber misalignment and reflector slope error. The combined absorber alignment and reflector slope errors are measured using a digital camera to photograph the reflected image of the absorber in the collector. Previous work using the image of the reflection of the absorber finds the reflector slope errors from the reflection of the absorber and an independent measurement of the absorber location. The accuracy of the reflector slope error measurement is thus dependent on the accuracy of the absorber location measurement. By measuring the combined reflector-absorber errors, the uncertainty in the absorber location measurement is eliminated. The related performance merit, the intercept factor, depends on the combined effects of the absorber alignment and reflector slope errors. Measuring the combined effect provides a simpler measurement and a more accurate input to the intercept factor estimate. The minimal equipment and setup required for this measurement technique make it ideal for field measurements.

  13. Control of Angular Intervals for Angle-Multiplexed Holographic Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Nobuhiro; Muroi, Tetsuhiko; Ishii, Norihiko; Kamijo, Koji; Shimidzu, Naoki

    2009-03-01

    In angle-multiplexed holographic memory, the full width at half maximum of the Bragg selectivity curves is dependent on the angle formed between the medium and incident laser beams. This indicates the possibility of high density and high multiplexing number by varying the angular intervals between adjacent holograms. We propose an angular interval scheduling for closely stacking holograms into medium even when the angle range is limited. We obtained bit error rates of the order of 10-4 under the following conditions: medium thickness of 1 mm, laser beam wavelength of 532 nm, and angular multiplexing number of 300.

  14. Bounded-Angle Iterative Decoding of LDPC Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolinar, Samuel; Andrews, Kenneth; Pollara, Fabrizio; Divsalar, Dariush

    2009-01-01

    Bounded-angle iterative decoding is a modified version of conventional iterative decoding, conceived as a means of reducing undetected-error rates for short low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes. For a given code, bounded-angle iterative decoding can be implemented by means of a simple modification of the decoder algorithm, without redesigning the code. Bounded-angle iterative decoding is based on a representation of received words and code words as vectors in an n-dimensional Euclidean space (where n is an integer).

  15. Implications of the small aspect angles of equatorial spread F

    SciTech Connect

    Hysell, D.L.; Farley, D.T.

    1996-03-01

    Small-scale equatorial spread F irregularities are almost perfectly aligned with the geomagnetic field. The authors develop here an analytic plasma kinetic theory of small-scale, quasi-field-aligned irregularities that include ion viscosity and finite Larmor radius effects. They conclude, for one thing, that the measured aspect angles are too small to be consistent with a dissipative drift wave source of 3-m irregularities. Nonlinearly driven flute modes appear to be the only available mechanism. The authors compare the relative influence of parallel and perpendicular dissipation and conclude that the aspect width depends only weakly on any single geophysical parameters, such as collision frequency, gradient length, temperature, etc. This finding is consistent with their observation that the measured aspect angles vary little with altitude and only weakly with instability level. 29 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Aberration and boresight error correction for conformal aircraft windows using the inner window surface and tilted fixed correctors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunzhu; Cui, Qingfeng; Mao, Shan

    2016-04-01

    A static solution to aberrations and boresight error for tilted conformal aircraft windows at different look angles is reported. The solution uses the inner window surface to correct the window aberrations at a 0° look angle and uses fixed correctors behind the window to correct the residual window aberrations at other look angles. Then, the boresight error for the window at different look angles is corrected by tilting the fixed correctors. The principle of the solution is discussed, and a design example shows that the solution is effective in correcting the aberrations and boresight error for a tilted conformal aircraft window at different look angles.

  17. Polymer-Layer-Free Alignment for Fast Switching Nematic Liquid Crystals by Multifunctional Nanostructured Substrate.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woo-Bin; Jeong, Hyeon Su; Jeon, Hwan-Jin; Kim, Yun Ho; Hwang, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2015-11-01

    A novel polymer-layer-free system for liquid-crystal alignment is demonstrated by various shaped indium tin oxide (ITO) patterns. Liquid crystals are aligned along the ITO line pattern and secondary sputtering lithography can change the shape of the ITO line pattern. Different shapes can control the direction and size of the pretilt angle. This effect eliminates defects and reduces the response time.

  18. Effect of wall alignment in a very short rotating annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noui-Mehidi, Mohamed N.; Ohmura, Naoto; Nishiyama, Kazuki; Takigawa, Teiji

    2009-02-01

    This paper reports numerical results of the study of effects of cylinders wall alignment in a small aspect ratio Taylor-Couette system. The investigation concerns bifurcations of steady vortical structures when the cylindrical walls defining the gap are not perfectly parallel. The imperfection is introduced by opening the outer fixed cylinder with a certain angle with regard to the vertical to form a tapered very short liquid column and keeping the inner rotating cylinder wall vertical. The numerical results obtained for the velocity components have revealed that bifurcation from a particular mode to another one occurs at a range of specific values of the inclination angle of the outer cylinder. The band width of the angle at which bifurcation occurred depended on the Reynolds number Re and was found to become narrower as Re increased. It is shown that geometrically broken symmetry can yield flow symmetry for specific combinations of geometrical and dynamical parameters.

  19. Junctional angle of a bihanded helix.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Wolgemuth, Charles W; Huber, Greg

    2014-10-01

    Helical filaments having sections of reversed chirality are common phenomena in the biological realm. The apparent angle between the two sections of opposite handedness provides information about the geometry and elasticity of the junctional region. In this paper, the governing differential equations for the local helical axis are developed, and asymptotic solutions of the governing equations are solved by perturbation theory. The asymptotic solutions are compared with the corresponding numerical solutions, and the relative error at second order is found to be less than 1.5% over a range of biologically relevant curvature and torsion values from 0 to 1/2 in dimensionless units.

  20. Wide Angle Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief movie illustrates the passage of the Moon through the Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft's wide-angle camera field of view as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. From beginning to end of the sequence, 25 wide-angle images (with a spatial image scale of about 14 miles per pixel (about 23 kilometers)were taken over the course of 7 and 1/2 minutes through a series of narrow and broadband spectral filters and polarizers, ranging from the violet to the near-infrared regions of the spectrum, to calibrate the spectral response of the wide-angle camera. The exposure times range from 5 milliseconds to 1.5 seconds. Two of the exposures were smeared and have been discarded and replaced with nearby images to make a smooth movie sequence. All images were scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is approximately the same in every image. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS)at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  1. Estimating Bias Error Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tian-Shu; Finley, Tom D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper formulates the general methodology for estimating the bias error distribution of a device in a measuring domain from less accurate measurements when a minimal number of standard values (typically two values) are available. A new perspective is that the bias error distribution can be found as a solution of an intrinsic functional equation in a domain. Based on this theory, the scaling- and translation-based methods for determining the bias error distribution arc developed. These methods are virtually applicable to any device as long as the bias error distribution of the device can be sufficiently described by a power series (a polynomial) or a Fourier series in a domain. These methods have been validated through computational simulations and laboratory calibration experiments for a number of different devices.

  2. The surveillance error grid.

    PubMed

    Klonoff, David C; Lias, Courtney; Vigersky, Robert; Clarke, William; Parkes, Joan Lee; Sacks, David B; Kirkman, M Sue; Kovatchev, Boris

    2014-07-01

    Currently used error grids for assessing clinical accuracy of blood glucose monitors are based on out-of-date medical practices. Error grids have not been widely embraced by regulatory agencies for clearance of monitors, but this type of tool could be useful for surveillance of the performance of cleared products. Diabetes Technology Society together with representatives from the Food and Drug Administration, the American Diabetes Association, the Endocrine Society, and the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation, and representatives of academia, industry, and government, have developed a new error grid, called the surveillance error grid (SEG) as a tool to assess the degree of clinical risk from inaccurate blood glucose (BG) monitors. A total of 206 diabetes clinicians were surveyed about the clinical risk of errors of measured BG levels by a monitor. The impact of such errors on 4 patient scenarios was surveyed. Each monitor/reference data pair was scored and color-coded on a graph per its average risk rating. Using modeled data representative of the accuracy of contemporary meters, the relationships between clinical risk and monitor error were calculated for the Clarke error grid (CEG), Parkes error grid (PEG), and SEG. SEG action boundaries were consistent across scenarios, regardless of whether the patient was type 1 or type 2 or using insulin or not. No significant differences were noted between responses of adult/pediatric or 4 types of clinicians. Although small specific differences in risk boundaries between US and non-US clinicians were noted, the panel felt they did not justify separate grids for these 2 types of clinicians. The data points of the SEG were classified in 15 zones according to their assigned level of risk, which allowed for comparisons with the classic CEG and PEG. Modeled glucose monitor data with realistic self-monitoring of blood glucose errors derived from meter testing experiments plotted on the SEG when compared to

  3. Alcohol and error processing.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, Clay B; Yeung, Nick

    2003-08-01

    A recent study indicates that alcohol consumption reduces the amplitude of the error-related negativity (ERN), a negative deflection in the electroencephalogram associated with error commission. Here, we explore possible mechanisms underlying this result in the context of two recent theories about the neural system that produces the ERN - one based on principles of reinforcement learning and the other based on response conflict monitoring.

  4. Quantum Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidar, Daniel A.; Brun, Todd A.

    2013-09-01

    Prologue; Preface; Part I. Background: 1. Introduction to decoherence and noise in open quantum systems Daniel Lidar and Todd Brun; 2. Introduction to quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 3. Introduction to decoherence-free subspaces and noiseless subsystems Daniel Lidar; 4. Introduction to quantum dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 5. Introduction to quantum fault tolerance Panos Aliferis; Part II. Generalized Approaches to Quantum Error Correction: 6. Operator quantum error correction David Kribs and David Poulin; 7. Entanglement-assisted quantum error-correcting codes Todd Brun and Min-Hsiu Hsieh; 8. Continuous-time quantum error correction Ognyan Oreshkov; Part III. Advanced Quantum Codes: 9. Quantum convolutional codes Mark Wilde; 10. Non-additive quantum codes Markus Grassl and Martin Rötteler; 11. Iterative quantum coding systems David Poulin; 12. Algebraic quantum coding theory Andreas Klappenecker; 13. Optimization-based quantum error correction Andrew Fletcher; Part IV. Advanced Dynamical Decoupling: 14. High order dynamical decoupling Zhen-Yu Wang and Ren-Bao Liu; 15. Combinatorial approaches to dynamical decoupling Martin Rötteler and Pawel Wocjan; Part V. Alternative Quantum Computation Approaches: 16. Holonomic quantum computation Paolo Zanardi; 17. Fault tolerance for holonomic quantum computation Ognyan Oreshkov, Todd Brun and Daniel Lidar; 18. Fault tolerant measurement-based quantum computing Debbie Leung; Part VI. Topological Methods: 19. Topological codes Héctor Bombín; 20. Fault tolerant topological cluster state quantum computing Austin Fowler and Kovid Goyal; Part VII. Applications and Implementations: 21. Experimental quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 22. Experimental dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 23. Architectures Jacob Taylor; 24. Error correction in quantum communication Mark Wilde; Part VIII. Critical Evaluation of Fault Tolerance: 25. Hamiltonian methods in QEC and fault tolerance Eduardo Novais, Eduardo Mucciolo and

  5. Thermodynamics of Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Pablo; Pigolotti, Simone

    2015-10-01

    Information processing at the molecular scale is limited by thermal fluctuations. This can cause undesired consequences in copying information since thermal noise can lead to errors that can compromise the functionality of the copy. For example, a high error rate during DNA duplication can lead to cell death. Given the importance of accurate copying at the molecular scale, it is fundamental to understand its thermodynamic features. In this paper, we derive a universal expression for the copy error as a function of entropy production and work dissipated by the system during wrong incorporations. Its derivation is based on the second law of thermodynamics; hence, its validity is independent of the details of the molecular machinery, be it any polymerase or artificial copying device. Using this expression, we find that information can be copied in three different regimes. In two of them, work is dissipated to either increase or decrease the error. In the third regime, the protocol extracts work while correcting errors, reminiscent of a Maxwell demon. As a case study, we apply our framework to study a copy protocol assisted by kinetic proofreading, and show that it can operate in any of these three regimes. We finally show that, for any effective proofreading scheme, error reduction is limited by the chemical driving of the proofreading reaction.

  6. Determining the rotational alignment of the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty using the epicondylar axis.

    PubMed

    Berger, R A; Rubash, H E; Seel, M J; Thompson, W H; Crossett, L S

    1993-01-01

    The posterior condylar surfaces of the femur are routinely used as the reference for the rotational orientation of the femoral component during most primary total knee arthroplasties. The purpose of this investigation was to identify a clearly discernible, reproducible secondary anatomic axis useful for determining the rotational orientation of the femoral component when the posterior condylar surfaces cannot be used. Seventy-five embalmed anatomic specimen femurs were studied. A surgical epicondylar axis was defined as the line connecting the lateral epicondylar prominence and the medial sulcus of the medial epicondyle. The posterior condylar angle was measured as the angle between the posterior condylar surfaces and the surgical epicondylar axis. Measurement of the posterior condylar angle referenced from the surgical epicondylar axis yielded a mean posterior condylar angle of 3.5 degrees (+/- 1.2 degrees) of internal rotation for males and a mean posterior condylar angle of 0.3 degree (+/- 1.2 degrees) of internal rotation for females. Thus, rotational alignment of the femoral component can be accurately estimated using the posterior condylar angle. The posterior condylar angle, referenced from the surgical epicondylar axis, provides a visual rotational alignment check during primary arthroplasty and may improve alignment of the femoral component at revision.

  7. Direct inelastic scattering of N/sub 2/ from Ag(111). I. Rotational populations and alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Sitz, G.O.; Kummel, A.C.; Zare, R.N.

    1988-08-15

    The rotational state populations and the quadrupole and hexadecapole alignment moments of N/sub 2/ scattered off clean Ag(111) are determined by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). The scattered N/sub 2/ is found to be highly aligned with its rotational angular momentum vector J parallel to the surface. The degree of alignment is found to increase with increasing rotational excitation. We see less than perfect alignment at intermediate J values indicating that the surface is not completely flat. The alignment is relatively insensitive to incident energy, incident angle, or surface temperature T/sub s/. However, the rotational state population distributions show pronounced rainbows for higher incident energy and/or more grazing exit angle. The rotational state distributions are found to depend strongly on the final scattering angle at low T/sub s/; this effect is markedly reduced at higher T/sub s/. Time-of-flight measurements are used to determine the average velocity of the scattered N/sub 2/ as a function of rotational level. It is found that higher rotational excitation correlates with lower average velocity and that the incident molecules lose 20%--30% of their translational energy to the solid. No correlation is found between velocity and alignment. A comparison is made with published results for the NO/Ag(111) system and a variety of theoretical models found in the literature.

  8. Program for PET image alignment: Effects on calculated differences in cerebral metabolic rates for glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.L.; London, E.D.; Links, J.M.; Cascella, N.G. )

    1990-12-01

    A program was developed to align positron emission tomography images from multiple studies on the same subject. The program allowed alignment of two images with a fineness of one-tenth the width of a pixel. The indications and effects of misalignment were assessed in eight subjects from a placebo-controlled double-blind crossover study on the effects of cocaine on regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose. Visual examination of a difference image provided a sensitive and accurate tool for assessing image alignment. Image alignment within 2.8 mm was essential to reduce variability of measured cerebral metabolic rates for glucose. Misalignment by this amount introduced errors on the order of 20% in the computed metabolic rate for glucose. These errors propagate to the difference between metabolic rates for a subject measured in basal versus perturbed states.

  9. A vision-aided alignment datum system for coordinate measuring machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Lin, G. C. I.

    1997-07-01

    This paper presents the development of a CAD-based and vision-aided precision measurement system. A new coordinate system alignment technique for coordinate measuring machines (CMMs) is described. This alignment technique involves a machine vision system with CAD-based planning and execution of inspection. The determination method for measuring datums for the coordinate measuring technique, using the AutoCAD development system, is described in more detail. To improve image quality in the machine vision system, a contrast enhancement technique is used on the image background to reduce image noise, and an on-line calibration technique is applied. Some systematic errors may be caused by imperfect geometric features in components during coordinate system alignment. This measurement system approach, with its new measuring coordinate alignment method, can be used for high-precision measurement to overcome such errors.

  10. Glancing angle RF sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    RF sheaths occur in tokamaks when ICRF waves encounter conducting boundaries. The sheath plays an important role in determining the efficiency of ICRF heating, the impurity influxes from the edge plasma, and the plasma-facing component damage. An important parameter in sheath theory is the angle θ between the equilibrium B field and the wall. Recent work with 1D and 2D sheath models has shown that the rapid variation of θ around a typical limiter can lead to enhanced sheath potentials and localized power deposition (hot spots) when the B field is near glancing incidence. The physics model used to obtain these results does not include some glancing-angle effects, e.g. possible modification of the angular dependence of the Child-Langmuir law and the role of the magnetic pre-sheath. Here, we report on calculations which explore these effects, with the goal of improving the fidelity of the rf sheath BC used in analytical and numerical calculations. Work supported by US DOE grants DE-FC02-05ER54823 and DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  11. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y K

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with {sup 13}C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system.

  12. Refractive Error and Visual Functions in Children with Special Needs Compared with the First Grade School Students in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Urmi; Khandekar, Rajiv; Natrajan, Sarvanan; Al-Hadrami, Khalfan

    2010-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the refractive status and visual function of children with special needs (other handicap) in 2010 and compared them with healthy 1st grade school students in Oman. Materials and Methods: This was a cohort study. Optometrists recorded vision using a logarithm of minimum angle of resolution (LogMAR) chart. Preferential looking method was used for testing 31 children. Cycloplegic refraction was performed on all children. Contrast sensitivity was tested using 2.5%, 10%, and 100% contrast charts. Ocular movement, alignment, and anterior segment were also assessed. A pediatrician reviewed the health records of all the children at the time of their enrollment in this study to determine if the child had been diagnosed with a systemic condition or syndromes. The visual functions were assessed by study investigators. We estimated the rates and the risk of different visual function defects in children with special needs. Result: The prevalence of refractive error in 70 children (4.7 ± 0.8 years) with special needs (group 1) and 175 normal healthy first grade students (group 2) were 58.5% and 2.9%, respectively. The risk of refractive error was significantly higher in children with special needs [relative risk, 48.1 (95% confidence interval, 17.54–131.8)]. Hyperopia (>1.00 D), myopia (≥ 1.00D) and astigmatism (≥ ±1.00 D) were found in 18.6%, 24.3%, and 27.1%, respectively, in group 1. Six children in this group had defective near vision. Sixteen (80%) children with Down syndrome had refractive error. Seven (50%) children with developmental disorder showed decreased contrast sensitivity. Conclusion: Prevalence of uncorrected refractive error was much higher in children with special needs. Prevalence of strabismus, nystagmus, and reduced contrast sensitivity was also higher in children with special needs. Early vision screening, visual function assessment, correction of refractive error, and frequent follow-up are recommended. PMID:21180428

  13. Aligned Nanofibers for Regenerating Arteries, Nerves, and Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClendon, Mark Trosper

    Cells are the fundamental unit of the human body, and therefore the ability to control cell behavior is the most important challenge in regenerative medicine. Peptides are the language of biology which is why synthetic peptide amphiphile (PA) molecules hold great potential as a biomaterial. The work presented in this dissertation explores a variety of liquid crystalline PA nanofibers as a means for directing cell growth. Shaping the alignment of these nanofiber networks requires a deep understanding of their rheological properties which presents a difficult challenge as they exist in complex solid and liquid environments. Using PA molecules that self-assemble into high aspect ratio nanofibers and liquid crystalline solutions, this work investigates the influence of shear flow on macroscopic and microscopic nanofiber alignment. To this end, a shear force applied to PA solutions was systematically varied while the alignment was probed using small angle x-ray scattering. Nanofibers were found to respond to shear flow by aligning parallel to the flow direction. By changing pH and PA chemical sequence it was observed that increasing the interfiber electrostatic repulsive interactions resulted in a greater dependence on shear rate. Nanofiber solutions having greater repulsion did not drastically increase in alignment when the applied strain was increased by two orders of magnitude (1 s -1 to 100 s-1), while solutions with nanofibers having less repulsion increased there alignment four fold with the same strain increase. say exactly what you mean by resulted in greater dependence: did it result in fibers aligning under lower shear rates or higher rates--give the results Anionic PA solutions typically used to encapsulate living cells at neutral pH were found to require minimal shear rates, <1s-1, to achieve significant nanofiber alignment. In an effort to produce tubular hydrogels composed of circumferentially aligned nanofibers, a procedure was designed that used an

  14. Automatic alignment of standard views in 3D echocardiograms using real-time tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orderud, Fredrik; Torp, Hans; Rabben, Stein Inge

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic approach for alignment of standard apical and short-axis slices, and correcting them for out-of-plane motion in 3D echocardiography. This is enabled by using real-time Kalman tracking to perform automatic left ventricle segmentation using a coupled deformable model, consisting of a left ventricle model, as well as structures for the right ventricle and left ventricle outflow tract. Landmark points from the segmented model are then used to generate standard apical and short-axis slices. The slices are automatically updated after tracking in each frame to correct for out-of-plane motion caused by longitudinal shortening of the left ventricle. Results from a dataset of 35 recordings demonstrate the potential for automating apical slice initialization and dynamic short-axis slices. Apical 4-chamber, 2-chamber and long-axis slices are generated based on an assumption of fixed angle between the slices, and short-axis slices are generated so that they follow the same myocardial tissue over the entire cardiac cycle. The error compared to manual annotation was 8.4 +/- 3.5 mm for apex, 3.6 +/- 1.8 mm for mitral valve and 8.4 +/- 7.4 for apical 4-chamber view. The high computational efficiency and automatic behavior of the method enables it to operate in real-time, potentially during image acquisition.

  15. DIDA: Distributed Indexing Dispatched Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Mohamadi, Hamid; Vandervalk, Benjamin P; Raymond, Anthony; Jackman, Shaun D; Chu, Justin; Breshears, Clay P; Birol, Inanc

    2015-01-01

    One essential application in bioinformatics that is affected by the high-throughput sequencing data deluge is the sequence alignment problem, where nucleotide or amino acid sequences are queried against targets to find regions of close similarity. When queries are too many and/or targets are too large, the alignment process becomes computationally challenging. This is usually addressed by preprocessing techniques, where the queries and/or targets are indexed for easy access while searching for matches. When the target is static, such as in an established reference genome, the cost of indexing is amortized by reusing the generated index. However, when the targets are non-static, such as contigs in the intermediate steps of a de novo assembly process, a new index must be computed for each run. To address such scalability problems, we present DIDA, a novel framework that distributes the indexing and alignment tasks into smaller subtasks over a cluster of compute nodes. It provides a workflow beyond the common practice of embarrassingly parallel implementations. DIDA is a cost-effective, scalable and modular framework for the sequence alignment problem in terms of memory usage and runtime. It can be employed in large-scale alignments to draft genomes and intermediate stages of de novo assembly runs. The DIDA source code, sample files and user manual are available through http://www.bcgsc.ca/platform/bioinfo/software/dida. The software is released under the British Columbia Cancer Agency License (BCCA), and is free for academic use. PMID:25923767

  16. Computational studies of the x-ray scattering properties of laser aligned stilbene

    SciTech Connect

    Debnarova, Andrea; Techert, Simone; Schmatz, Stefan

    2011-02-07

    The enhancement of the x-ray scattering signal from partially aligned molecular samples is investigated. The alignment properties of the studied molecular system are modeled based on the method of laser alignment. With the advances in the area of laser alignment of molecules, the application of this sample manipulation technique promises a great potential for x-ray scattering measurements. Preferential alignment of molecules in an otherwise amorphous sample leads to constructive interference and thus increases the scattering intensity. This enhances the structural information encoded in the scattering images and enables improved resolution in studies of reaction dynamics, as in this work is shown for the example of the photo-isomerization of stilbene. We demonstrate that the scattering signal is strongly influenced by the alignment axis. Even the most basic one-dimensional alignment offers significant improvement compared to the structural information provided by a randomly oriented sample. Although the signal is sensitive to the uncertainty in the alignment angle, it offers encouraging results even at realistic alignment uncertainties.

  17. Wide Angle View of Arsia Mons Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Arsia Mons (above) is one of the largest volcanoes known. This shield volcano is part of an aligned trio known as the Tharsis Montes--the others are Pavonis Mons and Ascraeus Mons. Arsia Mons is rivaled only by Olympus Mons in terms of its volume. The summit of Arsia Mons is more than 9 kilometers (5.6 miles) higher than the surrounding plains. The crater--or caldera--at the volcano summit is approximately 110 km (68 mi) across. This view of Arsia Mons was taken by the red and blue wide angle cameras of the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) system. Bright water ice clouds (the whitish/bluish wisps) hang above the volcano--a common sight every martian afternoon in this region. Arsia Mons is located at 120o west longitude and 9o south latitude. Illumination is from the left.

  18. Human error in aviation operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagel, David C.

    1988-01-01

    The role of human error in commercial and general aviation accidents and the techniques used to evaluate it are reviewed from a human-factors perspective. Topics addressed include the general decline in accidents per million departures since the 1960s, the increase in the proportion of accidents due to human error, methods for studying error, theoretical error models, and the design of error-resistant systems. Consideration is given to information acquisition and processing errors, visually guided flight, disorientation, instrument-assisted guidance, communication errors, decision errors, debiasing, and action errors.

  19. Electrically switchable liquid crystal Fresnel lens using UV-modified alignment film.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Shie-Chang; Hwang, Shug-June; Horng, Jing-Shyang; Lin, Kuo-Ren

    2010-12-01

    A simple method to make a switchable liquid crystal (LC) Fresnel lens with high diffraction efficiency and a low driving voltage was proposed based on the photo-induced surface modification of the vertical alignment layer. UV illumination alters the pretilt angle of alignment layers, a Fresnel zone-distribution hybrid alignment in the homeotropic LC cell can be straightforwardly achieved through UV exposure, yielding a concentric structure of the Fresnel phase LC lens. A remarkable diffraction efficiency of ~31.4%, close to the measured diffraction efficiency of the used Fresnel-zone-plate mask of 32%, was detected using a linearly polarized incident beam. PMID:21164982

  20. Global Alignment System for Large Genomic Sequencing

    2002-03-01

    AVID is a global alignment system tailored for the alignment of large genomic sequences up to megabases in length. Features include the possibility of one sequence being in draft form, fast alignment, robustness and accuracy. The method is an anchor based alignment using maximal matches derived from suffix trees.

  1. Photosensitive Polymers for Liquid Crystal Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahilny, U. V.; Stankevich, A. I.; Trofimova, A. V.; Muravsky, A. A.; Murauski, A. A.

    The peculiarities of alignment of liquid crystal (LC) materials by the layers of photocrosslinkable polymers with side benzaldehyde groups are considered. The investigation of mechanism of photostimulated alignment by rubbed benzaldehyde layer is performed. The methods of creation of multidomain aligning layers on the basis of photostimulated rubbing alignment are described.

  2. Ultraviolet-light-treated polyimide alignment layers for polarization-independent liquid crystal Fresnel lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, S.-J.; Chen, T.-A.; Lin, K.-R.; Jeng, S.-C.

    2012-04-01

    The surface energy of a conventional homeotropic polyimide (PI) alignment layer was altered via ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation, and the pretilt angle of the PI was changed along with the surface energy. The surface energy can be controlled by either UV exposure time or irradiation intensity. A switchable liquid crystal Fresnel lens (LCFL) was created by the UV-treated alignment layers to form a Fresnel zone-distribution hybrid alignment, vertically aligned and hybrid aligned LC in the odd and even zones, respectively. The LCFL was made polarization-independent by circular buffing, and it had a diffraction efficiency of ˜22% at a low driving voltage of ˜1.2 V.

  3. Error monitoring in musicians.

    PubMed

    Maidhof, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    To err is human, and hence even professional musicians make errors occasionally during their performances. This paper summarizes recent work investigating error monitoring in musicians, i.e., the processes and their neural correlates associated with the monitoring of ongoing actions and the detection of deviations from intended sounds. Electroencephalography (EEG) studies reported an early component of the event-related potential (ERP) occurring before the onsets of pitch errors. This component, which can be altered in musicians with focal dystonia, likely reflects processes of error detection and/or error compensation, i.e., attempts to cancel the undesired sensory consequence (a wrong tone) a musician is about to perceive. Thus, auditory feedback seems not to be a prerequisite for error detection, consistent with previous behavioral results. In contrast, when auditory feedback is externally manipulated and thus unexpected, motor performance can be severely distorted, although not all feedback alterations result in performance impairments. Recent studies investigating the neural correlates of feedback processing showed that unexpected feedback elicits an ERP component after note onsets, which shows larger amplitudes during music performance than during mere perception of the same musical sequences. Hence, these results stress the role of motor actions for the processing of auditory information. Furthermore, recent methodological advances like the combination of 3D motion capture techniques with EEG will be discussed. Such combinations of different measures can potentially help to disentangle the roles of different feedback types such as proprioceptive and auditory feedback, and in general to derive at a better understanding of the complex interactions between the motor and auditory domain during error monitoring. Finally, outstanding questions and future directions in this context will be discussed. PMID:23898255

  4. Measuring Parameters of Massive Black Hole Binaries with Partially-Aligned Spins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Ryan N.; Hughes, Scott A.; Cornish, Neil J.

    2010-01-01

    It is important to understand how well the gravitational-wave observatory LISA can measure parameters of massive black hole binaries. It has been shown that including spin precession in the waveform breaks degeneracies and produces smaller expected parameter errors than a simpler, precession-free analysis. However, recent work has shown that gas in binaries can partially align the spins with the orbital angular momentum, thus reducing the precession effect. We show how this degrades the earlier results, producing more pessimistic errors in gaseous mergers. However, we then add higher harmonics to the signal model; these also break degeneracies, but they are not affected by the presence of gas. The harmonics often restore the errors in partially-aligned binaries to the same as, or better than/ those that are obtained for fully precessing binaries with no harmonics. Finally, we investigate what LISA measurements of spin alignment can tell us about the nature of gas around a binary,

  5. Errata: Papers in Error Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svartvik, Jan, Ed.

    Papers presented at the symposium of error analysis in Lund, Sweden, in September 1972, approach error analysis specifically in its relation to foreign language teaching and second language learning. Error analysis is defined as having three major aspects: (1) the description of the errors, (2) the explanation of errors by means of contrastive…

  6. Anatomic Versus Mechanically Aligned Total Knee Arthroplasty for Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Toliopoulos, Panagiota; LeBlanc, Marc-Andre; Hutt, Jonathan; Lavigne, Martin; Desmeules, Francois; Vendittoli, Pascal-Andre

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the intra-operative benefits and the clinical outcomes from kinematic or mechanical alignment for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients undergoing revision of failed unicompartmental kneel arthroplasty (UKA) to TKA. Methods: Ten revisions were performed with a kinematic alignment technique and 11 with a mechanical alignment. Measurements of the hip-knee-ankle angle (HKA), the lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA), and the medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) were performed using long-leg radiographs. The need for augments, stems, and constrained inserts was compared between groups. Clinical outcomes were compared using the WOMAC score along with maximum distance walked as well as knee range of motion obtained prior to discharge. All data was obtained by a retrospective review of patient files. Results: The kinematic group required less augments, stems, and constrained inserts than the mechanical group and thinner polyethylene bearings. There were significant differences in the lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA) and the medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) between the two groups (p<0.05). The mean WOMAC score obtained at discharge was better in the kinematic group as was mean knee flexion. At last follow up of 34 months for the kinematic group and 58 months for the mechanical group, no orthopedic complications or reoperations were recorded. Conclusion: Although this study has a small patient cohort, our results suggest that kinematic alignment for TKA after UKA revision is an attractive method. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27563365

  7. Alignment method for parabolic trough solar concentrators

    DOEpatents

    Diver, Richard B.

    2010-02-23

    A Theoretical Overlay Photographic (TOP) alignment method uses the overlay of a theoretical projected image of a perfectly aligned concentrator on a photographic image of the concentrator to align the mirror facets of a parabolic trough solar concentrator. The alignment method is practical and straightforward, and inherently aligns the mirror facets to the receiver. When integrated with clinometer measurements for which gravity and mechanical drag effects have been accounted for and which are made in a manner and location consistent with the alignment method, all of the mirrors on a common drive can be aligned and optimized for any concentrator orientation.

  8. Combining Multiple Pairwise Structure-based Alignments

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-12

    CombAlign is a new Python code that generates a gapped, one-to-many, multiple structure-based sequence alignment(MSSA) given a set of pairwise structure-based alignments. In order to better define regions of similarity among related protein structures, it is useful to detect the residue-residue correspondences among a set of pairwise structure alignments. Few codes exist for constructing a one-to-many, multiple sequence alignment derived from a set of structure alignments, and we perceived a need for creating a new tool for combing pairwise structure alignments that would allow for insertion of gaps in the reference structure.

  9. Grain Alignment in Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. J.; Bagley, M.; Krejny, M.; Andersson, B.-G.; Bastien, P.

    2015-01-01

    We present near-IR polarimetry data of background stars shining through a selection of starless cores taken in the K band, probing visual extinctions up to {{A}V}˜ 48. We find that {{P}K}/{{τ }K} continues to decline with increasing AV with a power law slope of roughly -0.5. Examination of published submillimeter (submm) polarimetry of starless cores suggests that by {{A}V}≳ 20 the slope for P versus τ becomes ˜-1, indicating no grain alignment at greater optical depths. Combining these two data sets, we find good evidence that, in the absence of a central illuminating source, the dust grains in dense molecular cloud cores with no internal radiation source cease to become aligned with the local magnetic field at optical depths greater than {{A}V}˜ 20. A simple model relating the alignment efficiency to the optical depth into the cloud reproduces the observations well.

  10. Transformation and alignment in similarity.

    PubMed

    Hodgetts, Carl J; Hahn, Ulrike; Chater, Nick

    2009-10-01

    This paper contrasts two structural accounts of psychological similarity: structural alignment (SA) and Representational Distortion (RD). SA proposes that similarity is determined by how readily the structures of two objects can be brought into alignment; RD measures similarity by the complexity of the transformation that "distorts" one representation into the other. We assess RD by defining a simple coding scheme of psychological transformations for the experimental materials. In two experiments, this "concrete" version of RD provides compelling fits of the data and compares favourably with SA. Finally, stepping back from particular models, we argue that perceptual theory suggests that transformations and alignment processes should generally be viewed as complementary, in contrast to the current distinction in the literature. PMID:19720370

  11. Attitude control with realization of linear error dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paielli, Russell A.; Bach, Ralph E.

    1993-01-01

    An attitude control law is derived to realize linear unforced error dynamics with the attitude error defined in terms of rotation group algebra (rather than vector algebra). Euler parameters are used in the rotational dynamics model because they are globally nonsingular, but only the minimal three Euler parameters are used in the error dynamics model because they have no nonlinear mathematical constraints to prevent the realization of linear error dynamics. The control law is singular only when the attitude error angle is exactly pi rad about any eigenaxis, and a simple intuitive modification at the singularity allows the control law to be used globally. The forced error dynamics are nonlinear but stable. Numerical simulation tests show that the control law performs robustly for both initial attitude acquisition and attitude control.

  12. Computation of Standard Errors

    PubMed Central

    Dowd, Bryan E; Greene, William H; Norton, Edward C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We discuss the problem of computing the standard errors of functions involving estimated parameters and provide the relevant computer code for three different computational approaches using two popular computer packages. Study Design We show how to compute the standard errors of several functions of interest: the predicted value of the dependent variable for a particular subject, and the effect of a change in an explanatory variable on the predicted value of the dependent variable for an individual subject and average effect for a sample of subjects. Empirical Application Using a publicly available dataset, we explain three different methods of computing standard errors: the delta method, Krinsky–Robb, and bootstrapping. We provide computer code for Stata 12 and LIMDEP 10/NLOGIT 5. Conclusions In most applications, choice of the computational method for standard errors of functions of estimated parameters is a matter of convenience. However, when computing standard errors of the sample average of functions that involve both estimated parameters and nonstochastic explanatory variables, it is important to consider the sources of variation in the function's values. PMID:24800304

  13. Compact disk error measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, D.; Harriman, K.; Tehranchi, B.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this project are as follows: provide hardware and software that will perform simple, real-time, high resolution (single-byte) measurement of the error burst and good data gap statistics seen by a photoCD player read channel when recorded CD write-once discs of variable quality (i.e., condition) are being read; extend the above system to enable measurement of the hard decision (i.e., 1-bit error flags) and soft decision (i.e., 2-bit error flags) decoding information that is produced/used by the Cross Interleaved - Reed - Solomon - Code (CIRC) block decoder employed in the photoCD player read channel; construct a model that uses data obtained via the systems described above to produce meaningful estimates of output error rates (due to both uncorrected ECC words and misdecoded ECC words) when a CD disc having specific (measured) error statistics is read (completion date to be determined); and check the hypothesis that current adaptive CIRC block decoders are optimized for pressed (DAD/ROM) CD discs. If warranted, do a conceptual design of an adaptive CIRC decoder that is optimized for write-once CD discs.

  14. Dynamic finite element analysis of the crack-inclusion interaction in aligned CNF composites under impact loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Huat Tung

    The interaction between a crack and an inclusion of microfiber in an aligned carbon nanofiber (CNF) toughened composite under impact loading conditions was studied by using dynamic finite element analysis (FEA). The nanocomposite material used in this study was T300/Epon 862 enhanced with aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs). The dynamic stress intensity factors (DSIFs) were evaluated to describe the dynamic fracture behavior of the fracture model. In this study, a numerical homogenization model using FEA was first employed to determine the effective material properties of the equivalent matrix material of Epon 862 and aligned CNFs. The effects of T300 microfiber inclusion eccentricity and CNF alignment angle on the DSIFs were examined in this study. The displacement extrapolation method for monoclinic materials was utilized to calculate the DSIFs. The numerical results demonstrated a mechanism known as "crack-tip shielding" and demonstrated that the CNF alignment angle has an impact on the DSIFs.

  15. Image-based quantification of fiber alignment within electrospun tissue engineering scaffolds is related to mechanical anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Fee, Timothy; Downs, Crawford; Eberhardt, Alan; Zhou, Yong; Berry, Joel

    2016-07-01

    It is well documented that electrospun tissue engineering scaffolds can be fabricated with variable degrees of fiber alignment to produce scaffolds with anisotropic mechanical properties. Several attempts have been made to quantify the degree of fiber alignment within an electrospun scaffold using image-based methods. However, these methods are limited by the inability to produce a quantitative measure of alignment that can be used to make comparisons across publications. Therefore, we have developed a new approach to quantifying the alignment present within a scaffold from scanning electron microscopic (SEM) images. The alignment is determined by using the Sobel approximation of the image gradient to determine the distribution of gradient angles with an image. This data was fit to a Von Mises distribution to find the dispersion parameter κ, which was used as a quantitative measure of fiber alignment. We fabricated four groups of electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) + Gelatin scaffolds with alignments ranging from κ = 1.9 (aligned) to κ = 0.25 (random) and tested our alignment quantification method on these scaffolds. It was found that our alignment quantification method could distinguish between scaffolds of different alignments more accurately than two other published methods. Additionally, the alignment parameter κ was found to be a good predictor the mechanical anisotropy of our electrospun scaffolds. The ability to quantify fiber alignment within and make direct comparisons of scaffold fiber alignment across publications can reduce ambiguity between published results where cells are cultured on "highly aligned" fibrous scaffolds. This could have important implications for characterizing mechanics and cellular behavior on aligned tissue engineering scaffolds. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1680-1686, 2016.

  16. Cerebellopontine Angle Lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Schuhmann, Martin U.; Lüdemann, Wolf O.; Schreiber, Hartwig; Samii, Madjid

    1997-01-01

    Intracranial lipomas in an infratentorial and extra-axial location are extremely rare. The presented case of an extensive lipoma of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) represents 0.05% of all CPA tumors operated on in our department from 1978 to 1996. The lipoma constitutes an important differential diagnosis because the clinical management differs significantly from other CPA lesions. The clinical presentation and management of the presented case are analyzed in comparison to all previously described cases of CPA lipomas. The etiology and the radiological features of CPA lipomas are reviewed and discussed. CPA lipomas are maldevelopmental lesions that may cause slowly progressive symptoms. Neuroradiology enables a reliable preoperative diagnosis. Attempts of complete lipoma resection usually result in severe neurological deficits. Therefore, we recommend a conservative approach in managing these patients. Limited surgery is indicated if the patient has an associated vascular compression syndrome or suffers from disabling vertigo. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171031

  17. Heterodyne Interferometer Angle Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Weilert, Mark A.; Wang, Xu; Goullioud, Renaud

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution angle measurement instrument has been developed that is based on a heterodyne interferometer. The common-path heterodyne interferometer metrology is used to measure displacements of a reflective target surface. In the interferometer setup, an optical mask is used to sample the measurement laser beam reflecting back from a target surface. Angular rotations, around two orthogonal axes in a plane perpendicular to the measurement- beam propagation direction, are determined simultaneously from the relative displacement measurement of the target surface. The device is used in a tracking telescope system where pitch and yaw measurements of a flat mirror were simultaneously performed with a sensitivity of 0.1 nrad, per second, and a measuring range of 0.15 mrad at a working distance of an order of a meter. The nonlinearity of the device is also measured less than one percent over the measurement range.

  18. Alignment test results of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope mirrors in the cryogenic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, Tony L.; Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James B.; Knight, J. Scott; Lunt, Sharon

    2016-07-01

    After integration of the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) to become the OTIS, the James Webb Space Telescope OTIS is tested at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) in the cryogenic vacuum Chamber A for alignment and optical performance. The alignment of the mirrors comprises a sequence of steps as follows: The mirrors are coarsely aligned using photogrammetry cameras with reflective targets attached to the sides of the mirrors. Then a multi-wavelength interferometer is aligned to the 18-segment primary mirror using cameras at the center of curvature to align reflected light from the segments and using fiducials at the edge of the primary mirror. Once the interferometer is aligned, the 18 primary mirror segments are then adjusted to optimize wavefront error of the aggregate mirror. This process phases the piston and tilt positions of all the mirror segments. An optical fiber placed at the Cassegrain focus of the telescope then emits light towards the secondary mirror to create a collimated beam emitting from the primary mirror. Portions of the collimated beam are retro-reflected from flat mirrors at the top of the chamber to pass through the telescope to the Science Instrument (SI) detector. The image on the detector is used for fine alignment of the secondary mirror and a check of the primary mirror alignment using many of the same analysis techniques used in the on-orbit alignment. The entire process was practiced and evaluated in 2015 at cryogenic temperature with the Pathfinder telescope.

  19. Retention Time Alignment of LC/MS Data by a Divide-and-Conquer Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongqi

    2012-04-01

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) has become the method of choice for characterizing complex mixtures. These analyses often involve quantitative comparison of components in multiple samples. To achieve automated sample comparison, the components of interest must be detected and identified, and their retention times aligned and peak areas calculated. This article describes a simple pairwise iterative retention time alignment algorithm, based on the divide-and-conquer approach, for alignment of ion features detected in LC/MS experiments. In this iterative algorithm, ion features in the sample run are first aligned with features in the reference run by applying a single constant shift of retention time. The sample chromatogram is then divided into two shorter chromatograms, which are aligned to the reference chromatogram the same way. Each shorter chromatogram is further divided into even shorter chromatograms. This process continues until each chromatogram is sufficiently narrow so that ion features within it have a similar retention time shift. In six pairwise LC/MS alignment examples containing a total of 6507 confirmed true corresponding feature pairs with retention time shifts up to five peak widths, the algorithm successfully aligned these features with an error rate of 0.2%. The alignment algorithm is demonstrated to be fast, robust, fully automatic, and superior to other algorithms. After alignment and gap-filling of detected ion features, their abundances can be tabulated for direct comparison between samples.

  20. Alignment Test Results of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope Mirrors in the Cryogenic Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Tony L.; Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James; Knight, J. Scott; Lunt, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    After integration of the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) to become the OTIS, the James Webb Space Telescope OTIS is tested at NASAs Johnson Space Center (JSC) in the cryogenic vacuum Chamber A for alignment and optical performance. The alignment of the mirrors comprises a sequence of steps as follows: The mirrors are coarsely aligned using photogrammetry cameras with reflective targets attached to the sides of the mirrors. Then a multi-wavelength interferometer is aligned to the 18-segment primary mirror using cameras at the center of curvature to align reflected light from the segments and using fiducials at the edge of the primary mirror. Once the interferometer is aligned, the 18 primary mirror segments are then adjusted to optimize wavefront error of the aggregate mirror. This process phases the piston and tilt positions of all the mirror segments. An optical fiber placed at the Cassegrain focus of the telescope then emits light towards the secondary mirror to create a collimated beam emitting from the primary mirror. Portions of the collimated beam are retro-reflected from flat mirrors at the top of the chamber to pass through the telescope to the SI detector. The image on the detector is used for fine alignment of the secondary mirror and a check of the primary mirror alignment using many of the same analysis techniques used in the on-orbit alignment. The entire process was practiced and evaluated in 2015 at cryogenic temperature with the Pathfinder telescope.

  1. Estimation Filter for Alignment of the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David

    2007-01-01

    A document presents a summary of an onboard estimation algorithm now being used to calibrate the alignment of the Spitzer Space Telescope (formerly known as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility). The algorithm, denoted the S2P calibration filter, recursively generates estimates of the alignment angles between a telescope reference frame and a star-tracker reference frame. At several discrete times during the day, the filter accepts, as input, attitude estimates from the star tracker and observations taken by the Pointing Control Reference Sensor (a sensor in the field of view of the telescope). The output of the filter is a calibrated quaternion that represents the best current mean-square estimate of the alignment angles between the telescope and the star tracker. The S2P calibration filter incorporates a Kalman filter that tracks six states - two for each of three orthogonal coordinate axes. Although, in principle, one state per axis is sufficient, the use of two states per axis makes it possible to model both short- and long-term behaviors. Specifically, the filter properly models transient learning, characteristic times and bounds of thermomechanical drift, and long-term steady-state statistics, whether calibration measurements are taken frequently or infrequently. These properties ensure that the S2P filter performance is optimal over a broad range of flight conditions, and can be confidently run autonomously over several years of in-flight operation without human intervention.

  2. Narrow Angle movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief three-frame movie of the Moon was made from three Cassini narrow-angle images as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. The purpose of this particular set of images was to calibrate the spectral response of the narrow-angle camera and to test its 'on-chip summing mode' data compression technique in flight. From left to right, they show the Moon in the green, blue and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum in 40, 60 and 80 millisecond exposures, respectively. All three images have been scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is the same in each image. The spatial scale in the blue and ultraviolet images is 1.4 miles per pixel (2.3 kilometers). The original scale in the green image (which was captured in the usual manner and then reduced in size by 2x2 pixel summing within the camera system) was 2.8 miles per pixel (4.6 kilometers). It has been enlarged for display to the same scale as the other two. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS) at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  3. Ion beam fabrication of aluminum-doped zinc oxide layer for high-performance liquid crystals alignment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Lee, Ju Hwan; Seo, Dae-Shik

    2016-07-25

    In this paper, a 1.8 keV ion beam (IB) sputtered thin layer of aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) with columnar AZO bumps covering the surface working as an alignment layer for the homogeneous alignment of liquid crystals (LC) is investigated. Bumpy AZO alignment layers in twisted nematic (TN) cells generated larger LC pre-tilt angles and thus enabled accelerated switching of LC, and the highly conductive bumpy AZO thin layers allowed super-fast release of accumulated charges, and led to low residual DC performance. These results indicate the promising applications of AZO bumps layer as alignment layer in LC devices. PMID:27464189

  4. Alignment of sources and detectors on breast surface for noncontact diffuse correlation tomography of breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chong; Lin, Yu; He, Lian; Irwin, Daniel; Szabunio, Margaret M.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Noncontact diffuse correlation tomography (ncDCT) is an emerging technology for 3D imaging of deep tissue blood flow distribution without distorting hemodynamic properties. To adapt the ncDCT for imaging in vivo breast tumors, we designed a motorized ncDCT probe to scan over the breast surface. A computer-aided design (CAD)-based approach was proposed to create solid volume mesh from arbitrary breast surface obtained by a commercial 3D camera. The sources and detectors of ncDCT were aligned on the breast surface through ray tracing to mimic the ncDCT scanning with CAD software. The generated breast volume mesh along with the boundary data of ncDCT at the aligned source and detector pairs were used for finite-element-method-based flow image reconstruction. We evaluated the accuracy of source alignments on mannequin and human breasts; largest alignment errors were less than 10% in both tangential and radial directions of scanning. The impact of alignment errors (assigned 10%) on the tumor reconstruction was estimated using computer simulations. The deviations of simulated tumor location and blood flow contrast resulted from the alignment errors were 0.77 mm (less than the node distance of 1 mm) and 1%, respectively, which result in minor impact on flow image reconstruction. Finally, a case study on a human breast tumor was conducted and a tumor-to-normal flow contrast was reconstructed, demonstrating the feasibility of ncDCT in clinical application. PMID:26479823

  5. Alignment Tool For Inertia Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    Compact, easy-to-use tool aligns drive bar of inertia welder over hole in stub. Ensures drive bar concentric to hole within 0.002 in. (0.051 mm.). Holds two batteries and light bulb. Electrical circuit completed, providing current to bulb when pin in contact with post. When pin centered in post hole, it does not touch post, and lamp turns off. Built for use in making repair welds on liquid-oxygen-injector posts in Space Shuttle main engine. Version having suitably modified dimensions used to facilitate alignment in other forests of post.

  6. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelkensberg, F.; Rouzée, A.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G.; Johnsson, P.; Lucchini, M.; Lucchese, R. R.; Vrakking, M. J. J.

    2011-11-01

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO2 molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  7. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G.; Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Johnsson, P.; Lucchini, M.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2011-11-15

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO{sub 2} molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  8. The alignment-distribution graph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Schreiber, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Implementing a data-parallel language such as Fortran 90 on a distributed-memory parallel computer requires distributing aggregate data objects (such as arrays) among the memory modules attached to the processors. The mapping of objects to the machine determines the amount of residual communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. We present a program representation called the alignment-distribution graph that makes these communication requirements explicit. We describe the details of the representation, show how to model communication cost in this framework, and outline several algorithms for determining object mappings that approximately minimize residual communication.

  9. The alignment-distribution graph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Schreiber, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Implementing a data-parallel language such as Fortran 90 on a distributed-memory parallel computer requires distributing aggregate data objects (such as arrays) among the memory modules attached to the processors. The mapping of objects to the machine determines the amount of residual communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. We present a program representation called the alignment distribution graph that makes these communication requirements explicit. We describe the details of the representation, show how to model communication cost in this framework, and outline several algorithms for determining object mappings that approximately minimize residual communication.

  10. Nanofiber alignment of a small diameter elastic electrospun scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Jignesh

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in western countries with coronary heart disease making up 50% of these deaths. As a treatment option, tissue engineered grafts have great potential. Elastic scaffolds that mimic arterial extracellular matrix (ECM) may hold the key to creating viable vascular grafts. Electrospinning is a widely used scaffold fabrication technique to engineer tubular scaffolds. In this study, we investigated how the collector rotation speed altered the nanofiber alignment which may improve mechanical characteristics making the scaffold more suitable for arterial grafts. The scaffold was fabricated from a blend of PCL/Elastin. 2D Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) image processing tool and MatLab were used to quantitatively analyze nanofiber orientation at different collector speeds (13500 to 15500 rpm). Both Image J and MatLab showed graphical peaks indicating predominant fiber orientation angles. A collector speed of 15000 rpm was found to produce the best nanofiber alignment with narrow peaks at 90 and 270 degrees, and a relative amplitude of 200. This indicates a narrow distribution of circumferentially aligned nanofibers. Collector speeds below and above 15000 rpm caused a decrease in fiber alignment with a broader orientation distribution. Uniformity of fiber diameter was also measured. Of 600 measures from the 15000 rpm scaffolds, the fiber diameter range from 500 nm to 899 nm was most prevalent. This diameter range was slightly larger than native ECM which ranges from 50 nm to 500 nm. The second most prevalent diameter range had an average of 404 nm which is within the diameter range of collagen. This study concluded that with proper electrospinning technique and collector speed, it is possible to fabricate highly aligned small diameter elastic scaffolds. Image J 2D FFT results confirmed MatLab findings for the analyses of circumferentially aligned nanofibers. In addition, MatLab analyses simplified the FFT orientation data

  11. Alignment and Load Transfer in Carbon Nanotube and Dicyclopentadiene Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severino, Joseph Vincent

    Individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the strongest materials available but their macroscopic assemblies are weak. This work establishes a new thermosetting dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) and CNT composite that increases the strength of CNT assemblies. These high volume fraction and void free structures constitute advanced materials that could one day replace traditional composite systems. To further the understanding of physical interactions between polymer and CNTs, a novel "capstan" load transfer mechanism is also introduced. Self-supporting assemblies of interconnected carbon nanotubes were stretched, twisted and compressed to fashion composites by the infusion and polymerization of low viscosity DCPD based monomeric resins. The properties of the CNTs, polymer and composite were characterized with thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and Raman spectroscopy. The microstructure was analyzed by wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Sheets were drawn at 15 m/min from a growth furnace to impart alignment then stretched to further modify alignment. The mechanical properties were determined in five orientations with respect to the growth direction. The strength was nearly three times higher along this growth direction than it was perpendicular, and modulus was nearly six times higher. Transverse stretching achieved 1.5 times the elongation but alignment was inferior due to CNT kinking that prevented alignment and consolidation. Composites yarns and sheets were investigated for the mechanical properties, microstructure and load transfer. The DCPD resin was found to wet the CNTs and lubricated deformation. This reduced loads during processing, and curing solidified the aligned and consolidated structure. The stretched and twisted composite yarns increased the failure stress 51%. In aligned composite sheet, the failure stress increased 200%. The increased stresses

  12. Who watches the watchmen? An appraisal of benchmarks for multiple sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Iantorno, Stefano; Gori, Kevin; Goldman, Nick; Gil, Manuel; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is a fundamental and ubiquitous technique in bioinformatics used to infer related residues among biological sequences. Thus alignment accuracy is crucial to a vast range of analyses, often in ways difficult to assess in those analyses. To compare the performance of different aligners and help detect systematic errors in alignments, a number of benchmarking strategies have been pursued. Here we present an overview of the main strategies-based on simulation, consistency, protein structure, and phylogeny-and discuss their different advantages and associated risks. We outline a set of desirable characteristics for effective benchmarking, and evaluate each strategy in light of them. We conclude that there is currently no universally applicable means of benchmarking MSA, and that developers and users of alignment tools should base their choice of benchmark depending on the context of application-with a keen awareness of the assumptions underlying each benchmarking strategy.

  13. Dialogues on prediction errors.

    PubMed

    Niv, Yael; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2008-07-01

    The recognition that computational ideas from reinforcement learning are relevant to the study of neural circuits has taken the cognitive neuroscience community by storm. A central tenet of these models is that discrepancies between actual and expected outcomes can be used for learning. Neural correlates of such prediction-error signals have been observed now in midbrain dopaminergic neurons, striatum, amygdala and even prefrontal cortex, and models incorporating prediction errors have been invoked to explain complex phenomena such as the transition from goal-directed to habitual behavior. Yet, like any revolution, the fast-paced progress has left an uneven understanding in its wake. Here, we provide answers to ten simple questions about prediction errors, with the aim of exposing both the strengths and the limitations of this active area of neuroscience research.

  14. Experimental Quantum Error Detection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xian-Min; Yi, Zhen-Huan; Yang, Bin; Zhou, Fei; Yang, Tao; Peng, Cheng-Zhi

    2012-01-01

    Faithful transmission of quantum information is a crucial ingredient in quantum communication networks. To overcome the unavoidable decoherence in a noisy channel, to date, many efforts have been made to transmit one state by consuming large numbers of time-synchronized ancilla states. However, such huge demands of quantum resources are hard to meet with current technology and this restricts practical applications. Here we experimentally demonstrate quantum error detection, an economical approach to reliably protecting a qubit against bit-flip errors. Arbitrary unknown polarization states of single photons and entangled photons are converted into time bins deterministically via a modified Franson interferometer. Noise arising in both 10 m and 0.8 km fiber, which induces associated errors on the reference frame of time bins, is filtered when photons are detected. The demonstrated resource efficiency and state independence make this protocol a promising candidate for implementing a real-world quantum communication network. PMID:22953047

  15. Error Modeling of Multi-baseline Optical Truss. Part II; Application to SIM Metrology Truss Field Dependent Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Liwei Dennis; Milman, Mark; Korechoff, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The current design of the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) employs a 19 laser-metrology-beam system (also called L19 external metrology truss) to monitor changes of distances between the fiducials of the flight system's multiple baselines. The function of the external metrology truss is to aid in the determination of the time-variations of the interferometer baseline. The largest contributor to truss error occurs in SIM wide-angle observations when the articulation of the siderostat mirrors (in order to gather starlight from different sky coordinates) brings to light systematic errors due to offsets at levels of instrument components (which include comer cube retro-reflectors, etc.). This error is labeled external metrology wide-angle field-dependent error. Physics-based model of field-dependent error at single metrology gauge level is developed and linearly propagated to errors in interferometer delay. In this manner delay error sensitivity to various error parameters or their combination can be studied using eigenvalue/eigenvector analysis. Also validation of physics-based field-dependent model on SIM testbed lends support to the present approach. As a first example, dihedral error model is developed for the comer cubes (CC) attached to the siderostat mirrors. Then the delay errors due to this effect can be characterized using the eigenvectors of composite CC dihedral error. The essence of the linear error model is contained in an error-mapping matrix. A corresponding Zernike component matrix approach is developed in parallel, first for convenience of describing the RMS of errors across the field-of-regard (FOR), and second for convenience of combining with additional models. Average and worst case residual errors are computed when various orders of field-dependent terms are removed from the delay error. Results of the residual errors are important in arriving at external metrology system component requirements. Double CCs with ideally co-incident vertices

  16. Evaluation of lens distortion errors in video-based motion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poliner, Jeffrey; Wilmington, Robert; Klute, Glenn K.; Micocci, Angelo

    1993-01-01

    In an effort to study lens distortion errors, a grid of points of known dimensions was constructed and videotaped using a standard and a wide-angle lens. Recorded images were played back on a VCR and stored on a personal computer. Using these stored images, two experiments were conducted. Errors were calculated as the difference in distance from the known coordinates of the points to the calculated coordinates. The purposes of this project were as follows: (1) to develop the methodology to evaluate errors introduced by lens distortion; (2) to quantify and compare errors introduced by use of both a 'standard' and a wide-angle lens; (3) to investigate techniques to minimize lens-induced errors; and (4) to determine the most effective use of calibration points when using a wide-angle lens with a significant amount of distortion. It was seen that when using a wide-angle lens, errors from lens distortion could be as high as 10 percent of the size of the entire field of view. Even with a standard lens, there was a small amount of lens distortion. It was also found that the choice of calibration points influenced the lens distortion error. By properly selecting the calibration points and avoidance of the outermost regions of a wide-angle lens, the error from lens distortion can be kept below approximately 0.5 percent with a standard lens and 1.5 percent with a wide-angle lens.

  17. Overview of the MSTI 2 on-orbit alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rygaard, Christopher A.; Smith, Fred W.; Briggs, M. Michael

    1994-01-01

    The Miniature Sensor Technology Integration (MSTI) 2 Spacecraft is a small 3-axis stabilized spacecraft designed to track mid-range missiles and estimate their state vectors. In order to accurately estimate the target state vector, the MSTI 2 spacecraft must have highly accurate knowledge of its own attitude. Errors in its attitude knowledge arise primarily from the errors in its Attitude Control System (ACS) sensors. The ACS sensors on the spacecraft include a scanning Earth Sensor (ES), a Sun Sensor (SS), and two 2-axis gyros. The On-Orbit Alignment (OOA) generated an error map of the ES and estimated the biases of the SS and the misalignment of the gyros. This paper discusses some of the error sources, and the techniques used to reduce the effects of these errors. The payload carried by the MSTI2 spacecraft is a high fidelity camera, which was aimed at the target using gimballed mirrors. By aiming it at a celestial target, the payload was used as a high-accuracy single-axis attitude reference. This attitude reference was compared to the attitude reference of the ACS sensors, and the errors were attributed to the ACS sensors.

  18. An Automated SVD for Alignment and Control of James Webb Space Telescope Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiri, Sharam; Howard, Joseph M.; Aronstein, David L.; Ha, Kong; Smith, J. Scott; Dean, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a three-mirror anastigmatic telescope. The alignment of the segmented primary and secondary mirrors in the wavefront sensing and control process involves a series of actuators to control the six degrees-of-freedom motion on each surface in addition to the radius of curvature. The control matrix developed from the alignment parameters is over-determined and singular value decomposition (SVD) method is used to solve it in the least square sense. An automated SVD scheme has been developed to identify the most contributing modes in a typical alignment process and reduce the impact of error-prone modes from the control process.

  19. Impact angle constrained three-dimensional integrated guidance and control for STT missile in the presence of input saturation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Wang, Weihong; Xiong, Shaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Considering a class of skid-to-turn (STT) missile with fixed target and constrained terminal impact angles, a novel three-dimensional (3D) integrated guidance and control (IGC) scheme is proposed in this paper. Based on coriolis theorem, the fully nonlinear IGC model without the assumption that the missile flies heading to the target at initial time is established in the three-dimensional space. For this strict-feedback form of multi-variable system, dynamic surface control algorithm is implemented combining with extended observer (ESO) to complete the preliminary design. Then, in order to deal with the problems of the input constraints, a hyperbolic tangent function is introduced to approximate the saturation function and auxiliary system including a Nussbaum function established to compensate for the approximation error. The stability of the closed-loop system is proven based on Lyapunov theory. Numerical simulations results show that the proposed integrated guidance and control algorithm can ensure the accuracy of target interception with initial alignment angle deviation and the input saturation is suppressed with smooth deflection curves.

  20. Impact angle constrained three-dimensional integrated guidance and control for STT missile in the presence of input saturation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Wang, Weihong; Xiong, Shaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Considering a class of skid-to-turn (STT) missile with fixed target and constrained terminal impact angles, a novel three-dimensional (3D) integrated guidance and control (IGC) scheme is proposed in this paper. Based on coriolis theorem, the fully nonlinear IGC model without the assumption that the missile flies heading to the target at initial time is established in the three-dimensional space. For this strict-feedback form of multi-variable system, dynamic surface control algorithm is implemented combining with extended observer (ESO) to complete the preliminary design. Then, in order to deal with the problems of the input constraints, a hyperbolic tangent function is introduced to approximate the saturation function and auxiliary system including a Nussbaum function established to compensate for the approximation error. The stability of the closed-loop system is proven based on Lyapunov theory. Numerical simulations results show that the proposed integrated guidance and control algorithm can ensure the accuracy of target interception with initial alignment angle deviation and the input saturation is suppressed with smooth deflection curves. PMID:27167987